WorldWideScience

Sample records for ground-based simulation experiments

  1. Simulated forecasts for primordial B -mode searches in ground-based experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, David; Dunkley, Joanna; Thorne, Ben; Næss, Sigurd

    2017-02-01

    Detecting the imprint of inflationary gravitational waves on the B -mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is one of the main science cases for current and next-generation CMB experiments. In this work we explore some of the challenges that ground-based facilities will have to face in order to carry out this measurement in the presence of galactic foregrounds and correlated atmospheric noise. We present forecasts for stage-3 (S3) and planned stage-4 (S4) experiments based on the analysis of simulated sky maps using a map-based Bayesian foreground-cleaning method. Our results thus consistently propagate the uncertainties on foreground parameters such as spatially varying spectral indices, as well as the bias on the measured tensor-to-scalar ratio r caused by an incorrect modeling of the foregrounds. We find that S3 and S4-like experiments should be able to put constraints on r of the order σ (r )=(0.5 - 1.0 )×10-2 and σ (r )=(0.5 - 1.0 )×10-3 respectively, assuming instrumental systematic effects are under control. We further study deviations from the fiducial foreground model, finding that, while the effects of a second polarized dust component would be minimal on both S3 and S4, a 2% polarized anomalous dust emission component would be clearly detectable by stage-4 experiments.

  2. Simulated forecasts for primordial B-mode searches in ground-based experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, David; Naess, Sigurd; Thorne, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Detecting the imprint of inflationary gravitational waves on the $B$-mode polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) is one of the main science cases for current and next-generation CMB experiments. In this work we explore some of the challenges that ground-based facilities will have to face in order to carry out this measurement in the presence of Galactic foregrounds and correlated atmospheric noise. We present forecasts for Stage-3 (S3) and planned Stage-4 (S4) experiments based on the analysis of simulated sky maps using a map-based Bayesian foreground cleaning method. Our results thus consistently propagate the uncertainties on foreground parameters such as spatially-varying spectral indices, as well as the bias on the measured tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$ caused by an incorrect modelling of the foregrounds. We find that S3 and S4-like experiments should be able to put constraints on $r$ of the order $\\sigma(r)=(0.5-1.0)\\times10^{-2}$ and $\\sigma(r)=(0.5-1.0)\\times10^{-3}$ respectively, assuming...

  3. Ground-based simulation of telepresence for materials science experiments. [remote viewing and control of processes aboard Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, James C.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.; Bonner, Mary JO; Hahn, Richard C.; Herbach, Bruce

    1989-01-01

    A series of ground-based telepresence experiments have been performed to determine the minimum video frame rate and resolution required for the successive performance of materials science experiments in space. The approach used is to simulate transmission between earth and space station with transmission between laboratories on earth. The experiments include isothermal dendrite growth, physical vapor transport, and glass melting. Modifications of existing apparatus, software developed, and the establishment of an inhouse network are reviewed.

  4. Ground-based simulation of telepresence for materials science experiments. [remote viewing and control of processes aboard Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, James C.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.; Bonner, Mary JO; Hahn, Richard C.; Herbach, Bruce

    1989-01-01

    A series of ground-based telepresence experiments have been performed to determine the minimum video frame rate and resolution required for the successive performance of materials science experiments in space. The approach used is to simulate transmission between earth and space station with transmission between laboratories on earth. The experiments include isothermal dendrite growth, physical vapor transport, and glass melting. Modifications of existing apparatus, software developed, and the establishment of an inhouse network are reviewed.

  5. Ground based materials science experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. B.; Johnston, J. C.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    The facilities at the Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory (MMSL) at the Lewis Research Center, created to offer immediate and low-cost access to ground-based testing facilities for industrial, academic, and government researchers, are described. The equipment in the MMSL falls into three categories: (1) devices which emulate some aspect of low gravitational forces, (2) specialized capabilities for 1-g development and refinement of microgravity experiments, and (3) functional duplicates of flight hardware. Equipment diagrams are included.

  6. Ground based materials science experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. B.; Johnston, J. C.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    The facilities at the Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory (MMSL) at the Lewis Research Center, created to offer immediate and low-cost access to ground-based testing facilities for industrial, academic, and government researchers, are described. The equipment in the MMSL falls into three categories: (1) devices which emulate some aspect of low gravitational forces, (2) specialized capabilities for 1-g development and refinement of microgravity experiments, and (3) functional duplicates of flight hardware. Equipment diagrams are included.

  7. Simulations of direct and reflected wave trajectories for ground-based GNSS-R experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, N.; Frappart, F.; Ramillien, G.; Darrozes, J.; Desjardins, C.; Gegout, P.; Pérosanz, F.; Biancale, R.

    2014-10-01

    The detection of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals that are reflected off the surface, along with the reception of direct GNSS signals, offers a unique opportunity to monitor water level variations over land and ocean. The time delay between the reception of the direct and reflected signals gives access to the altitude of the receiver over the reflecting surface. The field of view of the receiver is highly dependent on both the orbits of the GNSS satellites and the configuration of the study site geometries. A simulator has been developed to determine the location of the reflection points on the surface accurately by modeling the trajectories of GNSS electromagnetic waves that are reflected by the surface of the Earth. Only the geometric problem was considered using a specular reflection assumption. The orbit of the GNSS constellation satellites (mainly GPS, GLONASS and Galileo), and the position of a fixed receiver, are used as inputs. Four different simulation modes are proposed, depending on the choice of the Earth surface model (local plane, osculating sphere or ellipsoid) and the consideration of topography likely to cause masking effects. Angular refraction effects derived from adaptive mapping functions are also taken into account. This simulator was developed to determine where the GNSS-R receivers should be located to monitor a given study area efficiently. In this study, two test sites were considered: the first one at the top of the 65 m Cordouan lighthouse in the Gironde estuary, France, and the second one on the shore of Lake Geneva (50 m above the reflecting surface), at the border between France and Switzerland. This site is hidden by mountains in the south (orthometric altitude up to 2000 m), and overlooking the lake in the north (orthometric altitude of 370 m). For this second test site configuration, reflections occur until 560 m from the receiver. The planimetric (arc length) differences (or altimetric difference as WGS84

  8. Self-Pressurization and Spray Cooling Simulations of the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) Ground-Based Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartuzova, O.; Kassemi, M.; Agui, J.; Moder, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a CFD (computational fluid dynamics) model for simulating the self-pressurization of a large scale liquid hydrogen storage tank. In this model, the kinetics-based Schrage equation is used to account for the evaporative and condensing interfacial mass flows. Laminar and turbulent approaches to modeling natural convection in the tank and heat and mass transfer at the interface are compared. The flow, temperature, and interfacial mass fluxes predicted by these two approaches during tank self-pressurization are compared against each other. The ullage pressure and vapor temperature evolutions are also compared against experimental data obtained from the MHTB (Multipuprpose Hydrogen Test Bed) self-pressurization experiment. A CFD model for cooling cryogenic storage tanks by spraying cold liquid in the ullage is also presented. The Euler- Lagrange approach is utilized for tracking the spray droplets and for modeling interaction between the droplets and the continuous phase (ullage). The spray model is coupled with the VOF (volume of fluid) model by performing particle tracking in the ullage, removing particles from the ullage when they reach the interface, and then adding their contributions to the liquid. Droplet ullage heat and mass transfer are modeled. The flow, temperature, and interfacial mass flux predicted by the model are presented. The ullage pressure is compared with experimental data obtained from the MHTB spray bar mixing experiment. The results of the models with only droplet/ullage heat transfer and with heat and mass transfer between the droplets and ullage are compared.

  9. Type-segregated aerosol effects on regional monsoon activity: A study using ground-based experiments and model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, K.; Devara, P. C. S.; Sonbawne, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Classification of observed aerosols into key types [e.g., clean-maritime (CM), desert-dust (DD), urban-industrial/biomass-burning (UI/BB), black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC) and mixed-type aerosols (MA)] would facilitate to infer aerosol sources, effects, and feedback mechanisms, not only to improve the accuracy of satellite retrievals but also to quantify the assessment of aerosol radiative impacts on climate. In this paper, we report the results of a study conducted in this direction, employing a Cimel Sun-sky radiometer at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune, India during 2008 and 2009, which represent two successive contrasting monsoon years. The study provided an observational evidence to show that the local sources are subject to heavy loading of absorbing aerosols (dust and black carbon), with strong seasonality closely linked to the monsoon annual rainfall cycle over Pune, a tropical urban station in India. The results revealed the absence of CM aerosols in the pre-monsoon as well as in the monsoon seasons of 2009 as opposed to 2008. Higher loading of dust aerosols is observed in the pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons of 2009; majority may be coated with fine BC aerosols from local emissions, leading to reduction in regional rainfall. Further, significant decrease in coarse-mode AOD and presence of carbonaceous aerosols, affecting the aerosol-cloud interaction and monsoon-rain processes via microphysics and dynamics, is considered responsible for the reduction in rainfall during 2009. Additionally, we discuss how optical depth, contributed by different types of aerosols, influences the distribution of monsoon rainfall over an urban region using the Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) aerosol reanalysis. Furthermore, predictions of the Dust REgional Atmospheric Model (DREAM) simulations combined with HYSPLIT (HYbrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) cluster model are also discussed in support of the

  10. GIFTS EDU Ground-based Measurement Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, W. L., Sr.; Zollinger, L. J.; Huppi, R. J.; Reisse, R. A.; Larar, A. M.; Liu, X.; Tansock, J. J., Jr.; Jensen, S. M.; Revercomb, H. E.; Feltz, W. F.; Bingham, G. E.

    2007-01-01

    Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) Engineering Demonstration Unit (EDU) is an imaging infrared spectrometer designed for atmospheric soundings. The EDU groundbased measurement experiment was held in Logan, Utah during September 2006 to demonstrate its extensive capabilities for geosynchronous and other applications.

  11. Preliminary results of simulation of hypo magnetic conditions and variations in energetic range of cosmic rays in ground-based experiments on plant objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belisheva, Natalia; Petrashova, Dina; Shchegolev, Boris

    The most dangerous for the astronauts and cosmonauts are the cosmic rays and drastic decrease of the tension of geomagnetic field (GMF) on the Earth orbit and in the open space. The tension in the interplanetary magnetic field is 10 nT, whereas the tension of GMF is 10 (4) nT on the Earth surface. We carried out the preliminary experiments for study the effects of hypo magnetic conditions and variations in energetic range of cosmic rays (CR) on the plant objects (Vigna radiata, Phaseolus vulgaris, Allium cepa and A. fistulosum, Cucumis sativis). GMF was weakened by using special shielding chamber made on the basis of the amorphous alloy magnetic material. The camera is able to weaken the GMF from 48 μT till 0.192 μT. Modulation of the energetic range of the neutron component of secondary CR was performed with using of the shielding by graphite and by paraffin. The influence of hypo magnetic field and the neutron intensity were studied on the germination of seeds, the growth, the length and the side branches of the roots in the experimental samples. We found that the sensitivity to the hypo magnetic field and to the variations in energetic range of neutrons can vary from object to object. For instance, exposure of the hypo magnetic field on black bean and mung bean stimulated the growth of the roots while do not affect on the white bean. Likewise sensitivity of Phaseolus vulgaris (black and white bean) and Vigna radiata (mung bean) to exposure of nucleon component of cosmic rays on the Earth's surface are differed. It was found that modification of energetic range of CR by using graphite shielding leads to a change in sign of correlation between the length of roots in all experimental samples and the nucleon component of CR compared with the control samples. This is evidence that physiology of biological objects significantly are modified in hypo magnetic environment, as well as under exposure of the CR in different energetic ranges during the space flights. Our

  12. SCENARIO AND TARGET SIMULATION FOR A GROUND BASED MULTIFUNCTION PHASED ARRAY RADAR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a scenario and target simulation which operates in non real-time to provide full closed-loop operation of the ground based multifunction phased array radar simulation system in support of ballistic missile defence experiments against countermeasure.By simulating the target scattering signature and dynamical signature,this scenario and target simulation provide re- alistic scenario source to evaluate the system performance of multifunction phased array radar,and the key algorithms verification and validation such as target tracking,multi-target imaging and target recognition.

  13. Experiments on a Ground-Based Tomographic Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoonyol Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development and experiment of three-dimensional image formation by using a ground-based tomographic synthetic aperture radar (GB-TomoSAR system. GB-TomoSAR formulates two-dimensional synthetic aperture by the motion of antennae, both in azimuth and vertical directions. After range compression, three-dimensional image focusing is performed by applying Deramp-FFT (Fast Fourier Transform algorithms, both in azimuth and vertical directions. Geometric and radiometric calibrations were applied to make an image cube, which is then projected into range-azimuth and range-vertical cross-sections for visualization. An experiment with a C-band GB-TomoSAR system with a scan length of 2.49 m and 1.86 m in azimuth and vertical-direction, respectively, shows distinctive three-dimensional radar backscattering of stable buildings and roads with resolutions similar to the theoretical values. Unstable objects such as trees and moving cars generate severe noise due to decorrelation during the eight-hour image-acquisition time.

  14. System Identification and Automatic Mass Balancing of Ground-Based Three-Axis Spacecraft Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    System Identification and Automatic Mass Balancing of Ground-Based Three-Axis Spacecraft Simulator Jae-Jun Kim∗ and Brij N. Agrawal † Department of...TITLE AND SUBTITLE System Identification and Automatic Mass Balancing of Ground-Based Three-Axis Spacecraft Simulator 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...and Dynamics, Vol. 20, No. 4, July-August 1997, pp. 625-632. 6Schwartz, J. L. and Hall, C. D., “ System Identification of a Spherical Air-Bearing

  15. Issues for Simulation of Galactic Cosmic Ray Exposures for Radiobiological Research at Ground Based Accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Hee Y Kim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available For research on the health risks of galactic cosmic rays (GCR ground-based accelerators have been used for radiobiology research with mono-energetic beams of single high charge, Z and energy, E (HZE particles. In this paper we consider the pros and cons of a GCR reference field at a particle accelerator. At the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL we have proposed a GCR simulator, which implements a new rapid switching mode and higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, in order to integrate multiple ions into a single simulation within hours or longer for chronic exposures. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, we performed extensive simulation studies using the stochastic transport code, GERMcode (GCR Event Risk Model to define a GCR reference field using 9 HZE particle beam-energy combinations each with a unique absorber thickness to provide fragmentation and 10 or more energies of proton and 4He beams. The reference field is shown to well represent the charge dependence of GCR dose in several energy bins behind shielding compared to a simulated GCR environment. However a more significant challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3 years in relation to simulations with animal models of human risks. We discuss issues in approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation with extended exposure of up to a few weeks using chronic or fractionation exposures. A kinetics model of HZE particle hit probabilities suggests that experimental simulations of several weeks will be needed to avoid high fluence rate artifacts, which places limitations on the experiments to be performed. Ultimately risk estimates are limited by theoretical understanding, and focus on improving understanding of mechanisms and development of experimental models to improve this understanding should remain the highest priority for space radiobiology

  16. A Guide to Designing Future Ground-based CMB Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, W. L.K. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Kavli Inst. for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Menlo, Park, CA (United States); Errard, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Dvorkin, C. [Inst. for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States); Kuo, C. L. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Kavli Inst. for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Menlo, Park, CA (United States); Lee, A. T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); McDonald, P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Slosar, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zahn, O. [Univ. of California, Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), CA (United States)

    2014-02-18

    In this follow-up work to the High Energy Physics Community Summer Study 2013 (HEP CSS 2013, a.k.a. Snowmass), we explore the scientific capabilities of a future Stage-IV Cosmic Microwave Background polarization experiment (CMB-S4) under various assumptions on detector count, resolution, and sky coverage. We use the Fisher matrix technique to calculate the expected uncertainties in cosmological parameters in vΛCDM that are especially relevant to the physics of fundamental interactions, including neutrino masses, effective number of relativistic species, dark-energy equation of state, dark-matter annihilation, and inflationary parameters. To further chart the landscape of future cosmology probes, we include forecasted results from the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) signal as measured by DESI to constrain parameters that would benefit from low redshift information. We find the following best 1-σ constraints: σ(Mv ) = 15 meV, σ(Neff ) = 0.0156, Dark energy Figure of Merit = 303, σ(pann) = 0.00588 x 3 x 10-26 cm3/s/GeV, σ( ΩK) = 0.00074, σ(ns) = 0.00110, σ( αs) = 0.00145, and σ(r) = 0.00009. We also detail the dependences of the parameter constraints on detector count, resolution, and sky coverage.

  17. BigBOSS: The Ground-Based Stage IV BAO Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlegel, David; Bebek, Chris; Heetderks, Henry; Ho, Shirley; Lampton, Michael; Levi, Michael; Mostek, Nick; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Perlmutter, Saul; Roe, Natalie; Sholl, Michael; Smoot, George; White, Martin; Dey, Arjun; Abraham, Tony; Jannuzi, Buell; Joyce, Dick; Liang, Ming; Merrill, Mike; Olsen, Knut; Salim, Samir

    2009-04-01

    The BigBOSS experiment is a proposed DOE-NSF Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment to study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure with an all-sky galaxy redshift survey. The project is designed to unlock the mystery of dark energy using existing ground-based facilities operated by NOAO. A new 4000-fiber R=5000 spectrograph covering a 3-degree diameter field will measure BAO and redshift space distortions in the distribution of galaxies and hydrogen gas spanning redshifts from 0.2< z< 3.5. The Dark Energy Task Force figure of merit (DETF FoM) for this experiment is expected to be equal to that of a JDEM mission for BAO with the lower risk and cost typical of a ground-based experiment.

  18. Application of Bayesian Neural Networks to Energy Reconstruction in EAS Experiments for ground-based TeV Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Ying; Lan, JieQin; Gao, WeiWei

    2016-01-01

    A toy detector array has been designed to simulate the detection of cosmic rays in Extended Air Shower(EAS) Experiments for ground-based TeV Astrophysics. The primary energies of protons from the Monte-Carlo simulation have been reconstructed by the algorithm of Bayesian neural networks (BNNs) and a standard method like the LHAASO experiment\\cite{lhaaso-ma}, respectively. The result of the energy reconstruction using BNNs has been compared with the one using the standard method. Compared to the standard method, the energy resolutions are significantly improved using BNNs. And the improvement is more obvious for the high energy protons than the low energy ones.

  19. Precision simulation of ground-based lensing data using observations from space

    CERN Document Server

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Leauthaud, Alexie; Massey, Richard J; Rhodes, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Current and upcoming wide-field, ground-based, broad-band imaging surveys promise to address a wide range of outstanding problems in galaxy formation and cosmology. Several such uses of ground-based data, especially weak gravitational lensing, require highly precise measurements of galaxy image statistics with careful correction for the effects of the point-spread function (PSF). In this paper, we introduce the SHERA (SHEar Reconvolution Analysis) software to simulate ground-based imaging data with realistic galaxy morphologies and observing conditions, starting from space-based data (from COSMOS, the Cosmological Evolution Survey) and accounting for the effects of the space-based PSF. This code simulates ground-based data, optionally with a weak lensing shear applied, in a model-independent way using a general Fourier space formalism. The utility of this pipeline is that it allows for a precise, realistic assessment of systematic errors due to the method of data processing, for example in extracting weak len...

  20. Simulation of the imaging quality of ground-based telescopes affected by atmospheric disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yubin; Kou, Songfeng; Gu, Bozhong

    2014-08-01

    Ground-based telescope imaging model is developed in this paper, the relationship between the atmospheric disturbances and the ground-based telescope image quality is studied. Simulation of the wave-front distortions caused by atmospheric turbulences has long been an important method in the study of the propagation of light through the atmosphere. The phase of the starlight wave-front is changed over time, but in an appropriate short exposure time, the atmospheric disturbances can be considered as "frozen". In accordance with Kolmogorov turbulence theory, simulating atmospheric disturbances of image model based on the phase screen distorted by atmospheric turbulences is achieved by the fast Fourier transform (FFT). Geiger mode avalanche photodiode array (APD arrays) model is used for atmospheric wave-front detection, the image is achieved by inversion method of photon counting after the target starlight goes through phase screens and ground-based telescopes. Ground-based telescope imaging model is established in this paper can accurately achieve the relationship between the quality of telescope imaging and monolayer or multilayer atmosphere disturbances, and it is great significance for the wave-front detection and optical correction in a Multi-conjugate Adaptive Optics system (MCAO).

  1. Zero-Gravity Locomotion Simulators: New Ground-Based Analogs for Microgravity Exercise Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perusek, Gail P.; DeWitt, John K.; Cavanagh, Peter R.; Grodsinsky, Carlos M.; Gilkey, Kelly M.

    2007-01-01

    Maintaining health and fitness in crewmembers during space missions is essential for preserving performance for mission-critical tasks. NASA's Exercise Countermeasures Project (ECP) provides space exploration exercise hardware and monitoring requirements that lead to devices that are reliable, meet medical, vehicle, and habitat constraints, and use minimal vehicle and crew resources. ECP will also develop and validate efficient exercise prescriptions that minimize daily time needed for completion of exercise yet maximize performance for mission activities. In meeting these mission goals, NASA Glenn Research Center (Cleveland, OH, USA), in collaboration with the Cleveland Clinic (Cleveland, Ohio, USA), has developed a suite of zero-gravity locomotion simulators and associated technologies to address the need for ground-based test analog capability for simulating in-flight (microgravity) and surface (partial-gravity) exercise to advance the health and safety of astronaut crews and the next generation of space explorers. Various research areas can be explored. These include improving crew comfort during exercise, and understanding joint kinematics and muscle activation pattern differences relative to external loading mechanisms. In addition, exercise protocol and hardware optimization can be investigated, along with characterizing system dynamic response and the physiological demand associated with advanced exercise device concepts and performance of critical mission tasks for Exploration class missions. Three zero-gravity locomotion simulators are currently in use and the research focus for each will be presented. All of the devices are based on a supine subject suspension system, which simulates a reduced gravity environment by completely or partially offloading the weight of the exercising test subject s body. A platform for mounting treadmill is positioned perpendicularly to the test subject. The Cleveland Clinic Zero-g Locomotion Simulator (ZLS) utilizes a

  2. Mixed-field GCR Simulations for Radiobiological Research Using Ground Based Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Rusek, Adam; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2014-01-01

    Space radiation is comprised of a large number of particle types and energies, which have differential ionization power from high energy protons to high charge and energy (HZE) particles and secondary neutrons produced by galactic cosmic rays (GCR). Ground based accelerators such as the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are used to simulate space radiation for radiobiology research and dosimetry, electronics parts, and shielding testing using mono-energetic beams for single ion species. As a tool to support research on new risk assessment models, we have developed a stochastic model of heavy ion beams and space radiation effects, the GCR Event-based Risk Model computer code (GERMcode). For radiobiological research on mixed-field space radiation, a new GCR simulator at NSRL is proposed. The NSRL-GCR simulator, which implements the rapid switching mode and the higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, can integrate multiple ions into a single simulation to create GCR Z-spectrum in major energy bins. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, a GCR reference field is proposed after extensive simulation studies using the GERMcode. The GCR reference field is shown to reproduce the Z and LET spectra of GCR behind shielding within 20% accuracy compared to simulated full GCR environments behind shielding. A major challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3-years in relation to simulations with cell and animal models of human risks. We discuss possible approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation with extended exposure of up to a few weeks and fractionation approaches at a GCR simulator.

  3. Critical Evaluation of the ISCCP Simulator Using Ground-Based Remote Sensing Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mace, G G; Houser, S; Benson, S; Klein, S A; Min, Q

    2009-11-02

    Given the known shortcomings in representing clouds in Global Climate Models (GCM) comparisons with observations are critical. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) diagnostic products provide global descriptions of cloud top pressure and column optical depth that extends over multiple decades. The necessary limitations of the ISCCP retrieval algorithm require that before comparisons can be made between model output and ISCCP results the model output must be modified to simulate what ISCCP would diagnose under the simulated circumstances. We evaluate one component of the so-called ISCCP simulator in this study by comparing ISCCP and a similar algorithm with various long-term statistics derived from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility ground-based remote sensors. We find that were a model to simulate the cloud radiative profile with the same accuracy as can be derived from the ARM data, then the likelihood of that occurrence being placed in the same cloud top pressure and optical depth bin as ISCCP of the 9 bins that have become standard ranges from 30% to 70% depending on optical depth. While the ISCCP simulator improved the agreement of cloud-top pressure between ground-based remote sensors and satellite observations, we find minor discrepancies due to the parameterization of cloud top pressure in the ISCCP simulator. The primary source of error seems to be related to discrepancies in visible optical depth that are not accounted for in the ISCCP simulator. We show that the optical depth discrepancies are largest when the assumptions necessary for plane parallel radiative transfer optical depths retrievals are violated.

  4. Precision in ground based solar polarimetry: Simulating the role of adaptive optics

    CERN Document Server

    Nagaraju, K

    2012-01-01

    Accurate measurement of polarization in spectral lines is important for the reliable inference of magnetic fields on the Sun. For ground based observations, polarimetric precision is severely limited by the presence of Earth's atmosphere. Atmospheric turbulence (seeing) produces signal fluctuations which combined with the non-simultaneous nature of the measurement process cause intermixing of the Stokes parameters known as seeing induced polarization cross-talk. Previous analysis of this effect (Judge et al., 2004) suggests that cross-talk is reduced not only with increase in modulation frequency but also by compensating the seeing induced image aberrations by an Adaptive Optics (AO) system. However, in those studies the effect of higher order image aberrations than those corrected by the AO system was not taken into account. We present in this paper an analysis of seeing induced cross-talk in the presence of higher order image aberrations through numerical simulation. In this analysis we find that the amount...

  5. Ground-based activities in preparation of SELENE ISS experiment on self-rewetting fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savino, R.; Abe, Y.; Castagnolo, D.; Celata, G. P.; Kabov, O.; Kawaji, M.; Sato, M.; Tanaka, K.; Thome, J. R.; Van Vaerenbergh, S.

    2011-12-01

    SELENE (SELf rewetting fluids for thermal ENErgy management) is a microgravity experiment proposed to the European Space Agency (ESA) in response to the Announcement of Opportunities for Physical Sciences. Main objectives of the microgravity research onboard ISS include the quantitative investigation of heat transfer performances of "self-rewetting fluids" and "nano self-rewetting fluids" in model heat pipes and validation of adequate theoretical and numerical modelling able to predict their behaviour in microgravity conditions. This article summarizes the results of ground-based research activities in preparation of the microgravity experiments. They include: 1) thermophysical properties measurements; 2) study of thermo-soluto-capillary effects in micro-channels; 3) numerical modelling; 4) thermal and concentration distribution measurements with optical (e.g. interferometric) and intrusive techniques; 5) surface tension-driven effects and thermal performances test on different capillary structures and heat pipes; 6) breadboards development and support to definition of scientific requirements.

  6. Bubble motion in a rotating liquid body. [ground based tests for space shuttle experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, P.; Subramanian, R. S.; Cole, R.

    1982-01-01

    The behavior of a single gas bubble inside a rotating liquid-filled sphere has been investigated analytically and experimentally as part of ground-based investigations aimed at aiding in the design and interpretation of Shuttle experiments. In the analysis, a quasi-static description of the motion of a bubble was developed in the limit of small values of the Taylor number. A series of rotation experiments using air bubbles and silicone oils were designed to match the conditions specified in the analysis, i.e., the bubble size, sphere rotation rate, and liquid kinematic viscosity were chosen such that the Taylor number was much less than unity. The analytical description predicts the bubble velocity and its asymptotic location. It is shown that the asymptotic position is removed from the axis of rotation.

  7. Ground-based acoustic parametric generator impact on the atmosphere and ionosphere in an active experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, Yuriy G.; Cheremnykh, Oleg K.; Koshovy, Volodymyr V.; Melnik, Mykola O.; Ivantyshyn, Oleh L.; Nogach, Roman T.; Selivanov, Yuriy A.; Grimalsky, Vladimir V.; Mezentsev, Valentyn P.; Karataeva, Larysa M.; Ivchenko, Vasyl. M.; Milinevsky, Gennadi P.; Fedun, Viktor N.; Tkachenko, Eugen N.

    2017-01-01

    We develop theoretical basics of active experiments with two beams of acoustic waves, radiated by a ground-based sound generator. These beams are transformed into atmospheric acoustic gravity waves (AGWs), which have parameters that enable them to penetrate to the altitudes of the ionospheric E and F regions where they influence the electron concentration of the ionosphere. Acoustic waves are generated by the ground-based parametric sound generator (PSG) at the two close frequencies. The main idea of the experiment is to design the output parameters of the PSG to build a cascade scheme of nonlinear wave frequency downshift transformations to provide the necessary conditions for their vertical propagation and to enable penetration to ionospheric altitudes. The PSG generates sound waves (SWs) with frequencies f1 = 600 and f2 = 625 Hz and large amplitudes (100-420 m s-1). Each of these waves is modulated with the frequency of 0.016 Hz. The novelty of the proposed analytical-numerical model is due to simultaneous accounting for nonlinearity, diffraction, losses, and dispersion and inclusion of the two-stage transformation (1) of the initial acoustic waves to the acoustic wave with the difference frequency Δf = f2 - f1 in the altitude ranges 0-0.1 km, in the strongly nonlinear regime, and (2) of the acoustic wave with the difference frequency to atmospheric acoustic gravity waves with the modulational frequency in the altitude ranges 0.1-20 km, which then reach the altitudes of the ionospheric E and F regions, in a practically linear regime. AGWs, nonlinearly transformed from the sound waves, launched by the two-frequency ground-based sound generator can increase the transparency of the ionosphere for the electromagnetic waves in HF (MHz) and VLF (kHz) ranges. The developed theoretical model can be used for interpreting an active experiment that includes the PSG impact on the atmosphere-ionosphere system, measurements of electromagnetic and acoustic fields, study of

  8. 3D visual analysis tool in support of the SANDF's growing ground based air defence simulation capability

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Duvenhage, B

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A 3D visual analysis tool has been developed to add value to the SANDF's growing Ground Based Air Defence (GBAD) System of Systems simulation capability. A time based XML interface between the simulation and analysis tool, via a TCP connection or a...

  9. Quantitative analysis results of CE-1 X-ray fluorescence spectrometer ground base experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Xing-Zhu; GAO Min; YANG Jia-Wei; WANG Huan-Yu; ZHANG Cheng-Mo; CHEN Yong; ZHANG Jia-Yu; PENG Wen-Xi; CAO Xue-Lei; LIANG Xiao-Hua; WANG Jin-Zhou

    2008-01-01

    As the nearest celestial body to the earth, the moon has become a hot spot again in astronomy field recently. The element analysis is a much important subject in many lunar projects. Remote X-ray spectrometry plays an important role in the geochemical exploration of the solar bodies. Because of th equasi-vacuum atmosphere on the moon, which has no absorption of X-ray, the X-ray fluorescence analysis is an effective way to determine the elemental abundance of lunar surface. The CE-1 X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (CE-1/XFS) aims to map the major elemental compositions on the lunar surface. This paper describes a method for quantitative analysis of elemental compositions. A series of ground base experiments are done to examine the capability of XFS. The obtained results, which show a reasonable agreement with the certified values at a 30% uncertainty level for major elements, are presented.

  10. Simulation of submillimetre atmospheric spectra for characterising potential ground-based remote sensing observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Emma C.; Withington, Stafford; Newnham, David A.; Wadhams, Peter; Jones, Anna E.; Clancy, Robin

    2016-11-01

    The submillimetre is an understudied region of the Earth's atmospheric electromagnetic spectrum. Prior technological gaps and relatively high opacity due to the prevalence of rotational water vapour lines at these wavelengths have slowed progress from a ground-based remote sensing perspective; however, emerging superconducting detector technologies in the fields of astronomy offer the potential to address key atmospheric science challenges with new instrumental methods. A site study, with a focus on the polar regions, is performed to assess theoretical feasibility by simulating the downwelling (zenith angle = 0°) clear-sky submillimetre spectrum from 30 mm (10 GHz) to 150 µm (2000 GHz) at six locations under annual mean, summer, winter, daytime, night-time and low-humidity conditions. Vertical profiles of temperature, pressure and 28 atmospheric gases are constructed by combining radiosonde, meteorological reanalysis and atmospheric chemistry model data. The sensitivity of the simulated spectra to the choice of water vapour continuum model and spectroscopic line database is explored. For the atmospheric trace species hypobromous acid (HOBr), hydrogen bromide (HBr), perhydroxyl radical (HO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) the emission lines producing the largest change in brightness temperature are identified. Signal strengths, centre frequencies, bandwidths, estimated minimum integration times and maximum receiver noise temperatures are determined for all cases. HOBr, HBr and HO2 produce brightness temperature peaks in the mK to µK range, whereas the N2O peaks are in the K range. The optimal submillimetre remote sensing lines for the four species are shown to vary significantly between location and scenario, strengthening the case for future hyperspectral instruments that measure over a broad wavelength range. The techniques presented here provide a framework that can be applied to additional species of interest and taken forward to simulate retrievals and guide the

  11. Complementing the ground-based CMB Stage-4 experiment on large scales with the PIXIE satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Calabrese, Erminia; Dunkley, Jo

    2016-01-01

    We present forecasts for cosmological parameters from future Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data measured by the Stage-4 (S4) generation of ground-based experiments in combination with large-scale anisotropy data from the PIXIE satellite. We demonstrate the complementarity of the two experiments and focus on science targets that benefit from their combination. We show that a cosmic-variance-limited measurement of the optical depth to reionization provided by PIXIE, with error $\\sigma(\\tau)=0.002$, is vital for enabling a 5$\\sigma$ detection of the sum of the neutrino masses when combined with a CMB-S4 lensing measurement, and with lower-redshift constraints on the growth of structure and the distance-redshift relation. Parameters characterizing the epoch of reionization will also be tightly constrained; PIXIE's $\\tau$ constraint converts into $\\sigma(\\rm{z_{re}})=0.2$ for the mean time of reionization, and a kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich measurement from S4 gives $\\sigma(\\Delta \\rm{z_{re}})=0.03$ for the du...

  12. Ground-based aerosol characterization during the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, J.; Rizzo, L. V.; Morgan, W. T.; Coe, H.; Johnson, B.; Haywood, J.; Longo, K.; Freitas, S.; Andreae, M. O.; Artaxo, P.

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigates the physical and chemical characteristics of aerosols at ground level at a site heavily impacted by biomass burning. The site is located near Porto Velho, Rondônia, in the southwestern part of the Brazilian Amazon rainforest, and was selected for the deployment of a large suite of instruments, among them an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor. Our measurements were made during the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment, which consisted of a combination of aircraft and ground-based measurements over Brazil, aimed to investigate the impacts of biomass burning emissions on climate, air quality, and numerical weather prediction over South America. The campaign took place during the dry season and the transition to the wet season in September/October 2012. During most of the campaign, the site was impacted by regional biomass burning pollution (average CO mixing ratio of 0.6 ppm), occasionally superimposed by intense (up to 2 ppm of CO), freshly emitted biomass burning plumes. Aerosol number concentrations ranged from ~1000 cm-3 to peaks of up to 35 000 cm-3 (during biomass burning (BB) events, corresponding to an average submicron mass mean concentrations of 13.7 μg m-3 and peak concentrations close to 100 μg m-3. Organic aerosol strongly dominated the submicron non-refractory composition, with an average concentration of 11.4 μg m-3. The inorganic species, NH4, SO4, NO3, and Cl, were observed, on average, at concentrations of 0.44, 0.34, 0.19, and 0.01 μg m-3, respectively. Equivalent black carbon (BCe) ranged from 0.2 to 5.5 μg m-3, with an average concentration of 1.3 μg m-3. During BB peaks, organics accounted for over 90% of total mass (submicron non-refractory plus BCe), among the highest values described in the literature. We examined the ageing of biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) using the changes in the H : C and O : C ratios, and found that throughout most of the aerosol processing (O : C ≅ 0

  13. Ground based aerosol characterization during the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA field experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brito

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the physical and chemical characteristics of aerosols at ground level at a site heavily impacted by biomass burning. The site is located near Porto Velho, Rondônia, in the Southwestern part of the Brazilian Amazon forest, and was selected for the deployment of a large suite of instruments, among them an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor. Our measurements were made during the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA field experiment, which consisted of a combination of aircraft and ground based measurements over Brazil, aiming to investigate the impacts of biomass burning emissions on climate, air quality, and numerical weather prediction over South America. The campaign took place during the dry season and the transition to the wet season in September/October 2012. During most of the campaign, the site was impacted by regional biomass burning pollution (average CO mixing ratio of 0.6 ppm, occasionally superimposed by intense (up to 2 ppm of CO, freshly emitted biomass burning plumes. Aerosol number concentrations ranged from ∼1000 cm−3 to peaks of up to 35 000 cm−3 during biomass burning (BB events, corresponding to an average submicron mass mean concentrations of 13.7 μg m−3 and peak concentrations close to 100 μg m−3. Organic aerosol strongly dominated the submicron non-refractory composition, with an average concentration of 11.4 μg m−3. The inorganic species, NH4, SO4, NO3, and Cl, were observed on average at concentrations of 0.44, 0.34, 0.19, and 0.01 μg m−3, respectively. Equivalent Black Carbon (BCe ranged from 0.2 to 5.5 μg m−3, with an average concentration of 1.3 μg m−3. During BB peaks, organics accounted for over 90% of total mass (submicron non-refractory plus BCe, among the highest values described in the literature. We examined the ageing of Biomass Burning Organic Aerosol (BBOA using the changes in the H : C and O : C ratios, and found that throughout most of the aerosol

  14. Solar tower atmospheric Cherenkov effect experiment (STACEE) for ground based gamma ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, D.; Chantell, M. C.; Coppi, P.; Covault, C. E.; Dragovan, M.; Gregorich, D. T.; Hanna, D. S.; Mukherjee, R.; Ong, R. A.; Oser, S.; Ragan, K.; Tümer, O. T.; Williams, D. A.

    1997-05-01

    The STACEE experiment is being developed to study very high energy astrophysical gamma rays between 50 and 500 GeV. During the last few years this previously unexplored region has received much attention due to the detection of sources up to about 10 GeV by the EGRET instrument on board the CGRO. However, the paucity of detected sources at ~1 TeV indicates that fundamental processes working within these sources and/or in the intergalactic space are responsible for the cutoff in the photon spectra of the EGRET sources. The cutoff or the spectral change of these sources can be observed with ground-based Cherenkov detectors with a very low threshold. The use of large arrays of mirrors at solar power facilities is a promising way of lowering the threshold. Using this concept a series of tests were conducted at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) at Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque, NM) with a full size prototype of the STACEE telescope system. The tests show that STACEE will be capable of meaningful exploration of the gamma-ray sky between 50 and 500 GeV with good sensitivity.

  15. Ground-Based Phase of Spaceflight Experiment "Biosignal" Using Autonomic Microflurimeter "Fluor-K"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorieva, O. V.; Gal'chuk, S. V.; Rudimov, E. G.; Buravkova, L. B.

    2013-02-01

    The majority of flight experiments with the use of cell cultures and equipment like KUBIK and CRIOGEM carried out on board of the satellites (Bion, Foton) and ISS only allows the after-flight biosamples to be analyzed. As far as with few exceptions, the real-time cellular parameters registration for a long period is hard to be implemented. We developed the "Fluor-K" equipment - precision, small-sized, autonomous, two-channel, programmed fluorimeter. This device is designed for registration of differential fluorescent signal from organic and non-organic objects of microscale in small volumes (cellular organelles suspensions, animal and human cells, unicellular algae, bacteria, various fluorescent colloid solutions). Beside that, "Fluor-K" allows simultaneous detection of temperature. The ground-based tests of the device proved successful. The developed software can support experimental schedules while real-time data registration with the built-in storage device allows changes in selected parameters to be analyzed using wide range of fluorescent probes.

  16. Solidification kinetics of a Cu-Zr alloy: ground-based and microgravity experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galenko, P. K.; Hanke, R.; Paul, P.; Koch, S.; Rettenmayr, M.; Gegner, J.; Herlach, D. M.; Dreier, W.; Kharanzhevski, E. V.

    2017-04-01

    Experimental and theoretical results obtained in the MULTIPHAS-project (ESA-European Space Agency and DLR-German Aerospace Center) are critically discussed regarding solidification kinetics of congruently melting and glass forming Cu50Zr50 alloy samples. The samples are investigated during solidification using a containerless technique in the Electromagnetic Levitation Facility [1]. Applying elaborated methodologies for ground-based and microgravity experimental investigations [2], the kinetics of primary dendritic solidification is quantitatively evaluated. Electromagnetic Levitator in microgravity (parabolic flights and on board of the International Space Station) and Electrostatic Levitator on Ground are employed. The solidification kinetics is determined using a high-speed camera and applying two evaluation methods: “Frame by Frame” (FFM) and “First Frame - Last Frame” (FLM). In the theoretical interpretation of the solidification experiments, special attention is given to the behavior of the cluster structure in Cu50Zr50 samples with the increase of undercooling. Experimental results on solidification kinetics are interpreted using a theoretical model of diffusion controlled dendrite growth.

  17. Preservation of Multiple Mammalian Tissues to Maximize Science Return from Ground Based and Spaceflight Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungshin; Ray, Hami E; Lai, San-Huei; Alwood, Joshua S; Globus, Ruth K

    2016-01-01

    Even with recent scientific advancements, challenges posed by limited resources and capabilities at the time of sample dissection continue to limit the collection of high quality tissues from experiments that can be conducted only infrequently and at high cost, such as in space. The resources and time it takes to harvest tissues post-euthanasia, and the methods and duration of long duration storage, potentially have negative impacts on sample quantity and quality, thereby limiting the scientific outcome that can be achieved. The goals of this study were to optimize methods for both sample recovery and science return from rodent experiments, with possible relevance to both ground based and spaceflight studies. The first objective was to determine the impacts of tissue harvest time post-euthanasia, preservation methods, and storage duration, focusing on RNA quality and enzyme activities in liver and spleen as indices of sample quality. The second objective was to develop methods that will maximize science return by dissecting multiple tissues after long duration storage in situ at -80°C. Tissues of C57Bl/6J mice were dissected and preserved at various time points post-euthanasia and stored at -80°C for up to 11 months. In some experiments, tissues were recovered from frozen carcasses which had been stored at -80°C up to 7 months. RNA quantity and quality was assessed by measuring RNA Integrity Number (RIN) values using an Agilent Bioanalyzer. Additionally, the quality of tissues was assessed by measuring activities of hepatic enzymes (catalase, glutathione reductase and GAPDH). Fresh tissues were collected up to one hour post-euthanasia, and stored up to 11 months at -80°C, with minimal adverse effects on the RNA quality of either livers or RNAlater-preserved spleens. Liver enzyme activities were similar to those of positive controls, with no significant effect observed at any time point. Tissues dissected from frozen carcasses that had been stored for up to 7

  18. Vertical profiling of atmospheric refractivity using GPS STD data from a single ground-based station: Simulations and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zus, F.; Dick, G.; Heise, S.; Wickert, J.; Ramatschi, M.

    2013-12-01

    We developed a ray-tracing operator to compute the signal travel time delay due to the neutral atmosphere, known as Slant Total Delay (STD), between a GPS satellite and a ground-based receiving station. Having developed a rapid and precise forward operator we constructed the tangent-linear (adjoint) operator to estimate refractivity in the vicinity of a single station. The refractivity retrievals potentially complement refractivity retrievals from radio occultation data and can be considered a valuable input for Numerical Weather Prediction. In a first experiment (simulation) we study the feasibility for vertical profiling of refractivity using STDs from a single station. The simulation cycle consists of the computation of STDs given a refractivity profile, the addition of noise to mimic observation errors and the retrieval of a refractivity profile from the artificial STDs by a non-linear least-square analysis. Clearly, besides the noise level, the elevation range plays an important role regarding the quality of the refractivity retrieval; near-horizon STDs corrupted by noise allow a significantly better refractivity retrieval than STDs close to the zenith without any noise. The simulation study suggests that near-horizon STDs provide additional information when compared to Zenith Total Delays (ZTDs). In a second experiment (application) we replace the artificial STDs in the simulation by STDs retrieved from GPS phase-observations. The procedure is repeated station-by-station for 200 stations in Germany. We do not find a significant benefit from STDs over ZTDs in the retrieved refractivity profile since near-horizon STDs are rarely available and representative errors due to asymmetry are non-negligable. We attempt to mitigate the latter problem by the additional estimation of horizontal gradients, and indeed, we find strong evidence that STDs retrieved from GPS phase-observations contain asymmetric information. The former problem still poses a serious limitation

  19. Observation of TGFs onboard "Vernov" satellite and TGEs in ground-based experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolov, Vitaly; Panasyuk, Mikhail; Svertilov, Sergey; Garipov, Gali; Iyudin, Anatoly; Klimov, Pavel; Morozenko, Violetta; Maximov, Ivan; Mishieva, Tatiana; Klimov, Stanislav; Pozanenko, Alexey; Rothkaehl, Hanna

    2016-04-01

    "Vernov" satellite with RELEC experiment on-board was launched on 2014 July, 8 into a polar solar-synchronous orbit. The payload includes DRGE gamma-ray spectrometer providing measurements in 10-3000 keV energy range with four detectors directed to atmosphere. Total area of DRGE detectors is ~500 cm2. The data were recorded both in monitoring and gamma by gamma modes with timing accuracy ~15 us. Several TGF candidates with 10-40 gammas in a burst with duration instruments on-board "Vernov" satellite shows the absence of significant electromagnetic pulses around correspondent time moments. Comparison with WWLLN lightning network data base also indicates that there were no thunderstorms connected with most of detected TGF candidates. Possible connection of these flashes with electron precipitations is discussed. Ground-based experiments, with similar gamma-spectrometers were conducted, to study the spectral, temporal and spatial characteristics of TGEs in 20-3000 keV energy range, as well, as to search the fast hard X-ray and gamma-ray flashes possibly appearing at the moment of lightning. The time of each gamma-quantum interaction was recorded with an ~15 us s accuracy together with detailed spectral data. Measurements were done on the ground at Moscow region, and at mountain altitude in Armenia at Aragatz station. During the time interval covering spring, summer and autumn of 2015 a number of TGEs were detected. Measured low-energy gamma-ray spectra usually contain a set of lines that can be interpreted as radiation of Rn-222 daughter isotopes. The increase of Rn-222 radiation was detected during rainfalls with thunderstorm, as well, as during rainy weather without thunderstorms. Variations of Rn-222 radiation dominate at low energies (measure low energy gamma-radiation from the electrons accelerated in thunderclouds. There were no significant flashes with duration of ~1ms detected in coincidence with a nearby lightnings.

  20. Radiometric modeling and calibration of the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) ground based measurement experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jialin; Smith, William L.; Gazarik, Michael J.

    2008-12-01

    The ultimate remote sensing benefits of the high resolution Infrared radiance spectrometers will be realized with their geostationary satellite implementation in the form of imaging spectrometers. This will enable dynamic features of the atmosphere's thermodynamic fields and pollutant and greenhouse gas constituents to be observed for revolutionary improvements in weather forecasts and more accurate air quality and climate predictions. As an important step toward realizing this application objective, the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) Engineering Demonstration Unit (EDU) was successfully developed under the NASA New Millennium Program, 2000-2006. The GIFTS-EDU instrument employs three focal plane arrays (FPAs), which gather measurements across the long-wave IR (LWIR), short/mid-wave IR (SMWIR), and visible spectral bands. The GIFTS calibration is achieved using internal blackbody calibration references at ambient (260 K) and hot (286 K) temperatures. In this paper, we introduce a refined calibration technique that utilizes Principle Component (PC) analysis to compensate for instrument distortions and artifacts, therefore, enhancing the absolute calibration accuracy. This method is applied to data collected during the GIFTS Ground Based Measurement (GBM) experiment, together with simultaneous observations by the accurately calibrated AERI (Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer), both simultaneously zenith viewing the sky through the same external scene mirror at ten-minute intervals throughout a cloudless day at Logan Utah on September 13, 2006. The accurately calibrated GIFTS radiances are produced using the first four PC scores in the GIFTS-AERI regression model. Temperature and moisture profiles retrieved from the PC-calibrated GIFTS radiances are verified against radiosonde measurements collected throughout the GIFTS sky measurement period. Using the GIFTS GBM calibration model, we compute the calibrated radiances from data

  1. Study of two-phase flows in reduced gravity using ground based experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasavada, S.; Ishii, M. [Purdue University, School of Nuclear Engineering, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Sun, X. [Ohio State University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Columbus, OH (United States); Duval, W. [NASA Glenn Research Center, Fluid Physics and Transport Branch, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Experimental studies have been carried out to support the development of a framework of the two-fluid model along with an interfacial area transport equation applicable to reduced gravity two-phase flows. The experimental study simulates the reduced gravity condition in ground based facilities by using two immiscible liquids of similar density namely, water as the continuous phase and Therminol 59 {sup registered} as the dispersed phase. We have acquired a total of eleven data sets in the bubbly flow and bubbly to slug flow transition regimes. These flow conditions have area-averaged void (volume) fractions ranging from 3 to 30% and channel Reynolds number for the continuous phase between 2,900 and 8,800. Flow visualization has been performed and a flow regime map developed which is compared with relevant bubbly to slug flow regime transition criteria. The comparison shows that the transition boundary is well predicted by the criterion based on critical void fraction. The value of the critical void fraction at transition was experimentally determined to be approximately 25%. In addition, important two-phase flow local parameters, including the void fraction, interfacial area concentration, droplet number frequency and droplet velocity, have been acquired at two axial locations using state-of-the-art multi-sensor conductivity probe. The radial profiles and axial development of the two-phase flow parameters show that the coalescence mechanism is enhanced by either increasing the continuous or dispersed phase Reynolds number. Evidence of turbulence induced particle interaction mechanism is highlighted. The data presented in this paper clearly show the marked differences in terms of bubble (droplet) size, phase distribution and phase interaction in two-phase flow between normal and reduced gravity conditions. (orig.)

  2. BIOMEX (Biology and Mars Experiment): Preliminary results on Antarctic black cryptoendolithic fungi in ground based experiments

    OpenAIRE

    C. Pacelli; Selbmann, L.; S. Onofri; de Vera, J.P.P.

    2014-01-01

    The main goal for astrobiologists is to find traces of present or past life in extraterrestrial environment or in meteorites. Biomolecules, such as lipids, pigments or polysaccharides, may be useful to establish the presence of extant or extinct life (Simoneit, B et al., 1998). BIOMEX (Biology and Mars Experiment) aims to measure to what extent biomolecules, such as pigments and cellular components, preserve their stability under space and Mars-like conditions. The experiment has just been la...

  3. ARADISH - Development of a Standardized Plant Growth Chamber for Experiments in Gravitational Biology Using Ground Based Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüler, Oliver; Krause, Lars; Görög, Mark; Hauslage, Jens; Kesseler, Leona; Böhmer, Maik; Hemmersbach, Ruth

    2016-06-01

    Plant development strongly relies on environmental conditions. Growth of plants in Biological Life Support Systems (BLSS), which are a necessity to allow human survival during long-term space exploration missions, poses a particular problem for plant growth, as in addition to the traditional environmental factors, microgravity (or reduced gravity such as on Moon or Mars) and limited gas exchange hamper plant growth. Studying the effects of reduced gravity on plants requires real or simulated microgravity experiments under highly standardized conditions, in order to avoid the influence of other environmental factors. Analysis of a large number of biological replicates, which is necessary for the detection of subtle phenotypical differences, can so far only be achieved in Ground Based Facilities (GBF). Besides different experimental conditions, the usage of a variety of different plant growth chambers was a major factor that led to a lack of reproducibility and comparability in previous studies. We have developed a flexible and customizable plant growth chamber, called ARAbidopsis DISH (ARADISH), which allows plant growth from seed to seedling, being realized in a hydroponic system or on Agar. By developing a special holder, the ARADISH can be used for experiments with Arabidopsis thaliana or a plant with a similar habitus on common GBF hardware, including 2D clinostats and Random Positioning Machines (RPM). The ARADISH growth chamber has a controlled illumination system of red and blue light emitting diodes (LED), which allows the user to apply defined light conditions. As a proof of concept we tested a prototype in a proteomic experiment in which plants were exposed to simulated microgravity or a 90° stimulus. We optimized the design and performed viability tests after several days of growth in the hardware that underline the utility of ARADISH in microgravity research.

  4. Ground-based aerosol characterization during the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA field experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brito

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the physical and chemical characteristics of aerosols at ground level at a site heavily impacted by biomass burning. The site is located near Porto Velho, Rondônia, in the southwestern part of the Brazilian Amazon rainforest, and was selected for the deployment of a large suite of instruments, among them an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor. Our measurements were made during the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA field experiment, which consisted of a combination of aircraft and ground-based measurements over Brazil, aimed to investigate the impacts of biomass burning emissions on climate, air quality, and numerical weather prediction over South America. The campaign took place during the dry season and the transition to the wet season in September/October 2012. During most of the campaign, the site was impacted by regional biomass burning pollution (average CO mixing ratio of 0.6 ppm, occasionally superimposed by intense (up to 2 ppm of CO, freshly emitted biomass burning plumes. Aerosol number concentrations ranged from ~1000 cm−3 to peaks of up to 35 000 cm−3 (during biomass burning (BB events, corresponding to an average submicron mass mean concentrations of 13.7 μg m−3 and peak concentrations close to 100 μg m−3. Organic aerosol strongly dominated the submicron non-refractory composition, with an average concentration of 11.4 μg m−3. The inorganic species, NH4, SO4, NO3, and Cl, were observed, on average, at concentrations of 0.44, 0.34, 0.19, and 0.01 μg m−3, respectively. Equivalent black carbon (BCe ranged from 0.2 to 5.5 μg m−3, with an average concentration of 1.3 μg m−3. During BB peaks, organics accounted for over 90% of total mass (submicron non-refractory plus BCe, among the highest values described in the literature. We examined the ageing of biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA using the changes in the H : C and O : C ratios, and found that throughout most of the

  5. Ground-based experiments complement microgravity flight opportunities in the investigation of the effects of space flight on the immune response: is protein kinase C gravity sensitive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapes, S. K.; Woods, K. M.; Armstrong, J. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    This manuscript briefly reviews ground-based and flight experiments, discusses how those experiments complement each other, and details how those experiments lead us to speculate about the gravity-sensitive nature of protein kinase C.

  6. Dust aerosol characterization and transport features based on combined ground-based, satellite and model-simulated data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, K.; Devara, P. C. S.; Rao, S. Vijaya Bhaskara; Jayasankar, C. K.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study aerosol characteristics over an urban station in Western India, during a dust event that occurred between 19 and 26 March 2012, with the help of ground-based and satellite measurements and model simulation data. The aerosol parameters are found to change significantly during dust events and they suggest dominance of coarse mode aerosols. The fine mode fraction, size distribution and single scattering albedo reveal that dust (natural) aerosols dominate the anthropogenic aerosols over the study region. Ground-based measurements show drastic reduction in visibility on the dust-laden day (22 March 2012). Additionally, HYSPLIT model and satellite daily data have been used to trace the source, path and spatial extent of dust storm events. Most of the dust aerosols, during the study period, travel from west-to-east pathway from source-to-sink region. Furthermore, aerosol vertical profiles from CALIPSO and synoptic meteorological parameters from ECMWF re-analysis data reveal a layer of thick dust extending from surface to an altitude of about 4 km, and decrease in temperature and increase in specific humidity, respectively. The aerosol radiative forcing calculations indicate more cooling at the surface and warming in the atmosphere during dust event. The results of satellite observations are found to have good consistency with ground-based air quality measurements. Synthesis of satellite data integrated with ground-based observations, supplemented by model analysis, is found to be a promising technique for improved understanding of dust storm phenomenon and its impact on regional climate.

  7. High resolution surface solar radiation patterns over Eastern Mediterranean: Satellite, ground-based, reanalysis data and radiative transfer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandri, G.; Georgoulias, A.; Meleti, C.; Balis, D.

    2013-12-01

    Surface solar radiation (SSR) and its long and short term variations play a critical role in the modification of climate and by extent of the social and financial life of humans. Thus, SSR measurements are of primary importance. SSR is measured for decades from ground-based stations for specific spots around the planet. During the last decades, satellite observations allowed for the assessment of the spatial variability of SSR at a global as well as regional scale. In this study, a detailed spatiotemporal view of the SSR over Eastern Mediterranean is presented at a high spatial resolution. Eastern Mediterranean is affected by various aerosol types (continental, sea, dust and biomass burning particles) and encloses countries with significant socioeconomical changes during the last decades. For the aims of this study, SSR data from satellites (Climate Monitoring Satellite Application Facility - CM SAF) and our ground station in Thessaloniki, a coastal city of ~1 million inhabitants in northern Greece, situated in the heart of Eastern Mediterranean (Eppley Precision pyranometer and Kipp & Zonen CM-11 pyranometer) are used in conjunction with radiative transfer simulations (Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer - SBDART). The CM SAF dataset used here includes monthly mean SSR observations at a high spatial resolution of 0.03x0.03 degrees for the period 1983-2005. Our ground-based SSR observations span from 1983 until today. SBDART radiative transfer simulations were implemented for a number of spots in the area of study in order to calculate the SSR. High resolution (level-2) aerosol and cloud data from MODIS TERRA and AQUA satellite sensors were used as input, as well as ground-based data from the AERONET. Data from other satellites (Earth Probe TOMS, OMI, etc) and reanalysis projects (ECMWF) were used where needed. The satellite observations, the ground-based measurements and the model estimates are validated against each other. The good agreement

  8. Ground-based simulation of the Earth's upper atmosphere oxygen impact on polymer composites with nanosized fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, Lev; Chernik, Vladimir; Voronina, Ekaterina; Chechenin, Nikolay; Samokhina, Maria S.; Bondarenko, Gennady G.; Gaidar, Anna I.; Vorobyeva, Ekaterina A.; Petrov, Dmitrii V.; Chirskaya, Natalia P.

    The improvement of durability of polymer composites to the space environment impact is a very important task because these materials are considered currently as very promising type of materials for aerospace engineering. By embedding various nanosized fillers into a polymer matrix it is possible to obtain composites with required mechanical, thermal, electrical and optic properties. However, while developing such materials for operation in low Earth orbits (LEO), it is necessary to study thoroughly their durability to the impact of atomic oxygen (AO) of the Earth’s upper atmosphere, because AO is the main factor that causes erosion and damage of spacecraft surface materials in LEO. Ground-based simulation of AO impact on polymer composites was performed on a magnetoplasmadynamic accelerator developed at Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University. Polymer composite samples which were prepared as films of 30-50 mum thickness with different amount (3-20 wt%) of various inorganic and organic nanofillers including nanoparticles of metal oxides and carbides as well as polyethoxysiloxanes and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), were exposed to hyperthermal AO flow, and mass losses of samples were estimated. Changes in the structure of composite surface and in material optical properties were studied. The experiments demonstrated that embedding nanosized fillers into a polymer matrix can significantly reduced mass losses, and the good dispersion of fillers improves AO durability in comparison with initial polymers [1]. The computer simulation within the developed 2D Monte-Carlo model demonstrated a good agreement with the experimental data [2]. Special attention was given to the study of AO impact on aligned multiwalled CNTs and CNT-based composites [3]. Some results of computer simulation of hyperthermal oxygen atom interaction with CNT and graphene as well as with polymers are presented to discuss elementary processes which occur in nanostructures

  9. Passive Microwave Soil Moisture Retrieval through Combined Radar/Radiometer Ground Based Simulator with Special Reference to Dielectric Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Prashant K., ,, Dr.; O'Neill, Peggy, ,, Dr.

    2014-05-01

    Soil moisture is an important element for weather and climate prediction, hydrological sciences, and applications. Hence, measurements of this hydrologic variable are required to improve our understanding of hydrological processes, ecosystem functions, and the linkages between the Earth's water, energy, and carbon cycles (Srivastava et al. 2013). The retrieval of soil moisture depends not only on parameterizations in the retrieval algorithm but also on the soil dielectric mixing models used (Behari 2005). Although a number of soil dielectric mixing models have been developed, testing these models for soil moisture retrieval has still not been fully explored, especially with SMAP-like simulators. The main objective of this work focuses on testing different dielectric models for soil moisture retrieval using the Combined Radar/Radiometer (ComRAD) ground-based L-band simulator developed jointly by NASA/GSFC and George Washington University (O'Neill et al., 2006). The ComRAD system was deployed during a field experiment in 2012 in order to provide long active/passive measurements of two crops under controlled conditions during an entire growing season. L-band passive data were acquired at a look angle of 40 degree from nadir at both horizontal & vertical polarization. Currently, there are many dielectric models available for soil moisture retrieval; however, four dielectric models (Mironov, Dobson, Wang & Schmugge and Hallikainen) were tested here and found to be promising for soil moisture retrieval (some with higher performances). All the above-mentioned dielectric models were integrated with Single Channel Algorithms using H (SCA-H) and V (SCA-V) polarizations for the soil moisture retrievals. All the ground-based observations were collected from test site-United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) OPE3, located a few miles away from NASA GSFC. Ground truth data were collected using a theta probe and in situ sensors which were then used for validation. Analysis

  10. Temporal dynamics of the gut microbiota in people sharing a confined environment, a 520-day ground-based space simulation, MARS500

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Silvia Turroni; Simone Rampelli; Elena Biagi; Clarissa Consolandi; Marco Severgnini; Clelia Peano; Sara Quercia; Matteo Soverini; Franck G Carbonero; Giovanna Bianconi; Petra Rettberg; Francesco Canganella; Patrizia Brigidi; Marco Candela

    2017-01-01

    .... Results The MARS500 project, the longest ground-based space simulation ever, provided us with a unique opportunity to trace the crew microbiota over 520 days of isolated confinement, such as that...

  11. Instrumentation for Ground-Based Testing in Simulated Space and Planetary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiman, Jacob; Horodetsky, Sergey; Issoupov, Vitali

    This paper is an overview of instrumentation developed and created by ITL Inc. for simulated testing and performance evaluation of spacecraft materials, structures, mechanisms, assemblies and components in different space and planetary environments. The LEO Space Environment Simulator allows simulation of the synergistic effect of ultra-high vacuum conditions, 5 eV neutral atomic oxygen beams, Vacuum-Ultraviolet (VUV) and Near-Ultraviolet (NUV) radiation, and temperature conditions. The simulated space environmental conditions can be controlled in-situ using a quadruple mass-spectrometer, Time-of-Flight technique, as well as Quartz Crystal Microbalance sensors. The new NUV System is capable of delivering an NUV power intensity of up to 10 Equivalent Suns. The design of the system uses horizontal orientation of the 5 kW Mercury lamp, focusing of NUV radiation is achieved due to a parabolic reflector. To address the Lunar/Martian surface environments, the Planetary Environmental Simulator/Test Facility has been developed and built to allow for physical evaluation of the effects of the Lunar/Martian dust environments in conjunction with other factors (ultra-high vacuum or planetary atmospheric conditions, VUV/NUV radiation, thermal cycling, and darkness). The ASTM E 595/ASTM E 1559 Outgassing Test Facility provides the means for the outgassing test of materials with the objective to select materials with low outgassing properties for spacecraft use and allows to determine the following outgassing parameters: Total Mass Loss, Collected Volatile Condensable Materials, and Water Vapor Regained.

  12. Evaluation of Radar Vegetation Indices for Vegetation Water Content Estimation Using Data from a Ground-Based SMAP Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Prashant K.; O'Neill, Peggy; Cosh, Michael; Lang, Roger; Joseph, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Vegetation water content (VWC) is an important component of microwave soil moisture retrieval algorithms. This paper aims to estimate VWC using L band active and passive radar/radiometer datasets obtained from a NASA ground-based Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) simulator known as ComRAD (Combined Radar/Radiometer). Several approaches to derive vegetation information from radar and radiometer data such as HH, HV, VV, Microwave Polarization Difference Index (MPDI), HH/VV ratio, HV/(HH+VV), HV/(HH+HV+VV) and Radar Vegetation Index (RVI) are tested for VWC estimation through a generalized linear model (GLM). The overall analysis indicates that HV radar backscattering could be used for VWC content estimation with highest performance followed by HH, VV, MPDI, RVI, and other ratios.

