WorldWideScience

Sample records for ground-based weather stations

  1. Weather Radar Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — These data represent Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) weather radar stations within the US. The NEXRAD radar stations are...

  2. Quantifying the spatio-temporal pattern of the ground impact of space weather events using dynamical networks formed from the SuperMAG database of ground based magnetometer stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dods, Joe; Chapman, Sandra; Gjerloev, Jesper

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative understanding of the full spatial-temporal pattern of space weather is important in order to estimate the ground impact. Geomagnetic indices such as AE track the peak of a geomagnetic storm or substorm, but cannot capture the full spatial-temporal pattern. Observations by the ~100 ground based magnetometers in the northern hemisphere have the potential to capture the detailed evolution of a given space weather event. We present the first analysis of the full available set of ground based magnetometer observations of substorms using dynamical networks. SuperMAG offers a database containing ground station magnetometer data at a cadence of 1min from 100s stations situated across the globe. We use this data to form dynamic networks which capture spatial dynamics on timescales from the fast reconfiguration seen in the aurora, to that of the substorm cycle. Windowed linear cross-correlation between pairs of magnetometer time series along with a threshold is used to determine which stations are correlated and hence connected in the network. Variations in ground conductivity and differences in the response functions of magnetometers at individual stations are overcome by normalizing to long term averages of the cross-correlation. These results are tested against surrogate data in which phases have been randomised. The network is then a collection of connected points (ground stations); the structure of the network and its variation as a function of time quantify the detailed dynamical processes of the substorm. The network properties can be captured quantitatively in time dependent dimensionless network parameters and we will discuss their behaviour for examples of 'typical' substorms and storms. The network parameters provide a detailed benchmark to compare data with models of substorm dynamics, and can provide new insights on the similarities and differences between substorms and how they correlate with external driving and the internal state of the

  3. Natural Weathering Exposure Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corps of Engineers' Treat Island Natural Weathering Exposure Station is a long-term natural weathering facility used to study concrete durability. Located on the...

  4. Ground-based Space Weather Monitoring with LOFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Michael; van Haarlem, Michiel; Lawrence, Gareth; Reid, Simon; Bos, Andre; Rawlings, Steve; Salvini, Stef; Mitchell, Cathryn; Soleimani, Manuch; Amado, Sergio; Teresa, Vital

    As one of the first of a new generation of radio instruments, the International LOFAR Telescope (ILT) will provide a number of unique and novel capabilities for the astronomical community. These include remote configuration and operation, dynamic real-time processing and system response, and the ability to provide multiple simultaneous streams of data to a community whose scientific interests run the gamut from lighting in the atmospheres of distant planets to the origins of the universe itself. The LOFAR (LOw Frequency ARray) system is optimized for a frequency range from 30-240 MHz and consists of multiple antenna fields spread across Europe. In the Netherlands, a total 36 LOFAR stations are nearing completion with an initial 8 international stations currently being deployed in Germany, France, Sweden, and the UK. Digital beam-forming techniques make the LOFAR system agile and allow for rapid repointing of the telescope as well as the potential for multiple simultaneous observations. With its dense core array and long interferometric baselines, LOFAR has the potential to achieve unparalleled sensitivity and spatial resolution in the low frequency radio regime. LOFAR will also be one of the first radio observatories to feature automated processing pipelines to deliver fully calibrated science products to its user community. As we discuss in this presentation, the same capabilities that make LOFAR a powerful tool for radio astronomy also provide an excellent platform upon which to build a ground-based monitoring system for space weather events. For example, the ability to monitor Solar activity in near real-time is one of the key scientific capabilities being developed for LOFAR. With only a fraction of its total observing capacity, LOFAR will be able to provide continuous monitoring of the Solar spectrum over the entire 10-240 MHz band down to microsecond timescales. Autonomous routines will scan these incoming spectral data for evidence of Solar flares and be

  5. Designing a Weather Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    The collection and analysis of weather data is crucial to the location of alternate energy systems like solar and wind. This article presents a design challenge that gives students a chance to design a weather station to collect data in advance of a large wind turbine installation. Data analysis is a crucial part of any science or engineering…

  6. Automatic Weather Station (AWS) Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rall, Jonathan A.R.; Abshire, James B.; Spinhirne, James D.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An autonomous, low-power atmospheric lidar instrument is being developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This compact, portable lidar will operate continuously in a temperature controlled enclosure, charge its own batteries through a combination of a small rugged wind generator and solar panels, and transmit its data from remote locations to ground stations via satellite. A network of these instruments will be established by co-locating them at remote Automatic Weather Station (AWS) sites in Antarctica under the auspices of the National Science Foundation (NSF). The NSF Office of Polar Programs provides support to place the weather stations in remote areas of Antarctica in support of meteorological research and operations. The AWS meteorological data will directly benefit the analysis of the lidar data while a network of ground based atmospheric lidar will provide knowledge regarding the temporal evolution and spatial extent of Type la polar stratospheric clouds (PSC). These clouds play a crucial role in the annual austral springtime destruction of stratospheric ozone over Antarctica, i.e. the ozone hole. In addition, the lidar will monitor and record the general atmospheric conditions (transmission and backscatter) of the overlying atmosphere which will benefit the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS). Prototype lidar instruments have been deployed to the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station (1995-96, 2000) and to an Automated Geophysical Observatory site (AGO 1) in January 1999. We report on data acquired with these instruments, instrument performance, and anticipated performance of the AWS Lidar.

  7. A Ground-Based Array to Observe Geospace Electrodynamics During Adverse Space Weather Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, J. J.; Eccles, J. V.; Rice, D.

    2004-05-01

    Geomagnetic Storms occur with surprising frequency and create adverse space weather conditions. During these periods, our knowledge and ability to specify or forecast in adequate detail for user needs is negligible. Neither experimental observations nor theoretical developments have made a significant new impact on the problem for over two decades. Although we can now map Total Electron Content (TEC) in the ionosphere over a continent with sufficient resolution to see coherent long-lived structures, these do not provide constraints on the geospace electrodynamics that is at the heart of our lack of understanding. We present arguments for the need of a continental deployment of ground-based sensors to stepwise advance our understanding of the geospace electrodynamics when it is most adverse from a space weather perspective and also most frustrating from an understanding of Magnetosphere-Ionosphere coupling. That a continental-scale deployment is more productive at addressing the problem than a realizable global distribution is shown. Each measurement is discussed from the point-of-view of either providing new knowledge or becoming a key for future real-time specification and forecasting for user applications. An example of a storm database from one mid-latitude station for the 31 March 2002 is used as a conceptual point in a ground-based array. The presentation focuses on scientific questions that have eluded a quantitative solution for over three decades and view a ground-based array as an "IGY" type of catalyst for answering these questions.

  8. Weather Monitoring Station: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Dipak V. Sose

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Weather monitoring plays a very important role in human life hence study of weather system is necessary. Currently there are two types of the weather monitoring stations available i.e. wired and wireless. Wireless system has some advantages over the wired one hence popular now a days. The parameters are include in weather monitoring usually temperature, humidity atmospheric pressure, light intensity, rainfall etc. There are many techniques existed using different processor such as PIC, AVR, ARM etc. Analog to digital channel are used to fetch the analog output of the sensors. The wireless techniques used in the weather monitoring having GSM, FM channel, Zigbee, RF etc Protocols

  9. Ground-based Observations of the Solar Sources of Space Weather (Invited Review)

    CERN Document Server

    Veronig, Astrid M

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring of the Sun and its activity is a task of growing importance in the frame of space weather research and awareness. Major space weather disturbances at Earth have their origin in energetic outbursts from the Sun: solar flares, coronal mass ejections and associated solar energetic particles. In this review we discuss the importance and complementarity of ground-based and space-based observations for space weather studies. The main focus is drawn on ground-based observations in the visible range of the spectrum, in particular in the diagnostically manifold H$\\alpha$ spectral line, which enables us to detect and study solar flares, filaments, filament eruptions, and Moreton waves. Existing H$\\alpha$ networks such as the GONG and the Global High-Resolution H$\\alpha$ Network are discussed. As an example of solar observations from space weather research to operations, we present the system of real-time detection of H$\\alpha$ flares and filaments established at Kanzelh\\"ohe Observatory (KSO; Austria) in the...

  10. Space weather monitoring by ground-based means carried out in Polar Geophysical Center at Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzhura, Alexander

    A real-time information on geophysical processes in polar regions is very important for goals of Space Weather monitoring by the ground-based means. The modern communication systems and computer technology makes it possible to collect and process the data from remote sites without significant delays. A new acquisition equipment based on microprocessor modules and reliable in hush climatic conditions was deployed at the Roshydromet networks of geophysical observations in Arctic and is deployed at observatories in Antarctic. A contemporary system for on-line collecting and transmitting the geophysical data from the Arctic and Antarctic stations to AARI has been realized and the Polar Geophysical Center (PGC) arranged at AARI ensures the near-real time processing and analyzing the geophysical information from 11 stations in Arctic and 5 stations in Antarctic. The space weather monitoring by the ground based means is one of the main tasks standing before the Polar Geophysical Center. As studies by Troshichev and Janzhura, [2012] showed, the PC index characterizing the polar cap magnetic activity appeared to be an adequate indicator of the solar wind energy that entered into the magnetosphere and the energy that is accumulating in the magnetosphere. A great advantage of the PC index application over other methods based on satellite data is a permanent on-line availability of information about magnetic activity in both northern and southern polar caps. A special procedure agreed between Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI) and Space Institute of the Danish Technical University (DTUSpace) ensures calculation of the unified PC index in quasi-real time by magnetic data from the Thule and Vostok stations (see public site: http://pc-index.org). The method for estimation of AL and Dst indices (as indicators of state of the disturbed magnetosphere) based on data on foregoing PC indices has been elaborated and testified in the Polar Geophysical Center. It is

  11. Ground-based Observations of the Solar Sources of Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronig, A. M.; Pötzi, W.

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring of the Sun and its activity is a task of growing importance in the frame of space weather research and awareness. Major space weather disturbances at Earth have their origin in energetic outbursts from the Sun: solar flares, coronal mass ejections and associated solar energetic particles. In this review we discuss the importance and complementarity of ground-based and space-based observations for space weather studies. The main focus is drawn on ground-based observations in the visible range of the spectrum, in particular in the diagnostically manifold Hα spectral line, which enables us to detect and study solar flares, filaments (prominences), filament (prominence) eruptions, and Moreton waves. Existing Hα networks such as the GONG and the Global High-Resolution Hα Network are discussed. As an example of solar observations from space weather research to operations, we present the system of real-time detection of Hα flares and filaments established at Kanzelhöhe Observatory (KSO; Austria) in the frame of the space weather segment of the ESA Space Situational Awareness programme (swe.ssa.esa.int). An evaluation of the system, which is continuously running since July 2013 is provided, covering an evaluation period of almost 2.5 years. During this period, KSO provided 3020 hours of real-time Hα observations at the ESA SWE portal. In total, 824 Hα flares were detected and classified by the real-time detection system, including 174 events of Hα importance class 1 and larger. For the total sample of events, 95 % of the automatically determined flare peak times lie within ±5 min of the values given in the official optical flares reports (by NOAA and KSO), and 76 % of the start times. The heliographic positions determined are better than ±5°. The probability of detection of flares of importance 1 or larger is 95 %, with a false alarm rate of 16 %. These numbers confirm the high potential of automatic flare detection and alerting from ground-based

  12. Weather station with a web server

    OpenAIRE

    Repinc, Matej

    2013-01-01

    In this diploma thesis we present the process of making a cheap weather station using Arduino prototyping platform and its functionality. The weather station monitors current temperature, humidity of air and air pressure. The station has its own simple HTTP server that is used to relay current data in two different formats: JSON encoded data and simple HTML website. The weather station can also send data to a pre-defined server used for data collection. We implemented a web site where data an...

  13. Designing of a risk assessment architecture to analyze potential risks from space weather to space and ground based assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, Erum

    2016-07-01

    Today's world is more vulnerable to space weather due to ever increased advance and costly space technology deployed in space and on ground. The space weather has a natural potential of posing harmful effects on space and ground based assets and on astronaut's life. This global challenge of space weather essentially demands global and regional preparedness to develop its situational awareness, analyzing risks and devise possible mitigation procedures. Considering risk mitigation architecture as inevitable for all scientific missions, this paper focuses to develop a risk assessment architecture for the space environment and to map its utility in identifying and analyzing potential risks to space and ground based assets from space weather in the South Asia region. Different risk assessment tools will be studied and would conclude in the most effective tool or strategy that may help to develop our capability in identifying, protecting and mitigating from the devastating effects of the space weather.

  14. Analysis of Correlation between Ionospheric Spatial Gradients and Space Weather Intensity under Nominal Conditions for Ground-Based Augmentation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.

    2013-12-01

    Ground-Based Augmentation Systems (GBAS) support aircraft precision approach and landing by providing differential GPS corrections to aviation users. For GBAS applications, most of ionospheric errors are removed by applying the differential corrections. However, ionospheric correction errors may exist due to ionosphere spatial decorrelation between GBAS ground facility and users. Thus, the standard deviation of ionosphere spatial decorrelation (σvig) is estimated and included in the computation of error bounds on user position solution. The σvig of 4mm/km, derived for the Conterminous United States (CONUS), bounds one-sigma ionospheric spatial gradients under nominal conditions (including active, but not stormy condition) with an adequate safety margin [1]. The conservatism residing in the current σvig by fixing it to a constant value for all non-stormy conditions could be mitigated by subdividing ionospheric conditions into several classes and using different σvig for each class. This new concept, real-time σvig adaptation, will be possible if the level of ionospheric activity can be well classified based on space weather intensity. This paper studies correlation between the statistics of nominal ionospheric spatial gradients and space weather indices. The analysis was carried out using two sets of data collected from Continuous Operating Reference Station (CORS) Network; 9 consecutive (nominal and ionospherically active) days in 2004 and 19 consecutive (relatively 'quiet') days in 2010. Precise ionospheric delay estimates are obtained using the simplified truth processing method and vertical ionospheric gradients are computed using the well-known 'station pair method' [2]. The remaining biases which include carrier-phase leveling errors and Inter-frequency Bias (IFB) calibration errors are reduced by applying linear slip detection thresholds. The σvig was inflated to overbound the distribution of vertical ionospheric gradients with the required confidence

  15. Vertical profiling of atmospheric refractivity using GPS STD data from a single ground-based station: Simulations and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zus, F.; Dick, G.; Heise, S.; Wickert, J.; Ramatschi, M.

    2013-12-01

    We developed a ray-tracing operator to compute the signal travel time delay due to the neutral atmosphere, known as Slant Total Delay (STD), between a GPS satellite and a ground-based receiving station. Having developed a rapid and precise forward operator we constructed the tangent-linear (adjoint) operator to estimate refractivity in the vicinity of a single station. The refractivity retrievals potentially complement refractivity retrievals from radio occultation data and can be considered a valuable input for Numerical Weather Prediction. In a first experiment (simulation) we study the feasibility for vertical profiling of refractivity using STDs from a single station. The simulation cycle consists of the computation of STDs given a refractivity profile, the addition of noise to mimic observation errors and the retrieval of a refractivity profile from the artificial STDs by a non-linear least-square analysis. Clearly, besides the noise level, the elevation range plays an important role regarding the quality of the refractivity retrieval; near-horizon STDs corrupted by noise allow a significantly better refractivity retrieval than STDs close to the zenith without any noise. The simulation study suggests that near-horizon STDs provide additional information when compared to Zenith Total Delays (ZTDs). In a second experiment (application) we replace the artificial STDs in the simulation by STDs retrieved from GPS phase-observations. The procedure is repeated station-by-station for 200 stations in Germany. We do not find a significant benefit from STDs over ZTDs in the retrieved refractivity profile since near-horizon STDs are rarely available and representative errors due to asymmetry are non-negligable. We attempt to mitigate the latter problem by the additional estimation of horizontal gradients, and indeed, we find strong evidence that STDs retrieved from GPS phase-observations contain asymmetric information. The former problem still poses a serious limitation

  16. Characterization of downwelling radiance measured from a ground-based microwave radiometer using numerical weather prediction model data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, M.-H.; Won, H. Y.; Han, D.; Kim, Y.-H.; Ha, J.-C.

    2016-01-01

    The ground-based microwave sounding radiometers installed at nine weather stations of Korea Meteorological Administration alongside with the wind profilers have been operating for more than 4 years. Here we apply a process to assess the characteristics of the observation data by comparing the measured brightness temperature (Tb) with reference data. For the current study, the reference data are prepared by the radiative transfer simulation with the temperature and humidity profiles from the numerical weather prediction model instead of the conventional radiosonde data. Based on the 3 years of data, from 2010 to 2012, we were able to characterize the effects of the absolute calibration on the quality of the measured Tb. We also showed that when clouds are present the comparison with the model has a high variability due to presence of cloud liquid water therefore making cloudy data not suitable for assessment of the radiometer's performance. Finally we showed that differences between modeled and measured brightness temperatures are unlikely due to a shift in the selection of the center frequency but more likely due to spectroscopy issues in the wings of the 60 GHz absorption band. With a proper consideration of data affected by these two effects, it is shown that there is an excellent agreement between the measured and simulated Tb. The regression coefficients are better than 0.97 along with the bias value of better than 1.0 K except for the 52.28 GHz channel which shows a rather large bias and variability of -2.6 and 1.8 K, respectively.

  17. Mesospheric CO above Troll station, Antarctica observed by a ground based microwave radiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Straub

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents mesospheric carbon monoxide (CO data acquired by the ground-based microwave radiometer of the British Antarctic Survey (BAS radiometer stationed at Troll station in Antarctica (72° S, 2.5° E, 1270 a.m.s.l.. The data set covers the period from February 2008 to January 2010, however, due to very low CO concentrations below approximately 80 km altitude in summer, profiles can only be retrieved during Antarctic winter. CO is measured for approximately 2 h each day and profiles are retrieved approximately every half hour. The retrieved profiles, covering the pressure range from 1 to 0.01 hPa (approximately 48 to 80 km, are compared to measurements from Aura/MLS and SD-WACCM. This intercomparison reveals a low bias of 0.5 to 1 ppmv at 0.1 hPa (approximately 64 km and 2.5 to 3.5 ppmv at 0.01 hPa (approximately 80 km of the BAS microwave radiometer compared to both reference datasets. One explanation for this low bias could be the known high bias of MLS which is in the same order of magnitude. The ground based radiometer shows high and significant correlation (coefficients higher than 0.9/0.65 compared to MLS/SD-WACCM at all altitudes compared with both reference datasets. doi:10.5285/DE3E2092-406D-47A9-9205-3971A8DFB4A9

  18. Mesospheric CO above Troll station, Antarctica observed by a ground based microwave radiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Straub

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents mesospheric carbon monoxide (CO data acquired by the ground-based microwave radiometer of the British Antarctic Survey (BAS radiometer stationed at Troll station in Antarctica (72° S, 2.5° E, 1270 m a.s.l.. The dataset covers the period from February 2008 to January 2010, however, due to very low CO concentrations below approximately 80 km altitude in summer, profiles are only presented during the Antarctic winter. CO is measured for approximately 2 h each day and profiles are retrieved approximately every half hour. The retrieved profiles, covering the pressure range from 1 to 0.01 hPa (approximately 48 to 80 km, are compared to measurements from Microwave Limb Sounder on the Aura satellite (Aura/MLS and Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model with Specified Dynamics (SD-WACCM. This intercomparison reveals a low bias of 0.5 to 1 ppmv at 0.1 hPa (approximately 64 km and 2.5 to 3.5 ppmv at 0.01 hPa (approximately 80 km of the BAS microwave radiometer compared to both reference datasets. One explanation for this low bias could be the known high bias of MLS which is on the same order of magnitude. The ground based radiometer shows high and significant correlation (coefficients higher than 0.9/0.7 compared to MLS/SD-WACCM at all altitudes compared with both reference datasets. The dataset can be accessed under http://dx.doi.org/10/mhq.

  19. Network analysis of geomagnetic substorms using the SuperMAG database of ground-based magnetometer stations

    CERN Document Server

    Dods, J; Gjerloev, J W

    2016-01-01

    The overall morphology and dynamics of magnetospheric substorms is well established in terms of the observed qualitative auroral features seen in ground-based magnetometers. This paper focuses on the quantitative characterization of substorm dynamics captured by ground-based magnetometer stations. We present the first analysis of substorms using dynamical networks obtained from the full available set of ground-based magnetometer observations in the Northern Hemisphere. The stations are connected in the network when the correlation between the vector magnetometer time series from pairs of stations within a running time window exceeds a threshold. Dimensionless parameters can then be obtained that characterize the network and by extension, the spatiotemporal dynamics of the substorm under observation. We analyze four isolated substorm test cases as well as a steady magnetic convection (SMC) event and a day in which no substorms occur. These test case substorms are found to give a consistent characteristic netwo...

  20. On-line data acquisition system for Aanderaa weather station

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    AshokKumar, K.; Diwan, S.G.

    Aanderaa Weather Station can be installed at unattended remote places for collection of various weather parameters at regular preselected intervals. The weather parameters are recorded on the magnetic spool inside a battery operated datalogger which...

  1. Weather station on platform Raspberry Pi

    OpenAIRE

    Dolgan, Matjaž

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project was to make a weather station on the computer Raspberry Pi. In the first part of the thesis we focused on the history of the computer’s development and a presentation of technologies we used. Hardware technologies enabled us to mea- sure air temperature and pressure (sensor MPL115A2), humidity (sensor DHT11) and coordinates GPS (receiver MAX-6). For the programming technologies we used Python and some other tools and libraries: Crontab, SQLAlchemy, SQLite, CherryPi, M...

