WorldWideScience

Sample records for ground-breaking feminist moral

  1. A Feminist View of Moral Development: Criticisms and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romer, Nancy

    1991-01-01

    Reviews Freud's psychoanalytic and Piaget's and Kohlberg's cognitive-developmental theories of moral development; presents feminist criticism of them; offers own criticisms of feminist theories from both social class and multicultural perspectives; and suggests ways in which this literature can be helpful to college administrators who design…

  2. Selective Abortion as Moral Failure? Revaluation of the Feminist Case for Reproductive Rights in a Disability Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire McKinney

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Of feminism and disability theory's many overlapping concerns, few have received as much attention as prenatal genetic diagnosis and selective abortion. While the attention to how genetic selection reinforces disability stigma is important, much of this writing has failed to present the feminist case for the right to unrestricted abortion. This oversight has led to an articulation of the disability critique of selective abortion that threatens the very claims to reproductive freedom and bodily self-determination that undergird disability politics as well. This article rearticulates the feminist case for unrestricted reproductive rights in order to challenge the current framing of prenatal genetic diagnosis as an ethical failure and to present the opportunity to refigure reproductive rights as disability rights.

  3. Morality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidt, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Moral psychology is a rapidly growing field with two principle lineages. The main line began with Jean Piaget and includes developmental psychologists who have studied the acquisition of moral concepts and reasoning. The alternative line began in the 1990s with a new synthesis of evolutionary, neurological, and social-psychological research in which the central phenomena are moral emotions and intuitions. In this essay, I show how both of these lines have been shaped by an older debate between two 19th century narratives about modernity: one celebrating the liberation of individuals, the other mourning the loss of community and moral authority. I suggest that both lines of moral psychology have limited themselves to the moral domain prescribed by the liberation narrative, and so one future step for moral psychology should be to study alternative moral perspectives, particularly religious and politically conservative ones in which morality is, in part, about protecting groups, institutions, and souls. © 2008 Association for Psychological Science.

  4. Feminist Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidlaw, Toni; Malmo, Cheryl

    1991-01-01

    Traces roots of feminist therapy and its independence from traditional and prevalent theories and therapy practices. Asserts that Freudian theory and humanistic assumptions are sexist and contribute to powerlessness of women. In contrast, feminist therapy is seen as dealing directly with client-counselor relationships, trust, advocacy, and…

  5. On feminist engagements with bioethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drezgić Rada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article explores two questions: what is feminist bioethics, and how different it is from standard bioethics. Development of feminist bioethics, it is argued, began as a response to standard bioethics, challenging its background values, and philosophical perspectives. The most important contribution of feminist bioethics has been its re-examination of the basic conceptual underpinnings of mainstream bioethics, including the concepts of “universality”, “autonomy”, and “trust”. Particularly important for feminists has been the concept of autonomy. They challenge the old liberal notion of autonomy that treats individuals as separate social units and argue that autonomy is established through relations. Relational autonomy assumes that identities and values are developed through relationships with others and that the choices one makes are shaped by specific social and historical contexts. Neither relational autonomy, nor feminist bioethics, however, represents a single, unified perspective. There are, actually, as many feminist bioethics as there are feminisms-liberal, cultural, radical, postmodern etc. Their different ontological, epistemological and political underpinnings shape their respective approaches to bioethical issues at hand. Still what they all have in common is interest in social justice-feminists explore mainstream bioethics and reproductive technologies in order to establish whether they support or impede gender and overall social justice and equality. Feminist bioethics thus brings a significant improvement to standard bioethics. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 41004: Bioethical Aspects: Morally Acceptable Within the Biotechnologically and Socially Possible i br. 43007: Studying climate change and its influence on the environment: impacts, adaptation and mitigation

  6. Fostering Nurses' Moral Agency and Moral Identity: The Importance of Moral Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaschenko, Joan; Peter, Elizabeth

    2016-09-01

    It may be the case that the most challenging moral problem of the twenty-first century will be the relationship between the individual moral agent and the practices and institutions in which the moral agent is embedded. In this paper, we continue the efforts that one of us, Joan Liaschenko, first called for in 1993, that of using feminist ethics as a lens for viewing the relationship between individual nurses as moral agents and the highly complex institutions in which they do the work of nursing. Feminist ethics, with its emphasis on the inextricable relationship between ethics and politics, provides a useful lens to understand the work of nurses in context. Using Margaret Urban Walker's and Hilde Lindemann's concepts of identity, relationships, values, and moral agency, we argue that health care institutions can be moral communities and profoundly affect the work and identity and, therefore, the moral agency of all who work within those structures, including nurses. Nurses are not only shaped by these organizations but also have the power to shape them. Because moral agency is intimately connected to one's identity, moral identity work is essential for nurses to exercise their moral agency and to foster moral community in health care organizations. We first provide a brief history of nursing's morally problematic relationship with institutions and examine the impact institutional master narratives and corporatism exert today on nurses' moral identities and agency. We close by emphasizing the significance of ongoing dialogue in creating and sustaining moral communities, repairing moral identities, and strengthening moral agency.

  7. The Chicana Feminist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotera, Martha P.

    Presented in this publication are seven essays and public presentations, prepared for Chicana feminist activities and events during the period 1970 to 1977, titled: "Our Feminist Heritage", "When Women Speak: Our Feminist Legacy", "Chicanas and Power", "Feminism As We See It", "Roles", "Identidad", and "Among the Feminist: Racist and Classist…

  8. The 2010 Nobel Prize in physics—ground-breaking experiments on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Y.

    2011-11-01

    The 2010 Nobel Prize in physics was awarded to Professors Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov for their ground-breaking experiments on graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon, and more generally, for their pioneering work in uncovering a new class of materials, namely two-dimensional atomic crystals. This paper gives an accessible account and review of the story of graphene; from its first description in the literature, to the realization and confirmation of its remarkable properties, through to its impressive potential for broad-reaching applications. The story of graphene is written within the context of the enormous impact that Geim and Novoselovs' work has had on this field of research, and recounts their personal pathways of discovery, which ultimately led to their award of the 2010 Nobel Prize.

  9. Cassandra in the Classroom: Teaching and Moral Madness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Doris A.

    2017-01-01

    Moral madness is a symptom of the moral violence experienced by teachers who are expected to exercise responsibility for their students and their work, but whose moral voice is misrecognized as self-interest and whose moral agency is suppressed. I conduct a feminist ethical analysis of the figure of Cassandra to examine the ways in which teachers…

  10. Cassandra in the Classroom: Teaching and Moral Madness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Doris A.

    2017-01-01

    Moral madness is a symptom of the moral violence experienced by teachers who are expected to exercise responsibility for their students and their work, but whose moral voice is misrecognized as self-interest and whose moral agency is suppressed. I conduct a feminist ethical analysis of the figure of Cassandra to examine the ways in which teachers…

  11. Virtues of the self : ethics and the critique of feminist identity politics

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is situated at the intersection of feminist political theory, identity politics and moral philosophy. Its broader aim is to show the positive consequences of returning the self and its inner activity to the ethical domain for feminist identity politics. To this end, it brings feminist identity politics into dialogue with contemporary developments in virtue ethics, in particular Christine Swanton’s pluralistic virtue ethics. As its starting point, it takes issue with...

  12. Human Trafficking, Globalisation and Transnational Feminist Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Truong, Thanh-Dam

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThis paper presents a historical overview of feminist frameworks for analysis and advocacy on human trafficking. It traces the major differences and similarities in the forms of knowledge produced since the Anti-White Slavery campaigns nearly two centuries ago. It highlights how institutional and moral considerations – especially concerning the treatment of the female body as an instrument – have played a role in shaping the conceptual possibilities and directions of politics for ...

  13. Feminist music therapy pedagogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahna, Nicole; Swantes, Melody

    2011-01-01

    This study surveyed 188 music therapy educators regarding their views and use of feminist pedagogy and feminist music therapy. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a) to determine how many music therapy educators used feminist pedagogy and (b) to determine if there was a relationship between......) participatory learning, (b) validation of personal experience/development of confidence, (c) political/social activism, and (d) critical thinking/ open-mindedness. The results revealed that 46% (n = 32) of participants identified as feminist music therapists and 67% (n = 46) of participants identified as using...

  14. Feminist music therapy pedagogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahna, Nicole; Swantes, Melody

    2011-01-01

    This study surveyed 188 music therapy educators regarding their views and use of feminist pedagogy and feminist music therapy. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a) to determine how many music therapy educators used feminist pedagogy and (b) to determine if there was a relationship between......) participatory learning, (b) validation of personal experience/development of confidence, (c) political/social activism, and (d) critical thinking/ open-mindedness. The results revealed that 46% (n = 32) of participants identified as feminist music therapists and 67% (n = 46) of participants identified as using...

  15. (Post)feminist paradoxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudloff, Maja

    2016-01-01

    Disney’s 2013 animated movie Frozen has been hugely popular with critics due to its perceived promotion of feminist ideals. In this article, I investigate this claim of the feminist ideals portrayed in Frozen, from the perspective of visual and cultural representation, situating my analysis withi...

  16. Caring Teacher-Pupil Relationship: Feminist or Phenomenological?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Harriet B.

    Nel Noddings'"Caring: A Feminine Approach to Ethics and Moral Education" (1984) represents a feminist view of the caring teacher-pupil relationship, focusing on the personal and social setting and speaking directly about the relationship. The works of Maurice Merleau-Ponty contribute a phenomenological perspective which is universal and…

  17. A Feminist Sophistic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitanza, Victor J.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses Susan Jarratt's book "Rereading the Sophists," interrogating her notion of a "feminist sophistic." Discusses the author's own work in terms of a "third sophistic," and calls on writings by Gayatri, Spivak, J. Derrida, and Helene Cixous. (SR)

  18. Pseudohomosexuality in feminist students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defries, Z

    1976-04-01

    The author describes the influence of the feminist movement on the intellectual, social, and sexual behavior of feminist college students. The complex interrelationship between sexual political ideology and actual sexual behavior creates confusion and anxiety for some vulnerable students in their attempts to evolve a satisfactory sexual identity. A series of vignettes illustrates the struggle of such students, who initially expressed concern over actual or potential lesbianism and its connection to the movement, to resolve their conflicts concerning feminism and sexual preference.

  19. The South African Constitution requires men to be feminist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.P.P. Lótter

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Can a man be a feminist? If so, what would it mean? I want to participate in a dialogue between women and men on how to accommodate women's moral concerns. I propose that the fundamental values of justice embodied in the South African constitutional democracy require men to be feminist. These values provide the best safeguard of the important interests and values of both women and men. Men who accept these values can support the main concerns of feminism. The implications of the argument in this article range from public issues to the most private aspects of marriage.

  20. Feminist Research in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropers-Huilman, Rebecca; Winters, Kelly T.

    2011-01-01

    This essay provides an overview of feminist methodology and its potential to enhance the study of higher education. Foregrounding the multiple purposes and research relationships developed through feminist research, the essay urges higher education scholars to engage feminist theories, epistemologies, and methods to inform policy, research, and…

  1. Feminist Translation in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩伟

    2008-01-01

    Feminist translation studies have underg one rapid development in China in recent years.However,most of its research rema ins on the inquiry of the influence on the theoretical layer.In this thesis,I tr y to probe carefully into the translation of "Men and Women,Women and the City" done by Zhu Hong in an attempt to find out wh at is the difference that exits in the translation between the Chinese female tr anslators and the western feminist translators.

  2. Moral Emotions and Morals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío Orsi Portalo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available My aim in this paper is to explore the ambivalent role played by the so called moral emotions in moral thinking, overall when the concept of responsibility is concerned. In the first part of this paper I show how moral emotions such as guilt and shame can appear in circumstances that are not under the agent’s control, and therefore the agent could be though of free or responsibility for them. By contrast, in the second part of this essay I put how the absence of moral emotions, or their twisted development, makes as well the flourishing of individual morality impossible.

  3. The Future of Feminist Liberalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Nussbaum

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Feminists have sometimes argued that philosophical theories of justice deriving from the liberal tradition cannot deal adequately with the concerns of women. I argue that in many ways this contention is mistaken: the best liberal theories of justice provide a very strong basis for thinking about what respect for human dignity requires. There are, however, two areas pertinent to sex equality in which even the strongest liberal theories have grave difficulty. First is the area of need and dependency. All theories of justice and morality deriving from the European social contract tradition fail to build into the basic social structure concern for care in times of asymmetrical dependency. The second problem I investigate is the problem of just distribution within the family. Focusing on the theory of John Rawls, I argue that his liberal commitment to seeing the family as a sphere of protected personal choice is in tension with his admission that the family is part of the "basic structure" of society. Moreover, the family does not exist by nature: it is always a construct of state action. The state should therefore make sure that this constructing is done well, compatibly with justice for women and children.

  4. Teaching Feminist Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Linda; Bowlby, Sophia

    1983-01-01

    Adopting a feminist perspective on geography should lead to changes in the content and organization of undergraduate courses and teaching methods, particularly in assessing the role of gender relations in human geography and in challenging the male-dominated world of academic research and teaching where women have remained largely invisible.…

  5. [Feminist strategies 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron, C

    1993-06-01

    This article is the second in a two-part series promoting the use of feminist strategies in nursing. Part one--in last month's issue--identified some of the myths in nursing. It focused mainly on the traditional scientific research methods upon which nursing research is based. In part two, the author defines the feminist approach and attempts to demonstrate the way nurses can use this approach to focus nursing care on women's specific needs. This approach consists of recognizing the components of patriarchal ideology, its myths and the reality of women and men. Feminism has restored the credibility of intuition, good listening skills, compassion, commitment and tolerance. They were long believed to be "feminine" and passive. These qualities do not discredit the women who possess them--many of whom are nurses, rather, they add to their competence. How can feminist nursing knowledge shed light on the different factors specific to a woman's life? Menopause, nutrition and domestic violence are examples presented by the author to address this question. Once nurses increase their knowledge of these factors--that up until now were not identified as women's needs--they will be able to rely upon their own capabilities to develop new methods of data collection, communication skills and promotion of their own professionalism. Through these conclusions, the author praises the feminist movement.

  6. Incorporating Feminist Standpoint Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlström, Kristoffer

    2005-01-01

    As has been noted by Alvin Goldman, there are some very interesting similarities between his Veritistic Social Epistemology (VSE) and Sandra Harding’s Feminist Standpoint Theory (FST). In the present paper, it is argued that these similarities are so significant as to motivate an incorporation...

  7. Feminist Language Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    Feminist language planning is an active engagement with the ways in which language represents and reproduces gender. It is not specifically concerned with the ways in which language presents women, although this is a major focus, but rather how language positions both males and females and how it enters into the social practices that gender people…

  8. A Rose for Emily: An Interpretation from Feminist Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒲红英

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to analyze the underlying causes for the madness of Emily from a feminist perspective. The causes of Emily's tragedy lie in the feudal paternalism and feminine morality of Puritanism governing the south of America. Two purposes are supposed to be fulfilled while exploring these causes. One is to help the audience gain a better understanding for the spirit of the story; the other is to encourage the audience to contemphte the destiny of women and reconstruct female values.

  9. Moral Functioning: Navigating the Messy Landscape of Values in Finnish Preschools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puroila, Anna-Maija; Haho, Annu

    2017-01-01

    This article employs a narrative approach to explore educators' moral functioning in Finnish preschools. Our study is theoretically inspired by notions drawn from feminist and sociocultural studies, according to which education is understood as an entirely moral phenomenon. Within a holistic framework, moral functioning is understood as a concept…

  10. Carol Gilligan's Theory of Sex Differences in the Development of Moral Reasoning during Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muuss, Rolf E.

    1988-01-01

    Gilligan's work on sex differences in moral reasoning, perception of violence, resolution of sexual dilemmas, and abortion decisions poses a major challenge to Kohlberg's theory because of its feminist perspective of moral development. Gilligan suggests Kohlberg's demonstration of males and females attaining different levels of moral development…

  11. Feminist troubles with the Balkans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drezgić Rada

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses writings of Slavenka Drakulić and certain number of other feminist writers from ex-Yugoslavia aiming to answer to the following questions: first, how much and in what way the discourses on ex-Yugoslavia Balkans, (postsocialism, nationalism and war have been produced by local feminists and/or imported from the West; second, have these discourses been overlapping with local feminist discourses about masculinity and femininity and how.

  12. Moral Teachers, Moral Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissbourd, Rick

    2003-01-01

    Argues that schools will largely fail in their efforts to improve the moral and emotional growth of students if they do not attend to the moral and ethical development of teachers, especially urban teachers, who suffer from depression and disillusionment, the two primary causes of which are isolation and stress induced by problem students.…

  13. The Early (Feminist Essays of Victoria Ocampo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Meyer

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the essays written by Ocampo between 1920 and 1934, prior to the time when she publicly voiced her adhesion to feminism and the rights of women in Argentine society. In these works from her Testimonios in which Ocampo struggles to find her voice as a female writer, the maleable essay serves her need to engage in discursive dialogues from the margins of the literary culture of her time. Both as a woman and a member of the oligarchy, she questions cultural assumptions and gender-based binary structures common among the male writers of her time, many of whom she knew personally. Using rhetorical strategies that show the self-reflexive and subversive nature of her writing, Ocampo reads and reinterprets these works from a parenthetical feminist perspective, contesting their intellectual and aesthetic biases. The active agency of the reader as writer in these early essays shows Ocampo's awareness of her own unorthodox subject position—alienated from the conventions of her class, her gender, her national culture and language. Her autobiographical musings and her engagement with literary modernity in the 1920s and 1930s reveal a woman who accepted the liabilities of articulating an autonomous self, both in a European and a Latin American context. The influence of family bonds and patriarchal morality decisively shaped, but did not ultimately control, the way Victoria Ocampo eventually defined herself as a feminist author.

  14. Feminist Identity among Latina Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manago, Adriana M.; Brown, Christia Spears; Leaper, Campbell

    2009-01-01

    This study explores developing conceptions of feminism among Latina adolescents, their prevalence of feminist endorsement, and whether home environment and well-being are related to feminist identity. One hundred and forty Latina girls (Grades 9 to 12, M age = 15) wrote personal narratives of their understanding of feminism and whether they…

  15. Feminist Identity among Latina Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manago, Adriana M.; Brown, Christia Spears; Leaper, Campbell

    2009-01-01

    This study explores developing conceptions of feminism among Latina adolescents, their prevalence of feminist endorsement, and whether home environment and well-being are related to feminist identity. One hundred and forty Latina girls (Grades 9 to 12, M age = 15) wrote personal narratives of their understanding of feminism and whether they…

  16. Feminist Language Planning in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milles, Karin

    2011-01-01

    The international literature has often described linguistic authorities as being opposed to the idea of changing language in the name of feminism. However, in Sweden, many linguistic authorities have been active agents in adopting feminist language reforms. This is probably due to Sweden's long tradition of political feminist efforts and to the…

  17. Toward Transnational Feminist Literacy Practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sato, C.

    2014-01-01

    This essay expands transnational feminist methodology such that it better affirms both women's agency and noncapitalism. By bridging transnational feminism and antiessentialist Marxism in the context of feminist development studies, it builds on the contributions of Chandra Talpade Mohanty, which re

  18. Post Keynesianism Meets Feminist Economics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.P. van Staveren (Irene)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThis article explores the relationships between post-Keynesian economics and feminist economics. It distinguishes three key concepts in each tradition that recommend serious attention in the other tradition: gender, the household and unpaid work and caring as key concepts in feminist

  19. Feminist Film Theory and Criticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Judith

    1985-01-01

    Discusses Laura Mulvey's 1975 essay, "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema," and the ideas about feminist film theory and psychoanalysis as a critical tool which it raises. Suggests contradiction is the central issue in feminist film theory. Explores definitions of women's cinema. (SA)

  20. (Post)feminist paradoxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudloff, Maja

    2016-01-01

    the context of feminist and postfeminist media studies. Focusing on the signs and cultural codes used to create meanings associated with the movie’s main female and male characters, the article is structured around four themes: signs of gender difference, heteronormative romance and female agency, empowerment...... them with postfeminist ideals of appearance, self-discipline and strongly gender stereotyped depictions with regard to how the characters look and act. Far from being ‘truly feminist’, it is concluded that despite popular sentiment to the contrary, Disney still has a long way to go towards promoting...... egalitarian and diverse representations of gender....

  1. Codependency: a feminist perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, G B; Berkery, A C

    1993-04-01

    1. Our understanding of psychological life has been underdeveloped and distorted because explanations have been created by only one half of the human species. The current broad and encompassing disease definition of codependency may devalue some of women's greatest strengths. 2. The disease model of codependency, it may be argued, is rooted in extant, reductionist models that suggest a developmental pathway of separation and individuation leading to an autonomous and independent maturity. 3. The feminist model of Growth in Connection proposes that the flowering of the self occurs within the development and maintenance of relationships in which accurate and mutual empathy is both the goal and the motivation toward growth.

  2. Feminist Critiques Against Traditional Approaches to Security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrus Kanisius Farneubun, P.

    2015-01-01

    Feminists claim that national security is a model of masculinity domination, which hardly disputed This essay addresses feminists critique on notion of conventional security and provides feminists own definition. It shows that feminists adopt comprehensive approach in relation to security. They tend

  3. Feminist Critiques Against Traditional Approaches to Security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrus Kanisius Farneubun, P.

    Feminists claim that national security is a model of masculinity domination, which hardly disputed This essay addresses feminists critique on notion of conventional security and provides feminists own definition. It shows that feminists adopt comprehensive approach in relation to security. They tend

  4. Feminist Motifs in William Faulkner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhen

    2015-01-01

    As we all know, William Faulkner shows really concern for the Southern people, especially the Southern women who suffer the most. In Faulkner’s works women characters play an important role, which is confirmed. After the theories of feminist literary come to understand Faulkner criticism, critics to Faulkner’s novels drafting an encouraging response detect the author himself either as a pro-feminist or a misogynist. On analyzing the woman characters through Addie and Lena Grove—the wom⁃en images in As I Lay Dying and Light in August, we found out that Faulkner is neither simple a pro-feminist nor a misogynist in the patriarchal society.

  5. Science from a Feminist Standpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risman, Barbara J.

    2005-01-01

    The author describes her choice of sociology as career brought about by involvement in the feminist movement and growing concerns for social injustice. She advocates sociologists' active involvement in social causes and community education to fight inequality and social division.

  6. Feminist epistemology: “Daughters of Quine”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijić Jelena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Feminist epistemology implies an approach to the theory of knowledge, which in its centre sets up feminist issues. The paper analyzes a recent course in the area dealing with feminist epistemology, namely feminist empiricism. Unlike other feminists engaged in epistemology, their goal is to keep the basic concepts of the analytic tradition, but considered in the light of feminist interests. Starting from Quine’s naturalized epistemology, feminist empiricists are introducing different concepts of knowledge and the nature of the knowers, creating a new perspective on the relationship of sociopolitical values and scientific research. The feminist empiricist’s advantage over feminist epistemology approaches outside the analytical framework is precisely in accepting the naturalistic and empiricist approach to gender biases. The aim is to evaluate how successful they are in achieving their ideas, and whether such an approach is acceptable.

  7. Transformational leadership: the feminist connection in postmodern organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, A M; Young, C E

    1994-10-01

    The article describes the changes occurring in the world and organizations and argues that the contemporary theory of transformational leadership can provide guidance for nursing leaders, who are predominantly women. Transformational leadership is defined and described. The feminist literature is briefly reviewed. A comparison of the attributes of women, who are constructed knowers, and those of transformational leaders is made, including the web of inclusion, caring, moral responsibility, reciprocity and cooperation, integration of voices, intuition, and hierarchic and patriarchal paradigms. It is argued that a new way of leading and new organizational structures are emerging that will provide a favorable environment for female leaders.

  8. A Black feminist approach to nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbee, E L

    1994-10-01

    Despite the presence of a body of Black feminist literature, the growing body of nursing literature on feminism and the feminist approach to research remains narrowly focused on White feminist concerns. By essentially ignoring the realities of Black women, nursing has reproduced the errors of previous White feminists. This article demonstrates the relevance of the Black feminist approach to nursing by applying it in combination with general feminist research principles and anthropological theory in research concerned with low-income Black women's experiences with dysphoria and depression. The findings of the research suggest that a combination approach more clearly illuminates how context effects dysphoria in poor Black women.

  9. Feminist research: definitions, methodology, methods and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, C

    1993-03-01

    The literature relating to feminist research both within and beyond nursing is reviewed in this paper. Feminist research is located within a post-positivist paradigm, and various definitions are considered. The distinctive methodological approach of feminist research is discussed, and interviewing and ethnography are evaluated as suitable methods for use in feminist research. Oakley's (1981) paper on interviewing women is subjected to criticism. A final section examines attempts by three sets of writers to propose evaluation criteria for feminist research. The review concludes that a number of paradoxes and dilemmas in feminist research have yet to be resolved.

  10. Dilemas morales

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Realpe Quintero

    2001-01-01

    Antes del siglo XX la tradición filosófica moral ha reconocido la existencia de los conflictos morales pero ha rechazado la posibilidad de los auténticos dilemas morales. Para poder entender por qué hoy el tema de los dilemas morales ha reclamado para sí tanta atención, es importante ponernos de acuerdo en la definición de algunos conceptos. Un conflicto moral es una situación en la que un(a) agente se ve confrontado(a) con dos obligaciones morales que le i...

  11. A Feminist Research Agenda in Youth Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandergrift, Kay

    1993-01-01

    Considers a feminist research agenda in literature for youth. Highlights include the sexist nature of literary theory; traditional studies of youth literature; feminist criticism and archetypal approaches, genre criticism, and reader response criticism; and a selected list of feminist scholarship and literary criticism applicable to youth…

  12. Professional Women and the Feminist Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Mary C.

    1974-01-01

    The professional aspirations of many young women in the 1970's are supported by the feminist movement. But there have been instances in which competition and jealousy between women outweighed feminist ideals. This review is an attempt to trace and understand the sources of these blocks to feminist support. (Author)

  13. A Feminist Research Agenda in Youth Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandergrift, Kay

    1993-01-01

    Considers a feminist research agenda in literature for youth. Highlights include the sexist nature of literary theory; traditional studies of youth literature; feminist criticism and archetypal approaches, genre criticism, and reader response criticism; and a selected list of feminist scholarship and literary criticism applicable to youth…

  14. Gender, CSR and Feminist Organization Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosser, Kate; Moon, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    this scholarship often fails to explicitly reference feminist theory, and particularly that deriving from feminist organization studies (FOS). The first contribution of our paper is to address this gap by reviewing developments in feminist organization theory, and mapping their relevance to CSR. Our second...

  15. What are feminist fussing about? : Feminists attempts for full Citizenship

    OpenAIRE

    Claesson, Ida

    2008-01-01

    Is citizenship gendered? The answer to this question for most feminist theorists has to be a resounding ‘yes’. For them citizenship has always been gendered in the sense that women and men have stood in different relationship to it, to the disadvantage of women. In recent years citizenship has been combined to gender by a number of feminists. Their work is all about the importance to reconstruct citizenship because they believe it fails to engage or to include women. This thesis examines the ...

  16. Moral knowledge and moral factuality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Wilburn

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1677-2954.2008v7n1p69For naturalistic and non-intuitionistic moral realists, moral knowledge is more problematic than ordinary and scientific factual knowledge. For without special faculties of moral discernment, how could we ever detect moral facts and properties? Physical facts and properties may be accessible to perceptual recognition. But how could moral facts and properties ever be similarly accessible? To address this challenge, we need a meta-ethical account that does two things. First, it must explain how the discernment of moral facts and properties ultimately consists only of the detection of appropriate physical items. Second, it must explain why, despite this fact, moral perception seems so very puzzling. In this paper I endeavor to provide such an account. It is largely because of the relational nature of moral properties, and the corresponding externalistically determined normative content of moral property terms, I argue, that our epistemic access to moral knowledge appears mysterious. The metaphysics of moral factuality does a lot to explain the seeming elusiveness of moral knowledge, and in ways that are surprisingly mundane.

  17. [Feminist strategies in nursing science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron, C

    1993-05-01

    This article is the first of a two-part series that will be completed in next month's issue. The article illustrates through examples how nursing has the potential for sexual bias. It also demonstrates how the feminist movement can contribute to improving nursing practice. This month, the views of Peggy Chinn are discussed, outlining myths that limit the development or hinder the progress of non-sexist education in nursing. Myths that have become traditional, scientific male-centred methodologies now solidly rooted in the health care community are identified. The author explains that once the myths are identified, they should be extracted and isolated from the context of nursing. This is the way feminist research can be useful. Next month the author will define the feminist approach and how it applies to specific aspects of women's health.

  18. A feminist perspective on divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, J R

    1994-01-01

    Feminist perspectives on divorce proceed from the ways in which women's positions at divorce systematically differ from men's positions. Although there has been a large-scale increase in mothers' labor force participation, there has been no corresponding increase in fathers' domestic contributions, and women continue to bear the overwhelming responsibility for child rearing. In substantial part because of this division of labor within the family, divorcing women, on average, face bleaker financial prospects and enjoy closer emotional ties to their children than do their former husbands. Existing divorce law, with its emphasis on each party's self-sufficiency, limited provision for child support, and gender-neutral custody principles, does not fully recognize or address these differences. Feminists differ in the responses they propose to these issues. "Liberal feminists" believe that women's domestic responsibilities will inevitably place them at a disadvantage and favor policies that encourage men to assume a proportionate share of family responsibilities. "Cultural feminists," or "feminists of difference," believe that it is not the fact that women care for children but that child rearing is so undervalued which is the source of the problem. "Radical feminists" believe that it is impossible to know whether women's involvement in child rearing would differ from men's in a different society and focus on the ways in which marriage and work force policies perpetuate male dominance. All agree, however, that existing law contributes to the relative impoverishment of many women and children and that, even when the rules purport to be gender-neutral, they are administered in systematically biased ways.

  19. DILEMAS MORALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Realpe Quintero

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Antes del siglo XX la tradición filosófica moral ha reconocido la existencia de los conflictos morales pero ha rechazado la posibilidad de los auténticos dilemas morales. Para poder entender por qué hoy el tema de los dilemas morales ha reclamado para sí tanta atención, es importante ponernos de acuerdo en la definición de algunos conceptos. Un conflicto moral es una situación en la que un(a agente se ve confrontado(a con dos obligaciones morales que le instan a actuar. Un dilema moral es una situación extrema de conflicto moral en la que nuestro(a agente no puede seguir un curso de acción que sea conforme con sus dos obligaciones en conflicto. Para que un conflicto moral tenga el carácter de ser un auténtico dilema moral (genuine moral dilemma y no simplemente un aparente dilema moral (apparent moral di- DILEMAS MORALES SANDRA REALPE Licenciada en Filosofía, Univalle, Maestría en Filosofía, Univalle, Diplomado en Psicología Aplicada, Universidad de Londres, Diplomado en Etica de los Negocios Universidad de Colorado, profesora Universidad Icesi, Facultad de Derecho y Humanidades. E-mail: sandrarealpe@hotmail.com lemma, ninguna de las obligaciones en conflicto es en efecto más fuerte o logra invalidar a la otra obligación. A raíz de un artículo escrito en 1962 por E. J. Lemmon, titulado precisamente “Dilemas morales” (Moral Dilemmas, se abrió un debate entre los filósofos anglosajones contemporáneos acerca de la existencia o no de los auténticos dilemas morales. Informar sobre este debate reciente, esclarecer los argumentos de sus principales protagonistas, y hacer presente en nuestro medio un novedoso debate que es importante para reflexionar sobre un buen número de problemas morales, son nuestros principales propósitos en el presente ensayo. ...

  20. The Militant Nun as Political Activist and Feminist in Martial Law Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Roces

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available During the martial law era (1972-1986, the militant nuns were the most visible symbols of political activism: they dominated the Task Force Detainees, they were active in the underground press, and were present in the labour strikes and demonstrations. But, in becoming political activists, they discovered the potential of moral power as women religious figures. During the People Power revolution, for example, the nuns – armed only with rosaries, confronted the military (the supreme example of machismo politics and triumphed. In the process of attacking political oppression, these nuns also began to challenge cultural constructions of the feminine – becoming the first overt feminists to do so in Philippine history. This paper explores how martial law transformed these women into militant activists and feminists. Although driven by their struggle to protect the victims of martial law, they also succeeded in empowering themselves. This new ‘moral power’ has since been harnessed for women’s issues.

  1. Moral virtues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Spielthenner

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Although much has been published on virtues in recent years, there is still considerable uncertainty in philosophy (and even more among philosophical laymen about the concept of a virtue and especially about moral virtues. In this article, I will try to clarify these notions. In particular, I want to answer the question: When are virtues moral virtues? Clearly, not every practical virtue is a moral virtue. Why was the courage of the Nazi soldiers in the second world war not a moral virtue, but yet is presumably one if included among the cardinal virtues? To clarify this question, this article will deal with the concept of a virtue but I will also investigate the notion of virtues being of a moral nature. To this end, I propose and explain (I a definition of moral virtues and clarify this definition further in section (II, by explaining why I did not include qualities, which others have considered as essential.

  2. The Awakening of Feminist Consciousness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊江

    2013-01-01

    Virginia Woolf in her great novel To the Lighthouse shows her deep concern for women. In this book, she discusses women’s spiritual world and the process of the awakening of feminist consciousness, which is represented by Mrs. Ramsay and Lily Briscoe.

  3. Morality, Moral Luck and Responsibility. Fortune's Web

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Fogh

    2011-01-01

    Anmeldelse af Nafsika Athanassoulis bog: Morality, Moral Lock and Responsibility (Palgrave MacMillian 2010)......Anmeldelse af Nafsika Athanassoulis bog: Morality, Moral Lock and Responsibility (Palgrave MacMillian 2010)...

  4. Moral Cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schleim, Stephan; Clausen, Jens; Levy, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Research on moral cognition is a growing and heavily multidisciplinary field. This section contains chapters addressing foundational psychological, neuroscientific, and philosophical issues of research on moral decision-making. Further- more, beyond summarizing the state of the art of their respecti

  5. Feminist methodologies and engineering education research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddoes, Kacey

    2013-03-01

    This paper introduces feminist methodologies in the context of engineering education research. It builds upon other recent methodology articles in engineering education journals and presents feminist research methodologies as a concrete engineering education setting in which to explore the connections between epistemology, methodology and theory. The paper begins with a literature review that covers a broad range of topics featured in the literature on feminist methodologies. Next, data from interviews with engineering educators and researchers who have engaged with feminist methodologies are presented. The ways in which feminist methodologies shape their research topics, questions, frameworks of analysis, methods, practices and reporting are each discussed. The challenges and barriers they have faced are then discussed. Finally, the benefits of further and broader engagement with feminist methodologies within the engineering education community are identified.

  6. Increasing the Number of Feminist Scientists: Why Feminist Aims Are Not Served by the Underdetermination Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intemann, Kristen

    2008-01-01

    Recent feminist philosophers of science have argued that feminist values can contribute to rational decisions about which scientific theories to accept. On this view, increasing the number of feminist scientists is important for ensuring rational and objective theory acceptance. The Underdetermination Thesis has played a key role in arguments for…

  7. A "Journey in Feminist Theory Together": The "Doing Feminist Theory through Digital Video" Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Rachel Alpha Johnston

    2014-01-01

    "Doing Feminist Theory Through Digital Video" is an assignment I designed for my undergraduate feminist theory course, where students created a short digital video on a concept in feminist theory. I outline the assignment and the pedagogical and epistemological frameworks that structured the assignment (digital storytelling,…

  8. Hidden in plain view: feminists doing engineering ethics, engineers doing feminist ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Donna

    2013-03-01

    How has engineering ethics addressed gender concerns to date? How have the ideas of feminist philosophers and feminist ethicists made their way into engineering ethics? What might an explicitly feminist engineering ethics look like? This paper reviews some major themes in feminist ethics and then considers three areas in which these themes have been taken up in engineering ethics to date. First, Caroline Whitbeck's work in engineering ethics integrates considerations from her own earlier writings and those of other feminist philosophers, but does not use the feminist label. Second, efforts to incorporate the Ethic of Care and principles of Social Justice into engineering have drawn on feminist scholarship and principles, but these commitments can be lost in translation to the broader engineering community. Third, the film Henry's Daughters brings gender considerations into the mainstream of engineering ethics, but does not draw on feminist ethics per se; despite the best intentions in broaching a difficult subject, the film unfortunately does more harm than good when it comes to sexual harassment education. I seek not only to make the case that engineers should pay attention to feminist ethics and engineering ethicists make more use of feminist ethics traditions in the field, but also to provide some avenues for how to approach integrating feminist ethics in engineering. The literature review and analysis of the three examples point to future work for further developing what might be called feminist engineering ethics.