  13. Experiments Using a Ground-Based Electrostatic Levitator and Numerical Modeling of Melt Convection for the Iron-Cobalt System in Support of Space Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghyun; SanSoucie, Michael P.

    2017-08-01

    Materials research is being conducted using an electromagnetic levitator installed in the International Space Station. Various metallic alloys were tested to elucidate unknown links among the structures, processes, and properties. To accomplish the mission of these space experiments, several ground-based activities have been carried out. This article presents some of our ground-based supporting experiments and numerical modeling efforts. Mass evaporation of Fe50Co50, one of flight compositions, was predicted numerically and validated by the tests using an electrostatic levitator (ESL). The density of various compositions within the Fe-Co system was measured with ESL. These results are being served as reference data for the space experiments. The convection inside a electromagnetically-levitated droplet was also modeled to predict the flow status, shear rate, and convection velocity under various process parameters, which is essential information for designing and analyzing the space experiments of some flight compositions influenced by convection.

  14. Ground Based Simulation Evaluation of the Effects of Time Delays and Motion on Rotorcraft Handling Qualities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Simulation Facility B. MATH MODEL The mathematical model for the rotorcraft was a generic, uncoupled stability-derivative model that has been used for...5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 Affiftu VCR Alti~de VCR Afttiue VCR a) Ho~w b) Vedical TAns/alon#)Pkue 5 5 5 12 "-i " -2 _ 3 3 3 3LC- L7 3______ i -1 1 1 eI 1...13-1 - 13-62. A-2. McRuer, D. T., and E. S. Krendel, Mathematical Models of Human Pilot Behavior. AGARD AG-188, Jan. 1974. A-3. Peters, Richard A

  15. Municipality Level Simulations of Dengue Fever Incidence in Puerto Rico Using Ground Based and Remotely Sensed Climate Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Morin, Cory

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is caused by a virus transmitted between humans and Aedes genus mosquitoes through blood feeding. In recent decades incidence of the disease has drastically increased in the tropical Americas, culminating with the Pan American outbreak in 2010 which resulted in 1.7 million reported cases. In Puerto Rico dengue is endemic, however, there is significant inter-annual, intraannual, and spatial variability in case loads. Variability in climate and the environment, herd immunity and virus genetics, and demographic characteristics may all contribute to differing patterns of transmission both spatially and temporally. Knowledge of climate influences on dengue incidence could facilitate development of early warning systems allowing public health workers to implement appropriate transmission intervention strategies. In this study, we simulate dengue incidence in several municipalities in Puerto Rico using population and meteorological data derived from ground based stations and remote sensing instruments. This data was used to drive a process based model of vector population development and virus transmission. Model parameter values for container composition, vector characteristics, and incubation period were chosen by employing a Monte Carlo approach. Multiple simulations were performed for each municipality and the results were compared with reported dengue cases. The best performing simulations were retained and their parameter values and meteorological input were compared between years and municipalities. Parameter values varied by municipality and year illustrating the complexity and sensitivity of the disease system. Local characteristics including the natural and built environment impact transmission dynamics and produce varying responses to meteorological conditions.

  16. ACE-2 HILLCLOUD. An overview of the ACE-2 ground-based cloud experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bower, B.K.N.; Choularton, T.W.; Gallagher, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    The ACE-2 HILLCLOUD experiment was carried out on the island of Tenerife in June-July 1997 to investigate the interaction of the boundary layer aerosol with a hill cap cloud forming over a ridge to the north-east of the island. The cloud was used as a natural flow through reactor to investigate......, (nocturnally for seven of the eight runs) and were carried out in a wide range of airmass conditions from clean maritime to polluted continental. Polluted air was characterised by higher than average concentrations of ozone (> 50 ppbv), fine and accumulation mode aerosols (>3000 and >1500 cm-3, respectively...... and hydrochloric acids were present as a result of outgassing from aerosol, the HNO3 from nitrate rich aerosol transported into the region from upwind of Tenerife, and HCl from sea salt aerosol newly formed at the sea surface. The oxidants hydrogen peroxide and ozone were abundant (i.e., were well in excess over...

  17. Simulation of polar atmospheric microwave and sub-millimetre spectra for characterizing potential new ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnham, David; Turner, Emma; Ford, George; Pumphrey, Hugh; Withington, Stafford

    2016-04-01

    Advanced detector technologies from the fields of astronomy and telecommunications are offering the potential to address key atmospheric science challenges with new instrumental methods. Adoption of these technologies in ground-based passive microwave and sub-millimetre radiometry could allow new measurements of chemical species and winds in the polar middle atmosphere for verifying meteorological data-sets and atmospheric models. A site study to assess the feasibility of new polar observations is performed by simulating the downwelling clear-sky submillimetre spectrum over 10-2000 GHz (30 mm to 150 microns) at two Arctic and two Antarctic locations under different seasonal and diurnal conditions. Vertical profiles for temperature, pressure and 28 atmospheric gases are constructed by combining radiosonde, meteorological reanalysis, and atmospheric chemistry model data. The sensitivity of the simulated spectra to the choice of water vapour continuum model and spectroscopic line database is explored. For the atmospheric trace species hypobromous acid (HOBr), hydrogen bromide (HBr), perhydroxyl radical (HO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) the emission lines producing the largest change in brightness temperature are identified and minimum integration times and maximum receiver noise temperatures estimated. The optimal lines for all species are shown to vary significantly between location and scenario, strengthening the case for future hyperspectral instruments that measure over a broad frequency range. We also demonstrate the feasibility of measuring horizontal wind profiles above Halley station, Antarctica with time resolution as high as 0.5hr using simulated spectroradiometric observations of Doppler-shifted ozone (O3) and carbon monoxide (CO) lines in the 230-250 GHz region. The techniques presented provide a framework that can be applied to the retrieval of additional atmospheric parameters and be taken forward to simulate and guide the design of future microwave and sub

  18. Insect gravitational biology: ground-based and shuttle flight experiments using the beetle Tribolium castaneum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, R. L.; Abbott, M. K.; Denell, R. E.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Many of the traditional experimental advantages of insects recommend their use in studies of gravitational and space biology. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is an obvious choice for studies of the developmental significance of gravity vectors because of the unparalleled description of regulatory mechanisms controlling oogenesis and embryogenesis. However, we demonstrate that Drosophila could not survive the conditions mandated for particular flight opportunities on the Space Shuttle. With the exception of Drosophila, the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, is the insect best characterized with respect to molecular embryology and most frequently utilized for past space flights. We show that Tribolium is dramatically more resistant to confinement in small sealed volumes. In preparation for flight experiments we characterize the course and timing of the onset of oogenesis in newly eclosed adult females. Finally, we present results from two shuttle flights which indicate that a number of aspects of the development and function of the female reproductive system are not demonstrably sensitive to microgravity. Available information supports the utility of this insect for future studies of gravitational biology.

  19. Ground-Based Measurement Experiment and First Results with Geosynchronous-Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer Engineering Demonstration Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, William L.; Bingham, Gail E.; Huppi, Ronald J.; Revercomb, Henry E.; Zollinger, Lori J.; Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Tansock, Joseph J.; Reisse, Robert A.; Hooker, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    The geosynchronous-imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (GIFTS) engineering demonstration unit (EDU) is an imaging infrared spectrometer designed for atmospheric soundings. It measures the infrared spectrum in two spectral bands (14.6 to 8.8 microns, 6.0 to 4.4 microns) using two 128 x 128 detector arrays with a spectral resolution of 0.57 cm(exp -1) with a scan duration of approximately 11 seconds. From a geosynchronous orbit, the instrument will have the capability of taking successive measurements of such data to scan desired regions of the globe, from which atmospheric status, cloud parameters, wind field profiles, and other derived products can be retrieved. The GIFTS EDU provides a flexible and accurate testbed for the new challenges of the emerging hyperspectral era. The EDU ground-based measurement experiment, held in Logan, Utah during September 2006, demonstrated its extensive capabilities and potential for geosynchronous and other applications (e.g., Earth observing environmental measurements). This paper addresses the experiment objectives and overall performance of the sensor system with a focus on the GIFTS EDU imaging capability and proof of the GIFTS measurement concept.

  20. Complementing the ground-based CMB-S4 experiment on large scales with the PIXIE satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Erminia; Alonso, David; Dunkley, Jo

    2017-03-01

    We present forecasts for cosmological parameters from future cosmic microwave background (CMB) data measured by the stage-4 (S4) generation of ground-based experiments in combination with large-scale anisotropy data from the PIXIE satellite. We demonstrate the complementarity of the two experiments and focus on science targets that benefit from their combination. We show that a cosmic-variance-limited measurement of the optical depth to reionization provided by PIXIE, with error σ (τ )=0.002 , is vital for enabling a 5 σ detection of the sum of the neutrino masses when combined with a CMB-S4 lensing measurement and with lower-redshift constraints on the growth of structure and the distance-redshift relation. Parameters characterizing the epoch of reionization will also be tightly constrained; PIXIE's τ constraint converts into σ (zre)=0.2 for the mean time of reionization, and a kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich measurement from S4 gives σ (Δ zre)=0.03 for the duration of reionization. Both PIXIE and S4 will put strong constraints on primordial tensor fluctuations, vital for testing early-Universe models, and will do so at distinct angular scales. We forecast σ (r )≈5 ×10-4 for a signal with a tensor-to-scalar ratio r =10-3, after accounting for diffuse foreground removal and delensing. The wide and dense frequency coverage of PIXIE results in an expected foreground-degradation factor on r of only ≈25 %. By measuring large and small scales PIXIE and S4 will together better limit the energy injection at recombination from dark matter annihilation, with pannmeasured from the damping tail with S4 will be best constrained by polarization, which has the advantage of minimal contamination from extragalactic emission.

  1. Radiometric Modeling and Calibration of the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS)Ground Based Measurement Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jialin; Smith, William L.; Gazarik, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate remote sensing benefits of the high resolution Infrared radiance spectrometers will be realized with their geostationary satellite implementation in the form of imaging spectrometers. This will enable dynamic features of the atmosphere s thermodynamic fields and pollutant and greenhouse gas constituents to be observed for revolutionary improvements in weather forecasts and more accurate air quality and climate predictions. As an important step toward realizing this application objective, the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) Engineering Demonstration Unit (EDU) was successfully developed under the NASA New Millennium Program, 2000-2006. The GIFTS-EDU instrument employs three focal plane arrays (FPAs), which gather measurements across the long-wave IR (LWIR), short/mid-wave IR (SMWIR), and visible spectral bands. The GIFTS calibration is achieved using internal blackbody calibration references at ambient (260 K) and hot (286 K) temperatures. In this paper, we introduce a refined calibration technique that utilizes Principle Component (PC) analysis to compensate for instrument distortions and artifacts, therefore, enhancing the absolute calibration accuracy. This method is applied to data collected during the GIFTS Ground Based Measurement (GBM) experiment, together with simultaneous observations by the accurately calibrated AERI (Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer), both simultaneously zenith viewing the sky through the same external scene mirror at ten-minute intervals throughout a cloudless day at Logan Utah on September 13, 2006. The accurately calibrated GIFTS radiances are produced using the first four PC scores in the GIFTS-AERI regression model. Temperature and moisture profiles retrieved from the PC-calibrated GIFTS radiances are verified against radiosonde measurements collected throughout the GIFTS sky measurement period. Using the GIFTS GBM calibration model, we compute the calibrated radiances from data

  2. Magnetic Levitation of MC3T3 Osteoblast Cells as a Ground-Based Simulation of Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidder, Louis S.; Williams, Philip C.; Xu, Wayne Wenzhong

    2009-01-01

    Diamagnetic samples placed in a strong magnetic field and a magnetic field gradient experience a magnetic force. Stable magnetic levitation occurs when the magnetic force exactly counter balances the gravitational force. Under this condition, a diamagnetic sample is in a simulated microgravity environment. The purpose of this study is to explore if MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells can be grown in magnetically simulated hypo-g and hyper-g environments and determine if gene expression is differentially expressed under these conditions. The murine calvarial osteoblastic cell line, MC3T3-E1, grown on Cytodex-3 beads, were subjected to a net gravitational force of 0, 1 and 2 g in a 17 T superconducting magnet for 2 days. Microarray analysis of these cells indicated that gravitational stress leads to up and down regulation of hundreds of genes. The methodology of sustaining long-term magnetic levitation of biological systems are discussed. PMID:20052306

  3. An autonomous receiver/digital signal processor applied to ground-based and rocket-borne wave experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowski, M. P.; LaBelle, J.; McGaw, D. G.; Broughton, M. C.

    2016-07-01

    The programmable combined receiver/digital signal processor platform presented in this article is designed for digital downsampling and processing of general waveform inputs with a 66 MHz initial sampling rate and multi-input synchronized sampling. Systems based on this platform are capable of fully autonomous low-power operation, can be programmed to preprocess and filter the data for preselection and reduction, and may output to a diverse array of transmission or telemetry media. We describe three versions of this system, one for deployment on sounding rockets and two for ground-based applications. The rocket system was flown on the Correlation of High-Frequency and Auroral Roar Measurements (CHARM)-II mission launched from Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska, in 2010. It measured auroral "roar" signals at 2.60 MHz. The ground-based systems have been deployed at Sondrestrom, Greenland, and South Pole Station, Antarctica. The Greenland system synchronously samples signals from three spaced antennas providing direction finding of 0-5 MHz waves. It has successfully measured auroral signals and man-made broadcast signals. The South Pole system synchronously samples signals from two crossed antennas, providing polarization information. It has successfully measured the polarization of auroral kilometric radiation-like signals as well as auroral hiss. Further systems are in development for future rocket missions and for installation in Antarctic Automatic Geophysical Observatories.

  4. Ground-based and in-flight simulator studies of flight characteristics of a twin-fuselage passenger transport airplane during approach and landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantham, W. D.; Smith, P. M.; Neely, W. R., Jr.; Deal, P. L.; Yenni, K. R.

    1985-01-01

    Six-degree-of-freedom ground-based and in-flight simulator studies were conducted to evaluate the low-speed flight characteristics of a twin-fuselage passenger transport airplane and to compare these characteristics with those of a large, single-fuselage (reference) transport configuration similar to the Lockheed C-5A airplane. The primary piloting task was the approach and landing task. The results of this study indicated that the twin-fuselage transport concept had acceptable but unsatisfactory longitudinal and lateral-directional low-speed flight characteristics, and that stability and control augmentation would be required in order to improve the handling qualities. Through the use of rate-command/attitude-hold augmentation in the pitch and roll axes, and the use of several turn coordination features, the handling qualities of the simulated transport were improved appreciably. The in-flight test results showed excellent agreement with those of the six-degree-of-freedom ground-based simulator handling qualities tests. As a result of the in-flight simulation study, a roll-control-induced normal-acceleration criterion was developed. The handling qualities of the augmented twin-fuselage passenger transport airplane exhibited an improvement over the handling characteristics of the reference (single-fuselage) transport.

  5. Comparison of lidar-derived PM10 with regional modeling and ground-based observations in the frame of MEGAPOLI experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-C. Raut

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available An innovative approach using mobile lidar measurements was implemented to test the performances of chemistry-transport models in simulating mass concentrations (PM10 predicted by chemistry-transport models. A ground-based mobile lidar (GBML was deployed around Paris onboard a van during the MEGAPOLI (Megacities: Emissions, urban, regional and Global Atmospheric POLlution and climate effects, and Integrated tools for assessment and mitigation summer experiment in July 2009. The measurements performed with this Rayleigh-Mie lidar are converted into PM10 profiles using optical-to-mass relationships previously established from in situ measurements performed around Paris for urban and peri-urban aerosols. The method is described here and applied to the 10 measurements days (MD. MD of 1, 15, 16 and 26 July 2009, corresponding to different levels of pollution and atmospheric conditions, are analyzed here in more details. Lidar-derived PM10 are compared with results of simulations from POLYPHEMUS and CHIMERE chemistry-transport models (CTM and with ground-based observations from the AIRPARIF network. GBML-derived and AIRPARIF in situ measurements have been found to be in good agreement with a mean Root Mean Square Error RMSE (and a Mean Absolute Percentage Error MAPE of 7.2 μg m−3 (26.0% and 8.8 μg m−3 (25.2% with relationships assuming peri-urban and urban-type particles, respectively. The comparisons between CTMs and lidar at ~200 m height have shown that CTMs tend to underestimate wet PM10 concentrations as revealed by the mean wet PM10 observed during the 10 MD of 22.4, 20.0 and 17.5 μg m−3 for lidar with peri-urban relationship, and POLYPHEMUS and CHIMERE models, respectively. This leads to a RMSE (and a MAPE of 6.4 μg m−3 (29.6% and 6.4 μg m−3 (27.6% when considering POLYPHEMUS and CHIMERE CTMs, respectively. Wet integrated PM10 computed (between the ground and 1 km above the ground level from lidar, POLYPHEMUS and CHIMERE results

  6. Simulated JWST/NIRISS Spectroscopy of Anticipated TESS Planets and Selected Super-Earths Discovered from K2 and Ground-Based Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Dana; Albert, Loic; Deming, Drake

    2017-01-01

    The 2018 launch of James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), coupled with the 2017 launch of the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), heralds a new era in Exoplanet Science, with TESS projected to detect over one thousand transiting sub-Neptune-sized planets (Ricker et al, 2014), and JWST offering unprecedented spectroscopic capabilities. Sullivan et al (2015) used Monte Carlo simulations to predict the properties of the planets that TESS is likely to detect, and published a catalog of 962 simulated TESS planets. Prior to TESS launch, the re-scoped Kepler K2 mission and ground-based surveys such as MEarth continue to seek nearby Earth-like exoplanets orbiting M-dwarf host stars. The exoplanet community will undoubtedly employ JWST for atmospheric characterization follow-up studies of promising exoplanets, but the targeted planets for these studies must be chosen wisely to maximize JWST science return. The goal of this project is to estimate the capabilities of JWST’s Near InfraRed Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS)—operating with the GR700XD grism in Single Object Slitless Spectrography (SOSS) mode—during observations of exoplanets transiting their host stars. We compare results obtained for the simulated TESS planets, confirmed K2-discovered super-Earths, and exoplanets discovered using ground-based surveys. By determining the target planet characteristics that result in the most favorable JWST observing conditions, we can optimize the choice of target planets in future JWST follow-on atmospheric characterization studies.

  7. Simulated Transmission of the Dengue Virus Across the US-Mexico Border Using Remotely Sensed and Ground Based Weather Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Cory; Quattrochi, Dale A.

    2015-01-01

    Incidence of dengue fever, caused by a mosquito transmitted virus, have increased in the Americas during recent decades. In the US, local transmission has been reported in southern Texas and Florida. However, despite its close proximity to dengue endemic areas in Mexico and the presence of a primary mosquito vector, there are no reports of local transmission in Arizona. Many studies have demonstrated that weather influences dengue virus transmission by regulating vector development rates, vector habitat availability, and the duration of the virus extrinsic incubation period (EIP). The EIP, the period between mosquito infection and the ability for it to retransmit the virus, is especially important given its high sensitivity to temperature and the short lifespan of mosquitoes. Other studies, however, have suggested that human related factors such as socioeconomic status and herd immunity may explain much of the disparity in dengue incidence in the US-Mexico border region. Using a meteorologically driven model of vector population dynamics and virus transmission we compare simulations of dengue fever cases in southern Arizona and northern Mexico. A Monte Carlo approach is employed to select parameter values by evaluating simulations in Hermosillo Mexico with reported dengue fever case data. Simulations that replicate the case data best are retained and rerun using remotely sensed climate data from other Arizona and Mexico locations to determine the relative influence of weather on virus transmission. Although human and environmental factors undoubtedly influence dengue transmission in the US-Mexico border regions, weather is a major facilitator of the transmission process.

  8. Network simulation experiments manual

    CERN Document Server

    Aboelela, Emad

    2011-01-01

    Network Simulation Experiments Manual, Third Edition, contains simulation-based experiments to help students and professionals learn about key concepts in computer networking. The simulation approach provides a virtual environment for a wide range of desirable features, such as modeling a network based on specified criteria and analyzing its performance under different scenarios. The experiments include the basics of using OPNET IT Guru Academic Edition; operation of the Ethernet network; partitioning of a physical network into separate logical networks using virtual local area networks (V

  9. Simulation - modeling - experiment; Simulation - modelisation - experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    After two workshops held in 2001 on the same topics, and in order to make a status of the advances in the domain of simulation and measurements, the main goals proposed for this workshop are: the presentation of the state-of-the-art of tools, methods and experiments in the domains of interest of the Gedepeon research group, the exchange of information about the possibilities of use of computer codes and facilities, about the understanding of physical and chemical phenomena, and about development and experiment needs. This document gathers 18 presentations (slides) among the 19 given at this workshop and dealing with: the deterministic and stochastic codes in reactor physics (Rimpault G.); MURE: an evolution code coupled with MCNP (Meplan O.); neutronic calculation of future reactors at EdF (Lecarpentier D.); advance status of the MCNP/TRIO-U neutronic/thermal-hydraulics coupling (Nuttin A.); the FLICA4/TRIPOLI4 thermal-hydraulics/neutronics coupling (Aniel S.); methods of disturbances and sensitivity analysis of nuclear data in reactor physics, application to VENUS-2 experimental reactor (Bidaud A.); modeling for the reliability improvement of an ADS accelerator (Biarotte J.L.); residual gas compensation of the space charge of intense beams (Ben Ismail A.); experimental determination and numerical modeling of phase equilibrium diagrams of interest in nuclear applications (Gachon J.C.); modeling of irradiation effects (Barbu A.); elastic limit and irradiation damage in Fe-Cr alloys: simulation and experiment (Pontikis V.); experimental measurements of spallation residues, comparison with Monte-Carlo simulation codes (Fallot M.); the spallation target-reactor coupling (Rimpault G.); tools and data (Grouiller J.P.); models in high energy transport codes: status and perspective (Leray S.); other ways of investigation for spallation (Audoin L.); neutrons and light particles production at intermediate energies (20-200 MeV) with iron, lead and uranium targets (Le Colley F

  10. A ground-based radio frequency inductively coupled plasma apparatus for atomic oxygen simulation in low Earth orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yongxian; Tian, Xiubo; Yang, Shiqin; Chu, Paul K

    2007-10-01

    A radio frequency (rf) inductively coupled plasma apparatus has been developed to simulate the atomic oxygen environment encountered in low Earth orbit (LEO). Basing on the novel design, the apparatus can achieve stable, long lasting operation, pure and high density oxygen plasma beam. Furthermore, the effective atomic oxygen flux can be regulated. The equivalent effective atomic oxygen flux may reach (2.289-2.984) x 10(16) at.cm(2) s at an oxygen pressure of 1.5 Pa and rf power of 400 W. The equivalent atomic oxygen flux is about 100 times than that in the LEO environment. The mass loss measured from the polyimide sample changes linearly with the exposure time, while the density of the eroded holes becomes smaller. The erosion mechanism of the polymeric materials by atomic oxygen is complex and involves initial reactions at the gas-surface interface as well as steady-state material removal.

  11. Dust impact on surface solar irradiance assessed with model simulations, satellite observations and ground-based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmopoulos, Panagiotis G.; Kazadzis, Stelios; Taylor, Michael; Athanasopoulou, Eleni; Speyer, Orestis; Raptis, Panagiotis I.; Marinou, Eleni; Proestakis, Emmanouil; Solomos, Stavros; Gerasopoulos, Evangelos; Amiridis, Vassilis; Bais, Alkiviadis; Kontoes, Charalabos

    2017-07-01

    This study assesses the impact of dust on surface solar radiation focussing on an extreme dust event. For this purpose, we exploited the synergy of AERONET measurements and passive and active satellite remote sensing (MODIS and CALIPSO) observations, in conjunction with radiative transfer model (RTM) and chemical transport model (CTM) simulations and the 1-day forecasts from the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS). The area of interest is the eastern Mediterranean where anomalously high aerosol loads were recorded between 30 January and 3 February 2015. The intensity of the event was extremely high, with aerosol optical depth (AOD) reaching 3.5, and optical/microphysical properties suggesting aged dust. RTM and CTM simulations were able to quantify the extent of dust impact on surface irradiances and reveal substantial reduction in solar energy exploitation capacity of PV and CSP installations under this high aerosol load. We found that such an extreme dust event can result in Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) attenuation by as much as 40-50 % and a much stronger Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) decrease (80-90 %), while spectrally this attenuation is distributed to 37 % in the UV region, 33 % in the visible and around 30 % in the infrared. CAMS forecasts provided a reliable available energy assessment (accuracy within 10 % of that obtained from MODIS). Spatially, the dust plume resulted in a zonally averaged reduction of GHI and DNI of the order of 150 W m-2 in southern Greece, and a mean increase of 20 W m-2 in the northern Greece as a result of lower AOD values combined with local atmospheric processes. This analysis of a real-world scenario contributes to the understanding and quantification of the impact range of high aerosol loads on solar energy and the potential for forecasting power generation failures at sunshine-privileged locations where solar power plants exist, are under construction or are being planned.

  12. Retrievals of formaldehyde from ground-based FTIR and MAX-DOAS observations at the Jungfraujoch station and comparisons with GEOS-Chem and IMAGES model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, B.; Hendrick, F.; Van Roozendael, M.; Müller, J.-F.; Stavrakou, T.; Marais, E. A.; Bovy, B.; Bader, W.; Fayt, C.; Hermans, C.; Lejeune, B.; Pinardi, G.; Servais, C.; Mahieu, E.

    2015-04-01

    As an ubiquitous product of the oxidation of many volatile organic compounds (VOCs), formaldehyde (HCHO) plays a key role as a short-lived and reactive intermediate in the atmospheric photo-oxidation pathways leading to the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosols. In this study, HCHO profiles have been successfully retrieved from ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) solar spectra and UV-visible Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) scans recorded during the July 2010-December 2012 time period at the Jungfraujoch station (Swiss Alps, 46.5° N, 8.0° E, 3580 m a.s.l.). Analysis of the retrieved products has revealed different vertical sensitivity between both remote sensing techniques. Furthermore, HCHO amounts simulated by two state-of-the-art chemical transport models (CTMs), GEOS-Chem and IMAGES v2, have been compared to FTIR total columns and MAX-DOAS 3.6-8 km partial columns, accounting for the respective vertical resolution of each ground-based instrument. Using the CTM outputs as the intermediate, FTIR and MAX-DOAS retrievals have shown consistent seasonal modulations of HCHO throughout the investigated period, characterized by summertime maximum and wintertime minimum. Such comparisons have also highlighted that FTIR and MAX-DOAS provide complementary products for the HCHO retrieval above the Jungfraujoch station. Finally, tests have revealed that the updated IR parameters from the HITRAN 2012 database have a cumulative effect and significantly decrease the retrieved HCHO columns with respect to the use of the HITRAN 2008 compilation.

  13. Retrievals of formaldehyde from ground-based FTIR and MAX-DOAS observations at the Jungfraujoch station and comparisons with GEOS-Chem and IMAGES model simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Franco

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available As an ubiquitous product of the oxidation of many volatile organic compounds (VOCs, formaldehyde (HCHO plays a key role as a short-lived and reactive intermediate in the atmospheric photo-oxidation pathways leading to the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosols. In this study, HCHO profiles have been successfully retrieved from ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR solar spectra and UV-visible Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS scans recorded during the July 2010–December 2012 time period at the Jungfraujoch station (Swiss Alps, 46.5° N, 8.0° E, 3580 m a.s.l.. Analysis of the retrieved products has revealed different vertical sensitivity between both remote sensing techniques. Furthermore, HCHO amounts simulated by two state-of-the-art chemical transport models (CTMs, GEOS-Chem and IMAGES v2, have been compared to FTIR total columns and MAX-DOAS 3.6–8 km partial columns, accounting for the respective vertical resolution of each ground-based instrument. Using the CTM outputs as the intermediate, FTIR and MAX-DOAS retrievals have shown consistent seasonal modulations of HCHO throughout the investigated period, characterized by summertime maximum and wintertime minimum. Such comparisons have also highlighted that FTIR and MAX-DOAS provide complementary products for the HCHO retrieval above the Jungfraujoch station. Finally, tests have revealed that the updated IR parameters from the HITRAN 2012 database have a cumulative effect and significantly decrease the retrieved HCHO columns with respect to the use of the HITRAN 2008 compilation.

  14. NASA Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX 2002/03): Ground-based and near-surface meteorological observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly Elder; Don Cline; Angus Goodbody; Paul Houser; Glen E. Liston; Larry Mahrt; Nick Rutter

    2009-01-01

    A short-term meteorological database has been developed for the Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX). This database includes meteorological observations from stations designed and deployed exclusively for CLPXas well as observations available from other sources located in the small regional study area (SRSA) in north-central Colorado. The measured weather parameters...

  15. Investigating the 90-day oscillations using ground-based, satellite and TIME-GCM model simulation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Taylor, M.; Hagan, M. E.; Pautet, P. D.; Pugmire, J. R.; Pendleton, W. R., Jr.; Russell, J. M., III

    2016-12-01

    The Andes Lidar Observatory (ALO) is an upper atmospheric observatory located high in the Andes mountain range at Cerro Pachón, Chile (30.3°S, 70.7°W, 2530 m). The Utah State University (USU) Mesospheric Temperature Mapper (MTM) was deployed in August, 2009 collocated with a Na wind/temperature lidar and a meteor wind radar from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) as well as other optical instrumentation. In this presentation, we focus on the characteristics of a unique 90-day oscillation identified in the first 18 months in both the mesospheric wind and temperature data from ALO. This event appeared to be long-lived but transient, with similar amplitude to the AO and SAO at this location. Additional mesospheric temperature data from nearby El Leoncito Observatory (31.8°S, 69.3°W), Argentina also showed the same oscillation. The existence and extent of this oscillation are being further examined using SABER/TIMED temperature. The National Center for Atmosphere Research (NCAR) Thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model (TIME-GCM) simulation of 2009/10 results are utilized to investigate the possible source of this event and the spatial structures are compared with the results from the SABER temperature data.

  16. Application of Bayesian neural networks to energy reconstruction in EAS experiments for ground-based TeV astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y.; Xu, Y.; Pan, J.; Lan, J. Q.; Gao, W. W.

    2016-07-01

    A toy detector array is designed to detect a shower generated by the interaction between a TeV cosmic ray and the atmosphere. In the present paper, the primary energies of showers detected by the detector array are reconstructed with the algorithm of Bayesian neural networks (BNNs) and a standard method like the LHAASO experiment [1], respectively. Compared to the standard method, the energy resolutions are significantly improved using the BNNs. And the improvement is more obvious for the high energy showers than the low energy ones.

  17. Comparing data obtained from ground-based measurements of the total contents of O3, HNO3,HCl, and NO2 and from their numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virolainen, Ya. A.; Timofeyev, Yu. M.; Polyakov, A. V.; Ionov, D. V.; Kirner, O.; Poberovskii, A. V.; Imhasin, H. Kh.

    2016-01-01

    Chemistry climate models of the gas composition of the atmosphere make it possible to simulate both space and time variations in atmospheric trace-gas components (TGCs) and predict their changes. Both verification and improvement of such models on the basis of a comparison with experimental data are of great importance. Data obtained from the 2009-2012 ground-based spectrometric measurements of the total contents (TCs) of a number of TGCs (ozone, HNO3, HCl, and NO2) in the atmosphere over the St. Petersburg region (Petergof station, St. Petersburg State University) have been compared to analogous EMAC model data. Both daily and monthly means of their TCs for this period have been analyzed in detail. The seasonal dependences of the TCs of the gases under study are shown to be adequately reproduced by the EMAC model. At the same time, a number of disagreements (including systematic ones) have been revealed between model and measurement data. Thus, for example, the EMAC model underestimates the TCs of NO2, HCl, and HNO3, when compared to measurement data, on average, by 14, 22, and 35%, respectively. However, the TC of ozone is overestimated by the EMAC model (on average, by 12%) when compared to measurement data. In order to reveal the reasons for such disagreements between simulated and measured data on the TCs of TGCs, it is necessary to continue studies on comparisons of the contents of TGCs in different atmospheric layers.

  18. Temporal dynamics of the gut microbiota in people sharing a confined environment, a 520-day ground-based space simulation, MARS500.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turroni, Silvia; Rampelli, Simone; Biagi, Elena; Consolandi, Clarissa; Severgnini, Marco; Peano, Clelia; Quercia, Sara; Soverini, Matteo; Carbonero, Franck G; Bianconi, Giovanna; Rettberg, Petra; Canganella, Francesco; Brigidi, Patrizia; Candela, Marco

    2017-03-24

    The intestinal microbial communities and their temporal dynamics are gaining increasing interest due to the significant implications for human health. Recent studies have shown the dynamic behavior of the gut microbiota in free-living, healthy persons. To date, it is not known whether these dynamics are applicable during prolonged life sharing in a confined and controlled environment. The MARS500 project, the longest ground-based space simulation ever, provided us with a unique opportunity to trace the crew microbiota over 520 days of isolated confinement, such as that faced by astronauts in real long-term interplanetary space flights, and after returning to regular life, for a total of 2 years. According to our data, even under the strictly controlled conditions of an enclosed environment, the human gut microbiota is inherently dynamic, capable of shifting between different steady states, typically with rearrangements of autochthonous members. Notwithstanding a strong individuality in the overall gut microbiota trajectory, some key microbial components showed conserved temporal dynamics, with potential implications for the maintenance of a health-promoting, mutualistic microbiota configuration. Sharing life in a confined habitat does not affect the resilience of the individual gut microbial ecosystem, even in the long term. However, the temporal dynamics of certain microbiota components should be monitored when programming future mission simulations and real space flights, to prevent breakdowns in the metabolic and immunological homeostasis of the crewmembers.

  19. Ground-based diffusion experiments on liquid Sn-In systems using the shear cell technique of the satellite mission Foton-M1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shinsuke; Kraatz, Kurt-Helmut; Frohberg, Günter

    2004-11-01

    This study reported in this paper was aimed at testing the shear cell that was developed for the satellite mission Foton-M1 to measure diffusion coefficients in liquid metals under microgravity (microg)-conditions. Thick Layer diffusion experiments were performed in the system Sn90In10 versus Sn under 1 g-conditions. For this system several microg-diffusion results are available as reference data. This combination provides a low, but sufficiently stable, density layering throughout the entire experiment, which is important to avoid buoyancy-driven convection. The experimental results were corrected for the influences of the shear-induced convection and mixing after the final shearing, both of which are typical for the shear cell technique. As the result, the reproducibility and the reliability of the diffusion coefficients in the ground-based experiments were within the limits of error of microg-data. Based on our results we discuss the necessary conditions to avoid buoyancy-driven convection.

  20. Comparison of radiometric scaling laws and detailed wave-optics simulations for designing ground-based laser satellite-illumination and receiver systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Keith A.

    2002-12-01

    Ground-based optical transmitter and receiver systems designed for active imaging, active tracking and laser ranging of satellites in Earth orbit are very sensitive to physical conditions limiting the radiometric returns for achieving these measurements. The initial design of these systems is often based on simple radiometric scaling laws that provide estimates of average radiometric returns and are derived from experimental data or from more complex theoretical calculations. While these laws are quite useful, it is often easy to lose sight of the initial assumptions made in their formulation, and hence, the limits of their accuracy for designing certain systems. The objective of this paper is to review some of the commonly used radiometric scaling laws for active systems and to establish guidelines for their use based on comparisons of their predictions with results from detailed wave-optics simulations for different system design requirements and physical conditions. The combined effects of laser and transmitter beam parameters, wave-front aberrations, atmospheric turbulence, and satellite optical cross-section are considered.

  1. Ground based characterization of biomass burning aerosols during the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment in Brazil during Sept - Oct 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artaxo, Paulo; Ferreira de Brito, Joel; Varanda Rizzo, Luciana; Johnson, Ben; Haywood, Jim; Longo, Karla; Freitas, Saulo; Coe, Hugh

    2013-04-01

    Biomass burning is one of the major drivers for atmospheric composition in the Southern hemisphere. In Amazonia, deforestation rates have been steadily decreasing, from 27,000 Km² in 2004 to about 5,000 Km² in 2011. This large reduction (by factor 5) was not followed by similar reduction in aerosol loading in the atmosphere due to the increase in agricultural fires. AERONET measurements from 5 sites show a large year-to year variability due to climatic and socio-economic issues. Besides this strong reduction in deforestation rate, biomass burning emissions in Amazonia increases concentrations of aerosol particles, CO, ozone and other species, and also change the surface radiation balance in a significant way. To complement the long term biomass burning measurements in Amazonia, it was organized in 2012 the intensive campaign of the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) experiment with an airborne and a ground based components. A sampling site was set up at Porto Velho, with measurements of aerosol size distribution, optical properties such as absorption and scattering at several wavelengths, organic aerosol characterization with an ACSM - Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor. CO, CO2 and O3 were also measured to characterize combustion efficiency and photochemical processes. Filters for trace elements measured by XRF and for OC/EC determined using a Sunset instrument were also collected. An AERONET CIMEL sunphotometer was operated in parallel with a multifilter radiometer (MFR). A large data set was collected from August to October 2012. PM2.5 aerosol concentrations up to 250 ug/m3 were measured, with up to 20 ug/m3 of black carbon. Ozone went up to 60 ppb at mid-day in August. At night time ozone was consumed completely most of the time. ACSM shows that more than 85% of the aerosol mass was organic with a clear diurnal pattern. The organic aerosol volatility was very variable depending on the air mass sampled over Porto Velho. Aerosol optical depth at

  2. Helios: a Multi-Purpose LIDAR Simulation Framework for Research, Planning and Training of Laser Scanning Operations with Airborne, Ground-Based Mobile and Stationary Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, S.; Höfle, B.

    2016-06-01

    In many technical domains of modern society, there is a growing demand for fast, precise and automatic acquisition of digital 3D models of a wide variety of physical objects and environments. Laser scanning is a popular and widely used technology to cover this demand, but it is also expensive and complex to use to its full potential. However, there might exist scenarios where the operation of a real laser scanner could be replaced by a computer simulation, in order to save time and costs. This includes scenarios like teaching and training of laser scanning, development of new scanner hardware and scanning methods, or generation of artificial scan data sets to support the development of point cloud processing and analysis algorithms. To test the feasibility of this idea, we have developed a highly flexible laser scanning simulation framework named Heidelberg LiDAR Operations Simulator (HELIOS). HELIOS is implemented as a Java library and split up into a core component and multiple extension modules. Extensible Markup Language (XML) is used to define scanner, platform and scene models and to configure the behaviour of modules. Modules were developed and implemented for (1) loading of simulation assets and configuration (i.e. 3D scene models, scanner definitions, survey descriptions etc.), (2) playback of XML survey descriptions, (3) TLS survey planning (i.e. automatic computation of recommended scanning positions) and (4) interactive real-time 3D visualization of simulated surveys. As a proof of concept, we show the results of two experiments: First, a survey planning test in a scene that was specifically created to evaluate the quality of the survey planning algorithm. Second, a simulated TLS scan of a crop field in a precision farming scenario. The results show that HELIOS fulfills its design goals.

  3. Space and Ground-Based Infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weems, Jon; Zell, Martin

    This chapter deals first with the main characteristics of the space environment, outside and inside a spacecraft. Then the space and space-related (ground-based) infrastructures are described. The most important infrastructure is the International Space Station, which holds many European facilities (for instance the European Columbus Laboratory). Some of them, such as the Columbus External Payload Facility, are located outside the ISS to benefit from external space conditions. There is only one other example of orbital platforms, the Russian Foton/Bion Recoverable Orbital Capsule. In contrast, non-orbital weightless research platforms, although limited in experimental time, are more numerous: sounding rockets, parabolic flight aircraft, drop towers and high-altitude balloons. In addition to these facilities, there are a number of ground-based facilities and space simulators, for both life sciences (for instance: bed rest, clinostats) and physical sciences (for instance: magnetic compensation of gravity). Hypergravity can also be provided by human and non-human centrifuges.

  4. Developing an instrument simulator: experience feedback from the JWST/NIRSpec and VLT/MUSE simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarno, Aurélien; Piqueras, Laure; Bacon, Roland; Ferruit, Pierre; Legros, Emeline; Pécontal-Rousset, Arlette; Gnata, Xavier; Streicher, Ole; Weilbacher, Peter

    2012-09-01

    The Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon (CRAL) has recently developed two instrument simulators for spectrographic instruments. They are based on Fourier optics, and model the whole chain of acquisition, taking into account both optical aberrations and diffraction effects, by propagating a wavefront through the instrument, according to the Fourier optics concept. One simulates the NIRSpec instrument, a near-infrared multi-object spectrograph for the future James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The other one models the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) instrument, a second-generation integral-field spectrograph for the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The two simulators have been developed in different contexts (subcontracted versus developed internally), and for very different instruments (space-based versus ground-based), which strengthen the CRAL experience. This paper describes the lessons learned while developing these simulators: development methods, phasing with the project, points to focus on, getting data, interacting with scientists and users, etc.

  5. Do the design concepts used for the space flight hardware directly affect cell structure and/or cell function ground based simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, David K.

    1989-01-01

    The use of clinostats and centrifuges to explore the hypogravity range between zero and 1 g is described. Different types of clinostat configurations and clinostat-centrifuge combinations are compared. Some examples selected from the literature and current research in gravitational physiology are presented to show plant responses in the simulated hypogravity region of the g-parameter (0 is greater than g is greater than 1). The validation of clinostat simulation is discussed. Examples in which flight data can be compared to clinostat data are presented. The data from 3 different laboratories using 3 different plant species indicate that clinostat simulation in some cases were qualitatively similar to flight data, but that in all cases were quantitatively different. The need to conduct additional tests in weightlessness is emphasized.

  6. DSMC Simulations of Hypersonic Flows and Comparison With Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, James N.; Bird, Graeme A.; Markelov, Gennady N.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents computational results obtained with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method for several biconic test cases in which shock interactions and flow separation-reattachment are key features of the flow. Recent ground-based experiments have been performed for several biconic configurations, and surface heating rate and pressure measurements have been proposed for code validation studies. The present focus is to expand on the current validating activities for a relatively new DSMC code called DS2V that Bird (second author) has developed. Comparisons with experiments and other computations help clarify the agreement currently being achieved between computations and experiments and to identify the range of measurement variability of the proposed validation data when benchmarked with respect to the current computations. For the test cases with significant vibrational nonequilibrium, the effect of the vibrational energy surface accommodation on heating and other quantities is demonstrated.

  7. Control of radiation and evaporation on temperature variability in a WRF regional climate simulation: comparison with colocated long term ground based observations near Paris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastin, S.; Chiriaco, M.; Drobinski, P.

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to understand how large-scale processes, cloud cover and surface fluxes affect the temperature variability over the SIRTA site, near Paris, and in a regional climate simulation performed in the frame of HyMeX/Med-CORDEX programs. This site is located in a climatic transitional area where models usually show strong dispersions despite the significant influence of large scale on interannual variability due to its western location. At seasonal time scale, the temperature is mainly controlled by surface fluxes. In the model, the transition from radiation to soil moisture limited regime occurs earlier than in observations leading to an overestimate of summertime temperature. An overestimate of shortwave radiation (SW), consistent with a lack of low clouds, enhances the soil dryness. A simulation with a wet soil is used to better analyse the relationship between dry soil and clouds but while the wetter soil leads to colder temperature, the cloud cover during daytime is not increased due to the atmospheric stability. At shorter time scales, the control of surface radiation becomes higher. In the simulation, higher temperatures are associated with higher SW. A wet soil mitigates the effect of radiation due to modulation by evaporation. In observations, the variability of clouds and their effect on SW is stronger leading to a nearly constant mean SW when sorted by temperature quantile but a stronger impact of cloud cover on day-to-day temperature variability. Impact of cloud albedo effect on precipitation is also compared.

  8. Online Simulations of Global Aerosol Distributions in the NASA GEOS-4 Model and Comparisons to Satellite and Ground-Based Aerosol Optical Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colarco, Peter; daSilva, Arlindo; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We have implemented a module for tropospheric aerosols (GO CART) online in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 4 model and simulated global aerosol distributions for the period 2000-2006. The new online system offers several advantages over the previous offline version, providing a platform for aerosol data assimilation, aerosol-chemistry-climate interaction studies, and short-range chemical weather forecasting and climate prediction. We introduce as well a methodology for sampling model output consistently with satellite aerosol optical thickness (AOT) retrievals to facilitate model-satellite comparison. Our results are similar to the offline GOCART model and to the models participating in the AeroCom intercomparison. The simulated AOT has similar seasonal and regional variability and magnitude to Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer observations. The model AOT and Angstrom parameter are consistently low relative to AERONET in biomass-burning-dominated regions, where emissions appear to be underestimated, consistent with the results of the offline GOCART model. In contrast, the model AOT is biased high in sulfate-dominated regions of North America and Europe. Our model-satellite comparison methodology shows that diurnal variability in aerosol loading is unimportant compared to sampling the model where the satellite has cloud-free observations, particularly in sulfate-dominated regions. Simulated sea salt burden and optical thickness are high by a factor of 2-3 relative to other models, and agreement between model and satellite over-ocean AOT is improved by reducing the model sea salt burden by a factor of 2. The best agreement in both AOT magnitude and variability occurs immediately downwind of the Saharan dust plume.

  9. 微重力下对流换热的地面缩比-减压模拟技术%Ground-based scale and pressure reduction technology for simulation of convection in micro-gravity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姬朝玥; 任建勋; 梁新刚; 陈泽敬; 过增元

    2001-01-01

    A technique was developed and verified numerically to simulatemicro-gravity convection in spacecraft in normal gravity ground-based experiments.The technique suppresses the natural convection and eliminates or lessenes the influence of gravity by reducing the scale and pressure of the ground-based. The results show that the disadvantages of reducing the scale or reducing the pressure can be overcome by combining the two methods. Natural convection can be suppressed to the same extent by reducing the scale and pressure by the same ratio, regardless of the size of the reduction. For a prototype, the scale and pressure reduction ratio is more easily attained maintaining than Gr/Re2 in engineering applications. The model scale and working pressure in the ground-based experiment can be predicted from the scale and pressure reduction ratio.%为了地面模拟空间飞行器在微重力条件下的对流换热,抑制自然对流,消除或减小重力的影响,研究了将缩小尺寸和减小压力相结合的缩比-减压模拟技术,并通过数值计算对这一技术进行了验证。研究表明,缩比-减压法可以克服缩比法和减压法在应用时的不足。不论缩小尺寸和减小压力的程度如何,只要缩减比相等,自然对流的抑制效果就相同。在工程应用中,对一定的原型工况,采用缩减比参数比采用Gr/Re2参数更直观,可以指导对地面模拟实验中合适的模型尺寸和工作压力的确定。

  10. Study of simulations using ECHAM-HAM and CAM5-MAM3 using ground-based and satellite data for Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvim, D. S., Sr.; Nobre, P. N.; Nilo, S.; Correa, S. M.; Pendharkar, J.; Capistrano, V.; Dos Santos, A. F.; Kubota, P. Y.; Silva, J.

    2015-12-01

    Brazil is developing its own atmosphere-ocean-biosphere-cryosphere Global Circulation Model - the Brazilian Earth System Model (BESM). BESM simulations demonstrate potential results on global climate change. Brazilian climate modeling community can significantly contribute to the international efforts on global climate change research. Currently, the Center for Weather Forecasting and Climate Studies of the National Institute for Space Research (CPTEC/INPE), Brazil is implementing and testing the aerosol component in BESM. A priori knowledge of the overall performance of the existing state-of-the-art aerosol models is necessary for the implementation. This work analyzes the performance of the aerosol component, their distribution over Brazil in particular, of two Atmospheric General Circulation Models (AGCM), the European Centre's Model - Hamburg Aerosol Model (ECHAM-HAM) and the Community Atmosphere Model - Modal Aerosol Model (CAM5-MAM3) against the observations. We evaluated the aerosol optical depth (AOD) from both the simulations and Angström exponent from ECHAM-HAM. The results are compared with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) ground station measurements, and satellite observations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). This study was done for four cities in Brazil - São Paulo, Cuiabá, Rio Branco, and Alta Floresta during 2001-2006. Both models underestimate AOD for all the four cities. However, CAM5-MAM3 has greater negative bias in the Northern and Northeastern regions of Brazil where biomass burning is more frequent during the dry season. Better performance is seen during January-June and November-December, but not consistent during July to October (i.e., the dry season), when fire occurrences are more frequent. CAM5-MAM3 model has small negative bias for this period. The Angström parameter is reasonably reproduced by ECHAM-HAM, except for Cuiabá, indicating that the particle size distribution is correctly represented in most

  11. Simulated Radiative Transfer DOAS - A new method for improving volcanic SO2 emissions retrievals from ground-based UV-spectroscopic measurements of scattered solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, C.; Deutschmann, T.; Vogel, L.; Bobrowski, N.; Hoermann, C.; Werner, C. A.; Sutton, A. J.; Elias, T.

    2011-12-01

    Passive Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) has become a standard tool for measuring SO2 at volcanoes. More recently, ultra-violet (UV) cameras have also been applied to obtain 2D images of SO2-bearing plumes. Both techniques can be used to derive SO2 emission rates by measuring SO2 column densities, integrating these along the plume cross-section, and multiplying by the wind speed. Recent measurements and model studies have revealed that the dominating source of uncertainty in these techniques often originates from an inaccurate assessment of radiative transfer through the volcanic plume. The typical assumption that all detected radiation is scattered behind the volcanic plume and takes a straight path from there to the instrument is often incorrect. We recently showed that the straight path assumption can lead to column density errors of 50% or more in cases where plumes with high SO2 and aerosol concentrations are measured from several kilometers distance, or where the background atmosphere contains a large amount of scattering aerosols. Both under- and overestimation are possible depending on the atmospheric conditions and geometry during spectral acquisition. Simulated Radiative Transfer (SRT) DOAS is a new evaluation scheme that combines radiative transfer modeling with spectral analysis of passive DOAS measurements in the UV region to derive more accurate SO2 column densities than conventional DOAS retrievals, which in turn leads to considerably more accurate emission rates. A three-dimensional backward Monte Carlo radiative transfer model is used to simulate realistic light paths in and around the volcanic plume containing variable amounts of SO2 and aerosols. An inversion algorithm is then applied to derive the true SO2 column density. For fast processing of large datasets, a linearized algorithm based on lookup tables was developed and tested on a number of example datasets. In some cases, the information content of the spectral data is

  12. Future Performance of Ground-Based and Airborne Water-Vapor Differential Absorption Lidar. II. Simulations of the Precision of a Near-Infrared, High-Power System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulfmeyer, V; Walther, C

    2001-10-20

    Taking into account Poisson, background, amplifier, and speckle noise, we can simulate the precision of water-vapor measurements by using a 10-W average-power differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system. This system is currently under development at Hohenheim University, Germany, and at the American National Center for Atmospheric Research. For operation in the 940-nm region, a large set of measurement situations is described, including configurations that are considered for the first time to the authors' knowledge. They include ultrahigh-resolution measurements in the surface layer (resolutions, 1.5 m and 0.1 s) and vertically pointing measurements (resolutions, 30 m and 1 s) from the ground to 2 km in the atmospheric boundary layer. Even during daytime, the DIAL system will have a measurement range from the ground to the upper troposphere (300 m, 10 min) that can be extended from a mountain site to the lower stratosphere. From the ground, for the first time of which the authors are aware, three-dimensional fields of water vapor in the boundary layer can be investigated within a range of the order of 15 km and with an averaging time of 10 min. From an aircraft, measurements of the atmospheric boundary layer (60 m, 1 s) can be performed from a height of 4 km to the ground. At higher altitudes, up to 18 km, water-vapor profiles can still be obtained from aircraft height level to the ground. When it is being flown either in the free troposphere or in the stratosphere, the system will measure horizontal water-vapor profiles up to 12 km. We are not aware of another remote-sensing technique that provides, simultaneously, such high resolution and accuracy.

  13. Analysis of partial-reflection data from the solar eclipse of 10 Jul. 1972. [ground-based experiment using vertical incident radio waves partially reflected from D region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, T. A.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    Partial-reflection data collected for the eclipse of July 10, 1972 as well as for July 9 and 11, 1972, are analyzed to determine eclipse effects on D-region electron densities. The partial-reflection experiment was set up to collect data using an on-line PDP-15 computer and DECtape storage. The electron-density profiles show good agreement with results from other eclipses. The partial-reflection programs were changed after the eclipse data collection to improve the operation of the partial-reflection system. These changes were mainly due to expanded computer hardware and have simplified the operations of the system considerably.

  14. Functional proteomic analysis revealed ground-base ion radiations cannot reflect biological effects of space radiations of rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Sun, Yeqing; Zhao, Qian; Han, Lu

    2016-07-01

    Highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as main factor causing biological effects. Radiobiological studies during space flights are unrepeatable due to the variable space radiation environment, ground-base ion radiations are usually performed to simulate of the space biological effect. Spaceflights present a low-dose rate (0.1˜~0.3mGy/day) radiation environment inside aerocrafts while ground-base ion radiations present a much higher dose rate (100˜~500mGy/min). Whether ground-base ion radiation can reflect effects of space radiation is worth of evaluation. In this research, we compared the functional proteomic profiles of rice plants between on-ground simulated HZE particle radiation and spaceflight treatments. Three independent ground-base seed ionizing radiation experiments with different cumulative doses (dose range: 2˜~20000mGy) and different liner energy transfer (LET) values (13.3˜~500keV/μμm) and two independent seed spaceflight experiments onboard Chinese 20th satellite and SZ-6 spacecraft were carried out. Alterations in the proteome were analyzed by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry identifications. 45 and 59 proteins showed significant (pmetabolic process, protein folding and phosphorylation. The results implied that ground-base radiations cannot truly reflect effects of spaceflight radiations, ground-base radiation was a kind of indirect effect to rice causing oxidation and metabolism stresses, but space radiation was a kind of direct effect leading to macromolecule (DNA and protein) damage and signal pathway disorders. This functional proteomic analysis work might provide a new evaluation method for further on-ground simulated HZE radiation experiments.

  15. Comparison of cytogenetic effects in bone marrow of mice after the flight on the biosatellite "BION-M1" and the ground-based radiobiological experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorozhkina, Olga; Vorozhtsova, Svetlana; Ivanov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    During space flight, the astronauts are exposed to radiation exposure at low doses with low dose rates, so one of the actual areas of Radiobiology is research of action of ionizing radiation in low and ultra-low doses. Violation of the chromosome apparatus of living biosystems, ranging from viruses and bacteria to humans, is the most reliable evidence of exposure to ionizing radiation. In this regard, the study of cytogenetic damage in the cells of humans and animals is central to space radiobiology (Fedorenko B.S., 2006). In experiment "BION - M1" by anaphase method was determined level of chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells of tibia of mice. Flight duration biosatellite "BION - M1" (Sychev V.N. et al., 2014) was 30 days in Earth orbit. Euthanasia of experimental animals was carried out after 12 hours from the moment of landing satellite by method of cervical dislocation. The level of chromosomal aberrations in vivarium-housed control mice was 1,75 ± 0,6% and 1,8 ± 0,45%, while the mitotic index 1,46 ± 0,09% and 1,53 ± 0,05%. The content of animals in the experiment with onboard equipment led to some increase in aberrant mitosis (2,3 ± 0,4%) and reduction of the mitotic index (1,37 ± 0,02%). In the flight experiment "BION-M1" was a statistically significant increase in level of chromosome aberrations (29,7 ± 4,18%) and a decrease in the mitotic index (0,74 ± 0,07%). According to VA Shurshakova (2014), the radiation dose to mice ranged from 32 to 72 mGy and relate to a range of small doses (ICRP, 2012). In this connection we conducted a series of experiments in the ground conditions, the aim of which was the study of earliest effects of ionizing radiation in vivo in mice irradiated with low doses of γ-irradiation of 10 to 200 mGy in the first 24 hours after exposure, i.e. within the first post-radiation exposure cell cycle. Studies were carried out on adult female mice outbred ICR (CD-1) - SPF category at the age of 4-4.5 months with an average

  16. Recoiling DNA Molecule Simulation & Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Neto, J C; Mesquita, O N; Neto, Jose Coelho; Dickman, Ronald

    2002-01-01

    Many recent experiments with single DNA molecules are based on force versus extension measurements and involve tethering a microsphere to one of its extremities and the other to a microscope coverglass. In this work we show that similar results can also be obtained by studying the recoil dynamics of the tethered microspheres. Computer simulations of the corresponding Langevin equation indicate which assumptions are required for a reliable analysis of the experimental recoil curves. We have measured the persistence length A of single naked DNA molecules and DNA-Ethidium Bromide complexes using this approach.

  17. 成都地区地基GPS观测网遥感大气可降水量的初步实验%Experiment on Driving Precipitable Water Vapor from Ground-Based GPS Network in Chengdu Plain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李国平; 黄丁发; 刘碧全; 陈娇娜

    2007-01-01

    The estimates of total zenith delay are derived using Bernese GPS Software V4. 2 based on GPS data every 30 s from the first measurement experiment of a ground-based GPS network in Chengdu Plain of Southwest China during the period from July to September 2004. Then the estimates of 0.5 hourly precipitable water vapor (PWV) derived from global positioning system (GPS) are obtained using meteorological data from automatic weather stations (AWS). The comparison of PWV derived from GPS and those from radiosonde observations is given for the Chengdu station, with RMS (root mean square)differences of 3.09m. The consistency of precipitabie water vapor derived from GPS to those from radiosonde is good. It is concluded that Bevis' empirical formula for estimating the weighted atmospheric mean temperature Can be applicable in Chengdu area because the relationship of GPS PWV with Bevis' formula and GPS PWV with radiosonde method shows a high correlation. The result of this GPS measurement experiment is helpful both for accumulating the study of precipitable water vapor derived from GPS in Chengdu areas located at the eastern side of the Tibetan Plateau and for studying spatial-temporal variations of regional atmospheric water vapor through many disciplines cooperatively.

  18. ECHAM5-wiso water vapour isotopologues simulation and its comparison with WS-CRDS measurements and retrievals from GOSAT and ground-based FTIR spectra in the atmosphere of Western Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gribanov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Water stable isotopes provide integrated tracers of the atmospheric water cycle, affected by changes in air mass origin, non-convective and convective processes and continental recycling. Novel remote sensing and in situ measuring techniques have recently offered opportunities for monitoring atmospheric water vapour isotopic composition. Recently developed infrared laser spectrometers allow for continuous in situ measurements of surface water vapour δDv and δ18Ov. So far, very few intercomparison of measurements conducted using different techniques have been achieved at a given location, due to difficulties intrinsic to the comparison of integrated with local measurements. Nudged simulations conducted with high resolution isotopically enabled GCMs provide a consistent framework for comparison with the different types of observations. Here, we compare simulations conducted with the ECHAM5-wiso model with three types of water vapour isotopic data obtained during summer 2012 at the forest site of Kourovka, Western Siberia: daily mean GOSAT δDv soundings, hourly ground-based FTIR total atmospheric columnar δDv amounts, and in situ hourly Picarro δDv measurements. There is an excellent correlation between observed and predicted δDv at surface while the comparison between water column values derived from the model compares well with FTIR and GOSAT estimates.

    This research was supported by the grant of Russian government under the contract 11.G34.31.0064.

  19. Ground-based observations of exoplanet atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ernst Johan Walter de

    2011-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the properties of exoplanet atmospheres. The results for ground-based near-infrared secondary eclipse observations of three different exoplanets, TrES-3b, HAT-P-1b and WASP-33b, are presented which have been obtained with ground-based telescopes as part of the GROUSE project.

  20. Ground-based observations of exoplanet atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ernst Johan Walter de

    2011-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the properties of exoplanet atmospheres. The results for ground-based near-infrared secondary eclipse observations of three different exoplanets, TrES-3b, HAT-P-1b and WASP-33b, are presented which have been obtained with ground-based telescopes as part of the GROUSE project.

  1. Mechanical Contact Experiments and Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Martins, P; Zhang, W.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical contact is studied under dynamic development by means of a combined numerical and experimental investigation. The experiments are designed to allow dynamical development of non-planar contact areas with significant expansion in all three directions as the load is increased. Different...... geometries and different materials are analyzed including contact between dissimilar materials. The numerical implementation is performed with a finite element computer program based on the irreducible flow formulation, and contact between deformable objects is modelled by applying the penalty method....... The overall investigation serves for testing and validating the numerical implementation of the mechanical contact, which is one of the main contributions to a system intended for 3D simulation of resistance welding. Correct modelling of contact between parts to be welded, as well as contact with electrodes...

  2. Tissue Engineering of Cartilage on Ground-Based Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleshcheva, Ganna; Bauer, Johann; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Egli, Marcel; Wehland, Markus; Grimm, Daniela

    2016-06-01

    Investigations under simulated microgravity offer the opportunity for a better understanding of the influence of altered gravity on cells and the scaffold-free three-dimensional (3D) tissue formation. To investigate the short-term influence, human chondrocytes were cultivated for 2 h, 4 h, 16 h, and 24 h on a 2D Fast-Rotating Clinostat (FRC) in DMEM/F-12 medium supplemented with 10 % FCS. We detected holes in the vimentin network, perinuclear accumulations of vimentin after 2 h, and changes in the chondrocytes shape visualised by F-actin staining after 4 h of FRC-exposure. Scaffold-free cultivation of chondrocytes for 7 d on the Random Positioning Machine (RPM), the FRC and the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) resulted in spheroid formation, a phenomenon already known from spaceflight experiments with chondrocytes (MIR Space Station) and thyroid cancer cells (SimBox/Shenzhou-8 space mission). The experiments enabled by the ESA-CORA-GBF programme gave us an optimal opportunity to study gravity-related cellular processes, validate ground-based facilities for our chosen cell system, and prepare long-term experiments under real microgravity conditions in space

  3. Bridging experiments, models and simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carusi, Annamaria; Burrage, Kevin; Rodríguez, Blanca

    2012-01-01

    Computational models in physiology often integrate functional and structural information from a large range of spatiotemporal scales from the ionic to the whole organ level. Their sophistication raises both expectations and skepticism concerning how computational methods can improve our understan...... that contributes to defining the specific aspects of cardiac electrophysiology the MSE system targets, rather than being only an external test, and that this is driven by advances in experimental and computational methods and the combination of both....... of biovariability; 2) testing and developing robust techniques and tools as a prerequisite to conducting physiological investigations; 3) defining and adopting standards to facilitate the interoperability of experiments, models, and simulations; 4) and understanding physiological validation as an iterative process...... understanding of living organisms and also how they can reduce, replace, and refine animal experiments. A fundamental requirement to fulfill these expectations and achieve the full potential of computational physiology is a clear understanding of what models represent and how they can be validated. The present...

  4. Simulation study for measurement of horizontal wind profiles in the polar stratosphere and mesosphere using ground-based observations of ozone and carbon monoxide lines in the 230-250 GHz region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnham, David A.; Ford, George P.; Moffat-Griffin, Tracy; Pumphrey, Hugh C.

    2016-07-01

    Meteorological and atmospheric models are being extended up to 80 km altitude but there are very few observing techniques that can measure stratospheric-mesospheric winds at altitudes between 20 and 80 km to verify model datasets. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of horizontal wind profile measurements using ground-based passive millimetre-wave spectroradiometric observations of ozone lines centred at 231.28, 249.79, and 249.96 GHz. Vertical profiles of horizontal winds are retrieved from forward and inverse modelling simulations of the line-of-sight Doppler-shifted atmospheric emission lines above Halley station (75°37' S, 26°14' W), Antarctica. For a radiometer with a system temperature of 1400 K and 30 kHz spectral resolution observing the ozone 231.28 GHz line we estimate that 12 h zonal and meridional wind profiles could be determined over the altitude range 25-74 km in winter, and 28-66 km in summer. Height-dependent measurement uncertainties are in the range 3-8 m s-1 and vertical resolution ˜ 8-16 km. Under optimum observing conditions at Halley a temporal resolution of 1.5 h for measuring either zonal or meridional winds is possible, reducing to 0.5 h for a radiometer with a 700 K system temperature. Combining observations of the 231.28 GHz ozone line and the 230.54 GHz carbon monoxide line gives additional altitude coverage at 85 ± 12 km. The effects of clear-sky seasonal mean winter/summer conditions, zenith angle of the received atmospheric emission, and spectrometer frequency resolution on the altitude coverage, measurement uncertainty, and height and time resolution of the retrieved wind profiles have been determined.