  2. Weather station on platform Raspberry Pi

    OpenAIRE

    Dolgan, Matjaž

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project was to make a weather station on the computer Raspberry Pi. In the first part of the thesis we focused on the history of the computer’s development and a presentation of technologies we used. Hardware technologies enabled us to mea- sure air temperature and pressure (sensor MPL115A2), humidity (sensor DHT11) and coordinates GPS (receiver MAX-6). For the programming technologies we used Python and some other tools and libraries: Crontab, SQLAlchemy, SQLite, CherryPi, M...

  3. Meteorological Automatic Weather Station (MAWS) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holdridge, Donna J [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kyrouac, Jenni A [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The Meteorological Automatic Weather Station (MAWS) is a surface meteorological station, manufactured by Vaisala, Inc., dedicated to the balloon-borne sounding system (BBSS), providing surface measurements of the thermodynamic state of the atmosphere and the wind speed and direction for each radiosonde profile. These data are automatically provided to the BBSS during the launch procedure and included in the radiosonde profile as the surface measurements of record for the sounding. The MAWS core set of measurements is: Barometric Pressure (hPa), Temperature (°C), Relative Humidity (%), Arithmetic-Averaged Wind Speed (m/s), and Vector-Averaged Wind Direction (deg). The sensors that collect the core variables are mounted at the standard heights defined for each variable: • Temperature and relative humidity: 2 meters • Barometric pressure: 1 meter • Winds: 10 meters.

  4. Intercomparison of snowfall estimates derived from the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar and the ground-based weather radar network over Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Norin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate snowfall estimates are important for both weather and climate applications. Ground-based weather radars and space-based satellite sensors are often used as viable alternatives to rain gauges to estimate precipitation in this context. In particular, the Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR on board CloudSat is proving to be a useful tool to map snowfall globally, in part due to its high sensitivity to light precipitation and its ability to provide near-global vertical structure. CloudSat snowfall estimates play a particularly important role in the high-latitude regions as other ground-based observations become sparse and passive satellite sensors suffer from inherent limitations. In this paper, snowfall estimates from two observing systems – Swerad, the Swedish national weather radar network, and CloudSat – are compared. Swerad offers a well-calibrated data set of precipitation rates with high spatial and temporal resolution, at very high latitudes. The measurements are anchored to rain gauges and provide valuable insights into the usefulness of CloudSat CPR's snowfall estimates in the polar regions. In total, 7.2 × 105 matchups of CloudSat and Swerad observations from 2008 through 2010 were intercompared, covering all but the summer months (June to September. The intercomparison shows encouraging agreement between the two observing systems despite their different sensitivities and user applications. The best agreement is observed when CloudSat passes close to a Swerad station (46–82 km, where the observational conditions for both systems are comparable. Larger disagreements outside this range suggest that both platforms have difficulty with shallow snow but for different reasons. The correlation between Swerad and CloudSat degrades with increasing distance from the nearest Swerad station, as Swerad's sensitivity decreases as a function of distance. Swerad also tends to overshoot low-level precipitating systems further away from the station

  5. Assessment of NASA Airborne Laser Altimetry Data Using Ground-Based GPS Data near Summit Station, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, Kelly M.; Hawley, Robert L.; Lutz, Eric R.; Studinger, Michael; Sonntag, John G.; Hofton, Michelle A.; Andrews, Lauren C.; Neumann, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    A series of NASA airborne lidars have been used in support of satellite laser altimetry missions. These airbornelaser altimeters have been deployed for satellite instrument development, for spaceborne data validation, and to bridge the data gap between satellite missions. We used data from ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) surveys of an 11 km long track near Summit Station, Greenland, to assess the surface elevation bias and measurement precision of three airborne laser altimeters including the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), the Land, Vegetation, and Ice Sensor (LVIS), and the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL). Ground-based GPS data from the monthly ground-based traverses, which commenced in 2006, allowed for the assessment of nine airborne lidar surveys associated with ATM and LVIS between 2007 and 2016. Surface elevation biases for these altimeters over the flat, ice-sheet interior are less than 0.12 m, while assessments of measurement precision are 0.09 m or better. Ground-based GPS positions determined both with and without differential post-processing techniques provided internally consistent solutions. Results from the analyses of ground-based and airborne data provide validation strategy guidance for the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite 2 (ICESat-2) elevation and elevation-change data products.

  6. Ground-based simulation of telepresence for materials science experiments. [remote viewing and control of processes aboard Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, James C.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.; Bonner, Mary JO; Hahn, Richard C.; Herbach, Bruce

    1989-01-01

    A series of ground-based telepresence experiments have been performed to determine the minimum video frame rate and resolution required for the successive performance of materials science experiments in space. The approach used is to simulate transmission between earth and space station with transmission between laboratories on earth. The experiments include isothermal dendrite growth, physical vapor transport, and glass melting. Modifications of existing apparatus, software developed, and the establishment of an inhouse network are reviewed.

  7. Ground-based simulation of telepresence for materials science experiments. [remote viewing and control of processes aboard Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, James C.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.; Bonner, Mary JO; Hahn, Richard C.; Herbach, Bruce

    1989-01-01

    A series of ground-based telepresence experiments have been performed to determine the minimum video frame rate and resolution required for the successive performance of materials science experiments in space. The approach used is to simulate transmission between earth and space station with transmission between laboratories on earth. The experiments include isothermal dendrite growth, physical vapor transport, and glass melting. Modifications of existing apparatus, software developed, and the establishment of an inhouse network are reviewed.

  8. Climatology of clouds and precipitation over East Antarctica using ground-based remote sensing at the Princess Elizabeth station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souverijns, Niels; Gossart, Alexandra; Gorodetskaya, Irina; Lhermitte, Stef; Van Tricht, Kristof; Mangold, Alexander; Laffineur, Quentin; Van Lipzig, Nicole

    2016-04-01

    The surface mass balance of the Antarctic ice sheet is highly dependent on the interaction between clouds and precipitation. Our understanding of these processes is challenged by the limited availability of observations over the area and problems in Antarctic climate simulations by state-of-the-art climate models. Improvements are needed in this field, as the Antarctic ice sheet is expected to become a dominant contributor to sea level rise in the 21st century. In 2010, an observational site was established at the Princess Elisabeth (PE) Antarctic station. PE is located in the escarpment area of Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica (72°S, 23°E). The instruments consist of several ground-based remote sensing instruments: a ceilometer (measuring cloud-base height and vertical structure), a 24-GHz Micro Rain Radar (MRR; providing vertical profiles of radar effective reflectivity and Doppler velocity), and a pyrometer (measuring effective cloud base temperature). An automatic weather station provides info on boundary-layer meteorology (temperature, wind speed and direction, humidity, pressure), as well as broadband radiative fluxes and snow height changes. This set of instruments can be used to infer the role of clouds in the Antarctic climate system, their interaction with radiation and their impact on precipitation. Cloud and precipitation characteristics are derived from 5-year-long measurement series, which is unprecedented for the Antarctic region. Here, we present an overview of the cloud and precipitation climatology. Statistics on cloud occurrence are calculated on annual / seasonal basis and a distinction between liquid / mixed phase and ice clouds is made. One can discriminate between liquid-bearing and ice-only clouds by investigating the ceilometer attenuated backscatter, since liquid phase clouds have a much higher signal. Furthermore, by using pyrometer measurements, we are able to identify the range of temperatures at which liquid / ice clouds are

  9. Weather Station and Sensor Locations, MDTA Roadway weather station, weather stations, weather sensors, Roadway weather sensors, RWIS, MDTA weather sensors, Published in 2009, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Maryland Transportation Authority.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Weather Station and Sensor Locations dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2009. It...

  10. Ground-based microwave weather radar observations and retrievals during the 2014 Holuhraun eruption (Bárðarbunga, Iceland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mereu, Luigi; Silvio Marzano, Frank; Barsotti, Sara; Montopoli, Mario; Yeo, Richard; Arngrimsson, Hermann; Björnsson, Halldór; Bonadonna, Costanza

    2015-04-01

    During an eruptive event the real-time forecasting of ash dispersal into the atmosphere is a key factor to prevent air traffic disasters. The ash plume is extremely hazardous to aircraft that inadvertently may fly through it. Real-time monitoring of such phenomena is crucial, particularly to obtain specific data for the initialization of eruption and dispersion models in terms of source parameters. The latter, such as plume height, ash concentration, mass flow rate and size spectra, are usually very difficult to measure or to estimate with a relatively good accuracy. Over the last years different techniques have been developed to improved ash plume detection and retrieval. Satellite-based observations, using multi-frequency visible and infrared radiometers, are usually exploited for monitoring and measuring dispersed ash clouds. The observations from geostationary orbit suffer from a relatively poor spatial resolution, whereas the low orbit level has a relatively poor temporal resolution. Moreover, the field-of-view of infrared radiometric measurements may be reduced by obstructions caused by water and ice clouds lying between the ground and the sensor's antenna. Weather radar-based observations represent an emerging technique to detect and, to a certain extent, mitigate the hazard from the ash plumes. Ground-based microwave scanning radar systems can provide the three-dimensional information about the detected ash volume with a fairly high spatial resolution every few minutes and in all weather conditions. Methodological studies have recently investigated the possibility of using single-polarization and dual-polarization ground-based radar for the remote sensing of volcanic ash cloud. In this respect, radar observations can be complementary to satellite observations. A microphysical electromagnetic characterization of volcanic ash was carried out in terms of dielectric properties, composition, size and orientation of ash particles. An extended Volcanic Ash Radar

  11. Comparison of total ozone and erythemal UV data from OMI with ground-based measurements at Rome station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Ialongo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Ground-based total ozone and surface UV irradiance measurements have been collected since 1992 using Brewer spectrophotometer and Erythemal Dose Rates (EDRs have been determined by a broad-band radiometer (model YES UVB-1 operational since 2000 at Rome station. The methodology to retrieve the EDR and the Erythemal Daily Dose (EDD from the radiometer observations is described. Ground-based measurements were compared with satellite-derived total ozone and UV data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI. OMI, onboard the NASA EOS Aura spacecraft, is a nadir viewing spectrometer that provides total ozone and surface UV retrievals. The results of the validation exercise showed satisfactory agreement between OMI and Brewer total ozone data, for both OMI-TOMS and OMI-DOAS ozone alghorithms (biases of −1.8% and −0.7%, respectively. Regarding UV data, OMI data overestimate ground-based erythemally weighted data retrieved from both Brewer and YES Radiometer (biases about 20%, probably because of the effect of absorbing aerosols in an urban site such as Rome.

  12. Aviation Weather Observations for Supplementary Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (SAWRS) and Limited Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (LAWRS). Federal Meteorological Handbook No. 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation, Washington, DC.

    This handbook provides instructions for observing, identifying, and recording aviation weather at Limited Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (LAWRS) and Supplementary Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (SAWRS). Official technical definitions, meteorological and administrative procedures are outlined. Although this publication is intended for use…

  13. A global assessment of NASA AIRS v6 and EUMETSAT IASI v6 precipitable water vapor using ground-based GPS SuomiNet stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Jacola; Knuteson, Robert; August, Thomas; Hultberg, Tim; Ackerman, Steve; Revercomb, Hank

    2016-08-01

    Satellite remote sensing of precipitable water vapor (PWV) is essential for monitoring moisture in real time for weather applications, as well as tracking the long-term changes in PWV for climate change trend detection. This study assesses the accuracies of the current satellite observing system, specifically the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) v6 PWV product and the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellite Studies (EUMETSAT) Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) v6 PWV product, using ground-based SuomiNet Global Positioning System (GPS) network as truth. Elevation-corrected collocated matchups to each SuomiNet GPS station in North America and around the world were created, and results were broken down by station, ARM region, climate zone, and latitude zone. The greatest difference, exceeding 5%, between IASI and AIRS retrievals occurred in the tropics. Generally, IASI and AIRS fall within a 5% error in the PWV range of 20-40 mm (a mean bias less than 2 mm), with a wet bias for extremely low PWV values (less than 5 mm) and a dry bias for extremely high PWV values (greater than 50 mm). The operational IR satellite products are able to capture the mean PWV but degrade in the extreme dry and wet regimes.

  14. Monitoring Weather Station Fire Rehabilitation Treatments: Hanford Reach National Monument

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Weather Station Fire (July, 2005) burned across 4,918 acres in the Saddle Mountain Unit of the Hanford Reach National Monument, which included parts of the...

  15. Weather Station and Sensor Locations, INDOT Weather Stations, Published in 2006, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, INDOT.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Weather Station and Sensor Locations dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2006....

  16. Weather Station and Sensor Locations, weather stations, Published in 2002, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Tooele County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Weather Station and Sensor Locations dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2002. It is...

  17. Study of Atmospheric Trace Gas Amounts at the Stara Zagora Ground-Based Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, R.; Valev, D.; Kostadinov, I.; Atanassov, At.; Giovanelli, G.; Petritoli, A.; Bortoli, D.; Ravegnani, F.

    2006-03-01

    Since the end of August 1999 twilight daily measurements of scattered zenith sky radiation have been carried out at Stara Zagora for determination of trace gas amounts, deploying GASCOD instrument. It was developed at the Institute of Atmospheric Science and Climate, Bologna. Reference spectra are obtained at midday. The instrument, appearing a UV-VIS spectrometer, registers the zenith sky spectra automatically and 410 nm to 460 nm spectral interval is used to retrieve NO2 and O3 slant column amounts (SCA) by application of the DOAS methodology. The spectral analysis uses minimum least squares fitting of the cross sections at the expected absorbers to a logarithm of the twilight spectrum and a reference spectrum. The accumulated time series show the well-known typical seasonal variations, caused by the solar insulation. The residual time series of the removed semi-annual seasonal cycles from the measured original series show many different variations, with short periods up to inter-annual variations. Single spikes of SCA are detected and we consider them a result of over-passing weather fronts and/or lightning. Variations of SCA with time scale up to about 10 days are the consequence of weather cyclones. Some short-term variations of NO2 and O3 SCA are a result of intensive stratospheric-tropospheric exchange. Other residual time series periods are caused by Rossby waves, by over-passing of the polar vortex filaments. The inter-annual variations can be affected by QBO and NAO. Applying wavelet analysis of the obtained NO2 slant column amount data series, and the total O3 amount obtained by the GOME instrument, during the 23-rd solar cycle maximum, time intervals are found with periods of 27 days on the time scale. The applied cross-correlation analysis demonstrates a phase lag of some days of the NO2 and O3 response to the 27-days solar cycle. The calculated vertical column amounts of NO2 are used for validation of the satellite measurements, e.g. SCIAMACHY NO2

  18. Primary Dendrite Array Morphology: Observations from Ground-based and Space Station Processed Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Surendra; Rajamure, Ravi; Grugel, Richard; Erdmann, Robert; Poirier, David

    2012-01-01

    Influence of natural convection on primary dendrite array morphology during directional solidification is being investigated under a collaborative European Space Agency-NASA joint research program, "Microstructure Formation in Castings of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions (MICAST)". Two Aluminum-7 wt pct Silicon alloy samples, MICAST6 and MICAST7, were directionally solidified in microgravity on the International Space Station. Terrestrially grown dendritic monocrystal cylindrical samples were remelted and directionally solidified at 18 K/cm (MICAST6) and 28 K/cm (MICAST7). Directional solidification involved a growth speed step increase (MICAST6-from 5 to 50 micron/s) and a speed decrease (MICAST7-from 20 to 10 micron/s). Distribution and morphology of primary dendrites is currently being characterized in these samples, and also in samples solidified on earth under nominally similar thermal gradients and growth speeds. Primary dendrite spacing and trunk diameter measurements from this investigation will be presented.

  19. Primary Dendrite Array: Observations from Ground-Based and Space Station Processed Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Surendra N.; Grugel, Richard N.; Erdman, Robert G.; Poirier, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Influence of natural convection on primary dendrite array morphology during directional solidification is being investigated under a collaborative European Space Agency-NASA joint research program, Microstructure Formation in Castings of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions (MICAST). Two Aluminum-7 wt pct Silicon alloy samples, MICAST6 and MICAST7, were directionally solidified in microgravity on the International Space Station. Terrestrially grown dendritic monocrystal cylindrical samples were remelted and directionally solidified at 18 K per centimeter (MICAST6) and 28 K per centimeter (MICAST7). Directional solidification involved a growth speed step increase (MICAST6-from 5 to 50 millimeters per second) and a speed decrease (MICAST7-from 20 to 10 millimeters per second). Distribution and morphology of primary dendrites is currently being characterized in these samples, and also in samples solidified on earth under nominally similar thermal gradients and growth speeds. Primary dendrite spacing and trunk diameter measurements from this investigation will be presented.

  20. Ground-based aerosol measurements during CHARMEX/ADRIMED campaign at Granada station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados-Muñoz, Maria Jose; Bravo-Aranda, Juan Antonio; Navas-Guzman, Francisco; Guerro-Rascado, Juan Luis; Titos, Gloria; Lyamani, Hassan; Valenzuela, Antonio; Cazorla, Alberto; Olmo, Francisco Jose; Mallet, Marc; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of ChArMEx/ADRIMED (Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/; Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact on the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region) projects, a field experiment based on in situ and remote sensing measurements from surface and airborne platforms was performed. The ADRIMED project aimed to capture the high complexity of the Mediterranean region by using an integrated approach based on intensive experimental field campaign and spaceborne observations, radiative transfer calculations and climate modelling with Regional Climate Models better adapted than global circulation models. For this purpose, measurements were performed at different surface super-sites (including Granada station) over the Occidental Mediterranean region during summer 2013 for creating an updated database of the physical, chemical, optical properties and the vertical distribution of the major "Mediterranean aerosols". Namely, measurements at Granada station were performed on 16 and 17 July 2013, in coincidence with the overpasses of the ATR aircraft over the station. The instrumentation used for the campaign includes both remote sensing instruments (a multiwavelength Raman lidar and a sun photometer) and in-situ measurements (a nephelometer, a Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP), an Aerodynamic particle sizer (APS), a high volume sampler of PM10 and an aethalometer). During the measurement period a mineral dust event was detected, with similar dust load on both days. According to in-situ measurements, the event reached the surface level on 16 of June. Vertically resolved lidar measurements indicated presence of mineral dust layers up to 5 km asl both on 16 and 17 June 2013. Temporal evolution analysis indicated that on 17 June the dust layer decoupled from the boundary layer and disappeared around 14:00 UTC. In addition, lidar and sun-photometer data were used to retrieve volume concentration profiles by means of LIRIC (Lidar

  1. Multiple ground-based observations at Zhongshan Station during the April/May 1998 solar events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Ruiyuan(刘瑞源); HU; Hongqiao(胡红桥); HE; Longsong(贺龙松); LIU; Yonghua(刘勇华); LIU; Shunlin(刘顺林); LI; Shenggui(李胜桂); N.; Sato; B.; J.; Fraser

    2002-01-01

    Simultaneous observations at Zhongshan Station, Antarctica, during May 1-7, 1998 are presented to show the responses of the polar ionosphere to the April/May 1998 solar events. One of the main geo-effects of the solar events resulted in the major magnetic storm on May 4. At the storm onset on May 2 the ionosphere F2 layer abruptly increased in altitude, the geomagnetic H-component started negative deviation and the spectral amplitude of the ULF wave intensified. Both large isolated riometer absorption and large negative deviation of the geomagnetic H-component occurred at about 0639UT. There was a time lag of about one hour and ten minutes between the storm onset and the IMF southward turning, as measured by the WIND satellite. The polar ionosphere was highly disturbed, as shown by frequent large deviations of the geomagnetic H-component, large riometer absorption events and strong ULF waves in all the courses of the storm. The absorption increased greatly causing the digisonde to be blackout most of the time. However, the data still showed a substantial decrease in the F2 electron density and oscillation of the F2 layer peak height with an amplitude exceeding 200 km.

  2. Implementation of weather stations at Ghanaian high schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieron, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Trans-African Hydro-Meteorological Observatory (www.tahmo.org) is an initiative that aims to develop a dense weather observation network in Sub-Sahara Africa. The ambition is to have 20.000 low-cost innovative weather stations in place in 2015. An increased amount of weather data is locally required to provide stakeholders that are dependent on the weather, such as farmers and fishermen, with accurate forecasts. As a first proof of concept, showing that sensors can be built at costs lower than commercially available, a disdrometer was developed. In parallel with the design of the measurement instruments, a high school curriculum is developed that covers environmental sciences. In order to find out which requirements the TAHMO weather station and accompanying educational materials should meet for optimal use at Junior High Schools research was done at Ghanaian schools. Useful insights regarding the future African context of the weather station and requirements for an implementation strategy were obtained during workshops with teachers and students, visits to WMO observatories and case studies regarding use of educational materials. The poster presents the conclusions of this research, which is part of the bigger TAHMO framework.

  3. Weather Stations as Educational and Hazard-Forecasting Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, L. J.; Gierke, J. S.; Gochis, E. E.; Dominguez, R.; Mayer, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    Small, relatively inexpensive (educational opportunities at all grade levels, while also facilitating compilation of climate data for longer term research. Weather stations and networks of stations have been installed both locally and abroad in mostly rural and resource-limited settings. The data are being used either in the classroom to engage students in place-based, scientific investigations and/or research to improve hydrometeorological hazard forecasting, including water scarcity. The San Vicente (El Salvador) Network of six stations monitors rainfall to aid warning and evacuations for landslide and flooding hazards. Other parameters are used in modeling the watershed hydrology. A station installed in Hermosillo, Mexico is used in both Geography and Ecology Classes. Trends in temperature and rainfall are graphed and compared to historic data gathered over the last 30 years by CONAGUA. These observations are linked to local water-related problems, including well salinization, diminished agriculture, depleted aquifers, and social conflict regarding access to water. Two weather stations were installed at the Hannahville Indian Community School (Nah Tah Wahsh) in Michigan for educational purposes of data collection, analysis, and presentation. Through inquiry-based explorations of local hydrological processes, students are introduced to how meteorological data are used in understanding watershed hydrology and the sustainable management of groundwater resources. Several Michigan Technological University Peace Corps Masters International students have deployed weather stations in and around the communities where they serve, and the data are used in research to help in understanding water resource availability and irrigation needs.