  9. A feminist challenge to practices of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, K A

    1994-01-01

    Susan Sherwin's No Longer Patient: Feminist Ethics and Health Care is a readable book that is accessible to a wide range of medical practitioners. It presupposes no prior training in ethics or feminism (and for just this reason, it may be somewhat less satisfying, although not necessarily less useful, for philosophers). The book is a feminist bioethics primer that introduces medical practitioners to issues that feminist theory makes prominent and that illuminate tensions in the structure and practice of medicine.

  10. A postmodern perspective on feminist gerontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, R E

    1996-10-01

    This article argues the need for research in a feminist gerontology that is informed by postmodern and poststructuralist theories. Feminist gerontology is defined and described as part of a larger movement in the field toward critical gerontology. A brief summary of postmodern thought is followed by questions for researchers in gerontology and guidelines for feminist research which is interpretive, interactive, critical, and change-oriented.

  11. On Feminist Translation Theory and Literary Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    狄东睿

    2015-01-01

    Feminist translation theory emerged in the late 70s and early 80s of 20th Century. It is the combination of the feminist movement and the“cultural turn”of translation. It was introduced to China in the 1980s, and with the development of the transla⁃tion theory and translation practice, more and more Chinese translators want to study the feminist translation theory from the deep levels.

  12. A feminist response to Weitzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dines, Gail

    2012-04-01

    In his review of my book Pornland: How Porn has Hijacked our Sexuality, Ronald Weitzer claims that anti-porn feminists are incapable of objective, rigorous research because they operate within the "oppression paradigm," which he defines as "a perspective that depicts all types of sex work as exploitive, violent, and perpetuating gender inequality." (VAW, 2011, 666). This article argues that while anti-porn feminists do indeed see pornography as exploitive, such a position is rooted in the rigorous theories and methods of cultural studies developed by critical media scholars such as Stuart Hall and Antonio Gramsci. Pornland applies a cultural studies approach by exploring how porn images are part of a wider system of sexist representations that legitimize and normalize the economic, political and legal oppression of women.

  13. The Methodological Imperatives of Feminist Ethnography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richelle D. Schrock

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Feminist ethnography does not have a single, coherent definition and is caught between struggles over the definition and goals of feminism and the multiple practices known collectively as ethnography. Towards the end of the 1980s, debates emerged that problematized feminist ethnography as a productive methodology and these debates still haunt feminist ethnographers today. In this article, I provide a concise historiography of feminist ethnography that summarizes both its promises and its vulnerabilities. I address the three major challenges I argue feminist ethnographers currently face, which include responding productively to feminist critiques of representing "others," accounting for feminisms' commitment to social change while grappling with poststructuralist critiques of knowledge production, and confronting the historical and ongoing lack of recognition for significant contributions by feminist ethnographers. Despite these challenges, I argue that feminist ethnography is a productive methodology and I conclude by delineating its methodological imperatives. These imperatives include producing knowledge about women's lives in specific cultural contexts, recognizing the potential detriments and benefits of representation, exploring women's experiences of oppression along with the agency they exercise in their own lives, and feeling an ethical responsibility towards the communities in which the researchers work. I argue that this set of imperatives enables feminist ethnographers to successfully navigate the challenges they face.

  14. Feminist Judgments as Teaching Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary Hunter

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses feminist judgments as a specific vehicle for teaching students to think critically about law. The analysis of appellate judgments forms a central plank of Anglo-Commonwealth and US jurisprudence and legal education. While academic scholarship generally offers various forms of commentary on decided cases, feminist judgment-writing projects have recently embarked on a new form of critical scholarship. Rather than critiquing judgments from a feminist perspective in academic essays, the participants in these projects have set out instead to write alternative judgments, as if they had been one of the judges sitting on the court at the time. After introducing the UK Feminist Judgments Project and describing what is ‘different’ about the judgments it has produced, the paper explains some of the ways in which these judgments have been used in UK law schools to teach critical thinking. The paper finally speculates on the potential production and application of feminist judgments or their equivalents beyond the common law context. Este artículo analiza las sentencias feministas como un vehículo específico para enseñar a los estudiantes a analizar el derecho desde un punto de vista crítico. El análisis de las sentencias de apelación constituye un elemento central de la jurisprudencia y la enseñanza del derecho en los países angloamericanos y de la Commonwealth. Mientras la comunidad académica ofrece generalmente diversas formas de comentario de casos resueltos, los proyectos de literatura judicial feminista se han embarcado recientemente en un nuevo sistema de crítica académica. En lugar de redactar ensayos académicos criticando las sentencias judiciales desde una perspectiva feminista, los participantes de estos proyectos se han propuesto redactar sentencias alternativas, como si hubieran sido uno de los jueces del tribunal en cuestión. Después de presentar el Proyecto de Sentencias Feministas del Reino Unido y

  15. Moral transhumanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Ingmar; Savulescu, Julian

    2010-12-01

    In its basic sense, the term "human" is a term of biological classification: an individual is human just in case it is a member of the species Homo sapiens. Its opposite is "nonhuman": nonhuman animals being animals that belong to other species than H. sapiens. In another sense of human, its opposite is "inhuman," that is cruel and heartless (cf. "humane" and "inhumane"); being human in this sense is having morally good qualities. This paper argues that biomedical research and therapy should make humans in the biological sense more human in the moral sense, even if they cease to be human in the biological sense. This serves valuable biomedical ends like the promotion of health and well-being, for if humans do not become more moral, civilization is threatened. It is unimportant that humans remain biologically human, since they do not have moral value in virtue of belonging to H. sapiens.

  16. Moral Communities and Moral Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2015-01-01

    The American College of Dentists is embarking on a multiyear project to improve ethics in dentistry. Early indications are that the focus will be on actual moral behavior rather than theory, that we will include organizations as ethical units, and that we will focus on building moral leadership. There is little evidence that the "telling individuals how to behave" approach to ethics is having the hoped-for effect. As a profession, dentistry is based on shared trust. The public level of trust in practitioners is acceptable, but could be improved, and will need to be strengthened to reduce the risk of increasing regulation. While feedback from the way dentists and patients view ethics is generally reassuring, dentists are often at odds with patients and their colleagues over how the profesion manages itself. Individuals are an inconsistent mix of good and bad behavior, and it may be more helpful to make small improvements in the habits of all dentists than to try to take a few certifiably dishonest ones off the street. A computer simulation model of dentistry as a moral community suggests that the profession will always have the proportion of bad actors it will tolerate, that moral leadership is a difficult posture to maintain, that massive interventions to correct imbalances through education or other means will be wasted unless the system as a whole is modified, and that most dentists see no compelling benefit in changing the ethical climate of the profession because they are doing just fine. Considering organiza-tions as loci of moral behavior reveals questionable practices that otherwise remain undetected, including moral distress, fragmentation, fictitious dentists, moral fading, decoupling, responsibility shifting, and moral priming. What is most needed is not phillosophy or principles, but moral leadership.

  17. An Exploration of Jane Eyre's Feminist Consciousness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴伊璐

    2013-01-01

    In the novel Jane Eyre,Jane's feminist consciousness can be divided into three stages which involve her lasting struggle for fundamental equality,economic Independence and freedom of love. Throughout Jane's lifetime,the author expressed the awakening of feminist consciousness which encouraged those traditional females to pursue gender equality of love and expressed concern about the liberation of women and thoughts.

  18. A Feminist Perspective on Parental Leave Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallee, Margaret W.

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on the ways that three feminist theories--liberal feminism, cultural feminism, and feminist poststructuralism--might be used to craft parental leave policies. After examining each theory in detail, the article concludes by offering one example of an ideal parental leave policy that combines the best features of each theory to…

  19. Deconstructing Gender in Revised Feminist Fairy Tales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcandrew, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Power relationships are a central premise in children's literature, especially traditional fairy tales and modern feminist fairy tales. This is seen in many fairy tales where the main female character is in some distress, her Prince Charming rescues her, and they live happily ever after. Modern feminist fairy tales are understood to be a forum…

  20. Leadership Education from within a Feminist Ethos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentith, Audrey M.; Peterlin, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the ways that feminist theories, history and pedagogies can be infused into leadership preparation programs in educational administration. This work is situated with the larger movement of leadership for social justice. The authors describe the theoretical frame for this work and the organization of a feminist leadership…

  1. Reading/Writing/Creating Feminist Utopian Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Libby Falk

    1990-01-01

    Presents the study of feminist utopian literature as a means to achieving three goals of feminist education: valuing self-disclosure and personal knowledge; encouraging innovative thinking transcending the traditional world view; and fostering critical awareness and community learning. Provides a selected bibliography of women's utopian fiction.…

  2. Feminist Fiction and the Uses of Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Gayle

    1991-01-01

    This essay concerns feminist fiction by Doris Lessing, Margaret Drabble, Margaret Atwood, Margaret Laurence, and Toni Morrison that utilizes memory as a means to liberation and explores this at the level of narrative form. In examining 1970s feminist fiction and metafiction, explores the importance of memory at particular cultural moments. (AF)

  3. Conceptualizing Critical Feminist Theory and Emancipatory Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Saxe, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This theoretical paper analyzes the relationship between critical feminist theory and emancipatory education as it relates to transformative educational practices. The first section will discuss how the author understands critical feminist theory by looking to Chela Sandoval's theoretical framework of oppositional resistance. The author discusses…

  4. A Feminist Perspective on Parental Leave Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallee, Margaret W.

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on the ways that three feminist theories--liberal feminism, cultural feminism, and feminist poststructuralism--might be used to craft parental leave policies. After examining each theory in detail, the article concludes by offering one example of an ideal parental leave policy that combines the best features of each theory to…

  5. A Feminist Critical Perspective on Educational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, Jill

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1980s, there has been a burgeoning literature on women and educational leadership. The focus has primarily been on the underrepresentation of women in leadership informed by a feminist critique of the mainstream literature. Over time, key feminist theories and research have been appropriated in education policy and are now embedded in…

  6. Conceptualizing Critical Feminist Theory and Emancipatory Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Saxe, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This theoretical paper analyzes the relationship between critical feminist theory and emancipatory education as it relates to transformative educational practices. The first section will discuss how the author understands critical feminist theory by looking to Chela Sandoval's theoretical framework of oppositional resistance. The author discusses…

  7. Children and the Feminist Ethic of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockburn, Tom

    2005-01-01

    This article looks at the recent contributions made by feminists who advocate a distinctive 'ethic of care' to replace the conventional 'ethic of rights'. The article explores ways in which the ethic of care could be utilized and applied to the children's rights context. After looking at the important feminist criticisms of conventional…

  8. Feminist Methodologies and Engineering Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddoes, Kacey

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces feminist methodologies in the context of engineering education research. It builds upon other recent methodology articles in engineering education journals and presents feminist research methodologies as a concrete engineering education setting in which to explore the connections between epistemology, methodology and theory.…

  9. Feminist leadership through total quality management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, M L

    1997-01-01

    Feminist leadership in nursing can be achieved through Total Quality Management. Total Quality Management (TQM) is a philosophy and technology that represents the foundation of a continuously improving organization. The feminist leadership ideas practiced by nurses, such as empowering staff and decision by consensus, are also central to TQM. Feminist leadership utilizing TQM enables employees to creatively contribute to the system without fear or intimidation. Employees at all levels in the organization are then empowered. The role of the feminist leader using TQM is one of facilitator rather than authority figure. Feminist leadership in nursing can spearhead the opportunity for improvement to provide high-quality, cost-effective health care in a troubled and complex economic environment.

  10. Feminist philosophy of science: `standpoint' and knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crasnow, Sharon

    2008-11-01

    Feminist philosophy of science has been criticized on several counts. On the one hand, it is claimed that it results in relativism of the worst sort since the political commitment to feminism is prima facie incompatible with scientific objectivity. On the other hand, when critics acknowledge that there may be some value in work that feminists have done, they comment that there is nothing particularly feminist about their accounts. I argue that both criticisms can be addressed through a better understanding of the current work in feminist epistemology. I offer an examination of standpoint theory as an illustration. Harding and Wylie have suggested ways in which the objectivity question can be addressed. These two accounts together with a third approach, ‘model-based objectivity’, indicate there is a clear sense in which we can understand how a standpoint theory both contributes to a better understanding of scientific knowledge and can provide a feminist epistemology.

  11. The Impact of the Feminist Heroine: Elizabeth in Pride and Prejudice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Chun CHANG

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper critically examines the feminist significance of Elizabeth Bennet, heroine of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. The feminist view found in Pride and Prejudice is well-supported in literary criticism yet little discussion has focused on Elizabeth’s feminism as seen in the prominent contrast to her female foils within the novel, namely Caroline, Jane, and Charlotte. Each of these women conforms to the socially imposed gender norms of Regency England, while Elizabeth artfully challenges gender inequality. As other women adapt their views to increase their chances of marriage, Elizabeth persistently refuses to capitulate. Defying traditional gender norms, Elizabeth affirms her feminist perspective by helping to shape Mr. Darcy’s moral character to match her own. Elizabeth inspires Mr. Darcy to set aside the pride he has in his high station in society in order to win her affections and take her hand in marriage. I argue that Elizabeth’s character is not feminist in isolation, but is understood only in contrast to Caroline, Jane, and Charlotte. This claim is supported by an in-depth comparison of Elizabeth and each of the female foils.

  12. Women's health and feminist politics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, D

    1994-06-01

    The Sempreviva Organizacao Feminista (SOF) has aimed since 1963 to improve women's health in low-income communities in southeastern Brazil. There is concern for the whole person in all stages of a woman's life, not just the reproductive one commonly addressed in population control programs. SOF has linked gender, health, and poverty and contributed to social movements to improve conditions. SOF's constituency is about 90% women aged 20-40 years, with 2-5 children, and a lack of education. About 70% remain in the home caring for their families, and 25% are employed formally or informally. The women's fertility rates are high and they desire to limit childbearing. Most women are unaware of their own reproductive physiology and had not discussed sex with their parents before marriage. Active membership by 1971 was 7600 members. SOF's present aims are to strengthen the women's movement, to develop feminist approaches to health issues, to implement a women's health program, and to incorporate gender issued into other social movements. The present goals evolved out of the initial program of offering health services and family planning in a suburb of Sao Paulo. After break with their funding agency in 1967, over the refusal to promote female sterilization, they found funding by the World Council of Churches and others, which opened the doors to improvement in the quality of care. Meetings held every 2 years provide a forum for involvement of grassroots groups. The National Feminist Network for Health and Reproductive Rights provides the integrating mechanism for feminist nongovernmental groups and pressures the national government for reforms that will benefit women. SOF is just one of the grassroots organizations that offers collective and innovative experiences and empowerment. Social movements in the south and west of Sao Paulo have become more organized and demanded better public health policy or improvements in sanitation and waste disposal. SOF is currently

  13. Productive aging: a feminist critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstein, M

    1992-01-01

    This essay offers a feminist perspective on the call for a "productive aging" society, and says that the movement provides an answer before we have systematically asked questions about the meaning of old age. An emphasis on productivity, among other things, can devalue relational activities, often inherent in women's roles, and certain older people-older women in particular. The author proposes a number of measures for the short term, so that society can be responsible to older women who need and want jobs, as well as ideas for more far-reaching change.

  14. Feminism and the Moral Imperative for Contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espey, Eve

    2015-08-01

    This commentary is adapted from the Irvin M. Cushner Memorial Lecture, "Feminism and the Moral Imperative for Contraception," given at 2014 Annual Clinical Meeting of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists in Chicago. It provides a brief and simplified historical review of the feminist movement, primarily in the United States, focusing on feminism's association with contraception. This commentary reflects the perspective and opinions of the author. Contraception is fundamental to a woman's ability to achieve equality and realize her full social, economic, and intellectual potential.

  15. In Search of Moral Coherence: Reconciling Uneasy Histories and Identities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katy Campbell PhD

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Through an autoethnographic account the authors explore the various entanglements, ambiguities, and conflicts inherent in the research relationships of institutionally marginalized communities. Agency and moral coherence are constructs with which personal, political, and sociocultural dimensions of negotiating a research identity are framed. They use a feminist lens to examine relations, autoethnography to reflexively examine these relations, and poststructuralist notions to illuminate cultural influences on the shifting identity of one actor.

  16. Authentic moral conflicts and students' moral development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Wei-li

    2006-01-01

    This research deals with the different psychological processes people undergo when they experience firsthand authentic moral conflicts.It also discusses the value of authentic moral conflicts in students' moral development,and reasons for the ineffectiveness of moral education in China.The main reason for the unsatisfactory effects of moral education in China over a period of time lies in the predominance of virtual moral education.In authentic situations,the proper arrangement of moral conflicts requires careful analysis of values hidden in the prearranged or generated moral conflicts so as to utilize,guide,and control them properly.Such arrangement of moral conflicts should be adapted to students' life experience for deepening their understanding of the moral aspects of life.Also,special attention should be attached to students' varied requirements,thus leaving enough options and space for their independent participation in activities of moral education.

  17. Grounded theory as feminist research methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keddy, B; Sims, S L; Stern, P N

    1996-03-01

    Feminist research is evolving, and with it new methods of doing science. In this feminist post-positivist era, grounded theory, while less inclusive and descriptive than ethnography, allows for complex analysis of complex questions. While Glaser & Strauss (the originators of this methodology) have written about grounded theory in an esoteric way, others have written extensively about this method in a much clearer and less rigid fashion. In this paper we discuss how grounded theory could be used in a creative and constantly evolving manner for feminist research.

  18. Moral Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahel, Kenneth

    1976-01-01

    Explains the rationale that there should be a kind of harmony between moral understanding or reasoning on the one hand, and the feeling dispositions on the other hand. Considers the views of Kant and Schopenhauer as they apply to the subject. (Author/RK)

  19. MORALE Assignment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carienvt

    also important in the South African National Defence Force (SANDF) for ensuring .... having a negative influence on morale, and Table 3 lists consequences or .... stated in the introduction, military training aims to prepare soldiers for battle. Skills ... the whole person.41 This includes mind, body, emotions, character and spirit.

  20. Moral Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahel, Kenneth

    1976-01-01

    Explains the rationale that there should be a kind of harmony between moral understanding or reasoning on the one hand, and the feeling dispositions on the other hand. Considers the views of Kant and Schopenhauer as they apply to the subject. (Author/RK)

  1. Feminist discourse on sex screening and selective abortion of female foetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazam, Farhat

    2004-06-01

    Although a preference for sons is reportedly a universal phenomenon, in some Asian societies daughters are considered financial and cultural liabilities. Increasing availability of ultrasonography and amniocentesis has led to widespread gender screening and selective abortion of normal female foetuses in many countries, including India. Feminists have taken widely divergent positions on the morality of this practice. Feminists from India have strongly opposed it, considering it as a further disenfranchisement of females in their patriarchal society, and have agitated successfully for legislative prohibitions. Libertarian feminists on the other hand, primarily from the United States, have argued that any prohibition of the use of this technology is a curtailment of a woman's reproductive choices and a violation of her right to make autonomous decisions regarding procreation. Using India as an illustrative case, this paper argues that in the context of what prevails in some societies, an ethical argument that hinges on the principle of autonomy as understood in the West can be problematic. Furthermore, a liberal theoretical assumption that it is always better to have more rather than fewer choices may not hold up well against the realities of life for such women. Although feminists have little disagreement concerning substantive matters, it is in the area of strategy that differences of opinion have arisen, their moral reasoning and responses shaped by the culture, ethnicity, class and race to which they belong. A view that a single 'orthodox' feminism of any variety can embody the aspiration of all women reverts to the problematic issues in the evolution of the rationalistic, individualistic, 'male' ethics against which women have consistently raised objections.

  2. An integrative feminist model: the evolving feminist perspective on intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhail, Beverly A; Busch, Noël Bridget; Kulkarni, Shanti; Rice, Gail

    2007-08-01

    The feminist perspective on intimate partner violence is a predominant model in the field, although not immune to criticism. In this research, frontline workers in the violence against women movement responded to critiques of the feminist model. The project used a focus group and a modified grounded theory analysis. Participants agreed with some criticisms, including an overreliance on a punitive criminal justice system, but reported skepticism toward proposed alternatives. Findings led to the development of the Integrative Feminist Model, which expands the feminist perspective in response to critiques, new research, and alternative theories while retaining a gendered analysis of violence.

  3. On Moral Luck and Nonideal Moral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnery, Ann

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the Kantian principle that we are morally accountable only for those actions over which we have control, Bernard Williams, Thomas Nagel, and others have argued that luck plays a significant role in the moral life. Put briefly, moral luck is at play when we are appropriately praised or blamed for our moral actions despite the fact…

  4. On Moral Luck and Nonideal Moral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnery, Ann

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the Kantian principle that we are morally accountable only for those actions over which we have control, Bernard Williams, Thomas Nagel, and others have argued that luck plays a significant role in the moral life. Put briefly, moral luck is at play when we are appropriately praised or blamed for our moral actions despite the fact…

  5. Grounding Moralism: Moral Flaws and Aesthetic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smuts, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Can moral flaws lessen an artwork's aesthetic value? Answering yes to this question requires both that artworks can be morally flawed and that moral flaws within a work of art can have an aesthetic impact. For present purposes, the author will assume that artworks can be morally flawed by such means as endorsing immoral perspectives, culpably…

  6. The community of nursing: moral friends, moral strangers, moral family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laabs, Carolyn A

    2008-10-01

    Unlike bioethicists who contend that there is a morality common to all, H. Tristan Engelhardt (1996) argues that, in a pluralistic secular society, any morality that does exist is loosely connected, lacks substantive moral content, is based on the principle of permission and, thus, is a morality between moral strangers. This, says Engelhardt, stands in contrast to a substance-full morality that exists between moral friends, a morality in which moral content is based on shared beliefs and values and exists in communities that tend to be closely knit and religiously based. Of what value does Engelhardt's description of ethics as moral friends and moral strangers have for nursing? In this essay, I attempt to show how Engelhardt's description serves to illustrate how the nursing community historically had been one of moral friends but has gradually become one of moral strangers and, hence, at risk of failing to protect patients in their vulnerability and of compromising the integrity of nursing. Building on Engelhardt's concepts, I suggest we might consider modern nursing like a moral family to the extent that members might at times relate to one another as moral strangers but still possess a desire and a need to reconnect with the common thread that binds us as moral friends. Nursing is a practice discipline. Given the challenges of modern bioethics, an applied ethic is needed to give moral direction to clinicians as we strive to conduct ourselves ethically in the practice of our profession. To that end, nursing should reflect upon and seek to reconnect with the content-full morality that is historically and religiously based.

  7. Reading Herzog from a Feminist Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢梦昕

    2014-01-01

    This essay is an analysis on Saul Bellow’s masterpiece Herzog in the light of Feminism, trying to find how women lived in a patriarchal world with a feminist movement in 1960s’ as general background.

  8. The Transformation of the "Old Feminist" Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Charles

    1981-01-01

    Demonstrates how the "Old Feminist" movement, originating in broad humanitarian concerns that affirmed woman's selfhood, eventually was transformed into the essentially different "Woman Suffrage" movement. Analyzes a key episode, the 1860 divorce debate. (PD)

  9. Infanticide, moral status and moral reasons: the importance of context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Leslie; Silvers, Anita

    2013-05-01

    Giubilini and Minerva ask why birth should be a critical dividing line between acceptable and unacceptable reasons for terminating existence. Their argument is that birth does not change moral status in the sense that is relevant: the ability to be harmed by interruption of one's aims. Rather than question the plausibility of their position or the argument they give, we ask instead about the importance to scholarship or policy of publishing the article: does it to any extent make a novel or needed addition to the literature? Giubilini and Minerva's argument is remarkably similar to one advanced by Michael Tooley in 'Abortion and Infanticide,' almost 40 years ago. There have been immense changes in the intervening 40 years: in the ability to diagnose conditions early in pregnancy, in genetics and in the availability of in vitro fertilization; in understanding of the capabilities of persons with disabilities; in law; in economic support and access to healthcare for pregnant women and their children; in social customs and arrangements; and even in philosophy, with developments in feminist thought, bioethics and cognitive science. Some of these changes have been for the better, but others, such as the unravelling of social safety nets, have arguably been for the worse. Any or all of these changes might give rise to moral reasons for the relevance of birth that were not available 40 years ago. These changes might also be relevant to the identification of cases, if any, in which 'after-birth abortion' might be considered. If context is relevant to the applicability of moral reasons-as for theorists of justice in the non-idealised world it surely should be-it is questionable whether a view of the birth-line that ignores contextualising change can be adequate.

  10. Liberating Moral Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horell, Harold D.

    2013-01-01

    The author argues that if we are to foster life-giving and liberating moral reflection, we must first liberate moral reflection from distortions; specifically, from the distorting effects of moral insensitivity, destructive moral relativism, and confusions resulting from a failure to understand the dynamics of moral reflection. The author proposes…

  11. Liberating Moral Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horell, Harold D.

    2013-01-01

    The author argues that if we are to foster life-giving and liberating moral reflection, we must first liberate moral reflection from distortions; specifically, from the distorting effects of moral insensitivity, destructive moral relativism, and confusions resulting from a failure to understand the dynamics of moral reflection. The author proposes…

  12. Moral Development in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Daniel; Carlo, Gustavo

    2005-01-01

    Themes in the papers in this special issue of the "JRA" on moral development are identified. We discuss the intersection of moral development research with policy concerns, the distinctive qualities of moral life in adolescence that warrant investigation, the multiple connotations of "moral", the methods typical of moral development research, and…

  13. Feminist Education and Feminist Community Psychology: Experiences from an Irish Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moane, Geraldine; Quilty, Aideen

    2012-01-01

    This article describes experiences in an Irish context of education programs delivered in 2 communities, 1 based on class (a working class urban community) and 1 based on sexual orientation (an urban lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community). It aims to illustrate how feminist education can play an important role in feminist community…

  14. Feminist Education and Feminist Community Psychology: Experiences from an Irish Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moane, Geraldine; Quilty, Aideen

    2012-01-01

    This article describes experiences in an Irish context of education programs delivered in 2 communities, 1 based on class (a working class urban community) and 1 based on sexual orientation (an urban lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community). It aims to illustrate how feminist education can play an important role in feminist community…

  15. Positive Portrayals of Feminist Men Increase Men's Solidarity with Feminists and Collective Action Intentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Shaun; Srinivasan, Ruhi; Finke, Elizabeth; Firnhaber, Joseph; Shilinsky, Alyssa

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined whether positive portrayals of feminist men could increase men's sense of solidarity with feminists and, through it, their intentions to engage in collective action in support of women. A sample of 102 mostly White men between the ages of 18 and 63 was recruited from Mechanical Turk, an online crowdsourcing marketplace.…

  16. Feminist Popular Education in Transnational Debates: Building Pedagogies of Possibility. Comparative Feminist Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manicom, Linzi, Ed.; Walters, Shirley, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This book is a collection of grounded accounts by feminist popular educators reflecting critically on processes of collective learning and self- and social transformation in various geopolitical settings. Engaging contemporary feminist political issues and theory, contributors explore emerging pedagogical practices. This book contains the…

  17. Moral Resilience: Managing and Preventing Moral Distress and Moral Residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachman, Vicki D

    2016-01-01

    Moral resilience is the ability to deal with an ethically adverse situation without lasting effects of moral distress and moral residue. This requires morally courageous action, activating needed supports and doing the right thing. Morally resilient people also have developed self-confidence by confronting such situations so they can maintain their self-esteem, no matter what life delivers. Finally, the ability to adapt to changing circumstances with a sense of humor is at the heart of their flexibility. Morally resilient nurses are not naïve about the price of moral integrity. They know it does not come without pain of dealing with adversity, but they believe the virtue of moral courage is necessary to meet the ethical obligations of their profession (ANA, 2015b).

  18. Feminist Framework Plus: Knitting Feminist Theories of Rape Etiology Into a Comprehensive Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhail, Beverly A

    2016-07-01

    The radical-liberal feminist perspective on rape posits that the assault is motivated by power and control rather than sexual gratification and is a violent rather than a sexual act. However, rape is a complex act. Relying on only one early strand of feminist thought to explain the etiology of rape limits feminists' understanding of rape and the practice based upon the theory. The history of the adoption of the "power, not sex" theory is presented and the model critiqued. A more integrated model is developed and presented, the Feminist Framework Plus, which knits together five feminist theories into a comprehensive model that better explains the depth and breadth of the etiology of rape. Empirical evidence that supports each theory is detailed as well as the implications of the model on service provision, education, and advocacy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Threats to Feminist Identity and Reactions to Gender Discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichocka, Aleksandra; Golec de Zavala, Agnieszka; Kofta, Mirek; Rozum, Joanna

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this research was to examine conditions that modify feminists' support for women as targets of gender discrimination. In an experimental study we tested a hypothesis that threatened feminist identity will lead to greater differentiation between feminists and conservative women as victims of discrimination and, in turn, a decrease in support for non-feminist victims. The study was conducted among 96 young Polish female professionals and graduate students from Gender Studies programs in Warsaw who self-identified as feminists (Mage  = 22.23). Participants were presented with a case of workplace gender discrimination. Threat to feminist identity and worldview of the discrimination victim (feminist vs. conservative) were varied between research conditions. Results indicate that identity threat caused feminists to show conditional reactions to discrimination. Under identity threat, feminists perceived the situation as less discriminatory when the target held conservative views on gender relations than when the target was presented as feminist. This effect was not observed under conditions of no threat. Moreover, feminists showed an increase in compassion for the victim when she was portrayed as a feminist compared to when she was portrayed as conservative. Implications for the feminist movement are discussed.

  20. Increasing the number of feminist scientists: why feminist aims are not served by the Underdetermination Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intemann, Kristen

    2008-11-01

    Recent feminist philosophers of science have argued that feminist values can contribute to rational decisions about which scientific theories to accept. On this view, increasing the number of feminist scientists is important for ensuring rational and objective theory acceptance. The Underdetermination Thesis has played a key role in arguments for this view [Anderson (1995) Hypatia 10(3), 50 84; Hankinson Nelson (1990) Who knows? From Quine to a feminist empiricism. Temple University Press, Philadelphia; Longino (1990) Science as social knowledge. Princeton University Press, Princeton; Longino (2002) The fate of knowledge. Princeton University Press, Princeton; Kourany (2003) Philosophy of Science 70, 1 14]. This thesis is alleged to open an argumentative “gap” between evidence and theory acceptance and provide a rationale for filling the gap with feminist values. While I agree with the conclusion that feminist values can contribute to rational decisions about which theories to accept, I argue that the Underdetermination Thesis cannot support this claim. First, using earlier arguments [Laudan (1990) in: R. Giere (ed) Minnesota studies in the philosophy of science, vol 14, pp 267 297; Slezak (1991) International Studies in Philosophy of Science 5, 241 256; Pinnick (1994) Philosophy of Science 61, 664 657] I show that Underdetermination cannot, by itself, establish that feminist values should fill the gap in theory acceptance. Secondly, I argue that the very use of the Underdetermination Thesis concedes that feminist values are extra-scientific, a-rational, factors in theory acceptance. This concession denies feminists grounds to explain why their values contribute to rational scientific reasoning. Finally, I propose two alternative ways to explain how feminist values can contribute to rational theory acceptance that do not rely on Underdetermination.

  1. Is moral bioenhancement dangerous?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    In a recent response to Persson and Savulescu's Unfit for the Future, Nicholas Agar argues that moral bioenhancement is dangerous. His grounds for this are that normal moral judgement should be privileged because it involves a balance of moral subcapacities; moral bioenhancement, Agar argues, involves the enhancement of only particular moral subcapacities, and thus upsets the balance inherent in normal moral judgement. Mistaken moral judgements, he says, are likely to result. I argue that Agar's argument fails for two reasons. First, having strength in a particular moral subcapacity does not necessarily entail a worsening of moral judgement; it can involve strength in a particular aspect of morality. Second, normal moral judgement is not sufficiently likely to be correct to be the standard by which moral judgements are measured. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Advancing Women's Social Justice Agendas: A Feminist Action Research Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Colleen Reid

    2004-01-01

    Feminist action research is a promising, though under-developed, research approach for advancing women's health and social justice agendas. In this article the foundations, principles, dimensions, promises, and challenges of engaging in feminist action research are explored.

  3. Notes towards a surfacing of feminist theoretical turns

    OpenAIRE

    Coleman, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    This article suggests that feminist theoretical turns are illuminating to study, as they make explicit how Western feminist theory is interested not only in the content of different theoretical turns, but also, relatedly, in how these turns move feminist theory in particular directions. Exploring some of the current and historical debate about turns in feminist theory, I pay particular attention to how these debates might be understood in terms of a wide range of work on the non-linear tempor...

  4. Grounded theory, feminist theory, critical theory: toward theoretical triangulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Kaysi Eastlick; Morrow, Raymond

    2003-01-01

    Nursing and social science scholars have examined the compatibility between feminist and grounded theory traditions in scientific knowledge generation, concluding that they are complementary, yet not without certain tensions. This line of inquiry is extended to propose a critical feminist grounded theory methodology. The construction of symbolic interactionist, feminist, and critical feminist variants of grounded theory methodology is examined in terms of the presuppositions of each tradition and their interplay as a process of theoretical triangulation.

  5. Five feminist myths about women's employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, C

    1995-09-01

    Feminist sociology has contributed substantial revisions to theory, especially in the sociology of work and employment. But it is also creating new feminist myths to replace the old patriarchal myths about women's attitudes and behaviour. Five feminist myths about women's employment are discussed whose acceptance as fact is not damaged by being demonstrably untrue. Arguably the most pervasive is the myth of rising female employment. The myth that women's work commitment is the same as that of men is often adduced to resist labour market discrimination. The myth of childcare problems as the main barrier to women's employment is commonplace in advocacy research reports. The myth of poor quality part-time jobs is used to blame employers for the characteristic behaviour of part-time workers, including high labour turnover. The issue of the sex differential in labour turnover and employment stability illustrates clearly how feminist orthodoxy has replaced dispassionate sociological research in certain topics. The concluding section considers the implications of such feminist myths for an academic community that claims to be in the truth business and for theories on the sexual division of labour.

  6. Decolonizing Liberation: Toward a Transnational Feminist Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuğçe Kurtiş

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper engages the theme of “decolonizing psychological science” in the context of a perspective on psychological theory and research—namely, feminist psychology—that shares an emphasis on broad liberation. Although conceived as a universal theory and practice of liberation, scholars across diverse sites have suggested that feminism—perhaps especially as it manifests in psychological science—is not always compatible with and at times is even contradictory to global struggles for decolonization. The liberatory impulse of feminist psychology falls short of its potential not only because of its grounding in neocolonial legacies of hegemonic feminisms, but also because of its complicity with neocolonial tendencies of hegemonic psychological science. In response to these concerns, we draw upon on perspectives of transnational feminisms and cultural psychology as tools to decolonize (feminist psychology. We then propose the possibility of a (transnational feminist psychology that takes the epistemological position of people in various marginalized majority-world settings as a resource to rethink conventional scientific wisdom and liberate “liberation”. Rather than freeing some women to better participate in global domination, a transnational feminist psychology illuminates sustainable ways of being that are consistent with broader liberation of humanity in general.

