WorldWideScience

Sample records for ground-based remote sensor

  1. Ground-based imaging remote sensing of ice clouds: uncertainties caused by sensor, method and atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinner, Tobias; Hausmann, Petra; Ewald, Florian; Bugliaro, Luca; Emde, Claudia; Mayer, Bernhard

    2016-09-01

    In this study a method is introduced for the retrieval of optical thickness and effective particle size of ice clouds over a wide range of optical thickness from ground-based transmitted radiance measurements. Low optical thickness of cirrus clouds and their complex microphysics present a challenge for cloud remote sensing. In transmittance, the relationship between optical depth and radiance is ambiguous. To resolve this ambiguity the retrieval utilizes the spectral slope of radiance between 485 and 560 nm in addition to the commonly employed combination of a visible and a short-wave infrared wavelength.An extensive test of retrieval sensitivity was conducted using synthetic test spectra in which all parameters introducing uncertainty into the retrieval were varied systematically: ice crystal habit and aerosol properties, instrument noise, calibration uncertainty and the interpolation in the lookup table required by the retrieval process. The most important source of errors identified are uncertainties due to habit assumption: Averaged over all test spectra, systematic biases in the effective radius retrieval of several micrometre can arise. The statistical uncertainties of any individual retrieval can easily exceed 10 µm. Optical thickness biases are mostly below 1, while statistical uncertainties are in the range of 1 to 2.5.For demonstration and comparison to satellite data the retrieval is applied to observations by the Munich hyperspectral imager specMACS (spectrometer of the Munich Aerosol and Cloud Scanner) at the Schneefernerhaus observatory (2650 m a.s.l.) during the ACRIDICON-Zugspitze campaign in September and October 2012. Results are compared to MODIS and SEVIRI satellite-based cirrus retrievals (ACRIDICON - Aerosol, Cloud, Precipitation, and Radiation Interactions and Dynamics of Convective Cloud Systems; MODIS - Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer; SEVIRI - Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager). Considering the identified

  2. Remote Sensing of Supercooled Cloud Layers in Cold Climate Using Ground Based Integrated Sensors System and Comparison with Pilot Reports and model forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudala, Faisal; Wu, Di; Gultepe, Ismail; Anderson, Martha; turcotte, marie-france

    2017-04-01

    In-flight aircraft icing is one of the major weather hazards to aviation . It occurs when an aircraft passes through a cloud layer containing supercooled drops (SD). The SD in contact with the airframe freezes on the surface which degrades the performance of the aircraft.. Prediction of in-flight icing requires accurate prediction of SD sizes, liquid water content (LWC), and temperature. The current numerical weather predicting (NWP) models are not capable of making accurate prediction of SD sizes and associated LWC. Aircraft icing environment is normally studied by flying research aircraft, which is quite expensive. Thus, developing a ground based remote sensing system for detection of supercooled liquid clouds and characterization of their impact on severity of aircraft icing one of the important tasks for improving the NWPs based predictions and validations. In this respect, Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) in cooperation with the Department of National Defense (DND) installed a number of specialized ground based remote sensing platforms and present weather sensors at Cold Lake, Alberta that includes a multi-channel microwave radiometer (MWR), K-band Micro Rain radar (MRR), Ceilometer, Parsivel distrometer and Vaisala PWD22 present weather sensor. In this study, a number of pilot reports confirming icing events and freezing precipitation that occurred at Cold Lake during the 2014-2016 winter periods and associated observation data for the same period are examined. The icing events are also examined using aircraft icing intensity estimated using ice accumulation model which is based on a cylindrical shape approximation of airfoil and the Canadian High Resolution Regional Deterministic Prediction System (HRDPS) model predicted LWC, median volume diameter and temperature. The results related to vertical atmospheric profiling conditions, surface observations, and the Canadian High Resolution Regional Deterministic Prediction System (HRDPS) model

  3. Critical Evaluation of the ISCCP Simulator Using Ground-Based Remote Sensing Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mace, G G; Houser, S; Benson, S; Klein, S A; Min, Q

    2009-11-02

    Given the known shortcomings in representing clouds in Global Climate Models (GCM) comparisons with observations are critical. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) diagnostic products provide global descriptions of cloud top pressure and column optical depth that extends over multiple decades. The necessary limitations of the ISCCP retrieval algorithm require that before comparisons can be made between model output and ISCCP results the model output must be modified to simulate what ISCCP would diagnose under the simulated circumstances. We evaluate one component of the so-called ISCCP simulator in this study by comparing ISCCP and a similar algorithm with various long-term statistics derived from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility ground-based remote sensors. We find that were a model to simulate the cloud radiative profile with the same accuracy as can be derived from the ARM data, then the likelihood of that occurrence being placed in the same cloud top pressure and optical depth bin as ISCCP of the 9 bins that have become standard ranges from 30% to 70% depending on optical depth. While the ISCCP simulator improved the agreement of cloud-top pressure between ground-based remote sensors and satellite observations, we find minor discrepancies due to the parameterization of cloud top pressure in the ISCCP simulator. The primary source of error seems to be related to discrepancies in visible optical depth that are not accounted for in the ISCCP simulator. We show that the optical depth discrepancies are largest when the assumptions necessary for plane parallel radiative transfer optical depths retrievals are violated.

  4. Magnetoseismology ground-based remote sensing of Earth's magnetosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Menk, Frederick W

    2013-01-01

    Written by a researcher at the forefront of the field, this first comprehensive account of magnetoseismology conveys the physics behind these movements and waves, and explains how to detect and investigate them. Along the way, it describes the principles as applied to remote sensing of near-Earth space and related remote sensing techniques, while also comparing and intercalibrating magnetoseismology with other techniques. The example applications include advanced data analysis techniques that may find wider used in areas ranging from geophysics to medical imaging, and remote sensing using radar systems that are of relevance to defense surveillance systems. As a result, the book not only reviews the status quo, but also anticipates new developments. With many figures and illustrations, some in full color, plus additional computational codes for analysis and evaluation. Aimed at graduate readers, the text assumes knowledge of electromagnetism and physical processes at degree level, but introductory chapters wil...

  5. Retrieval of liquid water cloud properties from ground-based remote sensing observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knist, C.L.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate ground-based remotely sensed microphysical and optical properties of liquid water clouds are essential references to validate satellite-observed cloud properties and to improve cloud parameterizations in weather and climate models. This requires the evaluation of algorithms for retrieval of

  6. Ground-based remote sensing scheme for monitoring aerosol–cloud interactions (discussion)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarna, K.; Russchenberg, H.W.J.

    2015-01-01

    A method for continuous observation of aerosol–cloud interactions with ground-based remote sensing instruments is presented. The main goal of this method is to enable the monitoring of cloud microphysical changes due to the changing aerosol concentration. We use high resolution measurements from lid

  7. Ground-based remote sensing scheme for monitoring aerosol-cloud interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarna, K.; Russchenberg, H.W.J.

    2016-01-01

    A new method for continuous observation of aerosol–cloud interactions with ground-based remote sensing instruments is presented. The main goal of this method is to enable the monitoring of the change of the cloud droplet size due to the change in the aerosol concentration. We use high-resolution mea

  8. Geospace Science from Ground-based Magnetometer Arrays: Advances in Sensors, Data Collection, and Data Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Ian; Chi, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Networks of ground-based magnetometers now provide the basis for the diagnosis of magnetic disturbances associated with solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling on a truly global scale. Advances in sensor and digitisation technologies offer increases in sensitivity in fluxgate, induction coil, and new micro-sensor technologies - including the promise of hybrid sensors. Similarly, advances in remote connectivity provide the capacity for truly real-time monitoring of global dynamics at cadences sufficient for monitoring and in many cases resolving system level spatio-temporal ambiguities especially in combination with conjugate satellite measurements. A wide variety of the plasmaphysical processes active in driving geospace dynamics can be monitored based on the response of the electrical current system, including those associated with changes in global convection, magnetospheric substorms and nightside tail flows, as well as due to solar wind changes in both dynamic pressure and in response to rotations of the direction of the IMF. Significantly, any changes to the dynamical system must be communicated by the propagation of long-period Alfven and/or compressional waves. These wave populations hence provide diagnostics for not only the energy transport by the wave fields themselves, but also provide a mechanism for diagnosing the structure of the background plasma medium through which the waves propagate. Ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves are especially significant in offering a monitor for mass density profiles, often invisible to particle detectors because of their very low energy, through the application of a variety of magneto-seismology and cross-phase techniques. Renewed scientific interest in the plasma waves associated with near-Earth substorm dynamics, including magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling at substorm onset and their relation to magnetotail flows, as well the importance of global scale ultra-low frequency waves for the energisation, transport

  9. REMOTE SENSING OF WATER VAPOR CONTENT USING GROUND-BASED GPS DATA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Spatial and temporal resolution of water vapor content is useful in improving the accuracy of short-term weather prediction.Dense and continuously tracking regional GPS arrays will play an important role in remote sensing atmospheric water vapor content.In this study,a piecewise linear solution method was proposed to estimate the precipitable water vapor (PWV) content from ground-based GPS observations in Hong Kong.To evaluate the solution accuracy of the water vapor content sensed by GPS,the upper air sounding data (radiosonde) that are collected locally was used to calculate the precipitable water vapor during the same period.One-month results of PWV from both ground-based GPS sensing technique and radiosonde method are in agreement within 1~2 mm.This encouraging result will motivate the GPS meteorology application based on the establishment of a dense GPS array in Hong Kong.

  10. Towards the development of tamper-resistant, ground-based mobile sensor nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenas, David; Stull, Christopher; Farrar, Charles

    2011-11-01

    Mobile sensor nodes hold great potential for collecting field data using fewer resources than human operators would require and potentially requiring fewer sensors than a fixed-position sensor array. It would be very beneficial to allow these mobile sensor nodes to operate unattended with a minimum of human intervention. In order to allow mobile sensor nodes to operate unattended in a field environment, it is imperative that they be capable of identifying and responding to external agents that may attempt to tamper with, damage or steal the mobile sensor nodes, while still performing their data collection mission. Potentially hostile external agents could include animals, other mobile sensor nodes, or humans. This work will focus on developing control policies to help enable a mobile sensor node to identify and avoid capture by a hostile un-mounted human. The work is developed in a simulation environment, and demonstrated using a non-holonomic, ground-based mobile sensor node. This work will be a preliminary step toward ensuring the cyber-physical security of ground-based mobile sensor nodes that operate unattended in potentially unfriendly environments.

  11. Potential use of ground-based sensor technologies for weed detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteinatos, Gerassimos G; Weis, Martin; Andújar, Dionisio; Rueda Ayala, Victor; Gerhards, Roland

    2014-02-01

    Site-specific weed management is the part of precision agriculture (PA) that tries to effectively control weed infestations with the least economical and environmental burdens. This can be achieved with the aid of ground-based or near-range sensors in combination with decision rules and precise application technologies. Near-range sensor technologies, developed for mounting on a vehicle, have been emerging for PA applications during the last three decades. These technologies focus on identifying plants and measuring their physiological status with the aid of their spectral and morphological characteristics. Cameras, spectrometers, fluorometers and distance sensors are the most prominent sensors for PA applications. The objective of this article is to describe-ground based sensors that have the potential to be used for weed detection and measurement of weed infestation level. An overview of current sensor systems is presented, describing their concepts, results that have been achieved, already utilized commercial systems and problems that persist. A perspective for the development of these sensors is given. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. remote sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Unold, Georg; Junker, Astrid; Altmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    High-throughput (HT) plant phenotyping systems enable the quantitative analysis of a variety of plant features in a fully automated fashion. The comprehensive phenomics infrastructure at IPK comprises three LemnaTec conveyor belt-based (plant-to-sensor) systems for the simultaneous analysis of large numbers of individual plants of different sizes. For monitoring of environmental conditions within the plant growth area and soil conditions in individual pots, highly modular and flexible remote sensing devices are required. We present the architecture of a wireless sensor network implemented in the HT plant phenotyping systems at IPK in the frame of the German Plant Phenotyping Network (DPPN). This system comprises 350 soil monitoring modules, each measuring water content, water matrix potential, temperature and electric conductivity. Furthermore small and large sensor platforms enable the continuous monitoring of environmental parameters such as incident photosynthetic active radiation, total radiation balance, relative humidity and CO2 concentration and more. Finally we present an introduction into data management and maintenance."

  13. Ground-based remote sensing of tropospheric water vapour isotopologues within the project MUSICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M.; Barthlott, S.; Hase, F.; González, Y.; Yoshimura, K.; García, O. E.; Sepúlveda, E.; Gomez-Pelaez, A.; Gisi, M.; Kohlhepp, R.; Dohe, S.; Blumenstock, T.; Wiegele, A.; Christner, E.; Strong, K.; Weaver, D.; Palm, M.; Deutscher, N. M.; Warneke, T.; Notholt, J.; Lejeune, B.; Demoulin, P.; Jones, N.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Smale, D.; Robinson, J.

    2012-12-01

    Within the project MUSICA (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water), long-term tropospheric water vapour isotopologue data records are provided for ten globally distributed ground-based mid-infrared remote sensing stations of the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change). We present a new method allowing for an extensive and straightforward characterisation of the complex nature of such isotopologue remote sensing datasets. We demonstrate that the MUSICA humidity profiles are representative for most of the troposphere with a vertical resolution ranging from about 2 km (in the lower troposphere) to 8 km (in the upper troposphere) and with an estimated precision of better than 10%. We find that the sensitivity with respect to the isotopologue composition is limited to the lower and middle troposphere, whereby we estimate a precision of about 30‰ for the ratio between the two isotopologues HD16O and H216O. The measurement noise, the applied atmospheric temperature profiles, the uncertainty in the spectral baseline, and the cross-dependence on humidity are the leading error sources. We introduce an a posteriori correction method of the cross-dependence on humidity, and we recommend applying it to isotopologue ratio remote sensing datasets in general. In addition, we present mid-infrared CO2 retrievals and use them for demonstrating the MUSICA network-wide data consistency. In order to indicate the potential of long-term isotopologue remote sensing data if provided with a well-documented quality, we present a climatology and compare it to simulations of an isotope incorporated AGCM (Atmospheric General Circulation Model). We identify differences in the multi-year mean and seasonal cycles that significantly exceed the estimated errors, thereby indicating deficits in the modeled atmospheric water cycle.

  14. Ground-based remote sensing of tropospheric water vapour isotopologues within the project MUSICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schneider

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the project MUSICA (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water, long-term tropospheric water vapour isotopologue data records are provided for ten globally distributed ground-based mid-infrared remote sensing stations of the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change. We present a new method allowing for an extensive and straightforward characterisation of the complex nature of such isotopologue remote sensing datasets. We demonstrate that the MUSICA humidity profiles are representative for most of the troposphere with a vertical resolution ranging from about 2 km (in the lower troposphere to 8 km (in the upper troposphere and with an estimated precision of better than 10%. We find that the sensitivity with respect to the isotopologue composition is limited to the lower and middle troposphere, whereby we estimate a precision of about 30‰ for the ratio between the two isotopologues HD16O and H216O. The measurement noise, the applied atmospheric temperature profiles, the uncertainty in the spectral baseline, and the cross-dependence on humidity are the leading error sources. We introduce an a posteriori correction method of the cross-dependence on humidity, and we recommend applying it to isotopologue ratio remote sensing datasets in general. In addition, we present mid-infrared CO2 retrievals and use them for demonstrating the MUSICA network-wide data consistency. In order to indicate the potential of long-term isotopologue remote sensing data if provided with a well-documented quality, we present a climatology and compare it to simulations of an isotope incorporated AGCM (Atmospheric General Circulation Model. We identify differences in the multi-year mean and seasonal cycles that significantly exceed the estimated errors, thereby indicating deficits in the modeled atmospheric water cycle.

  15. Ground-based remote sensing of tropospheric water vapour isotopologues within the project MUSICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schneider

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Within the project MUSICA (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water, long-term tropospheric water vapour isotopologues data records are provided for ten globally distributed ground-based mid-infrared remote sensing stations of the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change. We present a new method allowing for an extensive and straightforward characterisation of the complex nature of such isotopologue remote sensing datasets. We demonstrate that the MUSICA humidity profiles are representative for most of the troposphere with a vertical resolution ranging from about 2 km (in the lower troposphere to 8 km (in the upper troposphere and with an estimated precision of better than 10%. We find that the sensitivity with respect to the isotopologue composition is limited to the lower and middle troposphere, whereby we estimate a precision of about 30‰ for the ratio between the two isotopologues HD16O and H216O. The measurement noise, the applied atmospheric temperature profiles, the uncertainty in the spectral baseline, and interferences from humidity are the leading error sources. We introduce an a posteriori correction method of the humidity interference error and we recommend applying it for isotopologue ratio remote sensing datasets in general. In addition, we present mid-infrared CO2 retrievals and use them for demonstrating the MUSICA network-wide data consistency.

    In order to indicate the potential of long-term isotopologue remote sensing data if provided with a well-documented quality, we present a climatology and compare it to simulations of an isotope incorporated AGCM (Atmospheric General Circulation Model. We identify differences in the multi-year mean and seasonal cycles that significantly exceed the estimated errors, thereby indicating deficits in the modeled atmospheric water cycle.

  16. Integrated ground-based and remotely sensed data to support global studies of environmental change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, R.J.; Turner, R.S.; Garten, C.T.

    1994-09-15

    Data centers routinely archive and distribute large databases of high quality and with rigorous documentation but, to meet the needs of global studies effectively and efficiently, data centers must go beyond these traditional roles. Global studies of environmental change require integrated databases of multiple data types that are accurately coordinated in terms of spatial, temporal and thematic properties. Such datasets must be designed and developed jointly by scientific researchers, computer specialists, and policy analysts. The presentation focuses on our approach for organizing data from ground-based research programs so that the data can be linked with remotely sensed data and other map data into integrated databases with spatial, temporal, and thematic characteristics relevant to global studies. The development of an integrated database for Net Primary Productivity is described to illustrate the process.

  17. Ground-based grasslands data to support remote sensing and ecosystem modeling of terrestrial primary production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, R.J.; Turner, R.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Scurlock, J.M.O. [King`s College London, (England); Jennings, S.V. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Estimating terrestrial net primary production (NPP) using remote- sensing tools and ecosystem models requires adequate ground-based measurements for calibration, parameterization, and validation. These data needs were strongly endorsed at a recent meeting of ecosystem modelers organized by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme`s (IGBP`s) Data and Information System (DIS) and its Global Analysis, Interpretation, and Modelling (GAIM) Task Force. To meet these needs, a multinational, multiagency project is being coordinated by the IGBP DIS to compile existing NPP data from field sites and to regionalize NPP point estimates to various-sized grid cells. Progress at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on compiling NPP data for grasslands as part of the IGBP DIS data initiative is described. Site data and associated documentation from diverse field studies are being acquired for selected grasslands and are being reviewed for completeness, consistency, and adequacy of documentation, including a description of sampling methods. Data are being compiled in a database with spatial, temporal, and thematic characteristics relevant to remote sensing and global modeling. NPP data are available from the ORNL Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) for biogeochemical dynamics. The ORNL DAAC is part of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System, of the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  18. Retrieval of aerosol composition using ground-based remote sensing measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yisong; Li, Zhengqiang; Zhang, Ying; Li, Donghui; Li, Kaitao

    2016-04-01

    The chemical composition and mixing states of ambient aerosol are the main factors deciding aerosol microphysical and optical properties, and thus have significant impacts on regional or global climate change and air quality. Traditional approaches to detect atmospheric aerosol composition include sampling with laboratory analysis and in-situ measurements. They can accurately acquire aerosol components, however, the sampling or air exhausting could change the status of ambient aerosol or lead to some mass loss. Additionally, aerosol is usually sampled at the surface level so that it is difficult to detect the columnar aerosol properties. Remote sensing technology, however, can overcome these problems because it is able to detect aerosol information of entire atmosphere by optical and microphysical properties without destructing the natural status of ambient aerosol. This paper introduces a method to acquire aerosol composition by the remote sensing measurements of CIMEL CE318 ground-based sun-sky radiometer. A six component aerosol model is used in this study, including one strong absorbing component Black Carbon (BC), two partly absorbing components Brown Carbon (BrC) and Mineral Dust (MD), two scattering components Ammonia Sulfate-like (AS) and Sea Salt (SS), and Aerosol Water uptake (AW). Sensitivity analysis are performed to find the most sensitive parameters to each component and retrieval method for each component is accordingly developed. Different mixing models such as Maxwell-Garnett (MG), Bruggeman (BR) and Volume Average (VA) are also studied. The residual minimization method is used by comparing remote sensing measurements and simulation outputs to find the optimization of aerosol composition (including volume fraction and mass concentration of each component). This method is applied to measurements obtained from Beijing site under different weather conditions, including polluted haze, dust storm and clean days, to investigate the impacts of mixing

  19. Land cover for Ukraine: the harmonization of remote sensing and ground-based data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesiv, M.; Shchepashchenko, D.; Shvidenko, A.; See, L. M.; Bun, R.

    2012-12-01

    This study focuses on the development of a land cover map of the Ukraine through harmonization of remote sensing and ground-based data. At present there is no land cover map of the Ukraine available that is of sufficient accuracy for use in environmental modeling. The existing remote sensing data are not enough accurate. In this study we compare the territory of the Ukraine from three global remote sensing products (GlobCover 2009, MODIS Land Cover and GLC-2000) using a fuzzy logic methodology in order to capture the uncertainty in the classification of land cover. The results for the Ukraine show that GlobCover 2009, MODIS Land Cover and GLC-2000 have a fuzzy agreement of 65%. We developed a weighted algorithm for the creation of a land cover map based on an integration of a number of global land cover and remote sensing products including the GLC-2000, GlobCover 2009, MODIS Land Cover, the Vegetation Continuous Fields product, digital map of administrative units and forest account data at the local level. This weighted algorithm is based on the results of comparing these products and an analysis of a dataset of validation points for different land cover types in the Ukraine. We applied this algorithm to generate a forest land cover type map. This raster map contains a forest expectation index that was calculated for each pixel. Forest land was then allocated based on forest statistics at the local level. Areas with a higher forest expectation index were allocated with forest first until the results matched the forest statistics. The result is the first digital map of forest (with a spatial resolution of 300m) for the Ukraine, which consistent with forest and land accounts, remote sensing datasets and GIS products. The forest land was well defined in forest rich areas (i.e. in the northern part of the Ukraine, the Carpathians and the Crimea); well less accurate areas were identified in the steppe due to heterogeneous land cover. Acknowledgements. This research was

  20. Simulation of submillimetre atmospheric spectra for characterising potential ground-based remote sensing observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Emma C.; Withington, Stafford; Newnham, David A.; Wadhams, Peter; Jones, Anna E.; Clancy, Robin

    2016-11-01

    The submillimetre is an understudied region of the Earth's atmospheric electromagnetic spectrum. Prior technological gaps and relatively high opacity due to the prevalence of rotational water vapour lines at these wavelengths have slowed progress from a ground-based remote sensing perspective; however, emerging superconducting detector technologies in the fields of astronomy offer the potential to address key atmospheric science challenges with new instrumental methods. A site study, with a focus on the polar regions, is performed to assess theoretical feasibility by simulating the downwelling (zenith angle = 0°) clear-sky submillimetre spectrum from 30 mm (10 GHz) to 150 µm (2000 GHz) at six locations under annual mean, summer, winter, daytime, night-time and low-humidity conditions. Vertical profiles of temperature, pressure and 28 atmospheric gases are constructed by combining radiosonde, meteorological reanalysis and atmospheric chemistry model data. The sensitivity of the simulated spectra to the choice of water vapour continuum model and spectroscopic line database is explored. For the atmospheric trace species hypobromous acid (HOBr), hydrogen bromide (HBr), perhydroxyl radical (HO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) the emission lines producing the largest change in brightness temperature are identified. Signal strengths, centre frequencies, bandwidths, estimated minimum integration times and maximum receiver noise temperatures are determined for all cases. HOBr, HBr and HO2 produce brightness temperature peaks in the mK to µK range, whereas the N2O peaks are in the K range. The optimal submillimetre remote sensing lines for the four species are shown to vary significantly between location and scenario, strengthening the case for future hyperspectral instruments that measure over a broad wavelength range. The techniques presented here provide a framework that can be applied to additional species of interest and taken forward to simulate retrievals and guide the

  1. Confronting remote sensing product with ground base measurements across time and scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmokhtarian, A.; Dietze, M.

    2015-12-01

    Ecosystem models are essential tools in forecasting ecosystem responses to global climate change. One of the most challenging issues in ecosystem modeling is scaling while preserving landscape characteristics and minimizing loss of information, when moving from point observation to regional scale. There is a keen interest in providing accurate inputs for ecosystem models which represent ecosystem initial state conditions. Remote sensing land cover products, such as Landsat NLCD and MODIS MCD12Q1, provide extensive spatio-temporal coverage but do not capture forest composition and structure. Lidar and hyperspectral have the potential to meet this need but lack sufficient spatial and historical coverage. Forest inventory measurements provide detailed information on the landscape but in a very small footprint. Combining inventory and land cover could improve estimates of ecosystem state and characteristic across time and space. This study focuses on the challenges associated with fusing and scaling the US Forest Service FIA database and NLCD across regional scales to quantify ecosystem characteristics and reduce associated uncertainties. Across Southeast of U.S. 400 stratified random samples of 10x10 km2 landscapes were selected. Data on plant density, species, age, and DBH of trees in FIA plots within each site were extracted. Using allometry equations, the canopy cover of different plant functional types (PFTs) was estimated using a PPA-style canopy model and used to assign each inventory plot to a land cover class. Inventory and land cover were fused in a Bayesian model that adjusts the fractional coverage of inventory plots while accounting for multiple sources of uncertainty. Results were compared to estimates derived from inventory alone, land cover alone, and model spin-up alone. Our findings create a framework of data assimilation to better interpret remote sensing data using ground-based measurements.

  2. Ground-based remote sensing scheme for monitoring aerosol–cloud interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sarna

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A method for continuous observation of aerosol–cloud interactions with ground-based remote sensing instruments is presented. The main goal of this method is to enable the monitoring of cloud microphysical changes due to the changing aerosol concentration. We use high resolution measurements from lidar, radar and radiometer which allow to collect and compare data continuously. This method is based on a standardised data format from Cloudnet and can be implemented at any observatory where the Cloudnet data set is available. Two example study cases were chosen from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Program deployment at Graciosa Island, Azores, Portugal in 2009 to present the method. We show the Pearson Product–Moment Correlation Coefficient, r, and the Coefficient of Determination, r2 for data divided into bins of LWP, each of 10 g m−2. We explain why the commonly used way of quantity aerosol cloud interactions by use of an ACI index (ACIr,τ = dln re,τ/dlnα is not the best way of quantifying aerosol–cloud interactions.

  3. Coupling Fine-Scale Root and Canopy Structure Using Ground-Based Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brady S. Hardiman

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystem physical structure, defined by the quantity and spatial distribution of biomass, influences a range of ecosystem functions. Remote sensing tools permit the non-destructive characterization of canopy and root features, potentially providing opportunities to link above- and belowground structure at fine spatial resolution in functionally meaningful ways. To test this possibility, we employed ground-based portable canopy LiDAR (PCL and ground penetrating radar (GPR along co-located transects in forested sites spanning multiple stages of ecosystem development and, consequently, of structural complexity. We examined canopy and root structural data for coherence (i.e., correlation in the frequency of spatial variation at multiple spatial scales ≤10 m within each site using wavelet analysis. Forest sites varied substantially in vertical canopy and root structure, with leaf area index and root mass more becoming even vertically as forests aged. In all sites, above- and belowground structure, characterized as mean maximum canopy height and root mass, exhibited significant coherence at a scale of 3.5–4 m, and results suggest that the scale of coherence may increase with stand age. Our findings demonstrate that canopy and root structure are linked at characteristic spatial scales, which provides the basis to optimize scales of observation. Our study highlights the potential, and limitations, for fusing LiDAR and radar technologies to quantitatively couple above- and belowground ecosystem structure.

  4. Remote sensing of Sonoran Desert vegetation structure and phenology with ground-based LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankey, Joel B.; Munson, Seth M.; Webb, Robert H.; Wallace, Cynthia S.A.; Duran, Cesar M.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term vegetation monitoring efforts have become increasingly important for understanding ecosystem response to global change. Many traditional methods for monitoring can be infrequent and limited in scope. Ground-based LiDAR is one remote sensing method that offers a clear advancement to monitor vegetation dynamics at high spatial and temporal resolution. We determined the effectiveness of LiDAR to detect intra-annual variability in vegetation structure at a long-term Sonoran Desert monitoring plot dominated by cacti, deciduous and evergreen shrubs. Monthly repeat LiDAR scans of perennial plant canopies over the course of one year had high precision. LiDAR measurements of canopy height and area were accurate with respect to total station survey measurements of individual plants. We found an increase in the number of LiDAR vegetation returns following the wet North American Monsoon season. This intra-annual variability in vegetation structure detected by LiDAR was attributable to a drought deciduous shrub Ambrosia deltoidea, whereas the evergreen shrub Larrea tridentata and cactus Opuntia engelmannii had low variability. Benefits of using LiDAR over traditional methods to census desert plants are more rapid, consistent, and cost-effective data acquisition in a high-resolution, 3-dimensional context. We conclude that repeat LiDAR measurements can be an effective method for documenting ecosystem response to desert climatology and drought over short time intervals and at detailed-local spatial scale.

  5. Toward High Altitude Airship Ground-Based Boresight Calibration of Hyperspectral Pushbroom Imaging Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiwu Zhang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the single linear hyperspectral pushbroom imaging based on a high altitude airship (HAA without a three-axis stabilized platform is much more than that based on the spaceborne and airborne. Due to the effects of air pressure, temperature and airflow, the large pitch and roll angles tend to appear frequently that create pushbroom images highly characterized with severe geometric distortions. Thus, the in-flight calibration procedure is not appropriate to apply to the single linear pushbroom sensors on HAA having no three-axis stabilized platform. In order to address this problem, a new ground-based boresight calibration method is proposed. Firstly, a coordinate’s transformation model is developed for direct georeferencing (DG of the linear imaging sensor, and then the linear error equation is derived from it by using the Taylor expansion formula. Secondly, the boresight misalignments are worked out by using iterative least squares method with few ground control points (GCPs and ground-based side-scanning experiments. The proposed method is demonstrated by three sets of experiments: (i the stability and reliability of the method is verified through simulation-based experiments; (ii the boresight calibration is performed using ground-based experiments; and (iii the validation is done by applying on the orthorectification of the real hyperspectral pushbroom images from a HAA Earth observation payload system developed by our research team—“LanTianHao”. The test results show that the proposed boresight calibration approach significantly improves the quality of georeferencing by reducing the geometric distortions caused by boresight misalignments to the minimum level.

  6. Supporting a Diverse Community of Undergraduate Researchers in Satellite and Ground-Based Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, R.; Liou-Mark, J.

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. remains in grave danger of losing its global competitive edge in STEM. To find solutions to this problem, the Obama Administration proposed two new national initiatives: the Educate to Innovate Initiative and the $100 million government/private industry initiative to train 100,000 STEM teachers and graduate 1 million additional STEM students over the next decade. To assist in ameliorating the national STEM plight, the New York City College of Technology has designed its NSF Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) program in satellite and ground-based remote sensing to target underrepresented minority students. Since the inception of the program in 2008, a total of 45 undergraduate students of which 38 (84%) are considered underrepresented minorities in STEM have finished or are continuing with their research or are pursuing their STEM endeavors. The program is comprised of the three primary components. The first component, Structured Learning Environments: Preparation and Mentorship, provides the REU Scholars with the skill sets necessary for proficiency in satellite and ground-based remote sensing research. The students are offered mini-courses in Geographic Information Systems, MATLAB, and Remote Sensing. They also participate in workshops on the Ethics of Research. Each REU student is a member of a team that consists of faculty mentors, post doctorate/graduate students, and high school students. The second component, Student Support and Safety Nets, provides undergraduates a learning environment that supports them in becoming successful researchers. Special networking and Brown Bag sessions, and an annual picnic with research scientists are organized so that REU Scholars are provided with opportunities to expand their professional community. Graduate school support is provided by offering free Graduate Record Examination preparation courses and workshops on the graduate school application process. Additionally, students are supported by college

  7. Validating MODIS and Sentinel-2 NDVI Products at a Temperate Deciduous Forest Site Using Two Independent Ground-Based Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Maximilian; Dechant, Benjamin; Rebmann, Corinna; Vohland, Michael; Cuntz, Matthias; Doktor, Daniel

    2017-08-11

    Quantifying the accuracy of remote sensing products is a timely endeavor given the rapid increase in Earth observation missions. A validation site for Sentinel-2 products was hence established in central Germany. Automatic multispectral and hyperspectral sensor systems were installed in parallel with an existing eddy covariance flux tower, providing spectral information of the vegetation present at high temporal resolution. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) values from ground-based hyperspectral and multispectral sensors were compared with NDVI products derived from Sentinel-2A and Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The influence of different spatial and temporal resolutions was assessed. High correlations and similar phenological patterns between in situ and satellite-based NDVI time series demonstrated the reliability of satellite-based phenological metrics. Sentinel-2-derived metrics showed better agreement with in situ measurements than MODIS-derived metrics. Dynamic filtering with the best index slope extraction algorithm was nevertheless beneficial for Sentinel-2 NDVI time series despite the availability of quality information from the atmospheric correction procedure.

  8. Enviro-Net: From Networks of Ground-Based Sensor Systems to a Web Platform for Sensor Data Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario A. Nascimento

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystems monitoring is essential to properly understand their development and the effects of events, both climatological and anthropological in nature. The amount of data used in these assessments is increasing at very high rates. This is due to increasing availability of sensing systems and the development of new techniques to analyze sensor data. The Enviro-Net Project encompasses several of such sensor system deployments across five countries in the Americas. These deployments use a few different ground-based sensor systems, installed at different heights monitoring the conditions in tropical dry forests over long periods of time. This paper presents our experience in deploying and maintaining these systems, retrieving and pre-processing the data, and describes the Web portal developed to help with data management, visualization and analysis.

  9. Cloud parameters using Ground Based Remote Sensing Systems and Satellites over urban coastal area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Z. T.; Gross, B.; Moshary, F.; Wu, Y.; Ahmed, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    Determining cloud radiative and microphysical properties are very important as a means to assess their effect on earths energy balance. While MODIS and GOES have been used for estimating cloud properties, assessing cloud properties directly has been difficult due the lack of consistent ground based sensor measurements except in such established places such as the ARM site in Oklahoma. However, it is known that significant aerosol seeding from urban and/or maritime sources can modify cloud properties such as effective radius and cloud optical depth and therefore evaluation of satellite retrievals in such a unique area offers novel opportunities to assess the potential of satellite retrievals to distinguish these mechanisms In our study, we used a multi-filter rotating shadow band radiometer (MFRSR) and micro wave radiometer (MWR) to retrieve the cloud optical depth and cloud droplets effective radius . In particular, we make a statistical study during summer 2013 where water phase clouds dominate and assess the accuracy of both MODIS and GOES satellite cloud products including LWP, COD and Reff. Most importantly, we assess performance against satellite observing geometries. Much like previous studies at the ARM site, we observe significant biases in the effective radius when the solar zenith angle is too large. In addition, we show that biases are also sensitive to the LWP limiting such measurement s in assessing potential aerosol-cloud signatures Finally, we discuss preliminary aerosol-cloud interactions from our ground system where local lidar is used to assess aerosols below clouds and explore the Aerosol Cloud Index.

  10. PhotoSpec - Ground-based Remote Sensing of Solar-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence: First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, K.; Magney, T. S.; Frankenberg, C.; Seibt, U.; Pivovaroff, A. L.; Hurlock, S. C.; Stutz, J.

    2016-12-01

    Solar-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence (SIF) emitted from vegetation can be used as a proxy for photosynthetic activity and is observable on a global scale from space. However, many issues on a leaf-to-canopy scale remain poorly understood, such as influences on the SIF signal from environmental conditions, water stress, or radiation. We have developed a novel ground-based spectrometer system for measuring SIF from natural ecosystems. The instrumental set-up, requirements, and measurement technique are based on decades of experience using Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS), an established method to measure atmospheric trace gases. The instrument consists of three thermally stabilized commercial spectrometers that are linked to a 2D scanning telescope unit via optical fiber bundles, and also includes a commercial photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) sensor. The spectrometers cover a SIF retrieval wavelength range at high spectral resolution (670 - 780 nm, 0.1 nm FWHM), and also provide moderate resolution spectra (400 - 800 nm, 1.5 nm FWHM) to retrieve vegetation indices and the photochemical reflectance index (PRI). We report on results of the first continuous field measurements of this novel system at Stunt Ranch Santa Monica Mountains UC Reserve, where the PhotoSpec instrument was monitoring SIF of four native Californian shrubland species with different adaptations to seasonal summer drought. We report on the correlation with CO2 fluxes over both the growing season and the hot summer period in 2016. We also show detailed measurements of the diurnal cycle of the SIF signal of single broad leaves, as well as dark-light transitions, under controlled experimental conditions. In addition to demonstrating the instrumental set-up, retrieval algorithm, and instrument performance, our results illustrate that SIF measurements at the leaf to ecosystem scale are needed to understand and interpret the SIF signals retrieved at larger scales.

  11. Recent advances in ground-based ultraviolet remote sensing of volcanic SO2 fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euripides P. Kantzas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of volcanic SO2 emission rates have been the mainstay of remote-sensing volcanic gas geochemistry for almost four decades, and they have contributed significantly to our understanding of volcanic systems and their impact upon the atmosphere. The last ten years have brought step-change improvements in the instrumentation applied to these observations, which began with the application of miniature ultraviolet spectrometers that were deployed in scanning and traverse configurations, with differential optical absorption spectroscopy evaluation routines. This study catalogs the more recent empirical developments, including: ultraviolet cameras; wide-angle field-of-view differential optical absorption spectroscopy systems; advances in scanning operations, including tomography; and improved understanding of errors, in particular concerning radiative transfer. Furthermore, the outcomes of field deployments of sensors during the last decade are documented, with respect to improving our understanding of volcanic dynamics and degassing into the atmosphere.

  12. Improved ground-based remote-sensing systems help monitor plant response to climate and other changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Dennis G.; Bogle, Rian C.

    2016-05-26

    Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey are improving and developing new ground-based remote-sensing instruments and techniques to study how Earth’s vegetation responds to changing climates. Do seasonal grasslands and forests “green up” early (or late) and grow more (or less) during unusually warm years? How do changes in temperature and precipitation affect these patterns? Innovations in ground-based remote-sensing instrumentation can help us understand, assess, and mitigate the effects of climate change on vegetation and related land resources.

  13. Yield and quality prediction using satellite passive imagery and ground-based active optical sensors in sugar beet, spring wheat, corn, and sunflower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Honggang

    Remote sensing is one possible approach for improving crop nitrogen use efficiency to save fertilizer cost, reduce environmental pollution, and improve crop yield and quality. Feasibility and potential of using remote sensing tools to predict crops yield and quality as well as detect nitrogen requirements, application timing, rate, and places in season were investigated based on 2012-2013 two-year and four-crop (corn, spring wheat, sugar beet, and sunflower) study. Two ground-based active optical sensors, GreenSeeker and Holland Scientific Crop Circle, and the RapidEye satellite imagery were used to collect sensing data. Highly significant statistical relationships between INSEY (NDVI normalized by growing degree days) and crop yield and quality indices were found for all crops, indicating that remote sensing tools may be useful for managing in-season crop yield and quality prediction.

  14. Cloud and precipitation properties from ground-based remote sensing instruments in East Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Gorodetskaya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A new comprehensive cloud-precipitation-meteorological observatory has been established at Princess Elisabeth base, located in the escarpment zone of Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica. The observatory consists of a set of ground-based remote sensing instruments (ceilometer, infrared pyrometer and vertically profiling precipitation radar combined with automatic weather station measurements of near-surface meteorology, radiative fluxes, and snow accumulation. In this paper, the observatory is presented and the potential for studying the evolution of clouds and precipitating systems is illustrated by case studies. It is shown that the synergetic use of the set of instruments allows for distinguishing ice, mixed-phase and precipitating clouds, including some information on their vertical extent. In addition, wind-driven blowing snow events can be distinguished from deeper precipitating systems. Cloud properties largely affect the surface radiative fluxes, with liquid-containing clouds dominating the radiative impact. A statistical analysis of all measurements (in total 14 months mainly occurring in summer/autumn indicates that these liquid-containing clouds occur during as much as 20% of the cloudy periods. The cloud occurrence shows a strong bimodal distribution with clear sky conditions 51% of the time and complete overcast conditions 35% of the time. Snowfall occurred 17% of the cloudy periods with a predominance of light precipitation and only rare events with snowfall > 1 mm h−1 water equivalent (w.e.. Three of such intensive snowfall events occurred during 2011 contributing to anomalously large annual snow accumulation. This is the first deployment of a precipitation radar in Antarctica allowing to assess the contribution of the snowfall to the local surface mass balance. It is shown that on the one hand large accumulation events (>10 mm w.e. day−1 during the measurement period of 26 months were always associated with snowfall, but that

  15. NASA's Next Generation Sunphotometer for Ground-based Remote Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Peter K.; Miko, Laddawan; Bly, Vince T.; Chiao, Meng P.; Jones, Hollis H.; Kahle, Duncan M.

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol concentrations and their optical properties, in terms of which cause differential warming/cooling effects in the atmosphere and on the surface, constitute one of the largest sources of uncertainty in current assessments and predictions of global climatic change. This is especially true over the regions of bright-reflecting surface, such as desert and urban areas. Under the name of AERONET since the 90's, Cimel's sunphotometers have been deployed worldwide as the standard instrument for aerosol monitoring network, developed to support NASA, CNES, and NASDA's Earth satellite systems. PREDE's skyradiometers, as deployed in SKYNET, serve the similar role. One of the key ingredients for achieving accurate aerosol retrievals from satellite observations is comprehensive understanding of surface spectral BRF's (Bidirectional Reflectance Factors), defined as a ratio of radiance measurements reflected from a targeted surface and from a spectral-angular featureless referencing plate. Although the weather-resistant, automatic, sun/sky-scanning spectroradiometers enable Frequent measurements of atmospheric aerosol optical properties and precipitable water at remote sites, they are too slow for surface BRF measurements (20-25 seconds per 360 degree scan, in addition to filter wheel rotation time). We have designed a next generation sun photometer whose sensor head has no moving parts. A dedicated detector for each channel enables 12 simultaneous measurements ranging from the UV (380 nm) to shortwave-IR (2.13 micron) regions. The scan platform will be capable of traveling 360 degrees in about 6 seconds. This is sufficient to finish a BRDF scan every 30 degrees in azimuth and 15 degrees in elevation in less than 4 minutes. More details about this instrument will be presented, together with its applications to the aerosol and trace gas studies. The current plan for this instrument is to deploy during the EAST-AIRE (East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols: an

  16. Assessing slope stability by ground based and remote techniques - a case study of 2015 Tbilisi disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhalaia, G.; Cakir, Z.; Tsiskarishvili, L.; Otinashvili, M.; Sukhishvili, L.; Merebashvili, G.; Tserodze, M.; Akubardia, D.; Managadze, M.

    2016-12-01

    At the night of 13th of June 2015 complex-type landslide was triggered by heavy rainfall in the river Vere basin, 10 km to the west of Georgian capital Tbilisi. Flashflood flow transported the landslide body to the center of Tbilisi. As a result 20 people are dead and 2 still missing, direct infrastructure damage is about 50 mln USD. The landslide is located at Mtatsminda anticline, its length is 3600 meters and sliding surface area estimates 315 000 km2. Bedrock dips varies 20-800 and surface inclination is almost the same. Our group used geodetic, geophysical and UAV survey approaches to estimate total volume of landslide body. As a result of the investigation we calculated that 1 300 000 m3 was transported but about 25% of total amount is still on sliding surface. As the whole area is prone to landslide, different approaches were applied to assess slope stability and indentifing ongoing deformation areas. Two most challenging factors were steep terrain and forest cover, so we used InSAR techniques, optical remote sensing, RTK measurements and geophysical methods. The detection and assessment pre and post-failure deformation, represent important task to understand the failure mechanism and geometry of the landslide, an ultimately purpose is to evaluate its stability. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar data from ENVISAT sensor was utilized in the analysis of the pre-/ post-event deformation. Also, Network of GNSS (Continuously Operating Reference Stations) was used for RTK, to provide centimeter precise measurements. After comparing results derived from these different approaches, proper methods were selected to identify the most unstable areas within the landslide zone.

  17. Towards a Handshake of Ground-Based Measurements and Remote-Sensing of Vegetation Traits at Global Scale?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattge, J.; Díaz, S.; Lavorel, S.; Prentice, I. C.; Leadley, P.; Reich, P. B.; Banerjee, A.; Fazayeli, F.; Schrodt, F. I.; Joswig, J.; Mahecha, M. D.; Wirth, C.

    2014-12-01

    Plant traits determine how primary producers respond to environmental factors, affect other trophic levels, influence ecosystem processes and services, and provide a link from species richness to ecosystem functional diversity. Plant traits thus are a key to understand and predict the adaptation of ecosystems to environmental changes. At the same time ground based measurements of plant trait data are dispersed over a wide range of databases, many of these not publicly available. To overcome this deficiency IGBP and DIVERSITAS have initiated the development of a joint database, called TRY, aiming at constructing a standard resource of ground based plant trait observations for the ecological community and for the development of global vegetation models. So far the TRY initiative has united a wide range of the plant trait research community worldwide and gained an unprecedented buy-in of trait data: about 250 trait databases have been contributed and the data repository currently contains about 5.6 million trait entries for 90,000 out of the world's 350,000 plant species. The database includes data for 1100 traits, characterizing the vegetative and regeneration stages of the plant life cycle, including growth, dispersal, establishment and persistence. Based on advanced methods for gap-filling and spatial extrapolation currently being developed in applied statistics and machine learning and in combination with environmental information and species distribution ranges, the unprecedented availability of ground based trait measurements is expected to allow for up-scaling of trait observations from plant to ecosystem level and from point measurements to regional and global scales. These up-scaled data products are expected to provide a link from ground based trait measurements to remote sensing of vegetation function and traits with global coverage.

  18. Synergetic ground-based methods for remote measurements of ozone vertical profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeyev, Yuriy; Kostsov, Vladimir; Virolainen, Yana

    2013-05-01

    The technique of combining ground-based measurements in infrared and microwave spectral regions in order to achieve higher accuracy of ozone profile retrieval in extensive altitude ranges is described and analyzed. The information content, errors, altitude ranges and vertical resolution of ozone profile retrieval have been studied on the basis of numerical simulation of synergetic experiments. Optimal conditions of measurements are defined and requirements to additional information are formulated. The first results on ozone vertical profile retrieval using groundbased measurements of FTIR-spectrometer and microwave radiometer are given.

  19. Unsupervised learning in persistent sensing for target recognition by wireless ad hoc networks of ground-based sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortos, William S.

    2008-04-01

    In previous work by the author, effective persistent and pervasive sensing for recognition and tracking of battlefield targets were seen to be achieved, using intelligent algorithms implemented by distributed mobile agents over a composite system of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for persistence and a wireless network of unattended ground sensors for pervasive coverage of the mission environment. While simulated performance results for the supervised algorithms of the composite system are shown to provide satisfactory target recognition over relatively brief periods of system operation, this performance can degrade by as much as 50% as target dynamics in the environment evolve beyond the period of system operation in which the training data are representative. To overcome this limitation, this paper applies the distributed approach using mobile agents to the network of ground-based wireless sensors alone, without the UAV subsystem, to provide persistent as well as pervasive sensing for target recognition and tracking. The supervised algorithms used in the earlier work are supplanted by unsupervised routines, including competitive-learning neural networks (CLNNs) and new versions of support vector machines (SVMs) for characterization of an unknown target environment. To capture the same physical phenomena from battlefield targets as the composite system, the suite of ground-based sensors can be expanded to include imaging and video capabilities. The spatial density of deployed sensor nodes is increased to allow more precise ground-based location and tracking of detected targets by active nodes. The "swarm" mobile agents enabling WSN intelligence are organized in a three processing stages: detection, recognition and sustained tracking of ground targets. Features formed from the compressed sensor data are down-selected according to an information-theoretic algorithm that reduces redundancy within the feature set, reducing the dimension of samples used in the target

  20. Aerosol optical properties over the Svalbard region of Arctic: ground-based measurements and satellite remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Babu, S. Suresh

    2016-05-01

    In view of the increasing anthropogenic presence and influence of aerosols in the northern polar regions, long-term continuous measurements of aerosol optical parameters have been investigated over the Svalbard region of Norwegian Arctic (Ny-Ålesund, 79°N, 12°E, 8 m ASL). This study has shown a consistent enhancement in the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients during spring. The relative dominance of absorbing aerosols is more near the surface (lower single scattering albedo), compared to that at the higher altitude. This is indicative of the presence of local anthropogenic activities. In addition, long-range transported biomass burning aerosols (inferred from the spectral variation of absorption coefficient) also contribute significantly to the higher aerosol absorption in the Arctic spring. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) estimates from ground based Microtop sun-photometer measurements reveals that the columnar abundance of aerosols reaches the peak during spring season. Comparison of AODs between ground based and satellite remote sensing indicates that deep blue algorithm of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) retrievals over Arctic snow surfaces overestimate the columnar AOD.

  1. Towards retrieving critical relative humidity from ground-based remote sensing observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Weverberg, Kwinten; Boutle, Ian; Morcrette, Cyril J.; Newsom, Rob K.

    2016-08-22

    Nearly all parameterisations of large-scale cloud require the specification of the critical relative humidity (RHcrit). This is the gridbox-mean relative humidity at which the subgrid fluctuations in temperature and water vapour become so large that part of a subsaturated gridbox becomes saturated and cloud starts to form. Until recently, the lack of high-resolution observations of temperature and moisture variability has hindered a reasonable estimate of the RHcrit from observations. However, with the advent of ground-based measurements from Raman lidar, it becomes possible to obtain long records of temperature and moisture (co-)variances with sub-minute sample rates. Lidar observations are inherently noisy and any analysis of higher-order moments will be very dependent on the ability to quantify and remove this noise. We present an exporatory study aimed at understanding whether current noise levels of lidar-retrieved temperature and water vapour are sufficient to obtain a reasonable estimate of the RHcrit. We show that vertical profiles of RHcrit can be derived for a gridbox length of up to about 30 km (120) with an uncertainty of about 4 % (2 %). RHcrit tends to be smallest near the scale height and seems to be fairly insensitive to the horizontal grid spacing at the scales investigated here (30 - 120 km). However, larger sensitivity was found to the vertical grid spacing. As the grid spacing decreases from 400 to 100 m, RHcrit is observed to increase by about 6 %, which is more than the uncertainty in the RHcrit retrievals.

  2. Remote sensing the plasmasphere, plasmapause, plumes and other features using ground-based magnetometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menk Frederick

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The plasmapause is a highly dynamic boundary between different magnetospheric particle populations and convection regimes. Some of the most important space weather processes involve wave-particle interactions in this region, but wave properties may also be used to remote sense the plasmasphere and plasmapause, contributing to plasmasphere models. This paper discusses the use of existing ground magnetometer arrays for such remote sensing. Using case studies we illustrate measurement of plasmapause location, shape and movement during storms; refilling of flux tubes within and outside the plasmasphere; storm-time increase in heavy ion concentration near the plasmapause; and detection and mapping of density irregularities near the plasmapause, including drainage plumes, biteouts and bulges. We also use a 2D MHD model of wave propagation through the magnetosphere, incorporating a realistic ionosphere boundary and Alfvén speed profile, to simulate ground array observations of power and cross-phase spectra, hence confirming the signatures of plumes and other density structures.

  3. A study of remotely sensed aerosol properties from ground-based sun and sky scanning radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, David M.

    . The sensitivity of absorption properties is evaluated and quantified with respect to aerosol retrieval uncertainty. Using clustering analysis, aerosol absorption and size relationships provide a simple method to classify aerosol mixing states and origins and potentially improve aerosol retrievals from ground-based and satellite-based instrumentation.

  4. Spatio-temporal monitoring of cotton cultivation using ground-based and airborne multispectral sensors in GIS environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Antonis; Kalivas, Dionissios; Theocharopoulos, Sid

    2017-07-01

    Multispectral sensor capability of capturing reflectance data at several spectral channels, together with the inherent reflectance responses of various soils and especially plant surfaces, has gained major interest in crop production. In present study, two multispectral sensing systems, a ground-based and an aerial-based, were applied for the multispatial and temporal monitoring of two cotton fields in central Greece. The ground-based system was Crop Circle ACS-430, while the aerial consisted of a consumer-level quadcopter (Phantom 2) and a modified Hero3+ Black digital camera. The purpose of the research was to monitor crop growth with the two systems and investigate possible interrelations between the derived well-known normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Five data collection campaigns were conducted during the cultivation period and concerned scanning soil and plants with the ground-based sensor and taking aerial photographs of the fields with the unmanned aerial system. According to the results, both systems successfully monitored cotton growth stages in terms of space and time. The mean values of NDVI changes through time as retrieved by the ground-based system were satisfactorily modelled by a second-order polynomial equation (R (2) 0.96 in Field 1 and 0.99 in Field 2). Further, they were highly correlated (r 0.90 in Field 1 and 0.74 in Field 2) with the according values calculated via the aerial-based system. The unmanned aerial system (UAS) can potentially substitute crop scouting as it concerns a time-effective, non-destructive and reliable way of soil and plant monitoring.

  5. Ground-based hyperspectral remote sensing to discriminate biotic stress in cotton crop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Rahul; Kot, Rajsi; Sandhu, Sandeep S.; Bhattacharya, Bimal K.; Chandi, Ravinder S.; Singh, Manjeet; Singh, Jagdish; Manjunath, K. R.

    2016-05-01

    A large gap exists between the potential yield and the yield realized at the agricultural field. Among the factors contributing towards this yield gap are the biotic stresses that affect the crops growth and development. Severity of infestation of the pests and diseases differs between agroclimatic region, individual crops and seasons within a region. Information about the timing of start of infestation of these diseases and pests with their gradual progress in advance could enable plan necessary pesticide schedule for the season, region on the particular crop against the specific menace expected. This could be enabled by development of region, crop and pest-specific prediction models to forewarn these menaces. In India most (70%) of the land-holding size of farmers average 0.39 ha (some even 20 m x 20 m) and only 1% crop growers holdlabour-intensive for the seventh largest country with difficult terrain, 66% gross cropped area under food crops, lacking in number of skilled manpower and shrinking resources. Remote sensing overcomes such limitations with ability to access all parts of the country and can often achieve a high spatial, temporal and spectral resolution and thus leading to an accurate estimation of area affected. Due to pest and disease stress plants showed different behavior in terms of physiological and morphological changes lead to symptoms such as wilting, curling of leaf, stunned growth, reduction in leaf area due to severe defoliation or chlorosis or necrosis of photosynthetically active parts (Prabhakar et al., 2011; Booteet al., 1983; Aggarwal et al., 2006). Damage evaluation of diseases has been largely done by visual inspections and quantification but visual quantification of plant pest and diseases with accuracy and precision is a tough task. Utilization of remote sensing techniques are based on the assumption that plant pest and disease stresses interfere with physical structure and function of plant and influence the absorption of light

  6. Cross-Characterization of Aerosol Properties from Multiple Spaceborne Sensors Facilitated by Regional Ground-Based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, Maksym; Ichoku, Charles; Leptoukh, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Aerosol observations from space have become a standard source for retrieval of aerosol properties on both regional and global scales. Indeed, the large number of currently operational spaceborne sensors provides for unprecedented access to the most complete set of complimentary aerosol measurements ever to be available. Nonetheless, this resource remains under-utilized, largely due to the discrepancies and differences existing between the sensors and their aerosol products. To characterize the inconsistencies and bridge the gap that exists between the sensors, we have designed and implemented an online Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS) that facilitates the joint sampling of aerosol data from multiple sensors. MAPSS consistently samples aerosol products from multiple spaceborne sensors using a unified spatial and temporal resolution, where each dataset is sampled over Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) locations together with coincident AERONET data samples. In this way, MAPSS enables a direct cross-characterization and data integration between aerosol products from multiple sensors. Moreover, the well-characterized co-located ground-based AERONET data provides the basis for the integrated validation of these products.

  7. Ground-based and remotely sensed nutrient availability across a tropical landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porder, Stephen; Asner, Gregory P; Vitousek, Peter M

    2005-08-02

    Tropical soils often are assumed to be highly weathered and thus nutrient-depleted, but this prediction applies primarily to geomorphically stable surfaces. Topography complicates the assumption of nutrient depletion, because erosion can enhance the supply of nutrients to tropical ecosystems. Consequently, understanding nutrient availability across landscapes requires a spatially explicit assessment of the relative strength of depletion and enhancement. We document the relationship between foliar nutrients and topographic position across a 20-km(2), 4- to 5-million-year-old eroded landscape in Kaua'i, Hawai'i, and use this relationship to build a bottom-up map of predicted nutrient availability across this landscape. Only approximately 17% of the landscape is nutrient-poor, mostly on stable uplands; nutrient availability on slopes and valley bottoms is much higher, in some cases similar to the most fertile montane forests in the Hawaiian Islands. This pattern was corroborated by top-down remote sensing of area-integrated canopy phosphorus concentrations.

  8. Ozone columns obtained by ground-based remote sensing in Kiev for Aura Ozone Measuring Instrument validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavrina, A. V.; Pavlenko, Y. V.; Veles, A.; Syniavskyi, I.; Kroon, M.

    2007-12-01

    Ground-based observations with a Fourier transform spectrometer in the infrared region (FTIR) were performed in Kiev (Ukraine) during the time frames August-October 2005 and June-October 2006 within the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) validation project 2907 entitled "OMI validation by ground based remote sensing: ozone columns and profiles" in the frame of the international European Space Agency/Netherlands Agency for Aerospace Programmes/Royal Dutch Meteorological Institute OMI Announcement of Opportunity effort. Ozone column data for 2005 were obtained by modeling the ozone spectral band at 9.6 μm with the radiative transfer code MODTRAN3.5. Our total ozone column values were found to be lower than OMI Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) total ozone column data by 8-10 Dobson units (DU, 1 DU = 0.001 atm cm) on average, while our observations have a relatively small standard error of about 2 DU. Improved modeling of the ozone spectral band, now based on HITRAN-2004 spectral data as calculated by us, moves our results toward better agreement with the OMI DOAS total ozone column data. The observations made during 2006 with a modernized FTIR spectrometer and higher signal-to-noise ratio were simulated by the MODTRAN4 model computations. For ozone column estimates the Aqua Atmospheric Infrared Sounder satellite water vapor and temperature profiles were combined with the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder stratospheric ozone profiles and Tropospheric Emission Monitoring Internet Service-Koninklijk Nederlands Meteorologisch Instituut climatological profiles to create a priori input files for spectral modeling. The MODTRAN4 estimates of ozone columns from the 2006 observations compare rather well with the OMI total ozone column data: standard errors are of 1.11 DU and 0.68 DU, standard deviation are of 8.77 DU and 5.37 DU for OMI DOAS and OMI Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, respectively.

  9. Cloud Properties under Different Synoptic Circulations: Comparison of Radiosonde and Ground-Based Active Remote Sensing Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinqiang Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, long-term (10 years radiosonde-based cloud data are compared with the ground-based active remote sensing product under six prevailing large-scale synoptic patterns, i.e., cyclonic center (CC, weak pressure pattern (WP, the southeast bottom of cyclonic center (CB, cold front (CF, anticyclone edge (AE and anticyclone center (AC over the Southern Great Plains (SGP site. The synoptic patterns are generated by applying the self-organizing map weather classification method to the daily National Centers for Environmental Protection mean sea level pressure records from the North American Regional Reanalysis. It reveals that the large-scale synoptic circulations can strongly influence the regional cloud formation, and thereby have impact on the consistency of cloud retrievals from the radiosonde and ground-based cloud product. The total cloud cover at the SGP site is characterized by the least in AC and the most in CF. The minimum and maximum differences between the two cloud methods are 10.3% for CC and 13.3% for WP. Compared to the synoptic patterns characterized by scattered cloudy and clear skies (AE and AC, the agreement of collocated cloud boundaries between the two cloud approaches tends to be better under the synoptic patterns dominated by overcast and cloudy skies (CC, WP and CB. The rainy and windy weather conditions in CF synoptic pattern influence the consistency of the two cloud retrieval methods associated with the limited capabilities inherent to the instruments. The cloud thickness distribution from the two cloud datasets compares favorably with each other in all synoptic patterns, with relative discrepancy of ≤0.3 km.

  10. Monitoring particulate matters in urban areas in Malaysia using remote sensing and ground-based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanniah, K. D.; Kamarul Zaman, Nurul Amalin Fatihah; Lim, H. Q.; Reba, Mohd Nadzri Md.

    2014-10-01

    Monitoring particulate matter less than 10 μm (PM10) near the ground routinely is critical for Malaysia for emergency management because Malaysia receives considerable amount of pollutants from both local and trans-boundary sources. Nevertheless, aerosol data covering major cities over a large spatial extent and on a continuous manner are limited. Thus, in the present study we aimed to estimate PM10 at 5 km spatial scale using AOD derived from MERIS sensor at 3 metropolitan cities in Malaysia. MERIS level 2 AOD data covering 5 years (2007-2011) were used to develop an empirical model to estimate PM10 at 11 locations covering Klang valley, Penang and Johor Bahru metropolitan cities. This study is different from previous studies conducted in Malaysia because in the current study we estimated PM10 by considering meteorological parameters that affect aerosol properties, including atmospheric stability, surface temperature and relative humidity derived from MODIS data and our product will be at ~5 km spatial scale. Results of this study show that the direct correlation between monthly averaged AOD and PM10 yielded a low and insignificant relationship (R2= 0.04 and RMSE = 7.06μg m-3). However, when AOD, relative humidity, land surface temperature and k index (atmospheric stability) were combined in a multiple linear regression analysis the correlation coefficient increased to 0.34 and the RMSE decreased to 8.91μg m-3. Among the variables k- index showed highest correlation with PM 10 (R2=0.35) compared to other variables. We further improved the relationship among PM10 and the independent variables using Artificial Neural Network. Results show that the correlation coefficient of the calibration dataset increased to 0.65 with low RMSE of 6.72μg m-3. The results may change when we consider more data points covering 10 years (2002- 2011) and enable the construction of a local model to estimate PM10 in urban areas in Malaysia.

  11. Co-located ground-based remote sensing and in situ measurements at the tropical atmospheric observatory in Suriname

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warneke, T.; Petersen, K.; Gerbig, C.; Macatangay, R.; Koerner, S.; Jordan, A.; Rothe, M.; Notholt, J.; Schrems, O.

    2009-04-01

    The first ground-based remote sensing measurements of the column averaged volume mixing ratio of CO2 (XCO2) for the inner tropics have been obtained at Paramaribo, Suriname (5.8°N, 55.2°W). Due to the migration of the ITCZ over the measurement location the probed air masses belong to the northern or southern hemisphere depending on the time of the year. The XCO2 shows an average annual increase in the Southern Hemisphere of 2.2 ppm for the time period 2004 to 2007, which agrees within the error with model simulations. Co-located in-situ measurements are strongly influenced by a local source. From the isotopic composition of the air samples the local source component is suggested to be the terrestrial biosphere. Using d13C from the NOAA/ESRL stations Ascension Is. (ASC) and Ragged Point (RPB) the data has been corrected for the local source component. The corrected mixing ratios for the surface as well as the XCO2 qualitatively agree with model simulations.

  12. Comparing the Cloud Vertical Structure Derived from Several Methods Based on Radiosonde Profiles and Ground-based Remote Sensing Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa-Suros, M.; Calbo, J.; Gonzalez, J. A.; Long, Charles N.

    2014-08-27

    The cloud vertical distribution and especially the cloud base height, which is linked to cloud type, is an important characteristic in order to describe the impact of clouds in a changing climate. In this work several methods to estimate the cloud vertical structure (CVS) based on atmospheric sounding profiles are compared, considering number and position of cloud layers, with a ground based system which is taken as a reference: the Active Remote Sensing of Clouds (ARSCL). All methods establish some conditions on the relative humidity, and differ on the use of other variables, the thresholds applied, or the vertical resolution of the profile. In this study these methods are applied to 125 radiosonde profiles acquired at the ARM Southern Great Plains site during all seasons of year 2009 and endorsed by GOES images, to confirm that the cloudiness conditions are homogeneous enough across their trajectory. The overall agreement for the methods ranges between 44-88%; four methods produce total agreements around 85%. Further tests and improvements are applied on one of these methods. In addition, we attempt to make this method suitable for low resolution vertical profiles, which could be useful in atmospheric modeling. The total agreement, even when using low resolution profiles, can be improved up to 91% if the thresholds for a moist layer to become a cloud layer are modified to minimize false negatives with the current data set, thus improving overall agreement.

  13. Municipality Level Simulations of Dengue Fever Incidence in Puerto Rico Using Ground Based and Remotely Sensed Climate Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Morin, Cory

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is caused by a virus transmitted between humans and Aedes genus mosquitoes through blood feeding. In recent decades incidence of the disease has drastically increased in the tropical Americas, culminating with the Pan American outbreak in 2010 which resulted in 1.7 million reported cases. In Puerto Rico dengue is endemic, however, there is significant inter-annual, intraannual, and spatial variability in case loads. Variability in climate and the environment, herd immunity and virus genetics, and demographic characteristics may all contribute to differing patterns of transmission both spatially and temporally. Knowledge of climate influences on dengue incidence could facilitate development of early warning systems allowing public health workers to implement appropriate transmission intervention strategies. In this study, we simulate dengue incidence in several municipalities in Puerto Rico using population and meteorological data derived from ground based stations and remote sensing instruments. This data was used to drive a process based model of vector population development and virus transmission. Model parameter values for container composition, vector characteristics, and incubation period were chosen by employing a Monte Carlo approach. Multiple simulations were performed for each municipality and the results were compared with reported dengue cases. The best performing simulations were retained and their parameter values and meteorological input were compared between years and municipalities. Parameter values varied by municipality and year illustrating the complexity and sensitivity of the disease system. Local characteristics including the natural and built environment impact transmission dynamics and produce varying responses to meteorological conditions.

  14. Remote Sensing of Sonoran Desert Vegetation Structure and Phenology with Ground-Based LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel B. Sankey

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Long-term vegetation monitoring efforts have become increasingly important for understanding ecosystem response to global change. Many traditional methods for monitoring can be infrequent and limited in scope. Ground-based LiDAR is one remote sensing method that offers a clear advancement to monitor vegetation dynamics at high spatial and temporal resolution. We determined the effectiveness of LiDAR to detect intra-annual variability in vegetation structure at a long-term Sonoran Desert monitoring plot dominated by cacti, deciduous and evergreen shrubs. Monthly repeat LiDAR scans of perennial plant canopies over the course of one year had high precision. LiDAR measurements of canopy height and area were accurate with respect to total station survey measurements of individual plants. We found an increase in the number of LiDAR vegetation returns following the wet North American Monsoon season. This intra-annual variability in vegetation structure detected by LiDAR was attributable to a drought deciduous shrub Ambrosia deltoidea, whereas the evergreen shrub Larrea tridentata and cactus Opuntia engelmannii had low variability. Benefits of using LiDAR over traditional methods to census desert plants are more rapid, consistent, and cost-effective data acquisition in a high-resolution, 3-dimensional context. We conclude that repeat LiDAR measurements can be an effective method for documenting ecosystem response to desert climatology and drought over short time intervals and at detailed-local spatial scale.