  4. Ground-based remote sensing profiling and numerical weather prediction model to manage nuclear power plants meteorological surveillance in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Calpini

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The meteorological surveillance of the four nuclear power plants in Switzerland is of first importance in a densely populated area such as the Swiss Plateau. The project "Centrales Nucléaires et Météorologie" CN-MET aimed at providing a new security tool based on one hand on the development of a high resolution numerical weather prediction (NWP model. The latter is providing essential nowcasting information in case of a radioactive release from a nuclear power plant in Switzerland. On the other hand, the model input over the Swiss Plateau is generated by a dedicated network of surface and upper air observations including remote sensing instruments (wind profilers and temperature/humidity passive microwave radiometers. This network is built upon three main sites ideally located for measuring the inflow/outflow and central conditions of the main wind field in the planetary boundary layer over the Swiss Plateau, as well as a number of surface automatic weather stations (AWS. The network data are assimilated in real-time into the fine grid NWP model using a rapid update cycle of eight runs per day (one forecast every three hours. This high resolution NWP model has replaced the former security tool based on in situ observations (in particular one meteorological mast at each of the power plants and a local dispersion model. It is used to forecast the dynamics of the atmosphere in the planetary boundary layer (typically the first 4 km above ground layer and over a time scale of 24 h. This tool provides at any time (e.g. starting at the initial time of a nuclear power plant release the best picture of the 24-h evolution of the air mass over the Swiss Plateau and furthermore generates the input data (in the form of simulated values substituting in situ observations required for the local dispersion model used at each of the nuclear power plants locations. This paper is presenting the concept and two validation studies as well as the results of an

  5. Sophisticated technology for offshore weather station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2007-11-15

    A laser wind velocity measurement system has been installed by the NaiKun Wind Energy Group at its offshore wind project site at the Haida Energy Field (HEF) in the Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia. The ZephIR LiDAR was developed by QinetiQ of the United Kingdom. Compared to regular cup anemometers, this new measurement system provides a greater profile of wind resources because it measures wind speed, direction, turbulence and shear at various heights by measuring the Doppler shift of laser radiation scattered by atmospheric aerosols. The technology has been used at various research centres worldwide and wind energy developers such as Fred Olsen Renewables, Talisman Energy and Meridian Energy use the system to facilitate project development and acquire wind resource data. The HEF has some of the strongest and most consistent winds in Canada. NaiKun has access to Environment Canada's wind data which has been collected over the past decade at an onshore meteorological station in the area. The ZephIR LiDAR was actually operating at the onshore site prior to offshore installation in order to correlate the existing wind anemometer data. It is anticipated that LiDAR technology will facilitate resource profiling by quickly providing wind measurements within the entire area of a turbine blade rotation from base to hub height. Collected data will be used to optimize project design and layout of the wind turbine array. Germany-based GL Wind Test was retained by NaiKun to manage the data acquisition and analysis. 2 figs.

  6. Federal Weather Radar Stations in the United States as of September 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) weather radar stations within the US. The NEXRAD radar stations are...

  7. Improved Recharge Estimation from Portable, Low-Cost Weather Stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holländer, Hartmut M; Wang, Zijian; Assefa, Kibreab A; Woodbury, Allan D

    2016-03-01

    Groundwater recharge estimation is a critical quantity for sustainable groundwater management. The feasibility and robustness of recharge estimation was evaluated using physical-based modeling procedures, and data from a low-cost weather station with remote sensor techniques in Southern Abbotsford, British Columbia, Canada. Recharge was determined using the Richards-based vadose zone hydrological model, HYDRUS-1D. The required meteorological data were recorded with a HOBO(TM) weather station for a short observation period (about 1 year) and an existing weather station (Abbotsford A) for long-term study purpose (27 years). Undisturbed soil cores were taken at two locations in the vicinity of the HOBO(TM) weather station. The derived soil hydraulic parameters were used to characterize the soil in the numerical model. Model performance was evaluated using observed soil moisture and soil temperature data obtained from subsurface remote sensors. A rigorous sensitivity analysis was used to test the robustness of the model. Recharge during the short observation period was estimated at 863 and 816 mm. The mean annual recharge was estimated at 848 and 859 mm/year based on a time series of 27 years. The relative ratio of annual recharge-precipitation varied from 43% to 69%. From a monthly recharge perspective, the majority (80%) of recharge due to precipitation occurred during the hydrologic winter period. The comparison of the recharge estimates with other studies indicates a good agreement. Furthermore, this method is able to predict transient recharge estimates, and can provide a reasonable tool for estimates on nutrient leaching that is often controlled by strong precipitation events and rapid infiltration of water and nitrate into the soil.

  8. Simulated Transmission of the Dengue Virus Across the US-Mexico Border Using Remotely Sensed and Ground Based Weather Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Cory; Quattrochi, Dale A.

    2015-01-01

    Incidence of dengue fever, caused by a mosquito transmitted virus, have increased in the Americas during recent decades. In the US, local transmission has been reported in southern Texas and Florida. However, despite its close proximity to dengue endemic areas in Mexico and the presence of a primary mosquito vector, there are no reports of local transmission in Arizona. Many studies have demonstrated that weather influences dengue virus transmission by regulating vector development rates, vector habitat availability, and the duration of the virus extrinsic incubation period (EIP). The EIP, the period between mosquito infection and the ability for it to retransmit the virus, is especially important given its high sensitivity to temperature and the short lifespan of mosquitoes. Other studies, however, have suggested that human related factors such as socioeconomic status and herd immunity may explain much of the disparity in dengue incidence in the US-Mexico border region. Using a meteorologically driven model of vector population dynamics and virus transmission we compare simulations of dengue fever cases in southern Arizona and northern Mexico. A Monte Carlo approach is employed to select parameter values by evaluating simulations in Hermosillo Mexico with reported dengue fever case data. Simulations that replicate the case data best are retained and rerun using remotely sensed climate data from other Arizona and Mexico locations to determine the relative influence of weather on virus transmission. Although human and environmental factors undoubtedly influence dengue transmission in the US-Mexico border regions, weather is a major facilitator of the transmission process.

  9. Weather satellite picture receiving stations, APT digital scan converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermillion, C. H.; Kamowski, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The automatic picture transmission digital scan converter is used at ground stations to convert signals received from scanning radiometers to data compatible with ground equipment designed to receive signals from vidicons aboard operational meteorological satellites. Information necessary to understand the circuit theory, functional operation, general construction and calibration of the converter is provided. Brief and detailed descriptions of each of the individual circuits are included, accompanied by a schematic diagram contained at the end of each circuit description. Listings of integral parts and testing equipment required as well as an overall wiring diagram are included. This unit will enable the user to readily accept and process weather photographs from the operational meteorological satellites.

  10. Weather Station and Sensor Locations, WeatherStations-This dataset contains the names and locations of weathers stations found throughout Utah, Published in 2005, 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, State of Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Weather Station and Sensor Locations dataset, published at 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  11. Weather Station and Sensor Locations, WeatherStations-This dataset contains the names and locations of weathers stations found throughout Utah, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, State of Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Weather Station and Sensor Locations dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  12. Studies of Geomagnetic Pulsations Using Magnetometer Data from the CHAMP Low-Earth-Orbit Satellite and Ground-Based Stations: a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P R Sutcliffe

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We review research on geomagnetic pulsations carried out using magnetic field measurements from the CHAMP low-Earth-orbit (LEO satellite and ground-based stations in South Africa and Hungary. The high quality magnetic field measurements from CHAMP made it possible to extract and clearly resolve Pi2 and Pc3 pulsations in LEO satellite data. Our analyses for nighttime Pi2 pulsations are indicative of a cavity mode resonance. However, observations of daytime Pi2 pulsation events identified in ground station data show no convincing evidence of their occurrence in CHAMP data. We also studied low-latitude Pc3 pulsations and found that different types of field line resonant structure occur, namely discrete frequencies driven by a narrow band source and L-dependent frequencies driven by a broad band source.

  13. Ground based observations of Pc3-Pc5 geomagnetic pulsation power at Antarctic McMurdo station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. Maclennan

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available The two horizontal geomagnetic components and, measured by a fluxgate magnetometer at Antarctic McMurdo station (corrected geomagnetic coordinates 80.0° S, 327.5° E, are analyzed for the period May-June 1994; the spectral powers are calculated and integrated over three frequency intervals corresponding to the nominal ranges. The time dependence of those integrated powers and their correlations with northern auroral indices and solar wind speed are considered. The observations are compared with previous results reported from Terra Nova Bay station (located near McMurdo at the same corrected geomagnetic latitude during Antarctic summer intervals. The differences found between the two stations are discussed in terms of the seasonal dependence of geomagnetic field line configurations in the near cusp region.

  14. Ground-based multi-station spectroscopic imaging with ALIS. - Scientific highlights, project status and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brändström; Gustavsson, Björn; Pellinen-Wannberg, Asta; Sandahl, Ingrid; Sergienko, Tima; Steen, Ake

    2005-08-01

    The Auroral Large Imaging System (ALIS) was first proposed at the ESA-PAC meeting in Lahnstein 1989. The first spectroscopic imaging station was operational in 1994, and since then up to six stations have been in simultaneous operation. Each station has a scientific-grade CCD-detector and a filter-wheel for narrow-band interference-filters with six positions. The field-of-view is around 70°. Each imager is mounted in a positioning system, enabling imaging of a common volume from several sites. This enables triangulation and tomography. Raw data from ALIS is freely available at ("http://alis.irf.se") and ALIS is open for scientific colaboration. ALIS made the first unambiguous observations of Radio-induced optical emissions at high latitudes, and the detection of water in a Leonid meteor-trail. Both rockets and satellite coordination are considered for future observations with ALIS.

  15. Retrieval and validation of O3 measurements from ground-based FTIR spectrometer at equatorial station: Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takele Kenea, S.; Mengistu Tsidu, G.; Blumenstock, T.; Hase, F.; von Clarmann, T.; Stiller, G. P.

    2012-09-01

    Since May 2009 high-resolution Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) solar absorption spectra are recorded at Addis Ababa (9.01° N latitude, 38.76° E longitude, 2443 m altitude a.s.l.), Ethiopia. The vertical profiles and total column amounts of ozone (O3) are deduced from the spectra by using the retrieval code PROFFIT (V9.5) and regularly determined instrumental line shape (ILS). A detailed error analysis of the O3 retrieval is performed. Averaging kernels analysis of the target gas shows that the major contribution to the retrieved information always comes from the measurement. We obtained 2.1 degrees of freedom on average for signals in the retrieval of O3 from the observed FTIR spectra. We have compared the FTIR retrieval of ozone Volume Mixing Ratio (VMR) profiles and column amounts with the coincident satellite observations of Microwave Limb Sounding (MLS), Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) and Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), Atmospheric Infrared Sounding (AIRS) and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2) instrument. The mean relative differences are generally found below +15% in the altitude range of 27 to 36 km for comparison of VMR profiles made between MLS and MIPAS, whereas comparison with TES has shown below 9.4% relative difference. Furthermore, the mean relative difference is positive above 31 km, suggesting positive bias in the FTIR measurement of O3 VMR with respect to MLS, MIPAS and TES. The overall comparisons of column amounts of satellite measurements with the ground-based FTIR instruments show better agreement exhibiting mean relative differences of ground-based FTIR with respect to MLS and GOME-2 within +0.4% to +4.0% and corresponding standard deviations of 2.2 to 4.3% whereas, in the case of OMI, TES, AIRS, the mean relative differences are from -0.38 to -6.8%. Thus, the retrieved O3 VMR and column amounts from a tropical site, Addis Ababa, is found to exhibit

  16. Comparison Between Radar and Automatic Weather Station Refractivity Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallali, Ruben; Dalaudier, Francis; Parent du Chatelet, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    Weather radars measure changes in the refractive index of air in the atmospheric boundary layer. The technique uses the phase of signals from ground targets located around the radar to provide information on atmospheric refractivity related to meteorological quantities such as temperature, pressure and humidity. The approach has been successfully implemented during several field campaigns using operational S-band radars in Canada, UK, USA and France. In order to better characterize the origins of errors, a recent study has simulated temporal variations of refractivity based on Automatic Weather Station (AWS) measurements. This reveals a stronger variability of the refractivity during the summer and in the afternoon when the refractivity is the most sensitive to humidity, probably because of turbulence close to the ground. This raises the possibility of retrieving information on the turbulent state of the atmosphere from the variability in radar refractivity. An analysis based on a 1-year dataset from the operational C-band radar at Trappes (near Paris, France) and AWS refractivity variability measurements was used to measure those temporal and spatial variabilities. Particularly during summer, a negative bias increasing with range is observed between radar and AWS estimations, and is well explained by a model based on Taylor's hypotheses. The results demonstrate the possibility of establishing, depending on season, a quantitative and qualitative link between radar and AWS refractivity variability that reflects low-level coherent turbulent structures.

  17. Temporal evolution of chlorine and related species observed with ground-based FTIR at Syowa Station, Antarctica during late winter and spring in 2007 and 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hideaki; Saeki, Kosuke; Murata, Isao; Nagahama, Yoshihiro; Takeda, Masanori

    2017-04-01

    Vertical profiles of O3, HNO3, and HCl and vertical column of ClONO2 were retrieved from solar spectra taken with a ground-based Fourier-Transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) installed at Syowa Station, Antarctica (69.0S, 39.6E) from March to December, 2007 and September to November, 2011. We analyzed temporal variation of these species combined with ClO data taken by Aura/MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder) satellite sensor at 18 and 22 km over Syowa Station. In early July, polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) started to be formed over Syowa Station. With the return of sunlight at Syowa Station in early July, ClONO2 and HCl showed depleted values while ClO showed enhanced values. At two altitudes (18 and 22 km), when ClO concentrations started to decline in early September, HCl started to increase rapidly, while the increase in ClONO2 was gradual. The Cly partitioning between HCl, ClONO2, and ClO showed difference at different altitudes. At the altitudes of 18 km, where ozone was almost depleted, ClO and HNO3 amounts are low, so conversion to HCl was favored rather than ClONO2. Whereas, at 22 km, sufficient ozone still remained, at an amount that ClONO2 formation from ClO and NOy species continued to occur at this altitude.

  18. Weather Station and Sensor Locations, Kansas Weather Stations, Published in 2005, Smaller than 1:100000 scale, Kansas Adjutant General's Department.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Weather Station and Sensor Locations dataset, published at Smaller than 1:100000 scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as...

  19. Development of a Ground-Based Analog to the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device Aboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, Nathaniel J.; Scott-Pandorf, M. M.; Caldwell, E.; DeWitt, J.K.; Fincke, R.; Peters, B.T.

    2010-01-01

    NASA and Wyle engineers constructed a Horizontal Exercise Fixture (HEF) that was patented in 2006. Recently modifications were made to HEF with the goal of creating a device that mimics squat exercise on the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) and can be used by bed rest subjects who must remain supine during exercise. This project posed several engineering challenges, such as how best to reproduce the hip motions (we used a sled that allowed hip motion in the sagittal plane), how to counterweight the pelvis against gravity (we used a pulley and free-weight mechanism), and how to apply large loads (body weight plus squat load) to the shoulders while simultaneously supporting the back against gravity (we tested a standard and a safety bar that allowed movement in the subject s z-axis, both of which used a retractable plate for back support). METHODS An evaluation of the HEF was conducted with human subjects (3F, 3M), who performed sets of squat exercises of increasing load from 10-repetition maximum (RM) up to 1-RM. Three pelvic counterweight loads were tested along with each of the two back-support squat bars. Data collection included 3-dimensional ground reaction forces (GRF), muscle activation (EMG), body motion (video-based motion capture), and subjective comments. These data were compared with previous ground-based ARED study data. RESULTS All subjects in the evaluation were able to perform low- to high-loading squats on the HEF. Four of the 6 subjects preferred a pelvic counterweight equivalent to 60 percent of their body weight. Four subjects preferred the standard squat bar, whereas 2 female subjects preferred the safety bar. EMG data showed muscle activation in the legs and low back typical of squat motion. GRF trajectories and eccentric-concentric loading ratios were similar to ARED. CONCLUSION: Squat exercise performed on HEF approximated squat exercise on ARED.

  20. Ozone tropospheric and stratospheric trends (1995-2012) at six ground-based FTIR stations (28°N to 79°N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigouroux, Corinne; De Mazière, Martine; Demoulin, Philippe; Servais, Christian; Hase, Frank; Blumenstock, Thomas; Schneider, Matthias; Kohlepp, Regina; Barthlott, Sabine; García, Omaira; Mellqvist, Johan; Persson, Glenn; Palm, Mathias; Notholt, Justus; Hannigan, James; Coffey, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In the frame of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC), contributing ground-based stations have joined their efforts to homogenize and optimize the retrievals of ozone profiles from FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) solar absorption spectra. Using the optimal estimation method, distinct vertical information can be obtained in four layers: ground-10 km, 10-18 km, 18-27 km, and 27-42 km, in addition to total column amounts. In a previous study, Vigouroux et al. (2008)1 applied a bootstrap resampling method to determine the trends of the ozone total and four partial columns, over the period 1995-2004 at Western European stations. The updated trends for the period 1995-2009 have been published in the WMO 2010 report2. Here, we present the updated trends and their uncertainties, for the 1995-2012 period, for the different altitude ranges, above five European stations (28°N-79°N) and above the station Thule, Greenland (77°N). In this work, the trends have been estimated using a multiple regression model including some explanatory variables responsible for the ozone variability, such as the Quasi Biennial Oscillation (QBO), the solar flux, the Arctic Oscillation (AO) or El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). A major result is the significant positive trend of ozone in the upper stratosphere, observed at the Jungfraujoch (47°N), which is a typical mid-latitude site, as well as at the high latitude stations. This positive trend in the upper stratosphere at Jungfraujoch provides a sign of ozone recovery at mid-latitudes. 1 Vigouroux, C., De Mazière, M., Demoulin, P., Servais, C., Hase, F., Blumenstock, T., Kramer, I., Schneider, M., Mellqvist, J., Strandberg, A., Velazco, V., Notholt, J., Sussmann, R., Stremme, W., Rockmann, A., Gardiner, T., Coleman, M., and Woods, P. : Evaluation of tropospheric and stratospheric ozone trends over Western Europe from ground-based FTIR network observations, ACP, 8, 6865-6886, 2008. 2 Douglass, A., and

  1. Retrieval and satellite intercomparison of O3 measurements from ground-based FTIR Spectrometer at Equatorial Station: Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. von Clarmann

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Since May 2009, high-resolution Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR solar absorption spectra have been recorded at Addis Ababa (9.01° N latitude, 38.76° E longitude, 2443 m altitude above sea level, Ethiopia. The vertical profiles and total column amounts of ozone (O3 are deduced from the spectra by using the retrieval code PROFFIT (V9.5 and regularly determined instrumental line shape (ILS. A detailed error analysis of the O3 retrieval is performed. Averaging kernels of the target gas shows that the major contribution to the retrieved information comes from the measurement. The degrees of freedom for signals is found to be 2.1 on average for the retrieval of O3 from the observed FTIR spectra. The ozone Volume Mixing Ratio (VMR profiles and column amounts retrieved from FTIR spectra are compared with the coincident satellite observations of Microwave Limb Sounding (MLS, Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS, Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES, Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI, Atmospheric Infrared Sounding (AIRS and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2 instruments. The mean relative differences in ozone profiles of FTIR from MLS and MIPAS are generally lower than 15% within the altitude range of 27 to 36 km, whereas difference from TES is lower than 1%. Comparisons of measurements of column amounts from the satellite and the ground-based FTIR show very good agreement as exhibited by relative differences within +0.2% to +2.8% for FTIR versus MLS and GOME-2; and −0.9 to −9.0% for FTIR versus OMI, TES and AIRS. The corresponding standard deviations are within 2.0 to 2.8% for FTIR versus MLS and GOME-2 comparisons whereas that of FTIR versus OMI, TES and AIRS are within 3.5 to 7.3%. Thus, the retrieved O3 VMR and column amounts from a tropical site, Addis Ababa, is found to exhibit very good agreement with all coincident satellite observations over an approximate 3-yr period.

  2. Retrieval and satellite intercomparison of O3 measurements from ground-based FTIR Spectrometer at Equatorial Station: Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takele Kenea, S.; Mengistu Tsidu, G.; Blumenstock, T.; Hase, F.; von Clarmann, T.; Stiller, G. P.

    2013-02-01

    Since May 2009, high-resolution Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) solar absorption spectra have been recorded at Addis Ababa (9.01° N latitude, 38.76° E longitude, 2443 m altitude above sea level), Ethiopia. The vertical profiles and total column amounts of ozone (O3) are deduced from the spectra by using the retrieval code PROFFIT (V9.5) and regularly determined instrumental line shape (ILS). A detailed error analysis of the O3 retrieval is performed. Averaging kernels of the target gas shows that the major contribution to the retrieved information comes from the measurement. The degrees of freedom for signals is found to be 2.1 on average for the retrieval of O3 from the observed FTIR spectra. The ozone Volume Mixing Ratio (VMR) profiles and column amounts retrieved from FTIR spectra are compared with the coincident satellite observations of Microwave Limb Sounding (MLS), Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS), Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), Atmospheric Infrared Sounding (AIRS) and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2) instruments. The mean relative differences in ozone profiles of FTIR from MLS and MIPAS are generally lower than 15% within the altitude range of 27 to 36 km, whereas difference from TES is lower than 1%. Comparisons of measurements of column amounts from the satellite and the ground-based FTIR show very good agreement as exhibited by relative differences within +0.2% to +2.8% for FTIR versus MLS and GOME-2; and -0.9 to -9.0% for FTIR versus OMI, TES and AIRS. The corresponding standard deviations are within 2.0 to 2.8% for FTIR versus MLS and GOME-2 comparisons whereas that of FTIR versus OMI, TES and AIRS are within 3.5 to 7.3%. Thus, the retrieved O3 VMR and column amounts from a tropical site, Addis Ababa, is found to exhibit very good agreement with all coincident satellite observations over an approximate 3-yr period.