  7. Teaching Note: When a "Feminist Approach" Is Too Narrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondestam, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    For feminist literary critics and teachers writing about and teaching literature "after feminism," the path is potentially treacherous. Feminist literary criticism, if it is applied too narrowly and used to reject complex literary texts that do not uphold an imagined feminist standard of "positive images" of women, can end up undermining other…

  8. The Materiality of Fieldwork: An Ontology of Feminist Becoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Sara M.

    2013-01-01

    Through the materiality of fieldwork at a high-achieving high-poverty high school, I discuss how the collision between practices of feminist methodology and the materiality of fieldwork forced me to rethink the "feminist" in feminist research. Using the work of Karen Barad, this material-discursive account of methodology as ontology…

  9. A Study of Afro-American Feminist Criticism in America

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>Specialty:Comparative Literature and World Literature This dissertation is meant to make a systematic inquiry into the critical thoughts of Black feminist criticism in America.As the representative of the Third World feminist criticism,Black feminist criticism in America has become an indispensable

  10. Feminist Self-Identification among Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charter, Mollie Lazar

    2015-01-01

    The literature points to a concerning relationship that social work students have with feminism, including a hesitance to identify as feminist despite endorsing feminist principles. The present study sought to gain a better understanding of how current social work students perceive feminism and whether they self-identify as feminist. In this study…

  11. Gender and Physics: Feminist Philosophy and Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolin, Kristina

    2008-01-01

    Physics education reform movements should pay attention to feminist analyses of gender in the culture of physics for two reasons. One reason is that feminist analyses contribute to an understanding of a "chilly climate" women encounter in many physics university departments. Another reason is that feminist analyses reveal that certain styles of…

  12. From Freud to Feminist Personality Theory: Getting Here from There.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, Hannah

    1986-01-01

    States eight criteria arising out of feminist therapy theory for a woman-based theory of female development and personality. Evaluates Freudian theory, current psychoanalytic theory, and several feminist theories in light of the stated criteria. Concludes that feminists have arrived at some degree of general agreement about personality theory.…

  13. Feminist Transformation in Higher Education: Discipline, Structure, and Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarik, Lynn

    2003-01-01

    Using a feminist poststructuralist perspective, investigated academic feminism as a case of transformation in higher education. Used narrative analysis to examine the transformative role of feminist scholarship in the contexts of disciplines, departments, and the university, illustrated by the life histories of nine diverse feminists and their…

  14. 'Bodies Are Dangerous': Using Feminist Genealogy as Policy Studies Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillow, Wanda

    2003-01-01

    Explores implications of paying attention to the body, literally and figuratively, in policy analysis and policy theory. Building from recent critical, feminist, and post-structural work in policy studies, develops what is termed a feminist genealogy to aid in an analysis of policy studies. Provides example of feminist genealogical analysis…

  15. The Feminist Thoughts Embodied in the Epics of Possession

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴艳玲

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,features of the feminist thoughts embodied in Possession analyzed and readers are led to a mythological world centered onthree female characters in three epics in order to state the feminist thoughys in the epics.Byatt's feminist thoughts are highlighted here.

  16. Gender and Physics: Feminist Philosophy and Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolin, Kristina

    2008-01-01

    Physics education reform movements should pay attention to feminist analyses of gender in the culture of physics for two reasons. One reason is that feminist analyses contribute to an understanding of a "chilly climate" women encounter in many physics university departments. Another reason is that feminist analyses reveal that certain styles of…

  17. Nurturing "Critical Hope" in Teaching Feminist Social Work Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Nathe, Ben; Gringeri, Christina; Wahab, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Despite the congruence between critical feminist values and the cardinal values of the social work profession, feminist research in social work has lagged behind its feminist cousins in the social sciences, particularly in terms of critical uses of theory, reflexivity, and the troubling of binaries. This article presents as praxis our reflections…

  18. Feminist Self-Identification among Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charter, Mollie Lazar

    2015-01-01

    The literature points to a concerning relationship that social work students have with feminism, including a hesitance to identify as feminist despite endorsing feminist principles. The present study sought to gain a better understanding of how current social work students perceive feminism and whether they self-identify as feminist. In this study…

  19. Centering Marxist-Feminist Theory in Adult Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Using feminist extensions of Marxist theory, this article argues that a Marxist-feminist theory of adult learning offers a significant contribution to feminist pedagogical debates concerning the nature of experience and learning. From this theoretical perspective, the individual and the social are understood to exist in a mutually determining…

  20. The Feminist Interpretation of ’Night, Mother

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张璐

    2014-01-01

    The famous contemporary drama wrights in America, Marsha Norman, had won Pulitzer Prize, Tony Prize, Drama Desk Awards and so on. ’Night, Mother was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1983.Feminist is the theoretical basis of this paper, analyze ’Night, Mother with the theory of feminist.’Night, Mother is a feminist play.

  1. Counseling Supervision within a Feminist Framework: Guidelines for Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degges-White, Suzanne E.; Colon, Bonnie R.; Borzumato-Gainey, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Feminist supervision is based on the principles of feminist theory. Goals include sharing responsibility for the supervision process, empowering the supervisee, attending to the contextual assumptions about clients, and analyzing gender roles. This article explores feminist supervision and guidelines for providing counseling supervision…

  2. Moral Motivation, Moral Judgment, and Antisocial Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Jeff; Bock, Tonia; Narvaez, Darcia

    2013-01-01

    The link between judgment and action is weak throughout psychology, including moral psychology. That is, people often do not act in accordance with their reasoning. Might moral judgment development be better viewed as a capacity that inhibits "immoral" behavior? One model that helps account for the moral judgment-action gap is Rest's…

  3. Claims to protection: the rise and fall of feminist abolitionism in the League of Nations' Committee on the Traffic in Women and Children, 1919–1936.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliley, Jessica R

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the League of Nations Advisory Committee on the Trafficking of Women and Children (CTW) to assess the impact of international feminists on the interwar anti-sex trafficking movement. It argues that women who were firmly embedded in the transnational and international women's rights movement built a coalition on the CTW to ensure the prominence of the feminist abolitionist position of sex trafficking in the 1920s. This position was defined by calls for equal standards of morality between the sexes, resistance to laws that treated prostitutes as a group and infringed on their human rights, and unwavering demands for the abolition of state-regulated prostitution. Changes in the personnel and bureaucratic structure of the CTW and the rising tide of nationalism served to undermine the feminist abolitionists' position in the League in the 1930s.

  4. Rethinking the Secular in Feminist Marriage Debates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada S. Jaarsma

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The religious right often aligns its patriarchal opposition to same-sex marriage with the defence of religious freedom. In this article, I identify resources for confronting such prejudicial religiosity by surveying two predominant feminist approaches to same-sex marriage that are often assumed to be at odds: discourse ethics and queer critical theory. This comparative analysis opens to view commitments that may not be fully recognizable from within either feminist framework: commitments to ideals of selfhood, to specific conceptions of justice, and to particular definitions of secularism. I conclude by examining the "postsecular" turn in feminism, suggesting that we can see the same-sex marriage debate not in terms of an impasse between differing feminist approaches, but in terms of shared existential and ethical affinities. 

  5. Rethinking the Secular in Feminist Marriage Debates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada S. Jaarsma

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The religious right often aligns its patriarchal opposition to same-sex marriage with the defence of religious freedom. In this article, I identify resources for confronting such prejudicial religiosity by surveying two predominant feminist approaches to same-sex marriage that are often assumed to be at odds: discourse ethics and queer critical theory. This comparative analysis opens to view commitments that may not be fully recognizable from within either feminist framework: commitments to ideals of selfhood, to specific conceptions of justice, and to particular definitions of secularism. I conclude by examining the "postsecular" turn in feminism, suggesting that we can see the same-sex marriage debate not in terms of an impasse between differing feminist approaches, but in terms of shared existential and ethical affinities.

     

  6. Refining moral agency: Insights from moral psychology and moral philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milliken, Aimee

    2017-08-11

    Research in moral psychology has recently raised questions about the impact of context and the environment on the way the human mind works. In a 2012 call to action, Paley wrote: "If some of the conclusions arrived at by moral psychologists are true, they are directly relevant to the way nurses think about moral problems, and present serious challenges to favoured concepts in nursing ethics, such as the ethics of care, virtue, and the unity of the person" (p. 80). He urges nurse ethicists and scholars to evaluate the impact these findings may have for moral theory. In this paper, I review some of Paley's (Nursing Philosophy, 13, 2012, 80) critique, focusing on the argument that theories of nursing ethics have failed to account for the role of context; both in terms of its impact on the way nurses make moral judgements and in terms of the environment's influence on the way the mind works. I then examine nursing literature on moral agency, and focus on the role of the environment and context play within existing theory. I argue that theories of moral agency have often accounted for the role of context on the way nurses make decisions; however, less attention has been paid to its impact on the mind. With this background, I use insights from the fields of moral philosophy and moral psychology to refine the conceptualization of nurse moral agency in a way that is reflective of current cognitive, philosophical and nursing practice-based science. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Weaving Transnational Feminist(s) Methodologies: (Re)Examining Early Childhood Linguistic Diversity Teacher Training and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Cinthya M.; Chakravarthi, Swetha; Lower, Joanna K.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to engender a space where a variety of critical feminist(s) lenses are interwoven to problematize current discursive practices in linguistic diversity training and to (re)imagine "nueavas posibilidades" for linguistic diversity research/training for pre-kindergarten teachers. Transnational feminists' projects have…

  8. (MOthering: Feminist Motherhood, Neoliberal Discourses and the Other’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Leite

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Feminist theory often gravitates around the rejection and recuperation of motherhood. The recuperation of feminist motherhood demonstrates the importance of understanding the duality between feminist motherhood and the patriarchal concept of motherhood. Here, I will argue that in recuperating motherhood, feminists and non-feminists alike should also acknowledge the coexisting realities that reject it. I am specifically thinking of feminist non-motherhood but also of feminist notions of pregnancy that reject motherhood. The mother without the maternal bond or even the 'falling out of motherhood after motherhood'. These, I think, as opposed to submissive realities and resistance strategies, represent a move away from patriarchal values and create a social reality that uses something else as a parameter. In order support my argument, I will rely on a case study analysing maternal health policies and strategies, in particular feminist activists' discourses related to maternal mortality in Brazil. The data collected during this fieldwork demonstrates the importance of acknowledging non-motherhood as crucial to radical constructions of feminist motherhood. The article concludes that, sadly, there is not such thing as a post-feminist society in Brazil. The Brazilian case study demonstrates that, in fact, public policies, and the discourses built around them, are still oriented towards a neoliberal re-packaging of patriarchy that partially co-opts feminist motherhood. That is, neoliberalism partially accepts feminist motherhood as a way to reject all other feminist claims. In this sense, it its crucial for feminists and non-feminists alike to acknowledge and accept all concepts of motherhood, positive and negative. That is, it is absolutely necessary to recognise '''the 'other' ' in order not to contribute to further marginalisation of non-motherhood attitudes as promoted by neoliberal policies and discourses.

  9. Educating Moral Emotions or Moral Selves: A False Dichotomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjansson, Kristjan

    2010-01-01

    In the post-Kohlbergian era of moral education, a "moral gap" has been identified between moral cognition and moral action. Contemporary moral psychologists lock horns over how this gap might be bridged. The two main contenders for such bridge-building are moral emotions and moral selves. I explore these two options from an Aristotelian…

  10. Educating Moral Emotions or Moral Selves: A False Dichotomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjansson, Kristjan

    2010-01-01

    In the post-Kohlbergian era of moral education, a "moral gap" has been identified between moral cognition and moral action. Contemporary moral psychologists lock horns over how this gap might be bridged. The two main contenders for such bridge-building are moral emotions and moral selves. I explore these two options from an Aristotelian…

  11. The Feminist Consciousness in The Garden Party

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Song-zhi

    2016-01-01

    Feminist movement reaches its climax in the first two decades of the 20th century. There are many female novelists in that time and Mansfield is one of them. Most of her novels are full of feminist consciousness, and The Garden Party is a special one. The characters in the story are different from other story. The author describes how the society and its spokesman Mrs. Sher-idan restrain the nature of Laura in detail. The author uses Laura to hint the current situation of women.

  12. Morality in everyday life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmann, W.; Wisneski, D.C.; Brandt, M.J.; Skitka, L.J.

    2014-01-01

    The science of morality has drawn heavily on well-controlled but artificial laboratory settings. To study everyday morality, we repeatedly assessed moral or immoral acts and experiences in a large (N = 1252) sample using ecological momentary assessment. Moral experiences were surprisingly frequent

  13. Defining Legal Moralism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Jens Damgaard

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses how legal moralism should be defined. It is argued that legal moralism should be defined as the position that “For any X, it is always a pro tanto reason for justifiably imposing legal regulation on X that X is morally wrong (where “morally wrong” is not conceptually equivalent...

  14. Measuring nurses' moral judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, R S

    1990-01-01

    Studies of the moral reasoning of nurses yield inconsistent findings. Using Cronbach and Meehl's interpretive framework, the author demonstrates the lack of construct validity for Kohlberg's theory of moral development and related measures of moral reasoning. Gilligan's relational theory of moral orientations is proposed as an alternative theory worth testing in nurse samples.

  15. Individual morality and the morality of institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scanlon Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the relationship between moral philosophy and political philosophy. It holds that political philosophy in some way is part of moral philosophy as the former deals with the content of moral standards governing the relations between individuals and institutions. That would be the purpose of the „morality of institutions“, while the so-called "individual morality" would inform the standards applicable to individuals. On the basis of a conception of individual morality as it relates to contractualism and a discussion of the morality of institutions that closely follows John Rawls’ theory of justice, the paper addresses the question of the foundations of the obligation to comply with institution-defined standards that are directed towards individuals. At the end, it focuses in particular on the difficulty of rationalizing that obligation in the case of unjust institutions.

  16. Naturalistic Moral Realism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Susnik

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this paper is probably the most influential version of moral realism, known as “moral realism naturalism”. After I propose what seems to be the most appropriate formulation of moral realism, I discuss whether it is possible to show that moral properties and natural properties can be identified a posteriori. In the second part I try to show that moral realists naturalists cannot refute wellknown Mackie’s “argument from querness” (or at least one version of that argument. In the end I discuss whether moral realists naturalists can ascribe the explanatory power to moral properties.

  17. Defining Legal Moralism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Jens Damgaard

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses how legal moralism should be defined. It is argued that legal moralism should be defined as the position that “For any X, it is always a pro tanto reason for justifiably imposing legal regulation on X that X is morally wrong (where “morally wrong” is not conceptually equivalent...... to “harmful”)”. Furthermore, a distinction between six types of legal moralism is made. The six types are grouped according to whether they are concerned with the enforcement of positive or critical morality, and whether they are concerned with criminalising, legally restricting, or refraining from legally...... protecting morally wrong behaviour. This is interesting because not all types of legal moralism are equally vulnerable to the different critiques of legal moralism that have been put forth. Indeed, I show that some interesting types of legal moralism have not been criticised at all....

  18. Feminist Social Work: Practice and Theory of Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyal-Lubling, Roni; Krumer-Nevo, Michal

    2016-07-01

    Although feminist social work has been practiced in Israel since the 1970s, little has been written about it. This qualitative study aims to fill this gap by documenting and conceptualizing feminist theory of practice and actual practice based on interviews with 12 feminist social workers. Findings reveal that the interviewees perceive feminist practice as significantly different from traditional social work practice based on four analytical principles: (1) gender analysis, (2) awareness of power relations, (3) analysis of welfare services as structures of oppression, and (4) utilization of feminist language, as well as 10 principles of action. The principles are discussed in the context of feminist social work in Israel and in light of feminist principles described in international literature.

  19. Dressing the Older Woman in Post-Mao China: Perspectives from Official Feminist Mass Media and Ordinary Chinese Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne L. Shea

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines Chinese discourses on dressing the aging female body as a window into the tensions involved in the historical transformation of habitus in early post-Mao China.  Drawing on Chinese media articles and ethnographic interviews conducted with Chinese women in their 40s-60s, the analysis compares depictions of new official ideals for older women’s dress that appeared in Chinese government-sponsored feminist media with ordinary older Chinese women’s personal sensibilities about dress.  Assessing the applicability of dominant western feminist theories of gender, dress, and age, this article provides a historicized culture-specific application of practice theory, examining older women’s struggles with competing moral logics associated with past and present, and with official media versus personal experience.  Overall, it documents experiences of ambivalence and compromise accompanying lifecycle adjustment in embodiment in the context of rapid social change.

  20. Enhancing Moral Conformity and Enhancing Moral Worth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    It is plausible that we have moral reasons to become better at conforming to our moral reasons. However, it is not always clear what means to greater moral conformity we should adopt. John Harris has recently argued that we have reason to adopt traditional, deliberative means in preference to means that alter our affective or conative states directly-that is, without engaging our deliberative faculties. One of Harris' concerns about direct means is that they would produce only a superficial kind of moral improvement. Though they might increase our moral conformity, there is some deeper kind of moral improvement that they would fail to produce, or would produce to a lesser degree than more traditional means. I consider whether this concern might be justified by appeal to the concept of moral worth. I assess three attempts to show that, even where they were equally effective at increasing one's moral conformity, direct interventions would be less conducive to moral worth than typical deliberative alternatives. Each of these attempts is inspired by Kant's views on moral worth. Each, I argue, fails.

  1. Feminist, Yes, but Is It Evaluation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    2002-01-01

    Examines how feminist evaluation principles and practices look from the perspectives of five different frameworks, each offering different criteria for judging evaluations. These frameworks are: (1) traditional scientific research criteria; (2) social construction and constructivist criteria; (3) artistic and evocative criteria; (4) pragmatic and…

  2. Feminist Thinking on Education in Victorian England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Laura

    2011-01-01

    This article examines some of the conversations that took place between women's rights advocates on the subject of female education. The relationship between Victorian feminism and educational reform was a complex one, and historians have long argued over whether campaigns for women's schools and colleges can be termed "feminist". This article…

  3. On the Complexity of Multiple Feminist Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enns, Carolyn Zerbe; Fischer, Ann R.

    2012-01-01

    This response to J. D. Yoder, A. F. Snell, and A. Tobias (2012) discusses implications for applying and building on their research findings regarding the complex feminist identifications found in young university women. Based on identity scholarship by women of color, it also discusses the challenges of conceptualizing and studying interactions…

  4. Feminist i nye klæder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Dorthe Gert

    1997-01-01

    Historie, Kønskonstruktioner, hverdags-misogyni og feminisme i akademia. Når man taler om feminisme, eller som feminist, taler man ind i et rum, der allerede er fyldt. Den kollektive viden om feminisme er fordomsfuld, og feminster har forsømt at forhandle med eller at forholde sig til de negative...... feminisme-ikoner....

  5. Human Trafficking, Globalisation and Transnational Feminist Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T-D. Truong (Thanh-Dam)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThis paper presents a historical overview of feminist frameworks for analysis and advocacy on human trafficking. It traces the major differences and similarities in the forms of knowledge produced since the Anti-White Slavery campaigns nearly two centuries ago. It highlights how institut

  6. Epistemological Values of Feminists in Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Mary

    1989-01-01

    Studies the current epistemological values of North American feminist psychologists. Explores whether the political commitments, personal identities, and professional activities of psychologists are systematically related to different worldviews and different beliefs about the nature of human experience. Lends support to the idea of situated…

  7. Doing Academic Writing Differently: A Feminist Bricolage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handforth, Rachel; Taylor, Carol A.

    2016-01-01

    This article emerged as the product of a collaboration between two individuals at different stages of our academic careers, one a beginning researcher and the other a senior academic. Written as an experimental "bricolage", the article weaves together two main threads to chart our engagements with feminist research and with writing…

  8. Doing Academic Writing Differently: A Feminist Bricolage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handforth, Rachel; Taylor, Carol A.

    2016-01-01

    This article emerged as the product of a collaboration between two individuals at different stages of our academic careers, one a beginning researcher and the other a senior academic. Written as an experimental "bricolage", the article weaves together two main threads to chart our engagements with feminist research and with writing…

  9. World-Systems Theory and Feminist Scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joan

    World systems theory and feminist scholarship each have a great deal to offer the other, but the connections between the two have not often been recognized. The potential contributions from world systems theory include: (1) its understanding of history, (2) its understanding of what that history comprises, and (3) how it employs Marxist historical…

  10. Feminist Economics, Setting out the Parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.P. van Staveren (Irene)

    2010-01-01

    textabstract1. Introduction Feminist economics has developed its position over the past decade, towards a firmer embeddedness in economic science and a source of inspiration for activists, policy makers, and social science researchers in a wide variety of fields of research. This development has com

  11. Women's and Feminist Activism in Western Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buikema, R.L.

    2016-01-01

    First- and second-wave Western European feminists struggled to realize full access to civil rights for women and the creation of a participatory democracy that ensured social solidarity. They consequently stressed the fact that in addition to the struggle for civil rights, women needed to contest th

  12. Adopting feminist strategies to improve women's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, T

    The new public health movement offers community nurses a context in which to address the continuing inequalities faced by women in society. This paper explores the use of feminism as a tool for this. It considers some of the constraints on feminist nursing practice and offers some ways forward.

  13. Feminist Criticism in The Scarlet Letter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏福林; 何志燕

    2007-01-01

    The Scarlet Letter written by Nathaniel Hawthorne is a great book. Through feminist criticism we can get how The Scarlet Letter may be read as dramatizing Hester Prynne's spiritual and physical struggle to survive as an individual in a society whose values authorize the privileged power of men.

  14. Zine-Making as Feminist Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creasap, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    One of the challenges that many gender studies instructors face is making complex topics--such as gender identities, political theory, and media criticism--current, interesting, and relevant to students' lives. In order to help students connect feminist theory to their own experiences, the author suggest incorporating "zines" into gender…

  15. Between Gazes: Feminist, Queer, and 'Other' Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elias, Camelia

    In this book Camelia Elias introduces key terms in feminist, queer, and postcolonial/diaspora film. Taking her point of departure in the question, "what do you want from me?" she detours through Lacanian theory of the gaze and reframes questions of subjectivity and representation in an entertaini...

  16. Transnational Feminist Rhetorics in a Digital World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queen, Mary

    2008-01-01

    In this essay, the author examines the digital circulations of representations of one Afghan women's rights organization--the Revolutionary Association of Women of Afghanistan (RAWA)--to demonstrate the importance of a global and digital field for feminist rhetorical analysis. Specifically, this analysis traces how women's self-representations are…

  17. Between Gazes: Feminist, Queer, and 'Other' Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elias, Camelia

    In this book Camelia Elias introduces key terms in feminist, queer, and postcolonial/diaspora film. Taking her point of departure in the question, "what do you want from me?" she detours through Lacanian theory of the gaze and reframes questions of subjectivity and representation in an entertaini...

  18. Women: A Feminist Perspective. Third Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Jo, Ed.

    Feminist issues are discussed in 33 scholarly articles that cover the following areas: the body and its control, the family, growing up female, the working woman, institutions of social control, and historical and contemporary developments in feminism. Titles and authors include: "Sexual Terrorism" (Carole J. Sheffield); "The Rape Culture" (Dianne…

  19. A FEMINIST READING OF SISTER CARRIE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高陈科

    2011-01-01

    In the history of American literature, Sister Carrie has always been a controversial character. The critics regard Carrie either as a "fallen woman" or as a "new women". This thesis aims to offer a feminist reading of the image of Sister Carrie in the con

  20. Human Trafficking, Globalisation and Transnational Feminist Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T-D. Truong (Thanh-Dam)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThis paper presents a historical overview of feminist frameworks for analysis and advocacy on human trafficking. It traces the major differences and similarities in the forms of knowledge produced since the Anti-White Slavery campaigns nearly two centuries ago. It highlights how institut

  1. Movimentos feministas, feminismos Feminist movements, feminisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suely Gomes Costa

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Esta comunicação examina tendências atuais das práticas e teorias feministas. No plano das ações políticas, remarca a tendência ao backlash, acentuando interesses do avanço neoliberal. No teórico, avalia impactos dos paradigmas feministas sobre a história das mulheres e estudos das relações de gênero, com destaque para ocultações de singularidades da história das mulheres no Brasil e para o conhecimento da matéria, a qualidade da produção intelectual e a orientação dos movimentos feministas. Sugere um esforço de atualização teórica como parte da militância feminista na academia. Propõe agenda de trabalhos para balanços e inventários de temas que refinem conceitos e atualizem referências de lutas feministas.This paper examines the present-day trends of feminist practices and theories. On what concerns political actions, it deals with the backlash trend, stressing the interests of neo-liberal progression. In the theoretical field it evaluates the impacts of feminist paradigms on women history and gender relation studies, giving special attention to the occultation of singularities of women history in Brazil and to the knowledge of the subject, the value of intellectual production and the bias of feminist movements. It suggests an effort of theoretical updating as a means of feminist militancy in the academic sphere. It proposes an agenda of researches in order to prepare accounts and registers of some themes that may improve certain concepts and update references of feminist struggles.

  2. Moral identity in psychopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea L. Glenn

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Several scholars have recognized the limitations of theories of moral reasoning in explaining moral behavior. They have argued that moral behavior may also be influenced by moral identity, or how central morality is to one's sense of self. This idea has been supported by findings that people who exemplify moral behavior tend to place more importance on moral traits when defining their self-concepts (Colby and Damon, 1995. This paper takes the next step of examining individual variation in a construct highly associated with IMMORAL behavior --- psychopathy. In Study 1, we test the hypothesis that individuals with a greater degree of psychopathic traits have a weaker moral identity. Within a large online sample, we found that individuals who scored higher on a measure of psychopathic traits were less likely to base their self-concepts on moral traits. In Study 2, we test whether this reduced sense of moral identity can be attributed to differences in moral judgment, which is another factor that could influence immoral behavior. Our results indicated that the reduced sense of moral identity among more psychopathic individuals was independent of variation in moral judgment. These results suggest that individuals with psychopathic traits may display immoral behavior partially because they do not construe their personal identities in moral terms.

  3. Feminist approaches to social science: epistemological and methodological tenets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R; Wasco, S M

    2000-12-01

    This paper is a primer for community psychologists on feminist research. Much like the field of community psychology, feminist scholarship is defined by its values and process. Informed by the political ideologies of the 1970s women's movement (liberal, radical, socialist feminism, and womanism), feminist scholars reinterpreted classic concepts in philosophy of science to create feminist epistemologies and methodologies. Feminist epistemologies, such as feminist empiricism, standpoint theory, and postmodernism, recognize women's lived experiences as legitimate sources of knowledge. Feminist methodologies attempt to eradicate sexist bias in research and find ways to capture women's voices that are consistent with feminist ideals. Practically, the process of feminist research is characterized by four primary features: (1) expanding methodologies to include both quantitative and qualitative methods, (2) connecting women for group-level data collection, (3) reducing the hierarchical relationship between researchers and their participants to facilitate trust and disclosure, and (4) recognizing and reflecting upon the emotionality of women's lives. Recommendations for how community psychologists can integrate feminist scholarship into their practice are discussed.

  4. "Could Cherryl or Irene Just Take a Few Minutes to Explain This Feminist View of Literature?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoulis, Irene; Smith, Cherryl Armstrong

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the role that feminist issues played in a summer institute at the Literature Institute for Teachers and the role of feminist theory in teacher education. Shares thoughts about the role of feminist theory in the classroom. (MG)

  5. "Could Cherryl or Irene Just Take a Few Minutes to Explain This Feminist View of Literature?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoulis, Irene; Smith, Cherryl Armstrong

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the role that feminist issues played in a summer institute at the Literature Institute for Teachers and the role of feminist theory in teacher education. Shares thoughts about the role of feminist theory in the classroom. (MG)

  6. Rethinking moral reasoning theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokes, K M

    1989-01-01

    Many nursing studies on moral reasoning and ethics have used Kohlberg's theory of moral development. The body of knowledge that resulted from these studies indicated that nurses and nursing students had consistently lower than expected levels of moral reasoning. Educational offerings were developed to assist nurses to improve their moral reasoning. This article explores the cognitive-developmental theory of moral development as one way of determining the moral development of nurses. Since this theory of moral reasoning focuses on the rational thought of the individual and does not consider the impact of the environment, it is of limited applicability in nursing. A new theory of morality needs to be developed--a more holistic one that will include both universal principles and contextual tissues.

  7. Reactions to morally motivated deviance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cramwinckel, F.M.; Van den Bos, K.; Van Dijk, E.

    2015-01-01

    People value morality in themselves and others. They want to be moral and good individuals, associate themselves with others who share their moral values, and belong to moral groups. As an ironic consequence of the importance of morality, people sometimes respond negatively to morally motivated

  8. The Anatomy of Moral Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, Judith A.

    1994-01-01

    Argues that moral intelligence is one of the separate, autonomous multiple intelligences. The essay discusses moral development as a function of cognitive/analytical development, the relationship between moral reasoning and moral conduct, the biological basis of moral intelligence, moral intelligence as a function of social intelligence, and…

  9. Moral appearances: emotions, robots, and human morality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coeckelbergh, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Can we build ‘moral robots’? If morality depends on emotions, the answer seems negative. Current robots do not meet standard necessary conditions for having emotions: they lack consciousness, mental states, and feelings. Moreover, it is not even clear how we might ever establish whether robots satis

  10. Book review: The handbook of feminist research: theory and praxis

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Emma

    2013-01-01

    The second edition of the Handbook of Feminist Research: Theory and Praxis presents both a theoretical and practical approach to conducting social science research on, for, and about women. Emma Smith believes the Handbook effectively highlights the connection between feminist research and social change by drawing upon the range of existent feminist epistemologies, methods, and practices. While accessible for both research and teaching purposes, it draws our attention to the ne...

  11. Are Psychopaths Morally Sensitive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Bruce; Le Sage, Leonie

    2009-01-01

    Philosophical and psychological opinion is divided over whether moral sensitivity, understood as the ability to pick out a situation's morally salient features, necessarily involves emotional engagement. This paper seeks to offer insight into this question. It reasons that if moral sensitivity does draw significantly on affective capacities of…

  12. Mapping the Moral Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jesse; Nosek, Brian A.; Haidt, Jonathan; Iyer, Ravi; Koleva, Spassena; Ditto, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    The moral domain is broader than the empathy and justice concerns assessed by existing measures of moral competence, and it is not just a subset of the values assessed by value inventories. To fill the need for reliable and theoretically-grounded measurement of the full range of moral concerns, we developed the Moral Foundations Questionnaire (MFQ) based on a theoretical model of five universally available (but variably developed) sets of moral intuitions: Harm/care, Fairness/reciprocity, Ingroup/loyalty, Authority/respect, and Purity/sanctity. We present evidence for the internal and external validity of the scale and the model, and in doing so present new findings about morality: 1. Comparative model fitting of confirmatory factor analyses provides empirical justification for a five-factor structure of moral concerns. 2. Convergent/discriminant validity evidence suggests that moral concerns predict personality features and social group attitudes not previously considered morally relevant. 3. We establish pragmatic validity of the measure in providing new knowledge and research opportunities concerning demographic and cultural differences in moral intuitions. These analyses provide evidence for the usefulness of Moral Foundations Theory in simultaneously increasing the scope and sharpening the resolution of psychological views of morality. PMID:21244182

  13. Parenting for Moral Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Ralph L.

    1981-01-01

    Describes Kohlberg's cognitive-developmental theory of moral development and provides examples of how Kohlberg's theoretical principles can be employed in everyday family interaction. Holds that parents are always moral educators and must therefore consciously implement moral development strategies in the home environment. (GC)

  14. Compassion and Moral Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susky, John E.

    1979-01-01

    Critiquing Skinner's and Kohlberg's moral development theories as inadequate, the author asserts that affective development (compassion, empathy, caring) is necessary to moral action. While saying that schools are limited in their ability to provide moral education, he outlines qualities of an educational environment which could facilitate moral…

  15. Moral Education and Caring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noddings, Nel

    2010-01-01

    Michael Slote's very interesting work on moral sentimentalism and moral education raises some important questions on the meaning of empathy, the limitations of "inductions", and the development of moral education from the perspective of care ethics. These questions are addressed in this commentary. (Contains 5 notes.)

  16. Sentimentalist Moral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slote, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Care ethics, and moral sentimentalism more generally, have not developed a picture of moral education that is comparable in scope or depth to the rationalist/Kantian/Rawlsian account of moral education that has been offered by Lawrence Kohlberg. But it is possible to do so if one borrows from the work of Martin Hoffman and makes systematic use of…

  17. Character and Moral Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Johnnie

    1997-01-01

    Reflects on the ways in which children develop character as well as ways to foster moral development in elementary education communities. Includes a brief discussion of Robert Coles' documentation of moral intelligence in children, and lists several ways to aid the moral life of children in Montessori classrooms. (EV)

  18. The Failed Feminist Challenge to `Fundamental Epistemology'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnick, Cassandra L.

    Despite volumes written in the name of the new and fundamental feminist project in philosophy of science, and conclusions drawn on the strength of the hypothesis that the feminist project will boost progress toward cognitive aims associated with science and rationality (and, one might add, policy decisions enacted in the name of these aims), the whole rationale for the project remains (after 20 years, plus) wholly unsubstantiated. We must remain agnostic about its evidentiary merits or demerits. This is because we are without evidence to test the hypothesis: certainly, we have no data that would test the strength of the hypothesis as asserting a causal relationship between women and cognitive ends. Thus, any self-respecting epistemologist who places a premium on evidence-driven belief and justification ought not to accept the hypothesis. By extension, there is no reasoned basis to draw any definitive conclusion about the project itself. No matter how self-evidently correct.

  19. Organizational Theories and Analysis: A Feminist Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irefin, Peace; Ifah, S. S.; Bwala, M. H.

    2012-06-01

    This paper is a critique of organization theories and their failure to come to terms with the fact of the reproduction of labour power within a particular form of the division of labour. It examines feminist theory and its aims to understand the nature of inequality and focuses on gender, power relations and sexuality part of the task of feminists which organizational theories have neglected is to offer an account of how the different treatments of the sexes operate in our culture. The paper concludes that gender has been completely neglected within the organizational theory which result in a rhetorical reproduction of males as norms and women as others. It is recommended that only radical form of organization theory can account for the situation of women in organisational setting

  20. The Cosmopolitan Future: A Feminist Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Fogiel-Bijaoui

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study questions the “clash of civilizations” thesis. Referring to the cosmopolitanization process as defined by Beck and Sznaider (2010, I analyze the cosmopolitanization of feminism, that is, the gradual recognition of “the others’ others”, the women, through the evolution of their political rights—the right to elect and be elected—at a global level. In this context, the descriptive representation of women, their substantive representation, and their voices within civil society in the North and the South highlight the fact that feminism is undergoing a process of cosmopolitanization, albeit in a slow and sporadic way. I present this argument from a postcolonial feminist perspective and base my research on NGOs’ data and on data provided by the Inter-Parliamentary Union and UN-Women. First, I analyze the cosmpolitanization process as applied to feminism. Then, following Beck and Sznaider (2010, I describe how this process is articulated ‘from above’ (top-down cosmopolitanization, referring to electoral data from around the world and to international law. Further, I relate to the cosmopolitanization of feminism ‘from below’, referring to feminist theories, cyberfeminism and the global civil/feminist society. In conclusion, I discuss the common future of feminism and cosmopolitanism.

  1. Religion, morality, evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Paul

    2012-01-01

    How did religion evolve? What effect does religion have on our moral beliefs and moral actions? These questions are related, as some scholars propose that religion has evolved to enhance altruistic behavior toward members of one's group. I review here data from survey studies (both within and across countries), priming experiments, and correlational studies of the effects of religion on racial prejudice. I conclude that religion has powerfully good moral effects and powerfully bad moral effects, but these are due to aspects of religion that are shared by other human practices. There is surprisingly little evidence for a moral effect of specifically religious beliefs.