  5. EXPERIMENTS OF SEA ICE SIMULATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xi-ying; ZHANG Xue-hong; YU Ru-cong; LIU Hai-long; YU Yong-qiang

    2005-01-01

    As a substitute for the original displaced pole grids, a simple rotated spherical coordinate system was introduced into the Community Sea Ice Model version 4(CSIM4), which is a component of the Community Climate System Model(CCSM) of the American National Center of Atmospheric Research(NCAR), to deal with the "pole problems".In the new coordinates, both the geographical North Pole and South Pole lie in the model equator and grid sizes near the polar region are more uniform.With reanalysis dataset of American National Centers for Environment Prediction(NCEP) and Levitus dataset without considering sub-mixed layer heat flux, the model was integrated for 100 years with thermodynamics process involved only in the former 49 years and both dynamic and thermodynamic processes involved in the left time.Inner consistency of model results was checked with no contradiction found.The results of last 10 years' model output were analyzed and it is shown that the simulated sea ice seasonal variation is rational whereas sea ice extent in the Barents Sea in winter is larger than that of observation.Numerical experiment on influence of sub-mixed layer heat flux was also carried out and it is shown that the sub-mixed layer heat flux can modulate seasonal variation of sea ice greatly.As a model component, the sea ice model with rotated spherical coordinates was coupled with other models (the oceanic general circulation model is the LASG/IAP Climate System Ocean Model(LICOM) with reduced grid, other models are components of NCAR CCSM2) forming a climate system model and its preliminary results were also given briefly.

  6. GLAST and Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The launch of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope together with the advent of a new generation of ground-based gamma-ray detectors such as VERITAS, HESS, MAGIC and CANGAROO, will usher in a new era of high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics. GLAST and the ground based gamma-ray observatories will provide highly complementary capabilities for spectral, temporal and spatial studies of high energy gamma-ray sources. Joint observations will cover a huge energy range, from 20 MeV to over 20 TeV. The LAT will survey the entire sky every three hours, allowing it both to perform uniform, long-term monitoring of variable sources and to detect flaring sources promptly. Both functions complement the high-sensitivity pointed observations provided by ground-based detectors. Finally, the large field of view of GLAST will allow a study of gamma-ray emission on large angular scales and identify interesting regions of the sky for deeper studies at higher energies. In this poster, we will discuss the science returns that might result from joint GLAST/ground-based gamma-ray observations and illustrate them with detailed source simulations.

  7. GLAST and Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The launch of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope together with the advent of a new generation of ground-based gamma-ray detectors such as VERITAS, HESS, MAGIC and CANGAROO, will usher in a new era of high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics. GLAST and the ground based gamma-ray observatories will provide highly complementary capabilities for spectral, temporal and spatial studies of high energy gamma-ray sources. Joint observations will cover a huge energy range, from 20 MeV to over 20 TeV. The LAT will survey the entire sky every three hours, allowing it both to perform uniform, long-term monitoring of variable sources and to detect flaring sources promptly. Both functions complement the high-sensitivity pointed observations provided by ground-based detectors. Finally, the large field of view of GLAST will allow a study of gamma-ray emission on large angular scales and identify interesting regions of the sky for deeper studies at higher energies. In this poster, we will discuss the science returns that might result from joint GLAST/ground-based gamma-ray observations and illustrate them with detailed source simulations.

  8. Synergetic ground-based methods for remote measurements of ozone vertical profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeyev, Yuriy; Kostsov, Vladimir; Virolainen, Yana

    2013-05-01

    The technique of combining ground-based measurements in infrared and microwave spectral regions in order to achieve higher accuracy of ozone profile retrieval in extensive altitude ranges is described and analyzed. The information content, errors, altitude ranges and vertical resolution of ozone profile retrieval have been studied on the basis of numerical simulation of synergetic experiments. Optimal conditions of measurements are defined and requirements to additional information are formulated. The first results on ozone vertical profile retrieval using groundbased measurements of FTIR-spectrometer and microwave radiometer are given.

  9. Interactive dynamic three-dimensional scene for the ground-based three-dimensional display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Peining; Sang, Xinzhu; Guo, Nan; Chen, Duo; Yan, Binbin; Wang, Kuiru; Dou, Wenhua; Xiao, Liquan

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) displays provides valuable tools for many fields, such as scientific experiment, education, information transmission, medical imaging and physical simulation. Ground based 360° 3D display with dynamic and controllable scene can find some special applications, such as design and construction of buildings, aeronautics, military sand table and so on. It can be utilized to evaluate and visualize the dynamic scene of the battlefield, surgical operation and the 3D canvas of art. In order to achieve the ground based 3D display, the public focus plane should be parallel to the camera's imaging planes, and optical axes should be offset to the center of public focus plane in both vertical and horizontal directions. Virtual cameras are used to display 3D dynamic scene with Unity 3D engine. Parameters of virtual cameras for capturing scene are designed and analyzed, and locations of virtual cameras are determined by the observer's eye positions in the observing space world. An interactive dynamic 3D scene for ground based 360° 3D display is demonstrated, which provides high-immersion 3D visualization.

  10. Using the FLUKA Monte Carlo Code to Simulate the Interactions of Ionizing Radiation with Matter to Assist and Aid Our Understanding of Ground Based Accelerator Testing, Space Hardware Design, and Secondary Space Radiation Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddell, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    Designing hardware to operate in the space radiation environment is a very difficult and costly activity. Ground based particle accelerators can be used to test for exposure to the radiation environment, one species at a time, however, the actual space environment cannot be duplicated because of the range of energies and isotropic nature of space radiation. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code is an integrated physics package based at CERN that has been under development for the last 40+ years and includes the most up-to-date fundamental physics theory and particle physics data. This work presents an overview of FLUKA and how it has been used in conjunction with ground based radiation testing for NASA and improve our understanding of secondary particle environments resulting from the interaction of space radiation with matter.

  11. Labotratory Simulation Experiments of Cometary Plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Minami, S; Baum, P. J.; Kamin, G.; R. S. White; 南, 繁行

    1986-01-01

    Laboratory simulation experiment to study the interaction between a cometary plasma and the solar wind has been performed using the UCR-T 1 space simulation facility at the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, the University of California, Riverside. Light emitting plasma composed of Sr, Ba and/or C simulating cometary coma plasma is produced by a plasma emitter which interacts with intense plasma flow produced by a co-axial plasma gun simulating the solar wind. The purpose of this ...

  12. Toward High Altitude Airship Ground-Based Boresight Calibration of Hyperspectral Pushbroom Imaging Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiwu Zhang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the single linear hyperspectral pushbroom imaging based on a high altitude airship (HAA without a three-axis stabilized platform is much more than that based on the spaceborne and airborne. Due to the effects of air pressure, temperature and airflow, the large pitch and roll angles tend to appear frequently that create pushbroom images highly characterized with severe geometric distortions. Thus, the in-flight calibration procedure is not appropriate to apply to the single linear pushbroom sensors on HAA having no three-axis stabilized platform. In order to address this problem, a new ground-based boresight calibration method is proposed. Firstly, a coordinate’s transformation model is developed for direct georeferencing (DG of the linear imaging sensor, and then the linear error equation is derived from it by using the Taylor expansion formula. Secondly, the boresight misalignments are worked out by using iterative least squares method with few ground control points (GCPs and ground-based side-scanning experiments. The proposed method is demonstrated by three sets of experiments: (i the stability and reliability of the method is verified through simulation-based experiments; (ii the boresight calibration is performed using ground-based experiments; and (iii the validation is done by applying on the orthorectification of the real hyperspectral pushbroom images from a HAA Earth observation payload system developed by our research team—“LanTianHao”. The test results show that the proposed boresight calibration approach significantly improves the quality of georeferencing by reducing the geometric distortions caused by boresight misalignments to the minimum level.

  13. Mechanical Contact Experiments and Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Martins, P; Zhang, W.;

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical contact is studied under dynamic development by means of a combined numerical and experimental investigation. The experiments are designed to allow dynamical development of non-planar contact areas with significant expansion in all three directions as the load is increased. Different...

  14. Fresnel zones for ground-based antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J. Bach

    1964-01-01

    The ordinary Fresnel zone concept is modified to include the influence of finite ground conductivity. This is important for ground-based antennas because the influence on the radiation pattern of irregularities near the antenna is determined by the amplitude and phase of the groundwave. A new...

  15. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement unce...

  16. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Yordanova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement unce...

  17. Mechanical Contact Experiments and Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Martins, P; Zhang, W.

    2011-01-01

    geometries and different materials are analyzed including contact between dissimilar materials. The numerical implementation is performed with a finite element computer program based on the irreducible flow formulation, and contact between deformable objects is modelled by applying the penalty method....... The overall investigation serves for testing and validating the numerical implementation of the mechanical contact, which is one of the main contributions to a system intended for 3D simulation of resistance welding. Correct modelling of contact between parts to be welded, as well as contact with electrodes......, is crucial for satisfactory modelling of the resistance welding process. The resistance heating at the contact interfaces depends on both contact area and pressure, and as the contact areas develop dynamically, the presented tests are relevant for assessing the validity and accuracy of the mechanical contact...

  18. MCNP simulations of material exposure experiments (u)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temple, Brian A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-08

    Simulations of proposed material exposure experiments were performed using MCNP6. The experiments will expose ampules containing different materials of interest with radiation to observe the chemical breakdown of the materials. Simulations were performed to map out dose in materials as a function of distance from the source, dose variation between materials, dose variation due to ampule orientation, and dose variation due to different source energy. This write up is an overview of the simulations and will provide guidance on how to use the data in the spreadsheet.

  19. COMPASS Simulation for PHEBUS FPT-3 Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jun Ho; Kim, Jongtae; Park, Rae-Jun; Son, Donggun; Kim, Dong Ha [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The objective of this paper is to assess the core degradation modeling in COMPASS code by simulating the PHEBUS FPT3 experiment. For the comparison purpose, the numerical simulation by using MELCOR 2.1 have also conducted for the FPT3 experiment. Consequently, COMPASS results of PHEBUS FPT3 have been compared with the experimental data and MELCOR results. For the purpose of COMPASS code validation, the numerical simulation for PHEBUS FPT3 experiment has been conducted. The temperature of the main component has been secured by using COMPASS code for a fuel, cladding, control rod and surrounding structure. And they are compared with that of experimental data as well as MELCOR simulation results. MELCOR are showing that an oxidational reaction starts a little bit earlier time and has the slightly higher value of the accumulated hydrogen mass, while COMPASS code predicts the slightly lower value of the accumulated hydrogen mass.

  20. Research on target accuracy for ground-based lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ling; Shi, Ruoming

    2009-05-01

    In ground based Lidar system, the targets are used in the process of registration, georeferencing for point cloud, and also can be used as check points. Generally, the accuracy of capturing the flat target center is influenced by scanning range and scanning angle. In this research, the experiments are designed to extract accuracy index of the target center with 0-90°scan angles and 100-195 meter scan ranges using a Leica HDS3000 laser scanner. The data of the experiments are listed in detail and the related results are analyzed.

  1. Pyro shock simulation: Experience with the MIPS simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Thomas J.; Moul, David S.

    1988-01-01

    The Mechanical Impulse Pyro Shock (MIPS) Simulator at GE Astro Space Division is one version of a design that is in limited use throughout the aerospace industry, and is typically used for component shock testing at levels up to 10,000 response g's. Modifications to the force imput, table and component boundary conditions have allowed a range of test conditions to be achieved. Twelve different designs of components with weights up to 23 Kg are in the process or have completed qualification testing in the Dynamic Simulation Lab at GE in Valley Forge, Pa. A summary of the experience gained through the use of this simulator is presented as well as examples of shock experiments that can be readily simulated at the GE Astro MIPS facility.

  2. Development of Ground-Based Plant Sentinels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    plants in response to different strains of Pseudomonas syringae. Planta . 217:767-775. De Moraes CM, Schultz JC, Mescher MC, Tumlinson JH. (2004...09-30-2004 Final Technical _ April 2001 - April 2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Developing Plants as Ground-based Sentinels 5b. GRANT...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 9 "Z Plants emit volatile mixes characteristic of exposure to both plant and animal (insect) pathogens (bacteria and fungi). The

  3. Illumination compensation in ground based hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Alexander; Underwood, James

    2017-07-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has emerged as an important tool for analysing vegetation data in agricultural applications. Recently, low altitude and ground based hyperspectral imaging solutions have come to the fore, providing very high resolution data for mapping and studying large areas of crops in detail. However, these platforms introduce a unique set of challenges that need to be overcome to ensure consistent, accurate and timely acquisition of data. One particular problem is dealing with changes in environmental illumination while operating with natural light under cloud cover, which can have considerable effects on spectral shape. In the past this has been commonly achieved by imaging known reference targets at the time of data acquisition, direct measurement of irradiance, or atmospheric modelling. While capturing a reference panel continuously or very frequently allows accurate compensation for illumination changes, this is often not practical with ground based platforms, and impossible in aerial applications. This paper examines the use of an autonomous unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) to gather high resolution hyperspectral imaging data of crops under natural illumination. A process of illumination compensation is performed to extract the inherent reflectance properties of the crops, despite variable illumination. This work adapts a previously developed subspace model approach to reflectance and illumination recovery. Though tested on a ground vehicle in this paper, it is applicable to low altitude unmanned aerial hyperspectral imagery also. The method uses occasional observations of reference panel training data from within the same or other datasets, which enables a practical field protocol that minimises in-field manual labour. This paper tests the new approach, comparing it against traditional methods. Several illumination compensation protocols for high volume ground based data collection are presented based on the results. The findings in this paper are

  4. Ground based spectroscopy of hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Ingo

    2010-05-01

    It has been shown in recent years with great success that spectroscopy of exoplanetary atmospheres is feasible using space based observatories such as the HST and Spitzer. However, with the end of the Spitzer cold-phase, space based observations in the near to mid infra-red are limited, which will remain true until the the onset of the JWST. The importance of developing methods of ground based spectroscopic analysis of known hot Jupiters is therefore apparent. In the past, various groups have attempted exoplanetary spectroscopy using ground based facilities and various techniques. Here I will present results using a novel spectral retrieval method for near to mid infra-red emission and transmission spectra of exoplanetary atmospheres taken from the ground and discuss the feasibility of future ground-based spectroscopy in a broader context. My recently commenced PhD project is under the supervision of Giovanna Tinetti (University College London) and in collaboration with J. P. Beaulieu (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris), Mark Swain and Pieter Deroo (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech).

  5. SIMULATED ANIMAL EXPERIMENTS IN TEACHING AND RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirag B. Mistry, Shreya M. Shah, Jagatkumar D. Bhatt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Animal experiments are of paramount importance in the pre-clinical screening of new chemical entity. On the other hand, various regulatory guidelines for animal experiments are becoming more stringent in the face of worldwide protests by animal rights activists. Moreover, simulated animal experiments’ softwares are being developed and they can be implemented in the postgraduate and graduate students’ curriculum for demonstration of standard physiological and pharmacological principles compared to real time animal experiments. In fact, implementation of virtual experiment will decrease hand on experience of animal experiments among medical students, but after medical graduation, animal experiment is lest utilized during their day to day clinical practice. Similarly, in case of postgraduate pharmacology curriculum, computer based virtual animal experiments can facilitate teaching and learning in a short span of time with various protocols, without sacrificing any animal for already established experimental outcomes.

  6. Simulation Application for the LHCb Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Roiser, Stefan

    2003-01-01

    We describe the LHCb detector simulation application (Gauss) based on the Geant4 toolkit. The application is built using the Gaudi software framework, which is used for all event-processing applications in the LHCb experiment. The existence of an underlying framework allows several common basic services such as persistency, interactivity, as well as detector geometry description or particle data to be shared between simulation, reconstruction and analysis applications. The main benefits of such common services are coherence between different event-processing stages as well as reduced development effort. The interfacing to Geant4 toolkit is realized through a façade (GiGa) which minimizes the coupling to the simulation engine and provides a set of abstract interfaces for configuration and event-by-event communication. The Gauss application is composed of three main blocks, i.e. event generation, detector response simulation and digitization which reflect the different stages performed during the simulation jo...

  7. Fast simulations for intensity mapping experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, David; Santos, Mário G

    2014-01-01

    We present a code to generate mock observations of 21 cm intensity mapping experiments. The emphasis of the code is on reducing the computational cost of running a full-blown simulation, trading computational time for accuracy. The code can be used to generate independent realizations of the cosmological signal and foregrounds, which are necessary, for instance, in order to obtain realistic forecasts for future intensity mapping experiments. The code is able to reproduce the correct angular and radial clustering pattern for the cosmological signal, including redshift-space distortions, lightcone evolution and bias. Furthermore, it is possible to simulate a variety of foregrounds, including the potentially problematic polarized synchrotron emission.

  8. Experimenting with Request Assignment Simulator (RAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Arokia Paul Rajan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There is no existence of dedicated simulators on the Internet that studies the impact of load balancing principles of the cloud architectures. Request Assignment Simulator (RAS is a customizable, visual tool that helps to understand the request assignment to the resources based on the load balancing principles. We have designed this simulator to fit into Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS cloud model. In this paper, we present a working manual useful for the conduct of experiment with RAS. The objective of this paper is to instill the user to understand the pertinent parameters in the cloud, their metrics, load balancing principles, and their impact on the performance.

  9. Simulations of DT experiments in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budny, R.; Bell, M.G.; Biglari, H.; Bitter, M.; Bush, C.; Cheng, C.Z.; Fredrickson, E.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Hsuan, H.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D.L.; Johnson, D.; Johnson, L.C.; LeBlanc, B.; McCune, D.C.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Park, H.; Ramsey, A.T.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Scott, S.; Schivell, J.; Strachan, J.D.; Stratton, B.C.; Synakowski, E.; Taylor, G.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Zweben, S.J.

    1991-12-01

    A transport code (TRANSP) is used to simulate future deuterium-tritium experiments (DT) in TFTR. The simulations are derived from 14 TFTR DD discharges, and the modeling of one supershot is discussed in detail to indicate the degree of accuracy of the TRANSP modeling. Fusion energy yields and {alpha}-particle parameters are calculated, including profiles of the {alpha} slowing down time, average energy, and of the Alfven speed and frequency. Two types of simulations are discussed. The main emphasis is on the DT equivalent, where an equal mix of D and T is substituted for the D in the initial target plasma, and for the D{sup O} in the neutral-beam injection, but the other measured beam and plasma parameters are unchanged. This simulation does not assume that {alpha} heating will enhance the plasma parameters, or that confinement will increase with T. The maximum relative fusion yield calculated for these simulations is Q{sub DT} {approx} 0.3, and the maximum {alpha} contribution to the central toroidal {beta} is {beta}{sub {alpha}}(0) {approx} 0.5%. The stability of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) and kinetic ballooning modes (KBM) is discussed. The TAE mode is predicted to become unstable for some of the equivalent simulations, particularly after the termination of neutral beam injection. In the second type of simulation, empirical supershot scaling relations are used to project the performance at the maximum expected beam power. The MHD stability of the simulations is discussed.

  10. The STACEE-32 Ground Based Gamma-ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hanna, D S; Boone, L M; Chantell, M C; Conner, Z; Covault, C E; Dragovan, M; Fortin, P; Gregorich, D T; Hinton, J A; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Oser, S; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Schütte, D R; Theoret, C G; Tümer, T O; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J A

    2002-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment detector in its initial configuration (STACEE-32). STACEE is a new ground-based gamma ray detector using the atmospheric Cherenkov technique. In STACEE, the heliostats of a solar energy research array are used to collect and focus the Cherenkov photons produced in gamma-ray induced air showers. The large Cherenkov photon collection area of STACEE results in a gamma-ray energy threshold below that of previous detectors.

  11. The STACEE Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gingrich, D M; Bramel, D; Carson, J; Covault, C E; Fortin, P; Hanna, D S; Hinton, J A; Jarvis, A; Kildea, J; Lindner, T; Müller, C; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Theoret, C G; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J A

    2005-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) in its complete configuration. STACEE uses the heliostats of a solar energy research facility to collect and focus the Cherenkov photons produced in gamma-ray induced air showers. The light is concentrated onto an array of photomultiplier tubes located near the top of a tower. The large Cherenkov photon collection area of STACEE results in a gamma-ray energy threshold below that of previous ground-based detectors. STACEE is being used to observe pulsars, supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei, and gamma-ray bursts.

  12. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  13. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of a test of a ground-based lidar of other type. The test was performed at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. The result as an establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided...... by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from the wind vanes is also given....

  14. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Yordanova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  15. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  16. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Georgieva Yankova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  17. Design and Analysis of Simulation Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, Jack P.C.

    2015-01-01

    This is a new edition of Kleijnen’s advanced expository book on statistical methods for the Design and Analysis of Simulation Experiments (DASE). Altogether, this new edition has approximately 50% new material not in the original book. More specifically, the author has made significant changes to

  18. Introduction to Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prive, Nikki C.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation gives a brief overview of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs), including what OSSEs are, and how and why they are performed. The intent is to educate the audience in light of the OSSE-related sections of the Forecast Improvement Act (H.R. 2413).

  19. Monte Carlo Simulation of Counting Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Philip M.

    A computer program to perform a Monte Carlo simulation of counting experiments was written. The program was based on a mathematical derivation which started with counts in a time interval. The time interval was subdivided to form a binomial distribution with no two counts in the same subinterval. Then the number of subintervals was extended to…

  20. Computer Simulation Instruction: Carrying out Chemical Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibtesam Al-Mashaqbeh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of computer simulation Instruction (CSI on students' achievements: Carrying out chemical experiments to acquire chemical concepts for eleventh grade students. The subject of the study consisted two sections of a one girl's high school in Jordan. One section was randomly assigned to experimental group in which computer simulation Instruction (CSI was used, and the other section was randomly assigned to control group in which students were instructed by using the traditional teaching instruction. The findings indicated that there is progress on the part of the experimental group which used the computer simulation Instruction (CSI and this was reflected positively in the students’ achievement in carrying out chemical experiments to acquire chemical concepts.

  1. RTTOV-gb - adapting the fast radiative transfer model RTTOV for the assimilation of ground-based microwave radiometer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Francesco; Cimini, Domenico; Hocking, James; Martinet, Pauline; Kneifel, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWRs) offer a new capability to provide continuous observations of the atmospheric thermodynamic state in the planetary boundary layer. Thus, they are potential candidates to supplement radiosonde network and satellite data to improve numerical weather prediction (NWP) models through a variational assimilation of their data. However in order to assimilate MWR observations, a fast radiative transfer model is required and such a model is not currently available. This is necessary for going from the model state vector space to the observation space at every observation point. The fast radiative transfer model RTTOV is well accepted in the NWP community, though it was developed to simulate satellite observations only. In this work, the RTTOV code has been modified to allow for simulations of ground-based upward-looking microwave sensors. In addition, the tangent linear, adjoint, and K-modules of RTTOV have been adapted to provide Jacobians (i.e., the sensitivity of observations to the atmospheric thermodynamical state) for ground-based geometry. These modules are necessary for the fast minimization of the cost function in a variational assimilation scheme. The proposed ground-based version of RTTOV, called RTTOV-gb, has been validated against accurate and less time-efficient line-by-line radiative transfer models. In the frequency range commonly used for temperature and humidity profiling (22-60 GHz), root-mean-square brightness temperature differences are smaller than typical MWR uncertainties (˜ 0.5 K) at all channels used in this analysis. Brightness temperatures (TBs) computed with RTTOV-gb from radiosonde profiles have been compared with nearly simultaneous and co-located ground-based MWR observations. Differences between simulated and measured TBs are below 0.5 K for all channels except for the water vapor band, where most of the uncertainty comes from instrumental errors. The Jacobians calculated with the K-module of RTTOV

  2. Analysis and Compact Modeling of a Vertical Grounded-Base NPN Bipolar Transistor used as ESD Protection in a Smart Power Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Bertrand, Géraldine; Delage, Christelle; Bafleur, Marise; Nolhier, Nicolas; Dorkel, Jean-Marie; Nguyen, Quang; Mauran, Nicolas; Trémouilles, David; Perdu, Philippe

    2001-01-01

    9 pages; International audience; A thorough analysis of the physical mechanisms involved in a Vertical Grounded-Base NPN bipolar transistor (VGBNPN) under ElectroStatic Discharge (ESD) stress is first carried out by using 2D-device simulation, Transmission Line Pulse measurement (TLP) and photoemission experiments. This analysis is used to account for the unexpected low value of the VGBNPN snapback holding voltage under TLP stress. A compact model based on a new avalanche formulation resultin...

  3. GEANT4 Simulation of the NPDGamma Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frlez, Emil

    2014-03-01

    The n-> + p --> d + γ experiment, currently taking data at the Oak Ridge SNS facility, is a high-precision measurement of weak nuclear forces at low energies. Detecting the correlation between the cold neutron spin and photon direction in the capture of neutrons on Liquid Hydrogen (LH) target, the experiment is sensitive to the properties of neutral weak current. We have written a GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation of the NPDGamma detector that, in addition to the active CsI detectors, also includes different targets and passive materials as well as the beam line elements. The neutron beam energy spectrum, its profiles, divergencies, and time-of-flight are simulated in detail. We have used the code to cross-calibrate the positions of (i) polarized LH target, (ii) Aluminum target, and (iii) CCl4 target. The responses of the 48 CsI detectors in the simulation were fixed using data taken on the LH target. Both neutron absorption as well as scattering and thermal processes were turned on in the GEANT4 physics lists. We use the results to simulate in detail the data obtained with different targets used in the experiment within a comprehensive analysis. This work is supported by NSF grant PHY-1307328.

  4. Titan's organic chemistry: Results of simulation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, Carl; Thompson, W. Reid; Khare, Bishun N.

    1992-01-01

    Recent low pressure continuous low plasma discharge simulations of the auroral electron driven organic chemistry in Titan's mesosphere are reviewed. These simulations yielded results in good accord with Voyager observations of gas phase organic species. Optical constants of the brownish solid tholins produced in similar experiments are in good accord with Voyager observations of the Titan haze. Titan tholins are rich in prebiotic organic constituents; the Huygens entry probe may shed light on some of the processes that led to the origin of life on Earth.

  5. Mine Blast Loading: Experiments and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    calculation provided a better correlation with the one experiment that was discussed. UNCLASSIFIED 4 UNCLASSIFIED Neuberger , et al. [20] examine the...497-504, DEStech Publications, Inc., Lancaster, PA (2008). 5. S. Peles, D. Touati, I. Azulay, and A. Neuberger , “Numerical simulation of mine...DEStech Publications, Inc., Lancaster, PA (2008). 20. A. Neuberger , S. Peles, and D. Rittel, “Scaling the response of circular plates subjected to

  6. Collaborative virtual experience based on reconfigurable simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahab, Qonita M.; Kwon, Yong-Moo; Ko, Heedong

    2006-10-01

    Virtual Reality simulation enables immersive 3D experience of a Virtual Environment. A simulation-based Virtual Environment can be used to map real world phenomena onto virtual experience. With a reconfigurable simulation, users can reconfigure the parameters of the involved objects, so that they can see different effects from the different configurations. This concept is suitable for a classroom learning of physics law. This research studies the Virtual Reality simulation of Newton's physics law on rigid body type of objects. With network support, collaborative interaction is enabled so that people from different places can interact with the same set of objects in immersive Collaborative Virtual Environment. The taxonomy of the interaction in different levels of collaboration is described as: distinct objects and same object, in which there are same object - sequentially, same object - concurrently - same attribute, and same object - concurrently - distinct attributes. The case studies are the interaction of users in two cases: destroying and creating a set of arranged rigid bodies. In Virtual Domino, users can observe physics law while applying force to the domino blocks in order to destroy the arrangements. In Virtual Dollhouse, users can observe physics law while constructing a dollhouse using existing building blocks, under gravity effects.

  7. First ground-based FTIR-observations of methane in the tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Petersen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Total column concentrations and volume mixing ratio profiles of methane have been retrieved from ground-based solar absorption FTIR spectra in the near-infrared recorded in Paramaribo (Suriname. The methane FTIR observations are compared with TM5 model simulations and satellite observations from SCIAMACHY, and represent the first validation of SCIAMACHY retrievals in the tropics using ground-based remote sensing techniques. Apart from local biomass burning features, our methane FTIR observations agree well with the SCIAMACHY retrievals and TM5 model simulations.

  8. Atmospheric contamination for CMB ground-based observations

    CERN Document Server

    Errard, J; Akiba, Y; Arnold, K; Atlas, M; Baccigalupi, C; Barron, D; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Cukierman, A; Delabrouille, J; Dobbs, M; Ducout, A; Elleflot, T; Fabbian, G; Feng, C; Feeney, S; Gilbert, A; Goeckner-Wald, N; Halverson, N W; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Hill, C; Holzapfel, W L; Hori, Y; Inoue, Y; Jaehnig, G C; Jaffe, A H; Jeong, O; Katayama, N; Kaufman, J; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T; Jeune, M Le; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Leon, D; Linder, E; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Miller, N J; Myers, M J; Navaroli, M; Nishino, H; Okamura, T; Paar, H; Peloton, J; Poletti, D; Puglisi, G; Rebeiz, G; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Rotermund, K M; Schenck, D E; Sherwin, B D; Siritanasak, P; Smecher, G; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Tajima, O; Takakura, S; Tikhomirov, A; Tomaru, T; Whitehorn, N; Wilson, B; Yadav, A; Zahn, O

    2015-01-01

    Atmosphere is one of the most important noise sources for ground-based Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments. By increasing optical loading on the detectors, it amplifies their effective noise, while its fluctuations introduce spatial and temporal correlations between detected signals. We present a physically motivated 3d-model of the atmosphere total intensity emission in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. We derive an analytical estimate for the correlation between detectors time-ordered data as a function of the instrument and survey design, as well as several atmospheric parameters such as wind, relative humidity, temperature and turbulence characteristics. Using numerical computation, we examine the effect of each physical parameter on the correlations in the time series of a given experiment. We then use a parametric-likelihood approach to validate the modeling and estimate atmosphere parameters from the POLARBEAR-I project first season data set. We compare our results to previous st...

  9. Ground-based optical observation system for LEO objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, T.; Kurosaki, H.; Oda, H.; Tagawa, M.

    2015-08-01

    We propose a ground-based optical observation system for monitoring LEO objects, which uses numerous optical sensors to cover a vast region of the sky. Its potential in terms of detection and orbital determination were examined. About 30 cm LEO objects at 1000 km altitude are detectable using an 18 cm telescope, a CCD camera and the analysis software developed. Simulations and a test observation showed that two longitudinally separate observation sites with arrays of optical sensors can identify the same objects from numerous data sets and determine their orbits precisely. The proposed system may complement or replace the current radar observation system for monitoring LEO objects, like space-situation awareness, in the near future.

  10. A second simulated criticality accident dosimetry experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, N

    1973-01-01

    This experiment was undertaken to facilitate training in criticality dose assessment by UKAEA and BNFL establishments with potential criticality hazards. Personal dosemeters, coins, samples of hair, etc. supplied by the seven participating establishments were attached to a man-phantom filled with a solution of sodium nitrate (simulating 'body-sodium'), and exposed to a burst of radiation from the AWRE pulsed reactor VIPER. The neutron and photon doses were each several hundred rads. Participants made two sets of dose assessments. The first, made solely from the evidence of their routine dosemeters the activation of body-sodium and standard monitoring data, simulated the initial dose assessment that would be made before the circumstances of a real incident were established. The second was made when the position and orientation of the phantom relative to the reactor and the shielding (20 cm of copper) between the reactor core and the phantom were disclosed. Neutron and photon dose assessments for comparison wit...

  11. The STACEE Ground-Based Gamma-ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragan, Ken

    2002-04-01

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a ground-based instrument designed to study astrophysical sources of gamma rays in the energy range from 50 to 500 GeV using an array of heliostat mirrors at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in New Mexico. The mirrors collect Cherenkov light generated by gamma-ray air showers and concentrate it onto cameras composed of photomultiplier tubes. The STACEE instrument is now complete, and uses a total of 64 heliostats. Prototype instruments, using smaller numbers of heliostats, have previously detected gamma emission from both the Crab Nebula and the Active Galactic Nucleus Mrk421. The complete instrument has a lower threshold -- approximately 50 GeV -- than those prototypes due to superior triggering and electronics, including flash ADCs for every channel.We will discuss the performance of the complete instrument in its first full season of operation, and present preliminary results of selected observations.

  12. Unique cell culture systems for ground based research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Marian L.

    1990-01-01

    The horizontally rotating fluid-filled, membrane oxygenated bioreactors developed at NASA Johnson for spacecraft applications provide a powerful tool for ground-based research. Three-dimensional aggregates formed by cells cultured on microcarrier beads are useful for study of cell-cell interactions and tissue development. By comparing electron micrographs of plant seedlings germinated during Shuttle flight 61-C and in an earth-based rotating bioreactor it is shown that some effects of microgravity are mimicked. Bioreactors used in the UAH Bioreactor Laboratory will make it possible to determine some of the effects of altered gravity at the cellular level. Bioreactors can be valuable for performing critical, preliminary-to-spaceflight experiments as well as medical investigations such as in vitro tumor cell growth and chemotherapeutic drug response; the enrichment of stem cells from bone marrow; and the effect of altered gravity on bone and muscle cell growth and function and immune response depression.

  13. A simulation of data acquisition system for SSC experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watase, Y.; Ikeda, H. [National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1989-04-01

    A simulation on some parts of the data acquisition system was performed using a general purpose simulation language GPSS. Several results of the simulation are discussed for the data acquisition system for the SSC experiment.

  14. [Simulation in medicine: first experiences under hemodialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duranti, Ennio; Calzeroni, Gino; Venneri, Francesco; Marziali, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Education and practical training in medicine is neglected and pass directly from theory to do on the field, while also each task requires the acquisition of health behaviors that are aware and accountable to the outreach. In hemodialysis is necessary to create synergies and partnerships between different cooperating figures. Addressing organizational and legal protection of the professionals (Clinical Risk). Acquiring operational capabilities of team work. Managing the team roles and functions.It is necessary then to acquire a modern methodology where the simulation represents the main tool, "the mistake" need to "learn" and the acquisition of "awareness" about event handling (in this case on Hemodialysis), in the context of clinical scenarios absolutely realistic.The methodology is based on simulated tasks using past experience as a business tool and innovative research. Debriefing and discussion with those involved and finally debrief collegiate looking for active/latent errors and use of international guidelines. Use of indicators to measure and review of performance during the various events and proactively promoting the reduction of the error.Among the types of participants was clear the minor presence of doctors of hemodialysis, probably for the wrong feeling of being checked and then judged in carrying out of actions made complex by urgency. In addition participating physicians have all stressed the usefulness of simulations of unusual events within the Hemodialysis treatment, but that if not solved can lead to death of the patient.Simulation under hemodialysis, although its first steps, appears to be an effective methodology able to stimulate self-criticism of the operators, but still with hesitations and fears above all by the nephrologists timorous of being judged more on technical skills than on organizational skills and leadership.

  15. Simulation of a complete inelastic neutron scattering experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, H.; Lefmann, K.; Lake, B.; Nielsen, K.; Skaarup, P.

    A simulation of an inelastic neutron scattering experiment on the high-temperature superconductor La2-xSrxCuO4 is presented. The complete experiment, including sample, is simulated using an interface between the experiment control program and the simulation software package (McStas) and is compared with the experimental data. Simulating the entire experiment is an attractive alternative to the usual method of convoluting the model cross section with the resolution function, especially if the resolution function is nontrivial.

  16. Simulation of a complete inelastic neutron scattering experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, H.; Lefmann, K.; Lake, B.;

    2002-01-01

    A simulation of an inelastic neutron scattering experiment on the high-temperature superconductor La2-xSrxCuO4 is presented. The complete experiment, including sample, is simulated using an interface between the experiment control program and the simulation software package (McStas) and is compared...

  17. 微重力下固体材料燃烧特性的地面实验模拟方法研究%A Ground-based Experimental Method for Solid Material Flammability Simulation in Microgravity Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王双峰; 肖原

    2012-01-01

    The flame spread characteristics over thermally thin solid materials and the flammability limits of such materials have been investigated in horizontal narrow channels by experimental measurements and numerical simulations. The mechanism of narrow channel device to produce a microgravity environment is discussed. For the low forced flow velocities typically expected in space facilities, flame spread characteristics in microgravity can be effectively reproduced in narrow channels with height of 10~14 mm. Moreover, the measured flammability data in the narrow channels are close to those obtained in microgravity environment. The maximum buoyant velocity is estimated to be about 5 cm/s in the narrow channels. Compared with typical normal gravity test channel with relatively large height, buoyant effect is essentially suppressed. Consequently, a simulated microgravity environment can be produced with the horizontal narrow channels.%在对水平窄通道内典型热薄固体材料的燃烧特性进行实验和数值模拟的基础上,分析了材料表面火焰传播、材料可燃极限与微重力实验结果的相似性,以及窄通道实验模拟微重力材料燃烧特性的机理。研究表明,在航天器舱内常见的低速气流条件下,高度为10mm~14mm的窄通道能较好地模拟微重力环境中材料表面火焰传播的特征,并复现材料的可燃极限曲线;窄通道内火焰诱导的浮力流动速度的最大值约为5cm/s,与常规实验通道(高度较大)相比,窄通道能够有效地限制自然对流,进而提供模拟微重力条件下材料燃烧特性的实验环境。

  18. Experiments and DEM Simulations of Granular Ratcheting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorzi Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we studied the effect of cyclic loading on a granular packing by means of numerical simulations and experiments. A confined packing of glass beads was prepared and one of the walls was moved cyclically with a prescribed amplitude of the order of the particle diameter. Different amplitudes were tested, and their effect on the free surface evolution, the force transmitted to the moving wall and the displacement patterns in the material was characterized. Discrete numerical simulations were also carried out with the specific purpose of evaluating the effect of the particle shape on the dynamics of the system. The displacement amplitude of the moving wall was shown to increase the maximum force experienced at the end of the compressive phase of the wall movement; the angularity of the particles had a similar effect. Force-wall displacement curves displayed a peculiar hysteretic behavior. The evolution of the system towards an asymptotic state was shown to be faster for spheres than for angular particles; the latter displayed an interesting long-time evolution of the force-displacement paths which deserves deeper investigations.

  19. Background simulation for the COBRA-experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quante, Thomas [TU Dortmund, Institut fuer Physik (Germany); Collaboration: COBRA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    COBRA is a next-generation experiment searching for neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay using CdZnTe semiconductor detectors. The main focus is on {sup 116}Cd, with a Q-value of 2813.5 keV well above the highest dominant naturally occurring gamma lines. By measuring the half-life of the 0νββ decay, it is possible to clarify the nature of the neutrino as either Dirac or Majorana particle and furthermore to determine the effective Majorana mass. COBRA is currently in the demonstrator phase to study possible background contributions and gain information about the longterm stability of the used detectors. For this purpose a demonstrator array made up of 64 Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe) semiconductor detectors in coplanar grid configuration was designed and realised at the Gran Sasso Underground laboratory (LNGS) in Italy. Simulations of the whole demonstrator setup are ongoing to reproduce the measured spectra for each detector. This is done in two steps. The first uses the Geant4 based framework VENOM for tracking and energy deposition inside each detector. Detector effects like the energy resolution and electron trapping have to be applied in the second step. The used detector geometry has to be verified against calibration measurements. This talk gives an overview of the current simulation status.

  20. Ground-based observations of Kepler asteroseismic targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uyttterhoeven , K.; Karoff, Christoffer

    2010-01-01

    We present the ground-based activities within the different working groups of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium (KASC). The activities aim at the systematic characterization of the 5000+ KASC targets, and at the collection of ground-based follow-up time-series data of selected promising...

  1. Magnetized plasma jets in experiment and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrafel, Peter; Greenly, John; Gourdain, Pierre; Seyler, Charles; Blesener, Kate; Kusse, Bruce

    2013-10-01

    This research focuses on the initial ablation phase of a thing (20 micron) Al foil driven on the 1 MA-in-100 ns COBRA through a 5 mm diameter cathode in a radial configuration. In these experiments, ablated surface plasma (ASP) on the top of the foil and a strongly collimated axial plasma jet can be observed developing midway through current-rise. Our goal is to establish the relationship between the ASP and the jet. These jets are of interest for their potential relevance to astrophysical phenomena. An independently pulsed 200 μF capacitor bank with a Helmholtz coil pair allows for the imposition of a slow (150 μs) and strong (~1 T) axial magnetic field on the experiment. Application of this field eliminates significant azimuthal asymmetry in extreme ultraviolet emission of the ASP. This asymmetry is likely a current filamentation instability. Laser-backlit shadowgraphy and interferometry confirm that the jet-hollowing is correlated with the application of the axial magnetic field. Visible spectroscopic measurements show a doppler shift consistent with an azimuthal velocity in the ASP caused by the applied B-field. Computational simulations with the XMHD code PERSEUS qualitatively agree with the experimental results.

  2. Movable Ground Based Recovery System for Reuseable Space Flight Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver, George L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A reusable space flight launch system is configured to eliminate complex descent and landing systems from the space flight hardware and move them to maneuverable ground based systems. Precision landing of the reusable space flight hardware is enabled using a simple, light weight aerodynamic device on board the flight hardware such as a parachute, and one or more translating ground based vehicles such as a hovercraft that include active speed, orientation and directional control. The ground based vehicle maneuvers itself into position beneath the descending flight hardware, matching its speed and direction and captures the flight hardware. The ground based vehicle will contain propulsion, command and GN&C functionality as well as space flight hardware landing cushioning and retaining hardware. The ground based vehicle propulsion system enables longitudinal and transverse maneuverability independent of its physical heading.

  3. Herbicide Persistence in Seawater Simulation Experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Mercurio

    Full Text Available Herbicides are detected year-round in marine waters, including those of the World Heritage listed Great Barrier Reef (GBR. The few previous studies that have investigated herbicide persistence in seawater generally reported half-lives in the order of months, and several studies were too short to detect significant degradation. Here we investigated the persistence of eight herbicides commonly detected in the GBR or its catchments in standard OECD simulation flask experiments, but with the aim to mimic natural conditions similar to those found on the GBR (i.e., relatively low herbicide concentrations, typical temperatures, light and microbial communities. Very little degradation was recorded over the standard 60 d period (Experiment 1 so a second experiment was extended to 365 d. Half-lives of PSII herbicides ametryn, atrazine, diuron, hexazinone and tebuthiuron were consistently greater than a year, indicating high persistence. The detection of atrazine and diuron metabolites and longer persistence in mercuric chloride-treated seawater confirmed that biodegradation contributed to the breakdown of herbicides. The shortest half-life recorded was 88 d for growth-regulating herbicide 2,4-D at 31°C in the dark, while the fatty acid-inhibitor metolachlor exhibited a minimum half-life of 281 d. The presence of moderate light and elevated temperatures affected the persistence of most of the herbicides; however, the scale and direction of the differences were not predictable and were likely due to changes in microbial community composition. The persistence estimates here represent some of the first appropriate data for application in risk assessments for herbicide exposure in tropical marine systems. The long persistence of herbicides identified in the present study helps explain detection of herbicides in nearshore waters of the GBR year round. Little degradation of these herbicides would be expected during the wet season with runoff and associated

  4. Contrail study with ground-based cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Schumann

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Photogrammetric methods and analysis results for contrails observed with wide-angle cameras are described. Four cameras of two different types (view angle −1. With this information, the aircraft causing the contrails are identified by comparison to traffic waypoint data. The observations are compared with synthetic camera pictures of contrails simulated with the contrail prediction model CoCiP, a Lagrangian model using air traffic movement data and numerical weather prediction (NWP data as input. The results provide tests for the NWP and contrail models. The cameras show spreading and thickening contrails suggesting ice-supersaturation in the ambient air. The ice-supersaturated layer is found thicker and more humid in this case than predicted by the NWP model used. The simulated and observed contrail positions agree up to differences caused by uncertain wind data. The contrail widths, which depend on wake vortex spreading, ambient shear and turbulence, were partly wider than simulated.

  5. Element test experiments and simulations: from dry towards cohesive powders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imole, O.I.; Kumar, N.; Luding, S.; Onate, E.; Owen, D.R.J.

    2011-01-01

    Findings from experiments and particle simulations for dry and cohesive granular materials are presented with the goal to reach quantitative agreement between simulations and experiments. Results for the compressibility, tested with the FT4 Powder Rheometer are presented. The first simulation result

  6. A Fast Method for Embattling Optimization of Ground-Based Radar Surveillance Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H.; Cheng, H.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, J.

    A growing number of space activities have created an orbital debris environment that poses increasing impact risks to existing space systems and human space flight. For the safety of in-orbit spacecraft, a lot of observation facilities are needed to catalog space objects, especially in low earth orbit. Surveillance of Low earth orbit objects are mainly rely on ground-based radar, due to the ability limitation of exist radar facilities, a large number of ground-based radar need to build in the next few years in order to meet the current space surveillance demands. How to optimize the embattling of ground-based radar surveillance network is a problem to need to be solved. The traditional method for embattling optimization of ground-based radar surveillance network is mainly through to the detection simulation of all possible stations with cataloged data, and makes a comprehensive comparative analysis of various simulation results with the combinational method, and then selects an optimal result as station layout scheme. This method is time consuming for single simulation and high computational complexity for the combinational analysis, when the number of stations increases, the complexity of optimization problem will be increased exponentially, and cannot be solved with traditional method. There is no better way to solve this problem till now. In this paper, target detection procedure was simplified. Firstly, the space coverage of ground-based radar was simplified, a space coverage projection model of radar facilities in different orbit altitudes was built; then a simplified objects cross the radar coverage model was established according to the characteristics of space objects orbit motion; after two steps simplification, the computational complexity of the target detection was greatly simplified, and simulation results shown the correctness of the simplified results. In addition, the detection areas of ground-based radar network can be easily computed with the

  7. Ground-Based Tests of Spacecraft Polymeric Materials under OXY-GEN Plasma-Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernik, Vladimir; Novikov, Lev; Gaidar, Anna

    2016-07-01

    Spacecraft LEO mission is accompanied by destruction of polymeric material surface under influence of atomic oxygen flow. Sources of molecular, plasma and ion beams are used for the accelerated ground-based tests of spacecraft materials. In the work application of oxygen plasma accelerator of a duoplasmatron type is described. Plasma particles have been accelerated up to average speed of 13-16 km/s. Influence of such beam on materials leads to more intensive destruction of polymers than in LEO. This fact allows to execute tests in the accelerated time scale by a method of an effective fluence. Special measures were given to decrease a concentration of both gaseous and electrode material impurities in the oxygen beam. In the work the results of simulative tests of spacecraft materials and experiments on LEO are considered. Comparison of plasma beam simulation with LEO data has shown conformity for structures of a number of polymeric materials. The relative erosion yields (normalized with respect to polyimide) of the tested materials are shown practically equal to those in LEO. The obtained results give grounds for using the plasma-generation mode with ion energies of 20-30 eV to accelerated testing of spacecraft materials for long -term LEO missions.

  8. The Marble Experiment: Overview and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, M. R.; Murphy, T. J.; Cobble, J. A.; Fincke, J. R.; Haines, B. M.; Hamilton, C. E.; Lee, M. N.; Oertel, J. A.; Olson, R. E.; Randolph, R. B.; Schmidt, D. W.; Shah, R. C.; Smidt, J. M.; Tregillis, I. L.

    2015-11-01

    The Marble ICF platform has recently been launched on both OMEGA and NIF with the goal to investigate the influence of heterogeneous mix on fusion burn. The unique separated reactant capsule design consists of an ``engineered'' CH capsule filled with deuterated plastic foam that contains pores or voids that are filled with tritium gas. Initially the deuterium and tritium are separated, but as the implosion proceeds, the D and T mix, producing a DT signature. The results of these experiments will be used to inform a probability density function (PDF) burn modelling approach for un-resolved cell morphology. Initial targets for platform development have consisted of either fine-pore foams or gas mixtures, with the goal to field the engineered foams in 2016. An overview of the Marble experimental campaign will be presented and simulations will be discussed. This work is supported by US DOE/NNSA, performed at LANL, operated by LANS LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  9. Liquid crystal interfaces: Experiments, simulations and biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Piotr

    Interfacial phenomena are ubiquitous and extremely important in various aspects of biological and industrial processes. For example, many liquid crystal applications start by alignment with a surface. The underlying mechanisms of the molecular organization of liquid crystals at an interface are still under intensive study and continue to be important to the display industry in order to develop better and/or new display technology. My dissertation research has been devoted to studying how complex liquid crystals can be guided to organize at an interface, and to using my findings to develop practical applications. Specifically, I have been working on developing biosensors using liquid-crystal/surfactant/lipid/protein interactions as well as the alignment of low-symmetry liquid crystals for potential new display and optomechanical applications. The biotechnology industry needs better ways of sensing biomaterials and identifying various nanoscale events at biological interfaces and in aqueous solutions. Sensors in which the recognition material is a liquid crystal naturally connects the existing knowledge and experience of the display and biotechnology industries together with surface and soft matter sciences. This dissertation thus mainly focuses on the delicate phenomena that happen at liquid interfaces. In the introduction, I start by defining the interface and discuss its structure and the relevant interfacial forces. I then introduce the general characteristics of biosensors and, in particular, describe the design of biosensors that employ liquid crystal/aqueous solution interfaces. I further describe the basic properties of liquid crystal materials that are relevant for liquid crystal-based biosensing applications. In CHAPTER 2, I describe the simulation methods and experimental techniques used in this dissertation. In CHAPTER 3 and CHAPTER 4, I present my computer simulation work. CHAPTER 3 presents insight of how liquid crystal molecules are aligned by

  10. Reproducible computational biology experiments with SED-ML--the Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Waltemath, Dagmar; Adams, Richard; Bergmann, Frank T; Hucka, Michael; Kolpakov, Fedor; Miller, Andrew K; Moraru, Ion I; Nickerson, David; Sahle, Sven; Snoep, Jacky L; Le Novère, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    .... In this article, we present the Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML). SED-ML encodes in a computer-readable exchange format the information required by MIASE to enable reproduction of simulation experiments...

  11. Simulation of Stochastic Loads for Fatigue Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Brincker, Rune

    A simple direct simulation method for stochastic fatigue load generation is described in this paper. The simulation method is based on the assumption that only the peaks of the load process significantly affect the fatigue life. The method requires the conditional distribution functions of load...... second using an IBM PC. Finally the proposed simulation method for fatigue load generation is tested by comparing some fatigue damage measures obtained by the simulation methods....

  12. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of directional wetting: Comparing simulations to experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, H.P.; Sotthewes, K.; Swigchem, van J.; Zandvliet, H.J.W.; Kooij, E.S.

    2013-01-01

    Lattice Boltzmann Modeling (LBM) simulations were performed on the dynamic behavior of liquid droplets on chemically striped patterned surfaces, ultimately with the aim to develop a predictive tool enabling reliable design of future experiments. The simulations accurately mimic experimental results,

  13. Simulation of a complete inelastic neutron scattering experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Edwards, H; Nielsen, K; Skaarup, P; Lake, B

    2002-01-01

    A simulation of an inelastic neutron scattering experiment on the high-temperature superconductor La sub 2 sub - sub x Sr sub x CuO sub 4 is presented. The complete experiment, including sample, is simulated using an interface between the experiment control program and the simulation software package (McStas) and is compared with the experimental data. Simulating the entire experiment is an attractive alternative to the usual method of convoluting the model cross section with the resolution function, especially if the resolution function is nontrivial. (orig.)

  14. Global Three-Dimensional Ionospheric Data Assimilation Model Using Ground-based GPS and Radio Occultation Total Electron Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jann-Yenq Liu, Tiger; Lin, Chi-Yen; Matsuo, Tomoko; Lin, Charles C. H.; Tsai, Ho-Fang; Chen, Chao-Yen

    2017-04-01

    An ionospheric data assimilation approach presented here is based on the Gauss-Markov Kalman filter with International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) as the background model and designed to assimilate the total electron content (TEC) observed from ground-based GPS receivers and space-based radio occultation (RO) of FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C) or FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2 (F7/C2). The Kalman filter consists of the forecast step according to Gauss-Markov process and measurement update step. Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) show that the Gauss-Markov Kalman filter procedure can increase the accuracy of the data assimilation analysis over the procedure consisting of the measurement update step alone. Moreover, in comparing to F3/C, the dense F7/C2 RO observation can further increase the model accuracy significantly. Validating the data assimilation results with the vertical TEC in Global Ionosphere Maps and that derived from ground-based GPS measurements, as well as the ionospheric F2-peak height and electron density sounded by ionosondes is also carried out. Both the OSSE results and the observation validations confirm that the developed data assimilation model can be used to reconstruct the three-dimensional electron density in the ionosphere satisfactorily.

  15. Simulation of Stochastic Loads for Fatigue Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Brincker, Rune

    1989-01-01

    A simple direct simulation method for stochastic fatigue-load generation is described in this paper. The simulation method is based on the assumption that only the peaks of the load process significantly affect the fatigue life. The method requires the conditional distribution functions of load...... process by a Markov process. Two different spectra from two tubular joints in an offshore structure (one narrow banded and one wide banded) are considered in an example. The results show that the simple direct method is quite efficient and results in a simulation speed of about 3000 load cycles per second...... ranges given the last peak values. Analytical estimates of these distribution functions are presented in the paper and compared with estimates based on a more accurate simulation method. In the more accurate simulation method samples at equidistant times are generated by approximating the stochastic load...

  16. RTTOV-gb - Adapting the fast radiative transfer model RTTOV for the assimilation of ground-based microwave radiometer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Francesco; Cimini, Domenico; Hocking, James; Martinet, Pauline; Kneifel, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) is the single most important under-sampled part of the atmosphere. According to the WMO Statement Of Guidance For Global Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP), temperature and humidity profiles (in cloudy areas) are among the four critical atmospheric variables not adequately measured in the PBL. Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR) provide temperature and humidity profiles in both clear- and cloudy-sky conditions with high temporal resolution and low-to-moderate vertical resolution, with information mostly residing in the PBL. Ground-based MWR offer to bridge this observational gap by providing continuous temperature and humidity information in the PBL. The MWR data assimilation into NWP models may be particularly important in nowcasting and severe weather initiation. The assimilation of thermodynamic profiles retrieved from MWR data has been recently experimented, but a way to possibly increase the impact is to directly assimilate measured radiances instead of retrieved profiles. The assimilation of observed radiances in a variational scheme requires the following tools: (i) a fast radiative transfer (RT) model to compute the simulated radiances at MWR channels from the NWP model fields (ii) the partial derivatives (Jacobians) of the fast radiative transfer model with respect to control variables to optimize the distances of the atmospheric state from both the first guess and the observations. Such a RT model is available from the EUMETSAT NWPSAF (Numerical Weather Prediction Satellite Application Facility) and well accepted in the NWP community: RTTOV. This model was developed for nadir-viewing passive visible, infrared, and microwave satellite radiometers, spectrometers and interferometers. It has been modified to handle ground-based microwave radiometer observations. This version of RTTOV, called RTTOV-gb, provides the tools needed to exploit ground-based upward looking MWR brightness temperatures into NWP variational data

  17. Reproducible computational biology experiments with SED-ML--the Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltemath, Dagmar; Adams, Richard; Bergmann, Frank T; Hucka, Michael; Kolpakov, Fedor; Miller, Andrew K; Moraru, Ion I; Nickerson, David; Sahle, Sven; Snoep, Jacky L; Le Novère, Nicolas

    2011-12-15

    The increasing use of computational simulation experiments to inform modern biological research creates new challenges to annotate, archive, share and reproduce such experiments. The recently published Minimum Information About a Simulation Experiment (MIASE) proposes a minimal set of information that should be provided to allow the reproduction of simulation experiments among users and software tools. In this article, we present the Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML). SED-ML encodes in a computer-readable exchange format the information required by MIASE to enable reproduction of simulation experiments. It has been developed as a community project and it is defined in a detailed technical specification and additionally provides an XML schema. The version of SED-ML described in this publication is Level 1 Version 1. It covers the description of the most frequent type of simulation experiments in the area, namely time course simulations. SED-ML documents specify which models to use in an experiment, modifications to apply on the models before using them, which simulation procedures to run on each model, what analysis results to output, and how the results should be presented. These descriptions are independent of the underlying model implementation. SED-ML is a software-independent format for encoding the description of simulation experiments; it is not specific to particular simulation tools. Here, we demonstrate that with the growing software support for SED-ML we can effectively exchange executable simulation descriptions. With SED-ML, software can exchange simulation experiment descriptions, enabling the validation and reuse of simulation experiments in different tools. Authors of papers reporting simulation experiments can make their simulation protocols available for other scientists to reproduce the results. Because SED-ML is agnostic about exact modeling language(s) used, experiments covering models from different fields of research

  18. Reproducible computational biology experiments with SED-ML - The Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The increasing use of computational simulation experiments to inform modern biological research creates new challenges to annotate, archive, share and reproduce such experiments. The recently published Minimum Information About a Simulation Experiment (MIASE) proposes a minimal set of information that should be provided to allow the reproduction of simulation experiments among users and software tools. Results In this article, we present the Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML). SED-ML encodes in a computer-readable exchange format the information required by MIASE to enable reproduction of simulation experiments. It has been developed as a community project and it is defined in a detailed technical specification and additionally provides an XML schema. The version of SED-ML described in this publication is Level 1 Version 1. It covers the description of the most frequent type of simulation experiments in the area, namely time course simulations. SED-ML documents specify which models to use in an experiment, modifications to apply on the models before using them, which simulation procedures to run on each model, what analysis results to output, and how the results should be presented. These descriptions are independent of the underlying model implementation. SED-ML is a software-independent format for encoding the description of simulation experiments; it is not specific to particular simulation tools. Here, we demonstrate that with the growing software support for SED-ML we can effectively exchange executable simulation descriptions. Conclusions With SED-ML, software can exchange simulation experiment descriptions, enabling the validation and reuse of simulation experiments in different tools. Authors of papers reporting simulation experiments can make their simulation protocols available for other scientists to reproduce the results. Because SED-ML is agnostic about exact modeling language(s) used, experiments covering models from

  19. Reproducible computational biology experiments with SED-ML - The Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waltemath Dagmar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing use of computational simulation experiments to inform modern biological research creates new challenges to annotate, archive, share and reproduce such experiments. The recently published Minimum Information About a Simulation Experiment (MIASE proposes a minimal set of information that should be provided to allow the reproduction of simulation experiments among users and software tools. Results In this article, we present the Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML. SED-ML encodes in a computer-readable exchange format the information required by MIASE to enable reproduction of simulation experiments. It has been developed as a community project and it is defined in a detailed technical specification and additionally provides an XML schema. The version of SED-ML described in this publication is Level 1 Version 1. It covers the description of the most frequent type of simulation experiments in the area, namely time course simulations. SED-ML documents specify which models to use in an experiment, modifications to apply on the models before using them, which simulation procedures to run on each model, what analysis results to output, and how the results should be presented. These descriptions are independent of the underlying model implementation. SED-ML is a software-independent format for encoding the description of simulation experiments; it is not specific to particular simulation tools. Here, we demonstrate that with the growing software support for SED-ML we can effectively exchange executable simulation descriptions. Conclusions With SED-ML, software can exchange simulation experiment descriptions, enabling the validation and reuse of simulation experiments in different tools. Authors of papers reporting simulation experiments can make their simulation protocols available for other scientists to reproduce the results. Because SED-ML is agnostic about exact modeling language(s used

  20. Experiment Simulation Configurations Used in DUNE CDR

    CERN Document Server

    Alion, T; Bashyal, A; Bass, M; Bishai, M; Cherdack, D; Diwan, M; Djurcic, Z; Evans, J; Fernandez-Martinez, E; Fields, L; Fleming, B; Gran, R; Guenette, R; Hewes, J; Hogan, M; Hylen, J; Junk, T; Kohn, S; LeBrun, P; Lundberg, B; Marchionni, A; Morris, C; Papadimitriou, V; Rameika, R; Rucinski, R; Soldner-Rembold, S; Sorel, M; Urheim, J; Viren, B; Whitehead, L; Wilson, R; Worcester, E; Zeller, G

    2016-01-01

    The LBNF/DUNE CDR describes the proposed physics program and experimental design at the conceptual design phase. Volume 2, entitled The Physics Program for DUNE at LBNF, outlines the scientific objectives and describes the physics studies that the DUNE collaboration will perform to address these objectives. The long-baseline physics sensitivity calculations presented in the DUNE CDR rely upon simulation of the neutrino beam line, simulation of neutrino interactions in the far detector, and a parameterized analysis of detector performance and systematic uncertainty. The purpose of this posting is to provide the results of these simulations to the community to facilitate phenomenological studies of long-baseline oscillation at LBNF/DUNE. Additionally, this posting includes GDML of the DUNE single-phase far detector for use in simulations. DUNE welcomes those interested in performing this work as members of the collaboration, but also recognizes the benefit of making these configurations readily available to the...

  1. Metrology of ground-based satellite validation: co-location mismatch and smoothing issues of total ozone comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Verhoelst

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Comparisons with ground-based correlative measurements constitute a key component in the validation of satellite data on atmospheric composition. The error budget of these comparisons contains not only the measurement errors but also several terms related to differences in sampling and smoothing of the inhomogeneous and variable atmospheric field. A versatile system for Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs, named OSSSMOSE, is used here to quantify these terms. Based on the application of pragmatic observation operators onto high-resolution atmospheric fields, it allows a simulation of each individual measurement, and consequently, also of the differences to be expected from spatial and temporal field variations between both measurements making up a comparison pair. As a topical case study, the system is used to evaluate the error budget of total ozone column (TOC comparisons between GOME-type direct fitting (GODFITv3 satellite retrievals from GOME/ERS2, SCIAMACHY/Envisat, and GOME-2/MetOp-A, and ground-based direct-sun and zenith–sky reference measurements such as those from Dobsons, Brewers, and zenith-scattered light (ZSL-DOAS instruments, respectively. In particular, the focus is placed on the GODFITv3 reprocessed GOME-2A data record vs. the ground-based instruments contributing to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC. The simulations are found to reproduce the actual measurements almost to within the measurement uncertainties, confirming that the OSSE approach and its technical implementation are appropriate. This work reveals that many features of the comparison spread and median difference can be understood as due to metrological differences, even when using strict co-location criteria. In particular, sampling difference errors exceed measurement uncertainties regularly at most mid- and high-latitude stations, with values up to 10 % and more in extreme cases. Smoothing difference errors only

  2. Metrology of ground-based satellite validation: co-location mismatch and smoothing issues of total ozone comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoelst, T.; Granville, J.; Hendrick, F.; Köhler, U.; Lerot, C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Redondas, A.; Van Roozendael, M.; Lambert, J.-C.