  15. Mobile Ground-Based Radar Sensor for Localization and Mapping: An Evaluation of two Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Vivet

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with robotic applications using a ground‐based radar sensor for simultaneous localization and mapping problems. In mobile robotics, radar technology is interesting because of its long range and the robustness of radar waves to atmospheric conditions, making these sensors well‐suited for extended outdoor robotic applications. Two localization and mapping approaches using data obtained from a 360° field of view microwave radar sensor are presented and compared. The first method is a trajectory‐ oriented simultaneous localization and mapping technique, which makes no landmark assumptions and avoids the data association problem. The estimation of the ego‐motion makes use of the Fourier‐Mellin transform for registering radar images in a sequence, from which the rotation and translation of the sensor motion can be estimated. The second approach uses the consequence of using a rotating range sensor in high speed robotics. In such a situation, movement combinations create distortions in the collected data. Velocimetry is achieved here by explicitly analysing these measurement distortions. As a result, the trajectory of the vehicle and then the radar map of outdoor environments can be obtained. The evaluation of experimental results obtained by the two methods is presented on real‐world data from a vehicle moving at 30 km/h over a 2.5 km course.

  16. Project ORION: Orbital Debris Removal Using Ground-Based Sensors and Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    About 100,000 pieces of 1 to 10-cm debris in low-Earth orbit are too small to track reliably but large enough to cripple or destroy spacecraft. The ORION team studied the feasibility of removing the debris with ground-based laser impulses. Photoablation experiments were surveyed and applied to likely debris materials. Laser intensities needed for debris orbit modification call for pulses on the order of lOkJ or continuous wave lasers on the order of 1 MW. Adaptive optics are necessary to correct for atmospheric turbulence. Wavelength and pulse duration windows were found that limit beam degradation due to nonlinear atmospheric processes. Debris can be detected and located to within about 10 microrads with existing radar and passive optical technology. Fine targeting would be accomplished with laser illumination, which might also be used for detection. Bistatic detection with communications satellites may also be possible. We recommend that existing technology be used to demonstrate the concept at a loss of about $20 million. We calculate that an installation to clear altitudes up to 800 km of 1 to 10-cm debris over 2 years of operation would cost about $80 million. Clearing altitudes up to 1,500 km would take about 3 years and cost about $160 million.

  17. Satellite and ground-based sensors for the Urban Heat Island analysis in the city of Rome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabrizi, Roberto; Bonafoni, Stefania; Biondi, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the trend of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) of Rome is analyzed by both ground-based weather stations and a satellite-based infrared sensor. First, we have developed a suitable algorithm employing satellite brightness temperatures for the estimation of the air temperature belonging...... to the layer of air closest to the surface. UHI spatial characteristics have been assessed using air temperatures measured by both weather stations and brightness temperature maps from the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) on board ENVISAT polar-orbiting satellite. In total, 634 daytime...... and nighttime scenes taken between 2003 and 2006 have been processed. Analysis of the Canopy Layer Heat Island (CLHI) during summer months reveals a mean growth in magnitude of 3-4 K during nighttime and a negative or almost zero CLHI intensity during daytime, confirmed by the weather stations. © 2010...

  18. Aerosol physical and chemical properties retrieved from ground-based remote sensing measurements during heavy haze days in Beijing winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.; Gu, X.; Wang, L.; Li, D.; Xie, Y.; Li, K.; Dubovik, O.; Schuster, G.; Goloub, P.; Zhang, Y.; Li, L.; Ma, Y.; Xu, H.

    2013-10-01

    With the increase in economic development over the past thirty years, many large cities in eastern and southwestern China are experiencing increased haze events and atmospheric pollution, causing significant impacts on the regional environment and even climate. However, knowledge on the aerosol physical and chemical properties in heavy haze conditions is still insufficient. In this study, two winter heavy haze events in Beijing that occurred in 2011 and 2012 were selected and investigated by using the ground-based remote sensing measurements. We used a CIMEL CE318 sun-sky radiometer to retrieve haze aerosol optical, physical and chemical properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD), size distribution, complex refractive indices and aerosol fractions identified as black carbon (BC), brown carbon (BrC), mineral dust (DU), ammonium sulfate-like (AS) components and aerosol water content (AW). The retrieval results from a total of five haze days showed that the aerosol loading and properties during the two winter haze events were comparable. Therefore, average heavy haze property parameters were drawn to present a research case for future studies. The average AOD is about 3.0 at 440 nm, and the Ångström exponent is 1.3 from 440 to 870 nm. The fine-mode AOD is 2.8 corresponding to a fine-mode fraction of 0.93. The coarse particles occupied a considerable volume fraction of the bimodal size distribution in winter haze events, with the mean particle radius of 0.21 and 2.9 μm for the fine and coarse modes respectively. The real part of the refractive indices exhibited a relatively flat spectral behavior with an average value of 1.48 from 440 to 1020 nm. The imaginary part showed spectral variation, with the value at 440 nm (about 0.013) higher than the other three wavelengths (about 0.008 at 675 nm). The aerosol composition retrieval results showed that volume fractions of BC, BrC, DU, AS and AW are 1, 2, 49, 15 and 33%, respectively, on average for the investigated

  19. Integration of Remote Sensing Products with Ground-Based Measurements to Understand the Dynamics of Nepal's Forests and Plantation Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilani, H.; Jain, A. K.

    2016-12-01

    This study assembles information from three sources - remote sensing, terrestrial photography and ground-based inventory data, to understand the dynamics of Nepal's tropical and sub-tropical forests and plantation sites for the period 1990-2015. Our study focuses on following three specific district areas, which have conserved forests through social and agroforestry management practices: 1. Dolakha district: This site has been selected to study the impact of community-based forest management on land cover change using repeat photography and satellite imagery, in combination with interviews with community members. The study time period is during the period 1990-2010. We determined that satellite data with ground photographs can provide transparency for long term monitoring. The initial results also suggests that community-based forest management program in the mid-hills of Nepal was successful. 2. Chitwan district: Here we use high resolution remote sensing data and optimized community field inventories to evaluate potential application and operational feasibility of community level REDD+ measuring, reporting and verification (MRV) systems. The study uses temporal dynamics of land cover transitions, tree canopy size classes and biomass over a Kayar khola watershed REDD+ study area with community forest to evaluate satellite Image segmentation for land cover, linear regression model for above ground biomass (AGB), and estimation and monitoring field data for tree crowns and AGB. We study three specific years 2002, 2009, 2012. Using integration of WorldView-2 and airborne LiDAR data for tree species level. 3. Nuwakot district: This district was selected to study the impact of establishment of tree plantation on total barren/fallow. Over the last 40 year, this area has went through a drastic changes, from barren land to forest area with tree species consisting of Dalbergia sissoo, Leucaena leucocephala, Michelia champaca, etc. In 1994, this district area was registered

  20. Flight Test Result for the Ground-Based Radio Navigation System Sensor with an Unmanned Air Vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jaegyu; Ahn, Woo-Guen; Seo, Seungwoo; Lee, Jang Yong; Park, Jun-Pyo

    2015-11-11

    The Ground-based Radio Navigation System (GRNS) is an alternative/backup navigation system based on time synchronized pseudolites. It has been studied for some years due to the potential vulnerability issue of satellite navigation systems (e.g., GPS or Galileo). In the framework of our study, a periodic pulsed sequence was used instead of the randomized pulse sequence recommended as the RTCM (radio technical commission for maritime services) SC (special committee)-104 pseudolite signal, as a randomized pulse sequence with a long dwell time is not suitable for applications requiring high dynamics. This paper introduces a mathematical model of the post-correlation output in a navigation sensor, showing that the aliasing caused by the additional frequency term of a periodic pulsed signal leads to a false lock (i.e., Doppler frequency bias) during the signal acquisition process or in the carrier tracking loop of the navigation sensor. We suggest algorithms to resolve the frequency false lock issue in this paper, relying on the use of a multi-correlator. A flight test with an unmanned helicopter was conducted to verify the implemented navigation sensor. The results of this analysis show that there were no false locks during the flight test and that outliers stem from bad dilution of precision (DOP) or fluctuations in the received signal quality.

  1. Flight Test Result for the Ground-Based Radio Navigation System Sensor with an Unmanned Air Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaegyu Jang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Ground-based Radio Navigation System (GRNS is an alternative/backup navigation system based on time synchronized pseudolites. It has been studied for some years due to the potential vulnerability issue of satellite navigation systems (e.g., GPS or Galileo. In the framework of our study, a periodic pulsed sequence was used instead of the randomized pulse sequence recommended as the RTCM (radio technical commission for maritime services SC (special committee-104 pseudolite signal, as a randomized pulse sequence with a long dwell time is not suitable for applications requiring high dynamics. This paper introduces a mathematical model of the post-correlation output in a navigation sensor, showing that the aliasing caused by the additional frequency term of a periodic pulsed signal leads to a false lock (i.e., Doppler frequency bias during the signal acquisition process or in the carrier tracking loop of the navigation sensor. We suggest algorithms to resolve the frequency false lock issue in this paper, relying on the use of a multi-correlator. A flight test with an unmanned helicopter was conducted to verify the implemented navigation sensor. The results of this analysis show that there were no false locks during the flight test and that outliers stem from bad dilution of precision (DOP or fluctuations in the received signal quality.

  2. Real-time phasing and co-phasing of a ground-based interferometer with a pyramid wavefront sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vérinaud, Christophe; Esposito, Simone

    The feasibility and remarkable performances of pyramid wavefront sensing in adaptive optics have already been demonstrated. In this paper, we investigate another potential of the pyramid wavefront sensor which is differential piston sensing in interferometry: this can be done by using a glass pyramid placed in a combined focal plane of the interferometer, and a CCD sampling the usual four diffracted images of the pupil, composed here by the interferometer apertures. From a purely geometrical point of view, no information about the differential phase between two pupils could be retrieved. However, as the sensor main component, the pyramid, is located directly in the interference pattern of the interferometer, the piston information present in the electric field of the combined focal plane modifies, after diffraction by the pyramid, the intensity distribution in the pupil plane. Thus, with only one sensor, the differential piston can be measured, in addition to the classical local tilts determination. In this paper we present the concept and give some simulation results showing the performances of a closed-loop adaptive optics correction for a ground-based two-telescope interferometer like the Large Binocular Telescope.

  3. Satellite and ground-based remote sensing of aerosols during intense haze event of October 2013 over lahore, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Salman; Zia, ul-Haq; Ali, Muhammad

    2016-02-01

    Due to increase in population and economic development, the mega-cities are facing increased haze events which are causing important effects on the regional environment and climate. In order to understand these effects, we require an in-depth knowledge of optical and physical properties of aerosols in intense haze conditions. In this paper an effort has been made to analyze the microphysical and optical properties of aerosols during intense haze event over mega-city of Lahore by using remote sensing data obtained from satellites (Terra/Aqua Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO)) and ground based instrument (AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET)) during 6-14 October 2013. The instantaneous highest value of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) is observed to be 3.70 on 9 October 2013 followed by 3.12 on 8 October 2013. The primary cause of such high values is large scale crop residue burning and urban-industrial emissions in the study region. AERONET observations show daily mean AOD of 2.36 which is eight times higher than the observed values on normal day. The observed fine mode volume concentration is more than 1.5 times greater than the coarse mode volume concentration on the high aerosol burden day. We also find high values (~0.95) of Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) on 9 October 2013. Scatter-plot between AOD (500 nm) and Angstrom exponent (440-870 nm) reveals that biomass burning/urban-industrial aerosols are the dominant aerosol type on the heavy aerosol loading day over Lahore. MODIS fire activity image suggests that the areas in the southeast of Lahore across the border with India are dominated by biomass burning activities. A Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model backward trajectory showed that the winds at 1000 m above the ground are responsible for transport from southeast region of biomass burning to Lahore. CALIPSO derived sub-types of

  4. Climatology of clouds and precipitation over East Antarctica using ground-based remote sensing at the Princess Elizabeth station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souverijns, Niels; Gossart, Alexandra; Gorodetskaya, Irina; Lhermitte, Stef; Van Tricht, Kristof; Mangold, Alexander; Laffineur, Quentin; Van Lipzig, Nicole

    2016-04-01

    The surface mass balance of the Antarctic ice sheet is highly dependent on the interaction between clouds and precipitation. Our understanding of these processes is challenged by the limited availability of observations over the area and problems in Antarctic climate simulations by state-of-the-art climate models. Improvements are needed in this field, as the Antarctic ice sheet is expected to become a dominant contributor to sea level rise in the 21st century. In 2010, an observational site was established at the Princess Elisabeth (PE) Antarctic station. PE is located in the escarpment area of Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica (72°S, 23°E). The instruments consist of several ground-based remote sensing instruments: a ceilometer (measuring cloud-base height and vertical structure), a 24-GHz Micro Rain Radar (MRR; providing vertical profiles of radar effective reflectivity and Doppler velocity), and a pyrometer (measuring effective cloud base temperature). An automatic weather station provides info on boundary-layer meteorology (temperature, wind speed and direction, humidity, pressure), as well as broadband radiative fluxes and snow height changes. This set of instruments can be used to infer the role of clouds in the Antarctic climate system, their interaction with radiation and their impact on precipitation. Cloud and precipitation characteristics are derived from 5-year-long measurement series, which is unprecedented for the Antarctic region. Here, we present an overview of the cloud and precipitation climatology. Statistics on cloud occurrence are calculated on annual / seasonal basis and a distinction between liquid / mixed phase and ice clouds is made. One can discriminate between liquid-bearing and ice-only clouds by investigating the ceilometer attenuated backscatter, since liquid phase clouds have a much higher signal. Furthermore, by using pyrometer measurements, we are able to identify the range of temperatures at which liquid / ice clouds are

  5. Radiation in fog: quantification of the impact on fog liquid water based on ground-based remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wærsted, Eivind G.; Haeffelin, Martial; Dupont, Jean-Charles; Delanoë, Julien; Dubuisson, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    Radiative cooling and heating impact the liquid water balance of fog and therefore play an important role in determining their persistence or dissipation. We demonstrate that a quantitative analysis of the radiation-driven condensation and evaporation is possible in real time using ground-based remote sensing observations (cloud radar, ceilometer, microwave radiometer). Seven continental fog events in midlatitude winter are studied, and the radiative processes are further explored through sensitivity studies. The longwave (LW) radiative cooling of the fog is able to produce 40-70 g m-2 h-1 of liquid water by condensation when the fog liquid water path exceeds 30 g m-2 and there are no clouds above the fog, which corresponds to renewing the fog water in 0.5-2 h. The variability is related to fog temperature and atmospheric humidity, with warmer fog below a drier atmosphere producing more liquid water. The appearance of a cloud layer above the fog strongly reduces the LW cooling relative to a situation with no cloud above; the effect is strongest for a low cloud, when the reduction can reach 100 %. Consequently, the appearance of clouds above will perturb the liquid water balance in the fog and may therefore induce fog dissipation. Shortwave (SW) radiative heating by absorption by fog droplets is smaller than the LW cooling, but it can contribute significantly, inducing 10-15 g m-2 h-1 of evaporation in thick fog at (winter) midday. The absorption of SW radiation by unactivated aerosols inside the fog is likely less than 30 % of the SW absorption by the water droplets, in most cases. However, the aerosols may contribute more significantly if the air mass contains a high concentration of absorbing aerosols. The absorbed radiation at the surface can reach 40-120 W m-2 during the daytime depending on the fog thickness. As in situ measurements indicate that 20-40 % of this energy is transferred to the fog as sensible heat, this surface absorption can contribute

  6. Ground-based Hyperspectral Remote Sensing for Mapping Rock Alterations and Lithologies: Case Studies from Semail Ophiolite, Oman and Rush Springs Sandstone, Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L.; Khan, S.; Hauser, D. L.; Glennie, C. L.; Snyder, C.; Okyay, U.

    2014-12-01

    This study used ground-based hyperspectral remote sensing data to map rock alterations and lithologies at Semail Ophiolite, Oman, as well as hydrocarbon-induced rock alterations at Cement, Oklahoma. The Samail Ophiolite exposed the largest, least-deformed, and the most-studied ophiolite in the world. Hydrocarbon seepages at Cement, Oklahoma brought hydrocarbons to the Rush Springs sandstones at surface, and generated rock alterations including bleaching of red beds, and carbonate cementation. Surficial expressions of rock alterations and different lithofacies are distinct from adjacent rocks, and can be detected by remote sensing techniques. Hyperspectral remote sensing acquires light intensity for hundreds of bands in a continuous electromagnetic spectrum from visible light to short-wave infrared radiation, and holds potential to characterize rocks with great precision. Ground-based hyperspectral study could scan the objects at close ranges thus provide very fine spatial resolutions (millimeters to centimeters). This study mapped all the major iconic outcrops of Semail ophiolite including pillow lava, sheeted dykes, layered gabbros, and peridotites. This study also identified surficial rock alterations induced by hydrocarbons at Cement, Oklahoma. Reddish-brown Rush Spring sandstones are bleached to pink, yellow, and gray colors; pore spaces in the sandstones have been filled with carbonate cementation. Laboratory spectroscopy was used to assist with mineral identification and classification in hyperspectral data. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) was used to provide high-accuracy spatial references. Principal component analysis, minimum noise fraction, spectral angle mapper, and band ratios are used in image processing. Combining lithological, remote sensing and geochemical data, this study built a model for petroleum seepage and related rock alterations, and provided a workflow for employing ground-based hyperspectral remote sensing techniques in petrological

  7. Research on Ground-Based LWIR Hyperspectral Research on Ground-Based LWIR Hyperspectral Imaging Remote Gas Detection Imaging Remote Gas Detection%地面长波红外高光谱成像气体探测研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑为建; 雷正刚; 余春超; 杨智雄; 王海洋; 付艳鹏; 李训牛; 廖宁放; 苏君红

    2016-01-01

    The new progress of ground-based long-wave infrared remote sensing is presented ,which describes the windowing spatial and temporal modulation Fourier spectroscopy imaging in details .The prototype forms the interference fringes based on the corner-cube of spatial modulation of Michelson interferometer ,using cooled long-wave infrared photovoltaic staring FPA (focal plane array) detector .The LWIR hyperspectral ima-ging is achieved by the process of collection ,reorganization ,correction ,apodization ,FFT etc .from data cube .Noise equivalent spectral radiance (NESR) ,which is the sensitivity index of CHIPED-1 LWIR hyper-spectral imaging prototype ,can reach 5.6 × 10-8 W · (cm-1 · sr · cm2 )-1 at single sampling .The data is the same as commercial temporal modulation hyperspectral imaging spectrometer .It can prove the advantage of this technique . This technique still has space to be improved . For instance , spectral response range of CHIPED-1 LWIR hyperspectral imaging prototype can reach 11.5μm by testing the transmission curve of pol-ypropylene film .In this article ,choosing the results of outdoor high-rise and diethyl ether gas experiment as an example ,the authors research on the detecting method of 2D distribution chemical gas VOC by infrared hyper-spectral imaging .There is no observed diethyl ether gas from the infrared spectral slice of the same wave num-ber in complicated background and low concentration .By doing the difference spectrum ,the authors can see the space distribution of diethyl ether gas clearly . Hyperspectral imaging is used in the field of organic gas VOC infrared detection .Relative to wide band infrared imaging ,it has some advantages .Such as ,it has high sensitivity ,the strong anti-interference ability ,identify the variety ,and so on . Abstract The new progress of ground-based long-wave infrared remote sensing is presented ,which describes the windowing spatial and temporal modulation Fourier spectroscopy imaging in details

  8. GNSS as a sea ice sensor - detecting coastal freeze states with ground-based GNSS-R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandberg, Joakim; Hobiger, Thomas; Haas, Rüdiger

    2017-04-01

    Based on the idea of using freely available signals for remote sensing, ground-based GNSS-reflectometry (GNSS-R) has found more and more applications in hydrology, oceanography, agriculture and other Earth sciences. GNSS-R is based on analysing the elevation dependent SNR patterns of GNSS signals, and traditionally only the oscillation frequency and phase have been studied to retrieve parameters from the reflecting surfaces. However, recently Strandberg et al. (2016) developed an inversion algorithm that has changed the paradigms of ground-based GNSS-R as it enables direct access to the radiometric properties of the reflector. Using the signal envelope and the rate at which the magnitude of the SNR oscillations are damped w.r.t. satellite elevation, the algorithm retrieves the roughness of the reflector surface amongst other parameters. Based on this idea, we demonstrate for the first time that a GNSS installation situated close to the coastline can detect the presence of sea-ice unambiguously. Using data from the GTGU antenna at the Onsala Space Observatory, Sweden, the time series of the derived damping parameter clearly matches the occurrence of ice in the bay where the antenna is situated. Our results were validated against visual inspection logs as well as with the help of ice charts from the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute. Our method is even sensitive to partial and intermediate ice formation stages, with clear difference in response between frazil ice and both open and solidly frozen water surfaces. As the GTGU installation is entirely built with standard geodetic equipment, the method can be applied directly to any coastal GNSS site, allowing analysis of both new and historical data. One can use the method as an automatic way of retrieving independent ground truth data for ice extent measurements for use in hydrology, cryosphere studies, and even societal interest fields such as sea transportation. Finally, the new method opens up for

  9. Quantification of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from wastewater treatment plants using a ground-based remote sensing approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delre, Antonio; Mønster, Jacob; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2016-04-01

    The direct release of nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) from wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) is important because it contributes to the global greenhouse gases (GHGs) release and strongly effects the WWTP carbon footprint. Biological nitrogen removal technologies could increase the direct emission of N2O (IPCC, 2006), while CH4 losses are of environmental, economic and safety concern. Currently, reporting of N2O and CH4 emissions from WWTPs are performed mainly using methods suggested by IPCC which are not site specific (IPCC, 2006). The dynamic tracer dispersion method (TDM), a ground based remote sensing approach implemented at DTU Environment, was demonstrated to be a novel and successful tool for full-scale CH4 and N2O quantification from WWTPs. The method combines a controlled release of tracer gas from the facility with concentration measurements downwind of the plant (Mønster et al., 2014; Yoshida et al., 2014). TDM in general is based on the assumption that a tracer gas released at an emission source, in this case a WWTP, disperses into the atmosphere in the same way as the GHG emitted from process units. Since the ratio of their concentrations remains constant along their atmospheric dispersion, the GHG emission rate can be calculated using the following expression when the tracer gas release rate is known: EGHG=Qtr*(CGHG/Ctr)*(MWGHG/MWtr) EGHG is the GHG emission in mass per time, Qtr is the tracer release in mass per time, CGHG and Ctr are the concentrations measured downwind in parts per billion subtracted of their background values and integrated over the whole plume, and MWGHG and MWtr are the molar weights of GHG and tracer gas respectively (Mønster et al. 2014). In this study, acetylene (C2H2) was used as tracer. Downwind plume concentrations were measured driving along transects with two cavity ring down spectrometers (Yoshida et al., 2014). TDM was successfully applied in different seasons at several Scandinavian WWTPs characterized by

  10. Radiation in fog: quantification of the impact on fog liquid water based on ground-based remote sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Wærsted

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Radiative cooling and heating impact the liquid water balance of fog and therefore play an important role in determining their persistence or dissipation. We demonstrate that a quantitative analysis of the radiation-driven condensation and evaporation is possible in real time using ground-based remote sensing observations (cloud radar, ceilometer, microwave radiometer. Seven continental fog events in midlatitude winter are studied, and the radiative processes are further explored through sensitivity studies. The longwave (LW radiative cooling of the fog is able to produce 40–70 g m−2 h−1 of liquid water by condensation when the fog liquid water path exceeds 30 g m−2 and there are no clouds above the fog, which corresponds to renewing the fog water in 0.5–2 h. The variability is related to fog temperature and atmospheric humidity, with warmer fog below a drier atmosphere producing more liquid water. The appearance of a cloud layer above the fog strongly reduces the LW cooling relative to a situation with no cloud above; the effect is strongest for a low cloud, when the reduction can reach 100 %. Consequently, the appearance of clouds above will perturb the liquid water balance in the fog and may therefore induce fog dissipation. Shortwave (SW radiative heating by absorption by fog droplets is smaller than the LW cooling, but it can contribute significantly, inducing 10–15 g m−2 h−1 of evaporation in thick fog at (winter midday. The absorption of SW radiation by unactivated aerosols inside the fog is likely less than 30 % of the SW absorption by the water droplets, in most cases. However, the aerosols may contribute more significantly if the air mass contains a high concentration of absorbing aerosols. The absorbed radiation at the surface can reach 40–120 W m−2 during the daytime depending on the fog thickness. As in situ measurements indicate that 20–40 % of this energy is transferred to the fog

  11. Testing integrated sensors for cooperative remote monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filby, E.E.; Smith, T.E.; Albano, R.K.; Andersen, M.K. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lucero, R.L.; Tolk, K.M.; Andrews, N.S. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The Modular Integrated Monitoring System (MIMS) program, with Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) as the lead lab, was devised to furnish sensors and integrated multi-sensor systems for cooperative remote monitoring. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), via the Center for Integrated Monitoring and Control (CIMC), provides realistic field tests of the sensors and sensor-integration approach for the MIMS, and for other similar programs. This has two important goals: it helps insure that these systems are truly read for use, and provides a platform so they can be demonstrated for potential users. A remote monitoring test/demonstration has been initiated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) to track the movement of spent nuclear fuel from one storage location to another, using a straddle carrier and shielded cask combination. Radiation monitors, motion sensors, videocameras, and other devices from several US Department of Energy (DOE) labs and commercial vendors were linked on the network. Currently, project personnel are collecting raw data from this large array of sensors, without trying to program any special network activities or other responses. These data will be used to determine which devices can actually provide useful information for a cooperative monitoring situation, versus those that may be redundant.

  12. Trend analysis of greenhouse gases over Europe measured by a network of ground-based remote FTIR instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Gardiner

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the statistical analysis of annual trends in long term datasets of greenhouse gas measurements taken over ten or more years. The analysis technique employs a bootstrap resampling method to determine both the long-term and intra-annual variability of the datasets, together with the uncertainties on the trend values. The method has been applied to data from a European network of ground-based solar FTIR instruments to determine the trends in the tropospheric, stratospheric and total columns of ozone, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, methane, ethane and HCFC-22. The suitability of the method has been demonstrated through statistical validation of the technique, and comparison with ground-based in-situ measurements and 3-D atmospheric models.

  13. Ground-based simulation of telepresence for materials science experiments. [remote viewing and control of processes aboard Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, James C.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.; Bonner, Mary JO; Hahn, Richard C.; Herbach, Bruce

    1989-01-01

    A series of ground-based telepresence experiments have been performed to determine the minimum video frame rate and resolution required for the successive performance of materials science experiments in space. The approach used is to simulate transmission between earth and space station with transmission between laboratories on earth. The experiments include isothermal dendrite growth, physical vapor transport, and glass melting. Modifications of existing apparatus, software developed, and the establishment of an inhouse network are reviewed.

  14. Ground-based simulation of telepresence for materials science experiments. [remote viewing and control of processes aboard Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, James C.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.; Bonner, Mary JO; Hahn, Richard C.; Herbach, Bruce

    1989-01-01

    A series of ground-based telepresence experiments have been performed to determine the minimum video frame rate and resolution required for the successive performance of materials science experiments in space. The approach used is to simulate transmission between earth and space station with transmission between laboratories on earth. The experiments include isothermal dendrite growth, physical vapor transport, and glass melting. Modifications of existing apparatus, software developed, and the establishment of an inhouse network are reviewed.

  15. Thermal infrared remote sensing sensors, methods, applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kuenzer, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the state of the art in the field of thermal infrared remote sensing. Temperature is one of the most important physical environmental variables monitored by earth observing remote sensing systems. Temperature ranges define the boundaries of habitats on our planet. Thermal hazards endanger our resources and well-being. In this book renowned international experts have contributed chapters on currently available thermal sensors as well as innovative plans for future missions. Further chapters discuss the underlying physics and image processing techni

  16. Geometric calibration of high-resolution remote sensing sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Hong-you; GU Xing-fa; TAO Yu; QIAO Chao-fei

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces the applications of high-resolution remote sensing imagery and the necessity of geometric calibration for remote sensing sensors considering assurance of the geometric accuracy of remote sensing imagery. Then the paper analyzes the general methodology of geometric calibration. Taking the DMC sensor geometric calibration as an example, the paper discusses the whole calibration procedure. Finally, it gave some concluding remarks on geometric calibration of high-resolution remote sensing sensors.

  17. Development of a remote vital signs sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladd, M.D.; Pacheco, M.S.; Rivas, R.R.

    1997-06-01

    This paper describes the work at Sandia National Laboratories to develop sensors that remotely detect unique life-form characteristics, such as breathing patterns or heartbeat patterns. This paper will address the Technical Support Working Group`s (TSWG) objective: to develop a remote vital signs detector which can be used to assess someone`s malevolent intent. The basic concept of operations for the projects, system development issues, and the preliminary results for a radar device currently in-house and the implications for implementation are described. A survey that identified the in-house technology currently being evaluated is reviewed, as well as ideas for other potential technologies to explore. A radar unit for breathing and heartbeat detection is being tested, and the applicability of infrared technology is being explored. The desire for rapid prototyping is driving the need for off-the-shelf technology. As a conclusion, current status and future directions of the effort are reviewed.

  18. observation and analysis of the structure of winter precipitation-generating clouds using ground-based sensor measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez José Luis, Marcos; Gómez José Luis, Sánchez; Campano Laura, López; Ortega Eduardo, García; Suances Andrés, Merino; González Sergio, Fernández; Salvador Estíbaliz, Gascón; González Lucía, Hermida

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we used a 28-day database corresponding to December, January and February of 2011/2012 and 2012/2013 campaigns to analyze cloud structure that produced precipitation in the Sierra Norte near Madrid, Spain. We used remote sensing measurements, both active type like the K-band Micro Rain Radar (MRR) and passive type like the Radiometrics MP-3000A multichannel microwave radiometer. Using reflectivity data from the MRR, we determined the important microphysical parameters of Ice Water Content (IWC) and its integrated value over the atmospheric column, or Ice Water Path (IWP). Among the measurements taken by the MP-3000A were Liquid Water Path (LWP) and Integrated Water Vapor (IWV). By representing these data together, sharp declines in LWP and IWV were evident, coincident with IWP increases. This result indicates the ability of a K-band radar to measure the amount of ice in the atmospheric column, simultaneously revealing the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen mechanism. We also used a Present Weather Sensor (VPF-730; Biral Ltd., Bristol, UK) to determine the type and amount of precipitation at the surface. With these data, we used regression equations to establish the relationship between visibility and precipitation intensity. In addition, through theoretical precipitation visibility-intensity relationships, we estimated the type of crystal, degree of accretion (riming), and moisture content of fallen snow crystals.

  19. Monitoring Animal Behaviour and Environmental Interactions Using Wireless Sensor Networks, GPS Collars and Satellite Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Corke

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Remote monitoring of animal behaviour in the environment can assist in managing both the animal and its environmental impact. GPS collars which record animal locations with high temporal frequency allow researchers to monitor both animal behaviour and interactions with the environment. These ground-based sensors can be combined with remotely-sensed satellite images to understand animal-landscape interactions. The key to combining these technologies is communication methods such as wireless sensor networks (WSNs. We explore this concept using a case-study from an extensive cattle enterprise in northern Australia and demonstrate the potential for combining GPS collars and satellite images in a WSN to monitor behavioural preferences and social behaviour of cattle.

  20. Wearable Sensors for Remote Health Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Sumit; Mondal, Tapas; Deen, M Jamal

    2017-01-12

    Life expectancy in most countries has been increasing continually over the several few decades thanks to significant improvements in medicine, public health, as well as personal and environmental hygiene. However, increased life expectancy combined with falling birth rates are expected to engender a large aging demographic in the near future that would impose significant  burdens on the socio-economic structure of these countries. Therefore, it is essential to develop cost-effective, easy-to-use systems for the sake of elderly healthcare and well-being. Remote health monitoring, based on non-invasive and wearable sensors, actuators and modern communication and information technologies offers an efficient and cost-effective solution that allows the elderly to continue to live in their comfortable home environment instead of expensive healthcare facilities. These systems will also allow healthcare personnel to monitor important physiological signs of their patients in real time, assess health conditions and provide feedback from distant facilities. In this paper, we have presented and compared several low-cost and non-invasive health and activity monitoring systems that were reported in recent years. A survey on textile-based sensors that can potentially be used in wearable systems is also presented. Finally, compatibility of several communication technologies as well as future perspectives and research challenges in remote monitoring systems will be discussed.

  1. Wearable Sensors for Remote Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Majumder

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Life expectancy in most countries has been increasing continually over the several few decades thanks to significant improvements in medicine, public health, as well as personal and environmental hygiene. However, increased life expectancy combined with falling birth rates are expected to engender a large aging demographic in the near future that would impose significant  burdens on the socio-economic structure of these countries. Therefore, it is essential to develop cost-effective, easy-to-use systems for the sake of elderly healthcare and well-being. Remote health monitoring, based on non-invasive and wearable sensors, actuators and modern communication and information technologies offers an efficient and cost-effective solution that allows the elderly to continue to live in their comfortable home environment instead of expensive healthcare facilities. These systems will also allow healthcare personnel to monitor important physiological signs of their patients in real time, assess health conditions and provide feedback from distant facilities. In this paper, we have presented and compared several low-cost and non-invasive health and activity monitoring systems that were reported in recent years. A survey on textile-based sensors that can potentially be used in wearable systems is also presented. Finally, compatibility of several communication technologies as well as future perspectives and research challenges in remote monitoring systems will be discussed.

  2. Wearable Sensors for Remote Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Sumit; Mondal, Tapas; Deen, M. Jamal

    2017-01-01

    Life expectancy in most countries has been increasing continually over the several few decades thanks to significant improvements in medicine, public health, as well as personal and environmental hygiene. However, increased life expectancy combined with falling birth rates are expected to engender a large aging demographic in the near future that would impose significant  burdens on the socio-economic structure of these countries. Therefore, it is essential to develop cost-effective, easy-to-use systems for the sake of elderly healthcare and well-being. Remote health monitoring, based on non-invasive and wearable sensors, actuators and modern communication and information technologies offers an efficient and cost-effective solution that allows the elderly to continue to live in their comfortable home environment instead of expensive healthcare facilities. These systems will also allow healthcare personnel to monitor important physiological signs of their patients in real time, assess health conditions and provide feedback from distant facilities. In this paper, we have presented and compared several low-cost and non-invasive health and activity monitoring systems that were reported in recent years. A survey on textile-based sensors that can potentially be used in wearable systems is also presented. Finally, compatibility of several communication technologies as well as future perspectives and research challenges in remote monitoring systems will be discussed. PMID:28085085

  3. Ground-Based Remote or In Situ Measurement of Vertical Profiles of Wind in the Lower Troposphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, Andrew; Newman, Jennifer

    2017-02-24

    Knowledge of winds in the lower troposphere is essential for a range of applications, including weather forecasting, transportation, natural hazards, and wind energy. This presentation focuses on the measurement of vertical profiles of wind in the lower troposphere for wind energy applications. This presentation introduces the information that wind energy site development and operations require, how it used, and the benefits and problems of current measurements from in-situ measurements and remote sensing. The development of commercial Doppler wind lidar systems over the last 10 years are shown, along with the lessons learned from this experience. Finally, potential developments in wind profiling aimed at reducing uncertainty and increasing data availability are introduced.

  4. Absorption Properties of Mediterranean Aerosols Obtained from Multi-year Ground-based and Satellite Remote Sensing Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, M.; Dubovik, O.; Nabat, P.; Dulac, F.; Kahn, R.; Sciare, J.; Paronis, D.; Leon, J. F.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol absorption properties are of high importance to assess aerosol impact on regional climate. This study presents an analysis of aerosol absorption products obtained over the Mediterranean Basin or land stations in the region from multi-year ground-based AERONET and satellite observations with a focus on the Absorbing Aerosol Optical Depth (AAOD), Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and their spectral dependence. The AAOD and Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE) data set is composed of daily averaged AERONET level 2 data from a total of 22 Mediterranean stations having long time series, mainly under the influence of urban-industrial aerosols and/or soil dust. This data set covers the 17 yr period 1996-2012 with most data being from 2003-2011 (approximately 89 percent of level-2 AAOD data). Since AERONET level-2 absorption products require a high aerosol load (AOD at 440 nm greater than 0.4), which is most often related to the presence of desert dust, we also consider level-1.5 SSA data, despite their higher uncertainty, and filter out data with an Angstrom exponent less than 1.0 in order to study absorption by carbonaceous aerosols. The SSA data set includes both AERONET level-2 and satellite level-3 products. Satellite-derived SSA data considered are monthly level 3 products mapped at the regional scale for the spring and summer seasons that exhibit the largest aerosol loads. The satellite SSA dataset includes the following products: (i) Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) over 2000-2011, (ii) Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) near-UV algorithm over 2004-2010, and (iii) MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Deep-Blue algorithm over 2005-2011, derived only over land in dusty conditions. Sun-photometer observations show that values of AAOD at 440 nm vary between 0.024 +/- 0.01 (resp. 0.040 +/- 0.01) and 0.050 +/- 0.01 (0.055 +/- 0.01) for urban (dusty) sites. Analysis shows that the Mediterranean urban-industrial aerosols appear "moderately

  5. Simulated Transmission of the Dengue Virus Across the US-Mexico Border Using Remotely Sensed and Ground Based Weather Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Cory; Quattrochi, Dale A.

    2015-01-01

    Incidence of dengue fever, caused by a mosquito transmitted virus, have increased in the Americas during recent decades. In the US, local transmission has been reported in southern Texas and Florida. However, despite its close proximity to dengue endemic areas in Mexico and the presence of a primary mosquito vector, there are no reports of local transmission in Arizona. Many studies have demonstrated that weather influences dengue virus transmission by regulating vector development rates, vector habitat availability, and the duration of the virus extrinsic incubation period (EIP). The EIP, the period between mosquito infection and the ability for it to retransmit the virus, is especially important given its high sensitivity to temperature and the short lifespan of mosquitoes. Other studies, however, have suggested that human related factors such as socioeconomic status and herd immunity may explain much of the disparity in dengue incidence in the US-Mexico border region. Using a meteorologically driven model of vector population dynamics and virus transmission we compare simulations of dengue fever cases in southern Arizona and northern Mexico. A Monte Carlo approach is employed to select parameter values by evaluating simulations in Hermosillo Mexico with reported dengue fever case data. Simulations that replicate the case data best are retained and rerun using remotely sensed climate data from other Arizona and Mexico locations to determine the relative influence of weather on virus transmission. Although human and environmental factors undoubtedly influence dengue transmission in the US-Mexico border regions, weather is a major facilitator of the transmission process.

  6. Estimation of Hydraulic properties of a sandy soil using ground-based active and passive microwave remote sensing

    KAUST Repository

    Jonard, François

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we experimentally analyzed the feasibility of estimating soil hydraulic properties from 1.4 GHz radiometer and 0.8-2.6 GHz ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data. Radiometer and GPR measurements were performed above a sand box, which was subjected to a series of vertical water content profiles in hydrostatic equilibrium with a water table located at different depths. A coherent radiative transfer model was used to simulate brightness temperatures measured with the radiometer. GPR data were modeled using full-wave layered medium Green\\'s functions and an intrinsic antenna representation. These forward models were inverted to optimally match the corresponding passive and active microwave data. This allowed us to reconstruct the water content profiles, and thereby estimate the sand water retention curve described using the van Genuchten model. Uncertainty of the estimated hydraulic parameters was quantified using the Bayesian-based DREAM algorithm. For both radiometer and GPR methods, the results were in close agreement with in situ time-domain reflectometry (TDR) estimates. Compared with radiometer and TDR, much smaller confidence intervals were obtained for GPR, which was attributed to its relatively large bandwidth of operation, including frequencies smaller than 1.4 GHz. These results offer valuable insights into future potential and emerging challenges in the development of joint analyses of passive and active remote sensing data to retrieve effective soil hydraulic properties.

  7. Estimation of leaf area index using ground-based remote sensed NDVI measurements: validation and comparison with two indirect techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontailler, J.-Y. [Univ. Paris-Sud XI, Dept. d' Ecophysiologie Vegetale, Orsay Cedex (France); Hymus, G.J.; Drake, B.G. [Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Kennedy Space Center, Florida (United States)

    2003-06-01

    This study took place in an evergreen scrub oak ecosystem in Florida. Vegetation reflectance was measured in situ with a laboratory-made sensor in the red (640-665 nm) and near-infrared (750-950 nm) bands to calculate the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and derive the leaf area index (LAI). LAI estimates from this technique were compared with two other nondestructive techniques, intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and hemispherical photographs, in four contrasting 4 m{sup 2} plots in February 2000 and two 4m{sup 2} plots in June 2000. We used Beer's law to derive LAI from PAR interception and gap fraction distribution to derive LAI from photographs. The plots were harvested manually after the measurements to determine a 'true' LAI value and to calculate a light extinction coefficient (k). The technique based on Beer's law was affected by a large variation of the extinction coefficient, owing to the larger impact of branches in winter when LAI was low. Hemispherical photographs provided satisfactory estimates, slightly overestimated in winter because of the impact of branches or underestimated in summer because of foliage clumping. NDVI provided the best fit, showing only saturation in the densest plot (LAI = 3.5). We conclude that in situ measurement of NDVI is an accurate and simple technique to nondestructively assess LAI in experimental plots or in crops if saturation remains acceptable. (author)

  8. Ground-based remote sensing profiling and numerical weather prediction model to manage nuclear power plants meteorological surveillance in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Calpini

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The meteorological surveillance of the four nuclear power plants in Switzerland is of first importance in a densely populated area such as the Swiss Plateau. The project "Centrales Nucléaires et Météorologie" CN-MET aimed at providing a new security tool based on one hand on the development of a high resolution numerical weather prediction (NWP model. The latter is providing essential nowcasting information in case of a radioactive release from a nuclear power plant in Switzerland. On the other hand, the model input over the Swiss Plateau is generated by a dedicated network of surface and upper air observations including remote sensing instruments (wind profilers and temperature/humidity passive microwave radiometers. This network is built upon three main sites ideally located for measuring the inflow/outflow and central conditions of the main wind field in the planetary boundary layer over the Swiss Plateau, as well as a number of surface automatic weather stations (AWS. The network data are assimilated in real-time into the fine grid NWP model using a rapid update cycle of eight runs per day (one forecast every three hours. This high resolution NWP model has replaced the former security tool based on in situ observations (in particular one meteorological mast at each of the power plants and a local dispersion model. It is used to forecast the dynamics of the atmosphere in the planetary boundary layer (typically the first 4 km above ground layer and over a time scale of 24 h. This tool provides at any time (e.g. starting at the initial time of a nuclear power plant release the best picture of the 24-h evolution of the air mass over the Swiss Plateau and furthermore generates the input data (in the form of simulated values substituting in situ observations required for the local dispersion model used at each of the nuclear power plants locations. This paper is presenting the concept and two validation studies as well as the results of an

  9. Intelligent algorithms for persistent and pervasive sensing in systems comprised of wireless ad hoc networks of ground-based sensors and mobile infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortos, William S.

    2007-04-01

    With the development of low-cost, durable unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), it is now practical to perform persistent sensing and target tracking autonomously over broad surveillance areas. These vehicles can sense the environment directly through onboard active sensors, or indirectly when aimed toward ground targets in a mission environment by ground-based passive sensors operating wirelessly as an ad hoc network in the environment. The combination of the swarm intelligence of the airborne infrastructure comprised of UAVs with the ant-like collaborative behavior of the unattended ground sensors creates a system capable of both persistent and pervasive sensing of mission environment, such that, the continuous collection, analysis and tracking of targets from sensor data received from the ground can be achieved. Mobile software agents are used to implement intelligent algorithms for the communications, formation control and sensor data processing in this composite configuration. The enabling mobile agents are organized in a hierarchy for the three stages of processing in the distributed system: target detection, location and recognition from the collaborative data processing among active ground-sensor nodes; transfer of the target information processed on the ground to the UAV swarm overhead; and formation control and sensor activation of the UAV swarm for sustained ground-target surveillance and tracking. Intelligent algorithms are presented that can adapt to the operation of the composite system to target dynamics and system resources. Established routines, appropriate to the processing needs of each stage, are selected as preferred based on their published use in similar scenarios, ability to be distributively implemented over the set of processors at system nodes, and ability to conserve the limited resources at the ground nodes to extend the lifetime of the pervasive network. In this paper, the performance of this distributed, collaborative system concept for

  10. AIRCRAFT MOTION PARAMETER ESTIMATION VIA MULTIPATH TIME-DELAY USING A SINGLE GROUND-BASED PASSIVE ACOUSTIC SENSOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dai Hongyan; Zou Hongxing

    2007-01-01

    The time-frequency analysis of the signal acquired by a single ground-based microphone shows a two-dimensional interference pattern in the time-frequency plane,which is caused by the time delay of the received signal emitted from a low flying aircraft via the direct path and the ground-reflected path.A model is developed for estimating the motion parameters of an aircraft flying along a straight line at a constant height and with a constant speed.Monte Carlo simulation results and experimental results are presented to validate the model,and an error analysis of the model is presented to verify the effectiveness of the estimation scheme advocated.

  11. Sentinel-1 and ground-based sensors for a continuous monitoring of the Corvara landslide kinematic (South Tirol, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlögel, Romy; Darvishi, Mehdi; Cuozzo, Giovanni; Kofler, Christian; Rutzinger, Martin; Zieher, Thomas; Toschi, Isabella; Remondino, Fabio

    2017-04-01

    Sentinel-1 mission allows us to have Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) acquisitions over large areas every 6 days with spatial resolution of 20 m. This new open-source generation of satellites has enhanced the capabilities for continuously studying earth surface changes. Over the past two decades, several studies have demonstrated the potential of Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) for detecting and quantifying land surface deformation. DInSAR limitations and challenges are linked to the SAR properties and the field conditions (especially in Alpine environments) leading to spatial and temporal decorrelation of the SAR signal. High temporal decorrelation can be caused by changes in vegetation (particularly in non-urban areas), atmospheric conditions or high ground surface velocity. In this study, kinematics of the complex and vegetated Corvara landslide, situated in Val Badia (South Tirol, Italy), are monitored by a network of 3 permanent and 13 monthly Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) stations. The slope displacement rates are found to be highly unsteady and reach several meters a year. This analysis focuses on evaluating the limitations of Sentinel-1 imagery processed with Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) technique in comparison to ground-based measurements for assessing the landslide kinematic linked to meteorological conditions. Selecting some particular acquisitions, coherence thresholds and unwrapping processes gives various results in terms of reliability and accuracy supporting the understanding of the landslide velocity field. The evolution of the coherence and phase signals are studied according to the changing field conditions and the monitored ground-based displacements. DInSAR deformation maps and residual topographic heights are finally compared with difference of high resolution Digital Elevation Models at local scale. This research is conducted within the project LEMONADE (http://lemonade.mountainresearch.at) funded

  12. Ground-based remote sensing of O3 by high- and medium-resolution FTIR spectrometers over the Mexico City basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza-Medina, Eddy F.; Stremme, Wolfgang; Bezanilla, Alejandro; Grutter, Michel; Schneider, Matthias; Hase, Frank; Blumenstock, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    We present atmospheric ozone (O3) profiles measured over central Mexico between November 2012 and February 2014 from two different ground-based FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) solar absorption experiments. The first instrument offers very high-resolution spectra and contributes to NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change). It is located at a mountain observatory about 1700 m above the Mexico City basin. The second instrument has a medium spectral resolution and is located inside Mexico City at a horizontal distance of about 60 km from the mountain observatory. It is documented that the retrieval with the high- and medium-resolution experiments provides O3 variations for four and three independent atmospheric altitude ranges, respectively, and the theoretically estimated errors of these profile data are mostly within 10 %. The good quality of the data is empirically demonstrated above the tropopause by intercomparing the two FTIR O3 data, and for the boundary layer by comparing the Mexico City FTIR O3 data with in situ O3 surface data. Furthermore, we develop a combined boundary layer O3 remote sensing product that uses the retrieval results of both FTIR experiments, and we use theoretical and empirical evaluations to document the improvements that can be achieved by such a combination.

  13. Ground-based remote sensing of O3 by high- and medium-resolution FTIR spectrometers over the Mexico City basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. F. Plaza-Medina

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We present atmospheric ozone (O3 profiles measured over central Mexico between November 2012 and February 2014 from two different ground-based FTIR (Fourier transform infrared solar absorption experiments. The first instrument offers very high-resolution spectra and contributes to NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change. It is located at a mountain observatory about 1700 m above the Mexico City basin. The second instrument has a medium spectral resolution and is located inside Mexico City at a horizontal distance of about 60 km from the mountain observatory. It is documented that the retrieval with the high- and medium-resolution experiments provides O3 variations for four and three independent atmospheric altitude ranges, respectively, and the theoretically estimated errors of these profile data are mostly within 10 %. The good quality of the data is empirically demonstrated above the tropopause by intercomparing the two FTIR O3 data, and for the boundary layer by comparing the Mexico City FTIR O3 data with in situ O3 surface data. Furthermore, we develop a combined boundary layer O3 remote sensing product that uses the retrieval results of both FTIR experiments, and we use theoretical and empirical evaluations to document the improvements that can be achieved by such a combination.

  14. Super-cooled liquid water topped sub-arctic clouds and precipitation - investigation based on combination of ground-based in-situ and remote-sensing observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsikko, Anne; Brus, David; O'Connor, Ewan J.; Filioglou, Maria; Komppula, Mika; Romakkaniemi, Sami

    2017-04-01

    In the high and mid latitudes super-cooled liquid water layers are frequently observed on top of clouds. These layers are difficult to forecast with numerical weather prediction models, even though, they have strong influence on atmospheric radiative properties, cloud microphysical properties, and subsequently, precipitation. This work investigates properties of super-cooled liquid water layer topped sub-arctic clouds and precipitation observed with ground-based in-situ (cloud probes) and remote-sensing (a cloud radar, Doppler and multi-wavelength lidars) instrumentation during two-month long Pallas Cloud Experiment (PaCE 2015) in autumn 2015. Analysis is based on standard Cloudnet scheme supplemented with new retrieval products of the specific clouds and their properties. Combination of two scales of observation provides new information on properties of clouds and precipitation in the sub-arctic Pallas region. Current status of results will be presented during the conference. The authors acknowledge financial support by the Academy of Finland (Centre of Excellence Programme, grant no 272041; and ICINA project, grant no 285068), the ACTRIS2 - European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 654109, the KONE foundation, and the EU FP7 project BACCHUS (grant no 603445).

  15. Integrated Analysis of Asian Dust Events from CALIPSO Space Lidar Data in Conjunction with Passive Remote Sensing and Ground-Based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, H.; Sokolik, I. N.; Winker, D. M.; Kurosaki, Y.

    2008-05-01

    The vast arid regions of East Asia are active dust sources. Each spring, large amounts of mineral dust are emitted into the atmosphere, affecting the regional air quality, environment and climate. This study presents analyses of Asian dust events by integrating CALIPSO lidar data with A-Train satellite multi-sensor observations (Ozone Monitoring Instrument, OMI, and Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, MODIS) as well as ground-based observations. We use data from WMO meteorological stations located in China, Mongolia, Korea and Japan that report different present weather types related to dust events. Also, lidar data from Asian network sites were included in the analysis. The focus is on dust events that occurred during the spring seasons of 2006- 2008. The capability of CALIPSO to detect dust was investigated by analyzing the CALIPSO features against independent observations for selected CALPSO overpasses on a case-by-case basis. The changes in the linear depolarization ratio were analyzed in conjunction with T-matrix optical modeling to constrain the particle nonsphericity and size distribution. The dust properties and vertical distribution in different dust sources (the Taklamakan vs. Gobi) were analyzed. The evolution of dust properties during the mid-range transport was also investigated from combined CALIPSO and lidar data.

  16. Escape and evade control policies for ensuring the physical security of nonholonomic, ground-based, unattended mobile sensor nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenas, David; Stull, Christopher; Farrar, Charles

    2011-06-01

    In order to realize the wide-scale deployment of high-endurance, unattended mobile sensing technologies, it is vital to ensure the self-preservation of the sensing assets. Deployed mobile sensor nodes face a variety of physical security threats including theft, vandalism and physical damage. Unattended mobile sensor nodes must be able to respond to these threats with control policies that facilitate escape and evasion to a low-risk state. In this work the Precision Immobilization Technique (PIT) problem has been considered. The PIT maneuver is a technique that a pursuing, car-like vehicle can use to force a fleeing vehicle to abruptly turn ninety degrees to the direction of travel. The abrupt change in direction generally causes the fleeing driver to lose control and stop. The PIT maneuver was originally developed by law enforcement to end vehicular pursuits in a manner that minimizes damage to the persons and property involved. It is easy to imagine that unattended autonomous convoys could be targets of this type of action by adversarial agents. This effort focused on developing control policies unattended mobile sensor nodes could employ to escape, evade and recover from PIT-maneuver-like attacks. The development of these control policies involved both simulation as well as small-scale experimental testing. The goal of this work is to be a step toward ensuring the physical security of unattended sensor node assets.

  17. NIST in Space: Better Remote Sensors for Better Science Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA Innovative Research Grant activity conducts engineering analysis to demonstrate the feasibility and advantages of applyi?ng a breakthrough remote sensor...

  18. Vertical mass impact and features of Saharan dust intrusions derived from ground-based remote sensing in synergy with airborne in-situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba-Jabonero, Carmen; Andrey-Andrés, Javier; Gómez, Laura; Adame, José Antonio; Sorribas, Mar; Navarro-Comas, Mónica; Puentedura, Olga; Cuevas, Emilio; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    A study of the vertical mass impact of Saharan dust intrusions is presented in this work. Simultaneous ground-based remote-sensing and airborne in-situ measurements performed during the AMISOC-TNF campaign over the Tenerife area (Canary Islands) in summertime from 01 July to 11 August 2013 were used for that purpose. A particular dusty (DD) case, associated to a progressively arriving dust intrusion lasting for two days on 31 July (weak incidence) and 01 August (strong incidence), is especially investigated. AERONET AOD and AEx values were ranging, respectively, from 0.2 to 1.4 and 0.35 to 0.05 along these two days. Vertical particle size distributions within fine and coarse modes (0.16-2.8 μm range) were obtained from aircraft aerosol spectrometer measurements. Extinction profiles and Lidar Ratio (LR) values were derived from MPLNET/Micro Pulse Lidar observations. MAXDOAS measurements were also used to retrieve the height-resolved aerosol extinction for evaluation purposes in comparison to Lidar-derived profiles. The synergy between Lidar observations and airborne measurements is established in terms of the Mass Extinction Efficiency (MEE) to calculate the vertical mass concentration of Saharan dust particles. Both the optical and microphysical profilings show dust particles mostly confined in a layer of 4.3 km thickness from 1.7 to 6 km height. LR ranged between 50 and 55 sr, typical values for Saharan dust particles. In addition, this 2-day dust event mostly affected the Free Troposphere (FT), being less intense in the Boundary Layer (BL). In particular, rather high Total Mass Concentrations (TMC) were found on the stronger DD day (01 August 2013): 124, 70 and 21 μg m-3 were estimated, respectively, at FT and BL altitudes and on the near-surface level. This dust impact was enhanced due to the increase of large particles affecting the FT, but also the BL, likely due to their gravitational settling. However, the use of an assumed averaged MEE value can be

  19. Optimizing placements of ground-based snow sensors for areal snow cover estimation using a machine-learning algorithm and melt-season snow-LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroza, C.; Zheng, Z.; Glaser, S. D.; Bales, R. C.; Conklin, M. H.

    2016-12-01

    We present a structured, analytical approach to optimize ground-sensor placements based on time-series remotely sensed (LiDAR) data and machine-learning algorithms. We focused on catchments within the Merced and Tuolumne river basins, covered by the JPL Airborne Snow Observatory LiDAR program. First, we used a Gaussian mixture model to identify representative sensor locations in the space of independent variables for each catchment. Multiple independent variables that govern the distribution of snow depth were used, including elevation, slope, and aspect. Second, we used a Gaussian process to estimate the areal distribution of snow depth from the initial set of measurements. This is a covariance-based model that also estimates the areal distribution of model uncertainty based on the independent variable weights and autocorrelation. The uncertainty raster was used to strategically add sensors to minimize model uncertainty. We assessed the temporal accuracy of the method using LiDAR-derived snow-depth rasters collected in water-year 2014. In each area, optimal sensor placements were determined using the first available snow raster for the year. The accuracy in the remaining LiDAR surveys was compared to 100 configurations of sensors selected at random. We found the accuracy of the model from the proposed placements to be higher and more consistent in each remaining survey than the average random configuration. We found that a relatively small number of sensors can be used to accurately reproduce the spatial patterns of snow depth across the basins, when placed using spatial snow data. Our approach also simplifies sensor placement. At present, field surveys are required to identify representative locations for such networks, a process that is labor intensive and provides limited guarantees on the networks' representation of catchment independent variables.

  20. Specific sensors for special roles in oil spill remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carl E.; Fingas, Mervin F.

    1997-01-01

    Remote sensing is becoming an increasingly important tool for the effective direction of oil spill countermeasures. Cleanup personnel have recognized that remote sensing can increase spill cleanup efficiency. The general public expects that the government and/or the spiller know the location and the extent of the contamination. The Emergencies Science Division (ESD) of Environment Canada, is responsible for remote sensing during oil spill emergencies along Canada's three coastlines, extensive inland waterways, as well as over the entire land mass. In addition to providing operational remote sensing, ESD conducts research into the development of airborne oil spill remote sensors, including the Scanning Laser Environmental Airborne Fluorosensor (SLEAF) and the Laser Ultrasonic Remote SEnsing of Oil Thickness (LURSOT) sensor. It has long been recognized that there is not one sensor or 'magic bullet' which is capable of detecting oil and related petroleum products in all environments and spill scenarios. There are sensors which possess a wide filed-of-view and can therefore be used to map the overall extent of the spill. These sensors, however lack the specificity required to positively identify oil and related products. This is even more of a problem along complicated beach and shoreline environments where several substrates are present. The specific laser- based sensors under development by Environment Canada are designed to respond to special roles in oil spill response. In particular, the SLEAF is being developed to unambiguously detect and map oil and related petroleum products in complicated marine and shoreline environments where other non-specific sensors experience difficulty. The role of the SLEAF would be to confirm or reject suspected oil contamination sites that have been targeted by the non- specific sensors. This confirmation will release response crews from the time consuming task of physically inspecting each site, and direct crews to sites that

  1. Interactive display/graphics systems for remote sensor data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppler, W. G.; Loe, D. L.; Wilson, E. L.; Whitley, S. L.; Sachen, R. J.

    1970-01-01

    A color-television display system and interactive graphics equipment on-line to an IBM 360/44 computer are used to develop a variety of interactive displays which aid in analyzing remote sensor data. These interactive displays are used to: (1) analyze data from a multispectral scanner; (2) develop automatic pattern recognition systems based on multispectral scanner measurements; and (3) analyze data from non-imaging sensors such as the infrared radiometer and microwave scatterometer.

  2. Laser-based sensors for oil spill remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carl E.; Fingas, Mervin F.; Mullin, Joseph V.

    1997-07-01

    Remote sensing is becoming an increasingly important tool for the effective direction of oil spill countermeasures. Cleanup personnel have recognized that remote sensing can increase spill cleanup efficiency. It has long been recognized that there is no one sensor which is capable of detecting oil and related petroleum products in all environments and spill scenarios. There are sensors which possess a wide field-of- view and can therefore be used to map the overall extent of the spill. These sensors, however lack the capability to positively identify oil and related products, especially along complicated beach and shoreline environments where several substrates are present. The laser-based sensors under development by the Emergencies Science Division of Environment Canada are designed to fill specific roles in oil spill response. The scanning laser environmental airborne fluorosensor (SLEAF) is being developed to detect and map oil and related petroleum products in complex marine and shoreline environments where other non-specific sensors experience difficulty. The role of the SLEAF would be to confirm or reject suspected oil contamination sites that have been targeted by the non-specific sensors. This confirmation will release response crews from the time-consuming task of physically inspecting each site, and direct crews to sites that require remediation. The laser ultrasonic remote sensing of oil thickness (LURSOT) sensor will provide an absolute measurement of oil thickness from an airborne platform. There are presently no sensors available, either airborne or in the laboratory which can provide an absolute measurement of oil thickness. This information is necessary for the effective direction of spill countermeasures such as dispersant application and in-situ burning. This paper describes the development of laser-based airborne oil spill remote sensing instrumentation at Environment Canada and identifies the anticipated benefits of the use of this technology

  3. Application of spectral analysis techniques to the intercomparison of aerosol data - Part 4: Combined maximum covariance analysis to bridge the gap between multi-sensor satellite retrievals and ground-based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Carlson, B. E.; Lacis, A. A.

    2014-04-01

    The development of remote sensing techniques has greatly advanced our knowledge of atmospheric aerosols. Various satellite sensors and the associated retrieval algorithms all add to the information of global aerosol variability, while well-designed surface networks provide time series of highly accurate measurements at specific locations. In studying the variability of aerosol properties, aerosol climate effects, and constraining aerosol fields in climate models, it is essential to make the best use of all of the available information. In the previous three parts of this series, we demonstrated the usefulness of several spectral decomposition techniques in the analysis and comparison of temporal and spatial variability of aerosol optical depth using satellite and ground-based measurements. Specifically, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) successfully captures and isolates seasonal and interannual variability from different aerosol source regions, Maximum Covariance Analysis (MCA) provides a means to verify the variability in one satellite dataset against Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data, and Combined Principal Component Analysis (CPCA) realized parallel comparison among multi-satellite, multi-sensor datasets. As the final part of the study, this paper introduces a novel technique that integrates both multi-sensor datasets and ground observations, and thus effectively bridges the gap between these two types of measurements. The Combined Maximum Covariance Analysis (CMCA) decomposes the cross covariance matrix between the combined multi-sensor satellite data field and AERONET station data. We show that this new method not only confirms the seasonal and interannual variability of aerosol optical depth, aerosol source regions and events represented by different satellite datasets, but also identifies the strengths and weaknesses of each dataset in capturing the variability associated with sources, events or aerosol types. Furthermore, by examining the spread of

  4. Optical Communication System for Remote Monitoring and Adaptive Control of Distributed Ground Sensors Exhibiting Collective Intelligence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, S.M.; Stantz, K.M.; Trahan, M.W.; Wagner, J.S.

    1998-11-01

    Comprehensive management of the battle-space has created new requirements in information management, communication, and interoperability as they effect surveillance and situational awareness. The objective of this proposal is to expand intelligent controls theory to produce a uniquely powerful implementation of distributed ground-based measurement incorporating both local collective behavior, and interoperative global optimization for sensor fusion and mission oversight. By using a layered hierarchal control architecture to orchestrate adaptive reconfiguration of autonomous robotic agents, we can improve overall robustness and functionality in dynamic tactical environments without information bottlenecks. In this concept, each sensor is equipped with a miniaturized optical reflectance modulator which is interactively monitored as a remote transponder using a covert laser communication protocol from a remote mothership or operative. Robot data-sharing at the ground level can be leveraged with global evaluation criteria, including terrain overlays and remote imaging data. Information sharing and distributed intelli- gence opens up a new class of remote-sensing applications in which small single-function autono- mous observers at the local level can collectively optimize and measure large scale ground-level signals. AS the need for coverage and the number of agents grows to improve spatial resolution, cooperative behavior orchestrated by a global situational awareness umbrella will be an essential ingredient to offset increasing bandwidth requirements within the net. A system of the type described in this proposal will be capable of sensitively detecting, tracking, and mapping spatial distributions of measurement signatures which are non-stationary or obscured by clutter and inter- fering obstacles by virtue of adaptive reconfiguration. This methodology could be used, for example, to field an adaptive ground-penetrating radar for detection of underground structures in

  5. Proliferation detection using a remote resonance Raman chemical sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Chen, C.L.; Dougherty, D.R.

    1993-08-01

    The authors discussed the potential of the resonance Raman chemical sensor as a remote sensor that can be used for gases, liquids or solids. This spectroscopy has the fundamental advantage that it is based on optical fingerprints that are insensitive to environmental perturbations or excitation frequency. By taking advantage of resonance enhancement, the inelastic scattering cross-section can increase anywhere from 4 to 6 orders of magnitude which translates into increased sensing range or lower detection limits. It was also shown that differential cross-sections as small as 10{sup {minus}27} cm{sup 2}/sr do not preclude the use of this technique as being an important component in one`s remote-sensing arsenal. The results obtained in the early 1970s on various pollutants and the more recent work on atmospheric water cast a favorable light on the prospects for the successful development of a resonance Raman remote sensor. Currently, of the 20 CW agent-related {open_quotes}signature{close_quotes} chemicals that the authors have investigated, 18 show enhancements ranging from 3 to 6 orders of magnitude. The absolute magnitudes of the measured resonance enhanced Raman cross-sections for these 18 chemicals suggest that detection and identification of trace quantities of the {open_quotes}signature{close_quotes} chemicals, through a remote resonance Raman chemical sensor, could be achieved.

  6. Fire behavior sensor package remote trigger design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan Jimenez; Jason Forthofer; James Reardon; Bret Butler

    2007-01-01

    Fire behavior characteristics (such as temperature, radiant and total heat flux, 2- and 3-dimensional velocities, and air flow) are extremely difficult to measure insitu. Although insitu sensor packages are capable of such measurements in realtime, it is also essential to acquire video documentation as a means of better understanding the fire behavior data recorded by...

  7. Sensor Conditioning for Ultrasonic Remote Sensing Immersion

    OpenAIRE

    Breton, Sylvie; Benbouzid, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Ultrasonic detection has many applications in military, medical, marine biology, and physics domains. This paper presents then an emitting signal design for several immersion applications such as liquid level measurement, wall detection for submarine robots, and fish species behavior study. The designed and realized circuits are very simple, of flexible use, and cost-effective. Sensor sealing problems are also discussed in this paper.