  2. Moral cognition in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Jonathan; Langdon, Robyn; Brüne, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Disordered moral behaviour and understanding of moral rules were described early in the literature on schizophrenia; however, moral cognition has received scant attention in spite of a large literature focused on social cognitive impairments and violent behaviour in schizophrenia. We conducted a narrative synthesis of the literature on violence, moral judgement and schizophrenia. Initial empirical research into moral cognition in schizophrenia did not fully account for the basic- and social-cognitive deficits now known to characterise schizophrenia. Importantly, research into moral cognition in autism and psychopathy, disorders in part characterised by social cognitive impairments indicates subtle patterns of difference to the moral cognition of control participants. Recent neuroeconomic studies of moral cognition in schizophrenia have indicated that individuals with schizophrenia display subtle dysfunction in their fairness-related behaviours, but not in their propensity to engage in altruistic punishment. Further research has the potential to broaden our understanding of what is intact and what is impaired in moral cognition in schizophrenia and also to inform our theories of the structures subserving moral judgement in the general population. Furthermore, a more thorough understanding of moral cognitive impairments in schizophrenia may have implications for both legal process and psychosocial rehabilitation.

  3. Brogaard's Moral Contextualism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Lars Grassme

    2008-01-01

    Brogaard's non-indexical version of moral contextualism has two related problems. It is unable to account for the function of truth-governed assertoric moral discourse, since it leaves two (semantically clearheaded) disputants without any incentive to resolve seemingly contradictory moral claims....... The moral contextualist could explain why people do feel such an incentive by ascribing false beliefs about the semantic workings of their own language. But, secondly, this leaves Brogaard's moral contextualism looking weaker than a Mackie-style invariantist error theory about morals. The latter is equally...... non-objectivist, but less revisionist, since it takes the semantics of moral discourse at face value, and can also explain all of Brogaard's other linguistic evidence....

  4. Egalitarianism and moral bioenhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Robert

    2014-01-01

    A number of philosophers working in applied ethics and bioethics are now earnestly debating the ethics of what they term "moral bioenhancement." I argue that the society-wide program of biological manipulations required to achieve the purported goals of moral bioenhancement would necessarily implicate the state in a controversial moral perfectionism. Moreover, the prospect of being able to reliably identify some people as, by biological constitution, significantly and consistently more moral than others would seem to pose a profound challenge to egalitarian social and political ideals. Even if moral bioenhancement should ultimately prove to be impossible, there is a chance that a bogus science of bioenhancement would lead to arbitrary inequalities in access to political power or facilitate the unjust rule of authoritarians; in the meantime, the debate about the ethics of moral bioenhancement risks reinvigorating dangerous ideas about the extent of natural inequality in the possession of the moral faculties.

  5. Moral Hard-Wiring and Moral Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Ingmar; Savulescu, Julian

    2017-05-01

    We have argued for an urgent need for moral bioenhancement; that human moral psychology is limited in its ability to address current existential threats due to the evolutionary function of morality to maximize cooperation in small groups. We address here Powell and Buchanan's novel objection that there is an 'inclusivist anomaly': humans have the capacity to care beyond in-groups. They propose that 'exclusivist' (group-based) morality is sensitive to environmental cues that historically indicated out-group threat. When this is not present, we are inclusivist. They conclude that moral bioenhancement is unnecessary or less effective than socio-cultural interventions. We argue that Powell and Buchanan underestimate the hard-wiring features of moral psychology; their appeal to adaptively plastic, conditionally expressed responses accounts for only a fragment of our moral psychology. In addition to restrictions on our altruistic concern that their account addresses - such as racism and sexism - there are ones it is ill-suited to address: that our concern is stronger for kin and friends and for concrete individuals rather than for statistical lives; also our bias towards the near future. Hard-wired features of our moral psychology that are not clearly restrictions in altruistic concern also include reciprocity, tit-for-tat, and others. Biomedical means are not the only, and maybe not the most important, means of moral enhancement. Socio-cultural means are of great importance and there are currently no biomedical interventions for many hard-wired features. Nevertheless research is desirable because the influence of these features is greater than our critics think. © 2017 The Authors Bioethics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Feminist Pedagogy, Body Image, and the Dance Technique Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Sherrie; Oliver, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the evolution of feminist consciousness in dance technique class as related to body image, the myth of the perfect body, and the development of feminist pedagogy. Western concert dance forms have often been taught in a manner where imitating the teacher is primary in the learning process. In this traditional scenario,…

  7. Feminist Pedagogy, Body Image, and the Dance Technique Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Sherrie; Oliver, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the evolution of feminist consciousness in dance technique class as related to body image, the myth of the perfect body, and the development of feminist pedagogy. Western concert dance forms have often been taught in a manner where imitating the teacher is primary in the learning process. In this traditional scenario,…

  8. The Educational Journey of a Latina Feminist Community Psychologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Bianca

    2012-01-01

    This narrative describes how my educational journey led me to become a Latina feminist community psychologist. My experiences as a Central American woman living in the United States has made me deeply committed to feminist community values and the importance of social justice. Throughout the journey, I connect how immigration status, culture, and…

  9. A Foucauldian Reading of Learning in Feminist, Nonprofit Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Leona M.

    2006-01-01

    This article reports on research with eight board members and eight directors of 10 feminist, nonprofit organizations. A Foucauldian poststructuralist reading of the data gives voice to undertheorized aspects of learning in feminist organizations and makes visible the power relationships. It explores women's learned practices of resistance and…

  10. Engaging "Nuquanzhuyi": The Making of a Chinese Feminist Rhetoric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Examining two particular texts and applying modifications of Western feminist concepts, the author argues that early twentieth-century Chinese women's writing contains feminist thoughts and textual strategies far more complex and nuanced than conventional wisdom has led one to expect. (Contains 6 notes.)

  11. Feminist Policy Analysis: Expanding Traditional Social Work Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanenberg, Heather

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to move the methodology of policy analysis beyond the traditional and artificial position of being objective and value-free, this article is a call to those working and teaching in social work to consider a feminist policy analysis lens. A review of standard policy analysis models is presented alongside feminist models. Such a…

  12. Feminist Scholarship; Kindling in the Groves of Academe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, Ellen Carol; And Others

    Five leading feminist scholars assess the nature and extent of the contemporary women's movement in this collaborative book that focuses on the dual disciplinary-interdisciplinary character of feminist research. The five collaborators are Ellen Carol DuBois, Gail Paradise Kelly, Elizabeth Lapovsky Kennedy, Carolyn W. Korsmeyer, and Lillian S.…

  13. The College of Education and the Feminist Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Joan

    This article states that programs in higher education should include a component that deals with the feminist movement to clarify values for college educators and students. Four strategies for bringing about better understanding of the feminist movement by the faculty and students are suggested. These strategies are designed to increase awareness…

  14. Advancing Women's Social Justice Agendas: A Feminist Action Research Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen Reid

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Feminist action research is a promising, though under-developed, research approach for advancing women's health and social justice agendas. In this article the foundations, principles, dimensions, promises, and challenges of engaging in feminist action research are explored.

  15. Black Feminist Activism: Theory as Generating Collective Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Michelle Salazar; Williams, Eloise

    2014-01-01

    Black feminist scholars have theorized ways in which power permeates our everyday lived experiences. The authors of this article, a university faculty member and a grassroots community activist, share their collective Black feminist activist efforts to find spaces of resistance and empowerment within oppressive conditions in the city of New…

  16. Feminist ethic of care : A third alternative approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maeckelberghe, E

    2004-01-01

    A man with Alzheimer's who wanders around, a caregiver who disconnects the alarm, a daughter acting on her own, and a doctor who is not consulted set the stage for a feminist reflection oil capacity/competence assessment. Feminist theory attempts to account for gender inequality in the political and

  17. Unfinished Business with Feminist Thinking and Counselling and Guidance Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jeannie

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a personal view of the influence of feminist theories on counselling and guidance practice over a 30-year period. It is not intended to be a scoping review of the vast literature on feminist theory and practice in relation to the talking therapies. Based on the subjective experience of one researcher/practitioner, its…

  18. Reflections from the Trenches: Our Development as Feminist Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Elizabeth A.; Bermudez, J. Maria; Watson, Wendy; Fitzpatrick, Jacki

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we share our challenges and positive experiences of using feminist pedagogy to teach an undergraduate course on gender development. We use a developmental contextual, feminist perspective to address issues related to (a) internalized sexism, (b) contrasts in students religious beliefs and sexism, (c) students' developmental level,…

  19. Feminist music therapy pedagogy: a survey of music therapy educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahna, Nicole D; Schwantes, Melody

    2011-01-01

    This study surveyed 188 music therapy educators regarding their views and use of feminist pedagogy and feminist music therapy. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a) to determine how many music therapy educators used feminist pedagogy and (b) to determine if there was a relationship between the use of feminist pedagogy and academic rank of the participants. Seventy-two participants responded to this study, with 69 participants included for data analysis. Stake and Hoffman's (2000) feminist pedagogy survey was adapted for this study, examining four subscales of feminist pedagogy: (a) participatory learning, (b) validation of personal experience/development of confidence, (c) political/ social activism, and (d) critical thinking/open-mindedness. The results revealed that 46% (n=32) of participants identified as feminist music therapists and 67% (n=46) of participants identified as using feminist pedagogy. Results of a mixed analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant difference within the four survey subscales (p<.0001), no significant difference (p=.32) for academic rank, and no significant interaction (p=.08) of academic rank and the four survey subscales. Tukey's post hoc analysis of the data indicated that the survey subscale measuring political activism (p<.0001) was significantly lower than the other three survey subscales. In addition, a qualitative analysis on open-ended responses is also included. Discussion of the results, limitations, and areas for future research are addressed.

  20. A Postmodern Feminist Approach To Teaching Human Sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baber, Kristine M.; Murray, Colleen I.

    2001-01-01

    Explains the utility of using a postmodern feminist theory perspective for designing and teaching human sexuality courses, and presents strategies for helping students understand a constructivist framework. Concludes with a discussion of pedagogical and ethical challenges of teaching from a postmodern feminist perspective. (Contains 73 references…

  1. Transformative Learning in Nonprofit Organizations: A Feminist Interpretive Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Leona M.; Peters, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on interpretive research, influenced by a feminist theoretical framework, with 8 women, in their 20s to 60s, who work or volunteer in feminist nonprofit organizations. Particular emphasis is placed on their experience of transformative learning in these organizations; the linkages with the theory of transformative learning;…

  2. Feminist Policy Analysis: Expanding Traditional Social Work Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanenberg, Heather

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to move the methodology of policy analysis beyond the traditional and artificial position of being objective and value-free, this article is a call to those working and teaching in social work to consider a feminist policy analysis lens. A review of standard policy analysis models is presented alongside feminist models. Such a…

  3. Femifesta? Reflections on Writing a Feminist Memoir and a Feminist Manifesto

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Miriam E.

    2017-01-01

    This is a reflective account of the publication of two books in the same year (2016): "Reclaiming Feminism: Challenging Everyday Misogyny" and "Feminist Manifesto for Education." The former is a popular but scholarly memoir, and the latter is an academic text for sociology and education. It was never my intention to publish…

  4. Stability of Shifting Ground. Feminist Ethnography and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Blizzard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the two authors problematizethe moment of stabilization in doing fieldworkand writing ethnography from a feminist perspective.The paper begins with an introduction to the question:How do feminist science studies scholars reconcile a normativeneed to stabilize our research site to create knowledge withinthe shifting ground of “truth claims” that feminist practicesacknowledge and document? The heart of the paper reflectson our experiences as feminist theorists, teachers,and ethnographers with vignettes from studies of high-risk pregnanciesin the industrialized world, specifically the United States,and gender and everyday technologies in West Africa.Our goal is to theorize this instability in order to highlightthe limits and benefits of working with consciousness andreflectivity in social contexts while challenging and enrichingthe vibrancy of our feminist theory and practice.

  5. Towards a feminist empowerment model of forgiveness psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Kevin M; Hill, Melanie S; Freedman, Suzanne R; Enright, Robert D

    2007-03-01

    In recent years Enright and Fitzgibbon's (2000) process model of forgiveness therapy has received substantial theoretical and empirical attention. However, both the process model of forgiveness therapy and the social-cognitive developmental model on which it is based have received criticism from feminist theorists. The current paper considers feminist criticisms of forgiveness therapy and uses a feminist lens to identify potential areas for growth. Specifically, Worell and Remer's (2003) model of synthesizing feminist ideals into existing theory was consulted, areas of bias within the forgiveness model of psychotherapy were identified, and strategies for restructuring areas of potential bias were introduced. Further, the authors consider unique aspects of forgiveness therapy that can potentially strengthen existing models of feminist therapy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Improving the doctor/patient relationship: a feminist perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, P

    1989-07-01

    Since the early 1970s British and American feminists have developed a comprehensive critique of the dominant doctor/patient relationship within mainstream health care services. In Britain, activists in the women's health movement have struggled to put into practice a model of health care delivery based on feminist principles, within which the doctor/patient relationship is radically redesigned. This paper will explore the principles and practice of this feminist health care model. It will then attempt to evaluate alternative strategies for strengthening and expanding feminist health care within the NHS. The paper will draw on data gathered by the author in 1987 through a series of unstructured interviews with feminist health care providers who were working within a variety of NHS settings in the North West of England.

  7. Feminist activist women are masculinized in terms of digit-ratio and dominance: A possible explanation for the feminist paradox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy eMadison

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The feminist movement purports to improve conditions for women, and yet only a minority of women in modern societies self-identify as feminists. This is known as the feminist paradox. It has been suggested that feminists exhibit both physiological and psychological characteristics associated with heightened masculinization, which may predispose women for heightened competitiveness, sex-atypical behaviors, and belief in the interchangeability of sex roles. If feminist activists, i.e. those that manufacture the public image of feminism, are indeed masculinized relative to women in general, this might explain why the views and preferences of these two groups are at variance with each other. We measured the 2D:4D digit ratios (collected from both hands and a personality trait known as dominance (measured with the Directiveness scale in a sample of women attending a feminist conference. The sample exhibited significantly more masculine 2D:4D and higher dominance ratings than comparison samples representative of women in general, and these variables were furthermore positively correlated for both hands. The feminist paradox might thus to some extent be explained by biological differences between women in general and the activist women who formulate the feminist agenda.

  8. Are You Morally Modified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Neil; Douglas, Thomas; Kahane, Guy; Terbeck, Sylvia; Cowen, Philip J.; Hewstone, Miles; Savulescu, Julian

    2015-01-01

    A number of concerns have been raised about the possible future use of pharmaceuticals designed to enhance cognitive, affective, and motivational processes, particularly where the aim is to produce morally better decisions or behavior. In this article, we draw attention to what is arguably a more worrying possibility: that pharmaceuticals currently in widespread therapeutic use are already having unintended effects on these processes, and thus on moral decision making and morally significant behavior. We review current evidence on the moral effects of three widely used drugs or drug types: (i) propranolol, (ii) selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and (iii) drugs that effect oxytocin physiology. This evidence suggests that the alterations to moral decision making and behavior caused by these agents may have important and difficult-to-evaluate consequences, at least at the population level. We argue that the moral effects of these and other widely used pharmaceuticals warrant further empirical research and ethical analysis. PMID:25892904

  9. Moral Education in Japan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roesgaard, Marie Højlund

    What is a ‘good’ person and how do we educate ‘good’ persons? This question of morality is central to any society and its government and educational system including the Japanese. In many societies it has been customary to teach about morality from a religious standpoint, but not so in Japan, where....... It places moral education within the context of globalization and cosmopolitanism and shows, that moral education in Japan is a useful key to understanding how globalization and cosmopolitanism can work within a specific system, in this case Japanese values education. In recent years various changes...... political focus on moral education in Japan, particularly by the two Abe-administrations. Changes include for example increased emphasis on patriotism, on respect for life and the environment, on individual responsibility, on respecting differences and other countries and on a general strengthening of moral...

  10. Moral realism in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Steven D

    2014-04-01

    For more than 15 years Professor Per Nortvedt has been arguing the case for moral realism in nursing and the health-care context more generally. His arguments focus on the clinical contexts of nursing and medicine and are supplemented by a series of persuasive examples. Following a description of moral realism, and the kinds of considerations that support it, criticisms of it are developed that seem persuasive. It is argued that our moral responses are explained by our beliefs as opposed to moral realities. In particular, two key arguments presented by Nortvedt are challenged: the so-called argument from convergence and the argument from clinical sensitivity. Both of these key planks in the case for moral realism are rejected, and an alternative 'social conditioning' account briefly sketched, which, it is claimed, has the same explanatory power as Nortvedt's thesis but does not rest on an appeal to independently existing moral properties.

  11. Prudence and morality: Socrates versus moral philosophers1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scott Berman

    2014-01-01

      Socrates thinks that morality is identical to prudence. Many contemporary moral philosophers would give roughly three reasons for postulating the existence of a morality that is distinct from prudence...

  12. Moral judgment reloaded: a moral dilemma validation study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christensen, Julia F; Flexas, Albert; Calabrese, Margareta; Gut, Nadine K; Gomila, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    We propose a revised set of moral dilemmas for studies on moral judgment. We selected a total of 46 moral dilemmas available in the literature and fine-tuned them in terms of four conceptual factors...

  13. Human Trafficking as Lever for Feminist Voices?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanger, Marlene

    2011-01-01

    In Denmark, human trafficking has emerged as a central issue within the policy field of prostitution during the last decade. Taking a Foucauldian approach from a historical perspective, understanding the policy field of prostitution as a discursive terrain, the article analyses the thinking...... that lies behind policies on prostitution by identifying ruptures and discursive struggles which lead to transformations of the policy field. In particular, this article investigates how the problematisation of human trafficking has created space for a feminist discourse breakthrough within the policy field...

  14. Toward a feminist theory of disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendell, S

    1989-01-01

    We need a feminist theory of disability, both because 16 percent of women are disabled, and because the oppression of disabled people is closely linked to the cultural oppression of the body. Disability is not a biological given; like gender, it is socially constructed from biological reality. Our culture idealizes the body and demands that we control it. Thus, although most people will be disabled at some time in their lives, the disabled are made "the other," who symbolize failure of control and the threat of pain, limitation, dependency, and death. If disabled people and their knowledge were fully integrated into society, everyone's relation to her/his real body would be liberated.

  15. The Feminist and the Bible: Hermeneutical Alternatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Osiek

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Amid the varieties of feminist interpretive methods in biblical scholarship, this article suggests a general typology of approaches: rejection of the claims of biblical authority; acceptance of those claims with critique of oppressive interpretations; revisionism, which holds to the possibility of reconstructing the lost experience of women in the texts; reliance on symbol and image of the feminine to convey meaning; and finally, the liberation critique of oppressive structures. An appreciation and critique is offered for each alternative.

  16. A feminist analysis of the menopause discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loppie, Charlotte; Keddy, Barbara

    2002-02-01

    Menopause has been viewed as a medical condition which needs to be treated. The discourse surrounding the process reflects a positivist paradigm without acknowledgement of the lived experiences of women who have been given conflicitng information. In this paper we write about the dilemmas faced by peri menopausal, menopausal and post menopausal women as they grapple with the issues that focus on 'symptoms', rather than a natural phenomenon. We point out that the 'science' of menopause is class, race and gender biased as we present a feminist analysis of the concerns facing mid life women.

  17. Women's Relationship to Feminism: Effects of Generation and Feminist Self-Labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Lauren E.

    2010-01-01

    The relative importance to feminism of generation and feminist self-labeling was explored in a sample of 667 women riding buses to a 1992 March on Washington for Reproductive Rights. Specifically, generational (Generation X vs. Baby Boomers) and feminist self-labeling (strong feminists vs. weak feminists vs. nonfeminists) similarities and…

  18. Balancing Multicultural Competence with Social Justice: Feminist Beliefs and Optimal Psychological Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Janice D.; Snell, Andrea F.; Tobias, Ann

    2012-01-01

    To identify a multivariate configuration of feminist beliefs best associated with optimal psychological functioning, 215 mostly White college women completed an online survey measuring their feminist beliefs (Feminist Perspectives Scale, Attitudes toward Feminism and the Women's Movement, sense of common fate, and Feminist Identity Composite) and…

  19. Women's Relationship to Feminism: Effects of Generation and Feminist Self-Labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Lauren E.

    2010-01-01

    The relative importance to feminism of generation and feminist self-labeling was explored in a sample of 667 women riding buses to a 1992 March on Washington for Reproductive Rights. Specifically, generational (Generation X vs. Baby Boomers) and feminist self-labeling (strong feminists vs. weak feminists vs. nonfeminists) similarities and…

  20. Moral Concepts and Motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Greenberg, Mark

    2009-01-01

    I first argue that standard versions of moral internalism are untenable in light of a type of example that has not previously been considered in metaethical discussions. As a consequence of having unusual views, a good-willed thinker could make moral judgments and recognize moral facts without having a disposition to be motivated to act accordingly (and without believing himself to have reasons for action). Moreover, on a familiar conception of irrationality as incoherence, the thinker in q...

  1. [Morality and contraception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gakwaya, D

    1988-08-01

    The conflict of morality and natural law come into focus when contraception and procreation are examined despite the religious pronouncements of Charles de Koninck. Man, having mastered nature, confronts interminable new problems in the pursuit of physical, economic, moral, and material happiness. The population explosion in Rwanda make it indispensable that the prevention of undesired pregnancy is the right of a man and a women choosing the appropriate method. Man's morality allows the violation of natural law in order to pursue one's own goal of survival using counterbalancing means whenever under- or overpopulation may threaten its existence or portend extinction. Natural law could be the guiding principle in man's moral development.

  2. Moral Agency, Moral Imagination, and Moral Community: Antidotes to Moral Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traudt, Terri; Liaschenko, Joan; Peden-McAlpine, Cynthia

    Moral distress has been covered extensively in the nursing literature and increasingly in the literature of other health professions. Cases that cause nurses' moral distress that are mentioned most frequently are those concerned with prolonging the dying process. Given the standard of aggressive treatment that is typical in intensive care units (ICUs), much of the existing moral distress research focuses on the experiences of critical care nurses. However, moral distress does not automatically occur in all end-of-life circumstances, nor does every critical care nurse suffer its damaging effects. What are the practices of these nurses? What specifically do they do to navigate around or through the distressing situations? The nursing literature is lacking an answer to these questions. This article reports a study that used narrative analysis to explore the reported practices of experienced critical care nurses who are skilled at and comfortable working with families and physicians regarding the withdrawal of aggressive treatment. A major finding was that these nurses did not report experiencing the damaging effects of moral distress as described in the nursing literature. The verbal communication and stated practices relevant to this finding are organized under three major themes: (1) moral agency, (2) moral imagination, and (3) moral community. Further, a total of eight subthemes are identified. The practices that constitute these themes and subthemes are further detailed and discussed in this article. Understanding these practices can help mitigate critical care nurses' moral distress. Copyright 2016 The Journal of Clinical Ethics. All rights reserved.

  3. Moral Values In America

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁珍

    2005-01-01

    Do Americans have any morals? That’s a good question.Many people insist that ideas about right and wrong are merely personal opinions.Some voices,though,are calling Americans back to traditional moral values.William J.Bennett,former U.S.Secretary of Education,edited The Book of Virtues in 1993 to do just that.Bennett suggests that great moral stories can build character.The success of Bennett's book shows that many Americans still believe in moral values.But what are they?

  4. The morality of homosexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, S L

    1993-01-01

    Homosexuality has been considered a form of mental illness, morally wrong and socially deviant. The purpose of this paper is to present both sides of the homosexuality issue from a religious standpoint: opponents of homosexuality versus supporters of homosexuality. It is proposed that how one interprets the morality of homosexuality will depend upon one's level of moral development according to Kohlberg's theory. Ten churches in the Raleigh area of North Carolina completed a questionnaire designed to ascertain the church's position on the issue of homosexuality. Specifically, questions were asked to ascertain the church's level of moral development.

  5. Charisma and Moral Reasoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Flanigan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Charisma is morally problematic insofar as it replaces followers’ capacity to engage in genuine moral reasoning. When followers defer to charismatic leaders and act in ways that are morally wrong they are not only blameworthy for wrongdoing but for failing in their deliberative obligations. Even when followers defer to charismatic leaders and do the right thing, their action is less praiseworthy to the extent that it was the result of charisma rather than moral deliberation. Therefore, effective charismatic leadership reliably undermines the praiseworthiness and amplifies the blameworthiness of follower’s actions.

  6. Dianomy: understanding religious women's moral agency as creative conformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucar, Elizabeth M

    2010-01-01

    This essay seeks to contribute to work on moral agency of religious women through the creative naming of a dynamic that is emerging in recent scholarship. Drawing on fieldwork in Iran in 2004, I argue that prominent models of agency based on autonomy, heteronomy, and theonomy are unable take into account both religious influence on and individual creativity of women's actions. I propose the neologism, "dianomy," meaning dual-sources of the moral law, to account for moral agency that relies neither exclusively upon the self as a source of moral authority nor exclusively upon religious traditions. Dianomy also attempts to comprehend creative ruptures in obedience to tradition, even when these innovations are unintentional. Such a concept is particularly important in order to correct past tendencies to ignore or even negate feminist politics that do not resist or strategically reform religious norms. With dianomy, tactical moves, actions that are not "freely chosen," and even happy accidents can be studied as productive within traditional religious communities. I call these types of actions, which confound the actions theorized by autonomy, heteronomy, and theonomy, "creative conformity."

  7. "Good sex" and religion: a feminist overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Mary E; Jung, Patricia Beattie

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an overview of both the processes and the results of an international, interdisciplinary, and interreligious feminist study of "good sex" that resulted in a volume by the same name. We argue that religion (including its secular equivalent, i.e., global capitalism) remains a powerfully influential cultural force that shapes people's lives, in general, and sanctifies their beliefs, in particular, about what makes for good sex. This review seeks to expand conversations about sex in the bedroom and other private arenas (like the confessional) into more public venues and to demonstrate the connections between power, pleasure, and justice. The need to deconstruct religious traditions so as to critically analyze their structures and components is recognized. Several examples of how feminist scholars and activists are retrieving female-friendly religious insights from both their traditions and more transgressive communities of resistance are provided. This article also points to several ways that religious sexual scripts and norms might be reconstructed. Topics addressed include discussions of how to understand footbinding, the tendency of "forbidden" fruit to prove most erotic, whether sexual entanglements are spiritually dangerous distractions, and ways in which religion can make motherhood "compulsory." We examine both the ways in which equating sexual activity with reproductive activity have obscured the value of women's sexual delight and the risks to many women and children of an unqualified validation of sexual pleasure. Both the ambivalence of religious teachings about sexuality and the difficulties posed by monolithic portrayals of religious traditions are identified.

  8. 德育回归生活--道德的内化和外化的实现路径%Moral Education Returning to Life--Realization Path of Moral Internalization and Externalization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊亚澜

    2015-01-01

    “教育要回归生活”是教育界甚至社会各界人士的共同呼声。德育作为教育的重要组成部分,面临应试教育的大潮中被知识化、科学化和边缘化的危机,“回归生活”显得尤为重要。本文通过对胡塞尔“生活世界”的奠基性介绍,德育与生活关系的探讨和杜威的“教育即生活”与陶行知的“生活即德育”两个典型生活德育论的阐发,论证“德育回归生活”需要从学生的德育主体地位和道德生活的实践体验这两个方面以道德内化和外化的方式来实现。%"Education Should Return to Life"is the common voice of the community and even education. Moral education as an important part of education, examination-oriented education is facing the tide is educated, scientific and marginalization of the crisis,"Return to Life"is very important. Based on Husserl"life-world"ground-breaking introduction to explore the relationship between moral education and life and Dewey"Education is life"and Tao's"Life is Moral"Two typical Life Moral elucidation theory, argumentation"moral return to life", students need to practice the dominant position of moral and ethical life experience with these two aspects of moral internalization and externalization of ways.

  9. Towards a feminist global bioethics: addressing women's health concerns worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, R

    2001-01-01

    In this paper I argue that a global bioethics is possible. Specifically, I present the view that there are within feminist approaches to bioethics some conceptual and methodological tools necessary to forge a bioethics that embraces the health-related concerns of both developing and developed nations equally. To support my argument I discuss some of the challenges that have historically confronted feminists. If feminists accept the idea that women are entirely the same, then feminists present as fact the fiction of the essential "Woman." Not only does "Woman" not exist, -she" obscures important racial, ethnic, cultural, and class differences among women. However, if feminists stress women's differences too much, feminists lose the power to speak coherently and cogently about gender justice, women's rights, and sexual equality in general. Analyzing the ways in which the idea of difference as well as the idea of sameness have led feminists astray, I ask whether it is possible to avoid the Scylla of absolutism (imperialism, colonialism, hegemony) on the one hand and the Charybdis of relativism (postmodernism, fragmentation, Balkanization) on the other. Finally, after reflecting upon the work of Uma Narayan, Susan Muller Okin, and Martha Nussbaum, I conclude that there is a way out of this ethical bind. By focusing on women's, children's, and men's common human needs, it is possible to lay the foundation for a just and caring global bioethics.

  10. A martyr for modernity: Qiu Jin -- feminist warrior, and revolutionary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, H; Mangan, J A

    2001-01-01

    uncompromising attitudes she embraced. She eschewed motherhood, abandoned marriage, dismissed femininity, and yet won acclaim in the most traditional of cultures. Qui Jin was hardly a cynosure of universal acclaim but she was admired, respected and emulated by radical Chinese women and men seeking a new society accommodating women. Her modern feminism struggled to overcome an ancient patriarchy. Here was her appeal. She exuded no moral ambiguity. Consequently, if she was demonized by the conventional; she was deified by the radical - and inspired them as the contemplated and attempted to construct the future. There is a point, of course, that should not be overlooked. Qui Jin, in fact, is not divorced from occidental culture and political iconography. Qui Jin is closely associated with the attitudes, aspirations and fantasies of modern Western feminism. As Margarita Stocker observes, a 'romantic heroine, angry feminist, radical, activist is one example of a pervasive figure', in modern Western cultural mythology 'a figure we may sum up as the Woman with a Gun'. Force, that potent means to power, is available to the gun user irrespective of age of sex, with a resulting 'crucial alteration in the sexual politics of violence'. The Woman with a Gun can now be emphatically heroic - without duplicity, without deceitfulness, without subterfuge. Moral ambiguity in action has been abandoned. She becomes an unambiguous potent force - an armed woman faces an armed man on equal terms - physically, psychologically, morally. Equality offers the legal right and responsibility to kill in the name of patriotism. Modern culture has just caught up with Qui Jin.

  11. Moral distress and moral conflict in clinical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourie, Carina

    2015-02-01

    Much research is currently being conducted on health care practitioners' experiences of moral distress, especially the experience of nurses. What moral distress is, however, is not always clearly delineated and there is some debate as to how it should be defined. This article aims to help to clarify moral distress. My methodology consists primarily of a conceptual analysis, with especial focus on Andrew Jameton's influential description of moral distress. I will identify and aim to resolve two sources of confusion about moral distress: (1) the compound nature of a narrow definition of distress which stipulates a particular cause, i.e. moral constraint, and (2) the distinction drawn between moral dilemma (or, more accurately, moral conflict) and moral distress, which implies that the two are mutually exclusive. In light of these concerns, I argue that the definition of moral distress should be revised so that moral constraint should not be a necessary condition of moral distress, and that moral conflict should be included as a potential cause of distress. Ultimately, I claim that moral distress should be understood as a specific psychological response to morally challenging situations such as those of moral constraint or moral conflict, or both.

  12. Averting a Moral Landslide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Premier Wen Jiabao said food safety scandals in China indicate serious moral degradation Incidents related to food safety indicate that"dishonesty and moral degradation"have become a very serious problem in the country,Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao said on April 14.Wen made the remark during a

  13. Moral og videnproduktion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Birgitte

    Research report concerning moral and ethical problems inherent in the consulting engineers' profession. Based upon 25 in-depth interviews in 11 firms, the report is contributing to the understanding of the concepts and meaning of moral and ethics in a world of technical rationality. The objectivity...

  14. Moral og Videnproduktion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Birgitte

    En analyse af relationerne mellem viden og moral i de tekniske rådgivningskulturer. Publikationen beskriver de moralske og etiske overvejelser der præger rådgivernes professionelle univers i den praktiske udførelse af konsulentprojekter, og eftersporer den gensidige konstruktion af viden, moral og...

  15. Moral Education versus Indoctrination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, David

    2016-01-01

    Moral education is open to worries about indoctrination given the controversies there are about a wide range of ethical matters. I argue, however, that moral education is no more liable to being "indoctrinal" than education in history or science. I begin by proposing an account of what indoctrination involves. I then note that moral…

  16. Moral Education versus Indoctrination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, David

    2016-01-01

    Moral education is open to worries about indoctrination given the controversies there are about a wide range of ethical matters. I argue, however, that moral education is no more liable to being "indoctrinal" than education in history or science. I begin by proposing an account of what indoctrination involves. I then note that moral…

  17. Gender and Moral Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kathryn P.

    Because of widespread acceptance of Kohlberg's theory of moral development other aspects of moral thinking and behavior linked with the feminine voice have not received attention. Four areas of Kohlberg's theory relevant to the gender issue are critiqued, and work by Carol Gilligan, suggesting alternative theories for thinking and behavior, is…

  18. Groups as moral anchors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellemers, N.; van der Toorn, J

    2015-01-01

    Morality indicates what is the ‘right’ and the ‘wrong’ way to behave. However, what people see as moral can shift, depending on defining norms and distinctive features of the groups to which they belong. Acting in ways that are considered ‘moral’ by the group secures inclusion and elicits respect

  19. The Breakdown of Morale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Vikander (Nick)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis paper studies how morale in teams can break down. It interprets high morale as team members working together productively, either because of a sense of fairness or because of implicit incentives from repeated interactions. Team members learn that lay-offs will occur at a fixed

  20. Music and Morality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Scruton

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available [ES] El presente ensayo hace una reflexión sobre la relación entre la música y la moral, y en particular, ofrece una respuesta filosófica a dos cuestiones importantes: ¿Puede atribuirse un carácter moral concreto a la música?, y, de ser así, ¿cómo afecta este carácter moral musical al sentido moral de las personas que escuchan esa música? Estas preguntas llevan a una reflexión final sobre los límites de la interpretación crítica de la obra musical. ; [EN]This essay reflects on the relationship between music and morality, and in particular, provides a philosophical answer to two important questions: Can moral character be specifically attributed to music?, and, if so, how does this moral musical character affect on the moral sense of the people who listen to this music? These questions lead to a final reflection on the limits of critical interpretation of the musical work.

  1. Psychotherapy, Postmodernism, and Morality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitwood, Tom

    1990-01-01

    Proposes a postmodern ethics based on mutual respect and trust, derived from psychotherapy, and recognizing the primacy of individual subjectivity. Develops the concept of free attention to one another creating moral space. Stresses affect over reason and practice over theory. Sees moral space as fundamental to the social fabric. (CH)

  2. The Breakdown of Morale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Vikander (Nick)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis paper studies how morale in teams can break down. It interprets high morale as team members working together productively, either because of a sense of fairness or because of implicit incentives from repeated interactions. Team members learn that lay-offs will occur at a fixed futur

  3. Handbook of Moral Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Melanie; Smetana, Judith

    2006-01-01

    The psychological study of moral development has expanded greatly, both in terms of the diversity of theoretical perspectives that are represented in the field, as well as in the range of topics that have been studied. This "Handbook of Moral Development" represents the diversity and multidisciplinary influences on current theorizing about the…

  4. Jealousy and Moral Maturity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathes, Eugene W.; Deuger, Donna J.

    Jealousy may be perceived as either good or bad depending upon the moral maturity of the individual. To investigate this conclusion, a study was conducted testing two hypothesis: a positive relationship exists between conventional moral reasoning (reference to norms and laws) and the endorsement and level of jealousy; and a negative relationship…

  5. Feminist theory and nursing: an empowerment model for research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, B; McFarlane, J

    1991-03-01

    This article describes the use of the feminist process to empower nurses in conducting research. The criteria for feminist research, defined by Duffy, are applied to a research study that identifies the effects of physical abuse during pregnancy on maternal-infant outcomes. The authors describe the process of empowerment of the investigators through the use of a consortium model of research, the staff nurses who are conducting the interviews, and the research participants (pregnant women). The integration of feminist principles and nursing research is a process that merges similar beliefs and ideologies.