    2015-12-01

    Comparisons with ground-based correlative measurements constitute a key component in the validation of satellite data on atmospheric composition. The error budget of these comparisons contains not only the measurement errors but also several terms related to differences in sampling and smoothing of the inhomogeneous and variable atmospheric field. A versatile system for Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs), named OSSSMOSE, is used here to quantify these terms. Based on the application of pragmatic observation operators onto high-resolution atmospheric fields, it allows a simulation of each individual measurement, and consequently, also of the differences to be expected from spatial and temporal field variations between both measurements making up a comparison pair. As a topical case study, the system is used to evaluate the error budget of total ozone column (TOC) comparisons between GOME-type direct fitting (GODFITv3) satellite retrievals from GOME/ERS2, SCIAMACHY/Envisat, and GOME-2/MetOp-A, and ground-based direct-sun and zenith-sky reference measurements such as those from Dobsons, Brewers, and zenith-scattered light (ZSL-)DOAS instruments, respectively. In particular, the focus is placed on the GODFITv3 reprocessed GOME-2A data record vs. the ground-based instruments contributing to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). The simulations are found to reproduce the actual measurements almost to within the measurement uncertainties, confirming that the OSSE approach and its technical implementation are appropriate. This work reveals that many features of the comparison spread and median difference can be understood as due to metrological differences, even when using strict co-location criteria. In particular, sampling difference errors exceed measurement uncertainties regularly at most mid- and high-latitude stations, with values up to 10 % and more in extreme cases. Smoothing difference errors only play a role in the

  3. Dynamic System Simulation of the KRUSTY Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kimpland, Robert Herbert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-09

    The proposed KRUSTY experiment is a demonstration of a reactor operating at power. The planned experimental configuration includes a highly enriched uranium (HEU) reflected core, cooled by multiple heat pipes leading to Stirling engines for primary heat rejection. Operating power is expected to be approximately four (4) to five (5) kilowatts with a core temperature above 1,000 K. No data is available on any historical reactor employing HEU metal that operated over the temperature range required for the KRUSTY experiment. Further, no reactor has operated with heat pipes as the primary cooling mechanism. Historic power reactors have employed either natural or forced convection so data on their operation is not directly applicable to the KRUSTY experiment. The primary purpose of the system model once developed and refined by data from these component experiments, will be used to plan the KRUSTY experiment. This planning will include expected behavior of the reactor from start-up, through various transient conditions where cooling begins to become present and effective, and finally establishment of steady-state. In addition, the model can provide indicators of anticipated off-normal events and appropriate operator response to those conditions. This information can be used to develop specific experiment operating procedures and aids to guide the operators in conduct of the experiment.

  4. Simulations and Experiments in Philosophy of Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causey, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two interactive computer programs that simulate abstract relationships and require students to use inductive reasoning, form and test hypotheses, and analyze functions of systems and the reasoning processes required to understand them. Their development and use in college philosophy of science courses is outlined, and possible future…

  5. Guiding Simulations and Experiments using Continuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    for dimension N, but not for larger dimensions. In other words, a model is usually implemented as a carefully derived implicit integration scheme tailored for numerically stable simulations with the highest spacial resolution admitted by the computational power available. On the other hand, stable numerical...

  6. Issues of health evaluation during simulated space mission to Mars. Part 1. Research methodology and methods used in experiment Mars-500

    OpenAIRE

    Roman М. Baevsky; Evgenie Y. Bersenev; Anna G. Chernikova

    2013-01-01

    Research methodology and methods used in experiment Mars-500 held at the Institute of Biomedical Problems of the Russian Academy of Sciences in 2009-2011 are considered. 6 volunteers were isolated during 520 days in a sealed ground-based facility simulating space ship. Along with studies of the Martian crew, a number of satellite research were also carried out, which were devoted to the long-term program of medical and ecological investigations. This program was aimed at the study of the dyna...

  7. Experiences on dynamic simulation software in chemical engineering education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komulainen, Tiina M.; Enemark-rasmussen, Rasmus; Sin, Gürkan

    2012-01-01

    Commercial process simulators are increasing interest in the chemical engineer education. In this paper, the use of commercial dynamic simulation software, D-SPICE® and K-Spice®, for three different chemical engineering courses is described and discussed. The courses cover the following topics......: basic chemical engineering, operability and safety analysis and process control. User experiences from both teachers and students are presented. The benefits of dynamic simulation as an additional teaching tool are discussed and summarized. The experiences confirm that commercial dynamic simulators...

  8. Closed loop simulations of the thermal experiments in LISA Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Gibert, Ferran; Karnesis, Nikolaos; Díaz-Aguiló, Marc; Mateos, Ignacio; Lobo, Alberto; Gesa, Lluís; Martín, Víctor; Lloro, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    The thermal experiments to be carried out onboard LISA Pathfinder (LPF) will provide essential information of the dependences of the instrument with respect to temperature variations. These thermal experiments must be modelled and simulated both to be validated for mission operations purposes and also to develop a data analysis tool able to characterise the temperature noise contribution to the instrument performance. Here we will present the models developed and the simulated signals for some of the experiments together with the corresponding interferometer readouts, the latter being computed by combining the thermal models with the global LTP (LISA Technology Package) simulator of the LTP Data Analysis team.

  9. Particle production during inflation and gravitational waves detectable by ground-based interferometers

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Jessica L.; Sorbo, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    Inflation typically predicts a quasi scale-invariant spectrum of gravitational waves. In models of slow-roll inflation, the amplitude of such a background is too small to allow direct detection without a dedicated space-based experiment such as the proposed BBO or DECIGO. In this paper we note that particle production during inflation can generate a feature in the spectrum of primordial gravitational waves. We discuss the possibility that such a feature might be detected by ground-based laser...

  10. Comparison of NO2 vertical profiles from satellite and ground based measurements over Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni, Pavan; Bortoli, Daniele; Costa, Maria João; Silva, Ana Maria; Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Giovanelli, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    The Intercomparison of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) vertical profiles, derived from the satellite based HALogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) measurements and from the ground based UV-VIS spectrometer GASCOD (Gas Analyzer Spectrometer Correlating Optical Differences) observations at the Mario Zucchelli Station (MZS), in Antarctica, are done for the first time. It is shown here that both datasets are in good agreement showing the same features in terms of magnitude, profile structure, a...

  11. Polar-direct-drive simulations and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marozas, J.A.; Marshall, F.J.; Craxton, R.S.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Skupsky, S.; Bonino, M.J.; Collins, T.J.B.; Epstein, R.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.; Knauer, J.P.; McCrory, R.L.; McKenty, P.W.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Noyes, S.G.; Radha, P.B.; Sangster, T.C.; Seka, W.; Smalyuk, V.A.

    2006-05-17

    Polar direct drive (PDD) will allow direct-drive ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as it is configured for x-ray drive. Optimal drive uniformity is obtained via a combination of beam repointing, pulse shapes, spot shapes, and/or target design. This article describes progress in the development of standard and "Saturn" PDD target designs.

  12. DEM extraction and its accuracy analysis with ground-based SAR interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, J.; Yue, J. P.; Li, L. H.

    2014-03-01

    Two altimetry models extracting DEM (Digital Elevation Model) with the GBSAR (Ground-Based Synthetic Aperture Radar) technology are studied and their accuracies are analyzed in detail. The approximate and improved altimetry models of GBSAR were derived from the spaceborne radar altimetry based on the principles of the GBSAR technology. The error caused by the parallel ray approximation in the approximate model was analyzed quantitatively, and the results show that the errors cannot be ignored for the ground-based radar system. For the improved altimetry model, the elevation error expression can be acquired by simulating and analyzing the error propagation coefficients of baseline length, wavelength, differential phase and range distance in the mathematical model. By analyzing the elevation error with the baseline and range distance, the results show that the improved altimetry model is suitable for high-precision DEM and the accuracy can be improved by adjusting baseline and shortening slant distance.

  13. Phonocatalysis. An ab initio simulation experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwangnam Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Using simulations, we postulate and show that heterocatalysis on large-bandgap semiconductors can be controlled by substrate phonons, i.e., phonocatalysis. With ab initio calculations, including molecular dynamic simulations, the chemisorbed dissociation of XeF6 on h-BN surface leads to formation of XeF4 and two surface F/h-BN bonds. The reaction pathway and energies are evaluated, and the sorption and reaction emitted/absorbed phonons are identified through spectral analysis of the surface atomic motion. Due to large bandgap, the atomic vibration (phonon energy transfer channels dominate and among them is the match between the F/h-BN covalent bond stretching and the optical phonons. We show that the chemisorbed dissociation (the pathway activation ascent requires absorption of large-energy optical phonons. Then using progressively heavier isotopes of B and N atoms, we show that limiting these high-energy optical phonons inhibits the chemisorbed dissociation, i.e., controllable phonocatalysis.

  14. Plasma arc cutting technology: simulation and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantoro, G; Colombo, V; Concetti, A; Ghedini, E; Sanibondi, P; Zinzani, F; Rotundo, F [Department of Mechanical Engineering (D.I.E.M.) and Research Center for Applied Mathematics (C.I.R.A.M.), Alma Mater Studiorum-Universita di Bologna, Via Saragozza 8, 40123 Bologna (Italy); Dallavalle, S; Vancini, M, E-mail: emanuele.ghedini@unibo.it [Cebora S.p.A., Via Andrea Costa 24, 40057 Cadriano di Granarolo (Italy)

    2011-01-01

    Transferred arc plasma torches are widely used in industrial processes for cutting of metallic materials because of their ability to cut a wide range of metals with very high productivity. The process is characterized by a transferred electric arc established between an electrode inside the torch (the cathode) and another electrode, the metallic workpiece to be cut (the anode). In order to obtain a high quality cut and a high productivity, the plasma jet must be as collimated as possible and must have the higher achievable power density. Plasma modelling and numerical simulation can be very useful tools for the designing and optimizing these devices, but research is still in the making for finding a link between simulation of the plasma arc and a consistent prevision of cut quality. Numerical modelling of the behaviour of different types of transferred arc dual gas plasma torches can give an insight on the physical reasons for the industrial success of various design and process solutions that have appeared over the last years. Diagnostics based on high speed imaging and Schlieren photography can play an important role for investigating piercing, dross generation, pilot arcing and anode attachment location. Also, the behaviour of hafnium cathodes at high current levels at the beginning of their service life can been experimentally investigated, with the final aim of understanding the phenomena that take place during those initial piercing and cutting phases and optimizing the initial shape of the surface of the emissive insert exposed to plasma atmosphere.

  15. Ion tracking simulations for the WITCH experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Baczyk, Pawel

    2013-01-01

    The WITCH experiment (standing for Weak Interation Trap for CHarged particles) is dedicated to high-precision measurements of fundamental properties of electroweak interaction. Its first goal is to indirectly determine the electron-neutrino correlation coefficient in $\\beta$ decay by measuring the energy spectrum of the recoiling nuclei. For this, a set-up consisting of two Penning traps, a retardation spectrometer and an MCP (Microchannel Plate) detector was designed and coupled to REXTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN.

  16. Tunable nonlinear superconducting metamaterials: Experiment and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepanier, Melissa

    I present experimental and numerical simulation results for two types of nonlinear tunable superconducting metamaterials: 2D arrays of rf SQUIDs (radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices) as magnetic metamaterials and arrays of Josephson junction-loaded wires as electric metamaterials. The effective inductance of a Josephson junction is sensitive to dc current, temperature, and rf current. I took advantage of this property to design arrays of Josephson junction-loaded wires that present a tunable cutoff frequency and thus a tunable effective permittivity for propagating electromagnetic waves in a one-conductor waveguide. I measured the response of the metamaterial to each tuning parameter and found agreement with numerical simulations that employ the RCSJ (resistively and capacitively shunted junction) model. An rf SQUID is an analogue of an SRR (split ring resonator) with the gap capacitance replaced with a Josephson junction. Like the SRR the SQUID is a resonant structure with a frequency-dependent effective permeability. The difference between the SQUID and the SRR is that the effective inductance and thus effective permeability of the SQUID can be tuned with dc and rf flux, and temperature. Individual rf SQUID meta-atoms and two-dimensional arrays were designed and measured as a function of each tuning parameter and I have found excellent agreement with numerical simulations. There is also an interesting transparency feature that occurs for intermediate rf flux values. The tuning of SQUID arrays has a similar character to the tuning of individual rf SQUID meta-atoms. However, I found that the coupling between the SQUIDs increases the resonant frequency, decreases dc flux tuning, and introduces additional resonant modes. Another feature of arrays is disorder which suppresses the coherence of the response and negatively impacts the emergent properties of the metamaterial. The disorder was experimentally found to be mainly due to a dc flux

  17. The self-coherent camera-phasing sensor : from numerical simulations to early experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janin-Potiron, P.; Martinez, P.; Baudoz, P.; Carbillet, M.; Gouvret, C.; Spang, A.

    2016-07-01

    Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) are the next technological step when considering astrophysical observation. They will provide unprecedented angular resolution, thus improving the imaging capability and hopefully allow the imaging of the first Earth-like exoplanet. For technological and mechanical reasons, the primary mirror of these instruments will have to be segmented. To reach the image quality needed for the most demanding observational programs, the segments must be kept aligned below tens of nm RMS. The development of cophasing technics is of prime importance for the next generation of space- and ground-based segmented telescopes. We propose to describe in this paper a new focal plane cophasing sensor that exploits the scientific image of a coronagraphic instrument to retrieve simultaneously piston and tip-tilt misalignments. It is based on the self- coherent camera (SCC) principle and provides a non-invasive system and an efficient phasing sensor from the image domain. Numerical simulations have successfully demonstrated the proper functioning of this system and its algorithms. Along this, work to implement and test the self-coherent camera - phasing sensor (SCC-PS) is currently ongoing and a first look at the cophasing stage of the Segmented Pupil Experiment for Exoplanet Detection (SPEED) will be proposed.

  18. Experiences on dynamic simulation software in chemical engineering education

    OpenAIRE

    Komulainen, Tiina M.; Enemark-Rasmussen, Rasmus; Sin, Gürkan; John P Fletcher; Cameron, David

    2012-01-01

    Commercial process simulators are increasing interest in the chemical engineer education. In this paper, the use of commercial dynamic simulation software, D-SPICE® and K-Spice®, for three different chemical engineering courses is described and discussed. The courses cover the following topics: basic chemical engineering, operability and safety analysis and process control. User experiences from both teachers and students are presented. The benefits of dynamic simulation as an additional teac...

  19. Magnetized laboratory plasma jets: Experiment and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrafel, Peter; Bell, Kate; Greenly, John; Seyler, Charles; Kusse, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Experiments involving radial foils on a 1 M A , 100 n s current driver can be used to study the ablation of thin foils and liners, produce extreme conditions relevant to laboratory astrophysics, and aid in computational code validation. This research focuses on the initial ablation phase of a 20 μ m Al foil (8111 alloy), in a radial configuration, driven by Cornell University's COBRA pulsed power generator. In these experiments ablated surface plasma (ASP) on the top side of the foil and a strongly collimated axial plasma jet are observed developing midway through the current rise. With experimental and computational results this work gives a detailed description of the role of the ASP in the formation of the plasma jet with and without an applied axial magnetic field. This ˜1 T field is applied by a Helmholtz-coil pair driven by a slow, 150 μ s current pulse and penetrates the load hardware before arrival of the COBRA pulse. Several effects of the applied magnetic field are observed: (1) without the field extreme-ultraviolet emission from the ASP shows considerable azimuthal asymmetry while with the field the ASP develops azimuthal motion that reduces this asymmetry, (2) this azimuthal motion slows the development of the jet when the field is applied, and (3) with the magnetic field the jet becomes less collimated and has a density minimum (hollowing) on the axis. PERSEUS, an XMHD code, has qualitatively and quantitatively reproduced all these experimental observations. The differences between this XMHD and an MHD code without a Hall current and inertial effects are discussed. In addition the PERSEUS results describe effects we were not able to resolve experimentally and suggest a line of future experiments with better diagnostics.

  20. Magnetic processes in astrophysics theory, simulations, experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Rüdiger, Günther; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    In this work the authors draw upon their expertise in geophysical and astrophysical MHD to explore the motion of electrically conducting fluids, the so-called dynamo effect, and describe the similarities and differences between different magnetized objects. They also explain why magnetic fields are crucial to the formation of the stars, and discuss promising experiments currently being designed to investigate some of the relevant physics in the laboratory. This interdisciplinary approach will appeal to a wide audience in physics, astrophysics and geophysics. This second edition covers such add

  1. Optimizing Chromatographic Separation: An Experiment Using an HPLC Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalliker, R. A.; Kayillo, S.; Dennis, G. R.

    2008-01-01

    Optimization of a chromatographic separation within the time constraints of a laboratory session is practically impossible. However, by employing a HPLC simulator, experiments can be designed that allow students to develop an appreciation of the complexities involved in optimization procedures. In the present exercise, a HPLC simulator from "JCE…

  2. Optimizing Chromatographic Separation: An Experiment Using an HPLC Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalliker, R. A.; Kayillo, S.; Dennis, G. R.

    2008-01-01

    Optimization of a chromatographic separation within the time constraints of a laboratory session is practically impossible. However, by employing a HPLC simulator, experiments can be designed that allow students to develop an appreciation of the complexities involved in optimization procedures. In the present exercise, a HPLC simulator from "JCE…

  3. Designing Nursing Simulation Clinical Experiences to Promote Critical Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Bev; Koroll, Donna; Price, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The use of high fidelity simulation (HFS) learning opportunities in nursing education has received increased attention in the literature. This article describes the design of a systematic framework used to promote critical inquiry and provide meaningful simulation clinical experiences for second year nursing students. Critical inquiry, as defined…

  4. Polyurethane Foam Impact Experiments and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipp, M. E.; Chhabildas, L. C.; Reinhart, W. D.; Wong, M. K.

    1999-06-01

    Uniaxial strain impact experiments with a rigid polyurethane foam of nominal density 0.22g/cc are reported. A 6 mm thick foam impactor is mounted on the face of a projectile and impacts a thin (1 mm) target plate of aluminum or copper, on which the rear free surface velocity history is acquired with a VISAR. Impact velocities ranged from 300 to 1500 m/s. The velocity record monitors the initial shock from the foam transmitted through the target, followed by a reverberation within the target plate as the wave interacts with the compressed foam at the impact interface and the free recording surface. These one-dimensional uniaxial strain impact experiments were modeled using a traditional p-alpha porous material model for the distended polyurethane, which generally captured the motion imparted to the target by the foam. Some of the high frequency aspects of the data, reflecting the heterogeneous nature of the foam, can be recovered with computations of fully 3-dimensional explicit representations of this porous material.

  5. Simulation of physiology experiments--an alternative to animal use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nageswari, K Sri; Devi, M Syamala; Sharma, Rajeev

    2007-01-01

    Amphibian experiments on nerve-muscle preparation and heart are essential as per first year MBBS practical syllabus, for learning basic concepts in Physiology. Need was felt to design and develop computer based simulation software as an alternative to animal use, due to growing concern and stringent laws imposed by animal ethical bodies. Computer algorithms were developed for 13 amphibian experiments, by manually tracing the graphs obtained through mechanical experimentation and storing the X, Y coordinates for the end points of each line segment as data base tables. By retrieving the data base tables, one for each experiment, the computer simulated graphs were drawn using Visual Basic 6 with timer control and Macromedia Flash for animation effects. A CD-ROM consisting of the software for computer simulation of all the amphibian experiments, as an alternative to the conventional animal experiments, has been developed for the benefit of medical students across the country, as a useful active learning tool.

  6. Validation of Aura OMI by Aircraft and Ground-Based Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPeters, R. D.; Petropavlovskikh, I.; Kroon, M.

    2006-12-01

    Both aircraft-based and ground-based measurements have been used to validate ozone measurements by the OMI instrument on Aura. Three Aura Validation Experiment (AVE) flights have been conducted, in November 2004 and June 2005 with the NASA WB57, and in January/February 2005 with the NASA DC-8. On these flights, validation of OMI was primarily done using data from the CAFS (CCD Actinic Flux Spectroradiometer) instrument, which is used to measure total column ozone above the aircraft. These measurements are used to differentiate changes in stratospheric ozone from changes in total column ozone. Also, changes in ozone over high clouds measured by OMI were checked in a flight over tropical storm Arlene on a flight on June 11th. Ground-based measurements were made during the SAUNA campaign in Sodankyla, Finland, in March and April 2006. Both total column ozone and the ozone vertical distribution were validated.

  7. Nanoindentation shape effect: experiments, simulations and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calabri, L [CNR-INFM-National Research Center on nanoStructures and bioSystems at Surfaces (S3), Via Campi 213/a, 41100 Modena (Italy); Pugno, N [Department of Structural Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Rota, A [CNR-INFM-National Research Center on nanoStructures and bioSystems at Surfaces (S3), Via Campi 213/a, 41100 Modena (Italy); Marchetto, D [CNR-INFM-National Research Center on nanoStructures and bioSystems at Surfaces (S3), Via Campi 213/a, 41100 Modena (Italy); Valeri, S [CNR-INFM-National Research Center on nanoStructures and bioSystems at Surfaces (S3), Via Campi 213/a, 41100 Modena (Italy)

    2007-10-03

    AFM nanoindentation is nowadays commonly used for the study of mechanical properties of materials at the nanoscale. The investigation of surface hardness of a material using AFM means that the probe has to be able to indent the surface, but also to image it. Usually standard indenters are not sharp enough to obtain high-resolution images, but on the other hand measuring the hardness behaviour of a material with a non-standard sharp indenter gives only comparative results affected by a significant deviation from the commonly used hardness scales. In this paper we try to understand how the shape of the indenter affects the hardness measurement, in order to find a relationship between the measured hardness of a material and the corner angle of a pyramidal indenter. To achieve this we performed a full experimental campaign, indenting the same material with three focused ion beam (FIB) nanofabricated probes with a highly altered corner angle. We then compared the results obtained experimentally with those obtained by numerical simulations, using the finite element method (FEM), and by theoretical models, using a general scaling law for nanoindentation available for indenters with a variable size and shape. The comparison between these three approaches (experimental, numerical and theoretical approaches) reveals a good agreement and allowed us to find a theoretical relationship which links the measured hardness value with the shape of the indenter. The same theoretical approach has also been used to fit the hardness experimental results considering the indentation size effect. In this case we compare the measured data, changing the applied load.

  8. Ground-Based VIS/NIR Reflectance Spectra of 25143 Itokawa: What Hayabusa will See and How Ground-Based Data can Augment Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas, Faith; Abell, P. A.; Jarvis, K. S.

    2004-01-01

    Planning for the arrival of the Hayabusa spacecraft at asteroid 25143 Itokawa includes consideration of the expected spectral information to be obtained using the AMICA and NIRS instruments. The rotationally-resolved spatial coverage the asteroid we have obtained with ground-based telescopic spectrophotometry in the visible and near-infrared can be utilized here to address expected spacecraft data. We use spectrophotometry to simulate the types of data that Hayabusa will receive with the NIRS and AMICA instruments, and will demonstrate them here. The NIRS will cover a wavelength range from 0.85 m, and have a dispersion per element of 250 Angstroms. Thus, we are limited in coverage of the 1.0 micrometer and 2.0 micrometer mafic silicate absorption features. The ground-based reflectance spectra of Itokawa show a large component of olivine in its surface material, and the 2.0 micrometer feature is shallow. Determining the olivine to pyroxene abundance ratio is critically dependent on the attributes of the 1.0- and 2.0 micrometer features. With a cut-off near 2,1 micrometer the longer edge of the 2.0- feature will not be obtained by NIRS. Reflectance spectra obtained using ground-based telescopes can be used to determine the regional composition around space-based spectral observations, and possibly augment the longer wavelength spectral attributes. Similarly, the shorter wavelength end of the 1.0 micrometer absorption feature will be partially lost to the NIRS. The AMICA filters mimic the ECAS filters, and have wavelength coverage overlapping with the NIRS spectral range. We demonstrate how merging photometry from AMICA will extend the spectral coverage of the NIRS. Lessons learned from earlier spacecraft to asteroids should be considered.

  9. "FluSpec": A Simulated Experiment in Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigger, Stephen W.; Bigger, Andrew S.; Ghiggino, Kenneth P.

    2014-01-01

    The "FluSpec" educational software package is a fully contained tutorial on the technique of fluorescence spectroscopy as well as a simulator on which experiments can be performed. The procedure for each of the experiments is also contained within the package along with example analyses of results that are obtained using the software.

  10. Computer simulation of Wheeler's delayed-choice experiment with photons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, S.; Yuan, S.; De Raedt, H.; Michielsen, K.

    2008-01-01

    We present a computer simulation model of Wheeler's delayed-choice experiment that is a one-to-one copy of an experiment reported recently (Jacques V. et al., Science, 315 (2007) 966). The model is solely based on experimental facts, satisfies Einstein's criterion of local causality and does not rel

  11. "FluSpec": A Simulated Experiment in Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigger, Stephen W.; Bigger, Andrew S.; Ghiggino, Kenneth P.

    2014-01-01

    The "FluSpec" educational software package is a fully contained tutorial on the technique of fluorescence spectroscopy as well as a simulator on which experiments can be performed. The procedure for each of the experiments is also contained within the package along with example analyses of results that are obtained using the software.

  12. Experiences with linear solvers for oil reservoir simulation problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joubert, W.; Janardhan, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Biswas, D.; Carey, G.

    1996-12-31

    This talk will focus on practical experiences with iterative linear solver algorithms used in conjunction with Amoco Production Company`s Falcon oil reservoir simulation code. The goal of this study is to determine the best linear solver algorithms for these types of problems. The results of numerical experiments will be presented.

  13. Computer simulation of Wheeler's delayed-choice experiment with photons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, S.; Yuan, S.; De Raedt, H.; Michielsen, K.

    We present a computer simulation model of Wheeler's delayed-choice experiment that is a one-to-one copy of an experiment reported recently (Jacques V. et al., Science, 315 (2007) 966). The model is solely based on experimental facts, satisfies Einstein's criterion of local causality and does not

  14. Issues of health evaluation during simulated space mission to Mars. Part 1. Research methodology and methods used in experiment Mars-500

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman М. Baevsky

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Research methodology and methods used in experiment Mars-500 held at the Institute of Biomedical Problems of the Russian Academy of Sciences in 2009-2011 are considered. 6 volunteers were isolated during 520 days in a sealed ground-based facility simulating space ship. Along with studies of the Martian crew, a number of satellite research were also carried out, which were devoted to the long-term program of medical and ecological investigations. This program was aimed at the study of the dynamics of adaptation abilities of the organism during its long stay in the natural social, living and industrial environments. For physiological investigations in experiment Mars-500, including the main experiment in a sealed ground-based facility and parallel long-term medical and ecological investigations in different regions of the world, the specialized hardwaresoftware complex "Ecosan-2007" was used. The methodology was based on the principles of prenosological diagnostics that have been further developed in the concept of adaptation risks and in the probabilistic approach to their evaluation. For evaluation of various components of the autonomous regulation state the method of heart rate variability (HRV was used. It was concluded that the most important field in experiment Mars-500 was the investigation of the methodology of prenosological diagnostic in the preparation of a space mission to Mars.

  15. Comparison of Thermal Structure Results from Venus Express and Ground Based Observations since Vira

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Sanjay

    2016-07-01

    An international team was formed in 2013 through the International Space Studies Institute (Bern, Switzerland) to compare recent results of the Venus atmospheric thermal structure from spacecraft and ground based observations made since the Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA) was developed (Kliore et al., 1985, Keating et al., 1985). Five experiments on European Space Agency's Venus Express orbiter mission have yielded results on the atmospheric structure during is operational life (April 2006 - November 2014). Three of these were from occultation methods: at near infrared wavelengths from solar occultations, (SOIR, 70 - 170 km), at ultraviolet wavelengths from stellar occultations (SPICAV, 90-140 km), and occultation of the VEx-Earth radio signal (VeRa, 40-90 km). In-situ drag measurements from three different techniques (accelerometry, torque, and radio tracking, 130 - 200 km) were also obtained using the spacecraft itself while passive infrared remote sensing was used by the VIRTIS experiment (70 - 120 km). The only new data in the -40-70 km altitude range are from radio occultation, as no new profiles of the deep atmosphere have been obtained since the VeGa 2 lander measurements in 1985 (not included in VIRA). Some selected ground based results available to the team were also considered by team in the inter comparisons. The temperature structure in the lower thermosphere from disk resolved ground based observations (except for one ground based investigation), is generally consistent with the Venus Express results. These experiments sampled at different periods, at different locations and at different local times and have different vertical and horizontal resolution and coverage. The data were therefore binned in latitude and local time bins and compared, ignoring temporal variations over the life time of the Venus Express mission and assumed north-south symmetry. Alternating warm and cooler layers are present in the 120-160 altitude range in results

  16. Ground-based observations of Kepler asteroseismic targets

    CERN Document Server

    Uytterhoeven, K; Southworth, J; Randall, S; Ostensen, R; Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Marconi, M; Kurtz, D W; Kiss, L; Gutierrez-Soto, J; Frandsen, S; De Cat, P; Bruntt, H; Briquet, M; Zhang, X B; Telting, J H; Steslicki, M; Ripepi, V; Pigulski, A; Paparo, M; Oreiro, R; Choong, Ngeow Chow; Niemczura, E; Nemec, J; Narwid, A; Mathias, P; Martin-Ruiz, S; Lehman, H; Kopacki, G; Karoff, C; Jackiewicz, J; Henden, A A; Handler, G; Grigachene, A; Green, E M; Garrido, R; Machado, L Fox; Debosscher, J; Creevey, O L; Catanzaro, G; Bognar, Z; Biazzo, K; Bernabei, S

    2010-01-01

    We present the ground-based activities within the different working groups of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium (KASC). The activities aim at the systematic characterization of the 5000+ KASC targets, and at the collection of ground-based follow-up time-series data of selected promising Kepler pulsators. So far, 35 different instruments at 30 telescopes on 22 different observatories in 12 countries are in use, and a total of more than 530 observing nights has been awarded. (Based on observations made with the Isaac Newton Telescope, William Herschel Telescope, Nordic Optical Telescope, Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, Mercator Telescope (La Palma, Spain), and IAC-80 (Tenerife, Spain). Also based on observations taken at the observatories of Sierra Nevada, San Pedro Martir, Vienna, Xinglong, Apache Point, Lulin, Tautenburg, Loiano, Serra la Nave, Asiago, McDonald, Skinakas, Pic du Midi, Mauna Kea, Steward Observatory, Bialkow Observatory of the Wroclaw University, Piszkesteto Mountain Station, Observato...

  17. Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Technology Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Leslie A.

    2014-01-13

    This GNDD Technology Roadmap is intended to provide guidance to potential researchers and help management define research priorities to achieve technology advancements for ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring science being pursued by the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team within the Office of Nuclear Detonation Detection in the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Four science-based elements were selected to encompass the entire scope of nuclear monitoring research and development (R&D) necessary to facilitate breakthrough scientific results, as well as deliver impactful products. Promising future R&D is delineated including dual use associated with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Important research themes as well as associated metrics are identified along with a progression of accomplishments, represented by a selected bibliography, that are precursors to major improvements to nuclear explosion monitoring.

  18. Limitation of Ground-based Estimates of Solar Irradiance Due to Atmospheric Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Guoyong; Cahalan, Robert F.; Holben, Brent N.

    2003-01-01

    The uncertainty in ground-based estimates of solar irradiance is quantitatively related to the temporal variability of the atmosphere's optical thickness. The upper and lower bounds of the accuracy of estimates using the Langley Plot technique are proportional to the standard deviation of aerosol optical thickness (approx. +/- 13 sigma(delta tau)). The estimates of spectral solar irradiance (SSI) in two Cimel sun photometer channels from the Mauna Loa site of AERONET are compared with satellite observations from SOLSTICE (Solar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment) on UARS (Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite) for almost two years of data. The true solar variations related to the 27-day solar rotation cycle observed from SOLSTICE are about 0.15% at the two sun photometer channels. The variability in ground-based estimates is statistically one order of magnitude larger. Even though about 30% of these estimates from all Level 2.0 Cimel data fall within the 0.4 to approx. 0.5% variation level, ground-based estimates are not able to capture the 27-day solar variation observed from SOLSTICE.

  19. Ground-Based Calibration Of A Microwave Landing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriazes, John J.; Scott, Marshall M., Jr.; Willis, Alfred D.; Erdogan, Temel; Reyes, Rolando

    1996-01-01

    System of microwave instrumentation and data-processing equipment developed to enable ground-based calibration of microwave scanning-beam landing system (MSBLS) at distances of about 500 to 1,000 ft from MSBLS transmitting antenna. Ensures accuracy of MSBLS near touchdown point, without having to resort to expense and complex logistics of aircraft-based testing. Modified versions prove useful in calibrating aircraft instrument landing systems.

  20. Ground-Based Lidar for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Ozone Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J.; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than 10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures.

  1. Ground-based lidar for atmospheric boundary layer ozone measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-05-20

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than ±10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures.

  2. Rationalization of foundry processes on the basis of simulation experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kukla

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research obtained on the basis of simulation experiment, whose aim was to analyze the performance of cast iron foundry. A simulation model of automobile industry foundry was made. The course of the following processes was analyzedin a computer model: preparation of liquid cast iron, forming and filling the moulds, cooling and stamping the castings, cleaning andfinishing treatment. The sheets of multi-criterion evaluation were prepared, where criteria and variants were assessed by meansof subjective point evaluation and fuzzy character evaluation. The paper presents an analysis example of finishing activities of castings realized in foundry on traditional machines and efficient presses and in cooperation. On the basis of reports from a simulation experiment information was achieved related to activities’ duration, load of accessible resources, the problems of storage and transport, bottle necks in the system and appearing queues in from of workplaces. The research used a universal modelling and simulation packet for productionsystems - ARENA.

  3. Formation of Chimneys in Mushy Layers: Experiment and Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Anthony M; Worster, Grae

    2011-01-01

    In this fluid dyanmics video, we show experimental images and simulations of chimney formation in mushy layers. A directional solidification apparatus was used to freeze 25 wt % aqueous ammonium chloride solutions at controlled rates in a narrow Hele-Shaw cell (1mm gap). The convective motion is imaged with schlieren. We demonstrate the ability to numerically simulate mushy layer growth for direct comparison with experiments.

  4. Computer Simulation of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Raedt, H.; Michielsen, K.

    2016-07-01

    We review an event-based simulation approach which reproduces the statistical distributions of quantum physics experiments by generating detection events one-by-one according to an unknown distribution and without solving a wave equation. Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm laboratory experiments are used as an example to illustrate the applicability of this approach. It is shown that computer experiments that employ the same post-selection procedure as the one used in laboratory experiments produce data that is in excellent agreement with quantum theory.

  5. Boost-Phase ballistic missile trajectory estimation with ground based radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Yuyan; Huang Peikang

    2006-01-01

    A conditional boost-phase trajectory estimation method based on ballistic missile (BM) information database and classification is developed to estimate and predict boos-phase BM trajectory. The main uncertain factors to describe BM dynamics equation are reduced to the control law of trajectory pitch angle in boost-phase. After the BM mass at the beginning of estimation, the BM attack angle and the modification of engine thrust denoting BM acceleration are modeled reasonably, the boost-phase BM trajectory estimation with ground based radar is well realized. The validity of this estimation method is testified by computer simulation with a typical example.

  6. Simulator design for advanced ISDN satellite design and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Gerald R.

    1992-01-01

    This simulation design task completion report documents the simulation techniques associated with the network models of both the Interim Service ISDN (integrated services digital network) Satellite (ISIS) and the Full Service ISDN Satellite (FSIS) architectures. The ISIS network model design represents satellite systems like the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) orbiting switch. The FSIS architecture, the ultimate aim of this element of the Satellite Communications Applications Research (SCAR) program, moves all control and switching functions on-board the next generation ISDN communication satellite. The technical and operational parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite design will be obtained from the simulation of ISIS and FSIS engineering software models for their major subsystems. Discrete events simulation experiments will be performed with these models using various traffic scenarios, design parameters and operational procedures. The data from these simulations will be used to determine the engineering parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite.

  7. Truth Seeded Reconstruction for Fast Simulation in the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Jansky, Roland; Salzburger, Andreas

    The huge success of the ATLAS experiment for particle physics during Run 1 of the LHC would not have been possible without the production of vast amounts of simulated Monte Carlo data. However, the very detailed detector simulation is a highly CPU intensive task and thus resource shortages occurred. Motivated by this, great effort has been put into speeding up the simulation. As a result, other timeconsuming parts became visible. One of which is the track reconstruction. This thesis describes one potential solution to the CPU intensive reconstruction of simulated data: a newly designed truth seeded reconstruction. At its basics is the idea to skip the pattern recognition altogether, instead utilizing the available (truth) information from simulation to directly fit particle trajectories without searching for them. At the same time tracking effects of the standard reconstruction need to be emulated. This approach is validated thoroughly and no critical deviations of the results compared to the standard reconst...

  8. Blast Load Simulator Experiments for Computational Model Validation: Report 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    O’Daniel, 2016. Blast load simulator experiments for computational model validation – Report 1. ERDC/GSL TR-16-27. Vicksburg, MS: U.S. Army Engineer ...ER D C/ G SL T R- 16 -2 7 Blast Load Simulator Experiments for Computational Model Validation Report 2 G eo te ch ni ca l a nd S tr uc...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) solves the nation’s toughest

  9. HFSS Simulation on Cavity Coupling for Axion Detecting Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Yeo, Beomki

    2015-01-01

    In the resonant cavity experiment, it is vital maximize signal power at detector with the minimized reflection from source. Return loss is minimized when the impedance of source and cavity are matched to each other and this is called impedance matching. Establishing tunable antenna on source is required to get a impedance matching. Geometry and position of antenna is varied depending on the electromagnetic eld of cavity. This research is dedicated to simulation to nd such a proper design of coupling antenna, especially for axion dark matter detecting experiment. HFSS solver was used for the simulation.

  10. Reactor Simulation for Antineutrino Experiments using DRAGON and MURE

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, C L; Conrad, J M; Djurcic, Z; Fallot, M; Giot, L; Keefer, G; Onillon, A; Winslow, L

    2011-01-01

    Rising interest in nuclear reactors as a source of antineutrinos for experiments motivates validated, fast, and accessible simulations to predict reactor fission rates. Here we present results from the DRAGON and MURE simulation codes and compare them to other industry standards for reactor core modeling. We use published data from the Takahama-3 reactor to evaluate the quality of these simulations against the independently measured fuel isotopic composition. The propagation of the uncertainty in the reactor operating parameters to the resulting antineutrino flux predictions is also discussed.

  11. Numerical Simulation and Cold Modeling experiments on Centrifugal Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keerthiprasad, Kestur Sadashivaiah; Murali, Mysore Seetharam; Mukunda, Pudukottah Gopaliengar; Majumdar, Sekhar

    2011-02-01

    In a centrifugal casting process, the fluid flow eventually determines the quality and characteristics of the final product. It is difficult to study the fluid behavior here because of the opaque nature of melt and mold. In the current investigation, numerical simulations of the flow field and visualization experiments on cold models have been carried out for a centrifugal casting system using horizontal molds and fluids of different viscosities to study the effect of different process variables on the flow pattern. The effects of the thickness of the cylindrical fluid annulus formed inside the mold and the effects of fluid viscosity, diameter, and rotational speed of the mold on the hollow fluid cylinder formation process have been investigated. The numerical simulation results are compared with corresponding data obtained from the cold modeling experiments. The influence of rotational speed in a real-life centrifugal casting system has also been studied using an aluminum-silicon alloy. Cylinders of different thicknesses are cast at different rotational speeds, and the flow patterns observed visually in the actual castings are found to be similar to those recorded in the corresponding cold modeling experiments. Reasonable agreement is observed between the results of numerical simulation and the results of cold modeling experiments with different fluids. The visualization study on the hollow cylinders produced in an actual centrifugal casting process also confirm the conclusions arrived at from the cold modeling experiments and numerical simulation in a qualitative sense.

  12. Evaluation of brightness temperature from a forward model of ground-based microwave radiometer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Rambabu; J S Pillai; A Agarwal; G Pandithurai

    2014-06-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers are getting great attention in recent years due to their capability to profile the temperature and humidity at high temporal and vertical resolution in the lower troposphere. The process of retrieving these parameters from the measurements of radiometric brightness temperature () includes the inversion algorithm, which uses the background information from a forward model. In the present study, an algorithm development and evaluation of this forward model for a ground-based microwave radiometer, being developed by Society for Applied Microwave Electronics Engineering and Research (SAMEER) of India, is presented. Initially, the analysis of absorption coefficient and weighting function at different frequencies was made to select the channels. Further the range of variation of for these selected channels for the year 2011, over the two stations Mumbai and Delhi is discussed. Finally the comparison between forward-model simulated s and radiometer measured s at Mahabaleshwar (73.66°E and 17.93°N) is done to evaluate the model. There is good agreement between model simulations and radiometer observations, which suggests that these forward model simulations can be used as background for inversion models for retrieving the temperature and humidity profiles.

  13. Initial Experiences with Retrieving Similar Objects in Simulation Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, S-C S; Kamath, C

    2003-02-21

    Comparing the output of a physics simulation with an experiment, referred to as 'code validation,' is often done by visually comparing the two outputs. In order to determine which simulation is a closer match to the experiment, more quantitative measures are needed. In this paper, we describe our early experiences with this problem by considering the slightly simpler problem of finding objects in a image that are similar to a given query object. Focusing on a dataset from a fluid mixing problem, we report on our experiments with different features that are used to represent the objects of interest in the data. These early results indicate that the features must be chosen carefully to correctly represent the query object and the goal of the similarity search.

  14. Event-based simulation of neutron interferometry experiments

    CERN Document Server

    De Raedt, Hans; Michielsen, Kristel

    2012-01-01

    A discrete-event approach, which has already been shown to give a cause-and-effect explanation of many quantum optics experiments, is applied to single-neutron interferometry experiments. The simulation algorithm yields a logically consistent description in terms of individual neutrons and does not require the knowledge of the solution of a wave equation. It is shown that the simulation method reproduces the results of several single-neutron interferometry experiments, including experiments which, in quantum theoretical language, involve entanglement. Our results demonstrate that classical (non-Hamiltonian) systems can exhibit correlations which in quantum theory are associated with interference and entanglement, also when all particles emitted by the source are accounted for.

  15. Simulation Data Management for Adaptive Design Of Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    BLONDET, Gaëtan; BOUDAOUD, Nassim; LE DUIGOU, Julien

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Recent evolutions of computer-aided product development and massive integration of numerical simulations to the design process require new methodologies to decrease the computational costs. Numerical design of experiments is used to increase quality of products by taking into account uncertainties in product development. But, this method can be time-consuming and involves a high computational cost. This paper presents a literature review of design of experiments method...

  16. Simulation Experiments in Practice : Statistical Design and Regression Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, J.P.C.

    2007-01-01

    In practice, simulation analysts often change only one factor at a time, and use graphical analysis of the resulting Input/Output (I/O) data. Statistical theory proves that more information is obtained when applying Design Of Experiments (DOE) and linear regression analysis. Unfortunately, classic t

  17. Photovoltaic Experiment Using Light from a Solar Simulator Lamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell experiment utilizing the convenience of a solar simulating type lamp is described. Insight into the solid state aspect of a solar cell is gained by the student in studying the characteristics, and deducing from them cell parameters and efficiency. (Author/CS)

  18. Experience with the Simulated Patient-Physician Encounter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Richard B.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Computer-based simulations of the patient-physician encounter have been used at the University of Wisconsin Medical School for five years. They have been used to permit students to gain clinical experience, as part of a series of structured teaching conferences, and in a medical testing program. Student and faculty response is favorable.…

  19. Numerical simulation of the fast dense gas Ludwieg tube experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zamfirescu, C.; Guerdone, A.; Collona, P.

    2006-01-01

    The preliminary design of a Ludwieg tube experiment for the verification of the existence of nonclassical rarefaction shock waves in dense vapors is here critically analyzed by means of real gas numerical simulations of the experimental setup. The Flexible Asymmetric Shock Tube (FAST) setup is a den

  20. Photovoltaic Experiment Using Light from a Solar Simulator Lamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell experiment utilizing the convenience of a solar simulating type lamp is described. Insight into the solid state aspect of a solar cell is gained by the student in studying the characteristics, and deducing from them cell parameters and efficiency. (Author/CS)

  1. Students' Experiences of Learning Manual Clinical Skills through Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesson, Eva; Silen, Charlotte; Kvist, Joanna; Hult, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    Learning manual skills is a fundamental part of health care education, and motor, sensory and cognitive learning processes are essential aspects of professional development. Simulator training has been shown to enhance factors that facilitate motor and cognitive learning. The present study aimed to investigate the students' experiences and…

  2. Simulations of ultrafast x-ray laser experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortmann-Grote, C.; Andreev, A. A.; Appel, K.; Branco, J.; Briggs, R.; Bussmann, M.; Buzmakov, A.; Garten, M.; Grund, A.; Huebl, A.; Jurek, Z.; Loh, N. D.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Samoylova, L.; Santra, R.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Sharma, A.; Steiniger, K.; Yakubov, S.; Yoon, C. H.; Yurkov, M. V.; Zastrau, U.; Ziaja-Motyka, B.; Mancuso, A. P.

    2017-06-01

    Simulations of experiments at modern light sources, such as optical laser laboratories, synchrotrons, and free electron lasers, become increasingly important for the successful preparation, execution, and analysis of these experiments investigating ever more complex physical systems, e.g. biomolecules, complex materials, and ultra-short lived states of matter at extreme conditions. We have implemented a platform for complete start-to-end simulations of various types of photon science experiments, tracking the radiation from the source through the beam transport optics to the sample or target under investigation, its interaction with and scattering from the sample, and registration in a photon detector. This tool allows researchers and facility operators to simulate their experiments and instruments under real life conditions, identify promising and unattainable regions of the parameter space and ultimately make better use of valuable beamtime. In this paper, we present an overview about status and future development of the simulation platform and discuss three applications: 1.) Single-particle imaging of biomolecules using x-ray free electron lasers and optimization of x-ray pulse properties, 2.) x-ray scattering diagnostics of hot dense plasmas in high power laser-matter interaction and identification of plasma instabilities, and 3.) x-ray absorption spectroscopy in warm dense matter created by high energy laser-matter interaction and pulse shape optimization for low-isentrope dynamic compression.

  3. New simulation capability for gamma ray mirror experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Descalle, Marie-Anne [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ruz-Armendariz, Jaime [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Decker, Todd [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brejhnolt, Nicolai [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pivovaroff, Michael [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-09-28

    This report provides a description of the simulation toolkit developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to support the design of nuclear safeguards experiments using grazing incidence multilayer mirrors in the energy band of uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) emission lines. This effort was motivated by the data analysis of a scoping experiment at the Irradiated Fuels Examination Facility (IFEL) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in FY13 and of a benchmark experiment at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in FY14 that highlighted the need for predictive tools built around a ray-tracing capability. This report presents the simulation toolkit and relevant results such as the simulated spectra for TMI, MOX, and ATM106 fuel rods based on spent fuel models provided by Los Alamos National Laboratory and for a virgin high 240Pu-content fuel plate, as well as models of the IFEL and INL experiments implemented in the ray tracing tool. The beam position and height were validated against the INL ~60 keV americium data. Examples of alternate configurations of the optics or experimental set-up illustrate the future use of the simulation suite to guide the next IFEL experimental campaign.

  4. Quantum chemistry simulation on quantum computers: theories and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dawei; Xu, Boruo; Xu, Nanyang; Li, Zhaokai; Chen, Hongwei; Peng, Xinhua; Xu, Ruixue; Du, Jiangfeng

    2012-07-14

    It has been claimed that quantum computers can mimic quantum systems efficiently in the polynomial scale. Traditionally, those simulations are carried out numerically on classical computers, which are inevitably confronted with the exponential growth of required resources, with the increasing size of quantum systems. Quantum computers avoid this problem, and thus provide a possible solution for large quantum systems. In this paper, we first discuss the ideas of quantum simulation, the background of quantum simulators, their categories, and the development in both theories and experiments. We then present a brief introduction to quantum chemistry evaluated via classical computers followed by typical procedures of quantum simulation towards quantum chemistry. Reviewed are not only theoretical proposals but also proof-of-principle experimental implementations, via a small quantum computer, which include the evaluation of the static molecular eigenenergy and the simulation of chemical reaction dynamics. Although the experimental development is still behind the theory, we give prospects and suggestions for future experiments. We anticipate that in the near future quantum simulation will become a powerful tool for quantum chemistry over classical computations.

  5. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of directional wetting: Comparing simulations to experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, H. Patrick; Sotthewes, Kai; van Swigchem, Jeroen; Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Kooij, E. Stefan

    2013-07-01

    Lattice Boltzmann Modeling (LBM) simulations were performed on the dynamic behavior of liquid droplets on chemically striped patterned surfaces, ultimately with the aim to develop a predictive tool enabling reliable design of future experiments. The simulations accurately mimic experimental results, which have shown that water droplets on such surfaces adopt an elongated shape due to anisotropic preferential spreading. Details of the contact line motion such as advancing of the contact line in the direction perpendicular to the stripes exhibit pronounced similarities in experiments and simulations. The opposite of spreading, i.e., evaporation of water droplets, leads to a characteristic receding motion first in the direction parallel to the stripes, while the contact line remains pinned perpendicular to the stripes. Only when the aspect ratio is close to unity, the contact line also starts to recede in the perpendicular direction. Very similar behavior was observed in the LBM simulations. Finally, droplet movement can be induced by a gradient in surface wettability. LBM simulations show good semiquantitative agreement with experimental results of decanol droplets on a well-defined striped gradient, which move from high- to low-contact angle surfaces. Similarities and differences for all systems are described and discussed in terms of the predictive capabilities of LBM simulations to model direction wetting.

  6. Universality between Experiment and Simulation of a Diblock Copolymer Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardsley, Thomas M.; Matsen, Mark W.

    2016-11-01

    The equivalent behavior among analogous block copolymer systems involving chemically distinct molecules or mathematically different models has long hinted at an underlying universality, but only recently has it been rigorously demonstrated by matching results from different simulations. The profound implication of universality is that simple coarse-grained models can be calibrated so as to provide quantitatively accurate predictions to experiment. Here, we provide the first compelling demonstration of this by simulating a polyisoprene-polylactide diblock copolymer melt using a previously calibrated lattice model. The simulation successfully predicts the peak in the disordered-state structure function, the position of the order-disorder transition, and the latent heat of the transition in excellent quantitative agreement with experiment. This could mark a new era of precision in the field of block copolymer research.

  7. Supporting ITM Missions by Observing System Simulation Experiments: Initial Design, Challenges and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudin, V. A.; England, S.; Matsuo, T.; Wang, H.; Immel, T. J.; Eastes, R.; Akmaev, R. A.; Goncharenko, L. P.; Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Liu, H.; Solomon, S. C.; Wu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    We review and discuss the capability of novel configurations of global community (WACCM-X and TIME-GCM) and planned-operational (WAM) models to support current and forthcoming space-borne missions to monitor the dynamics and composition of the Ionosphere-Thermosphere-Mesosphere (ITM) system. In the specified meteorology model configuration of WACCM-X, the lower atmosphere is constrained by operational analyses and/or short-term forecasts provided by the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) of GMAO/NASA/GSFC. With the terrestrial weather of GEOS-5 and updated model physics, WACCM-X simulations are capable to reproduce the observed signatures of the perturbed wave dynamics and ion-neutral coupling during recent (2006-2013) stratospheric warming events, short-term, annual and year-to-year variability of prevailing flows, planetary waves, tides, and composition. With assimilation of the NWP data in the troposphere and stratosphere the planned-operational configuration of WAM can also recreate the observed features of the ITM day-to-day variability. These "terrestrial-weather" driven whole atmosphere simulations, with day-to-day variable solar and geomagnetic inputs, can provide specification of the background state (first guess) and errors for the inverse algorithms of forthcoming NASA ITM missions, such as ICON and GOLD. With two different viewing geometries (sun-synchronous, for ICON and geostationary for GOLD) these missions promise to perform complimentary global observations of temperature, winds and constituents to constrain the first-principle space weather forecast models. The paper will discuss initial designs of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSE) in the coupled simulations of TIME-GCM/WACCM-X/GEOS5 and WAM/GIP. As recognized, OSSE represent an excellent learning tool for designing and evaluating observing capabilities of novel sensors. The choice of assimilation schemes, forecast and observational errors will be discussed along with challenges

  8. Metrology of ground-based satellite validation: co-location mismatch and smoothing issues of total ozone comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Verhoelst

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Comparisons with ground-based correlative measurements constitute a key component in the validation of satellite data on atmospheric composition. The error budget of these comparisons contains not only the measurement uncertainties but also several terms related to differences in sampling and smoothing of the inhomogeneous and variable atmospheric field. A versatile system for Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs, named OSSSMOSE, is used here to quantify these terms. Based on the application of pragmatic observation operators onto high-resolution atmospheric fields, it allows a simulation of each individual measurement, and consequently also of the differences to be expected from spatial and temporal field variations between both measurements making up a comparison pair. As a topical case study, the system is used to evaluate the error budget of total ozone column (TOC comparisons between on the one hand GOME-type direct fitting (GODFITv3 satellite retrievals from GOME/ERS2, SCIAMACHY/Envisat, and GOME-2/MetOp-A, and on the other hand direct-sun and zenith-sky reference measurements such as from Dobsons, Brewers, and zenith scattered light (ZSL-DOAS instruments respectively. In particular, the focus is placed on the GODFITv3 reprocessed GOME-2A data record vs. the ground-based instruments contributing to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC. The simulations are found to reproduce the actual measurements almost to within the measurement uncertainties, confirming that the OSSE approach and its technical implementation are appropriate. This work reveals that many features of the comparison spread and median difference can be understood as due to metrological differences, even when using strict co-location criteria. In particular, sampling difference errors exceed measurement uncertainties regularly at most mid- and high-latitude stations, with values up to 10 % and more in extreme cases. Smoothing

  9. Augmenting WFIRST Microlensing with a Ground-Based Telescope Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Gould, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Augmenting the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) microlensing campaigns with intensive observations from a ground-based network of wide-field survey telescopes would have several major advantages. First, it would enable full two-dimensional (2-D) vector microlens parallax measurements for a substantial fraction of low-mass lenses as well as planetary and binary events that show caustic crossing features. For a significant fraction of the free-floating planet (FFP) events and all caustic-crossing planetary/binary events, these 2-D parallax measurements directly lead to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) of the lens object (or lens system). For even more events, the complementary ground-based observations will yield 1-D parallax measurements. Together with the 1-D parallaxes from WFIRST alone, they can probe the entire mass range M > M_Earth. For luminous lenses, such 1-D parallax measurements can be promoted to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) by high-resolution imaging. This would provide crucial information not only about the hosts of planets and other lenses, but also enable a much more precise Galactic model. Other benefits of such a survey include improved understanding of binaries (particularly with low mass primaries), and sensitivity to distant ice-giant and gas-giant companions of WFIRST lenses that cannot be detected by WFIRST itself due to its restricted observing windows. Existing ground-based microlensing surveys can be employed if WFIRST is pointed at lower-extinction fields than is currently envisaged. This would come at some cost to the event rate. Therefore the benefits of improved characterization of lenses must be weighed against these costs.

  10. APPLICATION OF INTERACTIVE ONLINE SIMULATIONS FOR DEMONSTRATION EXPERIMENT IN PHYSICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina P. Dementievska

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Development of modern school physics experiment is related to the extensive use of ICT not only for data processing and visualization. Interactive computer simulation for processes and phenomena, developed by scientists and methodologists by the site Phet, helps to improve the physical demonstration experiment with the support of modern pedagogical technologies that change the traditional procedure to form students' understanding of the processes and phenomena, active cognitive activity. To study the influence of methods to integrate interactive computer simulations for better understanding the students' physical processes, phenomena and laws of the international community, teachers and Ukrainian scientists and teachers of physics have been involved. The aim of the article is to introduce the research results in the development and testing of individual components of educational technology in performing a physical experiment in secondary school.

  11. SIMEX: Simulation of Experiments at Advanced Light Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Fortmann-Grote, C; Briggs, R; Bussmann, M; Buzmakov, A; Garten, M; Grund, A; Hübl, A; Hauff, S; Joy, A; Jurek, Z; Loh, N D; Rüter, T; Samoylova, L; Santra, R; Schneidmiller, E A; Sharma, A; Wing, M; Yakubov, S; Yoon, C H; Yurkov, M V; Ziaja, B; Mancuso, A P

    2016-01-01

    Realistic simulations of experiments at large scale photon facilities, such as optical laser laboratories, synchrotrons, and free electron lasers, are of vital importance for the successful preparation, execution, and analysis of these experiments investigating ever more complex physical systems, e.g. biomolecules, complex materials, and ultra-short lived states of highly excited matter. Traditional photon science modelling takes into account only isolated aspects of an experiment, such as the beam propagation, the photon-matter interaction, or the scattering process, making idealized assumptions about the remaining parts, e.g.\\ the source spectrum, temporal structure and coherence properties of the photon beam, or the detector response. In SIMEX, we have implemented a platform for complete start-to-end simulations, following the radiation from the source, through the beam transport optics to the sample or target under investigation, its interaction with and scattering from the sample, and its registration in...

  12. Comparing ballistic wounds with experiments on body simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresson, F; Franck, O

    2010-05-20

    This paper demonstrates how ballistic experiments on body simulator can bring a key information in the forensic science field. In the investigated case, a hunter was shot by accident in the back. Two hunters were suspected of having inadvertently shot towards the victim. The deadly bullet left the body and cannot be found on the scene neither in the body. The only way to discriminate the two options was to perform ballistic tests in body simulators. Even though the knowledge about body simulators is not enough advanced yet to expect accurate quantitative results, it was supposed to fully discriminate the two investigated cases as its respective impact energy are highly different (respectively 1200J and 2400J). For each investigated possibility, bullet's expansion state and body wounds were simulated. Bullet impact characteristics were determined by measuring the muzzle velocity, compute the impact velocity in the considered range (the position of each hunter is accurately known). Reloading cartridges allowed to reproduce accuretaly the corresponding velocity. The body was simulated by 3 different means in order to explore the accuracy of the simulation process. We demonstrated that the reported case is situated in a velocity/energy range in which body simulators do not need to be particularly accurate to reproduce the bullet expansion/non-expansion state. It furthermore demonstrated that only one case is compatible with the ballistic wounds of the victim. In the other case, the bullet's expansion would lead to a completely different wound shape.

  13. Complete Monte Carlo Simulation of Neutron Scattering Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosg, M.

    2011-12-01

    In the far past, it was not possible to accurately correct for the finite geometry and the finite sample size of a neutron scattering set-up. The limited calculation power of the ancient computers as well as the lack of powerful Monte Carlo codes and the limitation in the data base available then prevented a complete simulation of the actual experiment. Using e.g. the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNPX [1], neutron scattering experiments can be simulated almost completely with a high degree of precision using a modern PC, which has a computing power that is ten thousand times that of a super computer of the early 1970s. Thus, (better) corrections can also be obtained easily for previous published data provided that these experiments are sufficiently well documented. Better knowledge of reference data (e.g. atomic mass, relativistic correction, and monitor cross sections) further contributes to data improvement. Elastic neutron scattering experiments from liquid samples of the helium isotopes performed around 1970 at LANL happen to be very well documented. Considering that the cryogenic targets are expensive and complicated, it is certainly worthwhile to improve these data by correcting them using this comparatively straightforward method. As two thirds of all differential scattering cross section data of 3He(n,n)3He are connected to the LANL data, it became necessary to correct the dependent data measured in Karlsruhe, Germany, as well. A thorough simulation of both the LANL experiments and the Karlsruhe experiment is presented, starting from the neutron production, followed by the interaction in the air, the interaction with the cryostat structure, and finally the scattering medium itself. In addition, scattering from the hydrogen reference sample was simulated. For the LANL data, the multiple scattering corrections are smaller by a factor of five at least, making this work relevant. Even more important are the corrections to the Karlsruhe data due to the

  14. Processing biobased polymers using plasticizers: Numerical simulations versus experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desplentere, Frederik; Cardon, Ludwig; Six, Wim; Erkoç, Mustafa

    2016-03-01

    In polymer processing, the use of biobased products shows lots of possibilities. Considering biobased materials, biodegradability is in most cases the most important issue. Next to this, bio based materials aimed at durable applications, are gaining interest. Within this research, the influence of plasticizers on the processing of the bio based material is investigated. This work is done for an extrusion grade of PLA, Natureworks PLA 2003D. Extrusion through a slit die equipped with pressure sensors is used to compare the experimental pressure values to numerical simulation results. Additional experimental data (temperature and pressure data along the extrusion screw and die are recorded) is generated on a dr. Collin Lab extruder producing a 25mm diameter tube. All these experimental data is used to indicate the appropriate functioning of the numerical simulation tool Virtual Extrusion Laboratory 6.7 for the simulation of both the industrial available extrusion grade PLA and the compound in which 15% of plasticizer is added. Adding the applied plasticizer, resulted in a 40% lower pressure drop over the extrusion die. The combination of different experiments allowed to fit the numerical simulation results closely to the experimental values. Based on this experience, it is shown that numerical simulations also can be used for modified bio based materials if appropriate material and process data are taken into account.

  15. Simulation of the BGO-OD experiment at ELSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnstone, Russell [University of Bonn, Physikalisches Institut, Bonn (Germany); Collaboration: BGO-OD-Collaboration

    2011-07-01

    The goal of the BGO Open-Dipole (BGO-OD) project is the systematic investigation of the photoproduction of mesons off the nucleon. These processes are related to the structure of both the mesons and the baryons involved in reactions typical of low-energy hadronic physics. In order to fully understand and accurately interpret the results of the BGO-OD experiment it will be necessary to have a full detector and reaction simulation so that effects from detector resolution and acceptance can be accounted for in the final results. The simulation of the BGO-OD will be be undertaken with the Explora Virtual Monte-Carlo (VMC) software framework. This allows for one common user code to be implemented under Geant4, Geant3 and Fluka. The simulation software is also an analysis tool and such flexibility will be key to an efficient final analysis of the data from the BGO-OD experiment. Presented here are current status of the simulation software for the BGO-OD project and the relevant geometry of the BGO-OD, including the central BGO rugby ball detector with the dual-layer Multiwire Proportional Chambers (MWPCs) and the forward spectrometer, consisting of a large dipole magnet, tracking detectors and the Time-of-Flight walls. Simulation of the magnetic field will also be covered.

  16. CET exSim: mineral exploration experience via simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jason C. 13Holden, Eun-Jung 1Kovesi, Peter 1McCuaig, T. Campbell 1Hronsky, Jon

    2013-08-01

    Undercover mineral exploration is a challenging task as it requires understanding of subsurface geology by relying heavily on remotely sensed (i.e. geophysical) data. Cost-effective exploration is essential in order to increase the chance of success using finite budgets. This requires effective decision-making in both the process of selecting the optimum data collection methods and in the process of achieving accuracy during subsequent interpretation. Traditionally, developing the skills, behaviour and practices of exploration decision-making requires many years of experience through working on exploration projects under various geological settings, commodities and levels of available resources. This implies long periods of sub-optimal exploration decision-making, before the necessary experience has been successfully obtained. To address this critical industry issue, our ongoing research focuses on the development of the unique and novel e-learning environment, exSim, which simulates exploration scenarios where users can test their strategies and learn the consequences of their choices. This simulator provides an engaging platform for self-learning and experimentation in exploration decision strategies, providing a means to build experience more effectively. The exSim environment also provides a unique platform on which numerous scenarios and situations (e.g. deposit styles) can be simulated, potentially allowing the user to become virtually familiarised with a broader scope of exploration practices. Harnessing the power of computer simulation, visualisation and an intuitive graphical user interface, the simulator provides a way to assess the user's exploration decisions and subsequent interpretations. In this paper, we present the prototype functionalities in exSim including: simulation of geophysical surveys, follow-up drill testing and interpretation assistive tools.

  17. Ground-Based Global Positioning System (GPS) Meteorology Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor (IPW)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ground-Based Global Positioning System (GPS) Meteorology Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor (IPW) data set measures atmospheric water vapor using ground-based...

  18. Comparisons of pion simulations for the MOLLER experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunde, Dominic; Moller Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The MOLLER experiment at Jefferson Lab will measure the parity-violating asymmetry in Møller scattering, the scattering of electrons from electrons. A precise measurement of this parity-violating asymmetry will allow us to determine the weak charge of the electron with a precision that improves over the E158 experiment at SLAC. The experiment will scatter electrons from a 11 GeV beam from atomic electrons in a liquid hydrogen target. The detected particles will include inelastically produced pions, which will be a background to our measurements. In this work we investigate the validity and accuracy of two available pion physics models in order to estimate the uncertainty in the size of the pion background in the simulation. Currently there are two methods of pion models implemented. The LUND model is based on the Pythia event generator and has been used with success in simulations for the SoLID experiment. The Wiser model is based on data from previous pion scattering experiments. Comparison of the rates, cross sections, particle momentum, scattering angles, and other parameters show that both models produce consistent results for the parameters that were studied in this work, within the range of energies and scattering angles of interest to the MOLLER experiment. The work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant Nos. PHY-1359364 and PHY-1405857.