  3. Estimation of solar irradiance using ground-based whole sky imagers

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, Soumyabrata; Lee, Yee Hui; Winkler, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Ground-based whole sky imagers (WSIs) can provide localized images of the sky of high temporal and spatial resolution, which permits fine-grained cloud observation. In this paper, we show how images taken by WSIs can be used to estimate solar radiation. Sky cameras are useful here because they provide additional information about cloud movement and coverage, which are otherwise not available from weather station data. Our setup includes ground-based weather stations at the same location as the imagers. We use their measurements to validate our methods.

  4. Retrievals of formaldehyde from ground-based FTIR and MAX-DOAS observations at the Jungfraujoch station and comparisons with GEOS-Chem and IMAGES model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, B.; Hendrick, F.; Van Roozendael, M.; Müller, J.-F.; Stavrakou, T.; Marais, E. A.; Bovy, B.; Bader, W.; Fayt, C.; Hermans, C.; Lejeune, B.; Pinardi, G.; Servais, C.; Mahieu, E.

    2015-04-01

    As an ubiquitous product of the oxidation of many volatile organic compounds (VOCs), formaldehyde (HCHO) plays a key role as a short-lived and reactive intermediate in the atmospheric photo-oxidation pathways leading to the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosols. In this study, HCHO profiles have been successfully retrieved from ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) solar spectra and UV-visible Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) scans recorded during the July 2010-December 2012 time period at the Jungfraujoch station (Swiss Alps, 46.5° N, 8.0° E, 3580 m a.s.l.). Analysis of the retrieved products has revealed different vertical sensitivity between both remote sensing techniques. Furthermore, HCHO amounts simulated by two state-of-the-art chemical transport models (CTMs), GEOS-Chem and IMAGES v2, have been compared to FTIR total columns and MAX-DOAS 3.6-8 km partial columns, accounting for the respective vertical resolution of each ground-based instrument. Using the CTM outputs as the intermediate, FTIR and MAX-DOAS retrievals have shown consistent seasonal modulations of HCHO throughout the investigated period, characterized by summertime maximum and wintertime minimum. Such comparisons have also highlighted that FTIR and MAX-DOAS provide complementary products for the HCHO retrieval above the Jungfraujoch station. Finally, tests have revealed that the updated IR parameters from the HITRAN 2012 database have a cumulative effect and significantly decrease the retrieved HCHO columns with respect to the use of the HITRAN 2008 compilation.

  5. Retrievals of formaldehyde from ground-based FTIR and MAX-DOAS observations at the Jungfraujoch station and comparisons with GEOS-Chem and IMAGES model simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Franco

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available As an ubiquitous product of the oxidation of many volatile organic compounds (VOCs, formaldehyde (HCHO plays a key role as a short-lived and reactive intermediate in the atmospheric photo-oxidation pathways leading to the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosols. In this study, HCHO profiles have been successfully retrieved from ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR solar spectra and UV-visible Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS scans recorded during the July 2010–December 2012 time period at the Jungfraujoch station (Swiss Alps, 46.5° N, 8.0° E, 3580 m a.s.l.. Analysis of the retrieved products has revealed different vertical sensitivity between both remote sensing techniques. Furthermore, HCHO amounts simulated by two state-of-the-art chemical transport models (CTMs, GEOS-Chem and IMAGES v2, have been compared to FTIR total columns and MAX-DOAS 3.6–8 km partial columns, accounting for the respective vertical resolution of each ground-based instrument. Using the CTM outputs as the intermediate, FTIR and MAX-DOAS retrievals have shown consistent seasonal modulations of HCHO throughout the investigated period, characterized by summertime maximum and wintertime minimum. Such comparisons have also highlighted that FTIR and MAX-DOAS provide complementary products for the HCHO retrieval above the Jungfraujoch station. Finally, tests have revealed that the updated IR parameters from the HITRAN 2012 database have a cumulative effect and significantly decrease the retrieved HCHO columns with respect to the use of the HITRAN 2008 compilation.

  6. Following solar activity with geomagnetic and cosmic-ray ground-based stations in the Iberian Peninsula region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasante-Marcos, Victor; José Blanco, Juan; Miquel Torta, Joan; Catalán, Manuel; Ribeiro, Paulo; Morozova, Anna; Tordesillas, José Manuel; Solé, Germán; Gomis-Moreno, Almudena

    2016-04-01

    The Iberian Peninsula is located in the South-West of Europe between 36°00' N and 43°47' N and between 9°29' W and 3°19' E. There are four Geomagnetic Observatories currently operative in this area devoted to the observation of the Earth's magnetic field: Observatori de l'Ebre (NE Spain); Observatorio de San Pablo de los Montes (central Spain); Observatorio de San Fernando (southern Spain); Observatório de Coimbra (central Portugal); plus another one, Observatorio de Güímar, in Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain). There is also one neutron monitor located in Guadalajara (central Spain; 40°38' N, 3°9' W at 708 m asl) continuously measuring the arrival of cosmic rays to the Earth's surface. In this work we show combined observations of these six stations during events caused by solar activity. We analyze them looking for differences that could imply extremely local effects caused by the response of the Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere to solar activity.

  7. Rapid Retrieval and Assimilation of Ground Based GPS-Met Observations at the NOAA Forecast Systems Laboratory: Impact on Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, S.

    2003-04-01

    This year, 2003, marks the tenth anniversary of ground-based Global Positioning System meteorology. GPS-Met as we now know it started in 1992 with the definition of the essential techniques to retrieve integrated (total column) precipitable water vapor (IPW) from zenith-scaled neutral atmospheric signal delays (Bevis et al., 1992). It culminated with the GPS/Storm experiment in 1993, which demonstrated the ability to make IPW measurements with about the predicted accuracy under warm-weather conditions (Rocken et al., 1995). Since then, most of the major advances in GPS-Met data processing have been in the form of improved mapping functions (Niell, 1996), the estimation of GPS signal delays in an absolute (Duan et al., 1996) versus a relative sense (Rocken et al., 1993), and improved GPS satellite orbit accuracy with reduced latency (Fang et al., 1998). Experiments with other GPS-Met data processing techniques, such as the estimation of line-of-sight GPS signal delays using a double-difference to zero-difference technique described by Alber et al. (2000) and Braun et al. (2001) are noted, but lingering questions about the validity of this approach (Gutman, 2002), and not the potential value of a slant-path measurements per se, (as enumerated by MacDonald and Xie, 2001 or Ha et al., 2002) have thus far precluded its routine implementation at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Forecast Systems Laboratory (NOAA/FSL). Since 1994, NOAA/FSL has concentrated on evaluating the scientific and engineering bases of ground-based GPS-Met and assessing its utility for operational weather forecasting, climate monitoring, satellite calibration and validation, and improved differential GPS positioning and navigation. The term “rapid” in the title of this paper is defined as “available in time to be used for a specific application.” The requirement for high accuracy GPS-Met retrievals with lower latency is primarily driven by two factors: the trend toward

  8. International Space Station Sustaining Engineering: A Ground-Based Test Bed for Evaluating Integrated Environmental Control and Life Support System and Internal Thermal Control System Flight Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Charles D.; Perry, Jay L.; Callahan, David M.

    2000-01-01

    As the International Space Station's (ISS) various habitable modules are placed in service on orbit, the need to provide for sustaining engineering becomes increasingly important to ensure the proper function of critical onboard systems. Chief among these are the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) and the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS). Without either, life onboard the ISS would prove difficult or nearly impossible. For this reason, a ground-based ECLSS/ITCS hardware performance simulation capability has been developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. The ECLSS/ITCS Sustaining Engineering Test Bed will be used to assist the ISS Program in resolving hardware anomalies and performing periodic performance assessments. The ISS flight configuration being simulated by the test bed is described as well as ongoing activities related to its preparation for supporting ISS Mission 5A. Growth options for the test facility are presented whereby the current facility may be upgraded to enhance its capability for supporting future station operation well beyond Mission 5A. Test bed capabilities for demonstrating technology improvements of ECLSS hardware are also described.

  9. Comparison of Relative Humidity obtained from SAPHIR on board Megha-Tropiques and Ground based Microwave Radiometer Profiler over an equatorial station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renju, Ramachandran Pillai; Uma, K. N.; Krishna Moorthy, K.; Mathew, Nizy; Raju C, Suresh

    A comparison has been made between the SAPHIR on board Megha-Tropiques (MT) derived Relative Humidity (RH (%)) with that derived from a ground based multi-frequency Microwave Radiometer Profiler (MRP) observations over an equatorial station Thiruvananthapuram (8.5(°) N and 76.9(°) E) for a one year period. As a first step, the validation of MRP has been made against the radiosonde for two years (2010 and 2011) during the Indian monsoon period July-September. This analysis shows a wet bias below 6 km and dry bias above. The comparison between the MRP and the MT derived RH has been made at five different altitudinal levels (0.75, 2.25, 4.0, 6.25 and 9.2 km range) strictly under clear sky condition. The regression analysis between the two reveals very good correlation (>0.8) in the altitudinal layer of 2.25 to 6.25 km. The differences between the two observations had also been explained interms of percentage of occurrence between MT and the MRP at each altitudinal layer. About 70-80% of the time, the difference in the RH is found to below 10% at first three layer. The RMSE of 2% is observed at almost all the height layers. The differences have been attributed to the different measurement and retrieval techniques involved in the ground based and satellite based measurements. Since MRP frequecy channels are not sensitive to small water vapor variabilities above 6 km, large differences are observed. Radiative Transfer computation for the channels of both MRP and SAPHIR will be carried out to understand the variabilities.

  10. Meteorological observations from Dauphin Island Sea Lab Weather Station 1974-1997 (NCEI Accession 0156662)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The DISL Weather Station collected twice daily meteorological observations at the east end of Dauphin Island, Alabama (30 degrees 14' 57" N, 88 degrees 04' 38" W)...

  11. Observation of an Aligned Gas - Solid "Eutectic" during Controlled Directional Solidification Aboard the International Space Station - Comparison with Ground-based Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, R. N.; Anilkumar, A.

    2005-01-01

    Direct observation of the controlled melting and solidification of succinonitrile was conducted in the glovebox facility of the International Space Station (ISS). The experimental samples were prepared on ground by filling glass tubes, 1 cm ID and approximately 30 cm in length, with pure succinonitrile (SCN) in an atmosphere of nitrogen at 450 millibar pressure for eventual processing in the Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI) apparatus in the glovebox facility (GBX) on board the ISS. Real time visualization during controlled directional melt back of the sample showed nitrogen bubbles emerging from the interface and moving through the liquid up the imposed temperature gradient. Over a period of time these bubbles disappear by dissolving into the melt. Translation is stopped after melting back of about 9 cm of the sample, with an equilibrium solid-liquid interface established. During controlled re-solidification, aligned tubes of gas were seen growing perpendicular to the planar solid/liquid interface, inferring that the nitrogen previously dissolved into the liquid SCN was now coming out at the solid/liquid interface and forming the little studied liquid = solid + gas eutectic-type reaction. The observed structure is evaluated in terms of spacing dimensions, interface undercooling, and mechanisms for spacing adjustments. Finally, the significance of processing in a microgravity environment is ascertained in view of ground-based results.

  12. Doppler lidar observations of sensible heat flux and intercomparisons with a ground-based energy balance station and WRF model output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Davis

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available During the Convective and Orographically induced Precipitation Study (COPS, a scanning Doppler lidar was deployed at Achern, Baden-Wüttemberg, Germany from 13th June to 16th August 2007. Vertical velocity profiles ('rays' through the boundary layer were measured every 3 seconds with vertical profiles of horizontal wind velocity being derived from performing azimuth scans every 30 minutes. During Intense Observation Periods radiosondes were launched from the site. In this paper, a case study of convective boundary layer development on 15th July 2007 is investigated. Estimates of eddy dissipation rate are made from the vertically pointing lidar data and used as one input to the velocity-temperature co-variance equation to estimate sensible heat flux. The sensible heat flux values calculated from Doppler lidar data are compared with a surface based energy balance station and output from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model.

  13. Air Weather Service Master Station Catalog: USAFETAC Climatic Database Users Handbook No. 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-01

    MA MAURITIUS 61 MC MOROCCO 60 MD MADEIRA 08 MF ST.MARTIN, ST.BARTHOLOMEW, GUADELOUPE , AND FR ISLANDS 78 MG MADAGASCAR 67 MH MARSHALL ISLANDS 91 MI...THE SOUTH 78 MN ST. MAARTEN, ST.EUSTATIUS, AND SABA 78 MF ST. MARTIN, ST. BARTHOLOMEW, GUADELOUPE , AND FR ISLANDS 78 SU SUDAN 62 SM SURINAME 81 SV...strait z = zaliv ..... gulf AGMS - Agricultural meteorological station AGRO - Agricultural station AMSG - Air weather station of the civil air fleet

  14. Intercomparison of stratospheric nitrogen dioxide columns retrieved from ground-based DOAS and FTIR and satellite DOAS instruments over the subtropical Izana station

    OpenAIRE

    Robles-Gonzalez, Cristina; Navarro-Comas, Mónica; Puentedura, Olga; Schneider, Matthias; Hase, Frank; Garcia, Omaira; Blumenstock, Thomas; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    A 13-year analysis (2000–2012) of the NO2 vertical column densities derived from ground-based (GB) instruments and satellites has been carried out over the Izaña NDACC (Network for the Detection of the Atmospheric Composition Change) subtropical site. Ground-based DOAS (differential optical absorption spectroscopy) and FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) instruments are intercompared to test mutual consistency and then used for validation of stratospheric NO2 fro...

  15. Energy balance of a glacier surface: analysis of Automatic Weather Station data from the Morteratschgletscher, Switzerland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.; Klok, E.J.

    2002-01-01

    We describe and analyze a complete 1-yr data set from an automatic weather station (AWS) located on the snout of the Morteratschgletscher, Switzerland. The AWS stands freely on the glacier surface and measures pressure, windspeed, wind direction, air temperature and humidity, incoming and reflected

  16. The NASA-Lewis terrestrial photovoltaics program. [solar cell power system for weather station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernatowicz, D. T.

    1973-01-01

    Research and technology efforts on solar cells and arrays having relevance to terrestrial uses are outline. These include raising cell efficiency, developing the FEP-covered module concept, and exploring low cost cell concepts. Solar cell-battery power systems for remote weather stations have been built to demonstrate the capabilities of solar cells for terrestrial applications.

  17. Comments on: Antarctic Automatic Weather Station Program: 30 Years of Polar Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Sienicki, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Recently Lazzara et al. (2012) presented a review of the technical and scientific progress in deployment, data collection and analysis of the Automated Weather Stations (AWS) in the Antarctic. In the subsection entitled Science Applications using AWS Observations, the authors briefly account for several scientific occurrences of meteorological data collected by AWS.

  18. Retrievals of ethane from ground-based high-resolution FTIR solar observations with updated line parameters: determination of the optimum strategy for the Jungfraujoch station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, W.; Perrin, A.; Jacquemart, D.; Sudo, K.; Yashiro, H.; Gauss, M.; Demoulin, P.; Servais, C.; Mahieu, E.

    2012-04-01

    Ethane (C2H6) is the most abundant Non-Methane HydroCarbon (NMHC) in the Earth's atmosphere, with a lifetime of approximately 2 months. C2H6 has both anthropogenic and natural emission sources such as biomass burning, natural gas loss and biofuel consumption. Oxidation by the hydroxyl radical is by far the major C2H6 sink as the seasonally changing OH concentration controls the strong modulation of the ethane abundance throughout the year. Ethane lowers Cl atom concentrations in the lower stratosphere and is a major source of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and carbon monoxide (by reaction with OH). Involved in the formation of tropospheric ozone and in the destruction of atmospheric methane through changes in OH, C2H6 is a non-direct greenhouse gas with a net-global warming potential (100-yr horizon) of 5.5. The retrieval of ethane from ground-based infrared (IR) spectra is challenging. Indeed, the fitting of the ethane features is complicated by numerous interferences by strong water vapor, ozone and methane absorptions. Moreover, ethane has a complicated spectrum with many interacting vibrational modes and the current state of ethane parameters in HITRAN (e.g. : Rothman et al., 2009, see http://www.hitran.com) was rather unsatisfactory in the 3 μm region. In fact, PQ branches outside the 2973-3001 cm-1 range are not included in HITRAN, and most P and R structures are missing. New ethane absorption cross sections recorded at the Molecular Spectroscopy Facility of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (Harrison et al., 2010) are used in our retrievals. They were calibrated in intensity by using reference low-resolution spectra from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) IR database. Pseudoline parameters fitted to these ethane spectra have been combined with HITRAN 2004 line parameters (including all the 2006 updates) for all other species encompassed in the selected microwindows. Also, the improvement brought by the update of the line positions and intensities

  19. Weather Station and Sensor Locations, e911 Towers layer contain weather tower information, Published in 2007, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Edwards County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Weather Station and Sensor Locations dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2007. It is...

  20. Study on Rear-end Real-time Data Quality Control Method of Regional Automatic Weather Station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to study the rear-end real-time data quality control method of regional automatic weather station. [Method] The basic content and steps of rear-end real-time data quality control of regional automatic weather station were introduced. Each element was treated with systematic quality control procedure. The existence of rear-end real time data of regional meteorological station in Guangxi was expounded. Combining with relevant elements and linear changes, improvement based on traditiona...

  1. Weather Station and Sensor Locations, Prince George's County Earth Networks Owned Weather Stations located on County Facilities, Published in 2005, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Prince George's County Office of Information Technology and Communications.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Weather Station and Sensor Locations dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of...

  2. Forecasting New Hampshire Power Outages through the Analysis of Weather Station Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessenden, Ross T.

    Eversource Energy, formerly Public Service of New Hampshire (PSNH), has worked closely with Plymouth State University (PSU) in the past, and present, to better predict weather-related power outage events and maximize the efficiency with which Eversource responds to them. This research paired weather data from thirteen stations throughout New Hampshire, Vermont, and Massachusetts with Eversource Trouble Report and Unsatisfactory Performance of Equipment Report (TRUPER) data in an effort to quantify weather situations that lead to power outages. The ultimate goal involved developing a predictive model that uses weather data to forecast the magnitude of power outages. The study focused on the Eversource Western/Central service territory and utilized data from 2006-2010. The first four years, 2006-2009, were analyzed using Classification and Regression Tree (CART) statistical analysis. The results of this CART analysis trained a predictive model, while the fifth year, 2010, served as the testing set for the predictive model. To conduct the statistical analysis, a database was created pairing TRUPER reports with the closest available hourly weather observations. The database included nine weather variables matched with three variables from the TRUPER data: 1) customers, 2) customer minutes, and 3) outage duration. While the entire Eversource service territory saw 91,286 TRUPERs from 2006-2010, the Western/Central service territory, the focus of this study, accounted for 29,430. Before conducting the CART analysis, correlations between single weather variables and TRUPER data were calculated and, in general, proved xi weak. In addition to analyzing the complete four-year training data set, many portions/variations of the data set were analyzed. The analyses included a yearly analysis, time lag analysis, cold/warm-season analysis, and a single-station analysis. Although individual years and smaller data sets showed moderately higher correlations between weather and outage

  3. Intercomparison of stratospheric nitrogen dioxide columns retrieved from ground-based DOAS and FTIR and satellite DOAS instruments over the subtropical Izana station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Gonzalez, Cristina; Navarro-Comas, Mónica; Puentedura, Olga; Schneider, Matthias; Hase, Frank; Garcia, Omaira; Blumenstock, Thomas; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    A 13-year analysis (2000-2012) of the NO2 vertical column densities derived from ground-based (GB) instruments and satellites has been carried out over the Izaña NDACC (Network for the Detection of the Atmospheric Composition Change) subtropical site. Ground-based DOAS (differential optical absorption spectroscopy) and FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) instruments are intercompared to test mutual consistency and then used for validation of stratospheric NO2 from OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) and SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY). The intercomparison has been carried out taking into account the various differences existing in instruments, namely temporal coincidence, collocation, sensitivity, field of view, etc. The paper highlights the importance of considering an "effective solar zenith angle" instead of the actual one when comparing direct-sun instruments with zenith sky ones for a proper photochemical correction. Results show that NO2 vertical column densities mean relative difference between FTIR and DOAS instruments is 2.8 ± 10.7 % for a.m. data. Both instruments properly reproduce the NO2 seasonal and the interannual variation. Mean relative difference of the stratospheric NO2 derived from OMI and DOAS is -0.2 ± 8.7 % and from OMI and FTIR is -1.6 ± 6.7 %. SCIAMACHY mean relative difference is of 3.7 ± 11.7 and -5.7 ± 11.0 % for DOAS and FTIR, respectively. Note that the days used for the intercomparison are not the same for all the pairs of instruments since it depends on the availability of data. The discrepancies are found to be seasonally dependent with largest differences in winter and excellent agreement in the spring months (AMJ). A preliminary analysis of NO2 trends has been carried out with the available data series. Results show increases in stratospheric NO2 columns in all instruments but larger values in those that are GB than that expected by nitrous oxide oxidation. The

  4. Simultaneous PMC and PMSE observations with a ground-based lidar and SuperDARN HF radar at Syowa Station, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Suzuki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A Rayleigh–Raman lidar system was installed in January 2011 at Syowa Station, Antarctica (69.0° S, 39.6° E. Polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs were detected by lidar at around 22:30 UTC (LT −3 h on 4 February 2011, which was the first day of observation. This was the first detection of PMCs over Syowa Station by lidar. On the same day, a Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN HF radar with oblique-incidence beams detected polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE between 21:30 and 23:00 UTC. This event is regarded as the last PMC activity around Syowa Station during the austral summer season (2010–2011, since no other PMC signals were detected by lidar in February 2011. This is consistent with results of PMC and mesopause temperature observations by satellite-born instruments of AIM (Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere/CIPS (Cloud Imaging and Particle Size and AURA/MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder and horizontal wind measurements taken by a separate MF radar. Doppler velocity of PMSE observed by the HF radar showed motion toward Syowa Station (westward. This westward motion is consistent with the wind velocities obtained by the MF radar. However, the PMSE region showed horizontal motion from a north-to-south direction during the PMC event. This event indicates that the apparent horizontal motion of the PMSE region can deviate from neutral wind directions and observed Doppler velocities.