  6. A lesbian-feminist journey through queer nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Bonnie

    2007-01-01

    This article is an auto-ethnographical review of the political experiences and literary career of one of the early lesbian feminist critics and theorists. It poses the question: what does it mean to be shaped by one theoretical and political discourse (Lesbian Feminism) and then thrust by historical change into another (Queer Theory)? With the author's life and work as a frame and exemplar, it illustrates the development of lesbian feminist thought. Ultimately, it argues that the insights and values of Lesbian Feminism should not be suppressed by those of Queer Theory, and calls upon lesbian feminists to re-insert themselves into current scholarly and theoretical debates.

  7. New directions for feminist therapy based on social constructionism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finfgeld, D L

    2001-06-01

    Feminist therapy has made significant contributions in the area of women's mental health care. Of late, however, critics have argued that feminist therapists are neglecting the needs of many women. The unique perspectives of women of color, lower and upper class women, lesbians, and other persons have been ignored. As such, it is proposed that social constructionism offers a metaframework for reinterpreting feminist therapy tenets to better address the needs of a broad range of individuals. Clinical implications are offered along with future directions for research and education. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company

  8. EMOCIONES MORALES Y MORALIDAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío Orsi Portalo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available En este escrito me propongo examinar el papel ambiguo que pueden desempeñar las que solemos llamar "emociones morales" en la reflexión moral y, en especial, en lo que atañe al concepto de responsabilidad. En la primera parte muestro cómo dichas emociones "morales", la culpa y la vergüenza, pueden aparecer en circunstancias que no están bajo el control del agente y que, por tanto, son en buena medida independientes de su responsabilidad. En la segunda parte, sin embargo, lo que pretendo examinar es cómo su ausencia, o un desarrollo truncado de esas emociones, imposibilita a su vez la pertenencia del individuo a una comunidad moral y, con ello, la atribución de responsabilidad moral.

  9. [Moral development in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malá, E

    1989-08-01

    In child psychiatry the developmental aspect is emphasized. Recognition of normal sequence of development in so-called "normal children" makes it possible to reveal pathological conditions (either retardation or acceleration of development, distortion or atypical development). Change-motion-development are philosophical categories considered a manifestation or life--of psychobiological maturation and growth. When investigating the moral development three theories were applied: the developmental theory (Piaget)--learning (Kohlberg), the dynamic theory (Sandler). Among factors which influence in a certain way the moral behaviour the following were selected: age, sex, temperament, family environment. The author describes three stages of moral development in children: preventional stage (moral heteronomy) up to the age of 8 years, conventional and pst conventional (moral autonomy) in adolescence.

  10. Queer and Feminist Futures: The Importance of a Future and Mobilising Feminist Film in Post Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Šepetavc

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This article is concerned with alternative notions of temporality, specifically with alternative imaginings of the future that are important now more than ever. We try to deconstruct the politics of teleologically ordained linear temporalities which can function – if not questioned – as some sort of repetition without any real difference, through conceptualizing time ruptures and intervals, which would open up important ways of thinking about potentialities of the new. We attempt to think about time and the future through queer and Deleuzian feminist film theory, specifically the feminist film Born in Flames. We argue that cinema affects us, opens us up to thinking about potentialities of the new, futurity and new ways of connecting (new forms of communities, and therefore holds crucial transformative potential.

  11. Freethought, free love and feminism: secularist debates on marriage and sexual morality, England c. 1850-1885.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Laura

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the previously unexplored current of Freethinking feminism in the second half of the nineteenth century. Active in the women's movement of this period, Freethinking feminists were nonetheless viewed as a liability—an attitude that contributed to their exclusion from much of the subsequent historiography. Such marginalisation was due not only to their vocal opposition to all forms of religion, but also their openness to discussing new ways of organising heterosexual relationships. This article focuses on Freethinking feminist critiques of marriage and support for free unions. It demonstrates that these issues continued to be debated in the Secularist movement at a time when many other radical organisations—including much of the women's movement—kept silent on such topics. In this way, Freethinking feminists kept alive the more radical and libertarian critiques of traditional sexual morality developed by Owenite feminists in the 1830s and 40s. The author argues that the ideology of Freethought propelled its adherents to readdress questions of sex within a new 'Secularist' ethical framework. Fierce debate ensued, yet commitment to freedom of discussion ensured that 'unrespectable', libertarian voices were never entirely silenced. Freethinking feminism might, then, be viewed as the 'missing link' between early nineteenth-century feminist visions of greater sexual freedom and the more radical discussions of sexuality and free love that began to emerge at the fin de sicle.

  12. Direct vs. Indirect Moral Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, G Owen

    2015-09-01

    Moral enhancement is an ostensibly laudable project. Who wouldn't want people to become more moral? Still, the project's approach is crucial. We can distinguish between two approaches for moral enhancement: direct and indirect. Direct moral enhancements aim at bringing about particular ideas, motives or behaviors. Indirect moral enhancements, by contrast, aim at making people more reliably produce the morally correct ideas, motives or behaviors without committing to the content of those ideas, motives and/or actions. I will argue, on Millian grounds, that the value of disagreement puts serious pressure on proposals for relatively widespread direct moral enhancement. A more acceptable path would be to focus instead on indirect moral enhancements while staying neutral, for the most part, on a wide range of substantive moral claims. I will outline what such indirect moral enhancement might look like, and why we should expect it to lead to general moral improvement.

  13. Bondage and Feminist Consciousnessin the Patriarchal Society--A Feminist Approach to The Age of Innocence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏兰亭

    2016-01-01

    This paper is focused on women ’s status in the conventional society of masculine superiorityin The Age of Inno-cence .By studying the two female characters May Welland and Ellen Olenska , the paper analyses the topic of womenas victims in the patriarchal society .And through the further study of the character Ellen Olenska , the paper explores the fem-inist consciousness in the novel .

  14. Moral Identity as Moral Ideal Self: Links to Adolescent Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Sam A.; Walker, Lawrence J.; Olsen, Joseph A.; Woodbury, Ryan D.; Hickman, Jacob R.

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to conceptualize moral identity as moral ideal self, to develop a measure of this construct, to test for age and gender differences, to examine links between moral ideal self and adolescent outcomes, and to assess purpose and social responsibility as mediators of the relations between moral ideal self and outcomes.…

  15. Children's Moral Emotions and Moral Cognition: Towards an Integrative Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malti, Tina; Latzko, Brigitte

    2010-01-01

    This chapter presents a brief introduction to the developmental and educational literature linking children's moral emotions to cognitive moral development. A central premise of the chapter is that an integrative developmental perspective on moral emotions and moral cognition provides an important conceptual framework for understanding children's…

  16. Moral Identity as Moral Ideal Self: Links to Adolescent Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Sam A.; Walker, Lawrence J.; Olsen, Joseph A.; Woodbury, Ryan D.; Hickman, Jacob R.

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to conceptualize moral identity as moral ideal self, to develop a measure of this construct, to test for age and gender differences, to examine links between moral ideal self and adolescent outcomes, and to assess purpose and social responsibility as mediators of the relations between moral ideal self and outcomes.…

  17. Moral Psychology and the Problem of Moral Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    This article is intended as an initial investigation into the foundations of moral psychology. I primarily examine a recent work in moral education, Daniel Lapsley's and Darcia Narvaez"s "Character education", whose authors seem to assume at points that criteria for discerning moral actions and moral traits can be derived apart from ethics or…

  18. Why Be Moral? Moral Identity Motivation and Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krettenauer, Tobias; Victor, Rosemary

    2017-01-01

    Moral identity research to date has largely failed to provide evidence for developmental trends in moral identity, presumably because of restrictions in the age range of studies and the use of moral identity measures that are insensitive to age-related change. The present study investigated moral identity motivation across a broad age range (14-65…

  19. Cultural Conceptions of Morality: Examining Laypeople's Associations of Moral Character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauclair, Christin-Melanie; Wilson, Marc; Fischer, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Whether moral conceptions are universal or culture-specific is controversial in moral psychology. One option is to refrain from imposing theoretical constraints and to ask laypeople from different cultures how "they" conceptualize morality. Our article adopts this approach by examining laypeople's associations of moral character in…

  20. Moral Philosophy, Moral Expertise, and the Argument from Disagreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Ben

    2016-03-01

    Several recent articles have weighed in on the question of whether moral philosophers can be counted as moral experts. One argument denying this has been rejected by both sides of the debate. According to this argument, the extent of disagreement in modern moral philosophy prevents moral philosophers from being classified as moral experts. Call this the Argument From Disagreement (AD). In this article, I defend a version of AD. Insofar as practical issues in moral philosophy are characterized by disagreement between moral philosophers who are more or less equally well credentialed on the issue, non-philosophers have no good reasons to defer to their views. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The Moral Development of Moral Philosophers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunzl, Martin

    1977-01-01

    Lawrence Kohlberg thinks that Utilitarianism and Rawls' theory of justice are formal elaborations of different stages in the psychological development of moral reasoning. Also that there are psychological reasons to favor the stage of reasoning of which he thinks Rawls' theory is an elaboration. Attempts to show that Kohlberg has confused ethics…

  2. The Media: Moral Lessons and Moral Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Sue

    1993-01-01

    A lesson on female stereotypes in advertising begins a discussion of the mass media's role in the lives of young women. It is suggested that conventional moral wisdom about media education for children does not reflect the complexity of the media's influence but is narrow and ethnocentric. (MSE)

  3. Huck Finn, Moral Language and Moral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinkel, Anders

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is twofold. Against the traditional interpretation of "the conscience of Huckleberry Finn" (for which Jonathan Bennett's article with this title is the locus classicus) as a conflict between conscience and sympathy, I propose a new interpretation of Huck's inner conflict, in terms of Huck's mastery of (the) moral language…

  4. The Moral Development of Moral Philosophers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunzl, Martin

    1977-01-01

    Lawrence Kohlberg thinks that Utilitarianism and Rawls' theory of justice are formal elaborations of different stages in the psychological development of moral reasoning. Also that there are psychological reasons to favor the stage of reasoning of which he thinks Rawls' theory is an elaboration. Attempts to show that Kohlberg has confused ethics…

  5. A Feminist Reading of Margaret Atwood's Surfacing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛莹

    2008-01-01

    Margaret Atwood (1939-)is one of the most distinguished female writers in contemporary Canada.Surfacing is her second novel.published in 1972.Through the novel,Atwood expresses her deep concern about the women.Literally,it is about a iourney back to hometown and nature;but at the same time it also symbolizes a psychological journey for the heroine to find her true self.By analyzing the protagonist's personal experience with camera, ang abortion which serve as symbols of masculine power.this paper reveals women's dominated and victimized position in a male-oriented society,the gradual formation of the protagonist's feminist awareness and the process of her self-rediscovery.

  6. Some feminist contributions to community social psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Mayorga

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the contributions of feminist debate about intersectionality of social categories for Community Social Psychology in Brazil. This was set up as dedicated to theoretical analyze the social inequalities that characterize contemporary societies and propose methodological processes of intervention for questioning and processing of these realities. We discuss how the emergence of new actors and demands on public space, as distinct from the 60/70, is required to understand the oppression from various power systems such as gender, race and sexuality. We conclude that intersectional analysis should consider different levels of relationships between categories, the history of the same differential and common aspects of different systems of power as naturalization of inequality, the relationship between public and private relationship between equality and difference. Analyses based on intersectionality can contribute to processes of social intervention that considers the complexity of contemporary societies.

  7. A feminist perspective on Stroke Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvigne, Kari; Kirkevold, M.

    2002-01-01

    hits a great number of elderly women. Wyller et al. found that women seemed to be harder hit by stroke than men; they achieved lower scores in tests of motor, cognitive and ADL functions, both in the acute phase and 1 year after stroke. It is reasonable to expect that differences in outcome among male...... and female sufferers may in part be explained by the fact that rehabilitation services are designed primarily to meet the needs of men. de Beauvoir's feminist theory maintains that one's body is fundamental in creating the person, which is a lifelong process. Traditionally, the female body has been exposed...... to alienation and oppression through life. This has led women to develop a life in immanence. This we feel can be of significance in connection with rehabilitation after a stroke, particularly for elderly women. In this article we will discuss how de Beauvoir's theory can throw new light on the experiences...

  8. Feminist Challenges to the Reframing of Equality and Social Justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siim, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Global mobility and the present economic, political and refugee crisis have resulted in political contestations and new theoretical challenges. Inspired by several European research projects, in this paper I reflect upon feminist activism and the challenges to reframing equality and social justice...... in contemporary society (see Siim & Mokre, 2013; Lazaridis et al., 2016). I first discuss intersectional relations between anti-racist activism and feminist activism in the Danish context. Then I discuss how feminist theorists can contribute to the reframing of (gender) equality and social justice in contemporary...... for a transnational approach to social justice, premised on redistribution, recognition and participatory parity. I argue that both need to be adapted in order to contribute to an understanding of the feminist challenges in the particular Nordic contexts....

  9. the power and promise of feminist research in environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    methods and methodologies in environmental education research. This exploration includes a ..... evidence (method) from theory and analysis of how research should ..... Critical and Feminist Discourses as Regimes of. Truth. Routledge, New ...

  10. Feminist psychoanalytic theory: American and French reactions to Freud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, H; Zickler, E

    1996-01-01

    Ever since Freud's observations on women and their psychology were published, there have been revisions, expansions, and reactions to his ideas. Most recently, feminist psychoanalytic theorists from the United States and France have been fertile in producing revisions to traditional psychoanalytic theory about women. Reviewing the disjointed psychoanalytic traditions of the two countries provides a context for understanding the different approaches to feminist thinking that each country has produced. American feminist psychoanalytic theorists tend to stage reversals of traditional Freudian theory, while the French feminist psychoanalytic theorists have had to position themselves intellectually and politically with reference to the teachings of Lacan. This paper examines selected contemporary theorists from these two countries--Jean Baker Miller, Nancy Chodorow, and Carol Gilligan from the United States and Julia Kristeva, Luce Irigaray, and Helene Cixous from France--and discusses the difficulties of constructing a theory of sexual difference that avoids the pitfalls of either biological essentialism or its reverse, social constructionism.

  11. Reconciling Arabo-Islamic culture and feminist consciousness in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    present different strategies employed by women to counter gender ... A comparative reading of selected stories reveals that Rifaat's characters resort to ... and Djebar have made a great contribution to feminist literary creativity in North Africa.

  12. A Reformist-Feminist Approach to Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-05-20

    May 20, 2011 ... reformist feminist analysis has been adopted as a theoretical .... assault, child abuse, unwholesome widowhood practices, social beliefs and ..... skin of his neck is covered with scabs that look dry until he scratches them.

  13. "This Dialogue of One": A Feminist Reading of Donne's "Exstasie."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Janel M.

    1985-01-01

    Takes a new look at the importance and the oddity of John Donne's "The Exstasie" through a feminist critical perspective. Discusses certain major elements in the poem: the situation, the the persons, and the images that carry key meanings. (EL)

  14. On-line repository of audiovisual material feminist research methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Prado

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper includes a collection of audiovisual material available in the repository of the Interdisciplinary Seminar of Feminist Research Methodology SIMReF (http://www.simref.net.

  15. Religion and morality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Ryan; Whitehouse, Harvey

    2015-03-01

    The relationship between religion and morality has long been hotly debated. Does religion make us more moral? Is it necessary for morality? Do moral inclinations emerge independently of religious intuitions? These debates, which nowadays rumble on in scientific journals as well as in public life, have frequently been marred by a series of conceptual confusions and limitations. Many scientific investigations have failed to decompose "religion" and "morality" into theoretically grounded elements; have adopted parochial conceptions of key concepts-in particular, sanitized conceptions of "prosocial" behavior; and have neglected to consider the complex interplay between cognition and culture. We argue that to make progress, the categories "religion" and "morality" must be fractionated into a set of biologically and psychologically cogent traits, revealing the cognitive foundations that shape and constrain relevant cultural variants. We adopt this fractionating strategy, setting out an encompassing evolutionary framework within which to situate and evaluate relevant evidence. Our goals are twofold: to produce a detailed picture of the current state of the field, and to provide a road map for future research on the relationship between religion and morality.

  16. Who Engages with Moral Beauty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diessner, Rhett; Iyer, Ravi; Smith, Meghan M.; Haidt, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Aristotle considered moral beauty to be the "telos" of the human virtues. Displays of moral beauty have been shown to elicit the moral emotion of elevation and cause a desire to become a better person and to engage in prosocial behavior. Study 1 ("N" = 5380) shows engagement with moral beauty is related to several psychological…

  17. Who Engages with Moral Beauty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diessner, Rhett; Iyer, Ravi; Smith, Meghan M.; Haidt, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Aristotle considered moral beauty to be the "telos" of the human virtues. Displays of moral beauty have been shown to elicit the moral emotion of elevation and cause a desire to become a better person and to engage in prosocial behavior. Study 1 ("N" = 5380) shows engagement with moral beauty is related to several psychological…

  18. Felt Moral Obligation and the Moral Judgement-Moral Action Gap: Toward a Phenomenology of Moral Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard N.; Gantt, Edwin E.

    2012-01-01

    The step-off point for this article is the problem of the "moral judgement-moral action gap" as found in contemporary literature of moral education and moral development. We argue that this gap, and the conceptual problems encountered by attempts to bridge it, reflects the effect of a different, deeper and more problematic conceptual gap: the…

  19. Improving moral judgments: philosophical considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalis, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304823244

    2010-01-01

    In contemporary moral psychology, an often-heard claim is that knowing how we make moral judgments can help us make better moral judgments. Discussions about moral development and improvement are often framed in terms of the question of which mental processes have a better chance of leading to good

  20. Kant's Account of Moral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesinger, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    While Kant's pedagogical lectures present an account of moral education, his theory of freedom and morality seems to leave no room for the possibility of an education for freedom and morality. In this paper, it is first shown that Kant's moral philosophy and his educational philosophy are developed within different theoretical paradigms: whereas…

  1. Felt Moral Obligation and the Moral Judgement-Moral Action Gap: Toward a Phenomenology of Moral Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard N.; Gantt, Edwin E.

    2012-01-01

    The step-off point for this article is the problem of the "moral judgement-moral action gap" as found in contemporary literature of moral education and moral development. We argue that this gap, and the conceptual problems encountered by attempts to bridge it, reflects the effect of a different, deeper and more problematic conceptual gap: the…

  2. Kant's Account of Moral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesinger, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    While Kant's pedagogical lectures present an account of moral education, his theory of freedom and morality seems to leave no room for the possibility of an education for freedom and morality. In this paper, it is first shown that Kant's moral philosophy and his educational philosophy are developed within different theoretical paradigms: whereas…

  3. Relativistic Absolutism in Moral Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, W. Paul

    1982-01-01

    Discusses Emile Durkheim's "Moral Education: A Study in the Theory and Application of the Sociology of Education," which holds that morally healthy societies may vary in culture and organization but must possess absolute rules of moral behavior. Compares this moral theory with current theory and practice of American educators. (MJL)

  4. Feminist Online Identity: Analyzing the Presence of Hashtag Feminism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitsy Dixon

    2014-08-01

    Using the ongoing debate that feminism does not acknowledge real life experience outside of academic terrain, this paper explores how hashtag feminists identify in redefining feminism in their generation. Using the public platform of Twitter and Facebook (less specifically, this paper will explore the online followings of women who identify as hashtag feminists, and how their dialogue has set the tone for the era of internet activism.

  5. Hot bi babes and feminist families: Polyamorous women speak out

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Much academic literature on SM (sadomasochism) still portrays it as anti-feminist with authors arguing that, for example, SM reproduces and reinforces heterosexual gendered hierarchies and power imbalances. This study explored how women who identify as SMers understand and explain their practices in relation to feminist principles and gendered dynamics. An in-depth focus group discussion was conducted with a group of women who practice SM. Participants were involved in designing and managing ...

  6. The 'Maternal' Feminist: Exploring The Primal in Women's Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Turton-Turner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores women's art that interrogates the logic intrinsic to a powerful concept of maternal caring evident in Marian iconography. While conventional portrayals of women in the history of art connote maternity as divine and mystical, women's art with a feminist sensibility reconfigures the mother figure as monstrous and forbidding. Through the use of visual semiotics and Kristevan psychoanalytic theories, I analyse how feminist art reconciles sacred and sadistic states for a more aggressive mother to emerge.

  7. Uncovering Our Feminist Pedagogy: A Co/Autoethnography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coia, Lesley; Taylor, Monica

    2013-01-01

    What does it mean to be a feminist educator? How would we know if we were? We call ourselves feminist teachers and yet we have not focused on this identification and its influence on our teaching in some time. In this self-study, we set out to look at our practice-using co/autoethnography. As our study progressed, we began to realize that our…

  8. Personal agency in feminist theory: Evicting the illusive dweller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, M R

    1998-01-01

    The growing impact of feminist scholarship, activism, and politics would benefit substantially from input by radical behaviorists. The feminist community, broadly defined, and radical behaviorists share interesting commonalities that suggest a potentially fruitful alliance. There are, however, points of divergence that must be addressed; most prominently, the construct of personal agency. A behavioral reconstruction of personal agency is offered to deal with the invisible contingencies leading to gender-asymmetric interpretive repertoires. The benefits of a mutually informing fusion are discussed.

  9. Infanticide and moral consistency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahan, Jeff

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this essay is to show that there are no easy options for those who are disturbed by the suggestion that infanticide may on occasion be morally permissible. The belief that infanticide is always wrong is doubtfully compatible with a range of widely shared moral beliefs that underlie various commonly accepted practices. Any set of beliefs about the morality of abortion, infanticide and the killing of animals that is internally consistent and even minimally credible will therefore unavoidably contain some beliefs that are counterintuitive.

  10. Moral Hazard and Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tumennasan, Norovsambuu

    2014-01-01

    Economists perceive moral hazard as an undesirable problem because it undermines efficiency. Carefully designed contracts can mitigate the moral hazard problem, but this assumes that a team is already formed. This paper demonstrates that these contracts are sometimes the reason why teams do...... not form. Formally, we study the team formation problem in which the agents’ efforts are not verifiable and the size of teams does not exceed quota r . We show that if the team members cannot make transfers, then moral hazard affects stability positively in a large class of games. For example, a stable...

  11. Moral, tiempo y cristianismo

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Cañizares, J. (Javier)

    2012-01-01

    Se presentan algunas reflexiones sobre la dimensión moral del ser humano y su estructura temporal. La acción moral modifica de forma inmanente a la persona, pero también se desarrolla de modo transitivo. La temporaliclad del actuar revela un desarrollo histórico del ser humano, coherente con su naturaleza pero distinto de ésta. La moral cristiana mantiene el equilibro entre los diversos polos antropológicos implicados en un actuar bueno, que hace bueno y tendrá, eventualmente, ...

  12. Inverting the moral economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olwig, Mette Fog; Noe, Christine; Kangalawe, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Governments, donors and investors often promote land acquisitions for forest plantations as global climate change mitigation via carbon sequestration. Investors’ forestry thereby becomes part of a global moral economy imaginary. Using examples from Tanzania we critically examine the global moral...... economy’s narrative foundation, which presents trees as axiomatically ‘green’, ‘idle’ land as waste and economic investments as benefiting the relevant communities. In this way the traditional supposition of the moral economy as invoked by the economic underclass to maintain the basis of their subsistence...

  13. Inverting the moral economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olwig, Mette Fog; Noe, Christine; Kangalawe, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Governments, donors and investors often promote land acquisitions for forest plantations as global climate change mitigation via carbon sequestration. Investors’ forestry thereby becomes part of a global moral economy imaginary. Using examples from Tanzania we critically examine the global moral...... economy’s narrative foundation, which presents trees as axiomatically ‘green’, ‘idle’ land as waste and economic investments as benefiting the relevant communities. In this way the traditional supposition of the moral economy as invoked by the economic underclass to maintain the basis of their subsistence...

  14. Psychology as a Moral Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkmann, Svend

    of morality • Confronts the “naturalistic fallacy” in contemporary psychology. • Explains why moral science need not be separated from social science. • Addresses challenges and critiques to the author’s work from both formalist and relativist theories of morality. With its bold call to reason, Psychology......, Psychology as a Moral Science argues that psychological phenomena are inherently moral, and that psychology, as prescriptive and interventive practice, reflects specific moral principles. The book cites normative moral standards, as far back as Aristotle, that give human thoughts, feelings, and actions...

  15. The Epistemology of Moral Bioenhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutchfield, Parker

    2016-07-01

    Moral bioenhancement is the potential practice of manipulating individuals' moral behaviors by biological means in order to help resolve pressing moral issues such as climate change and terrorism. This practice has obvious ethical implications, and these implications have been and continue to be discussed in the bioethics literature. What have not been discussed are the epistemological implications of moral bioenhancement. This article details some of these implications of engaging in moral bioenhancement. The argument begins by making the distinction between moral bioenhancement that manipulates the contents of mental states (e.g. beliefs) and that which manipulates other, non-representational states (e.g. motivations). Either way, I argue, the enhanced moral psychology will fail to conform to epistemic norms, and the only way to resolve this failure and allow the moral bioenhancement to be effective in addressing the targeted moral issues is to make the moral bioenhancement covert.

  16. The Subject, Feminist Theory and Latin American Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Castro-Klaren

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available From a feminist perspective, this essay reviews and analyzes the interaction between metropolitan feminist theories and their interphase with the academic criticism of texts written by Latin American women. Discussion focuses on the question of the subject, which the author believes to be paramount in feminist theory, in as much as the construction of gender and the historical subordination of women devolve on the play of difference and identity. This paper examines how the problematic assumption by feminist theorists in the North American academy of Freudian and Lacanian theories of the subject pose unresolved problems and unanticipated complications to subsequent deployment of this subject theory as modes of interpretation of texts written by women in Latin America or even to the emancipatory goals on feminists in the academy. This is a case where "traveling theory" must be examined and evaluated very carefully. The second part of the paper concentrates on the feminist challenges that have been already made to both Freudian and Lacanian theories of the feminine. It highlights the work of Jane Flax, Nacy Chodorov, Gayatri Spivak and Judith Butler in suggesting a way out of theories that rely on the primacy of the male subject formation and therefore occlude and preclude the investigation of the modes of women's agency.

  17. Grounded theory and feminist inquiry: revitalizing links to the past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Marilyn; Young, Lynne E

    2010-04-01

    Grounded theory has served feminist research endeavors since the mid-1990s. Researchers from a variety of disciplines claim methodological compatibility and incorporate feminist principles into their grounded theory studies. This article seeks to demonstrate the epistemological affinity between feminist inquiry and grounded theory. Although this relationship is not necessarily unique, the authors contend that when combined, it loosens the androcentric moorings of the empirical processes underpinning grounded theory, enabling the researchers to design inquiry with greater potential to reveal issues particular to the lives and experiences of marginalized women. The article begins by retracing the roots of grounded theory and feminist inquiry to identify six key areas where the underpinnings of GT are enriched by a feminist perspective when working with women. In addition, the authors draw on the literature and their experience from a 2005 study of peer support and lone mothers' health to demonstrate the advantages of combining these theoretical perspectives. Finally, the authors recommend that nurse researchers draw on feminist principles to guide their use of grounded theory to better serve the interests of women by surfacing issues of gender and power that influence the health experience.

  18. Feminist theory and the study of gender and education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, Sandra

    1987-12-01

    This paper considers the three main Western feminist theoretical frameworks — liberal, socialist and radical — and their educational applications. Examples of studies using each approach are discussed. Liberal feminists writing about education use concepts of equal opportunities, socialization, sex roles and discrimination. Their strategies involve altering socialization practices, changing attitudes and making use of relevant legislation. Critics of the liberal school point to conceptual limitations and the liberal reluctance to confront power and patriarchy. Socialist feminists analyze the role of the school in the perpetuation of gender divisions under capitalism. Major concepts are socio-cultural reproduction and to a lesser extent acceptance of and resistance to gender-based patterns of behaviour. So far socialist-feminist educational writing is mainly theoretical rather than practical and has therefore been criticized for its over-determinism and insufficient empiric foundation. Radical feminists in education have concentrated mainly on the male monopolization of knowledge and culture and on sexual politics in schools. Strategies involve putting women's and girls' concerns first, through separate-sex groups when necessary. Critics argue that radical feminism tends towards biological reductionism, description rather than explanation and also contains methodological weaknesses. Mutual criticism of perspectives seems less destructive in educational writing than in some other categories of feminist scholarship. All the theoretical frameworks are subject to the same pressures including the oppressive power of structures, the resilience of individuals, and the tension between universality (how women are the same) and diversity (how women differ on attributes like class and race).

  19. Absoluteness or relativity of morality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Kadievskaya

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Article is dedicated to the case study of absoluteness or relativity of morals. The questions are in a new way comprehended: Can exist absolute morals? Is how its content? Is necessary it for humanity? Is moral personality absolute value? Does justify the purpose of means? It is substantiated, that reflecting about the problem of absoluteness or relativity of morals, one ought not to be abstracted from the religion ­ billions of people find in it the basis of their morals. Accumulated ethical experience is infinitely rich and diverse in humanity: it includes and the proclaimed prophets godly revelations, and the brilliant enlightenment of secular philosophers. Are analyzed such concepts, as morals, absolute morals, relativity, moral rigorizm, moral personality, formal ethics. The specific character of the moral relativity, which proclaims historicity and changeability of standards and standards of human behavior, is established. Moral rigorizm is understood as the principle, according to which the man must act only from the considerations of moral debt, whereas all other external motivations (interest, happiness, friendship, etc have no moral value. Is shown the priority significance of the nerigoristskoy formal ethics, in which strong idealizations and abstractions of the ethics of moral rigorizma are substituted by the weaker ­ more realistic and more humane. In the nerigoristskoy formal ethics, as in the life, moral estimations completely can be and in the overwhelming majority of the cases are relative.

  20. Moral Purpose Writ Large.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullan, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Argues that moral and spiritual leaders strive to make a difference in the lives of students; to reduce the achievement gap in one's school, district, and the larger educational environment; and to foster growth opportunities and leadership in others. (PKP)

  1. Explaining moral religions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumard, Nicolas; Boyer, Pascal

    2013-06-01

    Moralizing religions, unlike religions with morally indifferent gods or spirits, appeared only recently in some (but not all) large-scale human societies. A crucial feature of these new religions is their emphasis on proportionality (between deeds and supernatural rewards, between sins and penance, and in the formulation of the Golden Rule, according to which one should treat others as one would like others to treat oneself). Cognitive science models that account for many properties of religion can be extended to these religions. Recent models of evolved dispositions for fairness in cooperation suggest that proportionality-based morality is highly intuitive to human beings. The cultural success of moralizing movements, secular or religious, could be explained based on proportionality.

  2. Conciencia moral y gesinnung

    OpenAIRE

    Claudio La Rocca

    2012-01-01

    Kant ha subrayado el carácter problemático del auto-conocimiento en el campo de la antropología y la psicología: desde sus primeras obras insistió en la imposibilidad de conocer con certeza, sobre la base de las acciones, la disposición moral subjetiva, la única que da a la acción un valor moral. Esta dificultad no se atenúa cuando el juicio moral es dirigido sobre el sujeto mismo. A los problemas cognitivos se añade una tendencia al auto-engaño que está activa en toda la vida moral. Si se ma...

  3. Twentieth Century Moral Philosophy

    OpenAIRE

    Stout, Rowland

    2008-01-01

    Despite being somewhat long in the tooth at the time, Aristotle, Hume and Kant were still dominating twentieth century moral philosophy. Much of the progress made in that century came from a detailed working through of each of their approaches by the expanding and increasingly professionalized corps of academic philosophers. And this progress can be measured not just by the quality and sophistication of moral philosophy at the end of that century, but also by the narrowing of s...

  4. Neural basis of moral verdict and moral deliberation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Jana Schaich; Sinnott-Armstrong, Walter; Calhoun, Vince D.; Kiehl, Kent A.

    2011-01-01

    How people judge something to be morally right or wrong is a fundamental question of both the sciences and the humanities. Here we aim to identify the neural processes that underlie the specific conclusion that something is morally wrong. To do this, we introduce a novel distinction between “moral deliberation,” or the weighing of moral considerations, and the formation of a “moral verdict,” or the commitment to one moral conclusion. We predict and identify hemodynamic activity in the bilateral anterior insula and basal ganglia that correlates with committing to the moral verdict “this is morally wrong” as opposed to “this is morally not wrong,” a finding that is consistent with research from economic decision-making. Using comparisons of deliberation-locked vs. verdict-locked analyses, we also demonstrate that hemodynamic activity in high-level cortical regions previously implicated in morality—including the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate, and temporoparietal junction—correlates primarily with moral deliberation as opposed to moral verdicts. These findings provide new insights into what types of processes comprise the enterprise of moral judgment, and in doing so point to a framework for resolving why some clinical patients, including psychopaths, may have intact moral judgment but impaired moral behavior. PMID:21590588

  5. Rethinking Moral Expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priaulx, Nicky; Weinel, Martin; Wrigley, Anthony

    2016-12-01

    We argue that the way in which the concept of expertise is understood and invoked has prevented progress in the debate as to whether moral philosophers can be said to be 'moral experts'. We offer an account of expertise that draws on the role of tacit knowledge in order to provide a basis upon which the debate can progress. Our analysis consists of three parts. In the first part we highlight two specific problems in the way that the concept of expertise has been invoked in the moral expertise debate, namely the understanding of expertise as an exclusive concept and the conflation of expertise with the idea of 'authority'. In the second part we suggest an alternative way of approaching the concept of expertise. This is based on Collins and Evans' sociological theory of expertises. This theory provides a valuable analytical framework for thinking about claims to expertise and for drawing the kinds of distinctions which allow for different kinds of moral expertises and competencies. In the final part, we show how the application of this theory helps to avoid some of the problematic conclusions which theorists have arrived at to date and provides a common platform for debate. Ultimately, it permits the argument to be made that moral philosophers could be considered specialist members of an expert community of moral decision-makers.

  6. Moral status, justice, and the common morality: challenges for the principlist account of moral change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Kevin E; Sulmasy, Daniel P

    2013-09-01

    The theory of principlism elaborated by Beauchamp and Childress in Principles of Biomedical Ethics has become extremely influential in bioethics. The theory employs the idea of the common morality as a foundation for the principles of autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice. According to this account, the content of the common morality is universal and constant, while variability in morals is due to the fact that the issue of who is included within the scope of moral status evolves over time. This suggests that issues of moral status are not part of the common morality at all, and this presents a conundrum: questions of moral status seem central to any substantive account of justice, and any conception of the common morality that excludes moral status therefore seems inadequate for supporting a robust principle of justice. We argue that proponents of common morality theory are left with four options: (1) making moral status a part of the objective common morality and ignoring evidence that views about moral status do seem to vary over time and place; (2) excluding justice from the substantive content of the common morality; (3) taking common morality to be an imperfect approximation of an independently justified and universal foundationalist ethic against which the common morality is judged; or (4) weakening claims about the universality of common morality, thereby allowing the common morality to support a variety of principles of justice applicable only within particular communities that have specified the scope of moral status. We suspect that proponents of common morality theory will not view any of these options favorably, which raises questions about the ultimate contribution of that account.

  7. CE: Moral Distress: A Catalyst in Building Moral Resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Cynda Hylton; Caldwell, Meredith; Kurtz, Melissa

    2016-07-01

    : Moral distress is a pervasive problem in the nursing profession. An inability to act in alignment with one's moral values is detrimental not only to the nurse's well-being but also to patient care and clinical practice as a whole. Moral distress has typically been seen as characterized by powerlessness and victimization; we offer an alternate view. Ethically complex situations and experiences of moral distress can become opportunities for growth, empowerment, and increased moral resilience. This article outlines the concept and prevalence of moral distress, describes its impact and precipitating factors, and discusses promising practices and interventions.