  8. Remote monitoring of biodynamic activity using electric potential sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harl, C J; Prance, R J; Prance, H [Centre for Physical Electronics and Quantum Technology, Department of Engineering and Design, School of Science and Technology, University of Sussex, Brighton, BN1 9QT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: c.j.harland@sussex.ac.uk

    2008-12-01

    Previous work in applying the electric potential sensor to the monitoring of body electrophysiological signals has shown that it is now possible to monitor these signals without needing to make any electrical contact with the body. Conventional electrophysiology makes use of electrodes which are placed in direct electrical contact with the skin. The electric potential sensor requires no cutaneous electrical contact, it operates by sensing the displacement current using a capacitive coupling. When high resolution body electrophysiology is required a strong (capacitive) coupling is used to maximise the collected signal. However, in remote applications where there is typically an air-gap between the body and the sensor only a weak coupling can be achieved. In this paper we demonstrate that the electric potential sensor can be successfully used for the remote sensing and monitoring of bioelectric activity. We show examples of heart-rate measurements taken from a seated subject using sensors mounted in the chair. We also show that it is possible to monitor body movements on the opposite side of a wall to the sensor. These sensing techniques have biomedical applications for non-contact monitoring of electrophysiological conditions and can be applied to passive through-the-wall surveillance systems for security applications.

  9. Acoustic sensor for remote measuring of pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kataev V. F.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with sensors based on delay lines on surface acoustic waves (SAW, having a receiving-emitting and a reflective interdigital transducers (IDT. The dependence of the reflection coefficient of SAW on type and intensity of the load was studied. The authors propose a composite delay line in which the phase of the reflection coefficient depends on the pressure. Pressure leads to a shift of the reflective IDT relative to the transceiver, because they are located on different substrates. The paper also presents functional diagrams of the interrogator.

  10. Preliminary data for the 20 May 1974, simultaneous evaluation of remote sensors experiment. [water pollution monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. W.; Batten, C. E.; Bowker, D. E.; Bressette, W. E.; Grew, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    Several remote sensors were simultaneously used to collect data over the tidal James River from Hopewell to Norfolk, Virginia. Sensors evaluated included the Multichannel-Ocean Color Sensor, multispectral scanners, and multispectral photography. Ground truth measurements and remotely sensed data are given. Preliminary analysis indicates that suspended sediment and concentrated industrial effluent are observable from all sensors.

  11. Role of passive remote sensors. Sensor System Panel report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Capabilities of present passive systems are described and the development of passive remote sensing systems for the more abundant tropospheric trace species is recommended. The combination of nadir-viewing spectrometers and solar occultation for tropospheric measurement of those gases having large stratospheric burdens is discussed. Development of a nadir-viewing instrument capable of obtaining continuous spectra in narrower bands is recommended. Gas filter radiometers for species specific measurements and development of a spectral survey instrument are discussed. Further development of aerosol retrieval algorithms, including polarization techniques, for obtaining aerosol thickness and size distributions is advised. Recommendations of specific investigations to be pursued are presented.

  12. Remote optical sensor system for E-field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzelmann, Robert; Stoehr, Andreas; Alder, Thomas; Kalinowski, D.; Schmidt, Manuel; Gross, Matthias; Jaeger, Dieter

    1998-12-01

    The concept of a remote optical sensor system for frequency selective electric field measurements will be presented. The system will be applicable to field measurement problems up to frequencies in the microwave regime. Additionally, it will provide minimum interference with the measured field, due to the optical fiber coupled sensor head. The electrooptic key components within the head of this sensor system are an array of photovoltaic cells and an electroabsorption waveguide modulator. Based on experimental results these components will be discussed and evaluated for the application within the sensor system. Furthermore, a novel fiber modulator coupling technique employing the monolithic integration of the device with InP V-grooves will be presented.

  13. Downscaling Satellite Data for Predicting Catchment-scale Root Zone Soil Moisture with Ground-based Sensors and an Ensemble Kalman Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H.; Baldwin, D. C.; Smithwick, E. A. H.

    2015-12-01

    Predicting root zone (0-100 cm) soil moisture (RZSM) content at a catchment-scale is essential for drought and flood predictions, irrigation planning, weather forecasting, and many other applications. Satellites, such as the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP), can estimate near-surface (0-5 cm) soil moisture content globally at coarse spatial resolutions. We develop a hierarchical Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) data assimilation modeling system to downscale satellite-based near-surface soil moisture and to estimate RZSM content across the Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory at a 1-m resolution in combination with ground-based soil moisture sensor data. In this example, a simple infiltration model within the EnKF-model has been parameterized for 6 soil-terrain units to forecast daily RZSM content in the catchment from 2009 - 2012 based on AMSRE. LiDAR-derived terrain variables define intra-unit RZSM variability using a novel covariance localization technique. This method also allows the mapping of uncertainty with our RZSM estimates for each time-step. A catchment-wide satellite-to-surface downscaling parameter, which nudges the satellite measurement closer to in situ near-surface data, is also calculated for each time-step. We find significant differences in predicted root zone moisture storage for different terrain units across the experimental time-period. Root mean square error from a cross-validation analysis of RZSM predictions using an independent dataset of catchment-wide in situ Time-Domain Reflectometry (TDR) measurements ranges from 0.060-0.096 cm3 cm-3, and the RZSM predictions are significantly (p State Integrated Hydrologic Modeling (PIHM) system. Uncertainty estimates are significantly (p < 0.05) correlated to cross validation error during wet and dry conditions, but more so in dry summer seasons. Developing an EnKF-model system that downscales satellite data and predicts catchment-scale RZSM content is especially timely, given the anticipated

  14. [A mobile sensor for remote detection of natural gas leakage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Wen-qing; Zhang, Yu-jun; Kan, Rui-feng; Ruan, Jun; Wang, Li-ming; Yu, Dian-qiang; Dong, Jin-ting; Han, Xiao-lei; Cui, Yi-ben; Liu, Jian-guo

    2012-02-01

    The detection of natural gas pipeline leak becomes a significant issue for body security, environmental protection and security of state property. However, the leak detection is difficult, because of the pipeline's covering many areas, operating conditions and complicated environment. A mobile sensor for remote detection of natural gas leakage based on scanning wavelength differential absorption spectroscopy (SWDAS) is introduced. The improved soft threshold wavelet denoising was proposed by analyzing the characteristics of reflection spectrum. And the results showed that the signal to noise ratio (SNR) was increased three times. When light intensity is 530 nA, the minimum remote sensitivity will be 80 ppm x m. A widely used SWDAS can make quantitative remote sensing of natural gas leak and locate the leak source precisely in a faster, safer and more intelligent way.

  15. Equivalent Sensor Radiance Generation and Remote Sensing from Model Parameters. Part 1; Equivalent Sensor Radiance Formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, Galina; DaSilva, Arlindo M.; Norris, Peter M.; Platnick, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe a general procedure for calculating equivalent sensor radiances from variables output from a global atmospheric forecast model. In order to take proper account of the discrepancies between model resolution and sensor footprint the algorithm takes explicit account of the model subgrid variability, in particular its description of the probably density function of total water (vapor and cloud condensate.) The equivalent sensor radiances are then substituted into an operational remote sensing algorithm processing chain to produce a variety of remote sensing products that would normally be produced from actual sensor output. This output can then be used for a wide variety of purposes such as model parameter verification, remote sensing algorithm validation, testing of new retrieval methods and future sensor studies. We show a specific implementation using the GEOS-5 model, the MODIS instrument and the MODIS Adaptive Processing System (MODAPS) Data Collection 5.1 operational remote sensing cloud algorithm processing chain (including the cloud mask, cloud top properties and cloud optical and microphysical properties products.) We focus on clouds and cloud/aerosol interactions, because they are very important to model development and improvement.

  16. Regional Drought Monitoring Based on Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Jinyoung; Im, Jungho; Park, Seonyoung

    2014-05-01

    Drought originates from the deficit of precipitation and impacts environment including agriculture and hydrological resources as it persists. The assessment and monitoring of drought has traditionally been performed using a variety of drought indices based on meteorological data, and recently the use of remote sensing data is gaining much attention due to its vast spatial coverage and cost-effectiveness. Drought information has been successfully derived from remotely sensed data related to some biophysical and meteorological variables and drought monitoring is advancing with the development of remote sensing-based indices such as the Vegetation Condition Index (VCI), Vegetation Health Index (VHI), and Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) to name a few. The Scaled Drought Condition Index (SDCI) has also been proposed to be used for humid regions proving the performance of multi-sensor data for agricultural drought monitoring. In this study, remote sensing-based hydro-meteorological variables related to drought including precipitation, temperature, evapotranspiration, and soil moisture were examined and the SDCI was improved by providing multiple blends of the multi-sensor indices for different types of drought. Multiple indices were examined together since the coupling and feedback between variables are intertwined and it is not appropriate to investigate only limited variables to monitor each type of drought. The purpose of this study is to verify the significance of each variable to monitor each type of drought and to examine the combination of multi-sensor indices for more accurate and timely drought monitoring. The weights for the blends of multiple indicators were obtained from the importance of variables calculated by non-linear optimization using a Machine Learning technique called Random Forest. The case study was performed in the Republic of Korea, which has four distinct seasons over the course of the year and contains complex topography with a variety

  17. Remote Automatic Material On-Line Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnuson, Erik

    2005-12-20

    Low cost NMR sensor for measuring moisture content of forest products. The Department of Energy (DOE) Industries of the Future (IOF) program seeks development and implementation of technologies that make industry more efficient--in particular, more energy-efficient. Quantum Magnetics, Inc. (QM), a wholly-owned subsidiary of GE Security, received an award under the program to investigate roles for low-cost Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) technology in furtherance of these goals. Most NMR systems are designed for high-resolution spectroscopy applications. These systems use intense magnetic fields produced by superconducting magnets that drive price and operating cost to levels beyond industry tolerance. At low magnetic fields, achievable at low cost, one loses the ability to obtain spectroscopic information. However, measuring the time constants associated with the NMR signal, called NMR relaxometry, gives indications of chemical and physical states of interest to process control and optimization. It was the purpose of this effort to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of using such low-field, low-cost NMR to monitor parameters enabling greater process efficiencies. The primary target industry identified in the Cooperative Development Agreement was the wood industry, where the moisture content of wood is a key process parameter from the time the cut tree enters a mill until the time it is delivered as pieces of lumber. Extracting the moisture is energy consuming, and improvements in drying efficiency stand to reduce costs and emissions substantially. QM designed and developed a new, low-cost NMR instrument suitable for inspecting lumber up to 3 inches by 12 inches in cross section, and other materials of similar size. Low cost is achieved via an inexpensive, permanent magnet and low-cost NMR spectrometer electronics. Laboratory testing demonstrated that the NMR system is capable of accurate ({+-} 0.5%) measurements of the moisture content of wood for

  18. Ground-based investigation of soil moisture variability within remote sensing footprints during the Southern Great Plains 1997 (SGP97) Hydrology Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Famiglietti, J.S.; Devereaux, J.A.; Laymon, C.A.; Tsegaye, T.; Houser, P.R.; Jackson, T.J.; Graham, S.T.; Rodell, M.; Oevelen, van P.J.

    1999-01-01

    Surface soil moisture content is highly variable in both space and time. While remote sensing provides an effective methodology for mapping surface moisture content over large areas, it averages within-pixel variability thereby masking the underlying heterogeneity observed at the land surface. This

  19. A Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing Approach for Railway Corridor Ground Hazard Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromer, Ryan; Hutchinson, Jean; Lato, Matt; Gauthier, Dave; Edwards, Tom

    2015-04-01

    Characterizing and monitoring ground hazard processes is a difficult endeavor along mountainous transportation corridors. This is primarily due to the quantity of hazard sites, complex topography, limited and sometimes hazardous access to sites, and obstructed views. The current hazard assessment approach for Canadian railways partly relies on the ability of inspection employees to assess hazard from track level, which isn't practical in complex slope environments. Various remote sensing sensors, implemented on numerous platforms have the potential to be used in these environments. They are frequently found to be complementary in their use, however, an optimum combination of these approaches has not yet been found for an operational rail setting. In this study, we investigate various cases where remote sensing technologies have been used to characterize and monitor ground hazards along railway corridors across the Canadian network, in order to better understand failure mechanisms, identify hazard source zones and to provide early warning. Since early 2012, a series of high resolution gigapixel images, Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), Aerial laser scanning (ALS), ground based photogrammetry, oblique aerial photogrammetry (from helicopter and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) platforms), have been collected at ground hazard sites throughout the Canadian rail network. On a network level scale, comparison of sequential ALS scanning data has been found to be an ideal methodology for observing large-scale change and prioritizing high hazard sites for more detailed monitoring with terrestrial methods. The combination of TLS and high resolution gigapixel imagery at various temporal scales has allowed for a detailed characterization of the hazard level posed by the slopes, the identification of the main failure modes, an analysis of hazard activity, and the observation failure precursors such as deformation, rockfall and tension crack opening. At sites not feasible for ground

  20. Ground-based remote sensing of volcanic CO2 and correlated SO2, HF, HCl, and BrO, in safe-distance from the crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butz, Andre; Solvejg Dinger, Anna; Bobrowski, Nicole; Kostinek, Julian; Fieber, Lukas; Fischerkeller, Constanze; Giuffrida, Giovanni Bruno; Hase, Frank; Klappenbach, Friedrich; Kuhn, Jonas; Lübcke, Peter; Tirpitz, Lukas; Tu, Qiansi

    2017-04-01

    Remote sensing of CO2 enhancements in volcanic plumes can be a tool to estimate volcanic CO2 emissions and thereby, to gain insight into the geological carbon cycle and into volcano interior processes. However, remote sensing of the volcanic CO2 is challenged by the large atmospheric background concentrations masking the minute volcanic signal. Here, we report on a demonstrator study conducted in September 2015 at Mt. Etna on Sicily, where we deployed an EM27/SUN Fourier Transform Spectrometer together with a UV spectrometer on a mobile remote sensing platform. The spectrometers were operated in direct-sun viewing geometry collecting cross-sectional scans of solar absorption spectra through the volcanic plume by operating the platform in stop-and-go patterns in 5 to 10 kilometers distance from the crater region. We successfully detected correlated intra-plume enhancements of CO2 and volcanic SO2, HF, HCl, and BrO. The path-integrated volcanic CO2 enhancements amounted to about 0.5 ppm (on top of the ˜400 ppm background). Key to successful detection of volcanic CO2 was A) the simultaneous observation of the O2 total column which allowed for correcting changes in the CO2 column caused by changes in observer altitude and B) the simultaneous measurement of volcanic species co-emitted with CO2 which allowed for discriminating intra-plume and extra-plume observations. The latter were used for subtracting the atmospheric CO2 background. The field study suggests that our remote sensing observatory is a candidate technique for volcano monitoring in safe distance from the crater region.

  1. A multi-sensor study of the impact of ground-based glaciogenic seeding on clouds and precipitation over mountains in Wyoming. Part I: Project description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Binod; Geerts, Bart

    2016-12-01

    The AgI Seeding Cloud Impact Investigation (ASCII) campaign was conducted in early 2012 and 2013 over two mountain ranges in southern Wyoming to examine the impact of ground-based glaciogenic seeding on snow growth in winter orographic clouds. The campaign was supported by a network of ground-based instruments, including microwave radiometers, two profiling Ka-band Micro-Rain Radars (MRRs), a Doppler on Wheels (DOW) X-band radar, and a Parsivel disdrometer. The University of Wyoming King Air operated the profiling Wyoming Cloud Radar, the Wyoming Cloud Lidar, and in situ cloud and precipitation particle probes. The characteristics of the orographic clouds, flow field, and upstream stability profiles in 27 intensive observation periods (IOPs) are described here. A composite analysis of the impact of seeding on snow growth is presented in Part II of this study (Pokharel et al., 2017).

  2. Study of aerosol microphysical properties profiles retrieved from ground-based remote sensing and aircraft in-situ measurements during a Saharan dust event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Bravo-Aranda, J. A.; Baumgardner, D.; Guerrero-Rascado, J. L.; Pérez-Ramírez, D.; Navas-Guzmán, F.; Veselovskii, I.; Lyamani, H.; Valenzuela, A.; Olmo, F. J.; Titos, G.; Andrey, J.; Chaikovsky, A.; Dubovik, O.; Gil-Ojeda, M.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we present an analysis of mineral dust optical and microphysical properties obtained from different retrieval techniques applied to active and passive remote sensing measurements, including a comparison with simultaneous in-situ aircraft measurements. Data were collected in a field campaign performed during a mineral dust outbreak a Granada, Spain, experimental site (37.16° N, 3.61° W, 680 m a.s.l.) on the 27 June 2011. Column-integrated properties are provided by sun- and star-photometry which allows a continuous evaluation of the mineral dust optical properties during both day and night-time. Both the Linear Estimation and AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) inversion algorithms are applied for the retrieval of the column-integrated microphysical particle properties. In addition, vertically-resolved microphysical properties are obtained from a multi-wavelength Raman lidar system included in EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network), by using both LIRIC (Lidar Radiometer Inversion Code) algorithm during daytime and an algorithm applied to the Raman measurements based on the regularization technique during night-time. LIRIC retrievals reveal several dust layers between 3 and 5 km a.s.l. with volume concentrations of the coarse spheroid mode up to 60 μm3 cm-3. The combined use of the regularization and LIRIC methods reveals the night-to-day evolution of the vertical structure of the mineral dust microphysical properties and offers complementary information to that from column-integrated variables retrieved from passive remote sensing. Additionally, lidar depolarization profiles and LIRIC retrieved volume concentration are compared with aircraft in-situ measurements. This study presents for the first time a comparison of both volume concentration and dust particle polarization ratios measured with in-situ and remote sensing techniques. Results for the depolarization measurements in the dust layer indicate reasonable agreement within the

  3. Optimal feedback control of a bioreactor with a remote sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niranjan, S. C.; San, K. Y.

    1988-01-01

    Sensors used to monitor bioreactor conditions directly often perform poorly in the face of adverse nonphysiological conditions. One way to circumvent this is to use a remote sensor block. However, such a configuration usually causes a significant time lag between measurements and the actual state values. Here, the problem of implementing feedback control strategies for such systems, described by nonlinear equations, is addressed. The problem is posed as an optimal control problem with a linear quadratic performance index. The linear control law so obtained is used to implement feedback. A global linearization technique as well as an expansion using Taylor series is used to linearize the nonlinear system, and the feedback is subsequently implemented.

  4. Sensor Correction of a 6-Band Multispectral Imaging Sensor for UAV Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arko Lucieer

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs represent a quickly evolving technology, broadening the availability of remote sensing tools to small-scale research groups across a variety of scientific fields. Development of UAV platforms requires broad technical skills covering platform development, data post-processing, and image analysis. UAV development is constrained by a need to balance technological accessibility, flexibility in application and quality in image data. In this study, the quality of UAV imagery acquired by a miniature 6-band multispectral imaging sensor was improved through the application of practical image-based sensor correction techniques. Three major components of sensor correction were focused upon: noise reduction, sensor-based modification of incoming radiance, and lens distortion. Sensor noise was reduced through the use of dark offset imagery. Sensor modifications through the effects of filter transmission rates, the relative monochromatic efficiency of the sensor and the effects of vignetting were removed through a combination of spatially/spectrally dependent correction factors. Lens distortion was reduced through the implementation of the Brown–Conrady model. Data post-processing serves dual roles in data quality improvement, and the identification of platform limitations and sensor idiosyncrasies. The proposed corrections improve the quality of the raw multispectral imagery, facilitating subsequent quantitative image analysis.

  5. Estimating evapotranspiration using remote sensing: A hybrid approach between MODIS derived enhanced vegetation index, Bowen ratio system, and ground based micro-meteorological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sumantra

    We investigated water loss by evapotranspiration (ET) from the Palo Verde Irrigation District (PVID) and the Cibola National Wildlife Refuge (CNWR) in southern California bordering the Colorado River collaborating with the United States Bureau of Reclamation (U.S.B.R.). We developed an empirical model to estimate ET for the entire PVID using satellite derived MODIS enhanced vegetation index (EVI), and ground based measurements of solar radiation and vapor pressure. We compared our predictions with U.S.B.R. estimates through statistical cross validation and showed they agree with an error less than 8%. We tested the same model for an alfalfa field inside PVID to check its applicability at a smaller spatial scale. We showed that the same model developed for PVID is the best model for estimating ET for the alfalfa field. We collected data from three Bowen ratio energy balance (BREB) towers installed in the invasive saltcedar (Tamarix spp) dominated riparian zone in the CNWR and a fourth tower in the alfalfa field in PVID. The riparian sites were selected according to different densities of vegetation. We collected data from these sites at various intervals during the period between June 2006 to November 2008. We reduced the errors associated with the Bowen ratio data using statistical procedures taking into account occasional instrument failures and problems inherent in the BREB method. Our results were consistent with vegetation density and estimates from MODIS EVI images. To estimate ET for larger patches of mixed vegetation we modified the crop coefficient equation and represented it in terms of EVI. Using this approach, we scaled the alfalfa field data to the entire PVID and compared the results with U.S.B.R. (2001-2007) estimates. We predicted ET well within the acceptable range established in the literature. We empirically developed ET models for the riparian tower sites to provide accurate point scale ET estimation and scaled for the entire riparian region in

  6. CFC-11, CFC-12 and HCFC-22 ground-based remote sensing FTIR measurements at Réunion Island and comparisons with MIPAS/ENVISAT data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Minqiang; Vigouroux, Corinne; Langerock, Bavo; Wang, Pucai; Dutton, Geoff; Hermans, Christian; Kumps, Nicolas; Metzger, Jean-Marc; Toon, Geoff; De Mazière, Martine

    2016-11-01

    Profiles of CFC-11 (CCl3F), CFC-12 (CCl2F2) and HCFC-22 (CHF2Cl) have been obtained from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) solar absorption measurements above the Saint-Denis (St Denis) and Maïdo sites at Réunion Island (21° S, 55° E) with low vertical resolution. FTIR profile retrievals are performed by the well-established SFIT4 program and the detail retrieval strategies along with the systematic/random uncertainties of CFC-11, CFC-12 and HCFC-22 are discussed in this study. The FTIR data of all three species are sensitive to the whole troposphere and the lowermost stratosphere, with the peak sensitivity between 5 and 10 km. The ground-based FTIR data have been compared with the collocated Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS/ENVISAT) data and found to be in good agreement: the observed mean relative biases and standard deviations of the differences between the smoothed MIPAS and FTIR partial columns (6-30 km) are (-4.3 and 4.4 %), (-2.9 and 4.6 %) and (-0.7 and 4.8 %) for CFC-11, CFC-12 and HCFC-22, respectively, which are within the combined error budgets from both measurements. The season cycles of CFC-11, CFC-12 and HCFC-22 from FTIR measurements and MIPAS data show a similar variation: concentration is highest in February-April and lowest in August-October. The trends derived from the combined St Denis and Maïdo FTIR time series are -0.86 ± 0.12 and 2.84 ± 0.06 % year-1 for CFC-11 and HCFC-22, respectively, for the period 2004 to 2016, and -0.76 ± 0.05 % year-1 for CFC-12 for 2009 to 2016. These measurements are consistent with the trends observed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Global Monitoring Division's (GMD) Halocarbons & other Atmospheric Trace Species Group (HATS) measurements at Samoa (14.2° S, 170.5° W) for CFC-11 (-0.87 ± 0.04 % year-1), but slightly weaker for HCFC-22 (3.46 ± 0.05 %) year-1 and stronger for CFC-12 (-0.60 ± 0.02 % year-1).

  7. Study of aerosol microphysical properties profiles retrieved from ground-based remote sensing and aircraft in-situ measurements during a Saharan dust event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Granados-Muñoz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present an analysis of mineral dust optical and microphysical properties obtained from different retrieval techniques applied to active and passive remote sensing measurements, including a comparison with simultaneous in-situ aircraft measurements. Data were collected in a field campaign performed during a mineral dust outbreak a Granada, Spain, experimental site (37.16° N, 3.61° W, 680 m a.s.l. on the 27 June 2011. Column-integrated properties are provided by sun- and star-photometry which allows a continuous evaluation of the mineral dust optical properties during both day and night-time. Both the Linear Estimation and AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network inversion algorithms are applied for the retrieval of the column-integrated microphysical particle properties. In addition, vertically-resolved microphysical properties are obtained from a multi-wavelength Raman lidar system included in EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network, by using both LIRIC (Lidar Radiometer Inversion Code algorithm during daytime and an algorithm applied to the Raman measurements based on the regularization technique during night-time. LIRIC retrievals reveal several dust layers between 3 and 5 km a.s.l. with volume concentrations of the coarse spheroid mode up to 60 μm3 cm−3. The combined use of the regularization and LIRIC methods reveals the night-to-day evolution of the vertical structure of the mineral dust microphysical properties and offers complementary information to that from column-integrated variables retrieved from passive remote sensing. Additionally, lidar depolarization profiles and LIRIC retrieved volume concentration are compared with aircraft in-situ measurements. This study presents for the first time a comparison of both volume concentration and dust particle polarization ratios measured with in-situ and remote sensing techniques. Results for the depolarization measurements in the dust layer indicate reasonable agreement

  8. Modified Michelson fiber-optic interferometer: A remote low-coherence distributed strain sensor array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Libo

    2003-01-01

    A simple modified Michelson fiber-optic low-coherence interferometric quasi-distributed sensing system permitting absolute length measurement in remote reflective sensor array is proposed. The sensor reflective signals characteristics have been analyzed and the relationship between light signal intensities and sensors number was given for multiplexing potential evaluation. The proposed sensing scheme will be useful for the remote measurement of strain. An important application could be deformation sensing in smart structures. Experimentally, a three sensors array has been demonstrated.

  9. A comparative study of aerosol microphysical properties retrieved from ground-based remote sensing and aircraft in situ measurements during a Saharan dust event

    Science.gov (United States)

    José Granados-Muñoz, María; Bravo-Aranda, Juan Antonio; Baumgardner, Darrel; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; Pérez-Ramírez, Daniel; Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Veselovskii, Igor; Lyamani, Hassan; Valenzuela, Antonio; José Olmo, Francisco; Titos, Gloria; Andrey, Javier; Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Dubovik, Oleg; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas

    2016-03-01

    In this work we present an analysis of aerosol microphysical properties during a mineral dust event taking advantage of the combination of different state-of-the-art retrieval techniques applied to active and passive remote sensing measurements and the evaluation of some of those techniques using independent data acquired from in situ aircraft measurements. Data were collected in a field campaign performed during a mineral dust outbreak at the Granada, Spain, experimental site (37.16° N, 3.61° W, 680 m a.s.l.) on 27 June 2011. Column-integrated properties are provided by sun- and star-photometry, which allows for a continuous evaluation of the mineral dust optical properties during both day and nighttime. Both the linear estimation and AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) inversion algorithms are applied for the retrieval of the column-integrated microphysical particle properties. In addition, vertically resolved microphysical properties are obtained from a multi-wavelength Raman lidar system included in EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network), by using both LIRIC (Lidar Radiometer Inversion Code) algorithm during daytime and an algorithm applied to the Raman measurements based on the regularization technique during nighttime. LIRIC retrievals reveal the presence of dust layers between 3 and 5 km a.s.l. with volume concentrations of the coarse spheroid mode up to 60 µm3 cm-3. The combined use of the regularization and LIRIC methods reveals the night-to-day evolution of the vertical structure of the mineral dust microphysical properties and offers complementary information to that from column-integrated variables retrieved from passive remote sensing. Additionally, lidar depolarization profiles and LIRIC retrieved volume concentration are compared with aircraft in situ measurements. This study presents for the first time a comparison of the total volume concentration retrieved with LIRIC with independent in situ measurements, obtaining agreement within

  10. Remote Power Systems for Sensors on the Northern Border

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Lin J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kandt, Alicen J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-06-08

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is working with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) [1] to field sensors that accurately track different types of transportation across the northern border of the U.S.. To do this, the sensors require remote power so that they can be placed in the most advantageous geographical locations, often where no grid power is available. This enables the sensors to detect and track aircraft/vehicles despite natural features (e.g., mountains, ridges, valleys, trees) that often prevent standard methods (e.g., monostatic radar or visual observers) from detecting them. Without grid power, portable power systems were used to provide between 80 and 300 W continuously, even in bitter cold and when buried under feet of snow/ice. NREL provides details about the design, installation, and lessons learned from long-term deployment of a second-generation of novel power systems that used adjustable-angle photovoltaics (PV), lithium ion batteries, and fuel cells that provide power to achieve 100% up-time.

  11. Remote management of liquid level using Raspberry Pi with ultrasonic sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Lingden, Ganga

    2015-01-01

    Modern system management has been used remotely using various tools and techniques. One such practical example is fuel level management at a gas station. Fuel levels can be managed with remote management, saving extra costs and manpower. This kind of remote management can be achieved a solution implemented with Raspberry Pi, ultrasonic sensors, and Arduino. Most specifically, ultrasonic sensors equip the Arduino in the container of the fuel to update the status of the current level of liquid ...

  12. An Integrated Network of In situ and Remote Sensors to Characterize the Somali Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. An Integrated Network of In situ and Remote Sensors ...circulation, i.e. Ekman pumping resulting from the wind curl associated with local and seasonal monsoonal forcing. Use in situ sensors deployed in...surface waves in the context of wave-current interactions during monsoonal forcing of the Somali Current • Assess new in situ and remote sensor

  13. Novel remote sensor systems: design, prototyping, and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayastha, V.; Gibbons, S.; Lamb, J. E.; Giedd, R. E.

    2014-06-01

    We have designed and tested a prototype TRL4 radio-frequency (RF) sensing platform containing a transceiver that interrogates a passive carbon nanotube (CNT)-based sensor platform. The transceiver can be interfaced to a server technology such as a Bluetooth® or Wi-Fi device for further connectivity. The novelty of a very-low-frequency (VLF) implementation in the transceiver design will ultimately enable deep penetration into the ground or metal structures to communicate with buried sensing platforms. The sensor platform generally consists of printed electronic devices made of CNTs on flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and Kapton® substrates. This novel remote sensing system can be integrated with both passive and active sensing platforms. It offers unique characteristics suitable for a variety of sensing applications. The proposed sensing platforms can take on different form factors and the RF output of the sensing platforms could be modulated by humidity, temperature, pressure, strain, or vibration signals. Resonant structures were designed and constructed to operate in the very-high-frequency (VHF) and VLF ranges. In this presentation, we will report results of our continued effort to develop a commercially viable transceiver capable of interrogating the conformally mounted sensing platforms made from CNTs or silver-based nanomaterials on polyimide substrates over a broad range of frequencies. The overall performance of the sensing system with different sensing elements and at different frequency ranges will be discussed.

  14. Remote-Time Division Multiplexing of Bending Sensors Using a Broadband Light Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikel Bravo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work experimentally demonstrates a remote sensing network which interrogates bending sensors using time-division multiplexing techniques and a broadband light source. The bending sensors are located 50 km away from the monitoring station. They are based on a simple tie displacement sensor and offer high-resolution measurements of displacement.

  15. Analysis of climatically relevant processes in the troposphere using ground-based remote measuring methods (windprofiler/RASS). Final report; Analyse klimatisch relevanter Prozesse in der Troposphaere mit Hilfe bodengebundener Fernerkundungsmethoden (Windprofiler/RASS). Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinhagen, H.; Christoph, A.; Engelbart, D.; Goersdorf, U.; Hirsch, L.; Lippmann, J.; Neisser, J.; Wergen, W.

    1995-09-01

    In the framework of the present research project the Meterological Observatory of Lindenberg (MOL) was equipped with the scientific and technical means necessary for the future operational application at the German weather service of ground-based remote sounding technologies such as `windprofiler radar`, radio-acoustic sounding system (RASS). Several case studies were used to demonstrate the multifarious possibilities of analysing mesoscale tropospheric structures by means of windprofiler radar and RASS. Besides this, further information such as mixing layer thickness and heat flux were derived from windprofiler and RASS measurements and the applied algorithms were tried on case examples. (orig./AKF) [Deutsch] Im Rahmen dieses Forschungsvorhabens sind am Meteorologischen Observatorium Lindenberg (MOL) wissenschaftliche und technische Voraussetzungen fuer eine zukuenftige operationelle Anwendung aktiver bodengebundener Fernsondierungstechnologien, wie `Windprofiler-Radar` und `Radio-Akustisches-Sondierungs-System (RASS)` im Deutschen Wetterdienst geschaffen worden. An Hand mehrerer Fallstudien wurden die vielfaeltigen Moeglichkeiten zur Analyse mesoskaliger troposphaerischer Strukturen mit Windprofiler-Radar und RASS demonstriert. Darueber hinaus wurden aus Windprofiler-/RASS-Messungen weiterfuehrende Informationen, wie Mischungsschichthoehe und Waermefluss abgeleitet und die entsprechenden Algorithmen am Fallbeispielen erprobt. (orig./AKF)

  16. An Object Model for Integrating Diverse Remote Sensing Satellite Sensors: A Case Study of Union Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuli Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Earth Observation sensor web environment, the rapid, accurate, and unified discovery of diverse remote sensing satellite sensors, and their association to yield an integrated solution for a comprehensive response to specific emergency tasks pose considerable challenges. In this study, we propose a remote sensing satellite sensor object model, based on the object-oriented paradigm and the Open Geospatial Consortium Sensor Model Language. The proposed model comprises a set of sensor resource objects. Each object consists of identification, state of resource attribute, and resource method. We implement the proposed attribute state description by applying it to different remote sensors. A real application, involving the observation of floods at the Yangtze River in China, is undertaken. Results indicate that the sensor inquirer can accurately discover qualified satellite sensors in an accurate and unified manner. By implementing the proposed union operation among the retrieved sensors, the inquirer can further determine how the selected sensors can collaboratively complete a specific observation requirement. Therefore, the proposed model provides a reliable foundation for sharing and integrating multiple remote sensing satellite sensors and their observations.

  17. UAV Deployed Sensor System for Arctic Ocean Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palo, S. E.; Lawrence, D.; Weibel, D.; LoDolce, G.; Krist, S.; Crocker, I.; Maslanik, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Marginal Ice Zone Observations and Processes Experiment (MIZOPEX), is an Arctic field project scheduled for summer 2013. The goals of the project are to understand how warming of the marginal ice zone affects sea ice melt and if this warming has been over or underestimated by satellite measurements. To achieve these goals calibrated physical measurements, both remote and in-situ, of the marginal ice zone over scales of square kilometers with a resolution of square meters is required. This will be accomplished with a suite of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) equipped with both remote sensing and in-situ instruments, air deployed microbuoys, and ship deployed buoys. In this talk we will present details about the air-deployed micro-buoy (ADMB) and self-deployed surface-sonde (SDSS) components of the MIZOPEX project, developed at the University of Colorado. These systems were designed to explore the potential of low-cost, on-demand access to high-latitude areas of important scientific interest. Both the ADMB and SDSS share a common measurement suite with the capability to measure water temperature at three distinct depths and provide position information via GPS. The ADMBs are dropped from the InSitu ScanEagle UAV and expected to operate and log ocean temperatures for 14 days. The SDSS are micro UAVs that are designed to fly one-way to a region of interest and land at specified coordinates, thereafter becoming a surface sensor similar to the ADMB. A ScanEagle will periodically return to the deployment zone to gather ADMB/SDSS data via low power radio links. Design decisions based upon operational constraints and the current status of the ADMB and SDSS will be presented.

  18. CROPCAST - A Review Of An Existing Remote Sensor-Based Agricultural Information System With A View Toward Future Remote Sensor Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Earl S.; Heitkemper, Lawrence; Marcus, Kevin

    1984-08-01

    Global agricultural production information is the key to many economic decisions. National level planners use it to plan imports or to assess balance of payments, farmers use it to make planting decisions, lending and aid institutions use it to plan loans and aid needs, commodity buyers use it to plan purchases. Traditional information systems are slow, offer little confidence and may be inaccurate; systems based on the use of space remote sensor systems are, on the other hand, fast, provide good confidence and are demonstrating improving accuracies. The system structure for remote sensor assisted agricultural information systems is centered on a geobased structure, mapped outputs pinpoint locations where plant stress is impacting yields. Meteorological satellite assessments pinpoint where rainfall and significant solar radiation is impacting the plant environment. The CROPCAST Agricultural Information System offers an opportunity to examine an operating system which contains characteristics essential to all future systems. CROPCAST's use of a grid/cell geobased structure provides a mechanism to effectively use remote-sensor derived data of all types, i.e., Landsats, metsats, aircraft and human eyeball derived data. Predictive models operating in CROPCAST provide updated agricultural assessments in the time intervals when no Landsat or other field observation data are available. Economic models provide the opportunity to merge CROPCAST diagnostic and predictive output with the market place at both the cash and futures level. This presentation will examine the CROPCAST structure as a model for future uses of remote sensing data from civil remote sensing systems in assessing global agricultural production. A review of the future direction to be taken by the CROPCAST System will be included to identify new avenues for remote sensor-based agricultural information system growth over the coming decade of change in remote sensor systems.

  19. Development of a remote digital augmentation system and application to a remotely piloted research vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, J. W.; Deets, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    A cost-effective approach to flight testing advanced control concepts with remotely piloted vehicles is described. The approach utilizes a ground based digital computer coupled to the remotely piloted vehicle's motion sensors and control surface actuators through telemetry links to provide high bandwidth feedback control. The system was applied to the control of an unmanned 3/8-scale model of the F-15 airplane. The model was remotely augmented; that is, the F-15 mechanical and control augmentation flight control systems were simulated by the ground-based computer, rather than being in the vehicle itself. The results of flight tests of the model at high angles of attack are discussed.

  20. Space optical remote sensor image motion velocity vector computational modeling, error budget and synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiaqi Wang; Ping Yu; Changxiang Yan; Jianyue Ren; Bin He

    2005-01-01

    @@ For space optical remote sensor (SORS) with either film or time delay and integrate charge coupled device (TDI-CCD) imaging, in order to achieve higher resolution it requires more accurate real-time image motion compensation.

  1. The China Multimode Microwave Remote Sensor (CMMRS) Onboard the SZ-4 Spaceship

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Jingshan; LIU Heguang; DONG Xiaolong

    2004-01-01

    In this report, the specifications and some results of the China multimode microwave remote sensor (CMMRS) onboard China's SZ-4 spaceship are described. Technical details and initial processing results of the CMMRS measurement data are reported.

  2. Remote Query Resonant-Circuit Sensors for Monitoring of Bacteria Growth: Application to Food Quality Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonidas G. Bachas

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a technique for in-situ remote query monitoring of bacteria growth utilizing a printed thin or thick-film sensor comprised of an inductor-capacitor (LC resonant circuit. The sensor, which is placed within the biological medium of interest and remotely detected using a loop antenna, measures the complex permittivity of the medium. Since bacteria growth increases the complex permittivity of a biological medium the LC sensor can be used to determine bacteria concentration. This paper presents results on monitoring of three different bacteria strains, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli JM109, and Pseudomonas putida, demonstrating application of the sensor for monitoring bacteria growth in milk, meat, and beer. Due to its low unit cost and remote query detection, the sensor is potentially useful for commercial scale monitoring of food quality.

  3. Flexible Wing Base Micro Aerial Vehicles: Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) for Surveillance and Remote Sensor Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifju, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) will be developed for tracking individuals, locating terrorist threats, and delivering remote sensors, for surveillance and chemical/biological agent detection. The tasks are: (1) Develop robust MAV platform capable of carrying sensor payload. (2) Develop fully autonomous capabilities for delivery of sensors to remote and distant locations. The current capabilities and accomplishments are: (1) Operational electric (inaudible) 6-inch MAVs with novel flexible wing, providing superior aerodynamic efficiency and control. (2) Vision-based flight stability and control (from on-board cameras).

  4. Online Remote Recording and Monitoring of Sensor Data Using DTMF Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niladri Sekhar TRIPATHY

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Different wireless application platforms are available for remote monitoring and control of systems. In the present paper a system has been described for online remote recording and monitoring of sensor data using DTMF (Dual Tone Multi Frequency technology where acoustic communication has been implemented. One DTMF transceiver in the sensing system has been used to generate and decode the DTMF tone corresponding to the sensor output which in turn is received from the mobile phone in the user side. A separate DTMF decoder has been used in the user side to decode the received DTMF tone corresponding to the sensor output from the sensor side. Microcontroller has been used to store the decoded data from the sensor and to control the whole operation sequentially. Thus online remote recording and monitoring of the sensor data have been possible at any where in the coverage area of the mobile network. Experimental result shows good linearity between data output taken directly from the sensor side and that remotely from user side.

  5. Optical flows method for lightweight agile remote sensor design and instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; Xing, Fei; Wang, Hongjian; You, Zheng

    2013-08-01

    Lightweight agile remote sensors have become one type of the most important payloads and were widely utilized in space reconnaissance and resource survey. These imaging sensors are designed to obtain the high spatial, temporary and spectral resolution imageries. Key techniques in instrumentation include flexible maneuvering, advanced imaging control algorithms and integrative measuring techniques, which are closely correlative or even acting as the bottle-necks for each other. Therefore, mutual restrictive problems must be solved and optimized. Optical flow is the critical model which to be fully represented in the information transferring as well as radiation energy flowing in dynamic imaging. For agile sensors, especially with wide-field-of view, imaging optical flows may distort and deviate seriously when they perform large angle attitude maneuvering imaging. The phenomena are mainly attributed to the geometrical characteristics of the three-dimensional earth surface as well as the coupled effects due to the complicated relative motion between the sensor and scene. Under this circumstance, velocity fields distribute nonlinearly, the imageries may badly be smeared or probably the geometrical structures are changed since the image velocity matching errors are not having been eliminated perfectly. In this paper, precise imaging optical flow model is established for agile remote sensors, for which optical flows evolving is factorized by two forms, which respectively due to translational movement and image shape changing. Moreover, base on that, agile remote sensors instrumentation was investigated. The main techniques which concern optical flow modeling include integrative design with lightweight star sensors along with micro inertial measurement units and corresponding data fusion, the assemblies of focal plane layout and control, imageries post processing for agile remote sensors etc. Some experiments show that the optical analyzing method is effective to

  6. Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Network for Real Time Remote Monitoring of Sand Dynamics on Coastal Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzebon, Alessandro; Bove, Carmine; Cappelli, Irene; Alquini, Fernanda; Bertoni, Duccio; Sarti, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the architecture of a heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) to be deployed on coastal sand dunes is described, the aim of which is to provide real time measurements of physical parameters to better define the sediment transport in connection with Aeolian processes. The WSN integrates different typologies of sensors and is provided with both local and remote connection. In particular, three different typologies of sensors are integrated in the network: a multilayer anemometric station, a sensor developed ad-hoc to measure the sand dune level and a sand collector capable of measuring the weight of trapped sand and its quantity. Each sensor node is made up at least of a ZigBee radio module that is able to transmit the data collected by the sensor at a distance of about 100 meters. While the sand level sensor and the sand collector are provided only with this transmission module, the anemometric station also integrates a microprocessor board in charge of data processing. A Gateway node provided with a GSM connection for remote data transmission and a Zigbee radio module for Local Area communication has also been developed. This node is in charge of collecting all the data packets sent by the Sensor Nodes and transmit them to a remote server through GPRS connection. A Web server has been set up to collect these packets and store them in a database. The proposed WSN can provide both a static and a dynamic framework of sand transport processes acting on coastal dunes.

  7. Illumination compensation in ground based hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Alexander; Underwood, James

    2017-07-01

    applicable not only to robotics or agricultural applications, but most very low altitude or ground based hyperspectral sensors operating with natural light.

  8. A new type of remote sensors which allow directly forming certain statistical estimates of images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlaskin, Boris; Guk, Elena; Karpenko, Andrey

    2010-10-01

    A new approach to the problems of statistical and structural pattern recognition, a signal processing and image analysis techniques has been considered. These problems are extremely important for tasks being solved by airborne and space borne remote sensing systems. Development of new remote sensors for image and signal processing is inherently connected with a possibility of statistical processing of images. Fundamentally new optoelectronic sensors "Multiscan" have been suggested in the present paper. Such sensors make it possible to form directly certain statistical estimates, which describe completely enough the different types of images. The sensors under discussion perform the Lebesgue-Stieltjes signal integration rather than the Cauchy-Riemann one. That permits to create integral functionals for determining statistical features of images. The use of the integral functionals for image processing provides a good agreement of obtained statistical estimates with required image information features. The Multiscan remote sensors allows to create a set of integral moments of an input image right up to high-order integral moments, to form a quantile representation of an input image, which provides a count number limited texture, to form a median, which provides a localisation of a low-contrast horizon line in fog, localisation of water flow boundary etc. This work presents both the description of the design concept of the new remote sensor and mathematical apparatus providing the possibility to create input image statistical features and integral functionals.

  9. Provenance Information Representation and Tracking for Remote Sensing Observations in a Sensor Web Enabled Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeqiang Chen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The provenance of observations from a Sensor Web enabled remote sensing application represents a great challenge. There are currently no representations or tracking methods. We propose a provenance method that represents and tracks remote sensing observations in the Sensor Web enabled environment. The representation can be divided into the description model, encoding method, and service implementation. The description model uses a tuple to define four objects (sensor, data, processing, and service and their relationships at a time point or interval. The encoding method incorporates the description into the Observations & Measurements specification of the Sensor Web. The service implementation addresses the effects of the encoding method on the implementation of Sensor Web services. The tracking method abstracts a common provenance algorithm and four algorithms that track the four objects (sensor, data, processing, and service in a remote sensing observation application based on the representation. We conducted an experiment on the representation and tracking of provenance information for vegetation condition products, such as the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI and the Vegetation Condition Index (VCI. Our experiments used raw Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS data to produce daily NDVI, weekly NDVI, and weekly VCI for the 48 contiguous states of the United States, for May from 2000 to 2012. We also implemented inverse tracking. We evaluated the time and space requirements of the proposed method in this scenario. Our results show that this technique provides a solution for determining provenance information in remote sensing observations.

  10. A Design of Sensor Network for Remote Communication Based on GPON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yubao; Ma, Chong; Wu, Changqi

    2012-09-01

    A new scheme is proposed to realize the remote communication and monitor the sensor network, which is based on GPON. It is suited to carry data collected from optical sensor networks and to monitor environment on a public network. It is a cost-effective system architecture, which not only avoids re-laying of additional sensor fiber channel for sensor data communication, but also increases the flexibility of sensor network. In order to facilitate sensor monitoring center to receive and analyze sensor data, a novel frame format of sensor signal is designed to carry the low-rate sensor data. Here, TDMA techniques have been employed to upload data of various sensor networks to one port of ONU, which makes full use of time domain resources. The delay effect, identification method of the sensor data, and various interference factors which influence the sensor data to be correctly received are analyzed. The uplink simulation indicates that the accurate judgement can be obtained in the condition of time synchronization. The integration of the sensor network and communication network is feasible in reality. However, the time synchronization error, the laser response time delay and the received signal power difference will degrade the system performance to some extent.

  11. All-Optical Frequency Modulated High Pressure MEMS Sensor for Remote and Distributed Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Thomsen, Erik Vilain; Hansen, Ole

    2011-01-01

    a shift in the Bragg wavelength. The simple and robust design combined with the small chip area of 1 × 1.8 mm2 makes the sensor ideally suited for remote and distributed sensing in harsh environments and where miniaturized sensors are required. The sensor is designed for high pressure applications up......We present the design, fabrication and characterization of a new all-optical frequency modulated pressure sensor. Using the tangential strain in a circular membrane, a waveguide with an integrated nanoscale Bragg grating is strained longitudinally proportional to the applied pressure causing...

  12. A new remote optical wetness sensor and its applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heusinkveld, B.G.; Berkowicz, S.M.; Jacobs, A.F.G.; Hillen, W.C.A.M.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    An optical wetness sensor (OWS) was developed for continuous surface wetness measurements. The sensor is an all-weather instrument that does not interfere with the surface wetting and drying process and is unaffected by solar radiation. It is equipped with its own light source with which it can scan

  13. ‘Baseline-offset’ scheme for a methane remote sensor based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wuwen; Sun, Liqun; Yi, Luying; Zhang, Enyao

    2016-08-01

    A new scheme for methane remote sensing is presented. Unlike a standard published remote sensor based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS), a reference cell is inserted into the measuring optical path. This scheme inherits the merits of WMS and can achieve high signal-to-noise ratio especially in a low concentration environment. Experimental results show that the presented remote sensor can detect ambient methane with a detection limit of 5 ppm m (parts per million · meter) at a distance of 10 m and 16 ppm m for 20 m. A methane leak test shows the sensor can detect a methane leak of 15 ml min-1 within a range up to 37 m.

  14. Capacity Model and Constraints Analysis for Integrated Remote Wireless Sensor and Satellite Network in Emergency Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the capacity problem of an integrated remote wireless sensor and satellite network (IWSSN in emergency scenarios. We formulate a general model to evaluate the remote sensor and satellite network capacity. Compared to most existing works for ground networks, the proposed model is time varying and space oriented. To capture the characteristics of a practical network, we sift through major capacity-impacting constraints and analyze the influence of these constraints. Specifically, we combine the geometric satellite orbit model and satellite tool kit (STK engineering software to quantify the trends of the capacity constraints. Our objective in analyzing these trends is to provide insights and design guidelines for optimizing the integrated remote wireless sensor and satellite network schedules. Simulation results validate the theoretical analysis of capacity trends and show the optimization opportunities of the IWSSN.

  15. Respirable particulate monitoring with remote sensors. (Public health ecology: Air pollution)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severs, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of monitoring atmospheric aerosols in the respirable range from air or space platforms was studied. Secondary reflectance targets were located in the industrial area and near Galveston Bay. Multichannel remote sensor data were utilized to calculate the aerosol extinction coefficient and thus determine the aerosol size distribution. Houston Texas air sampling network high volume data were utilized to generate computer isopleth maps of suspended particulates and to establish the mass loading of the atmosphere. In addition, a five channel nephelometer and a multistage particulate air sampler were used to collect data. The extinction coefficient determined from remote sensor data proved more representative of wide areal phenomena than that calculated from on site measurements. It was also demonstrated that a significant reduction in the standard deviation of the extinction coefficient could be achieved by reducing the bandwidths used in remote sensor.

  16. Real-Time Virtual Instruments for Remote Sensor Monitoring Using Low Bandwidth Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biruk Gebre

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of a peer-to-peer virtual instrumentation system for remote acquisition, analysis and transmission of data on low bandwidth networks is described. The objective of this system is to collect high frequency/high bandwidth data from multiple sensors placed at remote locations and adaptively adjust the resolution of this data so that it can be transmitted on bandwidth limited networks to a central monitoring and command center. This is achieved by adaptively re-sampling (decimating the data from the sensors at the remote location before transmission. The decimation is adjusted to the available bandwidth of the communications network which is characterized in real-time. As a result, the system allows users at the remote command center to view high bandwidth data (at a lower resolution with user-aware and minimized latency. This technique is applied to an eight hydrophone data acquisition system that requires a 25.6 Mbps connection for the transmission of the full data set using a wireless connection with 1 – 3.5 Mbps variable bandwidth. This technique can be used for applications that require monitoring of high bandwidth data from remote sensors in research and education fields such as remote scientific instruments and visually driven control applications.

  17. Real-Time Virtual Instruments for Remote Sensor Monitoring Using Low Bandwidth Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biruk Gebre

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of a peer-to-peer virtual instrumentation system for remote acquisition, analysis and transmission of data on low bandwidth networks is described. The objective of this system is to collect high frequency/high bandwidth data from multiple sensors placed at remote locations and adaptively adjust the resolution of this data so that it can be transmitted on bandwidth limited networks to a central monitoring and command center. This is achieved by adaptively re-sampling (decimating the data from the sensors at the remote location before transmission. The decimation is adjusted to the available bandwidth of the communications network which is characterized in real-time. As a result, the system allows users at the remote command center to view high bandwidth data (at a lower resolution with user-aware and minimized latency. This technique is applied to an eight hydrophone data acquisition system that requires a 25.6 Mbps connection for the transmission of the full data set using a wireless connection with 1 – 3.5 Mbps variable bandwidth. This technique can be used for applications that require monitoring of high bandwidth data from remote sensors in research and education fields such as remote scientific instruments and visually driven control applications.

  18. Multi-sensor Cloud Retrieval Simulator and Remote Sensing from Model Parameters . Pt. 1; Synthetic Sensor Radiance Formulation; [Synthetic Sensor Radiance Formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, G.; DaSilva, A. M.; Norris, P. M.; Platnick, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe a general procedure for calculating synthetic sensor radiances from variable output from a global atmospheric forecast model. In order to take proper account of the discrepancies between model resolution and sensor footprint, the algorithm takes explicit account of the model subgrid variability, in particular its description of the probability density function of total water (vapor and cloud condensate.) The simulated sensor radiances are then substituted into an operational remote sensing algorithm processing chain to produce a variety of remote sensing products that would normally be produced from actual sensor output. This output can then be used for a wide variety of purposes such as model parameter verification, remote sensing algorithm validation, testing of new retrieval methods and future sensor studies.We show a specific implementation using the GEOS-5 model, the MODIS instrument and the MODIS Adaptive Processing System (MODAPS) Data Collection 5.1 operational remote sensing cloud algorithm processing chain (including the cloud mask, cloud top properties and cloud optical and microphysical properties products). We focus on clouds because they are very important to model development and improvement.

  19. Precision remote sensor for oxygen and carbon dioxide Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Mesa Photonics proposes development of a passive optical sensor for simultaneous high-precision measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide profiles within the full...

  20. Passive and Self-Powered Autonomous Sensors for Remote Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Serpelloni

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous sensors play a very important role in the environmental, structural, and medical fields. The use of this kind of systems can be expanded for several applications, for example in implantable devices inside the human body where it is impossible to use wires. Furthermore, they enable measurements in harsh or hermetic environments, such as under extreme heat, cold, humidity or corrosive conditions. The use of batteries as a power supply for these devices represents one solution, but the size, and sometimes the cost and unwanted maintenance burdens of replacement are important drawbacks. In this paper passive and self-powered autonomous sensors for harsh or hermetical environments without batteries are discussed. Their general architectures are presented. Sensing strategies, communication techniques and power management are analyzed. Then, general building blocks of an autonomous sensor are presented and the design guidelines that such a system must follow are given. Furthermore, this paper reports different proposed applications of autonomous sensors applied in harsh or hermetic environments: two examples of passive autonomous sensors that use telemetric communication are proposed, the first one for humidity measurements and the second for high temperatures. Other examples of self-powered autonomous sensors that use a power harvesting system from electromagnetic fields are proposed for temperature measurements and for airflow speeds.

  1. Research-grade CMOS image sensors for remote sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Pe, Olivier; Tulet, Michel; Davancens, Robert; Larnaudie, Franck; Magnan, Pierre; Martin-Gonthier, Philippe; Corbiere, Franck; Belliot, Pierre; Estribeau, Magali

    2004-11-01

    Imaging detectors are key elements for optical instruments and sensors on board space missions dedicated to Earth observation (high resolution imaging, atmosphere spectroscopy...), Solar System exploration (micro cameras, guidance for autonomous vehicle...) and Universe observation (space telescope focal planes, guiding sensors...). This market has been dominated by CCD technology for long. Since the mid-90s, CMOS Image Sensors (CIS) have been competing with CCDs for consumer domains (webcams, cell phones, digital cameras...). Featuring significant advantages over CCD sensors for space applications (lower power consumption, smaller system size, better radiations behaviour...), CMOS technology is also expanding in this field, justifying specific R&D and development programs funded by national and European space agencies (mainly CNES, DGA and ESA). All along the 90s and thanks to their increasingly improving performances, CIS have started to be successfully used for more and more demanding space applications, from vision and control functions requiring low-level performances to guidance applications requiring medium-level performances. Recent technology improvements have made possible the manufacturing of research-grade CIS that are able to compete with CCDs in the high-performances arena. After an introduction outlining the growing interest of optical instruments designers for CMOS image sensors, this paper will present the existing and foreseen ways to reach high-level electro-optics performances for CIS. The developments and performances of CIS prototypes built using an imaging CMOS process will be presented in the corresponding section.

  2. A simulation of remote sensor systems and data processing algorithms for spectral feature classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduini, R. F.; Aherron, R. M.; Samms, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    A computational model of the deterministic and stochastic processes involved in multispectral remote sensing was designed to evaluate the performance of sensor systems and data processing algorithms for spectral feature classification. Accuracy in distinguishing between categories of surfaces or between specific types is developed as a means to compare sensor systems and data processing algorithms. The model allows studies to be made of the effects of variability of the atmosphere and of surface reflectance, as well as the effects of channel selection and sensor noise. Examples of these effects are shown.

  3. Ground based materials science experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. B.; Johnston, J. C.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    The facilities at the Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory (MMSL) at the Lewis Research Center, created to offer immediate and low-cost access to ground-based testing facilities for industrial, academic, and government researchers, are described. The equipment in the MMSL falls into three categories: (1) devices which emulate some aspect of low gravitational forces, (2) specialized capabilities for 1-g development and refinement of microgravity experiments, and (3) functional duplicates of flight hardware. Equipment diagrams are included.

  4. Ground based materials science experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. B.; Johnston, J. C.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    The facilities at the Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory (MMSL) at the Lewis Research Center, created to offer immediate and low-cost access to ground-based testing facilities for industrial, academic, and government researchers, are described. The equipment in the MMSL falls into three categories: (1) devices which emulate some aspect of low gravitational forces, (2) specialized capabilities for 1-g development and refinement of microgravity experiments, and (3) functional duplicates of flight hardware. Equipment diagrams are included.

  5. The Effect of Remote Sensor Spatial Resolution in Monitoring U.S. Army Training Maneuver Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    sensor systems would be very interesting. REFERENCES CITED Acevedo, W., J.S. Buis, and R.C. Wrigley . "Changes in Classification Accuracy Due to Varying...Bryant, Anthony J. Brazel, Charles F. Hutchinson, and Robert C. Balling. "Using Remotely Sensed Data to Monitor Land Surface Climatology Variations in a

  6. Field Test of a Remote Multi-Path CLaDS Methane Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve Plant

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Existing technologies for quantifying methane emissions are often limited to single point sensors, making large area environmental observations challenging. We demonstrate the operation of a remote, multi-path system using Chirped Laser Dispersion Spectroscopy (CLaDS for quantification of atmospheric methane concentrations over extended areas, a technology that shows potential for monitoring emissions from wetlands.

  7. Fiber-optic sensor-based remote acoustic emission measurement of composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fengming; Okabe, Yoji; Wu, Qi; Shigeta, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) detection functioning at high temperatures could clarify the damage process in high heat-resistant composites. To achieve the high-temperature AE detection, a remote AE measurement based on a phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating (PS-FBG) sensor with a high sensitivity over a broad bandwidth was proposed. The common optical fibers were made from glass with good heat resistance. Hence, in this method, optical fiber was used as the waveguide to propagate the AE in the composite from a high-temperature environment to the room-temperature environment wherein the PS-FBG was located. Owing to the special AE detection configuration, this method was a new adhesive method for remote measurement (ADRM). The experiment and numerical simulation revealed that the PS-FBG sensor in the ADRM configuration demonstrated accurate remote sensing for the AE signals. This was because of the good waveguide system provided by the thin optical fiber and the sensitivity of the PS-FBG sensor to the axial strain in the core of the fiber. Consequently, the remote measurement utilizing the PS-FBG sensor in the ADRM configuration has a high potential for AE detection in high-temperature conditions.

  8. Present status of research on space optical remote sensors at CIOMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jia-qi; HAN Chang-yuan

    2003-01-01

    This paper is to review our space optical remote sensor(SORS) technologies including opti-cal materials, optics fabrication and coating, optical testing, system assembly and final testing, andspace environment simulation experiment conducted in our institute. The primary parts of the fabrica-tion and testing facilities and results are described in detail.

  9. Engineering a laser remote sensor for atmospheric pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalshoven, J. E., Jr.; Korb, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    A system for the remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and temperature is described. Resonant lines in the 7600 Angstrom oxygen A band region are used and an organic dye laser beam is tuned to measure line absorption changes with temperature or pressure. A reference beam outside this band is also transmitted for calibration. Using lidar techniques, profiling of these parameters with altitude can be accomplished.

  10. A remote sensor for electromagnetic personal safety monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pillet, K.; Buesink, F.; Leferink, F.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: Citizens are often afraid of electromagnetic fields. This creates a need for logging and quantifying the exposure to fields in the civil environment. An electromagnetic field strength sensor (from 1MHz to 1GHz) has been developed which is connected to a logging system and a modem. The syst

  11. Finite State Machine Analysis of Remote Sensor Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbson, John M.

    1999-07-12

    The use of unattended monitoring systems for monitoring the status of high value assets and processes has proven to be less costly and less intrusive than the on-site inspections which they are intended to replace. However, these systems present a classic information overload problem to anyone trying to analyze the resulting sensor data. These data are typically so voluminous and contain information at such a low level that the significance of any single reading (e.g., a door open event) is not obvious. Sophisticated, automated techniques are needed to extract expected patterns in the data and isolate and characterize the remaining patterns that are due to undeclared activities. This paper describes a data analysis engine that runs a state machine model of each facility and its sensor suite. It analyzes the raw sensor data, converting and combining the inputs from many sensors into operator domain level information. It compares the resulting activities against a set of activities declared by an inspector or operator, and then presents the differences in a form comprehensible to an inspector. Although the current analysis engine was written with international nuclear material safeguards, nonproliferation, and transparency in mind, since there is no information about any particular facility in the software, there is no reason why it cannot be applied anywhere it is important to verify processes are occurring as expected, to detect intrusion into a secured area, or to detect the diversion of valuable assets.

  12. REMOTE DETECTION OF INTERNAL PIPELINE CORROSION USING FLUIDIZED SENSORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narasi Sridhar; Garth Tormoen; Ashok Sabata

    2005-10-31

    Pipelines present a unique challenge to monitoring because of the great geographical distances they cover, their burial depth, their age, and the need to keep the product flowing without much interruption. Most other engineering structures that require monitoring do not pose such combined challenges. In this regard, a pipeline system can be considered analogous to the blood vessels in the human body. The human body has an extensive ''pipeline'' through which blood and other fluids are transported. The brain can generally sense damage to the system at any location and alert the body to provide temporary repair, unless the damage is severe. This is accomplished through a vast network of fixed and floating sensors combined with a vast and extremely complex communication/decision making system. The project described in this report mimics the distributed sensor system of our body, albeit in a much more rudimentary fashion. Internal corrosion is an important factor in pipeline integrity management. At present, the methods to assess internal corrosion in pipelines all have certain limitations. In-line inspection tools are costly and cannot be used in all pipelines. Because there is a significant time interval between inspections, any impact due to upsets in pipeline operations can be missed. Internal Corrosion Direct Assessment (ICDA) is a procedure that can be used to identify locations of possible internal corrosion. However, the uncertainties in the procedure require excavation and location of damage using more detailed inspection tools. Non-intrusive monitoring techniques can be used to monitor internal corrosion, but these tools also require pipeline excavation and are limited in the spatial extent of corrosion they can examine. Therefore, a floating sensor system that can deposit at locations of water accumulation and communicate the corrosion information to an external location is needed. To accomplish this, the project is divided into four main

  13. Sensor Performance Requirements for the Retrieval of Atmospheric Aerosols by Airborne Optical Remote Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Felix; Schläpfer, Daniel; Nieke, Jens; Itten, Klaus I

    2008-03-18

    This study explores performance requirements for the retrieval of the atmospheric aerosol optical depth (AOD) by airborne optical remote sensing instruments. Independent of any retrieval techniques, the calculated AOD retrieval requirements are compared with the expected performance parameters of the upcoming hyperspectral sensor APEX at the reference wavelength of 550nm. The AOD accuracy requirements are defined to be capable of resolving transmittance differences of 0.01 to 0.04 according to the demands of atmospheric corrections for remote sensing applications. For the purposes of this analysis, the signal at the sensor level is simulated by radiation transfer equations. The resulting radiances are translated into the AOD retrieval sensitivity (Δτλ(aer) ) and compared to the available measuring sensitivity of the sensor (NE ΔLλ(sensor)). This is done for multiple signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and surface reflectance values. It is shown that an SNR of 100 is adequate for AOD retrieval at 550nm under typical remote sensing conditions and a surface reflectance of 10% or less. Such dark surfaces require the lowest SNR values and therefore offer the best sensitivity for measuring AOD. Brighter surfaces with up to 30% reflectance require an SNR of around 300. It is shown that AOD retrieval for targets above 50% surface reflectance is more problematic with the current sensor performance as it may require an SNR larger than 1000. In general, feasibility is proven for the analyzed cases under simulated conditions.

  14. A remote sensor for detecting methane based on palladium-decorated single walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Li, Guomin

    2013-07-10

    The remote detection of the concentration of methane at room temperature is performed by a sensor that is configured by the combination of radio frequency identification (RFID), and functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The proposed sensor is schemed as a thin film RFID tag in a polyethylene substrate, on which a metal trace dipole, a metal trace T impedance matching networks, a 0.5 µm-CMOS RF/DC rectifier chipset and a sensor head of palladium-decorated single walled carbon nanotubes (Pd-SWCNTs) are surface mounted in cascade. The performances of the sensor are examined and described by the defined parameters of the received signal strength index (RSSI) and the comparative analog identifier (∆AID). Results validate the sensor's ability to detect molecules of methane at room temperature, showing that the RSSI can increase 4 dB and the ∆AID can increase 3% in response to methane concentrations ranging from zero to 100 ppm.

  15. Study on remote monitoring system for landslide hazard based on Wireless Sensor Network and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUI Yang; TAO Zhi-gang; WANG Chang-jun; XIE Xing

    2011-01-01

    Based on Beidou satellite communication platform,sliding force remote monitoring and warning system was widely used in Lingbao Luoshan gold ore,which had achieved remarkable social and economical benefits.However,there is one monitoring point at every 1 000 m2,and their distribution is so discrete that it will no doubt increase construction and operation cost if every monitoring point was installed a Beidou subscriber machine.Therefore,based on Zigbee wireless sensor network technology,network structure and the nodes,embed wireless sensor node in remote monitoring and warning system,a base platform of local wireless sensor network is formed,and it can combine punctiform monitoring information with planar network and transmit concentrated information through Beidou satellite terminal machine; as a result,this largely expands the transmission distance of monitoring data.

  16. REMOTE, a Wireless Sensor Network Based System to Monitor Rowing Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Llosa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we take a hard look at the performance of REMOTE, a sensor network based application that provides a detailed picture of a boat movement, individual rower performance, or his/her performance compared with other crew members. The application analyzes data gathered with a WSN strategically deployed over a boat to obtain information on the boat and oar movements. Functionalities of REMOTE are compared to those of RowX [1] outdoor instrument, a commercial wired sensor instrument designed for similar purposes. This study demonstrates that with smart geometrical configuration of the sensors, rotation and translation of the oars and boat can be obtained. Three different tests are performed: laboratory calibration allows us to become familiar with the accelerometer readings and validate the theory, ergometer tests which help us to set the acquisition parameters, and on boat tests shows the application potential of this technologies in sports.

  17. EVALUATING AN INNOVATIVE OXYGEN SENSOR FOR REMOTE SUBSURFACE OXYGEN MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millings, M; Brian Riha, B; Warren Hyde, W; Karen Vangelas, K; Brian02 Looney, B

    2006-10-12

    Oxygen is a primary indicator of whether anaerobic reductive dechlorination and similar redox based processes contribute to natural attenuation remedies at chlorinated solvent contaminated sites. Thus, oxygen is a viable indicator parameter for documenting that a system is being sustained in an anaerobic condition. A team of researchers investigated the adaptation of an optical sensor that was developed for oceanographic applications. The optical sensor, because of its design and operating principle, has potential for extended deployment and sensitivity at the low oxygen levels relevant to natural attenuation. The results of the research indicate this tool will be useful for in situ long-term monitoring applications, but that the traditional characterization tools continue to be appropriate for characterization activities.