  5. Simultaneous PMC and PMSE observations with a ground-based lidar and SuperDARN HF radar at Syowa Station, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, H.; Nakamura, T.; Ejiri, M. K.; Ogawa, T.; Tsutsumi, M.; Abo, M.; Kawahara, T. D.; Tomikawa, Y.; Yukimatu, A. S.; Sato, N.

    2013-10-01

    A Rayleigh-Raman lidar system was installed in January 2011 at Syowa Station, Antarctica (69.0° S, 39.6° E). Polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) were detected by lidar at around 22:30 UTC (LT -3 h) on 4 February 2011, which was the first day of observation. This was the first detection of PMCs over Syowa Station by lidar. On the same day, a Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) HF radar with oblique-incidence beams detected polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) between 21:30 and 23:00 UTC. This event is regarded as the last PMC activity around Syowa Station during the austral summer season (2010-2011), since no other PMC signals were detected by lidar in February 2011. This is consistent with results of PMC and mesopause temperature observations by satellite-born instruments of AIM (Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere)/CIPS (Cloud Imaging and Particle Size) and AURA/MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder) and horizontal wind measurements taken by a separate MF radar. Doppler velocity of PMSE observed by the HF radar showed motion toward Syowa Station (westward). This westward motion is consistent with the wind velocities obtained by the MF radar. However, the PMSE region showed horizontal motion from a north-to-south direction during the PMC event. This event indicates that the apparent horizontal motion of the PMSE region can deviate from neutral wind directions and observed Doppler velocities.

  6. High-Speed Monitoring of Multiple Grid-Connected Photovoltaic Array Configurations and Supplementary Weather Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Matthew T

    2017-06-01

    Three grid-connected monocrystalline silicon photovoltaic arrays have been instrumented with research-grade sensors on the Gaithersburg, MD campus of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). These arrays range from 73 kW to 271 kW and have different tilts, orientations, and configurations. Irradiance, temperature, wind, and electrical measurements at the arrays are recorded, and images are taken of the arrays to monitor shading and capture any anomalies. A weather station has also been constructed that includes research-grade instrumentation to measure all standard meteorological quantities plus additional solar irradiance spectral bands, full spectrum curves, and directional components using multiple irradiance sensor technologies. Reference photovoltaic (PV) modules are also monitored to provide comprehensive baseline measurements for the PV arrays. Images of the whole sky are captured, along with images of the instrumentation and reference modules to document any obstructions or anomalies. Nearly, all measurements at the arrays and weather station are sampled and saved every 1s, with monitoring having started on Aug. 1, 2014. This report describes the instrumentation approach used to monitor the performance of these photovoltaic systems, measure the meteorological quantities, and acquire the images for use in PV performance and weather monitoring and computer model validation.

  7. Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Ground-Based Radiation and Aerosol Validation Using the NOAA Mobile SURFRAD Station Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalsky, Joseph [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States); Lantz, Kathy [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is preparing for the launch of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-Series (GOES-R) satellite in 2015. This satellite will feature higher time (5-minute versus 30-minute sampling) and spatial resolution (0.5 km vs 1 km in the visible channel) than current GOES instruments provide. NOAA’s National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service has funded the Global Monitoring Division at the Earth System Research Laboratory to provide ground-based validation data for many of the new and old products the new GOES instruments will retrieve specifically related to radiation at the surface and aerosol and its extensive and intensive properties in the column. The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) had an emphasis on aerosol; therefore, we asked to be involved in this campaign to de-bug our new instrumentation and to provide a new capability that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s Mobile Facilities (AMF) did not possess, namely surface albedo measurement out to 1625 nm. This gave us a chance to test remote operation of our new multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer/multi-filter radiometer (MFRSR/MFR) combination. We did not deploy standard broadband shortwave and longwave radiation instrumentation because ARM does this as part of every AMF deployment. As it turned out, the ARM standard MFRSR had issues, and we were able to provide the aerosol column data for the first 2 months of the campaign covering the summer flight phase of the deployment. Using these data, we were able to work with personnel at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to retrieve not only aerosol optical depth (AOD), but single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter, as well.

  8. Two-day period fluctuation of PMC occurrence over Syowa Station, Antarctica observed by a ground-based lidar and AIM satellite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, T.; Suzuki, H.; Tsutsumi, M.; Ejiri, M. K.; Tomikawa, Y.; Abo, M.; Kawahara, T.; Tsuda, T. T.; Nishiyama, T.

    2014-12-01

    A Rayleigh/Raman lidar system has been operated by the Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE) since February, 2011 (JARE 52nd) in Syowa Station Antarctica (69.0S, 39.5E). The lidar system consists of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser (355nm) as a transmitter and two telescopes with four photo multiplier tubes which are to detect Rayleigh scattered light from low and high atmosphere at 355 nm and N2 Raman emission at 387nm. Polar Mesospheric Cloud (PMC) was detected by the lidar at 22:30UT (+3hr for LT) on Feb 4th, 2011, the first day of a routine operation. This event was the first time to detect PMC over Syowa Station by a lidar [Suzuki et al., Ann. Geophys., 2013]. However, signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the PMC event was not so good due to large shot noises from daytime background signals. Moreover, a receiver system was designed mainly for nighttime observations. In this way, observation of PMC during the midnight sun, which also corresponds to most frequent PMC season, was difficult. Thus, to improve SNR of the PMC observation with the lidar during daytime, a narrow band-pass Fabry-Perot etalon unit has been developed and installed in the receiver system on Dec 2013 by JARE 55th. By using this new system, clear PMC signals were successfully detected under daylight condition during the period of summer operation of JARE55th. During this period of 53 days (from 17 Dec. 2013 to 7 Feb. 2014), only 11 days were with a clear sky and suitable for PMC observation. Thus, it was difficult to study temporal variations on a PMC activity only by using the lidar data. Fortunately, NASA's AIM satellite had passed near Syowa Station and provided with complimentary PMC data during observation gap of the lidar. By combining our lidar data with the AIM/CIPS data, nearly continuous monitoring of PMC variability over Syowa Station was achieved for period between 13th and 18th in January 2014. PMC occurrence with an interval of two days over Syowa Station during the period was clearly

  9. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MENDOTA from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 21 December 1971 to 31 December 1971 (NODC Accession 7200575)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MENDOTA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  10. Insurance against weather risk : use of heating degree-days from non-local stations for weather derivatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asseldonk, van M.A.P.M.

    2003-01-01

    Weather derivatives enable policy-holders to safeguard themselves against extreme weather conditions. The effectiveness and the efficiency of the risk transfer is determined by the spatial risk basis, which is the stochastic dependency of the local weather outcome being insured and the outcome of

  11. Impacts of combining reanalyses and weather station data on the accuracy of discharge modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essou, Gilles R. C.; Brissette, François; Lucas-Picher, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    Reanalyses are important sources of meteorological data. Recent studies have shown that precipitation and temperature data from reanalysis present a strong potential for hydrological modelling, especially in regions with a sparse observational network. The objective of this study is to evaluate the impacts of the combination of three global atmospheric reanalyses - ERA-Interim, CFSR and MERRA - and one gridded observation dataset on the accuracy of hydrological model discharge simulations. Two combination approaches were used. The first one combined reanalyses and the observational database using a weighted average of the precipitation and temperature inputs. The second one consisted in using all meteorological inputs separately and combining the simulated hydrographs. The combinations were performed over 460 Canadian watersheds (representing regions with a low density of weather stations) and 370 US watersheds (representing regions with a higher density of weather stations). Results showed significant improvements in the simulated discharges for 68% and 92% of the Canadian watersheds for the input combinations and output combinations, respectively. Moreover, both approaches led to significant improvements in the simulated discharges for 72% of the US watersheds studied. For all watersheds where simulated discharges using observational data had a Nash Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) lower than 0.5, the combination with reanalyses resulted in a median NSE increase of 0.3. This indicates that reanalysis can successfully compensate for deficiencies in the surface observation record and provide significantly better hydrological modelling performance.

  12. Extreme events in total ozone over the northern mid-latitudes: A case study based on long-term data sets from 5 ground-based stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Harald E.; Jancso, Leonhardt M.; Staehelin, Johannes; Maeder, Jörg A.; Ribatet, Mathieu; Peter, Thomas; Davison, Anthony C.

    2010-05-01

    In this study we analyze the frequency distribution of extreme events in low and high total ozone (termed ELOs and EHOs) for 5 long-term stations in the northern mid-latitudes in Europe (Belsk, Poland; Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic; Hohenpeissenberg and Potsdam, Germany; and Uccle, Belgium). Further, the influence of these extreme events on annual and seasonal mean values and trends is analysed. The applied method follows the new "ozone extreme concept", which is based on tools from extreme value theory [Coles, 2001; Ribatet, 2007], recently developed by Rieder et al. [2010a, b]. Mathematically seen the decisive feature within the extreme concept is the Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD). In this analysis, the long-term trends needed to be removed first, differently to the treatment of Rieder et al. [2010a, b], in which the time series of Arosa was analysed, covering many decades of measurements in the anthropogenically undisturbed stratosphere. In contrast to previous studies only focusing on so called ozone mini-holes and mini-highs the "ozone extreme concept" provides a statistical description of the tails in total ozone distributions (i.e. extreme low and high values). It is shown that this concept is not only an appropriate method to describe the frequency and distribution of extreme events, it also provides new information on time series properties and internal variability. Furthermore it allows detection of fingerprints of physical (e.g. El Niño, NAO) and chemical (e.g. polar vortex ozone loss) features in the Earth's atmosphere as well as major volcanic eruptions (e.g. El Chichón, Mt. Pinatubo). It is shown that mean values and trends in total ozone are strongly influenced by extreme events. Trend calculations (for the period 1970-1990) are performed for the entire as well as the extremes-removed time series. The results after excluding extremes show that annual trends are most reduced at Hradec Kralove (about a factor of 3), followed by Potsdam

  13. Wavelet Study of Meteorological Data Collected by Arduino-Weather Station: Impact on Solar Energy Collection Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Caccamo Maria Teresa; Calabró Emanuele; Cannuli Antonio; Magazù Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Meteorological data collected by an automated LSI Lastem weather station connected with an Arduino device for remote acquisition are reported and discussed. Weather station, located at 38° 15’ 35.10’’ N latitude and 15° 35’ 58.86’’ E longitude, registered data which were analysed by wavelet transform to obtain time-frequency characterization of the signals. Such an approach allowed to highlight the correlation existing among the registered meteorological data. The results show a positive corr...

  14. Satellite and ground-based sensors for the Urban Heat Island analysis in the city of Rome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabrizi, Roberto; Bonafoni, Stefania; Biondi, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the trend of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) of Rome is analyzed by both ground-based weather stations and a satellite-based infrared sensor. First, we have developed a suitable algorithm employing satellite brightness temperatures for the estimation of the air temperature belonging...... to the layer of air closest to the surface. UHI spatial characteristics have been assessed using air temperatures measured by both weather stations and brightness temperature maps from the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) on board ENVISAT polar-orbiting satellite. In total, 634 daytime...... and nighttime scenes taken between 2003 and 2006 have been processed. Analysis of the Canopy Layer Heat Island (CLHI) during summer months reveals a mean growth in magnitude of 3-4 K during nighttime and a negative or almost zero CLHI intensity during daytime, confirmed by the weather stations. © 2010...

  15. Weather-related Ground Motions Recorded by Taiwan Broadband Seismic Network Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C. F.; Chi, W. C.; Lai, Y. J.

    2015-12-01

    Broadband seismometers record ground motions, which can be induced by weather-related processes. Analyzing such signals might help to better understand those natural processes. Here, we used continuous seismic data, meteorological data and stream data to analyze the weather-related ground motions during typhoon cases and rainy season case in Taiwan. We detected some long period seismic signals at the station Mahsi (MASB) during three meteorological cases (Typhoon Kalmaegi in 2008, Typhoon Morakot in 2009 and the East Asian rainy season in 2012). The amplitude of the seismic waveform correlated with the amount of the precipitation and the derivative of water level and discharge in the nearby river. According to the relationships of waveforms in main and minor rainfall events, we derived apparent source time functions (ASTFs) and used the ASTFs to estimate and quantify the precipitation of main rainfall events in the cases. The estimated precipitation has high correlation coefficients (> 0.82) with the observation. It shows that the long period seismic data may be applied to rainfall monitoring.

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the ABSECON from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 22 October 1969 to 17 November 1969 (NODC Accession 7000175)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ABSECON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MELLON from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 05 April 1974 to 01 May 1974 (NODC Accession 7400741)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  18. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 31 January 1974 to 05 February 1974 (NODC Accession 7400495)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  19. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 19 October 1971 to 10 November 1971 (NODC Accession 7201202)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  20. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the MCCULLOCH from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean 12 May 1970 to 04 June 1970 (NODC Accession 7000917)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MCCULLOCH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 20 June 1971 to 16 July 1971 (NODC Accession 7101504)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SPENCER from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean 24 November 1970 to 03 December 1970 (NODC Accession 7100192)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SPENCER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  3. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the BOUTWELL from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 18 February 1973 to 09 March 1973 (NODC Accession 7301106)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BOUTWELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the QUADRA from Ocean Weather Station P (OWS-P) in the North Pacific Ocean from 22 October 1977 to 05 December 1977 (NODC Accession 7800676)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the QUADRA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station P (5000N 14500W) and in transit. Data were collected from...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the USCGC SHERMAN and MCCULLOCH from multiple Ocean Weather Station (OWS) in the North Atlantic Ocean 22 May 1969 to 10 September 1969 (NODC Accession 7000056)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the USCGC SHERMAN and MCCULLOCH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W), D (4400N 04100W), E...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MELLON from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean from 03 June 1968 to 21 June 1968 (NODC Accession 6800092)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  7. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) and H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean 29 January 1971 to 11 February 1971 (NODC Accession 7100877)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W), H (3800N 07100W), and in transit. Data...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the RUSH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 20 August 1973 to 17 September 1973 (NODC Accession 7400296)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the RUSH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  9. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the USCGC SHERMAN and Other Platforms from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 22 October 1974 to 07 May 1975 (NODC Accession 7500707)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the USCGC SHERMAN and other Platforms within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit....

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 18 May 1968 to 05 June 1968 (NODC Accession 6800057)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MELLON from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 10 October 1972 to 09 November 1972 (NODC Accession 7300801)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  12. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the OWASCO from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 29 December 1970 to 12 January 1971 (NODC Accession 7100824)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the OWASCO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the KLAMATH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 23 June 1968 to 13 July 1968 (NODC Accession 6800265)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the KLAMATH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WINONA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 04 November 1970 to 19 November 1970 (NODC Accession 7100226)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINONA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the HUMBOLDT from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 26 May 1968 to 20 June 1968 (NODC Accession 6800071)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the HUMBOLDT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the SEBAGO from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 18 January 1971 to 07 February 1971 (NODC Accession 7100927)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SEBAGO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  17. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the USCGC SHERMAN from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 09 October 1969 to 02 November 1969 (NODC Accession 7000169)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the USCGC SHERMAN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  18. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SPENCER from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 11 September 1970 to 03 October 1970 (NODC Accession 7001420)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SPENCER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 19 September 1969 to 05 October 1969 (NODC Accession 6901099)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 27 March 1973 to 18 April 1973 (NODC Accession 7301059)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 01 May 1969 to 22 May 1969 (NODC Accession 6900713)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 24 November 1969 to 15 December 1969 (NODC Accession 7000137)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 19 February 1970 to 08 March 1970 (NODC Accession 7000506)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 26 February 1971 to 13 March 1971 (NODC Accession 7100925)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 26 June 1969 to 17 July 1969 (NODC Accession 6900857)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 22 June 1971 to 16 July 1971 (NODC Accession 7200031)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  7. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 08 November 1971 to 30 November 1971 (NODC Accession 7200576)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 15 January 1973 to 03 February 1973 (NODC Accession 7300563)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  9. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL and other platforms from multiple Ocean Weather Station (OWS) in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Pacific Ocean 16 December 1968 to 20 January 1969 (NODC Accession 6900569)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL, CHAUTAUQUA, and DALLAS within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W), C (5245N...

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 18 October 1973 to 31 October 1973 (NODC Accession 7400465)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 23 December 1973 to 12 January 1974 (NODC Accession 7400518)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  12. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 26 August 1971 to 17 September 1971 (NODC Accession 7200387)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 22 July 1973 to 15 August 1973 (NODC Accession 7400097)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  14. Oceanographic station from CTD casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 17 October 1973 to 26 October 1973 (NODC Accession 7400120)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  15. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 16 December 1973 to 28 December 1973 (NODC Accession 7400739)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 12 May 1973 to 05 June 1973 (NODC Accession 7301179)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 03 April 1970 to 24 April 1970 (NODC Accession 7000771)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  18. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 05 November 1971 to 23 November 1971 (NODC Accession 7200577)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  19. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the MORGENTHAU and Other Platforms from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 26 October 1975 to 11 February 1976 (NODC Accession 7600727)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU and Other Platforms within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit....

  20. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 20 June 1974 to 26 June 1974 (NODC Accession 7500032)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 24 August 1969 to 18 September 1969 (NODC Accession 7000138)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 26 October 1969 to 15 November 1969 (NODC Accession 7000149)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 07 August 1976 to 14 August 1976 (NODC Accession 7700047)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 11 January 1972 to 04 February 1972 (NODC Accession 7200611)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 14 January 1970 to 05 February 1970 (NODC Accession 7000417)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 09 September 1972 to 01 October 1972 (NODC Accession 7300485)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  7. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 27 November 1973 to 12 December 1973 (NODC Accession 7400476)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 29 September 1969 to 22 October 1969 (NODC Accession 7000086)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  9. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WACHUSETT from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 07 June 1970 to 07 August 1970 (NODC Accession 7100766)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WACHUSETT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 24 October 1971 to 17 November 1971 (NODC Accession 7200900)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  11. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the ANDROSCOGGIN from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 17 August 1969 to 07 September 1969 (NODC Accession 7000092)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ANDROSCOGGIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  12. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 03 January 1971 to 29 January 1971 (NODC Accession 7100863)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WACHUSETT from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 14 November 1971 to 08 December 1971 (NODC Accession 7200918)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WACHUSETT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  14. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) and J (OWS-J) in the North Atlantic Ocean 02 November 1969 to 11 December 1969 (NODC Accession 7000152)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W), J (5230N 02000W), and in transit. Data...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 1970-12-12 to 1971-01-02 (NODC Accession 7100905)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB and other platforms from multiple Ocean Weather Station (OWS) in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Pacific Ocean 13 April 1968 to 11 July 1969 (NODC Accession 6900853)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB, GRESHAM, and HUMBOLDT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W), E (3500N 04800W), H...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the COOK INLET from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 11 June 1968 to 30 June 1968 (NODC Accession 6800072)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the COOK INLET within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  18. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 16 June 1969 to 04 July 1969 (NODC Accession 6900859)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected...

  19. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 14 May 1972 to 02 June 1972 (NODC Accession 7300024)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MELLON from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 28 July 1969 to 13 August 1969 (NODC Accession 6900856)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 11 January 1970 to 30 January 1970 (NODC Accession 7000376)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the KLAMATH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 07 March 1971 to 29 March 1971 (NODC Accession 7101100)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the KLAMATH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BERING STRAIT from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 05 July 1969 to 25 July 1969 (NODC Accession 6900858)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BERING STRAIT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were...

  4. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the USCGC SHERMAN from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 10 April 1973 to 04 May 1973 (NODC Accession 7301145)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the USCGC SHERMAN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MCCULLOCH from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 15 January 1969 to 22 January 1969 (NODC Accession 6900446)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MCCULLOCH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SPENCER from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 29 September 1973 to 12 November 1973 (NODC Accession 7400209)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SPENCER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  7. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 02 June 1971 to 28 June 1971 (NODC Accession 7101477)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 20 January 1970 to 13 February 1970 (NODC Accession 7000361)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  9. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the USCGC SHERMAN from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 04 March 1969 to 26 March 1969 (NODC Accession 6900715)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the USCGC SHERMAN Ewithin a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were...