  8. Is equal moral consideration really compatible with unequal moral status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, John

    2010-09-01

    The issue of moral considerability, or how much moral importance a being's interests deserve, is one of the most important in animal ethics. Some leading theorists--most notably David DeGrazia--have argued that a principle of "equal moral consideration" is compatible with "unequal moral status." Such a position would reconcile the egalitarian force of equal consideration with more stringent obligations to humans than animals. The article presents arguments that equal consideration is not compatible with unequal moral status, thereby forcing those who would justify significantly different moral protections for humans and animals to argue for unequal consideration.

  9. The Moral Dimensions of Infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epting, Shane

    2016-04-01

    Moral issues in urban planning involving technology, residents, marginalized groups, ecosystems, and future generations are complex cases, requiring solutions that go beyond the limits of contemporary moral theory. Aside from typical planning problems, there is incongruence between moral theory and some of the subjects that require moral assessment, such as urban infrastructure. Despite this incongruence, there is not a need to develop another moral theory. Instead, a supplemental measure that is compatible with existing moral positions will suffice. My primary goal in this paper is to explain the need for this supplemental measure, describe what one looks like, and show how it works with existing moral systems. The secondary goal is to show that creating a supplemental measure that provides congruency between moral systems that are designed to assess human action and non-human subjects advances the study of moral theory.

  10. Feminists and their perspectives on the church fathers' beliefs regarding women: An inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannelie Wood

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The church fathers and their views on women were influenced substantially and significantly by philosophical voices, such as that of Aristotle and Plato, amongst others. A brief account on Aristotle�s and Plato�s ideas about women, from feminist perspectives, will be touched upon. The article furthermore explores feminist voices, regarding the church fathers� thinking about women, and how these views contributed to women�s subordination and domination. The research will focus on the many varied views on women held by Latin church fathers, such as Tertullian (c. 155�255, Cyprian (c. 200�258 AD, Jerome (c. 347�419, Ambrose (c. 339�397 and Augustine (354�430, and the Greek church fathers, such as Clement of Alexander (c. 150�215, Origen (c. 185�254 and Chrysostom (c. 347�407, from the perspective of feminists. It will be contended that an insensitive and too early denunciation of the early church fathers as misogynists often occurs in women�s history without taking into consideration the church fathers� philosophical and social contexts and, hence, the opinions that formed their views. One such theory that helped to shape the church fathers� views about women is the classic medical theory, and this therefore merits a brief discussion. Another important point one has to take into account is the church fathers� perceptions of the carnal (sexual and the spiritual world that shaped their views about women.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: History teaches us what people before us did, what their intentions were and where they failed or went wrong. If historical viewpoints about women reflect women�s subordination and oppression, they force women to discover their roots and their past. The church fathers, however, inherited a long tradition of debates, beliefs, and arguments regarding women�s moral, intellectual, and natural capacities. Therefore, generalised, simplified, and unsympathetic views

  11. SOCIÉTÉ ET MORALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan HUMÃ

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The moral is also a field of options. We can not hope about the moral pride of Superman; where there isn’t any compassion, dedication, understanding and sacrifice, there isn’t any moral. Also we do not believe in any false moral of solvent egalitarianism and of abstract universal love. At the same time, we do not retain the moral quotient of the technical license, producer of uncivilized “freedoms”. On the contrary we believe that the moral is born minute by minute on the grueling road of the daily tension, disinterested commitment in the communion.

  12. Maintaining Scholarly Standards in Feminist Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Esterson

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the editorial Introduction to Women, Science, and Technology: A Reader in Feminist Science Studies, published in 2001, can be found the exemplary statement that among the norms for acquiring scientific knowledge is “skepticism (all claims should be scrutinized for errors”. In this article, I address a section relating to historical contentions in the same volume that, I argue, fails to live up to this basic standard of scholarly research. It is now quite widely believed that Mileva Marić, Einstein’s first wife, played an active role in Einstein’s early scientific work until well after they married in 1903. Some commentators go so far as to argue that she coauthored his three major 1905 papers, while others contend that she solved the mathematical problems for him. I examine the claims made in relation to Marić in the section in question in the above-cited volume, and investigate the sources of the evidential claims that have been adduced to support them. I conclude that the several claims are without reliable evidential bases.

  13. The Feminist Consciousness of Dorothy Hewett

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦飏; 杜洪波

    2013-01-01

      Born in Perth, Western Australia, Dorothy Coade Hewett (21 May 1923-25 August 2002) was a well-known poet, novel⁃ist and dramatist. The feminist movement in Australia began at the end of the 19th century. But in Dorothy’s time, Australian soci⁃ety was still a male-dominated society. Women were defined as daughters, sisters, lovers, wives, mothers, grandmothers, domestic treasure, except as themselves. They were not given many chances and were treated differently from men. However, Dorothy hated all those roles given by the society to women and was determined to pursue her dream as an actress and a writer. She advocated sex⁃ual freedom, demanded equal pay for women workers, and as one of the founder members of the Union of Australian women, she al⁃so started the first left-wing Australian women’s journal. In all her life, Dorothy had been struggling for the realization of her self-value and fighting against the male-dominated society.

  14. A Feminist Framework for Nurses on Boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundean, Lisa J; Polifroni, E Carol

    Nurses' knowledge, skills, and expertise uniquely situate them to contribute to health care transformation as equal partners in organizational board governance. The Institute of Medicine, the 10,000 Nurses on Boards Coalition, and a growing number of nurse and health care scholars advocate nurse board leadership; however, nurses are rarely appointed as voting board members. When no room is made for nurses to take a seat at the table, the opportunity is lost to harness the power of nursing knowledge for health care transformation and social justice. No philosophical framework underpins the emerging focus on nurse board leadership. The purpose of this article is to add to the extant nursing literature by suggesting feminism as a philosophical framework for nurses on boards. Feminism contributes to the knowledge base of nursing as it relates to the expanding roles of nurses in health care transformation, policy, and social justice. Furthermore, a feminist philosophical framework for nurses on boards sets the foundation for new theory development and validates ongoing advancement of the nursing profession.

  15. Internet cancer support groups: a feminist analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eun-Ok; Chee, Wonshik; Tsai, Hsiu-Min; Lin, Li-Chen; Cheng, Ching-Yu

    2005-01-01

    Internet Cancer Support Groups (ICSGs) are an emerging form of support group on Internet specifically for cancer patients. Previous studies have indicated the effectiveness of ICSGs as a research setting or a data-collection method. Yet recent studies have also indicated that ICSGs tend to serve highly educated, high-income White males who tend to be at an early stage of cancer. In this article, a total of 317 general ICSGs and 229 ethnic-specific ICSGs searched through Google.com, Yahoo.com, Msn.com, AOL.com, and ACOR.org are analyzed from a feminist perspective. The written records of group discussions and written memos by the research staff members were also analyzed using content analysis. The idea categories that emerged about these groups include (a) authenticity issues; (b) ethnicity and gender issues; (c) intersubjectivity issues; and (d) potential ethical issues. The findings suggest that (a) researchers adopt multiple recruitment strategies through various Internet sites and/or real settings; (b) researchers raise their own awareness of the potential influences of the health-related resources provided by ICSGs and regularly update their knowledge related to the federal and state standards and/or policies related to ICSGs; and (c) researchers consider adopting a quota-sampling method.

  16. Criticism, context and community: Connections between Wittgenstein’s On and feminist epistemology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Caraway

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article the conceptual connections between Wittgenstein’s On Certainty and the work of three contemporary feminist epistemologists: standpoint theorist Sandra Harding and feminist empiricists Helen Longino and Lynn Hankinson Nelson, are explored. The inquiry reveals both surprising similarities and important differences between Wittgensteinian and feminist epistemologies. Exploring these similarities and differences (criticism, context and community clarifies Wittgenstein’s epistemology and reveals the ways in which feminist epistemologists developed the themes from On Certainty.

  17. Kohlberg and the Resolution of Moral Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressler, Marvin

    1976-01-01

    Author challenged Lawrence Kohlberg's theory of moral development with its conjoint moral standards. One's knowledge of the principle of moral justice, he said, does not offer him directives for dealing with specific moral conflicts. (Editor/RK)

  18. The complexities of power in feminist multicultural psychotherapy supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arczynski, Alexis V; Morrow, Susan L

    2017-03-01

    The goal of the present study was to understand how current feminist multicultural supervisors understand and implement their feminist multicultural principles into clinical supervision. We addressed this aim by answering the following research question: How do self-identified feminist multicultural psychotherapy supervisors conceptualize and practice feminist supervision that is explicitly multicultural? The perspectives of 14 participant supervisors were obtained by using semistructured initial interviews, follow-up interviews, and feedback interviews and were investigated via a feminist constructivist grounded theory design and analysis. Most participants identified as counseling psychologists (n = 12), women (n = 11) and temporarily able-bodied (n = 11); but they identified with diverse racial/ethnic, sexual, spiritual/religious, generational, and nationality statuses. A 7-category empirical framework emerged that explained how the participants anticipated and managed power in supervision. The core category, the complexities of power in supervision, explained how participants conceptualized power in supervisory relationships. The 6 remaining categories were bringing history into the supervision room, creating trust through openness and honesty, using a collaborative process, meeting shifting developmental (a)symmetries, cultivating critical reflexivity, and looking at and counterbalancing the impact of context. Limitations of the study, implications for research, and suggestions to use the theoretical framework to transform supervisory practice and training are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  19. Feminist Erotica and Agency @ The Love Piece Club

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DALES, Laura

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The Love Piece Club is a shop devoted to sex goods for women, located in Tokyo and online at www.lovepiececlub.com. As well as online shopping, the website offers regular columns, articles and photo-essays on subjects related to sexuality and women's lives. The site and shop are managed by Kitahara Minori, a writer, businesswoman and advocate for feminist erotica. This paper explores the Love Piece Club as a discursive site – its potential meanings and its significance as a feminist work in promoting 'active sexuality as a strategy' for enabling women (Wilkins 2004:332. Addressing the online and printed texts of the LPC, I examine the possibilities for feminist agency inherent in the creation of space(s for feminist erotica. Operating as a virtual site, the LPC can be interpreted as a cyberfeminist space, incorporating (and contributing to understandings of the ways that internet technology affects gender and identity (Chatterjee 2002:200. My aim here is also to tease out the concept of agency, insofar as it can be applied to the work of the LPC and advocates of feminist erotica like Kitahara.

  20. Speculative Before the Turn: Reintroducing Feminist Materialist Performativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Åsberg

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a moment for new conversations and new synergies. While a wealth of contemporary speculative materialisms is currently circulating in academia, art and activism, in this article we focus upon a few ethico-political stakes in the different, loosely affiliated conceptions of ontologies of immanence. More specifically, we are concerned here with the very meaning of speculation itself after the many new headings of immanent ontologies, such as object-oriented ontology (OOO, speculative realism or the (feminist new materialisms. Our concern is a feminist concern, as some of the immanent ontologies seem to actively connect with the varied feminist archive of speculative thought while others seem to actively disconnect from the very same archive. What does this imply for the feminist scholar who is in want of tools for navigating the contemporary landscape of ontologies of immanence? Here, we highlight some important overlapping as well as poignant clashes between various feminist materialist genealogies and OOO/speculative realism. In our discussion we underline the importance of situatedness and context, relationality and affinity—and the possibility for rewiring relations—amid a plethora of lively historiographies and emergent post-disciplinary movements and world-makings.

  1. Do You Understand? Unsettling Interpretative Authority in Feminist Oral History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Fobear

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article interrogates interpretative authority in feminist oral history through a critical Indigenous lens. I argue that critical Indigenous theory provides a useful and needed understanding of participants’ agency and the active role they have in shaping the research. Feminist oral history as a methodology has a long and well-established lineage of exploring difficult questions of power in the relationship between the researcher and the participants. While many feminist oral historians have actively interrogated issues surrounding power within their own research, there are relatively few works that press beyond looking at the one-sided hierarchical relationship between the oral historian and the research participants. The first part provides a theoretical and historical overview of feminist oral history in North America and Europe. From there I bring forward Linda Tuhiwai Smith’s work on decolonizing research and the need to recognize the authority of the participants. I will review the challenges I encountered when conducting oral histories with lesbian, gay, bisexual, and trans (LGBT refugees, and discuss how critical Indigenous theory provided a useful tool in understanding, acknowledging, and representing participants’ agency. In this way, I will intersect critical Indigenous theory with the methodology of feminist oral history and move previous discussions on power and interpretative authority away from focusing just on the role of the researcher and toward embracing the role of the participant as well.

  2. [Orbitofrontal cortex and morality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funayama, Michitaka; Mimura, Masaru

    2012-10-01

    Research on the neural substrates of morality is a recently emerging field in neuroscience. The anatomical structures implicated to play a role in morality include the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, cingulate gyrus, amygdala, hippocampus, and basal ganglia. In particular, the orbitofrontal or ventromedial prefrontal areas are thought to be involved in decision-making, and damage to these areas is likely to cause decision-making deficits and/or problems in impulsive control, which may lead to antisocial and less moral behaviors. In this article, we focus on case presentation and theory development with regard to moral judgment. First, we discuss notable cases and syndromes developing after orbitofrontal/ventromedial prefrontal damage, such as the famous cases of Gage and EVR, cases of childhood orbitofrontal damage, forced collectionism, squalor syndrome, and hypermoral syndrome. We then review the proposed theories and neuropsychological mechanisms underlying decision-making deficits following orbitofrontal/ventromedial prefrontal damage, including the somatic-marker hypothesis, reversal learning, preference judgment, theory of mind, and moral dilemma.

  3. Conciencia moral y Gesinnung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio La Rocca

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Kant ha subrayado el carácter problemático del auto-conocimiento en el campo de la antropología y la psicología: desde sus primeras obras insistió en la imposibilidad de conocer con certeza, sobre la base de las acciones, la disposición moral subjetiva, la única que da a la acción un valor moral. Esta dificultad no se atenúa cuando el juicio moral es dirigido sobre el sujeto mismo. A los problemas cognitivos se añade una tendencia al auto-engaño que está activa en toda la vida moral. Si se mantiene la importancia de este argumento, puede emerger una caracterización de la Gesinnung que la distingue de cualquier “intención” subjetiva. Aquella puede ser concebida más bien como una estructura “objetiva”, independiente de la conciencia subjetiva y análoga a una idea regulativa, que obliga a interpretar las acciones morales sobre la base de un principio que es necesario asumir, pero que no es posible conocer.

  4. Moral sensitivity and moral distress in Iranian critical care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borhani, Fariba; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Mohamadi, Elham; Ghasemi, Erfan; Hoseinabad-Farahani, Mohammad Javad

    2017-06-01

    Moral sensitivity is the foremost prerequisite to ethical performance; a review of literature shows that nurses are sometimes not sensitive enough for a variety of reasons. Moral distress is a frequent phenomenon in nursing, which may result in paradoxes in care, dealing with patients and rendering high-quality care. This may, in turn, hinder the meeting of care objectives, thus affecting social healthcare standards. The present research was conducted to determine the relationship between moral sensitivity and moral distress of nurses in intensive care units. This study is a descriptive-correlation research. Lutzen's moral sensitivity questionnaire and Corley Moral Distress Questionnaire were used to gather data. Participants and research context: A total of 153 qualified nurses working in the hospitals affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences were selected for this study. Subjects were selected by census method. Ethical considerations: After explaining the objectives of the study, all the participants completed and signed the written consent form. To conduct the study, permission was obtained from the selected hospitals. Nurses' average moral sensitivity grade was 68.6 ± 7.8, which shows a moderate level of moral sensitivity. On the other hand, nurses also experienced a moderate level of moral distress (44.8 ± 16.6). Moreover, there was no meaningful statistical relationship between moral sensitivity and moral distress (p = 0.26). Although the nurses' moral sensitivity and moral distress were expected to be high in the intensive care units, it was moderate. This finding is consistent with the results of some studies and contradicts with others. As moral sensitivity is a crucial factor in care, it is suggested that necessary training be provided to develop moral sensitivity in nurses in education and practical environments. Furthermore, removing factors that contribute to moral distress may help decrease it in nurses.

  5. Inverting the Inverted Pyramid: A Conversation about the Use of Feminist Theories to Teach Journalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Danna L.; Geertsema, Margaretha; Barnett, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Teaching is always challenging, and for some teachers who are feminists, teaching journalism is difficult. The tenets of good journalism--objectivity and neutrality--are often antithetical to their feminist values. Educators face the dilemma of how to incorporate feminist sensibilities into teaching journalism--a profession that strives for…

  6. Understanding Program Planning Theory and Practice in a Feminist Community-Based Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken, Susan J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss feminist-program-planning issues, drawing from a critical ethnographic study of a Latin American feminist community-based organization. The research findings discuss the centrality of feminist identity to understanding and analyzing day-to-day program-planning process issues within a feminist…

  7. The Influence of Curricula Content on English Sociology Students' Transformations: The Case of Feminist Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Andrea; Ashwin, Paul; McLean, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Previous research identifies the importance of feminist knowledge for improving gender equity, economic prosperity and social justice for all. However, there are difficulties in embedding feminist knowledge in higher education curricula. Across England, undergraduate sociology is a key site for acquiring feminist knowledge. In a study of four…

  8. Resisting Dominant Discourses: Implications of Indigenous, African Feminist Theory and Methods for Gender and Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilisa, Bagele; Ntseane, Gabo

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we explore tensions between Western gender theory and research, and post-colonial and indigenous feminist standpoints, which challenge us to re-define our roles as feminist-activist educators and researchers working with formerly colonised and historically marginalised communities. We discuss how African and Black feminist approaches…

  9. Dis/Locating the Margins: Gloria Anzaldua and Dynamic Feminist Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahraj, Katy

    2010-01-01

    It is confusing to be a feminist student. Deconstruction is "de rigueur"; reconstruction less so. Awareness rises while answers recede. Feminist students seek out learning experiences that disrupt, empower, and make them feminist students not only by what they learn, but also by how they learn, by the pedagogy in which they engage. Certainly there…

  10. Book review: Neurofeminism: issues at the intersection of feminist theory and cognitive science

    OpenAIRE

    Muntanyola-Saura, Dafne

    2013-01-01

    Neurofeminism is the first interdisciplinary collection of essays to address how recent neuroscience affects traditional feminist issues. Philosophers, psychologists, sociomedical scientists, and feminist scholars explore questions of ‘feminine’ ethics, feminist neuroscience, and overcoming unhelpful pop science books. Reviewed by Dafne Muntanyola-Saura.

  11. Understanding Program Planning Theory and Practice in a Feminist Community-Based Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken, Susan J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss feminist-program-planning issues, drawing from a critical ethnographic study of a Latin American feminist community-based organization. The research findings discuss the centrality of feminist identity to understanding and analyzing day-to-day program-planning process issues within a feminist…

  12. The Influence of Curricula Content on English Sociology Students' Transformations: The Case of Feminist Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Andrea; Ashwin, Paul; McLean, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Previous research identifies the importance of feminist knowledge for improving gender equity, economic prosperity and social justice for all. However, there are difficulties in embedding feminist knowledge in higher education curricula. Across England, undergraduate sociology is a key site for acquiring feminist knowledge. In a study of four…

  13. Inverting the Inverted Pyramid: A Conversation about the Use of Feminist Theories to Teach Journalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Danna L.; Geertsema, Margaretha; Barnett, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Teaching is always challenging, and for some teachers who are feminists, teaching journalism is difficult. The tenets of good journalism--objectivity and neutrality--are often antithetical to their feminist values. Educators face the dilemma of how to incorporate feminist sensibilities into teaching journalism--a profession that strives for…

  14. Book review: Neurofeminism: issues at the intersection of\\ud feminist theory and cognitive science

    OpenAIRE

    Muntanyola-Saura, Dafne

    2013-01-01

    Neurofeminism is the first interdisciplinary collection of essays to address how recent neuroscience affects traditional feminist issues. Philosophers, psychologists, sociomedical scientists, and feminist scholars explore questions of ‘feminine’ ethics, feminist neuroscience, and overcoming unhelpful pop science books. Reviewed by Dafne Muntanyola-Saura.

  15. Popper's Third World: Moral Habits, Moral Habitat and Their Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozolins, Janis Talivaldis

    2010-01-01

    If we accept Popper's idea that the human habitat is described in terms of three worlds, and that there are overlaps between these three worlds, our moral actions and values will also be subject to the same kinds of consideration as a repertoire of behaviours exhibited in a physical environment. We will develop moral habits in a moral habitat and…

  16. Personal Moral Development: Perceptions of 14 Moral Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Nancy; Efinger, Joan; Lacey, Candace H.

    This qualitative study investigated perceptions of 14 contemporary moral leaders regarding primary influences on their moral development. Findings indicated a number of important factors influenced the participants' moral development, including parents, spirituality, education/mentors/friends, and peak experiences. This study has implications for…

  17. Selective Moral Disengagement in the Exercise of Moral Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Albert

    2002-01-01

    Addresses the issue of selective moral disengagement in the exercise of moral agency. Argues that moral functioning is governed by self-reactive selfhood rather than by dispassionate abstract reasoning. Concludes that the massive threats to human welfare stem mainly from deliberate acts of principle rather than from unrestrained acts of impulse.…

  18. From moral agents to moral factors: the structural ethics approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brey, Philip A.E.; Kroes, P.; Verbeek, P.P.C.C.

    2014-01-01

    It has become a popular position in the philosophy of technology to claim that some or all technological artifacts can qualify as moral agents. This position has been developed to account for the moral role of technological artifacts in society and to help clarify the moral responsibility of

  19. From moral agents to moral factors: the structural ethics approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brey, P.A.E.; Kroes, P.; Verbeek, P.P.C.C.

    2014-01-01

    It has become a popular position in the philosophy of technology to claim that some or all technological artifacts can qualify as moral agents. This position has been developed to account for the moral role of technological artifacts in society and to help clarify the moral responsibility of enginee

  20. Transhumanism and moral equality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, James

    2007-10-01

    Conservative thinkers such as Francis Fukuyama have produced a battery of objections to the transhumanist project of fundamentally enhancing human capacities. This article examines one of these objections, namely that by allowing some to greatly extend their capacities, we will undermine the fundamental moral equality of human beings. I argue that this objection is groundless: once we understand the basis for human equality, it is clear that anyone who now has sufficient capacities to count as a person from the moral point of view will continue to count as one even if others are fundamentally enhanced; and it is mistaken to think that a creature which had even far greater capacities than an unenhanced human being should count as more than an equal from the moral point of view.

  1. Moral Violations Reduce Oral Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Cindy; Van Boven, Leaf; Andrade, Eduardo B; Ariely, Dan

    2014-07-01

    Consumers frequently encounter moral violations in everyday life. They watch movies and television shows about crime and deception, hear news reports of corporate fraud and tax evasion, and hear gossip about cheaters and thieves. How does exposure to moral violations influence consumption? Because moral violations arouse disgust and because disgust is an evolutionarily important signal of contamination that should provoke a multi-modal response, we hypothesize that moral violations affect a key behavioral response to disgust: reduced oral consumption. In three experiments, compared with those in control conditions, people drank less water and chocolate milk while (a) watching a film portraying the moral violations of incest, (b) writing about moral violations of cheating or theft, and (c) listening to a report about fraud and manipulation. These findings imply that "moral disgust" influences consumption in ways similar to core disgust, and thus provide evidence for the associations between moral violations, emotions, and consumer behavior.

  2. Sadomasochism or the Art of Loving: Fromm and Feminist Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chancer, Lynn S

    2017-08-01

    Although the work of Erich Fromm is not usually associated with feminist theory, his ideas overall are more consonant with contemporary notions of gender than usually recognized. This paper identifies three aspects of Fromm's thought worth feminist revisiting. The first relates to Fromm's gender-less use of sadomasochism to describe relationships based on dominance and subordination; this framework can be applied to sexist dynamics, though not limited to this context. Second, Fromm's vision of love as presented in The Art of Loving can be seen as kindred with Simone de Beauvoir's critique of romantic love and its flaws. Third, and relatedly, Fromm's concerns about the need for recognition as well as autonomy are compatible with Jessica Benjamin's notion of mutual recognition as developed in her book The Bonds of Love. All told, Frommian and feminist thought appear to be more connected than antagonistic.

  3. The Handmaid’s Tale: A Feminist Dystopia ?

    OpenAIRE

    Atwood, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    The question before us today is : “Is The Handmaid’s Tale a feminist dystopia ?” In order to answer this question we will have to begin by asking “What is feminist ?” ; “What is a dystopia ?” and then we can decide. First, “what is feminist ?” “Feminist” is now like “Christian”, by which I mean it is one of those terms that has developed so many different meanings that we don’t know what we’re talking about unless we become more precise. For instance, is “Christian” the Pope or is it the inte...

  4. A history of women and feminist perspectives in community psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, M A; Mulvey, A

    2000-10-01

    Using an historical framework, we document and assess efforts to include women, women's issues, and feminism in community psychology and in the Society for Community Research and Action (SCRA). Initiatives of the SCRA Task Force/Committee on Women are traced from its inception to present. We also chronicle the dilemmas and difficulties of moving toward a feminist community psychology. The history is divided into five phases. Each phase is described in terms of women's involvement in the field and efforts to integrate feminist content into research and practice of the field. Reflections on the qualities of contexts that have both supported and inhibited inclusion are identified. We look to this history to try to understand the observation that while women have been increasingly visible in leadership roles and women's professional development has been encouraged, less progress has been made toward building a feminist community psychology.

  5. The Handmaid’s Tale: A Feminist Dystopia ?

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The question before us today is : “Is The Handmaid’s Tale a feminist dystopia ?” In order to answer this question we will have to begin by asking “What is feminist ?” ; “What is a dystopia ?” and then we can decide. First, “what is feminist ?” “Feminist” is now like “Christian”, by which I mean it is one of those terms that has developed so many different meanings that we don’t know what we’re talking about unless we become more precise. For instance, is “Christian” the Pope or is it the inte...

  6. Altruismo e morale, percorsi separati?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Margoni

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Alcune delle più note teorie evolutive della morale affermano che il giudizio e il comportamento morale sono funzionali all’aumento del benessere del gruppo di appartenenza. Questo tipo di spiegazione dell’emergenza della morale, che sarebbe funzionale alla massimizzazione del benessere del gruppo di appartenenza, poggia su teorie come la selezione parentale. La semplice osservazione del giudizio morale umano ci dice però che...

  7. Altruismo e morale, percorsi separati?

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Margoni

    2013-01-01

    Alcune delle più note teorie evolutive della morale affermano che il giudizio e il comportamento morale sono funzionali all’aumento del benessere del gruppo di appartenenza. Questo tipo di spiegazione dell’emergenza della morale, che sarebbe funzionale alla massimizzazione del benessere del gruppo di appartenenza, poggia su teorie come la selezione parentale. La semplice osservazione del giudizio morale umano ci dice però che...

  8. Moral and Ethical Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    specific situations. Kohlberg (1969, 1983) similarly suggested that general moral principles arise from rational processes, and that everyday moral...Cognitive Science, 7, 320-324. [17] Hare, R. (1981). Moral Thinking: Its Levels, Method, and Point. Oxford, UK: Clarendon Press. [18] Kohlberg , L...pp. 347- 480). Chicago: Rand McNally and Co. [19] Kohlberg , L., Levine, C., & Hewer, A. (1983). Moral Stages: A Current Formulation and a Response

  9. Negotiating Moral Value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Lene; Svendsen, Mette N.

    2015-01-01

    In 2004, twelve capuchin monkeys were moved from the labs of the Danish psychiatric hospital of Sankt Hans to a small private-owned zoo in another part of Denmark in order to be rehabilitated. These monkeys were the last nonhuman primates to be used as research animals in Danish biomedical...... being considered a biological resource serving as a model of man, the monkeys had become moral subjects with a claim to a life suiting their natural needs. Simultaneously, the monkeys became instrumental in creating moral legitimacy for the actors involved in their rescue. What we see is an instance...

  10. Moralizing Food Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coff, Christian Eyde

    2015-01-01

    Food technologies are common on many levels in society and used by both food professionals and consumers. Food technologies are not neutral. They inform and shape the behaviour of people. This paper presents a theoretical framework for analysing the mediating role of food technology and its...... influence on food ethics. Post-phenomenology and the idea of a technologically mediated morality are central theoretical approaches. Four elements are included in the analytical framework: perception, interpretation, intentionality, and mediated morality. The framework is applied to two cases; food safety...

  11. "Hunger Hurts, but Starving Works". The Moral Conversion to Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, Gisella

    2017-03-01

    This article aims to shed light on the self-perceptions of people with eating disorders in Malta and Italy through a deep understanding of their narratives. In contrast to the biomedical perception of the phenomenon and in opposition with the prevalent feminist theories on the subject, I consider eating disorders as the result of self-transformative processes. I suggest that anorexics, bulimics and binge eaters are actively and deliberately engaged in a project of moral self-transformation that is culturally defined. The moral transformations of women with eating disorders in Malta and Italy, the two considered contexts of this research, reflect the social expectations of women in these societies. The drastic changes in personal attitudes towards both food and the body that characterise eating disorders are the result of a complete dedication to the moral values embodied in thinness, namely the control of bodily needs and pleasure. The self-transformative process of people with eating disorders can be understood as a form of moral conversion along a continuum of increasing control over hunger: the higher the control, the higher the level of satisfaction and the degree of moral conversion achieved. Considering the general low recovery rates of people with eating disorders, this approach helps in the understanding of why people who are diagnosed with an eating disorder accept medical definitions and treatments to different extents.

  12. Carol Gilligan's theory of sex differences in the development of moral reasoning during adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muuss, R E

    1988-01-01

    Gilligan's work, which focuses on sex differences in moral reasoning, the perception of violence, the resolution of sexual dilemmas and abortion decisions, poses a major challenge to Kohlberg's theory by introducing a feminist perspective of moral development. Kohlberg had shown that the average female attained a moral judgment rating of stage three (good boy-nice girl), while adolescent males score at level four (law and order) and are more likely to move on to postconventional levels. Gilligan suggests that these findings reveal a gender bias, not that females are less mature than boys. Men and women follow different voices. Men tend to organize social relationships in a hierarchical order and subscribe to a morality of rights. Females value interpersonal connectedness, care, sensitivity, and responsibility to people. Kohlberg's scoring criteria give the interpersonal care orientations of females lower ratings than the principled justice orientation. Hence, Gilligan identifies different developmental stages for females. However, she does not claim that one system is better; both are equally valid. Only by integrating these complementary male (justice) and female (care) orientations will we be able to realize our full human potential in moral development.

  13. Gender Differences in Moral Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunner-Winkler, Gertrud; Meyer-Nikele, Marion; Wohlrab, Doris

    2007-01-01

    Moral gender differences have been discussed in terms of Kohlbergian stages and content of orientations and taken to correspond to universal stable male and female features. The present study instead focuses on moral motivation and explains differences in terms of role expectations. We assessed moral motivation in 203 adolescents by a newly…

  14. Philosophy, Casuistry, and Moral Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullinwider, Robert K.

    2010-01-01

    Moral educators have little to learn from the moral theories in which philosophers routinely trade. These theories--including those by Slote, Hume, and Kant--leave behind the concrete world in which the moral educator labors. As interesting as they may be, they merely devise alternative routes to the same destination--to the main general features…

  15. Public Spaces and Moral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Ronald B.

    2009-01-01

    The questions of how and where to do moral education have been with us since antiquity. But, over the past couple of hundred years we have sent moral education to the margins within higher education. Using the historical analysis of Julie Reuben, the moral psychological work of Augusto Blasi, and the educational philosophical work of John Dewey, I…

  16. Moral Intelligence in the Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2009-01-01

    Moral intelligence is newer and less studied than the more established cognitive, emotional and social intelligences, but has great potential to improve our understanding of learning and behavior. Moral intelligence refers to the ability to apply ethical principles to personal goals, values and actions. The construct of moral intelligence consists…

  17. Race, Culture and Moral Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dummett, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Maintains that the great need in moral education is to consider general moral standards and arguments first and apply these to behavior affecting racial inequality, rather than to start from a concentration on racism, working back towards morality. Considers the consequences of confusing race with culture or viewing religion only as a…

  18. Confronting moral distress in Nursing: recognizing nurses as moral agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco A. Carnevale

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The concept of moral distress has brought forth a substantively different way of understanding some of the difficulties confronted by nurses in their practice. This concept highlights that nurses' distress can be an indication of nurses' conscientious moral engagement with their professional practice that has confronted practices or an environment that impedes them from acting according to their own ethical standards. Moral distress can be an indicator of problems in nurses' practice environments. This concept is described and related to moral agency in nursing practice. Selected research on moral distress is reviewed, followed by a discussion of recommendations for addressing this problem.

  19. Theological ethics, moral philosophy, and public moral discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsen, Albert R

    1994-03-01

    The advent and growth of bioethics in the United States in the late 1960s and early 1970s precipitated an era of public moral discourse, that is, the deliberate attempt to analyze and formulate moral argument for use in public policy. The language for rational discussion of moral matters evolved from the parent disciplines of moral philosophy and theological ethics, as well as from the idioms of a secular, pluralistic world that was searching for policy answers to difficult bioethical questions. This article explores the basis and content of the unique contributions of both theological and philosophical ethics to the development of public moral discourse.

  20. Moral knowledge: some reflections on moral controversies, incompatible moral epistemologies, and the culture wars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, H Tristram

    2004-01-01

    An authentic Christian bioethical account of abortion must take into consideration the conflicting epistemologies that separate Christian moral theology from secular moral philosophy. Moral epistemologies directed to the issue of abortion that fail to appreciate the orientation of morality to God will also fail adequately to appreciate the moral issues at stake. Christian accounts of the bioethics of abortion that reduce moral-theological considerations to moral-philosophical considerations will not only fail to appreciate fully the offense of abortion, but morally mislead. This article locates the bioethics of abortion within the theology of the Church of the first millennium, emphasizing that abortion was prohibited, whether or not one considered the embryo or fetus to be ensouled.

  1. An Essay on Feminist Thinking in Russia: To Be Born a Feminist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Alexandrovich Kondakov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on one particular life history of a Russian feminist. It analyses a narrative biography interview with one of the leading Russian feminist thinkers, Olga Lipovskaya, who was a founder of the Petersburg Centre for Gender Issues and promoted gender equality in Russia. The study examines the current situation of Russian feminist thinking by contextualisation of this biography into a larger scale of political and cultural transformations that have occurred after the fall of the USSR. Firstly, I provide contextual details, in which feminism in its contemporary form in Russia is developing as a political and scientific practice. Secondly, the paper raises problems of the method of narrative interview. Finally, I find common points of this particular life history and the history of the country once known as Soviet Union. Este artículo está basado en la particular biografía de una feminista rusa. En él se analiza una entrevista biografía narrativa con una de las principales pensadoras feministas rusas, Olga Lipovskaya, una de las fundadoras del Petersburg Centre for Gender Issues y promovió la igualdad de género en Rusia. El estudio analiza la situación actual del pensamiento feminista ruso, contextualizando esta biografía en un marco más amplio de las transformaciones políticas y culturales que se han producido después de la caída de la URSS. En primer lugar, se contextualiza cómo el feminismo ruso contemporáneo se está desarrollando como una práctica política y científica. En segundo lugar, el artículo plantea los problemas del método de la entrevista narrativa. Finalmente, se destacan puntos comunes entre esta biografía particular y la historia del país que en su día se denominó Unión Soviética. DOWNLOAD THIS PAPER FROM SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2195213

  2. [Feminist theory: the challenge of turning into a paradigm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, M S

    1997-01-01

    From crisis of traditional paradigm and having feminist criticism as an epicentre, this work attempts to present the challenge feminist theory faces for becoming a new paradigm and for that, a bibliographical research is accomplished, sustained by literature regarding to this theme. It is evidentiated that the challenge of being a paradigm in ascension makes this theory to face theoretical, conceptual and methodological problems which need a joined effort to be deepened and solved. However, this theory development depend not only on the academic world but is also linked to changes in social structure for it will more easily emerge, from a more equalitary society, knowledge with no domination of gender.