  18. Satellite radiometric remote sensing of rainfall fields: multi-sensor retrieval techniques at geostationary scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Marzano

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Microwave Infrared Combined Rainfall Algorithm (MICRA consists in a statistical integration method using the satellite microwave-based rain-rate estimates, assumed to be accurate enough, to calibrate spaceborne infrared measurements on limited sub-regions and time windows. Rainfall retrieval is pursued at the space-time scale of typical geostationary observations, that is at a spatial resolution of few kilometers and a repetition period of few tens of minutes. The actual implementation is explained, although the basic concepts of MICRA are very general and the method is easy to be extended for considering innovative statistical techniques or measurements from additional space-borne platforms. In order to demonstrate the potentiality of MICRA, case studies over central Italy are also discussed. Finally, preliminary results of MICRA validation by ground based remote and in situ measurements are shown and a comparison with a Neural Network (NN based technique is briefly illustrated.

  19. Ground-based SMART-COMMIT Measurements for Studying Aerosol and Cloud Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Si-Chee

    2008-01-01

    From radiometric principles, it is expected that the retrieved properties of extensive aerosols and clouds from reflected/emitted measurements by satellite (and/or aircraft) should be consistent with those retrieved from transmitted/emitted radiance observed at the surface. Although space-borne remote sensing observations cover large spatial domain, they are often plagued by contamination of surface signatures. Thus, ground-based in-situ and remote-sensing measurements, where signals come directly from atmospheric constituents, the sun, and/or the Earth-atmosphere interactions, provide additional information content for comparisons that confirm quantitatively the usefulness of the integrated surface, aircraft, and satellite data sets. The development and deployment of SMARTCOMMIT (Surface-sensing Measurements for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer - Chemical, Optical & Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere) mobile facilities are aimed for the optimal utilization of collocated ground-based observations as constraints to yield higher fidelity satellite retrievals and to determine any sampling bias due to target conditions. To quantify the energetics of the surface-atmosphere system and the atmospheric processes, SMART-COMMIT instruments fall into three categories: flux radiometer, radiance sensor and in-situ probe. In this paper, we will demonstrate the capability of SMART-COMMIT in recent field campaigns (e.g., CRYSTAL-FACE, UAE 2, BASEASIA, NAMMA) that were designed and executed to study the compelling variability in temporal scale of both anthropogenic and natural aerosols (e.g., biomass-burning smoke, airborne dust) and cirrus clouds. We envision robust approaches in which well-collocated ground-based measurements and space-borne observations will greatly advance our knowledge of extensive aerosols and clouds.

  20. Wireless Remote Monitoring of Glucose Using a Functionalized ZnO Nanowire Arrays Based Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Willander

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a prototype wireless remote glucose monitoring system interfaced with a ZnO nanowire arrays-based glucose sensor, glucose oxidase enzyme immobilized onto ZnO nanowires in conjunction with a Nafion® membrane coating, which can be effectively applied for the monitoring of glucose levels in diabetics. Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM services like General Packet Radio Service (GPRS and Short Message Service (SMS have been proven to be logical and cost effective methods for gathering data from remote locations. A communication protocol that facilitates remote data collection using SMS has been utilized for monitoring a patient’s sugar levels. In this study, we demonstrate the remote monitoring of the glucose levels with existing GPRS/GSM network infra-structures using our proposed functionalized ZnO nanowire arrays sensors integrated with standard readily available mobile phones. The data can be used for centralized monitoring and other purposes. Such applications can reduce health care costs and allow caregivers to monitor and support to their patients remotely, especially those located in rural areas.

  1. Computerized data reduction techniques for nadir viewing remote sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Gormsen, Barbara B.

    1985-01-01

    Computer resources have been developed for the analysis and reduction of MAPS experimental data from the OSTA-1 payload. The MAPS Research Project is concerned with the measurement of the global distribution of mid-tropospheric carbon monoxide. The measurement technique for the MAPS instrument is based on non-dispersive gas filter radiometer operating in the nadir viewing mode. The MAPS experiment has two passive remote sensing instruments, the prototype instrument which is used to measure tropospheric air pollution from aircraft platforms and the third generation (OSTA) instrument which is used to measure carbon monoxide in the mid and upper troposphere from space platforms. Extensive effort was also expended in support of the MAPS/OSTA-3 shuttle flight. Specific capabilities and resources developed are discussed.

  2. Optimized sampling strategy of Wireless sensor network for validation of remote sensing products over heterogeneous coarse-resolution pixel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, J.; Liu, Q.; Wen, J.; Fan, W.; Dou, B.

    2015-12-01

    Coarse-resolution satellite albedo products are increasingly applied in geographical researches because of their capability to characterize the spatio-temporal patterns of land surface parameters. In the long-term validation of coarse-resolution satellite products with ground measurements, the scale effect, i.e., the mismatch between point measurement and pixel observation becomes the main challenge, particularly over heterogeneous land surfaces. Recent advances in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) technologies offer an opportunity for validation using multi-point observations instead of single-point observation. The difficulty is to ensure the representativeness of the WSN in heterogeneous areas with limited nodes. In this study, the objective is to develop a ground-based spatial sampling strategy through consideration of the historical prior knowledge and avoidance of the information redundancy between different sensor nodes. Taking albedo as an example. First, we derive monthly local maps of albedo from 30-m HJ CCD images a 3-year period. Second, we pick out candidate points from the areas with higher temporal stability which helps to avoid the transition or boundary areas. Then, the representativeness (r) of each candidate point is evaluated through the correlational analysis between the point-specific and area-average time sequence albedo vector. The point with the highest r was noted as the new sensor point. Before electing a new point, the vector component of the selected points should be taken out from the vectors in the following correlational analysis. The selection procedure would be ceased once if the integral representativeness (R) meets the accuracy requirement. Here, the sampling method is adapted to both single-parameter and multi-parameter situations. Finally, it is shown that this sampling method has been effectively worked in the optimized layout of Huailai remote sensing station in China. The coarse resolution pixel covering this station could be

  3. An Optical Fibre Depth (Pressure) Sensor for Remote Operated Vehicles in Underwater Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duraibabu, Dinesh Babu; Poeggel, Sven; Omerdic, Edin; Capocci, Romano; Lewis, Elfed; Newe, Thomas; Leen, Gabriel; Toal, Daniel; Dooly, Gerard

    2017-02-19

    A miniature sensor for accurate measurement of pressure (depth) with temperature compensation in the ocean environment is described. The sensor is based on an optical fibre Extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) combined with a Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG). The EFPI provides pressure measurements while the Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) provides temperature measurements. The sensor is mechanically robust, corrosion-resistant and suitable for use in underwater applications. The combined pressure and temperature sensor system was mounted on-board a mini remotely operated underwater vehicle (ROV) in order to monitor the pressure changes at various depths. The reflected optical spectrum from the sensor was monitored online and a pressure or temperature change caused a corresponding observable shift in the received optical spectrum. The sensor exhibited excellent stability when measured over a 2 h period underwater and its performance is compared with a commercially available reference sensor also mounted on the ROV. The measurements illustrates that the EFPI/FBG sensor is more accurate for depth measurements (depth of ~0.020 m).

  4. An Optical Fibre Depth (Pressure Sensor for Remote Operated Vehicles in Underwater Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Babu Duraibabu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A miniature sensor for accurate measurement of pressure (depth with temperature compensation in the ocean environment is described. The sensor is based on an optical fibre Extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI combined with a Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG. The EFPI provides pressure measurements while the Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG provides temperature measurements. The sensor is mechanically robust, corrosion-resistant and suitable for use in underwater applications. The combined pressure and temperature sensor system was mounted on-board a mini remotely operated underwater vehicle (ROV in order to monitor the pressure changes at various depths. The reflected optical spectrum from the sensor was monitored online and a pressure or temperature change caused a corresponding observable shift in the received optical spectrum. The sensor exhibited excellent stability when measured over a 2 h period underwater and its performance is compared with a commercially available reference sensor also mounted on the ROV. The measurements illustrates that the EFPI/FBG sensor is more accurate for depth measurements (depth of ~0.020 m.

  5. Magnetically remote-controlled optical sensor spheres for monitoring oxygen or pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistlberger, Günter; Koren, Klaus; Borisov, Sergey M; Klimant, Ingo

    2010-03-01

    Magnetic sensor macrospheres (MagSeMacs), i.e., stainless steel spheres coated with optical chemical sensors, are presented as an alternative to existing optical sensor patches and fiber-optical dip-probes. Such spheres can either be reversibly attached to the tip of an optical fiber (dip-probe) or trapped inside a vessel for read-out through the side wall. Moving the magnetic separator at the exterior enables measurements at varying positions with a single sensor. Moreover, the sensor's replacement is rapid and contactless. We measured dissolved oxygen or pH in stirred liquids, rotating flasks, and 24-well plates with a SensorDish-reader device for parallel cell culture monitoring. In these applications, MagSeMacs proved to be advantageous over conventional sensor patches and magnetic optical sensor particles because of their magnetism, spherical shape, reflectance, and size. These properties resulted in strong but reversible fixation, magnetic remote-controllability, short response times, high signal intensities, and simplified handling.

  6. Distributed Multi-Sensor Real-Time Building Environmental Parameters Monitoring System with Remote Data Access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beinarts Ivars

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the advanced monitoring system of multiple environmental parameters is presented. The purpose of the system is a long-term estimation of energy efficiency and sustainability for the research test stands which are made of different building materials. Construction of test stands, and placement of main sensors are presented in the first chapter. The structure of data acquisition system includes a real-time interface with sensors and a data logger that allows to acquire and log data from all sensors with fixed rate. The data logging system provides a remote access to the processing of the acquired data and carries out periodical saving at a remote FTP server using an Internet connection. The system architecture and the usage of sensors are explained in the second chapter. In the third chapter implementation of the system, different interfaces of sensors and energy measuring devices are discussed and several examples of data logger program are presented. Each data logger is reading data from analog and digital channels. Measurements can be displayed directly on a screen using WEB access or using data from FTP server. Measurements and acquired data graphical results are presented in the fourth chapter in the selected diagrams. The benefits of the developed system are presented in the conclusion.

  7. Remote Inspection Techniques for Reactor Internals of Liquid Metal Reactor by using Ultrasonic Waveguide Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Young Sang; Kim, Seok Hun; Lee, Jae Han

    2006-02-15

    The primary components such as a reactor core, heat exchangers, pumps and internal structures of a liquid metal reactor (LMR) are submerged in hot sodium of reactor vessel. The division 3 of ASME code section XI specifies the visual inspection and continuous monitoring as major in-service inspection (ISI) methods of reactor internal structures. Reactor core and internal structures of LMR can not be visually examined due to an opaque liquid sodium. The under-sodium viewing and remote inspection techniques by using an ultrasonic wave should be applied for the in-service inspection of reactor internals. The remote inspection techniques using ultrasonic wave have been developed and applied for the visualization and ISI of reactor internals. The under sodium viewing technique has a limitation for the application of LMR due to the high temperature and irradiation environment. In this study, an ultrasonic waveguide sensor with a strip plate has been developed for an application to the under-sodium viewing and remote inspection. The Lamb wave propagation of a waveguide sensor has been analyzed and the zero-order antisymmetric A{sub 0} plate wave was selected as the application mode of the sensor. The A{sub 0} plate wave can be propagated in the dispersive low frequency range by using a liquid wedge clamped to the waveguide. A new technique is presented which is capable of steering the radiation beam angle of a waveguide sensor without a mechanical movement of the sensor assembly. The steering function of the ultrasonic radiation beam can be achieved by a frequency tuning method of the excitation pulse in the dispersive range of the A{sub 0} mode. The technique provides an opportunity to overcome the scanning limitation of a waveguide sensor. The beam steering function has been evaluated by an experimental verification. The ultrasonic C-scanning experiments are performed in water and the feasibility of the ultrasonic waveguide sensor has been verified. The various remote

  8. A manual for inexpensive methods of analyzing and utilizing remote sensor data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elifrits, C. D.; Barr, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Instructions are provided for inexpensive methods of using remote sensor data to assist in the completion of the need to observe the earth's surface. When possible, relative costs were included. Equipment need for analysis of remote sensor data is described, and methods of use of these equipment items are included, as well as advantages and disadvantages of the use of individual items. Interpretation and analysis of stereo photos and the interpretation of typical patterns such as tone and texture, landcover, drainage, and erosional form are described. Similar treatment is given to monoscopic image interpretation, including LANDSAT MSS data. Enhancement techniques are detailed with respect to their application and simple techniques of creating an enhanced data item. Techniques described include additive and subtractive (Diazo processes) color techniques and enlargement of photos or images. Applications of these processes, including mappings of land resources, engineering soils, geology, water resources, environmental conditions, and crops and/or vegetation, are outlined.

  9. Sensor Performance Requirements for the Retrieval of Atmospheric Aerosols by Airborne Optical Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus I. Itten

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This study explores performance requirements for the retrieval of the atmospheric aerosol optical depth (AOD by airborne optical remote sensing instruments. Independent of any retrieval techniques, the calculated AOD retrieval requirements are compared with the expected performance parameters of the upcoming hyperspectral sensor APEX at the reference wavelength of 550nm. The AOD accuracy requirements are defined to be capable of resolving transmittance differences of 0.01 to 0.04 according to the demands of atmospheric corrections for remote sensing applications. For the purposes of this analysis, the signal at the sensor level is simulated by radiation transfer equations. The resulting radiances are translated into the AOD retrieval sensitivity (Δτλaer and compared to the available measuring sensitivity of the sensor (NE ΔLλsensor. This is done for multiple signal-to-noise ratios (SNR and surface reflectance values. It is shown that an SNR of 100 is adequate for AOD retrieval at 550nm under typical remote sensing conditions and a surface reflectance of 10% or less. Such dark surfaces require the lowest SNR values and therefore offer the best sensitivity for measuring AOD. Brighter surfaces with up to 30% reflectance require an SNR of around 300. It is shown that AOD retrieval for targets above 50% surface reflectance is more problematic with the current sensor performance as it may require an SNR larger than 1000. In general, feasibility is proven for the analyzed cases under simulated conditions.

  10. Power management system for a 2.5 W remote sensor powered by a sediment microbial fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donovan, Conrad; Peng, Huan; Heo, Deukhyoun [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99163-2710 (United States); Dewan, Alim; Beyenal, Haluk [Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Center for Environmental, Sediment and Aquatic Research, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99163-2710 (United States)

    2011-02-01

    One of the challenges in using wireless sensors that require high power to monitor the environment is finding a renewable power source that can produce enough power. Sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) are considered an alternative renewable power source for remote monitoring, but current research on SMFCs has demonstrated that they can only produce several to tens of mW of continuous power. This limits the use of SMFCs as an alternative renewable remote power source to mW-level power. Such low power is only enough to operate a low-power sensors. However, there are many remote sensors that require higher power, on the order of watts. Current technology using a SMFC to power a remote sensor requiring watts-level intermittent power is limited because of limitations of power management technology. Our goal was to develop a power management system (PMS) that enables a SMFC to operate a remote sensor consuming 2.5 W of power. We designed a custom PMS to store microbial energy in capacitors and use the stored energy in short bursts. Our results demonstrate that SMFCs can be a viable alternative renewable power source for remote sensors requiring high power. (author)

  11. Distinctive Order Based Self-Similarity descriptor for multi-sensor remote sensing image matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedaghat, Amin; Ebadi, Hamid

    2015-10-01

    Robust, well-distributed and accurate feature matching in multi-sensor remote sensing image is a difficult task duo to significant geometric and illumination differences. In this paper, a robust and effective image matching approach is presented for multi-sensor remote sensing images. The proposed approach consists of three main steps. In the first step, UR-SIFT (Uniform robust scale invariant feature transform) algorithm is applied for uniform and dense local feature extraction. In the second step, a novel descriptor namely Distinctive Order Based Self Similarity descriptor, DOBSS descriptor, is computed for each extracted feature. Finally, a cross matching process followed by a consistency check in the projective transformation model is performed for feature correspondence and mismatch elimination. The proposed method was successfully applied for matching various multi-sensor satellite images as: ETM+, SPOT 4, SPOT 5, ASTER, IRS, SPOT 6, QuickBird, GeoEye and Worldview sensors, and the results demonstrate its robustness and capability compared to common image matching techniques such as SIFT, PIIFD, GLOH, LIOP and LSS.

  12. A remote quantitative Fugl-Meyer assessment framework for stroke patients based on wearable sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lei; Xiong, Daxi; Guo, Liquan; Wang, Jiping

    2016-05-01

    To extend the use of wearable sensor networks for stroke patients training and assessment in non-clinical settings, this paper proposes a novel remote quantitative Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA) framework, in which two accelerometer and seven flex sensors were used to monitoring the movement function of upper limb, wrist and fingers. The extreme learning machine based ensemble regression model was established to map the sensor data to clinical FMA scores while the RRelief algorithm was applied to find the optimal features subset. Considering the FMA scale is time-consuming and complicated, seven training exercises were designed to replace the upper limb related 33 items in FMA scale. 24 stroke inpatients participated in the experiments in clinical settings and 5 of them were involved in the experiments in home settings after they left the hospital. Both the experimental results in clinical and home settings showed that the proposed quantitative FMA model can precisely predict the FMA scores based on wearable sensor data, the coefficient of determination can reach as high as 0.917. It also indicated that the proposed framework can provide a potential approach to the remote quantitative rehabilitation training and evaluation.

  13. Remote detection of nuclear magnetic resonance with an anisotropic magnetoresistive sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verpillat, F; Ledbetter, M P; Xu, S; Michalak, D J; Hilty, C; Bouchard, L-S; Antonijevic, S; Budker, D; Pines, A

    2008-02-19

    We report the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using an anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensor. A "remote-detection" arrangement was used in which protons in flowing water were prepolarized in the field of a superconducting NMR magnet, adiabatically inverted, and subsequently detected with an AMR sensor situated downstream from the magnet and the adiabatic inverter. AMR sensing is well suited for NMR detection in microfluidic "lab-on-a-chip" applications because the sensors are small, typically on the order of 10 mum. An estimate of the sensitivity for an optimized system indicates that approximately 6 x 10(13) protons in a volume of 1,000 mum(3), prepolarized in a 10-kG magnetic field, can be detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 in a 1-Hz bandwidth. This level of sensitivity is competitive with that demonstrated by microcoils in superconducting magnets and with the projected sensitivity of microfabricated atomic magnetometers.

  14. Bluetooth-based sensor networks for remotely monitoring the physiological signals of a patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Xiao, Hannan

    2009-11-01

    Integrating intelligent medical microsensors into a wireless communication network makes it possible to remotely collect physiological signals of a patient, release the patient from being tethered to monitoring medical instrumentations, and facilitate the patient's early hospital discharge. This can further improve life quality by providing continuous observation without the need of disrupting the patient's normal life, thus reducing the risk of infection significantly, and decreasing the cost of the hospital and the patient. This paper discusses the implementation issues, and describes the overall system architecture of our developed Bluetooth sensor network for patient monitoring and the corresponding heart activity sensors. It also presents our approach to developing the intelligent physiological sensor nodes involving integration of Bluetooth radio technology, hardware and software organization, and our solutions for onboard signal processing.

  15. Gesture recognition based on computer vision and glove sensor for remote working environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, Sung Il; Kim, In Chul; Baek, Yung Mok; Kim, Dong Su; Jeong, Jee Won; Shin, Kug [Kyungpook National University, Taegu (Korea)

    1998-04-01

    In this research, we defined a gesture set needed for remote monitoring and control of a manless system in atomic power station environments. Here, we define a command as the loci of a gesture. We aim at the development of an algorithm using a vision sensor and glove sensors in order to implement the gesture recognition system. The gesture recognition system based on computer vision tracks a hand by using cross correlation of PDOE image. To recognize the gesture word, the 8 direction code is employed as the input symbol for discrete HMM. Another gesture recognition based on sensor has introduced Pinch glove and Polhemus sensor as an input device. The extracted feature through preprocessing now acts as an input signal of the recognizer. For recognition 3D loci of Polhemus sensor, discrete HMM is also adopted. The alternative approach of two foregoing recognition systems uses the vision and and glove sensors together. The extracted mesh feature and 8 direction code from the locus tracking are introduced for further enhancing recognition performance. MLP trained by backpropagation is introduced here and its performance is compared to that of discrete HMM. (author). 32 refs., 44 figs., 21 tabs.

  16. Secure Authentication for Remote Patient Monitoring with Wireless Medical Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayajneh, Thaier; Mohd, Bassam J; Imran, Muhammad; Almashaqbeh, Ghada; Vasilakos, Athanasios V

    2016-03-24

    There is broad consensus that remote health monitoring will benefit all stakeholders in the healthcare system and that it has the potential to save billions of dollars. Among the major concerns that are preventing the patients from widely adopting this technology are data privacy and security. Wireless Medical Sensor Networks (MSNs) are the building blocks for remote health monitoring systems. This paper helps to identify the most challenging security issues in the existing authentication protocols for remote patient monitoring and presents a lightweight public-key-based authentication protocol for MSNs. In MSNs, the nodes are classified into sensors that report measurements about the human body and actuators that receive commands from the medical staff and perform actions. Authenticating these commands is a critical security issue, as any alteration may lead to serious consequences. The proposed protocol is based on the Rabin authentication algorithm, which is modified in this paper to improve its signature signing process, making it suitable for delay-sensitive MSN applications. To prove the efficiency of the Rabin algorithm, we implemented the algorithm with different hardware settings using Tmote Sky motes and also programmed the algorithm on an FPGA to evaluate its design and performance. Furthermore, the proposed protocol is implemented and tested using the MIRACL (Multiprecision Integer and Rational Arithmetic C/C++) library. The results show that secure, direct, instant and authenticated commands can be delivered from the medical staff to the MSN nodes.

  17. Remote control of planetary surface vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heer, E.

    1973-01-01

    A remotely manned system consisting of an earth-based control center and a remote rover system on the planetary surface is assumed to extend to the remote site the sensory, manipulative and certain intellectual capabilities of humans here on earth. Required system functions, including scientific payload functions, vehicle functions and ground-based human control functions are discussed and the effects of communication delay and increased remote automaticity on system performance are investigated. To accomplish the required operations for scientific exploration, the control of the remote system requires the development of techniques to deal with problems of long communication time delays so that the performance in terms of operation speed can be increased to acceptable levels. Increased operational performance can be achieved primarily by increasing the rate of useful information flow in the man-machine sensor-control loop, or by increasing the autonomous capabilities of the remote system or by both.

  18. A New Remotely Operated Sensor Platform for Interdisciplinary Observations under Sea Ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Katlein

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Observation of the climate and ecosystem of ice covered polar seas is a timely task for the scientific community. The goal is to assess the drastic and imminent changes of the polar sea ice cover induced by climate change. Retreating and thinning sea ice affects the planets energy budget, atmospheric, and oceanic circulation patterns as well as the ecosystem associated with this unique habitat. To increase the observational capabilities of sea ice scientists, we equipped a remotely operated vehicle (ROV as sensor platform for interdisciplinary research at the ice water interface. Here, we present the technical details and operation scheme of the new vehicle and provide data examples from a first campaign in the Arctic in autumn 2016 to demonstrate the vehicle's capabilities. The vehicle is designed for efficient operations in the harsh polar conditions. Redundant modular design allows operation by three scientists simultaneously operating a wide variety of sensors. Sensors from physical, chemical, and biological oceanography are combined with optical and acoustic sea ice sensors to provide a comprehensive picture of the underside of sea ice. The sensor suite provides comprehensive capabilities and can be further extended as additional ports for power and communication are available. The vehicle provides full six degrees of freedom in navigation, enabling intervention, and manipulation skills despite its simple one function manipulator arm.

  19. Research on application of photoelectric rotary encoder in space optical remote sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jun; Qi, Shao-fan; Wang, Yuan-yuan; Zhang, Zhan-dong

    2016-11-01

    For space optical remote sensor, especially wide swath detecting sensor, the focusing control system for the focal plane should be well designed to obtain the best image quality. The crucial part of this system is the measuring instrument. For previous implements, the potentiometer, which is essentially a voltage divider, is usually introduced to conduct the position in feedback closed-loop control process system. However, the performances of both electro-mechanical and digital potentiometers is limited in accuracy, temperature coefficients, and scale range. To have a better performance of focal plane moving detection, this article presents a new measuring implement with photoelectric rotary encoder, which consists of the photoelectric conversion system and the signal process system. In this novel focusing control system, the photoelectric conversion system is fixed on main axis, which can transform the angle information into a certain analog signal. Through the signal process system, after analog-to-digital converting and data format processing of the certain analog signal, the focusing control system can receive the digital precision angle position which can be used to deduct the current moving position of the focal plane. For utilization of space optical remote sensor in aerospace areas, the reliability design of photoelectric rotary encoder system should be considered with highest priority. As mentioned above, this photoelectric digital precision angle measurement device is well designed for this real-time control and dynamic measurement system, because its characters of high resolution, high accuracy, long endurance, and easy to maintain.

  20. Rayleigh radiance computations for satellite remote sensing: accounting for the effect of sensor spectral response function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Menghua

    2016-05-30

    To understand and assess the effect of the sensor spectral response function (SRF) on the accuracy of the top of the atmosphere (TOA) Rayleigh-scattering radiance computation, new TOA Rayleigh radiance lookup tables (LUTs) over global oceans and inland waters have been generated. The new Rayleigh LUTs include spectral coverage of 335-2555 nm, all possible solar-sensor geometries, and surface wind speeds of 0-30 m/s. Using the new Rayleigh LUTs, the sensor SRF effect on the accuracy of the TOA Rayleigh radiance computation has been evaluated for spectral bands of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite and the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS)-1, showing some important uncertainties for VIIRS-SNPP particularly for large solar- and/or sensor-zenith angles as well as for large Rayleigh optical thicknesses (i.e., short wavelengths) and bands with broad spectral bandwidths. To accurately account for the sensor SRF effect, a new correction algorithm has been developed for VIIRS spectral bands, which improves the TOA Rayleigh radiance accuracy to ~0.01% even for the large solar-zenith angles of 70°-80°, compared with the error of ~0.7% without applying the correction for the VIIRS-SNPP 410 nm band. The same methodology that accounts for the sensor SRF effect on the Rayleigh radiance computation can be used for other satellite sensors. In addition, with the new Rayleigh LUTs, the effect of surface atmospheric pressure variation on the TOA Rayleigh radiance computation can be calculated precisely, and no specific atmospheric pressure correction algorithm is needed. There are some other important applications and advantages to using the new Rayleigh LUTs for satellite remote sensing, including an efficient and accurate TOA Rayleigh radiance computation for hyperspectral satellite remote sensing, detector-based TOA Rayleigh radiance computation, Rayleigh radiance calculations for high altitude

  1. In situ ozone data for evaluation of the laser absorption spectrometer ozone remote sensor: 1979 southeastern Virginia urban plume study summer field program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, G. L.; Mcdougal, D. S.; Mathis, J. J., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Ozone data from the 1979 Southeastern Virginia Urban Study (SEV-UPS) field program are presented. The SEV-UPS was conducted for evaluation of an ozone remote sensor, the Laser Absorption Spectrometer. During the measurement program, remote-sensor evaluation was in two areas; (1) determination of the remote sensor's accuracy, repeatability, and operational characteristics, and (2) demonstration of the application of remotely sensed ozone data in air-quality studies. Data from six experiments designed to provide in situ ozone data for evaluation of the sensor in area 1, above, are presented. Experiments consisted of overflights of a test area with the remote sensor aircraft while in situ measurements with a second aircraft and selected surface stations provided correlative ozone data within the viewing area of the remote sensor.

  2. A far-field-viewing sensor for making analytical measurements in remote locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, K L; Taylor, L C; Walt, D R

    1999-07-15

    We demonstrate a far-field-viewing GRINscope sensor for making analytical measurements in remote locations. The GRINscope was fabricated by permanently affixing a micro-Gradient index (GRIN) lens on the distal face of a 350-micron-diameter optical imaging fiber. The GRINscope can obtain both chemical and visual information. In one application, a thin, pH-sensitive polymer layer was immobilized on the distal end of the GRINscope. The ability of the GRINscope to visually image its far-field surroundings and concurrently detect pH changes in a flowing stream was demonstrated. In a different application, the GRINscope was used to image pH- and O2-sensitive particles on a remote substrate and simultaneously measure their fluorescence intensity in response to pH or pO2 changes.

  3. Raman backscatter as a remote laser power sensor in high-energy-density plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Moody, J D; Divol, L; Michel, P; Robey, H F; LePape, S; Ralph, J; Ross, J S; Glenzer, S H; Kirkwood, R K; Landen, O L; MacGowan, B J; Nikroo, A; Williams, E A

    2013-01-01

    Stimulated Raman backscatter (SRS) is used as a remote sensor to quantify the instantaneous laser power after transfer from outer to inner cones that cross in a National Ignition Facility (NIF) gas-filled hohlraum plasma. By matching SRS between a shot reducing outer vs a shot reducing inner power we infer that ~half of the incident outer-cone power is transferred to inner cones, for the specific time and wavelength configuration studied. This is the first instantaneous non-disruptive measure of power transfer in an indirect drive NIF experiment using optical measurements.

  4. Studies of complex terrain wind flows using acoustic sounder and optical cross-wind remote sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porch, W.M.; Neff, W.; King, C.

    1985-08-01

    Remote sensing instrumentation has played an important role in the Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) field experimental program. The goal of this program is to better understand transport and diffusion processes in complex terrain with an emphasis focused on nighttime drainage wind conditions. Two aspects of the instrumentation are discussed in this paper: acoustic sounders (doppler and monostatic) and space averaging optical cross-wind sensors. Data from these two sources are discussed and compared with data from conventional tower and tethersonde instrumentation. 13 refs., 10 figs. (WRF)

  5. Ground-based observations of exoplanet atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ernst Johan Walter de

    2011-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the properties of exoplanet atmospheres. The results for ground-based near-infrared secondary eclipse observations of three different exoplanets, TrES-3b, HAT-P-1b and WASP-33b, are presented which have been obtained with ground-based telescopes as part of the GROUSE project.

  6. Ground-based observations of exoplanet atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ernst Johan Walter de

    2011-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the properties of exoplanet atmospheres. The results for ground-based near-infrared secondary eclipse observations of three different exoplanets, TrES-3b, HAT-P-1b and WASP-33b, are presented which have been obtained with ground-based telescopes as part of the GROUSE project.

  7. Cardiac Care Assistance using Self Configured Sensor Network—a Remote Patient Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma Dhulipala, V. R.; Kanagachidambaresan, G. R.

    2014-04-01

    Pervasive health care systems are used to monitor patients remotely without disturbing the normal day-to-day activities in real-time. Wearable physiological sensors required to monitor various significant ecological parameters of the patients are connected to Body Central Unit (BCU). Body Sensor Network (BSN) updates data in real-time and are designed to transmit alerts against abnormalities which enables quick response by medical units in case of an emergency. BSN helps monitoring patient without any need for attention to the subject. BSN helps in reducing the stress and strain caused by hospital environment. In this paper, mathematical models for heartbeat signal, electro cardio graph (ECG) signal and pulse rate are introduced. These signals are compared and their RMS difference-fast Fourier transforms (PRD-FFT) are processed. In the context of cardiac arrest, alert messages of these parameters and first aid for post-surgical operations has been suggested.

  8. Global coverage measurement planning strategies for mobile robots equipped with a remote gas sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, Muhammad Asif; Trincavelli, Marco; Cirillo, Marcello; Schaffernicht, Erik; Lilienthal, Achim J

    2015-03-20

    The problem of gas detection is relevant to many real-world applications, such as leak detection in industrial settings and landfill monitoring. In this paper, we address the problem of gas detection in large areas with a mobile robotic platform equipped with a remote gas sensor. We propose an algorithm that leverages a novel method based on convex relaxation for quickly solving sensor placement problems, and for generating an efficient exploration plan for the robot. To demonstrate the applicability of our method to real-world environments, we performed a large number of experimental trials, both on randomly generated maps and on the map of a real environment. Our approach proves to be highly efficient in terms of computational requirements and to provide nearly-optimal solutions.

  9. Global Coverage Measurement Planning Strategies for Mobile Robots Equipped with a Remote Gas Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Asif Arain

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The problem of gas detection is relevant to many real-world applications, such as leak detection in industrial settings and landfill monitoring. In this paper, we address the problem of gas detection in large areas with a mobile robotic platform equipped with a remote gas sensor. We propose an algorithm that leverages a novel method based on convex relaxation for quickly solving sensor placement problems, and for generating an efficient exploration plan for the robot. To demonstrate the applicability of our method to real-world environments, we performed a large number of experimental trials, both on randomly generated maps and on the map of a real environment. Our approach proves to be highly efficient in terms of computational requirements and to provide nearly-optimal solutions.

  10. Cyberinfrastructure for remote environmental observatories: a model homogeneous sensor network in the Great Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, Scotty; Slater, David; Fritzinger, Eric; Lyles, Bradley; Kent, Graham; Smith, Kenneth; Dascalu, Sergiu; Harris, Frederick

    2017-04-01

    Sensor-based data collection has changed the potential scale and resolution of in-situ environmental studies by orders of magnitude, increasing expertise and management requirements accordingly. Cost-effective management of these observing systems is possible by leveraging cyberinfrastructure resources. Presented is a case study environmental observation network in the Great Basin region, USA, the Nevada Climate-ecohydrological Assessment Network (NevCAN). NevCAN stretches hundreds of kilometers across several mountain ranges and monitors climate and ecohydrological conditions from low desert (900 m ASL) to high subalpine treeline (3360 m ASL) down to 1-minute timescales. The network has been operating continuously since 2010, collecting billions of sensor data points and millions of camera images that record hourly conditions at each site, despite requiring relatively low annual maintenance expenditure. These data have provided unique insight into fine-scale processes across mountain gradients, which is crucial scientific information for a water-scarce region. The key to maintaining data continuity for these remotely-located study sites has been use of uniform data transport and management systems, coupled with high-reliability power system designs. Enabling non-proprietary digital communication paths to all study sites and sensors allows the research team to acquire data in near-real-time, troubleshoot problems, and diversify sensor hardware. A wide-area network design based on common Internet Protocols (IP) has been extended into each study site, providing production bandwidth of between 2 Mbps and 60 Mbps, depending on local conditions. The network architecture and site-level support systems (such as power generation) have been implemented with the core objectives of capacity, redundancy, and modularity. NevCAN demonstrates that by following simple but uniform "best practices", the next generation of regionally-specific environmental observatories can evolve to

  11. A Remote Sensor for Detecting Methane Based on Palladium-Decorated Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guomin Li

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The remote detection of the concentration of methane at room temperature is performed by a sensor that is configured by the combination of radio frequency identification (RFID, and functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs. The proposed sensor is schemed as a thin film RFID tag in a polyethylene substrate, on which a metal trace dipole, a metal trace T impedance matching networks, a 0.5 µm-CMOS RF/DC rectifier chipset and a sensor head of palladium-decorated single walled carbon nanotubes (Pd-SWCNTs are surface mounted in cascade. The performances of the sensor are examined and described by the defined parameters of the received signal strength index (RSSI and the comparative analog identifier (∆AID. Results validate the sensor’s ability to detect molecules of methane at room temperature, showing that the RSSI can increase 4 dB and the ∆AID can increase 3% in response to methane concentrations ranging from zero to 100 ppm.

  12. The design of support structure of mirror subassembly of space remote sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke-jun; Dong, Ji-hong; Li, Wei; Guo, Quan-feng; Li, Yan-chun; Zhao, Wei-guo; Wang, Hai-ping; Xuan, Ming

    2014-09-01

    The support structure of large aperture mirror of space remote sensor is the key of the space remote sensor development. In this paper, the size of the large aperture mirror is Φ700mm,which is supported in the back of mirror with 3 points ,the composite structure of ball joint and flexible groove is adopted in support structure which can guarantee the mirror surface satisfy the requirement of optical design under the coupled load of gravity and heat. At the same time, the mirror subassembly should have a high enough stiffness through the reasonable lightweight to ensure the camera in transportation and launch process can withstand severe vibration condition. In order to validate the rationality of the design,the finite element analysis is done to the mirror subassembly,which indicates that the shape error variation of mirror RMS is better than λ/50 and PV is better than λ/10 in the coupling load of gravity and heat,and the first natural frequency of the mirror subassembly is higher than the design requirements. Dynamics calculation results of mirror subassembly consistent with mechanics experiment results - the surface precision of the mirror subassembly obtained from the ZYGO interferometer consistent with the results of finite element analysis and meets the design requirements.

  13. Research of remote sensing technology of atmospheric water vapor by using ground-based GPS and application system of meteorological operations%地基GPS水汽监测技术及气象业务化应用系统的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李国平

    2011-01-01

    本研究建立了川渝地区地基GPS(global positioning system,全球定位系统)遥感水汽的本地化计算模型,开发出GPS遥感水汽的计算软件包,开展了局域地基GPS观测网遥感大气水汽的试验及业务应用,反演出30 min间隔的高时间分辨率GPS可降水量序列。评估了反演精度,研究了GPS水汽产品在气象业务应用的可行性。研发了可搭建在MICAPS(meteorological information comprehensive analysis and process system)平台上的地基G%This study established local computing model of remote sensing water vapor by using ground-based GPS(global positioning system) in the region of Sichuan-Chongqing,and developed computing software packages of GPS remote sensing water vapor.Then the experiment and operational application of remote sensing water vapor by using ground-based GPS in this local network was done,by which the high time resolution GPS precipitable water vapor(PWV) sequence of 30 min intervals was derived.This paper also gives the assessment of the retrieval accuracy,as well as the feasibility of meteorological operations application of GPS water vapor products.The major results of this study include developing the operations application system of remote sensing atmospheric water vapor by using ground-based GPS,which can be build on the MICAPS(meteorological information comprehensive analysis and process system) as an operational application system,and realizing the real-time transmission,data solution,deriving of PWV by a local ground-based GPS network and visualization of GPS water vapor products.This meteorological operations system played a unique role in the heavy rain,blizzard and other severe weather forecast in its trial-run.Systematical study of the temporal variation,horizontal distribution of GPS-PWV was done by our research group.Furthermore,the relationship between PWV derived by GPS among surface air temperature,pressure,specific humidity,solar radiation

  14. Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing of Forest Dynamics in Central Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, K. J.; Sun, G.; Kharuk, V. I.; Howl, J.

    2011-01-01

    The forested regions of Siberia, Russia are vast and contain about a quarter of the world's forests that have not experienced harvesting. However, many Siberian forests are facing twin pressures of rapidly changing climate and increasing timber harvest activity. Monitoring the dynamics and mapping the structural parameters of the forest is important for understanding the causes and consequences of changes observed in these areas. Because of the inaccessibility and large extent of this forest, remote sensing data can play an important role for observing forest state and change. In Central Siberia, multi-sensor remote sensing data have been used to monitor forest disturbances and to map above-ground biomass from the Sayan Mountains in the south to the taiga-tundra boundaries in the north. Radar images from the Shuttle Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C)/XSAR mission were used for forest biomass estimation in the Sayan Mountains. Radar images from the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite-1 (JERS-1), European Remote Sensing Satellite-1 (ERS-1) and Canada's RADARSAT-1, and data from ETM+ on-board Landsat-7 were used to characterize forest disturbances from logging, fire, and insect damage in Boguchany and Priangare areas.

  15. A MGy radiation-hardened sensor instrumentation link for nuclear reactor monitoring and remote handling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbeeck, Jens; Cao, Ying [KU Leuven - KUL, Div. LRD-MAGyICS, Kasteelpark Arenberg 10, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Van Uffelen, Marco; Mont Casellas, Laura; Damiani, Carlo; Morales, Emilio Ruiz; Santana, Roberto Ranz [Fusion for Energy - F4E, c/Josep,n deg. 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Ed. B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Meek, Richard; Haist, Bernhard [Oxford Technologies Ltd. OTL, 7 Nuffield Way, Abingdon OX14 1RL (United Kingdom); De Cock, Wouter; Vermeeren, Ludo [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Steyaert, Michiel [KU Leuven, ESAT-MICAS, KasteelparkArenberg 10, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Leroux, Paul [KU Leuven, ESAT-MICAS, KasteelparkArenberg 10, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

    2015-07-01

    Decommissioning, dismantling and remote handling applications in nuclear facilities all require robotic solutions that are able to survive in radiation environments. Recently raised safety, radiation hardness and cost efficiency demands from both the nuclear regulatory and the society impose severe challenges in traditional methods. For example, in case of the dismantling of the Fukushima sites, solutions that survive accumulated doses higher than 1 MGy are mandatory. To allow remote operation of these tools in nuclear environments, electronics were used to be shielded with several centimeters of lead or even completely banned in these solutions. However, shielding electronics always leads to bulky and heavy solutions, which reduces the flexibility of robotic tools. It also requires longer repair time and produces extra waste further in a dismantling or decommissioning cycle. In addition, often in current reactor designs, due to size restrictions and the need to inspect very tight areas there are limitations to the use of shielding. A MGy radiation-hardened sensor instrumentation link developed by MAGyICS provides a solution to build a flexible, easy removable and small I and C module with MGy radiation tolerance without any shielding. Hereby it removes all these pains to implement electronics in robotic tools. The demonstrated solution in this poster is developed for ITER Remote Handling equipments operating in high radiation environments (>1 MGy) in and around the Tokamak. In order to obtain adequately accurate instrumentation and control information, as well as to ease the umbilical management, there is a need of front-end electronics that will have to be located close to those actuators and sensors on the remote handling tool. In particular, for diverter remote handling, it is estimated that these components will face gamma radiation up to 300 Gy/h (in-vessel) and a total dose of 1 MGy. The radiation-hardened sensor instrumentation link presented here, consists

  16. The potential for synthesizing multi-sensor remote sensing data for global volcano monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtney, M.; Pritchard, M. E.; Carn, S. A.; McCormick, B.; Ebmeier, S. K.; Jay, J.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanoes exhibit variable eruption frequencies and styles, from near-continuous eruptions of effusive lavas to more intermittent, explosive eruptions. The monitoring frequency necessary to capture precursory signals at any volcano remains uncertain, as some warnings allot hours for evacuation. Likewise, no precursory signal appears deterministic for each volcano. Volcanic activity manifests in a variety of ways (i.e. tremor, deformation), thus requiring multiple monitoring mechanisms (i.e. geodetic, geochemical, geothermal). We are developing databases to compare relationships among remotely sensed volcanic unrest signals and eruptions. Satellite remote sensing utilizes frequent temporal measurements (daily to bi-weekly), an essential component of worldwide volcano monitoring. Remote sensing methods are also capable of detecting diverse precursory signals such as ground deformation from satellite interferometric synthetic aperture radar—InSAR— (multiple space agencies), degassing from satellite spectroscopy (i.e. OMI SO2 from NASA), and hot spots from thermal infrared (i.e. MODIS from NASA). We present preliminary results from seven SAR satellites and two thermal infrared satellites for 24 volcanoes with prominent SO2 emissions. We find near-continuous emissions at Ibu (Indonesia) since 2008 corresponded with hotspots and 10 cm of subsidence, with degassing and comparable subsidence observed at Pagan (Marianas). A newcomer to volcano monitoring, remote sensing data are only beginning to be utilized on a global scale, let alone as a synthesized dataset for monitoring developing eruptions. We foresee a searchable tool for rapidly accessing basic volcanic unrest characteristics for different types of volcanoes and whether or not they resulted in eruption. By including data from multiple satellite sensors in our database we hope to develop quantitative assessments for calculating the likelihood of eruption from individual events.

  17. Spatial Copula Model for Imputing Traffic Flow Data from Remote Microwave Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaolei; Luan, Sen; Du, Bowen; Yu, Bin

    2017-09-21

    Issues of missing data have become increasingly serious with the rapid increase in usage of traffic sensors. Analyses of the Beijing ring expressway have showed that up to 50% of microwave sensors pose missing values. The imputation of missing traffic data must be urgently solved although a precise solution that cannot be easily achieved due to the significant number of missing portions. In this study, copula-based models are proposed for the spatial interpolation of traffic flow from remote traffic microwave sensors. Most existing interpolation methods only rely on covariance functions to depict spatial correlation and are unsuitable for coping with anomalies due to Gaussian consumption. Copula theory overcomes this issue and provides a connection between the correlation function and the marginal distribution function of traffic flow. To validate copula-based models, a comparison with three kriging methods is conducted. Results indicate that copula-based models outperform kriging methods, especially on roads with irregular traffic patterns. Copula-based models demonstrate significant potential to impute missing data in large-scale transportation networks.

  18. Geometry Optimization Approaches of Inductively Coupled Printed Spiral Coils for Remote Powering of Implantable Biomedical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sondos Mehri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electronic biomedical implantable sensors need power to perform. Among the main reported approaches, inductive link is the most commonly used method for remote powering of such devices. Power efficiency is the most important characteristic to be considered when designing inductive links to transfer energy to implantable biomedical sensors. The maximum power efficiency is obtained for maximum coupling and quality factors of the coils and is generally limited as the coupling between the inductors is usually very small. This paper is dealing with geometry optimization of inductively coupled printed spiral coils for powering a given implantable sensor system. For this aim, Iterative Procedure (IP and Genetic Algorithm (GA analytic based optimization approaches are proposed. Both of these approaches implement simple mathematical models that approximate the coil parameters and the link efficiency values. Using numerical simulations based on Finite Element Method (FEM and with experimental validation, the proposed analytic approaches are shown to have improved accurate performance results in comparison with the obtained performance of a reference design case. The analytical GA and IP optimization methods are also compared to a purely Finite Element Method based on numerical optimization approach (GA-FEM. Numerical and experimental validations confirmed the accuracy and the effectiveness of the analytical optimization approaches to design the optimal coil geometries for the best values of efficiency.

  19. Development of a Three Dimensional Wireless Sensor Network for Terrain-Climate Research in Remote Mountainous Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, K.; Davis, A.; Gessler, P.; Hess, H.; Holden, Z.; Link, T. E.; Newingham, B. A.; Smith, A. M.; Robinson, P.

    2011-12-01

    Developing sensor networks that are robust enough to perform in the world's remote regions is critical since these regions serve as important benchmarks compared to human-dominated areas. Paradoxically, the factors that make these remote, natural sites challenging for sensor networking are often what make them indispensable for climate change research. We aim to overcome these challenges by developing a three-dimensional sensor network arrayed across a topoclimatic gradient (1100-1800 meters) in a wilderness area in central Idaho. Development of this sensor array builds upon advances in sensing, networking, and power supply technologies coupled with experiences of the multidisciplinary investigators in conducting research in remote mountainous locations. The proposed gradient monitoring network will provide near real-time data from a three-dimensional (3-D) array of sensors measuring biophysical parameters used in ecosystem process models. The network will monitor atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, humidity, air and soil temperature, soil water content, precipitation, incoming and outgoing shortwave and longwave radiation, snow depth, wind speed and direction, tree stem growth and leaf wetness at time intervals ranging from seconds to days. The long-term goal of this project is to realize a transformative integration of smart sensor networks adaptively communicating data in real-time to ultimately achieve a 3-D visualization of ecosystem processes within remote mountainous regions. Process models will be the interface between the visualization platforms and the sensor network. This will allow us to better predict how non-human dominated terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems function and respond to climate dynamics. Access to the data will be ensured as part of the Northwest Knowledge Network being developed at the University of Idaho, through ongoing Idaho NSF-funded cyber infrastructure initiatives, and existing data management systems funded by NSF, such as

  20. Remote monitoring of soldier safety through body posture identification using wearable sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Subir; Quwaider, Muhannad

    2008-04-01

    The physical safety and well being of the soldiers in a battlefield is the highest priority of Incident Commanders. Currently, the ability to track and monitor soldiers rely on visual and verbal communication which can be somewhat limited in scenarios where the soldiers are deployed inside buildings and enclosed areas that are out of visual range of the commanders. Also, the need for being stealth can often prevent a battling soldier to send verbal clues to a commander about his or her physical well being. Sensor technologies can remotely provide various data about the soldiers including physiological monitoring and personal alert safety system functionality. This paper presents a networked sensing solution in which a body area wireless network of multi-modal sensors can monitor the body movement and other physiological parameters for statistical identification of a soldier's body posture, which can then be indicative of the physical conditions and safety alerts of the soldier in question. The specific concept is to leverage on-body proximity sensing and a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) based mechanism that can be applied for stochastic identification of human body postures using a wearable sensor network. The key idea is to collect relative proximity information between wireless sensors that are strategically placed over a subject's body to monitor the relative movements of the body segments, and then to process that using HMM in order to identify the subject's body postures. The key novelty of this approach is a departure from the traditional accelerometry based approaches in which the individual body segment movements, rather than their relative proximity, is used for activity monitoring and posture detection. Through experiments with body mounted sensors we demonstrate that while the accelerometry based approaches can be used for differentiating activity intensive postures such as walking and running, they are not very effective for identification and

  1. Potentiometric Sensor for Real-Time Remote Surveillance of Actinides in Molten Salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natalie J. Gese; Jan-Fong Jue; Brenda E. Serrano; Guy L. Fredrickson

    2012-07-01

    A potentiometric sensor is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for real-time remote surveillance of actinides during electrorefining of spent nuclear fuel. During electrorefining, fuel in metallic form is oxidized at the anode while refined uranium metal is reduced at the cathode in a high temperature electrochemical cell containing LiCl-KCl-UCl3 electrolyte. Actinides present in the fuel chemically react with UCl3 and form stable metal chlorides that accumulate in the electrolyte. This sensor will be used for process control and safeguarding of activities in the electrorefiner by monitoring the concentrations of actinides in the electrolyte. The work presented focuses on developing a solid-state cation conducting ceramic sensor for detecting varying concentrations of trivalent actinide metal cations in eutectic LiCl-KCl molten salt. To understand the basic mechanisms for actinide sensor applications in molten salts, gadolinium was used as a surrogate for actinides. The ß?-Al2O3 was selected as the solid-state electrolyte for sensor fabrication based on cationic conductivity and other factors. In the present work Gd3+-ß?-Al2O3 was prepared by ion exchange reactions between trivalent Gd3+ from GdCl3 and K+-, Na+-, and Sr2+-ß?-Al2O3 precursors. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used for characterization of Gd3+-ß?-Al2O3 samples. Microfocus X-ray Diffraction (µ-XRD) was used in conjunction with SEM energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to identify phase content and elemental composition. The Gd3+-ß?-Al2O3 materials were tested for mechanical and chemical stability by exposing them to molten LiCl-KCl based salts. The effect of annealing on the exchanged material was studied to determine improvements in material integrity post ion exchange. The stability of the ß?-Al2O3 phase after annealing was verified by µ-XRD. Preliminary sensor tests with different assembly designs will also be presented.

  2. Distributed Remote Vector Gaussian Source Coding for Wireless Acoustic Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahedi, Adel; Østergaard, Jan; Jensen, Søren Holdt;

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of remote vector Gaussian source coding for a wireless acoustic sensor network. Each node receives messages from multiple nodes in the network and decodes these messages using its own measurement of the sound field as side information. The node’s measurement...... and the estimates of the source resulting from decoding the received messages are then jointly encoded and transmitted to a neighboring node in the network. We show that for this distributed source coding scenario, one can encode a so-called conditional sufficient statistic of the sources instead of jointly...... encoding multiple sources. We focus on the case where node measurements are in form of noisy linearly mixed combinations of the sources and the acoustic channel mixing matrices are invertible. For this problem, we derive the rate-distortion function for vector Gaussian sources and under covariance...

  3. New radiological material detection technologies for nuclear forensics: Remote optical imaging and graphene-based sensors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Richard Karl [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martin, Jeffrey B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wiemann, Dora K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Choi, Junoh [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Howell, Stephen W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    We developed new detector technologies to identify the presence of radioactive materials for nuclear forensics applications. First, we investigated an optical radiation detection technique based on imaging nitrogen fluorescence excited by ionizing radiation. We demonstrated optical detection in air under indoor and outdoor conditions for alpha particles and gamma radiation at distances up to 75 meters. We also contributed to the development of next generation systems and concepts that could enable remote detection at distances greater than 1 km, and originated a concept that could enable daytime operation of the technique. A second area of research was the development of room-temperature graphene-based sensors for radiation detection and measurement. In this project, we observed tunable optical and charged particle detection, and developed improved devices. With further development, the advancements described in this report could enable new capabilities for nuclear forensics applications.

  4. Beyond potentiometry: robust electrochemical ion sensor concepts in view of remote chemical sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Eric; Bhakthavatsalam, Vishnupriya; Gemene, Kebede L

    2008-05-15

    For about 100 years, potentiometry with ion-selective electrodes has been one of the dominating electroanalytical techniques. While great advances in terms of selective chemistries and materials have been achieved in recent years, the basic manner in which ion-selective membranes are used has not fundamentally changed. The potential readings are directly co-dependent on the potential at the reference electrode, which requires maintenance and for which very few accepted alternatives have been proposed. Fouling or clogging of the exposed electrode surfaces will lead to changes in the observed potential. At the same time, the Nernst equation predicts quite small potential changes, on the order of millivolts for concentration changes on the order of a factor two, making frequent recalibration, accurate temperature control and electrode maintenance key requirements of routine analytical measurements. While the relatively advanced selective materials developed for ion-selective sensors would be highly attractive for low power remote sensing application, one should consider solutions beyond classical potentiometry to make this technology practically feasible. This paper evaluates some recent examples that may be attractive solutions to the stated problems that face potentiometric measurements. These include high-amplitude sensing approaches, with sensitivities that are an order of magnitude larger than predicted by the Nernst equation; backside calibration potentiometry, where knowledge of the magnitude of the potential is irrelevant and the system is evaluated from the backside of the membrane; controlled current coulometry with ion-selective membranes, an attractive technique for calibration-free reagent delivery without the need for standards or volumetry; localized electrochemical titrations at ion-selective membranes, making it possible to design sensors that directly monitor parameters such as total acidity for which volumetric techniques were traditionally used

  5. Water Bodies and Vegetation in the California-Baja California Border Region a Remote Sensors Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, A.; Mexicano-Vargas, M. L.; Serrato, B. A.

    2007-05-01

    The California-Baja California border region although they share watersheds, similar climate and landscape, there is a big contrast in the vegetation cover and water bodies between the two countries as seen from remote sensors. There is a stronger signature of vegetation and larger number of water bodies in the California side. To do a quantitative estimate of these differences, a comparative analysis of vegetation and water bodies was perfomerd along a strip of 100 km from both sides of the border with remote sensing techniques using Landsat TM images from 1984 to 2006. The strong absorption of water to short wave infrared radiation captured by band 5 of TM Landsat sensor (1.55- 1.75 micrometers) is use to detect water bodies. The histogram segmentation technique was used with TM 5/1 band ratios reinforced with a shades prediction technique using the sun position and a digital elevation model. The aerial extent of detected water bodies is estimated. Also an analysis from 1972 trough 2002 of the Mexican portion of Colorado river delta will be presented, with emphasis on flood events induced by abnormal snowmelts and higher precipitations in the high basin; 250 Landsat image previews were collected , from which 157 were selected to integrate 63 scenes that provide a dynamic picture of the Colorado delta river over 30 years. A regression with the annual averages of inundated areas and annual water flow data from E.U. to Mexico was made with a correlation coefficient of 0.912. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) was used to estimate the vegetation greenness in the agricultural valleys and in natural vegetated areas along the mountains on both sides of the border. The spatial distribution of the NDVI and the differences between zones with the same land use regime on both sides of the border is presented.

  6. The development of a metering and remote checking system using a light sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, S.Y.; Ahn, S.H.; Lee, K.J. [R and D Center, Korea Gas Corporation, Ansan (Korea); Choi, W.Y.; Lee, B.C.; Song, J.C.; Park, J.Y.; Park, J.H.; Park, K.L.; Kim, K.Y.; Kim, J.Y [Venture Korea Corporation (Korea)

    1999-12-01

    The light sensing technology developed in this project can apply all the conventional mechanical meters using only attaching a light sensor set. The technology is available to the majority of small scale consumption such as households, restaurants and offices rather than the minority of large scale consumption such as industry use. When the light sensing technology is practically in use, the expense of the remote checking system can be below 30,000 won per household, and unnecessary national loss can be prevented due to replacement of the conventional meters. If the remote checking system can be constructed using low-priced expenses, all the city gas companies can not only settle all the inconveniences of consumers due to unexpected visit of a gas meterman and communication problems in their absence fundamentally but expect economic profit such as curtailment of the expenses of inspection of meters and early retrieval of gas usage charge. Especially, by inspecting all the households in the midnight of every month simultaneously, civil petitions can be reduced by eliminating causes of bottleneck for flexible rate of natural gas, thus it is expected that general management expenses can be curtailed to a great extent. 22 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Remote Sensing Analysis Techniques and Sensor Requirements to Support the Mapping of Illegal Domestic Waste Disposal Sites in Queensland, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine Glanville

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Illegal disposal of waste is a significant management issue for contemporary governments with waste posing an economic, social, and environmental risk. An improved understanding of the distribution of illegal waste disposal sites is critical to enhance the cost-effectiveness and efficiency of waste management efforts. Remotely sensed data has the potential to address this knowledge gap. However, the literature regarding the use of remote sensing to map illegal waste disposal sites is incomplete. This paper aims to analyze existing remote sensing methods and sensors used to monitor and map illegal waste disposal sites. The purpose of this paper is to support the evaluation of existing remote sensing methods for mapping illegal domestic waste sites in Queensland, Australia. Recent advances in technology and the acquisition of very high-resolution remote sensing imagery provide an important opportunity to (1 revisit established analysis techniques for identifying illegal waste disposal sites, (2 examine the applicability of different remote sensors for illegal waste disposal detection, and (3 identify opportunities for future research to increase the accuracy of any illegal waste disposal mapping products.

  8. Electronic tongue system for remote multi-ion sensing using blind source separation and wireless sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wen-Yan; Cruz, Febus Reidj G.; Szu, Harold; Pijanowska, Dorota G.; Dawgul, Marek; Torbicz, Wladyslaw; Grabiec, Piotr B.; Jarosewicz, Bohdan; Chiang, Jung-Lung; Cheng, Cheanyeh; Chang, Kuo-Chung; Truc, Le Thanh; Lin, Wei-Chiang

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents an electronic tongue system with blind source separation (BSS) and wireless sensor network (WSN) for remote multi-ion sensing applications. Electrochemical sensors, such as ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFET) and extended-gate field-effect transistor (EGFET), only provide the combined concentrations of all ions in aqueous solutions. Mixed hydrogen and sodium ions in chemical solutions are observed by means of H+ ISFET and H+ EGFET sensor array. The BSS extracts the concentration of individual ions using independent component analysis (ICA). The parameters of ISFET and EGFET sensors serve as a priori knowledge that helps solve the BSS problem. Using wireless transceivers, the ISFET/EGFET modules are realized as wireless sensor nodes. The integration of WSN technology into our electronic tongue system with BSS capability makes distant multi-ion measurement viable for environment and water quality monitoring.

  9. Airborne & Ground-based measurements of atmospheric CO2 using the 1.57-μm laser absorption spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaizawa, D.; Kawakami, S.; Nakajima, M.; Tanaka, T.; Miyamoto, Y.; Morino, I.; Uchino, O.; Asai, K.

    2009-12-01

    Greenhouse gases observing satellite (GOSAT) started the measurement of global CO2 abundances to reveal its continental inventory using two passive remote sensors. The goal that the sensor needs to be done is to achieve an 1% relative accuracy in order to reduce uncertainties of CO2 budget. Nevertheless, in the future global CO2 monitoring, more accurate measurement of global tropospheric CO2 abundances with the monthly regional scale are required to improve the knowledge of CO2 exchanges among the land, ocean, and atmosphere. In order to fulfill demands, a laser remote sensor, such as DIAL or laser absorption spectrometer (LAS), is a potential candidate of future space-based missions. Nowadays, those technologies are required to demonstrate an accuracy of the few-ppm level through airborne & ground-based measurements. We developed the prototype of the 1.57um LAS for a step of the next missions and perform it at the ground-based and airborne platform to show the properly validated performance in the framework of GOSAT validation. Our CO2 LAS is consisted of all optical fiber circuits & compact receiving /transmitting optics to achieve the portable, flexible and rigid system. The optical sources of on- and off-line are distributed feedback lasers, which are tuned at the strong and weak position of the R12 line in the (30012rate and combined and amplified using an erbium doped fiber amplifier. Scattered signals from the hard target are collected by the 11cm receiving telescope and detected and stored into the laptop computer. After that, we evaluated the atmospheric CO2 density using the meteorological parameters and ratio between the on- and off-line signals. The resultant of the ground-based measurement of 3km optical length indicated that the statistical error of the path averaged atmospheric CO2 density is less than 2.8ppm with 25 minutes averaging. The variation of the path averaged atmospheric CO2 is also quite consistent with that obtained from the in

  10. Improved thermal-vacuum compatible flat plate radiometric source for system-level testing of remote optical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Mark A.; Kent, Craig J.; Bousquet, Robert; Brown, Steven W.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we describe an improved thermal-vacuum compatible flat plate radiometric source which has been developed and utilized for the characterization and calibration of remote optical sensors. This source is unique in that it can be used in situ, in both ambient and thermal-vacuum environments, allowing it to follow the sensor throughout its testing cycle. The performance of the original flat plate radiometric source was presented at the 2009 SPIE1. Following the original efforts, design upgrades were incorporated into the source to improve both radiometric throughput and uniformity. The pre-thermal-vacuum (pre-TVAC) testing results of a spacecraft-level optical sensor with the improved flat plate illumination source, both in ambient and vacuum environments, are presented. We also briefly discuss potential FPI configuration changes in order to improve its radiometric performance. Keywords: Calibration, radiometry, remote sensing, source.

  11. Digital imaging and remote sensing image generator (DIRSIG) as applied to NVESD sensor performance modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Kimberly E.; Choi, Hee-sue S.; Kaur, Balvinder; Olson, Jeffrey T.; Hill, Clayton F.; Hutchinson, James A.

    2016-05-01

    The US Army's Communications Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center (CERDEC) Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (referred to as NVESD) is developing a virtual detection, recognition, and identification (DRI) testing methodology using simulated imagery as a means of augmenting the field testing component of sensor performance evaluation, which is expensive, resource intensive, time consuming, and limited to the available target(s) and existing atmospheric visibility and environmental conditions at the time of testing. Existing simulation capabilities such as the Digital Imaging Remote Sensing Image Generator (DIRSIG) and NVESD's Integrated Performance Model Image Generator (NVIPM-IG) can be combined with existing detection algorithms to reduce cost/time, minimize testing risk, and allow virtual/simulated testing using full spectral and thermal object signatures, as well as those collected in the field. NVESD has developed an end-to-end capability to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. Simple detection algorithms have been used on the degraded images generated by NVIPM-IG to determine the relative performance of the algorithms on both DIRSIG-simulated and collected images. Evaluating the degree to which the algorithm performance agrees between simulated versus field collected imagery is the first step in validating the simulated imagery procedure.

  12. Multi-Sensor Localization and Navigation for Remote Manipulation in Smoky Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Vicente Marti

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available When localizing mobile sensors and actuators in indoor environments laser meters, ultrasonic meters or even image processing techniques are usually used. On the other hand, in smoky conditions, due to a fire or building collapse, once the smoke or dust density grows, optical methods are not efficient anymore. In these scenarios other type of sensors must be used, such as sonar, radar or radiofrequency signals. Indoor localization in low-visibility conditions due to smoke is one of the EU GUARDIANS [1] project goals. The developed method aims to position a robot in front of doors, fire extinguishers and other points of interest with enough accuracy to allow a human operator to manipulate the robot's arm in order to actuate over the element. In coarse-grain localization, a fingerprinting technique based on ZigBee and WiFi signals is used, allowing the robot to navigate inside the building in order to get near the point of interest that requires manipulation. In fine-grained localization a remotely controlled programmable high intensity LED panel is used, which acts as a reference to the system in smoky conditions. Then, smoke detection and visual fine-grained localization are used to position the robot with precisely in the manipulation point (e.g., doors, valves, etc..

  13. AT89S52 Microcontroller Based Remote Room Monitoring System Using Passive Infrared Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Gifson

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This research describes about the design of the room detection system using a Passive Infrared sensors (PIR controlled by Microcontroller AT89S52 for remote control application. The output of the PIR is a low logic when it captures the heat waves of the human body. The output PIR is connected to the port 1.7 on Microcontroller in high logic. The maximum distance is 5 meters for the sensor to detect an object. When there is a signal sent by PIR, the Microcontroller processes the data and activates the buzzer to beep and the stepper motor to stop. Microcontroller also sends data through the RS-232 that continues a signal to the personal mobile phone. In order that the message is able to be sent, then first, messages must be programmed and stored in the Microcontroller AT89S52. The average message delivery time is 8.8 seconds. The recipient can turn the alarm of system on or off by a missed call.

  14. An investigation for the development of an integrated optical data preprocessor. [preprocessing remote sensor outputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verber, C. M.; Kenan, R. P.; Hartman, N. F.; Chapman, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    A laboratory model of a 16 channel integrated optical data preprocessor was fabricated and tested in response to a need for a device to evaluate the outputs of a set of remote sensors. It does this by accepting the outputs of these sensors, in parallel, as the components of a multidimensional vector descriptive of the data and comparing this vector to one or more reference vectors which are used to classify the data set. The comparison is performed by taking the difference between the signal and reference vectors. The preprocessor is wholly integrated upon the surface of a LiNbO3 single crystal with the exceptions of the source and the detector. He-Ne laser light is coupled in and out of the waveguide by prism couplers. The integrated optical circuit consists of a titanium infused waveguide pattern, electrode structures and grating beam splitters. The waveguide and electrode patterns, by virtue of their complexity, make the vector subtraction device the most complex integrated optical structure fabricated to date.

  15. Review of remote-sensor potential for wind-energy studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooke, W.H.

    1981-03-01

    This report evaluates a number of remote-sensing systems such as radars, lidars, and acoustic echo sounders which are potential alternatives to the cup- and propeller anemometers routinely used in wind energy siting. The high costs and demanding operational requirements of these sensors currently preclude their use in the early stages of a multi-phase wind energy siting strategy such as that recently articulated by Hiester and Pennell (1981). Instead, these systems can be used most effectively in the lattermost stages of the siting process - what Hiester and Pennell (1981) refer to as the site development phase, necessary only for the siting of large wind-energy conversion systems (WECS) or WECS clusters. Even for this particular application only four techniques appear to be operational now; that is, if used properly, these techniques should provide the data sets currently considered adequate for wind-energy siting purposes. They are, in rough order of increasing expense and operating demands: optical transverse wind sensors; acoustic Doppler sounders; time-of-flight and continuous wave (CW) Doppler lidar; and frequency-modulated, continuous wave (FM-CW) Doppler radar.