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SPENCER from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 24 July 1971 to 25 August 1971 (NODC Accession 7200318)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SPENCER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 12 September 1974 to 27 September 1974 (NODC Accession 7500166)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  12. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 09 August 1973 to 13 August 1973 (NODC Accession 7400043)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BARATARIA and other platforms from multiple Ocean Weather Station (OWS) in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Pacific Ocean 09 December 1968 to 19 February 1969 (NODC Accession 6900427)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BARATARIA, CASCO, BOUTWELL, and YAKUTAT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W), C (5245N...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 30 August 1970 to 23 September 1970 (NODC Accession 7100472)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 06 April 1970 to 01 May 1970 (NODC Accession 7000823)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the OWASCO from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 24 March 1970 to 12 April 1970 (NODC Accession 7000772)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the OWASCO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the PONTCHARTRAIN from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 07 September 1973 to 24 September 1973 (NODC Accession 7400473)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the PONTCHARTRAIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  18. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 25 May 1973 to 08 June 1973 (NODC Accession 7400044)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHINCOTEAGUE from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 31 January 1970 to 26 February 1970 (NODC Accession 7000507)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHINCOTEAGUE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  20. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 05 June 1972 to 24 June 1972 (NODC Accession 7300086)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHINCOTEAGUE from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 13 September 1968 to 03 October 1968 (NODC Accession 6900127)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHINCOTEAGUE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the RUSH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 26 November 1972 to 21 December 1972 (NODC Accession 7300769)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the RUSH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 04 January 1971 to 23 January 1971 (NODC Accession 7100858)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MELLON from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 22 September 1970 to 03 October 1970 (NODC Accession 7100471)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHINCOTEAGUE from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 19 June 1970 to 31 July 1970 (NODC Accession 7001070)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHINCOTEAGUE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the COOK INLET from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 19 December 1970 to 25 January 1971 (NODC Accession 7100763)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the COOK INLET within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  7. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the HAMILTON from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 19 August 1972 to 10 September 1972 (NODC Accession 7300498)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the HAMILTON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 08 May 1971 to 27 May 1971 (NODC Accession 7101316)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  9. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the PONTCHARTRAIN from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 19 April 1973 to 10 May 1973 (NODC Accession 7301097)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the PONTCHARTRAIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  10. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the HAMILTON from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 07 November 1973 to 02 December 1973 (NODC Accession 7400293)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the HAMILTON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MCCULLOCH and MINNETONKA and other platforms from multiple Ocean Weather Station (OWS) in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Pacific Ocean 24 March 1968 to 29 April 1969 (NODC Accession 6900695)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MCCULLOCH and MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W), D (4400N 04100W), E...

  12. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the MENDOTA from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 19 August 1973 to 08 September 1973 (NODC Accession 7400087)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MENDOTA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  13. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 03 October 1973 to 28 October 1973 (NODC Accession 7400821)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from PONTCHARTRAIN from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean from 23 August 1971 to 22 October 1971 (NODC Accession 7200425)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the PONTCHARTRAIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 1640W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BOUTWELL from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 11 March 1970 to 02 May 1970 (NODC Accession 7000770)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BOUTWELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WACHUSETT from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 29 December 1972 to 31 December 1972 (NODC Accession 7300319)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WACHUSETT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MENDOTA from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 05 July 1970 to 26 July 1970 (NODC Accession 7000969)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MENDOTA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  18. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the HALF MOON from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 26 October 1968 to 03 November 1968 (NODC Accession 6800332)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the HALF MOON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MELLON from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 31 January 1973 to 27 February 1973 (NODC Accession 7300897)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  20. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the HAMILTON from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 28 April 1974 to 14 May 1974 (NODC Accession 7400762)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the HAMILTON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  1. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the BOUTWELL from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 03 July 1969 to 31 July 1969 (NODC Accession 7000064)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BOUTWELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHINCOTEAGUE from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 19 September 1971 to 09 October 1971 (NODC Accession 7200041)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHINCOTEAGUE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MENDOTA from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 12 February 1970 to 27 February 1970 (NODC Accession 7000662)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MENDOTA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  4. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the YAKUTAT from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 08 June 1969 to 01 July 1969 (NODC Accession 7000013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the YAKUTAT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 18 March 1971 to 13 April 1971 (NODC Accession 7101188)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the PONTCHARTRAIN from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 17 August 1969 to 11 September 1969 (NODC Accession 7000111)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the PONTCHARTRAIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  7. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the WACHUSETT from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 06 May 1973 to 28 May 1973 (NODC Accession 7400231)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WACHUSETT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 19 October 1969 to 14 November 1969 (NODC Accession 7000143)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  9. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the JARVIS from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 04 April 1973 to 04 May 1973 (NODC Accession 7301101)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the JARVIS within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 1969-12-30 to 1970-01-11 (NODC Accession 7000262)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  11. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the ABSECON from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 16 May 1969 to 13 June 1969 (NODC Accession 7000012)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ABSECON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  12. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MCCULLOCH from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 26 November 1971 to 13 December 1971 (NODC Accession 7200542)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MCCULLOCH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 27 August 1970 to 20 September 1970 (NODC Accession 7001359)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 08 March 1971 to 07 May 1971 (NODC Accession 7101206)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 10 November 1974 to 25 November 1974 (NODC Accession 7500652)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WINNEBAGO from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 09 August 1970 to 17 November 1970 (NODC Accession 7100570)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINNEBAGO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 10 September 1976 to 25 September 1976 (NODC Accession 7700046)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  18. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 26 March 1971 to 17 April 1971 (NODC Accession 7101098)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SEBAGO from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 25 June 1971 to 14 July 1971 (NODC Accession 7200032)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SEBAGO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 10 June 1973 to 25 June 1973 (NODC Accession 7301115)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from Ocean Weather Station J (OWS-J) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 26 May 1957 to 31 May 1957 (NODC Accession 7201312)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station J (5230N 02000W) and in transit. Data were collected from 26 May 1957 to 31...

  2. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the BOUTWELL from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 07 November 1970 to 30 November 1970 (NODC Accession 7100764)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BOUTWELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  3. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the ABSECON from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 31 May 1970 to 14 June 1970 (NODC Accession 7001183)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ABSECON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the PONTCHARTRAIN from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 23 July 1970 to 12 August 1970 (NODC Accession 7100144)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the PONTCHARTRAIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHINCOTEAGUE from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 10 December 1970 to 02 January 1971 (NODC Accession 7100762)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHINCOTEAGUE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 31 December 1971 to 20 January 1972 (NODC Accession 7200242)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  7. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the RUSH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 17 May 1970 to 10 June 1970 (NODC Accession 7000943)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the RUSH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 29 March 1975 to 02 April 1975 (NODC Accession 7500664)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  9. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the OWASCO from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 20 October 1970 to 19 November 1970 (NODC Accession 7100359)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the OWASCO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 07 March 1970 to 24 March 1970 (NODC Accession 7000555)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 07 March 1975 to 22 March 1975 (NODC Accession 7500668)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  12. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ANTON DOHRN and other platforms from multiple Ocean Weather Station (OWS) in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Pacific Ocean from 17 February 1960 to 24 February 1967 (NODC Accession 6900261)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ANTON DOHRN and other platforms within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station A (6200N 03300W), B (5630N...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DUANE and other platforms from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 14 August 1969 to 18 December 1969 (NODC Accession 7000059)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DUANE, INGHAM, and SOUTHWIND within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the PONTCHARTRAIN from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 04 February 1973 to 27 February 1973 (NODC Accession 7300750)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the PONTCHARTRAIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ABSECON from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 10 May 1971 to 31 May 1971 (NODC Accession 7101318)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ABSECON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WINNEBAGO from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 05 February 1970 to 18 February 1970 (NODC Accession 7000556)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINNEBAGO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 13 January 1973 to 13 February 1973 (NODC Accession 7300755)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  18. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the ANDROSCOGGIN from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 02 June 1969 to 01 July 1969 (NODC Accession 7000020)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ANDROSCOGGIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 05 June 1973 to 30 June 1973 (NODC Accession 7400028)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  20. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the MENDOTA from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 24 February 1973 to 16 March 1973 (NODC Accession 7300752)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MENDOTA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ABSECON from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 21 March 1970 to 12 April 1970 (NODC Accession 7000825)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ABSECON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  2. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the BOUTWELL from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 23 April 1969 to 16 May 1969 (NODC Accession 6900903)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BOUTWELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WINONA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 25 July 1970 to 07 August 1970 (NODC Accession 7001072)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINONA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MCCULLOCH from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 07 August 1971 to 01 September 1971 (NODC Accession 7200414)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MCCULLOCH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the RUSH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 11 March 1970 to 04 April 1970 (NODC Accession 7000822)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the RUSH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 15 July 1971 to 04 August 1971 (NODC Accession 7200028)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  7. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WINONA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 23 November 1973 to 13 December 1973 (NODC Accession 7400295)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINONA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 01 July 1969 to 11 July 1969 (NODC Accession 7000063)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  9. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 30 December 1975 to 13 January 1976 (NODC Accession 7601044)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SPENCER from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 01 August 1968 to 23 August 1968 (NODC Accession 6800277)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SPENCER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 01 September 1970 to 16 September 1970 (NODC Accession 7001323)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  12. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 15 November 1970 to 11 December 1970 (NODC Accession 7100758)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  13. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the JARVIS and Other Platforms from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 14 August 1976 to 15 February 1977 (NODC Accession 7700265)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the JARVIS and Other Platforms within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MELLON from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 04 August 1968 to 19 August 1968 (NODC Accession 6800282)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 14 October 1972 to 09 November 1972 (NODC Accession 7300565)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BARATARIA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 04 August 1968 to 24 August 1968 (NODC Accession 6800281)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BARATARIA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the PONTCHARTRAIN from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 12 June 1972 to 28 June 1972 (NODC Accession 7300046)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the PONTCHARTRAIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  18. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SEBAGO from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 18 September 1971 to 07 October 1971 (NODC Accession 7200463)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SEBAGO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the KLAMATH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 07 November 1972 to 29 November 1972 (NODC Accession 7300567)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the KLAMATH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 26 July 1973 to 16 August 1973 (NODC Accession 7301171)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BERING STRAIT from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 17 November 1968 to 05 December 1968 (NODC Accession 6900563)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BERING STRAIT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DALLAS from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 02 October 1970 to 10 October 1970 (NODC Accession 7001322)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DALLAS within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WACHUSETT from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean from 31 May 1971 to 28 July 1971 (NODC Accession 7200665)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WACHUSETT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 1640E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  4. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the DALLAS from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 12 November 1973 to 01 December 1973 (NODC Accession 7500003)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DALLAS within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the PONTCHARTRAIN from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 26 May 1969 to 17 June 1969 (NODC Accession 6900878)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the PONTCHARTRAIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WINONA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 29 September 1969 to 23 October 1969 (NODC Accession 7000142)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINONA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  7. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MENDOTA from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) and H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean 21 February 1971 to 24 March 1971 (NODC Accession 7100926)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MENDOTA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W), H (3800N 07100W), and in transit. Data...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 22 February 1970 to 20 March 1970 (NODC Accession 7000760)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  9. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the PONTCHARTRAIN from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 25 August 1968 to 15 September 1968 (NODC Accession 6800333)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the PONTCHARTRAIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 15 August 1970 to 07 September 1970 (NODC Accession 7001320)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  11. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the CHASE from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 31 March 1974 to 20 April 1974 (NODC Accession 7500009)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHASE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  12. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the OWASCO from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 05 May 1973 to 16 May 1973 (NODC Accession 7301180)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the OWASCO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 17 May 1974 to 05 June 1974 (NODC Accession 7500004)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the KLAMATH from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean from 02 August 1971 to 30 September 1971 (NODC Accession 7200662)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the KLAMATH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 1640E) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 05 January 1971 to 25 January 1971 (NODC Accession 7100761)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 28 November 1974 to 09 December 1974 (NODC Accession 7500649)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the HALF MOON from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 20 June 1968 to 16 July 1968 (NODC Accession 6800264)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the HALF MOON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  18. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CASCO from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 12 October 1968 to 02 November 1968 (NODC Accession 6900098)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CASCO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  19. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the HAMILTON from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 06 April 1968 to 09 July 1968 (NODC Accession 6800164)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the HAMILTON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHINCOTEAGUE from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 02 July 1968 to 25 July 1968 (NODC Accession 6800342)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHINCOTEAGUE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHASE from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 27 December 1973 to 07 January 1974 (NODC Accession 7400475)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHASE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ABSECON from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean for 1970-01-02 (NODC Accession 7000210)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ABSECON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 02 June 1972 to 27 June 1972 (NODC Accession 7300050)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 21 April 1968 to 15 May 1968 (NODC Accession 6800006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the WINNEBAGO from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 30 June 1972 to 17 July 1972 (NODC Accession 7201442)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINNEBAGO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WINNEBAGO from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 22 March 1971 to 16 April 1971 (NODC Accession 7101190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINNEBAGO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  7. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 12 December 1972 to 28 December 1972 (NODC Accession 7300566)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the COOK INLET from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 07 October 1968 to 03 November 1968 (NODC Accession 6900107)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the COOK INLET within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  9. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 20 January 1970 to 30 January 1970 (NODC Accession 7000411)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected...

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 25 January 1975 to 18 February 1975 (NODC Accession 7500817)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the RUSH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 15 January 1970 to 03 February 1970 (NODC Accession 7000409)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the RUSH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  12. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the KLAMATH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 03 September 1972 to 25 September 1972 (NODC Accession 7300123)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the KLAMATH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 14 July 1969 to 07 August 1969 (NODC Accession 7000002)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 01 April 1977 to 11 April 1977 (NODC Accession 7700497)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 14 January 1974 to 25 January 1974 (NODC Accession 7400517)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the OWASCO from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 01 March 1971 to 18 March 1971 (NODC Accession 7100924)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the OWASCO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SEBAGO from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 30 March 1971 to 20 April 1971 (NODC Accession 7101099)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SEBAGO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  18. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BOUTWELL from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 20 August 1970 to 10 September 1970 (NODC Accession 7001421)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BOUTWELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 04 December 1971 to 17 December 1971 (NODC Accession 7200543)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  20. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the BOUTWELL from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 09 February 1972 to 25 February 1972 (NODC Accession 7201244)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BOUTWELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the BOUTWELL from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 23 September 1969 to 21 October 1969 (NODC Accession 7000093)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BOUTWELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 10 February 1974 to 25 February 1974 (NODC Accession 7400519)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ABSECON from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 13 October 1970 to 03 November 1970 (NODC Accession 7100571)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ABSECON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 09 May 1971 to 02 June 1971 (NODC Accession 7101386)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WACHUSETT from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 14 February 1971 to 07 March 1971 (NODC Accession 7101011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WACHUSETT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  6. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the USCGC SHERMAN from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 14 May 1972 to 10 June 1972 (NODC Accession 7300898)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the USCGC SHERMAN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  7. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WACHUSETT from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 05 April 1970 to 02 May 1970 (NODC Accession 7000824)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WACHUSETT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MELLON from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 07 October 1968 to 25 October 1968 (NODC Accession 6900095)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  9. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the OWASCO from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 23 April 1972 to 16 May 1972 (NODC Accession 7300067)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the OWASCO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the ABSECON from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) and D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 26 July 1969 to 23 August 1969 (NODC Accession 7000068)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ABSECON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W), D (4400N 04100W), and in transit. Data...

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 14 August 1973 to 05 September 1973 (NODC Accession 7400134)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  12. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the MUNRO and Other Platforms from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 16 December 1975 to 03 February 1976 (NODC Accession 7601181)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MUNRO and Other Platforms within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 25 December 1971 to 08 January 1972 (NODC Accession 7200975)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  14. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the USCGC SHERMAN from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 18 October 1972 to 13 November 1972 (NODC Accession 7300463)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the USCGC SHERMAN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the PONTCHARTRAIN from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 14 July 1968 to 03 August 1968 (NODC Accession 6800279)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the PONTCHARTRAIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MELLON from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 24 November 1970 to 19 January 1971 (NODC Accession 7100862)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the Ocean Weather Station A (OWS-A) in the North Atlantic Ocean 02 January 1963 to 13 April 1963 (NODC Accession 7000212)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station A (6200N 03300W) and in transit. Data were collected by the University of...

  18. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 03 March 1972 to 24 March 1972 (NODC Accession 7300065)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ABSECON from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 25 September 1971 to 13 October 1971 (NODC Accession 7200544)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ABSECON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WEST-HINDER and other platforms from multiple Ocean Weather Station (OWS) in the North Atlantic Ocean 02 March 1958 to 24 March 1971 (NODC Accession 7101039)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WEST-HINDER and other platforms within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station A (6200N 03300W), B (5630N...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SPENCER from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 22 May 1971 to 10 June 1971 (NODC Accession 7101383)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SPENCER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 17 August 1976 to 08 September 1976 (NODC Accession 7700048)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WACHUSETT from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 10 November 1969 to 01 December 1969 (NODC Accession 7000136)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WACHUSETT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the HUMBOLDT from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 15 March 1969 to 06 April 1969 (NODC Accession 6900694)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the HUMBOLDT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MELLON from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 20 May 1973 to 16 June 1973 (NODC Accession 7400032)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  6. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 18 March 1973 to 06 April 1973 (NODC Accession 7301104)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  7. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ABSECON from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 26 July 1970 to 20 August 1970 (NODC Accession 7001299)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ABSECON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WINNEBAGO from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 23 January 1971 to 28 January 1971 (NODC Accession 7100876)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINNEBAGO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  9. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 23 June 1970 to 15 July 1970 (NODC Accession 7001068)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WACHUSETT from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 11 October 1970 to 31 October 1970 (NODC Accession 7100193)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WACHUSETT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 23 June 1968 to 12 July 1968 (NODC Accession 6800278)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  12. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 23 August 1971 to 13 September 1971 (NODC Accession 7200932)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  13. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the HAMILTON from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 22 December 1971 to 12 January 1972 (NODC Accession 7200503)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the HAMILTON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 30 August 1970 to 17 September 1970 (NODC Accession 7100358)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MELLON from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 27 January 1974 to 22 February 1974 (NODC Accession 7400553)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MENDOTA from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 16 July 1971 to 04 August 1971 (NODC Accession 7200027)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MENDOTA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHINCOTEAGUE from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 05 November 1971 to 24 November 1971 (NODC Accession 7200504)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHINCOTEAGUE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  18. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 14 December 1973 to 09 January 1974 (NODC Accession 7400802)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WINNEBAGO from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 04 October 1971 to 29 October 1971 (NODC Accession 7200857)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINNEBAGO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the KLAMATH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 13 February 1969 to 01 March 1969 (NODC Accession 6900607)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the KLAMATH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 19 March 1973 to 07 April 1973 (NODC Accession 7301100)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MENDOTA from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 14 May 1971 to 07 June 1971 (NODC Accession 7101319)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MENDOTA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ANDROSCOGGIN from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 26 November 1972 to 10 December 1972 (NODC Accession 7300491)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ANDROSCOGGIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 12 July 1968 to 30 July 1968 (NODC Accession 6800058)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WACHUSETT from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 30 April 1972 to 25 May 1972 (NODC Accession 7201434)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WACHUSETT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WINONA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 16 September 1973 to 12 October 1973 (NODC Accession 7400294)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINONA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  7. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WINNEBAGO from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 20 June 1971 to 10 July 1971 (NODC Accession 7101432)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINNEBAGO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 20 September 1975 to 30 September 1975 (NODC Accession 7600086)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  9. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 24 October 1972 to 25 October 1972 (NODC Accession 7300099)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 01 June 1970 to 20 June 1970 (NODC Accession 7000915)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  11. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the OWASCO from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 02 October 1972 to 22 October 1972 (NODC Accession 7300501)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the OWASCO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  12. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ANDROSCOGGIN from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 02 July 1971 to 23 July 1971 (NODC Accession 7200413)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ANDROSCOGGIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SPENCER from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 28 November 1972 to 08 December 1972 (NODC Accession 7300097)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SPENCER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  14. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the DALLAS from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 23 April 1972 to 16 May 1972 (NODC Accession 7300327)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DALLAS within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ANDROSCOGGIN from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 20 July 1972 to 06 August 1972 (NODC Accession 7300015)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ANDROSCOGGIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MELLON from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean from 05 January 1972 to 10 January 1972 (NODC Accession 7201002)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 02 November 1972 to 04 November 1972 (NODC Accession 7300083)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  18. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the BOUTWELL from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 26 June 1972 to 17 July 1972 (NODC Accession 7300124)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BOUTWELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the USCGC SHERMAN from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 17 January 1972 to 09 February 1972 (NODC Accession 7200610)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the USCGC SHERMAN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  20. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the CHASE from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 06 September 1972 to 29 September 1972 (NODC Accession 7300326)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHASE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 25 August 1971 to 15 September 1971 (NODC Accession 7200386)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 12 September 1971 to 07 October 1971 (NODC Accession 7200963)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 10 July 1972 to 30 July 1972 (NODC Accession 7300204)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SPENCER from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 21 September 1972 to 12 October 1972 (NODC Accession 7300495)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SPENCER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 26 December 1971 to 20 January 1972 (NODC Accession 7201404)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the KLAMATH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 11 June 1972 to 06 July 1972 (NODC Accession 7201446)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the KLAMATH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  7. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 25 August 1972 to 17 September 1972 (NODC Accession 7300325)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 31 July 1971 to 24 August 1971 (NODC Accession 7200399)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  9. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SPENCER from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 19 July 1972 to 07 August 1972 (NODC Accession 7300084)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SPENCER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MUNRO from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 21 January 1973 to 26 January 1973 (NODC Accession 7300321)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MUNRO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean from 13 November 1971 to 03 December 1971 (NODC Accession 7200901)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  12. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 21 May 1972 to 10 June 1972 (NODC Accession 7201443)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 24 April 1972 to 12 May 1972 (NODC Accession 7300014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the JARVIS from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 15 August 1972 to 06 September 1972 (NODC Accession 7300055)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the JARVIS within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SPENCER from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 18 February 1972 to 23 March 1972 (NODC Accession 7300022)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SPENCER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WACHUSETT from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 18 January 1972 to 12 February 1972 (NODC Accession 7201170)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WACHUSETT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the OWASCO from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 09 July 1971 to 29 July 1971 (NODC Accession 7200029)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the OWASCO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  18. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 02 July 1972 to 28 July 1972 (NODC Accession 7201448)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the USCGC SHERMAN from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 12 August 1971 to 13 September 1971 (NODC Accession 7200410)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the USCGC SHERMAN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SPENCER from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 17 May 1972 to 07 June 1972 (NODC Accession 7201242)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SPENCER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MORGENTHAU from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 18 April 1972 to 11 May 1972 (NODC Accession 7201407)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MORGENTHAU within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MUNRO from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 22 July 1972 to 18 August 1972 (NODC Accession 7300208)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MUNRO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 18 March 1972 to 08 April 1972 (NODC Accession 7201168)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from from 12 January 1972 to 05 February 1972 (NODC Accession 7200973)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  5. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the BOUTWELL from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 20 November 1972 to 24 November 1972 (NODC Accession 7300492)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BOUTWELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 13 September 1971 to 14 October 1971 (NODC Accession 7200429)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  7. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the BOUTWELL from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 28 August 1972 to 21 September 1972 (NODC Accession 7300209)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BOUTWELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 11 July 1971 to 06 August 1971 (NODC Accession 7200316)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  9. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the OWASCO from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 11 February 1972 to 26 February 1972 (NODC Accession 7300018)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the OWASCO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ANDROSCOGGIN from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 16 May 1972 to 01 June 1972 (NODC Accession 7300017)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ANDROSCOGGIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WINONA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 04 August 1971 to 25 August 1971 (NODC Accession 7200033)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINONA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  12. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ABSECON from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 20 November 1971 to 04 December 1971 (NODC Accession 7200968)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ABSECON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WACHUSETT from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 25 September 1972 to 18 October 1972 (NODC Accession 7300487)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WACHUSETT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MELLON from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 24 July 1972 to 09 August 1972 (NODC Accession 7201441)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the USCGC SHERMAN from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 04 August 1972 to 02 September 1972 (NODC Accession 7300205)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the USCGC SHERMAN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 01 January 1972 to 05 January 1972 (NODC Accession 7200609)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 21 December 1972 to 04 January 1973 (NODC Accession 7300323)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  18. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from WINONA from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 24 October 1971 to 01 January 1972 (NODC Accession 7201123)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINONA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  19. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 07 July 1972 to 20 July 1972 (NODC Accession 7300212)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHASE from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 26 August 1971 to 24 September 1971 (NODC Accession 7200034)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHASE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 26 March 1972 to 17 April 1972 (NODC Accession 7201004)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 15 August 1972 to 24 August 1972 (NODC Accession 7300045)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the SPENCER from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean on 13 February 1973 (NODC Accession 7300481)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the SPENCER within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ANDROSCOGGIN from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 05 March 1972 to 22 March 1972 (NODC Accession 7300049)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ANDROSCOGGIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 09 February 1972 to 24 February 1972 (NODC Accession 7201243)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 01 August 1972 to 17 August 1972 (NODC Accession 7300203)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  7. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 17 January 1973 to 24 January 1973 (NODC Accession 7300322)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  8. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the WINNEBAGO from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 06 September 1972 to 03 October 1972 (NODC Accession 7300053)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the WINNEBAGO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  9. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 13 February 1972 to 04 March 1972 (NODC Accession 7201003)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DALLAS from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 09 November 1971 to 11 December 1971 (NODC Accession 7200974)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DALLAS within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DALLAS from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 22 April 1971 to 14 May 1971 (NODC Accession 7200325)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DALLAS within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  12. Oceanographic station CTD casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 31 December 1972 to 24 January 1973 (NODC Accession 7300763)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the KLAMATH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean 25 November 1970 to 11 December 1970 (NODC Accession 7100759)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the KLAMATH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (5230N 02000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 15 May 1970 to 17 July 1970 (NODC Accession 7001013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean 22 September 1969 to 17 October 1969 (NODC Accession 7000091)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400E) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHINCOTEAGUE and other platforms from multiple Ocean Weather Station (OWS) in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Pacific Ocean 26 November 1968 to 14 January 1969 (NODC Accession 6900424)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHINCOTEAGUE, DUANE, HAMILTON, HUMBOLDT, and MELLON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 06 January 1975 to 23 January 1975 (NODC Accession 7500665)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  18. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 04 December 1973 to 13 December 1973 (NODC Accession 7400208)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  19. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 17 May 1973 to 08 June 1973 (NODC Accession 7301207)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CHINCOTEAGUE from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 17 November 1969 to 06 December 1969 (NODC Accession 7000141)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHINCOTEAGUE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the RUSH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 05 January 1974 to 20 January 1974 (NODC Accession 7400477)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the RUSH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 28 January 1973 to 29 January 1973 (NODC Accession 7300500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the INGHAM from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 14 June 1971 to 04 July 1971 (NODC Accession 7101390)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the INGHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BOUTWELL from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 23 May 1973 to 15 June 1973 (NODC Accession 7301181)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BOUTWELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 0480W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  5. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CASTLE ROCK from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean 04 May 1970 to 11 May 1970 (NODC Accession 7000819)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CASTLE ROCK within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  6. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the YAKUTAT from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 26 March 1969 to 22 April 1969 (NODC Accession 6900831)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the YAKUTAT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  7. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the YAKUTAT from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 02 August 1969 to 26 August 1969 (NODC Accession 7000088)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the YAKUTAT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  8. Oceanographic station data from CTD casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 07 June 1970 to 05 July 1970 (NODC Accession 7001184)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  9. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MUNRO from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 03 October 1972 to 30 October 1972 (NODC Accession 7300482)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MUNRO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  10. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from Ocean Weather Station A (OWS-A) in the North Atlantic Ocean from the from 12 January 1964 to 27 June 1966 (NODC Accession 7300616)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station A (6200N 03300W) and in transit. Data were collected by the Hydrographic...