  19. Statistical Studies of Ground-Based Optical Lightning Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, C. R.; Nemzek, R. J.; Suszcynsky, D. M.

    2005-12-01

    Most extensive optical studies of lightning have been conducted from orbit, and the statistics of events collected from earth are relatively poorly documented. The time signatures of optical power measured in the presence of clouds are inevitably affected by scattering,which can distort the signatures by extending and delaying the amplitude profile in time. We have deployed two all-sky photodiode detectors, one in New Mexico and one in Oklahoma, which are gathering data alongside electric field change monitors as part of the LANL EDOTX Great Plains Array. Preliminary results show that the photodiode is sensitive to approximately 50% or more of RF events detected at ranges of up to 30 km, and still has some sensitivity at ranges in excess of 60 km (distances determined by the EDOTX field-change array). The shapes of events within this range were assessed, with focus on rise time, width, peak power, and their correlation to corresponding electric field signatures, and these are being compared with published on-orbit and ground-based data. Initial findings suggest a mean characteristic width (ratio of total detected optical energy to peak power) of 291 +/- 12 microseconds and a mean delay between the RF signal peak and optical peak of 121 +/- 17 microseconds. These values fall between prior ground-based measurements of direct return stroke emissions, and scattering-dominated on-orbit measurements. This work will promote better understanding of the correspondence between radio and optical measurements of lightning.

  20. Learner performance and attitudes in traditional versus simulated lab experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyatt, Kevin A.

    The expository laboratory, a type of physical laboratory that has prescribed outcomes, was initially designed to address learning environments and laboratory environments of the 20th century. Evidence suggests that it has lost its instructional value. Emerging technologies such as simulations have a multitude of instructional benefits which can serve as robust replacements for the expository lab. There is evidence that the expository lab is being redefined and may need to be redesigned for the online world. These changes have not been realized, however, due to the current accreditation process which does not recognize the simulated lab as a legitimate alternative to expository labs. This study investigated whether simulated laboratories can achieve the goals of contemporary lab instruction as successfully as the expository lab paradigm. This study addressed the differences and similarities in student attitudes toward using a simulated lab and an expository lab. The methodology used in this study was experimental and quantitative in nature. Two experiments were carried out, each of which comprised the completion of a lab activity by participants who were assigned to a control group (expository lab) or an experimental group (simulated lab). This study found that there were significant differences between the assessment means of the simulated lab groups and the expository lab groups. The assessment means for the simulated lab groups were significantly higher than the assessment means of the expository lab groups. In terms of learner attitude, it was found that simulated labs were perceived to be more open-ended, easier to use, and easier to generate usable data, than expository labs. Moreover, students preferred using simulated labs over expository labs, and the time to complete simulated lab activities was significantly less than the time to complete expository lab activities. This study showed that the simulated lab can serve as a legitimate alternative to the

  1. Virtual experiments: Combining realistic neutron scattering instrument and sample simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhi, E.; Hugouvieux, V.; Johnson, M. R.; Kob, W.

    2009-08-01

    A new sample component is presented for the Monte Carlo, ray-tracing program, McStas, which is widely used to simulate neutron scattering instruments. The new component allows the sample to be described by its material dynamic structure factor, which is separated into coherent and incoherent contributions. The effects of absorption and multiple scattering are treated and results from simulations and previous experiments are compared. The sample component can also be used to treat any scattering material which may be close to the sample and therefore contaminates the total, measured signal.

  2. A system for designing and simulating particle physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żelazny, Roman; Strzałkowski, Piotr

    1987-01-01

    In view of the rapid development of experimental facilities and their costs, the systematic design and preparation of particle physics experiments have become crucial. A software system is proposed as an aid for the experimental designer, mainly for experimental geometry analysis and experimental simulation. The following model is adopted: the description of an experiment is formulated in a language (here called XL) and put by its processor in a data base. The language is based on the entity-relationship-attribute approach. The information contained in the data base can be reported and analysed by an analyser (called XA) and modifications can be made at any time. In particular, the Monte Carlo methods can be used in experiment simulation for both physical phenomena in experimental set-up and detection analysis. The general idea of the system is based on the design concept of ISDOS project information systems. The characteristics of the simulation module are similar to those of the CERN Geant system, but some extensions are proposed. The system could be treated as a component of a greater, integrated software environment for the design of particle physics experiments, their monitoring and data processing.

  3. Simulations of flashing experiments in TOPFLOW facility with TRACE code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikuž, Blaž, E-mail: blaz.mikuz@ijs.si [Jozef Stefan Institute, Reactor Engineering Division, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Tiselj, Iztok [Jozef Stefan Institute, Reactor Engineering Division, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Beyer, Matthias; Lucas, Dirk [Institute of Fluid Dynamics, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Two decompression experiments performed at TOPFLOW are simulated with a TRACE code. • The depressurization triggers flashing of the slightly undersaturated liquid water. • Pressure, temperature and void fractions are compared with measurements. • Prediction of the choked flow is the most critical parameter of simulations. • Good agreement with measurements at high initial pressure (i.e. 65 and 40 bars). - Abstract: The decompression experiments performed at TOPFLOW facility in 2010 have been reproduced using the latest best-estimate thermohydraulic system code TRACE (V 5.0 Patch 3). The main component of TOPFLOW facility was about 8 m long vertical tube with an inner diameter of 195.3 mm. The evaporation of liquid water to steam caused by depressurization was simulated using two different procedures: from stagnant water and during circulating of water in tubes. The liquid water was almost saturated at initial pressure values of 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 and 6.5 MPa. Our approach applies one-dimensional code to simulate all the important parts of the facility not just the vertical test section, where the measurements were taken. The obtained simulated pressure, temperature and void fractions are compared with measured values. The simulations of the first procedure (stagnant water at beginning) are in a good agreement with measurements, especially for the cases with longer transients and higher initial pressure, however, choked flow model through the blow-off valve had to be adjusted. There is a short transient (about 2 s) after the fast opening valve opens, which was not reproduced correctly with TRACE. The simulations of the second procedure (circulating water in a loop) correctly predict pressure and temperature decrease, but underpredict void fraction. No modification of the default TRACE choked flow model was needed for procedure B.

  4. Development of binary image masks for TPF-C and ground-based AO coronagraphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jian; Crepp, Justin; Vanden Heuvel, Andrew; Miller, Shane; McDavitt, Dan; Kravchenko, Ivan; Kuchner, Marc

    2006-06-01

    We report progress on the development of precision binary notch-filter focal plane coronagraphic masks for directly imaging Earth-like planets at visible wavelengths with the Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph (TPF-C), and substellar companions at near infrared wavelengths from the ground with coronagraphs coupled to high-order adaptive optics (AO) systems. Our recent theoretical studies show that 8th-order image masks (Kuchner, Crepp & Ge 2005, KCG05) are capable of achieving unlimited dynamic range in an ideal optical system, while simultaneously remaining relatively insensitive to low-spatial-frequency optical aberrations, such as tip/tilt errors, defocus, coma, astigmatism, etc. These features offer a suite of advantages for the TPF-C by relaxing many control and stability requirements, and can also provide resistance to common practical problems associated with ground-based observations; for example, telescope flexure and low-order errors left uncorrected by the AO system due to wavefront sensor-deformable mirror lag time can leak light at significant levels. Our recent lab experiments show that prototype image masks can generate contrast levels on the order of 2x10 -6 at 3 λ/D and 6x10 -7 at 10 λ/D without deformable mirror correction using monochromatic light (Crepp et al. 2006), and that this contrast is limited primarily by light scattered by imperfections in the optics and extra diffraction created by mask construction errors. These experiments also indicate that the tilt and defocus sensitivities of high-order masks follow the theoretical predictions of Shaklan and Green 2005. In this paper, we discuss these topics as well as review our progress on developing techniques for fabricating a new series of image masks that are "free-standing", as such construction designs may alleviate some of the (mostly chromatic) problems associated with masks that rely on glass substrates for mechanical support. Finally, results obtained from our AO coronagraph

  5. An Observing System Simulation Experiment Approach to Meteorological Network Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasnezhadi, K.; Rasmussen, P. F.; Stadnyk, T.; Boluwade, A.

    2016-12-01

    A proper knowledge of the spatiotemporal distribution of rainfall is important in order to conduct a mindful investigation of water movement and storage throughout a catchment. Currently, the most accurate precipitation information available for the remote Boreal ecozones of northern Manitoba is coming from the Canadian Precipitation Analysis (CaPA) data assimilation system. Throughout the Churchill River Basin (CRB), CaPA still does not have the proper skill due to the limited number of weather stations. A new approach to experimental network design was investigated based on the concept of Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE). The OSSE-based network assessment procedure which simulates the CaPA system provides a scientific and hydrologically significant tool to assess the sensitivity of CaPA precipitation analysis to observation network density throughout the CRB. To simulate CaPA system, synthetic background and station data were simulated, respectively, by adding spatially uncorrelated and correlated Gaussian noises to an assumingly true daily weather field synthesized by a gridded precipitation generator which simulates CaPA data. Given the true reference field on one hand, and a set of pseudo-CaPA analyses associated with different network realizations on the other hand, a WATFLOOD hydrological model was employed to compare the modeled runoff. The simulations showed that as network density increases, the accuracy of CaPA precipitation products improves up to a certain limit beyond which adding more stations to the network does not result in further accuracy.

  6. Midwifery students' experiences of simulation- and skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendahls, Lena; Oscarsson, Marie G

    2017-03-01

    In Sweden, simulation- and skills training are implemented in midwifery education in order to prepare students for clinical practice. Research regarding the use of both low to high levels of fidelity in simulation in midwifery programme is limited. The aim of this study was to explore midwifery students' experiences of simulation- and skills training. Midwifery students (n=61), at advanced level, were interviewed in 13 group interviews from 2011 to 2105. A semi-structured interview guide was used, and data were analysed by content analysis. The results are presented in four main categories: develops hands on skills and communication, power of collaborative learning, highly valued learning environment and facilitates clinical practice. The majority of students felt that the simulation- and skills training were necessary to become familiar with hands on skills. Having repetitive practices in a safe and secure environment was viewed as important, and students highly valued that mistakes could be made without fear of comprising patient safety. Student's collaboration, reflections and critical thinking increased learning ability. Simulation- and skills training created links between theory and practice, and the lecturer had an important role in providing instructions and feedback. Students felt prepared and confident before their clinical practice, and simulation- and skills training increased safety for all involved, resulting in students being more confident, as patients in clinical practice became less exposed. Furthermore, mentors were satisfied with students' basic skills. Simulation- and skills training support the development of midwifery skills. It creates links between theory and practice, which facilitates students' learning ability. Training needs to include reflections and critical thinking in order to develop their learning. The lecturer has an important role in encouraging time for reflections and creating safe environment during the skills and simulation

  7. Optical turbulence forecast: toward a new era of ground-based astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Masciadri, E

    2009-01-01

    The simulation of the optical turbulence (OT) for astronomical applications obtained with non-hydrostatic atmospherical models at meso-scale presents, with respect to measurements, some advantages. The future of the ground-based astronomy relies upon the potentialities and feasibility of the ELTs. Our ability in knowing, controlling and 'managing' the effects of the turbulence on such a new generation telescopes and facilities are determinant to assure their competitiveness with respect to the space astronomy. In the past several studies have been carried out proving the feasibility of the simulation of realistic Cn2 profiles above astronomical sites. The European Community (FP6 Program) decided recently to fund a Project aiming, from one side, to prove the feasibility of the OT forecasts and the ability of meso-scale models in discriminating astronomical sites from optical turbulence point of view and, from the other side, to boost the development of this discipline at the borderline between the astrophysics...

  8. Flight validation of ground-based assessment for control power requirements at high angles of attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Ross, Holly M.; Foster, John V.; Pahle, Joseph W.; Sternberg, Charles A.; Traven, Ricardo; Lackey, James B.; Abbott, Troy D.

    1994-01-01

    A review is presented in viewgraph format of an ongoing NASA/U.S. Navy study to determine control power requirements at high angles of attack for the next generation high-performance aircraft. This paper focuses on recent flight test activities using the NASA High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV), which are intended to validate results of previous ground-based simulation studies. The purpose of this study is discussed, and the overall program structure, approach, and objectives are described. Results from two areas of investigation are presented: (1) nose-down control power requirements and (2) lateral-directional control power requirements. Selected results which illustrate issues and challenges that are being addressed in the study are discussed including test methodology, comparisons between simulation and flight, and general lessons learned.

  9. On integrating large eddy simulation and laboratory turbulent flow experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstein, Fernando F

    2009-07-28

    Critical issues involved in large eddy simulation (LES) experiments relate to the treatment of unresolved subgrid scale flow features and required initial and boundary condition supergrid scale modelling. The inherently intrusive nature of both LES and laboratory experiments is noted in this context. Flow characterization issues becomes very challenging ones in validation and computational laboratory studies, where potential sources of discrepancies between predictions and measurements need to be clearly evaluated and controlled. A special focus of the discussion is devoted to turbulent initial condition issues.

  10. Simulations of silicon vertex tracker for star experiment at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odyniec, G.; Cebra, D.; Christie, W.; Naudet, C.; Schroeder, L.; Wilson, W. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Liko, D. [Institut fur Hochenenergiephysik, Vienna, (Austria); Cramer, J.; Prindle, D.; Trainor, T. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States); Braithwaite, W. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The first computer simulations to optimize the Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) designed for the STAR experiment at RHIC are presented. The physics goals and the expected complexity of the events at RHIC dictate the design of a tracking system for the STAR experiment. The proposed tracking system will consist of a silicon vertex tracker (SVT) to locate the primary interaction and secondary decay vertices and to improve the momentum resolution, and a time projection chamber (TPC), positioned inside a solenoidal magnet, for continuous tracking.

  11. Simulations of silicon vertex tracker for star experiment at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odyniec, G.; Cebra, D.; Christie, W.; Naudet, C.; Schroeder, L.; Wilson, W. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Liko, D. [Institut fur Hochenenergiephysik, Vienna, (Austria); Cramer, J.; Prindle, D.; Trainor, T. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States); Braithwaite, W. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The first computer simulations to optimize the Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) designed for the STAR experiment at RHIC are presented. The physics goals and the expected complexity of the events at RHIC dictate the design of a tracking system for the STAR experiment. The proposed tracking system will consist of a silicon vertex tracker (SVT) to locate the primary interaction and secondary decay vertices and to improve the momentum resolution, and a time projection chamber (TPC), positioned inside a solenoidal magnet, for continuous tracking.

  12. Bringing history to life: simulating landmark experiments in psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynton, David M; Smith, Laurence D

    2006-05-01

    The course in history of psychology can be challenging for students, many of whom enter it with little background in history and faced with unfamiliar names and concepts. The sheer volume of material can encourage passive memorization unless efforts are made to increase student involvement. As part of a trend toward experiential history, historians of science have begun to supplement their lectures with demonstrations of classic physics experiments as a way to bring the history of science to life. Here, the authors report on computer simulations of five landmark experiments from early experimental psychology in the areas of reaction time, span of attention, and apparent motion. The simulations are designed not only to permit hands-on replication of historically important results but also to reproduce the experimental procedures closely enough that students can gain a feel for the nature of early research and the psychological processes being studied.

  13. Neutron Generation Simulations of Collisionless Shock Experiments on NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks, S. C.; Higginson, D. P.; Weber, S. V.; Ryutov, D. D.; Ross, J. S.; Park, H.-S.; Fiuza, F.

    2015-11-01

    A series of simulations that model recent collisionless shock experiments at the NIF will be presented. In these experiments, two opposing CD plasmas flow into each other, both plasmas arising from lasers hitting planar CD targets separated by 6, 8, and 10mm. Where the plasma flows overlap, a symmetric peak of neutron generation was observed about the mid-plane. When one of the CD foils was replaced by CH, neutron generation was still observed, but with an asymmetry about the mid-plane. The hybrid PIC code LSP is used to model this interaction. Neutron yields, temporal profiles and burn widths obtained from simulation compare favorably with experimental measurements from NTOF and PTOF diagnostics. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-675193.

  14. Simulation of Reactors for Antineutrino Experiments Using DRAGON

    CERN Document Server

    Winslow, L

    2011-01-01

    From the discovery of the neutrino to the precision neutrino oscillation measurements in KamLAND, nuclear reactors have proven to be an important source of antineutrinos. As their power and our knowledge of neutrino physics has increased, more sensitive measurements have become possible. The next generation of reactor antineutrino experiments require more detailed simulations of the reactor core. Many of the reactor simulation codes are proprietary which makes detailed studies difficult. Here we present the results of the open source DRAGON code and compare it to other industry standards for reactor modeling. We use published data from the Takahama reactor to determine the quality of the simulations. The propagation of the uncertainty to the antineutrino flux is also discussed.

  15. Virtual Reality Simulation of the International Space Welding Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) is a set of breakthrough technologies that allow a human being to enter and fully experience a 3-dimensional, computer simulated environment. A true virtual reality experience meets three criteria: (1) It involves 3-dimensional computer graphics; (2) It includes real-time feedback and response to user actions; and (3) It must provide a sense of immersion. Good examples of a virtual reality simulator are the flight simulators used by all branches of the military to train pilots for combat in high performance jet fighters. The fidelity of such simulators is extremely high -- but so is the price tag, typically millions of dollars. Virtual reality teaching and training methods are manifestly effective, and we have therefore implemented a VR trainer for the International Space Welding Experiment. My role in the development of the ISWE trainer consisted of the following: (1) created texture-mapped models of the ISWE's rotating sample drum, technology block, tool stowage assembly, sliding foot restraint, and control panel; (2) developed C code for control panel button selection and rotation of the sample drum; (3) In collaboration with Tim Clark (Antares Virtual Reality Systems), developed a serial interface box for the PC and the SGI Indigo so that external control devices, similar to ones actually used on the ISWE, could be used to control virtual objects in the ISWE simulation; (4) In collaboration with Peter Wang (SFFP) and Mark Blasingame (Boeing), established the interference characteristics of the VIM 1000 head-mounted-display and tested software filters to correct the problem; (5) In collaboration with Peter Wang and Mark Blasingame, established software and procedures for interfacing the VPL DataGlove and the Polhemus 6DOF position sensors to the SGI Indigo serial ports. The majority of the ISWE modeling effort was conducted on a PC-based VR Workstation, described below.

  16. Kinetic simulating experiment on the secondary hydrocarbon generation of kerogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The kinetic parameters of generation have been obtained for different hydrocarbon classes, including methane, C2-C5 gas hydrocarbons, C6-C13 light hydrocarbons and C13+ heavy hydrocarbons, and vitrinite reflectance (Ro) by the kinetic simulating experiment of kerogen cracking. Then, combined with the detailed geology of Sichuan Basin, the effective gas-generating intensity of the Lower Cambrian source rock is approximately estimated by applying these parameters.

  17. Neutron Transmission through Sapphire Crystals: Experiments and Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Rantsiou, Emmanouela; Filges, Uwe; Panzner, Tobias; Klinkby, Esben Bryndt

    2013-01-01

    Sapphire crystals are excellent filters of fast neutrons, while at the same time exhibit moderate to very little absorption at smaller energies. We have performed an extensive series of measurements in order to quantify the above effect. Alongside our experiments, we have performed a series of simulations, in order to reproduce the transmission of cold neutrons through sapphire crystals. Thosesimulations were part of the effort of validating and improving the newly developed interface between...

  18. Hydrodynamic simulations of gaseous Argon shock compression experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Daniel B.; Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Sheffield, Stephen A.; Morris, John S.; Gustavsen, Richard L.; Burkett, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    The lack of published Ar gas shock data motivated an evaluation of the Ar Equation of State (EOS) in gas phase initial density regimes. In particular, these regimes include initial pressures in the range of 13.8 - 34.5 bar (0.025 - 0.056 g/ cm3) and initial shock velocities around 0.2 cm/μs. The objective of the numerical evaluation was to develop a physical understanding of the EOS behavior of shocked and subsequently multiply re-shocked Ar gas through Pagosa numerical simulations utilizing the SESAME equation of state. Pagosa is a Los Alamos National Laboratory 2-D and 3-D Eulerian continuum dynamics code capable of modeling high velocity compressible flow with multiple materials. The approach involved the use of gas gun experiments to evaluate the shock and multiple re-shock behavior of pressurized Ar gas to validate Pagosa simulations and the SESAME EOS. Additionally, the diagnostic capability within the experiments allowed for the EOS to be fully constrained with measured shock velocity, particle velocity and temperature. The simulations demonstrate excellent agreement with the experiments in the shock velocity/particle velocity space, and reasonable comparisons for the ionization temperatures.

  19. Transverse beam compression on the Paul trap simulator experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik P. Gilson

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The Paul trap simulator experiment is a compact laboratory Paul trap that simulates a long, thin charged-particle bunch coasting through a kilometers-long magnetic alternating-gradient (AG transport system by putting the physicist in the beam’s frame of reference. The transverse dynamics of particles in both systems are described by similar equations, including all nonlinear space-charge effects. The time-dependent quadrupolar electric fields created by the confinement electrodes of a linear Paul trap correspond to the axially dependent magnetic fields applied in the AG system. Results are presented for experiments in which the lattice period and strength are changed over the course of the experiment to transversely compress a beam with an initial depressed tune of 0.9. Instantaneous and smooth changes are considered. Emphasis is placed on determining the conditions that minimize the emittance growth and the number of halo particles produced by the beam compression process. Both the results of particle-in-cell simulations performed with the warp code and envelope equation solutions agree well with the experimental data.

  20. Improved ground-based FTS measurement for column abundance CO2 retrievals(Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Tae-Young

    2016-10-01

    The National Institute of Meteorological Sciences has operated a ground-based Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) at Anmyeondo, Korea since December 2012. Anmyeondo FTS site is a designated operational station of Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) and belongs to regional Global Atmosphere Watch observatory. A Bruker IFS-125HR model, which has a significantly high spectral resolution by 0.02 cm-1, is employed and instrument specification is almost same as the TCCON configuration. such as a spectrum range of 3,800 16,000 cm-1, a resolution of 1 cm-1, InGaAs and Si-Diode detectors and CaF2 beam splitter. It is found that measured spectra have a good agreement with simulated spectra. In order to improve the spectral accuracy and stability, The Operational Automatic System for Intensity of Sunray (OASIS) has been developed. The OASIS can provide consistent photon energy optimized to detector range by controlling the diameter of solar beam reflected from the mirror of suntracker. As a result, monthly modulation efficiency (ME), which indicates the spectral accuracy of FTS measurement, has been recorded the vicinity of 99.9% since Feb 2015. The ME of 98% is regarded as the error of 0.1% in the ground-based in-situ CO2 measurement. Total column abundances of CO2 and CH4 during 2015 are estimated by using GGG v14 and compared with ground-based in-situ CO2 and CH4 measurements at the height of 86 m above sea level. The seasonality of CO2 is well captured by both FTS and in-situ measurements while there is considerable difference on the amplitude of CO2 seasonal variation due to the insensitivity of column CO2 to the surface carbon cycle dynamics in nature as well as anthropogenic sources. Total column CO2 and CH4 approximately vary from 395 ppm to 405 ppm and from 1.82 ppm to 1.88 ppm, respectively. It should be noted that few measurements obtained in July to August because of a lot of cloud and fog. It is found that enhancement of CH4 from the FTS at Anmyeondo

  1. Towards the development of tamper-resistant, ground-based mobile sensor nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenas, David; Stull, Christopher; Farrar, Charles

    2011-11-01

    Mobile sensor nodes hold great potential for collecting field data using fewer resources than human operators would require and potentially requiring fewer sensors than a fixed-position sensor array. It would be very beneficial to allow these mobile sensor nodes to operate unattended with a minimum of human intervention. In order to allow mobile sensor nodes to operate unattended in a field environment, it is imperative that they be capable of identifying and responding to external agents that may attempt to tamper with, damage or steal the mobile sensor nodes, while still performing their data collection mission. Potentially hostile external agents could include animals, other mobile sensor nodes, or humans. This work will focus on developing control policies to help enable a mobile sensor node to identify and avoid capture by a hostile un-mounted human. The work is developed in a simulation environment, and demonstrated using a non-holonomic, ground-based mobile sensor node. This work will be a preliminary step toward ensuring the cyber-physical security of ground-based mobile sensor nodes that operate unattended in potentially unfriendly environments.

  2. a Universal De-Noising Algorithm for Ground-Based LIDAR Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; Xiang, Chengzhi; Gong, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Ground-based lidar, working as an effective remote sensing tool, plays an irreplaceable role in the study of atmosphere, since it has the ability to provide the atmospheric vertical profile. However, the appearance of noise in a lidar signal is unavoidable, which leads to difficulties and complexities when searching for more information. Every de-noising method has its own characteristic but with a certain limitation, since the lidar signal will vary with the atmosphere changes. In this paper, a universal de-noising algorithm is proposed to enhance the SNR of a ground-based lidar signal, which is based on signal segmentation and reconstruction. The signal segmentation serving as the keystone of the algorithm, segments the lidar signal into three different parts, which are processed by different de-noising method according to their own characteristics. The signal reconstruction is a relatively simple procedure that is to splice the signal sections end to end. Finally, a series of simulation signal tests and real dual field-of-view lidar signal shows the feasibility of the universal de-noising algorithm.

  3. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel E; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfectly all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean and, as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources' right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO's observations and electromagnetic follow-up. Beyond galactic foregrounds associated with seasonal variations, we find that equatorial observatories can access over $80\\%$ of the localization probability, while mid-latitudes will access closer to $70\\%$. Facilities located near the two LIGO sites can obser...

  4. Progress in the ULTRA 1-m ground-based telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Robert C.; Martin, Robert N.; Twarog, Bruce; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara; Taghavi, Ray; Hale, Rick; Etzel, Paul; Fesen, Rob; Shawl, Steve

    2006-06-01

    We present the technical status of the Ultra Lightweight Telescope for Research in Astronomy (ULTRA) program. The program is a 3-year Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) program funded by NSF. The MRI is a collaborative effort involving Composite Mirror Applications, Inc. (CMA), University of Kansas, San Diego State University and Dartmouth College. Objectives are to demonstrate the feasibility of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite mirror technology for ground-based optical telescopes. CMA is spearheading the development of surface replication techniques to produce the optics, fabricating the 1m glass mandrel, and constructing the optical tube assembly (OTA). Presented will be an overview and status of the 1-m mandrel fabrication, optics development, telescope design and CFRP telescope fabrication by CMA for the ULTRA Telescope.

  5. Identification of rainy periods from ground based microwave radiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada Vittoria Bosisio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors present the results of a study aiming at detecting rainy data in measurements collected by a dual band ground-based radiometer. The proposed criterion is based on the ratio of the brightness temperatures observed in the 20-30 GHz band without need of any ancillary information. A major result obtained from the probability density of the ratio computed over one month of data is the identification of threshold values between clear sky, cloudy sky and rainy sky, respectively. A linear fit performed by using radiometric data and concurrent rain gauge measurements shows a correlation coefficient equal to 0.56 between the temperature ratio and the observed precipitation.

  6. Optical vortex coronagraphs on ground-based telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, Charles

    2007-01-01

    The optical vortex coronagraph is potentially a remarkably effective device, at least for an ideal unobstructed telescope. Most ground-based telescopes however suffer from central obscuration and also have to operate through the aberrations of the turbulent atmosphere. This note analyzes the performance of the optical vortex in these circumstances and compares to some other designs, showing that it performs similarly in this situation. There is a large class of coronagraphs of this general type, and choosing between them in particular applications depends on details of performance at small off-axis distances and uniformity of response in the focal plane. Issues of manufacturability to the necessary tolerances are also likely to be important.

  7. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfectly all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean and, as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources' right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO's observations and electromagnetic follow-up. These effects can inform electromagnetic follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  8. Spatial-angular modeling of ground-based biaxial lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agishev, Ravil R.

    1997-10-01

    Results of spatial-angular LIDAR modeling based on an efficiency criterion introduced are represented. Their analysis shows that a low spatial-angular efficiency of traditional VIS and NIR systems is a main cause of a low S/BR ratio at the photodetector input. It determines the considerable measurements errors and the following low accuracy of atmospheric optical parameters retrieval. As we have shown, the most effective protection against intensive sky background radiation for ground-based biaxial LIDAR's consist in forming of their angular field according to spatial-angular efficiency criterion G. Some effective approaches to high G-parameter value achievement to achieve the receiving system optimization are discussed.

  9. SPACECRAFT DOCKING SIMULATION USING HARDWARE-IN-THE-LOOP SIMULATOR WITH STEWART PLATFORM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Qitao; Jiang Hongzhou; Zhang Shangying; Han Junwei

    2005-01-01

    A ground-based hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulation system with hydraulically driven Stewart platform for spacecraft docking simulation is presented. The system is used for simulating docking process of the on-orbit spacecraft. Principle and structure of the six-degree-of-freedom simulation system are introduced. The docking process dynamic of the vehicles is modeled. Experiment results and mathematical simulation data are compared to validating the simulation system. The comparisons of the results prove that the simulation system proposed can effectively simulate the on-orbit docking process of the spacecraft.

  10. Comparison of GOME tropospheric NO2 columns with NO2 profiles deduced from ground-based in situ measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Schaub

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen dioxide (NO2 vertical tropospheric column densities (VTCs retrieved from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME are compared to coincident ground-based tropospheric NO2 columns. The ground-based columns are deduced from in situ measurements at different altitudes in the Alps for 1997 to June 2003, yielding a unique long-term comparison of GOME NO2 VTC data retrieved by a collaboration of KNMI (Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute and BIRA/IASB (Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy with independently derived tropospheric NO2 profiles. A first comparison relates the GOME retrieved tropospheric columns to the tropospheric columns obtained by integrating the ground-based NO2 measurements. For a second comparison, the tropospheric profiles constructed from the ground-based measurements are first multiplied with the averaging kernel (AK of the GOME retrieval. The second approach makes the comparison independent from the a priori NO2 profile used in the GOME retrieval. This allows splitting the total difference between the column data sets into two contributions: one that is due to differences between the a priori and the ground-based NO2 profile shapes, and another that can be attributed to uncertainties in both the remaining retrieval parameters (such as, e.g., surface albedo or aerosol concentration and the ground-based in situ NO2 profiles. For anticyclonic clear sky conditions the comparison indicates a good agreement between the columns (n=157, R=0.70/0.74 for the first/second comparison approach, respectively. The mean relative difference (with respect to the ground-based columns is −7% with a standard deviation of 40% and GOME on average slightly underestimating the ground-based columns. Both data sets show a similar seasonal behaviour with a distinct maximum of spring NO2 VTCs. Further analysis indicates small GOME columns being systematically smaller than the ground-based ones. The influence of different shapes in the a

  11. ASTROPHYSICAL JETS AS HYPERSONIC BUCKSHOT: LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS AND SIMULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Frank

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbig-Haro (HH jets are commonly thought of as homogeneous beams of plasma traveling at hypersonic velocities. Structure within jet beams is often attributed to periodic or "pulsed" variations of conditions at the jet source. In this contribution we offer an alternative to "pulsed" models of protostellar jets. Using direct numerical simulations and laboratory experiments we explore the possibility that jets are chains of sub-radial clumps propagating through a moving inter-clump medium. Our simulations explore an idealization of this scenario by injecting small (r ¿jet spheres embedded in an otherwise smooth inter-clump jet flow. The spheres are initialized with velocities differing from the jet velocity by ¿ 15%. We find the consequences of shifting from homogeneous to heterogeneous flows are significant as clumps interact with each other and with the inter-clump medium in a variety of ways. We also present new experiments that, for the first time, directly address issues of magnetized astrophysical jets. Our experiments explore the propagation and stability of super-magnetosonic, radiatively cooled, and magnetically dominated bubbles with internal, narrow jets. The results are scalable to astrophysical environments via the similarity of dimensionl ss numbers controlling the dynamics in both settings. These experiments show the jets are subject to kink mode instabilities which quickly fragment the jet into narrow chains of hypersonic knots, providing support for the "clumpy jet" paradigm.

  12. Simulations of Laboratory Astrophysics Experiments using the CRASH code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trantham, Matthew; Kuranz, Carolyn; Fein, Jeff; Wan, Willow; Young, Rachel; Keiter, Paul; Drake, R. Paul

    2015-11-01

    Computer simulations can assist in the design and analysis of laboratory astrophysics experiments. The Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) at the University of Michigan developed a code that has been used to design and analyze high-energy-density experiments on OMEGA, NIF, and other large laser facilities. This Eulerian code uses block-adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) with implicit multigroup radiation transport, electron heat conduction and laser ray tracing. This poster will demonstrate some of the experiments the CRASH code has helped design or analyze including: Kelvin-Helmholtz, Rayleigh-Taylor, magnetized flows, jets, and laser-produced plasmas. This work is funded by the following grants: DEFC52-08NA28616, DE-NA0001840, and DE-NA0002032.

  13. GLoBES: General Long Baseline Experiment Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Patrick; Kopp, Joachim; Lindner, Manfred; Rolinec, Mark; Winter, Walter

    2007-09-01

    GLoBES (General Long Baseline Experiment Simulator) is a flexible software package to simulate neutrino oscillation long baseline and reactor experiments. On the one hand, it contains a comprehensive abstract experiment definition language (AEDL), which allows to describe most classes of long baseline experiments at an abstract level. On the other hand, it provides a C-library to process the experiment information in order to obtain oscillation probabilities, rate vectors, and Δχ-values. Currently, GLoBES is available for GNU/Linux. Since the source code is included, the port to other operating systems is in principle possible. GLoBES is an open source code that has previously been described in Computer Physics Communications 167 (2005) 195 and in Ref. [7]). The source code and a comprehensive User Manual for GLoBES v3.0.8 is now available from the CPC Program Library as described in the Program Summary below. The home of GLobES is http://www.mpi-hd.mpg.de/~globes/. Program summaryProgram title: GLoBES version 3.0.8 Catalogue identifier: ADZI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADZI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 145 295 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 811 892 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: GLoBES builds and installs on 32bit and 64bit Linux systems Operating system: 32bit or 64bit Linux RAM: Typically a few MBs Classification: 11.1, 11.7, 11.10 External routines: GSL—The GNU Scientific Library, www.gnu.org/software/gsl/ Nature of problem: Neutrino oscillations are now established as the leading flavor transition mechanism for neutrinos. In a long history of many experiments, see, e.g., [1], two oscillation frequencies have been identified: The fast atmospheric

  14. Suborbital Reusable Launch Vehicles as an Opportunity to Consolidate and Calibrate Ground Based and Satellite Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, K.

    2014-12-01

    XCOR Aerospace, a commercial space company, is planning to provide frequent, low cost access to near-Earth space on the Lynx suborbital Reusable Launch Vehicle (sRLV). Measurements in the external vacuum environment can be made and can launch from most runways on a limited lead time. Lynx can operate as a platform to perform suborbital in situ measurements and remote sensing to supplement models and simulations with new data points. These measurements can serve as a quantitative link to existing instruments and be used as a basis to calibrate detectors on spacecraft. Easier access to suborbital data can improve the longevity and cohesiveness of spacecraft and ground-based resources. A study of how these measurements can be made on Lynx sRLV will be presented. At the boundary between terrestrial and space weather, measurements from instruments on Lynx can help develop algorithms to optimize the consolidation of ground and satellite based data as well as assimilate global models with new data points. For example, current tides and the equatorial electrojet, essential to understanding the Thermosphere-Ionosphere system, can be measured in situ frequently and on short notice. Furthermore, a negative-ion spectrometer and a Faraday cup, can take measurements of the D-region ion composition. A differential GPS receiver can infer the spatial gradient of ionospheric electron density. Instruments and optics on spacecraft degrade over time, leading to calibration drift. Lynx can be a cost effective platform for deploying a reference instrument to calibrate satellites with a frequent and fast turnaround and a successful return of the instrument. A calibrated reference instrument on Lynx can make collocated observations as another instrument and corrections are made for the latter, thus ensuring data consistency and mission longevity. Aboard a sRLV, atmospheric conditions that distort remotely sensed data (ground and spacecraft based) can be measured in situ. Moreover, an

  15. Engineering and simulation of life sciences Spacelab experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, R S; Bush, W H; Rummel, J A; Alexander, W C

    1979-10-01

    The third in a series of Spacelab Mission Development tests was conducted at the Johnson (correction of Johnston) Space Center as a part of the development of Life Sciences experiments for the Space Shuttle era. The latest test was a joint effort of the Ames Research and Johnson Space Centers and utilized animals and men for study. The basic objective of this test was to evaluate the operational concepts planned for the Space Shuttle life science payloads program. A three-man crew (Mission Specialist and two Payload Specialists) conducted 26 experiments and 12 operational tests, which were selected for this 7-day mission simulation. The crew lived on board a simulated Orbiter/Spacelab mockup 24 hr a day. The Orbiter section contained the mid deck crew quarters area, complete with sleeping, galley and waste management provisions. The Spacelab was identical in geometry to the European Space Agency Spacelab design, complete with removable rack sections and stowage provisions. Communications between the crewmen and support personnel were configured and controlled as currently planned for operational shuttle flights. For this test a Science Operations Remote Center was manned at the Ames Research Center and was managed by simulated Mission Control and Payload Operation Control Centers at the Johnson Space Center. This paper presents the test objectives, description of the facilities and test program, and the results of this test.

  16. Non-equilibrium Warm Dense Gold: Experiments and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    This talk is an overview of a series of studies of non-equilibrium Warm Dense Matter using a broad range of measured properties of a single material, namely Au, as comprehensive benchmarks for theory. The measurements are made in fs-laser pump-probe experiments. For understanding lattice stability, our investigation reveals a solid phase at high energy density. This leads to the calculation of lattice dynamics using MD simulations and phonon hardening in DFT-MD simulations. For understanding electron transport in two-temperature states, AC conductivity is used to evaluate DFT-MD and Kubo-Greenwood calculations while DC conductivity is used to test Ziman calculations in a DFT average atom model. The electron density is also used to assess electronic structure calculations in DFT simulations. In our latest study of electron kinetics in states with a non-Fermi-Dirac distribution, three-body recombination is found to have a significant effect on electron thermalizaiton time. This is driving an effort to develop electron kinetics simulations using the Boltzmann equation method.

  17. Ground Based Retrievals of Small Ice Crystals and Water Phase in Arctic Cirrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Subhashree; Mitchell, David L.; DeSlover, Daniel

    2009-03-01

    The microphysical properties of cirrus clouds are uncertain due to the problem of ice particles shattering at the probe inlet upon sampling. To facilitate better estimation of small ice crystal concentrations in cirrus clouds, a new ground-based remote sensing technique has been used in combination with in situ aircraft measurements. Data from the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted at the north slope of Alaska (winter 2004), have been used to test a new method for retrieving the liquid water path (LWP) and ice water path (IWP) in mixed phase clouds. The framework of the retrieval algorithm consists of the modified anomalous diffraction approximation or MADA (for mixed phase cloud optical properties), a radar reflectivity-ice microphysics relationship and a temperature-dependent ice particle size distribution (PSD) scheme. Cloud thermal emission measurements made by the ground-based Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) yield information on the total water path (TWP) while reflectivity measurements from the Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR) are used to derive the IWP. The AERI is also used to indicate the concentration of small ice crystals (DBeer's law absorption. While this is still a work in progress, the anticipated products from this AERI-radar retrieval scheme are the IWP, LWP, small-to-large ice crystal number concentration ratio and effective diameter for cirrus, as well as the ice particle number concentration for a given ice water content (IWC).

  18. De-mystifying earned value management for ground based astronomy projects, large and small

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Timothy; Brennan, Patricia; Mueller, Mark

    2014-08-01

    The scale and complexity of today's ground based astronomy projects have justifiably required Principal Investigator's and their project teams to adopt more disciplined management processes and tools in order to achieve timely and accurate quantification of the progress and relative health of their projects. Earned Value Management (EVM) is one such tool. Developed decades ago and used extensively in the defense and construction industries, and now a requirement of NASA projects greater than $20M; EVM has gained a foothold in ground-based astronomy projects. The intent of this paper is to de-mystify EVM by discussing the fundamentals of project management, explaining how EVM fits with existing principles, and describing key concepts every project can use to implement their own EVM system. This paper also discusses pitfalls to avoid during implementation and obstacles to its success. The authors report on their organization's most recent experience implementing EVM for the GMT-Consortium Large Earth Finder (G-CLEF) project. G-CLEF is a fiber-fed, optical echelle spectrograph that has been selected as a first light instrument for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT), planned for construction at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile's Atacama Desert region.

  19. Granular Solid-liquid Transition: Experiment and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, M.; Xu, X.; Sun, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Granular media are amorphous materials, which differs from traditional solid or liquid. In different circumstance, granular behavior varies from solid-like to liquid-like, and the transitions between these regimes are always related to many complex natural progresses such as the failure of soil foundation and the occurrence of landslide and debris flow. The mechanic of elastic instability during the transition from solid-like to liquid-like regime, and the quantitative description of irreversible deformation during flow are the key problems to interpret these transition phenomena. In this work, we developed a continuum model with elastic stable condition and irreversible flow rule of granular material based on a thermal dynamical model, the Two-Granular-Temperature model (TGT). Since infinitesimal elastic deformation in solid-like regime and significant plastic large deformation in liquid-like regime can coexist in the granular solid-liquid transition process, the material point method (MPM) was used to build an effective numerical model. Collapse of rectangular granular pile contains both the transition from granular solid to granular liquid and the inverse process, thus in this work we carried out collapse experiment with clay particles, and simulated the experiment with our continuum model and an open-source DEM model YADE to study the transition processes. Results between experiment and simulations were compared and good agreements on collapse shape and velocity profiles were achieved, and the new model proposed in this work seems to work well on the description of granular solid-liquid transition.

  20. Impact of particles on the Planck HFI detectors: Ground-based measurements and physical interpretation

    CERN Document Server

    Catalano, A; Atik, Y; Benoit, A; Bréele, E; Bock, J J; Camus, P; Chabot, M; Charra, M; Crill, B P; Coron, N; Coulais, A; Désert, F -X; Fauvet, L; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Guillaudin, O; Holmes, W; Jones, W C; Lamarre, J -M; Macías-Pérez, J; Martinez, M; Miniussi, A; Monfardini, A; Pajot, F; Patanchon, G; Pelissier, A; Piat, M; Puget, J -L; Renault, C; Rosset, C; Santos, D; Sauvé, A; Spencer, L D; Sudiwala, R

    2014-01-01

    The Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) surveyed the sky continuously from August 2009 to January 2012. Its noise and sensitivity performance were excellent, but the rate of cosmic ray impacts on the HFI detectors was unexpectedly high. Furthermore, collisions of cosmic rays with the focal plane produced transient signals in the data (glitches) with a wide range of characteristics. A study of cosmic ray impacts on the HFI detector modules has been undertaken to categorize and characterize the glitches, to correct the HFI time-ordered data, and understand the residual effects on Planck maps and data products. This paper presents an evaluation of the physical origins of glitches observed by the HFI detectors. In order to better understand the glitches observed by HFI in flight, several ground-based experiments were conducted with flight-spare HFI bolometer modules. The experiments were conducted between 2010 and 2013 with HFI test bolometers in different configurations using varying particles and impact ener...

  1. Combining Experiments and Simulations Using the Maximum Entropy Principle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boomsma, Wouter; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten

    2014-01-01

    are not in quantitative agreement with experimental data. The principle of maximum entropy is a general procedure for constructing probability distributions in the light of new data, making it a natural tool in cases when an initial model provides results that are at odds with experiments. The number of maximum entropy...... in the context of a simple example, after which we proceed with a real-world application in the field of molecular simulations, where the maximum entropy procedure has recently provided new insight. Given the limited accuracy of force fields, macromolecular simulations sometimes produce results....... Three very recent papers have explored this problem using the maximum entropy approach, providing both new theoretical and practical insights to the problem. We highlight each of these contributions in turn and conclude with a discussion on remaining challenges....

  2. Satellite hole formation during dewetting: experiment and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Neto, C; Seemann, R; Blossey, R; Becker, J; Grün, G

    2003-01-01

    The dewetting of thin polymer films on solid substrates has been studied extensively in recent years. These films can decay either by nucleation events or by spinodal dewetting, essentially only depending on the interface potential describing the short- and long-range intermolecular interactions between the interfaces and the initial film thickness. Here, we describe experiments and simulations concerned with the decay of polystyrene thin films. The rupture of the film occurs by the formation of a correlated pattern of holes ('satellite holes') along the liquid rims accumulating at the channel borders. The development of this complex film rupture process, which is neither simply spinodal nor nucleation dewetting, can be mimicked precisely by making use of a novel simulation code based on a rigorous mathematical treatment of the thin film equation and on the knowledge of the effective interface potential of the system. The conditions that determine the appearance and the position of the satellite holes around ...

  3. Analytical and numerical simulations of a hydraulic fracturing experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, M.Z.; Namiq, M.A.; Zhou, L.; Gou, Y. [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. of Petroleum Engineering

    2008-10-23

    Based on simulations of a previously published hydraulic fracturing experiment performed by Casas et al. (2006), this paper presents the performance assessment of the famous analytical fracture 2D-models (PKN and KGD) and a 3D numerical model (FDM program FLAC3D of the ITASCA Inc.). Strain-softening models are used in the FLAC3D to describe the fracture creation and propagation as well as to present the material softening properties (permeability, tensile strength, cohesion, friction and dilation angel) as functions of the plastic strain. The results show that the numerical simulator has a much better performance and produces more reliable results than the analytical fracture models. However, numerical models have limitations and thus potential for further development. (orig.)

  4. Gyrokinetic Simulation of Global Turbulent Transport Properties in Tokamak Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.X.; Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.; Ethier, S.; Lewandowski, J.L.V.; Rewoldt, G.; Hahm, T.S.; Manickam, J.

    2006-01-01

    A general geometry gyro-kinetic model for particle simulation of plasma turbulence in tokamak experiments is described. It incorporates the comprehensive influence of noncircular cross section, realistic plasma profiles, plasma rotation, neoclassical (equilibrium) electric fields, and Coulomb collisions. An interesting result of global turbulence development in a shaped tokamak plasma is presented with regard to nonlinear turbulence spreading into the linearly stable region. The mutual interaction between turbulence and zonal flows in collisionless plasmas is studied with a focus on identifying possible nonlinear saturation mechanisms for zonal flows. A bursting temporal behavior with a period longer than the geodesic acoustic oscillation period is observed even in a collisionless system. Our simulation results suggest that the zonal flows can drive turbulence. However, this process is too weak to be an effective zonal flow saturation mechanism.

  5. Simulations of MATROSHKA experiments at ISS using PHITS

    CERN Document Server

    Sihver, L; Puchalska, M; Reitz, G

    2010-01-01

    Concerns about the biological effects of space radiation are increasing rapidly due to the perspective of long-duration manned missions, both in relation to the International Space Station (ISS) and to manned interplanetary missions to Moon and Mars in the future. As a preparation for these long duration space missions it is important to ensure an excellent capability to evaluate the impact of space radiation on human health in order to secure the safety of the astronauts/cosmonauts and minimize their risks. It is therefore necessary to measure the radiation load on the personnel both inside and outside the space vehicles and certify that organ and tissue equivalent doses can be simulated as accurate as possible. In this paper we will present simulations using the three-dimensional Monte Carlo Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS) of long term dose measurements performed with the ESA supported experiment MATROSHKA (MTR), which is an anthropomorphic phantom containing over 6000 radiation detecto...

  6. STUDY ON SIMULATION EXPERIMENT OF EQUIVALENT MATERIAL APPLIED IN COAL MINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴敬; 苏普正; 刘晋安

    1998-01-01

    Based on simulation experiments of a number of scientific research items, the latestprogress of experiment method and test technique about equivalent material simulation areintroduced. The development of experiment technique makes analogy simulation evolve intoquantitative research about support-surrounding rock relationship from qualitative experiment.From this, large scale stereoscopic simulation experiment is developed, which has neverappeared in underground pressure research in China. The present mold specification is 3.6 m ×2,0 m×l.5 m.

  7. High-fidelity simulation in anesthesiology training: a survey of Canadian anesthesiology residents' simulator experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, James W; Price, John R; Pratt, Dan D; Collins, John B; McDonald, Julie

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this survey was to explore Canadian anesthesiology residents' educational experience with high-fidelity simulation and to improve understanding of the factors perceived to have either a positive or a negative effect on residents' learning. In 2008, all Canadian anesthesiology residents (n = 599) were invited to complete a ten-minute anonymous online survey. Survey questions were derived from two sources, a literature search of MEDLINE (1966 to present), EMBASE (1980 to present), and the Cochrane and Campbell collaboration libraries and the experience of 25 pilot residents and the lead author. The survey response rate was 27.9% (n = 167). Junior residents (PGY1-3) responded that it would be helpful to have an introductory simulation course dealing with common intraoperative emergencies. The introduction of multidisciplinary scenarios (where nurses and colleagues from different specialties were involved in scenarios) was strongly supported. With respect to gender, male anesthesia residents indicated their comfort in making mistakes and asking for help in the simulator more frequently than female residents. In accordance with the ten Best Evidence Medical Education (BEME) principles of successful simulator education, Canadian centres could improve residents' opportunities for repetitive practice (with feedback), individualization of scenarios, and defined learning outcomes for scenarios. Anesthesiology residents indicate that simulation-based education is an anxiety provoking experience, but value its role in promoting safe practice and enhancing one's ability to deal with emergency situations. Suggestions to improve simulation training include increasing residents' access, adopting a more student-centred approach to learning, and creating a safer learning environment.

  8. Simulation experiences of paramedic students: a cross-cultural examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams B

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Brett Williams,1 Chloe Abel,1 Eihab Khasawneh,2 Linda Ross,1 Tracy Levett-Jones31Department of Community Emergency Health & Paramedic Practice, Monash University, Frankston, Victoria, Australia; 2Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan; 3School of Nursing and Midwifery, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, AustraliaBackground: Simulation-based education is an important part of paramedic education and ­training. While accessing clinical placements that are adequate in quality and quantity continues to be challenging, simulation is being recognized by paramedic academics as a potential alternative. Examining students’ satisfaction of simulation, particularly cross-culturally is therefore important in providing feedback to academic teaching staff and the international paramedic community.Objective: This study aimed to compare simulation satisfaction among paramedic students from universities in Australia and Jordan.Methods: A cross-sectional study using a paper-based English version of the Satisfaction with Simulation Experience Scale was administered to paramedic students from all year levels.Results: A total of 511 students participated in this study; 306 students (60% from Australia (Monash University and 205 students (40% from Jordan (Jordan University of Science and Technology. There were statistically significant differences with large effect size noted in all three original factors between Australian and Jordanian students: debrief and feedback (mean =38.66 vs mean =34.15; P<0.001; d=0.86, clinical reasoning (mean =21.32 vs mean =18.28; P<0.001; d=0.90, and clinical learning (mean =17.59 vs mean =15.47; P<0.001; d=1.12.Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that simulation education is generally well received by students in Australia and Jordan although Australian students reported having higher satisfaction levels then their Jordanian counterparts. These results

  9. Non-robust numerical simulations of analogue extension experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naliboff, John; Buiter, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    Numerical and analogue models of lithospheric deformation provide significant insight into the tectonic processes that lead to specific structural and geophysical observations. As these two types of models contain distinct assumptions and tradeoffs, investigations drawing conclusions from both can reveal robust links between first-order processes and observations. Recent studies have focused on detailed comparisons between numerical and analogue experiments in both compressional and extensional tectonics, sometimes involving multiple lithospheric deformation codes and analogue setups. While such comparisons often show good agreement on first-order deformation styles, results frequently diverge on second-order structures, such as shear zone dip angles or spacing, and in certain cases even on first-order structures. Here, we present finite-element experiments that are designed to directly reproduce analogue "sandbox" extension experiments at the cm-scale. We use material properties and boundary conditions that are directly taken from analogue experiments and use a Drucker-Prager failure model to simulate shear zone formation in sand. We find that our numerical experiments are highly sensitive to numerous numerical parameters. For example, changes to the numerical resolution, velocity convergence parameters and elemental viscosity averaging commonly produce significant changes in first- and second-order structures accommodating deformation. The sensitivity of the numerical simulations to small parameter changes likely reflects a number of factors, including, but not limited to, high angles of internal friction assigned to sand, complex, unknown interactions between the brittle sand (used as an upper crust equivalent) and viscous silicone (lower crust), highly non-linear strain weakening processes and poor constraints on the cohesion of sand. Our numerical-analogue comparison is hampered by (a) an incomplete knowledge of the fine details of sand failure and sand

  10. Simulation Experiments of Reacting Two-Phase Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-06

    Simulation Experiments 16 2.8 Lord’s Work Done in the 1960’s 17 2.9 Investigations Performed by Wilkins and Carros in the 1960’s 19 2.10 Statement of Work 20...the fundamental research work described here. A gas gun facility, based on the studies of Lord (21 and Wilkins and Carros [3] was built at EMI-AFB...show that the calculations of Lord [2] are in error (see Section 4.). ’i 3-X: 2.9 Investigations Performed by Wilkins and Carros inthe 196o’s- Wilkins

  11. Audio-haptic interaction in simulated walking experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serafin, Stefania

    2011-01-01

    and interchangeable use of the haptic and auditory modality in floor interfaces, and for the synergy of perception and action in capturing and guiding human walking. We describe the technology developed in the context of this project, together with some experiments performed to evaluate the role of auditory......In this paper an overview of the work conducted on audio-haptic physically based simulation and evaluation of walking is provided. This work has been performed in the context of the Natural Interactive Walking (NIW) project, whose goal is to investigate possibilities for the integrated...

  12. Design of Experiment Using Simulation of a Discrete Dynamical System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mašek Jan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The topic of the presented paper is a promising approach to achieve optimal Design of Experiment (DoE, i.e. spreading of points within a design domain, using a simulation of a discrete dynamical system of interacting particles within an n-dimensional design space. The system of mutually repelling particles represents a physical analogy of the Audze-Eglājs (AE optimization criterion and its periodical modification (PAE, respectively. The paper compares the performance of two approaches to implementation: a single-thread process using the JAVA language environment and a massively parallel solution employing the nVidia CUDA platform.

  13. Simulations, Diagnostics and Recent Results of the VISA II Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Andonian, G; Pellegrini, C; Reiche, S; Rosenzweig, J B; Travish, G

    2005-01-01

    The VISA II experiment entails use of a chirped beam to drive a high gain SASE FEL. The output radiation is diagnosed with a modified frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) technique. Sextupoles are implemented to correct the lonigtudinal aberrations affecting the high energy spread chirped beam during transport to the undulator. The double differential energy spectrum is measured with a pair of slits and a set of gratings. In this paper, we report on start-to-end simulations, radiation diagnostics, as well as intial experimental results; experimental methods are described.

  14. Simulation of Upstream Tracker Detector Response for Modernised LHCb Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Pikies, M

    2015-01-01

    LHCb experiment operates a forward spectrometer that collects proton–proton collision data at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. During the so-called Long Shutdown 2 period in years 2018–2019, LHCb detector will undergo a major modernisation. A vital part of this upgrade process is building a silicon micro-strip tracking detector — Upstream Tracker (UT) — that will be placed before the bending magnet. The UT will play a critical role in the upgraded trigger system. This paper contains a general discussion of the UT detector and presents description of a silicon response simulation platform that is being currently designed by the AGH UST LHCb group.

  15. Global impacts of a Foreshock Bubble: Magnetosheath, magnetopause and ground-based observations

    CERN Document Server

    Archer, Martin; Eastwood, Jonathan; Schwartz, Steven; Horbury, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Using multipoint observations we show, for the first time, that Foreshock Bubbles (FBs) have a global impact on Earth's magnetosphere. We show that an FB, a transient kinetic phenomenon due to the interaction of backstreaming suprathermal ions with a discontinuity, modifies the total pressure upstream of the bow shock showing a decrease within the FB's core and sheath regions. Magnetosheath plasma is accelerated towards the the intersection of the FB's current sheet with the bow shock resulting in fast, sunward, flows as well as outward motion of the magnetopause. Ground-based magnetometers also show signatures of this magnetopause motion simultaneously across at least 7 hours of magnetic local time, corresponding to a distance of 21.5 RE transverse to the Sun-Earth line along the magnetopause. These observed global impacts of the FB are in agreement with previous simulations and in stark contrast to the known localised, smaller scale effects of Hot Flow Anomalies (HFAs).

  16. On the Interpretation of Gravity Wave Measurements by Ground-Based Lidars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Dörnbrack

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper asks the simple question: How can we interpret vertical time series of middle atmosphere gravity wave measurements by ground-based temperature lidars? Linear wave theory is used to show that the association of identified phase lines with quasi-monochromatic waves should be considered with great care. The ambient mean wind has a substantial effect on the inclination of the detected phase lines. The lack of knowledge about the wind might lead to a misinterpretation of the vertical propagation direction of the observed gravity waves. In particular, numerical simulations of three archetypal atmospheric mountain wave regimes show a sensitivity of virtual lidar observations on the position relative to the mountain and on the scale of the mountain.

  17. Space life sciences: ground-based iron-ion biology and physics, including shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This session of the 35th Scientific Assembly of COSPAR focuses on recent advances in ground-based studies of high-energy (mainly 1 GeV/nucleon) iron ions. The theme is interdisciplinary in nature and encompasses both physics and biology reports. Manned space missions, including those of the International Space Station and the planned Mars mission, will require the extended presence of crew members in space. As such, a better understanding in shielding design--in radiation detection as well as radio-protection based on simulating studies--is much needed. On the other hand, a better understanding of the basic mechanisms that modulate radiation sensitivity; in determining DNA double strand breaks, chromosomal aberrations, and the induction of apoptosis, will provide important information for an interventional approach.

  18. Ground-based testing of the dynamics of flexible space structures using band mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L. F.; Chew, Meng-Sang

    1991-01-01

    A suspension system based on a band mechanism is studied to provide the free-free conditions for ground based validation testing of flexible space structures. The band mechanism consists of a noncircular disk with a convex profile, preloaded by torsional springs at its center of rotation so that static equilibrium of the test structure is maintained at any vertical location; the gravitational force will be directly counteracted during dynamic testing of the space structure. This noncircular disk within the suspension system can be configured to remain unchanged for test articles with the different weights as long as the torsional spring is replaced to maintain the originally designed frequency ratio of W/k sub s. Simulations of test articles which are modeled as lumped parameter as well as continuous parameter systems, are also presented.

  19. Probing Pluto's Atmosphere Using Ground-Based Stellar Occultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicardy, Bruno; Rio de Janeiro Occultation Team, Granada Team, International Occultation and Timing Association, Royal Astronomical Society New Zealand Occultation Section, Lucky Star associated Teams

    2016-10-01

    Over the last three decades, some twenty stellar occultations by Pluto have been monitored from Earth. They occur when the dwarf planet blocks the light from a star for a few minutes as it moves on the sky. Such events led to the hint of a Pluto's atmosphere in 1985, that was fully confirmed during another occultation in 1988, but it was only in 2002 that a new occultation could be recorded. From then on, the dwarf planet started to move in front of the galactic center, which amplified by a large factor the number of events observable per year.Pluto occultations are essentially refractive events during which the stellar rays are bent by the tenuous atmosphere, causing a gradual dimming of the star. This provides the density, pressure and temperature profiles of the atmosphere from a few kilometers above the surface up to about 250 km altitude, corresponding respectively to pressure levels of about 10 and 0.1 μbar. Moreover, the extremely fine spatial resolution (a few km) obtained through this technique allows the detection of atmospheric gravity waves, and permits in principle the detection of hazes, if present.Several aspects make Pluto stellar occultations quite special: first, they are the only way to probe Pluto's atmosphere in detail, as the dwarf planet is far too small on the sky and the atmosphere is far too tenuous to be directly imaged from Earth. Second, they are an excellent example of participative science, as many amateurs have been able to record those events worldwide with valuable scientific returns, in collaboration with professional astronomers. Third, they reveal Pluto's climatic changes on decade-scales and constrain the various seasonal models currently explored.Finally, those observations are fully complementary to space exploration, in particular with the New Horizons (NH) mission. I will show how ground-based occultations helped to better calibrate some NH profiles, and conversely, how NH results provide some key boundary conditions

  20. Independet Component Analyses of Ground-based Exoplanetary Transits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Martins-Filho, Walter; Griffith, Caitlin Ann; Pearson, Kyle; Waldmann, Ingo; Biddle, Lauren; Zellem, Robert Thomas; Alvarez-Candal, Alvaro

    2016-10-01

    Most observations of exoplanetary atmospheres are conducted when a "Hot Jupiter" exoplanet transits in front of its host star. These Jovian-sized planets have small orbital periods, on the order of days, and therefore a short transit time, making them more ameanable to observations. Measurements of Hot Jupiter transits must achieve a 10-4 level of accuracy in the flux to determine the spectral modulations of the exoplanetary atmosphere. In order to accomplish this level of precision, we need to extract systematic errors, and, for ground-based measurements, the effects of Earth's atmosphere, from the signal due to the exoplanet, which is several orders of magnitudes smaller. Currently, the effects of the terrestrial atmosphere and the some of the time-dependent systematic errors are treated by dividing the host star by a reference star at each wavelength and time step of the transit. More recently, Independent Component Analyses (ICA) have been used to remove systematic effects from the raw data of space-based observations (Waldmann 2014,2012; Morello et al.,2015,2016). ICA is a statistical method born from the ideas of the blind-source separation studies, which can be used to de-trend several independent source signals of a data set (Hyvarinen and Oja, 2000). One strength of this method is that it requires no additional prior knowledge of the system. Here, we present a study of the application of ICA to ground-based transit observations of extrasolar planets, which are affected by Earth's atmosphere. We analyze photometric data of two extrasolar planets, WASP-1b and GJ3470b, recorded by the 61" Kuiper Telescope at Stewart Observatory using the Harris B and U filters. The presentation will compare the light curve depths and their dispersions as derived from the ICA analysis to those derived by analyses that ratio of the host star to nearby reference stars.References: Waldmann, I.P. 2012 ApJ, 747, 12, Waldamann, I. P. 2014 ApJ, 780, 23; Morello G. 2015 ApJ, 806

  1. Precipitation and microphysical processes observed by three polarimetric X-band radars and ground-based instrumentation during HOPE

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Xinxin; Evaristo, Raquel; Simmer, Clemens; Handwerker, Jan; Trömel, Silke

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a first analysis of precipitation and related microphysical processes observed by three polarimetric X-band Doppler radars (BoXPol, JuXPol and KiXPol) in conjunction with a ground-based network of disdrometers, rain gauges and vertically pointing micro rain radars (MRRs) during the High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2) Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) during April and May 2013 in Germany. While JuXPol...

  2. Initial NIF Shock Timing Experiments: Comparison with Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Boehly, T. R.; Datte, P. S.; Bowers, M. W.; Olson, R. E.; Munro, D. H.; Milovich, J. L.; Jones, O. S.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J. J.; Horner, J. B.; Hamza, A. V.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Giraldez, E.; Castro, C.; Gibson, C. R.; Eggert, J. H.; Smith, R. F.; Park, H.-S.; Young, B. K.; Hsing, W. W.; Landen, O. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2010-11-01

    Initial experiments are underway to demonstrate the techniques required to tune the shock timing of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments use a modified cryogenic hohlraum geometry designed to precisely match the performance of ignition hohlraums. The targets employ a re-entrant Au cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shocks is diagnosed with VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) and DANTE. The results of these measurements will be used to set the precision pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions to follow. Experimental results and comparisons with numerical simulation are presented.