  16. Ground-based RGB imaging to determine the leaf water potential of potato plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaluk, Robert F.

    The determination of plant water status from leaf water potential (Psi L) data obtained by conventional methods is impractical for meeting real time irrigation monitoring requirements. This research, undertaken first, in a greenhouse and then in the field, examined the use of artificial neural network (ANN) modeling of RGB (red green blue) images, captured by a ground-based, five mega pixel digital camera, to predict the leaf water potential of potato (Solanum tuberosum L). The greenhouse study examined cv. Russet Burbank, while the field study examined cv. Sangre. The protocol was similar in both studies: (1) images were acquired over different soil nitrate (N) and volumetric water content levels, (2) images were radiometrically calibrated, (3) green foliage was classified and extracted from the images, and (4) image transformations, and vegetation indices were calculated and transformed using principal components analysis (PCA). The findings from both studies were similar: (1) the R and G bands were more important than the B image band in the classification of green leaf pigment, (2) soil N showed an inverse linear relationship against leaf reflectance in the G image band, (3) the ANN model input neuron weights with more separation between soil N and PsiL were more important than other input neurons in predicting PsiL, and (4) the measured and predicted PsiL validation datasets were normally distributed with equal variances and means that were not significantly different. Based on these research findings, the ground-based digital camera proved to be an adequate sensor for image acquisition and a practical tool for acquiring data for predicting the PsiL of potato plants. Keywords: nitrogen, IHS transformation, chromaticity transformation, principal components, vegetation indices, remote sensing, artificial neural network, digital camera.

  17. Detection and quantification of localized groundwater inflow in small streams using ground-based infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Tobias; Weiler, Markus

    2010-05-01

    Localized groundwater (GW) inflow into small streams can be a major source of runoff during low flow periods in headwater catchments. The localization and determination of the fraction of runoff corresponding to a certain area may give insights into aquifer type, flow processes, the composition of base-flow concerning the spatial distribution of catchment storage and water quality issues. Though GW temperature has a small amplitude during the year compared to surface water, a significant temperature difference between stream water and groundwater can be expected in summer and winter. As the technical development of infrared thermography is progressing (the spatial resolution of infrared camera systems is increasing and the measuring error is decreasing) we tested ground based infrared thermography as a non-invasive and remote applicable method to detect and quantify GW entries in small streams during baseflow periods (INFRATEC). In addition, water temperature and electric conductivity of the groundwater entering the stream and of the stream water up- and downstream of localized GW inflow were measured with temperature and EC sensors. Though the zones of complete mixing were identified, point measurements and surface radiation temperatures were taken from the same areas. Discharge measurements were conducted using the salt dilution method with continuous injection. End-member mixing calculations were done using the measured EC and water temperature data and compared to the results of mixing calculations of observed water surface radiation temperatures. The discharge observations were used to validate the fraction calculations. Calculated GW entries using thermogramms had comparable deviations from the measured runoff fractions to those from direct temperature and EC measurements. This leads to the conclusion that the use of ground-based infrared thermography for the detection and quantification of localized groundwater inflows into small streams is a valuable and

  18. Evaluation of satellite soil moisture products over Norway using ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesfeller, A.; Lahoz, W. A.; Jeu, R. A. M. de; Dorigo, W.; Haugen, L. E.; Svendby, T. M.; Wagner, W.

    2016-03-01

    In this study we evaluate satellite soil moisture products from the advanced SCATterometer (ASCAT) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) over Norway using ground-based observations from the Norwegian water resources and energy directorate. The ASCAT data are produced using the change detection approach of Wagner et al. (1999), and the AMSR-E data are produced using the VUA-NASA algorithm (Owe et al., 2001, 2008). Although satellite and ground-based soil moisture data for Norway have been available for several years, hitherto, such an evaluation has not been performed. This is partly because satellite measurements of soil moisture over Norway are complicated owing to the presence of snow, ice, water bodies, orography, rocks, and a very high coastline-to-area ratio. This work extends the European areas over which satellite soil moisture is validated to the Nordic regions. Owing to the challenging conditions for soil moisture measurements over Norway, the work described in this paper provides a stringent test of the capabilities of satellite sensors to measure soil moisture remotely. We show that the satellite and in situ data agree well, with averaged correlation (R) values of 0.72 and 0.68 for ASCAT descending and ascending data vs in situ data, and 0.64 and 0.52 for AMSR-E descending and ascending data vs in situ data for the summer/autumn season (1 June-15 October), over a period of 3 years (2009-2011). This level of agreement indicates that, generally, the ASCAT and AMSR-E soil moisture products over Norway have high quality, and would be useful for various applications, including land surface monitoring, weather forecasting, hydrological modelling, and climate studies. The increasing emphasis on coupled approaches to study the earth system, including the interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere, will benefit from the availability of validated and improved soil moisture satellite datasets, including those

  19. Characterization of subarctic vegetation using ground based remote sensing methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnell, D.; Garnello, A.; Palace, M. W.; Sullivan, F.; Herrick, C.; Anderson, S. M.; Crill, P. M.; Varner, R. K.

    2014-12-01

    Stordalen mire is located at 68°21'N and 19°02'E in the Swedish subarctic. Climate monitoring has revealed a warming trend spanning the past 150 years affecting the mires ability to hold stable palsa/hummock mounds. The micro-topography of the landscape has begun to degrade into thaw ponds changing the vegetation cover from ombrothrophic to minerotrophic. Hummocks are ecologically important due to their ability to act as a carbon sinks. Thaw ponds and sphagnum rich transitional zones have been documented as sources of atmospheric CH4. An objective of this project is to determine if a high resolution three band camera (RGB) and a RGNIR camera could detect differences in vegetation over five different site types. Species composition was collected for 50 plots with ten repetitions for each site type: palsa/hummock, tall shrub, semi-wet, tall graminoid, and wet. Sites were differentiated based on dominating species and features consisting of open water presence, sphagnum spp. cover, graminoid spp. cover, or the presence of dry raised plateaus/mounds. A pole based camera mount was used to collect images at a height of ~2.44m from the ground. The images were cropped in post-processing to fit a one-square meter quadrat. Texture analysis was performed on all images, including entropy, lacunarity, and angular second momentum. Preliminary results suggested that site type influences the number of species present. The p-values for the ability to predict site type using a t-test range from <0.0001 to 0.0461. A stepwise discriminant analysis on site type vs. texture yielded a 10% misclassification rate. Through the use of a stepwise regression of texture variables, actual vs. predicted percent of vegetation coverage provided R squared values of 0.73, 0.71, 0.67, and 0.89 for C. bigelowii, R. chamaemorus, Sphagnum spp., and open water respectively. These data have provided some support to the notion that texture analyses can be used for classification of mire site types. Future work will involve scaling up from the 50 plots through the use of data collected from two unmanned aerial systems (UAS), as well as WorldView-2 satellite imagery collected during the years 2012-2014. Identification of methane flux regions will later be analyzed based on vegetation coverage to aid classification of increased emission zones within the mire.

  20. Ground-based Remote Sensing of Cloud Liquid Water Path

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crewell, S.; Loehnert, U.

    Within the BALTEX Cloud LIquid WAter NETwork (CLIWA-NET) measurements of cloud parameters were performed to improve/evaluate cloud parameterizations in numerical weather prediction and climate models. The key variable is the cloud liq- uid water path (LWP) which is measured by passive microwave radiometry from the ground during three two-month CLIWA-NET observational periods. Additionally to the high temporal resolution time series from the ground, LWP fields are derived from satellite measurements. During the first two campaigns a continental scale network consisting of 12 stations was established. Most stations included further cloud sen- sitive instruments like infrared radiometer and lidar ceilometer. The third campaign started with a two-week long microwave intercomparison campaign (MICAM) in Cabauw, The Netherlands, and proceeded with a regional network within a 100 by 100 km area. The presentation will focus on the accuracy of LWP derived from the ground by in- vestigating the accuracy of the microwave brightness temperature measurement and examining the LWP retrieval uncertainty. Up to now microwave radiometer are no standard instruments and the seven radiometer involved in MICAM differ in frequen- cies, bandwidths, angular resolution, integration time etc. The influence of this instru- ment specifications on the LWP retrieval will be discussed.

  1. Ground Based Ultraviolet Remote Sensing of Volcanic Gas Plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. S. McGonigle

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet spectroscopy has been implemented for over thirty years to monitorvolcanic SO2 emissions. These data have provided valuable information concerningunderground magmatic conditions, which have been of utility in eruption forecastingefforts. During the last decade the traditionally used correlation spectrometers have beenupgraded with miniature USB coupled UV spectrometers, opening a series of exciting newempirical possibilities for understanding volcanoes and their impacts upon the atmosphere.Here we review these technological developments, in addition to the scientific insightsthey have precipitated, covering the strengths and current limitations of this approach.

  2. Ground Based Ultraviolet Remote Sensing of Volcanic Gas Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantzas, Euripides P.; McGonigle, Andrew J. S.

    2008-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectroscopy has been implemented for over thirty years to monitor volcanic SO2 emissions. These data have provided valuable information concerning underground magmatic conditions, which have been of utility in eruption forecasting efforts. During the last decade the traditionally used correlation spectrometers have been upgraded with miniature USB coupled UV spectrometers, opening a series of exciting new empirical possibilities for understanding volcanoes and their impacts upon the atmosphere. Here we review these technological developments, in addition to the scientific insights they have precipitated, covering the strengths and current limitations of this approach.

  3. Ground-based optical observation system for LEO objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, T.; Kurosaki, H.; Oda, H.; Tagawa, M.

    2015-08-01

    We propose a ground-based optical observation system for monitoring LEO objects, which uses numerous optical sensors to cover a vast region of the sky. Its potential in terms of detection and orbital determination were examined. About 30 cm LEO objects at 1000 km altitude are detectable using an 18 cm telescope, a CCD camera and the analysis software developed. Simulations and a test observation showed that two longitudinally separate observation sites with arrays of optical sensors can identify the same objects from numerous data sets and determine their orbits precisely. The proposed system may complement or replace the current radar observation system for monitoring LEO objects, like space-situation awareness, in the near future.

  4. Design of the driving system for visible near-infrared spatial programmable push-broom remote CCD sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhipeng; Wei, Jun; Zhou, Qianting; Weng, Dongshan; Li, Jianwei

    2010-11-01

    VNIR multi-spectral image sensor has wide applications in remote sensing and imaging spectroscopy. An image spectrometer of a spatial remote programmable push-broom sensing satellite requires visible near infrared band ranges from 0.4μm to 1.04μm which is one of the most important bands in remote sensing. This paper introduces a method of design the driving system for 1024x1024 VNIR CCD sensor for programmable push-broom remote sensing. The digital driving signal is generated by the FPGA device. There are seven modules in the FPGA program and all the modules are coded by VHDL. The driving system have five mainly functions: drive the sensor as the demand of timing schedule, control the AD convert device to work, get the parameter via RS232 from control platform, process the data input from the AD device, output the processed data to PCI sample card to display in computer end. All the modules above succeed working on FPGA device APA600. This paper also introduced several important keys when designing the driving system including module synchronization, critical path optimization.

  5. Fresnel zones for ground-based antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J. Bach

    1964-01-01

    The ordinary Fresnel zone concept is modified to include the influence of finite ground conductivity. This is important for ground-based antennas because the influence on the radiation pattern of irregularities near the antenna is determined by the amplitude and phase of the groundwave. A new...

  6. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement unce...

  7. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Yordanova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement unce...

  8. Detection, Identification, Location, and Remote Sensing using SAW RFID Sensor Tags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation, we will consider the problem of simultaneous detection, identification, location estimation, and remote sensing for multiple objects. In particular, we will describe the design and testing of a wireless system capable of simultaneously detecting the presence of multiple objects, identifying each object, and acquiring both a low-resolution estimate of location and a high-resolution estimate of temperature for each object based on wireless interrogation of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) radiofrequency identification (RFID) sensor tags affixed to each object. The system is being studied for application on the lunar surface as well as for terrestrial remote sensing applications such as pre-launch monitoring and testing of spacecraft on the launch pad and monitoring of test facilities. The system utilizes a digitally beam-formed planar receiving antenna array to extend range and provide direction-of-arrival information coupled with an approximate maximum-likelihood signal processing algorithm to provide near-optimal estimation of both range and temperature. The system is capable of forming a large number of beams within the field of view and resolving the information from several tags within each beam. The combination of both spatial and waveform discrimination provides the capability to track and monitor telemetry from a large number of objects appearing simultaneously within the field of view of the receiving array. In the presentation, we will summarize the system design and illustrate several aspects of the operational characteristics and signal structure. We will examine the theoretical performance characteristics of the system and compare the theoretical results with results obtained from experiments in both controlled laboratory environments and in the field.

  9. Novel Networked Remote Laboratory Architecture for Open Connectivity Based on PLC-OPC-LabVIEW-EJS Integration. Application in Remote Fuzzy Control and Sensors Data Acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaías González

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the design and implementation of a network for integrating Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC, the Object-Linking and Embedding for Process Control protocol (OPC and the open-source Easy Java Simulations (EJS package is presented. A LabVIEW interface and the Java-Internet-LabVIEW (JIL server complete the scheme for data exchange. This configuration allows the user to remotely interact with the PLC. Such integration can be considered a novelty in scientific literature for remote control and sensor data acquisition of industrial plants. An experimental application devoted to remote laboratories is developed to demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of the proposed approach. The experiment to be conducted is the parameterization and supervision of a fuzzy controller of a DC servomotor. The graphical user interface has been developed with EJS and the fuzzy control is carried out by our own PLC. In fact, the distinctive features of the proposed novel network application are the integration of the OPC protocol to share information with the PLC and the application under control. The user can perform the tuning of the controller parameters online and observe in real time the effect on the servomotor behavior. The target group is engineering remote users, specifically in control- and automation-related tasks. The proposed architecture system is described and experimental results are presented.

  10. Novel Networked Remote Laboratory Architecture for Open Connectivity Based on PLC-OPC-LabVIEW-EJS Integration. Application in Remote Fuzzy Control and Sensors Data Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Isaías; Calderón, Antonio José; Mejías, Andrés; Andújar, José Manuel

    2016-10-31

    In this paper the design and implementation of a network for integrating Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC), the Object-Linking and Embedding for Process Control protocol (OPC) and the open-source Easy Java Simulations (EJS) package is presented. A LabVIEW interface and the Java-Internet-LabVIEW (JIL) server complete the scheme for data exchange. This configuration allows the user to remotely interact with the PLC. Such integration can be considered a novelty in scientific literature for remote control and sensor data acquisition of industrial plants. An experimental application devoted to remote laboratories is developed to demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of the proposed approach. The experiment to be conducted is the parameterization and supervision of a fuzzy controller of a DC servomotor. The graphical user interface has been developed with EJS and the fuzzy control is carried out by our own PLC. In fact, the distinctive features of the proposed novel network application are the integration of the OPC protocol to share information with the PLC and the application under control. The user can perform the tuning of the controller parameters online and observe in real time the effect on the servomotor behavior. The target group is engineering remote users, specifically in control- and automation-related tasks. The proposed architecture system is described and experimental results are presented.

  11. Wearable dry sensors with bluetooth connection for use in remote patient monitoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, Gaetano; Bifulco, Paolo; Cesarelli, Mario; Jin, Craig; McEwan, Alistair; van Schaik, Andre

    2010-01-01

    Cost reduction has become the primary theme of healthcare reforms globally. More providers are moving towards remote patient monitoring, which reduces the length of hospital stays and frees up their physicians and nurses for acute cases and helps them to tackle staff shortages. Physiological sensors are commonly used in many human specialties e.g. electrocardiogram (ECG) electrodes, for monitoring heart signals, and electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes, for sensing the electrical activity of the brain, are the most well-known applications. Consequently there is a substantial unmet need for physiological sensors that can be simply and easily applied by the patient or primary carer, are comfortable to wear, can accurately sense parameters over long periods of time and can be connected to data recording systems using Bluetooth technology. We have developed a small, battery powered, user customizable portable monitor. This prototype is capable of recording three-axial body acceleration, skin temperature, and has up to four bio analogical front ends. Moreover, it is also able of continuous wireless transmission to any Bluetooth device including a PDA or a cellular phone. The bio-front end can use long-lasting dry electrodes or novel textile electrodes that can be embedded in clothes. The device can be powered by a standard mobile phone which has a Ni-MH 3.6 V battery, to sustain more than seven days continuous functioning when using the Bluetooth Sniff mode to reduce TX power. In this paper, we present some of the evaluation experiments of our wearable personal monitor device with a focus on ECG applications.

  12. Hydraulic description of a flood event with optical remote sensors: a constructive constraint on modelling uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiston, Stéphanie; Allenbach, Bernard

    2010-05-01

    compartments; high resolution optical imagery allow the exhaustive inventory of breaches and overflows; turbidity variations and draw-off give information on stream directions. These facts are of primary interest to help in deriving a firm understanding of the flooding processes, but also comprise a powerful source for the necessary parameterization and/or calibration of hydraulic models. Thus the accuracy of flood extents derived from remote sensing data could, on the one hand, be valuable inputs to historical flood info-bases within overall risk-linked databases, and on the other hand, test the validity of hydrological modelling, while helping to lift equifinality uncertainties. These first investigations highlight that space imagery of events constitutes an unrivalled tool for flood disaster observation. This 2D record is complementary to all field measurements and the integration of "space derived flood products" is valuable for all stages of risk management. This potential of EO optical sensors for flood monitoring is also confirmed in a detailed analysis making a qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the results, confronting ten optical and radar remote sensing platforms with field observations.

  13. Two fast temperature sensors for probing of the atmospheric boundary layer using small remotely piloted aircraft (RPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Wildmann

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Two types of temperature sensors are designed and tested: a thermocouple and a fine wire resistance thermometer. The intention of this study is to figure out which kind of measurement principle is in general more suited for atmospheric boundary layer meteorology with small remotely piloted aircraft (RPA. The sensors are calibrated in a NIST traceable climate chamber and validated in flight against tower measurements, radiosondes and remote sensing. The sensors have a measurement range of at least −10–50 °C, an absolute RMS error of less than ±0.2 K which is stable over the lifetime of the sensors, and a resolution of about 0.01 K. Both devices are tested for typical errors like radiation error and adiabatic heating, as well as for their dynamic response. Spectral resolutions of up to approximately 10 Hz can be obtained with both sensors, which makes them suitable for turbulence measurement. Their low cost of less than 100 EUR in pure hardware is a major advantage for research with small RPA.

  14. A Novel High Sensitivity Sensor for Remote Field Eddy Current Non-Destructive Testing Based on Orthogonal Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojie Xu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Remote field eddy current is an effective non-destructive testing method for ferromagnetic tubular structures. In view of conventional sensors’ disadvantages such as low signal-to-noise ratio and poor sensitivity to axial cracks, a novel high sensitivity sensor based on orthogonal magnetic field excitation is proposed. Firstly, through a three-dimensional finite element simulation, the remote field effect under orthogonal magnetic field excitation is determined, and an appropriate configuration which can generate an orthogonal magnetic field for a tubular structure is developed. Secondly, optimized selection of key parameters such as frequency, exciting currents and shielding modes is analyzed in detail, and different types of pick-up coils, including a new self-differential mode pick-up coil, are designed and analyzed. Lastly, the proposed sensor is verified experimentally by various types of defects manufactured on a section of a ferromagnetic tube. Experimental results show that the proposed novel sensor can largely improve the sensitivity of defect detection, especially for axial crack whose depth is less than 40% wall thickness, which are very difficult to detect and identify by conventional sensors. Another noteworthy advantage of the proposed sensor is that it has almost equal sensitivity to various types of defects, when a self-differential mode pick-up coil is adopted.

  15. Ground-Based Robotic Sensing of an Agricultural Sub-Canopy Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, A.; Peschel, J.

    2015-12-01

    Airborne remote sensing is a useful method for measuring agricultural crop parameters over large areas; however, the approach becomes limited to above-canopy characterization as a crop matures due to reduced visual access of the sub-canopy environment. During the growth cycle of an agricultural crop, such as soybeans, the micrometeorology of the sub-canopy environment can significantly impact pod development and reduced yields may result. Larger-scale environmental conditions aside, the physical structure and configuration of the sub-canopy matrix will logically influence local climate conditions for a single plant; understanding the state and development of the sub-canopy could inform crop models and improve best practices but there are currently no low-cost methods to quantify the sub-canopy environment at a high spatial and temporal resolution over an entire growth cycle. This work describes the modification of a small tactical and semi-autonomous, ground-based robotic platform with sensors capable of mapping the physical structure of an agricultural row crop sub-canopy; a soybean crop is used as a case study. Point cloud data representing the sub-canopy structure are stored in LAS format and can be used for modeling and visualization in standard GIS software packages.

  16. Detection, Identification, Location, and Remote Sensing Using SAW RFID Sensor Tags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Richard J.; Kennedy, Timothy F.; Williams, Robert M.; Fink, Patrick W.; Ngo, Phong H.

    2009-01-01

    The Electromagnetic Systems Branch (EV4) of the Avionic Systems Division at NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX is studying the utility of surface acoustic wave (SAW) radiofrequency identification (RFID) tags for multiple wireless applications including detection, identification, tracking, and remote sensing of objects on the lunar surface, monitoring of environmental test facilities, structural shape and health monitoring, and nondestructive test and evaluation of assets. For all of these applications, it is anticipated that the system utilized to interrogate the SAW RFID tags may need to operate at fairly long range and in the presence of considerable multipath and multiple-access interference. Towards that end, EV4 is developing a prototype SAW RFID wireless interrogation system for use in such environments called the Passive Adaptive RFID Sensor Equipment (PARSED) system. The system utilizes a digitally beam-formed planar receiving antenna array to extend range and provide direction-of-arrival information coupled with an approximate maximum-likelihood signal processing algorithm to provide near-optimal estimation of both range and temperature. The system is capable of forming a large number of beams within the field of view and resolving the information from several tags within each beam. The combination of both spatial and waveform discrimination provides the capability to track and monitor telemetry from a large number of objects appearing simultaneously within the field of view of the receiving array. In this paper, we will consider the application of the PARSEQ system to the problem of simultaneous detection, identification, localization, and temperature estimation for multiple objects. We will summarize the overall design of the PARSEQ system and present a detailed description of the design and performance of the signal detection and estimation algorithms incorporated in the system. The system is currently configured only to measure temperature

  17. Short-Term Speed Prediction Using Remote Microwave Sensor Data: Machine Learning versus Statistical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a number of short-term speed prediction approaches have been developed, in which most algorithms are based on machine learning and statistical theory. This paper examined the multistep ahead prediction performance of eight different models using the 2-minute travel speed data collected from three Remote Traffic Microwave Sensors located on a southbound segment of 4th ring road in Beijing City. Specifically, we consider five machine learning methods: Back Propagation Neural Network (BPNN, nonlinear autoregressive model with exogenous inputs neural network (NARXNN, support vector machine with radial basis function as kernel function (SVM-RBF, Support Vector Machine with Linear Function (SVM-LIN, and Multilinear Regression (MLR as candidate. Three statistical models are also selected: Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA, Vector Autoregression (VAR, and Space-Time (ST model. From the prediction results, we find the following meaningful results: (1 the prediction accuracy of speed deteriorates as the prediction time steps increase for all models; (2 the BPNN, NARXNN, and SVM-RBF can clearly outperform two traditional statistical models: ARIMA and VAR; (3 the prediction performance of ANN is superior to that of SVM and MLR; (4 as time step increases, the ST model can consistently provide the lowest MAE comparing with ARIMA and VAR.

  18. Virtual Sensors: Using Data Mining Techniques to Efficiently Estimate Remote Sensing Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ashok N.; Oza, Nikunj; Stroeve, Julienne

    2004-01-01

    Various instruments are used to create images of the Earth and other objects in the universe in a diverse set of wavelength bands with the aim of understanding natural phenomena. These instruments are sometimes built in a phased approach, with some measurement capabilities being added in later phases. In other cases, there may not be a planned increase in measurement capability, but technology may mature to the point that it offers new measurement capabilities that were not available before. In still other cases, detailed spectral measurements may be too costly to perform on a large sample. Thus, lower resolution instruments with lower associated cost may be used to take the majority of measurements. Higher resolution instruments, with a higher associated cost may be used to take only a small fraction of the measurements in a given area. Many applied science questions that are relevant to the remote sensing community need to be addressed by analyzing enormous amounts of data that were generated from instruments with disparate measurement capability. This paper addresses this problem by demonstrating methods to produce high accuracy estimates of spectra with an associated measure of uncertainty from data that is perhaps nonlinearly correlated with the spectra. In particular, we demonstrate multi-layer perceptrons (MLPs), Support Vector Machines (SVMs) with Radial Basis Function (RBF) kernels, and SVMs with Mixture Density Mercer Kernels (MDMK). We call this type of an estimator a Virtual Sensor because it predicts, with a measure of uncertainty, unmeasured spectral phenomena.

  19. Multiple-scale Proximal Sensor and Remote Imagery Technology for Sustaining Agricultural Productivity During Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, D. L.; Scudiero, E.

    2016-12-01

    Changes in climatic patterns have had dramatic influence on agricultural areas worldwide, particularly in irrigated arid-zone agricultural areas subjected to recurring drought, such as California's San Joaquin Valley. Climate change has impacted water availability, which subsequently has impacted soil salinity levels in the root zone, especially on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley (WSJV). Inventorying and monitoring the extent of climate change on soil salinity is crucial to evaluate the extent of the problem, to recognize trends, and to formulate state-wide and field-scale irrigation management strategies that will sustain the agricultural productivity of the WSJV. Over the past 3 decades, Corwin and colleagues at the U.S. Salinity Laboratory have developed proximal sensor (i.e., electrical resistivity and electromagnetic induction) and remote imagery (i.e., MODIS and Landsat 7) methodologies for assessing soil salinity at multiple scales: field (0.5 ha to 3 km2), landscape (3 to 10 km2), and regional (10 to 105 km2) scales. The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of these scale-dependent salinity assessment technologies. Case studies for the WSJV are presented to demonstrate at multiple scales the utility of these approaches in assessing soil salinity changes due to management-induced changes and to changes in climate patterns, and in providing site-specific irrigation management information for salinity control. Land resource managers, producers, agriculture consultants, extension specialists, and Natural Resource Conservation Service field staff are the beneficiaries of this information.

  20. Remote assessment of cultural heritage environments with wireless sensor array networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbota, Henoc; Mitchell, John E; Odlyha, Marianne; Strlič, Matija

    2014-05-19

    The logistics and cost of environmental monitoring can represent challenges for heritage managers, partly because of the sheer number of environmental parameters to consider. There is a need for a system, capable of monitoring the holistic impact of the environment on cultural materials while remaining relatively easy to use and providing remote access. This paper describes a dosimetric system based on piezoelectric quartz crystal technology. The prototype sensing module consists of an array of piezoelectric quartz crystals (PQC) coated with different metals (Fe, Cu, Ni and Sn) and includes a temperature and relative humidity sensor. The communication module involves an 802.15.4 low-power radio and a GPRS gateway which allows real time visualisation of the measurements online. An energy management protocol ensures that the system consumes very low power between measurements. The paper also describes the results and experiences from two heritage field deployments, at Apsley House in London, UK, and at the Royal Palaces of Abomey in Benin. Evaluation of PQC measurements, temperature, relative humidity and the rate of successful transmission over the communication systems are also reported.

  1. Remote Marker-Based Tracking for UAV Landing Using Visible-Light Camera Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phong Ha; Kim, Ki Wan; Lee, Young Won; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2017-08-30

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), which are commonly known as drones, have proved to be useful not only on the battlefields where manned flight is considered too risky or difficult, but also in everyday life purposes such as surveillance, monitoring, rescue, unmanned cargo, aerial video, and photography. More advanced drones make use of global positioning system (GPS) receivers during the navigation and control loop which allows for smart GPS features of drone navigation. However, there are problems if the drones operate in heterogeneous areas with no GPS signal, so it is important to perform research into the development of UAVs with autonomous navigation and landing guidance using computer vision. In this research, we determined how to safely land a drone in the absence of GPS signals using our remote maker-based tracking algorithm based on the visible light camera sensor. The proposed method uses a unique marker designed as a tracking target during landing procedures. Experimental results show that our method significantly outperforms state-of-the-art object trackers in terms of both accuracy and processing time, and we perform test on an embedded system in various environments.

  2. Advances in Remote Sensing for Oil Spill Disaster Management: State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology for Oil Spill Surveillance

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Gao; Jason Levy; Maya Nand Jha

    2008-01-01

    Reducing the risk of oil spill disasters is essential for protecting the environment and reducing economic losses. Oil spill surveillance constitutes an important component of oil spill disaster management. Advances in remote sensing technologies can help to identify parties potentially responsible for pollution and to identify minor spills before they cause widespread damage. Due to the large number of sensors currently available for oil spill surveillance, there is a need for a comprehensiv...

  3. Space and Ground-Based Infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weems, Jon; Zell, Martin

    This chapter deals first with the main characteristics of the space environment, outside and inside a spacecraft. Then the space and space-related (ground-based) infrastructures are described. The most important infrastructure is the International Space Station, which holds many European facilities (for instance the European Columbus Laboratory). Some of them, such as the Columbus External Payload Facility, are located outside the ISS to benefit from external space conditions. There is only one other example of orbital platforms, the Russian Foton/Bion Recoverable Orbital Capsule. In contrast, non-orbital weightless research platforms, although limited in experimental time, are more numerous: sounding rockets, parabolic flight aircraft, drop towers and high-altitude balloons. In addition to these facilities, there are a number of ground-based facilities and space simulators, for both life sciences (for instance: bed rest, clinostats) and physical sciences (for instance: magnetic compensation of gravity). Hypergravity can also be provided by human and non-human centrifuges.

  4. Development of Ground-Based Plant Sentinels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    plants in response to different strains of Pseudomonas syringae. Planta . 217:767-775. De Moraes CM, Schultz JC, Mescher MC, Tumlinson JH. (2004...09-30-2004 Final Technical _ April 2001 - April 2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Developing Plants as Ground-based Sentinels 5b. GRANT...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 9 "Z Plants emit volatile mixes characteristic of exposure to both plant and animal (insect) pathogens (bacteria and fungi). The

  5. Ground based spectroscopy of hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Ingo

    2010-05-01

    It has been shown in recent years with great success that spectroscopy of exoplanetary atmospheres is feasible using space based observatories such as the HST and Spitzer. However, with the end of the Spitzer cold-phase, space based observations in the near to mid infra-red are limited, which will remain true until the the onset of the JWST. The importance of developing methods of ground based spectroscopic analysis of known hot Jupiters is therefore apparent. In the past, various groups have attempted exoplanetary spectroscopy using ground based facilities and various techniques. Here I will present results using a novel spectral retrieval method for near to mid infra-red emission and transmission spectra of exoplanetary atmospheres taken from the ground and discuss the feasibility of future ground-based spectroscopy in a broader context. My recently commenced PhD project is under the supervision of Giovanna Tinetti (University College London) and in collaboration with J. P. Beaulieu (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris), Mark Swain and Pieter Deroo (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech).

  6. Investigating the activity of the Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy) through remote and in situ sensors (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trasatti, E.; Polcari, M.; Bignami, C.; Bonafede, M.; Buongiorno, F.; Stramondo, S.

    2013-12-01

    large coverage InSAR technique results to be one of the most reliable tool for mapping the surface deformations and therefore for understanding the volcano dynamics. In addition to optimal data, characterizing the origin of deformation is of major importance for assessing the Campi Flegrei volcanic hazard, since the more realistic is the model employed (with parameters constrained by multidisciplinary data), the more reliable are the results and the ensuing interpretations. In the present work we show the contribution from different monitoring techniques, either in situ or from remote, in order to constrain the source of the activity at Campi Flegrei. In particular, we examine more deeply the contribution from geodesy. We consider leveling and EDM data for the large 1982-84 uplift and InSAR time series for the recent activity (2004-06 and ongoing uplifting detected by COSMO-SkyMed satellite). The use of modern satellite and ground-based geodetic techniques is a formidable tool to understand the state of activity of this volcanic area, providing a great contribution to the mitigation of risk.

  7. First ground-based FTIR-observations of methane in the tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Petersen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Total column concentrations and volume mixing ratio profiles of methane have been retrieved from ground-based solar absorption FTIR spectra in the near-infrared recorded in Paramaribo (Suriname. The methane FTIR observations are compared with TM5 model simulations and satellite observations from SCIAMACHY, and represent the first validation of SCIAMACHY retrievals in the tropics using ground-based remote sensing techniques. Apart from local biomass burning features, our methane FTIR observations agree well with the SCIAMACHY retrievals and TM5 model simulations.

  8. Integrating remote sensing data from multiple optical sensors for ecological and crop condition monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecological and crop condition monitoring requires high temporal and spatial resolution remote sensing data. Due to technical limitations and budget constraints, remote sensing instruments trade spatial resolution for swath width. As a result, it is difficult to acquire remotely sensed data with both...

  9. Smart multi-level tool for remote patient monitoring based on a wireless sensor network and mobile augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Fernando Cornelio Jiménez; Villegas, Osslan Osiris Vergara; Ramírez, Dulce Esperanza Torres; Sánchez, Vianey Guadalupe Cruz; Domínguez, Humberto Ochoa

    2014-09-16

    Technological innovations in the field of disease prevention and maintenance of patient health have enabled the evolution of fields such as monitoring systems. One of the main advances is the development of real-time monitors that use intelligent and wireless communication technology. In this paper, a system is presented for the remote monitoring of the body temperature and heart rate of a patient by means of a wireless sensor network (WSN) and mobile augmented reality (MAR). The combination of a WSN and MAR provides a novel alternative to remotely measure body temperature and heart rate in real time during patient care. The system is composed of (1) hardware such as Arduino microcontrollers (in the patient nodes), personal computers (for the nurse server), smartphones (for the mobile nurse monitor and the virtual patient file) and sensors (to measure body temperature and heart rate), (2) a network layer using WiFly technology, and (3) software such as LabView, Android SDK, and DroidAR. The results obtained from tests show that the system can perform effectively within a range of 20 m and requires ten minutes to stabilize the temperature sensor to detect hyperthermia, hypothermia or normal body temperature conditions. Additionally, the heart rate sensor can detect conditions of tachycardia and bradycardia.

  10. Smart Multi-Level Tool for Remote Patient Monitoring Based on a Wireless Sensor Network and Mobile Augmented Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Cornelio Jiménez González

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Technological innovations in the field of disease prevention and maintenance of patient health have enabled the evolution of fields such as monitoring systems. One of the main advances is the development of real-time monitors that use intelligent and wireless communication technology. In this paper, a system is presented for the remote monitoring of the body temperature and heart rate of a patient by means of a wireless sensor network (WSN and mobile augmented reality (MAR. The combination of a WSN and MAR provides a novel alternative to remotely measure body temperature and heart rate in real time during patient care. The system is composed of (1 hardware such as Arduino microcontrollers (in the patient nodes, personal computers (for the nurse server, smartphones (for the mobile nurse monitor and the virtual patient file and sensors (to measure body temperature and heart rate, (2 a network layer using WiFly technology, and (3 software such as LabView, Android SDK, and DroidAR. The results obtained from tests show that the system can perform effectively within a range of 20 m and requires ten minutes to stabilize the temperature sensor to detect hyperthermia, hypothermia or normal body temperature conditions. Additionally, the heart rate sensor can detect conditions of tachycardia and bradycardia.

  11. Digital methods and remote sensing in archaeology archaeology in the age of sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Campana, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    This volume debuts the new scope of Remote Sensing, which was first defined as the analysis of data collected by sensors that were not in physical contact with the objects under investigation (using cameras, scanners, and radar systems operating from spaceborne or airborne platforms). A wider characterization is now possible: Remote Sensing can be any non-destructive approach to viewing the buried and nominally invisible evidence of past activity. Spaceborne and airborne sensors, now supplemented by laser scanning, are united using ground-based geophysical instruments and undersea remote sensing, as well as other non-invasive techniques such as surface collection or field-walking survey. Now, any method that enables observation of evidence on or beneath the surface of the earth, without impact on the surviving stratigraphy, is legitimately within the realm of Remote Sensing. The new interfaces and senses engaged in Remote Sensing appear throughout the book. On a philosophical level, this is about the landscap...

  12. Volcanic Ash Cloud Observation using Ground-based Ka-band Radar and Near-Infrared Lidar Ceilometer during the Eyjafjallajökull eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank S. Marzano

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Active remote sensing techniques can probe volcanic ash plumes, but their sensitivity at a given distance depends upon the sensor transmitted power, wavelength and polarization capability. Building on a previous numerical study at centimeter wavelength, this work aims at i simulating the distal ash particles polarimetric response of millimeter-wave radar and multi-wavelength optical lidar; ii developing and applying a model-based statistical retrieval scheme using a multi-sensor approach. The microphysical electromagnetic forward model of volcanic ash particle distribution, previously set up at microwaves, is extended to include non-spherical particle shapes, vesicular composition, silicate content and orientation phenomena for both millimeter and optical bands. Monte Carlo generation of radar and lidar signatures are driven by random variability of volcanic particle main parameters, using constraints from available data and experimental evidences. The considered case study is related to the ground-based observation of the Eyjafjallajökull (Iceland volcanic ash plume on May 15, 2010, carried out by the Atmospheric Research Station at Mace Head (Ireland with a 35-GHz Ka-band Doppler cloud radar and a 1064-nm ceilometer lidar. The detection and estimation of ash layer presence and composition is carried out using a Bayesian approach, which is trained by the Monte Carlo model-based dataset. Retrieval results are corroborated exploiting auxiliary data such as those from a ground-based microwave radiometer also positioned at Mace Head.

  13. Crosstalk effect and its mitigation in thermal emissive bands of remote sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J.; Madhavan, S.; Wang, M.

    2016-09-01

    It has been found that there is severe electronic noise in the Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) bands 27-30 which corresponds to wavelengths ranging between 6.7 μm to 9.73 μm. The cause for the issue has been identified to be crosstalk, which is significantly amplified since 2010 due to severe degradation in the electronic circuitry. The crosstalk effect causes unexpected discontinuity/change in the calibration coefficients and induces strong striping artifacts in the earth view (EV) images. Also it is noticed, that there are large long-term drifts in the EV brightness temperature (BT) in these bands. An algorithm using a linear approximation derived from on-orbit lunar observations has been developed to correct the crosstalk effect for them. It was demonstrated that the crosstalk correction can remarkably minimize the discontinuity/change in the calibration coefficients, substantially reduce the striping in the EV images, and significantly remove the long-term drift in the EV BT in all these bands. In this paper, we present the recent progresses in the crosstalk effect analysis and its mitigation. In addition, we will show that besides these four bands, the TEBs in other satellite remote sensors also have significant crosstalk contaminations. Further, it will be demonstrated that the crosstalk correction algorithm we developed can be successfully applied to all the contaminated TEBs to significantly reduce the crosstalk effects and substantially improve both the image quality and the radiometric accuracy of Level-1B (L1B) products for the bands.

  14. Space-borne detection of volcanic carbon dioxide anomalies: The importance of ground-based validation networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandner, F. M.; Carn, S. A.; Corradini, S.; Merucci, L.; Salerno, G.; La Spina, A.

    2012-04-01

    We have investigated the feasibility of space-borne detection of volcanic carbon dioxide (CO2) anomalies, and their integration with ground-based observations. Three goals provide motivation to their integration: (a) development of new volcano monitoring techniques, with better spatial and temporal coverage, because pre-eruptive volcanic CO2 emissions are potentially the earliest available indicators of volcanic unrest; (b) improvement the currently very poor global CO2 source strength inventory for volcanoes, and (c) use of volcanic CO2 emissions for high altitude strong point source emission and dispersion studies. (1) Feasibility of space-borne detection of volcanic CO2 anomalies. Volcanoes are highly variable but continuous CO2 emitters, distributed globally, and emissions often occur at high altitudes. To detect strong point sources of CO2 from space, several hurdles have to be overcome: orographic clouds, unknown dispersion behavior, a high CO2 background in the troposphere, and sparse data coverage from existing satellite sensors. These obstacles can be overcome by a small field of view, enhanced spectral resolving power, and by employing repeat target mode observation strategies. The Japanese GOSAT instrument has been operational since January 2009, producing CO2 total column measurements with a repeat cycle of 3 days and a field of view of 10km. GOSAT thus has the potential to provide spatially integrated data for entire volcanic edifices, especially in target mode. Since summer 2010 we have conducted repeated target mode observations of over 20 persistently active global volcanoes including Etna (Italy), Erta Ale (Ethiopia), and Ambrym (Vanuatu), using L2 GOSAT FTS SWIR data. One of our best-studied test cases is Mt. Etna on Sicily (Italy), which reawakened in 2011 after a period of quiescence and produced a sequence of eruptive activities including lava fountaining events, coinciding with target-mode GOSAT observations conducted there since 2010. For the

  15. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  16. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of a test of a ground-based lidar of other type. The test was performed at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. The result as an establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided...... by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from the wind vanes is also given....

  17. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Yordanova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  18. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  19. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Georgieva Yankova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  20. Ka-band bistatic ground-based SAR using noise signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, K.; Mogyla, A.; Vyplavin, P.; Palamarchuk, V.; Zemlyaniy, O.; Tarasenko, V.; Zaets, N.; Skretsanov, V.; Shubniy, A.; Glamazdin, V.; Natarov, M.; Nechayev, O.

    2008-01-01

    Currently, one of the actual problems is remote monitoring of technical state of large objects. Different methods can be used for that purpose. The most promising of them relies on application of ground based synthetic aperture radars (SAR) and differential interferometry. We have designed and tested Ground Based Noise Waveform SAR based on noise radar technology [1] and synthetic aperture antennas [2]. It enabled to build an instrument for precise all-weather monitoring of large objects in real-time. We describe main performance of ground-based interferometric SAR which uses continuous Ka-band noise waveform as a probe signal. Besides, results of laboratory trials and evaluation of its main performance are presented as well.

  1. A field evaluation of remote sensor measurements of wind, temperature, and moisture for ARM integrated sounding system research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martner, B.E.; Westwater, E.R.; Strauch, R.G. [and others

    1993-10-01

    Remote sensing systems were operated in Colorado in February and March 1991 to obtain detailed profiles of the kinematic and thermodynamic structure of the atmosphere for the US Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) research program. The instruments included wind profilers, Radio Acoustic Sounding Systems (PASS), microwave and infrared radiometers, an infrared spectrometer, ceilometers, radiosondes, surface meteorological stations, and other equipment. A mesoscale data assimilation model will be used to combine the data into dynamically consistent four-dimensional fields as part of an integrated data assimilation sounding system. This report evaluates the performance of the NOAA remote sensors used in the 1991 field data collection. These included five different wind profilers, each equipped with RASS capability for temperature profiling, and microwave radiometers for measurements of pathintegrated water vapor and liquid water content. The design and initial testing of a Fourier-transform InfraRed Sounder (FIRS) for humidity profiling is also described. The ranges of height coverage and measurement accuracies for each wind profiler/RASS are examined. Specific recommendations for optimizing the design and configuration of similar instruments are made for the ARM cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites, based on results of the 1991 field work and earlier tests. Examples of routine processed data products are presented for three intensive operating period studies to further illustrate the remote sensors` capabilities.

  2. Wireless Batteryless Remote Sensors for Automated Monitoring, Control, and Inspection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Two new catogories of wireless batteryless sensors are proposed: magnetoelastic and LC type. These sensors are also chipless which provide significantly lower cost...

  3. Arrays of Remote Autonomous Sensors Using On-Board Hybrid Power Supplies Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is significant need for arrays of miniature sensors that are completely wireless. Ideally these sensors would be built as an integrated device, including...

  4. Two fast temperature sensors for probing of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer using small Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Wildmann

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Two types of temperature sensors are designed and tested, a thermocouple and a fine wire resistance thermometer. The intention of this study is to figure out which kind of measurement principle is in general more suited for atmospheric boundary layer meteorology with small RPA. The sensors are calibrated in a NIST traceable climate chamber and validated in flight against tower measurements, radiosondes and remote sensing. The sensors have a measurement range of at least −10...50° C, an absolute RMS error of less than ±0.2 K which is stable over the lifetime of the sensors, and a resolution of about 0.01 K. Both devices are tested for typical errors like radiation error and adiabatic heating, as well as for their dynamic response. Spectral resolutions of up to approximately 10 Hz can be obtained with both sensors, which makes them suitable for turbulence measurements. Their low cost of less than 100 EUR in pure hardware is a major advantage for research with small RPA.

  5. Calibration requirements and methodology for remote sensors viewing the ocean in the visible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Howard R.

    1987-01-01

    The calibration requirements for ocean-viewing sensors are outlined, and the present methods of effecting such calibration are described in detail. For future instruments it is suggested that provision be made for the sensor to view solar irradiance in diffuse reflection and that the moon be used as a source of diffuse light for monitoring the sensor stability.

  6. Monitoring soil moisture patterns in alpine meadows using ground sensor networks and remote sensing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoldi, Giacomo; Brenner, Johannes; Notarnicola, Claudia; Greifeneder, Felix; Nicolini, Irene; Della Chiesa, Stefano; Niedrist, Georg; Tappeiner, Ulrike

    2015-04-01

    Soil moisture content (SMC) is a key factor for numerous processes, including runoff generation, groundwater recharge, evapotranspiration, soil respiration, and biological productivity. Understanding the controls on the spatial and temporal variability of SMC in mountain catchments is an essential step towards improving quantitative predictions of catchment hydrological processes and related ecosystem services. The interacting influences of precipitation, soil properties, vegetation, and topography on SMC and the influence of SMC patterns on runoff generation processes have been extensively investigated (Vereecken et al., 2014). However, in mountain areas, obtaining reliable SMC estimations is still challenging, because of the high variability in topography, soil and vegetation properties. In the last few years, there has been an increasing interest in the estimation of surface SMC at local scales. On the one hand, low cost wireless sensor networks provide high-resolution SMC time series. On the other hand, active remote sensing microwave techniques, such as Synthetic Aperture Radars (SARs), show promising results (Bertoldi et al. 2014). As these data provide continuous coverage of large spatial extents with high spatial resolution (10-20 m), they are particularly in demand for mountain areas. However, there are still limitations related to the fact that the SAR signal can penetrate only a few centimeters in the soil. Moreover, the signal is strongly influenced by vegetation, surface roughness and topography. In this contribution, we analyse the spatial and temporal dynamics of surface and root-zone SMC (2.5 - 5 - 25 cm depth) of alpine meadows and pastures in the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Area Mazia Valley (South Tyrol - Italy) with different techniques: (I) a network of 18 stations; (II) field campaigns with mobile ground sensors; (III) 20-m resolution RADARSAT2 SAR images; (IV) numerical simulations using the GEOtop hydrological model (Rigon et al

  7. Estimation of Evapotranspiration and Crop Coefficients of Tendone Vineyards Using Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing Data in a Mediterranean Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Vanino

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The sustainable management of water resources plays a key role in Mediterranean viticulture, characterized by scarcity and competition of available water. This study focuses on estimating the evapotranspiration and crop coefficients of table grapes vineyards trained on overhead “tendone” systems in the Apulia region (Italy. Maximum vineyard transpiration was estimated by adopting the “direct” methodology for ETp proposed by the Food and Agriculture Organization in Irrigation and Drainage Paper No. 56, with crop parameters estimated from Landsat 8 and RapidEye satellite data in combination with ground-based meteorological data. The modeling results of two growing seasons (2013 and 2014 indicated that canopy growth, seasonal and 10-day sums evapotranspiration values were strictly related to thermal requirements and rainfall events. The estimated values of mean seasonal daily evapotranspiration ranged between 4.2 and 4.1 mm·d−1, while midseason estimated values of crop coefficients ranged from 0.88 to 0.93 in 2013, and 1.02 to 1.04 in 2014, respectively. The experimental evapotranspiration values calculated represent the maximum value in absence of stress, so the resulting crop coefficients should be used with some caution. It is concluded that the retrieval of crop parameters and evapotranspiration derived from remotely-sensed data could be helpful for downscaling to the field the local weather conditions and agronomic practices and thus may be the basis for supporting grape growers and irrigation managers.

  8. The Development of a Remote Sensor System and Decision Support Systems Architecture to Monitor Resistance Development in Transgenic Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacas, Joseph; Glaser, John; Copenhaver, Kenneth; May, George; Stephens, Karen

    2008-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has declared that "significant benefits accrue to growers, the public, and the environment" from the use of transgenic pesticidal crops due to reductions in pesticide usage for crop pest management. Large increases in the global use of transgenic pesticidal crops has reduced the amounts of broad spectrum pesticides used to manage pest populations, improved yield and reduced the environmental impact of crop management. A significant threat to the continued use of this technology is the evolution of resistance in insect pest populations to the insecticidal Bt toxins expressed by the plants. Management of transgenic pesticidal crops with an emphasis on conservation of Bt toxicity in field populations of insect pests is important to the future of sustainable agriculture. A vital component of this transgenic pesticidal crop management is establishing the proof of concept basic understanding, situational awareness, and monitoring and decision support system tools for more than 133650 square kilometers (33 million acres) of bio-engineered corn and cotton for development of insect resistance . Early and recent joint NASA, US EPA and ITD remote imagery flights and ground based field experiments have provided very promising research results that will potentially address future requirements for crop management capabilities.

  9. MetaSensing's FastGBSAR: ground based radar for deformation monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödelsperger, Sabine; Meta, Adriano

    2014-10-01

    The continuous monitoring of ground deformation and structural movement has become an important task in engineering. MetaSensing introduces a novel sensor system, the Fast Ground Based Synthetic Aperture Radar (FastGBSAR), based on innovative technologies that have already been successfully applied to airborne SAR applications. The FastGBSAR allows the remote sensing of deformations of a slope or infrastructure from up to a distance of 4 km. The FastGBSAR can be setup in two different configurations: in Real Aperture Radar (RAR) mode it is capable of accurately measuring displacements along a linear range profile, ideal for monitoring vibrations of structures like bridges and towers (displacement accuracy up to 0.01 mm). Modal parameters can be determined within half an hour. Alternatively, in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) configuration it produces two-dimensional displacement images with an acquisition time of less than 5 seconds, ideal for monitoring areal structures like dams, landslides and open pit mines (displacement accuracy up to 0.1 mm). The MetaSensing FastGBSAR is the first ground based SAR instrument on the market able to produce two-dimensional deformation maps with this high acquisition rate. By that, deformation time series with a high temporal and spatial resolution can be generated, giving detailed information useful to determine the deformation mechanisms involved and eventually to predict an incoming failure. The system is fully portable and can be quickly installed on bedrock or a basement. The data acquisition and processing can be fully automated leading to a low effort in instrument operation and maintenance. Due to the short acquisition time of FastGBSAR, the coherence between two acquisitions is very high and the phase unwrapping is simplified enormously. This yields a high density of resolution cells with good quality and high reliability of the acquired deformations. The deformation maps can directly be used as input into an Early

  10. Application and state of development for remote chemical sensors in environmental monitoring: A literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schabron, J.F.; Niss, N.D.; Hart, B.K.

    1991-09-01

    A study was performed on chemical sensor technology currently available and under development. The information was compiled into a format wherein information on the sensors is listed in a comparable manner. An introductory section is provided to illustrate the regulatory environment in which such sensor technology will be used. This information should allow corporations or federal agencies ready access to useful information for the potential licensing of sensor technology for commercial development or specific environmental monitoring operations. Although every attempt was made to identify as many chemical sensors as possible, we recognize that some may be missed inadvertently. The accuracy of the information provided by the various sources regarding the state of development for the various sensors was not verified. Judgments or opinions regarding the actual state of development or utility of these devices are not included in this report. However, we feel that this report accurately reflects the state of the art at the present time.

  11. Application and state of development for remote chemical sensors in environmental monitoring: A literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schabron, J.F.; Niss, N.D.; Hart, B.K.

    1991-09-01

    A study was performed on chemical sensor technology currently available and under development. The information was compiled into a format wherein information on the sensors is listed in a comparable manner. As introductory section is provided to illustrate the regulatory environment in which such sensor technology will be used. This information should allow corporations or federal agencies ready access to useful information for the potential licensing of sensor technology for commercial development or specific environmental monitoring operations. Although every attempt was made to identify as many chemical sensors as possible, we recognize that some may be missed inadvertently. The accuracy of the information provided by the various sources regarding the state of development for the various sensors was not verified. Judgments or opinions regarding the actual state of development or utility of these devices are not included in this report. However, we feel that this report accurately reflects the state of the art at the present time.

  12. Application and state of development for remote chemical sensors in environmental monitoring: A literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schabron, J.F.; Niss, N.D.; Hart, B.K.

    1991-09-01

    A study was performed on chemical sensor technology currently available and under development. The information was compiled into a format wherein information on the sensors is listed in a comparable manner. An introductory section is provided to illustrate the regulatory environment in which such sensor technology will be used. This information should allow corporations or federal agencies ready access to useful information for the potential licensing of sensor technology for commercial development or specific environmental monitoring operations. Although every attempt was made to identify as many chemical sensors as possible, we recognize that some may be missed inadvertently. The accuracy of the information provided by the various sources regarding the state of development for the various sensors was not verified. Judgments or opinions regarding the actual state of development or utility of these devices are not included in this report. However, we feel that this report accurately reflects the state of the art at the present time.

  13. Application and state of development for remote chemical sensors in environmental monitoring: A literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schabron, J.F.; Niss, N.D.; Hart, B.K.

    1991-09-01

    A study was performed on chemical sensor technology currently available and under development. The information was compiled into a format wherein information on the sensors is listed in a comparable manner. As introductory section is provided to illustrate the regulatory environment in which such sensor technology will be used. This information should allow corporations or federal agencies ready access to useful information for the potential licensing of sensor technology for commercial development or specific environmental monitoring operations. Although every attempt was made to identify as many chemical sensors as possible, we recognize that some may be missed inadvertently. The accuracy of the information provided by the various sources regarding the state of development for the various sensors was not verified. Judgments or opinions regarding the actual state of development or utility of these devices are not included in this report. However, we feel that this report accurately reflects the state of the art at the present time.

  14. Remote Monitoring of Post-eruption Volcano Environment Based-On Wireless Sensor Network (WSN): The Mount Sinabung Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeharwinto; Sinulingga, Emerson; Siregar, Baihaqi

    2017-01-01

    An accurate information can be useful for authorities to make good policies for preventive and mitigation after volcano eruption disaster. Monitoring of environmental parameters of post-eruption volcano provides an important information for authorities. Such monitoring system can be develop using the Wireless Network Sensor technology. Many application has been developed using the Wireless Sensor Network technology, such as floods early warning system, sun radiation mapping, and watershed monitoring. This paper describes the implementation of a remote environment monitoring system of mount Sinabung post-eruption. The system monitor three environmental parameters: soil condition, water quality and air quality (outdoor). Motes equipped with proper sensors, as components of the monitoring system placed in sample locations. The measured value from the sensors periodically sends to data server using 3G/GPRS communication module. The data can be downloaded by the user for further analysis.The measurement and data analysis results generally indicate that the environmental parameters in the range of normal/standard condition. The sample locations are safe for living and suitable for cultivation, but awareness is strictly required due to the uncertainty of Sinabung status.

  15. A study of the potential of remote sensors in urban transportation planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietschier, D.; Modlin, D. G., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The potential uses of remotely sensed data as applied to the transportation planning process are presented. By utilizing the remote sensing technology developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in the various space programs, it is hoped that both the expense and errors inherent in the conventional data collection techniques can be avoided. Additional bonuses derived from the use of remotely sensed data are those of the permanent record nature of the data and the traffic engineering data simultaneously made available. The major mathematical modeling phases and the role remotely sensed data might play in replacing conventionally collected data are discussed. Typical surveys undertaken in the overall planning process determine the nature and extent of travel desires, land uses, transportation facilities and socio-economic characteristics. Except for the socio-economic data, data collected in the other surveys mentioned can be taken from photographs in sufficient detail to be useful in the modeling procedures.

  16. The Archaeological Application of Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing Data in Qin Yongcheng Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M.; Wan, Y.; Zhao, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Remote sensing archaeology bases on the use of remote sensing images and interpretation of the principles. The historic relics and sites are resulted from human activities and have constantly caused influences on the soil component, moisture content, temperature, vegetation growth and so on. Based on this thought, this paper proposed a new remote sensing model and approach that integrates optical and thermal infrared remote sensing data for archaeology. Taking the Qin Yongcheng site as the example, this method conducts a comprehensive analysis of key factors affecting archaeological application, that is, LST estimated with Landsat TM data, soil brightness, humidity and greenness obtained from GF-1 data, and then interprets the potential site targets. By conducting the field verification, it is shown that the interpreted potential sites are well consisted with the field investigations and have a high interpretation precision. It can provide a guide for further archaeological research.

  17. A Method of Target Detection in Remote Sensing Image Captured based for Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Jin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A refined energy constrained minimization method is developed for target detection in hyperspectral remote sensing images captured by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs during their surveillance missions, which has been tested in the experiment under this paper. The experiment result proves, in the detection process, this method can effectively restrain noises so far as the spectral characteristics of any potential target are known, and find sub-pixel targets out effectively from the hyperspectral remote sensing image in unknown background spectrum

  18. Operation of remote mobile sensors for security of drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelman, By Lina; Ostfeld, Avi

    2013-09-01

    The deployment of fixed online water quality sensors in water distribution systems has been recognized as one of the key components of contamination warning systems for securing public health. This study proposes to explore how the inclusion of mobile sensors for inline monitoring of various water quality parameters (e.g., residual chlorine, pH) can enhance water distribution system security. Mobile sensors equipped with sampling, sensing, data acquisition, wireless transmission and power generation systems are being designed, fabricated, and tested, and prototypes are expected to be released in the very near future. This study initiates the development of a theoretical framework for modeling mobile sensor movement in water distribution systems and integrating the sensory data collected from stationary and non-stationary sensor nodes to increase system security. The methodology is applied and demonstrated on two benchmark networks. Performance of different sensor network designs are compared for fixed and combined fixed and mobile sensor networks. Results indicate that complementing online sensor networks with inline monitoring can increase detection likelihood and decrease mean time to detection.

  19. Ground-based and airborne measurements of volcanic gas emissions at White Island in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirpitz, Jan-Lukas; Poehler, Denis; Bobrowski, Nicole; Christenson, Bruce; Platt, Ulrich

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative understanding of volcanic gas emissions has twofold relevance for nature and society: 1) Variation in gas emission and/or in emitted gas ratios are tracers of the dynamic processes in the volcano interior indicating its activity. 2) Volcanic degassing plays an important role for the Earth's climate, for local sometimes even regional air quality and atmospheric chemistry. In autumn 2015, a campaign to White Island Volcano in New Zealand was organized to perform ground-based as well as airborne in-situ and remote sensing gas measurements of sulfur dioxide (SO2), carbon dioxide (CO2) and bromine monoxide (BrO). For all three gases the ratios and total emission rates were determined in different plume types and ages. An overview over the data will be presented with focus on the two most notable outcomes: 1) The first determination of the BrO/SO2 ratio in the White Island plume and a minimum estimate of the volcano's bromine emission rate; two of many parameters, which are important to assess the impact of volcanic degassing on the atmospheric halogen chemistry. 2) In-situ SO2 data was very successfully recorded with the PITSA, a prototype of a portable and cost-effective optical instrument. It is based on the principle of non-dispersive UV absorption spectroscopy and features different advantages over the customary electrochemical sensors, including a sub second response time, negligible cross sensitivities to other gases, and inherent calibration. The campaign data demonstrates the capabilities and limitations of the PITSA and shows, that it can be well applied as substitute for conventional electrochemical systems.

  20. Validation of Remote Sensing Retrieval Products using Data from a Wireless Sensor-Based Online Monitoring in Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuhong Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Of the modern technologies in polar-region monitoring, the remote sensing technology that can instantaneously form large-scale images has become much more important in helping acquire parameters such as the freezing and melting of ice as well as the surface temperature, which can be used in the research of global climate change, Antarctic ice sheet responses, and cap formation and evolution. However, the acquirement of those parameters is impacted remarkably by the climate and satellite transit time which makes it almost impossible to have timely and continuous observation data. In this research, a wireless sensor-based online monitoring platform (WSOOP for the extreme polar environment is applied to obtain a long-term series of data which is site-specific and continuous in time. Those data are compared and validated with the data from a weather station at Zhongshan Station Antarctica and the result shows an obvious correlation. Then those data are used to validate the remote sensing products of the freezing and melting of ice and the surface temperature and the result also indicated a similar correlation. The experiment in Antarctica has proven that WSOOP is an effective system to validate remotely sensed data in the polar region.

  1. Validation of Remote Sensing Retrieval Products using Data from a Wireless Sensor-Based Online Monitoring in Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuhong; Cheng, Xiao; Yang, Rongjin; Liu, Qiang; Qiu, Yubao; Zhang, Jialin; Cai, Erli; Zhao, Long

    2016-11-17

    Of the modern technologies in polar-region monitoring, the remote sensing technology that can instantaneously form large-scale images has become much more important in helping acquire parameters such as the freezing and melting of ice as well as the surface temperature, which can be used in the research of global climate change, Antarctic ice sheet responses, and cap formation and evolution. However, the acquirement of those parameters is impacted remarkably by the climate and satellite transit time which makes it almost impossible to have timely and continuous observation data. In this research, a wireless sensor-based online monitoring platform (WSOOP) for the extreme polar environment is applied to obtain a long-term series of data which is site-specific and continuous in time. Those data are compared and validated with the data from a weather station at Zhongshan Station Antarctica and the result shows an obvious correlation. Then those data are used to validate the remote sensing products of the freezing and melting of ice and the surface temperature and the result also indicated a similar correlation. The experiment in Antarctica has proven that WSOOP is an effective system to validate remotely sensed data in the polar region.

  2. Possibility of the Application of the Ultra-long Electromagnetic Wave Remote Sensor to Marine Geological Exploration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The ultra-long electromagnetic wave remote sensing technique developed by Peking University is one of new future techniques, which can detect the submarine geological information from the depth of 20 to 10000 m below the surface by receiving natural ultra-long electromagnetic waves (n Hz to n 100 Hz). The new remote sensor is composed of three parts: a main instrument with a portable computer, an antenna with an amplifier and an external power. The new remote sensing technique is characterized by good stability and reproducibility at the same spot but at different times and high sensitivity and high signal-to-noise ratio, and can reveal geological and lithologic boundaries as well as strata and related mineral sources. Two years of marine geological experiments on this technique have indicated that it can solve many problems in marine geological exploration, e.g. the burial depths of sea-floor mud, Quaternary sediments and submarine structures. This technique can be applied to detecting the sea bed depth and submarine sediment thickness.

  3. Integrated water vapor above Ny Ålesund, Spitsbergen: a multi-sensor intercomparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pałm

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Water vapor is an important constituent of the atmosphere. Because of its abundance and its radiative properties it plays an important role for the radiation budget of the atmosphere and has major influence on weather and climate.

    In this work integrated water vapor (IWV derived from the measurements of three satellite sensors, GOME, SCIAMACHY and AMSU-B, two ground based sensors, a Fourier-transform spectrometer (FTIR, a microwave radiometer for O3 (RAM and IWV inferred from GPS zenith path delay (ZPD measurements, are compared to radio-sonde measurements above Ny Ålesund, 79° N. All six remote sensors exploit different principles and work in different wavelength regions.

    All remote sensing instruments reproduce the sonde measurements very well and are highly correlated when compared with the radio-sonde measurements.

    The ground-based FTIR shows very little scatter of about 10%. The GPS performs similar to the FTIR at all times except for very low IWV, where the scatter exceeds 50% of the measured IWV. The other remote sensing instruments show scatter of about 20% (standard deviation. The ground-based RAM performs similar to the satellite instruments, despite the fact that the retrieval of IWV is just a by-product of this ozone sensor.

  4. Ground Based Investigation of Electrostatic Accelerometer in HUST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y.; Zhou, Z.

    2013-12-01

    High-precision electrostatic accelerometers with six degrees of freedom (DOF) acceleration measurement were successfully used in CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions which to measure the Earth's gravity field. In our group, space inertial sensor based on the capacitance transducer and electrostatic control technique has been investigated for test of equivalence principle (TEPO), searching non-Newtonian force in micrometer range, and satellite Earth's field recovery. The significant techniques of capacitive position sensor with the noise level at 2×10-7pF/Hz1/2 and the μV/Hz1/2 level electrostatic actuator are carried out and all the six servo loop controls by using a discrete PID algorithm are realized in a FPGA device. For testing on ground, in order to compensate one g earth's gravity, the fiber torsion pendulum facility is adopt to measure the parameters of the electrostatic controlled inertial sensor such as the resolution, and the electrostatic stiffness, the cross couple between different DOFs. A short distance and a simple double capsule equipment the valid duration about 0.5 second is set up in our lab for the free fall tests of the engineering model which can directly verify the function of six DOF control. Meanwhile, high voltage suspension method is also realized and preliminary results show that the horizontal axis of acceleration noise is about 10-8m/s2/Hz1/2 level which limited mainly by the seismic noise. Reference: [1] Fen Gao, Ze-Bing Zhou, Jun Luo, Feasibility for Testing the Equivalence Principle with Optical Readout in Space, Chin. Phys. Lett. 28(8) (2011) 080401. [2] Z. Zhu, Z. B. Zhou, L. Cai, Y. Z. Bai, J. Luo, Electrostatic gravity gradiometer design for the advanced GOCE mission, Adv. Sp. Res. 51 (2013) 2269-2276. [3] Z B Zhou, L Liu, H B Tu, Y Z Bai, J Luo, Seismic noise limit for ground-based performance measurements of an inertial sensor using a torsion balance, Class. Quantum Grav. 27 (2010) 175012. [4] H B Tu, Y Z Bai, Z B Zhou, L Liu, L

  5. Urban Textural Analysis from Remote Sensor Data: Lacunarity Measurements Based on the Differential Box Counting Method

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Myint, Soe W; Mesev, Victor; Lam, Nina

    2006-01-01

    ...‐cover classes from satellite sensor data. Our methodology focuses on two different gliding box methods to compute lacunarity values and demonstrate a mirror extension approach for a local moving window...

  6. Remote structural health monitoring with serially multiplexed fiber optic acoustic emission sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Development and testing of a serially multiplexed fiber optic sensor system is described. The sensor differs from conventional fiber optic acoustic systems, as it is capable of sensing AE emissions at several points along the length of a single fiber. Multiplexing provides for single channel detection of cracks and their locations in large structural systems. An algorithm was developed for signal recognition and tagging of the AE waveforms for detection of crack locations. Laboratory experiments on plain concrete beams and post-tensioned FRP tendons were performed to evaluate the crack detection capability of the sensor system. The acoustic emission sensor was able to detect initiation, growth and location of the cracks in concrete as well as in the FRP tendons. The AE system is potentially suitable for applications involving health monitoring of structures following an earthquake.