  3. Feminist Interpretation of Doris Lessing's The Golden Notebook

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王彦

    2010-01-01

    Doris Lessing is undoubtedly one of the most influential women writers in the 20th century. In 1962,her masterpiece The Golden Notebook was published. It is regarded as the companion volume of Simon de Beauvoir's The Second Sex. The novel soon became popular among the feminists because of its realistic description about women's independent consciousness and their living condition. This thesis has been written with the aim to interpret The Golden Notebook from the perspective of feminism. The novel's theme,structure,characters,narrative style serve well for the aim of feminist interpretation. The thesis also innovatively discusses the challenges to feminism reflected from The Golden Notebook.

  4. A feminist model of family care: practice and policy directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooyman, N R; Gonyea, J G

    1999-01-01

    Using a feminist perspective, this article examines women's experiences in caring for older family members with chronic illnesses or disabilities. Central to this analysis are the concepts of the social construction of gender-based inequities in caring, the interconnections between generations of women as givers and receivers of care, and variations in family care by gender, race, ethnicity, social class and sexual orientation. The authors critique current practice interventions and policies and purpose models for the elimination of gender-based inequities in caregiving and the provision of caregiver choice and empowerment for women and men, including feminist models of practice with women caregivers and economic and long-term care supports.

  5. Collective Action in the Women’s Movement and the Feminist Movement in Cali: Notes from Feminist Historiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girlandrey Sandoval Acosta

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The following article explores the feminist and women’s movements in Cali between 1980 and 1986, a period greatly influenced by second wave feminism, from a historical perspective. Based on feminist historiography, it reconstructs the origins and development of the Coordinadora de Mujeres (1981. At the same time, through the lens of collective action, it gives an account of the repertoire of the activities of organized women, the dynamics of the social movement and the generation of distinct public and non-public challenges, interpreted here in terms of increased political participation. Finally, it will reflect upon the redefinition of the concept of politics developed by feminist activists and theorists.

  6. Moral panic, moral regulation, and the civilizing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hier, Sean

    2016-09-01

    This article compares two analytical frameworks ostensibly formulated to widen the focus of moral panic studies. The comparative analysis suggests that attempts to conceptualize moral panics in terms of decivilizing processes have neither substantively supplemented the explanatory gains made by conceptualizing moral panic as a form of moral regulation nor provided a viable alternative framework that better explains the dynamics of contemporary moral panics. The article concludes that Elias's meta-theory of the civilizing process potentially provides explanatory resources to investigate a possible historical-structural shift towards the so-called age of (a)moral panic; the analytical demands of such a project, however, require a sufficiently different line of inquiry than the one encouraged by both the regulatory and decivilizing perspectives on moral panic. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2016.

  7. Morality and Foreign Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissinger, Henry

    1985-01-01

    Morality as an enduring element in United States foreign policy is discussed. In order to strengthen the steady purpose and responsible involvement of the American people, human rights policy must be presented in the context of a realistic assessment of world affairs. (RM)

  8. Sustainability as Moral Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Merrily S.; Hart-Steffes, Jeanne S.

    2012-01-01

    When one considers sustainability as a moral action, there are equally complex realities at hand--climate change, resource depletion, water and land rights. One author describes this broad sense of sustainability as "the connection of specific social and environmental problems to the functioning of human and ecological systems" (Jenkins, 2011).…

  9. Overconfidence and Moral Hazard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Rosa, Leonidas Enrique

    In this paper, I study the effects of overconfidence on incentive contracts in a moral-hazard framework in which principal and agent knowingly hold asymmetric beliefs regarding the probability of success of their enterprise. Agent overconfidence can have conflicting effects on the equilibrium...

  10. Overconfidence and Moral Hazard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Rosa, Leonidas Enrique

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, I study the effects of overconfidence on incentive contracts in a moral-hazard framework. Agent overconfidence can have conflicting effects on the equilibrium contract. On the one hand, an optimistic or overconfident agent disproportionately values success-contingent payments...

  11. Hospice: Morality and Economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Donald E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines hospice concepts and proposals to identify moral problems presented. Particular attention is given to the relationship between the hospice concept's alleged humanitarianism and emphasis on cost-efficiency. Suggests that cost emphasis raises serious questions about the meaning of hospice concepts. (JAC)

  12. Discourse and tractable morality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, de G.

    2013-01-01

    When managerial decisions are examined, somehow the business context must be included in the analysis. In this chapter, causalities that transcend individuals are promoted as unit of analysis in empirical moral research, namely, discourse. Studying managerial decisions in their discursive context is

  13. The Morality of Harm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Paulo; Holbrook, Colin; Piazza, Jared

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the range of concerns people weigh when evaluating the acceptability of harmful actions and propose a new perspective on the relationship between harm and morality. With this aim, we examine Kelly, Stich, Haley, Eng and Fessler's [Kelly, D., Stich, S., Haley, K., Eng, S., & Fessler, D. (2007). Harm, affect, and the…

  14. Moral behavior in sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavussanu, Maria; Stanger, Nicholas

    2017-08-01

    In this review paper, we provide an overview of recent research on prosocial and antisocial behaviors, in the context of sport, focusing mainly on antecedents and consequences of these behaviors. Motivational variables such as task orientation, mastery climate, autonomous motivation, and autonomy supportive climate are likely to promote prosocial behavior, whereas ego orientation, performance climate, controlled motivation, and controlling climate may lead to antisocial behavior. The effects of some motivational variables (i.e., controlled motivation and controlling climate) on antisocial behavior may be mediated by moral disengagement, which has been consistently linked to antisocial behavior across a number of studies. Two moral variables, moral identity and empathy have been found to inhibit antisocial behavior, and their effects are due to anticipated guilt for acting antisocially. With respect to consequences of teammate behavior, some evidence suggests that prosocial behavior may enhance the recipient's enjoyment, effort, commitment, and performance, whereas antisocial behavior could lead to anger. Finally, the frequency of prosocial and antisocial behaviors varies as a function of context: Student athletes display more antisocial behavior towards their opponents compared to their fellow students but also more prosocial behavior towards their teammates than towards their fellow students. In sum, both motivational and moral variables predict prosocial and antisocial behaviors in sport, and these behaviors can have important consequences for the recipient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Moral and metaphors:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Læssøe, Jeppe

    2005-01-01

    This summary is based on a workshop discussion at the conference "Elusive Consumtion", Gothenburg, June 2002. The workshop took it point of departure in a keynote speech held by Richard Wilk, Indiana University, USA, on 'Morals and Metaphors'. Consumption is not an exact, but a fuzzy concept. Thus...

  16. Moral actor, selfish agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimer, Jeremy A; Schaefer, Nicola K; Oakes, Harrison

    2014-05-01

    People are motivated to behave selfishly while appearing moral. This tension gives rise to 2 divergently motivated selves. The actor-the watched self-tends to be moral; the agent-the self as executor-tends to be selfish. Three studies present direct evidence of the actor's and agent's distinct motives. To recruit the self-as-actor, we asked people to rate the importance of various goals. To recruit the self-as-agent, we asked people to describe their goals verbally. In Study 1, actors claimed their goals were equally about helping the self and others (viz., moral); agents claimed their goals were primarily about helping the self (viz., selfish). This disparity was evident in both individualist and collectivist cultures, attesting to the universality of the selfish agent. Study 2 compared actors' and agents' motives to those of people role-playing highly prosocial or selfish exemplars. In content (Study 2a) and in the impressions they made on an outside observer (Study 2b), actors' motives were similar to those of the prosocial role-players, whereas agents' motives were similar to those of the selfish role-players. Study 3 accounted for the difference between the actor and agent: Participants claimed that their agent's motives were the more realistic and that their actor's motives were the more idealistic. The selfish agent/moral actor duality may account for why implicit and explicit measures of the same construct diverge, and why feeling watched brings out the better angels of human nature.

  17. Moral Education in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Luhmer

    1990-01-01

    Explores how religion is a pervasive influence in moral education in both the home and school in Japan, despite an official secular policy. Points out that after 1945 nationalism was replaced by secular social studies. Finds western thought included with Buddhism and Confucianism in government decrees on the curriculum. Places newly reemerging…

  18. Moral Leadership in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, William D., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The genesis of the moral leadership concept in educational administration and examples of studies exploring this idea during the 1979-2003 period are discussed. The author recommends more contextually sensitive descriptive studies with a focus on the social relations among school leaders and others, giving particular attention, in a…

  19. Rethinking Moral Responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vedder, A.H.; Johnson, D.; Moor, J.; Tavani, H.

    2000-01-01

    Questions regarding the moral responsibility of Internet access and service providers relating to possible negative aspects of information on the Internet call for a reassessment of the ways in which we think about attributing blame, guilt, and duties of reparation and compensation. They invite us t

  20. Discourse and tractable morality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, de G.

    2013-01-01

    When managerial decisions are examined, somehow the business context must be included in the analysis. In this chapter, causalities that transcend individuals are promoted as unit of analysis in empirical moral research, namely, discourse. Studying managerial decisions in their discursive context is

  1. Philosophy and Morality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    Philosophical thinking which has stood the test of time is summarized in this document. The rationale is that all students benefit from studies of philosophical thinking emphasizing moral standards. Thinkers included are: Plato, Aristotle, Peter Abelard, Francis Bacon, Sir Thomas More, Thomas Campanella, Thomas Hobbes, Benedict Spinoza, John…

  2. Ethics, Morality, and Mores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Royal

    It is possible to approach, but not to achieve, the goal of perfection. To the three traditional philosophical values of truth, goodness, and beauty it is appropriate to append the important values of wisdom, humanness, and grace. Among the resources available toward the perfection of behavior are ethics, morality, and mores. The first chapter of…

  3. Striving for the moral self : The effects of recalling past moral actions on future moral behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordan, J.; Mullen, E.; Murnighan, J.K.

    People's desires to see themselves as moral actors can contribute to their striving for and achievement of a sense of self-completeness. The authors use self-completion theory to predict (and show) that recalling one's own (im)moral behavior leads to compensatory rather than consistent moral action

  4. Striving for the moral self : The effects of recalling past moral actions on future moral behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordan, J.; Mullen, E.; Murnighan, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    People's desires to see themselves as moral actors can contribute to their striving for and achievement of a sense of self-completeness. The authors use self-completion theory to predict (and show) that recalling one's own (im)moral behavior leads to compensatory rather than consistent moral action

  5. Defining Features of Moral Sensitivity and Moral Motivation: Pathways to Moral Reasoning in Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Kelly R.; Worthley, Joanna S.; Testerman, John K.; Mahoney, Marita L.

    2006-01-01

    Kohlberg's theory of moral development explores the roles of cognition and emotion but focuses primarily on cognition. Contemporary post-formal theories lead to the conclusion that skills resulting from cognitive-affective integration facilitate consistency between moral judgement and moral behaviour. Rest's four-component model of moral…

  6. [The moral values of Malthus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilquin, E

    1998-01-01

    "More than his other writing, Malthus' first essay 'Essay on the Principle of Population' is a militant text, its arguments based more strongly on moral positions than scientific data.... In Malthusian demographic theory, 'vice' and 'moral constraint', factors in human behaviour, play a fundamental role that is indissociable from their moral significance. With his primary concern to preserve human freedom, but torn between his tendency toward idealism and his demand for realism, Malthus developed a pragmatic morality, a morality of the lesser evil, today described as 'Malthusian pessimism'." (EXCERPT)

  7. Socrates, discussion and moral education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembert, Ron B.

    1995-01-01

    For Socrates, as he appears in Plato's dialogues, the process of discussion is essential for preparing human beings to lead a moral life. Only through discussion, Socrates maintains, can we be led to an understanding of such concepts as wisdom, courage and justice. The author of this article believes that the Socratic notion of the moral value of discussion is still valid. In support of this view, he examines two recent works: Dialogues on Moral Education by John Wilson and Barbara Cowell, and Moral Education, Secular and Religious by John L. Elias. Finally, the author suggests how the Socratic concept of dialogue might be used in moral education today.

  8. Linguistic innovation in feminist utopian fiction Linguistic innovation in feminist utopian fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre Burton

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I shall be discussing some recent feminist utopian novels and some of the more interesting implications and questions we might draw from a close study of the linguistic innovations in them. Consistently, we find that defamiliarisation of the language of the idealised world is a recurrent characteristic. I shall begin by describing four of these texts to you, in general. I shall go on to map out the types of defamiliarisation they offer the reader, linking this with the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis which asserts, in its strongest form, a determining connection between a culture's language, its thought and its reality. The implications and questions I want to draw from these comparisons are two-fold. The first is socio-linguistic and concerns real life issues of whether linguistic change is a necessary part of conceptual change. In this paper I shall be discussing some recent feminist utopian novels and some of the more interesting implications and questions we might draw from a close study of the linguistic innovations in them. Consistently, we find that defamiliarisation of the language of the idealised world is a recurrent characteristic. I shall begin by describing four of these texts to you, in general. I shall go on to map out the types of defamiliarisation they offer the reader, linking this with the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis which asserts, in its strongest form, a determining connection between a culture's language, its thought and its reality. The implications and questions I want to draw from these comparisons are two-fold. The first is socio-linguistic and concerns real life issues of whether linguistic change is a necessary part of conceptual change.

  9. Linguistic innovation in feminist utopian fiction Linguistic innovation in feminist utopian fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre Burton

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I shall be discussing some recent feminist utopian novels and some of the more interesting implications and questions we might draw from a close study of the linguistic innovations in them. Consistently, we find that defamiliarisation of the language of the idealised world is a recurrent characteristic. I shall begin by describing four of these texts to you, in general. I shall go on to map out the types of defamiliarisation they offer the reader, linking this with the Sapir -Whorl hypothesis which asserts, in its strongest form, a determining connection between a culture's language, its thought and its reality. The implications and questions I want to draw from these comparisons are two-fold. The first is socio -linguistic and concerns real life issues of whether linguistic change is a necessary part of conceptual change. In this paper I shall be discussing some recent feminist utopian novels and some of the more interesting implications and questions we might draw from a close study of the linguistic innovations in them. Consistently, we find that defamiliarisation of the language of the idealised world is a recurrent characteristic. I shall begin by describing four of these texts to you, in general. I shall go on to map out the types of defamiliarisation they offer the reader, linking this with the Sapir -Whorl hypothesis which asserts, in its strongest form, a determining connection between a culture's language, its thought and its reality. The implications and questions I want to draw from these comparisons are two-fold. The first is socio -linguistic and concerns real life issues of whether linguistic change is a necessary part of conceptual change.

  10. Gender equality and women's absolute status: a test of the feminist models of rape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kimberly; Vieraitis, Lynne M; Britto, Sarah

    2006-04-01

    Feminist theory predicts both a positive and negative relationship between gender equality and rape rates. Although liberal and radical feminist theory predicts that gender equality should ameliorate rape victimization, radical feminist theorists have argued that gender equality may increase rape in the form of male backlash. Alternatively, Marxist criminologists focus on women's absolute socioeconomic status rather than gender equality as a predictor of rape rates, whereas socialist feminists combine both radical and Marxist perspectives. This study uses factor analysis to overcome multicollinearity limitations of past studies while exploring the relationship between women's absolute and relative socioeconomic status on rape rates in major U.S. cities using 2000 census data. The findings indicate support for both the Marxist and radical feminist explanations of rape but no support for the ameliorative hypothesis. These findings support a more inclusive socialist feminist theory that takes both Marxist and radical feminist hypotheses into account.

  11. Intersecting race and gender in feminist theories of women's psychological development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, D

    1997-01-01

    Although self-in-relation theory is the predominant feminist position on women's psychological development in the nursing literature, other voices and views, particularly from feminists of color, have challenged the thinking about the psychology of women. This article explores the intersectionality of race and gender in feminist theories of women's psychological development and mental health. It begins with a brief review of psychoanalytic feminism, focusing primarily on the work of Chodorow and what is labeled "self-in-relation" theory as it has been applied in (primarily mental health) nursing. This is followed by a discussion of the perspectives of several feminists of color concerning women's psychological development, perspectives that both challenge and concur with the views of psychoanalytic feminists. The final section presents the implications of these various feminist perspectives (and their challenges to each other) for feminist work in mental health nursing.

  12. Law and Morals. Prolegomena (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae V. DURĂ

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In the pages of this study we have emphasized the relation between Law and Morals, between what is just and in just, talking thus not only about the nature of the Law and of the Morals, but also about the relation between the juridical norms and the moral principles. An evaluation of the historical process of the emergence of Law and Morals – be it brief – has enabled us to notice that the Law has evolved step by step from the Moral norms and from the customs of a moral nature, hence the conclusion that the positive juridical norms should also express, in their content, values of a moral nature. In fact, from an ontological point of view, between Law and Morals could not be a divorce, since the notions of “righteousness” and of “justice” themselves are categories of Morals. That is why the theory of juridical positivism, according to which the rule of Law can exist in the absence of Morals since the state is the only source of Law, has no credibility both from a historical and philosophical and from a juridical point of view. Finally, the increasingly higher interest of the philosophers and jurists of our time to perceive and express the content of the nature of Law adequately and, ipso facto, the relation between this one and Morals, was also determined by the international and European legislation regarding the human fundamental rights and liberties.

  13. Structural flexibility of moral judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, D L; Denton, K L; Vermeulen, S C; Carpendale, J I; Bush, A

    1991-12-01

    One of the central assumptions of Kohlberg's theory of moral development--that moral judgment is organized in structures of the whole--was examined. Thirty men and 30 women were given 2 dilemmas from Kohlberg's Moral Judgment Interview, a 3rd involving prosocial behavior, and a 4th involving impaired driving. Half the Ss responded to the prosocial and impaired-driving dilemmas from the perspective of a hypothetical character, and half responded from the perspective of the self. No sex or perspective differences in moral maturity were observed. Ss scored highest in moral maturity on Kohlberg's dilemmas, intermediate on the prosocial dilemma, and lowest on the impaired-driving dilemma. In partial support of Kohlberg's contention that his test assesses moral competence, there was a negative linear relationship between scores on his test and the proportion of Stage 2 judgments on the 2 other dilemmas. An interactional model of moral judgment is advanced.

  14. The erosion of moral education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Robin

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses two closely related themes: first, the lack of provision of moral education; second, the loss of moral direction in society. The author argues that a proper moral education is one that provides an adequate understanding of the "moral sphere", just as the study of mathematics involves acquiring a grasp of mathematical thinking. While moral norms appear to differ from one culture to another, the author contends that there is a basic commonality at the level of essential moral principles. The paper concludes by arguing against any system where rights — particularly those of "any loosely definable minority" — restrict the freedom of others. The author laments that "justice" has become limited to a political definition of what is just. Thus politics has replaced morality as the arbiter of our behaviour.

  15. Ethnographic Locations: The Geographies of Feminist Post-Structural Ethnography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Kate

    2013-01-01

    The feminist post-structuralist emphasis on social location has yielded crucial insights within debates about power and reflexivity in educational research; however, spatial location is also at play in the formation of educational ethnographies. Reflecting upon various aspects of a research project with rural students in Ontario, Canada, this…

  16. Gender & Education Association: A Case Study in Feminist Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Miriam E.

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on feminist activist academics who were instrumental in creating the UK Gender & Education Association at the turn of the twenty-first century. Drawing on my own intellectual biography (David, M. E. 2003. "Personal and Political: Feminisms, Sociology and Family Lives" Stoke-on-Trent. Trentham Books.) linked to…

  17. Moving Forward: A Feminist Analysis of Mobile Music Streaming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Werner

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The importance of understanding gender, space and mobility as co-constructed in public space has been emphasized by feminist researchers (Massey 2005, Hanson 2010. And within feminist theory materiality, affect and emotions has been described as central for experienced subjectivity (Ahmed 2012. Music listening while moving through public space has previously been studied as a way of creating a private auditory bubble for the individual (Bull 2000, Cahir and Werner 2013 and in this article feminist theory on emotion (Ahmed 2010 and space (Massey 2005 is employed in order to understand mobile music streaming. More specifically it discusses what can happen when mobile media technology is used to listen to music in public space and investigates interconnectedness of bodies, music, technology and space. The article is based on autoethnographic material of mobile music streaming in public and concludes that a forward movement shaped by happiness is a desired result of mobile music streaming. The valuing of "forward" is critically examined from the point of feminist theory and the failed music listening moments are also discussed in terms of emotion and space.

  18. The Indecisive Feminist: Study of Anne Sexton's Revisionist Fairy Tales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Nadia Fayidh

    2015-01-01

    Fairy tales to female writers are major resource for their abundant writings, but for the feminist poets since 1960s, they become essential subject matter to often deal with in their literary production. With the motivation to address the conventional tradition of patriarchal society, and re-address the stereotype females inhabiting these tales,…

  19. Sonorous Voice and Feminist Teaching: Lessons from Cavarero

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    I claim that Adriana Cavarero's concept of sonorous voice is significant in feminist teaching because, as she argues, dominant concepts of voice refer to voice in semantic terms thereby discounting voice in sonorous terms. This process of "devocalization", spanning the history of Western philosophy, devalues the uniqueness embodied in…

  20. Gender Attitudes, Feminist Identity, and Body Images among College Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, Thomas F.; Ancis, Julie R.; Strachan, Melissa D.

    1997-01-01

    Examines how women's body-image experiences relate to their own gender attitudes and ideologies. Responses from 122 undergraduate women reveal minimal relationships between body-image attitudes and either feminist identity or adherence to traditional gender beliefs at individual/stereotypic or societal levels. Male-female social interactions…

  1. Gestalt Therapy and Feminist Therapy: A Proposed Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enns, Carolyn Zerbe

    1987-01-01

    Offers a proposal for integrating the Gestalt goals of self-responsibility with a feminist perspective that places value on the web of relationships in women's lives and focuses attention on the environmental constraints and socialization that affect women's choices. Discusses Gestalt techniques for enhancing women's growth and examines…

  2. Sonorous Voice and Feminist Teaching: Lessons from Cavarero

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    I claim that Adriana Cavarero's concept of sonorous voice is significant in feminist teaching because, as she argues, dominant concepts of voice refer to voice in semantic terms thereby discounting voice in sonorous terms. This process of "devocalization", spanning the history of Western philosophy, devalues the uniqueness embodied in…

  3. Negotiating and Navigating my Fat body - feminist autoethnographic encounters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Smailes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two years I have been consciously critically engaging with autoethnography as a way of gaining insight into the cultural phenomenon of being a fat woman. Autoethnography is an in-depth and engaged approach which opens up spaces of particular ways of being which have often been colonised by particular discourse in formed by invested situational knowledge. This process has involved me drawing on past journals, memories and re-memory work and present interwoven layers of process and reflection (Ronai 1995. It has been and is challenging, Chatham-Carpenter (2010 writes about the difficulties of being with and exposing vulnerable 'selves' - a self which is still very much part of the present, rather than a neatly contained and managed 'identity'. So part of what I will do in this article is consider the critical process of my feminist autoethnography, interweaving and responding to the literature' in feminist research, feminisms, autoethnography, critical fat studies, and intersectionality.  A key to this exploration is the experience of researching the experiences of being a fat woman, from within a feminist commitment - at some level I want to consider whether and how the experience reflects Averett, Soper's (2011, 371-372 suggestion that "Feminist autoethnography is intended to resist the social and institutional norms that often dictate research. It promotes women's voices and unique experiences".

  4. The future of mothering: reproductive technology and feminist theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donchin, A

    1986-01-01

    An exploration of (I) alternative perspectives toward recent innovations in reproductive technology: support for new techniques for the sake of the kind of feminist future they facilitate; unqualified opposition despite therapeutic benefit to individual women; or qualified opposition depending upon specific threats to women's interests and (II) relationships between these positions and values bound up with mothering practices.

  5. A feminist analysis of women's depression during the childbearing year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJoseph, J F

    1997-01-01

    This article proposes a set of questions about difference, location, power, and representation that nurses can use to critique qualitative and quantitative studies for the utility of their findings in specific practice settings. It then uses these questions to conduct a feminist postmodern critique of a brief report of a longitudinal study about women's depression patterns throughout the childbearing year.

  6. Feminist change revisited: Gender mainstreaming as slow revolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davids, T.; Driel, F.T.M. van; Parren, F.B.

    2014-01-01

    Within the growing body of literature on gender mainstreaming, intense and vivid discussions on an assumed loss of transformative potential and a feminist, revolutionary promise of change exist. Our analysis uses a paradigm shift in thinking on power and social relations, for analysing conceptualisa

  7. Changes in the Feminist Perspective: From 1970 - 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Carol E.; McDiarmid, Colin G.

    Many studies of attitudes toward feminism have investigated differences between the sexes or have examined a specific issue across time. To investigate attitude changes toward a variety of feminist issues over a 10-year period, a replication study was designed for college students in a midwestern university. A questionnaire measuring attitudes…

  8. No More Nice Girls: Feminist Art as Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullarkey, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    Nothing says "the sixties" like the word "revision," and, in keeping with those times, the fledgling feminist art movement dismissed hard-won mastery as "mere skill" and snubbed the canon of Western art as evidence of male dominion over the criteria for legitimacy and achievement. In debunking the myth of the Great (male) Artist, the women's…

  9. Counterhegemonic Acts: Appropriation as a Feminist Rhetorical Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugart, Helene A.

    1997-01-01

    Explores the rhetorical strategy of feminist appropriation to assess its function as a counterhegemonic tactic. Analyzes two appropriations: the Australian film "Shame" (appropriating "Shane") and Margaret Atwood's poems "Orpheus (1)" and "Eurydice" as a collective appropriation of the classical myth.…

  10. Situating the Greenham Archaeology: An Autoethnography of a Feminist Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armstrong, Kayt; Marshall, Yvonne; Roseneil, Sasha

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses an ongoing investigation into the material cultural legacy and memory of the Greenham Common Women's Peace Camp. Using an autoethnographic approach it explores how a project at Greenham became an exercise in feminist practice, which aimed to stay close to the spirit and ethics o

  11. Linking nursing theory and practice: a critical-feminist approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, Jane M

    2005-01-01

    Situated in a critical-feminist perspective, this article describes a pedagogical approach to linking nursing theory and practice. The inclusion of the critical humanities is emphasized in creating an environment in which this linkage can be reified for learners. Implications for the future of nursing theory and its links to practice in the context of current political realities in academia are considered.

  12. Rethinking Adolescent Peer Sexual Harassment: Contributions of Feminist Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Nicole E.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an integrative review of the literature on adolescent sexual harassment and highlights potential contributions of feminist theory for research. Although developmental theories for studying sexual harassment are useful in their own right, the discussion focuses on how they fail to address the ways in which sexual harassment…

  13. Is There Need for a Feminist Perspective on Hate Speech?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwell, Nancy C.

    A feminist perspective can be valuable in analysis of hate speech, but the analysis must connect with other social, political, and cultural perspectives such as race, class, sexual orientation, unity, and diversity. Hate speech has emerged as a contemporary political issue and is particularly visible on college and university campuses. Judicial…

  14. The Feminist Sophistic Enterprise: From Euripides to the Vietnam War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, Audrey

    1992-01-01

    Uses feminist sophistic historiography to open the doors of two distant historical movements onto each other, reading tensions between masculinity and femininity in Athens during the Peloponnesian war and in the United States during the Vietnam War. Foregrounds the possibility of forestalling arbitrary closure on gender questions which determined…

  15. Disciplining Professionals: A Feminist Discourse Analysis of Public Preschool Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisson, Jamie Huff; Iverson, Susan V.

    2014-01-01

    Educational reforms across the globe have had implications for the work of preschool teachers and thus their professional identities. This article draws on a feminist discourse lens to examine data collected from a recent narrative inquiry focused on understanding the professional identities of five public preschool teachers in the USA. This…

  16. Problems with Feminist Standpoint Theory in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Iddo

    2008-01-01

    Feminist standpoint theory has important implications for science education. The paper focuses on difficulties in standpoint theory, mostly regarding the assumptions that different social positions produce different types of knowledge, and that epistemic advantages that women might enjoy are always effective and significant. I conclude that the…

  17. Feminist theory, African gender history and transitional justice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    relationship of feminism and feminist theory to the field of transitional justice .... notion that autonomous states come together to make agreements and are then .... across religious and ethnic lines in an attempt to force men to make peace. ... currently located: without access to law, judiciary or medical care – all the potential ...

  18. An Interview with Cynthia L. Selfe: "Nomadic Feminist Cyborg Guerilla."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, Carolyn

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the development of Cynthia Selfe's philosophy concerning virtual landscapes as discursive spaces. Defines the "nomadic feminist cyborg guerilla" as a kind of English teacher-activist who uses computer technology as a medium for effecting political and educational change and for extending democracy. (NH)

  19. Pain relief in childbirth: changing historical and feminist perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowronski, G A

    2015-07-01

    Pain during human childbirth is ubiquitous and severe. Opium and its derivatives constitute the oldest effective method of pain relief and have been used in childbirth for several thousand years, along with numerous folk medicines and remedies. Interference with childbirth pain has always been criticised by doctors and clergy. The 19th century saw the introduction of three much more effective approaches to childbirth pain; diethyl ether, chloroform and nitrous oxide. Access to pain relief was demanded by the first wave of feminist activists as a woman's right. They popularised the use of 'twilight sleep', a combination of morphine and scopolamine, which fell into disrepute as its adverse effects became known. From the 1960s, as epidural analgesia became more popular, a second wave of feminists took the opposite position, calling for a return to non-medicalised, female-controlled, 'natural' childbirth and, in some cases, valorising the importance of the pain experience as empowering for women. However, from the 1990s, a third wave of feminist thought has begun to emerge, revalidating a woman's right to choose a 'technological', pain-free birth, rather than a 'natural' one, and regarding this as a legitimate feminist position.

  20. Feminist Economics at the Millennium: A Personal Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Julie A.

    2000-01-01

    Assesses feminism and economics, redefining the field of economics from its contemporary emphasis on rationality and market forces to an emphasis on provisioning, suggesting more balanced and adequate theoretical and methodological approaches and noting that neoclassical economics is a parody of what feminist scholars of science argue against.…

  1. Material Feminist Practices in a Body Politics Seminar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    In this article, Rachel Stein focuses on two course projects in which students apply materialist feminist practices within a capstone women's studies seminar entitled Body Politics. Undertaking these projects, students become more critically aware of gendered materialities that they had previously taken for granted as they deconstruct material…

  2. Making appropriation 'stick': stabilizing politics in an 'inherently feminist' tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, Katie Ann

    2012-10-01

    This article examines how feminist politics are made to 'stick' to appropriated technologies in the context of a contemporary feminist women's health clinic in the US. Feminist clinics such as 'FemHealth', founded as part of 1970s women's health movements, put medical tools and knowledge into lay women's hands, making the appropriation of medical technologies a centerpiece of their political project. In the process, they rejected the authority of physicians and gave new politicized meanings to the tools they claimed as their own. As lay healthworkers at FemHealth continued the project of appropriation, they also continued to negotiate their dependence on physicians to perform tasks that required a medical license. Drawing on participant observation and interviews with healthworkers, I argue that struggles over the role and authority of physicians in this clinic play out through debates over two similar and competing tools used in the abortion procedure: the single-tooth tenaculum and the cervical stabilizer. Many healthworkers invested in the stabilizer as 'inherently feminist' in hopes that it would maintain its politics even when passed into physicians' hands. While appropriation depends on the ability of users to alter a technology's meanings, actors may feel invested in the new politics taken on by appropriated tools and work towards making those meanings persist, or 'stick'.

  3. Moral Distress among Iranian Nurses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hosein Vaziri

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to describe the moral distress among Iranian registered nurses.This was a descriptive -analytic study, in which 264 out of 1000 nurses were randomly selected as a sample group and completed the questionnaire. The nurses' moral distress was assessed using Corley's 30-item Moral Distress Scale adapted for use in an Iranian population. The collected data were analyzed by SPSS version 19.In this study, no correlation was found between the level of moral distress and any of the demographic data. The mean moral distress score ranged from 3.56 to 5.83, indicating moderate to high levels of moral distress. The item with the highest mean score was "working with unsafe levels of nurse staffing". The item with the lowest mean score was "giving medication intravenously to a patient who has refused to take it". Nurses working in EMS and NICU units had the highest levels of moral distress.A higher degree of moral distress is observed among nurses who work in health care systems. The results of this study highly recommend practical and research-oriented evaluation of moral distress in the medical society in Iran. Our findings suggest that Iranian version of MDS is a reliable instrument to measure moral distress in nurses.

  4. Moral integrity and moral courage: can you teach it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, Ruth A; Hartley, Patricia Lynn; Hodges, Patricia Jeanne; Hoffpauir, Rebecca; Newbanks, Shirlene; Kelley, Jane H

    2013-04-01

    Nursing has been spared the ethical scandal of many other professions, but issues of compromised moral integrity are growing in practice and education. This study was structured to investigate faculty perceptions of the challenges encountered regarding moral integrity in academia and strategies to promote nursing students' moral integrity and moral courage. A content analysis of the responses to questions about challenges and strategies was completed. Themes identified from the data on student and instructor beliefs and behaviors correspond to those found in the literature. The need for instructors to model a high level of integrity and to create high-integrity classrooms and a community of learning were identified as essential. A finding different from other study results is that beliefs drive moral behaviors and must be the focus of strategies for change. A consensus was expressed that mechanisms are urgently needed to further identify and integrate strategies to enhance student moral integrity.

  5. Complexities of morality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, S

    1970-05-01

    This letter is sharply critical of an article by Dr. Holmes (Annals of Iternal Medicine 72: 123-127, 1970). The dilemma of 18 to 21-year-olds requesting birth control pills is not simply a question of "aesthetic bias." The pressures on these young women to have sexual relations is intense and the author has found these women grateful to hear an adult decidely opposed to premarital intercourse. The author is amazed at Dr. Holmes' characterization of a marriage between gentile and Jew as an act of morality. "Intermarriage as an act of agression against the parents is in my opinion as likely as intermarriage an an act of social justice," he writes. Finally, he feels that in talking with young patients, adults in general and psychiatrists in particular should not feel guilty because the world is not perfect. Children have a right to "enough healthy cynicism to avoid exploitation by those who would deceive them in the name of morality."

  6. Recycling as moral behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, John

    of Reasoned Action (TRA) with regard to understanding recycling behaviour. Further, examples of misleading policy conclusions are discussed suggested that within the framework of cognitive psychology, Schwartz's model of altruistic behaviour offers a more satisfying starting point for understanding recycling......It is argued in this paper that in the affluent, industrial societies, environmental behaviours like recycling are typically classified within ""the domain of morality"" in people's minds. Intentions regarding these types of behaviours are not ba a thorough - conscious or unconscious - calculation...... of the balance of costs and benefits. Rather, they are a function of the person's moral beliefs, i.e., beliefs in what is the right or wrong thing to do. The paper gives a brief review of the literature with the intention of uncovering problems and shortcomings in the framework of the SEU-model and the Theory...

  7. Predictors of Moral Disengagement in Sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, David Light; Funk, Christopher D; Bredemeier, Brenda Light

    2015-12-01

    Researchers have made productive use of Bandura's (1991) construct of moral disengagement (MD) to help explain why sport participants deviate from ethical ideals. In this study of intercollegiate athletes from diverse sports (N = 713), we examined MD in relation to other character-related variables: empathy, moral identity, moral attentiveness, and contesting orientations. We also examined whether moral attentiveness conforms to the pattern of "bracketed morality" found in moral reasoning (Shields & Bredemeier, 1995) and moral behavior (Kavussanu, Boardley, Sagar, & Ring, 2013). Results indicated that MD correlated positively with perceptual moral attentiveness and war contesting orientation; MD correlated negatively with empathy, moral identity, reflective moral attentiveness, and partnership contesting orientation. Results of hierarchical regression demonstrated that gender, contesting orientations, moral identity, and one form of moral attentiveness were significant predictors of MD. Finally, sport participants were found to be less morally attentive in sport than in everyday life.

