WorldWideScience

Sample records for ground-based radar profiles

  1. Intercomparison of snowfall estimates derived from the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar and the ground-based weather radar network over Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Norin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate snowfall estimates are important for both weather and climate applications. Ground-based weather radars and space-based satellite sensors are often used as viable alternatives to rain gauges to estimate precipitation in this context. In particular, the Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR on board CloudSat is proving to be a useful tool to map snowfall globally, in part due to its high sensitivity to light precipitation and its ability to provide near-global vertical structure. CloudSat snowfall estimates play a particularly important role in the high-latitude regions as other ground-based observations become sparse and passive satellite sensors suffer from inherent limitations. In this paper, snowfall estimates from two observing systems – Swerad, the Swedish national weather radar network, and CloudSat – are compared. Swerad offers a well-calibrated data set of precipitation rates with high spatial and temporal resolution, at very high latitudes. The measurements are anchored to rain gauges and provide valuable insights into the usefulness of CloudSat CPR's snowfall estimates in the polar regions. In total, 7.2 × 105 matchups of CloudSat and Swerad observations from 2008 through 2010 were intercompared, covering all but the summer months (June to September. The intercomparison shows encouraging agreement between the two observing systems despite their different sensitivities and user applications. The best agreement is observed when CloudSat passes close to a Swerad station (46–82 km, where the observational conditions for both systems are comparable. Larger disagreements outside this range suggest that both platforms have difficulty with shallow snow but for different reasons. The correlation between Swerad and CloudSat degrades with increasing distance from the nearest Swerad station, as Swerad's sensitivity decreases as a function of distance. Swerad also tends to overshoot low-level precipitating systems further away from the station

  2. Comparison of Precipitation Observations from a Prototype Space-based Cloud Radar and Ground-based Radars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Liping; ZHANG Zhiqiang; YU Danru; YANG Hu; ZHAO Chonghui; ZHONG Lingzhi

    2012-01-01

    A prototype space-based cloud radar has been developed and was installed on an airplane to observe a precipitation system over Tianjin,China in July 2010.Ground-based S-band and Ka-band radars were used to examine the observational capability of the prototype. A cross-comparison algorithm between different wavelengths,spatial resolutions and platform radars is presented.The reflectivity biases,correlation coefficients and standard deviations between the radars are analyzed.The equivalent reflectivity bias between the S- and Ka-band radars were simulated with a given raindrop size distribution.The results indicated that reflectivity bias between the S- and Ka-band radars due to scattering properties was less than 5 dB,and for weak precipitation the bias was negligible. The prototype space-based cloud radar was able to measure a reasonable vertical profile of reflectivity,but the reflectivity below an altitude of 1.5 km above ground level was obscured by ground clutter.The measured reflectivity by the prototype space-based cloud radar was approximately 10.9 dB stronger than that by the S-band Doppler radar (SA radar),and 13.7 dB stronger than that by the ground-based cloud radar.The reflectivity measured by the SA radar was 0.4 dB stronger than that by the ground-based cloud radar.This study could provide a method for the quantitative examination of the observation ability for space-based radars.

  3. Experiments on a Ground-Based Tomographic Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoonyol Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development and experiment of three-dimensional image formation by using a ground-based tomographic synthetic aperture radar (GB-TomoSAR system. GB-TomoSAR formulates two-dimensional synthetic aperture by the motion of antennae, both in azimuth and vertical directions. After range compression, three-dimensional image focusing is performed by applying Deramp-FFT (Fast Fourier Transform algorithms, both in azimuth and vertical directions. Geometric and radiometric calibrations were applied to make an image cube, which is then projected into range-azimuth and range-vertical cross-sections for visualization. An experiment with a C-band GB-TomoSAR system with a scan length of 2.49 m and 1.86 m in azimuth and vertical-direction, respectively, shows distinctive three-dimensional radar backscattering of stable buildings and roads with resolutions similar to the theoretical values. Unstable objects such as trees and moving cars generate severe noise due to decorrelation during the eight-hour image-acquisition time.

  4. Investigation of Rainfall Characteristics Using TRMM PR and Ground Based Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, B.; Lang, T. J.; Nesbitt, S. W.; Cifelli, R.; Rutledge, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    Despite relatively good agreement between reflectivity profiles, comparisons of rainfall statistics derived from TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) deviate from ground-based radar (GR) observations in various field locations across the globe. TRMM PR rain rate probability distribution functions underestimate the occurrence of high rain rates (> 80 mm hr-1) compared with similar ground-based statistics, and similarly, GR distributes the total rain volume over a larger range of rain rates. Analysis of ten years of TRMM data over three field sites has shown that the greatest disagreements occur in the most intense convection, such as over land and during the east and break wind regimes over the Amazon and Australia, respectively. These differences are investigated further in this study. Ten years of TRMM PR data are analyzed in conjunction with data collected during two field experiments involving the NCAR S-Pol radar. S-Pol was deployed in Brazil in the Amazon during TRMM LBA in 1998-1999 and near Mazatlan, Mexico as part of the North American Monsoon Experiment (NAME) in 2004. Additionally, multiple years of data from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology CPOL radar located in Darwin, Australia, are examined to extend the robustness of the GR observations beyond the relatively short field campaigns. Polarimetric data collected by the two radars are used to characterize the differences between TRMM PR and GR observations as a function of bulk hydrometeor type. For example, profiles with significant graupel, as identified by GR, are analyzed to investigate the role of mixed phase in the PR retrievals. The vertical variability of D0 is examined as a function of reflectivity and related to the underlying microphysical conditions using the polarimetric data provided by the GR observations. Spatial variability of D0 is also explored by correlating D0 values derived from GR at different heights. Several significant changes were made to the TRMM processing algorithms in the

  5. On reconciling ground-based with spaceborne normalized radar cross section measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumgartner, Francois; Munk, Jens; Jezek, K C

    2002-01-01

    This study examines differences in the normalized radar cross section, derived from ground-based versus spaceborne radar data. A simple homogeneous half-space model, indicates that agreement between the two improves as 1) the distance from the scatterer is increased; and/or 2) the extinction...

  6. Intercomparison of Vertical Structure of Storms Revealed by Ground-Based (NMQ and Spaceborne Radars (CloudSat-CPR and TRMM-PR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica M. Fall

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spaceborne radars provide great opportunities to investigate the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation. Two typical spaceborne radars for such a study are the W-band Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR and Ku-band Precipitation Radar (PR, which are onboard NASA’s CloudSat and TRMM satellites, respectively. Compared to S-band ground-based radars, they have distinct scattering characteristics for different hydrometeors in clouds and precipitation. The combination of spaceborne and ground-based radar observations can help in the identification of hydrometeors and improve the radar-based quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE. This study analyzes the vertical structure of the 18 January, 2009 storm using data from the CloudSat CPR, TRMM PR, and a NEXRAD-based National Mosaic and Multisensor QPE (NMQ system. Microphysics above, within, and below the melting layer are studied through an intercomparison of multifrequency measurements. Hydrometeors’ type and their radar scattering characteristics are analyzed. Additionally, the study of the vertical profile of reflectivity (VPR reveals the brightband properties in the cold-season precipitation and its effect on the radar-based QPE. In all, the joint analysis of spaceborne and ground-based radar data increases the understanding of the vertical structure of storm systems and provides a good insight into the microphysical modeling for weather forecasts.

  7. A Fast Method for Embattling Optimization of Ground-Based Radar Surveillance Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H.; Cheng, H.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, J.

    A growing number of space activities have created an orbital debris environment that poses increasing impact risks to existing space systems and human space flight. For the safety of in-orbit spacecraft, a lot of observation facilities are needed to catalog space objects, especially in low earth orbit. Surveillance of Low earth orbit objects are mainly rely on ground-based radar, due to the ability limitation of exist radar facilities, a large number of ground-based radar need to build in the next few years in order to meet the current space surveillance demands. How to optimize the embattling of ground-based radar surveillance network is a problem to need to be solved. The traditional method for embattling optimization of ground-based radar surveillance network is mainly through to the detection simulation of all possible stations with cataloged data, and makes a comprehensive comparative analysis of various simulation results with the combinational method, and then selects an optimal result as station layout scheme. This method is time consuming for single simulation and high computational complexity for the combinational analysis, when the number of stations increases, the complexity of optimization problem will be increased exponentially, and cannot be solved with traditional method. There is no better way to solve this problem till now. In this paper, target detection procedure was simplified. Firstly, the space coverage of ground-based radar was simplified, a space coverage projection model of radar facilities in different orbit altitudes was built; then a simplified objects cross the radar coverage model was established according to the characteristics of space objects orbit motion; after two steps simplification, the computational complexity of the target detection was greatly simplified, and simulation results shown the correctness of the simplified results. In addition, the detection areas of ground-based radar network can be easily computed with the

  8. Sub-Seasonal Variability of Tropical Rainfall Observed by TRMM and Ground-based Polarimetric Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Brenda; Rutledge, Steven; Lang, Timothy; Cifelli, Robert; Nesbitt, Stephen

    2010-05-01

    Studies of tropical precipitation characteristics from the TRMM-LBA and NAME field campaigns using ground-based polarimetric S-band data have revealed significant differences in microphysical processes occurring in the various meteorological regimes sampled in those projects. In TRMM-LMA (January-February 1999 in Brazil; a TRMM ground validation experiment), variability is driven by prevailing low-level winds. During periods of low-level easterlies, deeper and more intense convection is observed, while during periods of low-level westerlies, weaker convection embedded in widespread stratiform precipitation is common. In the NAME region (North American Monsoon Experiment, summer 2004 along the west coast of Mexico), strong terrain variability drives differences in precipitation, with larger drops and larger ice mass aloft associated with convection occurring over the coastal plain compared to convection over the higher terrain of the Sierra Madre Occidental, or adjacent coastal waters. Comparisons with the TRMM precipitation radar (PR) indicate that such sub-seasonal variability in these two regions are not well characterized by the TRMM PR reflectivity and rainfall statistics. TRMM PR reflectivity profiles in the LBA region are somewhat lower than S-Pol values, particularly in the more intense easterly regime convection. In NAME, mean reflectivities are even more divergent, with TRMM profiles below those of S-Pol. In both regions, the TRMM PR does not capture rain rates above 80 mm hr-1 despite much higher rain rates estimated from the S-Pol polarimetric data, and rain rates are generally lower for a given reflectivity from TRMM PR compared to S-Pol. These differences between TRMM PR and S-Pol may arise from the inability of Z-R relationships to capture the full variability of microphysical conditions or may highlight problems with TRMM retrievals over land. In addition to the TRMM-LBA and NAME regions, analysis of sub-seasonal precipitation variability and

  9. Wind Profiling Radar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Clutter present in radar return signals as used for wind profiling is substantially removed by carrying out a Daubechies wavelet transformation on a time series of...

  10. MetaSensing's FastGBSAR: ground based radar for deformation monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödelsperger, Sabine; Meta, Adriano

    2014-10-01

    The continuous monitoring of ground deformation and structural movement has become an important task in engineering. MetaSensing introduces a novel sensor system, the Fast Ground Based Synthetic Aperture Radar (FastGBSAR), based on innovative technologies that have already been successfully applied to airborne SAR applications. The FastGBSAR allows the remote sensing of deformations of a slope or infrastructure from up to a distance of 4 km. The FastGBSAR can be setup in two different configurations: in Real Aperture Radar (RAR) mode it is capable of accurately measuring displacements along a linear range profile, ideal for monitoring vibrations of structures like bridges and towers (displacement accuracy up to 0.01 mm). Modal parameters can be determined within half an hour. Alternatively, in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) configuration it produces two-dimensional displacement images with an acquisition time of less than 5 seconds, ideal for monitoring areal structures like dams, landslides and open pit mines (displacement accuracy up to 0.1 mm). The MetaSensing FastGBSAR is the first ground based SAR instrument on the market able to produce two-dimensional deformation maps with this high acquisition rate. By that, deformation time series with a high temporal and spatial resolution can be generated, giving detailed information useful to determine the deformation mechanisms involved and eventually to predict an incoming failure. The system is fully portable and can be quickly installed on bedrock or a basement. The data acquisition and processing can be fully automated leading to a low effort in instrument operation and maintenance. Due to the short acquisition time of FastGBSAR, the coherence between two acquisitions is very high and the phase unwrapping is simplified enormously. This yields a high density of resolution cells with good quality and high reliability of the acquired deformations. The deformation maps can directly be used as input into an Early

  11. Comparison of airborne radar altimeter and ground-based Ku-band radar measurements on the ice cap Austfonna, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Brandt

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We compare coincident data from the European Space Agency's Airborne SAR/Interferometric Radar Altimeter System (ASIRAS with ground-based Very High Bandwidth (VHB stepped-frequency radar measurements in the Ku-band. The ASIRAS instrument obtained data from ~700 m above the surface, using a 13.5 GHz center frequency and a 1 GHz bandwidth. The ground-based VHB radar measurements were acquired using the same center frequency, but with a variable bandwidth of either 1 or 8 GHz. Four sites were visited with the VHB radar; two sites within the transition region from superimposed ice to firn, and two sites in the long-term firn area (wet-snow zone. The greater bandwidth VHB measurements show that the first peak in the airborne data is a composite of the return from the surface (i.e. air-snow interface and returns of similar or stronger amplitude from reflectors in the upper ~30 cm of the subsurface. The peak position in the airborne data is thus not necessarily a good proxy for the surface since the maximum and width of the first return depend on the degree of interference between surface and subsurface reflectors. The major response from the winter snowpack was found to be caused by units of thin crust/ice layers (0.5–2 mm surrounded by large crystals (>3 mm. In the airborne data, it is possible to track such layers for tens of kilometers. The winter snowpack lacked thicker ice layers. The last year's summer surface, characterized by a low density large crystal layer overlaying a harder denser layer, gives a strong radar response, frequently the strongest. The clear relationship observed between the VHB and ASIRAS waveforms, justifies the use of ground-based radar measurements in the validation of air- or spaceborne radars.

  12. SCENARIO AND TARGET SIMULATION FOR A GROUND BASED MULTIFUNCTION PHASED ARRAY RADAR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a scenario and target simulation which operates in non real-time to provide full closed-loop operation of the ground based multifunction phased array radar simulation system in support of ballistic missile defence experiments against countermeasure.By simulating the target scattering signature and dynamical signature,this scenario and target simulation provide re- alistic scenario source to evaluate the system performance of multifunction phased array radar,and the key algorithms verification and validation such as target tracking,multi-target imaging and target recognition.

  13. Space Fence Ground-Based Radar System Increment 1 (Space Fence Inc 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-438 Space Fence Ground-Based Radar System Increment 1 (Space Fence Inc 1) As of FY 2017...11 Track to Budget 17 Cost and Funding 18 Low Rate Initial Production 23 Foreign Military Sales 24 Nuclear Costs 24 Unit Cost...Document CLIN - Contract Line Item Number CPD - Capability Production Document CY - Calendar Year DAB - Defense Acquisition Board DAE - Defense Acquisition

  14. Comparison of the TRMM Precipitation Radar rainfall estimation with ground-based disdrometer and radar measurements in South Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidou, Melina P.; Kalogiros, John A.; Stavrakis, Adrian K.

    2016-11-01

    The performance of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) rainfall estimation algorithm is assessed, locally, in Crete island, south Greece, using data from a 2D-video disdrometer and a ground-based, X-band, polarimetric radar. A three-parameter, normalized Gamma drop size distribution is fitted to the disdrometer rain spectra; the latter are classified in stratiform and convective rain types characterized by different relations between distribution parameters. The method of moments estimates more accurately the distribution parameters than the best fit technique, which exhibits better agreement with and is more biased by the observed droplet distribution at large diameter values. Power laws between the radar reflectivity factor (Z) and the rainfall rate (R) are derived from the disdrometer data. A significant diversity of the prefactor and the exponent of the estimated power laws is observed, depending on the scattering model and the regression technique. The Z-R relationships derived from the disdrometer data are compared to those obtained from TRMM-PR data. Generally, the power laws estimated from the two datasets are different. Specifically, the greater prefactor found for the disdrometer data suggests an overestimation of rainfall rate by the TRMM-PR algorithm for light and moderate stratiform rain, which was the main rain type in the disdrometer dataset. Finally, contemporary data from the TRMM-PR and a ground-based, X-band, polarimetric radar are analyzed. Comparison of the corresponding surface rain rates for a rain event with convective characteristics indicates a large variability of R in a single TRMM-PR footprint, which typically comprises several hundreds of radar pixels. Thus, the coarse spatial resolution of TRMM-PR may lead to miss of significant high local peaks of convective rain. Also, it was found that the high temporal variability of convective rain may introduce significant errors in the estimation of bias of

  15. Validation of GPM Ka-Radar Algorithm Using a Ground-based Ka-Radar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kenji; Kaneko, Yuki; Nakagawa, Katsuhiro; Furukawa, Kinji; Suzuki, Kenji

    2016-04-01

    GPM led by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration of US (NASA) aims to observe global precipitation. The core satellite is equipped with a microwave radiometer (GMI) and a dual-frequency radar (DPR) which is the first spaceborne Ku/Ka-band dual-wavelength radar dedicated for precipitation measurement. In the DPR algorithm, measured radar reflectivity is converted to effective radar reflectivity by estimating the rain attenuation. Here, the scattering/attenuation characteristics of Ka-band radiowaves are crucial, particularly for wet snow. A melting layer observation using a dual Ka-band radar system developed by JAXA was conducted along the slope of Mt. Zao in Yamagata Prefecture, Japan. The dual Ka-band radar system consists of two nearly identical Ka-band FM-CW radars, and the precipitation systems between two radars were observed in opposite directions. From this experiment, equivalent radar reflectivity (Ze) and specific attenuation (k) were obtained. The experiments were conducted for two winter seasons. During the data analyses, it was found that k estimate easily fluctuates because the estimate is based on double difference calculation. With much temporal and spatial averaging, k-Ze relationship was obtained for melting layers. One of the results is that the height of the peak of k seems slightly higher than that of Ze. The results are compared with in-situ precipitation particle measurements.

  16. Ozone profiles above Kiruna from two ground-based radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Niall J.; Walker, Kaley A.; Raffalski, Uwe; Kivi, Rigel; Gross, Jochen; Manney, Gloria L.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents new atmospheric ozone concentration profiles retrieved from measurements made with two ground-based millimetre-wave radiometers in Kiruna, Sweden. The instruments are the Kiruna Microwave Radiometer (KIMRA) and the Millimeter wave Radiometer 2 (MIRA 2). The ozone concentration profiles are retrieved using an optimal estimation inversion technique, and they cover an altitude range of ˜ 16-54 km, with an altitude resolution of, at best, 8 km. The KIMRA and MIRA 2 measurements are compared to each other, to measurements from balloon-borne ozonesonde measurements at Sodankylä, Finland, and to measurements made by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the Aura satellite. KIMRA has a correlation of 0.82, but shows a low bias, with respect to the ozonesonde data, and MIRA 2 shows a smaller magnitude low bias and a 0.98 correlation coefficient. Both radiometers are in general agreement with each other and with MLS data, showing high correlation coefficients, but there are differences between measurements that are not explained by random errors. An oscillatory bias with a peak of approximately ±1 ppmv is identified in the KIMRA ozone profiles over an altitude range of ˜ 18-35 km, and is believed to be due to baseline wave features that are present in the spectra. A time series analysis of KIMRA ozone for winters 2008-2013 shows the existence of a local wintertime minimum in the ozone profile above Kiruna. The measurements have been ongoing at Kiruna since 2002 and late 2012 for KIMRA and MIRA 2, respectively.

  17. Boost-Phase ballistic missile trajectory estimation with ground based radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Yuyan; Huang Peikang

    2006-01-01

    A conditional boost-phase trajectory estimation method based on ballistic missile (BM) information database and classification is developed to estimate and predict boos-phase BM trajectory. The main uncertain factors to describe BM dynamics equation are reduced to the control law of trajectory pitch angle in boost-phase. After the BM mass at the beginning of estimation, the BM attack angle and the modification of engine thrust denoting BM acceleration are modeled reasonably, the boost-phase BM trajectory estimation with ground based radar is well realized. The validity of this estimation method is testified by computer simulation with a typical example.

  18. Validation of TRMM Precipitation Radar Through Comparison of its Multi-Year Measurements to Ground-Based Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Liang; Meneghini, Robert

    2010-01-01

    A procedure to accurately resample spaceborne and ground-based radar data is described, and then applied to the measurements taken from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) and the ground-based Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D or WSR) for the validation of the PR measurements and estimates. Through comparisons with the well-calibrated, non-attenuated WSR at Melbourne, Florida for the period 1998-2007, the calibration of the Precipitation Radar (PR) aboard the TRMM satellite is checked using measurements near the storm top. Analysis of the results indicates that the PR, after taking into account differences in radar reflectivity factors between the PR and WSR, has a small positive bias of 0.8 dB relative to the WSR, implying a soundness of the PR calibration in view of the uncertainties involved in the comparisons. Comparisons between the PR and WSR reflectivities are also made near the surface for evaluation of the attenuation-correction procedures used in the PR algorithms. It is found that the PR attenuation is accurately corrected in stratiform rain but is underestimated in convective rain, particularly in heavy rain. Tests of the PR estimates of rainfall rate are conducted through comparisons in the overlap area between the TRMM overpass and WSR scan. Analyses of the data are made both on a conditional basis, in which the instantaneous rain rates are compared only at those pixels where both the PR and WSR detect rain, and an unconditional basis, in which the area-averaged rain rates are estimated independently for the PR and WSR. Results of the conditional rain comparisons show that the PR-derived rain is about 9% greater and 19% less than the WSR estimates for stratiform and convective storms, respectively. Overall, the PR tends to underestimate the conditional mean rain rate by 8% for all rain categories, a finding that conforms to the results of the area-averaged rain (unconditional) comparisons.

  19. Polarimetric analysis of radar backscatter from ground-based scatterometers and wheat biomass monitoring with advanced synthetic aperture radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lei; Tong, Ling; Li, Yuxia; Chen, Yan; Tan, Longfei; Guo, Caizheng

    2016-04-01

    This article presents an analysis of the scattering measurements for an entire wheat growth cycle by ground-based scatterometers at a frequency of 5.3 GHz. Since wheat ears are related to wheat growth and yield, the radar backscatter of wheat was analyzed at two different periods, i.e., with and without wheat ears. Simultaneously, parameters such as wheat and soil characteristics as well as volume scattering and soil scattering were analyzed for the two periods during the entire growth cycle. Wheat ears have been demonstrated to have a great influence on radar backscatter; therefore, a modified version of water-cloud model used for retrieving biomass should consider the effect of wheat ears. This work presents two retrieval models based on the water-cloud model and adopts the advanced integral equation model to simulate the soil backscatter before the heading stage and the backscatter from the layer under wheat ears after the heading stage. The research results showed that the biomass retrieved from the advanced synthetic aperture radar (ASAR) images to agree well with the data measured in situ after setting the modified water-cloud model for the growth stages with ears. Furthermore, it was concluded that wheat ears should form an essential component of theoretical modeling as they influence the final yield.

  20. DATA PROCESSING AND ANALYSIS TOOLS BASED ON GROUND-BASED SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Crosetto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Ground-Based SAR (GBSAR is a terrestrial remote sensing technique used to measure and monitor deformation. In this paper we describe two complementary approaches to derive deformation measurements using GBSAR data. The first approach is based on radar interferometry, while the second one exploits the GBSAR amplitude. In this paper we consider the so-called discontinuous GBSAR acquisition mode. The interferometric process is not always straightforward: it requires appropriate data processing and analysis tools. One of the main critical steps is phase unwrapping, which can critically affect the deformation measurements. In this paper we describe the procedure used at the CTTC to process and analyse discontinuous GBSAR data. In the second part of the paper we describe the approach based on GBSAR amplitude images and an image-matching method.

  1. Precipitation and microphysical processes observed by three polarimetric X-band radars and ground-based instrumentation during HOPE

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Xinxin; Evaristo, Raquel; Simmer, Clemens; Handwerker, Jan; Trömel, Silke

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a first analysis of precipitation and related microphysical processes observed by three polarimetric X-band Doppler radars (BoXPol, JuXPol and KiXPol) in conjunction with a ground-based network of disdrometers, rain gauges and vertically pointing micro rain radars (MRRs) during the High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2) Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) during April and May 2013 in Germany. While JuXPol...

  2. Ground based interferometric radar initial look at Longview, Blue Springs, Tuttle Creek, and Milford Dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Huazeng

    Measuring millimeter and smaller deformation has been demonstrated in the literature using RADAR. To address in part the limitations in current commercial satellite-based SAR datasets, a University of Missouri (MU) team worked with GAMMA Remote Sensing to develop a specialized (dual-frequency, polarimetric, and interferometric) ground-based real-aperture RADAR (GBIR) instrument. The GBIR device is portable with its tripod system and control electronics. It can be deployed to obtain data with high spatial resolution (i.e. on the order of 1 meter) and high temporal resolution (i.e. on the order 1 minute). The high temporal resolution is well suited for measurements of rapid deformation. From the same geodetic position, the GBIR may collect dual frequency data set using C-band and Ku-band. The overall goal of this project is to measure the deformation from various scenarios by applying the GBIR system. Initial efforts have been focusing on testing the system performance on different types of targets. This thesis details a number of my efforts on experimental and processing activities at the start of the MU GBIR imaging project. For improved close range capability, a wideband dual polarized antenna option was produced and tested. For GBIR calibration, several trihedral corner reflectors were designed and fabricated. In addition to experimental activities and site selection, I participated in advanced data processing activities. I processed GBIR data in several ways including single-look-complex (SLC) image generation, imagery registration, and interferometric processing. A number of initial-processed GBIR image products are presented from four dams: Longview, Blue Springs, Tuttle Creek, and Milford. Excellent imaging performance of the MU GBIR has been observed for various target types such as riprap, concrete, soil, rock, metal, and vegetation. Strong coherence of the test scene has been observed in the initial interferograms.

  3. Evaluation of Radar Vegetation Indices for Vegetation Water Content Estimation Using Data from a Ground-Based SMAP Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Prashant K.; O'Neill, Peggy; Cosh, Michael; Lang, Roger; Joseph, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Vegetation water content (VWC) is an important component of microwave soil moisture retrieval algorithms. This paper aims to estimate VWC using L band active and passive radar/radiometer datasets obtained from a NASA ground-based Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) simulator known as ComRAD (Combined Radar/Radiometer). Several approaches to derive vegetation information from radar and radiometer data such as HH, HV, VV, Microwave Polarization Difference Index (MPDI), HH/VV ratio, HV/(HH+VV), HV/(HH+HV+VV) and Radar Vegetation Index (RVI) are tested for VWC estimation through a generalized linear model (GLM). The overall analysis indicates that HV radar backscattering could be used for VWC content estimation with highest performance followed by HH, VV, MPDI, RVI, and other ratios.

  4. Precipitation and microphysical processes observed by three polarimetric X-band radars and ground-based instrumentation during HOPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xinxin; Evaristo, Raquel; Simmer, Clemens; Handwerker, Jan; Trömel, Silke

    2016-06-01

    This study presents a first analysis of precipitation and related microphysical processes observed by three polarimetric X-band Doppler radars (BoXPol, JuXPol and KiXPol) in conjunction with a ground-based network of disdrometers, rain gauges and vertically pointing micro rain radars (MRRs) during the High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2) Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) during April and May 2013 in Germany. While JuXPol and KiXPol were continuously observing the central HOPE area near Forschungszentrum Jülich at a close distance, BoXPol observed the area from a distance of about 48.5 km. MRRs were deployed in the central HOPE area and one MRR close to BoXPol in Bonn, Germany. Seven disdrometers and three rain gauges providing point precipitation observations were deployed at five locations within a 5 km × 5 km region, while three other disdrometers were collocated with the MRR in Bonn. The daily rainfall accumulation at each rain gauge/disdrometer location estimated from the three X-band polarimetric radar observations showed very good agreement. Accompanying microphysical processes during the evolution of precipitation systems were well captured by the polarimetric X-band radars and corroborated by independent observations from the other ground-based instruments.

  5. Ground-based radar reflectivity mosaic of mei-yu precipitation systems over the Yangtze River-Huaihe River basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yali; Qian, Weimiao; Gong, Yu; Wang, Hongyan; Zhang, Da-Lin

    2016-11-01

    The 3D radar reflectivity produced by a mosaic software system, with measurements from 29 operational weather radars in the Yangtze River-Huaihe River Basins (YRHRB) during the mei-yu season of 2007, is compared to coincident TRMM PR observations in order to evaluate the value of the ground-based radar reflectivity mosaic in characterizing the 3D structures of mei-yu precipitation. Results show reasonable agreement in the composite radar reflectivity between the two datasets, with a correlation coefficient of 0.8 and a mean bias of -1 dB. The radar mosaic data at constant altitudes are reasonably consistent with the TRMM PR observations in the height range of 2-5 km, revealing essentially the same spatial distribution of radar echo and nearly identical histograms of reflectivity. However, at altitudes above 5 km, the mosaic data overestimate reflectivity and have slower decreasing rates with height compared to the TRMM PR observations. The areas of convective and stratiform precipitation, based on the mosaic reflectivity distribution at 3-km altitude, are highly correlated with the corresponding regions in the TRMM products, with correlation coefficients of 0.92 and 0.97 and mean relative differences of -7.9% and -2.5%, respectively. Finally, the usefulness of the mosaic reflectivity at 3-km altitude at 6-min intervals is illustrated using a mesoscale convective system that occurred over the YRHRB.

  6. Ground-based microwave weather radar observations and retrievals during the 2014 Holuhraun eruption (Bárðarbunga, Iceland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mereu, Luigi; Silvio Marzano, Frank; Barsotti, Sara; Montopoli, Mario; Yeo, Richard; Arngrimsson, Hermann; Björnsson, Halldór; Bonadonna, Costanza

    2015-04-01

    During an eruptive event the real-time forecasting of ash dispersal into the atmosphere is a key factor to prevent air traffic disasters. The ash plume is extremely hazardous to aircraft that inadvertently may fly through it. Real-time monitoring of such phenomena is crucial, particularly to obtain specific data for the initialization of eruption and dispersion models in terms of source parameters. The latter, such as plume height, ash concentration, mass flow rate and size spectra, are usually very difficult to measure or to estimate with a relatively good accuracy. Over the last years different techniques have been developed to improved ash plume detection and retrieval. Satellite-based observations, using multi-frequency visible and infrared radiometers, are usually exploited for monitoring and measuring dispersed ash clouds. The observations from geostationary orbit suffer from a relatively poor spatial resolution, whereas the low orbit level has a relatively poor temporal resolution. Moreover, the field-of-view of infrared radiometric measurements may be reduced by obstructions caused by water and ice clouds lying between the ground and the sensor's antenna. Weather radar-based observations represent an emerging technique to detect and, to a certain extent, mitigate the hazard from the ash plumes. Ground-based microwave scanning radar systems can provide the three-dimensional information about the detected ash volume with a fairly high spatial resolution every few minutes and in all weather conditions. Methodological studies have recently investigated the possibility of using single-polarization and dual-polarization ground-based radar for the remote sensing of volcanic ash cloud. In this respect, radar observations can be complementary to satellite observations. A microphysical electromagnetic characterization of volcanic ash was carried out in terms of dielectric properties, composition, size and orientation of ash particles. An extended Volcanic Ash Radar

  7. Comparison of NO2 vertical profiles from satellite and ground based measurements over Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni, Pavan; Bortoli, Daniele; Costa, Maria João; Silva, Ana Maria; Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Giovanelli, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    The Intercomparison of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) vertical profiles, derived from the satellite based HALogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) measurements and from the ground based UV-VIS spectrometer GASCOD (Gas Analyzer Spectrometer Correlating Optical Differences) observations at the Mario Zucchelli Station (MZS), in Antarctica, are done for the first time. It is shown here that both datasets are in good agreement showing the same features in terms of magnitude, profile structure, a...

  8. Analysis of a dryline-like feature in northern Germany detected by ground-based microwave profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spaenkuch, Dietrich [Leibniz-Soziaetet der Wissenschaften zu Berlin e.V. (Germany); Gueldner, Juergen [Deutscher Wetterdienst, Lindenberg (Germany). Meteorologisches Observatorium Lindenberg - Richard-Assmann-Observatorium; Bender, Michael [Helmholtz-Zentrum Potsdam, Potsdam (DE). Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ); Steinhagen, Hans

    2011-08-15

    Two dryline-like humidity drops without considerable temperature change were detected by the ground-based microwave radiometer profiler (MWRP) at the Richard-Assmann-Observatory Lindenberg (52.21 N, 14.12 E) on April 28, 2007. The detailed analysis of these two events includes cloud radar and radar wind profiler measurements at the site as well as data from the surface synoptic network and from integrated water vapour (IWV) maps derived from GPS. The first more pronounced humidity drop is part of a roughly 200 km long line that meets the criterion of a classical dryline or dewpoint front, namely of a moisture gradient larger 3.5 g m{sup -3} per 100 km. This dewpoint front is ahead of an approaching cold front and is caused by strong downdraft induced by low tropospheric wind shear due to weakening of a midtropospheric high over Germany. It consisted in particular in two kernels of variable size depending on their stage. The fate of the kernels - migration, speed, unification and divorce - is described in detail. Their lifetime was a bit more than 9 hours. The second humidity drop at the site was observed after the passage of the cold front and was caused by dry advection behind the front. Both events are predicted by the numerical weather prediction model COSMO-EU of the German Weather Service to some extent.

  9. Synergetic ground-based methods for remote measurements of ozone vertical profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeyev, Yuriy; Kostsov, Vladimir; Virolainen, Yana

    2013-05-01

    The technique of combining ground-based measurements in infrared and microwave spectral regions in order to achieve higher accuracy of ozone profile retrieval in extensive altitude ranges is described and analyzed. The information content, errors, altitude ranges and vertical resolution of ozone profile retrieval have been studied on the basis of numerical simulation of synergetic experiments. Optimal conditions of measurements are defined and requirements to additional information are formulated. The first results on ozone vertical profile retrieval using groundbased measurements of FTIR-spectrometer and microwave radiometer are given.

  10. A Semiautomated Multilayer Picking Algorithm for Ice-sheet Radar Echograms Applied to Ground-Based Near-Surface Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onana, Vincent De Paul; Koenig, Lora Suzanne; Ruth, Julia; Studinger, Michael; Harbeck, Jeremy P.

    2014-01-01

    Snow accumulation over an ice sheet is the sole mass input, making it a primary measurement for understanding the past, present, and future mass balance. Near-surface frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) radars image isochronous firn layers recording accumulation histories. The Semiautomated Multilayer Picking Algorithm (SAMPA) was designed and developed to trace annual accumulation layers in polar firn from both airborne and ground-based radars. The SAMPA algorithm is based on the Radon transform (RT) computed by blocks and angular orientations over a radar echogram. For each echogram's block, the RT maps firn segmented-layer features into peaks, which are picked using amplitude and width threshold parameters of peaks. A backward RT is then computed for each corresponding block, mapping the peaks back into picked segmented-layers. The segmented layers are then connected and smoothed to achieve a final layer pick across the echogram. Once input parameters are trained, SAMPA operates autonomously and can process hundreds of kilometers of radar data picking more than 40 layers. SAMPA final pick results and layer numbering still require a cursory manual adjustment to correct noncontinuous picks, which are likely not annual, and to correct for inconsistency in layer numbering. Despite the manual effort to train and check SAMPA results, it is an efficient tool for picking multiple accumulation layers in polar firn, reducing time over manual digitizing efforts. The trackability of good detected layers is greater than 90%.

  11. Mobile Ground-Based Radar Sensor for Localization and Mapping: An Evaluation of two Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Vivet

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with robotic applications using a ground‐based radar sensor for simultaneous localization and mapping problems. In mobile robotics, radar technology is interesting because of its long range and the robustness of radar waves to atmospheric conditions, making these sensors well‐suited for extended outdoor robotic applications. Two localization and mapping approaches using data obtained from a 360° field of view microwave radar sensor are presented and compared. The first method is a trajectory‐ oriented simultaneous localization and mapping technique, which makes no landmark assumptions and avoids the data association problem. The estimation of the ego‐motion makes use of the Fourier‐Mellin transform for registering radar images in a sequence, from which the rotation and translation of the sensor motion can be estimated. The second approach uses the consequence of using a rotating range sensor in high speed robotics. In such a situation, movement combinations create distortions in the collected data. Velocimetry is achieved here by explicitly analysing these measurement distortions. As a result, the trajectory of the vehicle and then the radar map of outdoor environments can be obtained. The evaluation of experimental results obtained by the two methods is presented on real‐world data from a vehicle moving at 30 km/h over a 2.5 km course.

  12. Investigating the long-term evolution of subtropical ozone profiles applying ground-based FTIR spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    García, O.E.; Schneider, M; A. Redondas; Y. González; Hase, F.; Blumenstock, T.; Sepúlveda, E.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the long-term evolution of subtropical ozone profile time series (1999–2010) obtained from ground-based FTIR (Fourier Transform InfraRed) spectrometry at the Izaña Observatory ozone super-site. Different ozone retrieval strategies are examined, analysing the influence of an additional temperature retrieval and different constraints. The theoretical assessment reveals that the FTIR system is able to resolve four independent ozone layers with a precision of better than 6...

  13. A comparison of mixing depths observed by ground-based wind profilers and an airborne lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, A.B.; Senff, C. [Univ. of Colorado/NOAA Environmental Technology Lab., Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences, Boulder, CO (United States); Banta, R.M. [NOAA Environmental Technology Lab., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The mixing depth is one of the most important parameters in air pollution studies because it determines the vertical extent of the `box` in which pollutants are mixed and dispersed. During the 1995 Southern Oxidants Study (SOS95), scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) deployed four 915-MHz boundary-layer radar/wind profilers (hereafter radars) in and around the Nashville, Tennessee metropolitan area. Scientists from NOAA/ETL also operated an ultraviolet differential absorption lidar (DIAL) onboard a CASA-212 aircraft. Profiles from radar and DIAL can be used to derive estimates of the mixing depth. The methods used for both instruments are similar in that they depend on information derived from the backscattered power. However, different scattering mechanisms for the radar and DIAL mean that different tracers of mixing depth are measured. In this paper we compare the mixing depth estimates obtained from the radar and DIAL and discuss the similarities and differences that occur. (au)

  14. Ground-based microwave measuring of middle atmosphere ozone and temperature profiles during sudden stratospheric warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigin, A. M.; Shvetsov, A. A.; Krasilnikov, A. A.; Kulikov, M. Y.; Karashtin, D. A.; Mukhin, D.; Bolshakov, O. S.; Fedoseev, L. I.; Ryskin, V. G.; Belikovich, M. V.; Kukin, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    We carried out the experimental campaign aimed to study the response of middle atmosphere on a sudden stratospheric warming in winter 2011-2012 above Nizhny Novgorod, Russia (56N, 44E). We employed the ground-based microwave complex for remote sensing of middle atmosphere developed in the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Science. The complex combines two room-temperature radiometers, i.e. microwave ozonometer and the stratospheric thermometer. Ozonometer is a heterodyne spectroradiometer, operating in a range of frequencies that include the rotation transition of ozone molecules with resonance frequency 110.8 GHz. Operating frequency range of the stratospheric thermometer is 52.5-5.4 GHz and includes lower frequency edge of 5 mm molecular oxygen absorption bands and among them two relatively weak lines of O2 emission. Digital fast Fourier transform spectrometers developed by "Acqiris" are employed for signal spectral analysis. The spectrometers have frequency range 0.05-1 GHz and realizes the effective resolution about 61 KHz. For retrieval vertical profiles of ozone and temperature from radiometric data we applied novel method based on Bayesian approach to inverse problem solution, which assumed a construction of probability distribution of the characteristics of retrieved profiles with taking into account measurement noise and available a priori information about possible distributions of ozone and temperature in the middle atmosphere. Here we introduce the results of the campaign in comparison with Aura MLS data. Presented data includes one sudden stratospheric warming event which took place in January 13-14 and was accompanied by temperature increasing up to 310 K at 45 km height. During measurement period, ozone and temperature variations were (almost) anti-correlated, and total ozone abundance achieved a local maxima during the stratosphere cooling phase. In general, results of ground-based measurements are in good agreement with

  15. Combining dual-polarization radar and ground-based observations to study the effect of riming on ice particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisseev, Dmitri; von Lerber, Annakaisa; Tiira, Jussi

    2017-04-01

    Recently a new microphysical scheme based on a single ice-phase category was proposed for the use in numerical weather prediction models. In the proposed scheme, ice particle properties are predicted and vary in time and space. One of the attributes of the proposed scheme is that the prefactor of a power-law relation that links mass and size of ice particles is determined by the rime mass fraction, while the exponent is kept constant. According to this the maximum dimensions of ice particles do not change during riming until graupel growth phase is reached. The dual-polarization radar observations given an additional insight on what are the physical properties of ice particles. Often, it is assumed that differential reflectivity should decrease because of riming. The motivation for this is that heavy riming would transform an ice particle to graupel. A graupel particle typically would have an almost spherical shape and therefore the differential reflectivity will become smaller. On the other hand, at the earlier stages ice particle shape may not change much, while its mass and therefore the density increases. This would lead to the increase of the differential reflectivity, for example. By combining ground-based observations, which allow to quantify the effect of riming on snowfall, and dual-polarization radar observations we investigate the impact of riming on ice particle properties, i.e. mass, density and shape. Furthermore, a connection between, bulk properties of ice particles, liquid water path, radar equivalent reflectivity factor and precipitation rate observations is established. The study is based on data collected during US DOE Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC) field campaign that took place in Hyytiala, Finland. A detailed analysis of two events is presented to illustrate the method.

  16. Airborne and ground based lidar measurements of the atmospheric pressure profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, C. Laurence; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Dombrowski, Mark; Weng, Chi Y.

    1989-01-01

    The first high accuracy remote measurements of the atmospheric pressure profile have been made. The measurements were made with a differential absorption lidar system that utilizes tunable alexandrite lasers. The absorption in the trough between two lines in the oxygen A-band near 760 nm was used for probing the atmosphere. Measurements of the two-dimensional structure of the pressure field were made in the troposphere from an aircraft looking down. Also, measurements of the one-dimensional structure were made from the ground looking up. Typical pressure accuracies for the aircraft measurements were 1.5-2 mbar with a 30-m vertical resolution and a 100-shot average (20 s), which corresponds to a 2-km horizontal resolution. Typical accuracies for the upward viewing ground based measurements were 2.0 mbar for a 30-m resolution and a 100-shot average.

  17. Passive Microwave Soil Moisture Retrieval through Combined Radar/Radiometer Ground Based Simulator with Special Reference to Dielectric Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Prashant K., ,, Dr.; O'Neill, Peggy, ,, Dr.

    2014-05-01

    Soil moisture is an important element for weather and climate prediction, hydrological sciences, and applications. Hence, measurements of this hydrologic variable are required to improve our understanding of hydrological processes, ecosystem functions, and the linkages between the Earth's water, energy, and carbon cycles (Srivastava et al. 2013). The retrieval of soil moisture depends not only on parameterizations in the retrieval algorithm but also on the soil dielectric mixing models used (Behari 2005). Although a number of soil dielectric mixing models have been developed, testing these models for soil moisture retrieval has still not been fully explored, especially with SMAP-like simulators. The main objective of this work focuses on testing different dielectric models for soil moisture retrieval using the Combined Radar/Radiometer (ComRAD) ground-based L-band simulator developed jointly by NASA/GSFC and George Washington University (O'Neill et al., 2006). The ComRAD system was deployed during a field experiment in 2012 in order to provide long active/passive measurements of two crops under controlled conditions during an entire growing season. L-band passive data were acquired at a look angle of 40 degree from nadir at both horizontal & vertical polarization. Currently, there are many dielectric models available for soil moisture retrieval; however, four dielectric models (Mironov, Dobson, Wang & Schmugge and Hallikainen) were tested here and found to be promising for soil moisture retrieval (some with higher performances). All the above-mentioned dielectric models were integrated with Single Channel Algorithms using H (SCA-H) and V (SCA-V) polarizations for the soil moisture retrievals. All the ground-based observations were collected from test site-United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) OPE3, located a few miles away from NASA GSFC. Ground truth data were collected using a theta probe and in situ sensors which were then used for validation. Analysis

  18. Multi-component vertical profile retrievals for ground-based MAX-DOAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Hitoshi; Kanaya, Yugo; Takashima, Hisahiro; van Roozendael, Michel; Wittrock, Folkard; Piters, Ankie

    2010-05-01

    We attempt to retrieve lower-tropospheric vertical profile information for 8 components from ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements. The components retrieved include aerosol extinction coefficients (AEC) at two wavelengths 357 and 476 nm, NO2, HCHO, CHOCHO, H2O, SO2, and O3 volume mixing ratios (VMRs). This method was applied to MAX-DOAS observations performed at Cabauw, the Netherlands (52.0°N, 4.9°E) in June-July 2009 during the Cabauw Intercomparison campaign of Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI) campaign. For the lowest layer of retrieved profiles at 0-1 km, two channels of AEC values reveal consistent variations. NO2 showed typical diurnal variations with maximum in early morning and minimum in the afternoon. Positive correlations between HCHO and CHOCHO were often seen. H2O VMR agreed well with that derived from NCEP surface data, and was used to judge cloudy cases after conversion to relative humidity. All these results support the capability of MAX-DOAS observations applicable to various air quality studies. Similar multi-component retrievals applied to observations in Japan are also presented in this talk.

  19. Investigating the long-term evolution of subtropical ozone profiles applying ground-based FTIR spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. E. García

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the long-term evolution of subtropical ozone profile time series (1999–2010 obtained from ground-based FTIR (Fourier Transform InfraRed spectrometry at the Izaña Observatory ozone super-site. Different ozone retrieval strategies are examined, analysing the influence of an additional temperature retrieval and different constraints. The theoretical assessment reveals that the FTIR system is able to resolve four independent ozone layers with a precision of better than 6% in the troposphere and of better than 3% in the lower, middle and upper stratosphere. This total error includes the smoothing error, which dominates the random error budget. Furthermore, we estimate that the measurement noise as well as uncertainties in the applied atmospheric temperature profiles and instrumental line shape are leading error sources. We show that a simultaneous temperature retrieval can significantly reduce the total random errors and that a regular determination of the instrumental line shape is important for producing a consistent long-term dataset. These theoretical precision estimates are empirically confirmed by daily intercomparisons with Electro Chemical Cell (ECC sonde profiles. In order to empirically document the long-term stability of the FTIR ozone profile data we compare the linear trends and seasonal cycles as obtained from the FTIR and ECC time series. Concerning seasonality, in winter both techniques observe stratospheric ozone profiles that are typical middle latitude profiles (low tropopause, low ozone maximum concentrations and in summer/autumn profiles that are typical tropical profiles (high tropopause, high maximum concentrations. The linear trends estimated from the FTIR and the ECC datasets agree within their error bars. For the FTIR time series, we observe a significant negative trend in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere of about −0.2% yr−1 and a significant positive trend in the middle and

  20. Investigating the long-term evolution of subtropical ozone profiles applying ground-based FTIR spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, O. E.; Schneider, M.; Redondas, A.; González, Y.; Hase, F.; Blumenstock, T.; Sepúlveda, E.

    2012-11-01

    This study investigates the long-term evolution of subtropical ozone profile time series (1999-2010) obtained from ground-based FTIR (Fourier Transform InfraRed) spectrometry at the Izaña Observatory ozone super-site. Different ozone retrieval strategies are examined, analysing the influence of an additional temperature retrieval and different constraints. The theoretical assessment reveals that the FTIR system is able to resolve four independent ozone layers with a precision of better than 6% in the troposphere and of better than 3% in the lower, middle and upper stratosphere. This total error includes the smoothing error, which dominates the random error budget. Furthermore, we estimate that the measurement noise as well as uncertainties in the applied atmospheric temperature profiles and instrumental line shape are leading error sources. We show that a simultaneous temperature retrieval can significantly reduce the total random errors and that a regular determination of the instrumental line shape is important for producing a consistent long-term dataset. These theoretical precision estimates are empirically confirmed by daily intercomparisons with Electro Chemical Cell (ECC) sonde profiles. In order to empirically document the long-term stability of the FTIR ozone profile data we compare the linear trends and seasonal cycles as obtained from the FTIR and ECC time series. Concerning seasonality, in winter both techniques observe stratospheric ozone profiles that are typical middle latitude profiles (low tropopause, low ozone maximum concentrations) and in summer/autumn profiles that are typical tropical profiles (high tropopause, high maximum concentrations). The linear trends estimated from the FTIR and the ECC datasets agree within their error bars. For the FTIR time series, we observe a significant negative trend in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere of about -0.2% yr-1 and a significant positive trend in the middle and upper stratosphere of about +0

  1. Validation of stratospheric temperature profiles from a ground-based microwave radiometer with other techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Haefele, Alexander; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature trends has become recognized as an important indicator of climate change, because different climate forcing mechanisms exhibit distinct vertical warming and cooling patterns. For example, the cooling of the stratosphere is an indicator for climate change as it provides evidence of natural and anthropogenic climate forcing just like surface warming. Despite its importance, our understanding of the observed stratospheric temperature trend and our ability to test simulations of the stratospheric response to emissions of greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances remains limited. One of the main reason is because stratospheric long-term datasets are sparse and obtained trends differ from one another. Different techniques allow to measure stratospheric temperature profiles as radiosonde, lidar or satellite. The main advantage of microwave radiometers against these other instruments is a high temporal resolution with a reasonable good spatial resolution. Moreover, the measurement at a fixed location allows to observe local atmospheric dynamics over a long time period, which is crucial for climate research. This study presents an evaluation of the stratospheric temperature profiles from a newly ground-based microwave temperature radiometer (TEMPERA) which has been built and designed at the University of Bern. The measurements from TEMPERA are compared with the ones from other different techniques such as in-situ (radiosondes), active remote sensing (lidar) and passive remote sensing on board of Aura satellite (MLS) measurements. In addition a statistical analysis of the stratospheric temperature obtained from TEMPERA measurements during four years of data has been performed. This analysis evidenced the capability of TEMPERA radiometer to monitor the temperature in the stratosphere for a long-term. The detection of some singular sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) during the analyzed period shows the necessity of these

  2. Comparison of GOME tropospheric NO2 columns with NO2 profiles deduced from ground-based in situ measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Schaub

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen dioxide (NO2 vertical tropospheric column densities (VTCs retrieved from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME are compared to coincident ground-based tropospheric NO2 columns. The ground-based columns are deduced from in situ measurements at different altitudes in the Alps for 1997 to June 2003, yielding a unique long-term comparison of GOME NO2 VTC data retrieved by a collaboration of KNMI (Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute and BIRA/IASB (Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy with independently derived tropospheric NO2 profiles. A first comparison relates the GOME retrieved tropospheric columns to the tropospheric columns obtained by integrating the ground-based NO2 measurements. For a second comparison, the tropospheric profiles constructed from the ground-based measurements are first multiplied with the averaging kernel (AK of the GOME retrieval. The second approach makes the comparison independent from the a priori NO2 profile used in the GOME retrieval. This allows splitting the total difference between the column data sets into two contributions: one that is due to differences between the a priori and the ground-based NO2 profile shapes, and another that can be attributed to uncertainties in both the remaining retrieval parameters (such as, e.g., surface albedo or aerosol concentration and the ground-based in situ NO2 profiles. For anticyclonic clear sky conditions the comparison indicates a good agreement between the columns (n=157, R=0.70/0.74 for the first/second comparison approach, respectively. The mean relative difference (with respect to the ground-based columns is −7% with a standard deviation of 40% and GOME on average slightly underestimating the ground-based columns. Both data sets show a similar seasonal behaviour with a distinct maximum of spring NO2 VTCs. Further analysis indicates small GOME columns being systematically smaller than the ground-based ones. The influence of different shapes in the a

  3. Ground-based lidar and microwave radiometry synergy for high vertical resolution absolute humidity profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Verdejo, María; Crewell, Susanne; Löhnert, Ulrich; Orlandi, Emiliano; Di Girolamo, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Continuous monitoring of atmospheric humidity profiles is important for many applications, e.g., assessment of atmospheric stability and cloud formation. Nowadays there are a wide variety of ground-based sensors for atmospheric humidity profiling. Unfortunately there is no single instrument able to provide a measurement with complete vertical coverage, high vertical and temporal resolution and good performance under all weather conditions, simultaneously. For example, Raman lidar (RL) measurements can provide water vapor with a high vertical resolution, albeit with limited vertical coverage, due to sunlight contamination and the presence of clouds. Microwave radiometers (MWRs) receive water vapor information throughout the troposphere, though their vertical resolution is poor. In this work, we present an MWR and RL system synergy, which aims to overcome the specific sensor limitations. The retrieval algorithm combining these two instruments is an optimal estimation method (OEM), which allows for an uncertainty analysis of the retrieved profiles. The OEM combines measurements and a priori information, taking the uncertainty of both into account. The measurement vector consists of a set of MWR brightness temperatures and RL water vapor profiles. The method is applied to a 2-month field campaign around Jülich (Germany), focusing on clear sky periods. Different experiments are performed to analyze the improvements achieved via the synergy compared to the individual retrievals. When applying the combined retrieval, on average the theoretically determined absolute humidity uncertainty is reduced above the last usable lidar range by a factor of ˜ 2 with respect to the case where only RL measurements are used. The analysis in terms of degrees of freedom per signal reveal that most information is gained above the usable lidar range, especially important during daytime when the lidar vertical coverage is limited. The retrieved profiles are further evaluated using

  4. Validation of CALIPSO space-borne-derived attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles using a ground-based lidar in Athens, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Mamouri

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We present initial aerosol validation results of the space-borne lidar CALIOP -onboard the CALIPSO satellite- Level 1 attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles, using coincident observations performed with a ground-based lidar in Athens, Greece (37.9° N, 23.6° E. A multi-wavelength ground-based backscatter/Raman lidar system is operating since 2000 at the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA in the framework of the European Aerosol Research LIdar NETwork (EARLINET, the first lidar network for tropospheric aerosol studies on a continental scale. Since July 2006, a total of 40 coincidental aerosol ground-based lidar measurements were performed over Athens during CALIPSO overpasses. The ground-based measurements were performed each time CALIPSO overpasses the station location within a maximum distance of 100 km. The duration of the ground–based lidar measurements was approximately two hours, centred on the satellite overpass time. From the analysis of the ground-based/satellite correlative lidar measurements, a mean bias of the order of 22% for daytime measurements and of 8% for nighttime measurements with respect to the CALIPSO profiles was found for altitudes between 3 and 10 km. The mean bias becomes much larger for altitudes lower that 3 km (of the order of 60% which is attributed to the increase of aerosol horizontal inhomogeneity within the Planetary Boundary Layer, resulting to the observation of possibly different air masses by the two instruments. In cases of aerosol layers underlying Cirrus clouds, comparison results for aerosol tropospheric profiles become worse. This is attributed to the significant multiple scattering effects in Cirrus clouds experienced by CALIPSO which result in an attenuation which is less than that measured by the ground-based lidar.

  5. Quality assessment of weather radar wind profiles during bird migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holleman, I.; van Gasteren, H.; Bouten, W.

    2008-01-01

    Wind profiles from an operational C-band Doppler radar have been combined with data from a bird tracking radar to assess the wind profile quality during bird migration. The weather radar wind profiles (WRWPs) are retrieved using the well-known volume velocity processing (VVP) technique. The X-band

  6. Mapping plasma structures in the high-latitude ionosphere using beacon satellite, incoherent scatter radar and ground-based magnetometer observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Neubert

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available In the autumn of the year 2000, four radio receivers capable of tracking various beacon satellites were set up along the southwestern coast of Greenland. They are used to reconstruct images of the ionospheric plasma density distribution via the tomographic method. In order to test and validate tomographic imaging under the highly variable conditions often prevailing in the high-latitude ionosphere, a time interval was selected when the Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar conducted measurements of the ionospheric plasma density while the radio receivers tracked a number of beacon satellites. A comparison between two-dimensional images of the plasma density distribution obtained from the radar and the satellite receivers revealed generally good agreement between radar measurements and tomographic images. Observed discrepancies can be attributed to F region plasma patches moving through the field of view with a speed of several hundred meters per second, thereby smearing out the tomographic image. A notable mismatch occurred around local magnetic midnight when a magnetospheric substorm breakup occurred in the vicinity of southwest Greenland (identified from ground-based magnetometer observations. The breakup was associated with a sudden intensification of the westward auroral electrojet which was centered at about 69 and extended up to some 73 corrected geomagnetic latitude. Ground-based magnetometer data may thus have the potential of indicating when the tomographic method is at risk and may fail. We finally outline the application of tomographic imaging, when combined with magnetic field data, to estimate ionospheric Joule heating rates.

  7. Analysis of Terminal Velocity and VHF Backscatter of Precipitation Particles Using Chung-Li VHF Radar Combined with Ground-Based Disdrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Lun Su and Yen-Hsyang Chu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The backscatter from precipitation particles observed by the vertically pointed antenna beam of the Chung-Li VHF radar and the drop size distributions measured by a ground-based disdrometer co-located at the radar site are analyzed and studied in this article. We find that the disdrometermeasured drop size distribution can be well approximated to a Gamma distribution. On the basis of this property and a power law approximation to the fallspeed-diameter relation VD = ADB, we derive the theoretical relation between terminal velocity VD and range-corrected VHF backscatter P of the precipitation particles. We find that the VD - P relation follows a power law in the form of VD = _ where _ _ both the functions of the precipitation parameters. Chu et al. (1999 first found that the relation between _ _ be empirically approximated to an exponential form of _ _ where _ a function of B and _ a factor associated with precipitation. In this article, under the assumptions of the Gamma distribution of the drop size distribution and the power-law relation between VD and D, we theoretically show that the analytical relation between _ _ follows an exponential form of _ _ where _ a function of the drop size distribution. The experimental results obtained by the Chung-Li VHF radar combined with the ground-based disdrometer measurements validate the exponential approximation to the _ _ The uses of the _ _ for the investigations of the rainfall rate and properties of drop size distribution are presented and discussed.

  8. Volcanic Ash Cloud Observation using Ground-based Ka-band Radar and Near-Infrared Lidar Ceilometer during the Eyjafjallajökull eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank S. Marzano

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Active remote sensing techniques can probe volcanic ash plumes, but their sensitivity at a given distance depends upon the sensor transmitted power, wavelength and polarization capability. Building on a previous numerical study at centimeter wavelength, this work aims at i simulating the distal ash particles polarimetric response of millimeter-wave radar and multi-wavelength optical lidar; ii developing and applying a model-based statistical retrieval scheme using a multi-sensor approach. The microphysical electromagnetic forward model of volcanic ash particle distribution, previously set up at microwaves, is extended to include non-spherical particle shapes, vesicular composition, silicate content and orientation phenomena for both millimeter and optical bands. Monte Carlo generation of radar and lidar signatures are driven by random variability of volcanic particle main parameters, using constraints from available data and experimental evidences. The considered case study is related to the ground-based observation of the Eyjafjallajökull (Iceland volcanic ash plume on May 15, 2010, carried out by the Atmospheric Research Station at Mace Head (Ireland with a 35-GHz Ka-band Doppler cloud radar and a 1064-nm ceilometer lidar. The detection and estimation of ash layer presence and composition is carried out using a Bayesian approach, which is trained by the Monte Carlo model-based dataset. Retrieval results are corroborated exploiting auxiliary data such as those from a ground-based microwave radiometer also positioned at Mace Head.

  9. a Compact Dial LIDAR for Ground-Based Ozone Atmospheric Profiling Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Young, R.; Carrion, W.; Pliutau, D.; Ganoe, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    A compact differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center to provide ozone, aerosol and cloud atmospheric measurements in a mobile trailer for ground-based atmospheric ozone campaigns. This lidar will be integrated into the Air Quality lidar Network (AQLNet) currently made up of four other ozone lidars across the country. The lidar system consists of a UV and green laser transmitter, a telescope and an optical signal receiver box with associated Licel photon counting and analog channels. The laser transmitter consist of a Coherent Evolution 30 TEM00 1-kHz diode pumped Q-switched Nd:YLF inter-cavity doubled laser pumping a Ce:LiCAF tunable UV laser with all the associated power and lidar control support units on a single system rack. A custom-designed Ce:LiCAF tunable UV laser has a wavelength range of 282 to 300-nm that is selectable between two or more wavelengths. The current wavelengths are online 286.4 nm and offline 293.1 nm. The 527-nm visible beam is transmitted into the atmosphere for aerosol measurements. The fourth harmonic 262 nm beam is split by a beamsplitter into two pump beams that pump each face of the Ce:LiCAF crystal. A short laser cavity consisting of a 60% reflective (1m radius of curvature) output mirror, a dispersive prism and a flat HR mirror is used to produce the UV wavelengths. In order to produce different wavelengths, the high-reflectivity rear mirror is mounted on a servo controlled galvanometer motor to allow rapid tuning between the on and offline ozone wavelengths. Typical laser results are 6.8-W at 527-nm, 800-mW at 262-nm and 130-mW at the UV transmitted wavelengths. The lidar receiver system consists of a receiver telescope with a 40-cm diameter parabolic mirror. A fiber optic cable transmits the received signal from the telescope to the receiver box, which houses the detectors. A separate one inch diameter telescope with PMT and filter is used to sample the very near field to allow

  10. Spaceborne cloud-profiling radar: instrument parameter optimization for resolving highly layered cloud structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chung-Chi; Tinel, Claire; Caillault, Karine; Testud, Jacques; Caubet, Eric

    2003-04-01

    EarthCARE, a candidate Earth Explorer Core mission of ESA, aims to improve our knowledge of the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth's radiative budget. The satellite will carry two nadir sounding active instruments: a Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) and a backscatter lidar. In addition, a multispectral cloud-imager, a Fourier transform spectrometer and a broadband radiometer complement the payload. The objective of the present study was to optimize the parameters of the CPR for retrieving accurate radiative profiles for highly layered cloud structures. Realistic cloud scenarios taken from ground-based experiments have been used for simulating the radar response to cloud layers. A radar simulator was developed initially for one-dimensional simulation of the radar echos. The cloud microphysical properties were retrieved using a model as a function of the reflectivity factor and temperature, based on information from in-situ measurements. An extensive parametric analysis was performed for various vertical resolutions and sensitivities which have direct impacts on the radar design and necessary resources on-board the satellite. The analysis demonstrated that the proposed radar characteristics will meet the top-of-the-atmosphere radiative flux density estimation accuracy of 10 W/m2 as recommended by WCRP.