  11. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CASTLE ROCK from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 04 March 1970 to 24 March 1970 (NODC Accession 7000759)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CASTLE ROCK within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  12. Oceanographic station data from CTD and bottle casts from the CHASE from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 24 March 1972 to 18 April 1972 (NODC Accession 7300020)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CHASE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 4100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  13. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean 27 August 1969 to 18 September 1969 (NODC Accession 7000065)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the DUANE from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 28 April 1970 to 19 May 1970 (NODC Accession 7000820)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the DUANE within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  15. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the HUMBOLDT from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean 24 July 1968 to 15 August 1968 (NODC Accession 6800215)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the HUMBOLDT within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  16. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the HAMILTON from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 13 November 1972 to 06 December 1972 (NODC Accession 7300569)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the HAMILTON within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  17. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the USCGC SHERMAN from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 20 March 1972 to 13 April 1972 (NODC Accession 7201385)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the USCGC SHERMAN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 5100W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  18. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 02 August 1975 to 21 August 1975 (NODC Accession 7600089)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the MINNETONKA from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 05 December 1971 to 31 December 1971 (NODC Accession 7200902)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the MINNETONKA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BIBB and Other Platforms from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 06 February 1976 to 26 May 1976 (NODC Accession 7601610)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BIBB and Other Platforms within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the RUSH from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 27 February 1972 to 22 March 1972 (NODC Accession 7201387)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the RUSH within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  2. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the GALLATIN from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 26 March 1972 to 29 March 1972 (NODC Accession 7201241)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the GALLATIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0352W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  3. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CASTLE ROCK from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean 14 July 1968 to 08 August 1968 (NODC Accession 6800276)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CASTLE ROCK within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected...

  4. Oceanographic station data from bottle and CTD casts from the BERING STRAIT and other platforms from multiple Ocean Weather Station (OWS) in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Pacific Ocean 21 January 1969 to 10 April 1969 (NODC Accession 6900639)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BERING STRAIT, DUANE, CHASE, and GRESHAM within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W), C...

  5. Snow on the Ross Ice Shelf: comparison of reanalyses and observations from automatic weather stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Cohen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of precipitation from the ECMWF ERA-Interim and NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis-2 datasets is developed using snow accumulation measurements from Automatic Weather Stations (AWS around the Ross Ice Shelf (RIS, Antarctica. The high temporal resolution of the AWS snow accumulation measurements allow for a new, event-based comparison of reanalyses precipitation to in-situ observations. Snow accumulation records from nine AWS provide multiple years of accumulation data between 2008–2012 over a relatively large, homogeneous region of Antarctica and provide the basis for a statistical evaluation of accumulation events. The analysis shows that ERA-Interim reproduces significantly more precipitation events than NCEP-2 and these events correspond to an average 8.2% more precipitation. Correlations between reanalyses and AWS event sizes are seen at several stations (at > 90% significance levels and show that ERA-Interim consistently produces larger precipitation events than NCEP-2. The significant and complex effects of wind on snow accumulation (which can both limit and enhance accumulation make determining biases in the reanalyses data not possible with the AWS data, however the analysis does illustrate significant and important differences between ERA-Interim and NCEP-2 precipitation.

  6. ULF Waves Observed at MAGDAS Stations as Probes for Litho-Space Weather Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumoto, Kiyohumi

    K.Yumoto, Space Environment Research Center (SERC), Kyushu University started the MAGDAS Project effectively in May of 2005, with the installation of the first unit in Hualien, Taiwan (Yumoto et al., 2006, 2007). Since then, over 50 units have been deployed around the world. They are concentrated along three chains: (1) North and South of Japan (the so-called "210o Magnetic Meridian Chain"), (2) Dip Equator Chain, and (3) Africa Chain (the so-called "96o Magnetic Meridian Chain"). The main goals of MAGDAS project are: (1) study magnetospheric pro-cesses by distinguishing between temporal changes and spatial variations in the phenomena, (2) clarify global structures and propagation characteristics of magnetospheric variations from higher to equatorial latitudes, and (3) understand global generation mechanisms of the Solar-Terrestrial phenomena (see Yumoto, 2004). From MAGDAS observations, ULF waves are found to be used as good probes for litho-space weather study in developing and developed countries. In the present paper, we will introduce the following examples: Pc 5 magnetic amplitudes at lower-latitude MAGDAS station show a linear relation with the solar wind velocity, thus we can use the Pc 5 amplitudes as a monitoring probe of the solar wind velocity. Pc 3-4 magnetic pulsations have skin depth comparable with the depth of epicentre of earthquakes in the lithosphere. Therefore, we can use Pc 3-4 as a probe for detecting ULF anomaly and precursors associated with great earthquakes. Pi 2 magnetic pulsations are observed globally at MAGDAS stations located at high, middle, low, and equatorial latitudes in night-and day-time. We can use the Pi 2s as a good indicator of onsets of magnetospheric substorms. Sudden commencements (sc), sudden impulse (si), and solar flare effects (sfe) create magnetic variations at MAGDAS stations. Therefore, MAGDAS data can be used as a probe of interplanetary shocks and interplanetary discontinuities in the solar wind, and solar flare

  7. Different Multifractal Scaling of the 0 cm Average Ground Surface Temperature of Four Representative Weather Stations over China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The temporal scaling properties of the daily 0 cm average ground surface temperature (AGST records obtained from four selected sites over China are investigated using multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA method. Results show that the AGST records at all four locations exhibit strong persistence features and different scaling behaviors. The differences of the generalized Hurst exponents are very different for the AGST series of each site reflecting the different scaling behaviors of the fluctuation. Furthermore, the strengths of multifractal spectrum are different for different weather stations and indicate that the multifractal behaviors vary from station to station over China.

  8. Boreal Atmospheric circulation patterns on the basis of the world network weather station data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, V. A.; Moskalenko, L. V.; Golenko, N. N.; Golenko, M. N.

    2012-04-01

    Due to the recent developments of various methods of data representation in meteorology, the image of the globe-scale atmospheric circulation system has appeared. Basically, the circulation assessment is based on the indirect teleconnection method and rotated principal component analysis of the sea level pressure or geopotential height fields. These methods have several constraints because of the integration of intermittent and frontal atmospheric synoptic variability.As follows from the work of prof. B.L. Dzerdzeevskii, due to the existing of Arctic blocking processes, simplified geostrophic wind concept on the basis of the low-frequency baric patterns of the permanent centers of action, should be reconsidered in more details. For this purpose, weather station direct in-situ data with the use of progressive vector diagrams for wind speed and direction time series visualization are appropriate. Wind diagrams incorporate various fluctuations with time scales from synoptic to climatic, which can be considered without any filtration applied. The subject of work is to study the long-term wind regimes in the Northern Hemisphere, with the aim to obtain atmospheric circulation patterns in the regions of interest, in particular induced by the NAO(North Atlantic oscillation), EAWR(East Atlantic-West Russia) and SH(Siberian High) centers of action at different time and space scales. The analysis is based on the standard meteorological data (including wind direction and speed) of WMO network weather stations in the period since 1998 up to the present. For intercalibration and validation, NCEP-NCAR and QuickSCAT sea winds databases were considered, as well. Basic features of the wind variability are governed by the relevant types of the large-scale synoptic atmospheric processes, which depend upon the state of the global atmospheric circulation, their large-scale gyres and separate smaller vorticity cells. All the individual wind diagrams appear as having rather simple low

  9. Rancang Bangun Maximum Power Point Tracking pada Panel Photovoltaic Berbasis Logika Fuzzy di Buoy Weather Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayu Prima Juliansyah Putra

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Salah satu aplikasi yang sering digunakan dalam bidang energi terbarukan adalah panel photovoltaic. Panel ini memiliki prinsip kerja berdasarkan efek photovoltaic dimana lempengan logam akan menghasilkan energi listrik apabila diberi intensitas cahaya. Untuk menghasilkan daya keluaran panel yang maksimal, maka diperlukan suatu algoritma yang biasa disebut Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT.MPPT yang diterapkan pada sistem photovoltaic berfungsi untuk mengatur nilai tegangan keluaran panel sehingga titik ker-janya beroperasi pada kondisi maksimal. Algoritma MPPT pada panel ini telah dilakukan dengan menggunakan logika fuzzy melalui mikrokontroler Arduino Uno sebagai pem-bangkit sinyal Pulse Width Modulation (PWM yang akan dikirimkan menuju DC-DC Buck Boost Converter. Keluaran dari buck boost converterakan dihubungkan secara langsung dengan buoy weather station untuk menyuplai energi listrik tiap komponen yang berada di dalamnya. Untuk menguji performansi dari algoritma MPPT yang telah dirancang, maka sistem akan diuji menggunakan variasi beban antara metode direct-coupled dengan MPPT menggunakan logika fuzzy. Hasil pengujian menunjukkan bahwa MPPT dengan logika fuzzy dapat menghasilkan daya maksimum daripada direct-coupled. Pada sistem panel photovoltaic ini memiliki range efisiensi 33.07589 % hingga 74.25743 %. Daya mak-simal dapat dicapai oleh sistem untuk tiap variasi beban dan efisiensi maksimal dapat dicapai pada beban 20 Ohm dari hasil pengujian sistem MPPT.

  10. Using stochastic activity networks to study the energy feasibility of automatic weather stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassano, Luca [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informatica e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Cesarini, Daniel [Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa (Italy); Avvenuti, Marco [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione, University of Pisa (Italy)

    2015-03-10

    Automatic Weather Stations (AWSs) are systems equipped with a number of environmental sensors and communication interfaces used to monitor harsh environments, such as glaciers and deserts. Designing such systems is challenging, since designers have to maximize the amount of sampled and transmitted data while considering the energy needs of the system that, in most cases, is powered by rechargeable batteries and exploits energy harvesting, e.g., solar cells and wind turbines. To support designers of AWSs in the definition of the software tasks and of the hardware configuration of the AWS we designed and implemented an energy-aware simulator of such systems. The simulator relies on the Stochastic Activity Networks (SANs) formalism and has been developed using the Möbius tool. In this paper we first show how we used the SAN formalism to model the various components of an AWS, we then report results from an experiment carried out to validate the simulator against a real-world AWS and we finally show some examples of usage of the proposed simulator.

  11. Wavelet Study of Meteorological Data Collected by Arduino-Weather Station: Impact on Solar Energy Collection Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caccamo Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Meteorological data collected by an automated LSI Lastem weather station connected with an Arduino device for remote acquisition are reported and discussed. Weather station, located at 38° 15’ 35.10’’ N latitude and 15° 35’ 58.86’’ E longitude, registered data which were analysed by wavelet transform to obtain time-frequency characterization of the signals. Such an approach allowed to highlight the correlation existing among the registered meteorological data. The results show a positive correlation between the minimum temperature and the maximum temperature values whereas a negative correlation emerges between daily rainfall and minimum temperature values as well as for daily rainfall and maximum temperature values. These results suggest the possibility to estimate the global and diffuse solar radiation using more reliable climatologic parameters for optimizing solar energy collected by solar panels.

  12. Using Arduinos and 3D-printers to Build Research-grade Weather Stations and Environmental Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Many plant, soil, and surface-boundary-layer processes in the geosphere are governed by the microclimate at the land-air interface. Environmental monitoring is needed at smaller scales and higher frequencies than provided by existing weather monitoring networks. The objective of this project was to design, prototype, and test a research-grade weather station that is based on open-source hardware/software and off-the-shelf components. The idea is that anyone could make these systems with only elementary skills in fabrication and electronics. The first prototypes included measurements of air temperature, humidity, pressure, global irradiance, wind speed, and wind direction. The best approach for measuring precipitation is still being investigated. The data acquisition system was deigned around the Arduino microcontroller and included an LCD-based user interface, SD card data storage, and solar power. Sensors were sampled at 5 s intervals and means, standard deviations, and maximum/minimums were stored at user-defined intervals (5, 30, or 60 min). Several of the sensor components were printed in plastic using a hobby-grade 3D printer (e.g., RepRap Project). Both passive and aspirated radiation shields for measuring air temperature were printed in white Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS). A housing for measuring solar irradiance using a photodiode-based pyranometer was printed in opaque ABS. The prototype weather station was co-deployed with commercial research-grade instruments at an agriculture research unit near Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. Excellent agreement was found between Arduino-based system and commercial weather instruments. The technology was also used to support air quality research and automated air sampling. The next step is to incorporate remote access and station-to-station networking using Wi-Fi, cellular phone, and radio communications (e.g., Xbee).

  13. Inorganic carbon time series at Ocean Weather Station M in the Norwegian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Skjelvan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved inorganic carbon (CT has been collected at Ocean Weather Station M (OWSM in the Norwegian Sea since 2001. Seasonal variations in CT are confined to the upper 50 m, where the biology is active, and below this layer no clear seasonal signal is seen. From winter to summer the surface CT concentration typical drops from 2140 to about 2040 μmol kg−1, while a deep water CT concentration of about 2163 μmol kg−1 is measured throughout the year. Observations show an annual increase in salinity normalized carbon concentration (nCT of 1.3±0.7 μmol kg−1 in the surface layer, which is equivalent to a pCO2 increase of 2.6±1.2 μatm yr−1, i.e. larger than the atmospheric increase in this area. Observations also show an annual increase in the deep water nCT of 0.57± 0.24 μmol kg−1, of which about a tenth is due to inflow of old Arctic water with larger amounts of remineralised matter. The remaining part has an anthropogenic origin and sources for this might be Greenland Sea surface water, Iceland Sea surface water, and/or recirculated Atlantic Water. By using an extended multi linear regression method (eMLR it is verified that anthropogenic carbon has entered the whole water column at OWSM.

  14. Space and Ground-Based Infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weems, Jon; Zell, Martin

    This chapter deals first with the main characteristics of the space environment, outside and inside a spacecraft. Then the space and space-related (ground-based) infrastructures are described. The most important infrastructure is the International Space Station, which holds many European facilities (for instance the European Columbus Laboratory). Some of them, such as the Columbus External Payload Facility, are located outside the ISS to benefit from external space conditions. There is only one other example of orbital platforms, the Russian Foton/Bion Recoverable Orbital Capsule. In contrast, non-orbital weightless research platforms, although limited in experimental time, are more numerous: sounding rockets, parabolic flight aircraft, drop towers and high-altitude balloons. In addition to these facilities, there are a number of ground-based facilities and space simulators, for both life sciences (for instance: bed rest, clinostats) and physical sciences (for instance: magnetic compensation of gravity). Hypergravity can also be provided by human and non-human centrifuges.

  15. Meteorological effects of the solar eclipse of 20 March 2015: analysis of UK Met Office automatic weather station data and comparison with automatic weather station data from the Faroes and Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penman, John; Jónsson, Trausti; Bigg, Grant R.; Björnsson, Halldór; Sjúrðarson, Sølvi; Hansen, Mads A.; Cappelen, John; Bryant, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we analyse high-frequency (1 min) surface air temperature, mean sea-level pressure (MSLP), wind speed and direction and cloud-cover data acquired during the solar eclipse of 20 March 2015 from 76 UK Met Office weather stations, and compare the results with those from 30 weather stations in the Faroe Islands and 148 stations in Iceland. There was a statistically significant mean UK temperature drop of 0.83±0.63°C, which occurred over 39 min on average, and the minimum temperature lagged the peak of the eclipse by about 10 min. For a subset of 14 (16) relatively clear (cloudy) stations, the mean temperature drop was 0.91±0.78 (0.31±0.40)°C but the mean temperature drops for relatively calm and windy stations were almost identical. Mean wind speed dropped significantly by 9% on average during the first half of the eclipse. There was no discernible effect of the eclipse on the wind-direction or MSLP time series, and therefore we can discount any localized eclipse cyclone effect over Britain during this event. Similar changes in air temperature and wind speed are observed for Iceland, where conditions were generally clearer, but here too there was no evidence of an eclipse cyclone; in the Faroes, there was a much more muted meteorological signature. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse’. PMID:27550769

  16. Meteorological effects of the solar eclipse of 20 March 2015: analysis of UK Met Office automatic weather station data and comparison with automatic weather station data from the Faroes and Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Edward; Penman, John; Jónsson, Trausti; Bigg, Grant R; Björnsson, Halldór; Sjúrðarson, Sølvi; Hansen, Mads A; Cappelen, John; Bryant, Robert G

    2016-09-28

    Here, we analyse high-frequency (1 min) surface air temperature, mean sea-level pressure (MSLP), wind speed and direction and cloud-cover data acquired during the solar eclipse of 20 March 2015 from 76 UK Met Office weather stations, and compare the results with those from 30 weather stations in the Faroe Islands and 148 stations in Iceland. There was a statistically significant mean UK temperature drop of 0.83±0.63°C, which occurred over 39 min on average, and the minimum temperature lagged the peak of the eclipse by about 10 min. For a subset of 14 (16) relatively clear (cloudy) stations, the mean temperature drop was 0.91±0.78 (0.31±0.40)°C but the mean temperature drops for relatively calm and windy stations were almost identical. Mean wind speed dropped significantly by 9% on average during the first half of the eclipse. There was no discernible effect of the eclipse on the wind-direction or MSLP time series, and therefore we can discount any localized eclipse cyclone effect over Britain during this event. Similar changes in air temperature and wind speed are observed for Iceland, where conditions were generally clearer, but here too there was no evidence of an eclipse cyclone; in the Faroes, there was a much more muted meteorological signature.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'.