  3. What do we learn from computer simulations of Bell experiments?

    CERN Document Server

    Kupczynski, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Contrary to counterfactual definiteness quantum theory teaches us that measuring instruments are not passively reading predetermined values of physical observables. Counterfactual definiteness allows proving Bell inequalities. If the contextual character of quantum measurements is correctly taken into account the proofs of these inequalities may not be done. In recent computer simulations of idealized Bell experiment predetermined successive outcomes of measurements for each setting and predetermined time delays of their registrations are calculated. Time windows and time delays are used to select various samples. Correlations, estimated using these selected samples are consistent with the predictions of quantum theory and the time window dependence is similar to the dependence observed in some real experiments. It is an important example how correlations can be explained without evoking quantum magic. However by using a suitable post-selection one may prove anything. Moreover before the post-selection genera...

  4. Performance study of ground-based infrared Bracewell interferometers - Application to the detection of exozodiacal dust disks with GENIE

    CERN Document Server

    Absil, O; Gondoin, P; Fabry, P; Wilhelm, R; Gitton, P; Puech, F

    2005-01-01

    Nulling interferometry, a powerful technique for high-resolution imaging of the close neighbourhood of bright astrophysical objets, is currently considered for future space missions such as Darwin or the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer (TPF-I), both aiming at Earth-like planet detection and characterization. Ground-based nulling interferometers are being studied for both technology demonstration and scientific preparation of the Darwin/TPF-I missions through a systematic survey of circumstellar dust disks around nearby stars. In this paper, we investigate the influence of atmospheric turbulence on the performance of ground-based nulling instruments, and deduce the major design guidelines for such instruments. End-to-end numerical simulations allow us to estimate the performance of the main subsystems and thereby the actual sensitivity of the nuller to faint exozodiacal disks. Particular attention is also given to the important question of stellar leakage calibration. This study is illustrated in the ...

  5. Cryogenic Fracturing: Laboratory Visualization Experiments and Numerical Simulations Using Peridynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Short, R.; Edmiston, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Typical hydraulic fracturing operations involve the use of a large quantity of water, which can be problematic for several reasons including possible formation (permeability) damage, disposal of waste water, and the use of precious local water resource. An alternate reservoir permeability enhancing technology not requiring water is cryogenic fracturing. This method induces controlled fracturing of rock formations by thermal shock and has potentially important applications in the geothermal and hydrocarbon industries. In this process, cryogenic fluid—such as liquid nitrogen—is injected into the subsurface, causing fracturing due to thermal gradients. These fractures may improve the formation permeability relative to that achievable by hydraulic fracturing alone. We conducted combined laboratory visualization and numerical simulations studies of thermal-shock-induced fracture initiation and propagation resulting from liquid nitrogen injection in rock and analog materials. The experiment used transparent soda-lime glass cubes to facilitate real-time visualization of fracture growth and the fracture network geometry. In this contribution, we report the effect of overall temperature difference between cryogenic fluid and solid material on the produced fracture network, by pre-heating the glass cubes to several temperatures and injecting liquid nitrogen. Temperatures are monitored at several points by thermocouple and the fracture evolution is captured visually by camera. The experiment was modeled using a customized, thermoelastic, fracture-capable numerical simulation code based on peridynamics. The performance of the numerical code was validated by the results of the laboratory experiments, and then the code was used to study the different factors affecting a cryogenic fracturing operation, including the evolution of residual stresses and constitutive relationships for material failure. In complex rock such as shale, understanding the process of cryogenic

  6. Numerical simulation of the hydrodynamic instability experiments and flow mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Based on the numerical methods of volume of fluid (VOF) and piecewise parabolic method (PPM) and parallel circumstance of Message Passing Interface (MPI),a parallel multi-viscosity-fluid hydrodynamic code MVPPM (Multi-Viscosity-Fluid Piecewise Parabolic Method) is developed and performed to study the hydrodynamic instability and flow mixing. Firstly,the MVPPM code is verified and validated by simulating three instability cases:The first one is a Riemann problem of viscous flow on the shock tube; the second one is the hydrodynamic instability and mixing of gaseous flows under re-shocks; the third one is a half height experiment of interfacial instability,which is conducted on the AWE’s shock tube. By comparing the numerical results with experimental data,good agreement is achieved. Then the MVPPM code is applied to simulate the two cases of the interfacial instabilities of jelly models acceler-ated by explosion products of a gaseous explosive mixture (GEM),which are adopted in our experi-ments. The first is implosive dynamic interfacial instability of cylindrical symmetry and mixing. The evolving process of inner and outer interfaces,and the late distribution of mixing mass caused by Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in the center of different radius are given. The second is jelly layer ex-periment which is initialized with one periodic perturbation with different amplitude and wave length. It reveals the complex processes of evolution of interface,and presents the displacement of front face of jelly layer,bubble head and top of spike relative to initial equilibrium position vs. time. The numerical results are in excellent agreement with that experimental images,and show that the amplitude of initial perturbations affects the evolvement of fluid mixing zone (FMZ) growth rate extremely,especially at late times.

  7. Mountain wave PSC dynamics and microphysics from ground-based lidar measurements and meteorological modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Reichardt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The day-long observation of a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC by two co-located ground-based lidars at the Swedish research facility Esrange (67.9° N, 21.1° E on 16 January 1997 is analyzed in terms of PSC dynamics and microphysics. Mesoscale modeling is utilized to simulate the meteorological setting of the lidar measurements. Microphysical properties of the PSC particles are retrieved by comparing the measured particle depolarization ratio and the PSC-averaged lidar ratio with theoretical optical data derived for different particle shapes. In the morning, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT particles and then increasingly coexisting liquid ternary aerosol (LTA were detected as outflow from a mountain wave-induced ice PSC upwind Esrange. The NAT PSC is in good agreement with simulations for irregular-shaped particles with length-to-diameter ratios between 0.75 and 1.25, maximum dimensions from 0.7 to 0.9 µm, and a number density from 8 to 12 cm-3 and the coexisting LTA droplets had diameters from 0.7 to 0.9 µm, a refractive index of 1.39 and a number density from 7 to 11 cm-3. The total amount of condensed HNO3 was in the range of 8–12 ppbv. The data provide further observational evidence that NAT forms via deposition nucleation on ice particles as a number of recently published papers suggest. By early afternoon the mountain-wave ice PSC expanded above the lidar site. Its optical data indicate a decrease in minimum particle size from 3 to 1.9 µm with time. Later on, following the weakening of the mountain wave, wave-induced LTA was observed only. Our study demonstrates that ground-based lidar measurements of PSCs can be comprehensively interpreted if combined with mesoscale meteorological data.

  8. Simulation for Proton Charge Radius (PRad) Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Li; PRad Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The ``Proton Charge Radius Puzzle'' refers to 7 σ discrepancy between the proton charge radius extracted from muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurements and that from the atomic hydrogen Lamb shift and e-p elastic scattering measurements. In order to get a better understanding of this puzzle, the PRad experiment (E12-11-106) was proposed and recently performed with 1.1 and 2.2 GeV unpolarized electron beam in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The experiment aims to extract the electric form factor and the charge radius of proton by simultaneously measuring the e - p elastic scattering cross section and the Møller cross section at very low Q2(2 × 10-4 10-1(GeV / c) 2) region, with sub-percent precision. A windowless hydrogen gas flow target was used to better control the background. A high-efficiency and high-resolution calorimeter (HyCal) and a pair of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) chambers were used in the experiment. This talk will focus on comparing the detailed simulation of PRad experiment and its background with preliminary spectra from the data. This work is supported in part by NSF MRI Award PHY-1229153, the U.S. Department of Energy under Contacts No. DE-FG02-07ER41528, Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory, Mississippi State University and PRad collaboration.

  9. Observing Tsunamis in the Ionosphere Using Ground Based GPS Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, D. A.; Komjathy, A.; Song, Y. Tony; Stephens, P.; Hickey, M. P.; Foster, J.

    2011-01-01

    Ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements of ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) show variations consistent with atmospheric internal gravity waves caused by ocean tsunamis following recent seismic events, including the Tohoku tsunami of March 11, 2011. We observe fluctuations correlated in time, space, and wave properties with this tsunami in TEC estimates processed using JPL's Global Ionospheric Mapping Software. These TEC estimates were band-pass filtered to remove ionospheric TEC variations with periods outside the typical range of internal gravity waves caused by tsunamis. Observable variations in TEC appear correlated with the Tohoku tsunami near the epicenter, at Hawaii, and near the west coast of North America. Disturbance magnitudes are 1-10% of the background TEC value. Observations near the epicenter are compared to estimates of expected tsunami-driven TEC variations produced by Embry Riddle Aeronautical University's Spectral Full Wave Model, an atmosphere-ionosphere coupling model, and found to be in good agreement. The potential exists to apply these detection techniques to real-time GPS TEC data, providing estimates of tsunami speed and amplitude that may be useful for future early warning systems.

  10. Theoretical validation of ground-based microwave ozone observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ricaud

    Full Text Available Ground-based microwave measurements of the diurnal and seasonal variations of ozoneat 42±4.5 and 55±8 km are validated by comparing with results from a zero-dimensional photochemical model and a two-dimensional (2D chemical/radiative/dynamical model, respectively. O3 diurnal amplitudes measured in Bordeaux are shown to be in agreement with theory to within 5%. For the seasonal analysis of O3 variation, at 42±4.5 km, the 2D model underestimates the yearly averaged ozone concentration compared with the measurements. A double maximum oscillation (~3.5% is measured in Bordeaux with an extended maximum in September and a maximum in February, whilst the 2D model predicts only a single large maximum (17% in August and a pronounced minimum in January. Evidence suggests that dynamical transport causes the winter O3 maximum by propagation of planetary waves, phenomena which are not explicitly reproduced by the 2D model. At 55±8 km, the modeled yearly averaged O3 concentration is in very good agreement with the measured yearly average. A strong annual oscillation is both measured and modeled with differences in the amplitude shown to be exclusively linked to temperature fields.

  11. Models of ionospheric VLF absorption of powerful ground based transmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M. B.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Inan, U. S.

    2012-12-01

    Ground based Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) radio transmitters play a role in precipitation of energetic Van Allen electrons. Initial analyses of the contribution of VLF transmitters to radiation belt losses were based on early models of trans-ionospheric propagation known as the Helliwell absorption curves, but some recent studies have found that the model overestimates (by 20-100 dB) the VLF energy reaching the magnetosphere. It was subsequently suggested that conversion of wave energy into electrostatic modes may be responsible for the error. We utilize a newly available extensive record of VLF transmitter energy reaching the magnetosphere, taken from the DEMETER satellite, and perform a direct comparison with a sophisticated full wave model of trans-ionospheric propagation. Although the model does not include the effect of ionospheric irregularities, it correctly predicts the average total power injected into the magnetosphere within several dB. The results, particularly at nighttime, appear to be robust against the variability of the ionospheric electron density. We conclude that the global effect of irregularity scattering on whistler mode conversion to quasi-electrostatic may be no larger than 6 dB.

  12. Atmospheric Refraction Path Integrals in Ground-Based Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Mathar, R J

    2004-01-01

    The basic effect of the earth's atmospheric refraction on telescope operation is the reduction of the true zenith angle to the apparent zenith angle, associated with prismatic aberrations due to the dispersion in air. If one attempts coherent superposition of star images in ground-based interferometry, one is in addition interested in the optical path length associated with the refracted rays. In a model of a flat earth, the optical path difference between these is not concerned as the translational symmetry of the setup means no net effect remains. Here, I evaluate these interferometric integrals in the more realistic arrangement of two telescopes located on the surface of a common earth sphere and point to a star through an atmosphere which also possesses spherical symmetry. Some focus is put on working out series expansions in terms of the small ratio of the baseline over the earth radius, which allows to bypass some numerics which otherwise is challenged by strong cancellation effects in building the opti...

  13. A comparative study of satellite and ground-based phenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, S; Stöckli, R; Appenzeller, C; Vidale, P L

    2007-05-01

    Long time series of ground-based plant phenology, as well as more than two decades of satellite-derived phenological metrics, are currently available to assess the impacts of climate variability and trends on terrestrial vegetation. Traditional plant phenology provides very accurate information on individual plant species, but with limited spatial coverage. Satellite phenology allows monitoring of terrestrial vegetation on a global scale and provides an integrative view at the landscape level. Linking the strengths of both methodologies has high potential value for climate impact studies. We compared a multispecies index from ground-observed spring phases with two types (maximum slope and threshold approach) of satellite-derived start-of-season (SOS) metrics. We focus on Switzerland from 1982 to 2001 and show that temporal and spatial variability of the multispecies index correspond well with the satellite-derived metrics. All phenological metrics correlate with temperature anomalies as expected. The slope approach proved to deviate strongly from the temporal development of the ground observations as well as from the threshold-defined SOS satellite measure. The slope spring indicator is considered to indicate a different stage in vegetation development and is therefore less suited as a SOS parameter for comparative studies in relation to ground-observed phenology. Satellite-derived metrics are, however, very susceptible to snow cover, and it is suggested that this snow cover should be better accounted for by the use of newer satellite sensors.

  14. Satellite Type Estination from Ground-based Photometric Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, T.; Ono, H.; Suzuki, J.; Ando, T.; Takanezawa, T.

    2016-09-01

    The optical photometric observation is potentially a powerful tool for understanding of the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) objects. At first, we measured in laboratory the surface reflectance of common satellite materials, for example, Multi-layer Insulation (MLI), mono-crystalline silicon cells, and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP). Next, we calculated visual magnitude of a satellite by simplified shape and albedo. In this calculation model, solar panels have dimensions of 2 by 8 meters, and the bus area is 2 meters squared with measured optical properties described above. Under these conditions, it clarified the brightness can change the range between 3 and 4 magnitudes in one night, but color index changes only from 1 to 2 magnitudes. Finally, we observed the color photometric data of several GEO satellites visible from Japan multiple times in August and September 2014. We obtained that light curves of GEO satellites recorded in the B and V bands (using Johnson filters) by a ground-base optical telescope. As a result, color index changed approximately from 0.5 to 1 magnitude in one night, and the order of magnitude was not changed in all cases. In this paper, we briefly discuss about satellite type estimation using the relation between brightness and color index obtained from the photometric observation.

  15. Ground-based measurements of UV Index (UVI at Helwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Farouk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available On October 2010 UV Index (UVI ground-based measurements were carried out by weather station at solar laboratory in NRIAG. The daily variation has maximum values in spring and summer days, while minimum values in autumn and winter days. The low level of UVI between 2.55 and 2.825 was found in December, January and February. The moderate level of UVI between 3.075 and 5.6 was found in March, October and November. The high level of UVI between 6.7 and 7.65 was found in April, May and September. The very high level of UVI between 8 and 8.6 was found in June, July and August. High level of radiation over 6 months per year including 3 months with a very high level UVI. According to the equation {UVI=a[SZA]b} the UVI increases with decreasing SZA by 82% on a daily scale and 88% on a monthly scale. Helwan exposure to a high level of radiation over 6 months per year including 3 months with a very high level UVI, so it is advisable not to direct exposure to the sun from 11 am to 2:00 pm.

  16. Wireless Power Transfer Protocols in Sensor Networks: Experiments and Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotiris Nikoletseas

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Rapid technological advances in the domain of Wireless Power Transfer pave the way for novel methods for power management in systems of wireless devices, and recent research works have already started considering algorithmic solutions for tackling emerging problems. In this paper, we investigate the problem of efficient and balanced Wireless Power Transfer in Wireless Sensor Networks. We employ wireless chargers that replenish the energy of network nodes. We propose two protocols that configure the activity of the chargers. One protocol performs wireless charging focused on the charging efficiency, while the other aims at proper balance of the chargers’ residual energy. We conduct detailed experiments using real devices and we validate the experimental results via larger scale simulations. We observe that, in both the experimental evaluation and the evaluation through detailed simulations, both protocols achieve their main goals. The Charging Oriented protocol achieves good charging efficiency throughout the experiment, while the Energy Balancing protocol achieves a uniform distribution of energy within the chargers.

  17. Simulation of force spectroscopy experiments on galacturonic acid oligomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Cybulska

    Full Text Available Pectins, forming a matrix for cellulose and hemicellulose, determine the mechanics of plant cell walls. They undergo salient structural changes during their development. In the presence of divalent cations, usually calcium, pectins can form gel-like structures. Because of their importance they have been the subject of many force spectroscopy experiments, which have examined the conformational changes and molecular tensions due to external forces. The most abundant unit present in the pectin backbone is polygalacturonic acid. Unfortunately, experimental force spectroscopy on polygalacturonic acid molecules is still not a trivial task. The mechanism of the single-molecule response to external forces can be inferred by theoretical methods. Therefore, in this work we simulated such force spectroscopy experiments using the Enforced Geometry Optimization (EGO method. We examined the oligomeric (up to hexamer structures of α-D-galacturonic acid exposed to external stretching forces. The EGO simulation of the force spectroscopy appropriately reproduced the experimental course of the enforced conformational transition: chair →inverted chair via the twisted boat conformation(s in the pyranose ring of α-D-galacturonic acid. Additionally, our theoretical approach also allowed to determine the minimum oligomer size adequate for the description of nano-mechanical properties of (poly-α-D-galacturonic acid.

  18. Simulation of force spectroscopy experiments on galacturonic acid oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulska, Justyna; Brzyska, Agnieszka; Zdunek, Artur; Woliński, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Pectins, forming a matrix for cellulose and hemicellulose, determine the mechanics of plant cell walls. They undergo salient structural changes during their development. In the presence of divalent cations, usually calcium, pectins can form gel-like structures. Because of their importance they have been the subject of many force spectroscopy experiments, which have examined the conformational changes and molecular tensions due to external forces. The most abundant unit present in the pectin backbone is polygalacturonic acid. Unfortunately, experimental force spectroscopy on polygalacturonic acid molecules is still not a trivial task. The mechanism of the single-molecule response to external forces can be inferred by theoretical methods. Therefore, in this work we simulated such force spectroscopy experiments using the Enforced Geometry Optimization (EGO) method. We examined the oligomeric (up to hexamer) structures of α-D-galacturonic acid exposed to external stretching forces. The EGO simulation of the force spectroscopy appropriately reproduced the experimental course of the enforced conformational transition: chair →inverted chair via the twisted boat conformation(s) in the pyranose ring of α-D-galacturonic acid. Additionally, our theoretical approach also allowed to determine the minimum oligomer size adequate for the description of nano-mechanical properties of (poly)-α-D-galacturonic acid.

  19. Shocked materials at the intersection of experiment and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadau, Kai [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the dynamic lattice response of solids under the extreme conditions of pressure, temperature and strain rate is a scientific quest that spans nearly a century. Critical to developing this understanding is the ability to probe and model the spatial and temporal evolution of the material microstructure and properties at the scale of the relevant physical phenomena -- nanometers to micrometers and picoseconds to nanoseconds. While experimental investigations over this range of spatial and temporal scales were unimaginable just a decade ago, new technologies and facilities currently under development and on the horizon have brought these goals within reach for the first time. The equivalent advancements in simulation capabilities now mean that we can conduct simulations and experiments at overlapping temporal and spatial scales. In this article, we describe some of our studies which exploit existing and new generation ultrabright, ultrafast x-ray sources and large scale molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the real-time physical phenomena that control the dynamic response of shocked materials.

  20. Shocked materials at the intersection of experiment and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzana, H. E.; Belak, J. F.; Bradley, K. S.; Bringa, E. M.; Budil, K. S.; Cazamias, J. U.; El-Dasher, B.; Hawreliak, J. A.; Hessler, J.; Kadau, K.; Kalantar, D. H.; McNaney, J. M.; Milathianaki, D.; Rosolankova, K.; Swift, D. C.; Taravillo, M.; Van Buuren, T. W.; Wark, J. S.; de la Rubia, T. Diaz

    2008-04-01

    Understanding the dynamic lattice response of solids under the extreme conditions of pressure, temperature and strain rate is a scientific quest that spans nearly a century. Critical to developing this understanding is the ability to probe and model the spatial and temporal evolution of the material microstructure and properties at the scale of the relevant physical phenomena-nanometers to micrometers and picoseconds to nanoseconds. While experimental investigations over this range of spatial and temporal scales were unimaginable just a decade ago, new technologies and facilities currently under development and on the horizon have brought these goals within reach for the first time. The equivalent advancements in simulation capabilities now mean that we can conduct simulations and experiments at overlapping temporal and spatial scales. In this article, we describe some of our studies which exploit existing and new generation ultrabright, ultrafast x-ray sources and large scale molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the real-time physical phenomena that control the dynamic response of shocked materials.

  1. A Little Vacation on Mars: Mars Simulation Microbial Challenge Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boston, P.; Todd, P.; Van De Camp, J.; Northup, D.; Spilde, M.

    2008-06-01

    Communities of microbial organisms isolated from a variety of extreme environments were subjected to 1 to 5 weeks of simulated Martian environmental conditions using the Mars Environment Simulation Chamber at the Techshot, Inc. facility in Greenville, Indiana. The goal of the overall experiment program was to assess survival of test Earth organisms under Mars full spectrum sunlight, low-latitude daily temperature profile and various Mars-atmosphere pressures (~50 mbar to 500 mbar, 100% CO2) and low moisture content. Organisms surviving after 5 weeks at 100 mbar included those from gypsum surface fracture communities in a Permian aged evaporite basin, desert varnish on andesite lavas around a manganese mine, and iron and manganese oxidizing organisms isolated from two caves in Mew Mexico. Phylogenetic DNA analysis revealed strains of cyanobacteria, bacterial genera (present in all surviving communities) Asticacaulis, Achromobacter, Comamonas, Pantoea, Verrucomicrobium, Bacillus, Gemmatimonas, Actinomyces, and others. At least one microcolonial fungal strain from a desert varnish community and at least one strain from Utah survived simulations. Strains related to the unusual cave bacterial group Bacteroidetes are present in survivor communities that resist isolation into pure culture implying that their consortial relationships may be critical to their survival.

  2. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. I: Single layer cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Stephen A.; McCoy, Renata; Morrison, H.; Ackerman, Andrew; Avramov, Alexander; DeBoer, GIJS; Chen, Mingxuan; Cole, Jason N.; DelGenio, Anthony D.; Falk, Michael; Foster, Mike; Fridlind, Ann; Golaz, Jean-Christophe; Hashino, Tempei; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Hoose, Corinna; Khairoutdinov, Marat; Larson, Vince; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Yali; McFarquhar, Greg; Menon, Surabi; Neggers, Roel; Park, Sungsu; Poellot, M. R.; Schmidt, Jerome M.; Sednev, Igor; Shipway, Ben; Shupe, Matthew D.; Spangenberg, D.; Sud, Yogesh; Turner, David D.; Veron, Dana; Von Salzen, Knut; Walker, Gregory K.; Wang, Zhien; Wolf, Audrey; Xie, Shaocheng; Xu, Kuan-Man; Yang, Fanglin; Zhang, G.

    2009-05-21

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of –15°C. While the cloud was water dominated, ice precipitation appears to have lowered the liquid water path to about 2/3 of the adiabatic value. The simulations, which were performed by seventeen single column and nine cloud-resolving models, generally underestimate the liquid water path with the median single-column and cloud-resolving model liquid water path a factor of 3 smaller than observed. While the simulated ice water path is in general agreement with the observed values, results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics indicate that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice phase microphysics is responsible for the strong model underestimate of liquid water path. Although no single factor is found to lead to a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for care in the model treatment of mixed-phase microphysics. This case study, which has been well observed from both aircraft and ground-based remote sensors, could be benchmark for model simulations of mixed-phase clouds.

  3. An overview of the design and analysis of simulation experiments for sensitivity analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, J.P.C.

    2005-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis may serve validation, optimization, and risk analysis of simulation models. This review surveys 'classic' and 'modern' designs for experiments with simulation models. Classic designs were developed for real, non-simulated systems in agriculture, engineering, etc. These designs

  4. The World Climate Exercise: Is (Simulated) Experience Our Best Teacher?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, K.; Rooney-varga, J. N.; Jones, A.; Johnston, E.; Sterman, J.

    2015-12-01

    Meeting the challenge of climate change will clearly require 'deep learning' - learning that motivates a search for underlying meaning, a willingness to exert the sustained effort needed to understand complex problems, and innovative problem-solving. This type of learning is dependent on the level of the learner's engagement with the material, their intrinsic motivation to learn, intention to understand, and relevance of the material to the learner. Here, we present evidence for deep learning about climate change through a simulation-based role-playing exercise, World Climate. The exercise puts participants into the roles of delegates to the United Nations climate negotiations and asks them to create an international climate deal. They find out the implications of their decisions, according to the best available science, through the same decision-support computer simulation used to provide feedback for the real-world negotiations, C-ROADS. World Climate provides an opportunity for participants have an immersive, social experience in which they learn first-hand about both the social dynamics of climate change decision-making, through role-play, and the dynamics of the climate system, through an interactive computer simulation. Evaluation results so far have shown that the exercise is highly engaging and memorable and that it motivates large majorities of participants (>70%) to take action on climate change. In addition, we have found that it leads to substantial gains in understanding key systems thinking concepts (e.g., the stock-flow behavior of atmospheric CO2), as well as improvements in understanding of climate change causes and impacts. While research is still needed to better understand the impacts of simulation-based role-playing exercises like World Climate on behavior change, long-term understanding, transfer of systems thinking skills across topics, and the importance of social learning during the exercise, our results to date indicate that it is a

  5. Numerical simulation of the hydrodynamic instability experiments and flow mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI JingSong; WANG Tao; LI Ping; ZOU LiYong; LIU CangLi

    2009-01-01

    Based on the numerical methods of volume of fluid (VOF) and piecewise parabolic method (PPM) and parallel circumstance of Message Passing Interface (MPI), a parallel multi-viscosity-fluid hydrodynamic code MVPPM (Multi-Viscosity-Fluid Piecewise Parabolic Method) is developed and performed to study the hydrodynamic instability and flow mixing. Firstly, the MVPPM code is verified and validated by simulating three instability cases: The first one is a Riemann problem of viscous flow on the shock tube;the second one is the hydrodynamic instability and mixing of gaseous flows under re-shocks; the third one is a half height experiment of interfacial instability, which is conducted on the AWE's shock tube. By comparing the numerical results with experimental data, good agreement is achieved. Then the MVPPM code is applied to simulate the two cases of the interfacial instabilities of jelly models accelerated by explosion products of a gaseous explosive mixture (GEM), which are adopted in our experiments. The first is implosive dynamic interfacial instability of cylindrical symmetry and mixing. The evolving process of inner and outer interfaces, and the late distribution of mixing mass caused by Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in the center of different radius are given. The second is jelly layer experiment which is initialized with one periodic perturbation with different amplitude and wave length. It reveals the complex processes of evolution of interface, and presents the displacement of front face of jelly layer, bubble head and top of spike relative to initial equilibrium position vs. time. The numerical results are in excellent agreement with that experimental images, and show that the amplitude of initial perturbations affects the evolvement of fluid mixing zone (FMZ) growth rate extremely, especially at late times.

  6. Investigation of Rainfall Characteristics Using TRMM PR and Ground Based Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, B.; Lang, T. J.; Nesbitt, S. W.; Cifelli, R.; Rutledge, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    Despite relatively good agreement between reflectivity profiles, comparisons of rainfall statistics derived from TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) deviate from ground-based radar (GR) observations in various field locations across the globe. TRMM PR rain rate probability distribution functions underestimate the occurrence of high rain rates (> 80 mm hr-1) compared with similar ground-based statistics, and similarly, GR distributes the total rain volume over a larger range of rain rates. Analysis of ten years of TRMM data over three field sites has shown that the greatest disagreements occur in the most intense convection, such as over land and during the east and break wind regimes over the Amazon and Australia, respectively. These differences are investigated further in this study. Ten years of TRMM PR data are analyzed in conjunction with data collected during two field experiments involving the NCAR S-Pol radar. S-Pol was deployed in Brazil in the Amazon during TRMM LBA in 1998-1999 and near Mazatlan, Mexico as part of the North American Monsoon Experiment (NAME) in 2004. Additionally, multiple years of data from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology CPOL radar located in Darwin, Australia, are examined to extend the robustness of the GR observations beyond the relatively short field campaigns. Polarimetric data collected by the two radars are used to characterize the differences between TRMM PR and GR observations as a function of bulk hydrometeor type. For example, profiles with significant graupel, as identified by GR, are analyzed to investigate the role of mixed phase in the PR retrievals. The vertical variability of D0 is examined as a function of reflectivity and related to the underlying microphysical conditions using the polarimetric data provided by the GR observations. Spatial variability of D0 is also explored by correlating D0 values derived from GR at different heights. Several significant changes were made to the TRMM processing algorithms in the

  7. Ground-Based Sub-Millimagnitude CCD Photometry of Bright Stars using Snapshot Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, Andrew W; Aldering, Greg

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate ground-based sub-millimagnitude (10^7 electrons) to be acquired in a single integration; (iii) pointing the telescope so that all stellar images fall on the same detector pixels; and (iv) using a region of the CCD detector that is free of non-linear or aberrant pixels. We describe semi-automated observations with the Supernova Integrated Field Spectrograph (SNIFS) on the University of Hawaii 2.2m telescope on Mauna Kea, with which we achieved photometric precision as good as 5.2x10^-4 (0.56 mmag) with a 5 minute cadence over a two hour interval. In one experiment, we monitored 8 stars, each separated by several degrees, and achieved sub-mmag precision with a cadence (per star) of ~17 min. Our snapshot technique is suitable for automated searches for planetary transits among multiple, bright-stars.

  8. Neutron Transport Simulations for NIST Neutron Lifetime Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangchen; BL2 Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Neutrons in stable nuclei can exist forever; a free neutron lasts for about 15 minutes on average before it beta decays to a proton, an electron, and an antineutrino. Precision measurements of the neutron lifetime test the validity of weak interaction theory and provide input into the theory of the evolution of light elements in the early universe. There are two predominant ways of measuring the neutron lifetime: the bottle method and the beam method. The bottle method measures decays of ultracold neutrons that are stored in a bottle. The beam method measures decay protons in a beam of cold neutrons of known flux. An improved beam experiment is being prepared at the National Institute of Science and Technology (Gaithersburg, MD) with the goal of reducing statistical and systematic uncertainties to the level of 1 s. The purpose of my studies was to develop computer simulations of neutron transport to determine the beam collimation and study the neutron distribution's effect on systematic effects for the experiment, such as the solid angle of the neutron flux monitor. The motivation for the experiment and the results of this work will be presented. This work was supported, in part, by a Grant to Gettysburg College from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute through the Precollege and Undergraduate Science Education Program.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation experiments on box-type radon dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Khalid; Kamran, Muhammad; Illahi, Ahsan; Manzoor, Shahid

    2014-11-01

    Epidemiological studies show that inhalation of radon gas (222Rn) may be carcinogenic especially to mine workers, people living in closed indoor energy conserved environments and underground dwellers. It is, therefore, of paramount importance to measure the 222Rn concentrations (Bq/m3) in indoors environments. For this purpose, box-type passive radon dosimeters employing ion track detector like CR-39 are widely used. Fraction of the number of radon alphas emitted in the volume of the box type dosimeter resulting in latent track formation on CR-39 is the latent track registration efficiency. Latent track registration efficiency is ultimately required to evaluate the radon concentration which consequently determines the effective dose and the radiological hazards. In this research, Monte Carlo simulation experiments were carried out to study the alpha latent track registration efficiency for box type radon dosimeter as a function of dosimeter's dimensions and range of alpha particles in air. Two different self developed Monte Carlo simulation techniques were employed namely: (a) Surface ratio (SURA) method and (b) Ray hitting (RAHI) method. Monte Carlo simulation experiments revealed that there are two types of efficiencies i.e. intrinsic efficiency (ηint) and alpha hit efficiency (ηhit). The ηint depends upon only on the dimensions of the dosimeter and ηhit depends both upon dimensions of the dosimeter and range of the alpha particles. The total latent track registration efficiency is the product of both intrinsic and hit efficiencies. It has been concluded that if diagonal length of box type dosimeter is kept smaller than the range of alpha particle then hit efficiency is achieved as 100%. Nevertheless the intrinsic efficiency keeps playing its role. The Monte Carlo simulation experimental results have been found helpful to understand the intricate track registration mechanisms in the box type dosimeter. This paper explains that how radon concentration from the

  10. Monte Carlo simulation experiments on box-type radon dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil, Khalid, E-mail: kjamil@comsats.edu.pk; Kamran, Muhammad; Illahi, Ahsan; Manzoor, Shahid

    2014-11-11

    Epidemiological studies show that inhalation of radon gas ({sup 222}Rn) may be carcinogenic especially to mine workers, people living in closed indoor energy conserved environments and underground dwellers. It is, therefore, of paramount importance to measure the {sup 222}Rn concentrations (Bq/m{sup 3}) in indoors environments. For this purpose, box-type passive radon dosimeters employing ion track detector like CR-39 are widely used. Fraction of the number of radon alphas emitted in the volume of the box type dosimeter resulting in latent track formation on CR-39 is the latent track registration efficiency. Latent track registration efficiency is ultimately required to evaluate the radon concentration which consequently determines the effective dose and the radiological hazards. In this research, Monte Carlo simulation experiments were carried out to study the alpha latent track registration efficiency for box type radon dosimeter as a function of dosimeter’s dimensions and range of alpha particles in air. Two different self developed Monte Carlo simulation techniques were employed namely: (a) Surface ratio (SURA) method and (b) Ray hitting (RAHI) method. Monte Carlo simulation experiments revealed that there are two types of efficiencies i.e. intrinsic efficiency (η{sub int}) and alpha hit efficiency (η{sub hit}). The η{sub int} depends upon only on the dimensions of the dosimeter and η{sub hit} depends both upon dimensions of the dosimeter and range of the alpha particles. The total latent track registration efficiency is the product of both intrinsic and hit efficiencies. It has been concluded that if diagonal length of box type dosimeter is kept smaller than the range of alpha particle then hit efficiency is achieved as 100%. Nevertheless the intrinsic efficiency keeps playing its role. The Monte Carlo simulation experimental results have been found helpful to understand the intricate track registration mechanisms in the box type dosimeter. This paper

  11. First retrievals of methane isotopologues from FTIR ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Whitney; Strong, Kimberly; Walker, Kaley; Buzan, Eric

    2017-04-01

    Whitney Bader has received funding from the European Union's Horizon2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement n˚ 704951, and from the University of Toronto through a Faculty of Arts & Science Postdoctoral Fellowship Award. References Bader, W., Bovy, B., Conway, S., Strong, K., Smale, D., Turner, A. J., Blumenstock, T., Boone, C., Coulon, A., Garcia, O., Griffith, D. W. T., Hase, F., Hausmann, P., Jones, N., Krummel, P., Murata, I., Morino, I., Nakajima, H., O'Doherty, S., Paton-Walsh, C., Robinson, J., Sandrin, R., Schneider, M., Servais, C., Sussmann, R. and Mahieu, E.: Ten years of atmospheric methane from ground-based NDACC FTIR observations, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 1-31, doi:10.5194/acp-2016-699, 2016. Buzan, E. M., Beale, C. A., Boone, C. D. and Bernath, P. F.: Global stratospheric measurements of the isotopologues of methane from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier transform spectrometer, Atmos. Meas. Tech., 9(3), 1095-1111, doi:10.5194/amt-9-1095-2016, 2016. Marsh, D. R., Mills, M. J., Kinnison, D. E., Lamarque, J.-F., Calvo, N. and Polvani, L. M.: Climate Change from 1850 to 2005 Simulated in CESM1(WACCM), J. Clim., 26(19), 7372-7391, doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-12-00558.1, 2013. Rothman, L. S., Gordon, I. E., Babikov, Y., Barbe, A., Chris Benner, D., Bernath, P. F., Birk, M., Bizzocchi, L., Boudon, V., Brown, L. R., Campargue, A., Chance, K., Cohen, E. A., Coudert, L. H., Devi, V. M., Drouin, B. J., Fayt, A., Flaud, J.-M., Gamache, R. R., Harrison, J. J., Hartmann, J.-M., Hill, C., Hodges, J. T., Jacquemart, D., Jolly, A., Lamouroux, J., Le Roy, R. J., Li, G., Long, D. A., Lyulin, O. M., Mackie, C. J., Massie, S. T., Mikhailenko, S., Müller, H. S. P., Naumenko, O. V., Nikitin, A. V., Orphal, J., Perevalov, V., Perrin, A., Polovtseva, E. R., Richard, C., Smith, M. A. H., Starikova, E., Sung, K., Tashkun, S., Tennyson, J., Toon, G. C., Tyuterev, V. G. and Wagner, G.: The HITRAN2012 molecular spectroscopic

  12. Trends in gravity changes from 2009 to 2013 derived from ground-based gravimetry and GRACE data in North China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongyang Shen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available North China is a key region for studying geophysical progress. In this study, ground-based and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE gravity data from 2009 to 2013 are used to calculate the gravity change rate (GCR using the polynomial fitting method. In general, the study area was divided into the Shanxi rift, Jing-Jin-Ji (Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Province, and Bohai Bay Basin (BBB regions. Results of the distribution of the GCR determined from ground-based gravimetry show that the GCR appears to be “negative-positive-negative” from west to east, which indicates that different geophysical mechanisms are involved in the tectonic activities of these regions. However, GRACE solutions are conducted over a larger spatial scale and are able to show a difference between southern and northern areas and a mass redistribution of land water storage.

  13. Seismo-traveling ionospheric disturbances of earthquake and tsunami waves observed by space- and ground-based GPS receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J. Y. G.; Chen, C. Y.; Lin, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C) is a constellation of six microsatellites launched on April 15, 2006 and has been orbiting with 72° inclination at 700 to 800 km above the earth since December 2007. The main payload of the F3/C is the GPS Occultation eXperiment (GOX) which carries out probing the radio occultation (RO) total electron content between GPS satellite and F3/C. Therefore, F3/C provides us an excellent opportunity to vertically scan ionospheric electron density from 100 up to 800 km altitude. On the other hand, worldwide ground-based GPS receivers can be employed to observe traveling ionospheric disturbances of the TEC. Here, we present the ionosphere response to seismic and tsunami waves by means of F3/C RO TEC and worldwide ground-based GPS TEC as well as existing data of infrasondes, magnetometers, and Doppler sounding systems during the 11 March 2011 M9.0 Tohoku earthquake.

  14. Nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations: synergies between theory and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavernelli, Ivano

    2015-03-17

    Recent developments in nonadiabatic dynamics enabled ab inito simulations of complex ultrafast processes in the condensed phase. These advances have opened new avenues in the study of many photophysical and photochemical reactions triggered by the absorption of electromagnetic radiation. In particular, theoretical investigations can be combined with the most sophisticated femtosecond experimental techniques to guide the interpretation of measured time-resolved observables. At the same time, the availability of experimental data at high (spatial and time) resolution offers a unique opportunity for the benchmarking and the improvement of those theoretical models used to describe complex molecular systems in their natural environment. The established synergy between theory and experiments can produce a better understanding of new ultrafast physical and chemical processes at atomistic scale resolution. Furthermore, reliable ab inito molecular dynamics simulations can already be successfully employed as predictive tools to guide new experiments as well as the design of novel and better performing materials. In this paper, I will give a concise account on the state of the art of molecular dynamics simulations of complex molecular systems in their excited states. The principal aim of this approach is the description of a given system of interest under the most realistic ambient conditions including all environmental effects that influence experiments, for instance, the interaction with the solvent and with external time-dependent electric fields, temperature, and pressure. To this end, time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is among the most efficient and accurate methods for the representation of the electronic dynamics, while trajectory surface hopping gives a valuable representation of the nuclear quantum dynamics in the excited states (including nonadiabatic effects). Concerning the environment and its effects on the dynamics, the quantum mechanics

  15. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel E.; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfect all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean, and as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources’ right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO’s observations and electromagnetic (EM) follow-up. Beyond galactic foregrounds associated with seasonal variations, we find that equatorial observatories can access over 80% of the localization probability, while mid-latitudes will access closer to 70%. Facilities located near the two LIGO sites can observe sources closer to their zenith than their analogs in the south, but the average observation will still be no closer than 44° from zenith. We also find that observatories in Africa or the South Atlantic will wait systematically longer before they can begin observing compared to the rest of the world though, there is a preference for longitudes near the LIGOs. These effects, along with knowledge of the LIGO antenna pattern, can inform EM follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  16. Ground-based Measurements of Next Generation Spectroradiometric Standard Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate, radiometric standards are essential to the future of ground- and space-based astronomy and astrophysics. While astronomers tend to think of “standard stars” as available calibration sources, progress at NIST to accurately calibrate inexpensive, easy to use photodiode detectors as spectroradiometric standards from 200 nm to 1800 nm allows referencing astronomical measurements to these devices. Direction-, time-, and wavelength-dependent transmission of Earth’s atmosphere is the single largest source of error for ground-based radiometric measurement of astronomical objects. Measurements and impacts of atmospheric extinction - scattering and absorption - on imaging radiometric and spectroradiometric measurements are described. The conclusion is that accurate real-time measurement of extinction in the column of atmosphere through which standard star observations are made, over the spectral region being observed and over the field of view of the telescope are required. New techniques to directly and simultaneously measure extinction in the column of atmosphere through which observations are made are required. Our direct extinction measurement solution employs three small facility-class instruments working in parallel: a lidar to measure rapidly time variable transmission at three wavelengths with uncertainty of 0.25% per airmass, a spectrophotometer to measure rapidly wavelength variable extinction with sub-1% precision per nanometer resolution element from 350 to 1050nm, and a wide-field camera to measure angularly variable extinction over the field of view. These instruments and their operation will be described. We assert that application of atmospheric metadata provided by this instrument suite corrects for a significant fraction of systematic errors currently limiting radiometric precision, and provides a major step towards measurements that are provably dominated by random noise.

  17. Ozone profiles above Kiruna from two ground-based radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Niall J.; Walker, Kaley A.; Raffalski, Uwe; Kivi, Rigel; Gross, Jochen; Manney, Gloria L.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents new atmospheric ozone concentration profiles retrieved from measurements made with two ground-based millimetre-wave radiometers in Kiruna, Sweden. The instruments are the Kiruna Microwave Radiometer (KIMRA) and the Millimeter wave Radiometer 2 (MIRA 2). The ozone concentration profiles are retrieved using an optimal estimation inversion technique, and they cover an altitude range of ˜ 16-54 km, with an altitude resolution of, at best, 8 km. The KIMRA and MIRA 2 measurements are compared to each other, to measurements from balloon-borne ozonesonde measurements at Sodankylä, Finland, and to measurements made by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the Aura satellite. KIMRA has a correlation of 0.82, but shows a low bias, with respect to the ozonesonde data, and MIRA 2 shows a smaller magnitude low bias and a 0.98 correlation coefficient. Both radiometers are in general agreement with each other and with MLS data, showing high correlation coefficients, but there are differences between measurements that are not explained by random errors. An oscillatory bias with a peak of approximately ±1 ppmv is identified in the KIMRA ozone profiles over an altitude range of ˜ 18-35 km, and is believed to be due to baseline wave features that are present in the spectra. A time series analysis of KIMRA ozone for winters 2008-2013 shows the existence of a local wintertime minimum in the ozone profile above Kiruna. The measurements have been ongoing at Kiruna since 2002 and late 2012 for KIMRA and MIRA 2, respectively.

  18. Project management for complex ground-based instruments: MEGARA plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Vargas, María. Luisa; Pérez-Calpena, Ana; Gil de Paz, Armando; Gallego, Jesús; Carrasco, Esperanza; Cedazo, Raquel; Iglesias, Jorge

    2014-08-01

    The project management of complex instruments for ground-based large telescopes is a challenge itself. A good management is a clue for project success in terms of performance, schedule and budget. Being on time has become a strict requirement for two reasons: to assure the arrival at the telescope due to the pressure on demanding new instrumentation for this first world-class telescopes and to not fall in over-costs. The budget and cash-flow is not always the expected one and has to be properly handled from different administrative departments at the funding centers worldwide distributed. The complexity of the organizations, the technological and scientific return to the Consortium partners and the participation in the project of all kind of professional centers working in astronomical instrumentation: universities, research centers, small and large private companies, workshops and providers, etc. make the project management strategy, and the tools and procedures tuned to the project needs, crucial for success. MEGARA (Multi-Espectrógrafo en GTC de Alta Resolución para Astronomía) is a facility instrument of the 10.4m GTC (La Palma, Spain) working at optical wavelengths that provides both Integral-Field Unit (IFU) and Multi-Object Spectrograph (MOS) capabilities at resolutions in the range R=6,000-20,000. The project is an initiative led by Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain) in collaboration with INAOE (Mexico), IAA-CSIC (Spain) and Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain). MEGARA is being developed under contract with GRANTECAN.

  19. Simulation of Extreme Arctic Cyclones in IPCC AR5 Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavrus, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Although impending Arctic climate change is widely recognized, a wild card in its expression is how extreme weather events in this region will respond to greenhouse warming. Intense polar cyclones represent one type of high-latitude phenomena falling into this category, including very deep synoptic-scale cyclones and mesoscale polar lows. These systems inflict damage through high winds, heavy precipitation, and wave action along coastlines, and their impact is expected to expand in the future, when reduced sea ice cover allows enhanced wave energy. The loss of a buffering ice pack could greatly increase the rate of coastal erosion, which has already been increasing in the Arctic. These and related threats may amplify if extreme Arctic cyclones become more frequent and/or intense in a warming climate with much more open water to fuel them. This possibility has merit on the basis of GCM experiments, which project that greenhouse forcing causes lower mean sea level pressure (SLP) in the Arctic and a strengthening of the deepest storms over boreal high latitudes. In this study, the latest Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) climate model output is used to investigate the following questions: (1) What are the spatial and seasonal characteristics of extreme Arctic cyclones? (2) How well do GCMs simulate these phenomena? (3) Are Arctic cyclones already showing the expected response to greenhouse warming in climate models? To address these questions, a retrospective analysis is conducted of the transient 20th century simulations among the CMIP5 GCMs (spanning years 1850-2005). The results demonstrate that GCMs are able to reasonably represent extreme Arctic cyclones and that the simulated characteristics do not depend significantly on model resolution. Consistent with observational evidence, climate models generate these storms primarily during winter and within the climatological Aleutian and Icelandic Low regions. Occasionally the cyclones remain very intense

  20. A teaching experience using a flight simulator: Educational Simulation in practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Ruiz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of appropriate Educational Simulation systems (software and hardware for learning purposes may contribute to the application of the “Learning by Doing” (LbD paradigm in classroom, thus helping the students to assimilate the theoretical concepts of a subject and acquire certain pre-defined competencies in a more didactical way. The main objective of this work is to conduct a teaching experience using a flight simulation environment so that the students of Aeronautical Management degree can assume the role of an aircraft pilot, in order to allow the students understanding the basic processes of the air navigation and observe how the new technologies can transform and improve these processes. This is especially helpful in classroom to teach the contents of the Single European Sky ATM Research (SESAR programme, an European project that introduces a new Air Traffic Management (ATM paradigm based on several relevant technological and procedural changes that will affect the entire air transportation system in the short and medium term. After the execution of several activities with a flight simulator in the classroom a short test and a satisfaction survey have been requested to the students in order to assess the teaching experience.

  1. Experiences using DAKOTA stochastic expansion methods in computational simulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Ruthruff, Joseph R.

    2012-01-01

    Uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods bring rigorous statistical connections to the analysis of computational and experiment data, and provide a basis for probabilistically assessing margins associated with safety and reliability. The DAKOTA toolkit developed at Sandia National Laboratories implements a number of UQ methods, which are being increasingly adopted by modeling and simulation teams to facilitate these analyses. This report disseminates results as to the performance of DAKOTA's stochastic expansion methods for UQ on a representative application. Our results provide a number of insights that may be of interest to future users of these methods, including the behavior of the methods in estimating responses at varying probability levels, and the expansion levels for the methodologies that may be needed to achieve convergence.

  2. Apertureless SNOM study on gold nanoparticles: Experiments and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Weizhe; Kimel, Alexey; Kirilyuk, Andrei; Rasing, Theo [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-08-15

    Gold nanoparticles (about 10 nm in diameter) are investigated by an apertureless (or scattering-type) scanning near-field optical microscope (aSNOM) at 633 nm and a negative optical amplitude signal contrast is observed. To understand the size effect and the interactions between light, tip, and sample, an analytical solution is obtained by adopting a model considering the tip as a point dipole. This model successfully shows the contrast reversal measured in experiments. Some important aspects, however, are neglected by the quasistatic dipole model. Thus, three-dimensional (3D) numerical calculations by a finite integration technique are applied to study the interactions between tip apex, gold nanoparticle, and the substrate surface. The simulated near-field and far-field results help us not only to understand the experimentally acquired aSNOM images but also to investigate the complicated tip-particle-surface interactions. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  3. First experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models for detector simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amadio, G. [Sao Paulo State U.; Apostolakis, J. [CERN; Bandieramonte, M. [Catania Astrophys. Observ.; Bianchini, C. [Mackenzie Presbiteriana U.; Bitzes, G. [CERN; Brun, R. [CERN; Canal, P. [Fermilab; Carminati, F. [CERN; Licht, J.de Fine [U. Copenhagen (main); Duhem, L. [Intel, Santa Clara; Elvira, D. [Fermilab; Gheata, A. [CERN; Jun, S. Y. [Fermilab; Lima, G. [Fermilab; Novak, M. [CERN; Presbyterian, M. [Bhabha Atomic Res. Ctr.; Shadura, O. [CERN; Seghal, R. [Bhabha Atomic Res. Ctr.; Wenzel, S. [CERN

    2015-12-23

    The recent emergence of hardware architectures characterized by many-core or accelerated processors has opened new opportunities for concurrent programming models taking advantage of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. The GeantV vector prototype for detector simulations has been designed to exploit both the vector capability of mainstream CPUs and multi-threading capabilities of coprocessors including NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. The characteristics of these architectures are very different in terms of the vectorization depth, parallelization needed to achieve optimal performance or memory access latency and speed. An additional challenge is to avoid the code duplication often inherent to supporting heterogeneous platforms. In this paper we present the first experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models developed for the GeantV project.

  4. Movement of patches during thermoforming: Experiment and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, J. S. U.; Amory, L.; Guillon, D.

    2016-10-01

    The application of local reinforcement like uni-directional patches can locally increase the strength of composite parts without adding much weight. During design through structural analysis, shape and position of local reinforcement can easily be determined. In the thermoforming process, patches can be integrated into the ply-stack by preassembling. During forming, these patches can move and change their position reducing the structural effect of the patch. The movement of patches has been investigated experimentally. Key factors that influence this movement are orientation, size, position in the pile and slope of the mold. The forming process is simulated using HYPERFORM. The results show that this complex process needs special models which can be computationally intensive. In this work, we model the movement of patches and compare with experiments. The final goal is to have a reasonable predictive capability for movement of patches and design the process to minimize it.

  5. Aerodynamics of ski jumping: experiments and CFD simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meile, W.; Reisenberger, E.; Brenn, G. [Graz University of Technology, Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer, Graz (Austria); Mayer, M. [VRVis GmbH, Vienna (Austria); Schmoelzer, B.; Mueller, W. [Medical University of Graz, Department for Biophysics, Graz (Austria)

    2006-12-15

    The aerodynamic behaviour of a model ski jumper is investigated experimentally at full-scale Reynolds numbers and computationally applying a standard RANS code. In particular we focus on the influence of different postures on aerodynamic forces in a wide range of angles of attack. The experimental results proved to be in good agreement with full-scale measurements with athletes in much larger wind tunnels, and form a reliable basis for further predictions of the effects of position changes on the performance. The comparison of CFD results with the experiments shows poor agreement, but enables a clear outline of simulation potentials and limits when accurate predictions of effects from small variations are required. (orig.)

  6. Social Network Mixing Patterns In Mergers & Acquisitions - A Simulation Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Fabac

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the contemporary world of global business and continuously growing competition, organizations tend to use mergers and acquisitions to enforce their position on the market. The future organization’s design is a critical success factor in such undertakings. The field of social network analysis can enhance our uderstanding of these processes as it lets us reason about the development of networks, regardless of their origin. The analysis of mixing patterns is particularly useful as it provides an insight into how nodes in a network connect with each other. We hypothesize that organizational networks with compatible mixing patterns will be integrated more successfully. After conducting a simulation experiment, we suggest an integration model based on the analysis of network assortativity. The model can be a guideline for organizational integration, such as occurs in mergers and acquisitions.

  7. The Impact of theory and simulation on tokomak experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. R. Wilson; T.S. Hahm; F. Zonca

    2007-01-01

    @@ In this section, we consider how theory and simulation have influenced tokamak experiments. Over the years, there have been numerous examples, and it is not possible to review all of them in this section. Instead, we have identified a number of areas that raise key research issues for ITER: either for its performance, or for its structural integrity. Although the review is not exhaustive, it does provide an illustration of how the theoretical physics community helps to shape and guide the experimental programmes on the world's tokamaks. We have listed a number of important references. Again, it is not possible to include all references, but we have aimed to construct a representative list which will provide access to the wider literature in these areas.

  8. First experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models for detector simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadio, G.; Apostolakis, J.; Bandieramonte, M.; Bianchini, C.; Bitzes, G.; Brun, R.; Canal, P.; Carminati, F.; de Fine Licht, J.; Duhem, L.; Elvira, D.; Gheata, A.; Jun, S. Y.; Lima, G.; Novak, M.; Presbyterian, M.; Shadura, O.; Seghal, R.; Wenzel, S.

    2015-12-01

    The recent emergence of hardware architectures characterized by many-core or accelerated processors has opened new opportunities for concurrent programming models taking advantage of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. The GeantV vector prototype for detector simulations has been designed to exploit both the vector capability of mainstream CPUs and multi-threading capabilities of coprocessors including NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. The characteristics of these architectures are very different in terms of the vectorization depth, parallelization needed to achieve optimal performance or memory access latency and speed. An additional challenge is to avoid the code duplication often inherent to supporting heterogeneous platforms. In this paper we present the first experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models developed for the GeantV project.

  9. An Atmospheric Science Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Meemong; Weidner, Richard; Qu, Zheng; Bowman, Kevin; Eldering, Annmarie

    2010-01-01

    An atmospheric sounding mission starts with a wide range of concept designs involving measurement technologies, observing platforms, and observation scenarios. Observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) is a technical approach to evaluate the relative merits of mission and instrument concepts. At Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the OSSE team has developed an OSSE environment that allows atmospheric scientists to systematically explore a wide range of mission and instrument concepts and formulate a science traceability matrix with a quantitative science impact analysis. The OSSE environment virtually creates a multi-platform atmospheric sounding testbed (MAST) by integrating atmospheric phenomena models, forward modeling methods, and inverse modeling methods. The MAST performs OSSEs in four loosely coupled processes, observation scenario exploration, measurement quality exploration, measurement quality evaluation, and science impact analysis.

  10. Hydrodynamics of Hypersonic Jets: Experiments and Numerical Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Belan, Marco; Tordella, Daniela; Massaglia, Silvano; Ferrari, Attilio; Mignone, Andrea; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2011-01-01

    Stars form in regions of the galaxy that are denser and cooler than the mean interstellar medium. These regions are called Giant Molecular Clouds. At the beginning of their life, up to $10^5-10^6$ years, stars accrete matter from their rich surrounding environment and are origin of a peculiar phenomenon that is the jet emission. Jets from Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) are intensively studied by the astrophysical community by observations at different wavelengths, analytical and numerical modeling and laboratory experiments. Indications about the jet propagation and its resulting morphologies are here obtained by means of a combined study of hypersonic jets carried out both in the laboratory and by numerical simulations.

  11. Combining experiments and simulations using the maximum entropy principle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter Boomsma

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A key component of computational biology is to compare the results of computer modelling with experimental measurements. Despite substantial progress in the models and algorithms used in many areas of computational biology, such comparisons sometimes reveal that the computations are not in quantitative agreement with experimental data. The principle of maximum entropy is a general procedure for constructing probability distributions in the light of new data, making it a natural tool in cases when an initial model provides results that are at odds with experiments. The number of maximum entropy applications in our field has grown steadily in recent years, in areas as diverse as sequence analysis, structural modelling, and neurobiology. In this Perspectives article, we give a broad introduction to the method, in an attempt to encourage its further adoption. The general procedure is explained in the context of a simple example, after which we proceed with a real-world application in the field of molecular simulations, where the maximum entropy procedure has recently provided new insight. Given the limited accuracy of force fields, macromolecular simulations sometimes produce results that are at not in complete and quantitative accordance with experiments. A common solution to this problem is to explicitly ensure agreement between the two by perturbing the potential energy function towards the experimental data. So far, a general consensus for how such perturbations should be implemented has been lacking. Three very recent papers have explored this problem using the maximum entropy approach, providing both new theoretical and practical insights to the problem. We highlight each of these contributions in turn and conclude with a discussion on remaining challenges.

  12. Combining experiments and simulations using the maximum entropy principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomsma, Wouter; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten

    2014-02-01

    A key component of computational biology is to compare the results of computer modelling with experimental measurements. Despite substantial progress in the models and algorithms used in many areas of computational biology, such comparisons sometimes reveal that the computations are not in quantitative agreement with experimental data. The principle of maximum entropy is a general procedure for constructing probability distributions in the light of new data, making it a natural tool in cases when an initial model provides results that are at odds with experiments. The number of maximum entropy applications in our field has grown steadily in recent years, in areas as diverse as sequence analysis, structural modelling, and neurobiology. In this Perspectives article, we give a broad introduction to the method, in an attempt to encourage its further adoption. The general procedure is explained in the context of a simple example, after which we proceed with a real-world application in the field of molecular simulations, where the maximum entropy procedure has recently provided new insight. Given the limited accuracy of force fields, macromolecular simulations sometimes produce results that are at not in complete and quantitative accordance with experiments. A common solution to this problem is to explicitly ensure agreement between the two by perturbing the potential energy function towards the experimental data. So far, a general consensus for how such perturbations should be implemented has been lacking. Three very recent papers have explored this problem using the maximum entropy approach, providing both new theoretical and practical insights to the problem. We highlight each of these contributions in turn and conclude with a discussion on remaining challenges.

  13. Simulation experiments on gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Experiments were made on 58 sediment samples from four sites(1244,1245,1250 and 1251) of ODP204 at five temperature points(25,35,45,55 and 65℃) to simulate methane production from hydrate-bearing sediments.Simulation results from site 1244 show that the gas components consist mainly of methane and carbon dioxide,and heavy hydrocarbons more than C2+ cannot be detected.This site also gives results,similar to those from the other three,that the methane production is controlled by experimental temperatures,generally reaching the maximum gas yields per gram sediment or TOC under lower temperatures(25 and 35 ℃).In other words,the methane amount could be related to the buried depth of sediments,given the close relation between the depth and temperature.Sediments less than 1200 m below seafloor are inferred to still act as a biogenic gas producer to pour methane into the present hydrate zone,while sedimentary layers more than 1200 m below seafloor have become too biogenically exhausted to offer any biogas,but instead they produce thermogenic gas to give additional supply to the hydrate formation in the study area.

  14. Satellite hole formation during dewetting: experiment and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neto, Chiara [Department of Applied Physics, University of Ulm, Albert Einstein Allee 11, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Jacobs, Karin [Department of Applied Physics, University of Ulm, Albert Einstein Allee 11, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Seemann, Ralf [Department of Applied Physics, University of Ulm, Albert Einstein Allee 11, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Blossey, Ralf [Centre for Bioinformatics, Saarland University, PO Box 151150, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Becker, Juergen [Institute of Applied Mathematics, University of Bonn, Beringstrasse 6, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Gruen, Guenther [Institute of Applied Mathematics, University of Bonn, Beringstrasse 6, D-53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2003-05-21

    The dewetting of thin polymer films on solid substrates has been studied extensively in recent years. These films can decay either by nucleation events or by spinodal dewetting, essentially only depending on the interface potential describing the short- and long-range intermolecular interactions between the interfaces and the initial film thickness. Here, we describe experiments and simulations concerned with the decay of polystyrene thin films. The rupture of the film occurs by the formation of a correlated pattern of holes ('satellite holes') along the liquid rims accumulating at the channel borders. The development of this complex film rupture process, which is neither simply spinodal nor nucleation dewetting, can be mimicked precisely by making use of a novel simulation code based on a rigorous mathematical treatment of the thin film equation and on the knowledge of the effective interface potential of the system. The conditions that determine the appearance and the position of the satellite holes around pre-existing holes are discussed.

  15. Simulation experiments on gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG JianMing; CAO ZhiMin; CHEN JianWen; ZHANG Min; LI Jin; YANG GuiFang

    2009-01-01

    Experiments were made on 58 sediment samples from four sites (1244, 1245, 1250 and 1251) of ODP204 at five temperature points (25, 35, 45, 55 and 65℃) to simulate methane production from hy drate-bearing sediments. Simulation results from site 1244 show that the gas components consist mainly of methane and carbon dioxide, and heavy hydrocarbons more than C2+ cannot be detected.This site also gives results, similar to those from the other three, that the methane production is con trolled by experimental temperatures, generally reaching the maximum gas yields per gram sediment or TOC under lower temperatures (25 and 35℃). In other words, the methane amount could be related to the buried depth of sediments, given the close relation between the depth and temperature. Sediments less than 1200 m below seafioor are inferred to still act as a biogenic gas producer to pour methane into the present hydrate zone, while sedimentary layers more than 1200 m below seafloor have become too biogenically exhausted to offer any biogas, but instead they produce thermogenic gas to give ad ditional supply to the hydrate formation in the study area.

  16. Parallel collisionless shocks forming in simulations of the LAPD experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidl, Martin S.; Jenko, Frank; Niemann, Chris; Winske, Dan

    2016-10-01

    Research on parallel collisionless shocks, most prominently occurring in the Earth's bow shock region, has so far been limited to satellite measurements and simulations. However, the formation of collisionless shocks depends on a wide range of parameters and scales, which can be accessed more easily in a laboratory experiment. Using a kJ-class laser, an ongoing experimental campaign at the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA is expected to produce the first laboratory measurements of the formation of a parallel collisionless shock. We present hybrid kinetic/MHD simulations that show how beam instabilities in the background plasma can be driven by ablating carbon ions from a target, causing non-linear density oscillations which develop into a propagating shock front. The free-streaming carbon ions can excite both the resonant right-hand instability and the non-resonant firehose mode. We analyze their respective roles and discuss optimizing their growth rates to speed up the process of shock formation.

  17. Visualizing simulated learning experiences through the use of informatics tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Teri L; Warren, Judith J

    2009-01-01

    High-fidelity simulation technology is a growing educational technology. Designing effective simulations requires the use of informatics tools such as UML modeling. This poster demonstrates the steps in modeling a simulation exercise.

  18. Overview and Initial Results from the DEEPWAVE Airborne and Ground-Based Measurement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    The deep-propagating gravity wave experiment (DEEPWAVE) was performed on and over New Zealand, the Tasman Sea, and the Southern Ocean with core airborne measurements extending from 5 June to 21 July 2014 and supporting ground-based measurements spanning a longer interval. The NSF/NCAR GV employed standard flight-level measurements and new airborne lidar and imaging measurements of gravity waves (GWs) from sources at lower altitudes throughout the stratosphere and into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). The new GV lidars included a Rayleigh lidar measuring atmospheric density and temperature from ~20-60 km and a sodium resonance lidar measuring sodium density and temperature at ~75-105 km. An airborne Advanced Mesosphere Temperature Mapper (AMTM) and two IR "wing" cameras imaged the OH airglow temperature and/or intensity fields extending ~900 km across the GV flight track. The DLR Falcon was equipped with its standard flight-level instruments and an aerosol Doppler lidar measuring radial winds below the Falcon. DEEPWAVE also included extensive ground-based measurements in New Zealand, Tasmania, and Southern Ocean Islands. DEEPWAVE performed 26 GV flights and 13 Falcon flights, and ground-based measurements occurred whether or not the aircraft were flying. Collectively, many diverse cases of GW forcing, propagation, refraction, and dissipation spanning altitudes of 0-100 km were observed. Examples include strong mountain wave (MW) forcing and breaking in the lower and middle stratosphere, weak MW forcing yielding MW penetration into the MLT having very large amplitudes and momentum fluxes, MW scales at higher altitudes ranging from ~10-250 km, large-scale trailing waves from orography refracting into the polar vortex and extending to high altitudes, GW generation by deep convection, large-scale GWs arising from jet stream sources, and strong MWs in the MLT arising from strong surface flow over a small island. DEEPWAVE yielded a number of surprises, among

  19. Simulating Experiment and Circuit Simulation of RTD/HPT Photo-Controlled MOBILE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐海涛; 张之圣; 郭维廉; 钟明; 梁惠来; 张世林

    2004-01-01

    The MOBILE is a logic element realizing the monostable-bistable transition of a circuit that consists of two resonant tunneling transistors-the resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) connected in series. It has several advantages including multiple inputs and multiple functions. In this paper, by connecting a heterojunction phototransistor (HPT) with the MOBILE, a novel optoelectronic functional device can be got, which presents the function of both photocurrent switching and photocurrent latching. These behaviors have been demonstrated for the first time by simulating experiments and circuit simulations, with RTDs firstly manufactured in China. Research indicates that the novel photo-controlled MOBILE has the same logic functions as conventional electrical MOBILE except for with light as an input signal.