  11. A Gaussian Random Field Approach for Merging Radar and Ground-Based Rainfall Data on Small Spatial and Temporal Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebsbach, K.; Friederichs, P.

    2014-12-01

    The generation of reliable precipitation products that explicitly account for spatial and temporal structures of precipitation events requires a combination of data with a variety of error structures and temporal resolutions. In-situ measurements are relatively accurate, but available only at sparse and irregularly distributed locations, whereas remote measurements cover areas but suffer from spatially and temporally inhomogeneous systematic errors. Besides gauge measurements are available on coarser spatial and temporal resolution in contrast to remote sensing measurements which are given on a fine spatial and temporal resolution. In our study we use precipitation rates from the composit of two X-band radars in Bonn and Jülich in Germany. Our aim is to formulate a statistical space-time model that aggregates and disaggregates precipitation rates from radar and gauge observations. We model a Gaussian random field as underlying process, where we face the task of dealing with a large non-Gaussian data set. To start the analysis of the unadjusted radar rainfall rates, we follow the work of D. Allcroft and C. Glasbey (2003) and transform the data to a truncated Gaussian distribution. The advantage of the latent variable approach is that it takes account of the occurence of rainfall and the intensity using a single process. We proceed by estimating the empirical correlation from these transformed values with maximum likelihood methods and fit a parametric correlation function that gives rise to a Gaussian random field. Since the transformation gives censored values to dry locations, we simulate values for this area that lie below some threshold and extend the Gaussian field to the whole domain. In order to merge gauge and radar data for precipitation, we first aggregate the data to a scale on which the comparison is reasonable and then disaggregate again back to smaller desirable scales. The disaggregation step consists of calculating the difference between radar

  12. Investigating the long-term evolution of subtropical ozone profiles applying ground-based FTIR spectrometry [Discussion paper

    OpenAIRE

    García, O.E.; Schneider, M; A. Redondas; Y. González; Hase, F.; Blumenstock, T.; Sepúlveda, E.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the long-term evolution of subtropical ozone profile time series (1999–2010) obtained from different ground-based FTIR (Fourier Transform InfraRed) retrieval setups. We examine the influence of an additional temperature retrieval and different constraints. The study is performed at the Izaña Observatory ozone super-site (Tenerife Island, Spain). The FTIR system is able to resolve four independent ozone layers with a theoretical precision of better than 7.5% in the troposphere, ...

  13. A proposal on the study of solar-terrestrial coupling processes with atmospheric radars and ground-based observation network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Toshitaka; Yamamoto, Mamoru; Hashiguchi, Hiroyuki; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Ogawa, Yasunobu; Nozawa, Satonori; Miyaoka, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Akimasa

    2016-09-01

    The solar energy can mainly be divided into two categories: the solar radiation and the solar wind. The former maximizes at the equator, generating various disturbances over a wide height range and causing vertical coupling processes of the atmosphere between the troposphere and middle and upper atmospheres by upward propagating atmospheric waves. The energy and material flows that occur in all height regions of the equatorial atmosphere are named as "Equatorial Fountain." These processes from the bottom also cause various space weather effects, such as satellite communication and Global Navigation Satellite System positioning. While, the electromagnetic energy and high-energy plasma particles in the solar wind converge into the polar region through geomagnetic fields. These energy/particle inflow results in auroral Joule heating and ion drag of the atmosphere particularly during geomagnetic storms and substorms. The ion outflow from the polar ionosphere controls ambient plasma constituents in the magnetosphere and may cause long-term variation of the atmosphere. We propose to clarify these overall coupling processes in the solar-terrestrial system from the bottom and from above through high-resolution observations at key latitudes in the equator and in the polar region. We will establish a large radar with active phased array antenna, called the Equatorial Middle and Upper atmosphere radar, in west Sumatra, Indonesia. We will participate in construction of the EISCAT_3D radar in northern Scandinavia. These radars will enhance the existing international radar network. We will also develop a global observation network of compact radio and optical remote sensing equipment from the equator to polar region.

  14. Spectrum Analysis of Wind Profiling Radar Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮征; 慕瑞琪; 魏鸣; 葛润生

    2014-01-01

    Unlike previous studies on wind turbulence spectrum in the planetary boundary layer, this investigation focuses on high-altitude (1-5 km) wind energy spectrum and turbulence spectrum under various weather conditions. A fast Fourier transform (FFT) is used to calculate the wind energy and turbulence spectrum density at high altitudes (1-5 km) based on wind profiling radar (WPR) measurements. The turbulence spectrum under stable weather conditions at high altitudes is expressed in powers within a frequency range of 2 × 10-5-10-3 s-1, and the slope b is between -0.82 and -1.04, indicating that the turbulence is in the transition from the energetic area to the inertial sub-range. The features of strong weather are reflected less obviously in the wind energy spectrum than in the turbulence spectrum, with peaks showing up at different heights in the latter spectrum. Cold windy weather appears over a period of 1.5 days in the turbulence spectrum. Wide-range rainstorms exhibit two or three peaks in the spectrum over a period of 15-20 h, while in severe convective weather conditions, there are two peaks at 13 and 9 h. The results indicate that spectrum analysis of wind profiling radar measurements can be used as a supplemental and helpful method for weather analysis.

  15. Ground-based Radar Detection of Near-Earth Asteroids%近地小行星地基雷达探测研究现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张翔; 季江徽

    2014-01-01

    Ground-based radar detection may act as a powerful means to determine the shape and physical properties of the asteroids in our Solar system. By measuring time delay and doppler frequency of the received echoes, radar systems provide information in ranging and radial velocity of the asteroids. Over the past few decades, more than 500 asteroids (mostly near-Earth ob jects) were detected using radar observations. There are two categories of radar detection: (1) The continuous wave detection, which is adopted to determine the roughness of an asteroid’s surface. (2) The delay-Doppler de-tection,which is likely to produce its three-dimensional model, and to define the rotational state. In the delay-Doppler detection, target asteroids are resolved in line-of-sight distance and line-of-sight velocity, providing two-dimensional images with spatial resolution as fine as meter-scale. Besides radar detection, several other techniques would also provide the shape model of the asteroids, among which the lightcurve inverse method is the most popular one to do that. In comparison with other methods, radar observation may have an advantage on spacial resolution. The lightcurves cannot reveal elaborate information on small features, and the intermediate-scale features of the inversed model are only suggestive. By contrast, radar detection produces resolved images. In this review, we present the radar observation technique and the method for recon-structing three-dimensional models of asteroids from radar measurements. In addition, we also provide several examples of asteroid models by radar detection, and then compare them with other observations for the shape reconstruction for the asteroids.%地基雷达探测是研究太阳系中小行星的重要方法。雷达探测主要有两种方式:(1)连续波探测,可得到小行星表面的粗糙度等参数;(2)延迟多普勒探测,用于反演小行星的三维形状模型并确定自转轴状态。与其他探测方法

  16. Comparing the Cloud Vertical Structure Derived from Several Methods Based on Radiosonde Profiles and Ground-based Remote Sensing Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa-Suros, M.; Calbo, J.; Gonzalez, J. A.; Long, Charles N.

    2014-08-27

    The cloud vertical distribution and especially the cloud base height, which is linked to cloud type, is an important characteristic in order to describe the impact of clouds in a changing climate. In this work several methods to estimate the cloud vertical structure (CVS) based on atmospheric sounding profiles are compared, considering number and position of cloud layers, with a ground based system which is taken as a reference: the Active Remote Sensing of Clouds (ARSCL). All methods establish some conditions on the relative humidity, and differ on the use of other variables, the thresholds applied, or the vertical resolution of the profile. In this study these methods are applied to 125 radiosonde profiles acquired at the ARM Southern Great Plains site during all seasons of year 2009 and endorsed by GOES images, to confirm that the cloudiness conditions are homogeneous enough across their trajectory. The overall agreement for the methods ranges between 44-88%; four methods produce total agreements around 85%. Further tests and improvements are applied on one of these methods. In addition, we attempt to make this method suitable for low resolution vertical profiles, which could be useful in atmospheric modeling. The total agreement, even when using low resolution profiles, can be improved up to 91% if the thresholds for a moist layer to become a cloud layer are modified to minimize false negatives with the current data set, thus improving overall agreement.

  17. Ground based lidar and microwave radiometry synergy for high vertically resolved thermodynamic profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Barrera-Verdejo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Continuous monitoring of atmospheric humidity and temperature profiles is important for many applications, e.g. assessment of atmospheric stability and cloud formation. While lidar measurements can provide high vertical resolution albeit with limited coverage, microwave radiometers receive information throughout the troposphere though their vertical resolution is poor. In order to overcome these specific limitations the synergy of a Microwave Radiometer (MWR and a Raman Lidar (RL system is presented in this work. The retrieval algorithm that combines these two instruments is an Optimal Estimation Method (OEM that allows for a uncertainty analysis of the retrieved profiles. The OEM combines measurements and a priori information taking the uncertainty of both into account. The measurement vector consists of a set of MWR brightness temperatures and RL water vapor profiles. The method is applied for a two month field campaign around Jülich, Germany for clear sky periods. Different experiments are performed to analyse the improvements achieved via the synergy compared to the individual retrievals. When applying the combined retrieval, on average the theoretically determined absolute humidity error can be reduced by 59.8% (37.9% with respect to the retrieval using only-MWR (only-RL data. The analysis in terms of degrees of freedom for signal reveals that most information is gained above the usable lidar range. The retrieved profiles are further evaluated using radiosounding and GPS water vapor measurements. Within a single case study we also explore the potential of the OEM for deriving the relative humidity profile, which is especially interesting to study cloud formation in the vicinity of cloud edges. To do so temperature information is added both from RL and MWR. For temperature, it is shown that the error is reduced by 47.1% (24.6% with respect to the only-MWR (only-RL profile. Due to the use of MWR brightness temperatures at multiple elevation

  18. Ground based lidar and microwave radiometry synergy for high vertically resolved thermodynamic profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Verdejo, M.; Crewell, S.; Löhnert, U.; Orlandi, E.; Di Girolamo, P.

    2015-05-01

    Continuous monitoring of atmospheric humidity and temperature profiles is important for many applications, e.g. assessment of atmospheric stability and cloud formation. While lidar measurements can provide high vertical resolution albeit with limited coverage, microwave radiometers receive information throughout the troposphere though their vertical resolution is poor. In order to overcome these specific limitations the synergy of a Microwave Radiometer (MWR) and a Raman Lidar (RL) system is presented in this work. The retrieval algorithm that combines these two instruments is an Optimal Estimation Method (OEM) that allows for a uncertainty analysis of the retrieved profiles. The OEM combines measurements and a priori information taking the uncertainty of both into account. The measurement vector consists of a set of MWR brightness temperatures and RL water vapor profiles. The method is applied for a two month field campaign around Jülich, Germany for clear sky periods. Different experiments are performed to analyse the improvements achieved via the synergy compared to the individual retrievals. When applying the combined retrieval, on average the theoretically determined absolute humidity error can be reduced by 59.8% (37.9%) with respect to the retrieval using only-MWR (only-RL) data. The analysis in terms of degrees of freedom for signal reveals that most information is gained above the usable lidar range. The retrieved profiles are further evaluated using radiosounding and GPS water vapor measurements. Within a single case study we also explore the potential of the OEM for deriving the relative humidity profile, which is especially interesting to study cloud formation in the vicinity of cloud edges. To do so temperature information is added both from RL and MWR. For temperature, it is shown that the error is reduced by 47.1% (24.6%) with respect to the only-MWR (only-RL) profile. Due to the use of MWR brightness temperatures at multiple elevation angles, the

  19. Molecular abundance profiles characterization of Jupiter'satmosphere using ground-based observations at 5 microns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doriann, Blain; Fouchet, Thierry; Encrenaz, Therese A.; Drossart, Pierre; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Orton, Glenn S.

    2016-10-01

    We report on early results of an observational campaign to support the Juno mission. At the beginning of this year, using TEXES (Texas Echelon cross-dispersed Echelle Spectrograph), mounted on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), we obtained maps of Jupiter in several spectral ranges between 1800 and 2200 cm-1 which probes the atmosphere in the 1-4 bar region, with a spectral resolution of R ≈ 7000 and an angular resolution of ≈ 1.5''. This dataset is analyzed by a code which combines a line-by-line radiative transfer model with a non-linear optimal estimation inversion method. The inversion takes into account the abundance profiles of AsH3 , CO, GeH4 and H2O, as well as clouds contribution, in addtion to the abundance profiles of NH3 and PH3 . We will present the inverted abundance profiles, their significance for the understanding of Jupiter's atmospheric dynamics, and how they will be useful for the determination of water abundance up to 200 bars, which is one of the main objectives of the instrument MWR (MicroWave Radiometer) mounted on the Juno spacecraft. This work will also be useful to prepare the analysis of the JIRAM (Jovian InfraRed Auroral Mapper) 5-microns data aboard Juno.

  20. Measuring molecular abundance profiles from 5 microns ground-based spectroscopy in support of JUNO investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, Doriann; Fouchet, Thierry; Encrenaz, Thérèse; Drossart, Pierre; Greathouse, Thomas; Orton, Glenn; Fletcher, Leigh

    2017-04-01

    We report on early results of an observational campaign to support the Juno mission. At the beginning of 2015, using TEXES (Texas Echelon cross-dispersed Echelle Spectrograph), mounted on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), we obtained data cubes of Jupiter in several spectral ranges between 2100 and 2200 cm-1 (4.5 - 4.7 μm) which probes the atmosphere in the 1-4 bar region, with a spectral resolution of R ≈ 7000 and an angular resolution of ≈ 1.5''. This dataset is analyzed by a code which combines a line-by-line radiative transfer model with a non-linear optimal estimation inversion method. The inversion takes into account the abundance profiles of AsH_3, CO, GeH4 and H_2O, as well as clouds contribution, in addtion to the abundance profiles of NH3 and PH_3. We will present the inverted abundance profiles, the spatial distribution of the molecular abundances, their significance for the understanding of Jupiter's atmospheric dynamics, and how this will be useful for the determination of water abundance up to 200 bars, which is one of the main objectives of the instrument MWR (MicroWave Radiometer) mounted on the Juno spacecraft. This work will also be useful to prepare the analysis of the JIRAM (Jovian InfraRed Auroral Mapper) 5-microns data aboard Juno.

  1. High-Resolution Mapping of Sea Ice, Icebergs and Growlers in Kongsfjorden, Svalbard, using Ground Based Radar, Satellite, and UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauknes, T. R.; Rouyet, L.; Solbø, S. A.; Sivertsen, A.; Storvold, R.; Akbari, V.; Negrel, J.; Gerland, S.

    2016-12-01

    The dynamics of sea ­ice has a well­ recognized role in the climate system and its extent and evolution is impacted by the global warming. In addition, calving of icebergs and growlers at the tidewater glacier fronts is a component of the mass loss in polar regions. Understanding of calving and ice ­ocean interaction, in particular at tidewater glacier front remains elusive, and a problematic uncertainty in climate change projections. Studying the distribution, volumetry and motion of sea ­ice, icebergs and growlers is thus essential to understand their interactions with the environment in order to be able to predict at short­term their drifts, e.g. to mitigate the risk for shipping, and at longer term the multiple relations with climate changes. Here, we present the results from an arctic fieldwork campaign conducted in Kongsfjorden, Svalbard in April 2016, where we used different remote sensing instruments to observe dynamics of sea ice, icebergs, and growlers. We used a terrestrial radar system, imaging the study area every second minute during the observation period. At the front of the Kronebreen glacier, calving events can be detected and the drift of the generated icebergs and growlers tracked with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. During the field campaign, we collected four Radarsat-2 quad-pol images, that will be used to classify the different types of sea ice. In addition, we used small unmanned aircraft (UAS) instrumented with high resolution cameras capturing HD video and still pictures. This allows to map and measure the size of icebergs and ice floes. Such information is essential to validate sensitivity and detection limits from the ground and satellite based measurements.

  2. A comparison of Ne (h model profiles with ground-based and topside sounder observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Depuev

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Monthly median empirical models IRI-95 and NeUoG were compared with incoherent scatter EISCAT and Millstone Hill observations as well as with El Arenosillo Digisonde N e (h bottomside profiles. A comparison was made for various seasons, levels of solar activity, daytime and night-time hours. The results on the topside comparison: 1 the IRI-95 model systematically and strongly overestimates the Ne (h effective scale height both for daytime and night-time periods especially during maximum and middle solar activity both at EISCAT and Millstone Hill; 2 the NeUoG model on the contrary systematically underestimates the scale height at all levels of solar activity. But the NeUoG model provides much better overall agreement with SD being less by a factor of 1.5-1.7 in comparison with the IRI-95 model results. The results on the bottom-side comparison: 1 the IRI-95 accuracy is different for daytime and night-time hours, being much worse for the night-time; 2 the NeUoG model similar to IRI-95 demonstrates much worse accuracy for the night-time hours; 3 the NeUoG model demonstrates no advantages over the IRI-95 model in the bottomside N e (h description. A new simple TopN e model for the N e (h topside distribution based on the EISCAT and Millstone Hill observations is proposed. The model is supposed to be normalized by the observed hmF 2 and NmF 2 values and is valid below a 600 km height. The TopN e model provides good approximation accuracy over EISCAT and Millstone Hill observations. A comparison with the independent Intercosmos-19 topside sounder observations is given.

  3. The CU Airborne MAX-DOAS instrument: ground based validation, and vertical profiling of aerosol extinction and trace gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Baidar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The University of Colorado Airborne Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS instrument uses solar stray light remote sensing to detect and quantify multiple trace gases, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2, glyoxal (CHOCHO, formaldehyde (HCHO, water vapor (H2O, nitrous acid (HONO, iodine monoxide (IO, bromine monoxide (BrO, and oxygen dimers (O4 at multiple wavelengths (360 nm, 477 nm, 577 nm and 632 nm simultaneously, and sensitively in the open atmosphere. The instrument is unique, in that it presents the first systematic implementation of MAX-DOAS on research aircraft, i.e. (1 includes measurements of solar stray light photons from nadir, zenith, and multiple elevation angles forward and below the plane by the same spectrometer/detector system, and (2 features a motion compensation system that decouples the telescope field of view (FOV from aircraft movements in real-time (< 0.35° accuracy. Sets of solar stray light spectra collected from nadir to zenith scans provide some vertical profile information within 2 km above and below the aircraft altitude, and the vertical column density (VCD below the aircraft is measured in nadir view. Maximum information about vertical profiles is derived simultaneously for trace gas concentrations and aerosol extinction coefficients over similar spatial scales and with a vertical resolution of typically 250 m during aircraft ascent/descent.

    The instrument is described, and data from flights over California during the CalNex and CARES air quality field campaigns is presented. Horizontal distributions of NO2 VCDs (below the aircraft maps are sampled with typically 1 km resolution, and show good agreement with two ground based CU MAX-DOAS instruments (slope 0.95 ± 0.09, R2 = 0.86. As a case study vertical profiles of NO2, CHOCHO, HCHO, and H2O mixing ratios and aerosol extinction coefficients

  4. Investigation the optical and radiative properties of aerosol vertical profile of boundary layer by lidar and ground based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W.; Chou, C.; Lin, P.; Wang, S.

    2011-12-01

    The planetary boundary layer is the air layer near the ground directly affected by diurnal heat, moisture, aerosol, and cloud transfer to or from the surface. In the daytime solar radiation heats the surface, initiating thermal instability or convection. Whereas, the scattering and absorption of aerosols or clouds might decrease the surface radiation or heat atmosphere which induce feedbacks such as the enhanced stratification and change in relative humidity in the boundary layer. This study is aimed to understand the possible radiative effect of aerosols basing on ground based aerosol measurements and lidar installed in National Taiwan University in Taipei. The optical and radiative properties of aerosols are dominated by aerosol composition, particle size, hygroscopicity property, and shape. In this study, aerosol instruments including integrating nephelometer, open air nephelometer, aethalometer are applied to investigate the relationship between aerosol hygroscopicity properties and aerosol types. The aerosol hygroscopicity properties are further applied to investigate the effect of relative humidity on aerosol vertical profiles measured by a dual-wavelength and depolarization lidar. The possible radiative effect of aerosols are approached by vertical atmospheric extinction profiles measured by lidar. Calculated atmospheric and aerosol heating effects was compared with vertical meteorological parameters measured by radiosonde. The result shows light-absorbing aerosol has the potential to affect the stability of planetary boundary layer.

  5. Vertical profiling of atmospheric refractivity using GPS STD data from a single ground-based station: Simulations and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zus, F.; Dick, G.; Heise, S.; Wickert, J.; Ramatschi, M.

    2013-12-01

    We developed a ray-tracing operator to compute the signal travel time delay due to the neutral atmosphere, known as Slant Total Delay (STD), between a GPS satellite and a ground-based receiving station. Having developed a rapid and precise forward operator we constructed the tangent-linear (adjoint) operator to estimate refractivity in the vicinity of a single station. The refractivity retrievals potentially complement refractivity retrievals from radio occultation data and can be considered a valuable input for Numerical Weather Prediction. In a first experiment (simulation) we study the feasibility for vertical profiling of refractivity using STDs from a single station. The simulation cycle consists of the computation of STDs given a refractivity profile, the addition of noise to mimic observation errors and the retrieval of a refractivity profile from the artificial STDs by a non-linear least-square analysis. Clearly, besides the noise level, the elevation range plays an important role regarding the quality of the refractivity retrieval; near-horizon STDs corrupted by noise allow a significantly better refractivity retrieval than STDs close to the zenith without any noise. The simulation study suggests that near-horizon STDs provide additional information when compared to Zenith Total Delays (ZTDs). In a second experiment (application) we replace the artificial STDs in the simulation by STDs retrieved from GPS phase-observations. The procedure is repeated station-by-station for 200 stations in Germany. We do not find a significant benefit from STDs over ZTDs in the retrieved refractivity profile since near-horizon STDs are rarely available and representative errors due to asymmetry are non-negligable. We attempt to mitigate the latter problem by the additional estimation of horizontal gradients, and indeed, we find strong evidence that STDs retrieved from GPS phase-observations contain asymmetric information. The former problem still poses a serious limitation

  6. The CU Airborne MAX-DOAS instrument: ground based validation, and vertical profiling of aerosol extinction and trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baidar, S.; Oetjen, H.; Coburn, S.; Dix, B.; Ortega, I.; Sinreich, R.; Volkamer, R.

    2012-09-01

    The University of Colorado Airborne Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument uses solar stray light remote sensing to detect and quantify multiple trace gases, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2), glyoxal (CHOCHO), formaldehyde (HCHO), water vapor (H2O), nitrous acid (HONO), iodine monoxide (IO), bromine monoxide (BrO), and oxygen dimers (O4) at multiple wavelengths (360 nm, 477 nm, 577 nm and 632 nm) simultaneously, and sensitively in the open atmosphere. The instrument is unique, in that it presents the first systematic implementation of MAX-DOAS on research aircraft, i.e. (1) includes measurements of solar stray light photons from nadir, zenith, and multiple elevation angles forward and below the plane by the same spectrometer/detector system, and (2) features a motion compensation system that decouples the telescope field of view (FOV) from aircraft movements in real-time (CHOCHO, HCHO, and H2O mixing ratios and aerosol extinction coefficients, ɛ, at 477nm calculated from O4 measurements from a low approach at Brackett airfield inside the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB) are presented. These profiles contain ~ 12 degrees of freedom (DOF) over a 3.5 km altitude range, independent of signal-to-noise at which the trace gas is detected. The boundary layer NO2 concentration, and the integral aerosol extinction over height (aerosol optical depth, AOD) agrees well with nearby ground-based in-situ NO2 measurement, and AERONET station. The detection limits of NO2, CHOCHO, HCHO, ɛ360, ɛ477 from 30 s integration time spectra recorded forward of the plane are 5 ppt, 3 ppt, 100 ppt, 0.004 km-1, 0.002 km-1 in the free troposphere (FT), and 30 ppt, 16 ppt, 540 ppt, 0.012 km-1, 0.006 km-1 inside the boundary layer (BL), respectively. Mobile column observations of trace gases and aerosols are complimentary to in-situ observations, and help bridge the spatial scales probed by ground-based observations, satellites, and predicted by atmospheric

  7. Validation of COSMIC radio occultation electron density profiles by incoherent scatter radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniak, Iurii; Zakharenkova, Irina

    The COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 is a joint US/Taiwan radio occultation mission consisting of six identical micro-satellites. Each microsatellite has a GPS Occultation Experiment payload to operate the ionospheric RO measurements. FS3/COSMIC data can make a positive impact on global ionosphere study providing essential information about height electron density distribu-tion. For correct using of the RO electron density profiles for geophysical analysis, modeling and other applications it is necessary to make validation of these data with electron density distributions obtained by another measurement techniques such as proven ground based facili-ties -ionosondes and IS radars. In fact as the ionosondes provide no direct information on the profile above the maximum electron density and the topside ionosonde profile is obtained by fitting a model to the peak electron density value, the COSMIC RO measurements can make an important contribution to the investigation of the topside part of the ionosphere. IS radars provide information about the whole electron density profile, so we can estimate the agreement of topside parts between two independent measurements. To validate the reliability of COS-MIC data we have used the ionospheric electron density profiles derived from IS radar located near Kharkiv, Ukraine (geographic coordinates: 49.6N, 36.3E, geomagnetic coordinates: 45.7N, 117.8E). The Kharkiv radar is a sole incoherent scatter facility on the middle latitudes of Eu-ropean region. The radar operates with 100-m zenith parabolic antenna at 158 MHz with peak transmitted power 2.0 MW. The Kharkiv IS radar is able to determine the heights-temporal distribution of ionosphere parameters in height range of 70-1500 km. At the ionosphere in-vestigation by incoherent scatter method there are directly measured the power spectrum (or autocorrelation function) of scattered signal. With using of rather complex procedure of the received signal processing it is possible to estimate the

  8. Improvements to the OMI O2-O2 operational cloud algorithm and comparisons with ground-based radar-lidar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepijn Veefkind, J.; de Haan, Johan F.; Sneep, Maarten; Levelt, Pieternel F.

    2016-12-01

    The OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument on board NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura satellite) OMCLDO2 cloud product supports trace gas retrievals of for example ozone and nitrogen dioxide. The OMCLDO2 algorithm derives the effective cloud fraction and effective cloud pressure using a DOAS (differential optical absorption spectroscopy) fit of the O2-O2 absorption feature around 477 nm. A new version of the OMI OMCLDO2 cloud product is presented that contains several improvements, of which the introduction of a temperature correction on the O2-O2 slant columns and the updated look-up tables have the largest impact. Whereas the differences in the effective cloud fraction are on average limited to 0.01, the differences of the effective cloud pressure can be up to 200 hPa, especially at cloud fractions below 0.3. As expected, the temperature correction depends on latitude and season. The updated look-up tables have a systematic effect on the cloud pressure at low cloud fractions. The improvements at low cloud fractions are very important for the retrieval of trace gases in the lower troposphere, for example for nitrogen dioxide and formaldehyde. The cloud pressure retrievals of the improved algorithm are compared with ground-based radar-lidar observations for three sites at mid-latitudes. For low clouds that have a limited vertical extent the comparison yields good agreement. For higher clouds, which are vertically extensive and often contain several layers, the satellite retrievals give a lower cloud height. For high clouds, mixed results are obtained.

  9. Quantitative precipitation estimation in complex orography using quasi-vertical profiles of dual polarization radar variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montopoli, Mario; Roberto, Nicoletta; Adirosi, Elisa; Gorgucci, Eugenio; Baldini, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Weather radars are nowadays a unique tool to estimate quantitatively the rain precipitation near the surface. This is an important task for a plenty of applications. For example, to feed hydrological models, mitigate the impact of severe storms at the ground using radar information in modern warning tools as well as aid the validation studies of satellite-based rain products. With respect to the latter application, several ground validation studies of the Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) products have recently highlighted the importance of accurate QPE from ground-based weather radars. To date, a plenty of works analyzed the performance of various QPE algorithms making use of actual and synthetic experiments, possibly trained by measurement of particle size distributions and electromagnetic models. Most of these studies support the use of dual polarization variables not only to ensure a good level of radar data quality but also as a direct input in the rain estimation equations. Among others, one of the most important limiting factors in radar QPE accuracy is the vertical variability of particle size distribution that affects at different levels, all the radar variables acquired as well as rain rates. This is particularly impactful in mountainous areas where the altitudes of the radar sampling is likely several hundred of meters above the surface. In this work, we analyze the impact of the vertical profile variations of rain precipitation on several dual polarization radar QPE algorithms when they are tested a in complex orography scenario. So far, in weather radar studies, more emphasis has been given to the extrapolation strategies that make use of the signature of the vertical profiles in terms of radar co-polar reflectivity. This may limit the use of the radar vertical profiles when dual polarization QPE algorithms are considered because in that case all the radar variables used in the rain estimation process should be consistently extrapolated at the surface

  10. Exploring microphysical, radiative, dynamic and thermodynamic processes driving fog and low stratus clouds using ground-based Lidar and Radar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeffelin, Martial

    2016-04-01

    Radiation fog formation is largely influenced by the chemical composition, size and number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei and by heating/cooling and drying/moistening processes in a shallow mixing layer near the surface. Once a fog water layer is formed, its development and dissipation become predominantly controlled by radiative cooling/heating, turbulent mixing, sedimentation and deposition. Key processes occur in the atmospheric surface layer, directly in contact with the soil and vegetation, and throughout the atmospheric column. Recent publications provide detailed descriptions of these processes for idealized cases using very high-resolution models and proper representation of microphysical processes. Studying these processes in real fog situations require atmospheric profiling capabilities to monitor the temporal evolution of key parameters at several heights (surface, inside the fog, fog top, free troposphere). This could be done with in-situ sensors flown on tethered balloons or drones, during dedicated intensive field campaigns. In addition Backscatter Lidars, Doppler Lidars, Microwave Radiometers and Cloud Doppler Radars can provide more continuous, yet precise monitoring of key parameters throughout the fog life cycle. The presentation will describe how Backscatter Lidars can be used to study the height and kinetics of aerosol activation into fog droplets. Next we will show the potential of Cloud Doppler Radar measurements to characterize the temporal evolution of droplet size, liquid water content, sedimentation and deposition. Contributions from Doppler Lidars and Microwave Radiometers will be discussed. This presentation will conclude on the potential to use Lidar and Radar remote sensing measurements to support operational fog nowcasting.

  11. Comparison of stratospheric temperature profiles from a ground-based microwave radiometer with lidar, radiosonde and satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Haefele, Alexander; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain

    2015-04-01

    The importance of the knowledge of the temperature structure in the atmosphere has been widely recognized. Temperature is a key parameter for dynamical, chemical and radiative processes in the atmosphere. The cooling of the stratosphere is an indicator for climate change as it provides evidence of natural and anthropogenic climate forcing just like surface warming ( [1] and references therein). However, our understanding of the observed stratospheric temperature trend and our ability to test simulations of the stratospheric response to emissions of greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances remains limited. Stratospheric long-term datasets are sparse and obtained trends differ from one another [1]. Therefore it is important that in the future such datasets are generated. Different techniques allow to measure stratospheric temperature profiles as radiosonde, lidar or satellite. The main advantage of microwave radiometers against these other instruments is a high temporal resolution with a reasonable good spatial resolution. Moreover, the measurement at a fixed location allows to observe local atmospheric dynamics over a long time period, which is crucial for climate research. TEMPERA (TEMPERature RAdiometer) is a newly developed ground-based microwave radiometer designed, built and operated at the University of Bern. The instrument and the retrieval of temperature profiles has been described in detail in [2]. TEMPERA is measuring a pressure broadened oxygen line at 53.1 GHz in order to determine stratospheric temperature profiles. The retrieved profiles of TEMPERA cover an altitude range of approximately 20 to 45 km with a vertical resolution in the order of 15 km. The lower limit is given by the instrumental baseline and the bandwidth of the measured spectrum. The upper limit is given by the fact that above 50 km the oxygen lines are splitted by the Zeeman effect in the terrestrial magnetic field. In this study we present a comparison of stratospheric

  12. Detection Performance Assessment of Ground-Based Phased Array Radar for Ballistic Targets%地基相控阵雷达对弹道目标的探测性能评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李星星; 姚汉英; 孙文峰

    2014-01-01

    为解决地基相控阵雷达对弹道目标探测的最优部署问题,建立弹道中段目标轨道运动和进动模型,提出弹道中段多部地基相控阵雷达的弹道目标探测概率模型,以及平均检测概率、稳定跟踪时间和资源冗余时间3种组合的雷达探测性能评估指标。依据弹道目标RCS及探测距离随观测时间的变化情况,通过仿真实验对多种部署方式下地基雷达对弹道目标探测性能评估指标的分析,得出的结论为弹道导弹防御系统中地基雷达的部署方式提供了有效的参考依据。%In order to solve the optimal deployment problem of ground-based phased array radar in detecting ballistic targets,the orbit motion and precession motion models of ballistic targets were built up,and the detection probability model for ballistic targets by using several ground-based phased array radars was proposed.Three evaluation indexes of radars'detection performance were given: average detection probability,stable tracking time and resource redundancy time .According to the variation of RCS and detection range for ballistic targets in midcourse,detection performance evaluation indexes of several radar deployment schemes were analyzed through experiments .The conclusion in this paper may provide some reference for deploying the ground-based radar in ballistic missile defense (BMD) system for targets'optimal detection.

  13. On the use of Cloud Profiling Radar to detect solid precipitation over Antarctica at different scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Lisa; Kulie, Mark S.; Casella, Daniele; D'Adderio, Leo Pio; Dietrich, Stefano; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Panegrossi, Giulia; Porcù, Federico; Sanò, Paolo; Wood, Norman B.

    2016-04-01

    Precipitation is a key geophysical parameter in understanding the Antarctic climate. However, the particular environmental conditions of the Continent make it difficult to measure directly solid precipitation rate and accumulation from either ground based instruments or passive space-borne sensors. A significant improvement in the study of solid precipitation over Antarctica is possible by using active space-borne instruments: the Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR), a nadir-pointing 94 GHz radar, on board the low earth orbit CloudSat satellite. Five years (2006-2011) of CPR data and products over Antarctica are analyzed to investigate the characteristics of solid precipitation. The aim of this work is twofold: 1) to compare a global snowfall rate retrieval algorithm (Kulie and Bennartz, 2009) with the official CloudSat product (2C-SNOW-PROFILE) over the Antarctic environment, evaluating the sensitivity of the estimated snow fields to: ground clutter, choice of reflectivity-snowfall rate relationship (Z-S), presence of melting snow/liquid precipitation; 2) to provide snow fall rates and accumulation at different scales over Antarctica, evaluating the impact of background physiography and seasonal cycle on the precipitation distribution. Further comparisons are also performed with ERA-Interim snowfall fields and point-like snow stack height measurements by acoustic depth gauges. Results show that the difference between the Kulie and Bennartz (2009) algorithm and the 2C-SNOW-PROFILE product is mainly due to the choice of the Z-S relationship. Furthermore, despite the CPR limited temporal and spatial sampling capabilities, CPR is able to evidence precipitation characteristics difficult to study from conventional ground-based instruments, at spatial and temporal scales of interest for the study of the hydrological cycle over Antarctica. This is of particular relevance given that the CPR follow-on mission on EarthCare will ensure a long-term coverage.

  14. Using a Ground Based radar interferometer during emergency: the case of A3 motorway (Salerno Reggio-Calabria) treated by landslide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Ventisette, Chiara; Intrieri, Emanuele; Luzi, Guido; Casagli, Nicola

    2010-05-01

    An application of Ground Based radar interferometry (GB-InSAR) technique to monitor a landslide threatening infrastructures in emergency conditions is presented. During December 2008 and January 2009 intense rainfalls occurred in Italy, especially in the southern regions. These rain events occurred in the last days of January, worsened the already critical hydrogeological conditions of some areas and triggered many landslides. One of these landslides, named Santa Trada landslide, is located close to a periodical stream called Fiumara di Santa Trada, near Villa San Giovanni municipality (Reggio Calabria, Calabria Region). The volume involved is about 100 000 m3. This estimate represents the case of a collapse of the landslide which destabilize a larger part of the slope, involving other areas delimited by some fractures observed upstream. Nevertheless the landslide does not directly threaten the roadway, its complete collapse would hit the pillars of a motorway viaduct. Through GB-InSAR data it has been possible to obtain an overview of the area affected by movement and to quantify the displacements magnitude. The main benefit of the system was not only limited to the capability of fully characterizing the landslide in spatial terms, it also permitted emergency operators to follow, during the whole campaign, the evolution of the mass movement and to study its cinematic behaviour. This aspect is fundamental to evaluate the volume of the material involved and to assess the temporal evolution of the risk scenario. The GB-InSAR installed at Santa Trada points up toward the landslide from a distance of 250 m. The apparatus produces a synthesized radar image of the observed area every 6 minutes, night and day, with a pixel resolution of about 0.75 m in range and 1.2 m on average in cross range, performing a millimeter accuracy on the final displacement maps. The interferometric analysis of sequences of consecutive images allows the operator to derive the entire line of

  15. UAV-Borne Profiling Radar for Forest Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwei Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microwave Radar is an attractive solution for forest mapping and inventories because microwave signals penetrates into the forest canopy and the backscattering signal can provide information regarding the whole forest structure. Satellite-borne and airborne imaging radars have been used in forest resources mapping for many decades. However, their accuracy with respect to the main forest inventory attributes substantially varies depending on the wavelength and techniques used in the estimation. Systems providing canopy backscatter as a function of canopy height are, practically speaking, missing. Therefore, there is a need for a radar system that would enable the scientific community to better understand the radar backscatter response from the forest canopy. Consequently, we undertook a research study to develop an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV-borne profiling (i.e., waveform radar that could be used to improve the understanding of the radar backscatter response for forestry mapping and inventories. A frequency modulation continuous waveform (FMCW profiling radar, termed FGI-Tomoradar, was introduced, designed and tested. One goal is the total weight of the whole system is less than 7 kg, including the radar system and georeferencing system, with centimetre-level positioning accuracy. Achieving this weight goal would enable the FGI-Tomoradar system to be installed on the Mini-UAV platform. The prototype system had all four linear polarization measuring capabilities, with bistatic configuration in Ku-band. In system performance tests in this study, FGI-Tomoradar was mounted on a manned helicopter together with a Riegl VQ-480-U laser scanner and tested in several flight campaigns performed at the Evo site, Finland. Airborne laser scanning data was simultaneously collected to investigate the differences and similarities of the outputs for the same target area for better understanding the penetration of the microwave signal into the forest canopy

  16. A method for the retrieval of atomic oxygen density and temperature profiles from ground-based measurements of the O(+)(2D-2P) 7320 A twilight airglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennelly, J. A.; Torr, D. G.; Richards, P. G.; Torr, M. R.; Sharp, W. E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for extracting thermospheric profiles of the atomic-oxygen density and temperature, using ground-based measurements of the O(+)(2D-2P) doublet at 7320 and 7330 A in the twilight airglow. In this method, a local photochemical model is used to calculate the 7320-A intensity; the method also utilizes an iterative inversion procedure based on the Levenberg-Marquardt method described by Press et al. (1986). The results demonstrate that, if the measurements are only limited by errors due to Poisson noise, the altitude profiles of neutral temperature and atomic oxygen concentration can be determined accurately using currently available spectrometers.

  17. Multi-year comparison of stratospheric BrO vertical profiles retrieved from SCIAMACHY limb and ground-based UV-visible measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Van Roozendael

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Vertical profiles of stratospheric bromine monoxide (BrO retrieved daily from ENVISAT/SCIAMACHY (ENVIronmental SATellite/SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY limb scatter data and from ground-based UV-visible observations performed at Harestua (60° N, 11° E, Observatoire de Haute-Provence (44° N, 5.5° E, and Lauder (45° S, 170° E are compared in the 15–27 km altitude range for the 2002–2006, 2005–2006, and 2002–2005 periods, respectively. At the three stations, the SCIAMACHY and ground-based UV-visible mean profiles agree reasonably well, with relative difference smaller than 23%. When comparing the BrO partial columns, the agreement obtained is good, with mean relative differences smaller than 11% and corresponding standard deviations in the 13–19% range. These comparison results are obtained, however, using different BrO cross sections in SCIAMACHY limb and ground-based UV-visible retrievals. The seasonal variation of the BrO columns at the three stations is consistently captured by both retrievals as well as large BrO column events occurring during the winter and early spring at Harestua which are associated with bromine activation.

  18. The variability of tropical ice cloud properties as a function of the large-scale context from ground-based radar-lidar observations over Darwin, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Protat

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The statistical properties of non-precipitating tropical ice clouds over Darwin, Australia are characterized using ground-based radar-lidar observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Program. The ice cloud properties analysed are the frequency of ice cloud occurrence, the morphological properties (cloud top height and thickness, cloud fraction as derived considering a typical large-scale model grid box, and the microphysical and radiative properties (ice water content, visible extinction, effective radius, terminal fall speed, and total concentration. The variability of these tropical ice cloud properties is then studied as a function of the large-scale cloud regimes derived from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP, the amplitude and phase of the Madden–Julian Oscillation (MJO, and the large-scale atmospheric regime as derived from a long-term record of radiosonde observations over Darwin. The rationale for characterizing this variability is to provide an observational basis to which model outputs can be compared for the different regimes or large-scale characteristics and from which new parameterizations accounting for the large-scale context can be derived.

    The mean vertical variability of ice cloud occurrence and microphysical properties is large (1.5 order of magnitude for ice water content and extinction, a factor 3 in effective radius, and three orders of magnitude in concentration, typically. 98% of ice clouds in our dataset are characterized by either a small cloud fraction (smaller than 0.3 or a very large cloud fraction (larger than 0.9. Our results also indicate that, at least in the northern Australian region, the upper part of the troposphere can be split into three distinct layers characterized by different statistically-dominant microphysical processes. The variability of the ice cloud properties as a function of the large-scale atmospheric regime, cloud regime, and MJO phase

  19. Microphysical retrievals from simultaneous polarimetric and profiling radar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Morris

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The character of precipitation detected at the surface is the final product of many microphysical interactions in the cloud above, the combined effects of which may be characterized by the observed drop size distribution (DSD. This necessitates accurate retrieval of the DSD from remote sensing data, especially radar as it offers large areal coverage, high spatial resolution, and rigorous quality control and testing. Combined instrument observations with a UHF wind profiler, an S-band polarimetric weather radar, and a video disdrometer are analyzed for two squall line events occuring during the calendar year 2007. UHF profiler Doppler velocity spectra are used to estimate the DSD aloft, and are complemented by DSDs retrieved from an exponential model applied to polarimetric data. Ground truth is provided by the disdrometer. A complicating factor in the retrieval from UHF profiler spectra is the presence of ambient air motion, which can be corrected using the method proposed by Teshiba et al. (2009, in which a comparison between idealized Doppler spectra calculated from the DSDs retrieved from KOUN and those retrieved from contaminated wind profiler spectra is performed. It is found that DSDs measured using the distrometer at the surface and estimated using the wind profiler and polarimetric weather radar generally showed good agreement. The DSD retrievals using the wind profiler were improved when the estimates of the vertical wind were included into the analysis, thus supporting the method of Teshiba et al. (2009. Furthermore, the the study presents a method of investigating the time and height structure of DSDs.

  20. Simultaneous PMC and PMSE observations with a ground-based lidar and SuperDARN HF radar at Syowa Station, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Suzuki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A Rayleigh–Raman lidar system was installed in January 2011 at Syowa Station, Antarctica (69.0° S, 39.6° E. Polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs were detected by lidar at around 22:30 UTC (LT −3 h on 4 February 2011, which was the first day of observation. This was the first detection of PMCs over Syowa Station by lidar. On the same day, a Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN HF radar with oblique-incidence beams detected polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE between 21:30 and 23:00 UTC. This event is regarded as the last PMC activity around Syowa Station during the austral summer season (2010–2011, since no other PMC signals were detected by lidar in February 2011. This is consistent with results of PMC and mesopause temperature observations by satellite-born instruments of AIM (Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere/CIPS (Cloud Imaging and Particle Size and AURA/MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder and horizontal wind measurements taken by a separate MF radar. Doppler velocity of PMSE observed by the HF radar showed motion toward Syowa Station (westward. This westward motion is consistent with the wind velocities obtained by the MF radar. However, the PMSE region showed horizontal motion from a north-to-south direction during the PMC event. This event indicates that the apparent horizontal motion of the PMSE region can deviate from neutral wind directions and observed Doppler velocities.

  1. Simultaneous PMC and PMSE observations with a ground-based lidar and SuperDARN HF radar at Syowa Station, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, H.; Nakamura, T.; Ejiri, M. K.; Ogawa, T.; Tsutsumi, M.; Abo, M.; Kawahara, T. D.; Tomikawa, Y.; Yukimatu, A. S.; Sato, N.

    2013-10-01

    A Rayleigh-Raman lidar system was installed in January 2011 at Syowa Station, Antarctica (69.0° S, 39.6° E). Polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) were detected by lidar at around 22:30 UTC (LT -3 h) on 4 February 2011, which was the first day of observation. This was the first detection of PMCs over Syowa Station by lidar. On the same day, a Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) HF radar with oblique-incidence beams detected polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) between 21:30 and 23:00 UTC. This event is regarded as the last PMC activity around Syowa Station during the austral summer season (2010-2011), since no other PMC signals were detected by lidar in February 2011. This is consistent with results of PMC and mesopause temperature observations by satellite-born instruments of AIM (Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere)/CIPS (Cloud Imaging and Particle Size) and AURA/MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder) and horizontal wind measurements taken by a separate MF radar. Doppler velocity of PMSE observed by the HF radar showed motion toward Syowa Station (westward). This westward motion is consistent with the wind velocities obtained by the MF radar. However, the PMSE region showed horizontal motion from a north-to-south direction during the PMC event. This event indicates that the apparent horizontal motion of the PMSE region can deviate from neutral wind directions and observed Doppler velocities.

  2. Multi-year comparison of stratospheric BrO vertical profiles retrieved from SCIAMACHY limb and ground-based UV-visible measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hendrick

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Vertical profiles of stratospheric bromine monoxide (BrO daily retrieved from ENVISAT/SCIAMACHY (ENVIronmental SATellite/SCanning Imaging Absorption spectrometer for Atmospheric CHartographY limb scatter data and from ground-based UV-visible observations performed at Harestua (60° N, 11° E, Observatoire de Haute-Provence (44° N, 5.5° E, and Lauder (45° S, 170° E are compared in the 15–27 km altitude range for the period from 2002 until 2006. At the three stations, the SCIAMACHY and ground-based UV-visible profiles agree reasonably well, with relative difference smaller than 23% on average. When comparing the BrO partial columns, the agreement obtained is good, with mean relative differences smaller than 11% and corresponding standard deviations in the 13–19% range. The seasonal variation of the BrO columns at the three stations is consistently captured by both retrievals as well as large BrO column events occurring during the winter and early spring at Harestua which are associated with chlorine activation.

  3. Measuring Effective Leaf Area Index, Foliage Profile, and Stand Height in New England Forest Stands Using a Full-Waveform Ground-Based Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Feng; Yang, Xiaoyuan; Schull, Mithcell A.; Roman-Colon, Miguel O.; Yao, Tian; Wang, Zhuosen; Zhang, Qingling; Jupp, David L. B.; Lovell, Jenny L.; Culvenor, Darius; Newnham, Glenn J.; Richardson, Andrew D.; Ni-Meister, Wenge; Schaaf, Crystal L.; Woodcock, Curtis E.; Strahler, Alan H.

    2011-01-01

    Effective leaf area index (LAI) retrievals from a scanning, ground-based, near-infrared (1064 nm) lidar that digitizes the full return waveform, the Echidna Validation Instrument (EVI), are in good agreement with those obtained from both hemispherical photography and the Li-Cor LAI-2000 Plant Canopy Analyzer. We conducted trials at 28 plots within six stands of hardwoods and conifers of varying height and stocking densities at Harvard Forest, Massachusetts, Bartlett Experimental Forest, New Hampshire, and Howland Experimental Forest, Maine, in July 2007. Effective LAI values retrieved by four methods, which ranged from 3.42 to 5.25 depending on the site and method, were not significantly different ( b0.1 among four methods). The LAI values also matched published values well. Foliage profiles (leaf area with height) retrieved from the lidar scans, although not independently validated, were consistent with stand structure as observed and as measured by conventional methods. Canopy mean top height, as determined from the foliage profiles, deviated from mean RH100 values obtained from the Lidar Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) airborne large-footprint lidar system at 27 plots by .0.91 m with RMSE=2.04 m, documenting the ability of the EVI to retrieve stand height. The Echidna Validation Instrument is the first realization of the Echidna lidar concept, devised by Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), for measuring forest structure using full-waveform, ground-based, scanning lidar.

  4. Measuring Effective Leaf Area Index, Foliage Profile, and Stand Height in New England Forest Stands Using a Full-Waveform Ground-Based Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Feng; Yang, Xiaoyuan; Schull, Mithcell A.; Roman-Colon, Miguel O.; Yao, Tian; Wang, Zhuosen; Zhang, Qingling; Jupp, David L. B.; Lovell, Jenny L.; Culvenor, Darius; hide

    2011-01-01

    Effective leaf area index (LAI) retrievals from a scanning, ground-based, near-infrared (1064 nm) lidar that digitizes the full return waveform, the Echidna Validation Instrument (EVI), are in good agreement with those obtained from both hemispherical photography and the Li-Cor LAI-2000 Plant Canopy Analyzer. We conducted trials at 28 plots within six stands of hardwoods and conifers of varying height and stocking densities at Harvard Forest, Massachusetts, Bartlett Experimental Forest, New Hampshire, and Howland Experimental Forest, Maine, in July 2007. Effective LAI values retrieved by four methods, which ranged from 3.42 to 5.25 depending on the site and method, were not significantly different ( b0.1 among four methods). The LAI values also matched published values well. Foliage profiles (leaf area with height) retrieved from the lidar scans, although not independently validated, were consistent with stand structure as observed and as measured by conventional methods. Canopy mean top height, as determined from the foliage profiles, deviated from mean RH100 values obtained from the Lidar Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) airborne large-footprint lidar system at 27 plots by .0.91 m with RMSE=2.04 m, documenting the ability of the EVI to retrieve stand height. The Echidna Validation Instrument is the first realization of the Echidna lidar concept, devised by Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), for measuring forest structure using full-waveform, ground-based, scanning lidar.

  5. Improving Quantitative Precipitation Estimation via Data Fusion of High-Resolution Ground-based Radar Network and CMORPH Satellite-based Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifelli, R.; Chen, H.; Chandrasekar, V.; Xie, P.

    2015-12-01

    A large number of precipitation products at multi-scales have been developed based upon satellite, radar, and/or rain gauge observations. However, how to produce optimal rainfall estimation for a given region is still challenging due to the spatial and temporal sampling difference of different sensors. In this study, we develop a data fusion mechanism to improve regional quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) by utilizing satellite-based CMORPH product, ground radar measurements, as well as numerical model simulations. The CMORPH global precipitation product is essentially derived based on retrievals from passive microwave measurements and infrared observations onboard satellites (Joyce et al. 2004). The fine spatial-temporal resolution of 0.05o Lat/Lon and 30-min is appropriate for regional hydrologic and climate studies. However, it is inadequate for localized hydrometeorological applications such as urban flash flood forecasting. Via fusion of the Regional CMORPH product and local precipitation sensors, the high-resolution QPE performance can be improved. The area of interest is the Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) Metroplex, which is the largest land-locked metropolitan area in the U.S. In addition to an NWS dual-polarization S-band WSR-88DP radar (i.e., KFWS radar), DFW hosts the high-resolution dual-polarization X-band radar network developed by the center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA). This talk will present a general framework of precipitation data fusion based on satellite and ground observations. The detailed prototype architecture of using regional rainfall instruments to improve regional CMORPH precipitation product via multi-scale fusion techniques will also be discussed. Particularly, the temporal and spatial fusion algorithms developed for the DFW Metroplex will be described, which utilizes CMORPH product, S-band WSR-88DP, and X-band CASA radar measurements. In order to investigate the uncertainties associated with each

  6. Mobile Three Frequency Radar as Research Platform for Precipitation Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Walter; Rautiainen, Kimmo; Harri, Ari-Matti

    2014-05-01

    Precipitation profiling at the frequency bands of Ku, Ka and W bands are becoming increasingly popular in the studies of atmospheric microphysics. Ever since the introduction of Ku / Ka pair of frequencies for the Global Precipitation Measurement mission (GPM) and the success of W band in Cloudsat, the interest in precipitation profiling using these frequencies has increased. The profiling observations will also serve as ground validation instruments for several space missions such as GPM and EarthCARE [1]. In order to get better information to retrieve ice microphysics as well as to enhance sensitivity, we need to move from the standard S- and C-band weather radars to higher frequencies [2]. As was recently shown, the use of multi- frequency profiling yields important additional information compared to single-frequency radar mapping [3]. During the past four years a consortium of research, academic and private industries in Finland has been developing a flexible low-cost mobile three-band radar system for precipitation profiling. The feasibility of the concept is being demonstrated by implementing the Ku- and Ka-band part of the system. The antenna structure with antennas for Ku-, Ka- and W-band is completed allowing the pointing of all three antenna systems into the same direction during an azimuth and elevation scan. Using a freely programmable digital waveform generator and decoding electronics for the received data, the implementation of different wave form generation, compression and decoding schemes and their influence on the radar performance in the different bands can be evaluated and optimized. The modular design allows the connection of different transmitter control and receiver decoding units to any of the three band front-end electronics to evaluate the performance of different approaches in the various bands simultaneously. A real-time analysis software supports the data interpretation and system optimization during field tests. Via mobile internet

  7. First middle-atmospheric zonal wind profile measurements with a new ground-based microwave Doppler-spectro-radiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rüfenacht

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on the wind radiometer WIRA, a new ground-based microwave Doppler-spectro-radiometer specifically designed for the measurement of middle-atmospheric horizontal wind by observing ozone emission spectra at 142.17504 GHz. Currently, wind speeds in five levels between 30 and 79 km can be retrieved which makes WIRA the first instrument able to continuously measure horizontal wind in this altitude range. For an integration time of one day the measurement error on each level lies at around 25 m s−1. With a planned upgrade this value is expected to be reduced by a factor of 2 in the near future. On the altitude levels where our measurement can be compared to wind data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF very good agreement in the long-term statistics as well as in short time structures with a duration of a few days has been found.

    WIRA uses a passive double sideband heterodyne receiver together with a digital Fourier transform spectrometer for the data acquisition. A big advantage of the radiometric approach is that such instruments can also operate under adverse weather conditions and thus provide a continuous time series for the given location. The optics enables the instrument to scan a wide range of azimuth angles including the directions east, west, north, and south for zonal and meridional wind measurements. The design of the radiometer is fairly compact and its calibration does not rely on liquid nitrogen which makes it transportable and suitable for campaign use. WIRA is conceived in a way that it can be operated remotely and does hardly require any maintenance.

    In the present paper, a description of the instrument is given, and the techniques used for the wind retrieval based on the determination of the Doppler shift of the measured atmospheric ozone emission spectra are outlined. Their reliability was tested using Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, a time series of 11

  8. Ground-Based Remote or In Situ Measurement of Vertical Profiles of Wind in the Lower Troposphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, Andrew; Newman, Jennifer

    2017-02-24

    Knowledge of winds in the lower troposphere is essential for a range of applications, including weather forecasting, transportation, natural hazards, and wind energy. This presentation focuses on the measurement of vertical profiles of wind in the lower troposphere for wind energy applications. This presentation introduces the information that wind energy site development and operations require, how it used, and the benefits and problems of current measurements from in-situ measurements and remote sensing. The development of commercial Doppler wind lidar systems over the last 10 years are shown, along with the lessons learned from this experience. Finally, potential developments in wind profiling aimed at reducing uncertainty and increasing data availability are introduced.

  9. Time series analysis of ground-based microwave measurements at K- and V-bands to detect temporal changes in water vapor and temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Sibananda; Sahoo, Swaroop; Pandithurai, Govindan

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based microwave measurements performed at water vapor and oxygen absorption line frequencies are widely used for remote sensing of tropospheric water vapor density and temperature profiles, respectively. Recent work has shown that Bayesian optimal estimation can be used for improving accuracy of radiometer retrieved water vapor and temperature profiles. This paper focuses on using Bayesian optimal estimation along with time series of independent frequency measurements at K- and V-bands. The measurements are used along with statistically significant but short background data sets to retrieve and sense temporal variations and gradients in water vapor and temperature profiles. To study this capability, the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM) deployed a microwave radiometer at Mahabubnagar, Telangana, during August 2011 as part of the Integrated Ground Campaign during the Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX-IGOC). In this study, temperature profiles for the first time have been estimated using short but statistically significant background information so as to improve the accuracy of the retrieved profiles as well as to be able to detect gradients. Estimated water vapor and temperature profiles are compared with those taken from the reanalysis data updated by the Earth System Research Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), to determine the range of possible errors. Similarly, root mean square errors are evaluated for a month for water vapor and temperature profiles to estimate the accuracy of the retrievals. It is found that water vapor and temperature profiles can be estimated with an acceptable accuracy by using a background information data set compiled over a period of 1 month.

  10. A comparison of N{sub e}(h) model profiles with ground-based and topside sounder observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhailov, A.V.; Leschinskaya, T.Y.; Depuev, V.K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Troitsk (Russian Federation). Inst. of Terrestrial Magnetism; Miro, G. [National Institute of Aerospace Technology, Magazon (Spain)

    2000-02-01

    Monthly median empirical models IRI-95 and NeUoG were compared with incoherent scatter EISCAT and Millstone Hill observations as well as with El Arenosillo Digisonde N{sub e}(h) bottom side profiles. A comparison was made for various seasons, levels of solar activity, daytime and night-time hours. The results are showed and discussed.

  11. Ground-based assessment of the bias and long-term stability of 14 limb and occultation ozone profile data records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Daan; Lambert, Jean-Christopher; Verhoelst, Tijl; Granville, José; Keppens, Arno; Baray, Jean-Luc; Bourassa, Adam E.; Cortesi, Ugo; Degenstein, Doug A.; Froidevaux, Lucien; Godin-Beekmann, Sophie; Hoppel, Karl W.; Johnson, Bryan J.; Kyrölä, Erkki; Leblanc, Thierry; Lichtenberg, Günter; Marchand, Marion; McElroy, C. Thomas; Murtagh, Donal; Nakane, Hideaki; Portafaix, Thierry; Querel, Richard; Russell, James M., III; Salvador, Jacobo; Smit, Herman G. J.; Stebel, Kerstin; Steinbrecht, Wolfgang; Strawbridge, Kevin B.; Stübi, René; Swart, Daan P. J.; Taha, Ghassan; Tarasick, David W.; Thompson, Anne M.; Urban, Joachim; van Gijsel, Joanna A. E.; Van Malderen, Roeland; von der Gathen, Peter; Walker, Kaley A.; Wolfram, Elian; Zawodny, Joseph M.

    2016-06-01

    profile records of a large number of limb and occultation satellite instruments are widely used to address several key questions in ozone research. Further progress in some domains depends on a more detailed understanding of these data sets, especially of their long-term stability and their mutual consistency. To this end, we made a systematic assessment of 14 limb and occultation sounders that, together, provide more than three decades of global ozone profile measurements. In particular, we considered the latest operational Level-2 records by SAGE II, SAGE III, HALOE, UARS MLS, Aura MLS, POAM II, POAM III, OSIRIS, SMR, GOMOS, MIPAS, SCIAMACHY, ACE-FTS and MAESTRO. Central to our work is a consistent and robust analysis of the comparisons against the ground-based ozonesonde and stratospheric ozone lidar networks. It allowed us to investigate, from the troposphere up to the stratopause, the following main aspects of satellite data quality: long-term stability, overall bias and short-term variability, together with their dependence on geophysical parameters and profile representation. In addition, it permitted us to quantify the overall consistency between the ozone profilers. Generally, we found that between 20 and 40 km the satellite ozone measurement biases are smaller than ±5 %, the short-term variabilities are less than 5-12 % and the drifts are at most ±5 % decade-1 (or even ±3 % decade-1 for a few records). The agreement with ground-based data degrades somewhat towards the stratopause and especially towards the tropopause where natural variability and low ozone abundances impede a more precise analysis. In part of the stratosphere a few records deviate from the preceding general conclusions; we identified biases of 10 % and more (POAM II and SCIAMACHY), markedly higher single-profile variability (SMR and SCIAMACHY) and significant long-term drifts (SCIAMACHY, OSIRIS, HALOE and possibly GOMOS and SMR as well). Furthermore, we reflected on the repercussions

  12. Retrieval of nitrogen dioxide stratospheric profiles from ground-based zenith-sky UV-visible observations: validation of the technique through correlative comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hendrick

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A retrieval algorithm based on the Optimal Estimation Method (OEM has been developed in order to provide vertical distributions of NO2 in the stratosphere from ground-based (GB zenith-sky UV-visible observations. It has been applied to observational data sets from the NDSC (Network for Detection of Stratospheric Change stations of Harestua (60° N, 10° E and Andøya (69° N, 16° E in Norway. The information content and retrieval errors have been analyzed following a formalism used for characterizing ozone profiles retrieved from solar infrared absorption spectra. In order to validate the technique, the retrieved NO2 vertical profiles and columns have been compared to correlative balloon and satellite observations. Such extensive validation of the profile and column retrievals was not reported in previously published work on the profiling from GB UV-visible measurements. A good agreement - generally better than 25% - has been found with the SAOZ (Système d'Analyse par Observations Zénithales and DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy balloons. A similar agreement has been reached with correlative satellite data from the HALogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE and Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM III instruments above 25km of altitude. Below 25km, a systematic underestimation - by up to 40% in some cases - of both HALOE and POAM III profiles by our GB profile retrievals has been observed, pointing out more likely a limitation of both satellite instruments at these altitudes. We have concluded that our study strengthens our confidence in the reliability of the retrieval of vertical distribution information from GB UV-visible observations and offers new perspectives in the use of GB UV-visible network data for validation purposes.