  7. Remote Industrial Sensor Network Monitoring Using M2M Based Ethical Sniffers

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosing the deployed network efficiency and anomaly detection, which is an important research issue in traditional networking systems, has not been carefully addressed in industrial wireless sensor networks. Although recent wireless systems for industrial automation such as ISA100.11a employ device management protocols, these protocols generate and report a large amount of status information from individual sensor nodes. Also, these protocols do not capture influences on network performanc...

  8. Ground-based & satellite DOAS measurements integration for air quality evaluation/forecast management in the frame of QUITSAT Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostadinov, Ivan; Petritoli, Andrea; Giovanelli, Giorgio; Masieri, Samuele; Premuda, Margarita; Bortoli, Daniele; Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Palazzi, Elisa

    The observations of the Earth's atmosphere from space provide excellent opportunities for the exploration of the sophisticated physical-chemical processes on both global and regional scales. The major interest during the last three decades was focused mainly on the stratosphere and the ozone depletion. More recently the continuous improvements of satellite sensors have revealed new opportunities for larger applications of space observations, attracting scientific interest to the lower troposphere and air quality issues. The air quality depends strongly on the anthropogenic activity and therefore regional environmental agencies along with policy makers are in need of appropriate means for its continuous monitoring and control to ensure the adoption of the most appropriate actions. The goal of the pilot project QUITSAT, funded by the Italian Space Agency, is to develop algorithms and procedures for the evaluation and prediction of the air quality in Lombardia and Emilia-Romagna regions (Italy) by means of integrating satellite observations with ground-based in-situ and remote sensing measurements. This work presents dedicated Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements performed during the summer of 2007 and the winter of 2008. One of the DOAS instruments operate at Mt.Cimone station (2165m a.s.l) and the other two instruments conducted measurements in/near Bologna (90 m. a.s.l). Different observational geometry was adopted (zenith-sky, multi-axis and long-path) aimed to provide tropospheric NO2 columns and O3, SO2 and HCHO concentrations at ground level as an input data for QUITSAT procedures. Details of the instruments, the radiative transfer model used and the algorithms for retrieving and calculation of the target gases concentrations are presented. The obtained experimental results are correlated with the corresponding ones retrieved from SCIAMACHY /ENVISAT observations during the overpasses above the ground-based instruments. The analysis

  9. Remote sensing of plant trait responses to field-based plant-soil feedback using UAV-based optical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meij, Bob; Kooistra, Lammert; Suomalainen, Juha; Barel, Janna M.; De Deyn, Gerlinde B.

    2017-02-01

    Plant responses to biotic and abiotic legacies left in soil by preceding plants is known as plant-soil feedback (PSF). PSF is an important mechanism to explain plant community dynamics and plant performance in natural and agricultural systems. However, most PSF studies are short-term and small-scale due to practical constraints for field-scale quantification of PSF effects, yet field experiments are warranted to assess actual PSF effects under less controlled conditions. Here we used unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)-based optical sensors to test whether PSF effects on plant traits can be quantified remotely. We established a randomized agro-ecological field experiment in which six different cover crop species and species combinations from three different plant families (Poaceae, Fabaceae, Brassicaceae) were grown. The feedback effects on plant traits were tested in oat (Avena sativa) by quantifying the cover crop legacy effects on key plant traits: height, fresh biomass, nitrogen content, and leaf chlorophyll content. Prior to destructive sampling, hyperspectral data were acquired and used for calibration and independent validation of regression models to retrieve plant traits from optical data. Subsequently, for each trait the model with highest precision and accuracy was selected. We used the hyperspectral analyses to predict the directly measured plant height (RMSE = 5.12 cm, R2 = 0.79), chlorophyll content (RMSE = 0.11 g m-2, R2 = 0.80), N-content (RMSE = 1.94 g m-2, R2 = 0.68), and fresh biomass (RMSE = 0.72 kg m-2, R2 = 0.56). Overall the PSF effects of the different cover crop treatments based on the remote sensing data matched the results based on in situ measurements. The average oat canopy was tallest and its leaf chlorophyll content highest in response to legacy of Vicia sativa monocultures (100 cm, 0.95 g m-2, respectively) and in mixture with Raphanus sativus (100 cm, 1.09 g m-2, respectively), while the lowest values (76 cm, 0.41 g m-2, respectively

  10. Establishing a sea bottom model by applying a multi-sensor acoustic remote sensing approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemes, K.

    2013-01-01

    Detailed information about the oceanic environment is essential for many applications in the field of marine geology, marine biology, coastal engineering, and marine operations. Especially, knowledge of the properties of the sediment body is often required. Acoustic remote sensing techniques have be

  11. Multi-sensor remote sensing parameterization of heat fluxes over heterogeneous land surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faivre, R.D.

    2014-01-01

    The parameterization of heat transfer by remote sensing, and based on SEBS scheme for turbulent heat fluxes retrieval, already proved to be very convenient for estimating evapotranspiration (ET) over homogeneous land surfaces. However, the use of such a method over heterogeneous landscapes (e.g. sem

  12. Scaling-up camera traps: monitoring the planet's biodiversity with networks of remote sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenweg, Robin; Hebblewhite, Mark; Kays, Roland; Ahumada, Jorge A.; Fisher, Jason T.; Burton, Cole; Townsend, Susan E.; Carbone, Chris; Rowcliffe, J. Marcus; Whittington, Jesse; Brodie, Jedediah; Royle, Andy; Switalski, Adam; Clevenger, Anthony P.; Heim, Nicole; Rich, Lindsey N.

    2017-01-01

    Countries committed to implementing the Convention on Biological Diversity's 2011–2020 strategic plan need effective tools to monitor global trends in biodiversity. Remote cameras are a rapidly growing technology that has great potential to transform global monitoring for terrestrial biodiversity and can be an important contributor to the call for measuring Essential Biodiversity Variables. Recent advances in camera technology and methods enable researchers to estimate changes in abundance and distribution for entire communities of animals and to identify global drivers of biodiversity trends. We suggest that interconnected networks of remote cameras will soon monitor biodiversity at a global scale, help answer pressing ecological questions, and guide conservation policy. This global network will require greater collaboration among remote-camera studies and citizen scientists, including standardized metadata, shared protocols, and security measures to protect records about sensitive species. With modest investment in infrastructure, and continued innovation, synthesis, and collaboration, we envision a global network of remote cameras that not only provides real-time biodiversity data but also serves to connect people with nature.

  13. A comparative study of satellite and ground-based phenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, S; Stöckli, R; Appenzeller, C; Vidale, P L

    2007-05-01

    Long time series of ground-based plant phenology, as well as more than two decades of satellite-derived phenological metrics, are currently available to assess the impacts of climate variability and trends on terrestrial vegetation. Traditional plant phenology provides very accurate information on individual plant species, but with limited spatial coverage. Satellite phenology allows monitoring of terrestrial vegetation on a global scale and provides an integrative view at the landscape level. Linking the strengths of both methodologies has high potential value for climate impact studies. We compared a multispecies index from ground-observed spring phases with two types (maximum slope and threshold approach) of satellite-derived start-of-season (SOS) metrics. We focus on Switzerland from 1982 to 2001 and show that temporal and spatial variability of the multispecies index correspond well with the satellite-derived metrics. All phenological metrics correlate with temperature anomalies as expected. The slope approach proved to deviate strongly from the temporal development of the ground observations as well as from the threshold-defined SOS satellite measure. The slope spring indicator is considered to indicate a different stage in vegetation development and is therefore less suited as a SOS parameter for comparative studies in relation to ground-observed phenology. Satellite-derived metrics are, however, very susceptible to snow cover, and it is suggested that this snow cover should be better accounted for by the use of newer satellite sensors.

  14. Virtual Mission Operations of Remote Sensors With Rapid Access To and From Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, Dave; Walke, Jon; Dikeman, Larry; Sage, Steven; Miller, Eric; Northam, James; Jackson, Chris; Taylor, John; Lynch, Scott; Heberle, Jay

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes network-centric operations, where a virtual mission operations center autonomously receives sensor triggers, and schedules space and ground assets using Internet-based technologies and service-oriented architectures. For proof-of-concept purposes, sensor triggers are received from the United States Geological Survey (USGS) to determine targets for space-based sensors. The Surrey Satellite Technology Limited (SSTL) Disaster Monitoring Constellation satellite, the United Kingdom Disaster Monitoring Constellation (UK-DMC), is used as the space-based sensor. The UK-DMC s availability is determined via machine-to-machine communications using SSTL s mission planning system. Access to/from the UK-DMC for tasking and sensor data is via SSTL s and Universal Space Network s (USN) ground assets. The availability and scheduling of USN s assets can also be performed autonomously via machine-to-machine communications. All communication, both on the ground and between ground and space, uses open Internet standards.

  15. Studi Awal Teknologi WIFI Untuk Diimplementasikan Pada Pembuatan Prototipe Sistem Remote Terminal Unit Multi Sensor Dengan Energi Mandiri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asep Insani

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Dalam makalah ini dipaparkan tentang hasil studi awal teknologi wifi dalam rangka perancangan dan pembuatan prototipe sistem remote terminal unit (RTU multi sensor dengan energi mandiri untuk mercusuar di wilayah pulau-pulau kecil dan perbatasan yang akan digunakan untuk pengukuran dan komunikasi data serta pemantauan lingkungan. Dalam rangka pembuatan prototipe tersebut terlebih dahulu dibuat model sistem skala laboratorium, kemudian disempurnakan dan dikembangkan menjadi prototipe sistem. Seiring dengan pembuatan model skala laboratorium telah dilakukan pecobaan-percobaan meliputi mode operasi wireless, analisa dan pengamatan karakteristik teknologi wifi, mengetahui jarak optimal jaringan kabel di beberapa tempat dan jarak yang berbeda dengan menggunakan laptop. Dari penelitian ini didapat hasil percobaan yang terkait dengan posisi dan jarak yang optimal untuk mengakses jaringan nirkabel yang digunakan sebagai masukan atau bahan pertimbangan untuk penempatan suatu akses point dari RTU.  Dengan demikian  pengguna jaringan nirkabel dapat dengan mudah mendapatkan signal dan transfer rate yang paling optimum disetiap lokasi disekitar mercusuar.

  16. Fundamentals for remote structural health monitoring of wind turbine blades - a preproject. Annex A. Cost-benefit for embedded sensors in large wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L.G.; Lading, Lars

    2002-01-01

    This report contains the results of a cost-benefit analysis for the use of embed-ded sensors for damage detection in large wind turbine blades - structural health monitoring - (in connection with remote surveillance) of large wind turbine placedoff-shore. The total operating costs of a three......-bladed 2MW turbine placed offshore either without sensors or with sensors are compared. The price of a structural health monitoring system of a price of 100 000 DKK (per tur-bine) results in a break-eventime of about 3 years. For a price of 300 000 DKK the break-even time is about 8 years. However...

  17. MEMS acceleration sensor with remote optical readout for continuous power generator monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tormen Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Miniaturized accelerometers with remote optical readout are required devices for the continuous monitoring of vibrations inside power generators. In turbo and hydro generators, end-winding vibrations are present during operation causing in the long term undesirable out-of-service repairs. Continuous monitoring of these vibrations is therefore mandatory. The high electromagnetic fields in the generators impose the use of devices immune to electromagnetic interferences. In this paper a MEMS based accelerometer with remote optical readout is presented. Advantages of the proposed device are the use of a differential optical signal to reject the common mode signal and noise, the reduced number of steps for the MEMS chip fabrication and for the system assembly, and the reduced package volume.

  18. Airborne remote sensors applied to engineering geology and civil works design investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelnett, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    The usefulness of various airborne remote sensing systems in the detection and identification of regional and specific geologic structural features that may affect the design and location of engineering structures on major civil works projects is evaluated. The Butler Valley Dam and Blue Lake Project in northern California was selected as a demonstration site. Findings derived from the interpretation of various kinds of imagery used are given.

  19. The Physics of Imaging with Remote Sensors : Photon State Space & Radiative Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Anthony B.

    2012-01-01

    Standard (mono-pixel/steady-source) retrieval methodology is reaching its fundamental limit with access to multi-angle/multi-spectral photo- polarimetry. Next... Two emerging new classes of retrieval algorithm worth nurturing: multi-pixel time-domain Wave-radiometry transition regimes, and more... Cross-fertilization with bio-medical imaging. Physics-based remote sensing: - What is "photon state space?" - What is "radiative transfer?" - Is "the end" in sight? Two wide-open frontiers! center dot Examples (with variations.

  20. The Physics of Imaging with Remote Sensors : Photon State Space & Radiative Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Anthony B.

    2012-01-01

    Standard (mono-pixel/steady-source) retrieval methodology is reaching its fundamental limit with access to multi-angle/multi-spectral photo- polarimetry. Next... Two emerging new classes of retrieval algorithm worth nurturing: multi-pixel time-domain Wave-radiometry transition regimes, and more... Cross-fertilization with bio-medical imaging. Physics-based remote sensing: - What is "photon state space?" - What is "radiative transfer?" - Is "the end" in sight? Two wide-open frontiers! center dot Examples (with variations.

  1. Ground-based observations of Kepler asteroseismic targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uyttterhoeven , K.; Karoff, Christoffer

    2010-01-01

    We present the ground-based activities within the different working groups of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium (KASC). The activities aim at the systematic characterization of the 5000+ KASC targets, and at the collection of ground-based follow-up time-series data of selected promising...

  2. FAO-56 Dual Model Combined with Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing for Regional Evapotranspiration Estimations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rim Amri

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this study is to evaluate the potential of the FAO-56 dual technique for the estimation of regional evapotranspiration (ET and its constituent components (crop transpiration and soil evaporation, for two classes of vegetation (olives trees and cereals in the semi-arid region of the Kairouan plain in central Tunisia. The proposed approach combines the FAO-56 technique with remote sensing (optical and microwave, not only for vegetation characterization, as proposed in other studies but also for the estimation of soil evaporation, through the use of satellite moisture products. Since it is difficult to use ground flux measurements to validate remotely sensed data at regional scales, comparisons were made with the land surface model ISBA-A-gs which is a physical SVAT (Soil–Vegetation–Atmosphere Transfer model, an operational tool developed by Météo-France. It is thus shown that good results can be obtained with this relatively simple approach, based on the FAO-56 technique combined with remote sensing, to retrieve temporal variations of ET. The approach proposed for the daily mapping of evapotranspiration at 1 km resolution is approved in two steps, for the period between 1991 and 2007. In an initial step, the ISBA-A-gs soil moisture outputs are compared with ERS/WSC products. Then, the output of the FAO-56 technique is compared with the output generated by the SVAT ISBA-A-gs model.

  3. A cloud mask methodology for high resolution remote sensing data combining information from high and medium resolution optical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedano, Fernando; Kempeneers, Pieter; Strobl, Peter; Kucera, Jan; Vogt, Peter; Seebach, Lucia; San-Miguel-Ayanz, Jesús

    2011-09-01

    This study presents a novel cloud masking approach for high resolution remote sensing images in the context of land cover mapping. As an advantage to traditional methods, the approach does not rely on thermal bands and it is applicable to images from most high resolution earth observation remote sensing sensors. The methodology couples pixel-based seed identification and object-based region growing. The seed identification stage relies on pixel value comparison between high resolution images and cloud free composites at lower spatial resolution from almost simultaneously acquired dates. The methodology was tested taking SPOT4-HRVIR, SPOT5-HRG and IRS-LISS III as high resolution images and cloud free MODIS composites as reference images. The selected scenes included a wide range of cloud types and surface features. The resulting cloud masks were evaluated through visual comparison. They were also compared with ad-hoc independently generated cloud masks and with the automatic cloud cover assessment algorithm (ACCA). In general the results showed an agreement in detected clouds higher than 95% for clouds larger than 50 ha. The approach produced consistent results identifying and mapping clouds of different type and size over various land surfaces including natural vegetation, agriculture land, built-up areas, water bodies and snow.

  4. Sensor Node for Remote Monitoring of Waterborne Disease-Causing Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyukwang Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A sensor node for sampling water and checking for the presence of harmful bacteria such as E. coli in water sources was developed in this research. A chromogenic enzyme substrate assay method was used to easily detect coliform bacteria by monitoring the color change of the sampled water mixed with a reagent. Live webcam image streaming to the web browser of the end user with a Wi-Fi connected sensor node shows the water color changes in real time. The liquid can be manipulated on the web-based user interface, and also can be observed by webcam feeds. Image streaming and web console servers run on an embedded processor with an expansion board. The UART channel of the expansion board is connected to an external Arduino board and a motor driver to control self-priming water pumps to sample the water, mix the reagent, and remove the water sample after the test is completed. The sensor node can repeat water testing until the test reagent is depleted. The authors anticipate that the use of the sensor node developed in this research can decrease the cost and required labor for testing samples in a factory environment and checking the water quality of local water sources in developing countries.

  5. Fiber Optic-Fluorescence Sensors for Remote Detection of Chemical Species in Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    from the viewing volume by diffusive/convective mass transport processes and replaced by uncomplexed indicator from the reservoir. Because the flow...Morin as Fluorescence sensor for Determination of Aluminum(III) ." Anal. Chem., 1983, 55, 667-670. (10) Urbano , E., H. Offenbacher, and O.S. Wolfbeis

  6. Biosensors for EVA: Improved Instrumentation for Ground-based Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, B.; Ellerby, G.; Zou, F.; Scott, P.; Jin, C.; Lee, S. M. C.; Coates, J.

    2010-01-01

    During lunar excursions in the EVA suit, real-time measurement of metabolic rate is required to manage consumables and guide activities to ensure safe return to the base. Metabolic rate, or oxygen consumption (VO2), is normally measured from pulmonary parameters but cannot be determined with standard techniques in the oxygen-rich environment of a spacesuit. Our group has developed novel near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) methods to calculate muscle oxygen saturation (SmO 2), hematocrit, and pH, and we recently demonstrated that we can use our NIRS sensor to measure VO 2 on the leg during cycling. Our NSBRI project has 4 objectives: (1) increase the accuracy of the metabolic rate calculation through improved prediction of stroke volume; (2) investigate the relative contributions of calf and thigh oxygen consumption to metabolic rate calculation for walking and running; (3) demonstrate that the NIRS-based noninvasive metabolic rate methodology is sensitive enough to detect decrement in VO 2 in a space analog; and (4) improve instrumentation to allow testing within a spacesuit. Over the past year we have made progress on all four objectives, but the most significant progress was made in improving the instrumentation. The NIRS system currently in use at JSC is based on fiber optics technology. Optical fiber bundles are used to deliver light from a light source in the monitor to the patient, and light reflected back from the patient s muscle to the monitor for spectroscopic analysis. The fiber optic cables are large and fragile, and there is no way to get them in and out of the test spacesuit used for ground-based studies. With complimentary funding from the US Army, we undertook a complete redesign of the sensor and control electronics to build a novel system small enough to be used within the spacesuit and portable enough to be used by a combat medic. In the new system the filament lamp used in the fiber optic system was replaced with a novel broadband near infrared

  7. Biosensors for EVA: Improved Instrumentation for Ground-based Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, B.; Ellerby, G.; Zou, F.; Scott, P.; Jin, C.; Lee, S. M. C.; Coates, J.

    2010-01-01

    During lunar excursions in the EVA suit, real-time measurement of metabolic rate is required to manage consumables and guide activities to ensure safe return to the base. Metabolic rate, or oxygen consumption (VO2), is normally measured from pulmonary parameters but cannot be determined with standard techniques in the oxygen-rich environment of a spacesuit. Our group has developed novel near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) methods to calculate muscle oxygen saturation (SmO 2), hematocrit, and pH, and we recently demonstrated that we can use our NIRS sensor to measure VO 2 on the leg during cycling. Our NSBRI project has 4 objectives: (1) increase the accuracy of the metabolic rate calculation through improved prediction of stroke volume; (2) investigate the relative contributions of calf and thigh oxygen consumption to metabolic rate calculation for walking and running; (3) demonstrate that the NIRS-based noninvasive metabolic rate methodology is sensitive enough to detect decrement in VO 2 in a space analog; and (4) improve instrumentation to allow testing within a spacesuit. Over the past year we have made progress on all four objectives, but the most significant progress was made in improving the instrumentation. The NIRS system currently in use at JSC is based on fiber optics technology. Optical fiber bundles are used to deliver light from a light source in the monitor to the patient, and light reflected back from the patient s muscle to the monitor for spectroscopic analysis. The fiber optic cables are large and fragile, and there is no way to get them in and out of the test spacesuit used for ground-based studies. With complimentary funding from the US Army, we undertook a complete redesign of the sensor and control electronics to build a novel system small enough to be used within the spacesuit and portable enough to be used by a combat medic. In the new system the filament lamp used in the fiber optic system was replaced with a novel broadband near infrared

  8. Movable Ground Based Recovery System for Reuseable Space Flight Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver, George L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A reusable space flight launch system is configured to eliminate complex descent and landing systems from the space flight hardware and move them to maneuverable ground based systems. Precision landing of the reusable space flight hardware is enabled using a simple, light weight aerodynamic device on board the flight hardware such as a parachute, and one or more translating ground based vehicles such as a hovercraft that include active speed, orientation and directional control. The ground based vehicle maneuvers itself into position beneath the descending flight hardware, matching its speed and direction and captures the flight hardware. The ground based vehicle will contain propulsion, command and GN&C functionality as well as space flight hardware landing cushioning and retaining hardware. The ground based vehicle propulsion system enables longitudinal and transverse maneuverability independent of its physical heading.

  9. Delineation of geological problems for use in urban planning. [in Alabama using remote sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, T. H.; Bloss, P.; Fambrough, R.; Stow, S. H.; Hooks, W. G.; Freehafer, D.; Sutley, D.

    1976-01-01

    Activities of the University of Alabama in support of state and local planning commissions are reported. Demonstrations were given of the various types of remotely sensed images available from U-2, Skylab, and LANDSAT; and their uses and limitations were discussed. Techniques to be used in determining flood prone areas were provided for environmental studies. A rapid, inexpensive method for study was developed by which imagery is copied on 35 mm film and projected on existing topographic maps for measuring delta volume and growth.

  10. New Airborne Sensors and Platforms for Solving Specific Tasks in Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, G.

    2012-07-01

    A huge number of small and medium sized sensors entered the market. Today's mid format sensors reach 80 MPix and allow to run projects of medium size, comparable with the first big format digital cameras about 6 years ago. New high quality lenses and new developments in the integration prepared the market for photogrammetric work. Companies as Phase One or Hasselblad and producers or integrators as Trimble, Optec, and others utilized these cameras for professional image production. In combination with small camera stabilizers they can be used also in small aircraft and make the equipment small and easy transportable e.g. for rapid assessment purposes. The combination of different camera sensors enables multi or hyper-spectral installations e.g. useful for agricultural or environmental projects. Arrays of oblique viewing cameras are in the market as well, in many cases these are small and medium format sensors combined as rotating or shifting devices or just as a fixed setup. Beside the proper camera installation and integration, also the software that controls the hardware and guides the pilot has to solve much more tasks than a normal FMS did in the past. Small and relatively cheap Laser Scanners (e.g. Riegl) are in the market and a proper combination with MS Cameras and an integrated planning and navigation is a challenge that has been solved by different softwares. Turnkey solutions are available e.g. for monitoring power line corridors where taking images is just a part of the job. Integration of thermal camera systems with laser scanner and video capturing must be combined with specific information of the objects stored in a database and linked when approaching the navigation point.

  11. Demonstration of a Robust Sensor System for Remote Condition Monitoring of Heat-Distribution System Manholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    wireless Ether- net link; in the other eight pits, the sensors were interfaced with GSM cel- lular boards. To commission the wireless Ethernet links...precipitation 3.3 Lessons learned 3.3.1 Manhole electric service availability The importance of assuring that electric service is available at each net ...at the manhole, or the location must provide enough sky exposure to sup- port a photovoltaic power supply. ERDC/CERL TR-16-2 25 3.3.2 Wireless

  12. Flow Characteristics of Tidewater Glaciers in Greenland and Alaska using Ground-Based LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnegan, D. C.; Stearns, L. A.; Hamilton, G. S.; O'Neel, S.

    2010-12-01

    LiDAR scanning systems have been employed to characterize and quantify multi-temporal glacier and ice sheet changes for nearly three decades. Until recently, LiDAR scanning systems were limited to airborne and space-based platforms which come at a significant cost to deploy and are limited in spatial and temporal sampling capabilities necessary to compare with in-situ field measurements. Portable ground-based LiDAR scanning systems are now being used as a glaciological tool. We discuss research efforts to employ ground-based near-infrared LiDAR systems at two differing tidewater glacier systems in the spring of 2009; Helheim Glacier in southeast Greenland and Columbia Glacier in southeast Alaska. Preliminary results allow us to characterize short term displacement rates and detailed observations of calving processes. These results highlight the operational limitations and capabilities of commercially available LiDAR systems, and allow us to identify optimal operating characteristics for monitoring small to large-scale tidewater glaciers in near real-time. Furthermore, by identifying the operational limitations of these sensors it allows for optimal design characteristics of new sensors necessary to meet ground-based calibration and validation requirements of ongoing scientific missions.

  13. Tropospheric and total ozone columns over Paris (France) measured using medium-resolution ground-based solar-absorption Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    C. Viatte; B. Gaubert; Eremenko, M.; Hase, F.; Schneider, M; Blumenstock, T.; Ray, M; P. Chelin; J.-M. Flaud; Orphal, J

    2011-01-01

    Ground-based Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) solar absorption spectroscopy is a powerful remote sensing technique providing information on the vertical distribution of various atmospheric constituents. This work presents the first evaluation of a mid-resolution ground-based FTIR to measure tropospheric ozone, independently of stratospheric ozone. This is demonstrated using a new atmospheric observatory (named OASIS for "Observations of the Atmosphere by Solar absorption Infrared Spectroscop...

  14. Tropospheric and total ozone columns over Paris (France) measured using medium-resolution ground-based solar-absorption Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy [Discussion paper

    OpenAIRE

    C. Viatte; B. Gaubert; Eremenko, M.; Hase, F.; Schneider, M; Blumenstock, T.; Ray, M; P. Chelin; J.-M. Flaud; Orphal, J

    2011-01-01

    Ground-based Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) solar absorption spectroscopy is a powerful remote sensing technique providing information on the vertical distribution of various atmospheric constituents. This work presents the first evaluation of a mid-resolution ground-based FTIR to measure tropospheric ozone, independently of stratospheric ozone. This is demonstrated using a new atmospheric observatory (named OASIS for "Observations of the Atmosphere by Solar absorption Infrared Spectroscop...

  15. Ground-Based Network and Supersite Observations to Complement and Enrich EOS Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Holben, Brent N.; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2011-01-01

    Since 1997 NASA has been successfully launching a series of satellites - the Earth Observing System (EOS) - to intensively study, and gain a better understanding of, the Earth as an integrated system. Space-borne remote sensing observations, however, are often plagued by contamination of surface signatures. Thus, ground-based in-situ and remote-sensing measurements, where signals come directly from atmospheric constituents, the sun, and/or the Earth-atmosphere interactions, provide additional information content for comparisons that confirm quantitatively the usefulness of the integrated surface, aircraft, and satellite datasets. Through numerous participations, particularly but not limited to the EOS remote-sensing/retrieval and validation projects over the years, NASA/GSFC has developed and continuously refined ground-based networks and mobile observatories that proved to be vital in providing high temporal measurements, which complement and enrich the satellite observations. These are: the AERO NET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) a federation of ground-based globally distributed network of spectral sun-sky photometers; the MPLNET (Micro-Pulse Lidar NETwork, a similarly organized network of micro-pulse lidar systems measuring aerosol and cloud vertical structure continuously; and the SMART-COMMIT (Surface-sensing Measurements for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer - Chemical, Optical & Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere, mobile observatories, a suite of spectral radiometers and in-situ probes acquiring supersite measurements. Most MPLNET sites are collocated with those of AERONET, and both networks always support the deployment of SMART-COMMIT worldwide. These data products follow the data structure of EOS conventions: Level-0, instrument archived raw data; Level-1 (or 1.5), real-time data with no (or limited) quality assurance; Level-2, not real high temporal and spectral resolutions. In this talk, we will present NASA/GSFC groundbased facilities, serving

  16. Bi-Fi: an embedded sensor/system architecture for REMOTE biological monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshchi, Shahin; Pesterev, Aleksey; Nuyujukian, Paul H; Mody, Istvan; Judy, Jack W

    2007-11-01

    Wireless-enabled processor modules intended for communicating low-frequency phenomena (i.e., temperature, humidity, and ambient light) have been enabled to acquire and transmit multiple biological signals in real time, which has been achieved by using computationally efficient data acquisition, filtering, and compression algorithms, and interfacing the modules with biological interface hardware. The sensor modules can acquire and transmit raw biological signals at a rate of 32 kb/s, which is near the hardware limit of the modules. Furthermore, onboard signal processing enables one channel, sampled at a rate of 4000 samples/s at 12-bit resolution, to be compressed via adaptive differential-pulse-code modulation (ADPCM) and transmitted in real time. In addition, the sensors can be configured to filter and transmit individual time-referenced "spike" waveforms, or to transmit the spike height and width for alleviating network traffic and increasing battery life. The system is capable of acquiring eight channels of analog signals as well as data via an asynchronous serial connection. A back-end server archives the biological data received via networked gateway sensors, and hosts them to a client application that enables users to browse recorded data. The system also acquires, filters, and transmits oxygen saturation and pulse rate via a commercial-off-the-shelf interface board. The system architecture can be configured for performing real-time nonobtrusive biological monitoring of humans or rodents. This paper demonstrates that low-power, computational, and bandwidth-constrained wireless-enabled platforms can indeed be leveraged for wireless biosignal monitoring.

  17. Relation of NDVI obtained from different remote sensing at different space and resolutions sensors in Spanish Dehesas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano Rodríguez, Juan; Tarquis, Ana M.; Saa-Requejo, Antonio; Díaz-Ambrona, Carlos G. H.

    2015-04-01

    Satellite data are an important source of information and serve as monitoring crops on large scales. There are several indexes, but the most used for monitoring vegetation is NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index), calculated from the spectral bands of red (RED) and near infrared (NIR), obtaining the value according to relationship: [(NIR - RED) / (NIR + RED)]. During the years 2010-2013 monthly monitoring was conducted in three areas of Spain (Salamanca, Caceres and Cordoba). Pasture plots were selected and satellite images of two different sensors, DEIMOS-1 and MODIS were obtained. DEIMOS-1 is based on the concept Microsat-100 from Surrey. It is designed for imaging the Earth with a resolution good enough to study terrestrial vegetation cover (20x20 m), although with a wide range of visual field (600 km) to get those images with high temporal resolution. By contrast, MODIS images present a much lower spatial resolution (500x500 m). Indices obtained from both sensors to the same area and date are compared and the results show r2 = 0.56; r2 = 0.65 and r2 = 0.90 for the areas of Salamanca, Cáceres and Cordoba respectively. According to the results obtained show that the NDVI obtained by MODIS is slightly larger than that obtained by the sensor for DEIMOS for same time and area. References J.A. Escribano, C.G.H. Diaz-Ambrona, L. Recuero, M. Huesca, V. Cicuendez, A. Palacios-Orueta y A.M. Tarquis. Aplicacion de Indices de Vegetacion para evaluar la falta de produccion de pastos y montaneras en dehesas. I Congreso Iberico de la Dehesa y el Montado. 6-7 Noviembre, 2013, Badajoz. J.A. Escribano Rodriguez, A.M. Tarquis, C.G. Hernandez Diaz-Ambrona. Pasture Drought Insurance Based on NDVI and SAVI. Geophysical Research Abstracts, 14, EGU2012-13945, 2012. EGU General Assembly 2012. Juan Escribano Rodriguez, Carmelo Alonso, Ana Maria Tarquis, Rosa Maria Benito, Carlos Hernandez Diaz-Ambrona. Comparison of NDVI fields obtained from different remote sensors

  18. Anomaly Detection Rudiments for the Application of Hyperspectral Sensors in Aerospace Remote Sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Gerald, E-mail: gw25@hw.ac.u, E-mail: gerald.wong@selexgalileo.co [Heriot-Watt University, Riccarton Campus, Edinburgh, EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    Hyperspectral imaging differs from conventional techniques by exploiting the spectral dimensionality of remote scenes. This additional information promotes discrimination of image elements, especially anomalies that are dissimilar with respect to global features. Algorithms for anomaly detection are designed to overcome the inherent difficulty of analysing hypercubes, which are the higher-dimensional analogues of conventional broadband images. Such algorithms are prolific in their variety and design, which could become an obstacle in choice or application for the neophyte researcher in this field. This paper seeks to consolidate this plethora of algorithms into succinct categories for clarity of rudimentary decision making. A duplicate of article 012048 Snapshot hyperspectral imaging and practical applications was originally published here, in error, as article 012051. The present article replaced the duplicate and was published on 18 August 2009.

  19. Multi-Sensor Localization and Navigation for Remote Manipulation in Smoky Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Vicente Marti

    2013-04-01

    The developed method aims to position a robot in front of doors, fire extinguishers and other points of interest with enough accuracy to allow a human operator to manipulate the robot’s arm in order to actuate over the element. In coarse‐grain localization, a fingerprinting technique based on ZigBee and WiFi signals is used, allowing the robot to navigate inside the building in order to get near the point of interest that requires manipulation. In fine‐grained localization a remotely controlled programmable high intensity LED panel is used, which acts as a reference to the system in smoky conditions. Then, smoke detection and visual fine‐ grained localization are used to position the robot with precisely in the manipulation point (e.g., doors, valves, etc..

  20. Optimal Atmospheric Correction for Above-Ground Forest Biomass Estimation with the ETM+ Remote Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hieu Cong; Jung, Jaehoon; Lee, Jungbin; Choi, Sung-Uk; Hong, Suk-Young; Heo, Joon

    2015-07-31

    The reflectance of the Earth's surface is significantly influenced by atmospheric conditions such as water vapor content and aerosols. Particularly, the absorption and scattering effects become stronger when the target features are non-bright objects, such as in aqueous or vegetated areas. For any remote-sensing approach, atmospheric correction is thus required to minimize those effects and to convert digital number (DN) values to surface reflectance. The main aim of this study was to test the three most popular atmospheric correction models, namely (1) Dark Object Subtraction (DOS); (2) Fast Line-of-sight Atmospheric Analysis of Spectral Hypercubes (FLAASH) and (3) the Second Simulation of Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) and compare them with Top of Atmospheric (TOA) reflectance. By using the k-Nearest Neighbor (kNN) algorithm, a series of experiments were conducted for above-ground forest biomass (AGB) estimations of the Gongju and Sejong region of South Korea, in order to check the effectiveness of atmospheric correction methods for Landsat ETM+. Overall, in the forest biomass estimation, the 6S model showed the bestRMSE's, followed by FLAASH, DOS and TOA. In addition, a significant improvement of RMSE by 6S was found with images when the study site had higher total water vapor and temperature levels. Moreover, we also tested the sensitivity of the atmospheric correction methods to each of the Landsat ETM+ bands. The results confirmed that 6S dominates the other methods, especially in the infrared wavelengths covering the pivotal bands for forest applications. Finally, we suggest that the 6S model, integrating water vapor and aerosol optical depth derived from MODIS products, is better suited for AGB estimation based on optical remote-sensing data, especially when using satellite images acquired in the summer during full canopy development.

  1. Optimal Atmospheric Correction for Above-Ground Forest Biomass Estimation with the ETM+ Remote Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hieu Cong Nguyen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The reflectance of the Earth’s surface is significantly influenced by atmospheric conditions such as water vapor content and aerosols. Particularly, the absorption and scattering effects become stronger when the target features are non-bright objects, such as in aqueous or vegetated areas. For any remote-sensing approach, atmospheric correction is thus required to minimize those effects and to convert digital number (DN values to surface reflectance. The main aim of this study was to test the three most popular atmospheric correction models, namely (1 Dark Object Subtraction (DOS; (2 Fast Line-of-sight Atmospheric Analysis of Spectral Hypercubes (FLAASH and (3 the Second Simulation of Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S and compare them with Top of Atmospheric (TOA reflectance. By using the k-Nearest Neighbor (kNN algorithm, a series of experiments were conducted for above-ground forest biomass (AGB estimations of the Gongju and Sejong region of South Korea, in order to check the effectiveness of atmospheric correction methods for Landsat ETM+. Overall, in the forest biomass estimation, the 6S model showed the bestRMSE’s, followed by FLAASH, DOS and TOA. In addition, a significant improvement of RMSE by 6S was found with images when the study site had higher total water vapor and temperature levels. Moreover, we also tested the sensitivity of the atmospheric correction methods to each of the Landsat ETM+ bands. The results confirmed that 6S dominates the other methods, especially in the infrared wavelengths covering the pivotal bands for forest applications. Finally, we suggest that the 6S model, integrating water vapor and aerosol optical depth derived from MODIS products, is better suited for AGB estimation based on optical remote-sensing data, especially when using satellite images acquired in the summer during full canopy development.

  2. A FPGA embedded web server for remote monitoring and control of smart sensors networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdaleno, Eduardo; Rodríguez, Manuel; Pérez, Fernando; Hernández, David; García, Enrique

    2013-12-27

    This article describes the implementation of a web server using an embedded Altera NIOS II IP core, a general purpose and configurable RISC processor which is embedded in a Cyclone FPGA. The processor uses the μCLinux operating system to support a Boa web server of dynamic pages using Common Gateway Interface (CGI). The FPGA is configured to act like the master node of a network, and also to control and monitor a network of smart sensors or instruments. In order to develop a totally functional system, the FPGA also includes an implementation of the time-triggered protocol (TTP/A). Thus, the implemented master node has two interfaces, the webserver that acts as an Internet interface and the other to control the network. This protocol is widely used to connecting smart sensors and actuators and microsystems in embedded real-time systems in different application domains, e.g., industrial, automotive, domotic, etc., although this protocol can be easily replaced by any other because of the inherent characteristics of the FPGA-based technology.

  3. Multi-Sensor Localization and Navigation for Remote Manipulation in Smoky Areas

    OpenAIRE

    Jose Vicente Marti; Jorge Sales; Raul Marin; Pedro Sanz

    2013-01-01

    Abstract When localizing mobile sensors and actuators in indoor  environments  laser  meters,  ultrasonic  meters  or  even image processing techniques are usually used. On  the  other  hand,  in  smoky  conditions,  due  to  a  fire  or  building collapse, once the smoke or dust density grows,  optical  methods  are  not  efficient  anymore.  In  these  scenarios  other  type  of  sensors  must  be  used,  such  as  sonar,  radar  or  radiofrequency  signals.  Ind...

  4. A FPGA Embedded Web Server for Remote Monitoring and Control of Smart Sensors Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Magdaleno

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the implementation of a web server using an embedded Altera NIOS II IP core, a general purpose and configurable RISC processor which is embedded in a Cyclone FPGA. The processor uses the μCLinux operating system to support a Boa web server of dynamic pages using Common Gateway Interface (CGI. The FPGA is configured to act like the master node of a network, and also to control and monitor a network of smart sensors or instruments. In order to develop a totally functional system, the FPGA also includes an implementation of the time-triggered protocol (TTP/A. Thus, the implemented master node has two interfaces, the webserver that acts as an Internet interface and the other to control the network. This protocol is widely used to connecting smart sensors and actuators and microsystems in embedded real-time systems in different application domains, e.g., industrial, automotive, domotic, etc., although this protocol can be easily replaced by any other because of the inherent characteristics of the FPGA-based technology.

  5. Observations of UV radiation and total ozone column using ground based instruments in Río Gallegos, Argentina (51° 36' S, 69° 19' W)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Jacobo; Wolfram, Elian; Orte, Facundo; D'Elia, Raul; Bulnes, Daniela; Quel, Eduardo

    2013-05-01

    As a part of environmental studies in the southern hemisphere, the CEILAP Lidar Division with the financial support of JICA (Japan International Cooperation Agency) and the collaboration of IPSL France, mounted a ground based remote sensing site at Río Gallegos city (51° 36'S, 69° 19'W), at southern part of South America for the measurements of stratospheric ozone, with lidar remote sensing techniques and passive sensors to measure solar UV irradiance. The Patagonian region is characterized by high cloud cover during day changing strongly the distribution of UV radiation that reaches the ground surface. During the spring season some overpasses of ozone hole are masked by cloud cover avoiding the increase in UVB radiation. Solar UV radiation measured with multiband filter radiometer GUV-541 and Biometer manufactured by Biospherial Inc. San Diego and the Yankee Environmental Systems (YES) companies respectively. We present nine study days in the period 2007-2011 where total ozone column was below 250 DU focusing the impact that cloud cover had on the temporal evolution of these events.

  6. A Synchronized Sensor Array for Remote Monitoring of Avian and Bat Interactions with Offshore Renewable Energy Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suryan, Robert [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Department of Fisheries and Wildlife; Albertani, Roberto [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). School of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering; Polagye, Brian [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center

    2016-07-15

    Wind energy production in the U.S. is projected to increase to 35% of our nation’s energy by 2050. This substantial increase in the U.S. is only a portion of the global wind industry growth, as many countries strive to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. A major environmental concern and potential market barrier for expansion of wind energy is bird and bat mortality from impacts with turbine blades, towers, and nacelles. Carcass surveys are the standard protocol for quantifying mortality at onshore sites. This method is imperfect, however, due to survey frequency at remote sites, removal of carcasses by scavengers between surveys, searcher efficiency, and other biases as well as delays of days to weeks or more in obtaining information on collision events. Furthermore, carcass surveys are not feasible at offshore wind energy sites. Near-real-time detection and quantification of interaction rates is possible at both onshore and offshore wind facilities using an onboard, integrated sensor package with data transmitted to central processing centers. We developed and experimentally tested an array of sensors that continuously monitors for interactions (including impacts) of birds and bats with wind turbines. The synchronized array includes three sensor nodes: (1) vibration (accelerometers and contact microphones), (2) optical (visual and infrared spectrum cameras), and (3) bioacoustics (acoustic and ultrasonic microphones). Accelerometers and contact acoustic microphones are placed at the root of each blade to detect impact vibrations and sound waves propagating through the structure. On-board data processing algorithms using wavelet analysis detect impact signals exceeding background vibration. Stereo-visual and infrared cameras were placed on the nacelle to allow target tracking, distance, and size calculations. On-board image processing and target detection algorithms identify moving targets within the camera field of view. Bioacoustic recorders monitor vocalizations

  7. Yield estimation of winter wheat in early growth periods by vehicle-borne ground-based remote sensing system%基于车载近地遥感系统的冬小麦生育早期产量估测方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李树强; 李民赞

    2014-01-01

    冬小麦生育早期的产量估测对于制定冬小麦整个生长期的精准管理策略具有重要的参考意义。该文利用车载近地遥感估产系统对冬小麦生育早期冠层叶片光谱信息进行动态获取,提出了一种基于冠层光谱信息的动态光化学植被指数MPRI(mobile photochemical reflectance index),构建了基于MPRI的冬小麦产量车载近地遥感估产模型,分析了估测效果,结合GIS手段对估产数据进行了空间分析。研究结果表明:冬小麦生育早期冠层指数MPRI对冬小麦的产量单点估测具有一定的效果,决定系数R2约为0.78。车载近地遥感估产系统动态测量时,MPRI表现出良好的数据识别能力。通过设置阈值能够剔除动态测量中的土壤背景干扰信息,说明MPRI对于冬小麦生育早期产量具有较好的估测效果。对动态估产结果进行空间分析,能够掌握小区域内小麦生育早期产量的空间分布情况,为冬小麦生育早期产量估测提供了新的思路和方法。%The index of crop growth monitoring has a close relationship with crop yield. It could forecast a large-scale food state that indicates a possibility of either a missing or surplus yield as early as possible, and it is therefore important for the macro control of food. Using near-ground remote sensing is significant to understanding the growth of crops and providing accurate and scientific data for precision agriculture. For the small area growers, the vehicle-borne system shows the good prospects and has gradually become the first choice method. This paper discusses a method that is one of the most important tools for yield prediction for winter wheat in the jointing stage. It is an efficient, flexible, and economical operation for a small region. Usually the vehicle-borne growth monitoring system cannot maintain steady operations due to the row spacing of winter wheat in the jointing stage. The background

  8. Fluorescence-based remote irradiation sensor in liquid-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeltner, R.; Bykov, D. S.; Xie, S.; Euser, T. G.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2016-06-01

    We report an irradiation sensor based on a fluorescent "flying particle" that is optically trapped and propelled inside the core of a water-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. When the moving particle passes through an irradiated region, its emitted fluorescence is captured by guided modes of the fiber core and so can be monitored using a filtered photodiode placed at the fiber end. The particle speed and position can be precisely monitored using in-fiber Doppler velocimetry, allowing the irradiation profile to be measured to a spatial resolution of ˜10 μm. The spectral response can be readily adjusted by appropriate choice of particle material. Using dye-doped polystyrene particles, we demonstrate detection of green (532 nm) and ultraviolet (340 nm) light.

  9. Monitoring and modeling of wetland environment using time-series bi-sensor remotely sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michishita, Ryo

    More than half of the wetlands in the world have been lost in the last century mainly due to human activities. Since natural wetlands receive a significant amount of untreated runoff from urban and agricultural areas, it is necessary to account for other landscapes adjacent to wetlands, such as water bodies, agricultural areas, and urban areas, in the protection and restoration of the wetlands. The goal of this dissertation is to monitor and model land cover changes using the time-series Landsat-5 TM and Terra MODIS data in the Poyang Lake area of China from two perspectives: wetland cover changes and urbanization. A bi-scale monitoring approach was adopted in the monitoring and modeling of wetland cover changes to examine the similarities and differences derived from remotely sensed imagery with different spatial resolutions. The effect of different modeling settings of multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis (MESMA) were examined utilizing a single pair of TM and MODIS scenes. MESMA applied to nine pairs of TM and MODIS scenes acquired from July 2004 to October 2005 captured phenological and hydrological trends of land cover fractions (LCFs) and LCF agreement between the image pairs. Ground surface reflectance, rather than LCFs, was chosen as the key parameter in the blending of bi-scale remotely sensed data that utilized the spatial details of one data type and temporal details of the other. This research customized an existing fusion model to overcome the problem with the unobserved pixels in MODIS data acquired on TM data acquisition dates. It is interesting that the input data combination considering water level change achieved higher accuracy. In the monitoring of urbanization, this research investigated the relationship between urban land cover and human activities, and detected the areas of new urban development and redevelopment of built-up areas. Different urbanization processes largely influenced by the economic reforms of China were demonstrated

  10. Efficient Data Reduction Techniques for Remote Applications of a Wireless Visual Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khursheed Khursheed

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A Wireless Visual Sensor Network (WVSN is formed by deploying many Visual Sensor Nodes (VSNs in the field. After acquiring an image of the area of interest, the VSN performs local processing on it and transmits the result using an embedded wireless transceiver. Wireless data transmission consumes a great deal of energy, where energy consumption is mainly dependent on the amount of information being transmitted. The image captured by the VSN contains a huge amount of data. For certain applications, segmentation can be performed on the captured images. The amount of information in the segmented images can be reduced by applying efficient bi‐level image compression methods. In this way, the communication energy consumption of each of the VSNs can be reduced. However, the data reduction capability of bi‐level image compression standards is fixed and is limited by the used compression algorithm. For applications attributing few changes in adjacent frames, change coding can be applied for further data reduction. Detecting and compressing only the Regions of Interest (ROIs in the change frame is another possibility for further data reduction. In a communication system, where both the sender and the receiver know the employed compression standard, there is a possibility for further data reduction by not including the header information in the compressed bit stream of the sender. This paper summarizes different information reduction techniques such as image coding, change coding and ROI coding. The main contribution is the investigation of the combined effect of all these coding methods and their application to a few representative real life applications. This paper is intended to be a resource for researchers interested in techniques for information reduction in energy constrained embedded applications.

  11. Remote sensing observation used in offshore wind energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Christiansen, Merete Bruun

    2008-01-01

    Remote sensing observations used in offshore wind energy are described in three parts: ground-based techniques and applications, airborne techniques and applications, and satellite-based techniques and applications. Ground-based remote sensing of winds is relevant, in particular, for new large wind...

  12. Integrating Remote Sensing and Proximal Sensors for the Detection of Soil Moisture and Salinity Variability in Coastal Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yan; SHI Zhou; ZHOU Lian-qing; JIN Xi; TIAN Yan-feng; TENG Hong-fen

    2013-01-01

    Soil moisture and salinity are two crucial coastal saline soil variables, which influence the soil quality and agricultural productivity in the reclaimed coastal region. Accurately characterizing the spatial variability of these soil parameters is critical for the rational development and utilization of tideland resources. In the present study, the spatial variability of soil moisture and salinity in the reclaimed area of Hangzhou gulf, Shangyu City, Zhejiang Province, China, was detected using the data acquired from radar image and the proximal sensor EM38. Soil moisture closely correlates radar scattering coefficient, and a simplified inversion model was built based on a backscattering coefficient extracted from multi-polarization data of ALOS/PALSAR and in situ soil moisture measured by a time domain reflectometer to detect soil moisture variations. The result indicated a higher accuracy of soil moisture inversion by the HH polarization mode than those by the HV mode. Soil salinity is reflected by soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa). Further, ECa can be rapidly detected by EM38 equipment in situ linked with GPS for characterizing the spatial variability of soil salinity. Based on the strong spatial variability and interactions of soil moisture and salinity, a cokriging interpolation method with auxiliary variable of backscattering coefficient was adopted to map the spatial variability of ECa. When compared with a map of ECa interpolated by the ordinary kriging method, detail was revealed and the accuracy was increased by 15.3%. The results conclude that the integrating active remote sensing and proximal sensors EM38 are effective and acceptable approaches for rapidly and accurately detecting soil moisture and salinity variability in coastal areas, especially in the subtropical coastal zones of China with frequent heavy cloud cover.

  13. Multi-sensor time series of remote sensing data indicate rapid warming trend for lakes in California and Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, P.; Hook, S. J.; Radocinski, R. R.; Corlett, G. K.; Hulley, G. C.; Schladow, S. G.; Steissberg, T. E.

    2009-12-01

    The temperature of large lakes is a potential indicator of climate change. However, its usefulness is limited by the paucity of in situ measurements and lack of long-term data records. Thermal infrared (TIR) satellite imagery can be used to obtain frequent and accurate remote observations of lake surface temperatures. The archive of TIR imagery from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the series of Along-Track Scanning Radiometers (ATSR/ATSR-2/AATSR) sensors, as well as from the series of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRR), now spans nearly three decades and together these data sets can provide continuous time series of global lake surface temperatures. As part of an ongoing project involving the construction of 30-year time series of lake temperatures for 164 large lakes worldwide, we present the results of a case study for six lakes in California and Nevada. Seventeen years of data from the ATSR series was processed in combination with nine years of MODIS data in order to obtain time series of lake skin temperature. The accuracy of the skin temperature retrievals was tested against automated in situ measurements from buoys at the Lake Tahoe test site. The results indicate that nighttime skin temperatures can be estimated with mean errors as low as 0.2 °C. An analysis of average summer lake temperatures retrieved from the ATSR sensors shows that the six case study sites have exhibited average warming trends of 0.11 ± 0.026 °C yr-1 (p < 0.002) since 1992. The magnitude of the trend is confirmed by the shorter time series of MODIS data as well as by in situ measurements at Lake Tahoe. A comparison with air temperature observations suggests that the lake surface is warming more rapidly than the surface air temperature.

  14. [A review of atmospheric aerosol research by using polarization remote sensing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hong; Gu, Xing-Fa; Xie, Dong-Hai; Yu, Tao; Meng, Qing-Yan

    2014-07-01

    In the present paper, aerosol research by using polarization remote sensing in last two decades (1993-2013) was reviewed, including aerosol researches based on POLDER/PARASOL, APS(Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor), Polarized Airborne camera and Ground-based measurements. We emphasize the following three aspects: (1) The retrieval algorithms developed for land and marine aerosol by using POLDER/PARASOL; The validation and application of POLDER/PARASOL AOD, and cross-comparison with AOD of other satellites, such as MODIS AOD. (2) The retrieval algorithms developed for land and marine aerosol by using MICROPOL and RSP/APS. We also introduce the new progress in aerosol research based on The Directional Polarimetric Camera (DPC), which was produced by Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). (3) The aerosol retrieval algorithms by using measurements from ground-based instruments, such as CE318-2 and CE318-DP. The retrieval results from spaceborne sensors, airborne camera and ground-based measurements include total AOD, fine-mode AOD, coarse-mode AOD, size distribution, particle shape, complex refractive indices, single scattering albedo, scattering phase function, polarization phase function and AOD above cloud. Finally, based on the research, the authors present the problems and prospects of atmospheric aerosol research by using polarization remote sensing, and provide a valuable reference for the future studies of atmospheric aerosol.

  15. Distributed Least-Squares Estimation of a Remote Chemical Source via Convex Combination in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Li Cao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the problem of locating a continuous chemical source using the concentration measurements provided by a wireless sensor network (WSN. Such a problem exists in various applications: eliminating explosives or drugs, detecting the leakage of noxious chemicals, etc. The limited power and bandwidth of WSNs have motivated collaborative in-network processing which is the focus of this paper. We propose a novel distributed least-squares estimation (DLSE method to solve the chemical source localization (CSL problem using a WSN. The DLSE method is realized by iteratively conducting convex combination of the locally estimated chemical source locations in a distributed manner. Performance assessments of our method are conducted using both simulations and real experiments. In the experiments, we propose a fitting method to identify both the release rate and the eddy diffusivity. The results show that the proposed DLSE method can overcome the negative interference of local minima and saddle points of the objective function, which would hinder the convergence of local search methods, especially in the case of locating a remote chemical source.

  16. Energy-Efficient Transmissions for Remote Wireless Sensor Networks: An Integrated HAP/Satellite Architecture for Emergency Scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Feihong; Li, Hongjun; Gong, Xiangwu; Liu, Quan; Wang, Jingchao

    2015-09-03

    A typical application scenario of remote wireless sensor networks (WSNs) is identified as an emergency scenario. One of the greatest design challenges for communications in emergency scenarios is energy-efficient transmission, due to scarce electrical energy in large-scale natural and man-made disasters. Integrated high altitude platform (HAP)/satellite networks are expected to optimally meet emergency communication requirements. In this paper, a novel integrated HAP/satellite (IHS) architecture is proposed, and three segments of the architecture are investigated in detail. The concept of link-state advertisement (LSA) is designed in a slow flat Rician fading channel. The LSA is received and processed by the terminal to estimate the link state information, which can significantly reduce the energy consumption at the terminal end. Furthermore, the transmission power requirements of the HAPs and terminals are derived using the gradient descent and differential equation methods. The energy consumption is modeled at both the source and system level. An innovative and adaptive algorithm is given for the energy-efficient path selection. The simulation results validate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive algorithm. It is shown that the proposed adaptive algorithm can significantly improve energy efficiency when combined with the LSA and the energy consumption estimation.

  17. Energy-Efficient Transmissions for Remote Wireless Sensor Networks: An Integrated HAP/Satellite Architecture for Emergency Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feihong Dong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A typical application scenario of remote wireless sensor networks (WSNs is identified as an emergency scenario. One of the greatest design challenges for communications in emergency scenarios is energy-efficient transmission, due to scarce electrical energy in large-scale natural and man-made disasters. Integrated high altitude platform (HAP/satellite networks are expected to optimally meet emergency communication requirements. In this paper, a novel integrated HAP/satellite (IHS architecture is proposed, and three segments of the architecture are investigated in detail. The concept of link-state advertisement (LSA is designed in a slow flat Rician fading channel. The LSA is received and processed by the terminal to estimate the link state information, which can significantly reduce the energy consumption at the terminal end. Furthermore, the transmission power requirements of the HAPs and terminals are derived using the gradient descent and differential equation methods. The energy consumption is modeled at both the source and system level. An innovative and adaptive algorithm is given for the energy-efficient path selection. The simulation results validate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive algorithm. It is shown that the proposed adaptive algorithm can significantly improve energy efficiency when combined with the LSA and the energy consumption estimation.

  18. [Remote sensing of chlorophyll fluorescence at airborne level based on unmanned airship platform and hyperspectral sensor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pei-Qi; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Ni, Zhuo-Ya; Wang, Ran; Wang, Qing-Shan

    2013-11-01

    The solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) has a close relationship with photosynthetic and is considered as a probe of plant photosynthetic activity. In this study, an airborne fluorescence detecting system was constructed by using a hyperspectral imager on board an unmanned airship. Both Fraunhofer Line Discriminator (FLD) and 3FLD used to extract ChlF require the incident solar irradiance, which is always difficult to receive at airborne level. Alternative FLD (aFLD) can overcome the problem by selecting non-fluorescent emitter in the image. However, aFLD is based on the assumption that reflectance is identical around the Fraunhofer line, which is not realistic. A new method, a3FLD, is proposed, which assumes that reflectance varies linearly with the wavelength around Fraunhofer line. The result of simulated data shows that ChlF retrieval error of a3FLD is significantly lower than that of aFLD when vegetation reflectance varies near the Fraunhofer line. The results of hyperspectral remote sensing data with the airborne fluorescence detecting system show that the relative values of retrieved ChlF of 5 kinds of plants extracted by both aFLD and a3FLD are consistent with vegetation growth stage and the ground-level ChlF. The ChlF values of aFLD are about 15% greater than a3FLD. In addition, using aFLD, some non-fluorescent objects have considerable ChlF value, while a3FLD can effectively overcome the problem.

  19. EXTENDED PERFORMANCE HANDHELD AND MOBILE SENSORS FOR REMOTE DETECTION OF NATURAL GAS LEAKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael B. Frish; B. David Green; Richard T. Wainner; Francesca Scire-Scappuzzo; Paul Cataldi; Matthew C. Laderer

    2005-05-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) to advance the state-of-the-art of surveying for leaks of natural gas from transmission and distribution pipelines. The principal project goal was to develop means of deploying on an automotive platform an improved version of the handheld laser-based standoff natural gas leak detector previously developed by PSI and known as the Remote Methane Leak Detector or RMLD. A laser beam which interrogates the air for methane is projected from a spinning turret mounted upon a van. As the van travels forward, the laser beam scans an arc to the front and sides of the van so as to survey across streets and to building walls from a moving vehicle. When excess methane is detected within the arc, an alarm is activated. In this project, we built and tested a prototype Mobile RMLD (MRMLD) intended to provide lateral coverage of 10 m and one lateral scan for every meter of forward motion at forward speeds up to 10 m/s. Using advanced detection algorithms developed as part of this project, the early prototype MRMLD, installed on the back of a truck, readily detected simulated gas leaks of 50 liters per hour. As a supplement to the originally planned project, PSI also participated in a DoE demonstration of several gas leak detection systems at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) during September 2004. Using a handheld RMLD upgraded with the advanced detection algorithms developed in this project, from within a moving vehicle we readily detected leaks created along the 7.4 mile route of a virtual gas transmission pipeline.

  20. Remote Sensing of Residue Management in Farms using Landsat 8 Sensor Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A Rostami

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Preserving of crop residues in the field surface after harvesting crops, making difficult farm operations. The farmers for getting rid of crop residues always choose the easiest way, i.e. burning. Burning is one of the common disposal methods for wheat and corn straw in some region of the world. Present study was aimed to investigate the accurate methods for monitoring of residue management after wheat harvesting. With this vision, the potential of Landsat 8 sensor was evaluated for monitoring of residue burning, using satellite spectral indices and Linear Spectral Unmixing Analysis. For this purpose, correlation of ground data with satellite spectral indices and LSUA data were tested by linear regression. Materials and Methods In this study we considered 12 farms where remained plants were burned, 12 green farm, 12 bare farms and 12 farms with full crop residue cover were considered. Spatial coordinates of experimental fields recorded with a GPS and fields map were drawn using ArcGissoftware, version of 10.1. In this study,t wo methods were used to separate burned fields from other farms including Satellite Spectral Indices and Linear Spectral unmixing analysis. In this study, multispectral landsat 8 image was acquired over 2015 year. Landsat 8 products are delivered to the customer as radiometric, sensor, and geometric corrections. Image pixels are unique to Landsat 8 data, and should not be directly compared to imagery from other sensors. Therefore, DN value must be converted to radiance value in order to change the radiance to the reflectance, which is useful when performing spectral analysis techniques, such as transformations, band ratios and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, etc. In this study, a number of spectral indices and Linear Spectral Unmixing Analysis data were imported/extracted from Landsat 8 image. All satellite image data were analyzed by ENVI software package. The spectral indices used in this

  1. Spatial Estimation of Sub-Hour Global Horizontal Irradiance Based on Official Observations and Remote Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Corea, Federico-Vladimir; Manso-Callejo, Miguel-Angel; Moreno-Regidor, María-Pilar; Velasco-Gómez, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    This study was motivated by the need to improve densification of Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) observations, increasing the number of surface weather stations that observe it, using sensors with a sub-hour periodicity and examining the methods of spatial GHI estimation (by interpolation) with that periodicity in other locations. The aim of the present research project is to analyze the goodness of 15-minute GHI spatial estimations for five methods in the territory of Spain (three geo-statistical interpolation methods, one deterministic method and the HelioSat2 method, which is based on satellite images). The research concludes that, when the work area has adequate station density, the best method for estimating GHI every 15 min is Regression Kriging interpolation using GHI estimated from satellite images as one of the input variables. On the contrary, when station density is low, the best method is estimating GHI directly from satellite images. A comparison between the GHI observed by volunteer stations and the estimation model applied concludes that 67% of the volunteer stations analyzed present values within the margin of error (average of ±2 standard deviations). PMID:24732102

  2. Ground-Based Observing Campaign of Briz-M Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, S. M.; Buckalew, B.; Frith, J.; Cowardin, H. M.; Hickson, P.; Matney, M.; Anz-Meador, P.

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) completed the installation of the Meter Class Autonomous Telescope (MCAT) on Ascension Island. MCAT is a 1.3m optical telescope designed with a fast tracking capability for observing orbital debris at all orbital regimes (Low-Erath orbits to Geosyncronous (GEO) orbits) from a low latitude site. This new asset is dedicated year-round for debris observations, and its location fills a geographical gap in the Ground-based Electro Optical Space Surveillance (GEODSS) network. A commercial off the shelf (COTS) research grade 0.4m telescope (named the Benbrook telescope) will also be installed on Ascension at the end of 2016. This smaller version is controlled by the same master software, designed by Euclid Research, and can be tasked to work independently or in concert with MCAT. Like MCAT, it has a the same suite of filters, a similar field of view, and a fast-tracking Astelco mount, and is also capable of tracking debris at all orbital regimes. These assets are well suited for targeted campagins or surveys of debris. Since 2013, NASA's ODPO has also had extensive access to the 3.8m infrared UKIRT telescope, located on Mauna Kea. At nearly 14,000-ft, this site affords excellent conditions for collecting both photometery and spectroscopy at near-IR (0.9 - 2.5 micrometers SWIR) and thermal-IR (8 - 25 micrometers; LWIR) regimes, ideal for investigating material properties as well as thermal characteristics and sizes of debris. For the purposes of understanding orbital debris, taking data in both survey mode as well as targeting individual objects for more in-depth characterizations are desired. With the recent break-ups of Briz-M rocket bodies, we have collected a suite of data in the optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared of in-tact objects as well as those classified as debris. A break-up at GEO of a Briz-M rocket occurred in January, 2016, well timed for the first remote observing survey-campaign with MCAT. Access to

  3. Global Fine Particulate Matter Concentrations and Trends Inferred from Satellite Observations, Modeling, and Ground-Based Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Randall; van Donkelaar, Aaron; Boys, Brian; Philip, Sajeev; Lee, Colin; Snider, Graydon; Weagle, Crystal

    2014-05-01

    Outdoor fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is a leading environmentally-related cause of premature mortality worldwide. However, ground-level PM2.5 monitors remain sparse in many regions of the world. Satellite remote sensing from MODIS, MISR, and SeaWiFS yields a powerful global data source to address this issue. Global modeling (GEOS-Chem) plays a critical role in relating these observations to ground-level concentrations. The resultant satellite-based estimates of PM2.5 indicate dramatic variation around the world, with implications for global public health. A new ground-based aerosol network (SPARTAN) offers valuable measurements to understand the relationship between satellite observations of aerosol optical depth and ground-level PM2.5 concentrations. This talk will highlight recent advances in combining satellite remote sensing, global modeling, and ground-based measurements to improve understanding of global population exposure to outdoor fine particulate matter.

  4. Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, H. [PBI-Dansensor A/S (Denmark); Toft Soerensen, O. [Risoe National Lab., Materials Research Dept. (Denmark)

    1999-10-01

    A new type of ceramic oxygen sensors based on semiconducting oxides was developed in this project. The advantage of these sensors compared to standard ZrO{sub 2} sensors is that they do not require a reference gas and that they can be produced in small sizes. The sensor design and the techniques developed for production of these sensors are judged suitable by the participating industry for a niche production of a new generation of oxygen sensors. Materials research on new oxygen ion conducting conductors both for applications in oxygen sensors and in fuel was also performed in this project and finally a new process was developed for fabrication of ceramic tubes by dip-coating. (EHS)

  5. Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Pigorsch, Enrico

    1997-01-01

    This is the 5th edition of the Metra Martech Directory "EUROPEAN CENTRES OF EXPERTISE - SENSORS." The entries represent a survey of European sensors development. The new edition contains 425 detailed profiles of companies and research institutions in 22 countries. This is reflected in the diversity of sensors development programmes described, from sensors for physical parameters to biosensors and intelligent sensor systems. We do not claim that all European organisations developing sensors are included, but this is a good cross section from an invited list of participants. If you see gaps or omissions, or would like your organisation to be included, please send details. The data base invites the formation of effective joint ventures by identifying and providing access to specific areas in which organisations offer collaboration. This issue is recognised to be of great importance and most entrants include details of collaboration offered and sought. We hope the directory on Sensors will help you to find the ri...

  6. A Ground-Based Array to Observe Geospace Electrodynamics During Adverse Space Weather Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, J. J.; Eccles, J. V.; Rice, D.

    2004-05-01

    Geomagnetic Storms occur with surprising frequency and create adverse space weather conditions. During these periods, our knowledge and ability to specify or forecast in adequate detail for user needs is negligible. Neither experimental observations nor theoretical developments have made a significant new impact on the problem for over two decades. Although we can now map Total Electron Content (TEC) in the ionosphere over a continent with sufficient resolution to see coherent long-lived structures, these do not provide constraints on the geospace electrodynamics that is at the heart of our lack of understanding. We present arguments for the need of a continental deployment of ground-based sensors to stepwise advance our understanding of the geospace electrodynamics when it is most adverse from a space weather perspective and also most frustrating from an understanding of Magnetosphere-Ionosphere coupling. That a continental-scale deployment is more productive at addressing the problem than a realizable global distribution is shown. Each measurement is discussed from the point-of-view of either providing new knowledge or becoming a key for future real-time specification and forecasting for user applications. An example of a storm database from one mid-latitude station for the 31 March 2002 is used as a conceptual point in a ground-based array. The presentation focuses on scientific questions that have eluded a quantitative solution for over three decades and view a ground-based array as an "IGY" type of catalyst for answering these questions.