  20. The thermo-vibrational convection in microgravity condition. Ground-based modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyuzgin, A. V.; Putin, G. F.; Harisov, A. F.

    In 1995-2000 at orbital station "Mir" has been carried out the series of experiments with the equipment "Alice" for the studying regimes of heat transfer in the supercritical fluids under influence inertial microaccelerations. The experiments have found out existence of the thermo-vibrational and thermo-inertial convective movements in the real weightlessness[1] and controlling microgravity fields[2]. However regarding structures of thermovibrational convection the results of experiments have inconsistent character. Therefore carrying out the ground-based modeling of the given problem is actually. In this work in laboratory conditions were investigated the thermo-vibrational convective movements from the dot heat source at high-frequency vibrations of the cavity with the fluid and presence quasi-static microacceleration. As the result of ground-based modeling, the regimes of convective flows, similar observed in the space experiment are received. Evolution of the convective structures and the spatial-temporary characteristics of movements are investigated in a wide range of the problem parameters. The control criteria and its critical value are determined. The received results well coordinated to the data of space experiments and allow adding and expanding representation about thermo-vibrational effects in conditions of real weightlessness and remove the contradictions concerning structures thermo-vibrational convective flows, received at the analysis of the given orbital experiments. The research described in this publication was made possible in part by Russian Foundation for Basic Research and Administration of Perm Region, Russia, under grant 04-02-96038, and Award No. PE-009-0 of the U.S. Civilian Research & Development Foundation for the Independent States of the Former Soviet Union (CRDF). A.V. Zyuzgin, A. I. Ivanov, V. I. Polezhaev, G. F. Putin, E. B. Soboleva Convective Motions in Near-Critical Fluids under Real Zero-Gravity Conditions. Cosmic Research

  1. Statistical Properties of Car Following: Theory and Driving Simulator Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Ando, Hiromasa; Zgonnikov, Arkady; Saito, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    A fair simple car driving simulator was created based on the open source engine TORCS and used in car-following experiments aimed at studying the basic features of human behavior in car driving. Four subjects with different skill in driving real cars participated in these experiments. The subjects were instructed to drive a car without overtaking and losing sight of a lead car driven by computer at a fixed speed. Based on the collected data the distributions of the headway distance, the car velocity, acceleration, and jerk are constructed and compared with the available experimental data for the real traffic flow. A new model for the car-following is proposed to capture the found properties. As the main result, we draw a conclusion that human actions in car driving should be categorized as generalized intermittent control with noise-driven activation. Besides, we hypothesize that the car jerk together with the car acceleration are additional phase variables required for describing the dynamics of car motion g...

  2. Numerical Simulation of Receptivity for a Transition Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, S. Scott; Joslin, R. D. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The cost of fuel to overcome turbulence induced viscous drag on a commercial airplane constitutes a significant fraction of the operating cost of an airline. Achieving laminar flow and maintaining it over a large portion of the wing can significantly reduce the viscous drag, and hence the cost. Design of such laminar-flow-control wings and their practical operation requires the ability to accurately and reliably predict the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. The transition process begins with the conversion of environmental and surface disturbances into the instability waves of the flow by a process called receptivity. The goal of the current research project has been to improve the prediction of transition through a better understanding of the physics of receptivity. The initial objective of this work was to investigate the specific stability and receptivity characteristics of a particular experimental investigation of boundary layer receptivity at NASA Langley. Some simulation results using direct solutions of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations which modeled this experiment where presented in the 1999 APS DFD meeting. However, based on these initial investigations, it became clear that to cover the vast receptivity parameter space required for a practical transition prediction tool, more efficient methods would be required. Thus, the focus of this research was shifted from modeling this particular experiment to formulating and developing new techniques that could efficiently yet accurately predict receptivity for a wide range of disturbance conditions.

  3. Unsupervised learning in persistent sensing for target recognition by wireless ad hoc networks of ground-based sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortos, William S.

    2008-04-01

    In previous work by the author, effective persistent and pervasive sensing for recognition and tracking of battlefield targets were seen to be achieved, using intelligent algorithms implemented by distributed mobile agents over a composite system of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for persistence and a wireless network of unattended ground sensors for pervasive coverage of the mission environment. While simulated performance results for the supervised algorithms of the composite system are shown to provide satisfactory target recognition over relatively brief periods of system operation, this performance can degrade by as much as 50% as target dynamics in the environment evolve beyond the period of system operation in which the training data are representative. To overcome this limitation, this paper applies the distributed approach using mobile agents to the network of ground-based wireless sensors alone, without the UAV subsystem, to provide persistent as well as pervasive sensing for target recognition and tracking. The supervised algorithms used in the earlier work are supplanted by unsupervised routines, including competitive-learning neural networks (CLNNs) and new versions of support vector machines (SVMs) for characterization of an unknown target environment. To capture the same physical phenomena from battlefield targets as the composite system, the suite of ground-based sensors can be expanded to include imaging and video capabilities. The spatial density of deployed sensor nodes is increased to allow more precise ground-based location and tracking of detected targets by active nodes. The "swarm" mobile agents enabling WSN intelligence are organized in a three processing stages: detection, recognition and sustained tracking of ground targets. Features formed from the compressed sensor data are down-selected according to an information-theoretic algorithm that reduces redundancy within the feature set, reducing the dimension of samples used in the target

  4. Ground Based Investigation of Electrostatic Accelerometer in HUST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y.; Zhou, Z.

    2013-12-01

    High-precision electrostatic accelerometers with six degrees of freedom (DOF) acceleration measurement were successfully used in CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions which to measure the Earth's gravity field. In our group, space inertial sensor based on the capacitance transducer and electrostatic control technique has been investigated for test of equivalence principle (TEPO), searching non-Newtonian force in micrometer range, and satellite Earth's field recovery. The significant techniques of capacitive position sensor with the noise level at 2×10-7pF/Hz1/2 and the μV/Hz1/2 level electrostatic actuator are carried out and all the six servo loop controls by using a discrete PID algorithm are realized in a FPGA device. For testing on ground, in order to compensate one g earth's gravity, the fiber torsion pendulum facility is adopt to measure the parameters of the electrostatic controlled inertial sensor such as the resolution, and the electrostatic stiffness, the cross couple between different DOFs. A short distance and a simple double capsule equipment the valid duration about 0.5 second is set up in our lab for the free fall tests of the engineering model which can directly verify the function of six DOF control. Meanwhile, high voltage suspension method is also realized and preliminary results show that the horizontal axis of acceleration noise is about 10-8m/s2/Hz1/2 level which limited mainly by the seismic noise. Reference: [1] Fen Gao, Ze-Bing Zhou, Jun Luo, Feasibility for Testing the Equivalence Principle with Optical Readout in Space, Chin. Phys. Lett. 28(8) (2011) 080401. [2] Z. Zhu, Z. B. Zhou, L. Cai, Y. Z. Bai, J. Luo, Electrostatic gravity gradiometer design for the advanced GOCE mission, Adv. Sp. Res. 51 (2013) 2269-2276. [3] Z B Zhou, L Liu, H B Tu, Y Z Bai, J Luo, Seismic noise limit for ground-based performance measurements of an inertial sensor using a torsion balance, Class. Quantum Grav. 27 (2010) 175012. [4] H B Tu, Y Z Bai, Z B Zhou, L Liu, L

  5. Ground-Based Observing Campaign of Briz-M Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, S. M.; Buckalew, B.; Frith, J.; Cowardin, H. M.; Hickson, P.; Matney, M.; Anz-Meador, P.

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) completed the installation of the Meter Class Autonomous Telescope (MCAT) on Ascension Island. MCAT is a 1.3m optical telescope designed with a fast tracking capability for observing orbital debris at all orbital regimes (Low-Erath orbits to Geosyncronous (GEO) orbits) from a low latitude site. This new asset is dedicated year-round for debris observations, and its location fills a geographical gap in the Ground-based Electro Optical Space Surveillance (GEODSS) network. A commercial off the shelf (COTS) research grade 0.4m telescope (named the Benbrook telescope) will also be installed on Ascension at the end of 2016. This smaller version is controlled by the same master software, designed by Euclid Research, and can be tasked to work independently or in concert with MCAT. Like MCAT, it has a the same suite of filters, a similar field of view, and a fast-tracking Astelco mount, and is also capable of tracking debris at all orbital regimes. These assets are well suited for targeted campagins or surveys of debris. Since 2013, NASA's ODPO has also had extensive access to the 3.8m infrared UKIRT telescope, located on Mauna Kea. At nearly 14,000-ft, this site affords excellent conditions for collecting both photometery and spectroscopy at near-IR (0.9 - 2.5 micrometers SWIR) and thermal-IR (8 - 25 micrometers; LWIR) regimes, ideal for investigating material properties as well as thermal characteristics and sizes of debris. For the purposes of understanding orbital debris, taking data in both survey mode as well as targeting individual objects for more in-depth characterizations are desired. With the recent break-ups of Briz-M rocket bodies, we have collected a suite of data in the optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared of in-tact objects as well as those classified as debris. A break-up at GEO of a Briz-M rocket occurred in January, 2016, well timed for the first remote observing survey-campaign with MCAT. Access to

  6. Experiments and numerical simulation of mixing under supercritical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, T.; Rodriguez, J.; Leyva, I. A.; Candel, S.

    2012-05-01

    Supercritical pressure conditions designate a situation where the working fluid pressure is above the critical point. Among these conditions, it is interesting to identify a transcritical range which corresponds to cases where the pressure is above the critical point, but the injection temperature is below the critical value. This situation is of special interest because it raises fundamental issues which have technological relevance in the analysis of flows in liquid rocket engines. This situation is here envisaged by analyzing the behavior of a nitrogen shear coaxial jet comprising an inner stream injected at temperatures close to the critical temperature and a coaxial flow at a higher temperature. Experiments are carried out both in the absence of external modulation and by imposing a large amplitude transverse acoustic field. Real gas large eddy simulations are performed for selected experiments. The combination of experiments and calculations is used to evaluate effects of injector geometry and operating parameters. Calculations retrieve what is observed experimentally when the momentum flux ratio of the outer to the inner stream J= (ρ _eu_e^2)/(ρ _iu_i^2) is varied. Results exhibit the change in flow structure and the development of a recirculation region when this parameter exceeds a critical value. The instantaneous flow patterns for different momentum flux ratios are used in a second stage to characterize the dynamical behavior of the flow in terms of power spectral density of velocity and density fluctuations. Results obtained under acoustic modulation provide insight into mixing enhancement of coaxial streams with a view of its possible consequences in high frequency combustion instabilities. It is shown in particular that the presence of strong acoustic modulations notably reduces the high density jet core length, indicating an increased mixing efficiency. This behavior is more pronounced when the jet is placed at the location of maximum transverse

  7. Conceptual Issues in Quantifying Unusualness and Conceiving Stochastic Experiments: Insights from Students' Experiences in Designing Sampling Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldanha, Luis

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a classroom teaching experiment that engaged a group of high school students in designing sampling simulations within a computer microworld. The simulation-design activities aimed to foster students' abilities to conceive of contextual situations as stochastic experiments, and to engage them with the logic of hypothesis…

  8. Plans of a test bed for ionospheric modelling based on Fennoscandian ground-based instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauristie, Kirsti; Kero, Antti; Verronen, Pekka T.; Aikio, Anita; Vierinen, Juha; Lehtinen, Markku; Turunen, Esa; Pulkkinen, Tuija; Virtanen, Ilkka; Norberg, Johannes; Vanhamäki, Heikki; Kallio, Esa; Kestilä, Antti; Partamies, Noora; Syrjäsuo, Mikko

    2016-07-01

    One of the recommendations for teaming among research groups in the COSPAR/ILWS roadmap is about building test beds in which coordinated observing supports model development. In the presentation we will describe a test bed initiative supporting research on ionosphere-thermosphere-magnetosphere interactions. The EISCAT incoherent scatter radars with their future extension, EISCAT3D, form the backbone of the proposed system. The EISCAT radars are surrounded by versatile and dense arrays of ground-based instrumentation: magnetometers and auroral cameras (the MIRACLE and IMAGE networks), ionospheric tomography receivers (the TomoScand network) and other novel technology for upper atmospheric probing with radio waves (e.g. the KAIRA facility, riometers and the ionosonde maintained by the Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory). As a new opening, close coordination with the Finnish national cubesat program is planned. We will investigate opportunities to establish a cost efficient nanosatellite program which would support the ground-based observations in a systematic and persistent manner. First experiences will be gathered with the Aalto-1 and Aalto-2 satellites, latter of which will be the Finnish contribution to the international QB50 mission. We envisage close collaboration also in the development of data analysis tools with the goal to integrate routines and models from different research groups to one system, where the different elements support each other. In the longer run we are aiming for a modelling framework with observational guidance which gives a holistic description on ionosphere-thermosphere processes and this way enables reliable forecasts on upper atmospheric space weather activity.

  9. Ground based mobile isotopic methane measurements in the Front Range, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, B. H.; Rella, C.; Petron, G.; Sherwood, O.; Mielke-Maday, I.; Schwietzke, S.

    2014-12-01

    Increased development of unconventional oil and gas resources in North America has given rise to attempts to monitor and quantify fugitive emissions of methane from the industry. Emission estimates of methane from oil and gas basins can vary significantly from one study to another as well as from EPA or State estimates. New efforts are aimed at reconciling bottom-up, or inventory-based, emission estimates of methane with top-down estimates based on atmospheric measurements from aircraft, towers, mobile ground-based vehicles, and atmospheric models. Attributing airborne measurements of regional methane fluxes to specific sources is informed by ground-based measurements of methane. Stable isotopic measurements (δ13C) of methane help distinguish between emissions from the O&G industry, Confined Animal Feed Operations (CAFO), and landfills, but analytical challenges typically limit meaningful isotopic measurements to individual point sampling. We are developing a toolbox to use δ13CH4 measurements to assess the partitioning of methane emissions for regions with multiple methane sources. The method was applied to the Denver-Julesberg Basin. Here we present data from continuous isotopic measurements obtained over a wide geographic area by using MegaCore, a 1500 ft. tube that is constantly filled with sample air while driving, then subsequently analyzed at slower rates using cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS). Pressure, flow and calibration are tightly controlled allowing precise attribution of methane enhancements to their point of collection. Comparisons with point measurements are needed to confirm regional values and further constrain flux estimates and models. This effort was made in conjunction with several major field campaigns in the Colorado Front Range in July-August 2014, including FRAPPÉ (Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment), DISCOVER-AQ, and the Air Water Gas NSF Sustainability Research Network at the University of Colorado.

  10. Comparing Aerosol Retrievals from Ground-Based Instruments at the Impact-Pm Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupinski, M.; Bradley, C. L.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Xu, F.; Diner, D. J.; Clements, C. B.; Camacho, C.

    2016-12-01

    Detection of aerosol types, components having different size and chemical composition, over urban areas is important for understanding their impact on health and climate. In particular, sustained contact with size-differentiated airborne particulate matter: PM10 and PM2.5 can lead to adverse health effects such as asthma attacks, heart and lung diseases, and premature mortality. Multi-angular polarimetric measurements have been advocated in recent years as an additional tool to better understand and retrieve the aerosol properties needed for improved predictions of aerosol impart on air quality and climate. We deployed the ground-based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (GroundMSPI) for accurate spectropolarimetric and radiance measurements co-located with the AERONET CIMEL sun photometer and a Halo Doppler 18 m resolution lidar from San José State University at the Garland-Fresno Air Quality supersite in Fresno, CA on July 7 during the Imaging Polarimetric Assessment and Characterization of Tropospheric Particulate Matter (ImPACT-PM) field experiment. GroundMSPI sampled the atmospheric scattering phase function in and 90 degrees out of the principal plane every 15 minutes in an automated manner, utilizing the 2-axis gimbal mount in elevation and azimuth. The goal of this work is verify atmospheric measurement of GroundMSPI with the coincident CIMEL sun photometer and ground-based lidar. Diffuse-sky radiance measurements of GroundMSPI are compared with the CIMEL sun photometer throughout the day. AERONET aerosol parameters such as size, shape, and index of refraction as well as lidar aerosol extinction profiles will be used in a forward radiative transfer model to compare with GroundMSPI observations and optimize these parameters to best match GroundMSPI data.

  11. Ground-based studies of tropisms in hardware developed for the European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correll, Melanie J.; Edelmann, Richard E.; Hangarter, Roger P.; Mullen, Jack L.; Kiss, John Z.

    Phototropism and gravitropism play key roles in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism, but red light induces positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. The blue-light response is controlled by the phototropins while the red-light response is mediated by the phytochrome family of photoreceptors. In order to better characterize root phototropism, we plan to perform experiments in microgravity so that this tropism can be more effectively studied without the interactions with the gravity response. Our experiments are to be performed on the European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS), which provides an incubator, lighting system, and high resolution video that are on a centrifuge palette. These experiments will be performed at μg, 1g (control) and fractional g-levels. In order to ensure success of this mission on the International Space Station, we have been conducting ground-based studies on growth, phototropism, and gravitropism in experimental unique equipment (EUE) that was designed for our experiments with Arabidopsis seedlings. Currently, the EMCS and our EUE are scheduled for launch on space shuttle mission STS-121. This project should provide insight into how the blue- and red-light signaling systems interact with each other and with the gravisensing system.

  12. Water Yield and Sediment Yield Simulations for Teba Catchment in Spain Using SWRRB Model: Ⅰ. Model Input and Simulation Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Water yield and sediment yield in the Teba catchment, Spain, were simulated using SWRRB (Simulator for Water Resources in Rural Basins) model. The model is composed of 198 mathematical equations. About 120 items (variables) were input for the simulation, including meteorological and climatic factors, hydrologic factors, topographic factors, parent materials, soils, vegetation, human activities, etc. The simulated results involved surface runoff, subsurface runoff, sediment, peak flow, evapotranspiration, soil water, total biomass,etc. Careful and thorough input data preparation and repeated simulation experiments are the key to get the accurate results. In this work the simulation accuracy for annual water yield prediction reached to 83.68%.``

  13. Cascade processes in stratified media: experiment and direct numerical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibgatullin, Ilias; Brouzet, Christophe; Joubaud, Sylvain; Ermanyuk, Evgeny; Dauxois, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    Internal gravity waves may transfer substantial part of energy in oceans and astrophysical objects, influence the background stratification, and angular momentum. Internal waves can be generated by convection in astrophysical objects, by tidal motion and interaction with orography in oceans. Internal and inertial waves obey similar system of equations. Due to very particular type of dispersive relation and the way internal waves are reflected from surfaces, in confined domains the monochromatic internal waves after sequence of reflections may form closed paths, the "wave attractors" [1]. Presently, linear theory of wave attractors is quite elaborated and a principal interest of research is focused on nonlinear regimes and unstable configurations, overturning events and mixing. We have performed direct numerical simulation of wave attractors which closely reproduces experiments [2] being carried out in Ecole Normal Superior de Lyon (ENS de Lyon). Direct numerical simulation is realized with the help of spectral element approach and code nek5000. Triadic resonance is confirmed as the first instability which appears on the most energetic ray of the attractor at sufficiently large forcing. With further increase of the forcing amplitude the daughter waves also become unstable resulting in a sophisticated cascade process which was first observed experimentally. For very high forcing amplitude interaction of focused waves with the walls results in appearance of small-scale folded structures. Their interaction with principal flow is the subject of further research. 1. Maas, L. R. M. & Lam, F.-P. A., Geometric focusing of internal waves. J. Fluid Mech, 1995,. 300, 1-41 2. Scolan, H., Ermanyuk, E., Dauxois, T., 2013, Physical Review Letters, 110, 234501

  14. NASA Earth Observing System Simulator Suite (NEOS3): A Forward Simulation Framework for Observing System Simulation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niamsuwan, N.; Tanelli, S.; Johnson, M. P.; Jacob, J. C.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; Oveisgharan, S.; Dao, D.; Simard, M.; Turk, F. J.; Tsang, L.; Liao, T. H.; Chau, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Future Earth observation missions will produce a large volume of interrelated data sets that will help us to cross-calibrate and validate spaceborne sensor measurements. A forward simulator is a crucial tool for examining the quality of individual products as well as resolving discrepancy among related data sets. NASA Earth Observing System Simulator Suite (NEOS3) is a highly customizable forward simulation tool for Earth remote sensing instruments. Its three-stage simulation process converts the 3D geophysical description of the scene being observed to corresponding electromagnetic emission and scattering signatures, and finally to observable parameters as reported by a (passive or active) remote sensing instrument. User-configurable options include selection of models for describing geophysical properties of atmospheric particles and their effects on the signal of interest, selection of wave scattering and propagation models, and activation of simplifying assumptions (trading between computation time and solution accuracy). The next generation of NEOS3, to be released in 2015, will feature additional state-of-the-art electromagnetic scattering models for various types of the Earth's surfaces and ground covers (e.g. layered snowpack, forest, vegetated soil, and sea ice) tailored specifically for missions like GPM and SMAP. To be included in 2015 is dedicated functionalities and interface that facilitate integrating NEOS3 into Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) environments. This new generation of NEOS3 can also utilize high performance computing resources (parallel processing and cloud computing) and can be scaled to handle large or computation intensive problems. This presentation will highlight some notable features of NEOS3. Demonstration of its applications for evaluating new mission concepts, especially in the context of OSSE frameworks will also be presented.

  15. Transient Simulation of the Multi-SERTTA Experiment with MAMMOTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortensi, Javier [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Baker, Benjamin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wang, Yaqi [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schunert, Sebastian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); deHart, Mark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-07-11

    This work details the MAMMOTH reactor physics simulations of the Static Environment Rodlet Transient Test Apparatus (SERTTA) conducted at Idaho National Laboratory in FY-2017. TREAT static-environment experiment vehicles are being developed to enable transient testing of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) type fuel specimens, including fuel concepts with enhanced accident tolerance (Accident Tolerant Fuels, ATF). The MAMMOTH simulations include point reactor kinetics as well as spatial dynamics for a temperature-limited transient. The strongly coupled multi-physics solutions of the neutron flux and temperature fields are second order accurate both in the spatial and temporal domains. MAMMOTH produces pellet stack powers that are within 1.5% of the Monte Carlo reference solutions. Some discrepancies between the MCNP model used in the design of the flux collars and the Serpent/MAMMOTH models lead to higher power and energy deposition values in Multi-SERTTA unit 1. The TREAT core results compare well with the safety case computed with point reactor kinetics in RELAP5-3D. The reactor period is 44 msec, which corresponds to a reactivity insertion of 2.685% delta k/k$. The peak core power in the spatial dynamics simulation is 431 MW, which the point kinetics model over-predicts by 12%. The pulse width at half the maximum power is 0.177 sec. Subtle transient effects are apparent at the beginning insertion in the experimental samples due to the control rod removal. Additional difference due to transient effects are observed in the sample powers and enthalpy. The time dependence of the power coupling factor (PCF) is calculated for the various fuel stacks of the Multi-SERTTA vehicle. Sample temperatures in excess of 3100 K, the melting point UO$_2$, are computed with the adiabatic heat transfer model. The planned shaped-transient might introduce additional effects that cannot be predicted with PRK models. Future modeling will be focused on the shaped-transient by improving the

  16. Simulation of signal and background processes for collider experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumann, S.

    2008-10-08

    In this thesis new theoretical tools for the accurate simulation of scattering processes at present and future collider experiments have been developed. Special emphasis has thereby to be given to multi-particle/multi-jet final states that often constitute signals for interesting (new) physics. Considering final states with a number of hard jets, there seems to be enough evidence that the traditional simulation tools HERWIG and PYTHIA cannot fully accomplish their description. Starting from a 2{yields}2 core process, they account only for soft and collinear QCD emissions through parton-shower models. Only recently, theoretical prescriptions have been found to consistently combine tree-level matrix-element calculations with the existing parton-shower algorithms. The gain of such methods is that phase-space regions covered by hard and by soft parton kinematics are simultaneously well described. In Chapter 2 of this thesis the working principles of such prescriptions have been discussed with special attention being paid to the merging scheme implemented in the SHERPA Monte Carlo. To consistently match QCD higher-order calculations (at one-loop or tree-level) with parton showers, a good analytical control over the perturbative terms present in the latter is required. This has triggered the demand for improved parton-shower models that facilitate the inclusion of exact matrix elements. In this line a completely new shower algorithm has been presented in Chapter 3. It is based on the Catani-Seymour dipole subtraction formalism, a universal method for calculating arbitrary processes at next-to-leading order in QCD. The splitting kernels used in the shower are justified approximations of the Catani-Seymour dipole functions. The kinematics of the individual splittings is accomplished such that exact four-momentum conservation can be ensured for each single branching. Accordingly, the shower can be stopped and started again at each intermediate stage of the evolution. The

  17. First ground-based column measurements of CO{sub 2} in the tropics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warneke, T.; Petersen, K.; Macatangay, R.; Notholt, J. [Institute of Environmental Physics, University of Bremen, Bremen (Germany); Koerner, S.; Jordan, A.; Gerbig, C.; Rothe, M. [Max-Planck-Institute for Biogeochemistry (MPI-BGC), Jena (Germany); Schrems, O. [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI), Bremerhaven (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The first ground-based remote sensing measurements of the column averaged volume mixing ratio of CO{sub 2} (X{sub CO{sub 2}}) for the inner tropics have been obtained at Paramaribo, Suriname (5.8 N, 55.2 W). Due to the migration of the ITCZ over the measurement location the probed air masses belong to the northern or southern hemisphere depending on the time of the year. The X{sub CO{sub 2}} shows an average annual increase in the Southern Hemisphere of 2.2 ppm for the time period 2004 to 2007, which agrees within the error with model simulations. Co-located in-situ measurements are strongly influenced by a local source. From the isotopic composition of the air samples the local source component is suggested to be the terrestrial biosphere. Using d{sup {sub 13C}} from the NOAA/ESRL stations Ascension Is. (ASC) and Ragged Point (RPB) the data has been corrected for the local source component. The corrected mixing ratios for the surface agree with model simulations for the measurement campaigns in the LDS (Southern Hemisphere), but not for the SDS (Northern Hemisphere).

  18. Gamma/hadron segregation for a ground based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope using machine learning methods: Random Forest leads

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Mradul; Koul, M K; Bose, S; Mitra, Abhas

    2014-01-01

    A detailed case study of $\\gamma$-hadron segregation for a ground based atmospheric Cherenkov telescope is presented. We have evaluated and compared various supervised machine learning methods such as the Random Forest method, Artificial Neural Network, Linear Discriminant method, Naive Bayes Classifiers,Support Vector Machines as well as the conventional dynamic supercut method by simulating triggering events with the Monte Carlo method and applied the results to a Cherenkov telescope. It is demonstrated that the Random Forest method is the most sensitive machine learning method for $\\gamma$-hadron segregation.

  19. Preliminary Analysis of Ground-based Orbit Determination Accuracy for the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sease, Brad

    2017-01-01

    The Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope is a 2.4-meter telescope planned for launch to the Sun-Earth L2 point in 2026. This paper details a preliminary study of the achievable accuracy for WFIRST from ground-based orbit determination routines. The analysis here is divided into two segments. First, a linear covariance analysis of early mission and routine operations provides an estimate of the tracking schedule required to meet mission requirements. Second, a simulated operations scenario gives insight into the expected behavior of a daily Extended Kalman Filter orbit estimate over the first mission year given a variety of potential momentum unloading schemes.

  20. CLARREO shortwave observing system simulation experiments of the twenty-first century: Simulator design and implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, D.R.; Algieri, C.A.; Ong, J.R.; Collins, W.D.

    2011-04-01

    Projected changes in the Earth system will likely be manifested in changes in reflected solar radiation. This paper introduces an operational Observational System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) to calculate the signals of future climate forcings and feedbacks in top-of-atmosphere reflectance spectra. The OSSE combines simulations from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report for the NCAR Community Climate System Model (CCSM) with the MODTRAN radiative transfer code to calculate reflectance spectra for simulations of current and future climatic conditions over the 21st century. The OSSE produces narrowband reflectances and broadband fluxes, the latter of which have been extensively validated against archived CCSM results. The shortwave reflectance spectra contain atmospheric features including signals from water vapor, liquid and ice clouds, and aerosols. The spectra are also strongly influenced by the surface bidirectional reflectance properties of predicted snow and sea ice and the climatological seasonal cycles of vegetation. By comparing and contrasting simulated reflectance spectra based on emissions scenarios with increasing projected and fixed present-day greenhouse gas and aerosol concentrations, we find that prescribed forcings from increases in anthropogenic sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols are detectable and are spatially confined to lower latitudes. Also, changes in the intertropical convergence zone and poleward shifts in the subsidence zones and the storm tracks are all detectable along with large changes in snow cover and sea ice fraction. These findings suggest that the proposed NASA Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission to measure shortwave reflectance spectra may help elucidate climate forcings, responses, and feedbacks.

  1. LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS TO SIMULATE CO2 OCEAN DISPOSAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen M. Masutani

    1999-12-31

    This Final Technical Report summarizes the technical accomplishments of an investigation entitled ''Laboratory Experiments to Simulate CO{sub 2} Ocean Disposal'', funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's University Coal Research Program. This investigation responds to the possibility that restrictions on greenhouse gas emissions may be imposed in the future to comply with the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The primary objective of the investigation was to obtain experimental data that can be applied to assess the technical feasibility and environmental impacts of oceanic containment strategies to limit release of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal and other fossil fuel combustion systems into the atmosphere. A number of critical technical uncertainties of ocean disposal of CO{sub 2} were addressed by performing laboratory experiments on liquid CO{sub 2} jet break-up into a dispersed droplet phase, and hydrate formation, under deep ocean conditions. Major accomplishments of this study included: (1) five jet instability regimes were identified that occur in sequence as liquid CO{sub 2} jet disintegration progresses from laminar instability to turbulent atomization; (2) linear regression to the data yielded relationships for the boundaries between the five instability regimes in dimensionless Ohnesorge Number, Oh, and jet Reynolds Number, Re, space; (3) droplet size spectra was measured over the full range of instabilities; (4) characteristic droplet diameters decrease steadily with increasing jet velocity (and increasing Weber Number), attaining an asymptotic value in instability regime 5 (full atomization); and (5) pre-breakup hydrate formation appears to affect the size distribution of the droplet phase primary by changing the effective geometry of the jet.

  2. Ground-based monitoring of solar radiation in Moldova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aculinin, Alexandr; Smicov, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    Integrated measurements of solar radiation in Kishinev, Moldova have been started by Atmospheric Research Group (ARG) at the Institute of Applied Physics from 2003. Direct, diffuse and total components of solar and atmospheric long-wave radiation are measured by using of the radiometric complex at the ground-based solar radiation monitoring station. Measurements are fulfilled at the stationary and moving platforms equipped with the set of 9 broadband solar radiation sensors overlapping wavelength range from UV-B to IR. Detailed description of the station can be found at the site http://arg.phys.asm.md. Ground station is placed in an urban environment of Kishinev city (47.00N; 28.56E). Summary of observation data acquired at the station in the course of short-term period from 2004 to 2009 are presented below. Solar radiation measurements were fulfilled by using CM11(280-3000 nm) and CH1 sensors (Kipp&Zonen). In the course of a year maximum and minimum of monthly sums of total radiation was ~706.4 MJm-2 in June and ~82.1MJm-2 in December, respectively. Monthly sums of direct solar radiation (on horizontal plane) show the maximum and minimum values of the order ~456.9 MJm-2 in July and ~25.5MJm-2 in December, respectively. In an average, within a year should be marked the predominance of direct radiation over the scattered radiation, 51% and 49%, respectively. In the course of a year, the percentage contribution of the direct radiation into the total radiation is ~55-65% from May to September. In the remaining months, the percentage contribution decreases and takes the minimum value of ~ 28% in December. In an average, annual sum of total solar radiation is ~4679.9 MJm-2. For the period from April to September accounts for ~76% of the annual amount of total radiation. Annual sum of sunshine duration accounts for ~2149 hours, which is of ~ 48% from the possible sunshine duration. In an average, within a year maximum and minimum of sunshine duration is ~ 304 hours in

  3. Biosensors for EVA: Improved Instrumentation for Ground-based Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, B.; Ellerby, G.; Zou, F.; Scott, P.; Jin, C.; Lee, S. M. C.; Coates, J.

    2010-01-01

    During lunar excursions in the EVA suit, real-time measurement of metabolic rate is required to manage consumables and guide activities to ensure safe return to the base. Metabolic rate, or oxygen consumption (VO2), is normally measured from pulmonary parameters but cannot be determined with standard techniques in the oxygen-rich environment of a spacesuit. Our group has developed novel near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) methods to calculate muscle oxygen saturation (SmO 2), hematocrit, and pH, and we recently demonstrated that we can use our NIRS sensor to measure VO 2 on the leg during cycling. Our NSBRI project has 4 objectives: (1) increase the accuracy of the metabolic rate calculation through improved prediction of stroke volume; (2) investigate the relative contributions of calf and thigh oxygen consumption to metabolic rate calculation for walking and running; (3) demonstrate that the NIRS-based noninvasive metabolic rate methodology is sensitive enough to detect decrement in VO 2 in a space analog; and (4) improve instrumentation to allow testing within a spacesuit. Over the past year we have made progress on all four objectives, but the most significant progress was made in improving the instrumentation. The NIRS system currently in use at JSC is based on fiber optics technology. Optical fiber bundles are used to deliver light from a light source in the monitor to the patient, and light reflected back from the patient s muscle to the monitor for spectroscopic analysis. The fiber optic cables are large and fragile, and there is no way to get them in and out of the test spacesuit used for ground-based studies. With complimentary funding from the US Army, we undertook a complete redesign of the sensor and control electronics to build a novel system small enough to be used within the spacesuit and portable enough to be used by a combat medic. In the new system the filament lamp used in the fiber optic system was replaced with a novel broadband near infrared

  4. Biosensors for EVA: Improved Instrumentation for Ground-based Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, B.; Ellerby, G.; Zou, F.; Scott, P.; Jin, C.; Lee, S. M. C.; Coates, J.

    2010-01-01

    During lunar excursions in the EVA suit, real-time measurement of metabolic rate is required to manage consumables and guide activities to ensure safe return to the base. Metabolic rate, or oxygen consumption (VO2), is normally measured from pulmonary parameters but cannot be determined with standard techniques in the oxygen-rich environment of a spacesuit. Our group has developed novel near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) methods to calculate muscle oxygen saturation (SmO 2), hematocrit, and pH, and we recently demonstrated that we can use our NIRS sensor to measure VO 2 on the leg during cycling. Our NSBRI project has 4 objectives: (1) increase the accuracy of the metabolic rate calculation through improved prediction of stroke volume; (2) investigate the relative contributions of calf and thigh oxygen consumption to metabolic rate calculation for walking and running; (3) demonstrate that the NIRS-based noninvasive metabolic rate methodology is sensitive enough to detect decrement in VO 2 in a space analog; and (4) improve instrumentation to allow testing within a spacesuit. Over the past year we have made progress on all four objectives, but the most significant progress was made in improving the instrumentation. The NIRS system currently in use at JSC is based on fiber optics technology. Optical fiber bundles are used to deliver light from a light source in the monitor to the patient, and light reflected back from the patient s muscle to the monitor for spectroscopic analysis. The fiber optic cables are large and fragile, and there is no way to get them in and out of the test spacesuit used for ground-based studies. With complimentary funding from the US Army, we undertook a complete redesign of the sensor and control electronics to build a novel system small enough to be used within the spacesuit and portable enough to be used by a combat medic. In the new system the filament lamp used in the fiber optic system was replaced with a novel broadband near infrared

  5. Ground-based Space Weather Monitoring with LOFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Michael; van Haarlem, Michiel; Lawrence, Gareth; Reid, Simon; Bos, Andre; Rawlings, Steve; Salvini, Stef; Mitchell, Cathryn; Soleimani, Manuch; Amado, Sergio; Teresa, Vital

    As one of the first of a new generation of radio instruments, the International LOFAR Telescope (ILT) will provide a number of unique and novel capabilities for the astronomical community. These include remote configuration and operation, dynamic real-time processing and system response, and the ability to provide multiple simultaneous streams of data to a community whose scientific interests run the gamut from lighting in the atmospheres of distant planets to the origins of the universe itself. The LOFAR (LOw Frequency ARray) system is optimized for a frequency range from 30-240 MHz and consists of multiple antenna fields spread across Europe. In the Netherlands, a total 36 LOFAR stations are nearing completion with an initial 8 international stations currently being deployed in Germany, France, Sweden, and the UK. Digital beam-forming techniques make the LOFAR system agile and allow for rapid repointing of the telescope as well as the potential for multiple simultaneous observations. With its dense core array and long interferometric baselines, LOFAR has the potential to achieve unparalleled sensitivity and spatial resolution in the low frequency radio regime. LOFAR will also be one of the first radio observatories to feature automated processing pipelines to deliver fully calibrated science products to its user community. As we discuss in this presentation, the same capabilities that make LOFAR a powerful tool for radio astronomy also provide an excellent platform upon which to build a ground-based monitoring system for space weather events. For example, the ability to monitor Solar activity in near real-time is one of the key scientific capabilities being developed for LOFAR. With only a fraction of its total observing capacity, LOFAR will be able to provide continuous monitoring of the Solar spectrum over the entire 10-240 MHz band down to microsecond timescales. Autonomous routines will scan these incoming spectral data for evidence of Solar flares and be

  6. Foreground simulations for the LOFAR - Epoch of Reionization Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Jelic, Vibor; Labropoulos, Panagiotis; Thomas, Rajat M; Bernardi, Gianni; Brentjens, Michiel; de Bruyn, Ger; Ciardi, Benedetta; Harker, Geraint; Koopmans, Leon V E; Pandey, Vishambhar; Schaye, Joop; Yatawatta, Sarod

    2008-01-01

    Future high redshift 21-cm experiments will suffer from a high degree of contamination, due both to astrophysical foregrounds and to non-astrophysical and instrumental effects. In order to reliably extract the cosmological signal from the observed data, it is essential to understand very well all data components and their influence on the extracted signal. Here we present simulated astrophysical foregrounds datacubes and discuss their possible statistical effects on the data. The foreground maps are produced assuming 5 deg x 5 deg windows that match those expected to be observed by the LOFAR Epoch-of-Reionization (EoR) key science project. We show that with the expected LOFAR-EoR sky and receiver noise levels, which amount to ~52 mK at 150 MHz after 300 hours of total observing time, a simple polynomial fit allows a statistical reconstruction of the signal. We also show that the polynomial fitting will work for maps with realistic yet idealised instrument response, i.e., a response that includes only a unifor...

  7. Solution structures of rat amylin peptide: simulation, theory, and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Allam S; Wang, Lu; Lin, Yu-Shan; Ling, Yun; Chopra, Manan; Zanni, Martin T; Skinner, James L; De Pablo, Juan J

    2010-02-01

    Amyloid deposits of amylin in the pancreas are an important characteristic feature found in patients with Type-2 diabetes. The aggregate has been considered important in the disease pathology and has been studied extensively. However, the secondary structures of the individual peptide have not been clearly identified. In this work, we present detailed solution structures of rat amylin using a combination of Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. A new Monte Carlo method is presented to determine the free energy of distinct biomolecular conformations. Both folded and random-coil conformations of rat amylin are observed in water and their relative stability is examined in detail. The former contains an alpha-helical segment comprised of residues 7-17. We find that at room temperature the folded structure is more stable, whereas at higher temperatures the random-coil structure predominates. From the configurations and weights we calculate the alpha-carbon NMR chemical shifts, with results that are in reasonable agreement with experiments of others. We also calculate the infrared spectrum in the amide I stretch regime, and the results are in fair agreement with the experimental line shape presented herein.

  8. Simulated Interactive Research Experiments as Educational Tools for Advanced Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomandl, Mathias; Mieling, Thomas; Losert-Valiente Kroon, Christiane M.; Hopf, Martin; Arndt, Markus

    2015-09-01

    Experimental research has become complex and thus a challenge to science education. Only very few students can typically be trained on advanced scientific equipment. It is therefore important to find new tools that allow all students to acquire laboratory skills individually and independent of where they are located. In a design-based research process we have investigated the feasibility of using a virtual laboratory as a photo-realistic and scientifically valid representation of advanced scientific infrastructure to teach modern experimental science, here, molecular quantum optics. We found a concept based on three educational principles that allows undergraduate students to become acquainted with procedures and concepts of a modern research field. We find a significant increase in student understanding using our Simulated Interactive Research Experiment (SiReX), by evaluating the learning outcomes with semi-structured interviews in a pre/post design. This suggests that this concept of an educational tool can be generalized to disseminate findings in other fields.

  9. On the consistency of scale among experiments, theory, and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, James E.; Dye, Amanda L.; Miller, Cass T.; Gray, William G.

    2017-02-01

    As a tool for addressing problems of scale, we consider an evolving approach known as the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory (TCAT), which has broad applicability to hydrology. We consider the case of modeling of two-fluid-phase flow in porous media, and we focus on issues of scale as they relate to various measures of pressure, capillary pressure, and state equations needed to produce solvable models. We apply TCAT to perform physics-based data assimilation to understand how the internal behavior influences the macroscale state of two-fluid porous medium systems. A microfluidic experimental method and a lattice Boltzmann simulation method are used to examine a key deficiency associated with standard approaches. In a hydrologic process such as evaporation, the water content will ultimately be reduced below the irreducible wetting-phase saturation determined from experiments. This is problematic since the derived closure relationships cannot predict the associated capillary pressures for these states. We demonstrate that the irreducible wetting-phase saturation is an artifact of the experimental design, caused by the fact that the boundary pressure difference does not approximate the true capillary pressure. Using averaging methods, we compute the true capillary pressure for fluid configurations at and below the irreducible wetting-phase saturation. Results of our analysis include a state function for the capillary pressure expressed as a function of fluid saturation and interfacial area.

  10. Simulation and experiment for large scale space structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongbo; Zhou, Jian; Zha, Zuoliang

    2013-04-01

    The future space structures are relatively large, flimsy, and lightweight. As a result, they are more easily affected or distortion by space environments compared to other space structures. This study examines the structural integrity of a large scale space structure. A new design of transient temperature field analysis method of the developable reflector on orbit environment is presented, which simulates physical characteristic of developable antenna reflector with a high precision. The different kinds of analysis denote that different thermal elastic characteristics of different materials. The three-dimension multi-physics coupling transient thermal distortion equations for the antenna are founded based on the Galerkins method. For a reflector on geosynchronous orbit, the transient temperature field results from this method are compared with these from NASA. It follows from the analysis that the precision of this method is high. An experimental system is established to verify the control mechanism with IEBIS and thermal sensor technique. The shape control experiments are finished by measuring and analyzing developable tube. Results reveal that the temperature levels of the developable antenna reflector alternate greatly in the orbital period, which is about ±120° when considering solar flux ,earth radiating flux and albedo scattering flux.

  11. A didactic module for undertaking climate simulation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hantsaridou, A P; Theodorakakos, A Th; Polatoglou, H M [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2005-09-01

    It is a fact that one of the main roles of the university is to present the core concepts in every discipline. However it is often difficult for the students to understand and comprehend the several concepts taught, because of previous lack in relevant knowledge or due to today's information overload. For example, previous research in the physics department in the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece) indicated that the graduate students are often not familiar with those factors that determine the Earth's climate, which is a common everyday subject. In this project we describe a multimedia application appropriate for climate simulation experiments (http://dmod.physics.auth.gr/EBMC.html). The application is based on the energy balance model and is appropriate not only for undergraduates, but also for people with a basic scientific knowledge. We have used this model as part of an undergraduate teaching course. The results indicate that it can be a useful educational tool for understanding the factors that determine the Earth's climate.

  12. A didactic module for undertaking climate simulation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantsaridou, A. P.; Theodorakakos, A. Th; Polatoglou, H. M.

    2005-09-01

    It is a fact that one of the main roles of the university is to present the core concepts in every discipline. However it is often difficult for the students to understand and comprehend the several concepts taught, because of previous lack in relevant knowledge or due to today's information overload. For example, previous research in the physics department in the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece) indicated that the graduate students are often not familiar with those factors that determine the Earth's climate, which is a common everyday subject. In this project we describe a multimedia application appropriate for climate simulation experiments (http://dmod.physics.auth.gr/EBMC.html). The application is based on the energy balance model and is appropriate not only for undergraduates, but also for people with a basic scientific knowledge. We have used this model as part of an undergraduate teaching course. The results indicate that it can be a useful educational tool for understanding the factors that determine the Earth's climate.

  13. Simulated Interactive Research Experiments as Educational Tools for Advanced Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomandl, Mathias; Mieling, Thomas; Losert-Valiente Kroon, Christiane M.; Hopf, Martin; Arndt, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Experimental research has become complex and thus a challenge to science education. Only very few students can typically be trained on advanced scientific equipment. It is therefore important to find new tools that allow all students to acquire laboratory skills individually and independent of where they are located. In a design-based research process we have investigated the feasibility of using a virtual laboratory as a photo-realistic and scientifically valid representation of advanced scientific infrastructure to teach modern experimental science, here, molecular quantum optics. We found a concept based on three educational principles that allows undergraduate students to become acquainted with procedures and concepts of a modern research field. We find a significant increase in student understanding using our Simulated Interactive Research Experiment (SiReX), by evaluating the learning outcomes with semi-structured interviews in a pre/post design. This suggests that this concept of an educational tool can be generalized to disseminate findings in other fields. PMID:26370627

  14. Simulated Interactive Research Experiments as Educational Tools for Advanced Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomandl, Mathias; Mieling, Thomas; Losert-Valiente Kroon, Christiane M; Hopf, Martin; Arndt, Markus

    2015-09-15

    Experimental research has become complex and thus a challenge to science education. Only very few students can typically be trained on advanced scientific equipment. It is therefore important to find new tools that allow all students to acquire laboratory skills individually and independent of where they are located. In a design-based research process we have investigated the feasibility of using a virtual laboratory as a photo-realistic and scientifically valid representation of advanced scientific infrastructure to teach modern experimental science, here, molecular quantum optics. We found a concept based on three educational principles that allows undergraduate students to become acquainted with procedures and concepts of a modern research field. We find a significant increase in student understanding using our Simulated Interactive Research Experiment (SiReX), by evaluating the learning outcomes with semi-structured interviews in a pre/post design. This suggests that this concept of an educational tool can be generalized to disseminate findings in other fields.

  15. Non-Brownian diffusion in lipid membranes: Experiments and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler, R; Jeon, J-H; Cherstvy, A G

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of constituents and the surface response of cellular membranes-also in connection to the binding of various particles and macromolecules to the membrane-are still a matter of controversy in the membrane biophysics community, particularly with respect to crowded membranes of living biological cells. We here put into perspective recent single particle tracking experiments in the plasma membranes of living cells and supercomputing studies of lipid bilayer model membranes with and without protein crowding. Special emphasis is put on the observation of anomalous, non-Brownian diffusion of both lipid molecules and proteins embedded in the lipid bilayer. While single component, pure lipid bilayers in simulations exhibit only transient anomalous diffusion of lipid molecules on nanosecond time scales, the persistence of anomalous diffusion becomes significantly longer ranged on the addition of disorder-through the addition of cholesterol or proteins-and on passing of the membrane lipids to the gel phase. Concurrently, experiments demonstrate the anomalous diffusion of membrane embedded proteins up to macroscopic time scales in the minute time range. Particular emphasis will be put on the physical character of the anomalous diffusion, in particular, the occurrence of ageing observed in the experiments-the effective diffusivity of the measured particles is a decreasing function of time. Moreover, we present results for the time dependent local scaling exponent of the mean squared displacement of the monitored particles. Recent results finding deviations from the commonly assumed Gaussian diffusion patterns in protein crowded membranes are reported. The properties of the displacement autocorrelation function of the lipid molecules are discussed in the light of their appropriate physical anomalous diffusion models, both for non-crowded and crowded membranes. In the last part of this review we address the upcoming field of membrane distortion by elongated membrane

  16. Tissue Engineering of Cartilage on Ground-Based Facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aleshcheva, Ganna; Bauer, Johann; Hemmersbach, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Investigations under simulated microgravity offer the opportunity for a better understanding of the influence of altered gravity on cells and the scaffold-free threedimensional (3D) tissue formation. To investigate the shortterm influence, human chondrocytes were cultivated for 2h, 4 h, 16 h...

  17. Rheology of dense granular chute flow: simulations to experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharathraj S

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Granular chute flow simulations reveal an interesting transition from a random disordered structure to an ordered one with hexagonally ordered sheets of spherical particles, when the base roughness is modulated. Two types of base roughness are considered. The first is a fixed base, where glued spherical particles form the base, and the base roughness is varied by changing the ratio of diameters of the base and flowing particles. In the second sinusoidal base, a smooth wall with sinusoidal height variation is used; the amplitude and wavelength of the base modulation determine the base roughness. The transition is studied as a function of these roughness parameters. For the fixed base, there is a critical base particle diameter below which ordered states are observed. For the sinusoidal base, the critical amplitude increases linearly with the wavelength at lower wavelengths, reaches a maximum depending on the height of the flowing layer, and then decreases as the wavelength is further increased. There is flow for angles of inclination from 15 ° ≤ θ ≤ 25 ° for the ordered state and 20 ° ≤ θ ≤ 25 ° for the disordered state. Flow confinement by sidewalls also influences the rheology of the system and we see that the ordering is induced by the sidewalls as well. Experiments on chute flow at low angles indicate the presence of two types of rheology depending on the system height. A transition is observed from an erodible base configuration, where a dead zone at the bottom supports a free surface reposing at the top, to a Bagnold rheology with considerable slip at the bottom.

  18. On-Board and Ground-Based Complexes for Operating the Science Payload of the CORONAS-F Space Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, A. I.; Lisin, D. V.; Kuznetsov, V. D.; Afanas'ev, A. N.; Osin, A. I.; Schwarz, J.

    To ensure reliable operation of the science payload of the CORONAS-F satellite and to exercise its flexible control in the course of realization of the research program, an on-board and a specialized ground-based control complexes (GCCs) were designed and manufactured at the Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN). A demand for such systems arose because the service facilities of the satellite basic platform were unable to satisfy the requirements of the unique scientific experiments, i.e., an efficient on-line control of the variety of scientific instruments, managing large amounts of scientific information, etc.

  19. The Titan Haze Simulation experiment: laboratory simulation of Titan's atmospheric chemistry at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, E.; Contreras, C. S.; Ricketts, C. L.; Salama, F.

    2012-04-01

    In Titan’s atmosphere, a complex organic chemistry between its two main constituents, N2 and CH4, leads to the production of heavy molecules and subsequently to solid organic aerosols. Several instruments onboard Cassini have detected neutral, positively and negatively charged particles and heavy molecules in the ionosphere of Titan[1,2]. In particular, the presence of benzene (C6H6) and toluene (C6H5CH3)[3], which are critical precursors of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds, suggests that PAHs might play a role in the production of Titan’s aerosols. The Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment has been developed at NASA Ames’ Cosmic Simulation facility (COSmIC) to study the chemical pathways that link the simple precursor molecules resulting from the first steps of the N2-CH4 chemistry (C2H2, C2H4, HCN…) to benzene, and to PAHs and nitrogen-containing PAHs (or PANHs) as precursors to the production of solid aerosols. In the THS experiment, Titan’s atmospheric chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic jet expansion. With this unique design, the gas mixture is cooled to Titan-like temperature (~150K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma discharge. Different gas mixtures containing the first products of Titan’s N2-CH4 chemistry but also much heavier molecules like PAHs or PANHs can be injected to study specific chemical reactions. The products of the chemistry are detected and studied using two complementary techniques: Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy[4] and Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry[5]. Thin tholin deposits are also produced in the THS experiment and can be analyzed by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). We will present the results of ongoing mass spectrometry studies on the THS experiment using different gas mixtures: N2-CH4, N2-C2H2, N2-C2H4, N2-C2H6, N2-C6H6, and similar mixtures with an N2-CH4 (90:10) mixture instead of pure N2, to study specific pathways

  20. Ground-based analysis of volcanic ash plumes using a new multispectral thermal infrared camera approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D.; Ramsey, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic plumes are complex mixtures of mineral, lithic and glass fragments of varying size, together with multiple gas species. These plumes vary in size dependent on a number of factors, including vent diameter, magma composition and the quantity of volatiles within a melt. However, determining the chemical and mineralogical properties of a volcanic plume immediately after an eruption is a great challenge. Thermal infrared (TIR) satellite remote sensing of these plumes is routinely used to calculate the volcanic ash particle size variations and sulfur dioxide concentration. These analyses are commonly performed using high temporal, low spatial resolution satellites, which can only reveal large scale trends. What is lacking is a high spatial resolution study specifically of the properties of the proximal plumes. Using the emissive properties of volcanic ash, a new method has been developed to determine the plume's particle size and petrology in spaceborne and ground-based TIR data. A multispectral adaptation of a FLIR TIR camera has been developed that simulates the TIR channels found on several current orbital instruments. Using this instrument, data of volcanic plumes from Fuego and Santiaguito volcanoes in Guatemala were recently obtained Preliminary results indicate that the camera is capable of detecting silicate absorption features in the emissivity spectra over the TIR wavelength range, which can be linked to both mineral chemistry and particle size. It is hoped that this technique can be expanded to isolate different volcanic species within a plume, validate the orbital data, and ultimately to use the results to better inform eruption dynamics modelling.

  1. Ground-based near-infrared observations of water vapour in the Venus troposphere

    CERN Document Server

    Chamberlain, S; Crisp, D; Meadows, V S; 10.1016/j.icarus.2012.11.014

    2012-01-01

    We present a study of water vapour in the Venus troposphere obtained by modelling specific water vapour absorption bands within the 1.18 \\mu m window. We compare the results with the normal technique of obtaining the abundance by matching the peak of the 1.18 \\mu m window. Ground-based infrared imaging spectroscopy of the night side of Venus was obtained with the Anglo-Australian Telescope and IRIS2 instrument with a spectral resolving power of R ~ 2400. The spectra have been fitted with modelled spectra simulated using the radiative transfer model VSTAR. We find a best fit abundance of 31 ppmv (-6 + 9 ppmv), which is in agreement with recent results by B\\'ezard et al. 2011 using VEX/SPICAV (R ~ 1700) and contrary to prior results by B\\'ezard et al. 2009 of 44 ppmv (+/-9 ppmv) using VEX/VIRTIS-M (R ~ 200) data analyses. Comparison studies are made between water vapour abundances determined from the peak of the 1.18 \\mu m window and abundances determined from different water vapour absorption features within t...

  2. NASA HRP Plans for Collaboration at the IBMP Ground-Based Experimental Facility (NEK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.

    2016-01-01

    NASA and IBMP are planning research collaborations using the IBMP Ground-based Experimental Facility (NEK). The NEK offers unique capabilities to study the effects of isolation on behavioral health and performance as it relates to spaceflight. The NEK is comprised of multiple interconnected modules that range in size from 50-250m(sup3). Modules can be included or excluded in a given mission allowing for flexibility of platform design. The NEK complex includes a Mission Control Center for communications and monitoring of crew members. In an effort to begin these collaborations, a 2-week mission is planned for 2017. In this mission, scientific studies will be conducted to assess facility capabilities in preparation for longer duration missions. A second follow-on 2-week mission may be planned for early in 2018. In future years, long duration missions of 4, 8 and 12 months are being considered. Missions will include scenarios that simulate for example, transit to and from asteroids, the moon, or other interplanetary travel. Mission operations will be structured to include stressors such as, high workloads, communication delays, and sleep deprivation. Studies completed at the NEK will support International Space Station expeditions, and future exploration missions. Topics studied will include communication, crew autonomy, cultural diversity, human factors, and medical capabilities.

  3. Evaluation of Satellite and Ground Based Precipitation Products for Flood Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintalapudi, S.; Sharif, H.; Yeggina, S.

    2012-04-01

    The development in satellite-derived rainfall estimates encouraged the hydrological modeling in sparse gauged basins or ungauged basins. Especially, physically-based distributed hydrological models can benefit from the good spatial and temporal coverage of satellite precipitation products. In this study, three satellite derived precipitation datasets (TRMM, CMORPH, and PERSIANN), NEXRAD, and rain gauge precipitation datasets were used to drive the hydrological model. The physically-based, distributed hydrological model Gridded Surface Subsurface Hydrological Analysis (GSSHA) was used in this study. Focus will be on the results from the Guadalupe River Basin above Canyon Lake and below Comfort, Texas. The Guadalupe River Basin above Canyon Lake and below Comfort Texas drains an area of 1232 km2. Different storm events will be used in these simulations. August 2007 event was used as calibration and June 2007 event was used as validation. Results are discussed interms of accuracy of satellite precipitation estimates with the ground based precipitation estimates, predicting peak discharges, runoff volumes, time lag, and spatial distribution. The initial results showed that, model was able to predict the peak discharges and runoff volumes when using NEXRAD MPE data, and TRMM 3B42 precipitation product. The results also showed that there was time lag in hydrographs driven by both PERSIANN and CMORPH data sets.

  4. Proteomic and Epigenetic Analysis of Rice after Seed Spaceflight and Ground-Base Ion Radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Sun, Yeqing; Peng, Yuming; Zhao, Qian; Wen, Bin; Yang, Jun

    Highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as main factor causing biological effects to plant seeds. In previous work, we compared the proteomic profiles of rice plants growing after seed spaceflights to ground controls by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) with mass spectrometry and found that the protein expression profiles were changed and differentially expressed proteins participated in most of the biological processes of rice. To further evaluate the dosage effects of space radiation and compare between low- and high-dose ion effects, we carried out three independent ground-base ionizing radiation experiments with different cumulative doses (low-dose range: 2~1000mGy, high-dose range: 2000~20000mGy) to rice seeds and performed proteomic analysis of seedlings. We found that protein expression profiles showed obvious boundaries between low- and high-dose radiation groups. Rates of differentially expressed proteins presented a dose-dependent effect, it reached the highest value at 2000mGy dosage point in all three radiation experiments coincidently; while proteins responded to low-dose radiations preferred to change their expressions at the minimum dosage (2mGy). Proteins participating in rice biological processes also responded differently between low- and high-dose radiations: proteins involved in energy metabolism and photosynthesis tended to be regulated after low-dose radiations while stress responding, protein folding and cell redox homeostasis related proteins preferred to change their expressions after high-dose radiations. By comparing the proteomic profiles between ground-base radiations and spaceflights, it was worth noting that ground-base low-dose ion radiation effects shared similar biological effects as space environment. In addition, we discovered that protein nucleoside diphosphate kinase 1 (NDPK1) showed obvious increased regulation after spaceflights and ion radiations. NDPK1 catalyzes nucleotide metabolism

  5. Sub-Seasonal Variability of Tropical Rainfall Observed by TRMM and Ground-based Polarimetric Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Brenda; Rutledge, Steven; Lang, Timothy; Cifelli, Robert; Nesbitt, Stephen

    2010-05-01

    Studies of tropical precipitation characteristics from the TRMM-LBA and NAME field campaigns using ground-based polarimetric S-band data have revealed significant differences in microphysical processes occurring in the various meteorological regimes sampled in those projects. In TRMM-LMA (January-February 1999 in Brazil; a TRMM ground validation experiment), variability is driven by prevailing low-level winds. During periods of low-level easterlies, deeper and more intense convection is observed, while during periods of low-level westerlies, weaker convection embedded in widespread stratiform precipitation is common. In the NAME region (North American Monsoon Experiment, summer 2004 along the west coast of Mexico), strong terrain variability drives differences in precipitation, with larger drops and larger ice mass aloft associated with convection occurring over the coastal plain compared to convection over the higher terrain of the Sierra Madre Occidental, or adjacent coastal waters. Comparisons with the TRMM precipitation radar (PR) indicate that such sub-seasonal variability in these two regions are not well characterized by the TRMM PR reflectivity and rainfall statistics. TRMM PR reflectivity profiles in the LBA region are somewhat lower than S-Pol values, particularly in the more intense easterly regime convection. In NAME, mean reflectivities are even more divergent, with TRMM profiles below those of S-Pol. In both regions, the TRMM PR does not capture rain rates above 80 mm hr-1 despite much higher rain rates estimated from the S-Pol polarimetric data, and rain rates are generally lower for a given reflectivity from TRMM PR compared to S-Pol. These differences between TRMM PR and S-Pol may arise from the inability of Z-R relationships to capture the full variability of microphysical conditions or may highlight problems with TRMM retrievals over land. In addition to the TRMM-LBA and NAME regions, analysis of sub-seasonal precipitation variability and

  6. Good experiences with interactive temporal bone surgical simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steven A W; Mikkelsen, Peter Trier; Noe, Karsten Ostergaard;

    2014-01-01

    The Visible Ear Simulator (VES) is a freeware temporal bone surgical simulator utilizing a high-fidelity haptic and graphical voxel model compiled from segmented digital images of fresh frozen sections. A haptic device provides the 3-dimensional handling and drilling with force-feedback in real...

  7. Satellite link augmentation of ground based packet switched data networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, J. B.; McLane, P. J.; Campbell, L. L.

    Use of satellite link augmentation to improve the performance of a packet switched data network is considered. Particular attention is paid to the analysis of two queues in series from the standpoint of time delay. A finite state machine model is used to aid the analysis. The results from the analysis are then used in a flow deviation routing algorithm. This algorithm is applied to study the performance improvement when satellite links are used to augment the Canadian DATAPAC network. The results are backed up by extensive simulations on a digital computer.

  8. Simulation framework and XML detector description for the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Arce, P; Boccali, T; Case, M; de Roeck, A; Lara, V; Liendl, M; Nikitenko, A N; Schröder, M; Strässner, A; Wellisch, H P; Wenzel, H

    2003-01-01

    Currently CMS event simulation is based on GEANT3 while the detector description is built from different sources for simulation and reconstruction. A new simulation framework based on GEANT4 is under development. A full description of the detector is available, and the tuning of the GEANT4 performance and the checking of the ability of the physics processes to describe the detector response is ongoing. Its integration on the CMS mass production system and GRID is also currently under development. The Detector Description Database project aims at providing a common source of information for Simulation, Reconstruction, Analysis, and Visualisation, while allowing for different representations as well as specific information for each application. A functional prototype, based on XML, is already released. Also examples of the integration of DDD in the GEANT4 simulation and in the reconstruction applications are provided.

  9. Grinding process within vertical roller mills: experiment and simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian-huai; CHEN Qing-ru; KUANG Ya-li; LYNCH A J; ZHUO Jin-wu

    2009-01-01

    Based on screening analysis, laser size analysis, grindability and rigidity tests of samples collected on line from a cement and a power plant, a simulation of the grinding process in vertical roller mills was carried out. The simulation calculation used a breakage function, B. The results indicate that the breakage function, B, and the selection function, S, in the form of a matrix, can be used to express the probability of the material breaking during the grinding process. This allows the size distribution of the product to be numerically estimated. The simulation results also show that the simulated size distribution curves fit the actual ex-perimental product curves quite well. The model provides a good starting point for simulation of the grinding process. Further re-search is needed to determine the proper breakage function and the matrix value of the selection function.