  13. Mixing height measurements from UHF wind profiling radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angevine, W.M.; Grimsdell, A.W. [CIRES, Univ. of Colorado, and NOAA Aeronomy Lab., Boulder, Colorado (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Mixing height in convective boundary layers can be detected by wind profiling radars (profilers) operating at or near 915 MHZ. We have made such measurements in a variety of settings including Alabama in 1992; Nova Scotia, Canada, during the North Atlantic Regional Experiment (NARE) 1993; Tennessee during the Southern Oxidant Study (SOS) 1994; near a 450 m tower in Wisconsin in 1995; and extensively in Illinois during the Flatland95, `96, and `97 experiments, as well as continuous operations at the Flatland Atmospheric Observatory. Profiler mixing height measurements, like all measurements, are subject to some limitations. The most important of these are due to rainfall, minimum height, and height resolution. Profilers are very sensitive to rain, which dominates the reflectivity and prevents the mixing height from being detected. Because the best height resolution is currently 60 m and the minimum height is 120-150 m AGL, the profiler is not suited for detecting mixing height in stable or nocturnal boundary layers. Problems may also arise in very dry or cold environments. (au) 12 refs.

  14. Retrieval of nitrogen dioxide stratospheric profiles from ground-based zenith-sky UV-visible observations: validation of the technique through correlative comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hendrick

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available A retrieval algorithm based on the Optimal Estimation Method (OEM has been developed in order to provide vertical distributions of NO2 in the stratosphere from ground-based (GB zenith-sky UV-visible observations. It has been applied to observational data sets from the NDSC (Network for Detection of Stratospheric Change stations of Harestua (60° N, 10° E and Andøya (69.3° N, 16.1° E in Norway. The information content and retrieval errors have been analyzed following a formalism used for characterizing ozone profiles retrieved from solar infrared absorption spectra. In order to validate the technique, the retrieved NO2 vertical profiles and columns have been compared to correlative balloon and satellite observations. Such extensive validation of the profile and column retrievals was not reported in previously published work on the profiling from GB UV-visible measurements. A good agreement – generally better than 25% – has been found with the SAOZ (Système d'Analyse par Observations Zénithales and DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy balloon data. A similar agreement has been reached with correlative satellite data from HALogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE and Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM III instruments above 25 km of altitude. Below 25 km, a systematic overestimation of our retrieved profiles – by up to 50% in some cases – has been observed by both HALOE and POAM III, pointing out the limitation of the satellite solar occultation technique at these altitudes. We have concluded that our study strengthens our confidence in the reliability of the retrieval of vertical distribution information from GB UV-visible observations and offers new perspectives in the use of GB UV-visible network data for validation purposes.

  15. Optimal Estimation of Rain Rate Profiles From Radar Returns at Attenuating Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Z.; Im, E.

    1993-01-01

    There are significant inherent ambiguities when one tries to determine a particular vertical rain intensity profile from a given time profile of radar echo powers measured by a downward-looking (spaceborne or airborne) radar at a single attenuating frequency. In this paper, we quantify these ambiguities mathematically, and examine their effects on the performance of rain-rate retrieval algorithms initially proposed for use by the Precipitation Radar of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM).

  16. Comparison of Relative Humidity obtained from SAPHIR on board Megha-Tropiques and Ground based Microwave Radiometer Profiler over an equatorial station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renju, Ramachandran Pillai; Uma, K. N.; Krishna Moorthy, K.; Mathew, Nizy; Raju C, Suresh

    A comparison has been made between the SAPHIR on board Megha-Tropiques (MT) derived Relative Humidity (RH (%)) with that derived from a ground based multi-frequency Microwave Radiometer Profiler (MRP) observations over an equatorial station Thiruvananthapuram (8.5(°) N and 76.9(°) E) for a one year period. As a first step, the validation of MRP has been made against the radiosonde for two years (2010 and 2011) during the Indian monsoon period July-September. This analysis shows a wet bias below 6 km and dry bias above. The comparison between the MRP and the MT derived RH has been made at five different altitudinal levels (0.75, 2.25, 4.0, 6.25 and 9.2 km range) strictly under clear sky condition. The regression analysis between the two reveals very good correlation (>0.8) in the altitudinal layer of 2.25 to 6.25 km. The differences between the two observations had also been explained interms of percentage of occurrence between MT and the MRP at each altitudinal layer. About 70-80% of the time, the difference in the RH is found to below 10% at first three layer. The RMSE of 2% is observed at almost all the height layers. The differences have been attributed to the different measurement and retrieval techniques involved in the ground based and satellite based measurements. Since MRP frequecy channels are not sensitive to small water vapor variabilities above 6 km, large differences are observed. Radiative Transfer computation for the channels of both MRP and SAPHIR will be carried out to understand the variabilities.

  17. A comparison on radar range profiles between in-flight measurements and RCS-predictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiden, R. van der; Ewijk, L.J. van; Groen, F.C.A.

    1998-01-01

    The validation of Radar Cross Section (RCS) prediction techniques against real measurements is crucial to acquire confidence in predictions when measurements are nut available. In this paper we present the results of a comparison on one-dimensional signatures, i.e. radar range profiles. The profiles

  18. Ground-based remote sensing profiling and numerical weather prediction model to manage nuclear power plants meteorological surveillance in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Calpini

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The meteorological surveillance of the four nuclear power plants in Switzerland is of first importance in a densely populated area such as the Swiss Plateau. The project "Centrales Nucléaires et Météorologie" CN-MET aimed at providing a new security tool based on one hand on the development of a high resolution numerical weather prediction (NWP model. The latter is providing essential nowcasting information in case of a radioactive release from a nuclear power plant in Switzerland. On the other hand, the model input over the Swiss Plateau is generated by a dedicated network of surface and upper air observations including remote sensing instruments (wind profilers and temperature/humidity passive microwave radiometers. This network is built upon three main sites ideally located for measuring the inflow/outflow and central conditions of the main wind field in the planetary boundary layer over the Swiss Plateau, as well as a number of surface automatic weather stations (AWS. The network data are assimilated in real-time into the fine grid NWP model using a rapid update cycle of eight runs per day (one forecast every three hours. This high resolution NWP model has replaced the former security tool based on in situ observations (in particular one meteorological mast at each of the power plants and a local dispersion model. It is used to forecast the dynamics of the atmosphere in the planetary boundary layer (typically the first 4 km above ground layer and over a time scale of 24 h. This tool provides at any time (e.g. starting at the initial time of a nuclear power plant release the best picture of the 24-h evolution of the air mass over the Swiss Plateau and furthermore generates the input data (in the form of simulated values substituting in situ observations required for the local dispersion model used at each of the nuclear power plants locations. This paper is presenting the concept and two validation studies as well as the results of an

  19. Improved Estimates of Moments and Winds from Radar Wind Profiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmus, Jonathan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ghate, Virendra P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-01-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) operates nine radar wind profilers (RWP) across its sites. These RWPs operate at 915 MHz or 1290 MHz frequency and report the first three moments of the Doppler spectrum. The operational settings of the RWP were modified in summer, 2015 to have single pulse length setting for the wind mode and two pulse length settings for the precipitation mode. The moments data collected during the wind mode are used to retrieve horizontal winds. The vendor-reported winds are available at variable time resolution (10 mins, 60 mins, etc.) and contain a significant amount of contamination due to noise and clutter. In this data product we have recalculated the moments and the winds from the raw radar Doppler spectrum and have made efforts to mitigate the contamination due to instrument noise in the wind estimates. Additionally, the moments and wind data has been reported in a harmonized layout identical for all locations and sites.

  20. Critical Evaluation of 0-30 km Profile Information in Ground-Based Zenith-Sky and Satellite-Measured Backscattered UV Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhartia, Pawan; Petropavlovskikh, Irina; Deluishi, John; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We now have several decades of experience in deriving vertical ozone profiles from the measurements of diffuse ultraviolet radiation by both ground and satellite-based instruments using Umkehr and BUV techniques. Continuing technological advances are pushing the state-of-the-art of these measurements to high spectral resolution and broader wavelength coverage. These modern instruments include the ground-based Brewer and satellite-based Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) instruments, as well as advanced instruments being developed by ESA(SCIAMACHY), Netherlands(OMI) and Japan(ODUS). However, one of the issues that remains unresolved is the 0-30 km ozone profile information retrievable from these measurements. Though it is commonly believed that both the Umkehr and the satellite-based BUV techniques have very limited profile information below 30 km, there are those who argue that the data from these instruments should continue to be reported in this altitude range for they compare well with ozonesondes and hence there is useful scientific information. Others claim that the limitations of the Umkehr and BUV techniques are largely due to their low spectral resolution, and that the profile information below 30 km can be greatly improved by going to high spectral resolution instruments, such as Brewer and GOME. The purpose of this paper is to provide a critical evaluation of the 0-30 km ozone profile information in the various UV remote sensing techniques. We use a database of individual ozone profiles created using ozonesondes and SAGE and 4D ozone fields generated by data assimilation techniques to simulate radiances measured by the various techniques. We then apply a common inversion approach to all the methods to systematically examine how much profile information is available simply from the knowledge of total ozone, how much additional profile information is added by the traditional Dobson Umkehr and satellite buv techniques, and how much better one can do

  1. Archetypal TRMM Radar Profiles Identified Through Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccippio, Dennis J.

    2003-01-01

    It is widely held that identifiable 'convective regimes' exist in nature, although precise definitions of these are elusive. Examples include land / Ocean distinctions, break / monsoon beahvior, seasonal differences in the Amazon (SON vs DJF), etc. These regimes are often described by differences in the realized local convective spectra, and measured by various metrics of convective intensity, depth, areal coverage and rainfall amount. Objective regime identification may be valuable in several ways: regimes may serve as natural 'branch points' in satellite retrieval algorithms or data assimilation efforts; one example might be objective identification of regions that 'should' share a similar 2-R relationship. Similarly, objectively defined regimes may provide guidance on optimal siting of ground validation efforts. Objectively defined regimes could also serve as natural (rather than arbitrary geographic) domain 'controls' in studies of convective response to environmental forcing. Quantification of convective vertical structure has traditionally involved parametric study of prescribed quantities thought to be important to convective dynamics: maximum radar reflectivity, cloud top height, 30-35 dBZ echo top height, rain rate, etc. Individually, these parameters are somewhat deficient as their interpretation is often nonunique (the same metric value may signify different physics in different storm realizations). Individual metrics also fail to capture the coherence and interrelationships between vertical levels available in full 3-D radar datasets. An alternative approach is discovery of natural partitions of vertical structure in a globally representative dataset, or 'archetypal' reflectivity profiles. In this study, this is accomplished through cluster analysis of a very large sample (0[107) of TRMM-PR reflectivity columns. Once achieved, the rainconditional and unconditional 'mix' of archetypal profile types in a given location and/or season provides a description

  2. Archetypal TRMM Radar Profiles Identified Through Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccippio, Dennis J.

    2003-01-01

    It is widely held that identifiable 'convective regimes' exist in nature, although precise definitions of these are elusive. Examples include land / Ocean distinctions, break / monsoon beahvior, seasonal differences in the Amazon (SON vs DJF), etc. These regimes are often described by differences in the realized local convective spectra, and measured by various metrics of convective intensity, depth, areal coverage and rainfall amount. Objective regime identification may be valuable in several ways: regimes may serve as natural 'branch points' in satellite retrieval algorithms or data assimilation efforts; one example might be objective identification of regions that 'should' share a similar 2-R relationship. Similarly, objectively defined regimes may provide guidance on optimal siting of ground validation efforts. Objectively defined regimes could also serve as natural (rather than arbitrary geographic) domain 'controls' in studies of convective response to environmental forcing. Quantification of convective vertical structure has traditionally involved parametric study of prescribed quantities thought to be important to convective dynamics: maximum radar reflectivity, cloud top height, 30-35 dBZ echo top height, rain rate, etc. Individually, these parameters are somewhat deficient as their interpretation is often nonunique (the same metric value may signify different physics in different storm realizations). Individual metrics also fail to capture the coherence and interrelationships between vertical levels available in full 3-D radar datasets. An alternative approach is discovery of natural partitions of vertical structure in a globally representative dataset, or 'archetypal' reflectivity profiles. In this study, this is accomplished through cluster analysis of a very large sample (0[107) of TRMM-PR reflectivity columns. Once achieved, the rainconditional and unconditional 'mix' of archetypal profile types in a given location and/or season provides a description

  3. Comparison of natural and artificial forcing to study the dynamic behaviour of bell towers in low wind context by means of ground-based radar interferometry: the case of the Leaning Tower in Pisa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchisio, Mario; Piroddi, Luca; Ranieri, Gaetano; Calcina, Sergio V.; Farina, Paolo

    2014-10-01

    The study of Cultural Heritage assets needs the application of non-destructive and non-invasive monitoring techniques. In particular, monuments and historical buildings which are open to the visitors and/or subject to important stress must be studied for their dynamic response. In the last 10 years the new ground-based radar interferometry technology has been developed allowing to monitor displacements from a point of sight far from the studied targets. It virtually provides a continuous mapping of displacements of the observed structures up to 10 µm with a range resolution of 0.75 m. In this paper, the application of ground-based interferometry on one very important historical building, the Leaning Tower of Pisa in Italy, is reported. The analysis of these kind of structures is important to catch their dynamic response to natural actions in general, and also to assess the effects due to pedestrian and users, and consequently to define functional capabilities and levels of acceptable dynamic stress. The studied structure was subject to artificial loading by synchronous movement of about 20 people. Artificial forcing led the structure to a resonance condition with the same frequency of the one due to the natural noise excitation, which was separately measured, and with an oscillation amplitude more than thirty times greater than the natural one (in conditions of weak wind). During the passive stages of the survey the recorded structural vibrations were very closed to the instrumental sensitivity, making difficult to distinguish vibration amplitudes amplifications of various segments at various heights. Through the spectral analysis of the acquired data it was possible to estimate the vibration frequencies of the first modal shapes of the structure along two orthogonal directions. The power spectra of the passive survey data have the same maximum frequency of the active but contain more noise at low frequency.

  4. Retrieval of stratospheric and tropospheric BrO profiles and columns using ground-based zenith-sky DOAS observations at Harestua, 60° N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Pyle

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A profiling algorithm based on the optimal estimation method is applied to ground-based zenith-sky UV-visible measurements from Harestua, Southern Norway (60° N, 11° E in order to retrieve BrO vertical profiles. The sensitivity of the zenith-sky observations to the tropospheric BrO detection is increased by using for the spectral analysis a fixed reference spectrum corresponding to clear-sky noon summer conditions. The information content and retrieval errors are characterized and it is shown that the retrieved stratospheric profiles and total columns are consistent with correlative balloon and satellite observations, respectively. Tropospheric BrO columns are derived from profiles retrieved at 80° solar zenith angle during sunrise and sunset for the 2000–2006 period. They show a marked seasonality with mean column value ranging from 1.52±0.62×1013 molec/cm² in late winter/early spring to 0.92±0.38×1013 molec/cm² in summer, which corresponds to 1.0±0.4 and 0.6±0.2 pptv, respectively, if we assume that BrO is uniformly mixed in the troposphere. These column values are also consistent with previous estimates made from balloon, satellite, and other ground-based observations. Daytime (10:30 LT tropospheric BrO columns are compared to the p-TOMCAT 3-D tropospheric chemical transport model (CTM for the 2002–2003 period. p-TOMCAT shows a good agreement with the retrieved columns except in late winter/early spring where an underestimation by the model is obtained. This finding could be explained by the non-inclusion of sea-ice bromine sources in the current version of p-TOMCAT. Therefore the model cannot reproduce the possible transport of air-masses with enhanced BrO concentration due to bromine explosion events from the polar region to Harestua. The daytime stratospheric BrO columns are compared to the SLIMCAT stratospheric 3-D-CTM. The model run used in this study, which assumes 21.2 pptv for the Bry loading (15 pptv for long

  5. Wind profile radar for study of Antarctic air circulation. Progetto di un radar 'wind-profiler' per lo studio della circolazione atmosferica antartica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragaini, E.; Sarango, M.F.; Vasquez, E.H.

    1992-10-01

    After a brief discussion of meteorological methods used in the Antarctic, the paper gives an outline of a coordinated international research project whose objective is to set up a wind profiler radar station that would give meteorologists information regarding Antarctic atmospheric dynamics useful in their investigation of the causes and effects of the hole in the ozone layer. The radar instrumentation is to provide continuous readings of wind velocity at varying altitudes above the polar continent.

  6. Long Term Three-dimensional Model Parameterization and Evaluation By The Use of Combined Continuous Ozone Lidar Profiles, Vertical Wind Profiles and Ground Based Monitors Obtained During The Escompte Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frejafon, E.; Robin, D.; Kalthoff, N.; Pesch, M.

    ESCOMPTE 2001 is a field experiment that took place in the southeast of France, in order to understand chemical transformation and transport and then to improve numer- ical models devoted to pollution study and forecasting. To achieve this goal, a stand alone ozone LIDAR was installed from June 11th to July 13th in Cadarache, 30 km northeast of the cities of Marseilles and Aix-en-Provence, downwind from the ozone precursors emissions zones in case of sea-breeze development conditions. This full automatic LIDAR provided vertical profiles of ozone concentration and also the mix- ing height dynamics, between 100 m and 2 500 m, with a spatial resolution of less than 100 m and a temporal resolution of 3 minutes. Data obtained with the LIDAR were connected to ground based ozone monitor installed on the same location by the air quality network, in order to evaluate the data quality and to obtain ozone verti- cal profiles from the ground level up to the free troposphere, which is an optimized support for tree-dimensional photochemical models parameterization and evaluation. The ozone diurnal cycles and the daily atmospheric stratification recorded during this month show the fast dynamics during pollution episodes, resulting from combined photochemical and transport effects in case of sea-breeze. They also specify the re- maining ozone vertical structure during non polluted episodes. Such long-term infor- mation is then a consistent support for model parameterization and evaluation, as it can specify the ozone concentration and the PBL dynamics from the beginning to the last end of a pollution episode. This one month vertical ozone profiles, which were compiled in a movie, will be presented and discussed more precisely. The obtained results, combined with continuous vertical wind profiles obtained with a SODAR and a ground based meteorological station installed on the same location, give access to the continuous ozone flux vertical profiles and the PBL dynamics.

  7. Design and Analysis of 3-Element yagi-uda Antenna for Wind Profiling Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Kishore.K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available VHF/UHF Radars use yagi-uda antenna in an array configuration for various applications including phased Doppler radars to probe atmosphere. Wind profiler system is used to find the wind profiles in the layers of the atmosphere. The main aim of this paper is to design a 3-element yagi-uda antenna for wind profiler radar system. The simulations of yagi-uda antenna are carried out using windows based 4NEC2 antenna modeler. The radiation characteristics that are usually of interest in the yagi-uda antenna are forward and backward Gain, Input impedance, bandwidth, beamwidthfront to back ratio, VSWR, and magnitude of major lobes and minor lobes of a typical 3-element yagi-uda antenna operating at VHF-Band used in wind profiler radar systems.

  8. HIGH RESOLUTION RANGE PROFILE FORMATION BASED ON LFM SIGNAL FUSION OF MULTIPLE RADARS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Cheng; Hu Weidong; Du Xiaoyong; Yu Wenxian

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a new method of High Resolution Range (HRR) profile formation based on Linear Frequency Modulation (LFM) signal fusion of multiple radars with multiple frequency bands.The principle of the multiple radars signal fusion improving the range resolution is analyzed. With the analysis of return signals received by two radars, it is derived that the phase difference between the echoes varies almost linearly with respect to the frequency if the distance between two radars is negligible compared with the radar observation distance. To compensate the phase difference, an entropy-minimization principle based compensation algorithm is proposed. During the fusion process, the B-splines interpolation method is applied to resample the signals for Fourier transform imaging. The theoretical analysis and simulations results show the proposed method can effectively increase signal bandwidth and provide a high resolution range profile.

  9. A multi-sensor study of the impact of ground-based glaciogenic seeding on clouds and precipitation over mountains in Wyoming. Part I: Project description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Binod; Geerts, Bart

    2016-12-01

    The AgI Seeding Cloud Impact Investigation (ASCII) campaign was conducted in early 2012 and 2013 over two mountain ranges in southern Wyoming to examine the impact of ground-based glaciogenic seeding on snow growth in winter orographic clouds. The campaign was supported by a network of ground-based instruments, including microwave radiometers, two profiling Ka-band Micro-Rain Radars (MRRs), a Doppler on Wheels (DOW) X-band radar, and a Parsivel disdrometer. The University of Wyoming King Air operated the profiling Wyoming Cloud Radar, the Wyoming Cloud Lidar, and in situ cloud and precipitation particle probes. The characteristics of the orographic clouds, flow field, and upstream stability profiles in 27 intensive observation periods (IOPs) are described here. A composite analysis of the impact of seeding on snow growth is presented in Part II of this study (Pokharel et al., 2017).

  10. Comparison of midlatitude ionospheric F region peak parameters and topside Ne profiles from IRI2012 model prediction with ground-based ionosonde and Alouette II observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordiyenko, G. I.; Yakovets, A. F.

    2017-07-01

    The ionospheric F2 peak parameters recorded by a ground-based ionosonde at the midlatitude station Alma-Ata [43.25N, 76.92E] were compared with those obtained using the latest version of the IRI model (http://omniweb.gsfc.nasa.gov/vitmo/iri2012_vitmo.html). It was found that for the Alma-Ata (Kazakhstan) location, the IRI2012 model describes well the morphology of seasonal and diurnal variations of the ionospheric critical frequency (foF2) and peak density height (hmF2) monthly medians. The model errors in the median foF2 prediction (percentage deviations between the median foF2 values and their model predictions) were found to vary approximately in the range from about -20% to 34% and showed a stable overestimation in the median foF2 values for daytime in January and July and underestimation for day- and nighttime hours in the equinoctial months. The comparison between the ionosonde hmF2 and IRI results clearly showed that the IRI overestimates the nighttime hmF2 values for March and September months, and the difference is up to 30 km. The daytime Alma-Ata hmF2 data were found to be close to the IRI predictions (deviations are approximately ±10-15 km) in winter and equinoctial months, except in July when the observed hmF2 values were much more (from approximately 50-200 km). The comparison between the Alouette foF2 data and IRI predictions showed mixed results. In particular, the Alouette foF2 data showed a tendency to be overestimated for daytime in winter months similar to the ionosonde data; however, the overestimated foF2 values for nighttime in the autumn equinox were in disagreement with the ionosonde observations. There were large deviations between the observed hmF2 values and their model predictions. The largest deviations were found during winter and summer (up to -90 km). The comparison of the Alouette II electron density profiles with those predicted by the adapted IRI2012 model in the altitude range hmF2 of the satellite position showed a great

  11. A brief history of the development of wind-profiling or MST radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Van Zandt

    Full Text Available The history of the development of the wind-profiling or MST radar technique is reviewed from its inception in the late 1960s to the present. Extensions of the technique by the development of boundary-layer radars and the radio-acoustic sounding system (RASS technique to measure temperature are documented. Applications are described briefly, particularly practical applications to weather forecasting, with data from networks of radars, and scientific applications to the study of rapidly varying atmospheric phenomena such as gravity waves and turbulence.

    Key words: Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (instruments and techniques · Radio science (remote sensing; instruments and techniques

  12. Combined vertical-velocity observations with Doppler lidar, cloud radar and wind profiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bühl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Case studies of combined vertical-velocity measurements of Doppler lidar, cloud radar and wind profiler are presented. The measurements were taken at the Meteorological Observatory Lindenberg, Germany. Synergistic products are presented that are derived from the vertical-velocity measurements of the three instruments: A comprehensive classification mask of vertically moving atmospheric targets and the terminal fall velocity of water droplets and ice crystals corrected for vertical air motion. It is shown that the measurements of the Doppler lidar can extent the view of the cloud radar and the wind profiler, especially when observing clouds.

  13. A Study of Air/Space-borne Dual-Wavelength Radar for Estimation of Rain Profiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In this study, a framework is given by which air/space-borne dual-wavelength radar data can be used to estimate the characteristic parameters of hydrometeors. The focus of the study is on the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) precipitation radar, a dual-wavelength radar that will operate in the Ku (13.6 GHz) and Ka (35 GHz) bands. A key aspect of the retrievals is the relationship between the differential frequency ratio (DFR) and the median volume diameter, Do, and its dependence on the phase state of the hydrometeors. It is shown that parametric plots of Do and particle concentration in the plane of the DFR and the radar reflectivity factor in the Ku band can be used to reduce the ambiguities in deriving Do from DFR. A self-consistent iterative algorithm, which does not require the use of an independent pathattenuation constraint, is examined by applying it to the apparent radar reflectivity profiles simulated from a drop size distribution (DSD) model. For light to moderate rain, the self-consistent rain profiling approach converges to the correct solution only if the same shape factor of the Gamma distributions is used both to generate and retrieve the rain profiles. On the other hand, if the shape factors differ, the iteration generally converges but not to the correct solution. To further examine the dual-wavelength techniques, the selfconsistent iterative algorithm, along with forward and backward rain profiling algorithms, are applied to measurements taken from the 2nd generation Precipitation Radar (PR-2) built by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Consistent with the model results, it is found that the estimated rain profiles are sensitive to the shape factor of the size distribution when the iterative, self-consistent approach is used but relatively insensitive to this parameter when the forward- and backward-constrained approaches are used.

  14. Comparing helicopter-borne profiling radar with airborne laser scanner data for forest structure estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piermattei, Livia; Hollaus, Markus; Pfeifer, Norbert; Chen, Yuwei; Karjalainen, Mika; Hakala, Teemu; Hyyppä, Juha; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    Forests are complex ecosystems that show substantial variation with respect to climate, management regime, stand history, disturbance, and needs of local communities. The dynamic processes of growth and disturbance are reflected in the structural components of forests that include the canopy vertical structure and geometry (e.g. size, height, and form), tree position and species diversity. Current remote-sensing systems to measure forest structural attributes include passive optical sensors and active sensors. The technological capabilities of active remote sensing like the ability to penetrate the vegetation and provide information about its vertical structure has promoted an extensive use of LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) and radar (RAdio Detection And Ranging) system over the last 20 years. LiDAR measurements from aircraft (airborne laser scanning, ALS) currently represents the primary data source for three-dimensional information on forest vertical structure. Contrary, despite the potential of radar remote sensing, their use is not yet established in forest monitoring. In order to better understand the interaction of pulsed radar with the forest canopy, and to increase the feasibility of this system, the Finnish Geospatial Research Institute has developed a helicopter-borne profiling radar system, called TomoRadar. TomoRadar is capable of recording a canopy-penetrating profile of forests. To georeference the radar measurements the system was equipped with a global navigation satellite system and an inertial measurement unit with a centimeter level accuracy of the flight trajectory. The TomoRadar operates at Ku-band, (wave lengths λ 1.5cm) with two separated parabolic antennas providing co- and cross-polarization modes. The purpose of this work is to investigate the capability of the TomoRadar system, for estimating the forest vertical profile, terrain topography and tree height. We analysed 600 m TomoRadar crosspolarized (i.e. horizontal - vertical

  15. A comparison of vertical velocity variance measurements from wind profiling radars and sonic anemometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Katherine; Bianco, Laura; Johnston, Paul; Wilczak, James M.

    2017-03-01

    Observations of turbulence in the planetary boundary layer are critical for developing and evaluating boundary layer parameterizations in mesoscale numerical weather prediction models. These observations, however, are expensive and rarely profile the entire boundary layer. Using optimized configurations for 449 and 915 MHz wind profiling radars during the eXperimental Planetary boundary layer Instrumentation Assessment (XPIA), improvements have been made to the historical methods of measuring vertical velocity variance through the time series of vertical velocity, as well as the Doppler spectral width. Using six heights of sonic anemometers mounted on a 300 m tower, correlations of up to R2 = 0. 74 are seen in measurements of the large-scale variances from the radar time series and R2 = 0. 79 in measurements of small-scale variance from radar spectral widths. The total variance, measured as the sum of the small and large scales, agrees well with sonic anemometers, with R2 = 0. 79. Correlation is higher in daytime convective boundary layers than nighttime stable conditions when turbulence levels are smaller. With the good agreement with the in situ measurements, highly resolved profiles up to 2 km can be accurately observed from the 449 MHz radar and 1 km from the 915 MHz radar. This optimized configuration will provide unique observations for the verification and improvement to boundary layer parameterizations in mesoscale models.

  16. Velocity profiles inside volcanic clouds from three-dimensional scanning microwave dual-polarization Doppler radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montopoli, Mario

    2016-07-01

    In this work, velocity profiles within a volcanic tephra cloud obtained by dual-polarization Doppler radar acquisitions with three-dimensional (3-D) mechanical scanning capability are analyzed. A method for segmenting the radar volumes into three velocity regimes: vertical updraft, vertical fallout, and horizontal wind advection within a volcanic tephra cloud using dual-polarization Doppler radar moments is proposed. The horizontal and vertical velocity components within the regimes are retrieved using a novel procedure that makes assumptions concerning the characteristics of the winds inside these regimes. The vertical velocities retrieved are combined with 1-D simulations to derive additional parameters including particle fallout, mass flux, and particle sizes. The explosive event occurred on 23 November 2013 at the Mount Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy), is considered a demonstrative case in which to analyze the radar Doppler signal inside the tephra column. The X-band radar (3 cm wavelength) in the Catania, Italy, airport observed the 3-D scenes of the Etna tephra cloud ~32 km from the volcano vent every 10 min. From the radar-derived vertical velocity profiles of updraft, particle fallout, and horizontal transportation, an exit velocity of 150 m/s, mass flux rate of 1.37 • 107 kg/s, particle fallout velocity of 18 m/s, and diameters of precipitating tephra particles equal to 0.8 cm are estimated on average. These numbers are shown to be consistent with theoretical 1-D simulations of plume dynamics and local reports at the ground, respectively. A thickness of 3 ± 0.36 km for the downwind ash cloud is also inferred by differentiating the radar-derived cloud top and the height of transition between the convective and buoyancy regions, the latter being inferred by the estimated vertical updraft velocity profile. The unique nature of the case study as well as the novelty of the segmentation and retrieval methods presented potentially give new insights into the

  17. The new real-time measurement capabilities of the profiling TARA radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unal, C.M.H.; Dufournet, Y.; Otto, T.; Russchenberg, H.W.J.

    2012-01-01

    In the past 10 years, the S-band FM-CW TARA (Transportable Atmospheric RAdar), placed at the Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research (CESAR), provided in real-time vertical profiles of the Doppler moments. Classical spectral processing was carried out. The polarimetric and multi-beam measu

  18. Quality Control of Wind Data from 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacek, Austin

    2016-01-01

    Upper-level wind profiles obtained from a 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) instrument at Kennedy Space Center are incorporated in space launch vehicle design and day-of-launch operations to assess wind effects on the vehicle during ascent. Automated and manual quality control (QC) techniques are implemented to remove spurious data in the upper-level wind profiles caused from atmospheric and non-atmospheric artifacts over the 2010-2012 period of record (POR). By adding the new quality controlled profiles with older profiles from 1997-2009, a robust database will be constructed of upper-level wind characteristics. Statistical analysis will determine the maximum, minimum, and 95th percentile of the wind components from the DRWP profiles over recent POR and compare against the older database. Additionally, this study identifies specific QC flags triggered during the QC process to understand how much data is retained and removed from the profiles.

  19. An Unattended Cloud-Profiling Radar for Use in Climate Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Kenneth P.; Martner, Brooks E.; Post, M. J.; Kropfli, Robert A.; Welsh, David C.; Widener, Kevin B.

    1998-03-01

    A new millimeter-wave cloud radar (MMCR) has been designed to provide detailed, long-term observations of nonprecipitating and weakly precipitating clouds at Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. Scientific requirements included excellent sensitivity and vertical resolution to detect weak and thin multiple layers of ice and liquid water clouds over the sites and long-term, unattended operations in remote locales. In response to these requirements, the innovative radar design features a vertically pointing, single-polarization, Doppler system operating at 35 GHz (Ka band). It uses a low-peak-power transmitter for long-term reliability and high-gain antenna and pulse-compressed waveforms to maximize sensitivity and resolution. The radar uses the same kind of signal processor as that used in commercial wind profilers. The first MMCR began operations at the CART in northern Oklahoma in late 1996 and has operated continuously there for thousands of hours. It routinely provides remarkably detailed images of the ever-changing cloud structure and kinematics over this densely instrumented site. Examples of the data are presented. The radar measurements will greatly improve quantitative documentation of cloud conditions over the CART sites and will bolster ARM research to understand how clouds impact climate through their effects on radiative transfer. Millimeter-wave radars such as the MMCR also have potential applications in the fields of aviation weather, weather modification, and basic cloud physics research.

  20. Validation of vertical refractivity profiles as required for performance prediction of coastal surveillance radars

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naicker, K

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available for modeling the detection performance of coastal surveillance radars. Validation is provided through meteorological and radio wave propagation measurements undertaken in False Bay, South Africa. Keywords-vertical refractive profiles, evaporation ducts.... An atmospheric duct is a horizontal layer in troposphere, where the refractive conditions are such that an EM wave will be channeled or guided as discussed above. This results in EM wave propagation over great ranges. In a littoral environment, evaporation...

  1. RADAR HRR PROFILING FOR GROUND MOVING TARGET USING PHASE-CODED AND HOPPED-FREQUENCY WAVEFORMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yan; Wang Changming

    2007-01-01

    To obtain the radar High Range Resolution (HRR) profile of the slowly moving ground target in strong clutter background, the Phase-Coded Hopped-Frequency (PCHF) waveform is proposed. By multiple-bursts coherent processing, the HRR profile synthesis, target velocity compensation and clutter compression can be accomplished simultaneously. The new waveform is shown to have good ability to suppress ground clutter and good Electronic Counter-CounterMeasures (ECCM) ability as well. The clutter compression performance of the proposed method is verified by the numerical results.

  2. Measurements of Turbulence Dissipation Rates in the Planetary Boundary Layer from Wind Profiling Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, K.; Bianco, L.; Wilczak, J. M.; Johnston, P. E.

    2015-12-01

    When forecasting winds at a wind plant for energy production, the turbulence parameterizations are crucial for understanding wind plant performance. Recent research shows that the turbulence (eddy) dissipation rate in planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterization schemes introduces significant uncertainty in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Thus, developing the capability to measure dissipation rates in the PBL will allow for identification of weaknesses in, and improvements to the parameterizations. We use data from a 915-MHz wind profiling radar at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory, collected during the XPIA campaign in spring 2015, to identify the critical parameters for measuring eddy dissipation rates using the spectral width method. Radar set-up parameters (e.g., spectral resolution), post-processing techniques (e.g., filtering for non-atmospheric signals), and spectral averaging, are optimized to capture the most accurate power spectrum for measuring spectral widths for use in the computation of the eddy dissipation rates. These estimates are compared to six heights of turbulence-measuring sonic anemometers from 50 - 300 m on a co-located 300 m tower as verification, showing encouraging results. These methods are then applied to the wind profiling radar data being collected in the Wind Forecasting Improvement Project 2 (WFIP2), a DOE funded campaign that aims to improve the ability to forecast hub-height winds from WRF-based models. This campaign uses of a suite of field observations, including many wind profiling radars, in the Columbia River Gorge, a location with complex terrain where turbulence parameterizations are critical for wind energy prediction.

  3. Ground-based Measurements of Vertical Profiles and Columns of Atmospheric Trace Gases Over Toronto Using a New High-Resolution Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiacek, A.; Yashcov, D.; Strong, K.; Boudreau, L.; Rochette, L.; Roy, C.

    2002-12-01

    The University of Toronto Atmospheric Observatory (TAO) has recently been established at Toronto, Canada. TAO includes several instruments, with a DA8 Fourier Transform Spectrometer (DA8 FTS, manufactured by ABB Bomem Inc., Québec, Canada) serving as the primary instrument at the facility. The geographic position of TAO (43.66°N, 79.40°W) makes it well suited for long-term measurements of mid-latitude stratospheric ozone and related species, while its urban setting enables measurements of tropospheric pollution. The DA8 FTS is based on a Michelson interferometer with a maximum optical path difference of 250 cm, providing a maximum unapodized resolution of 0.0026 cm-1. It is currently equipped with KBr and CaF2 beamsplitters, and InSb and HgCdTe detectors, for coverage of the spectral range from 700 to 4100 cm-1. A new heliostat (manufactured by Aim Controls Inc., California, USA) provides active solar tracking, collecting the incoming solar radiation and directing it into the FTS. The TAO DA8 FTS incorporates a new optical design recently developed by ABB Bomem Inc., which results in a fixed optical axis through the beamsplitter (and a fixed focal point on the detector) as well as a more stable modulation efficiency. The new instrument optics will be discussed. Next, the performance of the instrument will be examined in the context of standard NDSC (Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change) trace gas column and vertical profile retrieval techniques, which use least squares fitting algorithms (SFIT, SFIT2). TAO has been operational (weather permitting) since October 2001. We have been retrieving columns and vertical profiles of HCl, HF, CH4, OCS, C2H6, CO, N2O and NO2 since May 2002. A detailed error analysis of retrieved columns and vertical profiles has been undertaken for the above species. Future plans for the TAO FTS include comparing our measurements with satellite measurements made by MOPITT, OSIRIS, and the upcoming ACE and MAESTRO instruments

  4. Study of aerosol microphysical properties profiles retrieved from ground-based remote sensing and aircraft in-situ measurements during a Saharan dust event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Bravo-Aranda, J. A.; Baumgardner, D.; Guerrero-Rascado, J. L.; Pérez-Ramírez, D.; Navas-Guzmán, F.; Veselovskii, I.; Lyamani, H.; Valenzuela, A.; Olmo, F. J.; Titos, G.; Andrey, J.; Chaikovsky, A.; Dubovik, O.; Gil-Ojeda, M.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we present an analysis of mineral dust optical and microphysical properties obtained from different retrieval techniques applied to active and passive remote sensing measurements, including a comparison with simultaneous in-situ aircraft measurements. Data were collected in a field campaign performed during a mineral dust outbreak a Granada, Spain, experimental site (37.16° N, 3.61° W, 680 m a.s.l.) on the 27 June 2011. Column-integrated properties are provided by sun- and star-photometry which allows a continuous evaluation of the mineral dust optical properties during both day and night-time. Both the Linear Estimation and AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) inversion algorithms are applied for the retrieval of the column-integrated microphysical particle properties. In addition, vertically-resolved microphysical properties are obtained from a multi-wavelength Raman lidar system included in EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network), by using both LIRIC (Lidar Radiometer Inversion Code) algorithm during daytime and an algorithm applied to the Raman measurements based on the regularization technique during night-time. LIRIC retrievals reveal several dust layers between 3 and 5 km a.s.l. with volume concentrations of the coarse spheroid mode up to 60 μm3 cm-3. The combined use of the regularization and LIRIC methods reveals the night-to-day evolution of the vertical structure of the mineral dust microphysical properties and offers complementary information to that from column-integrated variables retrieved from passive remote sensing. Additionally, lidar depolarization profiles and LIRIC retrieved volume concentration are compared with aircraft in-situ measurements. This study presents for the first time a comparison of both volume concentration and dust particle polarization ratios measured with in-situ and remote sensing techniques. Results for the depolarization measurements in the dust layer indicate reasonable agreement within the

  5. Evaluating CALIOP Nighttime Level 2 Aerosol Profile Retrievals Using a Global Transport Model Equipped with Two-Dimensional Variational Data Assimilation and Ground-Based Lidar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. R.; Tackett, J. L.; Reid, J. S.; Zhang, J.; Westphal, D. L.; Vaughan, M.; Winker, D. M.; Welton, E. J.; Prospero, J. M.; Shimizu, A.; Sugimoto, N.

    2011-12-01

    Launched in 2006, the Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization instrument (CALIOP) flown aboard the NASA/CNES Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite has collected the first high-resolution global, inter-seasonal and multi-year measurements of aerosol structure. Profiles for aerosol particle extinction coefficient and column-integrated optical depth (AOD) are unique and highly synergistic satellite measurements, given the limitations of passive aerosol remote sensors from resolving information vertically. However, accurate value-added (Level 2.0) CALIOP aerosol products require comprehensive validation of retrieval techniques and calibration stability. Daytime Level 2.0 CALIOP AOD retrievals have been evaluated versus co-located NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS-AQUA) data. To date, no corresponding investigation of nighttime retrieval performance has been conducted from a lack of requisite global nighttime validation datasets. In this paper, Version 3.01 CALIOP 5-km retrievals of nighttime 0.532 μm AOD from 2007 are evaluated versus corresponding 0.550 μm AOD analyses derived with the global 1° x 1° U. S. Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS). Mean regional profiles of CALIOP nighttime 0.532 μm extinction coefficient are assessed versus NASA Micropulse Lidar Network and NIES Skynet Lidar Network measurements. NAAPS features a two-dimensional variational assimilation procedure for quality-assured MODIS and NASA Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) AOD products. Whereas NAAPS nighttime AOD datasets represent a nominal 12-hr forecast field, from lack of MODIS/MISR retrievals for assimilation in the dark sector of the model, evaluation of NAAPS 00-hr analysis and 24-hr forecast skill versus MODIS and NASA Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) indicates adequate stability for conducting this study. Corresponding daytime comparisons of CALIOP retrievals with NAAPS

  6. Study of aerosol microphysical properties profiles retrieved from ground-based remote sensing and aircraft in-situ measurements during a Saharan dust event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Granados-Muñoz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present an analysis of mineral dust optical and microphysical properties obtained from different retrieval techniques applied to active and passive remote sensing measurements, including a comparison with simultaneous in-situ aircraft measurements. Data were collected in a field campaign performed during a mineral dust outbreak a Granada, Spain, experimental site (37.16° N, 3.61° W, 680 m a.s.l. on the 27 June 2011. Column-integrated properties are provided by sun- and star-photometry which allows a continuous evaluation of the mineral dust optical properties during both day and night-time. Both the Linear Estimation and AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network inversion algorithms are applied for the retrieval of the column-integrated microphysical particle properties. In addition, vertically-resolved microphysical properties are obtained from a multi-wavelength Raman lidar system included in EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network, by using both LIRIC (Lidar Radiometer Inversion Code algorithm during daytime and an algorithm applied to the Raman measurements based on the regularization technique during night-time. LIRIC retrievals reveal several dust layers between 3 and 5 km a.s.l. with volume concentrations of the coarse spheroid mode up to 60 μm3 cm−3. The combined use of the regularization and LIRIC methods reveals the night-to-day evolution of the vertical structure of the mineral dust microphysical properties and offers complementary information to that from column-integrated variables retrieved from passive remote sensing. Additionally, lidar depolarization profiles and LIRIC retrieved volume concentration are compared with aircraft in-situ measurements. This study presents for the first time a comparison of both volume concentration and dust particle polarization ratios measured with in-situ and remote sensing techniques. Results for the depolarization measurements in the dust layer indicate reasonable agreement

  7. Cloud Base Height and Effective Cloud Emissivity Retrieval with Ground-Based Infrared Interferometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Lin-Jun; LU Da-Ren

    2012-01-01

    Based on ground-based Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) observations in Shouxian, Anhui province, China, the authors retrieve the cloud base height (CBH) and effective cloud emissivity by using the minimum root-mean-square difference method. This method was originally developed for satellite remote sensing. The high-temporal-resolution retrieval results can depict the trivial variations of the zenith clouds continu- ously. The retrieval results are evaluated by comparing them with observations by the cloud radar. The compari- son shows that the retrieval bias is smaller for the middle and low cloud, especially for the opaque cloud. When two layers of clouds exist, the retrieval results reflect the weighting radiative contribution of the multi-layer cloud. The retrieval accuracy is affected by uncertainties of the AERI radiances and sounding profiles, in which the role of uncertainty in the temperature profile is dominant.

  8. Simulation study for measurement of horizontal wind profiles in the polar stratosphere and mesosphere using ground-based observations of ozone and carbon monoxide lines in the 230-250 GHz region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnham, David A.; Ford, George P.; Moffat-Griffin, Tracy; Pumphrey, Hugh C.

    2016-07-01

    Meteorological and atmospheric models are being extended up to 80 km altitude but there are very few observing techniques that can measure stratospheric-mesospheric winds at altitudes between 20 and 80 km to verify model datasets. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of horizontal wind profile measurements using ground-based passive millimetre-wave spectroradiometric observations of ozone lines centred at 231.28, 249.79, and 249.96 GHz. Vertical profiles of horizontal winds are retrieved from forward and inverse modelling simulations of the line-of-sight Doppler-shifted atmospheric emission lines above Halley station (75°37' S, 26°14' W), Antarctica. For a radiometer with a system temperature of 1400 K and 30 kHz spectral resolution observing the ozone 231.28 GHz line we estimate that 12 h zonal and meridional wind profiles could be determined over the altitude range 25-74 km in winter, and 28-66 km in summer. Height-dependent measurement uncertainties are in the range 3-8 m s-1 and vertical resolution ˜ 8-16 km. Under optimum observing conditions at Halley a temporal resolution of 1.5 h for measuring either zonal or meridional winds is possible, reducing to 0.5 h for a radiometer with a 700 K system temperature. Combining observations of the 231.28 GHz ozone line and the 230.54 GHz carbon monoxide line gives additional altitude coverage at 85 ± 12 km. The effects of clear-sky seasonal mean winter/summer conditions, zenith angle of the received atmospheric emission, and spectrometer frequency resolution on the altitude coverage, measurement uncertainty, and height and time resolution of the retrieved wind profiles have been determined.

  9. Vertical radar profiles for the calibration of unsaturated flow models under dynamic water table conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiani, G.; Gallotti, L.; Ventura, V.; Andreotti, G.

    2003-04-01

    The identification of flow and transport characteristics in the vadose zone is a fundamental step towards understanding the dynamics of contaminated sites and the resulting risk of groundwater pollution. Borehole radar has gained popularity for the monitoring of moisture content changes, thanks to its apparent simplicity and its high resolution characteristics. However, cross-hole radar requires closely spaced (a few meters), plastic-cased boreholes, that are rarely available as a standard feature in sites of practical interest. Unlike cross-hole applications, Vertical Radar Profiles (VRP) require only one borehole, with practical and financial benefits. High-resolution, time-lapse VRPs have been acquired at a crude oil contaminated site in Trecate, Northern Italy, on a few existing boreholes originally developed for remediation via bioventing. The dynamic water table conditions, with yearly oscillations of roughly 5 m from 6 to 11 m bgl, offers a good opportunity to observe via VRP a field scale drainage-imbibition process. Arrival time inversion has been carried out using a regularized tomographic algorithm, in order to overcome the noise introduced by first arrival picking. Interpretation of the vertical profiles in terms of moisture content has been based on standard models (Topp et al., 1980; Roth et al., 1990). The sedimentary sequence manifests itself as a cyclic pattern in moisture content over most of the profiles. We performed preliminary Richards' equation simulations with time varying later table boundary conditions, in order to estimate the unsaturated flow parameters, and the results have been compared with laboratory evidence from cores.

  10. A COMPARISON BETWEEN ZERO-OFFSET AND VERTICAL RADAR PROFILING GPR TECHNIQUES WITH EMPHASIS ON PROBLEMATIC BOREHOLE EFFECTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossi, Matteo; Vignoli, Giulio; Cassiani, Giorgio;

    contribution: Zero-Offset Profiling (ZOP) and Vertical Radar Profiling (VRP). We make a direct comparison of these methods in a field case (Trecate site, Northern Italy), to explore each method’s capabilities and limitations. Our analysis is focused on the results in the vadose zone and shows...

  11. The New Weather Radar for America's Space Program in Florida: A Temperature Profile Adaptive Scan Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, L. D.; Petersen, W. A.; Deierling, W.; Roeder, W. P.

    2009-01-01

    A new weather radar is being acquired for use in support of America s space program at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, NASA Kennedy Space Center, and Patrick AFB on the east coast of central Florida. This new radar replaces the modified WSR-74C at Patrick AFB that has been in use since 1984. The new radar is a Radtec TDR 43-250, which has Doppler and dual polarization capability. A new fixed scan strategy was designed to best support the space program. The fixed scan strategy represents a complex compromise between many competing factors and relies on climatological heights of various temperatures that are important for improved lightning forecasting and evaluation of Lightning Launch Commit Criteria (LCC), which are the weather rules to avoid lightning strikes to in-flight rockets. The 0 C to -20 C layer is vital since most generation of electric charge occurs within it and so it is critical in evaluating Lightning LCC and in forecasting lightning. These are two of the most important duties of 45 WS. While the fixed scan strategy that covers most of the climatological variation of the 0 C to -20 C levels with high resolution ensures that these critical temperatures are well covered most of the time, it also means that on any particular day the radar is spending precious time scanning at angles covering less important heights. The goal of this project is to develop a user-friendly, Interactive Data Language (IDL) computer program that will automatically generate optimized radar scan strategies that adapt to user input of the temperature profile and other important parameters. By using only the required scan angles output by the temperature profile adaptive scan strategy program, faster update times for volume scans and/or collection of more samples per gate for better data quality is possible, while maintaining high resolution at the critical temperature levels. The temperature profile adaptive technique will also take into account earth curvature and refraction

  12. Radar Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Giangrande, S. E. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bartholomew, M. J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Radar Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) [http://www.arm.gov/campaigns/osc2013rwpcf] campaign was scheduled to take place from 15 July 2013 through 15 July 2015 (or until shipped for the next U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement [ARM] Climate Research Facility first Mobile Facility [AMF1] deployment). The campaign involved the deployment of the AMF1 Scintec 915 MHz Radar Wind Profiler (RWP) at BNL, in conjunction with several other ARM, BNL and National Weather Service (NWS) instruments. The two main scientific foci of the campaign were: 1) To provide profiles of the horizontal wind to be used to test and validate short-term cloud advection forecasts for solar-energy applications and 2) to provide vertical profiling capabilities for the study of dynamics (i.e., vertical velocity) and hydrometeors in winter storms. This campaign was a serendipitous opportunity that arose following the deployment of the RWP at the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) campaign in Cape Cod, Massachusetts and restriction from participation in the Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15 (GoAmazon 2014/15) campaign due to radio-frequency allocation restriction for international deployments. The RWP arrived at BNL in the fall of 2013, but deployment was delayed until fall of 2014 as work/safety planning and site preparation were completed. The RWP further encountered multiple electrical failures, which eventually required several shipments of instrument power supplies and the final amplifier to the vendor to complete repairs. Data collection began in late January 2015. The operational modes of the RWP were changed such that in addition to collecting traditional profiles of the horizontal wind, a vertically pointing mode was also included for the purpose of precipitation sensing and estimation of vertical velocities. The RWP operated well until the end of the campaign in July 2015 and collected observations for more than 20 precipitation

  13. Ground based materials science experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. B.; Johnston, J. C.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    The facilities at the Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory (MMSL) at the Lewis Research Center, created to offer immediate and low-cost access to ground-based testing facilities for industrial, academic, and government researchers, are described. The equipment in the MMSL falls into three categories: (1) devices which emulate some aspect of low gravitational forces, (2) specialized capabilities for 1-g development and refinement of microgravity experiments, and (3) functional duplicates of flight hardware. Equipment diagrams are included.

  14. Ground based materials science experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. B.; Johnston, J. C.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    The facilities at the Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory (MMSL) at the Lewis Research Center, created to offer immediate and low-cost access to ground-based testing facilities for industrial, academic, and government researchers, are described. The equipment in the MMSL falls into three categories: (1) devices which emulate some aspect of low gravitational forces, (2) specialized capabilities for 1-g development and refinement of microgravity experiments, and (3) functional duplicates of flight hardware. Equipment diagrams are included.

  15. AirMOSS P-Band Radar Retrieval of Subcanopy Soil Moisture Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaeenejad, A.; Burgin, M. S.; Duan, X.; Moghaddam, M.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of soil moisture, as a key variable of the Earth system, plays an important role in our under-standing of the global water, energy, and carbon cycles. The importance of such knowledge has led NASA to fund missions such as Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) and Airborne Microwave Observatory of Subcanopy and Subsurface (AirMOSS). The AirMOSS mission seeks to improve the estimates of the North American Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) by providing high-resolution observations of the root zone soil moisture (RZSM) over regions representative of the major North American biomes. AirMOSS flies a P-band SAR to penetrate vegetation and into the root zone to provide estimates of RZSM. The flights cover areas containing flux tower sites in regions from the boreal forests in Saskatchewan, Canada, to the tropical forests in La Selva, Costa Rica. The radar snapshots are used to generate estimates of RZSM via inversion of a scattering model of vegetation overlying soils with variable moisture profiles. These retrievals will be used to generate a time record of RZSM, which will be integrated with an ecosystem demography model in order to estimate the respiration and photosynthesis carbon fluxes. The aim of this work is the retrieval of the moisture profile over AirMOSS sites using the collected P-band radar data. We have integrated layered-soil scattering models into a forest scattering model; for the backscattering from ground and for the trunk-ground double-bounce mechanism, we have used a layered small perturbation method and a coherent scattering model of layered soil, respectively. To estimate the soil moisture profile, we represent it as a second-order polynomial in the form of az2 + bz + c, where z is the depth and a, b, and c are the coefficients to be retrieved from radar measurements. When retrieved, these coefficients give us the soil moisture up to a prescribed depth of validity. To estimate the unknown coefficients of the polynomial, we use simulated

  16. Estimation of lava flow field volumes and volumetric effusion rates from airborne radar profiling and other data: Monitoring of the Nornahraun (Holuhraun) 2014/15 eruption in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürig, Tobias; Gudmundsson, Magnús; Högnadóttir, Thordís; Jónsdóttir, Ingibjörg; Gudbjörnsson, Snaebjörn; Lárusson, Örnólfur; Höskuldsson, Ármann; Thordarson, Thorvaldur; Riishuus, Morten; Magnússon, Eyjólfur

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring of lava-producing eruptions involves systematic measurement of flow field volumes, which in turn can be used to obtain average magma discharge over the period of observation. However, given inaccessibility to the interior parts of active lava fields, remote sensing techniques must be applied. Several satellite platforms provide data that can be geo-referenced, allowing area estimation. However, unless sterographic or tandem satellite data are available, the determination of thicknesses is non-trivial. The ongoing eruption ('Nornaeldar')at Dyngjusandurin the Icelandic highlands offers an opportunity to monitor the temporal and spatial evolution of a typical Icelandic lava flow field. The mode of emplacementis complex and includesboth horizontal and vertical stacking, inflation of lobes and topographic inversions. Due to the large extent of the flow field (>83 km2 on 5 Jan 2015, and still growing) and its considerable local variation in thickness (30 m) and surface roughness, obtaining robust quantification of lava thicknesses is very challenging,despite the lava is being emplaced onto a low-relief sandur plain. Creative methods have been implemented to obtain as reliable observation as possible into the third dimension: Next to areal extent measurements from satellites and maps generated with airborne synthetic-aperture radar (SAR), lava thickness profiles are regularly obtained by low-level flights with a fixed-wing aircraft that is equipped with a ground clearance radar coupled witha submeter DGPS,a system originally designed for monitoring surface changes of glaciers above geothermally active areas.The resulting radar profile data are supplemented by analyses of aerial photos and complemented by results from an array of ground based thickness measurement methods. The initial results indicate that average effusion ratewas ~200 m3/s in the first weeks of the eruption (end August, early September) but declined to 50-100 m3/s in November to December period

  17. Development of a Climatology of Vertically Complete Wind Profiles from Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes in detail the QC and splicing methodology for KSC's 50- and 915-MHz DRWP measurements that generates an extensive archive of vertically complete profiles from 0.20-18.45 km. The concurrent POR from each archive extends from April 2000 to December 2009. MSFC NE applies separate but similar QC processes to each of the 50- and 915-MHz DRWP archives. DRWP literature and data examination provide the basis for developing and applying the automated and manual QC processes on both archives. Depending on the month, the QC'ed 50- and 915-MHz DRWP archives retain 52-65% and 16-30% of the possible data, respectively. The 50- and 915-MHz DRWP QC archives retain 84-91% and 85-95%, respectively, of all the available data provided that data exist in the non- QC'ed archives. Next, MSFC NE applies an algorithm to splice concurrent measurements from both DRWP sources. Last, MSFC NE generates a composite profile from the (up to) five available spliced profiles to effectively characterize boundary layer winds and to utilize all possible 915-MHz DRWP measurements at each timestamp. During a given month, roughly 23,000-32,000 complete profiles exist from 0.25-18.45 km from the composite profiles' archive, and approximately 5,000- 27,000 complete profiles exist from an archive utilizing an individual 915-MHz DRWP. One can extract a variety of profile combinations (pairs, triplets, etc.) from this sample for a given application. The sample of vertically complete DRWP wind measurements not only gives launch vehicle customers greater confidence in loads and trajectory assessments versus using balloon output, but also provides flexibility to simulate different DOL situations across applicable altitudes. In addition to increasing sample size and providing more flexibility for DOL simulations in the vehicle design phase, the spliced DRWP database provides any upcoming launch vehicle program with the capability to utilize DRWP profiles on DOL to compute vehicle steering

  18. Pulse Doppler radar

    CERN Document Server

    Alabaster, Clive

    2012-01-01

    This book is a practitioner's guide to all aspects of pulse Doppler radar. It concentrates on airborne military radar systems since they are the most used, most complex, and most interesting of the pulse Doppler radars; however, ground-based and non-military systems are also included. It covers the fundamental science, signal processing, hardware issues, systems design and case studies of typical systems. It will be a useful resource for engineers of all types (hardware, software and systems), academics, post-graduate students, scientists in radar and radar electronic warfare sectors and milit

  19. GEOS-3 ocean current investigation using radar altimeter profiling. [Gulf Stream surface topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitao, C. D.; Huang, N. E.; Parra, C. G.

    1978-01-01

    Both quasi-stationary and dynamic departures from the marine geoid were successfully detected using altitude measurements from the GEOS-3 radar altimeter. The quasi-stationary departures are observed either as elevation changes in single pass profiles across the Gulf Stream or at the crowding of contour lines at the western and northern areas of topographic maps generated using altimeter data spanning one month or longer. Dynamic features such as current meandering and spawned eddies can be monitored by comparing monthly mean maps. Comparison of altimeter inferred eddies with IR detected thermal rings indicates agreement of the two techniques. Estimates of current velocity are made using derived slope estimates in conjunction with the geostrophic equation.

  20. Quality Control Algorithms for the Kennedy Space Center 50-Megahertz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Winds Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the process used by the Marshall Space Flight Center Natural Environments Branch (EV44) to quality control (QC) data from the Kennedy Space Center's 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler for use in vehicle wind loads and steering commands. The database has been built to mitigate limitations of using the currently archived databases from weather balloons. The DRWP database contains wind measurements from approximately 2.7-18.6 km altitude at roughly five minute intervals for the August 1997 to December 2009 period of record, and the extensive QC process was designed to remove spurious data from various forms of atmospheric and non-atmospheric artifacts. The QC process is largely based on DRWP literature, but two new algorithms have been developed to remove data contaminated by convection and excessive first guess propagations from the Median Filter First Guess Algorithm. In addition to describing the automated and manual QC process in detail, this paper describes the extent of the data retained. Roughly 58% of all possible wind observations exist in the database, with approximately 100 times as many complete profile sets existing relative to the EV44 balloon databases. This increased sample of near-continuous wind profile measurements may help increase launch availability by reducing the uncertainty of wind changes during launch countdown

  1. Retrieval of Vertical Profiles of Liquid Water and Ice Content in Mixed Clouds from Doppler Radar and Microwave Radiometer Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvageot, Henri

    1996-01-01

    A new method to retrieve vertical profiles of liquid water content Mw(z), ice water content Mi(z), and ice particle size distribution Ni(D, z), (where D is the ice particle size and z the vertical coordinate) in mixed nonprecipitating clouds using the observations of a zenith-viewing Doppler radar and of a microwave radiometer is proposed. In this method, the profile of the vertical air velocity deduced from Doppler radar measurements is used to describe the rate of production by the updrafts of water. vapor in excess of saturation with respect to ice. Using a Zi Mi power-law relation with an unknown linear parameter (let i, be this parameter) and initially assuming that Zw is negligible with respect to Zi, (where Zw and Zi are the radar reflectivity factors of liquid water and ice particles respectively), the measured radar reflectivity factor profile Zm ( Zi) is inverted to estimate Ni(D, z). From Ni(D, z), the profile of the rate of water vapor that can be consumed by pure deposition on ice particles is calculated. The difference between the rate of production of the exam water vapor and the rate of deposited water vapor is an expression of the rate of liquid water generation at each level. By writing that the integral of the liquid water along the profile has to be equal to the total liquid water deduced from the microwave radiometer measurement, an estimation of the i parameter is obtained. From i, an estimation of the profiles Mw(z), Mi(z), Zw(z), Zi(z) (=Zm Zw), and Ni(D, z) is calculated. If Zw is effectively negligible with respect to Zi, the computation of the retrieved profiles is ended. If not, Zi(z) is corrected and a new estimation of the profiles is computed. The results of the numerical simulation of the algorithm are presented.