  8. Morality, Intelligence, Personality and Intuition: What predicts our moral foundations?

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Despite the wealth of research investigating moral decision-making, the question of whether intelligence, personality, and resistance to intuitive thinking jointly predict differential reliance on the moral foundations has never been addressed. By combining information on these individual aspects, this study aimed to examine this possible association. In doing so, we were able to pinpoint additional areas important in influencing an individual’s morality, expanding and improving upon the Du...

  9. Promoting Health, Producing Moralisms?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard Kristensen, Dorthe; Askegaard, Søren; Hauge Jeppesen, Lene

    2010-01-01

    Based on an ethnographic study of 25 Danish consumers, the aim of this paper is threefold. Firstly, based on a critique of traditional approaches to consumer health campaigning, it argues for a more socially diversified approach for understanding consumer construction and pursuit of healthy behav...... behaviour. Secondly, it presents a typology of discourses that are employed by consumers in constructing their (health oriented) food consumption. Thirdly, it addresses certain social and moral dilemmas inherent in consumer health promotional campaigns....

  10. The Foundation of Morality

    OpenAIRE

    Juul-Larsen, Astrid; Cathmont-Prynn, Penelope Josefine; Magnúsdóttir, Gu∂rún Ása; Brudvig, Mette Rubeck; Kirkegaard, Marie Louise

    2008-01-01

    In this project we have been working on the phenomenon of morality, more specifically the foundation in relation to religion. We have been looking into both psychology and philosophy, in aim to find answers to our research. As main objects of investigation we have worked with the philosopher and psychologist William James, along with the theologian Paul Tillich. Furthermore we have looked into the Divine command theory, along with several theories and arguments from various professionals with...

  11. Tillid, socialitet og moral

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Esther Oluffa

    2011-01-01

    Artiklen diskuterer tillids og mistillids dobbeltkarakter som umiddelbar indstilling og villet handling. Det argumenteres, at tillid er et væsenligt fænomen til forståelse af menneskelig socialitet, idet tillid i sin grund er et forhold, der udspænder sig mellem mennesker. Desuden undersøges forh...... forholdet til moral, hvor det hævdes, at tillid mellem mennesker ikke nødvendigvis er moralsk legitimeret....

  12. Moral og frihed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rasmus Bysted

    2011-01-01

    at eliminere denne tvetydighed ved at levere en rationel rekonstruktion af det meningsmæssige indhold i begrebet kontrakausal frihed, således at en mere præcis teoretisk forståelse kan afløse de vage intuitioner vi har på området. Det er endvidere artiklens tese, at forbindelsen mellem frihed og moral skyldes...

  13. Moral og frihed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rasmus Bysted

    2011-01-01

    at eliminere denne tvetydighed ved at levere en rationel rekonstruktion af det meningsmæssige indhold i begrebet kontrakausal frihed, således at en mere præcis teoretisk forståelse kan afløse de vage intuitioner vi har på området. Det er endvidere artiklens tese, at forbindelsen mellem frihed og moral skyldes...

  14. Recycling as moral behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, John

    of Reasoned Action (TRA) with regard to understanding recycling behaviour. Further, examples of misleading policy conclusions are discussed suggested that within the framework of cognitive psychology, Schwartz's model of altruistic behaviour offers a more satisfying starting point for understanding recycling......It is argued in this paper that in the affluent, industrial societies, environmental behaviours like recycling are typically classified within ""the domain of morality"" in people's minds. Intentions regarding these types of behaviours are not ba a thorough - conscious or unconscious - calculation...

  15. Libertad Moral e Inteligencia

    OpenAIRE

    Bejarano Fernández, Teresa

    1996-01-01

    La Libertad Moral No Deriva De La Inteligencia Creativa, Pero Ambas Capacidadestendrian Un Prerrequisito Comun, Que, Aunque Remoto, Es Ya Exclusivamentehumano, A Saber, La Habilidad Para Imitar Pautas Complejas Nuevas. En Estasimitaciones, Y Por Primera Vez En La Evolucion, Ya No Es La Meta La Que Conformay Preactiva La Pauta, Sino Que El Control Ha Pasado A Estar En El Modelo Alprincipio, Y En El Sujeto Mismo Despues. Sugerimos Como Desde Tal Remotoprerrequisito Pudieron Derivarse La Liberta...

  16. Undermining Morales' Ideals

    OpenAIRE

    Erbì, Samuele; Krarup, Aske Helweg; Mccay Martinez, Eamonn; Skydsgaard, Nikolaj Stoeve; Nielsen, Anne Grue

    2014-01-01

    This project investigates Bolivia’s possibilities of achieving economic growth through mining while simultaneously protecting the rights of the indigenous populations and the environment. Firstly, a discourse analysis maps the inherent contradictions of president Evo Morales and the Bolivian government’s rhetorical presentation of a holistic development model, which encompasses both an extractivist approach as well as an assertion of indigenous’ and natures’ rights, through the Andean ideolog...

  17. Motivational Aspects of Moral Learning and Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curren, Randall

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses a puzzle about moral learning concerning its social context and the potential for moral progress: Won't the social context of moral learning shape moral perceptions, beliefs, and motivation in ways that will inevitably "limit" moral cognition, motivation, and progress? It addresses the relationships between…

  18. Motivational Aspects of Moral Learning and Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curren, Randall

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses a puzzle about moral learning concerning its social context and the potential for moral progress: Won't the social context of moral learning shape moral perceptions, beliefs, and motivation in ways that will inevitably "limit" moral cognition, motivation, and progress? It addresses the relationships between…

  19. Are the Moral Fixed Points Conceptual Truths?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, Daan; Streumer, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Terence Cuneo and Russ Shafer-Landau have recently proposed a new version of moral non-naturalism, according to which there are non-natural moral concepts and truths but no non-natural moral facts. This view entails that moral error theorists are conceptually deficient. We explain why moral error th

  20. Moral judgment reloaded: a moral dilemma validation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Julia F.; Flexas, Albert; Calabrese, Margareta; Gut, Nadine K.; Gomila, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    We propose a revised set of moral dilemmas for studies on moral judgment. We selected a total of 46 moral dilemmas available in the literature and fine-tuned them in terms of four conceptual factors (Personal Force, Benefit Recipient, Evitability, and Intention) and methodological aspects of the dilemma formulation (word count, expression style, question formats) that have been shown to influence moral judgment. Second, we obtained normative codings of arousal and valence for each dilemma showing that emotional arousal in response to moral dilemmas depends crucially on the factors Personal Force, Benefit Recipient, and Intentionality. Third, we validated the dilemma set confirming that people's moral judgment is sensitive to all four conceptual factors, and to their interactions. Results are discussed in the context of this field of research, outlining also the relevance of our RT effects for the Dual Process account of moral judgment. Finally, we suggest tentative theoretical avenues for future testing, particularly stressing the importance of the factor Intentionality in moral judgment. Additionally, due to the importance of cross-cultural studies in the quest for universals in human moral cognition, we provide the new set dilemmas in six languages (English, French, German, Spanish, Catalan, and Danish). The norming values provided here refer to the Spanish dilemma set. PMID:25071621

  1. Moral judgment reloaded: a moral dilemma validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Julia F; Flexas, Albert; Calabrese, Margareta; Gut, Nadine K; Gomila, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    We propose a revised set of moral dilemmas for studies on moral judgment. We selected a total of 46 moral dilemmas available in the literature and fine-tuned them in terms of four conceptual factors (Personal Force, Benefit Recipient, Evitability, and Intention) and methodological aspects of the dilemma formulation (word count, expression style, question formats) that have been shown to influence moral judgment. Second, we obtained normative codings of arousal and valence for each dilemma showing that emotional arousal in response to moral dilemmas depends crucially on the factors Personal Force, Benefit Recipient, and Intentionality. Third, we validated the dilemma set confirming that people's moral judgment is sensitive to all four conceptual factors, and to their interactions. Results are discussed in the context of this field of research, outlining also the relevance of our RT effects for the Dual Process account of moral judgment. Finally, we suggest tentative theoretical avenues for future testing, particularly stressing the importance of the factor Intentionality in moral judgment. Additionally, due to the importance of cross-cultural studies in the quest for universals in human moral cognition, we provide the new set dilemmas in six languages (English, French, German, Spanish, Catalan, and Danish). The norming values provided here refer to the Spanish dilemma set.

  2. Moral Judgment Reloaded: A Moral Dilemma validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia F. Christensen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a revised set of moral dilemmas for studies on moral judgment. We selected a total of 46 moral dilemmas available in the literature and fine-tuned them in terms of four conceptual factors (Personal Force, Benefit Recipient, Evitability and Intention and methodological aspects of the dilemma formulation (word count, expression style, question formats that have been shown to influence moral judgment. Second, we obtained normative codings of arousal and valence for each dilemma showing that emotional arousal in response to moral dilemmas depends crucially on the factors Personal Force, Benefit Recipient, and Intentionality. Third, we validated the dilemma set confirming that people's moral judgment is sensitive to all four conceptual factors, and to their interactions. Results are discussed in the context of this field of research, outlining also the relevance of our RT effects for the Dual Process account of moral judgment. Finally, we suggest tentative theoretical avenues for future testing, particularly stressing the importance of the factor Intentionality in moral judgment. Additionally, due to the importance of cross-cultural studies in the quest for universals in human moral cognition, we provide the new set dilemmas in six languages (English, French, German, Spanish, Catalan and Danish. The norming values provided here refer to the Spanish dilemma set.

  3. Wording effects in moral judgments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross E. O'Hara

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available As the study of moral judgments grows, it becomes imperative to compare results across studies in order to create unified theories within the field. These efforts are potentially undermined, however, by variations in wording used by different researchers. The current study sought to determine whether, when, and how variations in wording influence moral judgments. Online participants responded to 15 different moral vignettes (e.g., the trolley problem using 1 of 4 adjectives: ``wrong'', ``inappropriate'', ``forbidden'', or ``blameworthy''. For half of the sample, these adjectives were preceded by the adverb ``morally''. Results indicated that people were more apt to judge an act as wrong or inappropriate than forbidden or blameworthy, and that disgusting acts were rated as more acceptable when ``morally'' was included. Although some wording differences emerged, effects sizes were small and suggest that studies of moral judgment with different wordings can legitimately be compared.

  4. Psychology as a Moral Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkmann, Svend

    meaning, and posits psychology as one of the critical methods of organizing normative values in society; at the same time it carefully notes the discipline’s history of being sidetracked by overemphasis on theoretical constructs and physical causes—what the author terms “the psychologizing of morality......What does morality have to do with psychology in a value-neutral, postmodern world? According to a provocative new book, everything. Taking exception with current ideas in the mainstream (including cultural, evolutionary, and neuropsychology) as straying from the discipline’s ethical foundations......, Psychology as a Moral Science argues that psychological phenomena are inherently moral, and that psychology, as prescriptive and interventive practice, reflects specific moral principles. The book cites normative moral standards, as far back as Aristotle, that give human thoughts, feelings, and actions...

  5. Moral judgment in episodic amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, Carl F; Keven, Nazim; Kwan, Donna; Kurczek, Jake; Duff, Melissa C; Rosenbaum, R Shayna

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the role of episodic thought about the past and future in moral judgment, we administered a well-established moral judgment battery to individuals with hippocampal damage and deficits in episodic thought (insert Greene et al. 2001). Healthy controls select deontological answers in high-conflict moral scenarios more frequently when they vividly imagine themselves in the scenarios than when they imagine scenarios abstractly, at some personal remove. If this bias is mediated by episodic thought, individuals with deficits in episodic thought should not exhibit this effect. We report that individuals with deficits in episodic memory and future thought make moral judgments and exhibit the biasing effect of vivid, personal imaginings on moral judgment. These results strongly suggest that the biasing effect of vivid personal imagining on moral judgment is not due to episodic thought about the past and future. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Disgust as Embodied Moral Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnall, Simone; Haidt, Jonathan; Clore, Gerald L.; Jordan, Alexander H.

    2008-01-01

    How, and for whom, does disgust influence moral judgment? In 4 experiments participants made moral judgments while experiencing extraneous feelings of disgust. Disgust was induced in Experiment 1 by exposure to a bad smell, in Experiment 2 by working in a disgusting room, in Experiment 3 by recalling a physically disgusting experience, and in Experiment 4 through a video induction. In each case, the results showed that disgust can increase the severity of moral judgments relative to controls. Experiment 4 found that disgust had a different effect on moral judgment than did sadness. In addition, Experiments 2-4 showed that the role of disgust in severity of moral judgments depends on participants’ sensitivity to their own bodily sensations. Taken together, these data indicate the importance - and specificity - of gut feelings in moral judgments. PMID:18505801

  7. Moral transhumanism: the next step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennison, Michael N

    2012-08-01

    Although transhumanism offers hope for the transcendence of human biological limitations, it generates many intrinsic and consequential ethical concerns. The latter include issues such as the exacerbation of social inequalities and the exponentially increasing technological capacity to cause harm. To mitigate these risks, many thinkers have initiated investigations into the possibility of moral enhancement that could limit the power disparities facilitated by biotechnological enhancement. The arguments often focus on whether moral enhancement is morally permissible, or even obligatory, and remain largely in the realm of the hypothetical. This paper proposes that psilocybin may represent a viable, practical option for moral enhancement and that its further research in the context of moral psychology could comprise the next step in the development of moral transhumanism.

  8. Feminist activist women are masculinized in terms of digit-ratio and social dominance: a possible explanation for the feminist paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Guy; Aasa, Ulrika; Wallert, John; Woodley, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    The feminist movement purports to improve conditions for women, and yet only a minority of women in modern societies self-identify as feminists. This is known as the feminist paradox. It has been suggested that feminists exhibit both physiological and psychological characteristics associated with heightened masculinization, which may predispose women for heightened competitiveness, sex-atypical behaviors, and belief in the interchangeability of sex roles. If feminist activists, i.e., those that manufacture the public image of feminism, are indeed masculinized relative to women in general, this might explain why the views and preferences of these two groups are at variance with each other. We measured the 2D:4D digit ratios (collected from both hands) and a personality trait known as dominance (measured with the Directiveness scale) in a sample of women attending a feminist conference. The sample exhibited significantly more masculine 2D:4D and higher dominance ratings than comparison samples representative of women in general, and these variables were furthermore positively correlated for both hands. The feminist paradox might thus to some extent be explained by biological differences between women in general and the activist women who formulate the feminist agenda.

  9. Natural Selection and Morality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Rosas

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumen:En este ensayo abordo los intentos, relativamente recientes, de dar una explicación de la moralidad como adaptación por selección natural. Mi exposición tiene una introducción y cuatro partes: en la primera explico en qué consiste la paradoja del altruismo biológico. En la segunda expongo la solución que apela a la selección de grupos, recientemente resurgida; la solución que presuntamente aplicó Charles Darwin cuando formuló sus reflexiones biológicas sobre la moralidad humana. En la tercera expongo la solución sociobiológica, que opta por negar que la selección natural pueda explicar directamente la moralidad humana. La moralidad se presenta más bien como opuesta a la naturaleza diseñada por selección natural. En la cuarta parte desarrollo brevemente una explicación de la moralidad como adaptación que beneficia a los individuos. No opone la moralidad a la naturaleza, ni apela a la selección de grupos. Se sirve de un mecanismo de selección que opera a través de preferencias en la interacción social.Abstract:In this essay, I address recent attempts to account for morality as an adaptation due to natural selection. After a brief introduction, my exposition has four sections. I first explain the paradox of biological altruism. Second, I explain the solution to the paradox in terms of group selection. This solution was presumably applied by Darwin himself as he discussed human morality, and it has experienced a recent revival, though it remains suspicious to most biologists. In the third section I offer a socio-biological solution that opts for denying that morality can be explained by any form of natural selection. Morality is opposed to human nature as designed by natural selection. In the fourth, I argue for an explanation in terms of individual selection. It does not oppose morality to nature, and does not need the workings of group selection; rather, it operates through the agents’ psychological preferences

  10. Moral Education in English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚国娟

    2014-01-01

    It was said that the moral education should be the first in teaching.So,when in teaching, teachers must pay more attention to the moral education.English,as one of the main subjects,has the profound thought.Therefore,when we teach,it needs to pay more attention to the permeation of the moral education.Meanwhile,teachers should clear the requests when they permeate the moral education in English teaching,and then put the education for al-round development into every stage of teaching.

  11. Human Trafficking and National Morality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. DI PIETRO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes that national morality is an important variable for explaining national anti-trafficking policy. It uses cross country regression analysis to see whether or not empirically national morality is a determinant of anti-trafficking policy. The findings of the paper are consistent with the notion that improved levels of national morality lead to better national anti-trafficking policy. National morality is found to be statistically relevant for national anti-trafficking policy when controlling for the extent of democracy, the share of the private sector in the economy, and the degree of globalization.

  12. Moral Relativism: A Philosopher's Antidote for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Henry

    1977-01-01

    The author identifies four main sources of moral relativism; defines cultural and ethical relativism, and social and personal moral relativism; and presents three arguments to refute moral relativism. (AV)

  13. Moral Relativism: A Philosopher's Antidote for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Henry

    1977-01-01

    The author identifies four main sources of moral relativism; defines cultural and ethical relativism, and social and personal moral relativism; and presents three arguments to refute moral relativism. (AV)

  14. Moral Education and the Condition of Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reginald M. J. Oduor

    wholly, through moral education, among them corruption, poverty, hunger, Aids and ... For instance, we have individual morality, customary morality, social .... huge differences and inequalities among people, with regard to the income they get.

  15. Human morality and temperament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Jerome

    2005-01-01

    This chapter has tried to make two points. First, the concept of morality refers to a developmental cascade of phenomena whose essential features are (a) inhibition of punished acts; (b) a representation of prohibited actions; (c) the emotions of uncertainty, empathy, shame, and guilt; (d) the semantic concepts of good and bad; (e) accepting the moral obligations of social categories; and (f) the concepts of fairness and the ideal. The inhibition of prohibited actions and the cognitive representation of prohibited behaviors, as well as the affect states that follow violations, appear by the end of the second year of life. The concepts of good and bad appear early in the third year, the experience of guilt and awareness of social categories by 4-6 years, and the notions of fairness, the ideal, and relational social categories during the school years. Second, some of the variation in the intensity and frequency of the moral emotions is attributable to the child's temperament. Eleven-year-old children who had been high-reactive infants and admitted to feelings of guilt when they violated a family standard were cortically and autonomically more aroused than the low reactives who reported equally frequent experiences of guilt. Further, high reactives who were perceived by their mothers as highly sensitive to punishment were biologically more aroused than high reactives perceived as less sensitive. Both universal developmental phenomena tied to brain maturation and temperamental variation associated with neurochemistry contribute to the complex phenomena that constitute the moral domain. The role of affect in promoting the adherence to standards remains controversial. Kant believed that people acted morally because acceptance of the categorical imperative required proper behavior-reason was the guardian of social harmony. Peirce and Dewey, by contrast, argued that anticipation of the emotions of anxiety, shame, and guilt motivated loyalty to the community's ethical

  16. Getting quality in qualitative research: a short introduction to feminist methodology and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, Maeve

    2006-11-01

    The present paper reflects a practical activity undertaken by the Nutrition Society's qualitative research network in October 2005. It reflects the structure of that exercise. First, there is an introduction to feminist methodology and methods. The informing premise is that feminist methodology is of particular interest to practitioners (professional and/or academic) engaged in occupations numerically dominated by women, such as nutritionists. A critical argument is made for a place for feminist methodology in related areas of social research. The discussion points to the differences that exist between various feminist commentators, although the central aims of feminist research are broadly shared. The paper comprises an overview of organizing concepts, discussion and questions posed to stimulate discussion on the design and process of research informed by feminist methodology. Issues arising from that discussion are summarized.

  17. 1 The Necessity of Moral Principles in Moral Education Emmanuel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NGOZI

    Page 3 ..... Europe only one, in U.S.A only one at a time; therefore all morals are a matter of taste! As evils, murder and theft are just as culture-bound .... lines of morality are not like the ideal lines of mathematics. ... I once taught with a man who ...

  18. Executive Summary: Transforming Moral Distress into Moral Resilience in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Cynda Hylton; Schoonover-Shoffner, Kathy; Kennedy, Maureen Shawn

    To examine practices for addressing moral distress, a collaborative project was developed by the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, the American Journal of Nursing, and the Journal of Christian Nursing, along with the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses and the American Nurses Association. Its purpose was to identify strategies that individuals and systems can use to mitigate the detrimental effects of moral distress and foster moral resilience. On August 11 and 12, 2016, an invitational symposium, State of the Science: Transforming Moral Distress into Moral Resilience in Nursing, was held at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing in Baltimore, Maryland. Forty-five nurse clinicians, researchers, ethicists, organization representatives, and other stakeholders took part. The result of the symposium was group consensus on recommendations for addressing moral distress and building moral resilience in four areas: practice, education, research, and policy. Participants and the organizations represented were energized and committed to moving this agenda forward. The full report is available online at http://journals.lww.com/ajnonline/Pages/Moral-Distress-Supplement.aspx.

  19. The Everyday Moral Judge - Autobiographical Recollections of Moral Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, André; Tscharaktschiew, Nadine; Schindler, Rose; Schulz, Katrin; Rudolph, Udo

    2016-01-01

    Moral emotions are typically elicited in everyday social interactions and regulate social behavior. Previous research in the field of attribution theory identified ought (the moral standard of a given situation or intended goal), goal-attainment (a goal can be attained vs. not attained) and effort (high vs. low effort expenditure) as cognitive antecedents of moral emotions. In contrast to earlier studies, mainly relying on thought experiments, we investigated autobiographical recollections of N = 312 participants by means of an online study. We analyzed a diverse range of moral emotions, i.e., admiration, anger, contempt, indignation, pride, respect, schadenfreude, and sympathy, by using a mixed-method approach. Qualitative and quantitative methods clearly corroborate the important role of ought, goal-attainment, and effort as eliciting conditions of moral emotions. Furthermore, we built categorical systems based on our participants' descriptions of real-life situations, allowing for more fine-grained distinctions between seemingly similar moral emotions. We thus identify additional prerequisites explaining more subtle differences between moral emotion clusters as they emerge from our analyses (i.e., cluster 1: admiration, pride, and respect; cluster 2: anger, contempt, and indignation; cluster 3: schadenfreude and sympathy). Results are discussed in the light of attributional theories of moral emotions, and implications for future research are derived.

  20. Imagining Good Organizations: Moral Orders or Moral Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milley, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Defines the good in organizations; critiques the moral and methodological perspectives in Thomas Greenfield's writing; explains Jurgen Habermas' theory of discourse ethics; distinguishes key similarities and differences between Greenfield's and Habermas' moral theories; discusses substantive and methodological implications for the field of…

  1. Moral Distress Model Reconstructed Using Grounded Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hsun-Kuei; Chin, Chi-Chun; Hsu, Min-Tao

    2016-12-29

    The problems of nurse burnout and manpower shortage relate to moral distress. Thus, having a good understanding of moral distress is critical to developing strategies that effectively improve the clinical ethical climate and improve nursing retention in Taiwan. The aim of this study was to reconstruct the model of moral distress using the grounded theory. Twenty-five staff nurses at work units who attend to the needs of adult, pediatric, acute, and critical disease or end-of-life-care patients were recruited as participants using theoretical sampling from three teaching hospitals in Taiwan. Data were collected using intensive, 2- to 3-hour interviews with each participant. Audio recordings of the interviews were made and then converted into transcripts. The data were analyzed using the grounded theory. In the clinical setting, the perspective that nurses take toward clinical moral events reflects their moral values, which trigger moral cognition, provocation, and appraisal. The moral barriers that form when moral events that occur in clinical settings contradict personal moral values may later develop into moral distress. In handling moral barriers in the clinical environment, nurses make moral judgments and determine what is morally correct. Influenced by moral efficacy, the consequence may either be a moral action or an expression of personal emotion. Wasting National Health Insurance resources and Chinese culture are key sources of moral distress for nurses in Taiwan. The role of self-confidence in promoting moral efficacy and the role of heterodox skills in promoting moral actions represent findings that are unique to this study. The moral distress model was used in this study to facilitate the development of future nursing theories. On the basis of our findings, we suggested that nursing students be encouraged to use case studies to establish proper moral values, improve moral cognition and judgment capabilities, and promote moral actions to better handle the

  2. Moral Orientation Dynamics in Adolescence and Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molchanov S.V.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The problem of moral development is actual for modern psychology. Modern conception of moral development defines two main principles in the basis of moral orientation: care principle and justice principle. Adolescence and youth are sensitive period to develop moral orientation. 139 subjects from three age groups: young adolescents, older adolescents and youth took part in the investigation. Results shows age dynamic of moral judgments preferences, moral dilemma solving with different levels of motivation to achieve and be approved.

  3. A PHENOMENOLOGICAL RESEARCH ON MORAL PHILOSOPHY

    OpenAIRE

    CIPRIAN IULIAN ŞOPTICĂ

    2011-01-01

    The subject of this article concerns the what, the how and the whyof moral phenomenology. The first question we take into consideration is „What is moral phenomenology”? The second question which arises is „How to pursue moral phenomenology”? The third question is „Why pursue moral phenomenology”? We will analyze the study Moral phenomenology:foundation issues1, by which the American phenomenologist Uriah Kriegel aims three lines of research: the definition of moral phenomenology and the desc...

  4. Moral and Ethical Decision Making: Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-08

    concentrate solely on individual morality as a strong predictor of individual behaviour (e.g., the work of Kohlberg ) whereas others have adopted a...moral development. The work of Lawrence Kohlberg has been instrumental in elucidating the process of moral development and fostering new theories in...moral decision making. In short, Kohlberg presents a cognitive-developmental view of moral reasoning, and suggests that moral development moves

  5. A Brief Analysis of Feminist Pedagogy and its Development in China and America

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯婕

    2013-01-01

      Taking China and the United States as examples to analyze feminist pedagogy and its development, special attention will be paid to its actual significance in tow different cultures. Feminist pedagogy has been used in America for many years;while in China, it is a relatively new teaching method introduced in the 1980s. Despite its fast development, there are still some problems to be solved as to the construction of local feminist pedagogy in China.

  6. Re-reading time-geography from a feminist perspective : Gendered mobility

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Time-geography has by some feminist scholars been accused not taking gender relation, domination or power in consideration when analyzing the use of time and space. In this paper we argue that time-geography provides a useful set of analytical tools which successfully collaborate with social science theory as feminist studies. In a project called “Re-reading time-geography from a feminist perspective”, labour force mobility is, specially commuting, one important issue, for analysing women’s t...

  7. Moral character in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Taya R; Panter, A T; Turan, Nazli; Morse, Lily; Kim, Yeonjeong

    2014-11-01

    Using two 3-month diary studies and a large cross-sectional survey, we identified distinguishing features of adults with low versus high levels of moral character. Adults with high levels of moral character tend to: consider the needs and interests of others and how their actions affect other people (e.g., they have high levels of Honesty-Humility, empathic concern, guilt proneness); regulate their behavior effectively, specifically with reference to behaviors that have positive short-term consequences but negative long-term consequences (e.g., they have high levels of Conscientiousness, self-control, consideration of future consequences); and value being moral (e.g., they have high levels of moral identity-internalization). Cognitive moral development, Emotionality, and social value orientation were found to be relatively undiagnostic of moral character. Studies 1 and 2 revealed that employees with low moral character committed harmful work behaviors more frequently and helpful work behaviors less frequently than did employees with high moral character, according to their own admissions and coworkers' observations. Study 3 revealed that adults with low moral character committed more delinquent behavior and had more lenient attitudes toward unethical negotiation tactics than did adults with high moral character. By showing that individual differences have consistent, meaningful effects on employees' behaviors, after controlling for demographic variables (e.g., gender, age, income) and basic attributes of the work setting (e.g., enforcement of an ethics code), our results contest situationist perspectives that deemphasize the importance of personality. Moral people can be identified by self-reports in surveys, and these self-reports predict consequential behaviors months after the initial assessment.

  8. Intimate Design: Designing Intimacy As a Critical-Feminist Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Marie Louise Juul

    2017-01-01

    Intimate aspects of everyday life are increasingly being connected to and interacted with through digital technologies; this impacts the ways of being in the world and how bodies come to matter. From an interdisciplinary perspective at the intersections of feminist HCI, art, and interaction design...... I examine how design can reflect on and critically discuss political and cultural issues of intimate technologies, such as gender and identity, embodied experiences, privacy, intimate data and sharing. In presenting my PhD project's background, research objectives, hypothesis and methodological...... approach, as well as its current and future state and research contributions, I discuss how it is possible to research design of intimate technologies from a critical-feminist perspective....

  9. [The parameters of a feminist theory of psychotherapy.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbeil, J

    1979-01-01

    After recalling the origins of the feminist approach to therapy, and of the teaching of psych logy from the 1950's to the introduction of the first groups of self-therapy in 1967-1968, the author presents the basic principles of the traditional therapy that she qualifies as sexist. She then describ the analytical tools developed from the social psychology that the feminists and the radical therapis use to understand the different behavior and pathology of men and women. Finally, she adheres a theory of the personnality sharing with feminity the following features : humanistic philosoph favoring direct expression, speaking of reappropriation, seeing the unconscious and the conscious a continuous process, and considering the unit living-system-and-environment as a whole.

  10. The Subject of Critique: Ricoeur in Dialogue with Feminist Philosophers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemie Halsema

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to show the relevance of Ricœur’s notion of the self for postmodern feminist theory, but also to critically assess it. By bringing Ricœur’s “self” into dialogue with Braidotti’s, Irigaray’s and Butler’s conceptions of the subject, it shows that it is close to the feminist self in that it is articulated into language, is embodied and not fully conscious of itself. In the course of the argument, the major point of divergence also comes to light, namely, that the former considers discourse to be a laboratory for thought experiments, while the latter consider discourse to be normative, restrictive and exclusive. In the second part, the possibility of critique and change are further developed. Ricœur does not rule out critique, rather interpretation includes distanciation and critique. Finally, his notion of productive imagination explains how new identifications become possible. 

  11. BRAZILIAN FEMINIST MOVEMENT: REPERTOIRE AND STRATEGIES FOR ACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla de Paiva Bezerra

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at analyzing the development of and changes in, the repertoire and strategies for action of the Brazilian feminist movement, in the period between the democratic “re-opening” set in the 1980s and the first decade of the XXI century. Our interest is centered in two foci of analysis: on the one hand, it focuses on the movement’s positioning in relation to the State, which varied from a situation of opposition, or even of indifference, to direct attempts at influencing public policies and actions in the State sphere, whether through party politics or participative institutions. On the other hand, we are interested in analyzing how, and in which specific moments, agency beyond the national feminist frontiers takes place and in which measure this influences the local repertoires and vice-versa.

  12. Monsters. Feminist Reading of Hardt and Negri’s Commonwealth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Majewska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available I propose a discussion of some feminist observations concerning the book Commonwealth by Negri and Hardt. I focus on the issues of biopolitical labor and the topics developed in feminist analysis of reproductive and care labor, I also suggest, that there are problems regarding the body and sexuality, that need to be solved. In my discussion of the book I also rise some problems concerning the conditions of occupying the position of the excluded, and the colonial exclusions in particular, I refer to some observations made by Gayatri Spivak in her essay Can the Subaltern Speak?. As an extremely interesting proposition of emancipatory theory, I think that the project of Negri and Hardt need to be discussed, also from the perspectives I have mentioned.

  13. WOMEN, BODY AND SPORTS IN A FEMINIST PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Lessa

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The feminist theories discuss the denaturalization of the bodies, the performativity of the species, the sexualization of the identities, and the biologization of feminine characteristic, in several areas of knowledge. Physical Education has been producing knowledge on both the female participation in sports and feminine corporality. My text has the purpose of relating the studies on women and sports in what concerns the Physical Education theoretical production to the current feminist debate on corporality, sexuality and identity, searching the theoretical and conceptual purposes that give support to this debate. Texts published by the Revista Brasileira de Ciências e Esportes magazine and Motrivivência magazine are used as an analysis source. These magazines were chosen due to the fact of being including, and they will be a reference for other publications.

  14. Universal moral grammar: a critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupoux, Emmanuel; Jacob, Pierre

    2007-09-01

    A new framework for the study of the human moral faculty is currently receiving much attention: the so-called 'universal moral grammar' framework. It is based on an intriguing analogy, first pointed out by Rawls, between the study of the human moral sense and Chomsky's research program into the human language faculty. To assess UMG, we ask: is moral competence modular? Does it have an underlying hierarchical grammatical structure? Does moral diversity rest on culture-dependant parameters? We review the evidence and argue that formal grammatical concepts are of limited value for the study of moral judgments, moral development and moral diversity.

  15. A moral da infidelidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bundt, Roger

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Através das representações da infidelidade conjugal encontradas em três filmes do diretor Adrian Lyne realizados nas décadas de 1980, 1990 e 2000 (Atração Fatal, Proposta Indecente e Infidelidade, busca- se entender as idéias trabalhadas em cada obra, as maneiras de representar a mulher, a família, a relação amorosa e a monogamia, a partir das noções de dever e moral trabalhadas por Gilles Lipovetsky

  16. Economies morales contemporaines

    OpenAIRE

    Fassin, Didier; Eideliman, Jean-Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Les questions morales pénètrent nos représentations, nos pratiques, nos politiques. Qu'il s'agisse, dans le monde privé, d'interpréter les conduites des autres et de disci-pliner les siennes propres, ou bien, dans l'espace public, de sanctionner des déviances et de réguler des populations, nos sociétés mobilisent des normes, des valeurs et des affects, qu'illustrent notamment les tensions entre la raison humanitaire et l'ordre sécuritaire. Redonnant toute sa force crit...

  17. George Eliot’s Humanistic View and Feminist View

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Jing-chun

    2013-01-01

    George Eliot is a great authoress in the Victorian age. She has made great contribution in many fields such as:philoso-phy, literature and humanism. However she is a controversial novelist as well not only because her life experience which revolts against the traditional way of life at that time but also her unique humanistic and feminist view. The purpose of the study is to get the panoramic view of George Eliot.

  18. Voltairine de Cleyre: More of an Anarchist than a Feminist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve J. Shone

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The recently rediscovered Michigan-born poet, essayist, and political philosopher, Voltairine de Cleyre (1866-1912 has been celebrated by modern scholars as both an anarchist and a feminist. In this paper, however, it is argued that detailed scrutiny of her writings perhaps suggests de Cleyre, who spent much of her life in Philadelphia, was consistently an anarchist thinker, but that her ideas are not nearly so compatible with feminism as they have been portrayed.

  19. Perspectives on critical and feminist theory in developing nursing praxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, K N

    1993-01-01

    Critical theory and feminist theory offer to nurses points from which to approach change as nursing struggles for autonomy, accountability, and control over the profession. Nurses need to critically examine the forces that influence the profession as well as the individual and group identities of nurses. These theoretical frameworks, together with historical inquiry, are particularly valuable tools for nurses to use to remain strong and vital participants in shaping the profession as well as the future of health care.

  20. Feminist revolution in literacy women's bookstores in the United States

    CERN Document Server

    Onosaka, Junko

    2013-01-01

    This book examines the history of women's bookstores in the US from the 1970s to the 1990s. It establishes that women's bookstores played an important role in feminism by enabling the dissemination of women's voices and thereby helping to sustain and enrich the women's movement. They improved women's literacy - their abilities to read, write, publish, and distribute women's voices and visions - and helped women to instigate a feminist revolution in literacy.