  10. Ground-based Infrared Observations of Water Vapor and Hydrogen Peroxide in the Atmosphere of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encrenaz, T.; Greathouse, T. K.; Bitner, M.; Kruger, A.; Richter, M. J.; Lacy, J. H.; Bézard, B.; Fouchet, T.; Lefevre, F.; Forget, F.; Atreya, S. K.

    2008-11-01

    Ground-based observations of water vapor and hydrogen peroxide have been obtained in the thermal infrared range, using the TEXES instrument at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, for different times of the seasonal cycle.

  11. Informing hydrological models with ground-based time-lapse relative gravimetry: potential and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Christiansen, Lars; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Coupled hydrogeophysical inversion emerges as an attractive option to improve the calibration and predictive capability of hydrological models. Recently, ground-based time-lapse relative gravity (TLRG) measurements have attracted increasing interest because there is a direct relationship between ...

  12. Changes in ground-based solar ultraviolet radiation during fire episodes: a case study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wright, CY

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available about the relationship between fires and solar UVR without local high-quality column or ground-based ambient air pollution (particulate matter in particular) data; however, the threat to public health from fires was acknowledged....

  13. Simulation experiments for maximising the availability of a commercial octene production facility

    OpenAIRE

    RF Rossouw; RLJ Coetzer; PD Pretorius

    2010-01-01

    Overall availability of a chemical process is of critical importance in industry. In this paper we evaluate the process design factors that influence the availability of a new chemical production facility by performing computer experiments on a stochastic simulation model. Experimental designs commonly used in the Design and Analysis of Computer Experiments (DACE) and Classical Design of Experiments (DOE) are evaluated and compared for application by means of simulation experiments. Furthermo...

  14. ACES: The ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obland, M. D.; Prasad, N. S.; Harrison, F. W.; Browell, E. V.; Ismail, S.; Dobler, J. T.; Moore, B.; Zaccheo, T.; Campbell, J.; Chen, S.; Cleckner, C. S.; DiJoseph, M.; Little, A.; Notari, A.; Refaat, T. F.; Rosenbaum, D.; Vanek, M. D.; Bender, J.; Braun, M.; Chavez-Pirson, A.; Neal, M.; Rayner, P. J.; Rosiewicz, A.; Shure, M.; Welch, W.

    2012-12-01

    The ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) is a NASA Langley Research Center project funded by NASA's Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) that seeks to advance technologies critical to measuring atmospheric column carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratios in support of the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. The technologies being advanced are: (1) a high bandwidth detector, (2) a multi-aperture telescope assembly, (3) advanced algorithms for cloud and aerosol discrimination, and (4) high-efficiency, multiple-amplifier CO2 and O2 laser transmitters. The instrument architecture will be developed to operate on a high-altitude aircraft and will be directly scalable to meet the ASCENDS mission requirements. These technologies are viewed as critical towards developing an airborne simulator and eventual spaceborne instrument with lower size, mass, and power consumption, and improved performance. The detector effort will improve the existing detector subsystem by increasing its bandwidth to a goal of 5 MHz, reducing its overall mass from 18 lbs to stretching the duration of autonomous, service-free operation periods from 4 hrs to >24 hrs. The development goals are to permit higher laser modulation rates, which provides greater flexibility for implementing thin-cloud discrimination algorithms as well as improving range resolution and error reduction, and to enable long flights on a high-altitude unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The telescope development consists of a three-telescope design built for the constraints of the Global Hawk aircraft. This task addresses the ability of multiple smaller telescopes to provide equal or greater collection efficiency compared with a single larger telescope with a reduced impact on launch mass and cost. The telescope assembly also integrates fiber-coupled transmit collimators for all of the laser transmitters and fiber-coupled optical signal output

  15. Ground-based complex for checking the optical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenyuk, V.; Boreiko, V.; Dmitrotsa, A.; Gorbunov, N.; Khrenov, B.; Klimov, P.; Lavrova, M.; Popescu, E. M.; Sabirov, B.; Tkachenko, A.; Tkachev, L.; Volvach, A.; Yashin, I.

    2016-09-01

    The purpose TUS space experiment is to study cosmic rays of ultrahigh energies produced by extensive air showers from space. The concentrator is located on satellite, made in the form of the Fresnel mirror towards the earth's atmosphere, the focus of which is a photodetector. The angle of view of the mirror is ±4.5° that for a given height of the orbit corresponds to the area 80 × 80 km2 on ground. The ground complex consisting of a number of stations, to check the optical system of the experiment is created, (their location and the amount will be determined after the launch of the satellite based on its actual orbit).

  16. Kinetic simulating experiment on the secondary hydrocarbon generation of kerogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG; Yongqiang

    2002-01-01

    [1]Magoon, L. B., Dow, W. G., The petroleum system, in The Petroleum System--from Source to Trap (eds., Magoon, L. B., Dow, W. G..), AAPG Memoir 60, 1994, 3-24.[2]Ungerer, P., Pelet, R., Extrapolation of oil and gas formation kinetics from laboratory experiments to sedimentary basins, Nature, 1987, 327: 52-54.[3]Behar, F., Kressmann, S., Vandenbroucke, M. et al., Experimental simulation in a confined system and kinetic modelling of kerogen and oil cracking, Org. Geochem., 1991, 19: 173-189.[4]Behar, F., Vandenbroucke, M., Tang, Y. et al., Thermal cracking of kerogen in open and closed systems: determination of kinetic parameters and stoichiometric coefficients for oil and gas generation, Org. Geochem, 1997, 26(5/6): 321-339.[5]Waples, D. W., Time and temperture in petroleum exploration: application of Lopatin's method to petroleum exploration, AAPG Bulletin, 1980, 64: 916-926.[6]Dai, H. M., Wang, S. Y., Wang, H. Q. et al., Formation characteristics of natural gas reservoirs and favorable exploration areas in Sinian-Cambrian, Petroleum Exploration and Development (in Chinese), 1999, 26(5): 16-20.[7]Editorial Committee of Petroleum Geology of China Petroleum, Petroleum Geology of China, Beijing: Petroleum Industry Press, 1989.[8]Liu, J. Z., Tang, Y. C., One example of predicting methane generation yield by hydrocarbon generating kinetics, Chinese Science Bulletin, 1998, 43(11): 1187-1191.[9]Wang, J., Huang, S. Y., Huang, G. S. et al., Basic Characteristics of the Earth's Temperature Distribution in China (in Chinese), Beijing: Seismological Press, 1990.[10]Wang, Y. G., Yu X. F., Yang Y. et al., Applications of fluid inclusions in the study of paleogeotemperature in Sichuan Basin, Earth Science--Journal of China University of Geosciences (in Chinese), 1998, 23(3): 285-288.[11]Wu, D. M., Wu, N. L., Gao, J. J., The study of paleogeotemperature in Shichuan Basin and their geological significance, Acta Petroleum Sinica (in

  17. Status of the NASA GMAO Observing System Simulation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prive, Nikki C.; Errico, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    An Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) is a pure modeling study used when actual observations are too expensive or difficult to obtain. OSSEs are valuable tools for determining the potential impact of new observing systems on numerical weather forecasts and for evaluation of data assimilation systems (DAS). An OSSE has been developed at the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO, Errico et al 2013). The GMAO OSSE uses a 13-month integration of the European Centre for Medium- Range Weather Forecasts 2005 operational model at T511/L91 resolution for the Nature Run (NR). Synthetic observations have been updated so that they are based on real observations during the summer of 2013. The emulated observation types include AMSU-A, MHS, IASI, AIRS, and HIRS4 radiance data, GPS-RO, and conventional types including aircraft, rawinsonde, profiler, surface, and satellite winds. The synthetic satellite wind observations are colocated with the NR cloud fields, and the rawinsondes are advected during ascent using the NR wind fields. Data counts for the synthetic observations are matched as closely as possible to real data counts, as shown in Figure 2. Errors are added to the synthetic observations to emulate representativeness and instrument errors. The synthetic errors are calibrated so that the statistics of observation innovation and analysis increments in the OSSE are similar to the same statistics for assimilation of real observations, in an iterative method described by Errico et al (2013). The standard deviations of observation minus forecast (xo-H(xb)) are compared for the OSSE and real data in Figure 3. The synthetic errors include both random, uncorrelated errors, and an additional correlated error component for some observational types. Vertically correlated errors are included for conventional sounding data and GPS-RO, and channel correlated errors are introduced to AIRS and IASI (Figure 4). HIRS, AMSU-A, and MHS have a component of horizontally

  18. Comparison of Precipitation Observations from a Prototype Space-based Cloud Radar and Ground-based Radars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Liping; ZHANG Zhiqiang; YU Danru; YANG Hu; ZHAO Chonghui; ZHONG Lingzhi

    2012-01-01

    A prototype space-based cloud radar has been developed and was installed on an airplane to observe a precipitation system over Tianjin,China in July 2010.Ground-based S-band and Ka-band radars were used to examine the observational capability of the prototype. A cross-comparison algorithm between different wavelengths,spatial resolutions and platform radars is presented.The reflectivity biases,correlation coefficients and standard deviations between the radars are analyzed.The equivalent reflectivity bias between the S- and Ka-band radars were simulated with a given raindrop size distribution.The results indicated that reflectivity bias between the S- and Ka-band radars due to scattering properties was less than 5 dB,and for weak precipitation the bias was negligible. The prototype space-based cloud radar was able to measure a reasonable vertical profile of reflectivity,but the reflectivity below an altitude of 1.5 km above ground level was obscured by ground clutter.The measured reflectivity by the prototype space-based cloud radar was approximately 10.9 dB stronger than that by the S-band Doppler radar (SA radar),and 13.7 dB stronger than that by the ground-based cloud radar.The reflectivity measured by the SA radar was 0.4 dB stronger than that by the ground-based cloud radar.This study could provide a method for the quantitative examination of the observation ability for space-based radars.

  19. A decade of dark matter searches with ground-based Cherenkov telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doro, Michele, E-mail: michele.doro@pd.infn.it [University and INFN Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Department of Physics and CERES, Campus Universitat Autonoma Barcelona, 08135 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2014-04-01

    In the general scenario of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMP), dark matter (DM) can be observed via astrophysical gamma-rays because photons are produced in various DM annihilation or decay processes, either as broad-band or line emission, or because of the secondary processes of charged particles in the final stages of the annihilations or the decays. The energy range of the former processes is accessible by current ground-based Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs, like H.E.S.S., MAGIC and VERITAS). The strengths of this technique are (a) the expected DM gamma-ray spectra show peculiar features like bumps, spikes and cutoff that make them clearly distinguishable from the smoother astrophysical spectra and (b) the expected DM spectrum is universal and therefore by observing two or more DM targets with the same spectrum, a clear identification (besides detection) of DM would be enabled. The role of IACTs may gain more importance in the future as the results from the LHC may hint to a DM particle with mass at the TeV or above, where the IACTs sensitivity is unsurpassed by other experiments. In this contribution, a review of the search for DM with the current generation of IACT will be presented.

  20. Project ORION: Orbital Debris Removal Using Ground-Based Sensors and Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    About 100,000 pieces of 1 to 10-cm debris in low-Earth orbit are too small to track reliably but large enough to cripple or destroy spacecraft. The ORION team studied the feasibility of removing the debris with ground-based laser impulses. Photoablation experiments were surveyed and applied to likely debris materials. Laser intensities needed for debris orbit modification call for pulses on the order of lOkJ or continuous wave lasers on the order of 1 MW. Adaptive optics are necessary to correct for atmospheric turbulence. Wavelength and pulse duration windows were found that limit beam degradation due to nonlinear atmospheric processes. Debris can be detected and located to within about 10 microrads with existing radar and passive optical technology. Fine targeting would be accomplished with laser illumination, which might also be used for detection. Bistatic detection with communications satellites may also be possible. We recommend that existing technology be used to demonstrate the concept at a loss of about $20 million. We calculate that an installation to clear altitudes up to 800 km of 1 to 10-cm debris over 2 years of operation would cost about $80 million. Clearing altitudes up to 1,500 km would take about 3 years and cost about $160 million.

  1. Ozone ground-based measurements by the GASCOD near-UV and visible DOAS system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanelli, G.; Bonasoni, P.; Cervino, M.; Evangelisti, F.; Ravegnani, F.

    1994-01-01

    GASCOD, a near-ultraviolet and visible differential optical spectrometer, was developed at CNR's FISBAT Institute in Bologna, Italy, and first tested at Terra Nova Bay station in Antarctica (74.6 deg S, 164.6 deg E) during the summer expeditions 1988-1990 of PNRA (PNRA is the national research program in Antarctica, 'Programma Nazionale di Ricerche in Atartide'). A comparison with coincident O3 total column measurements taken in the same Antarctic area is presented, as is another comparison performed in Italy. Also introduced is an updated model for solar zenith measurements taken from a ground-based, upward-looking GASCOD spectrometer, which was employed for the 1991-92 winter campaign at Aer-Ostersund in Sweden (63.3 deg N, 13.1 deg E) during AESOE (European Arctic Stratospheric Ozone Experiment). The GASCOD can examine the spectra from 300 to 700 nm, in 50 nm steps, by moving the spectrometer's grating. At present, it takes measurements of solar zenith radiation in the 310-342 nm range for O3 and in the 405-463 nm range for NO2.

  2. Combined ground-based optical support for the aurora (DELTA) sounding rocket campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Eoghan; Kosch, Mike; Aruliah, Anasuya; Kavanagh, Andrew; McWhirter, Ian; Senior, Andrew; Ford, Elaina; Davis, Chris; Abe, Takumi; Kurihara, Junichi; Kauristie, Kirsti; Ogawa, Yasunobu

    2006-09-01

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) DELTA rocket experiment, successfully launched from Andøya at 0033 UT on December 13, 2004, supported by ground based optical instruments, primarily 2 Fabry- Perot Interferometers (FPIs) located at Skibotn, Norway (69.3°N, 20.4°E) and the KEOPS Site, Esrange, Kiruna, Sweden (67.8°N, 20.4°E). Both these instruments sampled the 557.7 nm lower thermosphere atomic oxygen emission and provided neutral temperatures and line-of-sight wind velocities, with deduced vector wind patterns over each site. All sky cameras allow contextual auroral information to be acquired. The proximity of the sites provided overlapping fields of view, adjacent to the trajectory of the DELTA rocket. This allowed independent verification of the absolute temperatures in the relatively quiet conditions early in the night, especially important given the context provided by co-located EISCAT ion temperature measurements which allow investigation of the likely emission altitude of the passive FPI measurements. The results demonstrate that this altitude changes from 120 km pre-midnight to 115 km post-midnight. Within this large scale context the results from the FPIs also demonstrate smaller scale structure in neutral temperatures, winds and intensities consistent with localised heating. These results present a challenge to the representation of thermospheric variability for the existing models of the region.

  3. Event-by-event simulation of single-neutron experiments to test uncertainty relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H.; Michielsen, K.

    2014-01-01

    Results from a discrete-event simulation of a recent single-neutron experiment that tests Ozawa's generalization of Heisenberg's uncertainty relation are presented. The event-based simulation algorithm reproduces the results of the quantum theoretical description of the experiment but does not requi

  4. Learning Oceanography from a Computer Simulation Compared with Direct Experience at Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winn, William; Stahr, Frederick; Sarason, Christian; Fruland, Ruth; Oppenheimer, Peter; Lee, Yen-Ling

    2006-01-01

    Considerable research has compared how students learn science from computer simulations with how they learn from "traditional" classes. Little research has compared how students learn science from computer simulations with how they learn from direct experience in the real environment on which the simulations are based. This study compared two…

  5. Integrating molecular dynamics simulations with chemical probing experiments using SHAPE-FIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmizialtin, Serdal; Hennelly, Scott P.; Schug, Alexander; Onuchic, Jose N.; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.

    2016-01-01

    Integration and calibration of molecular dynamics simulations with experimental data remains a challenging endeavor. We have developed a novel method to integrate chemical probing experiments with molecular simulations of RNA molecules by using a native structure-based model. Selective 2’-hydroxyl acylation by primer extension (SHAPE) characterizes the mobility of each residue in the RNA. Our method, SHAPE-FIT, automatically optimizes the potential parameters of the forcefield according to measured reactivities from SHAPE. The optimized parameter set allows simulations of dynamics highly consistent with SHAPE probing experiments. Such atomistic simulations, thoroughly grounded in experiment, can open a new window on RNA structure-function relations. PMID:25726467

  6. The Function of Fiction is the Abstraction and Simulation of Social Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Raymond A; Oatley, Keith

    2008-05-01

    Fiction literature has largely been ignored by psychology researchers because its only function seems to be entertainment, with no connection to empirical validity. We argue that literary narratives have a more important purpose. They offer models or simulations of the social world via abstraction, simplification, and compression. Narrative fiction also creates a deep and immersive simulative experience of social interactions for readers. This simulation facilitates the communication and understanding of social information and makes it more compelling, achieving a form of learning through experience. Engaging in the simulative experiences of fiction literature can facilitate the understanding of others who are different from ourselves and can augment our capacity for empathy and social inference.

  7. Estimates of the Planet Yield from Ground-Based High-Contrast Imaging Observations as a Function of Stellar Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Crepp, Justin R

    2011-01-01

    We use Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the number of extrasolar planets that are directly detectable in the solar-neighborhood using current and forthcoming high-contrast imaging instruments. Our calculations take into account the important factors that govern the likelihood for imaging a planet, including the statistical properties of nearby stars, correlations between star and planet properties, observational effects, and selection criteria. We consider several different ground-based surveys and express the resulting yields as a function of stellar mass. Selecting targets based on their youth and visual brightness, we find that strong correlations between star mass and planet properties are required to reproduce high-contrast imaging results to date. Using the most recent empirical findings for the occurrence rate of planets from RV surveys, our simulations indicate that extrapolation of the Doppler planet population to separations accessible to high-contrast instruments provides excellent agreement bet...

  8. Ground-based NIR emission spectroscopy of HD189733b

    CERN Document Server

    Waldmann, I P; Tinetti, G; Griffith, C A; Swain, M R; Deroo, P

    2011-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of transiting exoplanets are providing an unprecedented view of the atmospheres of planets around nearby stars. As we learn more about the atmospheres of these remote bodies, we begin to build up a clearer picture of their composition and thermal structure. Here we investigate the case of K and L band emissions of the hot-Jupiter HD 189733b. Using the SpeX instrument on the NASA IRTF, we obtained three nights of secondary eclipse data using equivalent settings for all nights. Our sample includes one night previously presented by Swain et al. (2010) which allows for comparability of results. In this publication we present and discuss in detail a greatly improved data-reduction and analysis routine. This, in conjunction with more data, allows us to increase the spectral resolution of our planetary spectrum (R ~ 170-180), leading to a better identifiability of the features present. We confirm the existence of a strong emission at ~3.3 microns which is inconsistent with LTE simulations ...

  9. Insight into mechanisms of reduced orthostatic performance after exposure to microgravity: comparison of ground-based and space flight data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, V. A.

    1998-01-01

    Since the beginning of human spaceflight, the value of understanding mechanisms of physiological adaptation to microgravity became apparent to life scientists who were interested in maintining crew health and developing countermeasures agains adverse effects of the mission. However, several characteristics associated the the logistics of spaceflight presented significant limitations to the scientific study of human adaptation to microgravity. Because space missions are so infrequent and involve minimal numbers of crewmembers, meaninful statistical analysis of data are limited. Reproducibility of results from spaceflight experiments is difficult to assess since there are few repeated space missions involving the same crewmembers. Since the emphasis of space missions is placed on operations, experiments are compromised without adequate control over various factors (e.g., time, diet, physical activities, etc.) that can impact measured responses. With the mimimal opportunity to collect spaceflight data, there is a high risk of experiments that simultaneously interfere with other experiments by the increasing demand on the crewmembers to participate in mumerous experiments proposed by multiple investigators. The technology and ability to measure physiological functions necessary to test specific hypotheses can be severely limited by physical space and power constraints of the space enviroment. Finally, technical and logistical aspects of space missions such as launch delays, extended missions, and inflight operational emergencies can significantly compromise the timing and control of experiments. These limitations have stimulated scientists to develop ground-based analogs of microgravity in an effort to investigate the effects of spaceflight on physiological function in a controlled experimental setting. The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected comparison of data collected from ground-based experiments with those obtained from spaceflight in an effort to

  10. Using the IRI, the MAGIC model, and the co-located ground-based GPS receivers to study ionospheric solar eclipse and storm signatures on July 22, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi-Yen; Liu, Jann-Yenq; Lin, Chien-Hung; Sun, Yang-Yi; Araujo-Pradere, Eduardo A.; Kakinami, Yoshihiro

    2012-06-01

    The longest total solar eclipse in the 21st century occurred in Southeast Asia on 22 July 2009 from 00:55 to 04:15 UT, and was accompanied by a moderate magnetic storm starting at 03:00 UT with a D st reduction of -78 nT at 07:00 UT. In this study, we use the ionospheric reference model IRI, the data assimilation model MAGIC, and ground-based GPS receivers to simulate and examine the ionospheric solar eclipse and geomagnetic storm signatures in Taiwan and Japan. Cross-comparisons between the two model results and observations show that IRI fails to simulate the two signatures while MAGIC partially reproduces the storm features. It is essential to include ground-based GPS measurements to improve the IRI performance.

  11. High-precision ground-based photometry of exoplanets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Mooij Ernst J.W.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available High-precision photometry of transiting exoplanet systems has contributed significantly to our understanding of the properties of their atmospheres. The best targets are the bright exoplanet systems, for which the high number of photons allow very high signal-to-noise ratios. Most of the current instruments are not optimised for these high-precision measurements, either they have a large read-out overhead to reduce the readnoise and/or their field-of-view is limited, preventing simultaneous observations of both the target and a reference star. Recently we have proposed a new wide-field imager for the Observatoir de Mont-Megantic optimised for these bright systems (PI: Jayawardhana. The instruments has a dual beam design and a field-of-view of 17' by 17'. The cameras have a read-out time of 2 seconds, significantly reducing read-out overheads. Over the past years we have obtained significant experience with how to reach the high precision required for the characterisation of exoplanet atmospheres. Based on our experience we provide the following advice: Get the best calibrations possible. In the case of bad weather, characterise the instrument (e.g. non-linearity, dome flats, bias level, this is vital for better understanding of the science data. Observe the target for as long as possible, the out-of-transit baseline is as important as the transit/eclipse itself. A short baseline can lead to improperly corrected systematic and mis-estimation of the red-noise. Keep everything (e.g. position on detector, exposure time as stable as possible. Take care that the defocus is not too strong. For a large defocus, the contribution of the total flux from the sky-background in the aperture could well exceed that of the target, resulting in very strict requirements on the precision at which the background is measured.

  12. Simulating the Beam-line at CERN's ISOLDE Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    McGrath, Casey

    2013-01-01

    Maximizing the optical matching along portions of the ISOLDE beam-line and automating this procedure will make it easier for scientists to determine what the strengths of the electrical elds of each beam-line element should be in order to reduce particle loss. Simulations are run using a program called MAD-X, however, certain issues were discovered that hindered an immediate success of the simulations. Specifically, the transfer matrices for electrostatic components like the switchyards, kickers, and electric quadrupoles were missing from the original coding. The primary aim of this project was to design these components using AutoCAD and then extract the transfer matrices using SIMION. Future work will then implement these transfer matrices into the MAD-X code to make the simulations of the beam-line more accurate.

  13. Developing Scintillation Light Readout Simulation for the SBND experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Gamez, D

    2015-01-01

    Detection of scintillation light can play several important roles in LArTPCs. Increased collection efficiency could result in the improvement of time, energy, and position resolution. The SBND collaboration is developing detailed MC simulations to study the performance of different types of light systems in the LArSoft framework. Due to the vast number of photons typically produced in neutrino physics events, a full optical simulation becomes extremely hard to run on reasonable time scales. I will describe how the SBND simulation tackles these problems and its current status for two of the light detection systems considered by SBND: (i) a traditional TPB-coated PMT based system and (ii) a system based on TPB-coated reflector foils to increase collection efficiency without increasing the number of photodetectors.

  14. Validation experiments for LBM simulations of electron beam melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammer, Regina; Rüde, Ulrich; Markl, Matthias; Jüchter, Vera; Körner, Carolin

    2014-05-01

    This paper validates three-dimensional (3D) simulation results of electron beam melting (EBM) processes by comparing experimental and numerical data. The physical setup is presented which is discretized by a 3D thermal lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). An experimental process window is used for the validation depending on the line energy injected into the metal powder bed and the scan velocity of the electron beam. In the process window, the EBM products are classified into the categories, porous, good and swelling, depending on the quality of the surface. The same parameter sets are used to generate a numerical process window. A comparison of numerical and experimental process windows shows a good agreement. This validates the EBM model and justifies simulations for future improvements of the EBM processes. In particular, numerical simulations can be used to explain future process window scenarios and find the best parameter set for a good surface quality and dense products.

  15. Determining material parameters using phase-field simulations and experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jin; Poulsen, Stefan O.; Gibbs, John W.

    2017-01-01

    A method to determine material parameters by comparing the evolution of experimentally determined 3D microstructures to simulated 3D microstructures is proposed. The temporal evolution of a dendritic solid-liquid mixture is acquired in situ using x-ray tomography. Using a time step from these dat...... variation of the best-fit parameters and the fidelity of the fitting. We find a liquid diffusion coefficient that is different from that measured using directional solidification....... as an initial condition in a phase-field simulation, the computed structure is compared to that measured experimentally at a later time. An optimization technique is used to find the material parameters that yield the best match of the simulated microstructure to the measured microstructure in a global manner...

  16. Measurements of total and tropospheric ozone from IASI: comparison with correlative satellite, ground-based and ozonesonde observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Boynard

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present measurements of total and tropospheric ozone, retrieved from infrared radiance spectra recorded by the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI, which was launched on board the MetOp-A European satellite in October 2006. We compare IASI total ozone columns to Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2 observations and ground-based measurements from the Dobson and Brewer network for one full year of observations (2008. The IASI total ozone columns are shown to be in good agreement with both GOME-2 and ground-based data, with correlation coefficients of about 0.9 and 0.85, respectively. On average, IASI ozone retrievals exhibit a positive bias of about 9 DU (3.3% compared to both GOME-2 and ground-based measurements. In addition to total ozone columns, the good spectral resolution of IASI enables the retrieval of tropospheric ozone concentrations. Comparisons of IASI tropospheric columns to 490 collocated ozone soundings available from several stations around the globe have been performed for the period of June 2007–August 2008. IASI tropospheric ozone columns compare well with sonde observations, with correlation coefficients of 0.95 and 0.77 for the [surface–6 km] and [surface–12 km] partial columns, respectively. IASI retrievals tend to overestimate the tropospheric ozone columns in comparison with ozonesonde measurements. Positive average biases of 0.15 DU (1.2% and 3 DU (11% are found for the [surface–6 km] and for the [surface–12 km] partial columns respectively.

  17. Tropospheric BrO column densities in the Arctic derived from satellite: retrieval and comparison to ground-based measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sihler

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available During polar spring, halogen radicals like bromine monoxide (BrO play an important role in the chemistry of tropospheric ozone destruction. Satellite measurements of the BrO distribution have become a particularly useful tool to investigate this probably natural phenomenon, but the separation of stratospheric and tropospheric partial columns of BrO is challenging. In this study, an algorithm was developed to retrieve tropospheric vertical column densities of BrO from data of high-resolution spectroscopic satellite instruments such as the second Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2. Unlike recently published approaches, the presented algorithm is capable of separating the fraction of BrO in the activated troposphere from the total BrO column solely based on remotely measured properties. The presented algorithm furthermore allows to estimate a realistic measurement error of the tropospheric BrO column. The sensitivity of each satellite pixel to BrO in the boundary layer is quantified using the measured UV radiance and the column density of the oxygen collision complex O4. A comparison of the sensitivities with CALIPSO LIDAR observations demonstrates that clouds shielding near-surface trace-gas columns can be reliably detected even over ice and snow. Retrieved tropospheric BrO columns are then compared to ground-based BrO measurements from two Arctic field campaigns in the Amundsen Gulf and at Barrow in 2008 and 2009, respectively. Our algorithm was found to be capable of retrieving enhanced near-surface BrO during both campaigns in good agreement with ground-based data. Some differences between ground-based and satellite measurements observed at Barrow can be explained by both elevated and shallow surface layers of BrO. The observations strongly suggest that surface release processes are the dominating source of BrO and that boundary layer meteorology influences the vertical distribution.

  18. Tropospheric BrO column densities in the Arctic from satellite: retrieval and comparison to ground-based measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sihler

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available During polar spring, halogen radicals like bromine monoxide (BrO play an important role in the chemistry of tropospheric ozone destruction. Satellite measurements of the BrO-distribution have become a particularly useful tool to investigate this probably natural phenomenon, but the separation of stratospheric and tropospheric partial columns of BrO is challenging. In this study, an algorithm was developed to retrieve tropospheric vertical column densities of BrO from data of high-resolution spectroscopic satellite instruments such as the second Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2. Unlike recently published approaches, the presented algorithm is capable of separating the fraction of BrO in the activated troposphere from the total BrO column solely based on remotely measured properties. The sensitivity of each satellite pixel to BrO in the boundary-layer is quantified using the measured UV-radiance and the column density of the oxygen collision complex O4. A comparison of the sensitivities with CALIPSO LIDAR observations demonstrates that clouds shielding near-surface trace-gas columns can be reliably detected even over ice and snow. Retrieved tropospheric BrO columns are then compared to ground-based BrO measurements from two Arctic field campaigns in the Amundsen Gulf and at Barrow in 2008 and 2009, respectively. Our algorithm was found to be capable of retrieving enhanced near-surface BrO during both campaigns in good agreement to ground-based data. Some differences between ground-based and satellite measurements observed at Barrow can be explained by both, elevated and shallow surface layers of BrO. The observations strongly suggest that surface release processes are the dominating source of BrO and that boundary-layer meteorology influences the vertical distribution.

  19. Combining Experiments and Simulations Using the Maximum Entropy Principle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boomsma, Wouter; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten

    2014-01-01

    applications in our field has grown steadily in recent years, in areas as diverse as sequence analysis, structural modelling, and neurobiology. In this Perspectives article, we give a broad introduction to the method, in an attempt to encourage its further adoption. The general procedure is explained...... in the context of a simple example, after which we proceed with a real-world application in the field of molecular simulations, where the maximum entropy procedure has recently provided new insight. Given the limited accuracy of force fields, macromolecular simulations sometimes produce results...

  20. Simulations and experiments on RITA-2 at PSI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, S.N.; Lefmann, K.; McMorrow, D.F.

    2002-01-01

    The cold-neutron triple-axis spectrometer RITA-2 designed and built at Riso National Laboratory was installed at the neutron source SINQ at Paul Scherrer Institute in April/May 2001. In connection with the installation of RITA-2, computer simulations were performed using the neutron ray-tracing p......The cold-neutron triple-axis spectrometer RITA-2 designed and built at Riso National Laboratory was installed at the neutron source SINQ at Paul Scherrer Institute in April/May 2001. In connection with the installation of RITA-2, computer simulations were performed using the neutron ray...

  1. Simulations and experiments on RITA-2 at PSI

    CERN Document Server

    Klausen, S N; McMorrow, D F; Altorfer, F; Janssen, S; Luethy, M

    2002-01-01

    The cold-neutron triple-axis spectrometer RITA-2 designed and built at Riso National Laboratory was installed at the neutron source SINQ at Paul Scherrer Institute in April/May 2001. In connection with the installation of RITA-2, computer simulations were performed using the neutron ray-tracing package McStas. The simulation results are compared to real experimental results obtained with a powder sample. Especially, the flux at the sample position and the resolution function of the spectrometer are investigated. (orig.)

  2. Simulations and experiments on RITA-2 at PSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausen, S. N.; Lefmann, K.; McMorrow, D. F.; Altorfer, F.; Janssen, S.; Lüthy, M.

    The cold-neutron triple-axis spectrometer RITA-2 designed and built at Riso National Laboratory was installed at the neutron source SINQ at Paul Scherrer Institute in April/May 2001. In connection with the installation of RITA-2, computer simulations were performed using the neutron ray-tracing package McStas. The simulation results are compared to real experimental results obtained with a powder sample. Especially, the flux at the sample position and the resolution function of the spectrometer are investigated.

  3. Experiment vs simulation RT WFNDEC 2014 benchmark: CIVA results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisseur, D.; Costin, M.; Rattoni, B.; Vienne, C.; Vabre, A.; Cattiaux, G.; Sollier, T.

    2015-03-01

    The French Atomic Energy Commission and Alternative Energies (CEA) has developed for years the CIVA software dedicated to simulation of NDE techniques such as Radiographic Testing (RT). RT modelling is achieved in CIVA using combination of a determinist approach based on ray tracing for transmission beam simulation and a Monte Carlo model for the scattered beam computation. Furthermore, CIVA includes various detectors models, in particular common x-ray films and a photostimulable phosphor plates. This communication presents the results obtained with the configurations proposed in the World Federation of NDEC 2014 RT modelling benchmark with the RT models implemented in the CIVA software.

  4. An obstetric simulation experience in an undergraduate nursing curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Bethany

    2006-01-01

    Educators face the dilemma of conveying didactic information in concise, creative ways that evoke critical thinking. In addition, high patient acuity, coupled with a growing nursing shortage, requires assimilation of didactic knowledge into sound clinical judgment in a timely manner. Human simulation offers a creative teaching modality that allows transference of textbook knowledge into a real-life situation where nursing students can function in their role without untoward effects to their clients. The author illustrates the use of a human birthing simulator, Noelle, in an undergraduate nursing program as a creative and effective teaching strategy.

  5. Implementing Simulation Design of Experiments and Remote Execution on a High Performance Computing Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    Kennard, R. W. & Stone, L.A. (1969). Computer Aided Desing of Experiments . Tecnometrics, 11(1), 137-148. Kleijnen, J. P. (2003). A user’s guide to the...SIMULATION DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS AND REMOTE EXECUTION ON A HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING CLUSTER by Adam J. Peters September 2007 Thesis...Simulation Design of Experiments and Remote Execution on a High Performance Computing Cluster 6. AUTHOR(S) Adam J. Peters 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7

  6. Impact of Simulation and Clinical Experience on Self-efficacy in Nursing Students: Intervention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimhi, Einat; Reishtein, Judith L; Cohen, Miri; Friger, Michael; Hurvitz, Nancy; Avraham, Rinat

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the effect of simulation and clinical experience timing on self-confidence/self-efficacy for the nursing process. Using a randomized, double-crossover design, self-efficacy was measured 3 times. Although self-efficacy was significantly higher at time 1 for students who had clinical experience, there was no difference between the groups at the end of the course (time 2). Thus, simulation increased self-confidence/self-efficacy equivalently if placed either before or after clinical experience.

  7. Gear Mesh Loss-of-Lubrication Experiments and Analytical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Polly, Joseph; Morales, Wilfredo

    2011-01-01

    An experimental program to determine the loss-of-lubrication (LOL) characteristics of spur gears in an aerospace simulation test facility has been completed. Tests were conducted using two different emergency lubricant types: (1) an oil mist system (two different misted lubricants) and (2) a grease injection system (two different grease types). Tests were conducted using a NASA Glenn test facility normally used for conducting contact fatigue. Tests were run at rotational speeds up to 10000 rpm using two different gear designs and two different gear materials. For the tests conducted using an air-oil misting system, a minimum lubricant injection rate was determined to permit the gear mesh to operate without failure for at least 1 hr. The tests allowed an elevated steady state temperature to be established. A basic 2-D heat transfer simulation has been developed to investigate temperatures of a simulated gear as a function of frictional behavior. The friction (heat generation source) between the meshing surfaces is related to the position in the meshing cycle, the load applied, and the amount of lubricant in the contact. Experimental conditions will be compared to those from the 2-D simulation.

  8. Simulation Experiments in Practice : Statistical Design and Regression Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, J.P.C.

    2007-01-01

    In practice, simulation analysts often change only one factor at a time, and use graphical analysis of the resulting Input/Output (I/O) data. The goal of this article is to change these traditional, naïve methods of design and analysis, because statistical theory proves that more information is obta

  9. Numerical Simulation of the Perrin-Like Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Zygmunt; Grech, Dariusz

    2008-01-01

    A simple model of the random Brownian walk of a spherical mesoscopic particle in viscous liquids is proposed. The model can be solved analytically and simulated numerically. The analytic solution gives the known Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion law r[superscript 2] = 2Dt, where the diffusion constant D is expressed by the mass and geometry of a…

  10. Event-based Simulation Model for Quantum Optics Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H.; Michielsen, K.; Jaeger, G; Khrennikov, A; Schlosshauer, M; Weihs, G

    2011-01-01

    We present a corpuscular simulation model of optical phenomena that does not require the knowledge of the solution of a wave equation of the whole system and reproduces the results of Maxwell's theory by generating detection events one-by-one. The event-based corpuscular model gives a unified

  11. Simulation of Material Mixing in Shocked Gas-Curtain Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowardhan, Akshay; Grinstein, Fernando

    2009-11-01

    The unique combination of shock and turbulence emulation capabilities supports direct use of implicit large eddy simulation (ILES) as an effective simulation anzatz in shock-driven mixing research. This possibility is demonstrated in the context of a prototypical case study for which available laboratory data can be used to test and validate the ILES modeling. An SF6 gas curtain is formed by forcing SF6 through a linear arrangement of round nozzles into the shocktube test section. The gas curtain is shocked (M=1.26, M=1.5), and its later evolution subject to Ritchmyer-Meshkov flow instabilities, transition, and non-equilibrium turbulence phenomena are investigated based on high resolution simulations for shocked and reshocked cases. The particular strategy tested here is based on a nominally-inviscid simulation model using the LANL RAGE code and adaptive mesh refinement. Initial conditions for ILES are based on emulating the physics of SF6 falling through the test section of the shock tube until a steady state is reached using a separate 3D Navier-Stokes code which solves incompressible flow in the Boussinesq approximation.

  12. Systems Approaches and Simulation in Curricular Programs: The Wageningen Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, A. M.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Wageningen Agricultural University's use of systems approaches and simulation for undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate education suggests the following elements are necessary: (1) congruence between the aims/interests of teachers and participants; (2) appropriate course level; (3) applicability to relevant research fields; and (4) a range of…

  13. Enhancing Lean Manufacturing Learning Experience through Hands-On Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbadawi, Isam; McWilliams, Douglas L.; Tetteh, Edem G.

    2010-01-01

    Finding appropriate interactive exercises to increase students' learning in technical topic courses is always challenging to educators. In this study, several paper plane hands-on simulation exercises were developed, used, and tested in a lean manufacturing course for beginning college students. A pretest and posttest was used to assess the…

  14. Multi-layer thermoplastic composites manufacturing processes: simulations and experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Thije, R.H.W.; Haanappel, Sebastiaan

    2011-01-01

    Press forming of multi-layer thermoplastic composite laminates is a fast and cost-effective method to produce thin shelled products. This paper shows that virtual forming provides designers with a tool to determine and to optimize the formability of these composite products. Forming simulations iden

  15. Multi-layer thermoplastic composites manufacturing processes: simulations and experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thije, ten René; Haanappel, Sebastiaan

    2011-01-01

    Press forming of multi-layer thermoplastic composite laminates is a fast and cost-effective method to produce thin shelled products. This paper shows that virtual forming provides designers with a tool to determine and to optimize the formability of these composite products. Forming simulations iden

  16. Enhancing Lean Manufacturing Learning Experience through Hands-On Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbadawi, Isam; McWilliams, Douglas L.; Tetteh, Edem G.

    2010-01-01

    Finding appropriate interactive exercises to increase students' learning in technical topic courses is always challenging to educators. In this study, several paper plane hands-on simulation exercises were developed, used, and tested in a lean manufacturing course for beginning college students. A pretest and posttest was used to assess the…

  17. Calibrating ground-based microwave radiometers: Uncertainty and drifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küchler, N.; Turner, D. D.; Löhnert, U.; Crewell, S.

    2016-04-01

    The quality of microwave radiometer (MWR) calibrations, including both the absolute radiometric accuracy and the spectral consistency, determines the accuracy of geophysical retrievals. The Microwave Radiometer Calibration Experiment (MiRaCalE) was conducted to evaluate the performance of MWR calibration techniques, especially of the so-called Tipping Curve Calibrations (TCC) and Liquid Nitrogen Calibrations (LN2cal), by repeatedly calibrating a fourth-generation Humidity and Temperature Profiler (HATPRO-G4) that measures downwelling radiance between 20 GHz and 60 GHz. MiRaCalE revealed two major points to improve MWR calibrations: (i) the necessary repetition frequency for MWR calibration techniques to correct drifts, which ensures stable long-term measurements; and (ii) the spectral consistency of control measurements of a well known reference is useful to estimate calibration accuracy. Besides, we determined the accuracy of the HATPRO's liquid nitrogen-cooled blackbody's temperature. TCCs and LN2cals were found to agree within 0.5 K when observing the liquid nitrogen-cooled blackbody with a physical temperature of 77 K. This agreement of two different calibration techniques suggests that the brightness temperature of the LN2 cooled blackbody is accurate within at least 0.5 K, which is a significant reduction of the uncertainties that have been assumed to vary between 0.6 K and 1.5 K when calibrating the HATPRO-G4. The error propagation of both techniques was found to behave almost linearly, leading to maximum uncertainties of 0.7 K when observing a scene that is associated with a brightness temperature of 15 K.

  18. Validation of ACE and OSIRIS ozone and NO2 measurements using ground-based instruments at 80° N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pazmino

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Optical Spectrograph and Infra-Red Imager System (OSIRIS and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE have been taking measurements from space since 2001 and 2003, respectively. This paper presents intercomparisons between ozone and NO2 measured by the ACE and OSIRIS satellite instruments and by ground-based instruments at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL, which is located at Eureka, Canada (80° N, 86° W and is operated by the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC. The ground-based instruments included in this study are four zenith-sky differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS instruments, one Bruker Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR and four Brewer spectrophotometers. Ozone total columns measured by the DOAS instruments were retrieved using new Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC guidelines and agree to within 3.2%. The DOAS ozone columns agree with the Brewer spectrophotometers with mean relative differences that are smaller than 1.5%. This suggests that for these instruments the new NDACC data guidelines were successful in producing a homogenous and accurate ozone dataset at 80° N. Satellite 14–52 km ozone and 17–40 km NO2 partial columns within 500 km of PEARL were calculated for ACE-FTS Version 2.2 (v2.2 plus updates, ACE-FTS v3.0, ACE-MAESTRO (Measurements of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation v1.2 and OSIRIS SaskMART v5.0x ozone and Optimal Estimation v3.0 NO2 data products. The new ACE-FTS v3.0 and the validated ACE-FTS v2.2 partial columns are nearly identical, with mean relative differences of 0.0 ± 0.2% and −0.2 ± 0.1% for v2.2 minus v3.0 ozone and NO2, respectively. Ozone columns were constructed from 14–52 km satellite and 0–14 km ozonesonde partial columns and compared with the ground-based total column measurements. The satellite-plus-sonde measurements agree

  19. Utilization of the Nursing Process to Foster Clinical Reasoning During a Simulation Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Lambie

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nursing practice includes complex reasoning and multifaceted decision making with minimal standardized guidance in how to evaluate this phenomenon among nursing students. Learning outcomes related to the clinical reasoning process among novice baccalaureate nursing students during a simulation experience were evaluated. Nursing process records were utilized to evaluate and foster the development of clinical reasoning in a high-fidelity medical-surgical simulation experience. Students were unable to describe and process pertinent patient information appropriately prior to the simulation experience. Students’ ability to identify pertinent patient cues and plan appropriate patient care improved following the simulation. The learning activity afforded a structured opportunity to identify cues, prioritize the proper course of nursing interventions, and engage in collaboration among peers. The simulation experience provides faculty insight into the students’ clinical reasoning processes, while providing students with a clear framework for successfully accomplishing learning outcomes.

  20. Experiments and FEM simulations of fracture behaviors for ADC12 aluminum alloy under impact load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yumei; Xiao, Yue; Jin, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Haoran; Zhou, Yinge; Shao, Jinhua

    2016-11-01

    Using the combination of experiment and simulation, the fracture behavior of the brittle metal named ADC12 aluminum alloy was studied. Five typical experiments were carried out on this material, with responding data collected on different stress states and dynamic strain rates. Fractographs revealed that the morphologies of fractured specimen under several rates showed different results, indicating that the fracture was predominantly a brittle one in nature. Simulations of the fracture processes of those specimens were conducted by Finite Element Method, whilst consistency was observed between simulations and experiments. In simulation, the Johnson- Cook model was chosen to describe the damage development and to predict the failure using parameters determined from those experimental data. Subsequently, an ADC12 engine mount bracket crashing simulation was conducted and the results indicated good agreement with the experiments. The accordance showed that our research can provide an accurate description for the deforming and fracture processes of the studied alloy.

  1. DSMC Simulations of Hypersonic Flows With Shock Interactions and Validation With Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, James N.; Bird, Graeme A.

    2004-01-01

    The capabilities of a relatively new direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code are examined for the problem of hypersonic laminar shock/shock and shock/boundary layer interactions, where boundary layer separation is an important feature of the flow. Flow about two model configurations is considered, where both configurations (a biconic and a hollow cylinder-flare) have recent published experimental measurements. The computations are made by using the DS2V code of Bird, a general two-dimensional/axisymmetric time accurate code that incorporates many of the advances in DSMC over the past decade. The current focus is on flows produced in ground-based facilities at Mach 12 and 16 test conditions with nitrogen as the test gas and the test models at zero incidence. Results presented highlight the sensitivity of the calculations to grid resolutions, sensitivity to physical modeling parameters, and comparison with experimental measurements. Information is provided concerning the flow structure and surface results for the extent of separation, heating, pressure, and skin friction.

  2. Validation of middle atmospheric campaign-based water vapour measured by the ground-based microwave radiometer MIAWARA-C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Tschanz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Middle atmospheric water vapour can be used as a tracer for dynamical processes. It is mainly measured by satellite instruments and ground-based microwave radiometers. Ground-based instruments capable of measuring middle atmospheric water vapour are sparse but valuable as they complement satellite measurements, are relatively easy to maintain and have a long lifetime. MIAWARA-C is a ground-based microwave radiometer for middle atmospheric water vapour designed for use on measurement campaigns for both atmospheric case studies and instrument intercomparisons. MIAWARA-C's retrieval version 1.1 (v1.1 is set up in a way to provide a consistent data set even if the instrument is operated from different locations on a campaign basis. The sensitive altitude range for v1.1 extends from 4 hPa (37 km to 0.017 hPa (75 km. MIAWARA-C measures two polarisations of the incident radiation in separate receiver channels and can therefore provide two independent measurements of the same air mass. The standard deviation of the difference between the profiles obtained from the two polarisations is in excellent agreement with the estimated random error of v1.1. In this paper, the quality of v1.1 data is assessed during two measurement campaigns: (1 five months of measurements in the Arctic (Sodankylä, 67.37° N/26.63° E and (2 nine months of measurements at mid-latitudes (Zimmerwald, 46.88° N/7.46° E. For both campaigns MIAWARA-C's profiles are compared to measurements from the satellite experiments Aura MLS and MIPAS. In addition, comparisons to ACE-FTS and SOFIE are presented for the Arctic and to the ground-based radiometer MIAWARA for the mid-latitudinal campaign. In general all intercomparisons show high correlation coefficients, above 0.5 at altitudes above 45 km, confirming the ability of MIAWARA-C to monitor temporal variations on the order of days. The biases are generally below 10% and within the estimated systematic uncertainty of MIAWARA-C. No

  3. Track Simulation and Reconstruction in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Salzburger, Andreas; Elsing, Markus

    The reconstruction and simulation of particle trajectories is an inevitable part of the analysis strate- gies for data taken with the ATLAS detector. Many aspects and necessary parts of a high-quality track reconstruction will be presented and discussed in this work. At first, the technical realisation of the data model and the reconstruction geometry will be given; the reconstruction geometry is charac- terised by a newly developed navigation model and an automated procedure for the synchronisation of the detailed simulation geometry description with the simplified reconstruction geometry model, which allows a precise description of the tracker material in track reconstruction. Both components help the coherent and fast integration of material effects in a newly established track extrapolation package, that is discussed in the following. The extrapolation engine enables a highly precise trans- port of the track parameterisation and the associated covariances through the complex magnetic field and the detec...

  4. Light scattering by neutrophils: model, simulation, and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, Darya Yu; Yurkin, Maxim A; Hoekstra, Alfons G; Maltsev, Valeri P

    2008-01-01

    We studied the elastic light-scattering properties of human blood neutrophils, both experimentally and theoretically. The experimental study was performed with a scanning flow cytometer measuring the light-scattering patterns (LSPs) of individual cells over an angular range of 5-60 deg. We determined the absolute differential light-scattering cross sections of neutrophils. We also proposed an optical model for a neutrophil as a sphere filled by small spheres and prolate spheroids that correspond to granules and segmented nucleus, respectively. This model was used in simulations of LSPs using the discrete dipole approximation and different compositions of internal organelles. A comparison of experimentally measured and simulated LSPs gives a good qualitative agreement in LSP shape and quantitative agreement in overall magnitude of the differential light-scattering cross section.

  5. Modeling and simulation for phase coarsening: A comparison with experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K. G.; Glicksman, M. E.; Rajan, K.

    2004-06-01

    The phase coarsening of precipitates is modeled in the framework of Debye-Hückel theory. The interactions observed among a population of precipitates dispersed throughout a matrix can be described by diffusion screening. The relationship between the maximum particle radius and the volume fraction of the phases is established, and the rate of coarsening is related to the volume fraction and the self-similar particle size distribution. We simulated the dynamics of late-stage phase separation using multiparticle diffusion methods. Experimental measurements on the rates of coarsening of δ' ( Al3 Li) precipitates in binary Al-Li alloys are compared with our results using modeling and simulation. The theoretically predicted particle size distributions and the maximum radius expected for particles in the microstructure agree well with recent experimental results.

  6. Simulation of Top Quark Production for the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Connelly, Ian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Monte Carlo setups used by ATLAS to model the tt⎯ and single-top production in 13 TeV pp collisions are described. The performance of different event generators is assessed by comparing measurements at 7 TeV, 8 TeV and 13 TeV to predictions from simulated data. The evaluation of systematic uncertainties and the dependence of generator predictions on the tuning parameters are also discussed.

  7. Platooning strategy of mobile robot: simulation and experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Baarath K.; Zakaria Muhammad Aizzat; Suparmaniam M.V.; Abu Mohd Yazid bin

    2017-01-01

    Concurrent studies show vehicle platooning system as a promising approach for a new transportation system. The platooning strategy can be also applied to automated mobile robots. Including dynamic modelling in the simulation with kinematic model would yield a different result as the dynamic modelling would include the physical parameters of the mobile robot. The aim is to create a model that describes the motion of a robot that follows another robot based on predetermined distance. Dynamic mo...

  8. Simulations and experiments on polarization squeezing in optical fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corney, J.F.; Heersink, J.; Dong, R.;

    2008-01-01

    We investigate polarization squeezing of ultrashort pulses in optical fiber, over a wide range of input energies and fiber lengths. Comparisons are made between experimental data and quantum dynamical simulations to find good quantitative agreement. The numerical calculations, performed using both...... effects cause a marked deterioration of squeezing at higher energies and longer fiber lengths. We also calculate the optimum fiber length for maximum squeezing....

  9. Simulation of Top Quark Production for the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Connelly, Ian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Monte Carlo setups used by ATLAS to model the $t\\bar{t}$ and single-top production in 13 TeV pp collisions are described. The performance of different event generators is assessed by comparing measurements at 7 TeV, 8 TeV and 13 TeV to predictions from simulated data. The evaluation of systematic uncertainties and the dependence of generator predictions on the tuning parameters are also discussed.

  10. Event-by-event simulation of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Shuang; De Raedt, Hans; Michielsen, Kristel

    2008-01-01

    We construct an event-based computer simulation model of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm experiments with photons. The algorithm is a one-to-one copy of the data gathering and analysis procedures used in real laboratory experiments. We consider two types of experiments, those with a source emitting

  11. Virtual experiments: the ultimate aim of neutron ray-tracing simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefmann, Kim; Willendrup, Peter Kjær; Udby, Linda

    2008-01-01

    We define a virtual neutron experiment as a complete simulation of an experiment, from source over sample to detector. The virtual experiment (VE) will ideally interface with the instrument control software for the input and with standard data analysis packages for the virtual data output. Virtua...

  12. Nucleation and solidification of thin walled ductile iron - Experiments and numerical simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl Martin; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2005-01-01

    Investigation of solidification of thin walled ductile cast iron has been performed based on experiments and numerical simulation. The experiments were based on temperature and microstructure examination. Results of the experiments have been compared with a 1-D numerical solidification model...

  13. Interaction of light with hematite hierarchical structures: Experiments and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distaso, Monica; Zhuromskyy, Oleksander; Seemann, Benjamin; Pflug, Lukas; Mačković, Mirza; Encina, Ezequiel; Taylor, Robin Klupp; Müller, Rolf; Leugering, Günter; Spiecker, Erdmann; Peschel, Ulf; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2017-03-01

    Mesocrystalline particles have been recognized as a class of multifunctional materials with potential applications in different fields. However, the internal organization of nanocomposite mesocrystals and its influence on the final properties have not yet been investigated. In this paper, a novel strategy based on electrodynamic simulations is developed to shed light on how the internal structure of mesocrystals influences their optical properties. In a first instance, a unified design protocol is reported for the fabrication of hematite/PVP particles with different morphologies such as pseudo-cubes, rods-like and apple-like structures and controlled particle size distributions. The optical properties of hematite/PVP mesocrystals are effectively simulated by taking their aggregate and nanocomposite structure into consideration. The superposition T-Matrix approach accounts for the aggregate nature of mesocrystalline particles and validate the effective medium approximation used in the framework of the Mie theory and electromagnetic simulation such as Finite Element Method. The approach described in our paper provides the framework to understand and predict the optical properties of mesocrystals and more general, of hierarchical nanostructured particles.

  14. Reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering: combining simulation and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Tomas; Vlcek, Jaroslav

    2016-09-01

    Reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) has recently been used for preparation of various oxide films with high application potential, such as TiO2, ZrO2, Ta2O5, HfO2, VO2. Using our patented method of pulsed reactive gas flow control with an optimized reactive gas inlet, we achieved significantly higher deposition rates compared to typical continuous dc magnetron depositions. We have developed a time-dependent model of the reactive HiPIMS. The model includes a depth-resolved description of the sputtered target (featuring sputtering, implantation and knock-on implantation processes) and a parametric description of the discharge plasma (dissociation of reactive gas, ionization and return of sputtered atoms and gas rarefaction). The model uses a combination of experimental and simulation data as input. We have calculated the composition of the target and substrate for several deposition conditions. The simulations predict a reduced compound coverage of the target in HiPIMS compared to the continuous dc sputtering regime which explains the increased deposition rate. The simulations show that an increased dissociation of oxygen in a HiPIMS discharge is beneficial to achieve stoichiometric films on the substrate at high deposition rates.

  15. Experiment and Simulation Study on the Amorphous Silicon Photovoltaic Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on comparative study on two amorphous silicon photovoltaic walls (a-Si PV walls, the temperature distribution and the instant power were tested; and with EnergyPlus software, similar models of the walls were built to simulate annual power generation and air conditioning load. On typical sunshine day, the corresponding position temperature of nonventilated PV wall was generally 0.5~1.5°C higher than that of ventilated one, while the power generation was 0.2%~0.4% lower, which was consistent with the simulation results with a difference of 0.41% in annual energy output. As simulation results, in summer, comparing the PV walls with normal wall, the heat per unit area of these two photovoltaic walls was 5.25 kWh/m2 (nonventilated and 0.67 kWh/m2 (ventilated higher, respectively. But in winter the heat loss of nonventilated one was smaller, while ventilated PV wall was similar to normal wall. To annual energy consumption of heating and cooling, the building with ventilated PV wall and normal wall was also similar but slightly better than nonventilated one. Therefore, it is inferred that, at low latitudes, such as Zhuhai, China, air gap ventilation is suitable, while the length to thickness ratio of the air gap needs to be taken into account.

  16. A Comparison of Space and Ground Based Facility Environmental Effects for FEP Teflon. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Kitral, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) Teflon is widely used as a thermal control material for spacecraft, however, it is susceptible to erosion, cracking, and subsequent mechanical failure in low Earth orbit. One of the difficulties in determining whether FEP Teflon will survive during a mission is the wide disparity of erosion rates observed for this material in space and in ground based facilities. Each environment contains different levels of atomic oxygen, ions, and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation in addition to parameters such as the energy of the arriving species and temperature. These variations make it difficult to determine what is causing the observed differences in erosion rates. This paper attempts to narrow down which factors affect the erosion rate of FEP Teflon through attempting to change only one environmental constituent at a time. This was attempted through the use of a single simulation facility (plasma asher) environment with a variety of Faraday cages and VUV transparent windows. Isolating one factor inside of a radio frequency (RF) plasma proved to be very difficult. Two observations could be made. First, it appears that the erosion yield of FEP Teflon with respect to that of polyimide Kapton is not greatly affected by the presence or lack of VUV radiation present in the RF plasma and the relative erosion yield for the FEP Teflon may decrease with increasing fluence. Second, shielding from charged particles appears to lower the relative erosion yield of the FEP to approximately that observed in space, however it is difficult to determine for sure whether ions, electrons, or some other components are causing the enhanced erosion.

  17. Eight-component retrievals from ground-based MAX-DOAS observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Irie

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We attempt for the first time to retrieve lower-tropospheric vertical profile information for 8 quantities from ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS observations. The components retrieved are the aerosol extinction coefficients at two wavelengths, 357 and 476 nm, and NO2, HCHO, CHOCHO, H2O, SO2, and O3 volume mixing ratios. A Japanese MAX-DOAS profile retrieval algorithm, version 1 (JM1, is applied to observations performed at Cabauw, the Netherlands (51.97° N, 4.93° E, in June–July 2009 during the Cabauw Intercomparison campaign of Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI. Of the retrieved profiles, we focus here on the lowest-layer data (mean values at altitudes 0–1 km, where the sensitivity is usually highest owing to the longest light path. In support of the capability of the multi-component retrievals, we find reasonable overall agreement with independent data sets, including a regional chemical transport model (CHIMERE and in situ observations performed near the surface (2–3 m and at the 200-m height level of the tall tower in Cabauw. Plumes of enhanced HCHO and SO2 were likely affected by biogenic and ship emissions, respectively, and an improvement in their emission strengths is suggested for better agreement between CHIMERE simulations and MAX-DOAS observations. Analysis of air mass factors indicates that the horizontal spatial representativeness of MAX-DOAS observations is about 3–15 km (depending mainly on aerosol extinction, comparable to or better than the spatial resolution of current UV-visible satellite observations and model calculations. These demonstrate that MAX-DOAS provides multi-component data useful for the evaluation of satellite observations and model calculations and can play an important role in bridging different data sets having different spatial resolutions.

  18. Ground-based remote sensing of tropospheric water vapour isotopologues within the project MUSICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M.; Barthlott, S.; Hase, F.; González, Y.; Yoshimura, K.; García, O. E.; Sepúlveda, E.; Gomez-Pelaez, A.; Gisi, M.; Kohlhepp, R.; Dohe, S.; Blumenstock, T.; Wiegele, A.; Christner, E.; Strong, K.; Weaver, D.; Palm, M.; Deutscher, N. M.; Warneke, T.; Notholt, J.; Lejeune, B.; Demoulin, P.; Jones, N.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Smale, D.; Robinson, J.

    2012-12-01

    Within the project MUSICA (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water), long-term tropospheric water vapour isotopologue data records are provided for ten globally distributed ground-based mid-infrared remote sensing stations of the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change). We present a new method allowing for an extensive and straightforward characterisation of the complex nature of such isotopologue remote sensing datasets. We demonstrate that the MUSICA humidity profiles are representative for most of the troposphere with a vertical resolution ranging from about 2 km (in the lower troposphere) to 8 km (in the upper troposphere) and with an estimated precision of better than 10%. We find that the sensitivity with respect to the isotopologue composition is limited to the lower and middle troposphere, whereby we estimate a precision of about 30‰ for the ratio between the two isotopologues HD16O and H216O. The measurement noise, the applied atmospheric temperature profiles, the uncertainty in the spectral baseline, and the cross-dependence on humidity are the leading error sources. We introduce an a posteriori correction method of the cross-dependence on humidity, and we recommend applying it to isotopologue ratio remote sensing datasets in general. In addition, we present mid-infrared CO2 retrievals and use them for demonstrating the MUSICA network-wide data consistency. In order to indicate the potential of long-term isotopologue remote sensing data if provided with a well-documented quality, we present a climatology and compare it to simulations of an isotope incorporated AGCM (Atmospheric General Circulation Model). We identify differences in the multi-year mean and seasonal cycles that significantly exceed the estimated errors, thereby indicating deficits in the modeled atmospheric water cycle.

  19. Validation of stratospheric temperature profiles from a ground-based microwave radiometer with other techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Haefele, Alexander; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature trends has become recognized as an important indicator of climate change, because different climate forcing mechanisms exhibit distinct vertical warming and cooling patterns. For example, the cooling of the stratosphere is an indicator for climate change as it provides evidence of natural and anthropogenic climate forcing just like surface warming. Despite its importance, our understanding of the observed stratospheric temperature trend and our ability to test simulations of the stratospheric response to emissions of greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances remains limited. One of the main reason is because stratospheric long-term datasets are sparse and obtained trends differ from one another. Different techniques allow to measure stratospheric temperature profiles as radiosonde, lidar or satellite. The main advantage of microwave radiometers against these other instruments is a high temporal resolution with a reasonable good spatial resolution. Moreover, the measurement at a fixed location allows to observe local atmospheric dynamics over a long time period, which is crucial for climate research. This study presents an evaluation of the stratospheric temperature profiles from a newly ground-based microwave temperature radiometer (TEMPERA) which has been built and designed at the University of Bern. The measurements from TEMPERA are compared with the ones from other different techniques such as in-situ (radiosondes), active remote sensing (lidar) and passive remote sensing on board of Aura satellite (MLS) measurements. In addition a statistical analysis of the stratospheric temperature obtained from TEMPERA measurements during four years of data has been performed. This analysis evidenced the capability of TEMPERA radiometer to monitor the temperature in the stratosphere for a long-term. The detection of some singular sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) during the analyzed period shows the necessity of these

  20. Retrieval of aerosol composition using ground-based remote sensing measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yisong; Li, Zhengqiang; Zhang, Ying; Li, Donghui; Li, Kaitao

    2016-04-01

    The chemical composition and mixing states of ambient aerosol are the main factors deciding aerosol microphysical and optical properties, and thus have significant impacts on regional or global climate change and air quality. Traditional approaches to detect atmospheric aerosol composition include sampling with laboratory analysis and in-situ measurements. They can accurately acquire aerosol components, however, the sampling or air exhausting could change the status of ambient aerosol or lead to some mass loss. Additionally, aerosol is usually sampled at the surface level so that it is difficult to detect the columnar aerosol properties. Remote sensing technology, however, can overcome these problems because it is able to detect aerosol information of entire atmosphere by optical and microphysical properties without destructing the natural status of ambient aerosol. This paper introduces a method to acquire aerosol composition by the remote sensing measurements of CIMEL CE318 ground-based sun-sky radiometer. A six component aerosol model is used in this study, including one strong absorbing component Black Carbon (BC), two partly absorbing components Brown Carbon (BrC) and Mineral Dust (MD), two scattering components Ammonia Sulfate-like (AS) and Sea Salt (SS), and Aerosol Water uptake (AW). Sensitivity analysis are performed to find the most sensitive parameters to each component and retrieval method for each component is accordingly developed. Different mixing models such as Maxwell-Garnett (MG), Bruggeman (BR) and Volume Average (VA) are also studied. The residual minimization method is used by comparing remote sensing measurements and simulation outputs to find the optimization of aerosol composition (including volume fraction and mass concentration of each component). This method is applied to measurements obtained from Beijing site under different weather conditions, including polluted haze, dust storm and clean days, to investigate the impacts of mixing