  2. The Earthcare Cloud Profiling Radar, its PFM development status (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuka, Hirotaka; Tomita, Eichi; Aida, Yoshihisa; Seki, Yoshihiro; Okada, Kazuyuki; Maruyama, Kenta; Ishii, Yasuyuki; Tomiyama, Nobuhiro; Ohno, Yuichi; Horie, Hiroaki; Sato, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    The Earth Clouds, Aerosols and Radiation Explorer (EarthCARE) mission is joint mission between Europe and Japan for the launch year of 2018. Mission objective is to improve scientific understanding of cloud-aerosol-radiation interactions that is one of the biggest uncertain factors for numerical climate and weather predictions. The EarthCARE spacecraft equips four instruments such as an ultra violet lidar (ATLID), a cloud profiling radar (CPR), a broadband radiometer (BBR), and a multi-spectral imager (MSI) and perform complete synergy observation to observe aerosols, clouds and their interactions simultaneously from the orbit. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) is responsible for development of the CPR in this EarthCARE mission and the CPR will be the first space-borne W-band Doppler radar. The CPR is defined with minimum radar sensitivity of -35dBz (6dB better than current space-borne cloud radar, i.e. CloudSat, NASA), radiometric accuracy of 2.7 dB, and Doppler velocity measurement accuracy of less than 1.3 m/s. These specifications require highly accurate pointing technique in orbit and high power source with large antenna dish. JAXA and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) have been jointly developed this CPR to meet these strict requirements so far and then achieved the development such as new CFRP flex-core structure, long life extended interaction klystron, low loss quasi optical feed technique, and so on. Through these development successes, CPR development phase has been progressed to critical design phase. In addition, new ground calibration technique is also being progressed for launch of EarthCARE/CPR. The unique feature of EarthCARE CPR is vertical Doppler velocity measurement capability. Vertical Doppler velocity measurement is very attractive function from the science point of view, because vertical motions of cloud particles are related with cloud microphysics and dynamics. However, from engineering point of

  3. Air-Sea Spray Airborne Radar Profiler Characterizes Energy Fluxes in Hurricanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durden, Stephen L.; Esteban-Fermandez, D.

    2010-01-01

    A report discusses ASAP (Air-sea Spray Airborne Profiler), a dual-wavelength radar profiler that provides measurement information about the droplet size distribution (DSD) of sea-spray, which can be used to estimate heat and moisture fluxes for hurricane research. Researchers have recently determined that sea spray can have a large effect on the magnitude and distribution of the air-sea energy flux at hurricane -force wind speeds. To obtain information about the DSD, two parameters of the DSD are required; for example, overall DSD amplitude and DSD mean diameter. This requires two measurements. Two frequencies are used, with a large enough separation that the differential frequency provides size information. One frequency is 94 GHz; the other is 220 GHz. These correspond to the Rayleigh and Mie regions. Above a surface wind speed of 10 m/ s, production of sea spray grows exponentially. Both the number of large droplets and the altitude they reach are a function of the surface wind speed.

  4. Fast comparison of IS radar code sequences for lag profile inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Lehtinen

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A fast method for theoretically comparing the posteriori variances produced by different phase code sequences in incoherent scatter radar (ISR experiments is introduced. Alternating codes of types 1 and 2 are known to be optimal for selected range resolutions, but the code sets are inconveniently long for many purposes like ground clutter estimation and in cases where coherent echoes from lower ionospheric layers are to be analyzed in addition to standard F-layer spectra.

    The method is used in practice for searching binary code quads that have estimation accuracy almost equal to that of much longer alternating code sets. Though the code sequences can consist of as few as four different transmission envelopes, the lag profile estimation variances are near to the theoretical minimum. Thus the short code sequence is equally good as a full cycle of alternating codes with the same pulse length and bit length. The short code groups cannot be directly decoded, but the decoding is done in connection with more computationally expensive lag profile inversion in data analysis.

    The actual code searches as well as the analysis and real data results from the found short code searches are explained in other papers sent to the same issue of this journal. We also discuss interesting subtle differences found between the different alternating codes by this method. We assume that thermal noise dominates the incoherent scatter signal.

  5. Combining Satellite Microwave Radiometer and Radar Observations to Estimate Atmospheric Latent Heating Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.; Shie, Chung-Lin; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    In this study, satellite passive microwave sensor observations from the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) are utilized to make estimates of latent + eddy sensible heating rates (Q1-QR) in regions of precipitation. The TMI heating algorithm (TRAIN) is calibrated, or "trained" using relatively accurate estimates of heating based upon spaceborne Precipitation Radar (PR) observations collocated with the TMI observations over a one-month period. The heating estimation technique is based upon a previously described Bayesian methodology, but with improvements in supporting cloud-resolving model simulations, an adjustment of precipitation echo tops to compensate for model biases, and a separate scaling of convective and stratiform heating components that leads to an approximate balance between estimated vertically-integrated condensation and surface precipitation. Estimates of Q1-QR from TMI compare favorably with the PR training estimates and show only modest sensitivity to the cloud-resolving model simulations of heating used to construct the training data. Moreover, the net condensation in the corresponding annual mean satellite latent heating profile is within a few percent of the annual mean surface precipitation rate over the tropical and subtropical oceans where the algorithm is applied. Comparisons of Q1 produced by combining TMI Q1-QR with independently derived estimates of QR show reasonable agreement with rawinsonde-based analyses of Q1 from two field campaigns, although the satellite estimates exhibit heating profile structure with sharper and more intense heating peaks than the rawinsonde estimates. 2

  6. RaInCube: a proposed constellation of atmospheric profiling radars in cubesat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Ziad S.; Peral, Eva; Tanelli, Simone; Sy, Ousmane; Stephens, Graeme

    2016-05-01

    Numerical climate and weather models depend on measurements from space-borne satellites to complete model validation and improvements. Precipitation profiling capabilities are currently limited to a few instruments deployed in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), which cannot provide the temporal resolution necessary to observe the evo- lution of short time-scale weather phenomena and improve numerical weather prediction models. A constellation of cloud- and precipitation-profiling instruments in LEO would provide this essential capability, but the cost and timeframe of typical satellite platforms and instruments constitute a possibly prohibitive challenge. A new radar instrument architecture that is compatible with low-cost satellite platforms, such as CubeSats and SmallSats, has been designed at JPL. Its small size, moderate mass and low power requirement enable constellation missions, which will vastly expand our ability to observe weather systems and their dynamics and thermodynamics at sub-diurnal time scales down to the temporal resolutions required to observe developing convection. In turn, this expanded observational ability can revolutionize weather now-casting and medium-range forecasting, and enable crucial model improvements to improve climate predictions.

  7. Retrieval of convective boundary layer wind field statistics from radar profiler measurements in conjunction with large eddy simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Scipión

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The daytime convective boundary layer (CBL is characterized by strong turbulence that is primarily forced by buoyancy transport from the heated underlying surface. The present study focuses on an example of flow structure of the CBL as observed in the U.S. Great Plains on June 8, 2007. The considered CBL flow has been reproduced using a numerical large eddy simulation (LES, sampled with an LES-based virtual boundary layer radar (BLR, and probed with an actual operational radar profiler. The LES-generated CBL flow data are then ingested by the virtual BLR and treated as a proxy for prevailing atmospheric conditions. The mean flow and turbulence parameters retrieved via each technique (actual radar profiler, virtual BLR, and LES have been cross-analyzed and reasonable agreement was found between the CBL wind parameters obtained from the LES and those measured by the actual radar. Averaged vertical velocity variance estimates from the virtual and actual BLRs were compared with estimates calculated from the LES for different periods of time. There is good agreement in the estimates from all three sources. Also, values of the vertical velocity skewness retrieved by all three techniques have been inter-compared as a function of height for different stages of the CBL evolution, showing fair agreement with each other. All three retrievals contain positively skewed vertical velocity structure throughout the main portion of the CBL. Radar estimates of the turbulence kinetic energy (eddy dissipation rate (ε have been obtained based on the Doppler spectral width of the returned signal for the vertical radar beam. The radar estimates were averaged over time in the same fashion as the LES output data. The agreement between estimates was generally good, especially within the mixing layer. Discrepancies observed above the inversion layer may be explained by a weak turbulence signal in particular flow configurations. The virtual BLR produces voltage

  8. Distributed micro-radar system for detection and tracking of low-profile, low-altitude targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorwara, Ashok; Molchanov, Pavlo

    2016-05-01

    Proposed airborne surveillance radar system can detect, locate, track, and classify low-profile, low-altitude targets: from traditional fixed and rotary wing aircraft to non-traditional targets like unmanned aircraft systems (drones) and even small projectiles. Distributed micro-radar system is the next step in the development of passive monopulse direction finder proposed by Stephen E. Lipsky in the 80s. To extend high frequency limit and provide high sensitivity over the broadband of frequencies, multiple angularly spaced directional antennas are coupled with front end circuits and separately connected to a direction finder processor by a digital interface. Integration of antennas with front end circuits allows to exclude waveguide lines which limits system bandwidth and creates frequency dependent phase errors. Digitizing of received signals proximate to antennas allows loose distribution of antennas and dramatically decrease phase errors connected with waveguides. Accuracy of direction finding in proposed micro-radar in this case will be determined by time accuracy of digital processor and sampling frequency. Multi-band, multi-functional antennas can be distributed around the perimeter of a Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) and connected to the processor by digital interface or can be distributed between swarm/formation of mini/micro UAS and connected wirelessly. Expendable micro-radars can be distributed by perimeter of defense object and create multi-static radar network. Low-profile, lowaltitude, high speed targets, like small projectiles, create a Doppler shift in a narrow frequency band. This signal can be effectively filtrated and detected with high probability. Proposed micro-radar can work in passive, monostatic or bistatic regime.

  9. KSC 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) Operational Acceptance Test (OAT) Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbre, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    This report documents analysis results of the Kennedy Space Center updated 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) Operational Acceptance Test (OAT). This test was designed to demonstrate that the new DRWP operates in a similar manner to the previous DRWP for use as a situational awareness asset for mission operations at the Eastern Range to identify rapid changes in the wind environment that weather balloons cannot depict. Data examination and two analyses showed that the updated DRWP meets the specifications in the OAT test plan and performs at least as well as the previous DRWP. Data examination verified that the DRWP provides complete profiles every five minutes from 1.8-19.5 km in vertical increments of 150 m. Analysis of 5,426 wind component reports from 49 concurrent DRWP and balloon profiles presented root mean square (RMS) wind component differences around 2.0 m/s. The DRWP's effective vertical resolution (EVR) was found to be 300 m for both the westerly and southerly wind component, which the best EVR possible given the DRWP's vertical sampling interval. A third analysis quantified the sensitivity to rejecting data that do not have adequate signal by assessing the number of first-guess propagations at each altitude. This report documents the data, quality control procedures, methodology, and results of each analysis. It also shows that analysis of the updated DRWP produced results that were at least as good as the previous DRWP with proper rationale. The report recommends acceptance of the updated DRWP for situational awareness usage as per the OAT's intent.

  10. In-flight measurements and RCS-predictions: A comparison on broad-side radar range profiles of a Boeing 737

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiden, R. van der; Ewijk, L.J. van; Groen, F.C.A.

    1997-01-01

    The validation of Radar Cross Section (RCS) prediction techniques against real measurements is crucial to acquire confidence in predictions when measurements are not available. In this paper we present the first results of a comparison on one dimensional images, i.e., radar range profiles. The profi

  11. Comparison of snowfall estimates from the NASA CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar and NOAA/NSSL Multi-Radar Multi-Sensor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng; Hong, Yang; Kulie, Mark; Behrangi, Ali; Stepanian, Phillip M.; Cao, Qing; You, Yalei; Zhang, Jian; Hu, Junjun; Zhang, Xinhua

    2016-10-01

    The latest global snowfall product derived from the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (2C-SNOW-PROFILE) is compared with NOAA/National Severe Storms Laboratory's Multi-Radar Multi-Sensor (MRMS/Q3) system precipitation products from 2009 through 2010. The results show that: (1) Compared to Q3, CloudSat tends to observe more extremely light snowfall events (snow and 10% as certain mixed. When possible snow, possible mixed, and certain mixed precipitation categories are assumed to be snowfall events, CloudSat has a high snowfall POD (86.10%). (3) CloudSat shows less certain snow precipitation than Q3 by 26.13% with a low correlation coefficient (0.41) with Q3 and a high RMSE (0.6 mm/h). (4) With Q3 as reference, CloudSat underestimates (overestimates) certain snowfall when the bin height of detected snowfall events are below (above) 3 km, and generally overestimates light snowfall (surface snowfall events are >1 km high above the surface, whereas 76.41% of corresponding Q3 observations are low below 1 km to the near ground surface. This analysis will provide helpful reference for CloudSat snowfall estimation algorithm developers and the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) snowfall product developers to understand and quantify the strengths and weaknesses of remote sensing techniques and precipitation estimation products.

  12. High-resolution geophysical profiling using a stepped-frequency ground penetrating radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noon, D.; Longstaff, D. [The University of Queensland, (Australia)

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes the results of a ground penetrating radar (GPR) system which uses stepped-frequency waveforms to obtain high-resolution geophysical profiles. The main application for this system is the high-resolution mapping of thin coal seam structures, in order to assist surface mining operations in open-cut coal mines. The required depth of penetration is one meter which represents the maximum thickness of coal seams that are designated `thin`. A resolution of five centimeters is required to resolve the minimum thickness of coal (or shale partings) which can be economically recovered in an open-cut coal mine. For this application, a stepped-frequency GPR system has been developed, because of its ultrawide bandwidth (1 to 2 GHz) and high external loop sensitivity (155 dB). The field test results of the stepped-frequency GPR system on a concrete pavement and at two Australian open-cut coal mines are also presented. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Groundwater Surface Trends at Van Norden Meadow, California, from Ground Penetrating Radar Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadrick, N. I.; Blacic, T. M.; Yarnell, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Van Norden meadow in the Donner Summit area west of Lake Tahoe is one of the largest sub-alpine meadows in the Sierra Nevada mountain range. As natural water retention basins, meadows attenuate floods, improve water quality and support vegetation that stabilizes stream banks and promotes high biodiversity. Like most meadows in the Sierras however, over-grazing, road-building, and development has resulted in localized stream incision, degradation, and partial conversion from wet to dry conditions in Van Norden. Additionally, a small dam at the base of the meadow has partially flooded the lower meadow creating reservoir conditions. Privately owned since the late 1800s, Van Norden was recently purchased by a local land trust to prevent further development and return the area to public ownership. Restoration of the natural meadow conditions will involve notching the dam in 2016 to reduce currently impounded water volumes from 250 to less than 50 acre-feet. To monitor the effects of notching the dam on the upstream meadow conditions, better understanding of the surface and groundwater hydrology both pre- and post-restoration is required. We surveyed the meadow in summer 2014 with ground penetrating radar (GPR) to map the groundwater surface prior to restoration activities using a 270MHz antenna to obtain a suite of longitudinal and transverse transects. Groundwater level within the meadow was assessed using both piezometer readings and sweeps of the GPR antenna. Seventeen piezometers were added this year to the 13 already in place to monitor temporal changes in the groundwater surface, while the GPR profiles provided information about lateral variations. Our results provide an estimate of the groundwater depth variations across the upper portion of the meadow before notching. We plan to return in 2015 to collect GPR profiles during wetter conditions, which will provide a more complete assessment of the pre-notching groundwater hydrology.

  14. Ice thickness profile surveying with ground penetrating radar at Artesonraju Glacier, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisolm, Rachel; Rabatel, Antoine; McKinney, Daene; Condom, Thomas; Cochacin, Alejo; Davila Roller, Luzmilla

    2014-05-01

    Tropical glaciers are an essential component of the water resource systems in the mountainous regions where they are located, and a warming climate has resulted in the accelerated retreat of Andean glaciers in recent decades. The shrinkage of Andean glaciers influences the flood risk for communities living downstream as new glacial lakes have begun to form at the termini of some glaciers. As these lakes continue to grow in area and volume, they pose an increasing risk of glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs). Ice thickness measurements have been a key missing link in studying the tropical glaciers in Peru and how climate change is likely to impact glacial melt and the growth of glacial lakes. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) has rarely been applied to glaciers in Peru to measure ice thickness, and these measurements can tell us a lot about how a warming climate will affect glaciers in terms of thickness changes. In the upper Paron Valley (Cordillera Blanca, Peru), an emerging lake has begun to form at the terminus of the Artesonraju Glacier, and this lake has key features, including overhanging ice and loose rock likely to create slides, that could trigger a catastrophic GLOF if the lake continues to grow. Because the glacier mass balance and lake mass balance are closely linked, ice thickness measurements and measurements of the bed slope of the Artesonraju Glacier and underlying bedrock can give us an idea of how the lake is likely to evolve in the coming decades. This study presents GPR data taken in July 2013 at the Artesonraju Glacier as part of a collaboration between the Unidad de Glaciologia y Recursos Hidricos (UGRH) of Peru, the Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD) of France and the University of Texas at Austin (UT) of the United States of America. Two different GPR units belonging to UGRH and UT were used for subsurface imaging to create ice thickness profiles and to characterize the total volume of ice in the glacier. A common midpoint

  15. Ground-based observations of exoplanet atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ernst Johan Walter de

    2011-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the properties of exoplanet atmospheres. The results for ground-based near-infrared secondary eclipse observations of three different exoplanets, TrES-3b, HAT-P-1b and WASP-33b, are presented which have been obtained with ground-based telescopes as part of the GROUSE project.

  16. Ground-based observations of exoplanet atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ernst Johan Walter de

    2011-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the properties of exoplanet atmospheres. The results for ground-based near-infrared secondary eclipse observations of three different exoplanets, TrES-3b, HAT-P-1b and WASP-33b, are presented which have been obtained with ground-based telescopes as part of the GROUSE project.

  17. RESEARCH ON MOTION COMPENSATION FOR HIGH RESOLUTION PROFILE OF EXTENDED TARGET FOR STEPPED CHIRP RADAR AND DSP IMPLEMENTATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Bin; He Xiang; Wang Hongqiang; Guo Guirong

    2007-01-01

    A discrete model is set up for High Resolution Range Profile (HRRP) of an extended target and the model of echo from an extended target for a Stepped Chirp Radar (SCR) is proposed. The effect of target motion on a range profile is thoroughly analyzed, and based on which precision requirement is developed for motion compensation. By studying the time domain correlation and the rule based on the least burst error, a motion compensation algorithm which satisfies the project requirement is presented, and the cyber-emulation confirms the conclusion. At last the processor is designed by using DSP devices to realize motion compensation and target recognition.

  18. Analysis of the substorm trigger phase using multiple ground-based instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauristie, K.; Pulkkinen, T.I.; Pellinen, R.J. [Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    The authors discuss in detail the observation of an event of auroral activity fading during the trigger, or growth phase of a magnetic storm. This event was observed by all-sky cameras, EISCAT radar and magnetometers, riometers, and pulsation magnetometers, from ground based stations in Finland and Scandanavia. Based on their detailed analysis, they present a possible cause for the observed fading.

  19. Ka-band bistatic ground-based SAR using noise signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, K.; Mogyla, A.; Vyplavin, P.; Palamarchuk, V.; Zemlyaniy, O.; Tarasenko, V.; Zaets, N.; Skretsanov, V.; Shubniy, A.; Glamazdin, V.; Natarov, M.; Nechayev, O.

    2008-01-01

    Currently, one of the actual problems is remote monitoring of technical state of large objects. Different methods can be used for that purpose. The most promising of them relies on application of ground based synthetic aperture radars (SAR) and differential interferometry. We have designed and tested Ground Based Noise Waveform SAR based on noise radar technology [1] and synthetic aperture antennas [2]. It enabled to build an instrument for precise all-weather monitoring of large objects in real-time. We describe main performance of ground-based interferometric SAR which uses continuous Ka-band noise waveform as a probe signal. Besides, results of laboratory trials and evaluation of its main performance are presented as well.

  20. Retrieving fog liquid water content using a new 94 GHz FMCW cloud radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, F.; Thies, B.; Bendix, J.

    2010-07-01

    The vertical distribution of the liquid water content (LWC) in fog and low stratus is a critical microphysical parameter since it essentially influences the interaction between these low level clouds and the solar and terrestrial radiation. Despite of this importance there are only few investigations concerning LWC-profiles during fog events, which are mainly restricted to balloon borne measurements and suffer from a low temporal resolution. Therefore, no continuous records covering the whole life cycle of fog events can be provided for climatology studies. A new ground based frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) cloud radar has the po-tential to fill this lack of knowledge. Working at a frequency of 94 GHz (wavelength 3 mm) it is ideal for monitoring low level water clouds. The radar can detect clouds at a minimum height range of ~30 m and provides a vertical resolution of 4m: This offers the potential to retrieve detailed vertical structures of fog and low stratus. The reconstruction of the LWC-profile can be accomplished due to the close relationship be-tween the cloud LWC and the detected radar reflectivity. However, this relationship depends strongly on the drop size distribution within the cloud. The strength of the radar reflectivity is related to the sixth power of the drop size distribution and the LWC is related to the latter by the third power. Former studies yielded the existence of different fog evolutionary stages with characteristical drop size distributions. In order to explore the effect of the different drop size distribution on the relationship between the radar reflectivity and the LWC we conducted radiative transfer calculations with characteristical drop size distributions and LWC-profiles taken from the literature. For this purpose we adapted the radiative transfer model (RTM) QuickBeam developed for the Cloudsat satellite to our ground based microwave radar. Beside the adaptation to the verti-cal resolution of the ground based cloud

  1. A COMPARISON BETWEEN ZERO-OFFSET AND VERTICAL RADAR PROFILING GPR TECHNIQUES WITH EMPHASIS ON PROBLEMATIC BOREHOLE EFFECTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossi, Matteo; Vignoli, Giulio; Cassiani, Giorgio

    contribution: Zero-Offset Profiling (ZOP) and Vertical Radar Profiling (VRP). We make a direct comparison of these methods in a field case (Trecate site, Northern Italy), to explore each method’s capabilities and limitations. Our analysis is focused on the results in the vadose zone and shows...... that the dielectric relative permittivity profiles recovered from ZOP and VRP first-break inversions are in strong disagreement, providing very different permittivity profiles. The analysis of synthetic radargrams shows the presence of an electromagnetic (EM) wave established by the joint presence of the air......-filled borehole within a higher permittivity surrounding soil. This event has a velocity intermediate between the soil and air speed values, and interferes with the picking of first arrivals in the VRP mode. The numerical simulations are performed with different borehole diameters, confirming that the velocity...

  2. Non-Cooperative Target Recognition by Means of Singular Value Decomposition Applied to Radar High Resolution Range Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia López-Rodríguez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Radar high resolution range profiles are widely used among the target recognition community for the detection and identification of flying targets. In this paper, singular value decomposition is applied to extract the relevant information and to model each aircraft as a subspace. The identification algorithm is based on angle between subspaces and takes place in a transformed domain. In order to have a wide database of radar signatures and evaluate the performance, simulated range profiles are used as the recognition database while the test samples comprise data of actual range profiles collected in a measurement campaign. Thanks to the modeling of aircraft as subspaces only the valuable information of each target is used in the recognition process. Thus, one of the main advantages of using singular value decomposition, is that it helps to overcome the notable dissimilarities found in the shape and signal-to-noise ratio between actual and simulated profiles due to their difference in nature. Despite these differences, the recognition rates obtained with the algorithm are quite promising.

  3. DEM extraction and its accuracy analysis with ground-based SAR interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, J.; Yue, J. P.; Li, L. H.

    2014-03-01

    Two altimetry models extracting DEM (Digital Elevation Model) with the GBSAR (Ground-Based Synthetic Aperture Radar) technology are studied and their accuracies are analyzed in detail. The approximate and improved altimetry models of GBSAR were derived from the spaceborne radar altimetry based on the principles of the GBSAR technology. The error caused by the parallel ray approximation in the approximate model was analyzed quantitatively, and the results show that the errors cannot be ignored for the ground-based radar system. For the improved altimetry model, the elevation error expression can be acquired by simulating and analyzing the error propagation coefficients of baseline length, wavelength, differential phase and range distance in the mathematical model. By analyzing the elevation error with the baseline and range distance, the results show that the improved altimetry model is suitable for high-precision DEM and the accuracy can be improved by adjusting baseline and shortening slant distance.

  4. The measurement of sea surface profile with X-band coherent marine radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yunhua; LI Huimin; ZHANG Yanmin; GUO Lixin

    2015-01-01

    The line-of-sight velocity of scattering facets is related to the Doppler signals of X-band coherent marine radar from the oceanic surface. First, the sign Doppler Estimator is applied to estimate the Doppler shift of each radar resolution cell. And then, in terms of the Doppler shift, a retrieval algorithm extracting the vertical displacement of the sea surface has been proposed. The effects induced by radar look-direction and radar spatial resolution are both taken into account in this retrieval algorithm. The comparison between the sea surface spectrum of buoy data and the retrieved spectrum reveals that the function of the radar spatial resolution is equivalent to a low pass filter, impacting especially the spectrum of short gravity waves. The experimental data collected by McMaster IPIX radar are also used to validate the performance of the retrieval algorithm. The derived significant wave height and wave period are compared with the in situ measurements, and the agreement indicates the practicality of the retrieval technology.

  5. Improving soil moisture profile reconstruction from ground-penetrating radar data: a maximum likelihood ensemble filter approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Tran

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The vertical profile of shallow unsaturated zone soil moisture plays a key role in many hydro-meteorological and agricultural applications. We propose a closed-loop data assimilation procedure based on the maximum likelihood ensemble filter algorithm to update the vertical soil moisture profile from time-lapse ground-penetrating radar (GPR data. A hydrodynamic model is used to propagate the system state in time and a radar electromagnetic model and petrophysical relationships to link the state variable with the observation data, which enables us to directly assimilate the GPR data. Instead of using the surface soil moisture only, the approach allows to use the information of the whole soil moisture profile for the assimilation. We validated our approach through a synthetic study. We constructed a synthetic soil column with a depth of 80 cm and analyzed the effects of the soil type on the data assimilation by considering 3 soil types, namely, loamy sand, silt and clay. The assimilation of GPR data was performed to solve the problem of unknown initial conditions. The numerical soil moisture profiles generated by the Hydrus-1D model were used by the GPR model to produce the "observed" GPR data. The results show that the soil moisture profile obtained by assimilating the GPR data is much better than that of an open-loop forecast. Compared to the loamy sand and silt, the updated soil moisture profile of the clay soil converges to the true state much more slowly. Decreasing the update interval from 60 down to 10 h only slightly improves the effectiveness of the GPR data assimilation for the loamy sand but significantly for the clay soil. The proposed approach appears to be promising to improve real-time prediction of the soil moisture profiles as well as to provide effective estimates of the unsaturated hydraulic properties at the field scale from time-lapse GPR measurements.

  6. a Comparison Between Zero-Offset and Vertical Radar Profiling Gpr Techniques with Emphasis on Problematic Borehole Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, M.; Vignoli, G.; Cassiani, G.; Deiana, R.

    2012-12-01

    Non-invasive geophysical techniques are increasingly used to study the unsaturated zone. In particular, cross-hole methods can are able to infer more detailed information about the subsoil than surface measurements. Two borehole Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) techniques are discussed in our contribution: Zero-Offset Profiling (ZOP) and Vertical Radar Profiling (VRP). We make a direct comparison of these methods in a field case (Trecate site, Northern Italy), to explore each method's capabilities and limitations. Our analysis is focused on the results in the vadose zone and shows that the dielectric relative permittivity profiles recovered from ZOP and VRP first-break inversions are in strong disagreement, providing very different permittivity profiles. The analysis of synthetic radargrams shows the presence of an electromagnetic (EM) wave established by the joint presence of the air-filled borehole within a higher permittivity surrounding soil. This event has a velocity intermediate between the soil and air speed values, and interferes with the picking of first arrivals in the VRP mode. The numerical simulations are performed with different borehole diameters, confirming that the velocity of the first recorded event depends on the ratio between the wave length in air and the finite dimension of the borehole. Once these arrivals in the simulated VRP radargrams are recognized, their contribution can be removed by picking the "direct" arrivals, that correspond to the waves that directly propagates from source to receiver, through the unsaturated zone. Once the borehole effects are accounted for, the comparison between the ZOP and VRP permittivity profiles is reasonable and reveals the different resolution of these techniques, focusing on the information that can be inferred for hydrological characterizations. Thus, VRP surveys in vadose zone must be accurately interpreted, as the electromagnetic waves may propagate via guided modes along the borehole. Neglecting this

  7. Ground-based optical observation system for LEO objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, T.; Kurosaki, H.; Oda, H.; Tagawa, M.

    2015-08-01

    We propose a ground-based optical observation system for monitoring LEO objects, which uses numerous optical sensors to cover a vast region of the sky. Its potential in terms of detection and orbital determination were examined. About 30 cm LEO objects at 1000 km altitude are detectable using an 18 cm telescope, a CCD camera and the analysis software developed. Simulations and a test observation showed that two longitudinally separate observation sites with arrays of optical sensors can identify the same objects from numerous data sets and determine their orbits precisely. The proposed system may complement or replace the current radar observation system for monitoring LEO objects, like space-situation awareness, in the near future.

  8. Ozone profiles obtained by DIAL technique at Maïdo Observatory in La Réunion Island: comparisons with ECC ozone-sondes, ground-based FTIR spectrometer and microwave radiometer measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Portafaix T.; Godin-Beekmann S.; Payen G.; de Mazière M.; Langerock B.; Fernandez S; Posny F.; Cammas J.P.; Metzger J. M.; Bencherif H.; Vigouroux C.; Marquestaut N.

    2016-01-01

    International audience; A DIAL lidar system performing stratospheric ozone profile measurements from 15 to 45 km is installed at Reunion Island (southwest of Indian Ocean). The purpose of this communication is to present this DIAL system mounted now at the new Maïdo Observatory since February 2013, and the ozone profile retrieval. The first stratospheric ozone profiles obtained during 2013 and 2014 will be presented and discussed. Inter-comparison and differences observed with other high vert...

  9. Estimation of cloud fraction profile in shallow convection using a scanning cloud radar: Cloud Fraction of Shallow Cumuli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oue, Mariko [School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook New York USA; Kollias, Pavlos [School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook New York USA; Environmental and Climate Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton New York USA; North, Kirk W. [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, McGill University, Montreal Quebec Canada; Tatarevic, Aleksandra [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, McGill University, Montreal Quebec Canada; Endo, Satoshi [Environmental and Climate Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton New York USA; Vogelmann, Andrew M. [Environmental and Climate Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton New York USA; Gustafson, William I. [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA

    2016-10-18

    Large spatial inhomogeneity in shallow convection raises uncertainties in estimation of the domain-averaged cloud fraction profile (CFP). Here, numerical model simulations of shallow convection over land, coupled with a sophisticated radar simulator, are used to address this issue, and an objective method for estimating domain-averaged CFP is proposed. The analysis clearly indicates that profiling observations are inadequate to provide reliable CFP estimates. The use of Scanning Cloud Radar (SCR) performing a sequence of cross-wind horizon-to-horizon scans is not straightforward due to the strong dependency of its sensitivity with range. The retrieved CFP by a novel methodology that uses the observed statistics of SCR hydrometeor detections with height to estimate optimum ranges shows very good agreement with the model CFP. On average of CFP estimates more than 40 min of SCR observations are required to converge on the model domain average. The proposed technique is expected to improve our ability to compare model and observations in broken cloud conditions.

  10. Ozone profiles obtained by DIAL technique at Maïdo Observatory in La Reunion Island: comparisons with ECC ozone-sondes, ground-based FTIR spectrometer and microwave radiometer measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Portafaix T.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A DIAL lidar system performing stratospheric ozone profile measurements from 15 to 45 km is installed at Reunion Island (southwest of Indian Ocean. The purpose of this communication is to present this DIAL system mounted now at the new Maïdo Observatory since February 2013, and the ozone profile retrieval. The first stratospheric ozone profiles obtained during 2013 and 2014 will be presented and discussed. Inter-comparison and differences observed with other high vertical resolution ozone profiles performed by ECC ozonesonde will be shown. Finally, comparisons with low vertical resolution ozone profiles retrieved from microwave and FTIR remote sensing measurements performed at Maïdo will be carried out, making appropriate use of the associated averaging kernels

  11. Ozone profiles obtained by DIAL technique at Maïdo Observatory in La Reunion Island: comparisons with ECC ozone-sondes, ground-based FTIR spectrometer and microwave radiometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portafaix, T.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Payen, G.; de Mazière, M.; Langerock, B.; Fernandez, S.; Posny, F.; Cammas, J. P.; Metzger, J. M.; Bencherif, H.; Vigouroux, C.; Marquestaut, N.

    2016-06-01

    A DIAL lidar system performing stratospheric ozone profile measurements from 15 to 45 km is installed at Reunion Island (southwest of Indian Ocean). The purpose of this communication is to present this DIAL system mounted now at the new Maïdo Observatory since February 2013, and the ozone profile retrieval. The first stratospheric ozone profiles obtained during 2013 and 2014 will be presented and discussed. Inter-comparison and differences observed with other high vertical resolution ozone profiles performed by ECC ozonesonde will be shown. Finally, comparisons with low vertical resolution ozone profiles retrieved from microwave and FTIR remote sensing measurements performed at Maïdo will be carried out, making appropriate use of the associated averaging kernels

  12. An evaluation of the accuracy of some radar wind profiling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koscielny, A. J.; Doviak, R. J.

    1983-12-01

    Major advances in Doppler radar measurement in optically clear air have made it feasible to monitor radial velocities in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. For most applications the three dimensional wind vector is monitored rather than the radial velocity. Measurement of the wind vector with a single radar can be made assuming a spatially linear, time invariant wind field. The components and derivatives of the wind are estimated by the parameters of a linear regression of the radial velocities on functions of their spatial locations. The accuracy of the wind measurement thus depends on the locations of the radial velocities. The suitability is evaluated of some of the common retrieval techniques for simultaneous measurement of both the vertical and horizontal wind components. The techniques considered for study are fixed beam, azimuthal scanning (VAD) and elevation scanning (VED).

  13. Ground-Based Lidar for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Ozone Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J.; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than 10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures.

  14. Ground-based lidar for atmospheric boundary layer ozone measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-05-20

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than ±10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures.

  15. Evaluation of turbulent dissipation rate retrievals from Doppler Cloud Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Shupe

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Turbulent dissipation rate retrievals from cloud radar Doppler velocity measurements are evaluated using independent, in situ observations in Arctic stratocumulus clouds. In situ validation data sets of dissipation rate are derived using sonic anemometer measurements from a tethered balloon and high frequency pressure variation observations from a research aircraft, both flown in proximity to stationary, ground-based radars. Modest biases are found among the data sets in particularly low- or high-turbulence regimes, but in general the radar-retrieved values correspond well with the in situ measurements. Root mean square differences are typically a factor of 4–6 relative to any given magnitude of dissipation rate. These differences are no larger than those found when comparing dissipation rates computed from tethered-balloon and meteorological tower-mounted sonic anemometer measurements made at spatial distances of a few hundred meters. Temporal lag analyses suggest that approximately half of the observed differences are due to spatial sampling considerations, such that the anticipated radar-based retrieval uncertainty is on the order of a factor of 2–3. Moreover, radar retrievals are clearly able to capture the vertical dissipation rate structure observed by the in situ sensors, while offering substantially more information on the time variability of turbulence profiles. Together these evaluations indicate that radar-based retrievals can, at a minimum, be used to determine the vertical structure of turbulence in Arctic stratocumulus clouds.

  16. Fresnel zones for ground-based antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J. Bach

    1964-01-01

    The ordinary Fresnel zone concept is modified to include the influence of finite ground conductivity. This is important for ground-based antennas because the influence on the radiation pattern of irregularities near the antenna is determined by the amplitude and phase of the groundwave. A new...

  17. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement unce...

  18. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Yordanova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement unce...

  19. Latent Heating Profiles Derived from ARM Radar Observations in MC3E and GoAmazon Field Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Q.; Li, R.; Mu, Z.; Giangrande, S. E.; Wang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Atmosphere latent heating (LH) is released through water phase change processes in the atmosphere. There is a physical connection between LH rate and updraft velocity (ω) inside clouds. In this study, we develop a new LH algorithm based on a quantified LH-ω relationship found in cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations. The self-consistency check with CRM simulations shows that the retrievals correctly replicate the main features of LH profiles, including their total and individual components (i.e. condensation-evaporation heating rate, deposition-sublimation heating rate, and freezing-melting heating rate). Further, the algorithm is applied to real cases from the DOE-ARM MC3E and GoAmazon2014/6 Field Campaigns using available UHF (915 and 1290 MHz) zenith radar retrievals of vertical velocity and rain rate as input. The retrieved LH profiles in the deep convective rains show positive heating throughout the column, the LH profiles in the stratiform rains with well-defined bright-band showing clear dipole patterns with positive heating above and negative cooling below the freezing level. The altitudes of maximum heating in the widespread stratiform regimes are clearly higher than those found within deep convective regions. Overall, these Latent heating rate profiles, as an important geophysical quantity of interest, can provide useful climate diagnostic data, and ultimately, constraints for model-based analyses of large-scale heating distributions.

  20. Vertical Cloud Climatology During TC4 Derived from High-Altitude Aircraft Merged Lidar and Radar Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavka, Dennis; Tian, Lin; Hart, William; Li, Lihua; McGill, Matthew; Heymsfield, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    Aircraft lidar works by shooting laser pulses toward the earth and recording the return time and intensity of any of the light returning to the aircraft after scattering off atmospheric particles and/or the Earth s surface. The scattered light signatures can be analyzed to tell the exact location of cloud and aerosol layers and, with the aid of a few optical assumptions, can be analyzed to retrieve estimates of optical properties such as atmospheric transparency. Radar works in a similar fashion except it sends pulses toward earth at a much larger wavelength than lidar. Radar records the return time and intensity of cloud or rain reflection returning to the aircraft. Lidar can measure scatter from optically thin cirrus and aerosol layers whose particles are too small for the radar to detect. Radar can provide reflection profiles through thick cloud layers of larger particles that lidar cannot penetrate. Only after merging the two instrument products can accurate measurements of the locations of all layers in the full atmospheric column be achieved. Accurate knowledge of the vertical distribution of clouds is important information for understanding the Earth/atmosphere radiative balance and for improving weather/climate forecast models. This paper describes one such merged data set developed from the Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling (TC4) experiment based in Costa Rica in July-August 2007 using the nadir viewing Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) and the Cloud Radar System (CRS) on board the NASA ER-2 aircraft. Statistics were developed concerning cloud probability through the atmospheric column and frequency of the number of cloud layers. These statistics were calculated for the full study area, four sub-regions, and over land compared to over ocean across all available flights. The results are valid for the TC4 experiment only, as preferred cloud patterns took priority during mission planning. The TC4 Study Area was a very cloudy region, with cloudy

  1. Comparisons between high-resolution profiles of squared refractive index gradient M2 measured by the Middle and Upper Atmosphere Radar and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) during the Shigaraki UAV-Radar Experiment 2015 campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, Hubert; Kantha, Lakshmi; Hashiguchi, Hiroyuki; Lawrence, Dale; Yabuki, Masanori; Tsuda, Toshitaka; Mixa, Tyler

    2017-03-01

    New comparisons between the square of the generalized potential refractive index gradient M2, estimated from the very high-frequency (VHF) Middle and Upper Atmosphere (MU) Radar, located at Shigaraki, Japan, and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) measurements are presented. These comparisons were performed at unprecedented temporal and range resolutions (1-4 min and ˜ 20 m, respectively) in the altitude range ˜ 1.27-4.5 km from simultaneous and nearly collocated measurements made during the ShUREX (Shigaraki UAV-Radar Experiment) 2015 campaign. Seven consecutive UAV flights made during daytime on 7 June 2015 were used for this purpose. The MU Radar was operated in range imaging mode for improving the range resolution at vertical incidence (typically a few tens of meters). The proportionality of the radar echo power to M2 is reported for the first time at such high time and range resolutions for stratified conditions for which Fresnel scatter or a reflection mechanism is expected. In more complex features obtained for a range of turbulent layers generated by shear instabilities or associated with convective cloud cells, M2 estimated from UAV data does not reproduce observed radar echo power profiles. Proposed interpretations of this discrepancy are presented.

  2. Airborne Radar Observations of Severe Hailstorms: Implications for Future Spaceborne Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Tian, Lin; Li, Lihua; McLinden, Matthew; Cervantes, Jaime I.

    2013-01-01

    A new dual-frequency (Ku and Ka band) nadir-pointing Doppler radar on the high-altitude NASA ER-2 aircraft, called the High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP), has collected data over severe thunderstorms in Oklahoma and Kansas during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). The overarching motivation for this study is to understand the behavior of the dualwavelength airborne radar measurements in a global variety of thunderstorms and how these may relate to future spaceborne-radar measurements. HIWRAP is operated at frequencies that are similar to those of the precipitation radar on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (Ku band) and the upcoming Global Precipitation Measurement mission satellite's dual-frequency (Ku and Ka bands) precipitation radar. The aircraft measurements of strong hailstorms have been combined with ground-based polarimetric measurements to obtain a better understanding of the response of the Ku- and Ka-band radar to the vertical distribution of the hydrometeors, including hail. Data from two flight lines on 24 May 2011 are presented. Doppler velocities were approx. 39m/s2at 10.7-km altitude from the first flight line early on 24 May, and the lower value of approx. 25m/s on a second flight line later in the day. Vertical motions estimated using a fall speed estimate for large graupel and hail suggested that the first storm had an updraft that possibly exceeded 60m/s for the more intense part of the storm. This large updraft speed along with reports of 5-cm hail at the surface, reflectivities reaching 70 dBZ at S band in the storm cores, and hail signals from polarimetric data provide a highly challenging situation for spaceborne-radar measurements in intense convective systems. The Ku- and Ka-band reflectivities rarely exceed approx. 47 and approx. 37 dBZ, respectively, in these storms.

  3. The Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruption from a microwave weather radar perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Marzano

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The sub-glacial Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruptions of April and May 2010 are analyzed and quantitatively interpreted by using ground-based weather radar data and volcanic ash radar retrieval (VARR technique. The Eyjafjöll eruptions have been continuously monitored by the Keflavík C-band weather radar, located at a distance of about 155 km from the volcano vent. Considering that the Eyjafjöll volcano is approximately 20 km far from the Atlantic Ocean and that the northerly winds stretched the plume toward the mainland Europe, weather radars are the only means to provide an estimate of the total ejected tephra. The VARR methodology is summarized and applied to available radar time series to estimate the plume maximum height, ash particle category, ash volume, ash fallout and ash concentration every 5 min near the vent. Estimates of the discharge rate of eruption, based on the retrieved ash plume top height, are provided together with an evaluation of the total erupted mass and volume. Deposited ash at ground is also retrieved from radar data by empirically reconstructing the vertical profile of radar reflectivity and estimating the near-surface ash fallout. Radar-based retrieval results cannot be compared with ground measurements, due to the lack of the latter, but further demonstrate the unique contribution of these remote sensing products to the understating and modelling of explosive volcanic ash eruptions.

  4. The Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruption from a microwave weather radar perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Marzano

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The sub-glacial Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruptions of April and May 2010 are analyzed and quantitatively interpreted by using ground-based weather radar data and the Volcanic Ash Radar Retrieval (VARR technique. The Eyjafjöll eruptions have been continuously monitored by the Keflavík C-band weather radar, located at a distance of about 155 km from the volcano vent. Considering that the Eyjafjöll volcano is approximately 20 km from the Atlantic Ocean and that the northerly winds stretched the plume toward the mainland Europe, weather radars are the only means to provide an estimate of the total ejected tephra. The VARR methodology is summarized and applied to available radar time series to estimate the plume maximum height, ash particle category, ash volume, ash fallout and ash concentration every 5 min near the vent. Estimates of the discharge rate of eruption, based on the retrieved ash plume top height, are provided together with an evaluation of the total erupted mass and volume. Deposited ash at ground is also retrieved from radar data by empirically reconstructing the vertical profile of radar reflectivity and estimating the near-surface ash fallout. Radar-based retrieval results cannot be compared with ground measurements, due to the lack of the latter, but further demonstrate the unique contribution of these remote sensing products to the understating and modelling of explosive volcanic ash eruptions.

  5. Detailed 1 x 1 deg gravimetric Indian Ocean geoid and comparison with GEOS-3 radar altimeter geoid profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, H.-G.; Chapman, M.; Talwani, M.

    1978-01-01

    A new set of 1 x 1 deg mean free-air anomalies in the Indian Ocean is determined on the basis of previously published free-air anomaly maps (Talwani and Kahle, 1975) and the most recent Lamont surface ship gravity measurements. The data are then used to compute a (total) 1 x 1 deg gravimetric Indian Ocean geoid. The computation is carried out by combining the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) GEM-6 geoid and a difference geoid that corresponds to the differences between the set of 1 x 1 deg surface gravity values and the GEM-6 gravity anomalies. The difference geoid is highest over the Madagascar Ridge (+20 m) and lowest over the Timor Trough (-30 m). The total geoid is compared with GEOS-3 radar altimeter-derived geoid profiles, and geophysical implications are discussed.

  6. Space and Ground-Based Infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weems, Jon; Zell, Martin

    This chapter deals first with the main characteristics of the space environment, outside and inside a spacecraft. Then the space and space-related (ground-based) infrastructures are described. The most important infrastructure is the International Space Station, which holds many European facilities (for instance the European Columbus Laboratory). Some of them, such as the Columbus External Payload Facility, are located outside the ISS to benefit from external space conditions. There is only one other example of orbital platforms, the Russian Foton/Bion Recoverable Orbital Capsule. In contrast, non-orbital weightless research platforms, although limited in experimental time, are more numerous: sounding rockets, parabolic flight aircraft, drop towers and high-altitude balloons. In addition to these facilities, there are a number of ground-based facilities and space simulators, for both life sciences (for instance: bed rest, clinostats) and physical sciences (for instance: magnetic compensation of gravity). Hypergravity can also be provided by human and non-human centrifuges.

  7. Ground Based GPS Phase Measurements for Atmospheric Sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    based GPS observations for the correction of radar observations. 6 REFERENCES Alber, C., R. Ware, C. Rocken, and J. Braun, A new method for sensing ...rocken@ucar.edu Award #: N00014-97-1-0258 LONG-TERM GOAL The goal is to develop GPS remote sensing techniques to determine atmospheric signal delay and...agrees best with the observations in a least squares sense is selected. The corresponding refractivity profile is then selected. • We tested this

  8. Development of Ground-Based Plant Sentinels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    plants in response to different strains of Pseudomonas syringae. Planta . 217:767-775. De Moraes CM, Schultz JC, Mescher MC, Tumlinson JH. (2004...09-30-2004 Final Technical _ April 2001 - April 2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Developing Plants as Ground-based Sentinels 5b. GRANT...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 9 "Z Plants emit volatile mixes characteristic of exposure to both plant and animal (insect) pathogens (bacteria and fungi). The

  9. Illumination compensation in ground based hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Alexander; Underwood, James

    2017-07-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has emerged as an important tool for analysing vegetation data in agricultural applications. Recently, low altitude and ground based hyperspectral imaging solutions have come to the fore, providing very high resolution data for mapping and studying large areas of crops in detail. However, these platforms introduce a unique set of challenges that need to be overcome to ensure consistent, accurate and timely acquisition of data. One particular problem is dealing with changes in environmental illumination while operating with natural light under cloud cover, which can have considerable effects on spectral shape. In the past this has been commonly achieved by imaging known reference targets at the time of data acquisition, direct measurement of irradiance, or atmospheric modelling. While capturing a reference panel continuously or very frequently allows accurate compensation for illumination changes, this is often not practical with ground based platforms, and impossible in aerial applications. This paper examines the use of an autonomous unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) to gather high resolution hyperspectral imaging data of crops under natural illumination. A process of illumination compensation is performed to extract the inherent reflectance properties of the crops, despite variable illumination. This work adapts a previously developed subspace model approach to reflectance and illumination recovery. Though tested on a ground vehicle in this paper, it is applicable to low altitude unmanned aerial hyperspectral imagery also. The method uses occasional observations of reference panel training data from within the same or other datasets, which enables a practical field protocol that minimises in-field manual labour. This paper tests the new approach, comparing it against traditional methods. Several illumination compensation protocols for high volume ground based data collection are presented based on the results. The findings in this paper are

  10. Ground based spectroscopy of hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Ingo

    2010-05-01

    It has been shown in recent years with great success that spectroscopy of exoplanetary atmospheres is feasible using space based observatories such as the HST and Spitzer. However, with the end of the Spitzer cold-phase, space based observations in the near to mid infra-red are limited, which will remain true until the the onset of the JWST. The importance of developing methods of ground based spectroscopic analysis of known hot Jupiters is therefore apparent. In the past, various groups have attempted exoplanetary spectroscopy using ground based facilities and various techniques. Here I will present results using a novel spectral retrieval method for near to mid infra-red emission and transmission spectra of exoplanetary atmospheres taken from the ground and discuss the feasibility of future ground-based spectroscopy in a broader context. My recently commenced PhD project is under the supervision of Giovanna Tinetti (University College London) and in collaboration with J. P. Beaulieu (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris), Mark Swain and Pieter Deroo (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech).

  11. Initial Results from the DEEPWAVE Airborne and Ground-Based Measurement Program in New Zealand in 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, Dave; Smith, Ron; Taylor, Mike; Doyle, Jim; Eckermann, Steve; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Rapp, Markus; Williams, Biff; Bossert, Katrina; Pautet, Dominique

    2015-04-01

    The deep-propagating gravity wave experiment (DEEPWAVE) was performed on and over New Zealand, Tasmania, the Tasman Sea, and the Southern Ocean with core airborne measurements extending from 5 June to 21 July 2014 and supporting ground-based measurements beginning in late May and extending beyond the airborne component. DEEPWAVE employed two aircraft, the NSF/NCAR GV and the German DLR Falcon. The GV carried the standard flight-level instruments, dropsondes, and the Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP). It also hosted new airborne lidar and imaging instruments built specifically to allow quantification of gravity waves (GWs) from sources at lower altitudes (e.g., orography, convection, jet streams, fronts, and secondary GW generation) throughout the stratosphere and into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). The new GV lidars included a Rayleigh lidar measuring atmospheric density and temperature from ~20-60 km and a sodium resonance lidar measuring sodium density and temperature at ~75-100 km. An airborne Advanced Mesosphere Temperature Mapper (AMTM) was also developed for the GV, and together with additional IR "wing" cameras, imaged the OH airglow temperature and/or intensity fields extending ~900 km across the GV flight track. The DLR Falcon was equipped with its standard flight-level instruments and an aerosol Doppler lidar able to measure radial winds below the Falcon where aerosol backscatter was sufficient. Additional ground-based instruments included a 449 MHz boundary layer radar, balloons at multiple sites, two ground-based Rayleigh lidars, a second ground-based AMTM, a Fabry Perot interferometer measuring winds and temperatures at ~87 and 95 km, and a meteor radar measuring winds from ~80-100 km. DEEPWAVE performed 26 GV flights, 13 Falcon flights, and an extensive series of ground-based measurements whether or not the aircraft were flying. Together, these observed many diverse cases of GW forcing, propagation, refraction, and dissipation

  12. Evaluation of turbulent dissipation rate retrievals from Doppler cloud radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Shupe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbulent dissipation rate retrievals from cloud radar Doppler velocity measurements are evaluated using independent, in situ observations in Arctic stratocumulus clouds. In situ validation data sets of dissipation rate are derived using sonic anemometer measurements from a tethered balloon and high frequency pressure variation observations from a research aircraft, both flown in proximity to stationary, ground-based radars. Modest biases are found among the data sets in particularly low- or high-turbulence regimes, but in general the radar-retrieved values correspond well with the in situ measurements. Root mean square differences are typically a factor of 4–6 relative to any given magnitude of dissipation rate. These differences are no larger than those found when comparing dissipation rates computed from tethered-balloon and 15-m tower sonic measurements made at spatial distances of a few hundred meters. Moreover, radar retrievals are able to capture the vertical dissipation rate structure observed by the in situ sensors, while offering substantially more information on the time variability of turbulence profiles. Together these evaluations indicate that radar-based retrievals can, at a minimum, be used to determine the vertical structure of turbulence in Arctic stratocumulus clouds.

  13. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  14. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of a test of a ground-based lidar of other type. The test was performed at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. The result as an establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided...... by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from the wind vanes is also given....

  15. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Yordanova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  16. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  17. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Georgieva Yankova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  18. Measurements of radar ground returns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loor, G.P. de

    1974-01-01

    The ground based measurement techniques for the determination of the radar back-scatter of vegetation and soils as used in The Netherlands will be described. Two techniques are employed: one covering a large sample area (> 1000 m2) but working at low grazing angels only and one (short range) coverin

  19. Statistical Studies of Ground-Based Optical Lightning Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, C. R.; Nemzek, R. J.; Suszcynsky, D. M.

    2005-12-01

    Most extensive optical studies of lightning have been conducted from orbit, and the statistics of events collected from earth are relatively poorly documented. The time signatures of optical power measured in the presence of clouds are inevitably affected by scattering,which can distort the signatures by extending and delaying the amplitude profile in time. We have deployed two all-sky photodiode detectors, one in New Mexico and one in Oklahoma, which are gathering data alongside electric field change monitors as part of the LANL EDOTX Great Plains Array. Preliminary results show that the photodiode is sensitive to approximately 50% or more of RF events detected at ranges of up to 30 km, and still has some sensitivity at ranges in excess of 60 km (distances determined by the EDOTX field-change array). The shapes of events within this range were assessed, with focus on rise time, width, peak power, and their correlation to corresponding electric field signatures, and these are being compared with published on-orbit and ground-based data. Initial findings suggest a mean characteristic width (ratio of total detected optical energy to peak power) of 291 +/- 12 microseconds and a mean delay between the RF signal peak and optical peak of 121 +/- 17 microseconds. These values fall between prior ground-based measurements of direct return stroke emissions, and scattering-dominated on-orbit measurements. This work will promote better understanding of the correspondence between radio and optical measurements of lightning.

  20. Installation and Initial Operation of DOE's 449-MHz Wind Profiling Radars on the U.S. West Coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaherty, Julia E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shaw, William J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Morris, Victor R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wilczak, J. M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); White, A. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ayers, Tom [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jordan, Jim [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); King, Clark W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), has recently completed the installation of three new wind profiling radars on the Washington and Oregon coasts. These systems operate at a frequency of 449 MHz and provide mean wind profiles to a height of roughly 8 km, with the maximum measurement height depending on time-varying atmospheric conditions. This is roughly half the depth of the troposphere at these latitudes. Each system is also equipped with a radio acoustic sounding system (RASS), which provides a measure of the temperature profile to heights of approximately 2 km. Other equipment deployed alongside the radar includes a surface meteorological station and GPS for column water vapor. This project began in fiscal year 2014, starting with equipment procurements and site selection. In addition, environmental reviews, equipment assembly and testing, site access agreements, and infrastructure preparations have been performed. Finally, with equipment deployment with data collection and dissemination, the primary tasks of this project have been completed. The three new wind profiling radars have been deployed at airports near Coos Bay, OR, and Astoria, OR, and at an industrial park near Forks, WA. Data are available through the NOAA Earth Systems Research Laboratory Data Display website, and will soon be made available through the DOE Atmosphere to Electrons data archive and portal as well.

  1. Underestimation of Oceanic Warm Cloud Occurrences by the Cloud Profiling Radar Aboard CloudSat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The Cloud Profi ling Radar (CPR) onboard CloudSat is an active sensor specifi cally dedicated to cloud detection. Compared to passive remote sensors, CPR plays a unique role in investigating the occurrence of multi-layer clouds and depicting the internal vertical structure of clouds. However, owing to contamination from ground clutter, CPR refl ectivity signals are invalid in the lowest 1 km above the surface, leading to numerous missed detections of warm clouds. In this study, by using 1-yr CPR and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) synchronous data, those CPR-missed oceanic warm clouds that are identifi ed as cloudy by MODIS are examined. It is demonstrated that CPR severely underestimates the occurrence of oceanic warm clouds, with a global-average miss rate of about 0.43. Over the tropical and subtropical oceans, the CPR-missed clouds tend to occur in regions with relatively low sea surface temperature. CPR misses almost all warm clouds with cloud tops lower than 1 km, and the miss rate reduces with increasing cloud top. As for clouds with cloud tops higher than 2 km, the negative bias of CPR-captured warm cloud occurrence falls below 3%. The cloud top height of CPR-missed warm clouds ranges from 0.6 to 1.2 km, and these clouds mostly have evidently small optical depths and droplet eff ective radii. The vertically integrated cloud liquid water content of CPR-missed warm clouds is smaller than 50 g m−2 . It is also revealed that CPR misses some warm clouds that have small optical depths or small droplet sizes, besides those limited in the boundary layer below about 1 km due to ground clutter.

  2. Application of model-based spectral analysis to wind-profiler radar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Boyer

    Full Text Available A classical way to reduce a radar’s data is to compute the spectrum using FFT and then to identify the different peak contributions. But in case an overlapping between the different echoes (atmospheric echo, clutter, hydrometeor echo. . . exists, Fourier-like techniques provide poor frequency resolution and then sophisticated peak-identification may not be able to detect the different echoes. In order to improve the number of reduced data and their quality relative to Fourier spectrum analysis, three different methods are presented in this paper and applied to actual data. Their approach consists of predicting the main frequency-components, which avoids the development of very sophisticated peak-identification algorithms. The first method is based on cepstrum properties generally used to determine the shift between two close identical echoes. We will see in this paper that this method cannot provide a better estimate than Fourier-like techniques in an operational use. The second method consists of an autoregressive estimation of the spectrum. Since the tests were promising, this method was applied to reduce the radar data obtained during two thunder-storms. The autoregressive method, which is very simple to implement, improved the Doppler-frequency data reduction relative to the FFT spectrum analysis. The third method exploits a MUSIC algorithm, one of the numerous subspace-based methods, which is well adapted to estimate spectra composed of pure lines. A statistical study of performances of this method is presented, and points out the very good resolution of this estimator in comparison with Fourier-like techniques. Application to actual data confirms the good qualities of this estimator for reducing radar’s data.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (tropical meteorology- Radio science (signal processing- General (techniques applicable in three or more fields

  3. Atmospheric temp erature profiles estimated by the vertical wind sp eed observed by MST radar%基于MST雷达垂直风速的大气温度剖面反演

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    青海银; 张援农; 周晨; 赵正予; 陈罡

    2014-01-01

    本文主要利用MST(mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere)雷达垂直风速时间序列进行频谱分析,计算B-V(Brunt-Väisälä)频率,再根据B-V频率和温度的关系,本文建立了离散的温度反演模型,最后反演得到了全高度的温度剖面。通过计算温度剖面和探空仪实测温度剖面比较可见,二者的符合度非常高,变化趋势也完全一致。本文还进一步讨论了,利用B-V频率和MST雷达的水平风速还可以计算理查德森数,通过理查德森数可以很清晰的判断大气的稳定性,进而可以量化大气很多动力学特征以及解释大气中的很多波动现象。因此, B-V频率的获得是MST雷达对大气动力学研究的又一贡献,它可以准确地反演大气的温度剖面,同时获取大气动力学稳定性参数。%Atmospheric temperature is an important parameter for studying the process of atmospheric dynamics and pho-tochemistry, and is a significant sign of the atmospheric vertical stratification structure. It is a challenge in atmo-spheric science research to obtain temperature profiles with high space-time resolution all the time. MST (mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere) radar, which is the modern large-scale ground-based radio remote sensing equipment, can measure 3D atmospheric winds with high space-time resolution and unattended 24 hours a day. This paper uses the time series of vertical wind observed by MST radar to make spectral analysis and calculate B-V (Brunt-Väisälä) frequen-cy. Then this paper builds the discrete model of temperature inversion based on the relationship between B-V frequency and temperature. Compared with actual measurement of temperature from radiosondes, the agreement between the radiosonde profile and the profile from MST radar data is quite good. Furthermore, the Richardson number can also be obtained by using the B-V frequency and horizontal winds, which can judge the atmospheric stability, quantize many of

  4. Profiling river surface velocities and volume flow estimation with bistatic UHF RiverSonde radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, D.; Teague, C.; Lilleboe, P.; Cheng, R.; Gartner, J.; ,

    2003-01-01

    From the velocity profiles across the river, estimates of total volume flow for the four methods were calculated based on a knowledge of the bottom depth vs position across the river. It was found that the flow comparisons for the American River were much closer, within 2% of each other among all of the methods. Sources of positional biases and anomalies in the RiverSonde measurement patterns along the river were identified and discussed.

  5. Large phased-array radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookner, Eli, Dr.

    1988-12-01

    Large phased-array radars can play a very important part in arms control. They can be used to determine the number of RVs being deployed, the type of targeting of the RVs (the same or different targets), the shape of the deployed objects, and possibly the weight and yields of the deployed RVs. They can provide this information at night as well as during the day and during rain and cloud covered conditions. The radar can be on the ground, on a ship, in an airplane, or space-borne. Airborne and space-borne radars can provide high resolution map images of the ground for reconnaissance, of anti-ballistic missile (ABM) ground radar installations, missile launch sites, and tactical targets such as trucks and tanks. The large ground based radars can have microwave carrier frequencies or be at HF (high frequency). For a ground-based HF radar the signal is reflected off the ionosphere so as to provide over-the-horizon (OTH) viewing of targets. OTH radars can potentially be used to monitor stealth targets and missile traffic.