  7. Remote monitoring of a natural gas pipeline using fiber optic sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cauchi, Sam; Morison, William Donald [Fiber Optic Systems Technology Inc. (FOX-TEK), Bedford, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    The pipeline network referred to herein transports natural gas from the NE part of British Columbia through Western Canada into the US Mid-West. Across over 2000 km of the operator's large diameter transmission pipeline system are numerous river crossings and other geotechnical hazards that are continuously identified and risk ranked using a variety of methods, including in line inspection and geotechnical surveys. One particular section of the operator's mainline near Edmonton, Alberta, where railway tracks have recently been installed overtop this vital natural gas transport pipeline, will be the focus of this paper. In order to protect the pipeline from soil stresses to be imposed by heavy cyclic loading during construction of the railway tracks and when trains begin passing overtop, protective concrete structures were constructed around the pipeline within the vicinity of the tracks. While these structures assist in maintaining the integrity of the pipeline in the presence of heavy loading forces, they simultaneously prevent any subsequent access to the pipeline for general inspection and repair. As a result, prior to the construction of the protective concrete structures, the operator made multiple modifications to the pipeline's integrity system within the area of the proposed tracks. This included the enhancement of the cathodic protection to further prevent external corrosion, and the installation of fiber optic strain gauges at multiple sites to ensure that strain levels remain within tolerable limits under the inaccessible area. Background information on operator's pipeline and the layout of the protective concrete structures and railways will be presented in addition to field data obtained using the fiber optic strain monitoring system. An introduction to fiber optic strain gauges will be given, followed by a discussion on the design and installation of the sensors themselves. The particular method used to analyze the strain data is

  8. Ground-based monitoring of solar radiation in Moldova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aculinin, Alexandr; Smicov, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    Integrated measurements of solar radiation in Kishinev, Moldova have been started by Atmospheric Research Group (ARG) at the Institute of Applied Physics from 2003. Direct, diffuse and total components of solar and atmospheric long-wave radiation are measured by using of the radiometric complex at the ground-based solar radiation monitoring station. Measurements are fulfilled at the stationary and moving platforms equipped with the set of 9 broadband solar radiation sensors overlapping wavelength range from UV-B to IR. Detailed description of the station can be found at the site http://arg.phys.asm.md. Ground station is placed in an urban environment of Kishinev city (47.00N; 28.56E). Summary of observation data acquired at the station in the course of short-term period from 2004 to 2009 are presented below. Solar radiation measurements were fulfilled by using CM11(280-3000 nm) and CH1 sensors (Kipp&Zonen). In the course of a year maximum and minimum of monthly sums of total radiation was ~706.4 MJm-2 in June and ~82.1MJm-2 in December, respectively. Monthly sums of direct solar radiation (on horizontal plane) show the maximum and minimum values of the order ~456.9 MJm-2 in July and ~25.5MJm-2 in December, respectively. In an average, within a year should be marked the predominance of direct radiation over the scattered radiation, 51% and 49%, respectively. In the course of a year, the percentage contribution of the direct radiation into the total radiation is ~55-65% from May to September. In the remaining months, the percentage contribution decreases and takes the minimum value of ~ 28% in December. In an average, annual sum of total solar radiation is ~4679.9 MJm-2. For the period from April to September accounts for ~76% of the annual amount of total radiation. Annual sum of sunshine duration accounts for ~2149 hours, which is of ~ 48% from the possible sunshine duration. In an average, within a year maximum and minimum of sunshine duration is ~ 304 hours in

  9. Assessment of NASA Airborne Laser Altimetry Data Using Ground-Based GPS Data near Summit Station, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, Kelly M.; Hawley, Robert L.; Lutz, Eric R.; Studinger, Michael; Sonntag, John G.; Hofton, Michelle A.; Andrews, Lauren C.; Neumann, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    A series of NASA airborne lidars have been used in support of satellite laser altimetry missions. These airbornelaser altimeters have been deployed for satellite instrument development, for spaceborne data validation, and to bridge the data gap between satellite missions. We used data from ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) surveys of an 11 km long track near Summit Station, Greenland, to assess the surface elevation bias and measurement precision of three airborne laser altimeters including the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), the Land, Vegetation, and Ice Sensor (LVIS), and the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL). Ground-based GPS data from the monthly ground-based traverses, which commenced in 2006, allowed for the assessment of nine airborne lidar surveys associated with ATM and LVIS between 2007 and 2016. Surface elevation biases for these altimeters over the flat, ice-sheet interior are less than 0.12 m, while assessments of measurement precision are 0.09 m or better. Ground-based GPS positions determined both with and without differential post-processing techniques provided internally consistent solutions. Results from the analyses of ground-based and airborne data provide validation strategy guidance for the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite 2 (ICESat-2) elevation and elevation-change data products.

  10. A Landslide Monitoring Network based on Multi-source Spatial Sensors in Li County, Sichuan Province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, P.

    2014-12-01

    A multi-source spatial sensor network has been established to strengthen the landslide monitoring activities in the mountainous areas in Western China. The focused Xishancun landslide is in Li County in Sichuan Province, located in the upper Minjiang River areas that is thought as very unstable slope areas after the "5.12" Wenchuan Earthquake. This spatial sensor chiefly concentrates on constructing a monitoring network with four hierarchies of observation: (1) space-borne sensors including VHR optical images (P5, IKONOS, WorldView-1,2 and ZY-3) and a series of X-band TerraSAR-X SAR images; (2) aerial observation by a group of UAV scanning schemes with the ground-based controlling platform, the produced the 1:2000 scale DOM mosaic images and the generated high resolution DEM; (3) ground-based sensors involving in-situ sensors such as inclinometers and piezometers with a smart self-forming seamless real-time data communication and terrestrial remote sensing platform of laser scanning and ground-based SAR; and (4) internal investigation from geophysical approaches such as seismological and electromagnetic analyses. This landslide monitoring system based on spatial sensor network is expected to provide solid monitoring data for landslide models and data assimilation for potential landslide hazard prediction and risk assessment.

  11. Applications of passive remote surface acoustic wave sensors in high-voltage systems; Einsatz von passiven funkabfragbaren Oberflaechenwellensensoren in der elektrischen Energietechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teminova, R.

    2007-06-29

    Passive remote Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors have been applied e.g. as temperature, pressure or torque sensors. Their important advantages over standard methods are their passive operating principle, which allows operation without any power supply, as well as the wireless high-frequency signal transmission over distances up to about 10..15 m even through (non metallic) housings. These properties of SAW sensors particularly qualify them for applications in high voltage operational equipment. First experience was gained in a long time field test of surge arrester monitoring based on SAW temperature sensors in a German high-voltage substation. Now, this system has been further developed at Darmstadt University of Technology for other applications, the first of them being an overhead line (OHL) conductor temperature measurement, the second one a temperature monitoring system for of high-voltage disconnectors. After designing and building the sensors, extensive laboratory tests were carried out applying high-voltage, high-current and thermal stress in order to approve the suitability for the intended application. All these tests confirmed the assumption that SAW sensors, due to their passive working principle, are not affected at all by any kind of electrical, magnetic or thermal stress that may occur during service. The complete temperature sensor consists of three parts: a sensor chip, an antenna which receives and transmits the signal from and to the radar unit and a body for installation and for protection against environmental impact. One must find a good compromise between optimizing of thermal, dielectric and high-frequency characteristics and at the same time taking into consideration a simple installation. These requirements on the SAW sensors turned out to be difficult to coordinate. To achieve a high measuring precision is especially difficult. First, a new sensor for OHL application was developed. The OHL conductor temperature sensor had been optimized

  12. Successful Mars remote sensors, MO THEMIS and MER Mini-TES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Steven; Christensen, Phil

    2003-11-01

    This paper describes results of the calibration of the Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) and the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) built by Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing (SBRS) under contract to Arizona State University (ASU). This paper also serves as an update to an earlier paper (Silverman, et al., 2003) for mission description and instrument designs (Schueler, et al., 2003). A major goal of the Mars Exploration Program is to help determine whether life ever existed on Mars via detailed in situ studies and surface sample return. It is essential to identify landing sites with the highest probability of containing samples indicative of early pre-biotic or biotic environments. Of particular interest are aqueous and/or hydrothermal environments in which life could have existed, or regions of current near-surface water or heat sources. The search requires detailed geologic mapping and accurate interpretations of site composition and history in a global context. THEMIS and Mini-TES were designed to do this and builds upon a wealth of data from previous experiments. Previous experiments include the Mariner 6/7 Mars Infrared Radiometer (MIR) and Infrared Spectrometer, the Mariner 9 Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer (IRIS), the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM), the Phobos Termoscan, and the continuing Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission using the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) and MGS Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). TES has collected hyperspectral images (up to 286 spectral bands from 6-50 μm) of the entire martian surface, providing an initial global reconnaissance of mineralogy and thermophysical properties. By covering the key 6.3 to 15.0 μm region in both TES and THEMIS, it is possible to combine TES fine spectral resolution with THEMIS fine spatial resolution to achieve a global mineralogic inventory at the spatial scales necessary for detailed geologic studies within the Odyssey data resources. Mini-TES is a single detector

  13. Fundamentals for remote structural health monitoring of wind turbine blades - a pre-project. Annex A - Cost-benefit for embedded sensors in large wind turbine blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottlieb Hansen, Lars; Lading, L.

    2002-05-01

    This report contains the results of a cost-benefit analysis for the use of embedded sensors for damage detection in large wind turbine blades - structural health monitoring - (in connection with remote surveillance) of large wind turbine placed off-shore. The total operating costs of a three-bladed 2MW turbine placed offshore either without sensors or with sensors are compared. The price of a structural health monitoring system of a price of 100,000 DKK (per turbine) results in a break-even time of about 3 years. For a price of 300,000 DKK the break-even time is about 8 years. However, the cost/benefit analysis has large uncertainties. (au)

  14. Multi-sensor cloud and aerosol retrieval simulator and remote sensing from model parameters - Part 2: Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, Galina; da Silva, Arlindo M.; Norris, Peter M.; Platnick, Steven; Mattoo, Shana; Levy, Robert C.

    2016-07-01

    The Multi-sensor Cloud Retrieval Simulator (MCRS) produces a "simulated radiance" product from any high-resolution general circulation model with interactive aerosol as if a specific sensor such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) were viewing a combination of the atmospheric column and land-ocean surface at a specific location. Previously the MCRS code only included contributions from atmosphere and clouds in its radiance calculations and did not incorporate properties of aerosols. In this paper we added a new aerosol properties module to the MCRS code that allows users to insert a mixture of up to 15 different aerosol species in any of 36 vertical layers.This new MCRS code is now known as MCARS (Multi-sensor Cloud and Aerosol Retrieval Simulator). Inclusion of an aerosol module into MCARS not only allows for extensive, tightly controlled testing of various aspects of satellite operational cloud and aerosol properties retrieval algorithms, but also provides a platform for comparing cloud and aerosol models against satellite measurements. This kind of two-way platform can improve the efficacy of model parameterizations of measured satellite radiances, allowing the assessment of model skill consistently with the retrieval algorithm. The MCARS code provides dynamic controls for appearance of cloud and aerosol layers. Thereby detailed quantitative studies of the impacts of various atmospheric components can be controlled.In this paper we illustrate the operation of MCARS by deriving simulated radiances from various data field output by the Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) model. The model aerosol fields are prepared for translation to simulated radiance using the same model subgrid variability parameterizations as are used for cloud and atmospheric properties profiles, namely the ICA technique. After MCARS computes modeled sensor radiances equivalent to their observed counterparts, these radiances are presented as input to

  15. Multi-Sensor Cloud and Aerosol Retrieval Simulator and Remote Sensing from Model Parameters . Part 2; Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, Galina; Da Silva, Arlindo M.; Norris, Peter M.; Platnick, Steven; Mattoo, Shana; Levy, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    The Multi-sensor Cloud Retrieval Simulator (MCRS) produces a simulated radiance product from any high-resolution general circulation model with interactive aerosol as if a specific sensor such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) were viewing a combination of the atmospheric column and land ocean surface at a specific location. Previously the MCRS code only included contributions from atmosphere and clouds in its radiance calculations and did not incorporate properties of aerosols. In this paper we added a new aerosol properties module to the MCRS code that allows users to insert a mixture of up to 15 different aerosol species in any of 36 vertical layers. This new MCRS code is now known as MCARS (Multi-sensor Cloud and Aerosol Retrieval Simulator). Inclusion of an aerosol module into MCARS not only allows for extensive, tightly controlled testing of various aspects of satellite operational cloud and aerosol properties retrieval algorithms, but also provides a platform for comparing cloud and aerosol models against satellite measurements. This kind of two-way platform can improve the efficacy of model parameterizations of measured satellite radiances, allowing the assessment of model skill consistently with the retrieval algorithm. The MCARS code provides dynamic controls for appearance of cloud and aerosol layers. Thereby detailed quantitative studies of the impacts of various atmospheric components can be controlled. In this paper we illustrate the operation of MCARS by deriving simulated radiances from various data field output by the Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) model. The model aerosol fields are prepared for translation to simulated radiance using the same model sub grid variability parameterizations as are used for cloud and atmospheric properties profiles, namely the ICA technique. After MCARS computes modeled sensor radiances equivalent to their observed counterparts, these radiances are presented as input to

  16. Exploration of a Polarized Surface Bidirectional Reflectance Model Using the Ground-Based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Diner

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate characterization of surface reflection is essential for retrieval of aerosols using downward-looking remote sensors. In this paper, observations from the Ground-based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (GroundMSPI are used to evaluate a surface polarized bidirectional reflectance distribution function (PBRDF model. GroundMSPI is an eight-band spectropolarimetric camera mounted on a rotating gimbal to acquire pushbroom imagery of outdoor landscapes. The camera uses a very accurate photoelastic-modulator-based polarimetric imaging technique to acquire Stokes vector measurements in three of the instrument’s bands (470, 660, and 865 nm. A description of the instrument is presented, and observations of selected targets within a scene acquired on 6 January 2010 are analyzed. Data collected during the course of the day as the Sun moved across the sky provided a range of illumination geometries that facilitated evaluation of the surface model, which is comprised of a volumetric reflection term represented by the modified Rahman-Pinty-Verstraete function plus a specular reflection term generated by a randomly oriented array of Fresnel-reflecting microfacets. While the model is fairly successful in predicting the polarized reflection from two grass targets in the scene, it does a poorer job for two manmade targets (a parking lot and a truck roof, possibly due to their greater degree of geometric organization. Several empirical adjustments to the model are explored and lead to improved fits to the data. For all targets, the data support the notion of spectral invariance in the angular shape of the unpolarized and polarized surface reflection. As noted by others, this behavior provides valuable constraints on the aerosol retrieval problem, and highlights the importance of multiangle observations.

  17. Automated Ground-based Time-lapse Camera Monitoring of West Greenland ice sheet outlet Glaciers: Challenges and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Y.; Box, J. E.; Balog, J.; Lewinter, A.

    2008-12-01

    Monitoring Greenland outlet glaciers using remotely sensed data has drawn a great attention in earth science communities for decades and time series analysis of sensory data has provided important variability information of glacier flow by detecting speed and thickness changes, tracking features and acquiring model input. Thanks to advancements of commercial digital camera technology and increased solid state storage, we activated automatic ground-based time-lapse camera stations with high spatial/temporal resolution in west Greenland outlet and collected one-hour interval data continuous for more than one year at some but not all sites. We believe that important information of ice dynamics are contained in these data and that terrestrial mono-/stereo-photogrammetry can provide theoretical/practical fundamentals in data processing along with digital image processing techniques. Time-lapse images over periods in west Greenland indicate various phenomenon. Problematic is rain, snow, fog, shadows, freezing of water on camera enclosure window, image over-exposure, camera motion, sensor platform drift, and fox chewing of instrument cables, and the pecking of plastic window by ravens. Other problems include: feature identification, camera orientation, image registration, feature matching in image pairs, and feature tracking. Another obstacle is that non-metric digital camera contains large distortion to be compensated for precise photogrammetric use. Further, a massive number of images need to be processed in a way that is sufficiently computationally efficient. We meet these challenges by 1) identifying problems in possible photogrammetric processes, 2) categorizing them based on feasibility, and 3) clarifying limitation and alternatives, while emphasizing displacement computation and analyzing regional/temporal variability. We experiment with mono and stereo photogrammetric techniques in the aide of automatic correlation matching for efficiently handling the enormous

  18. Integrating Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing and In-situ Measurements for Africa Drought Monitoring and Food Security Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, X.; Qu, J. J.; Motha, R. P.; Stefanski, R.; Malherbe, J.

    2015-12-01

    Drought is one of the most complicated natural hazards, and causes serious environmental, economic and social consequences. Agricultural production systems, which are highly susceptible to weather and climate extremes, are often the first and most vulnerable sector to be affected by drought events. In Africa, crop yield potential and grazing quality are already nearing their limit of temperature sensitivity, and, rapid population growth and frequent drought episodes pose serious complications for food security. It is critical to promote sustainable agriculture development in Africa under conditions of climate extremes. Soil moisture is one of the most important indicators for agriculture drought, and is a fundamentally critical parameter for decision support in crop management, including planting, water use efficiency and irrigation. While very significant technological advances have been introduced for remote sensing of surface soil moisture from space, in-situ measurements are still critical for calibration and validation of soil moisture estimation algorithms. For operational applications, synergistic collaboration is needed to integrate measurements from different sensors at different spatial and temporal scales. In this presentation, a collaborative effort is demonstrated for drought monitoring in Africa, supported and coordinated by WMO, including surface soil moisture and crop status monitoring. In-situ measurements of soil moisture, precipitation and temperature at selected sites are provided by local partners in Africa. Measurements from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are integrated with in-situ observations to derive surface soil moisture at high spatial resolution. Crop status is estimated through temporal analysis of current and historical MODIS measurements. Integrated analysis of soil moisture data and crop status provides both in-depth understanding of drought conditions and

  19. Nighttime Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements Using a Ground-based Lunar Photometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkoff, Tim; Omar, Ali; Haggard, Charles; Pippin, Margaret; Tasaddaq, Aasam; Stone, Tom; Rodriguez, Jon; Slutsker, Ilya; Eck, Tom; Holben, Brent; hide

    2015-01-01

    In recent years it was proposed to combine AERONET network photometer capabilities with a high precision lunar model used for satellite calibration to retrieve columnar nighttime AODs. The USGS lunar model can continuously provide pre-atmosphere high precision lunar irradiance determinations for multiple wavelengths at ground sensor locations. When combined with measured irradiances from a ground-based AERONET photometer, atmospheric column transmissions can determined yielding nighttime column aerosol AOD and Angstrom coefficients. Additional demonstrations have utilized this approach to further develop calibration methods and to obtain data in polar regions where extended periods of darkness occur. This new capability enables more complete studies of the diurnal behavior of aerosols, and feedback for models and satellite retrievals for the nighttime behavior of aerosols. It is anticipated that the nighttime capability of these sensors will be useful for comparisons with satellite lidars such as CALIOP and CATS in additional to ground-based lidars in MPLNET at night, when the signal-to-noise ratio is higher than daytime and more precise AOD comparisons can be made.

  20. A novel technique for extracting clouds base height using ground based imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Hirsch

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The height of a cloud in the atmospheric column is a key parameter in its characterization. Several remote sensing techniques (passive and active, either ground-based or on space-borne platforms and in-situ measurements are routinely used in order to estimate top and base heights of clouds. In this article we present a novel method that combines thermal imaging from the ground and sounded wind profile in order to derive the cloud base height. This method is independent of cloud types, making it efficient for both low boundary layer and high clouds. In addition, using thermal imaging ensures extraction of clouds' features during daytime as well as at nighttime. The proposed technique was validated by comparison to active sounding by ceilometers (which is a standard ground based method, to lifted condensation level (LCL calculations, and to MODIS products obtained from space. As all passive remote sensing techniques, the proposed method extracts only the height of the lowest cloud layer, thus upper cloud layers are not detected. Nevertheless, the information derived from this method can be complementary to space-borne cloud top measurements when deep-convective clouds are present. Unlike techniques such as LCL, this method is not limited to boundary layer clouds, and can extract the cloud base height at any level, as long as sufficient thermal contrast exists between the radiative temperatures of the cloud and its surrounding air parcel. Another advantage of the proposed method is its simplicity and modest power needs, making it particularly suitable for field measurements and deployment at remote locations. Our method can be further simplified for use with visible CCD or CMOS camera (although nighttime clouds will not be observed.

  1. Ground-based microwave weather radar observations and retrievals during the 2014 Holuhraun eruption (Bárðarbunga, Iceland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mereu, Luigi; Silvio Marzano, Frank; Barsotti, Sara; Montopoli, Mario; Yeo, Richard; Arngrimsson, Hermann; Björnsson, Halldór; Bonadonna, Costanza

    2015-04-01

    During an eruptive event the real-time forecasting of ash dispersal into the atmosphere is a key factor to prevent air traffic disasters. The ash plume is extremely hazardous to aircraft that inadvertently may fly through it. Real-time monitoring of such phenomena is crucial, particularly to obtain specific data for the initialization of eruption and dispersion models in terms of source parameters. The latter, such as plume height, ash concentration, mass flow rate and size spectra, are usually very difficult to measure or to estimate with a relatively good accuracy. Over the last years different techniques have been developed to improved ash plume detection and retrieval. Satellite-based observations, using multi-frequency visible and infrared radiometers, are usually exploited for monitoring and measuring dispersed ash clouds. The observations from geostationary orbit suffer from a relatively poor spatial resolution, whereas the low orbit level has a relatively poor temporal resolution. Moreover, the field-of-view of infrared radiometric measurements may be reduced by obstructions caused by water and ice clouds lying between the ground and the sensor's antenna. Weather radar-based observations represent an emerging technique to detect and, to a certain extent, mitigate the hazard from the ash plumes. Ground-based microwave scanning radar systems can provide the three-dimensional information about the detected ash volume with a fairly high spatial resolution every few minutes and in all weather conditions. Methodological studies have recently investigated the possibility of using single-polarization and dual-polarization ground-based radar for the remote sensing of volcanic ash cloud. In this respect, radar observations can be complementary to satellite observations. A microphysical electromagnetic characterization of volcanic ash was carried out in terms of dielectric properties, composition, size and orientation of ash particles. An extended Volcanic Ash Radar

  2. GLAST and Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The launch of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope together with the advent of a new generation of ground-based gamma-ray detectors such as VERITAS, HESS, MAGIC and CANGAROO, will usher in a new era of high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics. GLAST and the ground based gamma-ray observatories will provide highly complementary capabilities for spectral, temporal and spatial studies of high energy gamma-ray sources. Joint observations will cover a huge energy range, from 20 MeV to over 20 TeV. The LAT will survey the entire sky every three hours, allowing it both to perform uniform, long-term monitoring of variable sources and to detect flaring sources promptly. Both functions complement the high-sensitivity pointed observations provided by ground-based detectors. Finally, the large field of view of GLAST will allow a study of gamma-ray emission on large angular scales and identify interesting regions of the sky for deeper studies at higher energies. In this poster, we will discuss the science returns that might result from joint GLAST/ground-based gamma-ray observations and illustrate them with detailed source simulations.

  3. GLAST and Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The launch of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope together with the advent of a new generation of ground-based gamma-ray detectors such as VERITAS, HESS, MAGIC and CANGAROO, will usher in a new era of high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics. GLAST and the ground based gamma-ray observatories will provide highly complementary capabilities for spectral, temporal and spatial studies of high energy gamma-ray sources. Joint observations will cover a huge energy range, from 20 MeV to over 20 TeV. The LAT will survey the entire sky every three hours, allowing it both to perform uniform, long-term monitoring of variable sources and to detect flaring sources promptly. Both functions complement the high-sensitivity pointed observations provided by ground-based detectors. Finally, the large field of view of GLAST will allow a study of gamma-ray emission on large angular scales and identify interesting regions of the sky for deeper studies at higher energies. In this poster, we will discuss the science returns that might result from joint GLAST/ground-based gamma-ray observations and illustrate them with detailed source simulations.

  4. Ground-based Space Weather Monitoring with LOFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Michael; van Haarlem, Michiel; Lawrence, Gareth; Reid, Simon; Bos, Andre; Rawlings, Steve; Salvini, Stef; Mitchell, Cathryn; Soleimani, Manuch; Amado, Sergio; Teresa, Vital

    As one of the first of a new generation of radio instruments, the International LOFAR Telescope (ILT) will provide a number of unique and novel capabilities for the astronomical community. These include remote configuration and operation, dynamic real-time processing and system response, and the ability to provide multiple simultaneous streams of data to a community whose scientific interests run the gamut from lighting in the atmospheres of distant planets to the origins of the universe itself. The LOFAR (LOw Frequency ARray) system is optimized for a frequency range from 30-240 MHz and consists of multiple antenna fields spread across Europe. In the Netherlands, a total 36 LOFAR stations are nearing completion with an initial 8 international stations currently being deployed in Germany, France, Sweden, and the UK. Digital beam-forming techniques make the LOFAR system agile and allow for rapid repointing of the telescope as well as the potential for multiple simultaneous observations. With its dense core array and long interferometric baselines, LOFAR has the potential to achieve unparalleled sensitivity and spatial resolution in the low frequency radio regime. LOFAR will also be one of the first radio observatories to feature automated processing pipelines to deliver fully calibrated science products to its user community. As we discuss in this presentation, the same capabilities that make LOFAR a powerful tool for radio astronomy also provide an excellent platform upon which to build a ground-based monitoring system for space weather events. For example, the ability to monitor Solar activity in near real-time is one of the key scientific capabilities being developed for LOFAR. With only a fraction of its total observing capacity, LOFAR will be able to provide continuous monitoring of the Solar spectrum over the entire 10-240 MHz band down to microsecond timescales. Autonomous routines will scan these incoming spectral data for evidence of Solar flares and be

  5. Autonomous sensors. Microsensors without external power supply and with remote signal processing; Energieautarke Sensorik. Mikrosensorik mit autarker Energieversorgung und drahtloser Signaluebertragung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The workshop discussed the development perspectives of future applications and implementation problems of autonomous sensors and microsystems for remote data acquisition and exchange without external power supply. The following subjects were discussed in 14 papers: Wireless power and signal transmission; Integrated power supply; Batteries and battery management; Radiocommunication systems for sensors; Coil-on chip for sensors; Transponder technology and development trends; Small fuel cells for mobile applications; Development trends in fuel cells; The world of nanotechnology; Inductive power and data transmission; Sensor systems for tele-rehabilitation; Self-learning systems in cardiac electrotherapy; Sensor processor for transponder applications in autonomous systems without external power supply; One-chip CMOS pressure sensor system with wireless power and data transmission. [German] Dieser Workshop-Band befasst sich mit den Entwicklungsperspektiven, zukuenftigen Anwendungen und Umsetzungsproblemen der energieautarken Sensor- oder Mikrosysteme, die drahtlos mit minimalem Aufwand Daten erfassen und Informationen austauschen. Die Themen der 14 Beitraege, die teilweise Vortragsfolien enthalten, sind: Drahtlose Energie- und Signaluebertragung (M. Klein); integrierte Energieversorgung (J. Pelka); Batterien und Batterie-Management (A. Jossen); Funksysteme fuer die Sensorik (H. Borkes); Coil-on-Chip fuer die Sensorik (G. Daalmans); Transpondertechnik und Entwicklungstendenzen (A. Miessner); kleine Brennstoffzellen fuer den mobilen Einsatz (A. Heinzel); Entwicklungstendenzen bei Brennstoffzellen (L. Joerissen); die Welt der Nanotechnologie (U. Koenig); induktive Leistungs- und Datenuebertragung (H. Bercher); Sensorsysteme fuer die Tele-Rehabilitation (D. Tietze/K.-U. Schmidt); selbstlernende Systeme in der Elektrotherapie des Herzens (M. Schaldach); Sensorprozessor fuer Transponderanwendungen in energieautarken Systemen (H. Graetz); Ein-Chip CMOS-Drucksensor-System mit

  6. Remote sensing of forest decline and Enaphalodes rufulus outbreak in the Arkansas Ozarks, U.S.A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggins, John Joseph

    A widespread oak decline event was reported in the Arkansas Ozarks during the late 1990's. Ground-based monitoring attempts have been successful at recording the progression of this event, but are extremely laborious and as a result are only possible in a few locations. Remote sensing technologies offer the ability to substantially decrease labor and time required to collect large-scale forest biophysical data. Remote sensors allow continuous samples to be acquired across large tracts of land that would only be represented by a few widely spaced sampling points in traditional terrestrial sampling schemes. Remotely sensed data from large study areas can be acquired in minutes or hours, which greatly reduces cost compared to long-term field sampling activities. Additionally, changes of biophysical variables ongoing during long-term data collection can be avoided. Sampling bias caused by multiple individuals collecting field data is also reduced. Geographically-referenced digital remote sensor data from the Arkansas Ozarks have been acquired using two fundamentally different remote sensor systems: a hand held spectroradiometer, and aerial LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging). Spectroradiometer data were used to identify the spectral signatures of northern red oak decline, and methods for applying this information to aerial imagery were described. LIDAR data were used to estimate total aboveground biomass. Biomass estimates will allow subsequent remote sensing and hazard modeling to estimate quantifiable changes in biomass at the landscape level.

  7. A study of selected environmental quality remote sensors for free flyer missions launched from the space shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, H. W.; Grenda, R. N.

    1977-01-01

    The sensors were examined for adaptability to shuttle by reviewing pertinent information regarding sensor characteristics as they related to the shuttle and Multimission Modular Spacecraft environments. This included physical and electrical characteristics, data output and command requirements, attitude and orientation requirements, thermal and safety requirements, and adaptability and modification for space. The sensor requirements and characteristics were compared with the corresponding shuttle and Multimission Modular Spacecraft characteristics and capabilities. On this basis the adaptability and necessary modifications for each sensor were determined. A number of the sensors were examined in more detail and estimated cost for the modifications was provided.

  8. Comparison of Thermal Structure Results from Venus Express and Ground Based Observations since Vira

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Sanjay

    2016-07-01

    An international team was formed in 2013 through the International Space Studies Institute (Bern, Switzerland) to compare recent results of the Venus atmospheric thermal structure from spacecraft and ground based observations made since the Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA) was developed (Kliore et al., 1985, Keating et al., 1985). Five experiments on European Space Agency's Venus Express orbiter mission have yielded results on the atmospheric structure during is operational life (April 2006 - November 2014). Three of these were from occultation methods: at near infrared wavelengths from solar occultations, (SOIR, 70 - 170 km), at ultraviolet wavelengths from stellar occultations (SPICAV, 90-140 km), and occultation of the VEx-Earth radio signal (VeRa, 40-90 km). In-situ drag measurements from three different techniques (accelerometry, torque, and radio tracking, 130 - 200 km) were also obtained using the spacecraft itself while passive infrared remote sensing was used by the VIRTIS experiment (70 - 120 km). The only new data in the -40-70 km altitude range are from radio occultation, as no new profiles of the deep atmosphere have been obtained since the VeGa 2 lander measurements in 1985 (not included in VIRA). Some selected ground based results available to the team were also considered by team in the inter comparisons. The temperature structure in the lower thermosphere from disk resolved ground based observations (except for one ground based investigation), is generally consistent with the Venus Express results. These experiments sampled at different periods, at different locations and at different local times and have different vertical and horizontal resolution and coverage. The data were therefore binned in latitude and local time bins and compared, ignoring temporal variations over the life time of the Venus Express mission and assumed north-south symmetry. Alternating warm and cooler layers are present in the 120-160 altitude range in results

  9. Ground-based microwave measuring of middle atmosphere ozone and temperature profiles during sudden stratospheric warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigin, A. M.; Shvetsov, A. A.; Krasilnikov, A. A.; Kulikov, M. Y.; Karashtin, D. A.; Mukhin, D.; Bolshakov, O. S.; Fedoseev, L. I.; Ryskin, V. G.; Belikovich, M. V.; Kukin, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    We carried out the experimental campaign aimed to study the response of middle atmosphere on a sudden stratospheric warming in winter 2011-2012 above Nizhny Novgorod, Russia (56N, 44E). We employed the ground-based microwave complex for remote sensing of middle atmosphere developed in the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Science. The complex combines two room-temperature radiometers, i.e. microwave ozonometer and the stratospheric thermometer. Ozonometer is a heterodyne spectroradiometer, operating in a range of frequencies that include the rotation transition of ozone molecules with resonance frequency 110.8 GHz. Operating frequency range of the stratospheric thermometer is 52.5-5.4 GHz and includes lower frequency edge of 5 mm molecular oxygen absorption bands and among them two relatively weak lines of O2 emission. Digital fast Fourier transform spectrometers developed by "Acqiris" are employed for signal spectral analysis. The spectrometers have frequency range 0.05-1 GHz and realizes the effective resolution about 61 KHz. For retrieval vertical profiles of ozone and temperature from radiometric data we applied novel method based on Bayesian approach to inverse problem solution, which assumed a construction of probability distribution of the characteristics of retrieved profiles with taking into account measurement noise and available a priori information about possible distributions of ozone and temperature in the middle atmosphere. Here we introduce the results of the campaign in comparison with Aura MLS data. Presented data includes one sudden stratospheric warming event which took place in January 13-14 and was accompanied by temperature increasing up to 310 K at 45 km height. During measurement period, ozone and temperature variations were (almost) anti-correlated, and total ozone abundance achieved a local maxima during the stratosphere cooling phase. In general, results of ground-based measurements are in good agreement with

  10. Spectral interdependence of remote-sensing reflectance and its implications on the design of ocean color satellite sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Zhongping; Shang, Shaoling; Hu, Chuanmin; Zibordi, Giuseppe

    2014-05-20

    Using 901 remote-sensing reflectance spectra (R(rs)(λ), sr⁻¹, λ from 400 to 700 nm with a 5 nm resolution), we evaluated the correlations of R(rs)(λ) between neighboring spectral bands in order to characterize (1) the spectral interdependence of R(rs)(λ) at different bands and (2) to what extent hyperspectral R(rs)(λ) can be reconstructed from multiband measurements. The 901 R(rs) spectra were measured over a wide variety of aquatic environments in which water color varied from oceanic blue to coastal green or brown, with chlorophyll-a concentrations ranging from ~0.02 to >100  mg  m⁻³, bottom depths from ~1  m to >1000  m, and bottom substrates including sand, coral reef, and seagrass. The correlation coefficient of R(rs)(λ) between neighboring bands at center wavelengths λ(k) and λ(l), r(Δλ)(λ(k), λ(l)), was evaluated systematically, with the spectral gap (Δλ=λ(l)-λ(k)) changing between 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 nm, respectively. It was found that r(Δλ) decreased with increasing Δλ, but remained >0.97 for Δλ≤20  nm for all spectral bands. Further, using 15 spectral bands between 400 and 710 nm, we reconstructed, via multivariant linear regression, hyperspectral R(rs)(λ) (from 400 to 700 nm with a 5 nm resolution). The percentage difference between measured and reconstructed R(rs) for each band in the 400-700 nm range was generally less than 1%, with a correlation coefficient close to 1.0. The mean absolute error between measured and reconstructed R(rs) was about 0.00002  sr⁻¹ for each band, which is significantly smaller than the R(rs) uncertainties from all past and current ocean color satellite radiometric products. These results echo findings of earlier studies that R(rs) measurements at ~15 spectral bands in the visible domain can provide nearly identical spectral information as with hyperspectral (contiguous bands at 5 nm spectral resolution) measurements. Such results provide insights for data

  11. a Universal De-Noising Algorithm for Ground-Based LIDAR Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; Xiang, Chengzhi; Gong, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Ground-based lidar, working as an effective remote sensing tool, plays an irreplaceable role in the study of atmosphere, since it has the ability to provide the atmospheric vertical profile. However, the appearance of noise in a lidar signal is unavoidable, which leads to difficulties and complexities when searching for more information. Every de-noising method has its own characteristic but with a certain limitation, since the lidar signal will vary with the atmosphere changes. In this paper, a universal de-noising algorithm is proposed to enhance the SNR of a ground-based lidar signal, which is based on signal segmentation and reconstruction. The signal segmentation serving as the keystone of the algorithm, segments the lidar signal into three different parts, which are processed by different de-noising method according to their own characteristics. The signal reconstruction is a relatively simple procedure that is to splice the signal sections end to end. Finally, a series of simulation signal tests and real dual field-of-view lidar signal shows the feasibility of the universal de-noising algorithm.

  12. Ground Based Retrievals of Small Ice Crystals and Water Phase in Arctic Cirrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Subhashree; Mitchell, David L.; DeSlover, Daniel

    2009-03-01

    The microphysical properties of cirrus clouds are uncertain due to the problem of ice particles shattering at the probe inlet upon sampling. To facilitate better estimation of small ice crystal concentrations in cirrus clouds, a new ground-based remote sensing technique has been used in combination with in situ aircraft measurements. Data from the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted at the north slope of Alaska (winter 2004), have been used to test a new method for retrieving the liquid water path (LWP) and ice water path (IWP) in mixed phase clouds. The framework of the retrieval algorithm consists of the modified anomalous diffraction approximation or MADA (for mixed phase cloud optical properties), a radar reflectivity-ice microphysics relationship and a temperature-dependent ice particle size distribution (PSD) scheme. Cloud thermal emission measurements made by the ground-based Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) yield information on the total water path (TWP) while reflectivity measurements from the Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR) are used to derive the IWP. The AERI is also used to indicate the concentration of small ice crystals (DBeer's law absorption. While this is still a work in progress, the anticipated products from this AERI-radar retrieval scheme are the IWP, LWP, small-to-large ice crystal number concentration ratio and effective diameter for cirrus, as well as the ice particle number concentration for a given ice water content (IWC).

  13. On-Board Mining in the Sensor Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, S.; Conover, H.; Graves, S.; Ramachandran, R.; Rushing, J.

    2004-12-01

    On-board data mining can contribute to many research and engineering applications, including natural hazard detection and prediction, intelligent sensor control, and the generation of customized data products for direct distribution to users. The ability to mine sensor data in real time can also be a critical component of autonomous operations, supporting deep space missions, unmanned aerial and ground-based vehicles (UAVs, UGVs), and a wide range of sensor meshes, webs and grids. On-board processing is expected to play a significant role in the next generation of NASA, Homeland Security, Department of Defense and civilian programs, providing for greater flexibility and versatility in measurements of physical systems. In addition, the use of UAV and UGV systems is increasing in military, emergency response and industrial applications. As research into the autonomy of these vehicles progresses, especially in fleet or web configurations, the applicability of on-board data mining is expected to increase significantly. Data mining in real time on board sensor platforms presents unique challenges. Most notably, the data to be mined is a continuous stream, rather than a fixed store such as a database. This means that the data mining algorithms must be modified to make only a single pass through the data. In addition, the on-board environment requires real time processing with limited computing resources, thus the algorithms must use fixed and relatively small amounts of processing time and memory. The University of Alabama in Huntsville is developing an innovative processing framework for the on-board data and information environment. The Environment for On-Board Processing (EVE) and the Adaptive On-board Data Processing (AODP) projects serve as proofs-of-concept of advanced information systems for remote sensing platforms. The EVE real-time processing infrastructure will upload, schedule and control the execution of processing plans on board remote sensors. These plans

  14. Passive Microwave Soil Moisture Retrieval through Combined Radar/Radiometer Ground Based Simulator with Special Reference to Dielectric Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Prashant K., ,, Dr.; O'Neill, Peggy, ,, Dr.

    2014-05-01

    Soil moisture is an important element for weather and climate prediction, hydrological sciences, and applications. Hence, measurements of this hydrologic variable are required to improve our understanding of hydrological processes, ecosystem functions, and the linkages between the Earth's water, energy, and carbon cycles (Srivastava et al. 2013). The retrieval of soil moisture depends not only on parameterizations in the retrieval algorithm but also on the soil dielectric mixing models used (Behari 2005). Although a number of soil dielectric mixing models have been developed, testing these models for soil moisture retrieval has still not been fully explored, especially with SMAP-like simulators. The main objective of this work focuses on testing different dielectric models for soil moisture retrieval using the Combined Radar/Radiometer (ComRAD) ground-based L-band simulator developed jointly by NASA/GSFC and George Washington University (O'Neill et al., 2006). The ComRAD system was deployed during a field experiment in 2012 in order to provide long active/passive measurements of two crops under controlled conditions during an entire growing season. L-band passive data were acquired at a look angle of 40 degree from nadir at both horizontal & vertical polarization. Currently, there are many dielectric models available for soil moisture retrieval; however, four dielectric models (Mironov, Dobson, Wang & Schmugge and Hallikainen) were tested here and found to be promising for soil moisture retrieval (some with higher performances). All the above-mentioned dielectric models were integrated with Single Channel Algorithms using H (SCA-H) and V (SCA-V) polarizations for the soil moisture retrievals. All the ground-based observations were collected from test site-United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) OPE3, located a few miles away from NASA GSFC. Ground truth data were collected using a theta probe and in situ sensors which were then used for validation. Analysis

  15. Ground-based observations of Kepler asteroseismic targets

    CERN Document Server

    Uytterhoeven, K; Southworth, J; Randall, S; Ostensen, R; Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Marconi, M; Kurtz, D W; Kiss, L; Gutierrez-Soto, J; Frandsen, S; De Cat, P; Bruntt, H; Briquet, M; Zhang, X B; Telting, J H; Steslicki, M; Ripepi, V; Pigulski, A; Paparo, M; Oreiro, R; Choong, Ngeow Chow; Niemczura, E; Nemec, J; Narwid, A; Mathias, P; Martin-Ruiz, S; Lehman, H; Kopacki, G; Karoff, C; Jackiewicz, J; Henden, A A; Handler, G; Grigachene, A; Green, E M; Garrido, R; Machado, L Fox; Debosscher, J; Creevey, O L; Catanzaro, G; Bognar, Z; Biazzo, K; Bernabei, S

    2010-01-01

    We present the ground-based activities within the different working groups of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium (KASC). The activities aim at the systematic characterization of the 5000+ KASC targets, and at the collection of ground-based follow-up time-series data of selected promising Kepler pulsators. So far, 35 different instruments at 30 telescopes on 22 different observatories in 12 countries are in use, and a total of more than 530 observing nights has been awarded. (Based on observations made with the Isaac Newton Telescope, William Herschel Telescope, Nordic Optical Telescope, Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, Mercator Telescope (La Palma, Spain), and IAC-80 (Tenerife, Spain). Also based on observations taken at the observatories of Sierra Nevada, San Pedro Martir, Vienna, Xinglong, Apache Point, Lulin, Tautenburg, Loiano, Serra la Nave, Asiago, McDonald, Skinakas, Pic du Midi, Mauna Kea, Steward Observatory, Bialkow Observatory of the Wroclaw University, Piszkesteto Mountain Station, Observato...

  16. Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Technology Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Leslie A.

    2014-01-13

    This GNDD Technology Roadmap is intended to provide guidance to potential researchers and help management define research priorities to achieve technology advancements for ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring science being pursued by the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team within the Office of Nuclear Detonation Detection in the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Four science-based elements were selected to encompass the entire scope of nuclear monitoring research and development (R&D) necessary to facilitate breakthrough scientific results, as well as deliver impactful products. Promising future R&D is delineated including dual use associated with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Important research themes as well as associated metrics are identified along with a progression of accomplishments, represented by a selected bibliography, that are precursors to major improvements to nuclear explosion monitoring.

  17. DATA PROCESSING AND ANALYSIS TOOLS BASED ON GROUND-BASED SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Crosetto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Ground-Based SAR (GBSAR is a terrestrial remote sensing technique used to measure and monitor deformation. In this paper we describe two complementary approaches to derive deformation measurements using GBSAR data. The first approach is based on radar interferometry, while the second one exploits the GBSAR amplitude. In this paper we consider the so-called discontinuous GBSAR acquisition mode. The interferometric process is not always straightforward: it requires appropriate data processing and analysis tools. One of the main critical steps is phase unwrapping, which can critically affect the deformation measurements. In this paper we describe the procedure used at the CTTC to process and analyse discontinuous GBSAR data. In the second part of the paper we describe the approach based on GBSAR amplitude images and an image-matching method.

  18. Quantitative analysis results of CE-1 X-ray fluorescence spectrometer ground base experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Xing-Zhu; GAO Min; YANG Jia-Wei; WANG Huan-Yu; ZHANG Cheng-Mo; CHEN Yong; ZHANG Jia-Yu; PENG Wen-Xi; CAO Xue-Lei; LIANG Xiao-Hua; WANG Jin-Zhou

    2008-01-01

    As the nearest celestial body to the earth, the moon has become a hot spot again in astronomy field recently. The element analysis is a much important subject in many lunar projects. Remote X-ray spectrometry plays an important role in the geochemical exploration of the solar bodies. Because of th equasi-vacuum atmosphere on the moon, which has no absorption of X-ray, the X-ray fluorescence analysis is an effective way to determine the elemental abundance of lunar surface. The CE-1 X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (CE-1/XFS) aims to map the major elemental compositions on the lunar surface. This paper describes a method for quantitative analysis of elemental compositions. A series of ground base experiments are done to examine the capability of XFS. The obtained results, which show a reasonable agreement with the certified values at a 30% uncertainty level for major elements, are presented.

  19. Cloud Base Height and Effective Cloud Emissivity Retrieval with Ground-Based Infrared Interferometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Lin-Jun; LU Da-Ren

    2012-01-01

    Based on ground-based Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) observations in Shouxian, Anhui province, China, the authors retrieve the cloud base height (CBH) and effective cloud emissivity by using the minimum root-mean-square difference method. This method was originally developed for satellite remote sensing. The high-temporal-resolution retrieval results can depict the trivial variations of the zenith clouds continu- ously. The retrieval results are evaluated by comparing them with observations by the cloud radar. The compari- son shows that the retrieval bias is smaller for the middle and low cloud, especially for the opaque cloud. When two layers of clouds exist, the retrieval results reflect the weighting radiative contribution of the multi-layer cloud. The retrieval accuracy is affected by uncertainties of the AERI radiances and sounding profiles, in which the role of uncertainty in the temperature profile is dominant.

  20. Airborne and ground based lidar measurements of the atmospheric pressure profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, C. Laurence; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Dombrowski, Mark; Weng, Chi Y.

    1989-01-01

    The first high accuracy remote measurements of the atmospheric pressure profile have been made. The measurements were made with a differential absorption lidar system that utilizes tunable alexandrite lasers. The absorption in the trough between two lines in the oxygen A-band near 760 nm was used for probing the atmosphere. Measurements of the two-dimensional structure of the pressure field were made in the troposphere from an aircraft looking down. Also, measurements of the one-dimensional structure were made from the ground looking up. Typical pressure accuracies for the aircraft measurements were 1.5-2 mbar with a 30-m vertical resolution and a 100-shot average (20 s), which corresponds to a 2-km horizontal resolution. Typical accuracies for the upward viewing ground based measurements were 2.0 mbar for a 30-m resolution and a 100-shot average.

  1. Ground-Based Calibration Of A Microwave Landing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriazes, John J.; Scott, Marshall M., Jr.; Willis, Alfred D.; Erdogan, Temel; Reyes, Rolando

    1996-01-01

    System of microwave instrumentation and data-processing equipment developed to enable ground-based calibration of microwave scanning-beam landing system (MSBLS) at distances of about 500 to 1,000 ft from MSBLS transmitting antenna. Ensures accuracy of MSBLS near touchdown point, without having to resort to expense and complex logistics of aircraft-based testing. Modified versions prove useful in calibrating aircraft instrument landing systems.

  2. Ground-Based Lidar for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Ozone Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J.; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than 10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures.

  3. Ground-based lidar for atmospheric boundary layer ozone measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-05-20

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than ±10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures.

  4. Applications of passive remote surface acoustic wave sensors in high-voltage systems; Einsatz von passiven funkabfragbaren Oberflaechenwellensensoren in der elektrischen Energietechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teminova, R.

    2007-06-29

    Passive remote Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors have been applied e.g. as temperature, pressure or torque sensors. Their important advantages over standard methods are their passive operating principle, which allows operation without any power supply, as well as the wireless high-frequency signal transmission over distances up to about 10..15 m even through (non metallic) housings. These properties of SAW sensors particularly qualify them for applications in high voltage operational equipment. First experience was gained in a long time field test of surge arrester monitoring based on SAW temperature sensors in a German high-voltage substation. Now, this system has been further developed at Darmstadt University of Technology for other applications, the first of them being an overhead line (OHL) conductor temperature measurement, the second one a temperature monitoring system for of high-voltage disconnectors. After designing and building the sensors, extensive laboratory tests were carried out applying high-voltage, high-current and thermal stress in order to approve the suitability for the intended application. All these tests confirmed the assumption that SAW sensors, due to their passive working principle, are not affected at all by any kind of electrical, magnetic or thermal stress that may occur during service. The complete temperature sensor consists of three parts: a sensor chip, an antenna which receives and transmits the signal from and to the radar unit and a body for installation and for protection against environmental impact. One must find a good compromise between optimizing of thermal, dielectric and high-frequency characteristics and at the same time taking into consideration a simple installation. These requirements on the SAW sensors turned out to be difficult to coordinate. To achieve a high measuring precision is especially difficult. First, a new sensor for OHL application was developed. The OHL conductor temperature sensor had been optimized

  5. Remote sensing and reflectance profiling in entomology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remote sensing is about characterizing the status of objects and/or classifies their identity based on a combination of spectral features extracted from reflectance or transmission profiles of radiometric energy. Remote sensing can be ground-based, and therefore acquired at a high spatial resolutio...

  6. AOLI: Near-diffraction limited imaging in the visible on large ground-based telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Mackay, Craig; King, David; Labadie, Lucas; Antolin, Marta Puga; Garrido, Antonio; Colodro-Conde, Carlos; Lopez, Roberto; Muthusubramanian, Balaji; Oscoz, Alejandro; Rodriguez-Ramos, Jose; Rodriquez-Ramos, Luis; Fernandez-Valdivia, Jose; Velasco, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    The combination of Lucky Imaging with a low order adaptive optics system was demonstrated very successfully on the Palomar 5m telescope nearly 10 years ago. It is still the only system to give such high-resolution images in the visible or near infrared on ground-based telescope of faint astronomical targets. The development of AOLI for deployment initially on the WHT 4.2 m telescope in La Palma, Canary Islands, will be described in this paper. In particular, we will look at the design and status of our low order curvature wavefront sensor which has been somewhat simplified to make it more efficient, ensuring coverage over much of the sky with natural guide stars as reference object. AOLI uses optically butted electron multiplying CCDs to give an imaging array of 2000 x 2000 pixels.

  7. Remote sensing monitoring of the global ozonosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genco, S.; Bortoli, D.; Ravegnani, F.

    2013-10-01

    The use of CFCs, which are the main responsible for the ozone depletion in the upper atmosphere and the formation of the so-called "ozone hole" over Antarctic Region, was phase out by Montreal Protocol (1989). CFCs' concentration is recently reported to decrease in the free atmosphere, but severe episodes of ozone depletion in both Arctic and Antarctic regions are still occurring. Nevertheless the complete recovery of the Ozone layer is expected by about 2050. Recent simulation of perturbations in stratospheric chemistry highlight that circulation, temperature and composition are strictly correlated and they influence the global climate changes. Chemical composition plays an important role in the thermodynamic of the atmosphere, as every gaseous species can absorb and emit in different wavelengths, so their different concentration is responsible for the heating or cooling of the atmosphere. Therefore long-term observations are required to monitor the evolution of the stratospheric ozone layer. Measurements from satellite remote sensing instruments, which provide wide coverage, are supplementary to selective ground-based observations which are usually better calibrated, more stable in time and cover a wider time span. The combination of the data derived from different space-borne instruments calibrated with ground-based sensors is needed to produce homogeneous and consistent long-term data records. These last are required for robust investigations and especially for trend analysis. Here, we perform a review of the major remote-sensing techniques and of the principal datasets available to study the evolution of ozone layer in the past decades and predict future behavio

  8. Augmenting WFIRST Microlensing with a Ground-Based Telescope Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Gould, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Augmenting the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) microlensing campaigns with intensive observations from a ground-based network of wide-field survey telescopes would have several major advantages. First, it would enable full two-dimensional (2-D) vector microlens parallax measurements for a substantial fraction of low-mass lenses as well as planetary and binary events that show caustic crossing features. For a significant fraction of the free-floating planet (FFP) events and all caustic-crossing planetary/binary events, these 2-D parallax measurements directly lead to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) of the lens object (or lens system). For even more events, the complementary ground-based observations will yield 1-D parallax measurements. Together with the 1-D parallaxes from WFIRST alone, they can probe the entire mass range M > M_Earth. For luminous lenses, such 1-D parallax measurements can be promoted to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) by high-resolution imaging. This would provide crucial information not only about the hosts of planets and other lenses, but also enable a much more precise Galactic model. Other benefits of such a survey include improved understanding of binaries (particularly with low mass primaries), and sensitivity to distant ice-giant and gas-giant companions of WFIRST lenses that cannot be detected by WFIRST itself due to its restricted observing windows. Existing ground-based microlensing surveys can be employed if WFIRST is pointed at lower-extinction fields than is currently envisaged. This would come at some cost to the event rate. Therefore the benefits of improved characterization of lenses must be weighed against these costs.

  9. The STACEE-32 Ground Based Gamma-ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hanna, D S; Boone, L M; Chantell, M C; Conner, Z; Covault, C E; Dragovan, M; Fortin, P; Gregorich, D T; Hinton, J A; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Oser, S; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Schütte, D R; Theoret, C G; Tümer, T O; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J A

    2002-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment detector in its initial configuration (STACEE-32). STACEE is a new ground-based gamma ray detector using the atmospheric Cherenkov technique. In STACEE, the heliostats of a solar energy research array are used to collect and focus the Cherenkov photons produced in gamma-ray induced air showers. The large Cherenkov photon collection area of STACEE results in a gamma-ray energy threshold below that of previous detectors.

  10. The STACEE Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gingrich, D M; Bramel, D; Carson, J; Covault, C E; Fortin, P; Hanna, D S; Hinton, J A; Jarvis, A; Kildea, J; Lindner, T; Müller, C; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Theoret, C G; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J A

    2005-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) in its complete configuration. STACEE uses the heliostats of a solar energy research facility to collect and focus the Cherenkov photons produced in gamma-ray induced air showers. The light is concentrated onto an array of photomultiplier tubes located near the top of a tower. The large Cherenkov photon collection area of STACEE results in a gamma-ray energy threshold below that of previous ground-based detectors. STACEE is being used to observe pulsars, supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei, and gamma-ray bursts.

  11. Research on target accuracy for ground-based lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ling; Shi, Ruoming

    2009-05-01

    In ground based Lidar system, the targets are used in the process of registration, georeferencing for point cloud, and also can be used as check points. Generally, the accuracy of capturing the flat target center is influenced by scanning range and scanning angle. In this research, the experiments are designed to extract accuracy index of the target center with 0-90°scan angles and 100-195 meter scan ranges using a Leica HDS3000 laser scanner. The data of the experiments are listed in detail and the related results are analyzed.

  12. Effect of atmospheric interference and sensor noise in retrieval of optically active materials in the ocean by hyperspectral remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Iosif M; Levina, Elizaveta

    2007-10-01

    We present a method to construct the best linear estimate of optically active material concentration from ocean radiance spectra measured through an arbitrary atmosphere layer by a hyperspectral sensor. The algorithm accounts for sensor noise. Optical models of seawater and maritime atmosphere were used to obtain the joint distribution of spectra and concentrations required for the algorithm. The accuracy of phytoplankton retrieval is shown to be substantially lower than that of sediment and dissolved matter. In all cases, the sensor noise noticeably reduces the retrieval accuracy. Additional errors due to atmospheric interference are analyzed, and possible ways to increase the accuracy of retrieval are suggested, such as changing sensor parameters and including a priori information about observation conditions.

  13. A Method for Application of Classification Tree Models to Map Aquatic Vegetation Using Remotely Sensed Images from Different Sensors and Dates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Cai

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In previous attempts to identify aquatic vegetation from remotely-sensed images using classification trees (CT, the images used to apply CT models to different times or locations necessarily originated from the same satellite sensor as that from which the original images used in model development came, greatly limiting the application of CT. We have developed an effective normalization method to improve the robustness of CT models when applied to images originating from different sensors and dates. A total of 965 ground-truth samples of aquatic vegetation types were obtained in 2009 and 2010 in Taihu Lake, China. Using relevant spectral indices (SI as classifiers, we manually developed a stable CT model structure and then applied a standard CT algorithm to obtain quantitative (optimal thresholds from 2009 ground-truth data and images from Landsat7-ETM+, HJ-1B-CCD, Landsat5-TM and ALOS-AVNIR-2 sensors. Optimal CT thresholds produced average classification accuracies of 78.1%, 84.7% and 74.0% for emergent vegetation, floating-leaf vegetation and submerged vegetation, respectively. However, the optimal CT thresholds for different sensor images differed from each other, with an average relative variation (RV of 6.40%. We developed and evaluated three new approaches to normalizing the images. The best-performing method (Method of 0.1% index scaling normalized the SI images using tailored percentages of extreme pixel values. Using the images normalized by Method of 0.1% index scaling, CT models for a particular sensor in which thresholds were replaced by those from the models developed for images originating from other sensors provided average classification accuracies of 76.0%, 82.8% and 68.9% for emergent vegetation, floating-leaf vegetation and submerged vegetation, respectively. Applying the CT models developed for normalized 2009 images to 2010 images resulted in high classification (78.0%–93.3% and overall (92.0%–93.1% accuracies. Our

  14. Ground-Based Global Positioning System (GPS) Meteorology Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor (IPW)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ground-Based Global Positioning System (GPS) Meteorology Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor (IPW) data set measures atmospheric water vapor using ground-based...

  15. Statistical Studies of Ground-Based Optical Lightning Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, C. R.; Nemzek, R. J.; Suszcynsky, D. M.

    2005-12-01

    Most extensive optical studies of lightning have been conducted from orbit, and the statistics of events collected from earth are relatively poorly documented. The time signatures of optical power measured in the presence of clouds are inevitably affected by scattering,which can distort the signatures by extending and delaying the amplitude profile in time. We have deployed two all-sky photodiode detectors, one in New Mexico and one in Oklahoma, which are gathering data alongside electric field change monitors as part of the LANL EDOTX Great Plains Array. Preliminary results show that the photodiode is sensitive to approximately 50% or more of RF events detected at ranges of up to 30 km, and still has some sensitivity at ranges in excess of 60 km (distances determined by the EDOTX field-change array). The shapes of events within this range were assessed, with focus on rise time, width, peak power, and their correlation to corresponding electric field signatures, and these are being compared with published on-orbit and ground-based data. Initial findings suggest a mean characteristic width (ratio of total detected optical energy to peak power) of 291 +/- 12 microseconds and a mean delay between the RF signal peak and optical peak of 121 +/- 17 microseconds. These values fall between prior ground-based measurements of direct return stroke emissions, and scattering-dominated on-orbit measurements. This work will promote better understanding of the correspondence between radio and optical measurements of lightning.

  16. Optimized Solar Energy Power Supply for Remote Wireless Sensors Based on IEEE 802.15.4 Standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondrej Krejcar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Powering of intelligent wireless sensors without a permanent electric connection is a general problem which is often solved by adopting alternative power sources. One of the most commonly used sources is solar energy in the form of solar panel and charging circuits. However, it is not possible to find a solution in the markets for operation in changeable weather conditions, where sun intensity is not so high. This fact leads us to the development of optimized solar panel and all circuits for reliable power supply of wireless sensors. A special charging circuit for Li-ION battery and DC-DC adapter circuit for stabilization of wireless sensor working voltage were developed and optimized for very low energy consumption and high efficiency.

  17. Combining multiple remote sensors with reanalysis and a radiative transfer model to assess the microphysical impact of smoke on cirrus clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kablick, G. P.

    2011-12-01

    A multi-spectral technique for retrieving properties of smoke contaminated ice clouds is evaluated. This method utilizes Earth orbiting active and passive remote sensors combined with atmospheric reanalysis and a multiple scattering, single column radiative transfer algorithm. This study focuses on a specific type of cirrus cloud that exhibits IR radiances, lidar backscatter values, color ratios and depolarization ratios comparable to thick cirrus as observed by MODIS and CALIPSO. However, the radar reflectivities as determined by CloudSat are significantly lower than expected for clouds with such large visible optical depths. This work also demonstrates the sensitivity of retrievals to a priori assumptions by using a few notable cases. Collocated data observed during the boreal fire season of 2010 is analyzed using this methodology as a first step to ascertain the impact that pyroconvection may have on ice cloud properties.

  18. Assessment of the aerosol optical depths measured by satellite-based passive remote sensors in the Alberta oil sands region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sioris, Christopher E.; McLinden, Chris A.; Shephard, Mark W.; Fioletov, Vitali E.; Abboud, Ihab

    2017-02-01

    Several satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products are assessed in terms of their data quality in the Alberta oil sands region. The instruments consist of MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), POLDER (Polarization and Directionality of Earth Reflectances), MISR (Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer), and AATSR (Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer). The AOD data products are examined in terms of multiplicative and additive biases determined using local Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) (AEROCAN) stations. Correlation with ground-based data is used to assess whether the satellite-based AODs capture day-to-day, month-to-month, and spatial variability. The ability of the satellite AOD products to capture interannual variability is assessed at Albian mine and Shell Muskeg River, two neighbouring sites in the northern mining region where a statistically significant positive trend (2002-2015) in PM2.5 mass density exists. An increasing trend of similar amplitude (˜ 5 % year-1) is observed in this northern mining region using some of the satellite AOD products.

  19. System-level view of geospace dynamics: Challenges for high-latitude ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, E.

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, research programs including GEM, CEDAR, GEMSIS, GO Canada, and others are focusing on how geospace works as a system. Coupling sits at the heart of system level dynamics. In all cases, coupling is accomplished via fundamental processes such as reconnection and plasma waves, and can be between regions, energy ranges, species, scales, and energy reservoirs. Three views of geospace are required to attack system level questions. First, we must observe the fundamental processes that accomplish the coupling. This "observatory view" requires in situ measurements by satellite-borne instruments or remote sensing from powerful well-instrumented ground-based observatories organized around, for example, Incoherent Scatter Radars. Second, we need to see how this coupling is controlled and what it accomplishes. This demands quantitative observations of the system elements that are being coupled. This "multi-scale view" is accomplished by networks of ground-based instruments, and by global imaging from space. Third, if we take geospace as a whole, the system is too complicated, so at the top level we need time series of simple quantities such as indices that capture important aspects of the system level dynamics. This requires a "key parameter view" that is typically provided through indices such as AE and DsT. With the launch of MMS, and ongoing missions such as THEMIS, Cluster, Swarm, RBSP, and ePOP, we are entering a-once-in-a-lifetime epoch with a remarkable fleet of satellites probing processes at key regions throughout geospace, so the observatory view is secure. With a few exceptions, our key parameter view provides what we need. The multi-scale view, however, is compromised by space/time scales that are important but under-sampled, combined extent of coverage and resolution that falls short of what we need, and inadequate conjugate observations. In this talk, I present an overview of what we need for taking system level research to its next level, and how

  20. SIRTA, a ground-based atmospheric observatory for cloud and aerosol research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Haeffelin

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Ground-based remote sensing observatories have a crucial role to play in providing data to improve our understanding of atmospheric processes, to test the performance of atmospheric models, and to develop new methods for future space-borne observations. Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, a French research institute in environmental sciences, created the Site Instrumental de Recherche par Télédétection Atmosphérique (SIRTA, an atmospheric observatory with these goals in mind. Today SIRTA, located 20km south of Paris, operates a suite a state-of-the-art active and passive remote sensing instruments dedicated to routine monitoring of cloud and aerosol properties, and key atmospheric parameters. Detailed description of the state of the atmospheric column is progressively archived and made accessible to the scientific community. This paper describes the SIRTA infrastructure and database, and provides an overview of the scientific research associated with the observatory. Researchers using SIRTA data conduct research on atmospheric processes involving complex interactions between clouds, aerosols and radiative and dynamic processes in the atmospheric column. Atmospheric modellers working with SIRTA observations develop new methods to test their models and innovative analyses to improve parametric representations of sub-grid processes that must be accounted for in the model. SIRTA provides the means to develop data interpretation tools for future active remote sensing missions in space (e.g. CloudSat and CALIPSO. SIRTA observation and research activities take place in networks of atmospheric observatories that allow scientists to access consistent data sets from diverse regions on the globe.

  1. Configurable adaptive optical system for imaging of ground-based targets from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, Brian K.; Friedman, Edward J.; Hooker, R. Brian; Cermak, Michael A.

    2003-03-01

    Space-based, high resolution, Earth remote sensing systems, that employ large, flexible, lightweight primary mirrors, will require active wavefront correction, in the form of active and adaptive optics, to correct for thermally and vibrationally induced deformations in the optics. These remote sensing systems typically have a large field-of-view. Unlike the adaptive optics on ground-based astronomical telescopes, which have a negligible field-of-view, the adaptive optics on these space-based remote sensing systems will be required to correct the wavefront over the entire field-of-view, which can be several degrees. The error functions for astronomical adaptive optics have been developed for the narrow field-of-view correction of atmospheric turbulence and do not address the needs of wide field space-based systems. To address these needs, a new wide field adaptive optics theory and a new error function are developed. Modeling and experimental results demonstrate the validity of the wide field adaptive optics theory and new error function. This new error function, which is a new extension of conventional adaptive optics, lead to the development of three new types of imaging systems: wide field-of-view, selectable field-of-view, and steerable field-of-view. These new systems can have nearly diffraction-limited performance across the entire field-of-view or a narrow movable region of high-resolution imaging. The factors limiting system performance will be shown. The range of applicability of the wide field adaptive optics theory is shown. The range of applicability is used to avoid limitations in system performance and to estimate the optical systems parameters, which will meet the system"s performance requirements.

  2. Development of a multi-sensor based urban discharge forecasting system using remotely sensed data: A case study of extreme rainfall in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sunkwon; Jang, Sangmin; Park, Kyungwon

    2017-04-01

    Extreme weather due to changing climate is a main source of water-related disasters such as flooding and inundation and its damage will be accelerated somewhere in world wide. To prevent the water-related disasters and mitigate their damage in urban areas in future, we developed a multi-sensor based real-time discharge forecasting system using remotely sensed data such as radar and satellite. We used Communication, Ocean and Meteorological Satellite (COMS) and Korea Meteorological Agency (KMA) weather radar for quantitative precipitation estimation. The Automatic Weather System (AWS) and McGill Algorithm for Precipitation Nowcasting by Lagrangian Extrapolation (MAPLE) were used for verification of rainfall accuracy. The optimal Z-R relation was applied the Tropical Z-R relationship (Z=32R1.65), it has been confirmed that the accuracy is improved in the extreme rainfall events. In addition, the performance of blended multi-sensor combining rainfall was improved in 60mm/h rainfall and more strong heavy rainfall events. Moreover, we adjusted to forecast the urban discharge using Storm Water Management Model (SWMM). Several statistical methods have been used for assessment of model simulation between observed and simulated discharge. In terms of the correlation coefficient and r-squared discharge between observed and forecasted were highly correlated. Based on this study, we captured a possibility of real-time urban discharge forecasting system using remotely sensed data and its utilization for real-time flood warning. Acknowledgement This research was supported by a grant (13AWMP-B066744-01) from Advanced Water Management Research Program (AWMP) funded by Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport (MOLIT) of Korean government.