  17. Comments to the Article by Thuillier et al. "The Infrared Solar Spectrum Measured by the SOLSPEC Spectrometer Onboard the International Space Station" on the Interpretation of Ground-based Measurements at the Izaña Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolsée, D.; Pereira, N.; Cuevas, E.; García, R.; Redondas, A.

    2016-10-01

    Thuillier et al. ( Solar Phys. 290, 1581, 2015) article compares ATLAS-3 reference composite solar spectral irradiance (SSI) with more recent spatial measurements, as well as ground-based ones, including IRSPERAD. With respect to the IRSPERAD spectrum of Bolsée et al. ( Solar Phys. 289, 2433, 2014), Thuillier et al. (2015) presents an analysis based on a set of meteorological parameters retrieved at the moment of the respective ground-based campaign. This comment is intended to give a new insight to the said analysis which is based upon revised values of the meteorological parameters incorrectly used in Thuillier et al. (2015).

  18. Separation of dry and wet periods from regular weather station data for the analysis of wind erosion risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naeini, Mohammadali Saremi; Fister, Wolfgang; Heckrath, Goswin Johann

    ), climate (e.g. air temperature, solar radiation, evaporation) and soil (e.g. infiltration rate, adhesion). The purpose of this study is to overcome the lack of soil moisture data for wind erosion risk assessment by developing a method to estimate the soil wetness based on easy available weather data......, such as daily precipitation, hourly/sub hourly ambient air temperature and hourly/sub hourly relative humidity. This new method was used to identify periods of wet and dry soil moisture conditions of a time series from 20 weather stations in Denmark. The length of the time series varied between 8 to 37 years...... that using wind data without the influence of soil moisture most likely lead to an overestimation of the wind erosion risk. It is, therefore, strongly recommended for wind erosion risk assessments to associate more importance to winds that occur during dry times of the year, by including soil moisture...

  19. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the CASCO from multiple Ocean Weather Station (OWS) in the North Atlantic Ocean 04 May 1955 to 26 September 1966 (NODC Accession 7500368)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the CASCO within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W), C (5630N 05100W), D (4400N 04100W), E...

  20. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BARATARIA and DALLAS from multiple Ocean Weather Station (OWS) in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Pacific Ocean 24 February 1969 to 21 March 1969 (NODC Accession 6900610)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BARATARIA and DALLAS within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W), E (3500N 04800W), H (3800N...

  1. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the HALF MOON and WINONA from multiple Ocean Weather Station (OWS) in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Pacific Ocean 16 April 1969 to 19 June 1969 (NODC Accession 6900696)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the HALF MOON and WINONA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W), E (3500N 04800W), H (3800N...

  2. Ground-based measurements of UV Index (UVI at Helwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Farouk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available On October 2010 UV Index (UVI ground-based measurements were carried out by weather station at solar laboratory in NRIAG. The daily variation has maximum values in spring and summer days, while minimum values in autumn and winter days. The low level of UVI between 2.55 and 2.825 was found in December, January and February. The moderate level of UVI between 3.075 and 5.6 was found in March, October and November. The high level of UVI between 6.7 and 7.65 was found in April, May and September. The very high level of UVI between 8 and 8.6 was found in June, July and August. High level of radiation over 6 months per year including 3 months with a very high level UVI. According to the equation {UVI=a[SZA]b} the UVI increases with decreasing SZA by 82% on a daily scale and 88% on a monthly scale. Helwan exposure to a high level of radiation over 6 months per year including 3 months with a very high level UVI, so it is advisable not to direct exposure to the sun from 11 am to 2:00 pm.

  3. Automatic Weather Station and Backup Techniques%自动气象站数据备份技巧

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    景新娟; 赵俊平; 刘雪芹; 杨瑞霞; 郭晓晨

    2014-01-01

    Based on the problems caused by some weather stations’ not backing up the date promptly, the paper makes an analysis on the present situation of data backup of automatic weather station and expounds in detail the methods of automatically date backup by means of sharing the date of the host and backup computers as well as using the target project. With an expectation to help automatic weather stations backup the relative data files promptly, the paper is also expected to contribute to further improve the quality of service by docking the data collector and the backup computer so as to solve such problems as data processing or data missing resulting in missing predictions and reports when the host computer is out of order.%分析了自动气象站数据备份的现状,针对台站数据备份不及时等问题,提出了通过业务主机与备份机数据共享,利用计划任务自动备份数据文件的方法。实现了自动气象站有关数据文件的及时备份,能够在主用计算机故障时实现采集器与备份机及时对接,从而解决了由于数据缺失引起的问题,为进一步提高业务质量奠定了基础。

  4. Predictability of PV power grid performance on insular sites without weather stations: use of artificial neural networks

    CERN Document Server

    Voyant, Cyril; Paoli, Christophe; Nivet, Marie Laure; Poggi, Philippe; Haurant, P; 10.4229/24thEUPVSEC2009-5BV.2.35

    2010-01-01

    The official meteorological network is poor on the island of Corsica: only three sites being about 50 km apart are equipped with pyranometers which enable measurements by hourly and daily step. These sites are Ajaccio (41\\degree 55'N and 8\\degree 48'E, seaside), Bastia (42\\degree 33'N, 9\\degree 29'E, seaside) and Corte (42\\degree 30'N, 9\\degree 15'E average altitude of 486 meters). This lack of weather station makes difficult the predictability of PV power grid performance. This work intends to study a methodology which can predict global solar irradiation using data available from another location for daily and hourly horizon. In order to achieve this prediction, we have used Artificial Neural Network which is a popular artificial intelligence technique in the forecasting domain. A simulator has been obtained using data available for the station of Ajaccio that is the only station for which we have a lot of data: 16 years from 1972 to 1987. Then we have tested the efficiency of this simulator in two places w...

  5. Ground based materials science experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. B.; Johnston, J. C.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    The facilities at the Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory (MMSL) at the Lewis Research Center, created to offer immediate and low-cost access to ground-based testing facilities for industrial, academic, and government researchers, are described. The equipment in the MMSL falls into three categories: (1) devices which emulate some aspect of low gravitational forces, (2) specialized capabilities for 1-g development and refinement of microgravity experiments, and (3) functional duplicates of flight hardware. Equipment diagrams are included.

  6. Ground based materials science experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. B.; Johnston, J. C.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    The facilities at the Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory (MMSL) at the Lewis Research Center, created to offer immediate and low-cost access to ground-based testing facilities for industrial, academic, and government researchers, are described. The equipment in the MMSL falls into three categories: (1) devices which emulate some aspect of low gravitational forces, (2) specialized capabilities for 1-g development and refinement of microgravity experiments, and (3) functional duplicates of flight hardware. Equipment diagrams are included.

  7. Analysis of antenna position measurements and weather station network data during the ALMA Long Baseline Campaign of 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Hunter, Todd R; Broguiere, Dominique; Fomalont, Ed B; Dent, William R F; Phillips, Neil; Rabanus, David; Vlahakis, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    In a radio interferometer, the determination of geometrical antenna positions relies on accurate calibration of the dry and wet delay of the atmosphere above each antenna. For the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA), which has baseline lengths up to 16 kilometers, the geography of the site forces the height above mean sea level of the more distant antenna pads to be significantly lower than the central array. Thus, both the ground level meteorological values and the total water column can be quite different between antennas in the extended configurations. During 2015, a network of six additional weather stations was installed to monitor pressure, temperature, relative humidity and wind velocity, in order to test whether inclusion of these parameters could improve the repeatability of antenna position determinations in these configurations. We present an analysis of the data obtained during the ALMA Long Baseline Campaign of Oct. through Nov. 2015. The repeatability of antenna position measurem...

  8. A Sounding-based Severe Weather Tool to Support Daily Operations at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William H.; Roeder, William P.

    2014-01-01

    People and property at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) are at risk when severe weather occurs. Strong winds, hail and tornadoes can injure individuals and cause costly damage to structures if not properly protected. NASA's Launch Services Program and Ground Systems Development and Operations Program and other KSC programs use the daily and weekly severe weather forecasts issued by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) to determine if they need to limit an activity such as working on gantries, or protect property such as a vehicle on a pad. The 45 WS requested the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) develop a warm season (May-September) severe weather tool for use in the Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS) based on the late morning, 1500 UTC (1100 local time), CCAFS (XMR) sounding. The 45 WS frequently makes decisions to issue a severe weather watch and other severe weather warning support products to NASA and the 45th Space Wing in the late morning, after the 1500 UTC sounding. The results of this work indicate that certain stability indices based on the late morning XMR soundings can depict differences between days with reported severe weather and days with no reported severe weather. The AMU determined a frequency of reported severe weather for the stability indices and implemented an operational tool in MIDDS.

  9. Teachers guide for building and operating weather satellite ground stations for high school science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, R. J.; Gotwald, T.

    1981-01-01

    A number of colleges and universities are operating APT direct readout stations. However, high school science teachers have often failed to realize the potential of meteorological satellites and their products as unique instructional tools. The ability to receive daily pictures from these satellites offers exciting opportunities for secondary school teachers and students to assemble the electronic hardware and to view real time pictures of Earth from outer space. The station and pictures can be used in the classroom to develop an approach to science teaching that could span many scientific disciplines and offer many opportunities for student research and participation in scientific processes. This can be accomplished with relatively small expenditures of funds for equipment. In most schools some of the equipment may already be available. Others can be constructed by teachers and/or students. Yet another source might be the purchase of used equipment from industry or through the government surplus channels. The information necessary for individuals unfamiliar with these systems to construct a direct readout for receiving real time APT photographs on a daily basis in the classroom is presented.

  10. Using crowdsourced data from citizen weather stations to analyse air temperature in 'local climate zones' in Berlin, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, Daniel; Meier, Fred; Bechtel, Benjamin; Otto, Marco; Scherer, Dieter

    2017-04-01

    Provision of observational data with high spatial coverage over extended time periods still remains as one of the biggest challenges in urban climate research. Classical meteorological networks are seldomly designed to monitor atmospheric conditions in a broad variety of urban environments, though the heterogeneity of urban structures leads to distinct thermal characteristics on local scales, i.e., hundreds of metres to several kilometres. One approach to overcome the aforementioned challenges of observation networks is to use data from weather stations that are maintained by citizens. The private company 'netatmo' (www.netatmo.com) produces and distributes such citizen weather stations (CWS) around the world. The stations automatically send their data to the netatmo server, and the user decides if data are publicly shared. Shared data can freely be retrieved via an application programming interface. We collected air temperature (T) data for the year 2015 for the city of Berlin, Germany, and surroundings with more than 1500 'netatmo' CWS in the study area. The entire data set was thoroughly quality checked, and filter techniques, involving data from a reference network, were developed to address different types of errors associated with CWS data. Additionally, the accuracy of 'netatmo' CWS was checked in a climate chamber and in a long-term field experiment. Since the terms 'urban' and 'rural' are ambiguous in urban climate studies, Stewart and Oke (2012) developed the 'local climate zone' (LCZ) concept to enhance understanding and interpretation of air temperature differences in urban regions. LCZ classification for the study region was conducted using the 'WUDAPT' approach by Bechtel et al. (2015). The quality-checked CWS data were used to analyse T characteristics of LCZ classes in Berlin and surroundings. Specifically, we analysed how LCZ classes are represented by CWS in 2015, how T varies within each LCZ class ('intra-LCZ variability'), and if significant

  11. Geostatistical improvements of evapotranspiration spatial information using satellite land surface and weather stations data

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho Alves, Marcelo; de Carvalho, Luiz Gonsaga; Vianello, Rubens Leite; Sediyama, Gilberto C.; de Oliveira, Marcelo Silva; de Sá Junior, Arionaldo

    2013-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to use the simple cokriging methodology to characterize the spatial variability of Penman-Monteith reference evapotranspiration and Thornthwaite potential evapotranspiration methods based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spetroradiometer (MODIS) global evapotranspiration products and high-resolution surfaces of WordClim temperature and precipitation data. The climatic element data referred to 39 National Institute of Meteorology climatic stations located in Minas Gerais state, Brazil and surrounding states. The use of geostatistics and simple cokriging technique enabled the characterization of the spatial variability of the evapotranspiration providing uncertainty information on the spatial prediction pattern. Evapotranspiration and precipitation surfaces were implemented for the climatic classification in Minas Gerais. Multivariate geostatistical determined improvements of evapotranspiration spatial information. The regions in the south of Minas Gerais derived from the moisture index estimated with the MODIS evapotranspiration (2000-2010), presented divergence of humid conditions when compared to the moisture index derived from the simple kriged and cokriged evapotranspiration (1961-1990), indicating climate change in this region. There was stronger pattern of crossed covariance between evapotranspiration and precipitation rather than temperature, indicating that trends in precipitation could be one of the main external drivers of the evapotranspiration in Minas Gerais state, Brazil.

  12. Using Large-scale Spatially and Temporally Consistent Reanalysis Data to Assess Fire Weather and Fire Regimes in Siberia in Preparation for Future Fire Weather Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soja, A. J.; Westberg, D. J.; Stackhouse, P. W.; McRae, D.; Jin, J.

    2008-12-01

    A primary driving force of land cover change in boreal regions is fire, where extreme fire seasons are influenced by local weather and ultimately climate. It is predicted that fire frequency, area burned, fire severity, fire season length, and severe fire seasons will increase under current climate change scenarios. The use of local ground based weather data can be used to gauge the local fire potential on a daily, monthly, or seasonal basis. However, the number and distribution of surface observing stations in Siberia have been declining since the early 1990's. A compounding problem is existing observing stations have missing data on various time scales. The density of stations is limited; hence results may not be representative of the spatial reality. One solution is the temporally and spatially consistent NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 4 (GEOS-4) satellite-derived weather data interpolated to a 1x1 degree grid. In previous work, we showed the Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index (FWI) derived using GEOS-4 weather and Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) precipitation data compared well to ground based weather data from Jakutsk (Sakha) and Kyzyl (Tuva), Russia. Our primary focus is to expand on this work by spatially comparing the FWI derived from GEOS-4 / GPCP data and ground-based weather observations from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). Extreme fires burned in Sakha and Tuva in 2002 and 2004, respectively, while in contrast, normal fire seasons occurred in Sakha and Tuva in 1999 and 2002, respectively. For this reason, we focus on the 1999, 2002, and 2004 fire seasons (April - September). In this investigation, we demonstrate how fire weather models perform on a large scale and investigate the performance of these models relative to input uncertainties. We intend to use this information to build regional-scale fire predictions systems that can be used for future interactive fire-weather-climate assessments.

  13. A Review on Climate Change in Weather Stations of Guilan Province Using Mann-Kendal Methodand GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Jalal

    2016-07-01

    Climate has always been changing during the life time of the earth, and has appeared in the form of ice age, hurricanes, severe and sudden temperature changes, precipitation and other climatic elements, and has dramatically influenced the environment, and in some cases has caused severe changes and even destructions. Some of the most important aspects of climate changes can be found in precipitation types of different regions in the world and especially Guilan, which is influenced by drastic land conversions and greenhouse gases. Also, agriculture division, industrial activities and unnecessary land conversions are thought to have a huge influence on climate change. Climate change is a result of abnormalcies of metorologyl parameters. Generally, the element of precipitation is somehow included in most theories about climate change. The present study aims to reveal precipitation abnormalcies in Guilan which lead to climate change, and possible deviations of precipitation parameter based on annual, seasonal and monthly series have been evaluated. The Mann-Kendal test has been used to reveal likely deviations leading to climate change. The trend of precipitation changes in long-term has been identifiedusing this method. Also, the beginning and end of these changes have been studied in five stations as representatives of all the thirteen weather stations. Then,the areas which have experienced climate change have been identified using the GIS software along with the severity of the changes with an emphasis on drought. These results can be used in planning and identifying the effects of these changes on the environment. Keywords: Climate Change, Guilan, Mann-Kendal, GIS

  14. Oceanographic station data from bottle casts from the BERING STRAIT and COOK INLET from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) and V (OWS-V) in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Pacific Ocean 15 July 1968 to 25 August 1968 (NODC Accession 6800290)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station data were collected from the BERING STRAIT and COOK INLET within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W), V (3400N 16400E),...

  15. Insolation data manual: long-term monthly averages of solar radiation, temperature, degree-days and global anti K/sub T/ for 248 national weather service stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, C L; Stoffel, T L; Whitaker, S D

    1980-10-01

    Monthly averaged data is presented which describes the availability of solar radiation at 248 National Weather Service stations. Monthly and annual average daily insolation and temperature values have been computed from a base of 24 to 25 years of data. Average daily maximum, minimum, and monthly temperatures are provided for most locations in both Celsius and Fahrenheit. Heating and cooling degree-days were computed relative to a base of 18.3/sup 0/C (65/sup 0/F). For each station, global anti K/sub T/ (cloudiness index) were calculated on a monthly and annual basis. (MHR)

  16. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 321: Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE/NV

    1999-01-28

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO (1996), CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. A CAU consists of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the CAU 321 Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, CAS 22-99-05 Fuel Storage Area. For purposes of this discussion, this site will be referred to as either CAU 321 or the Fuel Storage Area. The Fuel Storage Area is located in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The Fuel Storage Area (Figure 1-2) was used to store fuel and other petroleum products necessary for motorized operations at the historic Camp Desert Rock facility which was operational from 1951 to 1958 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The site was dismantled after 1958 (DOE/NV, 1996a).

  17. Ground-based observations of exoplanet atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ernst Johan Walter de

    2011-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the properties of exoplanet atmospheres. The results for ground-based near-infrared secondary eclipse observations of three different exoplanets, TrES-3b, HAT-P-1b and WASP-33b, are presented which have been obtained with ground-based telescopes as part of the GROUSE project.

  18. Ground-based observations of exoplanet atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ernst Johan Walter de

    2011-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the properties of exoplanet atmospheres. The results for ground-based near-infrared secondary eclipse observations of three different exoplanets, TrES-3b, HAT-P-1b and WASP-33b, are presented which have been obtained with ground-based telescopes as part of the GROUSE project.

  19. Performance Assessment of a Solar powered Air Quality and Weather Station Placed on a School Rooftop in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summary of compact, roof version of a Village Green Project station installed on a secondary school rooftop in Hong Kong. Preliminary comparison of the station's data against nearby regulatory monitors are summarized.

  20. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the ESCANABA from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 17 July 1962 to 31 August 1962 (NODC Accession 6200209)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the ESCANABA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  1. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the COOS BAY from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 05 July 1966 to 30 July 1966 (NODC Accession 6600090)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the COOS BAY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (56305N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  2. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the CHAUTAUQUA from Ocean Weather Station V (OWS-V) in the North Pacific Ocean from 13 November 1963 to 08 December 1963 (NODC Accession 6300091)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station V (3400N 16400W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  3. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DALLAS from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) and D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 03 November 1973 to 27 November 1973 (NODC Accession 7301191)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the DALLAS within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 03530W), D (4400N 04100W), and in transit. Data were...

  4. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the CHAUTAUQUA and other platforms from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 19 November 1963 to 18 July 1968 (NODC Accession 6900791)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the CHAUTAUQUA and other platforms within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data...

  5. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the COOK INLET from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 01 November 1966 to 26 November 1966 (NODC Accession 6600313)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the COOK INLET within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  6. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the TANEY from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 13 January 1974 to 01 February 1974 (NODC Accession 7400133)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the TANEY within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  7. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the PONTCHARTRAIN from Ocean Weather Station N (OWS-N) in the North Pacific Ocean from 26 August 1969 to 11 September 1969 (NODC Accession 6900731)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the PONTCHARTRAIN within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station N (3000N 14000W) and in transit. Data were collected by...

  8. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 02 July 1962 to 02 August 1962 (NODC Accession 6200220)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0350W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  9. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 27 February 1967 to 22 March 1967 (NODC Accession 6700088)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  10. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 08 September 1964 to 01 October 1964 (NODC Accession 6400046)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (56305N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  11. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the CAMPBELL Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 26 June 1964 to 23 July 1964 (NODC Accession 6400991)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  12. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 03 June 1973 to 02 July 1973 (NODC Accession 7300933)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  13. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 20 June 1965 to 19 July 1965 (NODC Accession 6500782)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0350W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  14. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station H (OWS-H) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 18 December 1973 to 13 January 1974 (NODC Accession 7400074)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station H (3800N 07100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  15. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 26 March 1963 to 26 April 1963 (NODC Accession 6300986)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0350W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  16. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station C (OWS-C) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 21 February 1965 to 11 March 1965 (NODC Accession 6500029)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station C (5245N 0350W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  17. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 17 February 1970 to 07 March 1970 (NODC Accession 7000337)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (5630N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  18. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station E (OWS-E) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 29 November 1964 to 22 December 1964 (NODC Accession 6400064)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station E (3500N 04800W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  19. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station D (OWS-D) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 29 May 1972 to 01 July 1972 (NODC Accession 7200930)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station D (4400N 04100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...

  20. Temperature profiles from MBT casts from the CAMPBELL from Ocean Weather Station B (OWS-B) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 26 April 1967 to 16 May 1967 (NODC Accession 6700188)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data were collected from the CAMPBELL within a 1-mile radius of Ocean Weather Station B (56305N 05100W) and in transit. Data were collected by the...