  6. Comparisons of refractive index gradient and stability profiles measured by balloons and the MU radar at a high vertical resolution in the lower stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Luce

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Many experimental studies have demonstrated that VHF Stratosphere-Troposphere (ST radar echo power is proportional to the generalized refractive index gradient squared M2 when using a vertically oriented beam. Because humidity is generally negligible above the tropopause, VHF ST radars can thus provide information on the static stability (quantified by the squared Brunt-Väisälä frequency N2 at stratospheric heights and this capability is useful for many scientific applications. Most studies have been performed until now at a vertical resolution of 150 m or more. In the present paper, results of comparisons between radar- and (balloon borne radiosonde-derived M2 and N2 are shown at a better vertical resolution of 50 m with the MU radar (34.85° N, 136.15° E; Japan by benefiting from the range resolution improvement provided by the multi-frequency range imaging technique, using the Capon processing method. Owing to favorable winds in the troposphere, the radiosondes did not drift horizontally more than about 30 km from the MU radar site by the time they reached an altitude of 20 km. The measurements were thus simultaneous and almost collocated. Very good agreements have been obtained between both high resolution profiles of M2, as well as profiles of N2. It is also shown that this agreement can still be improved by taking into account a frozen-in advection of the air parcels by a horizontally uniform wind. Therefore, it can be concluded that 1 the range imaging technique with the Capon method really provides substantial range resolution improvement, despite the relatively weak Signal-to-Noise Ratios (SNR over the analyzed region of the lower stratosphere, 2 the proportionality of the radar echo power to M2 at a vertical scale down to 50 m in the lower stratosphere is experimentally demonstrated, 3 the MU radar can

  7. Ground Penetrating Radar Profiles of Breached Anticlinal Ridges in the Northern Piedmont of the San Bernardino Mountains in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobyarchick, A. R.; Eppes, M. C.; Diemer, J. A.; Cathey, R. B.; Cottingham, M. A.; Eckardt, I. J.; Shiflet, J. E.; Waldron, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    The northern piedmont of the San Bernardino Mountains contains kinematic elements characteristic of the Mojave block dextral plate boundary zone between the North American and Pacific plates and the complex convergent Transverse Ranges partition of that motion here represented by the North Frontal thrust system. Predominantly lateral slip in the central Mojave block is carried by the Helendale fault through Lucerne Valley and southward to intersect the North Frontal thrust system in the San Bernardino Mountains. Active anticlinal flexures and partially emergent north-verging thrust faults have deformed Pleistocene alluvial fans and older rocks into east-trending ridges in the piedmont on both sides of the Helendale fault. The Cougar Buttes anticline underlies such a ridge east of the fault and is breached by contemporaneous orthogonal washes in several places along strike of the anticline. Greater relief occurs where the alluvial fans comprise carbonate- cemented soils and particularly resistant, prominent petrocalcic horizons. It is within these incised valleys that the sequence of Tertiary through Pleistocene deposits show that the asymmetric anticline is cored by a thrust fault. In order to examine more closely the fold-fault association in the Cougar Buttes anticline and suggest possible kinematic models, we conducted several ground penetrating radar (GPR) profiles at different levels across the ridge. Relatively superior relief in some washes allowed us to conduct profiles along the present topographic ridge crests (and thus along the crestal zone of the fold) and also along wash bottoms to provide profiles at the level of the fold's core. We used a GSSI SIR-3000 GPR system equipped with a monostatic 100 MHz antennae set to continuous recording mode; traverses over very irregular ground were done in point data mode. The system was set up with nominal high and low cutoff filters and automatic gain control, but we found that AGC overly amplified multiples or

  8. Ground Based Retrievals of Small Ice Crystals and Water Phase in Arctic Cirrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Subhashree; Mitchell, David L.; DeSlover, Daniel

    2009-03-01

    The microphysical properties of cirrus clouds are uncertain due to the problem of ice particles shattering at the probe inlet upon sampling. To facilitate better estimation of small ice crystal concentrations in cirrus clouds, a new ground-based remote sensing technique has been used in combination with in situ aircraft measurements. Data from the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted at the north slope of Alaska (winter 2004), have been used to test a new method for retrieving the liquid water path (LWP) and ice water path (IWP) in mixed phase clouds. The framework of the retrieval algorithm consists of the modified anomalous diffraction approximation or MADA (for mixed phase cloud optical properties), a radar reflectivity-ice microphysics relationship and a temperature-dependent ice particle size distribution (PSD) scheme. Cloud thermal emission measurements made by the ground-based Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) yield information on the total water path (TWP) while reflectivity measurements from the Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR) are used to derive the IWP. The AERI is also used to indicate the concentration of small ice crystals (DBeer's law absorption. While this is still a work in progress, the anticipated products from this AERI-radar retrieval scheme are the IWP, LWP, small-to-large ice crystal number concentration ratio and effective diameter for cirrus, as well as the ice particle number concentration for a given ice water content (IWC).

  9. Cloud and precipitation properties from ground-based remote sensing instruments in East Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Gorodetskaya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A new comprehensive cloud-precipitation-meteorological observatory has been established at Princess Elisabeth base, located in the escarpment zone of Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica. The observatory consists of a set of ground-based remote sensing instruments (ceilometer, infrared pyrometer and vertically profiling precipitation radar combined with automatic weather station measurements of near-surface meteorology, radiative fluxes, and snow accumulation. In this paper, the observatory is presented and the potential for studying the evolution of clouds and precipitating systems is illustrated by case studies. It is shown that the synergetic use of the set of instruments allows for distinguishing ice, mixed-phase and precipitating clouds, including some information on their vertical extent. In addition, wind-driven blowing snow events can be distinguished from deeper precipitating systems. Cloud properties largely affect the surface radiative fluxes, with liquid-containing clouds dominating the radiative impact. A statistical analysis of all measurements (in total 14 months mainly occurring in summer/autumn indicates that these liquid-containing clouds occur during as much as 20% of the cloudy periods. The cloud occurrence shows a strong bimodal distribution with clear sky conditions 51% of the time and complete overcast conditions 35% of the time. Snowfall occurred 17% of the cloudy periods with a predominance of light precipitation and only rare events with snowfall > 1 mm h−1 water equivalent (w.e.. Three of such intensive snowfall events occurred during 2011 contributing to anomalously large annual snow accumulation. This is the first deployment of a precipitation radar in Antarctica allowing to assess the contribution of the snowfall to the local surface mass balance. It is shown that on the one hand large accumulation events (>10 mm w.e. day−1 during the measurement period of 26 months were always associated with snowfall, but that

  10. First ground-based FTIR-observations of methane in the tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Petersen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Total column concentrations and volume mixing ratio profiles of methane have been retrieved from ground-based solar absorption FTIR spectra in the near-infrared recorded in Paramaribo (Suriname. The methane FTIR observations are compared with TM5 model simulations and satellite observations from SCIAMACHY, and represent the first validation of SCIAMACHY retrievals in the tropics using ground-based remote sensing techniques. Apart from local biomass burning features, our methane FTIR observations agree well with the SCIAMACHY retrievals and TM5 model simulations.

  11. Validation of Satellite-Based Objective Overshooting Cloud-Top Detection Methods Using CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedka, Kristopher M.; Dworak, Richard; Brunner, Jason; Feltz, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Two satellite infrared-based overshooting convective cloud-top (OT) detection methods have recently been described in the literature: 1) the 11-mm infrared window channel texture (IRW texture) method, which uses IRW channel brightness temperature (BT) spatial gradients and thresholds, and 2) the water vapor minus IRW BT difference (WV-IRW BTD). While both methods show good performance in published case study examples, it is important to quantitatively validate these methods relative to overshooting top events across the globe. Unfortunately, no overshooting top database currently exists that could be used in such study. This study examines National Aeronautics and Space Administration CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar data to develop an OT detection validation database that is used to evaluate the IRW-texture and WV-IRW BTD OT detection methods. CloudSat data were manually examined over a 1.5-yr period to identify cases in which the cloud top penetrates above the tropopause height defined by a numerical weather prediction model and the surrounding cirrus anvil cloud top, producing 111 confirmed overshooting top events. When applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-based Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R Series (GOES-R) Advanced Baseline Imager proxy data, the IRW-texture (WV-IRW BTD) method offered a 76% (96%) probability of OT detection (POD) and 16% (81%) false-alarm ratio. Case study examples show that WV-IRW BTD.0 K identifies much of the deep convective cloud top, while the IRW-texture method focuses only on regions with a spatial scale near that of commonly observed OTs. The POD decreases by 20% when IRW-texture is applied to current geostationary imager data, highlighting the importance of imager spatial resolution for observing and detecting OT regions.

  12. Radar activities of the DFVLR Institute for Radio Frequency Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keydel, W.

    1983-01-01

    Aerospace research and the respective applications microwave tasks with respect to remote sensing, position finding and communication are discussed. The radar activities are directed at point targets, area targets and volume targets; they center around signature research for earth and ocean remote sensing, target recognition, reconnaissance and camouflage and imaging and area observation radar techniques (SAR and SLAR). The radar activities cover a frequency range from 1 GHz up to 94 GHz. The radar program is oriented to four possible application levels: ground, air, shuttle orbits and satellite orbits. Ground based studies and measurements, airborne scatterometers and imaging radars, a space shuttle radar, the MRSE, and follow on experiments are considered.

  13. Radar activities of the DFVLR Institute for Radio Frequency Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keydel, W.

    1983-01-01

    Aerospace research and the respective applications microwave tasks with respect to remote sensing, position finding and communication are discussed. The radar activities are directed at point targets, area targets and volume targets; they center around signature research for earth and ocean remote sensing, target recognition, reconnaissance and camouflage and imaging and area observation radar techniques (SAR and SLAR). The radar activities cover a frequency range from 1 GHz up to 94 GHz. The radar program is oriented to four possible application levels: ground, air, shuttle orbits and satellite orbits. Ground based studies and measurements, airborne scatterometers and imaging radars, a space shuttle radar, the MRSE, and follow on experiments are considered.

  14. Autonomous landing of a helicopter UAV with a ground-based multisensory fusion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dianle; Zhong, Zhiwei; Zhang, Daibing; Shen, Lincheng; Yan, Chengping

    2015-02-01

    In this study, this paper focus on the vision-based autonomous helicopter unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) landing problems. This paper proposed a multisensory fusion to autonomous landing of an UAV. The systems include an infrared camera, an Ultra-wideband radar that measure distance between UAV and Ground-Based system, an PAN-Tilt Unit (PTU). In order to identify all weather UAV targets, we use infrared cameras. To reduce the complexity of the stereovision or one-cameral calculating the target of three-dimensional coordinates, using the ultra-wideband radar distance module provides visual depth information, real-time Image-PTU tracking UAV and calculate the UAV threedimensional coordinates. Compared to the DGPS, the test results show that the paper is effectiveness and robustness.

  15. An englacial image and water pathways of the Fourcade glacier on King George Island, Antarctic Peninsula, inferred from ground-penetrating radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEE; Joohan; KIM; Ki; Young; HONG; Jong; Kuk; JIN; Young; Keun

    2010-01-01

    The distribution of small fractures and water content of the Fourcade glacier on King George Island, Antarctica, was investigated in November 2006 and December 2007 by two ground-based (470-and 490-m-long profiles) and one helicopter-borne (470-m-long profile) ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys using 50-, 100-, and 500-MHz antennas. Radar images in the pre-migrated GPR sections are characterized by a smooth ice surface and irregular bed topography, numerous diffraction hyperbolas in the ice and at the glacier bed, strong scattering noise, and near-surface folded layers. Scattering noise above a mound in the center of the profiles is associated with an area of dense fractures extending down from the ice surface that has relatively low reflection strength. Near the northeast ends of the profiles where few englacial fractures occur, scattering noise may result from the presence of warmer ice. A water-filled conduit and an air-filled cavity are interpreted as the source of two distinct hyperbolas in sub-glacial valleys based on the polarity of the reflections. Through migration velocity analysis on 106 hyperbolas, radar velocities were obtained for the 100-MHz ground-based profile. Using the velocities and Paren’s mixture formula, we calculated the water content of the ice to have been in the range of 0.00–0.09. High water content occurs near the glacier margin, in sub-glacial valleys, and in zones of scattering noise.

  16. Dual Ka-band radar field campaign for GPM/DPR algorithm development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, K.; Nishikawa, M.; Nakamura, K.; Komachi, K.; Hanado, H.; Kawamura, S.; Sugitani, S.; Minda, H.; Shimizu, S.; Oki, R.

    2012-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an expanded follow-on mission to TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) and a GPM core satellite will carry dual frequency precipitation radar (DPR) and a GPM Microwave Imager on board. The DPR, which is being developed by National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), consists of two radars; Ku-band precipitation radar (KuPR) and Ka-band radar (KaPR). The DPR is expected to advance precipitation science by expanding the coverage of observations to higher latitudes than those of the TRMM/PR, measuring snow and light rain by the KaPR, and providing drop size distribution information based on the differential attenuation of echoes at two frequencies. In order to secure the quality of precipitation estimates, ground validation (GV) of satellite data and retrieval algorithms is essential. Since end-to-end comparisons between instantaneous precipitation data observed by satellite and ground-based instruments is not enough to improve the algorithms. The error of various physical parameters in the precipitation retrieval algorithms (e.g. attenuation factor, drop size distribution, terminal velocity, density of the snow particles, etc.) will be estimated by the comparison with the ground-based observation data. A dual Ka-band radar system is developed by the JAXA for the GPM/DPR algorithm development. The dual Ka-radar system which consists of two identical Ka-band radars can measure both the specific attenuation and the equivalent radar reflectivity at Ka-band. Those parameters are important particularly for snow measurement. Using the dual Ka-radar system along with other instruments, such as a polarimetric precipitation radar, a wind-profiler radar, ground-based precipitation measurement systems, the uncertainties of the parameters in the DPR algorithm can be reduced. The verification of improvement of rain retrieval with the DPR algorithm is

  17. Probing Pluto's Atmosphere Using Ground-Based Stellar Occultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicardy, Bruno; Rio de Janeiro Occultation Team, Granada Team, International Occultation and Timing Association, Royal Astronomical Society New Zealand Occultation Section, Lucky Star associated Teams

    2016-10-01

    Over the last three decades, some twenty stellar occultations by Pluto have been monitored from Earth. They occur when the dwarf planet blocks the light from a star for a few minutes as it moves on the sky. Such events led to the hint of a Pluto's atmosphere in 1985, that was fully confirmed during another occultation in 1988, but it was only in 2002 that a new occultation could be recorded. From then on, the dwarf planet started to move in front of the galactic center, which amplified by a large factor the number of events observable per year.Pluto occultations are essentially refractive events during which the stellar rays are bent by the tenuous atmosphere, causing a gradual dimming of the star. This provides the density, pressure and temperature profiles of the atmosphere from a few kilometers above the surface up to about 250 km altitude, corresponding respectively to pressure levels of about 10 and 0.1 μbar. Moreover, the extremely fine spatial resolution (a few km) obtained through this technique allows the detection of atmospheric gravity waves, and permits in principle the detection of hazes, if present.Several aspects make Pluto stellar occultations quite special: first, they are the only way to probe Pluto's atmosphere in detail, as the dwarf planet is far too small on the sky and the atmosphere is far too tenuous to be directly imaged from Earth. Second, they are an excellent example of participative science, as many amateurs have been able to record those events worldwide with valuable scientific returns, in collaboration with professional astronomers. Third, they reveal Pluto's climatic changes on decade-scales and constrain the various seasonal models currently explored.Finally, those observations are fully complementary to space exploration, in particular with the New Horizons (NH) mission. I will show how ground-based occultations helped to better calibrate some NH profiles, and conversely, how NH results provide some key boundary conditions

  18. Convective cloud vertical velocity and mass-flux characteristics from radar wind profiler observations during GoAmazon2014/5: VERTICAL VELOCITY GOAMAZON2014/5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giangrande, Scott E. [Environmental and Climate Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton New York USA; Toto, Tami [Environmental and Climate Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton New York USA; Jensen, Michael P. [Environmental and Climate Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton New York USA; Bartholomew, Mary Jane [Environmental and Climate Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton New York USA; Feng, Zhe [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Protat, Alain [Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, Melbourne Victoria Australia; Williams, Christopher R. [University of Colorado Boulder and NOAA/Earth System Research Laboratory/Physical Sciences Division, Boulder Colorado USA; Schumacher, Courtney [Texas A& M University, College Station Texas USA; Machado, Luiz [National Institute for Space Research, Sao Jose dos Campos Brazil

    2016-11-15

    A radar wind profiler data set collected during the 2 year Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) campaign is used to estimate convective cloud vertical velocity, area fraction, and mass flux profiles. Vertical velocity observations are presented using cumulative frequency histograms and weighted mean profiles to provide insights in a manner suitable for global climate model scale comparisons (spatial domains from 20 km to 60 km). Convective profile sensitivity to changes in environmental conditions and seasonal regime controls is also considered. Aggregate and ensemble average vertical velocity, convective area fraction, and mass flux profiles, as well as magnitudes and relative profile behaviors, are found consistent with previous studies. Updrafts and downdrafts increase in magnitude with height to midlevels (6 to 10 km), with updraft area also increasing with height. Updraft mass flux profiles similarly increase with height, showing a peak in magnitude near 8 km. Downdrafts are observed to be most frequent below the freezing level, with downdraft area monotonically decreasing with height. Updraft and downdraft profile behaviors are further stratified according to environmental controls. These results indicate stronger vertical velocity profile behaviors under higher convective available potential energy and lower low-level moisture conditions. Sharp contrasts in convective area fraction and mass flux profiles are most pronounced when retrievals are segregated according to Amazonian wet and dry season conditions. During this deployment, wet season regimes favored higher domain mass flux profiles, attributed to more frequent convection that offsets weaker average convective cell vertical velocities.

  19. Ground-based observations of Kepler asteroseismic targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uyttterhoeven , K.; Karoff, Christoffer

    2010-01-01

    We present the ground-based activities within the different working groups of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium (KASC). The activities aim at the systematic characterization of the 5000+ KASC targets, and at the collection of ground-based follow-up time-series data of selected promising...

  20. Climatology of clouds and precipitation over East Antarctica using ground-based remote sensing at the Princess Elizabeth station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souverijns, Niels; Gossart, Alexandra; Gorodetskaya, Irina; Lhermitte, Stef; Van Tricht, Kristof; Mangold, Alexander; Laffineur, Quentin; Van Lipzig, Nicole

    2016-04-01

    The surface mass balance of the Antarctic ice sheet is highly dependent on the interaction between clouds and precipitation. Our understanding of these processes is challenged by the limited availability of observations over the area and problems in Antarctic climate simulations by state-of-the-art climate models. Improvements are needed in this field, as the Antarctic ice sheet is expected to become a dominant contributor to sea level rise in the 21st century. In 2010, an observational site was established at the Princess Elisabeth (PE) Antarctic station. PE is located in the escarpment area of Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica (72°S, 23°E). The instruments consist of several ground-based remote sensing instruments: a ceilometer (measuring cloud-base height and vertical structure), a 24-GHz Micro Rain Radar (MRR; providing vertical profiles of radar effective reflectivity and Doppler velocity), and a pyrometer (measuring effective cloud base temperature). An automatic weather station provides info on boundary-layer meteorology (temperature, wind speed and direction, humidity, pressure), as well as broadband radiative fluxes and snow height changes. This set of instruments can be used to infer the role of clouds in the Antarctic climate system, their interaction with radiation and their impact on precipitation. Cloud and precipitation characteristics are derived from 5-year-long measurement series, which is unprecedented for the Antarctic region. Here, we present an overview of the cloud and precipitation climatology. Statistics on cloud occurrence are calculated on annual / seasonal basis and a distinction between liquid / mixed phase and ice clouds is made. One can discriminate between liquid-bearing and ice-only clouds by investigating the ceilometer attenuated backscatter, since liquid phase clouds have a much higher signal. Furthermore, by using pyrometer measurements, we are able to identify the range of temperatures at which liquid / ice clouds are

  1. Design and Study on IFDigitalReceiver of Wind Profiler Radar%风廓线雷达中频数字接收机设计研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯武威; 袁安民; 赵颖辉; 汪筱阳

    2012-01-01

    Windprofiler radar is a radio remote-sensing sounding system for detectingthe atmosphere wind. The analog receiver adopted by traditional radar receivers is cockamamie and the precision of signal pretreatment is not very high. The structure of digital receiver of wind profiler radar is studied by the approach of intermediate frequency digitization technique on the basis of software radio, including IF sampling, digital down converter, I, Q data processing. At last, the feasibility of design scheme is validated by the simulations and practical tests.%风廓线雷达是用于大气风场探测的无线电遥感系统,传统的雷达接收机采用模拟接收机,结构繁琐且信号处理精度不高.基于软件无线电,运用中频数字化技术,提出了一种数字化接收机的设计方案,包含中频采样、数字下变频、IQ数据处理等.通过对方案进行仿真和测试,验证了方案的可行性.

  2. Movable Ground Based Recovery System for Reuseable Space Flight Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver, George L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A reusable space flight launch system is configured to eliminate complex descent and landing systems from the space flight hardware and move them to maneuverable ground based systems. Precision landing of the reusable space flight hardware is enabled using a simple, light weight aerodynamic device on board the flight hardware such as a parachute, and one or more translating ground based vehicles such as a hovercraft that include active speed, orientation and directional control. The ground based vehicle maneuvers itself into position beneath the descending flight hardware, matching its speed and direction and captures the flight hardware. The ground based vehicle will contain propulsion, command and GN&C functionality as well as space flight hardware landing cushioning and retaining hardware. The ground based vehicle propulsion system enables longitudinal and transverse maneuverability independent of its physical heading.

  3. Integrating Wind Profiling Radars and Radiosonde Observations with Model Point Data to Develop a Decision Support Tool to Assess Upper-Level Winds for Space Launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William H., III; Flinn, Clay

    2013-01-01

    On the day-of-launch, the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers (LWOs) monitor the upper-level winds for their launch customers to include NASA's Launch Services Program and NASA's Ground Systems Development and Operations Program. They currently do not have the capability to display and overlay profiles of upper-level observations and numerical weather prediction model forecasts. The LWOs requested the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) develop a tool in the form of a graphical user interface (GUI) that will allow them to plot upper-level wind speed and direction observations from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) 50 MHz tropospheric wind profiling radar, KSC Shuttle Landing Facility 915 MHz boundary layer wind profiling radar and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) Automated Meteorological Processing System (AMPS) radiosondes, and then overlay forecast wind profiles from the model point data including the North American Mesoscale (NAM) model, Rapid Refresh (RAP) model and Global Forecast System (GFS) model to assess the performance of these models. The AMU developed an Excel-based tool that provides an objective method for the LWOs to compare the model-forecast upper-level winds to the KSC wind profiling radars and CCAFS AMPS observations to assess the model potential to accurately forecast changes in the upperlevel profile through the launch count. The AMU wrote Excel Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) scripts to automatically retrieve model point data for CCAFS (XMR) from the Iowa State University Archive Data Server (http://mtarchive.qeol.iastate.edu) and the 50 MHz, 915 MHz and AMPS observations from the NASA/KSC Spaceport Weather Data Archive web site (http://trmm.ksc.nasa.gov). The AMU then developed code in Excel VBA to automatically ingest and format the observations and model point data in Excel to ready the data for generating Excel charts for the LWO's. The resulting charts allow the LWOs to independently initialize the three models 0

  4. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release and Their Retrieval for TOGA COARE Convective Systems Using a Cloud Resolving Model, SSM/I, and Ship-borne Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Olson, W. S.; Johnson, D.; Ferrier, B.; Kummerow, C.; Adler, R.

    1999-01-01

    Latent heating profiles associated with three (TOGA COARE) Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment active convective episodes (December 10-17 1992; December 19-27 1992; and February 9-13 1993) are examined using the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) Model and retrieved by using the Goddard Convective and Stratiform Heating (CSH) algorithm . The following sources of rainfall information are input into the CSH algorithm: Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/1), Radar and the GCE model. Diagnostically determined latent heating profiles calculated using 6 hourly soundings are used for validation. The GCE model simulated rainfall and latent heating profiles are in excellent agreement with those estimated by soundings. In addition, the typical convective and stratiform heating structures (or shapes) are well captured by the GCE model. Radar measured rainfall is smaller than that both estimated by the GCE model and SSM/I in all three different COARE IFA periods. SSM/I derived rainfall is more than the GCE model simulated for the December 19-27 and February 9-13 periods, but is in excellent agreement with the GCE model for the December 10-17 period. The GCE model estimated stratiform amount is about 50% for December 19-27, 42% for December 11-17 and 56% for the February 9-13 case. These results are consistent with large-scale analyses. The accurate estimates of stratiform amount is needed for good latent heating retrieval. A higher (lower) percentage of stratiform rain can imply a maximum heating rate at a higher (lower) altitude. The GCE model always simulates more stratiform rain (10 to 20%) than the radar for all three convective episodes. SSM/I derived stratiform amount is about 37% for December 19-27, 48% for December 11-17 and 41% for the February 9-13 case. Temporal variability of CSH algorithm retrieved latent heating profiles using either GCE model simulated or radar estimated rainfall and stratiform amount is in good

  5. Current status of Dual Ka-band radar field campaign in Japan for GPM/DPR mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Yuki; Nakagawa, Katsuhiro; Nishikawa, Masanori; Nakamura, Kenji; Fujiyoshi, Yasushi; Hanado, Hiroshi; Minda, Haruya; Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Oki, Riko; Furukawa, Kinji

    2013-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an expanded follow-on mission to TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) and a GPM core satellite will carry dual frequency precipitation radar (DPR) and a GPM Microwave Imager on board. The DPR, which is being developed by National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), consists of two radars; Ku-band precipitation radar (KuPR) and Ka-band radar (KaPR). The DPR is expected to advance precipitation science by expanding the coverage of observations to higher latitudes than those of the TRMM/PR, measuring snow and light rain by the KaPR, and providing drop size distribution information based on the differential attenuation of echoes at two frequencies. In order to secure the quality of precipitation estimates, ground validation (GV) of satellite data and retrieval algorithms is essential. Since end-to-end comparisons between instantaneous precipitation data observed by satellite and ground-based instruments is not enough to improve the algorithms. The error of various physical parameters in the precipitation retrieval algorithms (e.g. attenuation factor, drop size distribution, terminal velocity, density of the snow particles, etc.) will be estimated by the comparison with the ground-based observation data. A dual Ka-band radar system is developed by the JAXA for the GPM/DPR algorithm development. The dual Ka-radar system which consists of two identical Ka-band radars can measure both the specific attenuation and the equivalent radar reflectivity at Ka-band. Those parameters are important particularly for snow measurement. Using the dual Ka-radar system along with other instruments, such as a polarimetric precipitation radar, a wind-profiler radar, ground-based precipitation measurement systems, the uncertainties of the parameters in the DPR algorithm can be reduced. The verification of improvement of rain retrieval with the DPR algorithm is

  6. Quantum radar

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzagorta, Marco

    2011-01-01

    This book offers a concise review of quantum radar theory. Our approach is pedagogical, making emphasis on the physics behind the operation of a hypothetical quantum radar. We concentrate our discussion on the two major models proposed to date: interferometric quantum radar and quantum illumination. In addition, this book offers some new results, including an analytical study of quantum interferometry in the X-band radar region with a variety of atmospheric conditions, a derivation of a quantum radar equation, and a discussion of quantum radar jamming.This book assumes the reader is familiar w

  7. Ground-Based Lidar Measurements During the CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ) Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkoff, Timothy; Qian, Li; Kleidman, Richard; Stewart, Sebastian; Welton, Ellsworth; Li, Zhu; Holbem, Brent

    2008-01-01

    The CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ) field campaign was carried out between June 26th and August 29th of 2007 in the multi-state Maryland-Virginia-Pennsylvania region of the U.S. to study aerosol properties and cloud-aerosol interactions during overpasses of the CALIPSO satellite. Field work was conducted on selected days when CALIPSO ground tracks occurred in the region. Ground-based measurements included data from multiple Cimel sunphotometers that were placed at intervals along a segment of the CALIPSO ground-track. These measurements provided sky radiance and AOD measurements to enable joints inversions and comparisons with CALIPSO retrievals. As part of this activity, four ground-based lidars provided backscatter measurements (at 523 nm) in the region. Lidars at University of Maryland Baltimore County (Catonsville, MD) and Goddard Space Flight Center (Greenbelt, MD) provided continuous data during the campaign, while two micro-pulse lidar (MPL) systems were temporarily stationed at various field locations directly on CALIPSO ground-tracks. As a result, thirteen on-track ground-based lidar observations were obtained from eight different locations in the region. In some cases, nighttime CALIPSO coincident measurements were also obtained. In most studies reported to date, ground-based lidar validation efforts for CALIPSO rely on systems that are at fixed locations some distance away from the satellite ground-track. The CATZ ground-based lidar data provide an opportunity to examine vertical structure properties of aerosols and clouds both on and off-track simultaneously during a CALIPSO overpass. A table of available ground-based lidar measurements during this campaign will be presented, along with example backscatter imagery for a number of coincident cases with CALIPSO. Results indicate that even for a ground-based measurements directly on-track, comparisons can still pose a challenge due to the differing spatio-temporal properties of the ground and satellite

  8. Structure and evolution of Pluto's Atmosphere from ground-based stellar occultations between 2002 and 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, Erick; Sicardy, Bruno; Rio de Janeiro occultation team, Granada occultation team, International Occultation and Timing Association

    2016-10-01

    Ground-Based stellar occultations probe Pluto's atmosphere from about 3 km altitude (~ 10 μbar pressure level) up to 260 km altitude (~0.1 μbar). Our main goal is to derive Pluto's atmosphere evolution using thirteen ground-based occultations observed between 2002 and 2015 (plus 2016, if available). We consistently analyze the light curves using the Dias et al. (ApJ 811, 53, 2015) model, and confirm the general pressure increase by a factor of about 1.5 between 2002 and 2015 and a factor of almost three between 1988 and 2015. Implications for Pluto's seasonal evolution will be briefly discussed in the context of the New Horizons (NH) findings.Ground-based-derived temperature profiles will be compared with NH's results, where we use new temperature boundary conditions in our inversion procedures, as given by NH near 260 km altitude. Although the profiles reasonably agree, significant discrepancies are observed both in the deeper stratospheric zone (altitude topographic features revealed by NH.Finally, possible correlations between spike activity in the occultation light-curves and local underlying presence of free nitrogen ice terrains will be investigated.Part of the research leading to these results has received funding from the European Research Council under the European Community's H2020 (2014-2020/ ERC Grant Agreement n 669416 "LUCKY STAR").

  9. Observation of a tropopause fold by MARA VHF wind-profiler radar and ozonesonde at Wasa, Antarctica: comparison with ECMWF analysis and a WRF model simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mihalikova

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tropopause folds are one of the mechanisms of stratosphere–troposphere exchange, which can bring ozone rich stratospheric air to low altitudes in the extra-tropical regions. They have been widely studied at northern mid- or high latitudes, but so far almost no studies have been made at mid- or high southern latitudes. The Moveable Atmospheric Radar for Antarctica (MARA, a 54.5 MHz wind-profiler radar, has operated at the Swedish summer station Wasa, Antarctica (73° S, 13.5° W during austral summer seasons from 2007 to 2011 and has observed on several occasions signatures similar to those caused by tropopause folds at comparable Arctic latitudes. Here a case study is presented of one of these events when an ozonesonde successfully sampled the fold. Analysis from European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF is used to study the circumstances surrounding the event, and as boundary conditions for a mesoscale simulation using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model. The fold is well resolved by the WRF simulation, and occurs on the poleward side of the polar jet stream. However, MARA resolves fine-scale layering associated with the fold better than the WRF simulation.

  10. Observation of a tropopause fold by MARA VHF wind-profiler radar and ozonesonde at Wasa, Antarctica: comparison with ECMWF analysis and a WRF model simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalikova, M.; Kirkwood, S.; Arnault, J.; Mikhaylova, D.

    2012-09-01

    Tropopause folds are one of the mechanisms of stratosphere-troposphere exchange, which can bring ozone rich stratospheric air to low altitudes in the extra-tropical regions. They have been widely studied at northern mid- or high latitudes, but so far almost no studies have been made at mid- or high southern latitudes. The Moveable Atmospheric Radar for Antarctica (MARA), a 54.5 MHz wind-profiler radar, has operated at the Swedish summer station Wasa, Antarctica (73° S, 13.5° W) during austral summer seasons from 2007 to 2011 and has observed on several occasions signatures similar to those caused by tropopause folds at comparable Arctic latitudes. Here a case study is presented of one of these events when an ozonesonde successfully sampled the fold. Analysis from European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) is used to study the circumstances surrounding the event, and as boundary conditions for a mesoscale simulation using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The fold is well resolved by the WRF simulation, and occurs on the poleward side of the polar jet stream. However, MARA resolves fine-scale layering associated with the fold better than the WRF simulation.

  11. Radar Chart

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Radar Chart collection is an archived product of summarized radar data. The geographic coverage is the 48 contiguous states of the United States. These hourly...

  12. Radiation in fog: quantification of the impact on fog liquid water based on ground-based remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wærsted, Eivind G.; Haeffelin, Martial; Dupont, Jean-Charles; Delanoë, Julien; Dubuisson, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    Radiative cooling and heating impact the liquid water balance of fog and therefore play an important role in determining their persistence or dissipation. We demonstrate that a quantitative analysis of the radiation-driven condensation and evaporation is possible in real time using ground-based remote sensing observations (cloud radar, ceilometer, microwave radiometer). Seven continental fog events in midlatitude winter are studied, and the radiative processes are further explored through sensitivity studies. The longwave (LW) radiative cooling of the fog is able to produce 40-70 g m-2 h-1 of liquid water by condensation when the fog liquid water path exceeds 30 g m-2 and there are no clouds above the fog, which corresponds to renewing the fog water in 0.5-2 h. The variability is related to fog temperature and atmospheric humidity, with warmer fog below a drier atmosphere producing more liquid water. The appearance of a cloud layer above the fog strongly reduces the LW cooling relative to a situation with no cloud above; the effect is strongest for a low cloud, when the reduction can reach 100 %. Consequently, the appearance of clouds above will perturb the liquid water balance in the fog and may therefore induce fog dissipation. Shortwave (SW) radiative heating by absorption by fog droplets is smaller than the LW cooling, but it can contribute significantly, inducing 10-15 g m-2 h-1 of evaporation in thick fog at (winter) midday. The absorption of SW radiation by unactivated aerosols inside the fog is likely less than 30 % of the SW absorption by the water droplets, in most cases. However, the aerosols may contribute more significantly if the air mass contains a high concentration of absorbing aerosols. The absorbed radiation at the surface can reach 40-120 W m-2 during the daytime depending on the fog thickness. As in situ measurements indicate that 20-40 % of this energy is transferred to the fog as sensible heat, this surface absorption can contribute

  13. Plans of a test bed for ionospheric modelling based on Fennoscandian ground-based instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauristie, Kirsti; Kero, Antti; Verronen, Pekka T.; Aikio, Anita; Vierinen, Juha; Lehtinen, Markku; Turunen, Esa; Pulkkinen, Tuija; Virtanen, Ilkka; Norberg, Johannes; Vanhamäki, Heikki; Kallio, Esa; Kestilä, Antti; Partamies, Noora; Syrjäsuo, Mikko

    2016-07-01

    One of the recommendations for teaming among research groups in the COSPAR/ILWS roadmap is about building test beds in which coordinated observing supports model development. In the presentation we will describe a test bed initiative supporting research on ionosphere-thermosphere-magnetosphere interactions. The EISCAT incoherent scatter radars with their future extension, EISCAT3D, form the backbone of the proposed system. The EISCAT radars are surrounded by versatile and dense arrays of ground-based instrumentation: magnetometers and auroral cameras (the MIRACLE and IMAGE networks), ionospheric tomography receivers (the TomoScand network) and other novel technology for upper atmospheric probing with radio waves (e.g. the KAIRA facility, riometers and the ionosonde maintained by the Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory). As a new opening, close coordination with the Finnish national cubesat program is planned. We will investigate opportunities to establish a cost efficient nanosatellite program which would support the ground-based observations in a systematic and persistent manner. First experiences will be gathered with the Aalto-1 and Aalto-2 satellites, latter of which will be the Finnish contribution to the international QB50 mission. We envisage close collaboration also in the development of data analysis tools with the goal to integrate routines and models from different research groups to one system, where the different elements support each other. In the longer run we are aiming for a modelling framework with observational guidance which gives a holistic description on ionosphere-thermosphere processes and this way enables reliable forecasts on upper atmospheric space weather activity.

  14. Microwave signatures of ice hydrometeors from ground-based observations above Summit, Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pettersen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Multi-instrument, ground-based measurements provide unique and comprehensive datasets of the atmosphere for a specific location over long periods of time and resulting data compliments past and existing global satellite observations. This paper explores the effect of ice hydrometeors on ground-based, high frequency passive microwave measurements and attempts to isolate an ice signature for summer seasons at Summit, Greenland from 2010–2013. Data from a combination of passive microwave, cloud radar, radiosonde, and ceilometer were examined to isolate the ice signature at microwave wavelengths. By limiting the study to a cloud liquid water path of 40 g m−2 or less, the cloud radar can identify cases where the precipitation was dominated by ice. These cases were examined using liquid water and gas microwave absorption models, and brightness temperatures were calculated for the high frequency microwave channels: 90, 150, and 225 GHz. By comparing the measured brightness temperatures from the microwave radiometers and the calculated brightness temperature using only gas and liquid contributions, any residual brightness temperature difference is due to emission and scattering of microwave radiation from the ice hydrometeors in the column. The ice signature in the 90, 150, and 225 GHz channels for the Summit Station summer months was isolated. This measured ice signature was then compared to an equivalent brightness temperature difference calculated with a radiative transfer model including microwave single scattering properties for several ice habits. Initial model results compare well against the four years of summer season isolated ice signature in the high-frequency microwave channels.

  15. CRRES/Ground-based multi-instrument observations of an interval of substorm activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. Yeoman

    Full Text Available Observations are presented of data taken during a 3-h interval in which five clear substorm onsets/intensifications took place. During this interval ground-based data from the EISCAT incoherent scatter radar, a digital CCD all sky camera, and an extensive array of magnetometers were recorded. In addition data from the CRRES and DMSP spacecraft, whose footprints passed over Scandinavia very close to most of the ground-based instrumentation, are available. The locations and movements of the substorm current system in latitude and longitude, determined from ground and spacecraft magnetic field data, have been correlated with the locations and propagation of increased particle precipitation in the E-region at EISCAT, increased particle fluxes measured by CRRES and DMSP, with auroral luminosity and with ionospheric convection velocities. The onsets and propagation of the injection of magnetospheric particle populations and auroral luminosity have been compared. CRRES was within or very close to the substorm expansion phase onset sector during the interval. The onset region was observed at low latitudes on the ground, and has been confirmed to map back to within L=7 in the magnetotail. The active region was then observed to propagate tailward and poleward. Delays between the magnetic signature of the substorm field aligned currents and field dipolarisation have been measured. The observations support a near-Earth plasma instability mechanism for substorm expansion phase onset.

  16. HPRF pulse Doppler stepped frequency radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Teng; REN LiXiang

    2009-01-01

    Stepped frequency radar Is a well known scheme to generate high range resolution profile (HRRP) of targets. Through appropriate radar parameter design, the radar enables both unambiguous velocity measurement and high resolution ranging within a single dwell in a high pulse repetition frequency (HPRF) mode. This paper analyzes in detail the design principle of the HPRF stepped frequency radar system, the solution to its ambiguity issue, as well as its signal processing method. Both theoretical analysis and simulation results demonstrate that the proposed radar scheme can work independently to solve the problem of motion compensation, and is therefore highly applicable to many new types of radar.

  17. Radar Fundamentals, Presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Jenn, David

    2008-01-01

    Topics include: introduction, radar functions, antennas basics, radar range equation, system parameters, electromagnetic waves, scattering mechanisms, radar cross section and stealth, and sample radar systems.

  18. Radar Fundamentals, Presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Jenn, David

    2008-01-01

    Topics include: introduction, radar functions, antennas basics, radar range equation, system parameters, electromagnetic waves, scattering mechanisms, radar cross section and stealth, and sample radar systems.

  19. Orbit Determination Using a Decametric Line-of-Sight Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazer, G.; Meehan, D.; Rutten, M.; Gordon, N.

    2013-09-01

    The paper investigates the effectiveness of a ground-based bistatic decametric line-of-sight radar for orbit determination of low Earth orbit satellites. Radar observations of the Hubble Space Telescope are used to demonstrate our approach. We present methods for initial orbit determination and for the case of improving an a-priori established orbit descriptor. We discuss the suitability of this class of radar for wide-field space situational awareness and consider a SSA architecture that uses this class of radar to cue high-accuracy narrow field-of-view optical sensors as part of a wide-field high-accuracy system for SSA.

  20. Radar equations for modern radar

    CERN Document Server

    Barton, David K

    2012-01-01

    Based on the classic Radar Range-Performance Analysis from 1980, this practical volume extends that work to ensure applicability of radar equations to the design and analysis of modern radars. This unique book helps you identify what information on the radar and its environment is needed to predict detection range. Moreover, it provides equations and data to improve the accuracy of range calculations. You find detailed information on propagation effects, methods of range calculation in environments that include clutter, jamming and thermal noise, as well as loss factors that reduce radar perfo

  1. Soil moisture retrieval using ground based bistatic scatterometer data at X-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Dileep Kumar; Prasad, Rajendra; Kumar, Pradeep; Vishwakarma, Ajeet Kumar

    2017-02-01

    Several hydrological phenomenon and applications need high quality soil moisture information of the top Earth surface. The advent of technologies like bistatic scatterometer can retrieve soil moisture information with high accuracy and hence used in present study. The radar data is acquired by specially designed ground based bistatic scatterometer system in the specular direction of 20-70° incidence angles at steps of 5° for HH and VV polarizations. This study provides first time comprehensive evaluation of different machine learning algorithms for the retrieval of soil moisture using the X-band bistatic scatterometer measurements. The comparison of different artificial neural network (ANN) models such as back propagation artificial neural network (BPANN), radial basis function artificial neural network (RBFANN), generalized regression artificial neural network (GRANN) along with linear regression model (LRM) are used to estimate the soil moisture. The performance indices such as %Bias, Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) and Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) are used to evaluate the performances of the machine learning techniques. Among different models employed in this study, the BPANN is found to have marginally higher performance in case of HH polarization while RBFANN is found suitable with VV polarization followed by GRANN and LRM. The results obtained are of considerable scientific and practical value to the wider scientific community for the number of practical applications and research studies in which radar datasets are used.

  2. Ground-based Optical Observations of Geophysical Phenomena: Aurora Borealis and Meteors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, Marilia

    2010-10-01

    Advances in low-light level imaging technology have enabled significant improvements in the ground based study of geophysical phenomena. In this talk we focus on two such phenomena that occur in the Earth's ionosphere: aurorae and meteors. Imaging the aurora which is created by the interplay of the Earth's magnetosphere, ionosphere and atmosphere, provides a tool for remote sensing physical processes that are otherwise very difficult to study. By quantifying the intensities, scale sizes and lifetimes of auroral structures, we can gain significant insight into the physics behind the generation of the aurora and the interaction of the magnetosphere with the solar wind. Additionally, the combination of imaging with radars provides complimentary data and therefore more information than either method on its own. Meteor observations are a perfect example of this because the radar can accurately determine only the line-of-sight component of velocity, while imaging provides the direction of motion, the perpendicular velocity and brightness (a proxy for mass), therefore enabling a much more accurate determination of the full velocity vector and mass.

  3. Coupling Fine-Scale Root and Canopy Structure Using Ground-Based Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brady S. Hardiman

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystem physical structure, defined by the quantity and spatial distribution of biomass, influences a range of ecosystem functions. Remote sensing tools permit the non-destructive characterization of canopy and root features, potentially providing opportunities to link above- and belowground structure at fine spatial resolution in functionally meaningful ways. To test this possibility, we employed ground-based portable canopy LiDAR (PCL and ground penetrating radar (GPR along co-located transects in forested sites spanning multiple stages of ecosystem development and, consequently, of structural complexity. We examined canopy and root structural data for coherence (i.e., correlation in the frequency of spatial variation at multiple spatial scales ≤10 m within each site using wavelet analysis. Forest sites varied substantially in vertical canopy and root structure, with leaf area index and root mass more becoming even vertically as forests aged. In all sites, above- and belowground structure, characterized as mean maximum canopy height and root mass, exhibited significant coherence at a scale of 3.5–4 m, and results suggest that the scale of coherence may increase with stand age. Our findings demonstrate that canopy and root structure are linked at characteristic spatial scales, which provides the basis to optimize scales of observation. Our study highlights the potential, and limitations, for fusing LiDAR and radar technologies to quantitatively couple above- and belowground ecosystem structure.

  4. Effects of near surface soil moisture profiles during evaporation on far-field ground-penetrating radar data: A numerical study

    KAUST Repository

    Moghadas, Davood

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigated the effect of vapor flow on the drying front that develops in soils when water evaporates from the soil surface and on GPR data. The results suggest the integration of the full-wave GPR model with a coupled water, vapor, and heat flow model to accurately estimate the soil hydraulic properties. We investigated the Effects of a drying front that emerges below an evaporating soil surface on the far-field ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data. First, we performed an analysis of the width of the drying front in soils with 12 different textures by using an analytical model. Then, we numerically simulated vertical soil moisture profiles that develop during evaporation for the soil textures. We performed the simulations using a Richards flow model that considers only liquid water flow and a model that considers coupled water, vapor, and heat flows. The GPR signals were then generated from the simulated soil water content profiles taking into account the frequency dependency of apparent electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity. The analytical approach indicated that the width of the drying front at the end of Stage I of the evaporation was larger in silty soils than in other soil textures and smaller in sandy soils. We also demonstrated that the analytical estimate of the width of the drying front can be considered as a proxy for the impact that a drying front could have on far-field GPR data. The numerical simulations led to the conclusion that vapor transport in soil resulted in S-shaped soil moisture profiles, which clearly influenced the GPR data. As a result, vapor flow needs to be considered when GPR data are interpreted in a coupled inversion approach. Moreover, the impact of vapor flow on the GPR data was larger for silty than for sandy soils. These Effects on the GPR data provide promising perspectives regarding the use of radars for evaporation monitoring. © Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI

  5. Meteor radar measurements of MLT winds near the equatorial electro jet region over Thumba (8.5° N, 77° E: comparison with TIDI observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. John

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The All-Sky interferometric meteor (SKYiMET radar (MR derived winds in the vicinity of the equatorial electrojet (EEJ are discussed. As Thumba (8.5° N, 77° E; dip lat. 0.5° N is under the EEJ belt, there has been some debate on the reliability of the meteor radar derived winds near the EEJ height region. In this regard, the composite diurnal variations of zonal wind profiles in the mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT region derived from TIMED Doppler Interferometer (TIDI and ground based meteor radar at Thumba are compared. In this study, emphasis is given to verify the meteor radar observations at 98 km height region, especially during the EEJ peaking time (11:00 to 14:00 LT. The composite diurnal cycles of zonal winds over Thumba are constructed during four seasons of the year 2006 using TIDI and meteor radar observations, which showed good agreement especially during the peak EEJ hours, thus assuring the reliability of meteor radar measurements of neutral winds close to the EEJ height region. It is evident from the present study that on seasonal scales, the radar measurements are not biased by the EEJ. The day-time variations of HF radar measured E-region drifts at the EEJ region are also compared with MR measurements to show there are large differences between ionospheric drifts and MR measurements. The significance of the present study lies in validating the meteor radar technique over Thumba located at magnetic equator by comparing with other than the radio technique for the first time.

  6. GLAST and Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The launch of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope together with the advent of a new generation of ground-based gamma-ray detectors such as VERITAS, HESS, MAGIC and CANGAROO, will usher in a new era of high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics. GLAST and the ground based gamma-ray observatories will provide highly complementary capabilities for spectral, temporal and spatial studies of high energy gamma-ray sources. Joint observations will cover a huge energy range, from 20 MeV to over 20 TeV. The LAT will survey the entire sky every three hours, allowing it both to perform uniform, long-term monitoring of variable sources and to detect flaring sources promptly. Both functions complement the high-sensitivity pointed observations provided by ground-based detectors. Finally, the large field of view of GLAST will allow a study of gamma-ray emission on large angular scales and identify interesting regions of the sky for deeper studies at higher energies. In this poster, we will discuss the science returns that might result from joint GLAST/ground-based gamma-ray observations and illustrate them with detailed source simulations.

  7. GLAST and Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The launch of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope together with the advent of a new generation of ground-based gamma-ray detectors such as VERITAS, HESS, MAGIC and CANGAROO, will usher in a new era of high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics. GLAST and the ground based gamma-ray observatories will provide highly complementary capabilities for spectral, temporal and spatial studies of high energy gamma-ray sources. Joint observations will cover a huge energy range, from 20 MeV to over 20 TeV. The LAT will survey the entire sky every three hours, allowing it both to perform uniform, long-term monitoring of variable sources and to detect flaring sources promptly. Both functions complement the high-sensitivity pointed observations provided by ground-based detectors. Finally, the large field of view of GLAST will allow a study of gamma-ray emission on large angular scales and identify interesting regions of the sky for deeper studies at higher energies. In this poster, we will discuss the science returns that might result from joint GLAST/ground-based gamma-ray observations and illustrate them with detailed source simulations.

  8. Coordinated ground-based, low altitude satellite and Cluster observations on global and local scales during a transient post-noon sector excursion of the magnetospheric cusp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opgenoorth, H.J.; Lockwood, M.; Alcayde, D.

    2001-01-01

    in Canada, Greenland and Scandinavia. After an initial eastward and later poleward expansion of the flow-channel between 13:20 and 13:40 UT, the four Cluster spacecraft, and the field line footprints covered by the eastward looking scan cycle of the Sondre Stromfjord incoherent scatter radar were engulfed...... formed to the west and north of the radar. From a detailed analysis of the coordinated Cluster and ground-based data, it was found that this extraordinary transient convection pattern, indeed, had moved the cusp precipitation from its former pre-noon position into the late post-noon sector, allowing...

  9. Characterizing Olive Grove Canopies by Means of Ground-Based Hemispherical Photography and Spaceborne RADAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Morillo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the main strengths of active microwave remote sensing, in relation to frequency, is its capacity to penetrate vegetation canopies and reach the ground surface, so that information can be drawn about the vegetation and hydrological properties of the soil surface. All this information is gathered in the so called backscattering coefficient (s0. The subject of this research have been olive groves canopies, where which types of canopy biophysical variables can be derived by a specific optical sensor and then integrated into microwave scattering models has been investigated. This has been undertaken by means of hemispherical photographs and gap fraction procedures. Then, variables such as effective and true Leaf Area Indices have been estimated. Then, in order to characterize this kind of vegetation canopy, two models based on Radiative Transfer theory have been applied and analyzed. First, a generalized two layer geometry model made up of homogeneous layers of soil and vegetation has been considered. Then, a modified version of the Xu and Steven Water Cloud Model has been assessed integrating the canopy biophysical variables derived by the suggested optical procedure. The backscattering coefficients at various polarized channels have been acquired from RADARSAT 2 (C-band, with 38.5° incidence angle at the scene center. For the soil simulation, the best results have been reached using a Dubois scattering model and the VV polarized channel (r2 = 0.88. In turn, when effective LAI (LAIeff has been taken into account, the parameters of the scattering canopy model are better estimated (r2 = 0.89. Additionally, an inversion procedure of the vegetation microwave model with the adjusted parameters has been undertaken, where the biophysical values of the canopy retrieved by this methodology fit properly with field measured values.

  10. Error in Radar-Derived Soil Moisture due to Roughness Parameterization: An Analysis Based on Synthetical Surface Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard De Baets

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In the past decades, many studies on soil moisture retrieval from SAR demonstrated a poor correlation between the top layer soil moisture content and observed backscatter coefficients, which mainly has been attributed to difficulties involved in the parameterization of surface roughness. The present paper describes a theoretical study, performed on synthetical surface profiles, which investigates how errors on roughness parameters are introduced by standard measurement techniques, and how they will propagate through the commonly used Integral Equation Model (IEM into a corresponding soil moisture retrieval error for some of the currently most used SAR configurations. Key aspects influencing the error on the roughness parameterization and consequently on soil moisture retrieval are: the length of the surface profile, the number of profile measurements, the horizontal and vertical accuracy of profile measurements and the removal of trends along profiles. Moreover, it is found that soil moisture retrieval with C-band configuration generally is less sensitive to inaccuracies in roughness parameterization than retrieval with L-band configuration.

  11. Quality Control and Calibration of the Dual-Polarization Radar at Kwajalein, RMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, David A.; Wolff, David B.; Carey, Lawrence D.; Tokay, Ali

    2010-01-01

    southwest of Hawaii and 1400 miles east of Guam in the tropical North Pacific Ocean. This tropical oceanic location is important because the majority of rain, and therefore the majority of atmospheric heating, occurs in the tropics where limited ground-based radar data are available.

  12. Tentative detection of clear-air turbulence using a ground-based Rayleigh lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauchecorne, Alain; Cot, Charles; Dalaudier, Francis; Porteneuve, Jacques; Gaudo, Thierry; Wilson, Richard; Cénac, Claire; Laqui, Christian; Keckhut, Philippe; Perrin, Jean-Marie; Dolfi, Agnès; Cézard, Nicolas; Lombard, Laurent; Besson, Claudine

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric gravity waves and turbulence generate small-scale fluctuations of wind, pressure, density, and temperature in the atmosphere. These fluctuations represent a real hazard for commercial aircraft and are known by the generic name of clear-air turbulence (CAT). Numerical weather prediction models do not resolve CAT and therefore provide only a probability of occurrence. A ground-based Rayleigh lidar was designed and implemented to remotely detect and characterize the atmospheric variability induced by turbulence in vertical scales between 40 m and a few hundred meters. Field measurements were performed at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP, France) on 8 December 2008 and 23 June 2009. The estimate of the mean squared amplitude of bidimensional fluctuations of lidar signal showed excess compared to the estimated contribution of the instrumental noise. This excess can be attributed to atmospheric turbulence with a 95% confidence level. During the first night, data from collocated stratosphere-troposphere (ST) radar were available. Altitudes of the turbulent layers detected by the lidar were roughly consistent with those of layers with enhanced radar echo. The derived values of turbulence parameters Cn2 or CT2 were in the range of those published in the literature using ST radar data. However, the detection was at the limit of the instrumental noise and additional measurement campaigns are highly desirable to confirm these initial results. This is to our knowledge the first successful attempt to detect CAT in the free troposphere using an incoherent Rayleigh lidar system. The built lidar device may serve as a test bed for the definition of embarked CAT detection lidar systems aboard airliners.

  13. New-Measurement Techniques to Diagnose Charged Dust and Plasma Layers in the Near-Earth Space Environment Using Ground-Based Ionospheric Heating Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoudian, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Recently, experimental observations have shown that radar echoes from the irregularitysource region associated with mesospheric dusty space plasmas may be modulated by radio wave heating with ground-based ionospheric heating facilities. These experiments show great promise as a diagnostic for the associated dusty plasma in the Near-Earth Space Environment which is believed to have links to global change. This provides an alternative to more complicated and costly space-based observational app...

  14. Planetary Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neish, Catherine D.; Carter, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of planetary radar, and the primary scientific discoveries that have been made using this technique. The chapter starts by describing the different types of radar systems and how they are used to acquire images and accurate topography of planetary surfaces and probe their subsurface structure. It then explains how these products can be used to understand the properties of the target being investigated. Several examples of discoveries made with planetary radar are then summarized, covering solar system objects from Mercury to Saturn. Finally, opportunities for future discoveries in planetary radar are outlined and discussed.

  15. Cross Validation of Spaceborne and Ground Polarimetric Radar Snowfall Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Y.; Hong, Y.; Cao, Q.; Kirstetter, P.; Gourley, J. J.; Zhang, J.

    2013-12-01

    Snow, as a primary contribution to regional or even global water budgets is of critical importance to our society. For large-scale weather monitoring and global climate studies, satellite-based snowfall observations with ground validations have become highly desirable. Ground-based polarimetric weather radar is the powerful validation tool that provides physical insight into the development and interpretation of spaceborne snowfall retrievals. This study aims to compare and resolve discrepancies in snowfall detection and estimation between Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) on board NASA's Cloudsat satellite and new polarimetric National Mosaic and Multi-sensor QPE (NMQ) system (Q3) developed by OU and NOAA/NSSL scientists. The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission with its core satellite scheduled for launch in 2014 will carry active and passive microwave instrumentation anticipated to detect and estimate snowfall or snowpack. This study will potentially serve as the basis for global validation of space-based snowfall products and also invite synergistic development of coordinated space-ground multisensor snowfall products.

  16. A Potential Integrated Multiwavelength Radar System at the Medicina Radiotelescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montebugnoli, S.; Salerno, E.; Pupillo, G.; Pluchino, S.

    2009-03-01

    Ground-based radars provide a powerful tool for detection, tracking and identification of the space debris fragments orbiting around Earth at different altitudes. The Medicina Radioastronomical Station is an Italian radio observation facility that is here proposed as receiving part of a bistatic radar system for detecting and tracking space debris at different orbital regions (from Low Earth Orbits up to Geostationary Earth Orbits).

  17. Ground-based observations of Kepler asteroseismic targets

    CERN Document Server

    Uytterhoeven, K; Southworth, J; Randall, S; Ostensen, R; Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Marconi, M; Kurtz, D W; Kiss, L; Gutierrez-Soto, J; Frandsen, S; De Cat, P; Bruntt, H; Briquet, M; Zhang, X B; Telting, J H; Steslicki, M; Ripepi, V; Pigulski, A; Paparo, M; Oreiro, R; Choong, Ngeow Chow; Niemczura, E; Nemec, J; Narwid, A; Mathias, P; Martin-Ruiz, S; Lehman, H; Kopacki, G; Karoff, C; Jackiewicz, J; Henden, A A; Handler, G; Grigachene, A; Green, E M; Garrido, R; Machado, L Fox; Debosscher, J; Creevey, O L; Catanzaro, G; Bognar, Z; Biazzo, K; Bernabei, S

    2010-01-01

    We present the ground-based activities within the different working groups of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium (KASC). The activities aim at the systematic characterization of the 5000+ KASC targets, and at the collection of ground-based follow-up time-series data of selected promising Kepler pulsators. So far, 35 different instruments at 30 telescopes on 22 different observatories in 12 countries are in use, and a total of more than 530 observing nights has been awarded. (Based on observations made with the Isaac Newton Telescope, William Herschel Telescope, Nordic Optical Telescope, Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, Mercator Telescope (La Palma, Spain), and IAC-80 (Tenerife, Spain). Also based on observations taken at the observatories of Sierra Nevada, San Pedro Martir, Vienna, Xinglong, Apache Point, Lulin, Tautenburg, Loiano, Serra la Nave, Asiago, McDonald, Skinakas, Pic du Midi, Mauna Kea, Steward Observatory, Bialkow Observatory of the Wroclaw University, Piszkesteto Mountain Station, Observato...

  18. Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Technology Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Leslie A.

    2014-01-13

    This GNDD Technology Roadmap is intended to provide guidance to potential researchers and help management define research priorities to achieve technology advancements for ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring science being pursued by the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team within the Office of Nuclear Detonation Detection in the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Four science-based elements were selected to encompass the entire scope of nuclear monitoring research and development (R&D) necessary to facilitate breakthrough scientific results, as well as deliver impactful products. Promising future R&D is delineated including dual use associated with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Important research themes as well as associated metrics are identified along with a progression of accomplishments, represented by a selected bibliography, that are precursors to major improvements to nuclear explosion monitoring.

  19. Ground-Based Calibration Of A Microwave Landing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriazes, John J.; Scott, Marshall M., Jr.; Willis, Alfred D.; Erdogan, Temel; Reyes, Rolando

    1996-01-01

    System of microwave instrumentation and data-processing equipment developed to enable ground-based calibration of microwave scanning-beam landing system (MSBLS) at distances of about 500 to 1,000 ft from MSBLS transmitting antenna. Ensures accuracy of MSBLS near touchdown point, without having to resort to expense and complex logistics of aircraft-based testing. Modified versions prove useful in calibrating aircraft instrument landing systems.

  20. Functional proteomic analysis revealed ground-base ion radiations cannot reflect biological effects of space radiations of rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Sun, Yeqing; Zhao, Qian; Han, Lu

    2016-07-01

    Highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as main factor causing biological effects. Radiobiological studies during space flights are unrepeatable due to the variable space radiation environment, ground-base ion radiations are usually performed to simulate of the space biological effect. Spaceflights present a low-dose rate (0.1˜~0.3mGy/day) radiation environment inside aerocrafts while ground-base ion radiations present a much higher dose rate (100˜~500mGy/min). Whether ground-base ion radiation can reflect effects of space radiation is worth of evaluation. In this research, we compared the functional proteomic profiles of rice plants between on-ground simulated HZE particle radiation and spaceflight treatments. Three independent ground-base seed ionizing radiation experiments with different cumulative doses (dose range: 2˜~20000mGy) and different liner energy transfer (LET) values (13.3˜~500keV/μμm) and two independent seed spaceflight experiments onboard Chinese 20th satellite and SZ-6 spacecraft were carried out. Alterations in the proteome were analyzed by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry identifications. 45 and 59 proteins showed significant (pmetabolic process, protein folding and phosphorylation. The results implied that ground-base radiations cannot truly reflect effects of spaceflight radiations, ground-base radiation was a kind of indirect effect to rice causing oxidation and metabolism stresses, but space radiation was a kind of direct effect leading to macromolecule (DNA and protein) damage and signal pathway disorders. This functional proteomic analysis work might provide a new evaluation method for further on-ground simulated HZE radiation experiments.

  1. Evaluation of brightness temperature from a forward model of ground-based microwave radiometer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Rambabu; J S Pillai; A Agarwal; G Pandithurai

    2014-06-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers are getting great attention in recent years due to their capability to profile the temperature and humidity at high temporal and vertical resolution in the lower troposphere. The process of retrieving these parameters from the measurements of radiometric brightness temperature () includes the inversion algorithm, which uses the background information from a forward model. In the present study, an algorithm development and evaluation of this forward model for a ground-based microwave radiometer, being developed by Society for Applied Microwave Electronics Engineering and Research (SAMEER) of India, is presented. Initially, the analysis of absorption coefficient and weighting function at different frequencies was made to select the channels. Further the range of variation of for these selected channels for the year 2011, over the two stations Mumbai and Delhi is discussed. Finally the comparison between forward-model simulated s and radiometer measured s at Mahabaleshwar (73.66°E and 17.93°N) is done to evaluate the model. There is good agreement between model simulations and radiometer observations, which suggests that these forward model simulations can be used as background for inversion models for retrieving the temperature and humidity profiles.