  3. Proceedings of the twelfth international symposium on remote sensing of environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    This is the third of three volumes of the proceedings of the Twelfth International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment, held 20 to 26 April 1978 in Manila, Philippines. This symposium is part of a continuing program investigating current activities in the field of remote sensing. The meeting is intended to promote increased international cooperation in research, development and application of this technology, and to stimulate an exchange of information on all aspects of this multidisciplinary field through the presentation of reports on work planned, in progress or completed. Presentations include those concerned with the utilization of this technology in various national and international programs as well as in numerous applications for monitoring and managing the earth's resources and man's global environment. Ground-based, airborne, and spaceborne sensor systems and both manual and machine-assisted data analysis and interpretation are included. All papers included in their entirety were abstracted and indexed for EDB/ERA.

  4. Investigating mixed phase clouds using a synergy of ground based remote sensing measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierens, Rosa; Kneifel, Stefan; Löhnert, Ulrich

    2017-04-01

    Low level mixed phase clouds occur frequently in the Arctic, and can persist from hours to several days. However, the processes that lead to the commonality and persistence of these clouds are not well understood. The aim of our work is to get a more detailed understanding of the dynamics of and the processes in Arctic mixed phase clouds using a combination of instruments operating at the AWIPEV station in Svalbard. In addition, an aircraft campaign collecting in situ measurements inside mixed phase clouds above the station is planned for May-June 2017. The in situ data will be used for developing and validating retrievals for microphysical properties from Doppler cloud radar measurements. Once observational data for cloud properties is obtained, it can be used for evaluating model performance, for studies combining modeling and observational approaches, and eventually lead to developing model parameterizations of mixed phase microphysics. To describe the low-level mixed phase clouds, and the atmospheric conditions in which they occur, we present a case study of a persistent mixed phase cloud observed above the AWIPEV station. In the frame of the Arctic Amplification: Climate Relevant Atmospheric and Surface Processes and Feedback Mechanisms ((AC)3) -project, a millimeter wavelength cloud radar was installed at the site in June 2016. The high vertical (4 m in the lowest layer) and temporal (2.5 sec) resolution allows for a detailed description of the structure of the cloud. In addition to radar reflectivity and mean vertical velocity, we also utilize the higher moments of the Doppler spectra, such as skewness and kurtosis. To supplement the radar measurements, a ceilometer is used to detect liquid layers inside the cloud. Liquid water path and integrated water vapor are estimated using a microwave radiometer, which together with soundings can also provide temperature and humidity profiles in the lower troposphere. Moreover, a three-dimensional wind field is be obtained from a Doppler wind lidar. Furthermore, the Cloudnet scheme (www.cloud-net.org), that combines radar, lidar and microwave radiometer observations with a forecast model to provide a best estimate of cloud properties, is used for identifying mixed phase clouds. The continuous measurements carried out at AWIPEV make it possible to characterize the macro- and micro- physical properties of mixed-phase clouds on a long-term, statistical basis. The Arctic observations are compared to a 5-year observational data set from Jülich Observatory for Cloud Evolution (JOYCE) in Western Germany. The occurrence of different types of clouds (with focus on mixed-phase and super-cooled clouds), the distribution of ice and liquid within the clouds, the turbulent environment as well as the temperatures where the different phases are occurring are investigated.

  5. Absorption properties of Mediterranean aerosols obtained from multi-year ground-based remote sensing observations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M. Mallet; O. Dubovik; P. Nabat; F. Dulac; R. Kahn; J. Sciare; D. Paronis; J. F. Léon

    2013-01-01

    .... The AAOD and Absorption Angström Exponent (AAE) dataset is composed of daily averaged AERONET level 2 data from a total of 22 Mediterranean stations having long time series, mainly under the influence of urban-industrial aerosols and/or soil dust...

  6. Tracking of urban aerosols using combined lidar-based remote sensing and ground-based measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.-Y. He

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A measuring campaign was performed over the neighboring towns of Nova Gorica in Slovenia and Gorizia in Italy on 24 and 25 May 2010, to investigate the concentration and distribution of urban aerosols. Tracking of two-dimensional spatial and temporal aerosol distributions was performed using scanning elastic lidar operating at 1064 nm. In addition, PM10 concentrations of particles, NOx and meteorological data were continuously monitored within the lidar scanning region. Based on the collected data, we investigated the flow dynamics and the aerosol concentrations within the lower troposphere and an evidence for daily aerosol cycles. We observed a number of cases with spatially localized increased lidar returns, which were found to be due to the presence of point sources of particulate matter. Daily aerosol concentration cycles were also clearly visible with a peak in aerosol concentration during the morning rush hours and daily maximum at around 17:00 Central European Time. We also found that the averaged horizontal atmospheric extinction within the scanning region 200 m above the ground is correlated to the PM10 concentration at the ground level with a correlation coefficient of 0.64, which may be due to relatively quiet meteorological conditions and basin-like terrain configuration.

  7. Predicting chlorophyll content of greenhouse tomato with ground-based remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yong-jun; Li, Min-zan; Li, Shu-qiang; An, Deng-kui

    2010-11-01

    NIR spectroscopy can be used in analysis of plant chlorophyll content on a large scale area. This offers the opportunity to use spectral reflectance as a non-destructive method for analyzing photosynthetic pigment status in plant. This research studied the variation of the chlorophyll content and spectral response at different growth stages of greenhouse tomato. Leaf spectral measurements from each treatment (4 N-levels: 0%, 33.3%, 66.6%, 100%) were taken in the greenhouse using an ASD FieldSpec HH spectrophotometer. Chlorophyll content of tomato leaves were measured by alcoholic-acetone extraction in lab. It was found that chlorophyll content of tomato leaf was increasing continuously to the maximum 50 days after the transplantation, while red edge moved to the NIR bands (long wave), and green peak position moved to the Blue bands (short wave) and green peak amplitude decreased. The chlorophyll content would decrease after fruiting stage, while red edge, green peak position and amplitude moved to the opposite direction. Regarding quantitative analysis the relationship between chlorophyll content and spectral response, red edge parameters (Sred(area of red edge), Dred (amplitude of red edge) and Pred (position of red edge ) ) in the first derivative of reflectance curve were obtained at bands of 680-760 nm. Similarly, blue edge, green peak and red valley parameters were defined to reflect spectral character. Vegetation indices were used extensively to estimate the vegetation growth status. Thus, the following wavelengths were used for developing RVI, NDVI and ARVI indices: λ440nm, λ500nm, λ550nm, λ680nm, λ770nm, Pblue (position of blue edge), Pyellow (position of yellow edge), Pred (position of red edge), Pgreenpeak (position of green peak), Predvalley (position of red valley). Seven optimal spectral parameters were chosen with the method of Karhunen-Loeve from the above-mentioned 68 self-defined property parameters. Stepwise multiple regression (SMLR), principal component regression (PCR), ridge regression (RR) and partial least squares regression (PLSR) were used to develop the prediction models of the chlorophyll content of tomato leaf. The best model was obtained by RR. Root MSE was 0.406 and R2 was 0.839.

  8. Volcanic ash from Iceland over Munich: mass concentration retrieved from ground-based remote sensing measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasteiger, J.; Gro{ß}, S.; Freudenthaler, V.; Wiegner, M.

    2011-03-01

    Volcanic ash plumes, emitted by the Eyjafjallajökull volcano (Iceland) in spring 2010, were observed by the lidar systems MULIS and POLIS in Maisach (near Munich, Germany), and by a CIMEL Sun photometer and a JenOptik ceilometer in Munich. We retrieve mass concentrations of volcanic ash from the lidar measurements; spectral optical properties, i.e.~extinction coefficients, backscatter coefficients, and linear depolarization ratios, are used as input for an inversion. The inversion algorithm searches for model aerosol ensembles with optical properties that agree with the measured values within their uncertainty ranges. The non-sphericity of ash particles is considered by assuming spheroids. Optical particle properties are calculated using the T-matrix method supplemented by the geometric optics approach. The lidar inversion is applied to observations of the pure volcanic ash plume in the morning of 17 April 2010. We find 1.45 g m-2 for the ratio between the mass concentration and the extinction coefficient at λ = 532 nm, assuming an ash density of 2.6 g cm-3. The uncertainty range for this ratio is from 0.87 g m-2 to 2.32 g m-2. At the peak of the ash concentration over Maisach the extinction coefficient at λ = 532 nm was 0.75 km-1 (1-h-average), which corresponds to a maximum mass concentration of 1.1 mg m-3 (0.65 to 1.8 mg m-3). Model calculations show that particle backscatter at our lidar wavelengths (λ ≤ 1064 nm), and thus the lidar retrieval, is hardly sensitive to large particles (r ≳ 3 μm); large particles, however, may contain significant amounts of mass. Therefore, as an independent cross check of the lidar retrieval and to investigate the presence of large particles in more detail, we model ratios of sky radiances in the aureole of the Sun and compare them to measurements of the CIMEL. These ratios are sensitive to particles up to r ≈ 10 μm. This approach confirms the mass concentrations from the lidar retrieval. We conclude that synergistic utilization of high quality lidar and Sun photometer data, in combination with realistic aerosol models, is recommended for improving ash mass concentration retrievals.

  9. Ground-based atmospheric remote sensing in the Netherlands: European outlook

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russchenberg, H.; Bosveld, F.; Swart, D.; Brink, H. ten; Leeuw, G. de; Uijlenhoet, R.; Arbesser-Rastburg, B.; Marel, H. van der; Ligthart, L.; Boers, R.; Apituley, A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the contours of a Dutch monitoring and research site for climate change and related atmospheric processes. The station has large benefits for atmospheric science, both in The Netherlands and internationally. It provides a platform for collaboration in this important field, and w

  10. Ground-based and remotely sensed nutrient availability across a tropical landscape

    OpenAIRE

    Porder, Stephen; Asner, Gregory P.; Vitousek, Peter M.

    2005-01-01

    Tropical soils often are assumed to be highly weathered and thus nutrient-depleted, but this prediction applies primarily to geomorphically stable surfaces. Topography complicates the assumption of nutrient depletion, because erosion can enhance the supply of nutrients to tropical ecosystems. Consequently, understanding nutrient availability across landscapes requires a spatially explicit assessment of the relative strength of depletion and enhancement. We document the relationship between fo...

  11. Ground-based atmospheric remote sensing in the Netherlands: European Outlook

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russchenberg, H.; Bosveld, F.C.; Swart, D.; Brink, ten H.; Leeuw, de G.; Uijlenhoet, R.; Arbesser-Rastburg, B.; Marel, van der H.; Ligthart, L.; Boers, R.; Apituley, A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the contours of a Dutch monitoring and research site for climate change and related atmospheric processes. The station has large benefits for atmospheric science, both in The Netherlands and internationally. It provides a platform for collaboration in this important field, and w

  12. Tools and Techniques to Collaborate and Connect with At-Risk Climate Communities UsingSensors, Remote Sensing Data, and Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapkin, J. K.; Ramamurthy, P.; Vant-Hull, B.; Yuen, K.; Glenn, A.; Jusino, C.; Corbin, C.; Schuerman, M.; Keefe, J.; Brooke, H.

    2016-12-01

    Those most at risk during heat waves and floods are often the socio-economically vulnerable. Yet very few studies exist of indoor temperatures during heat waves or of standing water events at the neighborhood level during extreme events. ISeeChange, a community weather and climate journal, is developing tools and testing techniques in a series of community pilots in Harlem and New Orleans to assess if a combination of citizen science, remote sensing, and journalism can bridge the gap. Our consortium of media (WNYC,Adapt NYC, ISeeChange), scientists (CUNY, CoCoRaHS, NASAJPL), and community partners (WE ACT for Environmental Justice, tenant, and neighborhood associations) are collaborating to engage with residents, report radio stories, as well as develop scientifically valuableinformation for decision-making. Community volunteers place temperature and humidity sensors inside residences (Harlem) or photograph standing water using specific methodologies (New Orleans). Sensordata, photographs, and text documenting the impacts of extreme weather on residents are posted on the ISeeChange platform via mobile app or community ambassadors and compared to other remote sensing data products (surface temperature, precipitation, subsidence) Preliminary results of the Harlem pilot show that indoor temperatures are far more stable than outdoor temperatures, so can be both cooler during the day but warmer at night; preliminary work on the New Orleans pilot is set to begin in fall 2016. A full analysis of the Harlem pilot will be presented along with preliminary results of the New Orleans pilot.

  13. Active-Layer Soil Moisture Content Regional Variations in Alaska and Russia by Ground-Based and Satellite-Based Methods, 2002 Through 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muskett, Reginald; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Cable, William; Kholodov, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture is a vital physical parameter of the active-layer in permafrost environments, and associated biological and geophysical processes operative at the microscopic to hemispheric spatial scales and at hourly to multidecadal time scales. While in-situ measurements can give the highest quality of information on a site-specific basis, the vast permafrost terrains of North America and Eurasia require space-based techniques for assessments of cause and effect and long-term changes and impacts from the changes of permafrost and the active-layer. Satellite-based 6.925 and 10.65 GHz sensor algorithmic retrievals of soil moisture by Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observation System (AMSR-E) onboard NASA-Aqua and follow-on AMSR2 onboard JAXA-Global Change Observation Mission - Water-1 are ongoing since July 2002. Accurate land-surface temperature and vegetation parameters are critical to the success of passive microwave algorithmic retrieval schemes. Strategically located soil moisture measurements are needed for spatial and temporal co-location evaluation and validation of the space-based algorithmic estimates. We compare on a daily basis ground-based (subsurface-probe) 50- and 70-MHz radio-frequency soil moisture measurements with NASA- and JAXA-algorithmic retrieval passive microwave retrievals. We find improvements in performance of the JAXA-algorithm (AMSR-E reprocessed and AMSR2 ongoing) relative to the earlier NASA-algorithm version. In the boreal forest regions accurate land-surface temperatures and vegetation parameters are still needed for algorithmic retrieval success. Over the period of AMSR-E retrievals we find evidence of at the high northern latitudes of growing terrestrial radio-frequency interference in the 10.65 GHz channel soil moisture content. This is an important error source for satellite-based active and passive microwave remote sensing soil moisture retrievals in Arctic regions that must be addressed. Ref: Muskett, R

  14. The STACEE Ground-Based Gamma-ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragan, Ken

    2002-04-01

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a ground-based instrument designed to study astrophysical sources of gamma rays in the energy range from 50 to 500 GeV using an array of heliostat mirrors at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in New Mexico. The mirrors collect Cherenkov light generated by gamma-ray air showers and concentrate it onto cameras composed of photomultiplier tubes. The STACEE instrument is now complete, and uses a total of 64 heliostats. Prototype instruments, using smaller numbers of heliostats, have previously detected gamma emission from both the Crab Nebula and the Active Galactic Nucleus Mrk421. The complete instrument has a lower threshold -- approximately 50 GeV -- than those prototypes due to superior triggering and electronics, including flash ADCs for every channel.We will discuss the performance of the complete instrument in its first full season of operation, and present preliminary results of selected observations.

  15. Atmospheric contamination for CMB ground-based observations

    CERN Document Server

    Errard, J; Akiba, Y; Arnold, K; Atlas, M; Baccigalupi, C; Barron, D; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Cukierman, A; Delabrouille, J; Dobbs, M; Ducout, A; Elleflot, T; Fabbian, G; Feng, C; Feeney, S; Gilbert, A; Goeckner-Wald, N; Halverson, N W; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Hill, C; Holzapfel, W L; Hori, Y; Inoue, Y; Jaehnig, G C; Jaffe, A H; Jeong, O; Katayama, N; Kaufman, J; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T; Jeune, M Le; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Leon, D; Linder, E; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Miller, N J; Myers, M J; Navaroli, M; Nishino, H; Okamura, T; Paar, H; Peloton, J; Poletti, D; Puglisi, G; Rebeiz, G; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Rotermund, K M; Schenck, D E; Sherwin, B D; Siritanasak, P; Smecher, G; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Tajima, O; Takakura, S; Tikhomirov, A; Tomaru, T; Whitehorn, N; Wilson, B; Yadav, A; Zahn, O

    2015-01-01

    Atmosphere is one of the most important noise sources for ground-based Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments. By increasing optical loading on the detectors, it amplifies their effective noise, while its fluctuations introduce spatial and temporal correlations between detected signals. We present a physically motivated 3d-model of the atmosphere total intensity emission in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. We derive an analytical estimate for the correlation between detectors time-ordered data as a function of the instrument and survey design, as well as several atmospheric parameters such as wind, relative humidity, temperature and turbulence characteristics. Using numerical computation, we examine the effect of each physical parameter on the correlations in the time series of a given experiment. We then use a parametric-likelihood approach to validate the modeling and estimate atmosphere parameters from the POLARBEAR-I project first season data set. We compare our results to previous st...

  16. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel E; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfectly all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean and, as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources' right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO's observations and electromagnetic follow-up. Beyond galactic foregrounds associated with seasonal variations, we find that equatorial observatories can access over $80\\%$ of the localization probability, while mid-latitudes will access closer to $70\\%$. Facilities located near the two LIGO sites can obser...

  17. Progress in the ULTRA 1-m ground-based telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Robert C.; Martin, Robert N.; Twarog, Bruce; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara; Taghavi, Ray; Hale, Rick; Etzel, Paul; Fesen, Rob; Shawl, Steve

    2006-06-01

    We present the technical status of the Ultra Lightweight Telescope for Research in Astronomy (ULTRA) program. The program is a 3-year Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) program funded by NSF. The MRI is a collaborative effort involving Composite Mirror Applications, Inc. (CMA), University of Kansas, San Diego State University and Dartmouth College. Objectives are to demonstrate the feasibility of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite mirror technology for ground-based optical telescopes. CMA is spearheading the development of surface replication techniques to produce the optics, fabricating the 1m glass mandrel, and constructing the optical tube assembly (OTA). Presented will be an overview and status of the 1-m mandrel fabrication, optics development, telescope design and CFRP telescope fabrication by CMA for the ULTRA Telescope.

  18. Identification of rainy periods from ground based microwave radiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada Vittoria Bosisio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors present the results of a study aiming at detecting rainy data in measurements collected by a dual band ground-based radiometer. The proposed criterion is based on the ratio of the brightness temperatures observed in the 20-30 GHz band without need of any ancillary information. A major result obtained from the probability density of the ratio computed over one month of data is the identification of threshold values between clear sky, cloudy sky and rainy sky, respectively. A linear fit performed by using radiometric data and concurrent rain gauge measurements shows a correlation coefficient equal to 0.56 between the temperature ratio and the observed precipitation.

  19. Optical vortex coronagraphs on ground-based telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, Charles

    2007-01-01

    The optical vortex coronagraph is potentially a remarkably effective device, at least for an ideal unobstructed telescope. Most ground-based telescopes however suffer from central obscuration and also have to operate through the aberrations of the turbulent atmosphere. This note analyzes the performance of the optical vortex in these circumstances and compares to some other designs, showing that it performs similarly in this situation. There is a large class of coronagraphs of this general type, and choosing between them in particular applications depends on details of performance at small off-axis distances and uniformity of response in the focal plane. Issues of manufacturability to the necessary tolerances are also likely to be important.

  20. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfectly all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean and, as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources' right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO's observations and electromagnetic follow-up. These effects can inform electromagnetic follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  1. Unique cell culture systems for ground based research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Marian L.

    1990-01-01

    The horizontally rotating fluid-filled, membrane oxygenated bioreactors developed at NASA Johnson for spacecraft applications provide a powerful tool for ground-based research. Three-dimensional aggregates formed by cells cultured on microcarrier beads are useful for study of cell-cell interactions and tissue development. By comparing electron micrographs of plant seedlings germinated during Shuttle flight 61-C and in an earth-based rotating bioreactor it is shown that some effects of microgravity are mimicked. Bioreactors used in the UAH Bioreactor Laboratory will make it possible to determine some of the effects of altered gravity at the cellular level. Bioreactors can be valuable for performing critical, preliminary-to-spaceflight experiments as well as medical investigations such as in vitro tumor cell growth and chemotherapeutic drug response; the enrichment of stem cells from bone marrow; and the effect of altered gravity on bone and muscle cell growth and function and immune response depression.

  2. Spatial-angular modeling of ground-based biaxial lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agishev, Ravil R.

    1997-10-01

    Results of spatial-angular LIDAR modeling based on an efficiency criterion introduced are represented. Their analysis shows that a low spatial-angular efficiency of traditional VIS and NIR systems is a main cause of a low S/BR ratio at the photodetector input. It determines the considerable measurements errors and the following low accuracy of atmospheric optical parameters retrieval. As we have shown, the most effective protection against intensive sky background radiation for ground-based biaxial LIDAR's consist in forming of their angular field according to spatial-angular efficiency criterion G. Some effective approaches to high G-parameter value achievement to achieve the receiving system optimization are discussed.

  3. Optical remote sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Prasad, Saurabh; Chanussot, Jocelyn

    2011-01-01

    Optical remote sensing relies on exploiting multispectral and hyper spectral imagery possessing high spatial and spectral resolutions respectively. These modalities, although useful for most remote sensing tasks, often present challenges that must be addressed for their effective exploitation. This book presents current state-of-the-art algorithms that address the following key challenges encountered in representation and analysis of such optical remotely sensed data: challenges in pre-processing images, storing and representing high dimensional data, fusing different sensor modalities, patter

  4. REMOTE SENSING IN OCEANOGRAPHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    remote sensing from satellites. Sensing of oceanographic variables from aircraft began with the photographing of waves and ice. Since then remote measurement of sea surface temperatures and wave heights have become routine. Sensors tested for oceanographic applications include multi-band color cameras, radar scatterometers, infrared spectrometers and scanners, passive microwave radiometers, and radar imagers. Remote sensing has found its greatest application in providing rapid coverage of large oceanographic areas for synoptic and analysis and

  5. Evaluation of atmospheric dust prediction models using ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terradellas, Enric; María Baldasano, José; Cuevas, Emilio; Basart, Sara; Huneeus, Nicolás; Camino, Carlos; Dundar, Cinhan; Benincasa, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    An important step in numerical prediction of mineral dust is the model evaluation aimed to assess its performance to forecast the atmospheric dust content and to lead to new directions in model development and improvement. The first problem to address the evaluation is the scarcity of ground-based routine observations intended for dust monitoring. An alternative option would be the use of satellite products. They have the advantage of a large spatial coverage and a regular availability. However, they do have numerous drawbacks that make the quantitative retrievals of aerosol-related variables difficult and imprecise. This work presents the use of different ground-based observing systems for the evaluation of dust models in the Regional Center for Northern Africa, Middle East and Europe of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and Assessment System (SDS-WAS). The dust optical depth at 550 nm forecast by different models is regularly compared with the AERONET measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) for 40 selected stations. Photometric measurements are a powerful tool for remote sensing of the atmosphere allowing retrieval of aerosol properties, such as AOD. This variable integrates the contribution of different aerosol types, but may be complemented with spectral information that enables hypotheses about the nature of the particles. Comparison is restricted to cases with low Ångström exponent values in order to ensure that coarse mineral dust is the dominant aerosol type. Additionally to column dust load, it is important to evaluate dust surface concentration and dust vertical profiles. Air quality monitoring stations are the main source of data for the evaluation of surface concentration. However they are concentrated in populated and industrialized areas around the Mediterranean. In the present contribution, results of different models are compared with observations of PM10 from the Turkish air quality network for

  6. Impact of the spatial resolution of satellite remote sensing sensors in the quantification of total suspended sediment concentration: A case study in turbid waters of Northern Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearns, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The impact of anthropogenic activities on coastal waters is a cause of concern because such activities add to the total suspended sediment (TSS) budget of the coastal waters, which have negative impacts on the coastal ecosystem. Satellite remote sensing provides a powerful tool in monitoring TSS concentration at high spatiotemporal resolution, but coastal managers should be mindful that the satellite-derived TSS concentrations are dependent on the satellite sensor’s radiometric properties, atmospheric correction approaches, the spatial resolution and the limitations of specific TSS algorithms. In this study, we investigated the impact of different spatial resolutions of satellite sensor on the quantification of TSS concentration in coastal waters of northern Western Australia. We quantified the TSS product derived from MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-Aqua, Landsat-8 Operational Land Image (OLI), and WorldView-2 (WV2) at native spatial resolutions of 250 m, 30 m and 2 m respectively and coarser spatial resolution (resampled up to 5 km) to quantify the impact of spatial resolution on the derived TSS product in different turbidity conditions. The results from the study show that in the waters of high turbidity and high spatial variability, the high spatial resolution WV2 sensor reported TSS concentration as high as 160 mg L-1 while the low spatial resolution MODIS-Aqua reported a maximum TSS concentration of 23.6 mg L-1. Degrading the spatial resolution of each satellite sensor for highly spatially variable turbid waters led to variability in the TSS concentrations of 114.46%, 304.68% and 38.2% for WV2, Landsat-8 OLI and MODIS-Aqua respectively. The implications of this work are particularly relevant in the situation of compliance monitoring where operations may be required to restrict TSS concentrations to a pre-defined limit. PMID:28380059

  7. Runoff simulation sensitivity to remotely sensed initial soil water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, D. C.; Schmugge, T. J.; Jackson, T. J.; Unkrich, C. L.; Keefer, T. O.; Parry, R.; Bach, L. B.; Amer, S. A.

    1994-05-01

    A variety of aircraft remotely sensed and conventional ground-based measurements of volumetric soil water content (SW) were made over two subwatersheds (4.4 and 631 ha) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service Walnut Gulch experimental watershed during the 1990 monsoon season. Spatially distributed soil water contents estimated remotely from the NASA push broom microwave radiometer (PBMR), an Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics (IRE) multifrequency radiometer, and three ground-based point methods were used to define prestorm initial SW for a distributed rainfall-runoff model (KINEROS; Woolhiser et al., 1990) at a small catchment scale (4.4 ha). At a medium catchment scale (631 ha or 6.31 km2) spatially distributed PBMR SW data were aggregated via stream order reduction. The impacts of the various spatial averages of SW on runoff simulations are discussed and are compared to runoff simulations using SW estimates derived from a simple daily water balance model. It was found that at the small catchment scale the SW data obtained from any of the measurement methods could be used to obtain reasonable runoff predictions. At the medium catchment scale, a basin-wide remotely sensed average of initial water content was sufficient for runoff simulations. This has important implications for the possible use of satellite-based microwave soil moisture data to define prestorm SW because the low spatial resolutions of such sensors may not seriously impact runoff simulations under the conditions examined. However, at both the small and medium basin scale, adequate resources must be devoted to proper definition of the input rainfall to achieve reasonable runoff simulations.

  8. Mobile-Cloud Assisted Video Summarization Framework for Efficient Management of Remote Sensing Data Generated by Wireless Capsule Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Mehmood

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE has great advantages over traditional endoscopy because it is portable and easy to use, especially in remote monitoring health-services. However, during the WCE process, the large amount of captured video data demands a significant deal of computation to analyze and retrieve informative video frames. In order to facilitate efficient WCE data collection and browsing task, we present a resource- and bandwidth-aware WCE video summarization framework that extracts the representative keyframes of the WCE video contents by removing redundant and non-informative frames. For redundancy elimination, we use Jeffrey-divergence between color histograms and inter-frame Boolean series-based correlation of color channels. To remove non-informative frames, multi-fractal texture features are extracted to assist the classification using an ensemble-based classifier. Owing to the limited WCE resources, it is impossible for the WCE system to perform computationally intensive video summarization tasks. To resolve computational challenges, mobile-cloud architecture is incorporated, which provides resizable computing capacities by adaptively offloading video summarization tasks between the client and the cloud server. The qualitative and quantitative results are encouraging and show that the proposed framework saves information transmission cost and bandwidth, as well as the valuable time of data analysts in browsing remote sensing data.

  9. CO measurements from the ACE-FTS satellite instrument: data analysis and validation using ground-based, airborne and spaceborne observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Clerbaux

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE mission was launched in August 2003 to sound the atmosphere by solar occultation. Carbon monoxide (CO, a good tracer of pollution plumes and atmospheric dynamics, is one of the key species provided by the primary instrument, the ACE-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS. This instrument performs measurements in both the CO 1-0 and 2-0 ro-vibrational bands, from which vertically resolved CO concentration profiles are retrieved, from the mid-troposphere to the thermosphere. This paper presents an updated description of the ACE-FTS version 2.2 CO data product, along with a comprehensive validation of these profiles using available observations (February 2004 to December 2006. We have compared the CO partial columns with ground-based measurements using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and millimeter wave radiometry, and the volume mixing ratio profiles with airborne (both high-altitude balloon flight and airplane observations. CO satellite observations provided by nadir-looking instruments (MOPITT and TES as well as limb-viewing remote sensors (MIPAS, SMR and MLS were also compared with the ACE-FTS CO products. We show that the ACE-FTS measurements provide CO profiles with small retrieval errors (better than 5% from the upper troposphere to 40 km, and better than 10% above. These observations agree well with the correlative measurements, considering the rather loose coincidence criteria in some cases. Based on the validation exercise we assess the following uncertainties to the ACE-FTS measurement data: better than 15% in the upper troposphere (8–12 km, than 30% in the lower stratosphere (12–30 km, and than 25% from 30 to 100 km.

  10. CO measurements from the ACE-FTS satellite instrument: data analysis and validation using ground-based, airborne and spaceborne observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Clerbaux

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE mission was launched in August 2003 to sound the atmosphere by solar occultation. Carbon monoxide (CO, a good tracer of pollution plumes and atmospheric dynamics, is one of the key species provided by the primary instrument, the ACE-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS. This instrument performs measurements in both the CO 1-0 and 2-0 ro-vibrational bands, from which vertically resolved CO concentration profiles are retrieved, from the mid-troposphere to the thermosphere. This paper presents an updated description of the ACE-FTS version 2.2 CO data product, along with a comprehensive validation of these profiles using available observations (February 2004 to December 2006. We have compared the CO partial columns with ground-based measurements using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and millimeter wave radiometry, and the volume mixing ratio profiles with airborne (both high-altitude balloon flight and airplane observations. CO satellite observations provided by nadir-looking instruments (MOPITT and TES as well as limb-viewing remote sensors (MIPAS, SMR and MLS were also compared with the ACE-FTS CO products. We show that the ACE-FTS measurements provide CO profiles with small retrieval errors (better than 5% from the upper troposphere to 40 km, and better than 10% above. These observations agree well with the correlative measurements, considering the rather loose coincidence criteria in some cases. Based on the validation exercise we assess the following uncertainties to the ACE-FTS measurement data: better than 15% in the upper troposphere (8–12 km, than 30% in the lower stratosphere (12–30 km, and than 25% from 30 to 100 km.

  11. Probing Pluto's Atmosphere Using Ground-Based Stellar Occultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicardy, Bruno; Rio de Janeiro Occultation Team, Granada Team, International Occultation and Timing Association, Royal Astronomical Society New Zealand Occultation Section, Lucky Star associated Teams

    2016-10-01

    Over the last three decades, some twenty stellar occultations by Pluto have been monitored from Earth. They occur when the dwarf planet blocks the light from a star for a few minutes as it moves on the sky. Such events led to the hint of a Pluto's atmosphere in 1985, that was fully confirmed during another occultation in 1988, but it was only in 2002 that a new occultation could be recorded. From then on, the dwarf planet started to move in front of the galactic center, which amplified by a large factor the number of events observable per year.Pluto occultations are essentially refractive events during which the stellar rays are bent by the tenuous atmosphere, causing a gradual dimming of the star. This provides the density, pressure and temperature profiles of the atmosphere from a few kilometers above the surface up to about 250 km altitude, corresponding respectively to pressure levels of about 10 and 0.1 μbar. Moreover, the extremely fine spatial resolution (a few km) obtained through this technique allows the detection of atmospheric gravity waves, and permits in principle the detection of hazes, if present.Several aspects make Pluto stellar occultations quite special: first, they are the only way to probe Pluto's atmosphere in detail, as the dwarf planet is far too small on the sky and the atmosphere is far too tenuous to be directly imaged from Earth. Second, they are an excellent example of participative science, as many amateurs have been able to record those events worldwide with valuable scientific returns, in collaboration with professional astronomers. Third, they reveal Pluto's climatic changes on decade-scales and constrain the various seasonal models currently explored.Finally, those observations are fully complementary to space exploration, in particular with the New Horizons (NH) mission. I will show how ground-based occultations helped to better calibrate some NH profiles, and conversely, how NH results provide some key boundary conditions

  12. Independet Component Analyses of Ground-based Exoplanetary Transits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Martins-Filho, Walter; Griffith, Caitlin Ann; Pearson, Kyle; Waldmann, Ingo; Biddle, Lauren; Zellem, Robert Thomas; Alvarez-Candal, Alvaro

    2016-10-01

    Most observations of exoplanetary atmospheres are conducted when a "Hot Jupiter" exoplanet transits in front of its host star. These Jovian-sized planets have small orbital periods, on the order of days, and therefore a short transit time, making them more ameanable to observations. Measurements of Hot Jupiter transits must achieve a 10-4 level of accuracy in the flux to determine the spectral modulations of the exoplanetary atmosphere. In order to accomplish this level of precision, we need to extract systematic errors, and, for ground-based measurements, the effects of Earth's atmosphere, from the signal due to the exoplanet, which is several orders of magnitudes smaller. Currently, the effects of the terrestrial atmosphere and the some of the time-dependent systematic errors are treated by dividing the host star by a reference star at each wavelength and time step of the transit. More recently, Independent Component Analyses (ICA) have been used to remove systematic effects from the raw data of space-based observations (Waldmann 2014,2012; Morello et al.,2015,2016). ICA is a statistical method born from the ideas of the blind-source separation studies, which can be used to de-trend several independent source signals of a data set (Hyvarinen and Oja, 2000). One strength of this method is that it requires no additional prior knowledge of the system. Here, we present a study of the application of ICA to ground-based transit observations of extrasolar planets, which are affected by Earth's atmosphere. We analyze photometric data of two extrasolar planets, WASP-1b and GJ3470b, recorded by the 61" Kuiper Telescope at Stewart Observatory using the Harris B and U filters. The presentation will compare the light curve depths and their dispersions as derived from the ICA analysis to those derived by analyses that ratio of the host star to nearby reference stars.References: Waldmann, I.P. 2012 ApJ, 747, 12, Waldamann, I. P. 2014 ApJ, 780, 23; Morello G. 2015 ApJ, 806

  13. A method for colocating satellite XCO2 data to ground-based data and its application to ACOS-GOSAT and TCCON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nguyen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Satellite measurements are often compared with higher-precision ground-based measurements as part of validation efforts. The satellite soundings are rarely perfectly coincident in space and time with the ground-based measurements, so a colocation methodology is needed to aggregate "nearby" soundings into what the instrument would have seen at the location and time of interest. We are particularly interested in validation efforts for satellite-retrieved total column carbon dioxide (XCO2, where XCO2 data from Greenhouse Gas Observing Satellite (GOSAT retrievals (ACOS, NIES, RemoteC, PPDF, etc. or SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCHIACHY are often colocated and compared to ground-based column XCO2 measurement from Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON. Current colocation methodologies for comparing satellite measurements of total column dry-air mole fractions of CO2 (XCO2 with ground-based measurements typically involve locating and averaging the satellite measurements within some latitudinal, longitudinal, and temporal window. We examine a geostatistical colocation methodology that takes a weighted average of satellite observations depending on the "distance" of each observation from a ground-based location of interest. The "distance" function that we use is a modified Euclidian distance with respect to latitude, longitude, time, and mid-tropospheric temperature at 700 hPa. We apply this methodology to XCO2 retrieved from Greenhouse Gas Observing Satellite (GOSAT spectra by the ACOS team, cross-validate the results to TCCON XCO2 ground-based data, and present some comparison between our methodology and standard existing colocation methods showing that in general geostatistical colocation produces smaller mean-squared error.

  14. A method for colocating satellite XCO2 data to ground-based data and its application to ACOS-GOSAT and TCCON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, H.; Osterman, G.; Wunch, D.; O'Dell, C.; Mandrake, L.; Wennberg, P.; Fisher, B.; Castano, R.

    2014-08-01

    Satellite measurements are often compared with higher-precision ground-based measurements as part of validation efforts. The satellite soundings are rarely perfectly coincident in space and time with the ground-based measurements, so a colocation methodology is needed to aggregate "nearby" soundings into what the instrument would have seen at the location and time of interest. We are particularly interested in validation efforts for satellite-retrieved total column carbon dioxide (XCO2), where XCO2 data from Greenhouse Gas Observing Satellite (GOSAT) retrievals (ACOS, NIES, RemoteC, PPDF, etc.) or SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) are often colocated and compared to ground-based column XCO2 measurement from Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON). Current colocation methodologies for comparing satellite measurements of total column dry-air mole fractions of CO2 (XCO2) with ground-based measurements typically involve locating and averaging the satellite measurements within a latitudinal, longitudinal, and temporal window. We examine a geostatistical colocation methodology that takes a weighted average of satellite observations depending on the "distance" of each observation from a ground-based location of interest. The "distance" function that we use is a modified Euclidian distance with respect to latitude, longitude, time, and midtropospheric temperature at 700 hPa. We apply this methodology to XCO2 retrieved from GOSAT spectra by the ACOS team, cross-validate the results to TCCON XCO2 ground-based data, and present some comparisons between our methodology and standard existing colocation methods showing that, in general, geostatistical colocation produces smaller mean-squared error.

  15. Atmospheric Corrections and Multi-Conditional Algorithm for Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing of Suspended Particulate Matter in Low-to-High Turbidity Levels Coastal Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéfani Novoa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The accurate measurement of suspended particulate matter (SPM concentrations in coastal waters is of crucial importance for ecosystem studies, sediment transport monitoring, and assessment of anthropogenic impacts in the coastal ocean. Ocean color remote sensing is an efficient tool to monitor SPM spatio-temporal variability in coastal waters. However, near-shore satellite images are complex to correct for atmospheric effects due to the proximity of land and to the high level of reflectance caused by high SPM concentrations in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. The water reflectance signal (ρw tends to saturate at short visible wavelengths when the SPM concentration increases. Using a comprehensive dataset of high-resolution satellite imagery and in situ SPM and water reflectance data, this study presents (i an assessment of existing atmospheric correction (AC algorithms developed for turbid coastal waters; and (ii a switching method that automatically selects the most sensitive SPM vs. ρw relationship, to avoid saturation effects when computing the SPM concentration. The approach is applied to satellite data acquired by three medium-high spatial resolution sensors (Landsat-8/Operational Land Imager, National Polar-Orbiting Partnership/Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite and Aqua/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer to map the SPM concentration in some of the most turbid areas of the European coastal ocean, namely the Gironde and Loire estuaries as well as Bourgneuf Bay on the French Atlantic coast. For all three sensors, AC methods based on the use of short-wave infrared (SWIR spectral bands were tested, and the consistency of the retrieved water reflectance was examined along transects from low- to high-turbidity waters. For OLI data, we also compared a SWIR-based AC (ACOLITE with a method based on multi-temporal analyses of atmospheric constituents (MACCS. For the selected scenes, the ACOLITE-MACCS difference was

  16. Image quality modeling and characterization of Nyquist-sampled framing sensors with operational considerations for remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garma, Rey Jan D.; Schott, John R.; Fiete, Robert D.; Qiao, Jie; McKeown, Donald

    2017-01-01

    The effect of increasing Q on image interpretability is explored, and the fidelity of general image quality equation (GIQE) predictions is assessed for Nyquist-sampled (Q=2) imagery at low signal-to-noise ratio. A digital image chain simulation is developed and validated against a laboratory test bed using objective and subjective assessments. Using the validated model, additional test cases are simulated to study the effects of increased detector sampling on image quality with operational considerations for space-based remote sensing. Variants of the GIQE are evaluated against subject-provided ratings, and modifications that increase prediction accuracy for Q=2 imagery are proposed. Finally, using the validated simulation and modified image quality equation, trades are conducted to ascertain the feasibility of implementing Q=2 designs in future electro-optical systems.

  17. Validation of stratospheric temperature profiles from a ground-based microwave radiometer with other techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Haefele, Alexander; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature trends has become recognized as an important indicator of climate change, because different climate forcing mechanisms exhibit distinct vertical warming and cooling patterns. For example, the cooling of the stratosphere is an indicator for climate change as it provides evidence of natural and anthropogenic climate forcing just like surface warming. Despite its importance, our understanding of the observed stratospheric temperature trend and our ability to test simulations of the stratospheric response to emissions of greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances remains limited. One of the main reason is because stratospheric long-term datasets are sparse and obtained trends differ from one another. Different techniques allow to measure stratospheric temperature profiles as radiosonde, lidar or satellite. The main advantage of microwave radiometers against these other instruments is a high temporal resolution with a reasonable good spatial resolution. Moreover, the measurement at a fixed location allows to observe local atmospheric dynamics over a long time period, which is crucial for climate research. This study presents an evaluation of the stratospheric temperature profiles from a newly ground-based microwave temperature radiometer (TEMPERA) which has been built and designed at the University of Bern. The measurements from TEMPERA are compared with the ones from other different techniques such as in-situ (radiosondes), active remote sensing (lidar) and passive remote sensing on board of Aura satellite (MLS) measurements. In addition a statistical analysis of the stratospheric temperature obtained from TEMPERA measurements during four years of data has been performed. This analysis evidenced the capability of TEMPERA radiometer to monitor the temperature in the stratosphere for a long-term. The detection of some singular sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) during the analyzed period shows the necessity of these

  18. Observing Tsunamis in the Ionosphere Using Ground Based GPS Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, D. A.; Komjathy, A.; Song, Y. Tony; Stephens, P.; Hickey, M. P.; Foster, J.

    2011-01-01

    Ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements of ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) show variations consistent with atmospheric internal gravity waves caused by ocean tsunamis following recent seismic events, including the Tohoku tsunami of March 11, 2011. We observe fluctuations correlated in time, space, and wave properties with this tsunami in TEC estimates processed using JPL's Global Ionospheric Mapping Software. These TEC estimates were band-pass filtered to remove ionospheric TEC variations with periods outside the typical range of internal gravity waves caused by tsunamis. Observable variations in TEC appear correlated with the Tohoku tsunami near the epicenter, at Hawaii, and near the west coast of North America. Disturbance magnitudes are 1-10% of the background TEC value. Observations near the epicenter are compared to estimates of expected tsunami-driven TEC variations produced by Embry Riddle Aeronautical University's Spectral Full Wave Model, an atmosphere-ionosphere coupling model, and found to be in good agreement. The potential exists to apply these detection techniques to real-time GPS TEC data, providing estimates of tsunami speed and amplitude that may be useful for future early warning systems.

  19. Tissue Engineering of Cartilage on Ground-Based Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleshcheva, Ganna; Bauer, Johann; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Egli, Marcel; Wehland, Markus; Grimm, Daniela

    2016-06-01

    Investigations under simulated microgravity offer the opportunity for a better understanding of the influence of altered gravity on cells and the scaffold-free three-dimensional (3D) tissue formation. To investigate the short-term influence, human chondrocytes were cultivated for 2 h, 4 h, 16 h, and 24 h on a 2D Fast-Rotating Clinostat (FRC) in DMEM/F-12 medium supplemented with 10 % FCS. We detected holes in the vimentin network, perinuclear accumulations of vimentin after 2 h, and changes in the chondrocytes shape visualised by F-actin staining after 4 h of FRC-exposure. Scaffold-free cultivation of chondrocytes for 7 d on the Random Positioning Machine (RPM), the FRC and the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) resulted in spheroid formation, a phenomenon already known from spaceflight experiments with chondrocytes (MIR Space Station) and thyroid cancer cells (SimBox/Shenzhou-8 space mission). The experiments enabled by the ESA-CORA-GBF programme gave us an optimal opportunity to study gravity-related cellular processes, validate ground-based facilities for our chosen cell system, and prepare long-term experiments under real microgravity conditions in space

  20. Theoretical validation of ground-based microwave ozone observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ricaud

    Full Text Available Ground-based microwave measurements of the diurnal and seasonal variations of ozoneat 42±4.5 and 55±8 km are validated by comparing with results from a zero-dimensional photochemical model and a two-dimensional (2D chemical/radiative/dynamical model, respectively. O3 diurnal amplitudes measured in Bordeaux are shown to be in agreement with theory to within 5%. For the seasonal analysis of O3 variation, at 42±4.5 km, the 2D model underestimates the yearly averaged ozone concentration compared with the measurements. A double maximum oscillation (~3.5% is measured in Bordeaux with an extended maximum in September and a maximum in February, whilst the 2D model predicts only a single large maximum (17% in August and a pronounced minimum in January. Evidence suggests that dynamical transport causes the winter O3 maximum by propagation of planetary waves, phenomena which are not explicitly reproduced by the 2D model. At 55±8 km, the modeled yearly averaged O3 concentration is in very good agreement with the measured yearly average. A strong annual oscillation is both measured and modeled with differences in the amplitude shown to be exclusively linked to temperature fields.

  1. Models of ionospheric VLF absorption of powerful ground based transmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M. B.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Inan, U. S.

    2012-12-01

    Ground based Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) radio transmitters play a role in precipitation of energetic Van Allen electrons. Initial analyses of the contribution of VLF transmitters to radiation belt losses were based on early models of trans-ionospheric propagation known as the Helliwell absorption curves, but some recent studies have found that the model overestimates (by 20-100 dB) the VLF energy reaching the magnetosphere. It was subsequently suggested that conversion of wave energy into electrostatic modes may be responsible for the error. We utilize a newly available extensive record of VLF transmitter energy reaching the magnetosphere, taken from the DEMETER satellite, and perform a direct comparison with a sophisticated full wave model of trans-ionospheric propagation. Although the model does not include the effect of ionospheric irregularities, it correctly predicts the average total power injected into the magnetosphere within several dB. The results, particularly at nighttime, appear to be robust against the variability of the ionospheric electron density. We conclude that the global effect of irregularity scattering on whistler mode conversion to quasi-electrostatic may be no larger than 6 dB.

  2. Atmospheric Refraction Path Integrals in Ground-Based Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Mathar, R J

    2004-01-01

    The basic effect of the earth's atmospheric refraction on telescope operation is the reduction of the true zenith angle to the apparent zenith angle, associated with prismatic aberrations due to the dispersion in air. If one attempts coherent superposition of star images in ground-based interferometry, one is in addition interested in the optical path length associated with the refracted rays. In a model of a flat earth, the optical path difference between these is not concerned as the translational symmetry of the setup means no net effect remains. Here, I evaluate these interferometric integrals in the more realistic arrangement of two telescopes located on the surface of a common earth sphere and point to a star through an atmosphere which also possesses spherical symmetry. Some focus is put on working out series expansions in terms of the small ratio of the baseline over the earth radius, which allows to bypass some numerics which otherwise is challenged by strong cancellation effects in building the opti...

  3. Experiments on a Ground-Based Tomographic Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoonyol Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development and experiment of three-dimensional image formation by using a ground-based tomographic synthetic aperture radar (GB-TomoSAR system. GB-TomoSAR formulates two-dimensional synthetic aperture by the motion of antennae, both in azimuth and vertical directions. After range compression, three-dimensional image focusing is performed by applying Deramp-FFT (Fast Fourier Transform algorithms, both in azimuth and vertical directions. Geometric and radiometric calibrations were applied to make an image cube, which is then projected into range-azimuth and range-vertical cross-sections for visualization. An experiment with a C-band GB-TomoSAR system with a scan length of 2.49 m and 1.86 m in azimuth and vertical-direction, respectively, shows distinctive three-dimensional radar backscattering of stable buildings and roads with resolutions similar to the theoretical values. Unstable objects such as trees and moving cars generate severe noise due to decorrelation during the eight-hour image-acquisition time.

  4. Satellite Type Estination from Ground-based Photometric Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, T.; Ono, H.; Suzuki, J.; Ando, T.; Takanezawa, T.

    2016-09-01

    The optical photometric observation is potentially a powerful tool for understanding of the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) objects. At first, we measured in laboratory the surface reflectance of common satellite materials, for example, Multi-layer Insulation (MLI), mono-crystalline silicon cells, and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP). Next, we calculated visual magnitude of a satellite by simplified shape and albedo. In this calculation model, solar panels have dimensions of 2 by 8 meters, and the bus area is 2 meters squared with measured optical properties described above. Under these conditions, it clarified the brightness can change the range between 3 and 4 magnitudes in one night, but color index changes only from 1 to 2 magnitudes. Finally, we observed the color photometric data of several GEO satellites visible from Japan multiple times in August and September 2014. We obtained that light curves of GEO satellites recorded in the B and V bands (using Johnson filters) by a ground-base optical telescope. As a result, color index changed approximately from 0.5 to 1 magnitude in one night, and the order of magnitude was not changed in all cases. In this paper, we briefly discuss about satellite type estimation using the relation between brightness and color index obtained from the photometric observation.

  5. Ground-based measurements of UV Index (UVI at Helwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Farouk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available On October 2010 UV Index (UVI ground-based measurements were carried out by weather station at solar laboratory in NRIAG. The daily variation has maximum values in spring and summer days, while minimum values in autumn and winter days. The low level of UVI between 2.55 and 2.825 was found in December, January and February. The moderate level of UVI between 3.075 and 5.6 was found in March, October and November. The high level of UVI between 6.7 and 7.65 was found in April, May and September. The very high level of UVI between 8 and 8.6 was found in June, July and August. High level of radiation over 6 months per year including 3 months with a very high level UVI. According to the equation {UVI=a[SZA]b} the UVI increases with decreasing SZA by 82% on a daily scale and 88% on a monthly scale. Helwan exposure to a high level of radiation over 6 months per year including 3 months with a very high level UVI, so it is advisable not to direct exposure to the sun from 11 am to 2:00 pm.

  6. First ground-based column measurements of CO{sub 2} in the tropics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warneke, T.; Petersen, K.; Macatangay, R.; Notholt, J. [Institute of Environmental Physics, University of Bremen, Bremen (Germany); Koerner, S.; Jordan, A.; Gerbig, C.; Rothe, M. [Max-Planck-Institute for Biogeochemistry (MPI-BGC), Jena (Germany); Schrems, O. [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI), Bremerhaven (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The first ground-based remote sensing measurements of the column averaged volume mixing ratio of CO{sub 2} (X{sub CO{sub 2}}) for the inner tropics have been obtained at Paramaribo, Suriname (5.8 N, 55.2 W). Due to the migration of the ITCZ over the measurement location the probed air masses belong to the northern or southern hemisphere depending on the time of the year. The X{sub CO{sub 2}} shows an average annual increase in the Southern Hemisphere of 2.2 ppm for the time period 2004 to 2007, which agrees within the error with model simulations. Co-located in-situ measurements are strongly influenced by a local source. From the isotopic composition of the air samples the local source component is suggested to be the terrestrial biosphere. Using d{sup {sub 13C}} from the NOAA/ESRL stations Ascension Is. (ASC) and Ragged Point (RPB) the data has been corrected for the local source component. The corrected mixing ratios for the surface agree with model simulations for the measurement campaigns in the LDS (Southern Hemisphere), but not for the SDS (Northern Hemisphere).

  7. Overview of the DACCIWA ground-based field campaign in southern West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohou, Fabienne; Kalthoff, Norbert; Brooks, Barbara; Jegede, Gbenga; Adler, Bianca; Ajao, Adewale; Ayoola, Muritala; Babić, Karmen; Bessardon, Geoffrey; Delon, Claire; Dione, Cheikh; Handwerker, Jan; Jambert, Corinne; Kohler, Martin; Lothon, Marie; Pedruzo-Bagazgoitia, Xabier; Smith, Victoria; Sunmonu, Lukman; Wieser, Andreas; Derrien, Solène

    2017-04-01

    During June and July 2016, a ground-based field campaign took place in southern West Africa within the framework of the Dynamics-aerosol-chemistry-cloud interactions in West Africa (DACCIWA) project. In the investigated region, extended low-level stratus clouds form very frequently during night-time and persist long into the following day influencing the diurnal cycle of the atmospheric boundary layer and, hence, the regional climate. The motivation for the measurements was to identify the meteorological controls on the whole process chain from the formation of nocturnal stratus clouds, via the daytime transition to convective clouds and the formation of deep precipitating clouds. During the measurement period, extensive remote sensing and in-situ measurements were performed at three supersites in Kumasi (Ghana), Savè (Benin) and Ile-Ife (Nigeria). The gathered observations included the energy-balance components at the Earth's surface, the mean and turbulent conditions in the nocturnal and daytime ABL as well as the de- and entrainment processes between the ABL and the free troposphere. The meteorological measurements were supplemented by aerosol and air-chemistry observations. We will give an overview of the conducted measurements including instrument availability and strategy during intensive observation periods.

  8. Ground-based analysis of volcanic ash plumes using a new multispectral thermal infrared camera approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D.; Ramsey, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic plumes are complex mixtures of mineral, lithic and glass fragments of varying size, together with multiple gas species. These plumes vary in size dependent on a number of factors, including vent diameter, magma composition and the quantity of volatiles within a melt. However, determining the chemical and mineralogical properties of a volcanic plume immediately after an eruption is a great challenge. Thermal infrared (TIR) satellite remote sensing of these plumes is routinely used to calculate the volcanic ash particle size variations and sulfur dioxide concentration. These analyses are commonly performed using high temporal, low spatial resolution satellites, which can only reveal large scale trends. What is lacking is a high spatial resolution study specifically of the properties of the proximal plumes. Using the emissive properties of volcanic ash, a new method has been developed to determine the plume's particle size and petrology in spaceborne and ground-based TIR data. A multispectral adaptation of a FLIR TIR camera has been developed that simulates the TIR channels found on several current orbital instruments. Using this instrument, data of volcanic plumes from Fuego and Santiaguito volcanoes in Guatemala were recently obtained Preliminary results indicate that the camera is capable of detecting silicate absorption features in the emissivity spectra over the TIR wavelength range, which can be linked to both mineral chemistry and particle size. It is hoped that this technique can be expanded to isolate different volcanic species within a plume, validate the orbital data, and ultimately to use the results to better inform eruption dynamics modelling.

  9. Development of ground-based ELF/VLF receiver system in Wuhan and its first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanping; Yang, Guobin; Ni, Binbin; Zhao, Zhengyu; Gu, Xudong; Zhou, Chen; Wang, Feng

    2016-05-01

    A new digital low-frequency receiver system has been developed at Wuhan University for sensitive reception of low-latitude broadband Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio waves originating from either natural or artificial sources. These low-frequency radio waves are useful for ionospheric remote sensing, geospace environment monitoring, and submarine communications. This paper presents the principle and architecture of the system framework, including magnetic loop antenna design, low-noise analog front-end and digital receiver with data sampling and transmission. A new structure is adopted in the analog front end to provide high common-mode rejection and to reduce interference. On basis of field programmable gate array (FPGA) device and Universal Serial Bus (USB) architecture, the digital receiver is developed along with time keeping and synchronization module. The validity and feasibility of the self-developed ground-based ELF/VLF receiver system is evaluated by first results of experimental data that show the temporal variation of broadband ELF/VLF wave spectral intensity in Wuhan (30.54 °N, 114.37 °E). In addition to the acquisition of VLF transmitter signals at various frequencies, tweek atmospherics are also clearly captured to occur at multiple modes up to n = 6.

  10. Ground-based Optical Observations of Geophysical Phenomena: Aurora Borealis and Meteors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, Marilia

    2010-10-01

    Advances in low-light level imaging technology have enabled significant improvements in the ground based study of geophysical phenomena. In this talk we focus on two such phenomena that occur in the Earth's ionosphere: aurorae and meteors. Imaging the aurora which is created by the interplay of the Earth's magnetosphere, ionosphere and atmosphere, provides a tool for remote sensing physical processes that are otherwise very difficult to study. By quantifying the intensities, scale sizes and lifetimes of auroral structures, we can gain significant insight into the physics behind the generation of the aurora and the interaction of the magnetosphere with the solar wind. Additionally, the combination of imaging with radars provides complimentary data and therefore more information than either method on its own. Meteor observations are a perfect example of this because the radar can accurately determine only the line-of-sight component of velocity, while imaging provides the direction of motion, the perpendicular velocity and brightness (a proxy for mass), therefore enabling a much more accurate determination of the full velocity vector and mass.

  11. CO2 Total Column Variability From Ground-Based FTIR Measurements Over Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylon, J. L.; Stremme, W.; Plaza, E.; Bezanilla, A.; Grutter, M.; Hase, F.; Blumenstock, T.

    2014-12-01

    There are now several space missions dedicated to measure greenhouse gases in order to improve the understanding of the carbon cycle. Ground based measurement sites are of great value in the validation process, however there are only a few stations in tropical latitudes. We present measurements of solar-absorption infrared spectra recorded on two locations over Central Mexico: the High-Altitude Station Altzomoni (19.12 N, 98.65 W), located in the Izta-Popo National Park outside of Mexico City; and the UNAM's Atmospheric Observatory (19.32 N, 99.17 W) in Mexico City. These measurements were performed using a high resolution Fourier transform infrared spectrometer FTIR (Bruker, HR 120/5) at Altzomoni and a moderate resolution FTIR (Bruker, Vertex 80) within the city. In this work, we present the first results for total vertical columns of CO2 derived from near-infrared spectra recorded at both locations using the retrieval code PROFFIT. We present the seasonal cycle and variability from the measurements, as well as the full diagnostics of the retrieval in order assess its quality and discuss the differences of both instruments and locations (altitudes, urban vs remote). This work aims to contribute to generate high quality datasets for satellite validation.

  12. Ground-based infrared surveys: imaging the thermal fields at volcanoes and revealing the controlling parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaleo, Michele; Walter, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Temperature monitoring is a widespread procedure in the frame of volcano hazard monitoring. Indeed temperature changes are expected to reflect changes in volcanic activity. We propose a new approach, within the thermal monitoring, which is meant to shed light on the parameters controlling the fluid pathways and the fumarole sites by using infrared measurements. Ground-based infrared cameras allow one to remotely image the spatial distribution, geometric pattern and amplitude of fumarole fields on volcanoes at metre to centimetre resolution. Infrared mosaics and time series are generated and interpreted, by integrating geological field observations and modeling, to define the setting of the volcanic degassing system at shallow level. We present results for different volcano morphologies and show that lithology, structures and topography control the appearance of fumarole field by the creation of permeability contrasts. We also show that the relative importance of those parameters is site-dependent. Deciphering the setting of the degassing system is essential for hazard assessment studies because it would improve our understanding on how the system responds to endogenous or exogenous modification.

  13. Evidence of rock slope breathing using ground-based InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouyet, Line; Kristensen, Lene; Derron, Marc-Henri; Michoud, Clément; Blikra, Lars Harald; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Lauknes, Tom Rune

    2017-07-01

    Ground-Based Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (GB-InSAR) campaigns were performed in summer 2011 and 2012 in the Romsdalen valley (Møre & Romsdal county, western Norway) in order to assess displacements on Mannen/Børa rock slope. Located 1 km northwest, a second GB-InSAR system continuously monitors the large Mannen rockslide. The availability of two GB-InSAR positions creates a wide coverage of the rock slope, including a slight dataset overlap valuable for validation. A phenomenon of rock slope breathing is detected in a remote and hard-to-access area in mid-slope. Millimetric upward displacements are recorded in August 2011. Analysis of 2012 GB-InSAR campaign, combined with the large dataset from the continuous station, shows that the slope is affected by inflation/deflation phenomenon between 5 and 10 mm along the line-of-sight. The pattern is not homogenous in time and inversions of movement have a seasonal recurrence. These seasonal changes are confirmed by satellite InSAR observations and can possibly be caused by hydrogeological variations. In addition, combination of GB-InSAR results, in situ measurements and satellite InSAR analyses contributes to a better overview of movement distribution over the whole area.

  14. Comparison of forest aboveground biomass estimates from passive and active remote sensing sensors over Kayar Khola watershed, Chitwan district, Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qazi, Waqas A.; Baig, Shahbaz; Gilani, Hammad; Waqar, Mirza Muhammad; Dhakal, Ashwin; Ammar, Ahmad

    2017-04-01

    We use passive optical high-resolution GeoEye-1 imagery and active synthetic aperture radar (SAR) Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS-1) phased array type L-band synthetic aperture radar (PALSAR) L-band horizontal-horizontal-polarization imagery to estimate forest aboveground biomass (AGB) of the tropical mountainous forest test site in Kayar Khola watershed, Chitwan district, Nepal. Object-based tools were used to delineate tree crowns from the orthorectified pan-sharpened GeoEye-1 optical imagery. AGB modeling with crown projection area extracted from the optical imagery shows a good linear relationship with R2=0.76. The terrain-corrected, radiometrically calibrated, and speckle-filtered ALOS-1 PALSAR backscatter image was utilized for AGB modeling; the nonlinear modeling of AGB with the SAR backscatter (dB) shows R2=0.52. The validation R2 values for AGB estimates from GeoEye-1 and ALOS-1 PALSAR are 0.83 and 0.44, respectively. The direct comparison of AGB estimates from both sensors is made possible by the utilization of the same set of ground survey points for both training and validation of the statistical models for both datasets. The final AGB output maps from both sensors show that the spatial patterns of AGB are in reasonable agreement at lower elevation, while SAR seems to underestimate AGB values as compared with optical-based estimates in the higher elevation zones.

  15. Ground Based GPS Phase Measurements for Atmospheric Sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    based GPS observations for the correction of radar observations. 6 REFERENCES Alber, C., R. Ware, C. Rocken, and J. Braun, A new method for sensing ...rocken@ucar.edu Award #: N00014-97-1-0258 LONG-TERM GOAL The goal is to develop GPS remote sensing techniques to determine atmospheric signal delay and...agrees best with the observations in a least squares sense is selected. The corresponding refractivity profile is then selected. • We tested this

  16. Remote detection of biological aerosols at a distance of 3 km with a passive Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-David, Avishai

    2003-03-10

    Bio-aerosols containing Bacillus subtilis var. niger (BG) were detected at a distance of 3 km with a passive Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectrometer in an open-air environment where the thermal contrast was low (~ 1 K). The measurements were analyzed with a new hyperspectral detection, identification and estimation algorithm based on radiative transfer theory and advanced signal processing techniques that statistically subtract the undesired background spectra. The results are encouraging as they suggest for the first time the feasibility of detecting biological aerosols with passive FTIR sensors. The number of detection events was small but statistically significant. We estimate the false alarm rate for this experiment to be 0.0095 and the probability of detection to be 0.61 when a threshold of detection that minimizes the sum of the probabilities of false alarm and of missed detection is chosen.

  17. The use of remotely-sensed canopy variables and ultrasonic snow depth sensors to improve the understanding of forest - snow interactions (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varhola, A.; Coops, N.; Teti, P.; Weiler, M.

    2013-12-01

    Current methods to estimate snow accumulation and ablation at the plot and watershed levels can be improved as new technologies offer alternative approaches to more accurately monitor snow dynamics and their drivers. Here we conduct a meta-analysis of snow and vegetation data collected in British Columbia to explore the relationships between a wide range of forest structure variables --obtained from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), hemispherical photography (HP) and Landsat Thematic Mapper-- and several indicators of snow accumulation and ablation estimated from manual snow surveys and ultrasonic range sensors. By merging and standardizing all the ground plot information available in the study area, we demonstrate how LiDAR-derived forest cover above 0.5 m was the variable explaining the highest percentage of absolute peak snow water equivalent (SWE) (33%), while HP-derived leaf area index and gap fraction (45° angle of view) were the best potential predictors of snow ablation rate (SAR) (explaining 57% of variance). This study reveals how continuous SWE data from ultrasonic sensors are fundamental to obtain statistically-significant relationships between snow indicators and structural metrics by increasing mean coefficient of determination by 20% when compared to manual surveys. The relationships between vegetation and some spectral indices from Landsat and snow indicators, not explored before, were almost as high as those shown by LiDAR or HP and thus point towards a new line of research with important practical implications. While the use of different data sources from two snow seasons prevented us from developing models with predictive capacity, a large sample size allowed us to identify outliers that weakened the relationships and suggest improvements for future research. A concise overview of the limitations of this and previous studies is provided along with propositions to consistently improve experimental designs to take advantage of remote sensing

  18. Optical Remote Sensing Potentials for Looting Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athos Agapiou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Looting of archaeological sites is illegal and considered a major anthropogenic threat for cultural heritage, entailing undesirable and irreversible damage at several levels, such as landscape disturbance, heritage destruction, and adverse social impact. In recent years, the employment of remote sensing technologies using ground-based and/or space-based sensors has assisted in dealing with this issue. Novel remote sensing techniques have tackled heritage destruction occurring in war-conflicted areas, as well as illicit archeological activity in vast areas of archaeological interest with limited surveillance. The damage performed by illegal activities, as well as the scarcity of reliable information are some of the major concerns that local stakeholders are facing today. This study discusses the potential use of remote sensing technologies based on the results obtained for the archaeological landscape of Ayios Mnason in Politiko village, located in Nicosia district, Cyprus. In this area, more than ten looted tombs have been recorded in the last decade, indicating small-scale, but still systematic, looting. The image analysis, including vegetation indices, fusion, automatic extraction after object-oriented classification, etc., was based on high-resolution WorldView-2 multispectral satellite imagery and RGB high-resolution aerial orthorectified images. Google Earth© images were also used to map and diachronically observe the site. The current research also discusses the potential for wider application of the presented methodology, acting as an early warning system, in an effort to establish a systematic monitoring tool for archaeological areas in Cyprus facing similar threats.

  19. High resolution surface solar radiation patterns over Eastern Mediterranean: Satellite, ground-based, reanalysis data and radiative transfer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandri, G.; Georgoulias, A.; Meleti, C.; Balis, D.

    2013-12-01

    Surface solar radiation (SSR) and its long and short term variations play a critical role in the modification of climate and by extent of the social and financial life of humans. Thus, SSR measurements are of primary importance. SSR is measured for decades from ground-based stations for specific spots around the planet. During the last decades, satellite observations allowed for the assessment of the spatial variability of SSR at a global as well as regional scale. In this study, a detailed spatiotemporal view of the SSR over Eastern Mediterranean is presented at a high spatial resolution. Eastern Mediterranean is affected by various aerosol types (continental, sea, dust and biomass burning particles) and encloses countries with significant socioeconomical changes during the last decades. For the aims of this study, SSR data from satellites (Climate Monitoring Satellite Application Facility - CM SAF) and our ground station in Thessaloniki, a coastal city of ~1 million inhabitants in northern Greece, situated in the heart of Eastern Mediterranean (Eppley Precision pyranometer and Kipp & Zonen CM-11 pyranometer) are used in conjunction with radiative transfer simulations (Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer - SBDART). The CM SAF dataset used here includes monthly mean SSR observations at a high spatial resolution of 0.03x0.03 degrees for the p