  2. A one year comparison of 482 MHz radar wind profiler, RS92-SGP Radiosonde and 1.5 μm Doppler Lidar wind measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Päschke

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of a one-year quasi-operational testing of the 1.5 μm StreamLine Doppler lidar developed by Halo Photonics from 2 October 2012 to 2 October 2013. The system was configured to continuously perform a velocity-azimuth display (VAD scan pattern using 24 azimuthal directions with a constant beam elevation angle of 75°. Radial wind estimates were selected using a rather conservative signal-to-noise ratio (SNR based threshold of −18.2 dB (0.015. A 30 min average wind vector was calculated based on the assumption of a horizontally homogeneous wind field through a singular-value decomposed Moore–Penrose pseudoinverse of the overdetermined linear system. A strategy for a quality control of the retrieved wind vector components is outlined which is used to ensure consistency between the retrieved winds and the assumptions inherent to the employed wind vector retrieval. Finally, the lidar measurements are compared with operational data from a collocated 482 MHz radar wind profiler running in a four-beam Doppler beam swinging (DBS mode and winds from operational radiosonde measurements. The intercomparisons show that the Doppler lidar is a reliable system for operational wind measurements in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL.

  3. Turbulence Dissipation Rates in the Planetary Boundary Layer from Wind Profiling Radars and Mesoscale Numerical Weather Prediction Models during WFIP2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, L.; McCaffrey, K.; Wilczak, J. M.; Olson, J. B.; Kenyon, J.

    2016-12-01

    When forecasting winds at a wind plant for energy production, the turbulence parameterizations in the forecast models are crucial for understanding wind plant performance. Recent research shows that the turbulence (eddy) dissipation rate in planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterization schemes introduces significant uncertainty in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Thus, developing the capability to measure dissipation rates in the PBL will allow for identification of weaknesses in, and improvements to the parameterizations. During a preliminary field study at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory in spring 2015, a 915-MHz wind profiling radar (WPR) measured dissipation rates concurrently with sonic anemometers mounted on a 300-meter tower. WPR set-up parameters (e.g., spectral resolution), post-processing techniques (e.g., filtering for non-atmospheric signals), and spectral averaging were optimized to capture the most accurate Doppler spectra for measuring spectral widths for use in the computation of the eddy dissipation rates. These encouraging results lead to the implementation of the observing strategy on a 915-MHz WPR in Wasco, OR, operating as part of the Wind Forecasting Improvement Project 2 (WFIP2). These observations are compared to dissipation rates calculated from the High-Resolution Rapid Refresh model, a WRF-based mesoscale numerical weather prediction model run for WFIP2 at 3000 m horizontal grid spacing and with a nest, which has 750-meter horizontal grid spacing, in the complex terrain region of the Columbia River Gorge. The observed profiles of dissipation rates are used to evaluate the PBL parameterization schemes used in the HRRR model, which are based on the modeled turbulent kinetic energy and a tunable length scale.

  4. Thermally driven circulation in a region of complex topography: comparison of wind-profiling radar measurements and MM5 numerical predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bianco

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal variation of regional wind patterns in the complex terrain of Central Italy was investigated for summer fair-weather conditions and winter time periods using a radar wind profiler. The profiler is located on a site where interaction between the complex topography and land-surface produces a variety of thermally and dynamically driven wind systems. The observational data set, collected for a period of one year, was used first to describe the diurnal evolution of thermal driven winds, second to validate the Mesoscale Model 5 (MM5 that is a three-dimensional numerical model. This type of analysis was focused on the near-surface wind observation, since thermally driven winds occur in the lower atmosphere. According to the valley wind theory expectations, the site – located on the left sidewall of the valley (looking up valley – experiences a clockwise turning with time. Same characteristics in the behavior were established in both the experimental and numerical results.

    Because the thermally driven flows can have some depth and may be influenced mainly by model errors, as a third step the analysis focuses on a subset of cases to explore four different MM5 Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL parameterizations. The reason is to test how the results are sensitive to the selected PBL parameterization, and to identify the better parameterization if it is possible. For this purpose we analysed the MM5 output for the whole PBL levels. The chosen PBL parameterizations are: 1 Gayno-Seaman; 2 Medium-Range Forecast; 3 Mellor-Yamada scheme as used in the ETA model; and 4 Blackadar.

  5. On the Creation of An Urban Boundary Layer Product Using The Radar Wind Profiler of the New York City Meteorological Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, M. J.; Booth, J.; Arend, M.; Melecio-Vazquez, D.

    2016-12-01

    The radar wind profiler (RWP) located on the Liberty Science Center in Jersey City, NJ is a part of the New York City Meteorological Network (NYCMetNet). An automatic algorithm based on those by Angevine [1] and Molod [2] is expanded upon and implemented to take RWP signal to noise ratio data and create an urban boundary layer (UBL) height product. Time series of the RWP UBL heights from clear and cloudy days are examined and compared to UBL height time series calculated from thermal data obtained from a NYCMetNet radiometer located on the roof of the Grove School of Engineering at The City College of New York. UBL data from the RWP are also compared to the MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications) planetary boundary layer height time series product. A limited seasonal climatology is created from the available RWP data for clear and cloudy days and then compared to a limited seasonal climatology produced from boundary layer data obtained from MERRA and boundary layer data calculated from the CCNY radiometer. As with wind profilers in the NOAA wind profiler network, the signal return to the lowest range gates is not always the result of turbulent scattering, but from scattering from other targets such as the building itself, birds and insects. The algorithm attempts to address this during the daytime, when strong signal returns at the lowest range gates mask the SNR maxima above which are representative of the actual UBL height. Detecting the collapse and fall of the boundary layer meets with limited success, also, from the hours of 2:30pm to 5:00pm. Upper and lower range gates from the wind profiler limit observation of the nighttime boundary layer for heights falling below the lowest range gate and daytime convective boundary layer maxima rising above the highest. Due to the constraints of the instrument and the algorithm it is recommended that the boundary layer height product be constrained to the hours of 8am to 7pm.

  6. Operational Bright-Band Snow Level Detection Using Doppler Radar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A method to detect the bright-band snow level from radar reflectivity and Doppler vertical velocity data collection with an atmospheric profiling Doppler radar. The...

  7. Comparison of Thermal Structure Results from Venus Express and Ground Based Observations since Vira

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Sanjay

    2016-07-01

    An international team was formed in 2013 through the International Space Studies Institute (Bern, Switzerland) to compare recent results of the Venus atmospheric thermal structure from spacecraft and ground based observations made since the Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA) was developed (Kliore et al., 1985, Keating et al., 1985). Five experiments on European Space Agency's Venus Express orbiter mission have yielded results on the atmospheric structure during is operational life (April 2006 - November 2014). Three of these were from occultation methods: at near infrared wavelengths from solar occultations, (SOIR, 70 - 170 km), at ultraviolet wavelengths from stellar occultations (SPICAV, 90-140 km), and occultation of the VEx-Earth radio signal (VeRa, 40-90 km). In-situ drag measurements from three different techniques (accelerometry, torque, and radio tracking, 130 - 200 km) were also obtained using the spacecraft itself while passive infrared remote sensing was used by the VIRTIS experiment (70 - 120 km). The only new data in the -40-70 km altitude range are from radio occultation, as no new profiles of the deep atmosphere have been obtained since the VeGa 2 lander measurements in 1985 (not included in VIRA). Some selected ground based results available to the team were also considered by team in the inter comparisons. The temperature structure in the lower thermosphere from disk resolved ground based observations (except for one ground based investigation), is generally consistent with the Venus Express results. These experiments sampled at different periods, at different locations and at different local times and have different vertical and horizontal resolution and coverage. The data were therefore binned in latitude and local time bins and compared, ignoring temporal variations over the life time of the Venus Express mission and assumed north-south symmetry. Alternating warm and cooler layers are present in the 120-160 altitude range in results

  8. Synthetic range profiling, ISAR imaging of sea vessels and feature extraction, using a multimode radar to classify targets: initial results from field trials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Abdul Gaffar, MY

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available -based classification of small to medium sized sea vessels in littoral condition. The experimental multimode radar is based on an experimental tracking radar that was modified to generate SRP and ISAR images in both search and tracking modes. The architecture...

  9. System-level view of geospace dynamics: Challenges for high-latitude ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, E.

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, research programs including GEM, CEDAR, GEMSIS, GO Canada, and others are focusing on how geospace works as a system. Coupling sits at the heart of system level dynamics. In all cases, coupling is accomplished via fundamental processes such as reconnection and plasma waves, and can be between regions, energy ranges, species, scales, and energy reservoirs. Three views of geospace are required to attack system level questions. First, we must observe the fundamental processes that accomplish the coupling. This "observatory view" requires in situ measurements by satellite-borne instruments or remote sensing from powerful well-instrumented ground-based observatories organized around, for example, Incoherent Scatter Radars. Second, we need to see how this coupling is controlled and what it accomplishes. This demands quantitative observations of the system elements that are being coupled. This "multi-scale view" is accomplished by networks of ground-based instruments, and by global imaging from space. Third, if we take geospace as a whole, the system is too complicated, so at the top level we need time series of simple quantities such as indices that capture important aspects of the system level dynamics. This requires a "key parameter view" that is typically provided through indices such as AE and DsT. With the launch of MMS, and ongoing missions such as THEMIS, Cluster, Swarm, RBSP, and ePOP, we are entering a-once-in-a-lifetime epoch with a remarkable fleet of satellites probing processes at key regions throughout geospace, so the observatory view is secure. With a few exceptions, our key parameter view provides what we need. The multi-scale view, however, is compromised by space/time scales that are important but under-sampled, combined extent of coverage and resolution that falls short of what we need, and inadequate conjugate observations. In this talk, I present an overview of what we need for taking system level research to its next level, and how

  10. Evaluating Frontal Precipitation with a Spectral Microphysics Mesoscale Model and a Satellite Simulator as Compared to Radar and Radiometer Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, M.; Braun, S. A.; Matsui, T.; Iguchi, T.; Williams, C. R.

    2013-12-01

    The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) onboard NASA Aqua satellite and a ground-based precipitation profiling radar sampled a frontal precipitation event in the US west coast on 30 to 31 December 2005. Simulations with bulk microphysics schemes in the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model have been evaluated with those remote sensing data. In the current study, we continue similar work to evaluate a spectral bin microphysics (SBM) scheme, HUCM, in the WRF model. The Goddard-Satellite Data Simulation Unit (G-SDSU) is used to simulate quantities observed by the radar and radiometer. With advanced representation of cloud and precipitation microphysics processes, the HUCM scheme predicts distributions of 7 hydrometeor species as storms evolve. In this study, the simulation with HUCM well captured the structure of the precipitation and its microphysics characteristics. In addition, it improved total precipitation ice mass simulation and corrected, to a certain extent, the large low bias of ice scattering signature in the bulk scheme simulations. However, the radar reflectivity simulations with the HUCM scheme were not improved as compared to the bulk schemes. We conducted investigations to understand how microphysical processes and properties, such as snow break up parameter and particle fall velocities would influence precipitation size distribution and spectrum of water paths, and further modify radar and/or radiometer simulations. Influence by ice nuclei is going to be examined as well.

  11. Characterizing the Vertical Distribution of Aerosols using Ground-based Multiwavelength Lidar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Thorsen, T. J.; Clayton, M.; Mueller, D.; Chemyakin, E.; Burton, S. P.; Goldsmith, J.; Holz, R.; Kuehn, R.; Eloranta, E. W.; Marais, W.; Newsom, R. K.; Liu, X.; Sawamura, P.; Holben, B. N.; Hostetler, C. A.

    2016-12-01

    Observations of aerosol optical and microphysical properties are critical for developing and evaluating aerosol transport model parameterizations and assessing global aerosol-radiation impacts on climate. During the Combined HSRL And Raman lidar Measurement Study (CHARMS), we investigated the synergistic use of ground-based Raman lidar and High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) measurements to retrieve aerosol properties aloft. Continuous (24/7) operation of these co-located lidars during the ten-week CHARMS mission (mid-July through September 2015) allowed the acquisition of a unique, multiwavelength ground-based lidar dataset for studying aerosol properties above the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The ARM Raman lidar measured profiles of aerosol backscatter, extinction and depolarization at 355 nm as well as profiles of water vapor mixing ratio and temperature. The University of Wisconsin HSRL simultaneously measured profiles of aerosol backscatter, extinction and depolarization at 532 nm and aerosol backscatter at 1064 nm. Recent advances in both lidar retrieval theory and algorithm development demonstrate that vertically-resolved retrievals using such multiwavelength lidar measurements of aerosol backscatter and extinction can help constrain both the aerosol optical (e.g. complex refractive index, scattering, etc.) and microphysical properties (e.g. effective radius, concentrations) as well as provide qualitative aerosol classification. Based on this work, the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) HSRL group developed automated algorithms for classifying and retrieving aerosol optical and microphysical properties, demonstrated these retrievals using data from the unique NASA/LaRC airborne multiwavelength HSRL-2 system, and validated the results using coincident airborne in situ data. We apply these algorithms to the CHARMS multiwavelength (Raman+HSRL) lidar dataset to retrieve aerosol properties above the SGP site. We present some profiles of aerosol effective

  12. High Ice Water Content at Low Radar Reflectivity near Deep Convection. Part I ; Consistency of In Situ and Remote-Sensing Observations with Stratiform Rain Column Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridlind, A. M.; Ackerman, A. S.; Grandin, A.; Dezitter, F.; Weber, M.; Strapp, J. W.; Korolev, A. V.; Williams, C. R.

    2015-01-01

    Occurrences of jet engine power loss and damage have been associated with flight through fully glaciated deep convection at -10 to -50 degrees Centigrade. Power loss events commonly occur during flight through radar reflectivity (Zeta (sub e)) less than 20-30 decibels relative to Zeta (dBZ - radar returns) and no more than moderate turbulence, often overlying moderate to heavy rain near the surface. During 2010-2012, Airbus carried out flight tests seeking to characterize the highest ice water content (IWC) in such low-radar-reflectivity regions of large, cold-topped storm systems in the vicinity of Cayenne, Darwin, and Santiago. Within the highest IWC regions encountered, at typical sampling elevations (circa 11 kilometers), the measured ice size distributions exhibit a notably narrow concentration of mass over area-equivalent diameters of 100-500 micrometers. Given substantial and poorly quantified measurement uncertainties, here we evaluate the consistency of the Airbus in situ measurements with ground-based profiling radar observations obtained under quasi-steady, heavy stratiform rain conditions in one of the Airbus-sampled locations. We find that profiler-observed radar reflectivities and mean Doppler velocities at Airbus sampling temperatures are generally consistent with those calculated from in situ size-distribution measurements. We also find that column simulations using the in situ size distributions as an upper boundary condition are generally consistent with observed profiles of radar reflectivity (Ze), mean Doppler velocity (MDV), and retrieved rain rate. The results of these consistency checks motivate an examination of the microphysical pathways that could be responsible for the observed size-distribution features in Ackerman et al. (2015).

  13. Detecting and mitigating wind turbine clutter for airspace radar systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Qin

    2013-01-01

    It is well recognized that a wind turbine has a large radar cross-section (RCS) and, due to the movement of the blades, the wind turbine will generate a Doppler frequency shift. This scattering behavior may cause severe interferences on existing radar systems including static ground-based radars and spaceborne or airborne radars. To resolve this problem, efficient techniques or algorithms should be developed to mitigate the effects of wind farms on radars. Herein, one transponder-based mitigation technique is presented. The transponder is not a new concept, which has been proposed for calibrating high-resolution imaging radars. It modulates the radar signal in a manner that the retransmitted signals can be separated from the scene echoes. As wind farms often occupy only a small area, mitigation processing in the whole radar operation will be redundant and cost inefficient. Hence, this paper uses a transponder to determine whether the radar is impacted by the wind farms. If so, the effects of wind farms are then mitigated with subsequent Kalman filtering or plot target extraction algorithms. Taking airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and pulse Doppler radar as the examples, this paper provides the corresponding system configuration and processing algorithms. The effectiveness of the mitigation technique is validated by numerical simulation results.

  14. TOMS and Ground-based Measurements: Long-term Trends, Spatial Variability, Cloud Effects, and Data Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, H. A.; Dahlback, A.; Stamnes, K.; Høyskar, B.; Olsen, R.; Schmidlin, F.; Tsay, S.

    2003-12-01

    Ground-based measurements and TOMS measurements are mutually beneficial to each other. Ground-based measurements of UV radiation and total column ozone amounts are important for the validation of TOMS measurements. For example, it has been shown that TOMS measurements has a tendency to under-estimate ground UV exposure. Some of these effects can perhaps be ascribed to local cloud effects or choice of ozone profiles in the retrieval algorithm. More ground-based measurements are needed to establish the cause of these discrepancies. Recent technology advances have made ground-based measurements of UV doses and ozone column amounts with inexpensive multi-channel filter instruments not only possible, but also an attractive alternative to other more labor-intensive and weather dependent methods. Filter instruments can operate unattended for long periods of time, and it is possible to obtain accurate ozone column amounts even on cloudy days. We present results from extensive comparisons of the performance of several ground-based instruments (the NILU-UV and GUV filter instruments, as well as the Dobson and Brewer instruments) against the EP-TOMS instrument. The data used in the comparisons are from three different sites where we have had the opportunity to operate more than one type of UV instruments for extended periods of time. The sites include the University of Oslo, Norway, the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center facilities at Wallops Island, VA, and Greenbelt, MD and the University of Alaska, Fairbanks (during the TOMS3F campaign). Our results show that ozone column amounts obtained with current filter-type instruments are just as good as those obtained with the Dobson instrument, and might even out-perform the Dobson instrument on cloudy days. The TOMS measurements are shown to exhibit some more variability, but there is on average very good agreement with the ground- based measurements even for high solar zenith angles (SZA). Further more, our comparison shows that

  15. Augmenting WFIRST Microlensing with a Ground-Based Telescope Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Gould, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Augmenting the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) microlensing campaigns with intensive observations from a ground-based network of wide-field survey telescopes would have several major advantages. First, it would enable full two-dimensional (2-D) vector microlens parallax measurements for a substantial fraction of low-mass lenses as well as planetary and binary events that show caustic crossing features. For a significant fraction of the free-floating planet (FFP) events and all caustic-crossing planetary/binary events, these 2-D parallax measurements directly lead to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) of the lens object (or lens system). For even more events, the complementary ground-based observations will yield 1-D parallax measurements. Together with the 1-D parallaxes from WFIRST alone, they can probe the entire mass range M > M_Earth. For luminous lenses, such 1-D parallax measurements can be promoted to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) by high-resolution imaging. This would provide crucial information not only about the hosts of planets and other lenses, but also enable a much more precise Galactic model. Other benefits of such a survey include improved understanding of binaries (particularly with low mass primaries), and sensitivity to distant ice-giant and gas-giant companions of WFIRST lenses that cannot be detected by WFIRST itself due to its restricted observing windows. Existing ground-based microlensing surveys can be employed if WFIRST is pointed at lower-extinction fields than is currently envisaged. This would come at some cost to the event rate. Therefore the benefits of improved characterization of lenses must be weighed against these costs.

  16. Quantifying the effect of riming on snowfall using ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisseev, Dmitri; von Lerber, Annakaisa; Tiira, Jussi

    2017-04-01

    Ground-based observations of ice particle size distribution and ensemble mean density are used to quantify the effect of riming on snowfall. The rime mass fraction is derived from these measurements by following the approach that is used in a single ice-phase category microphysical scheme proposed for the use in numerical weather prediction models. One of the characteristics of the proposed scheme is that the prefactor of a power law relation that links mass and size of ice particles is determined by the rime mass fraction, while the exponent does not change. To derive the rime mass fraction, a mass-dimensional relation representative of unrimed snow is also determined. To check the validity of the proposed retrieval method, the derived rime mass fraction is converted to the effective liquid water path that is compared to microwave radiometer observations. Since dual-polarization radar observations are often used to detect riming, the impact of riming on dual-polarization radar variables is studied for differential reflectivity measurements. It is shown that the relation between rime mass fraction and differential reflectivity is ambiguous, other factors such as change in median volume diameter need also be considered. Given the current interest on sensitivity of precipitation to aerosol pollution, which could inhibit riming, the importance of riming for surface snow accumulation is investigated. It is found that riming is responsible for 5% to 40% of snowfall mass. The study is based on data collected at the University of Helsinki field station in Hyytiälä during U.S. Department of Energy Biogenic Aerosols Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC) field campaign and the winter 2014/2015. In total 22 winter storms were analyzed, and detailed analysis of two events is presented to illustrate the study.

  17. Anomalously-dense firn in an ice-shelf channel revealed by wide-angle radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Drews

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The thickness of ice shelves, a basic parameter for mass balance estimates, is typically inferred using hydrostatic equilibrium for which knowledge of the depth-averaged density is essential. The densification from snow to ice depends on a number of local factors (e.g. temperature and surface mass balance causing spatial and temporal variations in density–depth profiles. However, direct measurements of firn density are sparse, requiring substantial logistical effort. Here, we infer density from radio-wave propagation speed using ground-based wide-angle radar datasets (10 MHz collected at five sites on Roi Baudouin Ice Shelf (RBIS, Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica. Using a novel algorithm including traveltime inversion and raytracing with a prescribed shape of the depth–density relationship, we show that the depth to internal reflectors, the local ice thickness and depth-averaged densities can reliably be reconstructed. For the particular case of an ice-shelf channel, where ice thickness and surface slope change substantially over a few kilometers, the radar data suggests that firn inside the channel is about 5 % denser than outside the channel. Although this density difference is at the detection limit of the radar, it is consistent with a similar density anomaly reconstructed from optical televiewing, which reveals 10 % denser firn inside compared to outside the channel. The denser firn in the ice-shelf channel should be accounted for when using the hydrostatic ice thickness for determining basal melt rates. The radar method presented here is robust and can easily be adapted to different radar frequencies and data-acquisition geometries.

  18. The STACEE-32 Ground Based Gamma-ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hanna, D S; Boone, L M; Chantell, M C; Conner, Z; Covault, C E; Dragovan, M; Fortin, P; Gregorich, D T; Hinton, J A; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Oser, S; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Schütte, D R; Theoret, C G; Tümer, T O; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J A

    2002-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment detector in its initial configuration (STACEE-32). STACEE is a new ground-based gamma ray detector using the atmospheric Cherenkov technique. In STACEE, the heliostats of a solar energy research array are used to collect and focus the Cherenkov photons produced in gamma-ray induced air showers. The large Cherenkov photon collection area of STACEE results in a gamma-ray energy threshold below that of previous detectors.

  19. The STACEE Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gingrich, D M; Bramel, D; Carson, J; Covault, C E; Fortin, P; Hanna, D S; Hinton, J A; Jarvis, A; Kildea, J; Lindner, T; Müller, C; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Theoret, C G; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J A

    2005-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) in its complete configuration. STACEE uses the heliostats of a solar energy research facility to collect and focus the Cherenkov photons produced in gamma-ray induced air showers. The light is concentrated onto an array of photomultiplier tubes located near the top of a tower. The large Cherenkov photon collection area of STACEE results in a gamma-ray energy threshold below that of previous ground-based detectors. STACEE is being used to observe pulsars, supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei, and gamma-ray bursts.

  20. Research on target accuracy for ground-based lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ling; Shi, Ruoming

    2009-05-01

    In ground based Lidar system, the targets are used in the process of registration, georeferencing for point cloud, and also can be used as check points. Generally, the accuracy of capturing the flat target center is influenced by scanning range and scanning angle. In this research, the experiments are designed to extract accuracy index of the target center with 0-90°scan angles and 100-195 meter scan ranges using a Leica HDS3000 laser scanner. The data of the experiments are listed in detail and the related results are analyzed.

  1. Remote Sensing of Supercooled Cloud Layers in Cold Climate Using Ground Based Integrated Sensors System and Comparison with Pilot Reports and model forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudala, Faisal; Wu, Di; Gultepe, Ismail; Anderson, Martha; turcotte, marie-france

    2017-04-01

    In-flight aircraft icing is one of the major weather hazards to aviation . It occurs when an aircraft passes through a cloud layer containing supercooled drops (SD). The SD in contact with the airframe freezes on the surface which degrades the performance of the aircraft.. Prediction of in-flight icing requires accurate prediction of SD sizes, liquid water content (LWC), and temperature. The current numerical weather predicting (NWP) models are not capable of making accurate prediction of SD sizes and associated LWC. Aircraft icing environment is normally studied by flying research aircraft, which is quite expensive. Thus, developing a ground based remote sensing system for detection of supercooled liquid clouds and characterization of their impact on severity of aircraft icing one of the important tasks for improving the NWPs based predictions and validations. In this respect, Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) in cooperation with the Department of National Defense (DND) installed a number of specialized ground based remote sensing platforms and present weather sensors at Cold Lake, Alberta that includes a multi-channel microwave radiometer (MWR), K-band Micro Rain radar (MRR), Ceilometer, Parsivel distrometer and Vaisala PWD22 present weather sensor. In this study, a number of pilot reports confirming icing events and freezing precipitation that occurred at Cold Lake during the 2014-2016 winter periods and associated observation data for the same period are examined. The icing events are also examined using aircraft icing intensity estimated using ice accumulation model which is based on a cylindrical shape approximation of airfoil and the Canadian High Resolution Regional Deterministic Prediction System (HRDPS) model predicted LWC, median volume diameter and temperature. The results related to vertical atmospheric profiling conditions, surface observations, and the Canadian High Resolution Regional Deterministic Prediction System (HRDPS) model

  2. Profiling Radar Observations and Numerical Simulations of a Downslope Wind Storm and Rotor on the Lee of the Medicine Bow Mountains in Wyoming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binod Pokharel

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study describes a downslope wind storm event observed over the Medicine Bow range (Wyoming, USA on 11 January 2013. The University of Wyoming King Air (UWKA made four along-wind passes over a five-hour period over the mountain of interest. These passes were recognized as among the most turbulent ones encountered in many years by crew members. The MacCready turbulence meter aboard the UWKA measured moderate to severe turbulence conditions on each pass in the lee of the mountain range, with eddy dissipation rate values over 0.5 m2/3 s−1. Three rawinsondes were released from an upstream location at different times. This event is simulated using the non-hydrostatic Weather Research and Forecast (WRF model at an inner- domain resolution of 1 km. The model produces a downslope wind storm, notwithstanding some discrepancies between model and rawinsonde data in terms of upstream atmospheric conditions. Airborne Wyoming Cloud Radar (WCR vertical-plane Doppler velocity data from two beams, one pointing to the nadir and one pointing slant forward, are synthesized to obtain a two-dimensional velocity field in the vertical plane below flight level. This synthesis reveals the fine-scale details of an orographic wave breaking event, including strong, persistent downslope acceleration, a strong leeside updraft (up to 10 m·s−1 flanked by counter-rotating vortices, and deep turbulence, extending well above flight level. The analysis of WCR-derived cross-mountain flow in 19 winter storms over the same mountain reveals that cross-mountain flow acceleration and downslope wind formation are difficult to predict from upstream wind and stability profiles.

  3. Mesospheric CO above Troll station, Antarctica observed by a ground based microwave radiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Straub

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents mesospheric carbon monoxide (CO data acquired by the ground-based microwave radiometer of the British Antarctic Survey (BAS radiometer stationed at Troll station in Antarctica (72° S, 2.5° E, 1270 a.m.s.l.. The data set covers the period from February 2008 to January 2010, however, due to very low CO concentrations below approximately 80 km altitude in summer, profiles can only be retrieved during Antarctic winter. CO is measured for approximately 2 h each day and profiles are retrieved approximately every half hour. The retrieved profiles, covering the pressure range from 1 to 0.01 hPa (approximately 48 to 80 km, are compared to measurements from Aura/MLS and SD-WACCM. This intercomparison reveals a low bias of 0.5 to 1 ppmv at 0.1 hPa (approximately 64 km and 2.5 to 3.5 ppmv at 0.01 hPa (approximately 80 km of the BAS microwave radiometer compared to both reference datasets. One explanation for this low bias could be the known high bias of MLS which is in the same order of magnitude. The ground based radiometer shows high and significant correlation (coefficients higher than 0.9/0.65 compared to MLS/SD-WACCM at all altitudes compared with both reference datasets. doi:10.5285/DE3E2092-406D-47A9-9205-3971A8DFB4A9

  4. Mesospheric CO above Troll station, Antarctica observed by a ground based microwave radiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Straub

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents mesospheric carbon monoxide (CO data acquired by the ground-based microwave radiometer of the British Antarctic Survey (BAS radiometer stationed at Troll station in Antarctica (72° S, 2.5° E, 1270 m a.s.l.. The dataset covers the period from February 2008 to January 2010, however, due to very low CO concentrations below approximately 80 km altitude in summer, profiles are only presented during the Antarctic winter. CO is measured for approximately 2 h each day and profiles are retrieved approximately every half hour. The retrieved profiles, covering the pressure range from 1 to 0.01 hPa (approximately 48 to 80 km, are compared to measurements from Microwave Limb Sounder on the Aura satellite (Aura/MLS and Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model with Specified Dynamics (SD-WACCM. This intercomparison reveals a low bias of 0.5 to 1 ppmv at 0.1 hPa (approximately 64 km and 2.5 to 3.5 ppmv at 0.01 hPa (approximately 80 km of the BAS microwave radiometer compared to both reference datasets. One explanation for this low bias could be the known high bias of MLS which is on the same order of magnitude. The ground based radiometer shows high and significant correlation (coefficients higher than 0.9/0.7 compared to MLS/SD-WACCM at all altitudes compared with both reference datasets. The dataset can be accessed under http://dx.doi.org/10/mhq.

  5. Ground-Based Global Positioning System (GPS) Meteorology Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor (IPW)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ground-Based Global Positioning System (GPS) Meteorology Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor (IPW) data set measures atmospheric water vapor using ground-based...

  6. a Universal De-Noising Algorithm for Ground-Based LIDAR Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; Xiang, Chengzhi; Gong, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Ground-based lidar, working as an effective remote sensing tool, plays an irreplaceable role in the study of atmosphere, since it has the ability to provide the atmospheric vertical profile. However, the appearance of noise in a lidar signal is unavoidable, which leads to difficulties and complexities when searching for more information. Every de-noising method has its own characteristic but with a certain limitation, since the lidar signal will vary with the atmosphere changes. In this paper, a universal de-noising algorithm is proposed to enhance the SNR of a ground-based lidar signal, which is based on signal segmentation and reconstruction. The signal segmentation serving as the keystone of the algorithm, segments the lidar signal into three different parts, which are processed by different de-noising method according to their own characteristics. The signal reconstruction is a relatively simple procedure that is to splice the signal sections end to end. Finally, a series of simulation signal tests and real dual field-of-view lidar signal shows the feasibility of the universal de-noising algorithm.

  7. Project ORION: Orbital Debris Removal Using Ground-Based Sensors and Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    About 100,000 pieces of 1 to 10-cm debris in low-Earth orbit are too small to track reliably but large enough to cripple or destroy spacecraft. The ORION team studied the feasibility of removing the debris with ground-based laser impulses. Photoablation experiments were surveyed and applied to likely debris materials. Laser intensities needed for debris orbit modification call for pulses on the order of lOkJ or continuous wave lasers on the order of 1 MW. Adaptive optics are necessary to correct for atmospheric turbulence. Wavelength and pulse duration windows were found that limit beam degradation due to nonlinear atmospheric processes. Debris can be detected and located to within about 10 microrads with existing radar and passive optical technology. Fine targeting would be accomplished with laser illumination, which might also be used for detection. Bistatic detection with communications satellites may also be possible. We recommend that existing technology be used to demonstrate the concept at a loss of about $20 million. We calculate that an installation to clear altitudes up to 800 km of 1 to 10-cm debris over 2 years of operation would cost about $80 million. Clearing altitudes up to 1,500 km would take about 3 years and cost about $160 million.

  8. Ground-based remote sensing scheme for monitoring aerosol–cloud interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sarna

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A method for continuous observation of aerosol–cloud interactions with ground-based remote sensing instruments is presented. The main goal of this method is to enable the monitoring of cloud microphysical changes due to the changing aerosol concentration. We use high resolution measurements from lidar, radar and radiometer which allow to collect and compare data continuously. This method is based on a standardised data format from Cloudnet and can be implemented at any observatory where the Cloudnet data set is available. Two example study cases were chosen from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Program deployment at Graciosa Island, Azores, Portugal in 2009 to present the method. We show the Pearson Product–Moment Correlation Coefficient, r, and the Coefficient of Determination, r2 for data divided into bins of LWP, each of 10 g m−2. We explain why the commonly used way of quantity aerosol cloud interactions by use of an ACI index (ACIr,τ = dln re,τ/dlnα is not the best way of quantifying aerosol–cloud interactions.

  9. Evidence of rock slope breathing using ground-based InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouyet, Line; Kristensen, Lene; Derron, Marc-Henri; Michoud, Clément; Blikra, Lars Harald; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Lauknes, Tom Rune

    2017-07-01

    Ground-Based Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (GB-InSAR) campaigns were performed in summer 2011 and 2012 in the Romsdalen valley (Møre & Romsdal county, western Norway) in order to assess displacements on Mannen/Børa rock slope. Located 1 km northwest, a second GB-InSAR system continuously monitors the large Mannen rockslide. The availability of two GB-InSAR positions creates a wide coverage of the rock slope, including a slight dataset overlap valuable for validation. A phenomenon of rock slope breathing is detected in a remote and hard-to-access area in mid-slope. Millimetric upward displacements are recorded in August 2011. Analysis of 2012 GB-InSAR campaign, combined with the large dataset from the continuous station, shows that the slope is affected by inflation/deflation phenomenon between 5 and 10 mm along the line-of-sight. The pattern is not homogenous in time and inversions of movement have a seasonal recurrence. These seasonal changes are confirmed by satellite InSAR observations and can possibly be caused by hydrogeological variations. In addition, combination of GB-InSAR results, in situ measurements and satellite InSAR analyses contributes to a better overview of movement distribution over the whole area.

  10. Weather Radar Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — These data represent Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) weather radar stations within the US. The NEXRAD radar stations are...

  11. Radiation in fog: quantification of the impact on fog liquid water based on ground-based remote sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Wærsted

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Radiative cooling and heating impact the liquid water balance of fog and therefore play an important role in determining their persistence or dissipation. We demonstrate that a quantitative analysis of the radiation-driven condensation and evaporation is possible in real time using ground-based remote sensing observations (cloud radar, ceilometer, microwave radiometer. Seven continental fog events in midlatitude winter are studied, and the radiative processes are further explored through sensitivity studies. The longwave (LW radiative cooling of the fog is able to produce 40–70 g m−2 h−1 of liquid water by condensation when the fog liquid water path exceeds 30 g m−2 and there are no clouds above the fog, which corresponds to renewing the fog water in 0.5–2 h. The variability is related to fog temperature and atmospheric humidity, with warmer fog below a drier atmosphere producing more liquid water. The appearance of a cloud layer above the fog strongly reduces the LW cooling relative to a situation with no cloud above; the effect is strongest for a low cloud, when the reduction can reach 100 %. Consequently, the appearance of clouds above will perturb the liquid water balance in the fog and may therefore induce fog dissipation. Shortwave (SW radiative heating by absorption by fog droplets is smaller than the LW cooling, but it can contribute significantly, inducing 10–15 g m−2 h−1 of evaporation in thick fog at (winter midday. The absorption of SW radiation by unactivated aerosols inside the fog is likely less than 30 % of the SW absorption by the water droplets, in most cases. However, the aerosols may contribute more significantly if the air mass contains a high concentration of absorbing aerosols. The absorbed radiation at the surface can reach 40–120 W m−2 during the daytime depending on the fog thickness. As in situ measurements indicate that 20–40 % of this energy is transferred to the fog

  12. To See the Unseen: A History of Planetary Radar Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butrica, Andrew J.

    1996-01-01

    This book relates the history of planetary radar astronomy from its origins in radar to the present day and secondarily to bring to light that history as a case of 'Big Equipment but not Big Science'. Chapter One sketches the emergence of radar astronomy as an ongoing scientific activity at Jodrell Bank, where radar research revealed that meteors were part of the solar system. The chief Big Science driving early radar astronomy experiments was ionospheric research. Chapter Two links the Cold War and the Space Race to the first radar experiments attempted on planetary targets, while recounting the initial achievements of planetary radar, namely, the refinement of the astronomical unit and the rotational rate and direction of Venus. Chapter Three discusses early attempts to organize radar astronomy and the efforts at MIT's Lincoln Laboratory, in conjunction with Harvard radio astronomers, to acquire antenna time unfettered by military priorities. Here, the chief Big Science influencing the development of planetary radar astronomy was radio astronomy. Chapter Four spotlights the evolution of planetary radar astronomy at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a NASA facility, at Cornell University's Arecibo Observatory, and at Jodrell Bank. A congeries of funding from the military, the National Science Foundation, and finally NASA marked that evolution, which culminated in planetary radar astronomy finding a single Big Science patron, NASA. Chapter Five analyzes planetary radar astronomy as a science using the theoretical framework provided by philosopher of science Thomas Kuhn. Chapter Six explores the shift in planetary radar astronomy beginning in the 1970s that resulted from its financial and institutional relationship with NASA Big Science. Chapter Seven addresses the Magellan mission and its relation to the evolution of planetary radar astronomy from a ground-based to a space-based activity. Chapters Eight and Nine discuss the research carried out at ground-based

  13. Coordinated ground-based, low altitude satellite and Cluster observations on global and local scales during a transient post-noon sector excursion of the magnetospheric cusp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Opgenoorth

    Full Text Available On 14 January 2001, the four Cluster spacecraft passed through the northern magnetospheric mantle in close conjunction to the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR and approached the post-noon dayside magnetopause over Green-land between 13:00 and 14:00 UT. During that interval, a sudden reorganisation of the high-latitude dayside convection pattern occurred after 13:20 UT, most likely caused by a direction change of the Solar wind magnetic field. The result was an eastward and poleward directed flow-channel, as monitored by the SuperDARN radar network and also by arrays of ground-based magnetometers in Canada, Greenland and Scandinavia. After an initial eastward and later poleward expansion of the flow-channel between 13:20 and 13:40 UT, the four Cluster spacecraft, and the field line footprints covered by the eastward looking scan cycle of the Söndre Strömfjord incoherent scatter radar were engulfed by cusp-like precipitation with transient magnetic and electric field signatures. In addition, the EISCAT Svalbard Radar detected strong transient effects of the convection reorganisation, a poleward moving precipitation, and a fast ion flow-channel in association with the auroral structures that suddenly formed to the west and north of the radar. From a detailed analysis of the coordinated Cluster and ground-based data, it was found that this extraordinary transient convection pattern, indeed, had moved the cusp precipitation from its former pre-noon position into the late post-noon sector, allowing for the first and quite unexpected encounter of the cusp by the Cluster spacecraft. Our findings illustrate the large amplitude of cusp dynamics even in response to moderate solar wind forcing. The global ground-based data proves to be an invaluable tool to monitor the dynamics and width of the affected magnetospheric regions.

    Key words. Magnetospheric cusp, ionosphere, reconnection, convection flow-channel, Cluster, ground-based observations

  14. Optical turbulence forecast: toward a new era of ground-based astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Masciadri, E

    2009-01-01

    The simulation of the optical turbulence (OT) for astronomical applications obtained with non-hydrostatic atmospherical models at meso-scale presents, with respect to measurements, some advantages. The future of the ground-based astronomy relies upon the potentialities and feasibility of the ELTs. Our ability in knowing, controlling and 'managing' the effects of the turbulence on such a new generation telescopes and facilities are determinant to assure their competitiveness with respect to the space astronomy. In the past several studies have been carried out proving the feasibility of the simulation of realistic Cn2 profiles above astronomical sites. The European Community (FP6 Program) decided recently to fund a Project aiming, from one side, to prove the feasibility of the OT forecasts and the ability of meso-scale models in discriminating astronomical sites from optical turbulence point of view and, from the other side, to boost the development of this discipline at the borderline between the astrophysics...

  15. Ground-based testing of the dynamics of flexible space structures using band mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L. F.; Chew, Meng-Sang

    1991-01-01

    A suspension system based on a band mechanism is studied to provide the free-free conditions for ground based validation testing of flexible space structures. The band mechanism consists of a noncircular disk with a convex profile, preloaded by torsional springs at its center of rotation so that static equilibrium of the test structure is maintained at any vertical location; the gravitational force will be directly counteracted during dynamic testing of the space structure. This noncircular disk within the suspension system can be configured to remain unchanged for test articles with the different weights as long as the torsional spring is replaced to maintain the originally designed frequency ratio of W/k sub s. Simulations of test articles which are modeled as lumped parameter as well as continuous parameter systems, are also presented.

  16. The STACEE Ground-Based Gamma-ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragan, Ken

    2002-04-01

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a ground-based instrument designed to study astrophysical sources of gamma rays in the energy range from 50 to 500 GeV using an array of heliostat mirrors at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in New Mexico. The mirrors collect Cherenkov light generated by gamma-ray air showers and concentrate it onto cameras composed of photomultiplier tubes. The STACEE instrument is now complete, and uses a total of 64 heliostats. Prototype instruments, using smaller numbers of heliostats, have previously detected gamma emission from both the Crab Nebula and the Active Galactic Nucleus Mrk421. The complete instrument has a lower threshold -- approximately 50 GeV -- than those prototypes due to superior triggering and electronics, including flash ADCs for every channel.We will discuss the performance of the complete instrument in its first full season of operation, and present preliminary results of selected observations.

  17. Atmospheric contamination for CMB ground-based observations

    CERN Document Server

    Errard, J; Akiba, Y; Arnold, K; Atlas, M; Baccigalupi, C; Barron, D; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Cukierman, A; Delabrouille, J; Dobbs, M; Ducout, A; Elleflot, T; Fabbian, G; Feng, C; Feeney, S; Gilbert, A; Goeckner-Wald, N; Halverson, N W; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Hill, C; Holzapfel, W L; Hori, Y; Inoue, Y; Jaehnig, G C; Jaffe, A H; Jeong, O; Katayama, N; Kaufman, J; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T; Jeune, M Le; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Leon, D; Linder, E; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Miller, N J; Myers, M J; Navaroli, M; Nishino, H; Okamura, T; Paar, H; Peloton, J; Poletti, D; Puglisi, G; Rebeiz, G; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Rotermund, K M; Schenck, D E; Sherwin, B D; Siritanasak, P; Smecher, G; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Tajima, O; Takakura, S; Tikhomirov, A; Tomaru, T; Whitehorn, N; Wilson, B; Yadav, A; Zahn, O

    2015-01-01

    Atmosphere is one of the most important noise sources for ground-based Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments. By increasing optical loading on the detectors, it amplifies their effective noise, while its fluctuations introduce spatial and temporal correlations between detected signals. We present a physically motivated 3d-model of the atmosphere total intensity emission in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. We derive an analytical estimate for the correlation between detectors time-ordered data as a function of the instrument and survey design, as well as several atmospheric parameters such as wind, relative humidity, temperature and turbulence characteristics. Using numerical computation, we examine the effect of each physical parameter on the correlations in the time series of a given experiment. We then use a parametric-likelihood approach to validate the modeling and estimate atmosphere parameters from the POLARBEAR-I project first season data set. We compare our results to previous st...

  18. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel E; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfectly all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean and, as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources' right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO's observations and electromagnetic follow-up. Beyond galactic foregrounds associated with seasonal variations, we find that equatorial observatories can access over $80\\%$ of the localization probability, while mid-latitudes will access closer to $70\\%$. Facilities located near the two LIGO sites can obser...

  19. Progress in the ULTRA 1-m ground-based telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Robert C.; Martin, Robert N.; Twarog, Bruce; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara; Taghavi, Ray; Hale, Rick; Etzel, Paul; Fesen, Rob; Shawl, Steve

    2006-06-01

    We present the technical status of the Ultra Lightweight Telescope for Research in Astronomy (ULTRA) program. The program is a 3-year Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) program funded by NSF. The MRI is a collaborative effort involving Composite Mirror Applications, Inc. (CMA), University of Kansas, San Diego State University and Dartmouth College. Objectives are to demonstrate the feasibility of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite mirror technology for ground-based optical telescopes. CMA is spearheading the development of surface replication techniques to produce the optics, fabricating the 1m glass mandrel, and constructing the optical tube assembly (OTA). Presented will be an overview and status of the 1-m mandrel fabrication, optics development, telescope design and CFRP telescope fabrication by CMA for the ULTRA Telescope.

  20. Identification of rainy periods from ground based microwave radiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada Vittoria Bosisio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors present the results of a study aiming at detecting rainy data in measurements collected by a dual band ground-based radiometer. The proposed criterion is based on the ratio of the brightness temperatures observed in the 20-30 GHz band without need of any ancillary information. A major result obtained from the probability density of the ratio computed over one month of data is the identification of threshold values between clear sky, cloudy sky and rainy sky, respectively. A linear fit performed by using radiometric data and concurrent rain gauge measurements shows a correlation coefficient equal to 0.56 between the temperature ratio and the observed precipitation.

  1. Optical vortex coronagraphs on ground-based telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, Charles

    2007-01-01

    The optical vortex coronagraph is potentially a remarkably effective device, at least for an ideal unobstructed telescope. Most ground-based telescopes however suffer from central obscuration and also have to operate through the aberrations of the turbulent atmosphere. This note analyzes the performance of the optical vortex in these circumstances and compares to some other designs, showing that it performs similarly in this situation. There is a large class of coronagraphs of this general type, and choosing between them in particular applications depends on details of performance at small off-axis distances and uniformity of response in the focal plane. Issues of manufacturability to the necessary tolerances are also likely to be important.

  2. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfectly all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean and, as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources' right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO's observations and electromagnetic follow-up. These effects can inform electromagnetic follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  3. Unique cell culture systems for ground based research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Marian L.

    1990-01-01

    The horizontally rotating fluid-filled, membrane oxygenated bioreactors developed at NASA Johnson for spacecraft applications provide a powerful tool for ground-based research. Three-dimensional aggregates formed by cells cultured on microcarrier beads are useful for study of cell-cell interactions and tissue development. By comparing electron micrographs of plant seedlings germinated during Shuttle flight 61-C and in an earth-based rotating bioreactor it is shown that some effects of microgravity are mimicked. Bioreactors used in the UAH Bioreactor Laboratory will make it possible to determine some of the effects of altered gravity at the cellular level. Bioreactors can be valuable for performing critical, preliminary-to-spaceflight experiments as well as medical investigations such as in vitro tumor cell growth and chemotherapeutic drug response; the enrichment of stem cells from bone marrow; and the effect of altered gravity on bone and muscle cell growth and function and immune response depression.

  4. Spatial-angular modeling of ground-based biaxial lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agishev, Ravil R.

    1997-10-01

    Results of spatial-angular LIDAR modeling based on an efficiency criterion introduced are represented. Their analysis shows that a low spatial-angular efficiency of traditional VIS and NIR systems is a main cause of a low S/BR ratio at the photodetector input. It determines the considerable measurements errors and the following low accuracy of atmospheric optical parameters retrieval. As we have shown, the most effective protection against intensive sky background radiation for ground-based biaxial LIDAR's consist in forming of their angular field according to spatial-angular efficiency criterion G. Some effective approaches to high G-parameter value achievement to achieve the receiving system optimization are discussed.

  5. Bistatic radar

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, Nick

    2004-01-01

    Annotation his book is a major extension of a chapter on bistatic radar written by the author for the Radar Handbook, 2nd edition, edited by Merrill Skolnik. It provides a history of bistatic systems that points out to potential designers the applications that have worked and the dead-ends not worth pursuing. The text reviews the basic concepts and definitions, and explains the mathematical development of relationships, such as geometry, Ovals of Cassini, dynamic range, isorange and isodoppler contours, target doppler, and clutter doppler spread.Key Features * All development and analysis are

  6. A comparison of ground-based hydroxyl airglow temperatures with SABER/TIMED measurements over 23° N, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, Navin; Singh, Dupinder; Gurubaran, Subramanian

    2017-03-01

    Ground-based observations of OH (6, 2) Meinel band nightglow were carried out at Ranchi (23.3° N, 85.3° E), India, during January-March 2011, December 2011-May 2012 and December 2012-March 2013 using an all-sky imaging system. Near the mesopause, OH temperatures were derived from the OH (6, 2) Meinel band intensity information. A limited comparison of OH temperatures (TOH) with SABER/TIMED measurements in 30 cases was performed by defining almost coincident criterion of ±1.5° latitude-longitude and ±3 min of the ground-based observations. Using SABER OH 1.6 and 2.0 µm volume emission rate profiles as the weighing function, two sets of OH-equivalent temperature (T1. 6 and T2. 0 respectively) were estimated from its kinetic temperature profile for comparison with OH nightglow measurements. Overall, fair agreement existed between ground-based and SABER measurements in the majority of events within the limits of experimental errors. Overall, the mean value of OH-derived temperatures and SABER OH-equivalent temperatures were 197.3 ± 4.6, 192.0 ± 10.8 and 192.7 ± 10.3 K, and the ground-based temperatures were 4-5 K warmer than SABER values. A difference of 8 K or more is noted between two measurements when the peak of the OH emission layer lies in the vicinity of large temperature inversions. A comparison of OH temperatures derived using different sets of Einstein transition probabilities and SABER measurements was also performed; however, OH temperatures derived using Langhoff et al. (1986) transition probabilities were found to compare well.

  7. The internal structure of the Brunt Ice Shelf, Antarctica from ice-penetrating radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Edward; De Rydt, Jan; Gudmundsson, Hilmar

    2016-04-01

    The Brunt Ice Shelf is a small feature on the Coats Land Coast of the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. It is unusual among Antarctic ice shelves because the ice crossing the grounding line from the ice sheet retains no structural integrity, so the ice shelf comprises icebergs of continental ice cemented together by sea ice, with the whole blanketed by in-situ snowfall. The size and distribution of the icebergs is governed by the thickness profile along the grounding line. Where bedrock troughs discharge thick ice to the ice shelf, the icebergs are large and remain close together with little intervening sea ice. Where bedrock ridges mean the ice crossing the grounding line is thin, the icebergs are small and widely-scattered with large areas of sea ice between them. To better understand the internal structure of the Brunt Ice Shelf and how this might affect the flow dynamics we conducted ice-penetrating radar surveys during December 2015 and January 2016. Three different ground-based radar systems were used, operating at centre frequencies of 400, 50 and 10 MHz respectively. The 400 MHz system gave detailed firn structure and accumulation profiles as well as time-lapse profiles of the active propagation of a crevasse. The 50 MHz system provided intermediate-level detail of iceberg distribution and thickness as well as information on the degree of salt water infiltration into the accumulating snow pack. The 10 MHz system used a high-power transmitter in an attempt to measure ice thickness beneath salt-impregnated ice. In this poster we will present example data from each of the three radar systems which will demonstrate the variability of the internal structure of the ice shelf. We will also present preliminary correlations between the internal structure and the surface topography from satellite data.

  8. Sentinel-1 and ground-based sensors for a continuous monitoring of the Corvara landslide kinematic (South Tirol, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlögel, Romy; Darvishi, Mehdi; Cuozzo, Giovanni; Kofler, Christian; Rutzinger, Martin; Zieher, Thomas; Toschi, Isabella; Remondino, Fabio

    2017-04-01

    Sentinel-1 mission allows us to have Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) acquisitions over large areas every 6 days with spatial resolution of 20 m. This new open-source generation of satellites has enhanced the capabilities for continuously studying earth surface changes. Over the past two decades, several studies have demonstrated the potential of Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) for detecting and quantifying land surface deformation. DInSAR limitations and challenges are linked to the SAR properties and the field conditions (especially in Alpine environments) leading to spatial and temporal decorrelation of the SAR signal. High temporal decorrelation can be caused by changes in vegetation (particularly in non-urban areas), atmospheric conditions or high ground surface velocity. In this study, kinematics of the complex and vegetated Corvara landslide, situated in Val Badia (South Tirol, Italy), are monitored by a network of 3 permanent and 13 monthly Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) stations. The slope displacement rates are found to be highly unsteady and reach several meters a year. This analysis focuses on evaluating the limitations of Sentinel-1 imagery processed with Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) technique in comparison to ground-based measurements for assessing the landslide kinematic linked to meteorological conditions. Selecting some particular acquisitions, coherence thresholds and unwrapping processes gives various results in terms of reliability and accuracy supporting the understanding of the landslide velocity field. The evolution of the coherence and phase signals are studied according to the changing field conditions and the monitored ground-based displacements. DInSAR deformation maps and residual topographic heights are finally compared with difference of high resolution Digital Elevation Models at local scale. This research is conducted within the project LEMONADE (http://lemonade.mountainresearch.at) funded

  9. The interdependence of continental warm cloud properties derived from unexploited solar background signal in ground-based lidar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Chiu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We have extensively analysed the interdependence between cloud optical depth, droplet effective radius, liquid water path (LWP and geometric thickness for stratiform warm clouds using ground-based observations. In particular, this analysis uses cloud optical depths retrieved from untapped solar background signal that is previously unwanted and needs to be removed in most lidar applications. Combining these new optical depth retrievals with radar and microwave observations at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Climate Research Facility in Oklahoma during 2005–2007, we have found that LWP and geometric thickness increase and follow a power-law relationship with cloud optical depth regardless of the presence of drizzle; LWP and geometric thickness in drizzling clouds can be generally 20–40% and at least 10% higher than those in non-drizzling clouds, respectively. In contrast, droplet effective radius shows a negative correlation with optical depth in drizzling clouds, while it increases with optical depth and reaches an asymptote of 10 μm in non-drizzling clouds. This asymptotic behaviour in non-drizzling clouds is found in both droplet effective radius and optical depth, making it possible to use simple thresholds of optical depth, droplet size, or a combination of these two variables for drizzle delineation. This paper demonstrates a new way to enhance ground-based cloud observations and drizzle delineations using existing lidar networks.

  10. Radar detection

    CERN Document Server

    DiFranco, Julius

    2004-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive tutorial exposition of radar detection using the methods and techniques of mathematical statistics. The material presented is as current and useful to today's engineers as when the book was first published by Prentice-Hall in 1968 and then republished by Artech House in 1980. The book is divided into six parts.

  11. Ozone vertical distribution retrieval from ground-based high resolution infrared solar spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pougatchev, N. S.; Connor, B. J.; Rinsland, C. P.

    1995-01-01

    A practical procedure for the retrieval of ozone vertical profiles from ground-based high resolution Fourier transform infrared solar spectra has been developed. The analysis is based on a multilayer line-by-line forward model and a semi-empirical version of the optimal estimation inversion method of Rodgers. The 1002.6-1003.2 cm(exp -1) spectral interval has been selected for the analysis on the basis of synthetic spectrum calculations. This interval contains numerous ozone lines covering a range of intensities and providing retrieval sensitivity from ground level to about 35 km. Characterization of the method and an error analysis have been performed. For a spectral resolution of 0.05-0.01 cm(exp -1) and a signal-to-noise ratio greater than or equal to 100 the retrieval is stable with a vertical resolution of approximately 5 km attainable near the surface degrading to approximately 10 km in the stratosphere. Synthetic spectra studies show that the a priori profile and weak constraints selected for the retrievals introduce no significant biases for a wide range of ozone profiles.

  12. Assessment of the quality of OSIRIS mesospheric temperatures using satellite and ground-based measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. E. Sheese

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imaging System (OSIRIS on the Odin satellite is currently in its 12th year of observing the Earth's limb. For the first time, continuous temperature profiles extending from the stratopause to the upper mesosphere have been derived from OSIRIS measurements of Rayleigh-scattered sunlight. Through most of the mesosphere, OSIRIS temperatures are in good agreement with coincident temperature profiles derived from other satellite and ground-based measurements. In the altitude region of 55–80 km, OSIRIS temperatures are typically within 4–5 K of those from the SABER, ACE-FTS, and SOFIE instruments on the TIMED, SciSat-I, and AIM satellites, respectively. The mean differences between individual OSIRIS profiles and those of the other satellite instruments are typically within the combined uncertainties and previously reported biases. OSIRIS temperatures are typically within 2 K of those from the University of Western Ontario's Purple Crow Lidar in the altitude region of 52–79 km, where the mean differences are within combined uncertainties. Near 84 km, OSIRIS temperatures exhibit a cold bias of 10–15 K, which is due to a cold bias in OSIRIS O2 A-band temperatures at 85 km, the upper boundary of the Rayleigh-scatter derived temperatures; and near 48 km OSIRIS temperatures exhibit a cold bias of 5–15 K, which is likely due to multiple-scatter effects that are not taken into account in the retrieval.

  13. Reconciling Ground-Based and Space-Based Estimates of the Frequency of Occurrence and Radiative Effect of Clouds around Darwin, Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Protat, Alain; Young, Stuart; McFarlane, Sally A.; L' Ecuyer, Tristan; Mace, Gerald G.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Long, Charles N.; Berry, Elizabeth; Delanoe, Julien

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate whether estimates of the cloud frequency of occurrence and associated cloud radiative forcing as derived from ground-based and satellite active remote sensing and radiative transfer calculations can be reconciled over a well instrumented active remote sensing site located in Darwin, Australia, despite the very different viewing geometry and instrument characteristics. It is found that the ground-based radar-lidar combination at Darwin does not detect most of the cirrus clouds above 10 km (due to limited lidar detection capability and signal obscuration by low-level clouds) and that the CloudSat radar - Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) combination underreports the hydrometeor frequency of occurrence below 2 km height, due to instrument limitations at these heights. The radiative impact associated with these differences in cloud frequency of occurrence is large on the surface downwelling shortwave fluxes (ground and satellite) and the top-of atmosphere upwelling shortwave and longwave fluxes (ground). Good agreement is found for other radiative fluxes. Large differences in radiative heating rate as derived from ground and satellite radar-lidar instruments and RT calculations are also found above 10 km (up to 0.35 Kday-1 for the shortwave and 0.8 Kday-1 for the longwave). Given that the ground-based and satellite estimates of cloud frequency of occurrence and radiative impact cannot be fully reconciled over Darwin, caution should be exercised when evaluating the representation of clouds and cloud-radiation interactions in large-scale models and limitations of each set of instrumentation should be considered when interpreting model-observations differences.

  14. RTTOV-gb - adapting the fast radiative transfer model RTTOV for the assimilation of ground-based microwave radiometer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Francesco; Cimini, Domenico; Hocking, James; Martinet, Pauline; Kneifel, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWRs) offer a new capability to provide continuous observations of the atmospheric thermodynamic state in the planetary boundary layer. Thus, they are potential candidates to supplement radiosonde network and satellite data to improve numerical weather prediction (NWP) models through a variational assimilation of their data. However in order to assimilate MWR observations, a fast radiative transfer model is required and such a model is not currently available. This is necessary for going from the model state vector space to the observation space at every observation point. The fast radiative transfer model RTTOV is well accepted in the NWP community, though it was developed to simulate satellite observations only. In this work, the RTTOV code has been modified to allow for simulations of ground-based upward-looking microwave sensors. In addition, the tangent linear, adjoint, and K-modules of RTTOV have been adapted to provide Jacobians (i.e., the sensitivity of observations to the atmospheric thermodynamical state) for ground-based geometry. These modules are necessary for the fast minimization of the cost function in a variational assimilation scheme. The proposed ground-based version of RTTOV, called RTTOV-gb, has been validated against accurate and less time-efficient line-by-line radiative transfer models. In the frequency range commonly used for temperature and humidity profiling (22-60 GHz), root-mean-square brightness temperature differences are smaller than typical MWR uncertainties (˜ 0.5 K) at all channels used in this analysis. Brightness temperatures (TBs) computed with RTTOV-gb from radiosonde profiles have been compared with nearly simultaneous and co-located ground-based MWR observations. Differences between simulated and measured TBs are below 0.5 K for all channels except for the water vapor band, where most of the uncertainty comes from instrumental errors. The Jacobians calculated with the K-module of RTTOV

  15. Cloud effective particle size and water content profile retrievals using combined lidar and radar observations: 2. Comparison with IR radiometer and in situ measurements of ice clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, D. P.; van Lammeren, A. C. A. P.; Hogan, R. J.; Russchenberg, H. W. J.; Apituley, A.; Francis, P.; Testud, J.; Pelon, J.; Quante, M.; Goddard, J.

    2001-11-01

    A new combined iidar/radar inversion procedure has been developed for cloud effective radius and water content retrievals. The algorithm treats the lidar extinction, derived effective particle size, and multiple-scattering effects together in a consistent fashion. This procedure has been applied to data taken during the Netherlands Cloud and Radiation (CLARA) campaign and the Cloud Lidar and Radar Experiment (CLARE'98) multisensor cloud measurement campaign. The results of the algorithm compare well with simultaneous IR radiometer cloud measurements as well as with measurements made by using aircraft-mounted two-dimensional probe particle-sizing instruments.

  16. Emulation of Forward-looking Radar Technology for Threat Detection in Rough Terrain Environments: A Scattering and Imaging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    ground -based, ultra-wideband (UWB) radars with the capability to simultaneously penetrate the ground , and image concealed landmines and improvised...electromagnetic, ground - penetrating radar , rough terrain, target detection, time-reversal imaging 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION...developed at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL)—is the low-frequency, UWB synchronous impulse reconstruction (SIRE), imaging ground - penetrating radar

  17. Independet Component Analyses of Ground-based Exoplanetary Transits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Martins-Filho, Walter; Griffith, Caitlin Ann; Pearson, Kyle; Waldmann, Ingo; Biddle, Lauren; Zellem, Robert Thomas; Alvarez-Candal, Alvaro

    2016-10-01

    Most observations of exoplanetary atmospheres are conducted when a "Hot Jupiter" exoplanet transits in front of its host star. These Jovian-sized planets have small orbital periods, on the order of days, and therefore a short transit time, making them more ameanable to observations. Measurements of Hot Jupiter transits must achieve a 10-4 level of accuracy in the flux to determine the spectral modulations of the exoplanetary atmosphere. In order to accomplish this level of precision, we need to extract systematic errors, and, for ground-based measurements, the effects of Earth's atmosphere, from the signal due to the exoplanet, which is several orders of magnitudes smaller. Currently, the effects of the terrestrial atmosphere and the some of the time-dependent systematic errors are treated by dividing the host star by a reference star at each wavelength and time step of the transit. More recently, Independent Component Analyses (ICA) have been used to remove systematic effects from the raw data of space-based observations (Waldmann 2014,2012; Morello et al.,2015,2016). ICA is a statistical method born from the ideas of the blind-source separation studies, which can be used to de-trend several independent source signals of a data set (Hyvarinen and Oja, 2000). One strength of this method is that it requires no additional prior knowledge of the system. Here, we present a study of the application of ICA to ground-based transit observations of extrasolar planets, which are affected by Earth's atmosphere. We analyze photometric data of two extrasolar planets, WASP-1b and GJ3470b, recorded by the 61" Kuiper Telescope at Stewart Observatory using the Harris B and U filters. The presentation will compare the light curve depths and their dispersions as derived from the ICA analysis to those derived by analyses that ratio of the host star to nearby reference stars.References: Waldmann, I.P. 2012 ApJ, 747, 12, Waldamann, I. P. 2014 ApJ, 780, 23; Morello G. 2015 ApJ, 806

  18. Proteomic and Epigenetic Analysis of Rice after Seed Spaceflight and Ground-Base Ion Radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Sun, Yeqing; Peng, Yuming; Zhao, Qian; Wen, Bin; Yang, Jun

    Highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as main factor causing biological effects to plant seeds. In previous work, we compared the proteomic profiles of rice plants growing after seed spaceflights to ground controls by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) with mass spectrometry and found that the protein expression profiles were changed and differentially expressed proteins participated in most of the biological processes of rice. To further evaluate the dosage effects of space radiation and compare between low- and high-dose ion effects, we carried out three independent ground-base ionizing radiation experiments with different cumulative doses (low-dose range: 2~1000mGy, high-dose range: 2000~20000mGy) to rice seeds and performed proteomic analysis of seedlings. We found that protein expression profiles showed obvious boundaries between low- and high-dose radiation groups. Rates of differentially expressed proteins presented a dose-dependent effect, it reached the highest value at 2000mGy dosage point in all three radiation experiments coincidently; while proteins responded to low-dose radiations preferred to change their expressions at the minimum dosage (2mGy). Proteins participating in rice biological processes also responded differently between low- and high-dose radiations: proteins involved in energy metabolism and photosynthesis tended to be regulated after low-dose radiations while stress responding, protein folding and cell redox homeostasis related proteins preferred to change their expressions after high-dose radiations. By comparing the proteomic profiles between ground-base radiations and spaceflights, it was worth noting that ground-base low-dose ion radiation effects shared similar biological effects as space environment. In addition, we discovered that protein nucleoside diphosphate kinase 1 (NDPK1) showed obvious increased regulation after spaceflights and ion radiations. NDPK1 catalyzes nucleotide metabolism

  19. Comparative Study on Cloud Parameter Estimation Among GOSAT/CAI, MODIS, CALIPSO/CALIOP and Landsat-8/OLI with Laser Radar: Lidar as Truth Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study on cloud parameter estimation among GOSAT/CAI, MODIS, CALIPSO/CALIOP and Landsat-8/OLI is carried out using Laser Radar: Lidar as a truth data. Optical depth, size distribution, as well as cirrus type of clouds are cloud parameters. In particular, cirrus cloud detection is tough issue. 1.38 µm channel is required for its detection. Although MODIS and Landsat-8/OLI have such channel, the other mission instruments, CAI and CALIPSO/CALIOP do not have such channel. As a truth data of cloud parameter, ground based Lidar is used in this comparative study. From the Lidar, backscattered echo signal and depolarization coefficient are obtained as a function of altitude. Therefore, cloud type, vertical profile can be derived from the Lidar data. CALIPSO/CALIOP is satellite based Lidar which allows observation of clouds from space. Although the directions of laser light emissions between CALIPSO/CALIOP and the ground based Lidar are different, their principles are same. Therefore, it is expected that CALIPSO/CALIOP data derived cloud parameters are similar to the ground based Lidar data derived cloud parameters. The experimental results show the aforementioned facts and are useful for improvement of cloud parameter estimation accuracy with several sensor data combinations.

  20. RTTOV-gb - Adapting the fast radiative transfer model RTTOV for the assimilation of ground-based microwave radiometer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Francesco; Cimini, Domenico; Hocking, James; Martinet, Pauline; Kneifel, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) is the single most important under-sampled part of the atmosphere. According to the WMO Statement Of Guidance For Global Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP), temperature and humidity profiles (in cloudy areas) are among the four critical atmospheric variables not adequately measured in the PBL. Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR) provide temperature and humidity profiles in both clear- and cloudy-sky conditions with high temporal resolution and low-to-moderate vertical resolution, with information mostly residing in the PBL. Ground-based MWR offer to bridge this observational gap by providing continuous temperature and humidity information in the PBL. The MWR data assimilation into NWP models may be particularly important in nowcasting and severe weather initiation. The assimilation of thermodynamic profiles retrieved from MWR data has been recently experimented, but a way to possibly increase the impact is to directly assimilate measured radiances instead of retrieved profiles. The assimilation of observed radiances in a variational scheme requires the following tools: (i) a fast radiative transfer (RT) model to compute the simulated radiances at MWR channels from the NWP model fields (ii) the partial derivatives (Jacobians) of the fast radiative transfer model with respect to control variables to optimize the distances of the atmospheric state from both the first guess and the observations. Such a RT model is available from the EUMETSAT NWPSAF (Numerical Weather Prediction Satellite Application Facility) and well accepted in the NWP community: RTTOV. This model was developed for nadir-viewing passive visible, infrared, and microwave satellite radiometers, spectrometers and interferometers. It has been modified to handle ground-based microwave radiometer observations. This version of RTTOV, called RTTOV-gb, provides the tools needed to exploit ground-based upward looking MWR brightness temperatures into NWP variational data

  1. Observing Tsunamis in the Ionosphere Using Ground Based GPS Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, D. A.; Komjathy, A.; Song, Y. Tony; Stephens, P.; Hickey, M. P.; Foster, J.

    2011-01-01

    Ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements of ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) show variations consistent with atmospheric internal gravity waves caused by ocean tsunamis following recent seismic events, including the Tohoku tsunami of March 11, 2011. We observe fluctuations correlated in time, space, and wave properties with this tsunami in TEC estimates processed using JPL's Global Ionospheric Mapping Software. These TEC estimates were band-pass filtered to remove ionospheric TEC variations with periods outside the typical range of internal gravity waves caused by tsunamis. Observable variations in TEC appear correlated with the Tohoku tsunami near the epicenter, at Hawaii, and near the west coast of North America. Disturbance magnitudes are 1-10% of the background TEC value. Observations near the epicenter are compared to estimates of expected tsunami-driven TEC variations produced by Embry Riddle Aeronautical University's Spectral Full Wave Model, an atmosphere-ionosphere coupling model, and found to be in good agreement. The potential exists to apply these detection techniques to real-time GPS TEC data, providing estimates of tsunami speed and amplitude that may be useful for future early warning systems.

  2. Tissue Engineering of Cartilage on Ground-Based Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleshcheva, Ganna; Bauer, Johann; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Egli, Marcel; Wehland, Markus; Grimm, Daniela

    2016-06-01

    Investigations under simulated microgravity offer the opportunity for a better understanding of the influence of altered gravity on cells and the scaffold-free three-dimensional (3D) tissue formation. To investigate the short-term influence, human chondrocytes were cultivated for 2 h, 4 h, 16 h, and 24 h on a 2D Fast-Rotating Clinostat (FRC) in DMEM/F-12 medium supplemented with 10 % FCS. We detected holes in the vimentin network, perinuclear accumulations of vimentin after 2 h, and changes in the chondrocytes shape visualised by F-actin staining after 4 h of FRC-exposure. Scaffold-free cultivation of chondrocytes for 7 d on the Random Positioning Machine (RPM), the FRC and the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) resulted in spheroid formation, a phenomenon already known from spaceflight experiments with chondrocytes (MIR Space Station) and thyroid cancer cells (SimBox/Shenzhou-8 space mission). The experiments enabled by the ESA-CORA-GBF programme gave us an optimal opportunity to study gravity-related cellular processes, validate ground-based facilities for our chosen cell system, and prepare long-term experiments under real microgravity conditions in space

  3. Theoretical validation of ground-based microwave ozone observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ricaud

    Full Text Available Ground-based microwave measurements of the diurnal and seasonal variations of ozoneat 42±4.5 and 55±8 km are validated by comparing with results from a zero-dimensional photochemical model and a two-dimensional (2D chemical/radiative/dynamical model, respectively. O3 diurnal amplitudes measured in Bordeaux are shown to be in agreement with theory to within 5%. For the seasonal analysis of O3 variation, at 42±4.5 km, the 2D model underestimates the yearly averaged ozone concentration compared with the measurements. A double maximum oscillation (~3.5% is measured in Bordeaux with an extended maximum in September and a maximum in February, whilst the 2D model predicts only a single large maximum (17% in August and a pronounced minimum in January. Evidence suggests that dynamical transport causes the winter O3 maximum by propagation of planetary waves, phenomena which are not explicitly reproduced by the 2D model. At 55±8 km, the modeled yearly averaged O3 concentration is in very good agreement with the measured yearly average. A strong annual oscillation is both measured and modeled with differences in the amplitude shown to be exclusively linked to temperature fields.

  4. Models of ionospheric VLF absorption of powerful ground based transmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M. B.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Inan, U. S.

    2012-12-01

    Ground based Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) radio transmitters play a role in precipitation of energetic Van Allen electrons. Initial analyses of the contribution of VLF transmitters to radiation belt losses were based on early models of trans-ionospheric propagation known as the Helliwell absorption curves, but some recent studies have found that the model overestimates (by 20-100 dB) the VLF energy reaching the magnetosphere. It was subsequently suggested that conversion of wave energy into electrostatic modes may be responsible for the error. We utilize a newly available extensive record of VLF transmitter energy reaching the magnetosphere, taken from the DEMETER satellite, and perform a direct comparison with a sophisticated full wave model of trans-ionospheric propagation. Although the model does not include the effect of ionospheric irregularities, it correctly predicts the average total power injected into the magnetosphere within several dB. The results, particularly at nighttime, appear to be robust against the variability of the ionospheric electron density. We conclude that the global effect of irregularity scattering on whistler mode conversion to quasi-electrostatic may be no larger than 6 dB.

  5. Atmospheric Refraction Path Integrals in Ground-Based Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Mathar, R J

    2004-01-01

    The basic effect of the earth's atmospheric refraction on telescope operation is the reduction of the true zenith angle to the apparent zenith angle, associated with prismatic aberrations due to the dispersion in air. If one attempts coherent superposition of star images in ground-based interferometry, one is in addition interested in the optical path length associated with the refracted rays. In a model of a flat earth, the optical path difference between these is not concerned as the translational symmetry of the setup means no net effect remains. Here, I evaluate these interferometric integrals in the more realistic arrangement of two telescopes located on the surface of a common earth sphere and point to a star through an atmosphere which also possesses spherical symmetry. Some focus is put on working out series expansions in terms of the small ratio of the baseline over the earth radius, which allows to bypass some numerics which otherwise is challenged by strong cancellation effects in building the opti...

  6. A comparative study of satellite and ground-based phenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, S; Stöckli, R; Appenzeller, C; Vidale, P L

    2007-05-01

    Long time series of ground-based plant phenology, as well as more than two decades of satellite-derived phenological metrics, are currently available to assess the impacts of climate variability and trends on terrestrial vegetation. Traditional plant phenology provides very accurate information on individual plant species, but with limited spatial coverage. Satellite phenology allows monitoring of terrestrial vegetation on a global scale and provides an integrative view at the landscape level. Linking the strengths of both methodologies has high potential value for climate impact studies. We compared a multispecies index from ground-observed spring phases with two types (maximum slope and threshold approach) of satellite-derived start-of-season (SOS) metrics. We focus on Switzerland from 1982 to 2001 and show that temporal and spatial variability of the multispecies index correspond well with the satellite-derived metrics. All phenological metrics correlate with temperature anomalies as expected. The slope approach proved to deviate strongly from the temporal development of the ground observations as well as from the threshold-defined SOS satellite measure. The slope spring indicator is considered to indicate a different stage in vegetation development and is therefore less suited as a SOS parameter for comparative studies in relation to ground-observed phenology. Satellite-derived metrics are, however, very susceptible to snow cover, and it is suggested that this snow cover should be better accounted for by the use of newer satellite sensors.

  7. Satellite Type Estination from Ground-based Photometric Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, T.; Ono, H.; Suzuki, J.; Ando, T.; Takanezawa, T.

    2016-09-01

    The optical photometric observation is potentially a powerful tool for understanding of the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) objects. At first, we measured in laboratory the surface reflectance of common satellite materials, for example, Multi-layer Insulation (MLI), mono-crystalline silicon cells, and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP). Next, we calculated visual magnitude of a satellite by simplified shape and albedo. In this calculation model, solar panels have dimensions of 2 by 8 meters, and the bus area is 2 meters squared with measured optical properties described above. Under these conditions, it clarified the brightness can change the range between 3 and 4 magnitudes in one night, but color index changes only from 1 to 2 magnitudes. Finally, we observed the color photometric data of several GEO satellites visible from Japan multiple times in August and September 2014. We obtained that light curves of GEO satellites recorded in the B and V bands (using Johnson filters) by a ground-base optical telescope. As a result, color index changed approximately from 0.5 to 1 magnitude in one night, and the order of magnitude was not changed in all cases. In this paper, we briefly discuss about satellite type estimation using the relation between brightness and color index obtained from the photometric observation.

  8. Ground-based measurements of UV Index (UVI at Helwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Farouk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available On October 2010 UV Index (UVI ground-based measurements were carried out by weather station at solar laboratory in NRIAG. The daily variation has maximum values in spring and summer days, while minimum values in autumn and winter days. The low level of UVI between 2.55 and 2.825 was found in December, January and February. The moderate level of UVI between 3.075 and 5.6 was found in March, October and November. The high level of UVI between 6.7 and 7.65 was found in April, May and September. The very high level of UVI between 8 and 8.6 was found in June, July and August. High level of radiation over 6 months per year including 3 months with a very high level UVI. According to the equation {UVI=a[SZA]b} the UVI increases with decreasing SZA by 82% on a daily scale and 88% on a monthly scale. Helwan exposure to a high level of radiation over 6 months per year including 3 months with a very high level UVI, so it is advisable not to direct exposure to the sun from 11 am to 2:00 pm.

  9. Comparison of the characteristic energy of precipitating electrons derived from ground-based and DMSP satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ashrafi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy maps are important for ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling studies, because quantitative determination of field-aligned currents requires knowledge of the conductances and their spatial gradients. By combining imaging riometer absorption and all-sky auroral optical data it is possible to produce high temporal and spatial resolution maps of the Maxwellian characteristic energy of precipitating electrons within a 240240 common field of view. These data have been calibrated by inverting EISCAT electron density profiles into equivalent energy spectra. In this paper energy maps produced by ground-based instruments (optical and riometer are compared with DMSP satellite data during geomagnetic conjunctions. For the period 1995-2002, twelve satellite passes over the ground-based instruments' field of view for the cloud-free conditions have been considered. Four of the satellite conjunctions occurred during moderate geomagnetic, steady-state conditions and without any ion precipitation. In these cases with Maxwellian satellite spectra, there is 71% agreement between the characteristic energies derived from the satellite and the ground-based energy map method.

  10. Limitations of Radar Coordinates

    OpenAIRE

    Bini, Donato; Lusanna, Luca; Mashhoon, Bahram

    2004-01-01

    The construction of a radar coordinate system about the world line of an observer is discussed. Radar coordinates for a hyperbolic observer as well as a uniformly rotating observer are described in detail. The utility of the notion of radar distance and the admissibility of radar coordinates are investigated. Our results provide a critical assessment of the physical significance of radar coordinates.

  11. 基于多点雷达和最小二乘法估计高炉料面形状%Estimating the burden surface profile of a blast furnace based on multi-radar measurement and least squares approximations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝乔; 程汉卿; 尹怡欣; 陈先中

    2012-01-01

    Burden distribution in a blast furnace was estimated based on least squares approximations and multi-radar data. First- ly, a three-segment curve, which includes two straight lines and a quadratic curve, was used to describe the burden distribution. Sec- ondly, based on the burden distribution principles, some constraint equations were obtained to estimate parameters in the three-segment curve, which makes the burden surface profile more reasonable. Then, the burden distribution was estimated by using least squares ap- proximations and multi-radar data, and a real-timely display of the burden surface profile could be achieved. A numerical example with real multi-radar data obtained from a steel plant shows the effectiveness of the estimate method.%利用多点雷达数据,使用最小二乘法对高炉的料面形状进行估计.首先,采用三段曲线描述料面形状,其中包括两段直线一段二次曲线.其次,利用炉料分布规律对三段曲线的具体参数进行约束,使得料面形状的估计更为合理.然后,利用多点雷达数据和最小二乘法估计料面形状,实现料面的实时动态显示.利用某钢厂的实际雷达测量数据,证实了该方法的有效性.

  12. An evaluation of IASI-NH3 with ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammers, Enrico; Palm, Mathias; Van Damme, Martin; Vigouroux, Corinne; Smale, Dan; Conway, Stephanie; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Jones, Nicholas; Nussbaumer, Eric; Warneke, Thorsten; Petri, Christof; Clarisse, Lieven; Clerbaux, Cathy; Hermans, Christian; Lutsch, Erik; Strong, Kim; Hannigan, James W.; Nakajima, Hideaki; Morino, Isamu; Herrera, Beatriz; Stremme, Wolfgang; Grutter, Michel; Schaap, Martijn; Wichink Kruit, Roy J.; Notholt, Justus; Coheur, Pierre-F.; Erisman, Jan Willem

    2016-08-01

    Global distributions of atmospheric ammonia (NH3) measured with satellite instruments such as the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) contain valuable information on NH3 concentrations and variability in regions not yet covered by ground-based instruments. Due to their large spatial coverage and (bi-)daily overpasses, the satellite observations have the potential to increase our knowledge of the distribution of NH3 emissions and associated seasonal cycles. However the observations remain poorly validated, with only a handful of available studies often using only surface measurements without any vertical information. In this study, we present the first validation of the IASI-NH3 product using ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) observations. Using a recently developed consistent retrieval strategy, NH3 concentration profiles have been retrieved using observations from nine Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) stations around the world between 2008 and 2015. We demonstrate the importance of strict spatio-temporal collocation criteria for the comparison. Large differences in the regression results are observed for changing intervals of spatial criteria, mostly due to terrain characteristics and the short lifetime of NH3 in the atmosphere. The seasonal variations of both datasets are consistent for most sites. Correlations are found to be high at sites in areas with considerable NH3 levels, whereas correlations are lower at sites with low atmospheric NH3 levels close to the detection limit of the IASI instrument. A combination of the observations from all sites (Nobs = 547) give a mean relative difference of -32.4 ± (56.3) %, a correlation r of 0.8 with a slope of 0.73. These results give an improved estimate of the IASI-NH3 product performance compared to the previous upper-bound estimates (-50 to +100 %).

  13. A novel technique for extracting clouds base height using ground based imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Hirsch

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The height of a cloud in the atmospheric column is a key parameter in its characterization. Several remote sensing techniques (passive and active, either ground-based or on space-borne platforms and in-situ measurements are routinely used in order to estimate top and base heights of clouds. In this article we present a novel method that combines thermal imaging from the ground and sounded wind profile in order to derive the cloud base height. This method is independent of cloud types, making it efficient for both low boundary layer and high clouds. In addition, using thermal imaging ensures extraction of clouds' features during daytime as well as at nighttime. The proposed technique was validated by comparison to active sounding by ceilometers (which is a standard ground based method, to lifted condensation level (LCL calculations, and to MODIS products obtained from space. As all passive remote sensing techniques, the proposed method extracts only the height of the lowest cloud layer, thus upper cloud layers are not detected. Nevertheless, the information derived from this method can be complementary to space-borne cloud top measurements when deep-convective clouds are present. Unlike techniques such as LCL, this method is not limited to boundary layer clouds, and can extract the cloud base height at any level, as long as sufficient thermal contrast exists between the radiative temperatures of the cloud and its surrounding air parcel. Another advantage of the proposed method is its simplicity and modest power needs, making it particularly suitable for field measurements and deployment at remote locations. Our method can be further simplified for use with visible CCD or CMOS camera (although nighttime clouds will not be observed.

  14. Critical Evaluation of the ISCCP Simulator Using Ground-Based Remote Sensing Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mace, G G; Houser, S; Benson, S; Klein, S A; Min, Q

    2009-11-02

    Given the known shortcomings in representing clouds in Global Climate Models (GCM) comparisons with observations are critical. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) diagnostic products provide global descriptions of cloud top pressure and column optical depth that extends over multiple decades. The necessary limitations of the ISCCP retrieval algorithm require that before comparisons can be made between model output and ISCCP results the model output must be modified to simulate what ISCCP would diagnose under the simulated circumstances. We evaluate one component of the so-called ISCCP simulator in this study by comparing ISCCP and a similar algorithm with various long-term statistics derived from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility ground-based remote sensors. We find that were a model to simulate the cloud radiative profile with the same accuracy as can be derived from the ARM data, then the likelihood of that occurrence being placed in the same cloud top pressure and optical depth bin as ISCCP of the 9 bins that have become standard ranges from 30% to 70% depending on optical depth. While the ISCCP simulator improved the agreement of cloud-top pressure between ground-based remote sensors and satellite observations, we find minor discrepancies due to the parameterization of cloud top pressure in the ISCCP simulator. The primary source of error seems to be related to discrepancies in visible optical depth that are not accounted for in the ISCCP simulator. We show that the optical depth discrepancies are largest when the assumptions necessary for plane parallel radiative transfer optical depths retrievals are violated.

  15. Nutritional status assessment in semiclosed environments: ground-based and space flight studies in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. M.; Davis-Street, J. E.; Rice, B. L.; Nillen, J. L.; Gillman, P. L.; Block, G.

    2001-01-01

    Adequate nutrition is critical during long-term spaceflight, as is the ability to easily monitor dietary intake. A comprehensive nutritional status assessment profile was designed for use before, during and after flight. It included assessment of both dietary intake and biochemical markers of nutritional status. A spaceflight food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was developed to evaluate intake of key nutrients during spaceflight. The nutritional status assessment protocol was evaluated during two ground-based closed-chamber studies (60 and 91 d; n = 4/study), and was implemented for two astronauts during 4-mo stays on the Mir space station. Ground-based studies indicated that the FFQ, administered daily or weekly, adequately estimated intake of key nutrients. Chamber subjects maintained prechamber energy intake and body weight. Astronauts tended to eat 40--50% of WHO-predicted energy requirements, and lost >10% of preflight body mass. Serum ferritin levels were lower after the chamber stays, despite adequate iron intake. Red blood cell folate concentrations were increased after the chamber studies. Vitamin D stores were decreased by > 40% on chamber egress and after spaceflight. Mir crew members had decreased levels of most nutritional indices, but these are difficult to interpret given the insufficient energy intake and loss of body mass. Spaceflight food systems can provide adequate intake of macronutrients, although, as expected, micronutrient intake is a concern for any closed or semiclosed food system. These data demonstrate the utility and importance of nutritional status assessment during spaceflight and of the FFQ during extended-duration spaceflight.

  16. Comparing Aerosol Retrievals from Ground-Based Instruments at the Impact-Pm Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupinski, M.; Bradley, C. L.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Xu, F.; Diner, D. J.; Clements, C. B.; Camacho, C.

    2016-12-01

    Detection of aerosol types, components having different size and chemical composition, over urban areas is important for understanding their impact on health and climate. In particular, sustained contact with size-differentiated airborne particulate matter: PM10 and PM2.5 can lead to adverse health effects such as asthma attacks, heart and lung diseases, and premature mortality. Multi-angular polarimetric measurements have been advocated in recent years as an additional tool to better understand and retrieve the aerosol properties needed for improved predictions of aerosol impart on air quality and climate. We deployed the ground-based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (GroundMSPI) for accurate spectropolarimetric and radiance measurements co-located with the AERONET CIMEL sun photometer and a Halo Doppler 18 m resolution lidar from San José State University at the Garland-Fresno Air Quality supersite in Fresno, CA on July 7 during the Imaging Polarimetric Assessment and Characterization of Tropospheric Particulate Matter (ImPACT-PM) field experiment. GroundMSPI sampled the atmospheric scattering phase function in and 90 degrees out of the principal plane every 15 minutes in an automated manner, utilizing the 2-axis gimbal mount in elevation and azimuth. The goal of this work is verify atmospheric measurement of GroundMSPI with the coincident CIMEL sun photometer and ground-based lidar. Diffuse-sky radiance measurements of GroundMSPI are compared with the CIMEL sun photometer throughout the day. AERONET aerosol parameters such as size, shape, and index of refraction as well as lidar aerosol extinction profiles will be used in a forward radiative transfer model to compare with GroundMSPI observations and optimize these parameters to best match GroundMSPI data.

  17. Network operability of ground-based microwave radiometers: Calibration and standardization efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospichal, Bernhard; Löhnert, Ulrich; Küchler, Nils; Czekala, Harald

    2017-04-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR) are already widely used by national weather services and research institutions all around the world. Most of the instruments operate continuously and are beginning to be implemented into data assimilation for atmospheric models. Especially their potential for continuously observing boundary-layer temperature profiles as well as integrated water vapor and cloud liquid water path makes them valuable for improving short-term weather forecasts. However until now, most MWR have been operated as stand-alone instruments. In order to benefit from a network of these instruments, standardization of calibration, operation and data format is necessary. In the frame of TOPROF (COST Action ES1303) several efforts have been undertaken, such as uncertainty and bias assessment, or calibration intercomparison campaigns. The goal was to establish protocols for providing quality controlled (QC) MWR data and their uncertainties. To this end, standardized calibration procedures for MWR have been developed and recommendations for radiometer users compiled. Based on the results of the TOPROF campaigns, a new, high-accuracy liquid-nitrogen calibration load has been introduced for MWR manufactured by Radiometer Physics GmbH (RPG). The new load improves the accuracy of the measurements considerably and will lead to even more reliable atmospheric observations. Next to the recommendations for set-up, calibration and operation of ground-based MWR within a future network, we will present homogenized methods to determine the accuracy of a running calibration as well as means for automatic data quality control. This sets the stage for the planned microwave calibration center at JOYCE (Jülich Observatory for Cloud Evolution), which will be shortly introduced.

  18. Mesospheric minor species determinations from rocket and ground-based i.r. measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulwick, J. C.; Baker, K. D.; Baker, D. J.; Steed, A. J.; Pendleton, W. R.; Grossmann, K.; Brückelmann, H. G.

    As part of the MAP/WINE campaign the infrared hydroxyl airglow layer was investigated at Kiruna, Sweden, by simultaneous measurements with rocket probes of OH ≠ and O2( a1Δg) infrared emissions and concentrations of odd oxygen species (O and O 3). Coordinated measurements of OH ≠ and O2( a1Δg) zenith radiance and emission spectra and their time histories were made from the ground. The rocket-borne Λ = 1.55 μm radiometer ( ΔΛ ≊ 0.23 μm) provided volume emission rates for OH for both rocket ascent and descent, showing a peak near 87 km with a maximum of nearly 10 6 photons sec -1 cm -3. The atomic oxygen distribution showed a concentration of about 10 11 cm -3 between 88 and 100 km, dropping off sharply below 85 km. The ground-based radiometer at Λ = 1.56 μm, which had a similar filter bandpass to the rocket-borne instrument, yielded an equivalent of 130 kR for the total OH Δv = 2 sequence, which is consistent with the zenith-corrected rocket-based sequence radiance value of ≌ 110 kR. The rotational temperature of the OH night airglow obtained from the rotational structure of the OH M (3,1) band observed by the ground-based interferometer was about 195K at the time of the rocket measurement. Atomic oxygen concentrations were calculated from the OH profile and show agreement with the directly measured values. Atomic hydrogen concentrations of a few times 10 7 cm -3 near 85 km were inferred from the data set.

  19. Shifts in the eruptive styles at Stromboli in 2010–2014 revealed by ground-based InSAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Traglia, Federico; Battaglia, Maurizio; Nolesini, Teresa; Lagomarsino, Daniela; Casaglia, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Ground-Based Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (GBInSAR) is an efficient technique for capturing short, subtle episodes of conduit pressurization in open vent volcanoes like Stromboli (Italy), because it can detect very shallow magma storage, which is difficult to identify using other methods. This technique allows the user to choose the optimal radar location for measuring the most significant deformation signal, provides an exceptional geometrical resolution, and allows for continuous monitoring of the deformation. Here, we present and model ground displacements collected at Stromboli by GBInSAR from January 2010 to August 2014. During this period, the volcano experienced several episodes of intense volcanic activity, culminated in the effusive flank eruption of August 2014. Modelling of the deformation allowed us to estimate a source depth of 482 ± 46 m a.s.l. The cumulative volume change was 4.7 ± 2.6 × 105 m3. The strain energy of the source was evaluated 3–5 times higher than the surface energy needed to open the 6–7 August eruptive fissure. The analysis proposed here can help forecast shifts in the eruptive style and especially the onset of flank eruptions at Stromboli and at similar volcanic systems (e.g. Etna, Piton de La Fournaise, Kilauea).

  20. Dust aerosol characterization and transport features based on combined ground-based, satellite and model-simulated data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, K.; Devara, P. C. S.; Rao, S. Vijaya Bhaskara; Jayasankar, C. K.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study aerosol characteristics over an urban station in Western India, during a dust event that occurred between 19 and 26 March 2012, with the help of ground-based and satellite measurements and model simulation data. The aerosol parameters are found to change significantly during dust events and they suggest dominance of coarse mode aerosols. The fine mode fraction, size distribution and single scattering albedo reveal that dust (natural) aerosols dominate the anthropogenic aerosols over the study region. Ground-based measurements show drastic reduction in visibility on the dust-laden day (22 March 2012). Additionally, HYSPLIT model and satellite daily data have been used to trace the source, path and spatial extent of dust storm events. Most of the dust aerosols, during the study period, travel from west-to-east pathway from source-to-sink region. Furthermore, aerosol vertical profiles from CALIPSO and synoptic meteorological parameters from ECMWF re-analysis data reveal a layer of thick dust extending from surface to an altitude of about 4 km, and decrease in temperature and increase in specific humidity, respectively. The aerosol radiative forcing calculations indicate more cooling at the surface and warming in the atmosphere during dust event. The results of satellite observations are found to have good consistency with ground-based air quality measurements. Synthesis of satellite data integrated with ground-based observations, supplemented by model analysis, is found to be a promising technique for improved understanding of dust storm phenomenon and its impact on regional climate.

  1. Magnetoseismology ground-based remote sensing of Earth's magnetosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Menk, Frederick W

    2013-01-01

    Written by a researcher at the forefront of the field, this first comprehensive account of magnetoseismology conveys the physics behind these movements and waves, and explains how to detect and investigate them. Along the way, it describes the principles as applied to remote sensing of near-Earth space and related remote sensing techniques, while also comparing and intercalibrating magnetoseismology with other techniques. The example applications include advanced data analysis techniques that may find wider used in areas ranging from geophysics to medical imaging, and remote sensing using radar systems that are of relevance to defense surveillance systems. As a result, the book not only reviews the status quo, but also anticipates new developments. With many figures and illustrations, some in full color, plus additional computational codes for analysis and evaluation. Aimed at graduate readers, the text assumes knowledge of electromagnetism and physical processes at degree level, but introductory chapters wil...

  2. Gravitational waves from merging intermediate-mass black holes : II Event rates at ground-based detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Shinkai, Hisa-aki; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Based on a dynamical formation model of a super-massive black-hole (SMBH), we estimate expected observational profile of gravitational wave at ground-based detectors, such as KAGRA or advanced LIGO/VIRGO. Focusing that the second generation of detectors have enough sensitivity from 10 Hz and up (especially with KAGRA due to its location at less seismic noise), we are able to detect the ring-down gravitational wave of a BH of the mass $M 1$ per year for $\\rho=10$. Thus if we observe a BH with more than $100 M_\\odot$ in future gravitational wave observations, our model naturally explains its source.

  3. Seven years of middle-atmospheric CO in the Arctic by ground based radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Niall; Palm, Mathias; Raffalski, Uwe; Larsson, Richard; Notholt, Justus

    2016-04-01

    During polar winter, carbon monoxide (CO) is a well-suited tracer for middle atmospheric dynamics and for studying the polar vortex boundary: In polar night the chemical reactions involving atmospheric carbon monoxide are negligible due to the lack of sunlight and, as a result, the gas exhibits strong vertical and horizontal gradients in the stratosphere and mesosphere. Due to the upcoming likely gap in satellite profiling instruments, and in order to maintain a long-term global record of atmospheric trace gas concentrations, current and future satellite missions must be inter-calibrated using measurements from ground-based instruments around the globe. The Kiruna Microwave Radiometer (KIMRA), installed at the Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna, Sweden (67.8 N, 20.4 E), has been measuring microwave spectra of emissions from atmospheric CO since 2007. This contribution presents the CO concentration record which has been retrieved from KIMRA measurements using different temperature datasets: measurements from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program - F18 and model output from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. The concentration profiles, retrieved between 40 and 80 km altitude, are compared to data from the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Aura satellite and are used to examine the concentration gradient across the polar vortex edge.

  4. RADAR PPI Scope Overlay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — RADAR PPI Scope Overlays are used to position a RADAR image over a station at the correct resolution. The archive maintains several different RADAR resolution types,...

  5. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel E.; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfect all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean, and as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources’ right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO’s observations and electromagnetic (EM) follow-up. Beyond galactic foregrounds associated with seasonal variations, we find that equatorial observatories can access over 80% of the localization probability, while mid-latitudes will access closer to 70%. Facilities located near the two LIGO sites can observe sources closer to their zenith than their analogs in the south, but the average observation will still be no closer than 44° from zenith. We also find that observatories in Africa or the South Atlantic will wait systematically longer before they can begin observing compared to the rest of the world though, there is a preference for longitudes near the LIGOs. These effects, along with knowledge of the LIGO antenna pattern, can inform EM follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  6. Ground-based Measurements of Next Generation Spectroradiometric Standard Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate, radiometric standards are essential to the future of ground- and space-based astronomy and astrophysics. While astronomers tend to think of “standard stars” as available calibration sources, progress at NIST to accurately calibrate inexpensive, easy to use photodiode detectors as spectroradiometric standards from 200 nm to 1800 nm allows referencing astronomical measurements to these devices. Direction-, time-, and wavelength-dependent transmission of Earth’s atmosphere is the single largest source of error for ground-based radiometric measurement of astronomical objects. Measurements and impacts of atmospheric extinction - scattering and absorption - on imaging radiometric and spectroradiometric measurements are described. The conclusion is that accurate real-time measurement of extinction in the column of atmosphere through which standard star observations are made, over the spectral region being observed and over the field of view of the telescope are required. New techniques to directly and simultaneously measure extinction in the column of atmosphere through which observations are made are required. Our direct extinction measurement solution employs three small facility-class instruments working in parallel: a lidar to measure rapidly time variable transmission at three wavelengths with uncertainty of 0.25% per airmass, a spectrophotometer to measure rapidly wavelength variable extinction with sub-1% precision per nanometer resolution element from 350 to 1050nm, and a wide-field camera to measure angularly variable extinction over the field of view. These instruments and their operation will be described. We assert that application of atmospheric metadata provided by this instrument suite corrects for a significant fraction of systematic errors currently limiting radiometric precision, and provides a major step towards measurements that are provably dominated by random noise.

  7. Project management for complex ground-based instruments: MEGARA plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Vargas, María. Luisa; Pérez-Calpena, Ana; Gil de Paz, Armando; Gallego, Jesús; Carrasco, Esperanza; Cedazo, Raquel; Iglesias, Jorge

    2014-08-01

    The project management of complex instruments for ground-based large telescopes is a challenge itself. A good management is a clue for project success in terms of performance, schedule and budget. Being on time has become a strict requirement for two reasons: to assure the arrival at the telescope due to the pressure on demanding new instrumentation for this first world-class telescopes and to not fall in over-costs. The budget and cash-flow is not always the expected one and has to be properly handled from different administrative departments at the funding centers worldwide distributed. The complexity of the organizations, the technological and scientific return to the Consortium partners and the participation in the project of all kind of professional centers working in astronomical instrumentation: universities, research centers, small and large private companies, workshops and providers, etc. make the project management strategy, and the tools and procedures tuned to the project needs, crucial for success. MEGARA (Multi-Espectrógrafo en GTC de Alta Resolución para Astronomía) is a facility instrument of the 10.4m GTC (La Palma, Spain) working at optical wavelengths that provides both Integral-Field Unit (IFU) and Multi-Object Spectrograph (MOS) capabilities at resolutions in the range R=6,000-20,000. The project is an initiative led by Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain) in collaboration with INAOE (Mexico), IAA-CSIC (Spain) and Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain). MEGARA is being developed under contract with GRANTECAN.

  8. Advances in bistatic radar

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, Nick

    2007-01-01

    Advances in Bistatic Radar updates and extends bistatic and multistatic radar developments since publication of Willis' Bistatic Radar in 1991. New and recently declassified military applications are documented. Civil applications are detailed including commercial and scientific systems. Leading radar engineers provide expertise to each of these applications. Advances in Bistatic Radar consists of two major sections: Bistatic/Multistatic Radar Systems and Bistatic Clutter and Signal Processing. Starting with a history update, the first section documents the early and now declassified military

  9. Integrating radar and laser-based remote sensing techniques for monitoring structural deformation of archaeological monuments

    OpenAIRE

    Tapete D.; Casagli N.; Luzi G.; Fanti R.; Gigli G.; Leva D.

    2013-01-01

    Ground-Based Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (GBInSAR) and Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) were purposely integrated to obtain 3D interferometric radar point clouds to facilitate the spatial interpretation of displacements affecting archaeological monuments. The paper describes the procedure to implement this integrated approach in the real-world situations of surveillance of archaeological and built heritage. Targeted tests were carried out on the case study of the Domus Tiberiana s...

  10. Geospace Science from Ground-based Magnetometer Arrays: Advances in Sensors, Data Collection, and Data Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Ian; Chi, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Networks of ground-based magnetometers now provide the basis for the diagnosis of magnetic disturbances associated with solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling on a truly global scale. Advances in sensor and digitisation technologies offer increases in sensitivity in fluxgate, induction coil, and new micro-sensor technologies - including the promise of hybrid sensors. Similarly, advances in remote connectivity provide the capacity for truly real-time monitoring of global dynamics at cadences sufficient for monitoring and in many cases resolving system level spatio-temporal ambiguities especially in combination with conjugate satellite measurements. A wide variety of the plasmaphysical processes active in driving geospace dynamics can be monitored based on the response of the electrical current system, including those associated with changes in global convection, magnetospheric substorms and nightside tail flows, as well as due to solar wind changes in both dynamic pressure and in response to rotations of the direction of the IMF. Significantly, any changes to the dynamical system must be communicated by the propagation of long-period Alfven and/or compressional waves. These wave populations hence provide diagnostics for not only the energy transport by the wave fields themselves, but also provide a mechanism for diagnosing the structure of the background plasma medium through which the waves propagate. Ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves are especially significant in offering a monitor for mass density profiles, often invisible to particle detectors because of their very low energy, through the application of a variety of magneto-seismology and cross-phase techniques. Renewed scientific interest in the plasma waves associated with near-Earth substorm dynamics, including magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling at substorm onset and their relation to magnetotail flows, as well the importance of global scale ultra-low frequency waves for the energisation, transport

  11. Ground Based Investigation of Electrostatic Accelerometer in HUST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y.; Zhou, Z.

    2013-12-01

    High-precision electrostatic accelerometers with six degrees of freedom (DOF) acceleration measurement were successfully used in CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions which to measure the Earth's gravity field. In our group, space inertial sensor based on the capacitance transducer and electrostatic control technique has been investigated for test of equivalence principle (TEPO), searching non-Newtonian force in micrometer range, and satellite Earth's field recovery. The significant techniques of capacitive position sensor with the noise level at 2×10-7pF/Hz1/2 and the μV/Hz1/2 level electrostatic actuator are carried out and all the six servo loop controls by using a discrete PID algorithm are realized in a FPGA device. For testing on ground, in order to compensate one g earth's gravity, the fiber torsion pendulum facility is adopt to measure the parameters of the electrostatic controlled inertial sensor such as the resolution, and the electrostatic stiffness, the cross couple between different DOFs. A short distance and a simple double capsule equipment the valid duration about 0.5 second is set up in our lab for the free fall tests of the engineering model which can directly verify the function of six DOF control. Meanwhile, high voltage suspension method is also realized and preliminary results show that the horizontal axis of acceleration noise is about 10-8m/s2/Hz1/2 level which limited mainly by the seismic noise. Reference: [1] Fen Gao, Ze-Bing Zhou, Jun Luo, Feasibility for Testing the Equivalence Principle with Optical Readout in Space, Chin. Phys. Lett. 28(8) (2011) 080401. [2] Z. Zhu, Z. B. Zhou, L. Cai, Y. Z. Bai, J. Luo, Electrostatic gravity gradiometer design for the advanced GOCE mission, Adv. Sp. Res. 51 (2013) 2269-2276. [3] Z B Zhou, L Liu, H B Tu, Y Z Bai, J Luo, Seismic noise limit for ground-based performance measurements of an inertial sensor using a torsion balance, Class. Quantum Grav. 27 (2010) 175012. [4] H B Tu, Y Z Bai, Z B Zhou, L Liu, L

  12. Ground-Based Observing Campaign of Briz-M Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, S. M.; Buckalew, B.; Frith, J.; Cowardin, H. M.; Hickson, P.; Matney, M.; Anz-Meador, P.

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) completed the installation of the Meter Class Autonomous Telescope (MCAT) on Ascension Island. MCAT is a 1.3m optical telescope designed with a fast tracking capability for observing orbital debris at all orbital regimes (Low-Erath orbits to Geosyncronous (GEO) orbits) from a low latitude site. This new asset is dedicated year-round for debris observations, and its location fills a geographical gap in the Ground-based Electro Optical Space Surveillance (GEODSS) network. A commercial off the shelf (COTS) research grade 0.4m telescope (named the Benbrook telescope) will also be installed on Ascension at the end of 2016. This smaller version is controlled by the same master software, designed by Euclid Research, and can be tasked to work independently or in concert with MCAT. Like MCAT, it has a the same suite of filters, a similar field of view, and a fast-tracking Astelco mount, and is also capable of tracking debris at all orbital regimes. These assets are well suited for targeted campagins or surveys of debris. Since 2013, NASA's ODPO has also had extensive access to the 3.8m infrared UKIRT telescope, located on Mauna Kea. At nearly 14,000-ft, this site affords excellent conditions for collecting both photometery and spectroscopy at near-IR (0.9 - 2.5 micrometers SWIR) and thermal-IR (8 - 25 micrometers; LWIR) regimes, ideal for investigating material properties as well as thermal characteristics and sizes of debris. For the purposes of understanding orbital debris, taking data in both survey mode as well as targeting individual objects for more in-depth characterizations are desired. With the recent break-ups of Briz-M rocket bodies, we have collected a suite of data in the optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared of in-tact objects as well as those classified as debris. A break-up at GEO of a Briz-M rocket occurred in January, 2016, well timed for the first remote observing survey-campaign with MCAT. Access to

  13. Meteorological radar methods for validating space observations of precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Otto W.

    1991-01-01

    Meteorological approaches to verification of space measurements of rainfall are examined; validation of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) observations is expected to depend significantly on ground-based radars. Two methods of comparison are initially contemplated. TRMM rainfall data over time periods of a month for large areas (500 x 500 km) are averaged and compared with similarly averaged ground truth measurements. Both the rainfall and height distribution data from TRMM are compared with the instantaneous values observed at one or more 'ground truth' stations and from airborne radar and radiometers as available.

  14. Validation of middle atmospheric campaign-based water vapour measured by the ground-based microwave radiometer MIAWARA-C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Tschanz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Middle atmospheric water vapour can be used as a tracer for dynamical processes. It is mainly measured by satellite instruments and ground-based microwave radiometers. Ground-based instruments capable of measuring middle atmospheric water vapour are sparse but valuable as they complement satellite measurements, are relatively easy to maintain and have a long lifetime. MIAWARA-C is a ground-based microwave radiometer for middle atmospheric water vapour designed for use on measurement campaigns for both atmospheric case studies and instrument intercomparisons. MIAWARA-C's retrieval version 1.1 (v1.1 is set up in a way to provide a consistent data set even if the instrument is operated from different locations on a campaign basis. The sensitive altitude range for v1.1 extends from 4 hPa (37 km to 0.017 hPa (75 km. MIAWARA-C measures two polarisations of the incident radiation in separate receiver channels and can therefore provide two independent measurements of the same air mass. The standard deviation of the difference between the profiles obtained from the two polarisations is in excellent agreement with the estimated random error of v1.1. In this paper, the quality of v1.1 data is assessed during two measurement campaigns: (1 five months of measurements in the Arctic (Sodankylä, 67.37° N/26.63° E and (2 nine months of measurements at mid-latitudes (Zimmerwald, 46.88° N/7.46° E. For both campaigns MIAWARA-C's profiles are compared to measurements from the satellite experiments Aura MLS and MIPAS. In addition, comparisons to ACE-FTS and SOFIE are presented for the Arctic and to the ground-based radiometer MIAWARA for the mid-latitudinal campaign. In general all intercomparisons show high correlation coefficients, above 0.5 at altitudes above 45 km, confirming the ability of MIAWARA-C to monitor temporal variations on the order of days. The biases are generally below 10% and within the estimated systematic uncertainty of MIAWARA-C. No

  15. Eight-component retrievals from ground-based MAX-DOAS observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Irie

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We attempt for the first time to retrieve lower-tropospheric vertical profile information for 8 quantities from ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS observations. The components retrieved are the aerosol extinction coefficients at two wavelengths, 357 and 476 nm, and NO2, HCHO, CHOCHO, H2O, SO2, and O3 volume mixing ratios. A Japanese MAX-DOAS profile retrieval algorithm, version 1 (JM1, is applied to observations performed at Cabauw, the Netherlands (51.97° N, 4.93° E, in June–July 2009 during the Cabauw Intercomparison campaign of Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI. Of the retrieved profiles, we focus here on the lowest-layer data (mean values at altitudes 0–1 km, where the sensitivity is usually highest owing to the longest light path. In support of the capability of the multi-component retrievals, we find reasonable overall agreement with independent data sets, including a regional chemical transport model (CHIMERE and in situ observations performed near the surface (2–3 m and at the 200-m height level of the tall tower in Cabauw. Plumes of enhanced HCHO and SO2 were likely affected by biogenic and ship emissions, respectively, and an improvement in their emission strengths is suggested for better agreement between CHIMERE simulations and MAX-DOAS observations. Analysis of air mass factors indicates that the horizontal spatial representativeness of MAX-DOAS observations is about 3–15 km (depending mainly on aerosol extinction, comparable to or better than the spatial resolution of current UV-visible satellite observations and model calculations. These demonstrate that MAX-DOAS provides multi-component data useful for the evaluation of satellite observations and model calculations and can play an important role in bridging different data sets having different spatial resolutions.

  16. Eight-component retrievals from ground-based MAX-DOAS observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Irie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We attempt for the first time to retrieve lower-tropospheric vertical profile information for 8 quantities from ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS observations. The components retrieved are the aerosol extinction coefficients at two wavelengths, 357 and 476 nm and NO2, HCHO, CHOCHO, H2O, SO2, and O3 volume mixing ratios. A Japanese MAX-DOAS profile retrieval algorithm, version 1 (JM1, is applied to observations performed at Cabauw, the Netherlands (51.97° N, 4.93° E, in June–July 2009 during the Cabauw Intercomparison campaign of Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI. Of the retrieved profiles, we focus here on the lowest-layer data (mean values at altitudes 0–1 km, where the sensitivity is usually highest owing to the longest light path. In support of the capability of the multi-component retrievals, we find reasonable overall agreement with independent data sets, including a regional chemical transport model (CHIMERE and in situ observations performed at the 3 and 200 m height levels of the tall tower in Cabauw. Plumes of enhanced HCHO and SO2 were likely affected by biogenic and ship emissions, respectively, and an improvement in their emission strengths is suggested for better agreement between CHIMERE simulations and MAX-DOAS observations. Analysis of air mass factors indicates that the horizontal spatial representativeness of MAX-DOAS observations is about 3–15 km (depending mainly on aerosol extinction, comparable to or better than the spatial resolution of current UV-visible satellite observations and model calculations. These demonstrate that MAX-DOAS provides multi-component data useful for the evaluation of satellite observations and model calculations and can play an important role in bridging different data sets having different spatial resolutions.

  17. The 8-component retrievals from ground-based MAX-DOAS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, H.; Takashima, H.; Kanaya, Y.; Boersma, F.; Gast, L.; Wittrock, F.; van Roozendael, M.

    2010-12-01

    We first attempt to retrieve lower-tropospheric vertical profile information on 8 components from ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) observations. Components retrieved are aerosol extinction coefficients (AEC) at two wavelengths 357 and 476 nm, NO2, HCHO, CHOCHO, H2O, SO2, and O3 volume mixing ratios (VMRs). A Japanese MAX-DOAS profile retrieval algorithm version 1 (JM1) is applied to observations performed at Cabauw, the Netherlands (51.97N, 4.93E) in June-July 2009 during the Cabauw Intercomparison campaign of Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI). Of retrieved profiles, we focus here on the lowest layer data (mean values at altitudes 0-1 km), where the sensitivity is usually highest owing to the longest light path. In support of the capability of the multi-component retrievals, overall we find reasonable agreement with independent data sets, including a regional chemical transport model (CHIMERE) and in situ observations performed at 3- and 200-m height levels of a tower placed in Cabauw. Enhanced HCHO and SO2 plumes were likely affected by biogenic and ship emissions, respectively, but an improvement in their emission strengths was suggested for better agreement. Analysis of air mass factors indicates that the horizontal representativeness of MAX-DOAS observation is about 3-15 km, comparable to or better than the spatial resolution of relevant UV-visible satellite observations and model calculations. These demonstrate that MAX-DOAS provides multi-component data useful for evaluation of satellite observations and model calculations and plays a role in bridging different data sets having different spatial resolutions.

  18. Eight-component retrievals from ground-based MAX-DOAS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, H.; Takashima, H.; Kanaya, Y.; Boersma, K. F.; Gast, L.; Wittrock, F.; Brunner, D.; Zhou, Y.; van Roozendael, M.

    2011-06-01

    We attempt for the first time to retrieve lower-tropospheric vertical profile information for 8 quantities from ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) observations. The components retrieved are the aerosol extinction coefficients at two wavelengths, 357 and 476 nm, and NO2, HCHO, CHOCHO, H2O, SO2, and O3 volume mixing ratios. A Japanese MAX-DOAS profile retrieval algorithm, version 1 (JM1), is applied to observations performed at Cabauw, the Netherlands (51.97° N, 4.93° E), in June-July 2009 during the Cabauw Intercomparison campaign of Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI). Of the retrieved profiles, we focus here on the lowest-layer data (mean values at altitudes 0-1 km), where the sensitivity is usually highest owing to the longest light path. In support of the capability of the multi-component retrievals, we find reasonable overall agreement with independent data sets, including a regional chemical transport model (CHIMERE) and in situ observations performed near the surface (2-3 m) and at the 200-m height level of the tall tower in Cabauw. Plumes of enhanced HCHO and SO2 were likely affected by biogenic and ship emissions, respectively, and an improvement in their emission strengths is suggested for better agreement between CHIMERE simulations and MAX-DOAS observations. Analysis of air mass factors indicates that the horizontal spatial representativeness of MAX-DOAS observations is about 3-15 km (depending mainly on aerosol extinction), comparable to or better than the spatial resolution of current UV-visible satellite observations and model calculations. These demonstrate that MAX-DOAS provides multi-component data useful for the evaluation of satellite observations and model calculations and can play an important role in bridging different data sets having different spatial resolutions.

  19. Radar-to-Radar Interference Suppression for Distributed Radar Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-Qin Wang; Huaizong Shao

    2014-01-01

    Radar sensor networks, including bi- and multi-static radars, provide several operational advantages, like reduced vulnerability, good system flexibility and an increased radar cross-section. However, radar-to-radar interference suppression is a major problem in distributed radar sensor networks. In this paper, we present a cross-matched filtering-based radar-to-radar interference suppression algorithm. This algorithm first uses an iterative filtering algorithm to suppress the radar-to-radar ...

  20. Comparison of HRDI wind measurements with radar and rocket observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrage, M.D.; Skinner, W.R.; Marshall, A.R.; Hays, P.B.; Lieberman, R.S.; Gell, D.A.; Ortland, D.A.; Morton, Y.T.; Wu, D.L.; Franke, S.J.; Schmidlin, F.J.; Vincent, R.A.

    1993-06-18

    This paper reports wind measurements in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere made by the high resolution doppler imager (HRDI) on board the upper atmosphere research satellite (UARS). These measurements are correlated with ground based radar and rocket measurements. The HRDI makes measurements by observing doppler shifts in molecular oxygen lines. The intercomparison helps to validate the remote sensing results, helps to verify the on board calibration system, and also gives a common measurement which other measurements systems can be compared against.

  1. Evaluation of Ionospheric Densities Using Coincident OII 83.4 nm Airglow and the Millstone Hill Radar

    CERN Document Server

    Douglas, Ewan S; Stephan, Andrew W; Cashman, Lauren; Bishop, Rebecca L; Budzien, Scott A; Christensen, Andrew B; Hecht, James H; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    2016-01-01

    We test the utility of the OII 83.4 nm emission feature as a measure of ionospheric parameters. Observed with the Remote Atmospheric and Ionospheric Detection System (RAIDS) Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrograph on the International Space Station (ISS), limb profiles of 83.4 nm emissions are compared to predicted dayglow emission profiles from a theoretical model incorporating ground-based electron density profiles measured by the Millstone Hill radar and parameterized by a best-fit Chapman-{\\alpha} function. Observations and models are compared for periods of conjunction between Millstone Hill and the RAIDS fields-of-view. These RAIDS observations show distinct differences in topside morphology between two days, 15 January and 10 March 2010, closely matching the forward model morphology and demonstrating that 83.4 nm emission is sensitive to changes in the ionospheric density profile from the 340 km altitude of the ISS during solar minimum. We find no significant difference between 83.4 nm emission profiles model...

  2. Ground-based monitoring of solar radiation in Moldova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aculinin, Alexandr; Smicov, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    Integrated measurements of solar radiation in Kishinev, Moldova have been started by Atmospheric Research Group (ARG) at the Institute of Applied Physics from 2003. Direct, diffuse and total components of solar and atmospheric long-wave radiation are measured by using of the radiometric complex at the ground-based solar radiation monitoring station. Measurements are fulfilled at the stationary and moving platforms equipped with the set of 9 broadband solar radiation sensors overlapping wavelength range from UV-B to IR. Detailed description of the station can be found at the site http://arg.phys.asm.md. Ground station is placed in an urban environment of Kishinev city (47.00N; 28.56E). Summary of observation data acquired at the station in the course of short-term period from 2004 to 2009 are presented below. Solar radiation measurements were fulfilled by using CM11(280-3000 nm) and CH1 sensors (Kipp&Zonen). In the course of a year maximum and minimum of monthly sums of total radiation was ~706.4 MJm-2 in June and ~82.1MJm-2 in December, respectively. Monthly sums of direct solar radiation (on horizontal plane) show the maximum and minimum values of the order ~456.9 MJm-2 in July and ~25.5MJm-2 in December, respectively. In an average, within a year should be marked the predominance of direct radiation over the scattered radiation, 51% and 49%, respectively. In the course of a year, the percentage contribution of the direct radiation into the total radiation is ~55-65% from May to September. In the remaining months, the percentage contribution decreases and takes the minimum value of ~ 28% in December. In an average, annual sum of total solar radiation is ~4679.9 MJm-2. For the period from April to September accounts for ~76% of the annual amount of total radiation. Annual sum of sunshine duration accounts for ~2149 hours, which is of ~ 48% from the possible sunshine duration. In an average, within a year maximum and minimum of sunshine duration is ~ 304 hours in

  3. Biosensors for EVA: Improved Instrumentation for Ground-based Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, B.; Ellerby, G.; Zou, F.; Scott, P.; Jin, C.; Lee, S. M. C.; Coates, J.

    2010-01-01

    During lunar excursions in the EVA suit, real-time measurement of metabolic rate is required to manage consumables and guide activities to ensure safe return to the base. Metabolic rate, or oxygen consumption (VO2), is normally measured from pulmonary parameters but cannot be determined with standard techniques in the oxygen-rich environment of a spacesuit. Our group has developed novel near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) methods to calculate muscle oxygen saturation (SmO 2), hematocrit, and pH, and we recently demonstrated that we can use our NIRS sensor to measure VO 2 on the leg during cycling. Our NSBRI project has 4 objectives: (1) increase the accuracy of the metabolic rate calculation through improved prediction of stroke volume; (2) investigate the relative contributions of calf and thigh oxygen consumption to metabolic rate calculation for walking and running; (3) demonstrate that the NIRS-based noninvasive metabolic rate methodology is sensitive enough to detect decrement in VO 2 in a space analog; and (4) improve instrumentation to allow testing within a spacesuit. Over the past year we have made progress on all four objectives, but the most significant progress was made in improving the instrumentation. The NIRS system currently in use at JSC is based on fiber optics technology. Optical fiber bundles are used to deliver light from a light source in the monitor to the patient, and light reflected back from the patient s muscle to the monitor for spectroscopic analysis. The fiber optic cables are large and fragile, and there is no way to get them in and out of the test spacesuit used for ground-based studies. With complimentary funding from the US Army, we undertook a complete redesign of the sensor and control electronics to build a novel system small enough to be used within the spacesuit and portable enough to be used by a combat medic. In the new system the filament lamp used in the fiber optic system was replaced with a novel broadband near infrared

  4. Biosensors for EVA: Improved Instrumentation for Ground-based Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, B.; Ellerby, G.; Zou, F.; Scott, P.; Jin, C.; Lee, S. M. C.; Coates, J.

    2010-01-01

    During lunar excursions in the EVA suit, real-time measurement of metabolic rate is required to manage consumables and guide activities to ensure safe return to the base. Metabolic rate, or oxygen consumption (VO2), is normally measured from pulmonary parameters but cannot be determined with standard techniques in the oxygen-rich environment of a spacesuit. Our group has developed novel near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) methods to calculate muscle oxygen saturation (SmO 2), hematocrit, and pH, and we recently demonstrated that we can use our NIRS sensor to measure VO 2 on the leg during cycling. Our NSBRI project has 4 objectives: (1) increase the accuracy of the metabolic rate calculation through improved prediction of stroke volume; (2) investigate the relative contributions of calf and thigh oxygen consumption to metabolic rate calculation for walking and running; (3) demonstrate that the NIRS-based noninvasive metabolic rate methodology is sensitive enough to detect decrement in VO 2 in a space analog; and (4) improve instrumentation to allow testing within a spacesuit. Over the past year we have made progress on all four objectives, but the most significant progress was made in improving the instrumentation. The NIRS system currently in use at JSC is based on fiber optics technology. Optical fiber bundles are used to deliver light from a light source in the monitor to the patient, and light reflected back from the patient s muscle to the monitor for spectroscopic analysis. The fiber optic cables are large and fragile, and there is no way to get them in and out of the test spacesuit used for ground-based studies. With complimentary funding from the US Army, we undertook a complete redesign of the sensor and control electronics to build a novel system small enough to be used within the spacesuit and portable enough to be used by a combat medic. In the new system the filament lamp used in the fiber optic system was replaced with a novel broadband near infrared

  5. Ground-based Space Weather Monitoring with LOFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Michael; van Haarlem, Michiel; Lawrence, Gareth; Reid, Simon; Bos, Andre; Rawlings, Steve; Salvini, Stef; Mitchell, Cathryn; Soleimani, Manuch; Amado, Sergio; Teresa, Vital

    As one of the first of a new generation of radio instruments, the International LOFAR Telescope (ILT) will provide a number of unique and novel capabilities for the astronomical community. These include remote configuration and operation, dynamic real-time processing and system response, and the ability to provide multiple simultaneous streams of data to a community whose scientific interests run the gamut from lighting in the atmospheres of distant planets to the origins of the universe itself. The LOFAR (LOw Frequency ARray) system is optimized for a frequency range from 30-240 MHz and consists of multiple antenna fields spread across Europe. In the Netherlands, a total 36 LOFAR stations are nearing completion with an initial 8 international stations currently being deployed in Germany, France, Sweden, and the UK. Digital beam-forming techniques make the LOFAR system agile and allow for rapid repointing of the telescope as well as the potential for multiple simultaneous observations. With its dense core array and long interferometric baselines, LOFAR has the potential to achieve unparalleled sensitivity and spatial resolution in the low frequency radio regime. LOFAR will also be one of the first radio observatories to feature automated processing pipelines to deliver fully calibrated science products to its user community. As we discuss in this presentation, the same capabilities that make LOFAR a powerful tool for radio astronomy also provide an excellent platform upon which to build a ground-based monitoring system for space weather events. For example, the ability to monitor Solar activity in near real-time is one of the key scientific capabilities being developed for LOFAR. With only a fraction of its total observing capacity, LOFAR will be able to provide continuous monitoring of the Solar spectrum over the entire 10-240 MHz band down to microsecond timescales. Autonomous routines will scan these incoming spectral data for evidence of Solar flares and be

  6. Continuous ground-based aerosol Lidar observation during seasonal pollution events at Wuxi, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Man Sing; Qin, Kai; Lian, Hong; Campbell, James R.; Lee, Kwon Ho; Sheng, Shijie

    2017-04-01

    Haze pollution has long been a significant research topic and challenge in China, with adverse effects on air quality, agricultural production, as well as human health. In coupling with ground-based Lidar measurements, air quality observation, meteorological data, and backward trajectories model, two typical haze events at Wuxi, China are analyzed respectively, depicting summer and winter scenarios. Results indicate that the winter haze pollution is a compound pollution process mainly affected by calm winds that induce pollution accumulation near the surface. In the summer case, with the exception of influence from PM2.5 concentrations, ozone is the main pollutant and regional transport is also a significant influencing factor. Both events are marked by enhanced PM2.5 concentrations, driven by anthropogenic emissions of pollutants such as vehicle exhaust and factory fumes. Meteorological factors such as wind speed/direction and relative humidity are also contributed. These results indicate how the vertical profile offered by routine regional Lidar monitoring helps aid in understanding local variability and trends, which may be adapted for developing abatement strategies that improve air quality.

  7. The Effect of Pulsar Timing Noise and Glitches on Timing Analysis for Ground Based Telescopes Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oña-Wilhelmi, E.; de Jager, O. C.; Contreras, J. L.; de los Reyes, R.; Fonseca, V.; López, M.; Lucarelli, F.; MAGIC Collaboration

    2003-07-01

    Pulsed emission from a number of gamma-ray pulsars is expected to be detectable with next generation ground-based gamma-ray telescopes such as MAGIC and possibly H.E.S.S. within a few hours of observations. The sensitivity is however not sufficient to enable a detection within a few seconds as reached by radio surveys. In some cases we may be fortunate to do a period search given a few hours' data, but if the signal is marginal, the correct period parameters must be known to allow a folding of the gamma-ray arrival times. The residual phases are then sub jected to a test for uniformity from which the significance of a signal can be assessed. If contemporary radio parameters are not available, we have to extrap olate archival radio parameters to the observation time in question. Such an extrap olation must then be accurate enough to avoid significant pulse smearing. The pulsar ephemerides from the archival data of HartRAO and Princeton (b etween 1989 and 1998) provide an excellent opportunity to study the accuracy of extrap olations of such ephemerides to the present moment, if an appropriate time shift is intro duced. The aim of this study is to investigate the smear in the gamma-ray pulse profile during a single night of observations.

  8. Validation of the CrIS fast physical NH3 retrieval with ground-based FTIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Dammers

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Presented here is the validation of the CrIS (Cross-track Infrared Sounder fast physical NH3 retrieval (CFPR column and profile measurements using ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR observations. We use the total columns and profiles from seven FTIR sites in the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC to validate the satellite data products. The overall FTIR and CrIS total columns have a positive correlation of r  =  0.77 (N  =  218 with very little bias (a slope of 1.02. Binning the comparisons by total column amounts, for concentrations larger than 1.0  ×  1016 molecules cm−2, i.e. ranging from moderate to polluted conditions, the relative difference is on average ∼ 0–5 % with a standard deviation of 25–50 %, which is comparable to the estimated retrieval uncertainties in both CrIS and the FTIR. For the smallest total column range (< 1.0  × 1016 molecules cm−2 where there are a large number of observations at or near the CrIS noise level (detection limit the absolute differences between CrIS and the FTIR total columns show a slight positive column bias. The CrIS and FTIR profile comparison differences are mostly within the range of the single-level retrieved profile values from estimated retrieval uncertainties, showing average differences in the range of  ∼ 20 to 40 %. The CrIS retrievals typically show good vertical sensitivity down into the boundary layer which typically peaks at  ∼ 850 hPa (∼ 1.5 km. At this level the median absolute difference is 0.87 (std  =  ±0.08 ppb, corresponding to a median relative difference of 39 % (std  =  ±2 %. Most of the absolute and relative profile comparison differences are in the range of the estimated retrieval uncertainties. At the surface, where CrIS typically has lower sensitivity, it tends to overestimate in low-concentration conditions and underestimate

  9. Clinical profile of 266 Filipino patients with rheumatoid arthritis included in the rheumatoid arthritis database and registry (RADAR) of the Philippine General Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penserga, Ester G; Natividad, Therese Aileen L; Salido, Evelyn S

    2015-05-01

    To describe Filipino patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) entered in the Rheumatoid arthritis database and registry (RADAR) of the Philippine General Hospital. Cases entered to RADAR from 2010-2012 were included. All fulfilled the 1987 American College of Rheumatology criteria for classification of RA. Included cases gave written infomed consent. Data extracted were demographics, clinical presentation, laboratory tests, treatment and disease course. Means and proportions were used for population characteristics. Two hundred and sixty-six cases were included. Mean age was 44 years, with 9 : 1 female preponderance and mean diagnosis time of 5 years. There was symmetrical polyarthritis with high tender and swollen joint count and mean Disease Activity Score of 28 joints, erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 5.27 (3.39, 8.13). Rheumatoid factor was positive in 2/3 of cases. Hypertension, tuberculosis and diabetes were important co-morbidities. Treatment included prednisone, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and methotrexate. At 12 months of treatment, evaluable cases (arthritis unit whose disease characteristics are similar to what is reported worldwide. This cohort differs from most studies in having a high female to male ratio, a long delay in diagnosis, and high attrition rate. Mean methotrexate dose was low and there was less access to biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Radar model fusion of asteroid (4179) Toutatis via its optical images observed by Chang'e-2 probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Xiao, Ting; Liu, Peng; Sun, Lei; Huang, Jiangchuan; Tang, Xianglong

    2016-06-01

    Asteroid (4179) Toutatis has been modeling by ground-based radar observations until Dec 13th, 2012, when distinct optical images of Toutatis were captured during the Chang'e-2 flyby at the shortest distance for the first time. The surface details on Toutatis in the optical images are abundant enough to reinforce the radar model descriptions. Under this context, we customized a method of frequency domain data fusion, which combines the topography information of radar model and the 3rd dimension information estimated from optical image by shape from shading algorithm, and gave out a new Toutatis' radar model. A model with abundant surface characteristics had been resulted.

  11. The PHARUS Project; Real Time Digital Processing of Airborne Polarimetric Radar Signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, H.; Hoogeboom, P.; Koomen, P.J.; Snoeij, P.

    1992-01-01

    The Dutch PHARUS project aims for the developrlenÈ of a polarimetric C-band aircraft SAR, to be finalized in 1994. The PHARUS systen consists of three subsystens: the radar, the subsystem for the onboard data processing and recording and the ground-based subsystem for SAR processing. PHARUS is a ver

  12. Quality assessment of water cycle parameters in REMO by radar-lidar synergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Hennemuth

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparison study of water cycle parameters derived from ground-based remote-sensing instruments and from the regional model REMO is presented. Observational data sets were collected during three measuring campaigns in summer/autumn 2003 and 2004 at Richard Aßmann Observatory, Lindenberg, Germany. The remote sensing instruments which were used are differential absorption lidar, Doppler lidar, ceilometer, cloud radar, and micro rain radar for the derivation of humidity profiles, ABL height, water vapour flux profiles, cloud parameters, and rain rate. Additionally, surface latent and sensible heat flux and soil moisture were measured. Error ranges and representativity of the data are discussed. For comparisons the regional model REMO was run for all measuring periods with a horizontal resolution of 18 km and 33 vertical levels. Parameter output was every hour. The measured data were transformed to the vertical model grid and averaged in time in order to better match with gridbox model values. The comparisons show that the atmospheric boundary layer is not adequately simulated, on most days it is too shallow and too moist. This is found to be caused by a wrong partitioning of energy at the surface, particularly a too large latent heat flux. The reason is obviously an overestimation of soil moisture during drying periods by the one-layer scheme in the model. The profiles of water vapour transport within the ABL appear to be realistically simulated. The comparison of cloud cover reveals an underestimation of low-level and mid-level clouds by the model, whereas the comparison of high-level clouds is hampered by the inability of the cloud radar to see cirrus clouds above 10 km. Simulated ABL clouds apparently have a too low cloud base, and the vertical extent is underestimated. The ice water content of clouds agree in model and observation whereas the liquid water content is unsufficiently derived from cloud radar reflectivity in the present study

  13. Quality assessment of water cycle parameters in REMO by Radar-Lidar synergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Hennemuth

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A comparison study of water cycle parameters derived from ground-based remote-sensing instruments and from the regional model REMO is presented. Observational data sets were collected during three measuring campaigns in summer/autumn 2003 and 2004 at Richard Aßmann Observatory, Lindenberg, Germany. The remote sensing instruments which were used are differential absorption lidar, Doppler lidar, ceilometer, cloud radar, and micro rain radar for the derivation of humidity profiles, ABL height, water vapour flux profiles, cloud parameters, and rain rate. Additionally, surface latent and sensible heat flux and soil moisture were measured. Error ranges and representativity of the data are discussed. For comparisons the regional model REMO was run for all measuring periods with a horizontal resolution of 18 km and 33 vertical levels. Parameter output was every hour. The measured data were transformed to the vertical model grid and averaged in time in order to better fit with gridbox model values. The comparisons show that the atmospheric boundary layer is not adequately simulated, on most days it is too shallow and too moist. This is found to be caused by a wrong partitioning of energy at the surface, particularly a too large latent heat flux. The reason is obviously an overestimation of soil moisture during drying periods by the one-layer scheme in the model. The profiles of water vapour transport within the ABL appear to be realistically simulated. The comparison of cloud cover reveals an underestimation of low-level and mid-level clouds by the model, whereas the comparison of high-level clouds is hampered by the inability of the cloud radar to see cirrus clouds above 10 km. Simulated ABL clouds apparently have a too low cloud base, and the vertical extent is underestimated. The ice water content of clouds agree in model and observation whereas the liquid water content is unsufficiently derived from cloud radar reflectivity in the present study

  14. Quality assessment of water cycle parameters in REMO by radar-lidar synergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennemuth, B.; Weiss, A.; Bösenberg, J.; Jacob, D.; Linné, H.; Peters, G.; Pfeifer, S.

    2008-01-01

    A comparison study of water cycle parameters derived from ground-based remote-sensing instruments and from the regional model REMO is presented. Observational data sets were collected during three measuring campaigns in summer/autumn 2003 and 2004 at Richard Aßmann Observatory, Lindenberg, Germany. The remote sensing instruments which were used are differential absorption lidar, Doppler lidar, ceilometer, cloud radar, and micro rain radar for the derivation of humidity profiles, ABL height, water vapour flux profiles, cloud parameters, and rain rate. Additionally, surface latent and sensible heat flux and soil moisture were measured. Error ranges and representativity of the data are discussed. For comparisons the regional model REMO was run for all measuring periods with a horizontal resolution of 18 km and 33 vertical levels. Parameter output was every hour. The measured data were transformed to the vertical model grid and averaged in time in order to better match with gridbox model values. The comparisons show that the atmospheric boundary layer is not adequately simulated, on most days it is too shallow and too moist. This is found to be caused by a wrong partitioning of energy at the surface, particularly a too large latent heat flux. The reason is obviously an overestimation of soil moisture during drying periods by the one-layer scheme in the model. The profiles of water vapour transport within the ABL appear to be realistically simulated. The comparison of cloud cover reveals an underestimation of low-level and mid-level clouds by the model, whereas the comparison of high-level clouds is hampered by the inability of the cloud radar to see cirrus clouds above 10 km. Simulated ABL clouds apparently have a too low cloud base, and the vertical extent is underestimated. The ice water content of clouds agree in model and observation whereas the liquid water content is unsufficiently derived from cloud radar reflectivity in the present study. Rain rates are

  15. TESTING GROUND BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES TO REFINE ELECTROMAGNETIC SURVEYS NORTH OF THE 300 AREA HANFORD WASHINGTON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN SW

    2010-12-02

    Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys were flown during fiscal year (FY) 2008 within the 600 Area in an attempt to characterize the underlying subsurface and to aid in the closure and remediation design study goals for the 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU). The rationale for using the AEM surveys was that airborne surveys can cover large areas rapidly at relatively low costs with minimal cultural impact, and observed geo-electrical anomalies could be correlated with important subsurface geologic and hydrogeologic features. Initial interpretation of the AEM surveys indicated a tenuous correlation with the underlying geology, from which several anomalous zones likely associated with channels/erosional features incised into the Ringold units were identified near the River Corridor. Preliminary modeling resulted in a slightly improved correlation but revealed that more information was required to constrain the modeling (SGW-39674, Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Report, 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, 600 Area, Hanford Site). Both time-and frequency domain AEM surveys were collected with the densest coverage occurring adjacent to the Columbia River Corridor. Time domain surveys targeted deeper subsurface features (e.g., top-of-basalt) and were acquired using the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} system along north-south flight lines with a nominal 400 m (1,312 ft) spacing. The frequency domain RESOLVE system acquired electromagnetic (EM) data along tighter spaced (100 m [328 ft] and 200 m [656 ft]) north-south profiles in the eastern fifth of the 200-PO-1 Groundwater OU (immediately adjacent to the River Corridor). The overall goal of this study is to provide further quantification of the AEM survey results, using ground based geophysical methods, and to link results to the underlying geology and/or hydrogeology. Specific goals of this project are as follows: (1) Test ground based geophysical techniques for the efficacy in delineating underlying geology; (2) Use ground

  16. Evaluation of atmospheric dust prediction models using ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terradellas, Enric; María Baldasano, José; Cuevas, Emilio; Basart, Sara; Huneeus, Nicolás; Camino, Carlos; Dundar, Cinhan; Benincasa, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    An important step in numerical prediction of mineral dust is the model evaluation aimed to assess its performance to forecast the atmospheric dust content and to lead to new directions in model development and improvement. The first problem to address the evaluation is the scarcity of ground-based routine observations intended for dust monitoring. An alternative option would be the use of satellite products. They have the advantage of a large spatial coverage and a regular availability. However, they do have numerous drawbacks that make the quantitative retrievals of aerosol-related variables difficult and imprecise. This work presents the use of different ground-based observing systems for the evaluation of dust models in the Regional Center for Northern Africa, Middle East and Europe of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and Assessment System (SDS-WAS). The dust optical depth at 550 nm forecast by different models is regularly compared with the AERONET measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) for 40 selected stations. Photometric measurements are a powerful tool for remote sensing of the atmosphere allowing retrieval of aerosol properties, such as AOD. This variable integrates the contribution of different aerosol types, but may be complemented with spectral information that enables hypotheses about the nature of the particles. Comparison is restricted to cases with low Ångström exponent values in order to ensure that coarse mineral dust is the dominant aerosol type. Additionally to column dust load, it is important to evaluate dust surface concentration and dust vertical profiles. Air quality monitoring stations are the main source of data for the evaluation of surface concentration. However they are concentrated in populated and industrialized areas around the Mediterranean. In the present contribution, results of different models are compared with observations of PM10 from the Turkish air quality network for

  17. Ozone columns obtained by ground-based remote sensing in Kiev for Aura Ozone Measuring Instrument validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavrina, A. V.; Pavlenko, Y. V.; Veles, A.; Syniavskyi, I.; Kroon, M.

    2007-12-01

    Ground-based observations with a Fourier transform spectrometer in the infrared region (FTIR) were performed in Kiev (Ukraine) during the time frames August-October 2005 and June-October 2006 within the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) validation project 2907 entitled "OMI validation by ground based remote sensing: ozone columns and profiles" in the frame of the international European Space Agency/Netherlands Agency for Aerospace Programmes/Royal Dutch Meteorological Institute OMI Announcement of Opportunity effort. Ozone column data for 2005 were obtained by modeling the ozone spectral band at 9.6 μm with the radiative transfer code MODTRAN3.5. Our total ozone column values were found to be lower than OMI Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) total ozone column data by 8-10 Dobson units (DU, 1 DU = 0.001 atm cm) on average, while our observations have a relatively small standard error of about 2 DU. Improved modeling of the ozone spectral band, now based on HITRAN-2004 spectral data as calculated by us, moves our results toward better agreement with the OMI DOAS total ozone column data. The observations made during 2006 with a modernized FTIR spectrometer and higher signal-to-noise ratio were simulated by the MODTRAN4 model computations. For ozone column estimates the Aqua Atmospheric Infrared Sounder satellite water vapor and temperature profiles were combined with the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder stratospheric ozone profiles and Tropospheric Emission Monitoring Internet Service-Koninklijk Nederlands Meteorologisch Instituut climatological profiles to create a priori input files for spectral modeling. The MODTRAN4 estimates of ozone columns from the 2006 observations compare rather well with the OMI total ozone column data: standard errors are of 1.11 DU and 0.68 DU, standard deviation are of 8.77 DU and 5.37 DU for OMI DOAS and OMI Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, respectively.

  18. Retrieval of Precipitation Profiles from Multiresolution, Multifrequency, Active and Passive Microwave Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, a technique for estimating vertical profiles of precipitation from multifrequency, multiresolution active and passive microwave observations is investigated. The technique is applicable to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) observations and it is based on models that simulate high-resolution brightness temperatures as functions of observed reflectivity profiles and a parameter related to the rain drop-size-distribution. The modeled high-resolution brightness temperatures are used to determine normalized brightness temperature polarizations at the microwave radiometer resolution. An optimal estimation procedure is employed to minimize the differences between the simulated and observed normalized polarizations by adjusting the drop-size-distribution parameter. The impact of other unknowns that are not independent variables in the optimal estimation but affect the retrievals is minimized through statistical parameterizations derived from cloud model simulations. The retrieval technique is investigated using TRMM observations collected during the Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX). These observations cover an area extending from 5 deg to deg N latitude and 166 deg to 172 deg E longitude from July to September 1999, and are coincident with various ground-based observations, facilitating a detailed analysis of the retrieved precipitation. Using the method developed in this study, precipitation estimates consistent with both the passive and active TRMM observations are obtained. Various parameters characterizing these estimates, i.e. the rain rate, the precipitation water content, the drop-size-distribution intercept, and the mass weighted mean drop diameter, are in good qualitative agreement with independent experimental and theoretical estimates. Combined rain estimates are in general higher than the official TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) only estimates for the area and the period considered in the study. Ground-based precipitation estimates

  19. Ground-based remote sensing of tropospheric water vapour isotopologues within the project MUSICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M.; Barthlott, S.; Hase, F.; González, Y.; Yoshimura, K.; García, O. E.; Sepúlveda, E.; Gomez-Pelaez, A.; Gisi, M.; Kohlhepp, R.; Dohe, S.; Blumenstock, T.; Wiegele, A.; Christner, E.; Strong, K.; Weaver, D.; Palm, M.; Deutscher, N. M.; Warneke, T.; Notholt, J.; Lejeune, B.; Demoulin, P.; Jones, N.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Smale, D.; Robinson, J.

    2012-12-01

    Within the project MUSICA (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water), long-term tropospheric water vapour isotopologue data records are provided for ten globally distributed ground-based mid-infrared remote sensing stations of the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change). We present a new method allowing for an extensive and straightforward characterisation of the complex nature of such isotopologue remote sensing datasets. We demonstrate that the MUSICA humidity profiles are representative for most of the troposphere with a vertical resolution ranging from about 2 km (in the lower troposphere) to 8 km (in the upper troposphere) and with an estimated precision of better than 10%. We find that the sensitivity with respect to the isotopologue composition is limited to the lower and middle troposphere, whereby we estimate a precision of about 30‰ for the ratio between the two isotopologues HD16O and H216O. The measurement noise, the applied atmospheric temperature profiles, the uncertainty in the spectral baseline, and the cross-dependence on humidity are the leading error sources. We introduce an a posteriori correction method of the cross-dependence on humidity, and we recommend applying it to isotopologue ratio remote sensing datasets in general. In addition, we present mid-infrared CO2 retrievals and use them for demonstrating the MUSICA network-wide data consistency. In order to indicate the potential of long-term isotopologue remote sensing data if provided with a well-documented quality, we present a climatology and compare it to simulations of an isotope incorporated AGCM (Atmospheric General Circulation Model). We identify differences in the multi-year mean and seasonal cycles that significantly exceed the estimated errors, thereby indicating deficits in the modeled atmospheric water cycle.

  20. Ground-based remote sensing of tropospheric water vapour isotopologues within the project MUSICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schneider

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the project MUSICA (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water, long-term tropospheric water vapour isotopologue data records are provided for ten globally distributed ground-based mid-infrared remote sensing stations of the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change. We present a new method allowing for an extensive and straightforward characterisation of the complex nature of such isotopologue remote sensing datasets. We demonstrate that the MUSICA humidity profiles are representative for most of the troposphere with a vertical resolution ranging from about 2 km (in the lower troposphere to 8 km (in the upper troposphere and with an estimated precision of better than 10%. We find that the sensitivity with respect to the isotopologue composition is limited to the lower and middle troposphere, whereby we estimate a precision of about 30‰ for the ratio between the two isotopologues HD16O and H216O. The measurement noise, the applied atmospheric temperature profiles, the uncertainty in the spectral baseline, and the cross-dependence on humidity are the leading error sources. We introduce an a posteriori correction method of the cross-dependence on humidity, and we recommend applying it to isotopologue ratio remote sensing datasets in general. In addition, we present mid-infrared CO2 retrievals and use them for demonstrating the MUSICA network-wide data consistency. In order to indicate the potential of long-term isotopologue remote sensing data if provided with a well-documented quality, we present a climatology and compare it to simulations of an isotope incorporated AGCM (Atmospheric General Circulation Model. We identify differences in the multi-year mean and seasonal cycles that significantly exceed the estimated errors, thereby indicating deficits in the modeled atmospheric water cycle.

  1. Ground-based remote sensing of tropospheric water vapour isotopologues within the project MUSICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schneider

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Within the project MUSICA (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water, long-term tropospheric water vapour isotopologues data records are provided for ten globally distributed ground-based mid-infrared remote sensing stations of the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change. We present a new method allowing for an extensive and straightforward characterisation of the complex nature of such isotopologue remote sensing datasets. We demonstrate that the MUSICA humidity profiles are representative for most of the troposphere with a vertical resolution ranging from about 2 km (in the lower troposphere to 8 km (in the upper troposphere and with an estimated precision of better than 10%. We find that the sensitivity with respect to the isotopologue composition is limited to the lower and middle troposphere, whereby we estimate a precision of about 30‰ for the ratio between the two isotopologues HD16O and H216O. The measurement noise, the applied atmospheric temperature profiles, the uncertainty in the spectral baseline, and interferences from humidity are the leading error sources. We introduce an a posteriori correction method of the humidity interference error and we recommend applying it for isotopologue ratio remote sensing datasets in general. In addition, we present mid-infrared CO2 retrievals and use them for demonstrating the MUSICA network-wide data consistency.

    In order to indicate the potential of long-term isotopologue remote sensing data if provided with a well-documented quality, we present a climatology and compare it to simulations of an isotope incorporated AGCM (Atmospheric General Circulation Model. We identify differences in the multi-year mean and seasonal cycles that significantly exceed the estimated errors, thereby indicating deficits in the modeled atmospheric water cycle.

  2. Radar diagnosis of the subglacial conditions in Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fujita

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to better understand the spatial distribution of subglacial environments, ground-based radar profiling data were analyzed for a total distance of ~ 3300 km across Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica. The relationship between geometrically corrected bed returned power [Pcbed]dB in decibels and ice thickness H was examined. When H is smaller than a~critical value that varies according to location, [Pcbed]dB tends to decrease relatively smoothly with increasing H, which is explicable primarily by the cumulative effect of dielectric attenuation within the ice. However, at locations where H is larger than the critical H values, anomalous increases and fluctuations in [Pcbed]dB were observed, regardless of the choice of radar frequency or radar-pulse width. In addition, the amplitude of the fluctuations often range 10 ~ 20 dB. We argue that the anomalous increases are caused by higher bed reflectivity associated with the existence of subglacial water. We used these features to delineate frozen and temperate beds. Approximately two-thirds of the investigated area was found to have a temperate bed. The beds of the inland part of the ice sheet tend to be temperate, with the exception of subglacial high mountains. In contrast, the beds of coastal areas tend to be frozen, with the exception of fast-flowing ice on the subglacial lowland or troughs. We argue that this new analytical method can be applied to other regions.

  3. Ozone tropospheric and stratospheric trends (1995-2008) over Western Europe from ground-based FTIR network observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigouroux, Corinne; Demoulin, Philippe; Blumenstock, Thomas; Schneider, Matthias; Klyft, Jon; Palm, Mathias; Gardiner, Tom

    2010-05-01

    Five ground-based stations in Western Europe, from 79°N to 28°N, all part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC), have joined their efforts to homogenize and optimize the retrievals of ozone profiles from FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) solar absorption spectra. Using the optimal estimation method, distinct vertical information can be obtained in four layers: ground--10 km, 10--18 km, 18--27 km, and 27--42 km, in addition to total column amounts. A bootstrap resampling method has been implemented to determine annual partial and total column trends1. Vigouroux et al. (2008)2 applied this method to the ozone data and discussed the trends of the total columns and of the partial columns in the above four layers, over the period 1995-2004. Here, we present and discuss an update of this analysis for the 1995-2008 period. We obtain, among others, that at all the stations, the ozone total columns trends are non significant while the trends in the upper stratospheric layer (27-42 km) are significantly positive. 1 Gardiner, T., Forbes, A., Woods, P., De Mazière, M., Vigouroux, C., Mahieu, E., Demoulin, P., Velazco, V., Notholt, J., Blumenstock, T., Hase, F., Kramer, I., Sussmann, R., Stremme, W., Mellqvist, J., Strandberg, A., Ellingsen, K., and Gauss, M.: Method for evaluating trends in greenhouse gases from ground-based remote FTIR measurements over Europe, ACP, 8, 6719-6727, 2008. 2 Vigouroux, C., De Mazière, M., Demoulin, P., Servais, C., Hase, F., Blumenstock, T., Kramer, I., Schneider, M., Mellqvist, J., Strandberg, A., Velazco, V., Notholt, J., Sussmann, R., Stremme, W., Rockmann, A., Gardiner, T., Coleman, M., and Woods, P. : Evaluation of tropospheric and stratospheric ozone trends over Western Europe from ground-based FTIR network observations, ACP, 8, 6865-6886, 2008.

  4. PENGGUNAAN SECONDARY SURVEILLANCE RADAR UNTUK PENENTUAN POSISI PESAWAT UDARA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhmad Hafidz Irfandi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Republik Indonesia merupakan negara kepulauan terbesar di dunia yang memiliki lebih dari 17.000 pulau dengan pertumbuhan demografi yang sangat pesat, hal ini menjadikan Indonesia sebagai negara berpenduduk terbesar ke-empat di dunia. Pesawat udara merupakan alat transportasi yang paling efektif dalam mendukung mobilitas penduduk.Navigasi atau pandu arah adalah penentuan kedudukan (position dan arah perjalanan baik di medan sebenarnya atau di peta. Navigasi ini dilakukan pada pesawat udara yang dipandu dari darat melalui sinyal yang dipancarkan oleh instrumen terpasang pada menara (ground base maupun sinyal dari satelit (satellite base.Dalam navigasi ada beberapa macam radar yang umum digunakan yaitu Primary Surveillance Radar (PSR dan Secondary Surveillance Radar (SSR.Kedua jenis radar baik PSR maupun SSR mempunyai cara kerja berbeda. Pada PSR sifatnya aktif dan pesawat yang ditargetkan sifatnya pasif.Karena PSR hanya menerima pantulan gelombang radio dari refleksi pesawat tersebut (echo.Sedangkan pesawat itu sendiri tidak ikut aktif dengan pancaran sinyal radar di bawah. Pada SSR, baik radar maupun pesawat kedua-duanya aktif. Hal ini dapat dilakukan karena pesawat terbang telah dilengkapi dengan transponder. Pesawat-pesawat yang tidak dilengkapi transponder tidak akan dapat dilihat pada radar scope seperti identifikasi pesawat, ketinggiannya, dan lain-lain.SSR merupakan peralatan untuk mendeteksi dan mengetahui posisi dan data target yang ada di sekelilingnya secara aktif, dimana pesawat ikut aktif jika menerima pancaran sinyal Radio Frequency (RF radar sekunder. Pancaran radar ini berupa pulsa-pulsa mode, pesawat yang dipasangi transponder, akan menerima pulsa-pulsa tersebut dan akan menjawab berupa pulsa-pulsa code ke sistem penerima radar.

  5. Coordinated ground-based and Cluster observations of large amplitude global magnetospheric oscillations during a fast solar wind speed interval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. R. Mann

    Full Text Available We present magnetospheric observations of very large amplitude global scale ULF waves, from 9 and 10 December 2000 when the upstream solar wind speed exceeded 600 km/s. We characterise these ULF waves using ground-based magnetometer, radar and optical instrumentation on both the dawn and dusk flanks; we find evidence to support the hypothesis that discrete frequency field line resonances (FLRs were being driven by magnetospheric waveguide modes. During the early part of this interval, Cluster was on an outbound pass from the northern dusk side magnetospheric lobe into the magnetosheath, local-time conjugate to the Canadian sector. In situ magnetic fluctuations, observed by Cluster FGM, show evidence of quasi-periodic motion of the magnetosheath boundary layer with the same period as the ULF waves seen on the ground. Our observations represent the first simultaneous magnetometer, radar and optical observations of the characteristics of FLRs, and confirm the potential importance of ULF waves for magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling, particularly via the generation and modulation of electron precipitation into the ionosphere. The in situ Cluster measurements support the hypothesis that, during intervals of fast solar wind speed, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI can excite magnetospheric waveguide modes which bathe the flank magnetosphere with discrete frequency ULF wave power and drive large amplitude FLRs. 

    Paper submitted to the special issue devoted to "Cluster: First scientific results", Ann. Geophysicae, 19, 10/11/12, 2001.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers; MHD waves and instabilities; solar wind-magnetosphere interactions

  6. Raindrop Size Distribution Retrieval from Wind Profiler Radar Based on Double-Gaussian Fitting%基于双高斯拟合的风廓线雷达反演雨滴谱

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何越; 何平; 林晓萌

    2014-01-01

    The raindrop size distribution is extremely important for understanding the physical process of cloud and fog formation,and the generation of natural rainfall.It is a major tool that can be used to assess the cloud conditions for weather modification and verify associated results,in addition to being an important scientific evidence for numerical modeling.The weather radar often uses the method of PPP (Pulse Pair Processing)to process the signal,so it cannot get the raindrop size data directly.However,wind profiler radar is invented to detect the turbulence of clear air and it can obtain the distribution of Doppler velocity of precipitation particles,hence data can be used to retrieve raindrop spectral of precipitation effectively.Un-der the condition of precipitation,the return information of wind profiler radar is superimposed by turbu-lent signal and precipitation signal,and the power spectrum would often appear an obvious bimodal struc-ture.Some representative precipitation data of Yanqing,Beijing in 2006 and 2012 are analyzed,by the method of removing noise and calibration curve,the power spectrum of antenna array is retrieved and then a more accurate signal power spectrum is obtained.The method of double-Gaussian fitting is used to dis-tinguish the power spectrum of atmospheric turbulence signal and the power spectrum of precipitation sig-nal.The signal is used to estimate a better raindrop size distribution after removing effects of air turbu-lence.According to relations between precipitation particles and diameters,the raindrop spectrum can be obtained easily.Through analyses and comparisons of different intensity and types of retrieved raindrop size distribution data,it can be concluded that in the process of estimating the raindrop size distribution from wind profiler radar,the method of double-Gaussian fitting could separate two peaks effectively,and the precision is more accurate and the structure emerges an exponential form basically.The result shows

  7. Investigating mixed phase clouds using a synergy of ground based remote sensing measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierens, Rosa; Kneifel, Stefan; Löhnert, Ulrich

    2017-04-01

    Low level mixed phase clouds occur frequently in the Arctic, and can persist from hours to several days. However, the processes that lead to the commonality and persistence of these clouds are not well understood. The aim of our work is to get a more detailed understanding of the dynamics of and the processes in Arctic mixed phase clouds using a combination of instruments operating at the AWIPEV station in Svalbard. In addition, an aircraft campaign collecting in situ measurements inside mixed phase clouds above the station is planned for May-June 2017. The in situ data will be used for developing and validating retrievals for microphysical properties from Doppler cloud radar measurements. Once observational data for cloud properties is obtained, it can be used for evaluating model performance, for studies combining modeling and observational approaches, and eventually lead to developing model parameterizations of mixed phase microphysics. To describe the low-level mixed phase clouds, and the atmospheric conditions in which they occur, we present a case study of a persistent mixed phase cloud observed above the AWIPEV station. In the frame of the Arctic Amplification: Climate Relevant Atmospheric and Surface Processes and Feedback Mechanisms ((AC)3) -project, a millimeter wavelength cloud radar was installed at the site in June 2016. The high vertical (4 m in the lowest layer) and temporal (2.5 sec) resolution allows for a detailed description of the structure of the cloud. In addition to radar reflectivity and mean vertical velocity, we also utilize the higher moments of the Doppler spectra, such as skewness and kurtosis. To supplement the radar measurements, a ceilometer is used to detect liquid layers inside the cloud. Liquid water path and integrated water vapor are estimated using a microwave radiometer, which together with soundings can also provide temperature and humidity profiles in the lower troposphere. Moreover, a three-dimensional wind field is be

  8. A Method to Suppress the Precipitation Interference on Horizontal Wind of Wind Profile Radar%一种抑制降水对风廓线雷达水平风干扰的方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林晓萌; 何平; 黄兴友

    2015-01-01

    降水条件下,风廓线雷达(wind profiler radar,WPR)能够同时接收到大气湍流回波和降水粒子的散射回波,降水信号谱与湍流信号谱叠加在一起。风廓线雷达计算水平风时,若采用叠加在一起的功率谱处理降水条件下的探测数据,必将导致后期水平风的合成严重失真。该文首先对原始功率谱数据进行插值和平滑处理,通过功率谱曲线极大值点的个数判断其是否受到降水影响。对于受到降水影响的功率谱,依据湍流谱和降水谱均趋于对称型的特点,用两种方法分别对不同特征的功率谱曲线进行湍流谱和降水谱的分离处理,继而利用分离出的湍流谱信号反演水平风场。研究选取广东省湛江站风廓线雷达2013年6月及7月两次实测降水过程,分析结果表明:用湍流谱代替原始功率谱反演的风场,一致性较处理前有明显提高,从而证明了该分离方法的可行性。%Wind profile radar (WPR)is a kind of clear air radar,which takes atmospheric turbulence as the main detecting object.In the past few decades,WPR spectral data processing mainly focus on the wind spectrum estimation.In recent years,with the use of WPR data expansion,there are increasingly high demands for WPR data accuracy.However,ground clutter,external noise,flying objects,presence of disturbances such as precipitation and limitations of Fourier Transform often lead multiple peaks overlapping phenome-non,which makes it difficult to judge spectral moments,resulting in large error detection products.Espe-cially in the case of precipitation,wind speed measurement may be even completely wrong.Therefore,the radar power spectrum data need further processing under different weather conditions especially for turbu-lence and precipitation to establish an effective spectral extraction programs and enhance the wind profile accuracy of radar detection. WPR has a large dynamic reception range,so it

  9. Ground-Based Midcourse Defense (GMD) Sea-Based X-Band Radar (SBX) Placement and Operation, Adak, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-03

    can swim freely in the ocean and includes fish, squids, and marine mammals. Most species of nektonic animals live near the sea surface, where food is...living in rural areas of Alaska are partially or wholly dependent on the harvesting of natural resources for food and other living necessities. To...emissions time of up to 5 hours per day. The main beam would be GMO SBX Placement and Operation at Adak, Alaska EA 4-11 constantly moving and would

  10. Ground-based Infrared Observations of Water Vapor and Hydrogen Peroxide in the Atmosphere of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encrenaz, T.; Greathouse, T. K.; Bitner, M.; Kruger, A.; Richter, M. J.; Lacy, J. H.; Bézard, B.; Fouchet, T.; Lefevre, F.; Forget, F.; Atreya, S. K.

    2008-11-01

    Ground-based observations of water vapor and hydrogen peroxide have been obtained in the thermal infrared range, using the TEXES instrument at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, for different times of the seasonal cycle.

  11. Informing hydrological models with ground-based time-lapse relative gravimetry: potential and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Christiansen, Lars; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Coupled hydrogeophysical inversion emerges as an attractive option to improve the calibration and predictive capability of hydrological models. Recently, ground-based time-lapse relative gravity (TLRG) measurements have attracted increasing interest because there is a direct relationship between ...

  12. Changes in ground-based solar ultraviolet radiation during fire episodes: a case study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wright, CY

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available about the relationship between fires and solar UVR without local high-quality column or ground-based ambient air pollution (particulate matter in particular) data; however, the threat to public health from fires was acknowledged....

  13. Adaptive radar resource management

    CERN Document Server

    Moo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Radar Resource Management (RRM) is vital for optimizing the performance of modern phased array radars, which are the primary sensor for aircraft, ships, and land platforms. Adaptive Radar Resource Management gives an introduction to radar resource management (RRM), presenting a clear overview of different approaches and techniques, making it very suitable for radar practitioners and researchers in industry and universities. Coverage includes: RRM's role in optimizing the performance of modern phased array radars The advantages of adaptivity in implementing RRMThe role that modelling and

  14. Radar and ARPA manual

    CERN Document Server

    Bole, A G

    2013-01-01

    Radar and ARPA Manual focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of electronic navigation. The manual first discusses basic radar principles, including principles of range and bearing measurements and picture orientation and presentation. The text then looks at the operational principles of radar systems. Function of units; aerial, receiver, and display principles; transmitter principles; and sitting of units on board ships are discussed. The book also describes target detection, Automatic Radar Plotting Aids (ARPA), and operational controls of radar systems, and then discusses radar plo

  15. Further Studies of Forest Structure Parameter Retrievals Using the Echidna® Ground-Based Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahler, A. H.; Yao, T.; Zhao, F.; Yang, X.; Schaaf, C.; Wang, Z.; Li, Z.; Woodcock, C. E.; Culvenor, D.; Jupp, D.; Newnham, G.; Lovell, J.

    2012-12-01

    Ongoing work with the Echidna® Validation Instrument (EVI), a full-waveform, ground-based scanning lidar (1064 nm) developed by Australia's CSIRO and deployed by Boston University in California conifers (2008) and New England hardwood and softwood (conifer) stands (2007, 2009, 2010), confirms the importance of slope correction in forest structural parameter retrieval; detects growth and disturbance over periods of 2-3 years; provides a new way to measure the between-crown clumping factor in leaf area index retrieval using lidar range; and retrieves foliage profiles with more lower-canopy detail than a large-footprint aircraft scanner (LVIS), while simulating LVIS foliage profiles accurately from a nadir viewpoint using a 3-D point cloud. Slope correction is important for accurate retrieval of forest canopy structural parameters, such as mean diameter at breast height (DBH), stem count density, basal area, and above-ground biomass. Topographic slope can induce errors in parameter retrievals because the horizontal plane of the instrument scan, which is used to identify, measure, and count tree trunks, will intersect trunks below breast height in the uphill direction and above breast height in the downhill direction. A test of three methods at southern Sierra Nevada conifer sites improved the range of correlations of these EVI-retrieved parameters with field measurements from 0.53-0.68 to 0.85-0.93 for the best method. EVI scans can detect change, including both growth and disturbance, in periods of two to three years. We revisited three New England forest sites scanned in 2007-2009 or 2007-2010. A shelterwood stand at the Howland Experimental Forest, Howland, Maine, showed increased mean DBH, above-ground biomass and leaf area index between 2007 and 2009. Two stands at the Harvard Forest, Petersham, Massachusetts, suffered reduced leaf area index and reduced stem count density as the result of an ice storm that damaged the stands. At one stand, broken tops were

  16. System Identification and Automatic Mass Balancing of Ground-Based Three-Axis Spacecraft Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    System Identification and Automatic Mass Balancing of Ground-Based Three-Axis Spacecraft Simulator Jae-Jun Kim∗ and Brij N. Agrawal † Department of...TITLE AND SUBTITLE System Identification and Automatic Mass Balancing of Ground-Based Three-Axis Spacecraft Simulator 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...and Dynamics, Vol. 20, No. 4, July-August 1997, pp. 625-632. 6Schwartz, J. L. and Hall, C. D., “ System Identification of a Spherical Air-Bearing

  17. Ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Eddy; Stremme, Wolfgang; Bezanilla, Alejandro; Baylon, Jorge; Grutter, Michel; Blumenstock, Thomas; Hase, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Altzomoni is a high altitude station in central Mexico (19.12 N, 98.65 W, 4000 m a.s.l.) for continuous measurements of various atmospheric parameters. It is located within the Izta-Popo National Park and is operated remotely from the UNAM campus. Since May 2012, high resolution solar absorption spectra have been recorded from this site using a FTIR from Bruker (HR120/5) equipped with MCT, InSb and InGaAs detectors and various optical filters. In this contribution we present a detailed description of the measurement site and the instrumental set-up including a record of the instrumental line-shapes (modulation efficiency and phase error) obtained from cell measurements and analyzed with the LINEFIT code. A preliminary analysis of almost two years of spectra recorded at the Altzomoni site resulting in profile retrievals of four NDACC gases O3, CO, HF and HCl is presented. The retrieval code PROFFIT is used and the Averaging Kernels and an error analysis are used to describe the quality of the measurements. The annual cycles in the time series of O3 and CO are presented and discussed, as well as some examples of anomalies due to volcanic gas emissions of HF and HCl are shown. The presented work is part of an effort to certify this station as part of the NDACC international network.

  18. Decrypting geophysical signals at Stromboli Volcano (Italy): Integration of seismic and Ground-Based InSAR displacement data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Traglia, F; Cauchie, L; Casagli, N; Saccorotti, G

    2014-04-28

    We present the integration of seismic and Ground-Based Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar system (GBInSAR) displacement data at Stromboli Volcano. Ground deformation in the area of summit vents is positively correlated with both seismic tremor amplitude and cumulative amplitudes of very long period (VLP) signals associated with Strombolian explosions. Changes in VLP amplitudes precede by a few days the variations in ground deformation and seismic tremor. We propose a model where the arrival of fresh, gas-rich magma from depth enhances gas slug formation, promoting convection and gas transfer throughout the conduit system. At the shallowest portion of the conduit, an increase in volatile content causes a density decrease, expansion of the magmatic column and augmented degassing activity, which respectively induce inflation of the conduit, and increased tremor amplitudes. The temporal delay between increase of VLP and tremor amplitudes/conduit inflation can be interpreted in terms of the different timescales characterizing bulk gas transfer versus slug formation and ascent.

  19. Advanced Covariance-Based Stochastic Inversion and Neuro-Genetic Optimization for Rosetta CONSERT Radar Data to Improve Spatial Resolution of Multi-Fractal Depth Profiles for Cometary Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edenhofer, Peter; Ulamec, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    procedure of data inversion by combining inverted artificial neural networks of adequately chosen topology and learning routines for short access times with the concept of genetic algorithms enabling to achieve a multi-dimensional global optimum subject to a properly constructed and problem-oriented target function, ensemble selection rules, etc. Finally the paper discusses how the power of realistic simulation of the structures of the interior of a cometary nucleus can be improved by applying Benoit Mandelbrot's concept of fractal structures. It is shown how the fractal volumetric modelling of the nucleus of a comet can be accomplished by finite 3D elements of flexibility (serving topography and morphology as well) such as of tetrahedron shape with specific scaling factors of self similarity and a Maxwellian type of distribution function. By applying the widely accepted fBm-concept of fractal Brownian motion basically each of the corresponding Hurst exponents 0 (rough) < H < 1 (smooth) can be derived for the multi-fractal depth (and terrain) profiles of the equivalent dielectric constant per tomographic angular orbital segment of intersection by transmissive radar ray paths with the nucleus of the comet. Cooperative efforts and work are in progress to achieve numerical results of depth profiles for the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

  20. Radar detection of drones responding to honeybee queen pheromone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loper, G M; Wolf, W W; Taylor, O R

    1993-09-01

    The response of honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) drones to queen pheromone(s) (either natural from a mated queen, or synthetic from a lure) was recorded using an X-band, ground-based radar. The distribution of drones (insect targets on the radar screen) changed from a scattered distribution to a line concentration (downwind) when the pheromone was released. Displacement within the line concentration was toward the pheromone. This response was seen as far as 800±15 m downwind from a lure with 10 mg of synthetic 9-oxodec-trans-2-enoic acid (9-ODA) and as far as 420±15 m from a mated queen. These studies demonstrate that queen pheromone can be detected by drones at much greater distances than previously believed and illustrate how X-band radar may be used to establish the distances at which insects of similar or larger size respond to pheromones.

  1. Calibrating ground-based microwave radiometers: Uncertainty and drifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küchler, N.; Turner, D. D.; Löhnert, U.; Crewell, S.

    2016-04-01

    The quality of microwave radiometer (MWR) calibrations, including both the absolute radiometric accuracy and the spectral consistency, determines the accuracy of geophysical retrievals. The Microwave Radiometer Calibration Experiment (MiRaCalE) was conducted to evaluate the performance of MWR calibration techniques, especially of the so-called Tipping Curve Calibrations (TCC) and Liquid Nitrogen Calibrations (LN2cal), by repeatedly calibrating a fourth-generation Humidity and Temperature Profiler (HATPRO-G4) that measures downwelling radiance between 20 GHz and 60 GHz. MiRaCalE revealed two major points to improve MWR calibrations: (i) the necessary repetition frequency for MWR calibration techniques to correct drifts, which ensures stable long-term measurements; and (ii) the spectral consistency of control measurements of a well known reference is useful to estimate calibration accuracy. Besides, we determined the accuracy of the HATPRO's liquid nitrogen-cooled blackbody's temperature. TCCs and LN2cals were found to agree within 0.5 K when observing the liquid nitrogen-cooled blackbody with a physical temperature of 77 K. This agreement of two different calibration techniques suggests that the brightness temperature of the LN2 cooled blackbody is accurate within at least 0.5 K, which is a significant reduction of the uncertainties that have been assumed to vary between 0.6 K and 1.5 K when calibrating the HATPRO-G4. The error propagation of both techniques was found to behave almost linearly, leading to maximum uncertainties of 0.7 K when observing a scene that is associated with a brightness temperature of 15 K.

  2. Inferring hydroxyl layer peak heights from ground-based measurements of OH(6-2 band integrated emission rate at Longyearbyen (78° N, 16° E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sigernes

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of hydroxyl nightglow emissions over Longyearbyen (78° N, 16° E recorded simultaneously by the SABER instrument onboard the TIMED satellite and a ground-based Ebert-Fastie spectrometer have been used to derive an empirical formula for the height of the OH layer as a function of the integrated emission rate (IER. Altitude profiles of the OH volume emission rate (VER derived from SABER observations over a period of more than six years provided a relation between the height of the OH layer peak and the integrated emission rate following the procedure described by Liu and Shepherd (2006. An extended period of overlap of SABER and ground-based spectrometer measurements of OH(6-2 IER during the 2003–2004 winter season allowed us to express ground-based IER values in terms of their satellite equivalents. The combination of these two formulae provided a method for inferring an altitude of the OH emission layer over Longyearbyen from ground-based measurements alone. Such a method is required when SABER is in a southward looking yaw cycle. In the SABER data for the period 2002–2008, the peak altitude of the OH layer ranged from a minimum near 76 km to a maximum near 90 km. The uncertainty in the inferred altitude of the peak emission, which includes a contribution for atmospheric extinction, was estimated to be ±2.7 km and is comparable with the ±2.6 km value quoted for the nominal altitude (87 km of the OH layer. Longer periods of overlap of satellite and ground-based measurements together with simultaneous on-site measurements of atmospheric extinction could reduce the uncertainty to approximately 2 km.

  3. Principles of modern radar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Carpentier, Michel H

    1988-01-01

    Introduction to random functions ; signal and noise : the ideal receiver ; performance of radar systems equipped with ideal receivers ; analysis of the operating principles of some types of radar ; behavior of real targets, fluctuation of targets ; angle measurement using radar ; data processing of radar information, radar coverage ; applications to electronic scanning antennas to radar ; introduction to Hilbert spaces.

  4. Radar Range Sidelobe Reduction Using Adaptive Pulse Compression Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lihua; Coon, Michael; McLinden, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Pulse compression has been widely used in radars so that low-power, long RF pulses can be transmitted, rather than a highpower short pulse. Pulse compression radars offer a number of advantages over high-power short pulsed radars, such as no need of high-power RF circuitry, no need of high-voltage electronics, compact size and light weight, better range resolution, and better reliability. However, range sidelobe associated with pulse compression has prevented the use of this technique on spaceborne radars since surface returns detected by range sidelobes may mask the returns from a nearby weak cloud or precipitation particles. Research on adaptive pulse compression was carried out utilizing a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) waveform generation board and a radar transceiver simulator. The results have shown significant improvements in pulse compression sidelobe performance. Microwave and millimeter-wave radars present many technological challenges for Earth and planetary science applications. The traditional tube-based radars use high-voltage power supply/modulators and high-power RF transmitters; therefore, these radars usually have large size, heavy weight, and reliability issues for space and airborne platforms. Pulse compression technology has provided a path toward meeting many of these radar challenges. Recent advances in digital waveform generation, digital receivers, and solid-state power amplifiers have opened a new era for applying pulse compression to the development of compact and high-performance airborne and spaceborne remote sensing radars. The primary objective of this innovative effort is to develop and test a new pulse compression technique to achieve ultrarange sidelobes so that this technique can be applied to spaceborne, airborne, and ground-based remote sensing radars to meet future science requirements. By using digital waveform generation, digital receiver, and solid-state power amplifier technologies, this improved pulse compression

  5. Passive MIMO Radar Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    cumulative distribution function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 CORA COvert RAdar...PaRaDe), developed by the Insti- tute of Electronic Systems at the Warsaw University of Technology [59, 60]; COvert RAdar ( CORA ), developed by the German

  6. Weather Radar Impact Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent an inventory of the national impacts of wind turbine interference with NEXRAD radar stations. This inventory was developed by the NOAA Radar...

  7. Using phase for radar scatterer classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Linda J.; Rigling, Brian D.; Penno, Robert P.; Zelnio, Edmund G.

    2017-04-01

    Traditional synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems tend to discard phase information of formed complex radar imagery prior to automatic target recognition (ATR). This practice has historically been driven by available hardware storage, processing capabilities, and data link capacity. Recent advances in high performance computing (HPC) have enabled extremely dense storage and processing solutions. Therefore, previous motives for discarding radar phase information in ATR applications have been mitigated. First, we characterize the value of phase in one-dimensional (1-D) radar range profiles with respect to the ability to correctly estimate target features, which are currently employed in ATR algorithms for target discrimination. These features correspond to physical characteristics of targets through radio frequency (RF) scattering phenomenology. Physics-based electromagnetic scattering models developed from the geometrical theory of diffraction are utilized for the information analysis presented here. Information is quantified by the error of target parameter estimates from noisy radar signals when phase is either retained or discarded. Operating conditions (OCs) of signal-tonoise ratio (SNR) and bandwidth are considered. Second, we investigate the value of phase in 1-D radar returns with respect to the ability to correctly classify canonical targets. Classification performance is evaluated via logistic regression for three targets (sphere, plate, tophat). Phase information is demonstrated to improve radar target classification rates, particularly at low SNRs and low bandwidths.

  8. Reconstruction of cloud geometry using a scanning cloud radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, F.; Winkler, C.; Zinner, T.

    2015-06-01

    Clouds are one of the main reasons of uncertainties in the forecasts of weather and climate. In part, this is due to limitations of remote sensing of cloud microphysics. Present approaches often use passive spectral measurements for the remote sensing of cloud microphysical parameters. Large uncertainties are introduced by three-dimensional (3-D) radiative transfer effects and cloud inhomogeneities. Such effects are largely caused by unknown orientation of cloud sides or by shadowed areas on the cloud. Passive ground-based remote sensing of cloud properties at high spatial resolution could be crucially improved with this kind of additional knowledge of cloud geometry. To this end, a method for the accurate reconstruction of 3-D cloud geometry from cloud radar measurements is developed in this work. Using a radar simulator and simulated passive measurements of model clouds based on a large eddy simulation (LES), the effects of different radar scan resolutions and varying interpolation methods are evaluated. In reality, a trade-off between scan resolution and scan duration has to be found as clouds change quickly. A reasonable choice is a scan resolution of 1 to 2°. The most suitable interpolation procedure identified is the barycentric interpolation method. The 3-D reconstruction method is demonstrated using radar scans of convective cloud cases with the Munich miraMACS, a 35 GHz scanning cloud radar. As a successful proof of concept, camera imagery collected at the radar location is reproduced for the observed cloud cases via 3-D volume reconstruction and 3-D radiative transfer simulation. Data sets provided by the presented reconstruction method will aid passive spectral ground-based measurements of cloud sides to retrieve microphysical parameters.

  9. Dust forecast over North Africa: verification with satellite and ground based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Aditi; Kumar, Sumit; George, John P.

    2016-05-01

    Arid regions of North Africa are considered as one of the major dust source. Present study focuses on the forecast of aerosol optical depth (AOD) of dust over different regions of North Africa. NCMRWF Unified Model (NCUM) produces dust AOD forecasts at different wavelengths with lead time upto 240 hr, based on 00UTC initial conditions. Model forecast of dust AOD at 550 nm up to 72 hr forecast, based on different initial conditions are verified against satellite and ground based observations of total AOD during May-June 2014 with the assumption that except dust, presence of all other aerosols type are negligible. Location specific and geographical distribution of dust AOD forecast is verified against Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) station observations of total and coarse mode AOD. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) dark target and deep blue merged level 3 total aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550 nm and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) retrieved dust AOD at 532 nm are also used for verification. CALIOP dust AOD was obtained by vertical integration of aerosol extinction coefficient at 532 nm from the aerosol profile level 2 products. It is found that at all the selected AERONET stations, the trend in dust AODs is well predicted by NCUM up to three days advance. Good correlation, with consistently low bias (~ +/-0.06) and RMSE (~ 0.2) values, is found between model forecasts and point measurements of AERONET, except over one location Cinzana (Mali). Model forecast consistently overestimated the dust AOD compared to CALIOP dust AOD, with a bias of 0.25 and RMSE of 0.40.

  10. Simulation of submillimetre atmospheric spectra for characterising potential ground-based remote sensing observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Emma C.; Withington, Stafford; Newnham, David A.; Wadhams, Peter; Jones, Anna E.; Clancy, Robin

    2016-11-01

    The submillimetre is an understudied region of the Earth's atmospheric electromagnetic spectrum. Prior technological gaps and relatively high opacity due to the prevalence of rotational water vapour lines at these wavelengths have slowed progress from a ground-based remote sensing perspective; however, emerging superconducting detector technologies in the fields of astronomy offer the potential to address key atmospheric science challenges with new instrumental methods. A site study, with a focus on the polar regions, is performed to assess theoretical feasibility by simulating the downwelling (zenith angle = 0°) clear-sky submillimetre spectrum from 30 mm (10 GHz) to 150 µm (2000 GHz) at six locations under annual mean, summer, winter, daytime, night-time and low-humidity conditions. Vertical profiles of temperature, pressure and 28 atmospheric gases are constructed by combining radiosonde, meteorological reanalysis and atmospheric chemistry model data. The sensitivity of the simulated spectra to the choice of water vapour continuum model and spectroscopic line database is explored. For the atmospheric trace species hypobromous acid (HOBr), hydrogen bromide (HBr), perhydroxyl radical (HO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) the emission lines producing the largest change in brightness temperature are identified. Signal strengths, centre frequencies, bandwidths, estimated minimum integration times and maximum receiver noise temperatures are determined for all cases. HOBr, HBr and HO2 produce brightness temperature peaks in the mK to µK range, whereas the N2O peaks are in the K range. The optimal submillimetre remote sensing lines for the four species are shown to vary significantly between location and scenario, strengthening the case for future hyperspectral instruments that measure over a broad wavelength range. The techniques presented here provide a framework that can be applied to additional species of interest and taken forward to simulate retrievals and guide the

  11. Validation of NH3 satellite observations by ground-based FTIR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammers, Enrico; Palm, Mathias; Van Damme, Martin; Shephard, Mark; Cady-Pereira, Karen; Capps, Shannon; Clarisse, Lieven; Coheur, Pierre; Erisman, Jan Willem

    2016-04-01

    Global emissions of reactive nitrogen have been increasing to an unprecedented level due to human activities and are estimated to be a factor four larger than pre-industrial levels. Concentration levels of NOx are declining, but ammonia (NH3) levels are increasing around the globe. While NH3 at its current concentrations poses significant threats to the environment and human health, relatively little is known about the total budget and global distribution. Surface observations are sparse and mainly available for north-western Europe, the United States and China and are limited by the high costs and poor temporal and spatial resolution. Since the lifetime of atmospheric NH3 is short, on the order of hours to a few days, due to efficient deposition and fast conversion to particulate matter, the existing surface measurements are not sufficient to estimate global concentrations. Advanced space-based IR-sounders such as the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) enable global observations of atmospheric NH3 that help overcome some of the limitations of surface observations. However, the satellite NH3 retrievals are complex requiring extensive validation. Presently there have only been a few dedicated satellite NH3 validation campaigns performed with limited spatial, vertical or temporal coverage. Recently a retrieval methodology was developed for ground-based Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) instruments to obtain vertical concentration profiles of NH3. Here we show the applicability of retrieved columns from nine globally distributed stations with a range of NH3 pollution levels to validate satellite NH3 products.

  12. Towards retrieving critical relative humidity from ground-based remote sensing observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Weverberg, Kwinten; Boutle, Ian; Morcrette, Cyril J.; Newsom, Rob K.

    2016-08-22

    Nearly all parameterisations of large-scale cloud require the specification of the critical relative humidity (RHcrit). This is the gridbox-mean relative humidity at which the subgrid fluctuations in temperature and water vapour become so large that part of a subsaturated gridbox becomes saturated and cloud starts to form. Until recently, the lack of high-resolution observations of temperature and moisture variability has hindered a reasonable estimate of the RHcrit from observations. However, with the advent of ground-based measurements from Raman lidar, it becomes possible to obtain long records of temperature and moisture (co-)variances with sub-minute sample rates. Lidar observations are inherently noisy and any analysis of higher-order moments will be very dependent on the ability to quantify and remove this noise. We present an exporatory study aimed at understanding whether current noise levels of lidar-retrieved temperature and water vapour are sufficient to obtain a reasonable estimate of the RHcrit. We show that vertical profiles of RHcrit can be derived for a gridbox length of up to about 30 km (120) with an uncertainty of about 4 % (2 %). RHcrit tends to be smallest near the scale height and seems to be fairly insensitive to the horizontal grid spacing at the scales investigated here (30 - 120 km). However, larger sensitivity was found to the vertical grid spacing. As the grid spacing decreases from 400 to 100 m, RHcrit is observed to increase by about 6 %, which is more than the uncertainty in the RHcrit retrievals.

  13. Study of two-phase flows in reduced gravity using ground based experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasavada, S.; Ishii, M. [Purdue University, School of Nuclear Engineering, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Sun, X. [Ohio State University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Columbus, OH (United States); Duval, W. [NASA Glenn Research Center, Fluid Physics and Transport Branch, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Experimental studies have been carried out to support the development of a framework of the two-fluid model along with an interfacial area transport equation applicable to reduced gravity two-phase flows. The experimental study simulates the reduced gravity condition in ground based facilities by using two immiscible liquids of similar density namely, water as the continuous phase and Therminol 59 {sup registered} as the dispersed phase. We have acquired a total of eleven data sets in the bubbly flow and bubbly to slug flow transition regimes. These flow conditions have area-averaged void (volume) fractions ranging from 3 to 30% and channel Reynolds number for the continuous phase between 2,900 and 8,800. Flow visualization has been performed and a flow regime map developed which is compared with relevant bubbly to slug flow regime transition criteria. The comparison shows that the transition boundary is well predicted by the criterion based on critical void fraction. The value of the critical void fraction at transition was experimentally determined to be approximately 25%. In addition, important two-phase flow local parameters, including the void fraction, interfacial area concentration, droplet number frequency and droplet velocity, have been acquired at two axial locations using state-of-the-art multi-sensor conductivity probe. The radial profiles and axial development of the two-phase flow parameters show that the coalescence mechanism is enhanced by either increasing the continuous or dispersed phase Reynolds number. Evidence of turbulence induced particle interaction mechanism is highlighted. The data presented in this paper clearly show the marked differences in terms of bubble (droplet) size, phase distribution and phase interaction in two-phase flow between normal and reduced gravity conditions. (orig.)

  14. Radiometric modeling and calibration of the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) ground based measurement experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jialin; Smith, William L.; Gazarik, Michael J.

    2008-12-01

    The ultimate remote sensing benefits of the high resolution Infrared radiance spectrometers will be realized with their geostationary satellite implementation in the form of imaging spectrometers. This will enable dynamic features of the atmosphere's thermodynamic fields and pollutant and greenhouse gas constituents to be observed for revolutionary improvements in weather forecasts and more accurate air quality and climate predictions. As an important step toward realizing this application objective, the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) Engineering Demonstration Unit (EDU) was successfully developed under the NASA New Millennium Program, 2000-2006. The GIFTS-EDU instrument employs three focal plane arrays (FPAs), which gather measurements across the long-wave IR (LWIR), short/mid-wave IR (SMWIR), and visible spectral bands. The GIFTS calibration is achieved using internal blackbody calibration references at ambient (260 K) and hot (286 K) temperatures. In this paper, we introduce a refined calibration technique that utilizes Principle Component (PC) analysis to compensate for instrument distortions and artifacts, therefore, enhancing the absolute calibration accuracy. This method is applied to data collected during the GIFTS Ground Based Measurement (GBM) experiment, together with simultaneous observations by the accurately calibrated AERI (Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer), both simultaneously zenith viewing the sky through the same external scene mirror at ten-minute intervals throughout a cloudless day at Logan Utah on September 13, 2006. The accurately calibrated GIFTS radiances are produced using the first four PC scores in the GIFTS-AERI regression model. Temperature and moisture profiles retrieved from the PC-calibrated GIFTS radiances are verified against radiosonde measurements collected throughout the GIFTS sky measurement period. Using the GIFTS GBM calibration model, we compute the calibrated radiances from data

  15. Digital LPI Radar Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Peng Ghee; Teng, Haw Kiad

    2001-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The function of a Low Probability ofIntercept (LPI) radar is to prevent its interception by an Electronic Support (ES) receiver. This objective is generally achieved through the use of a radar waveform that is mismatched to those waveforms for which an ES receiver is tuned. This allows the radar to achieve a processing gain, with respect to the ES receiver, that is equal to the time-bandwidth product ofthe radar waveform. This...

  16. Network radar countermeasure systems integrating radar and radar countermeasures

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Qiuxi

    2016-01-01

    This is the very first book to present the network radar countermeasure system. It explains in detail the systematic concept of combining radar and radar countermeasures from the perspective of the information acquisition of target location, the optimization of the reconnaissance and detection, the integrated attack of the signals and facilities, and technological and legal developments concerning the networked system. It achieves the integration of the initiative and passivity, detection and jamming. The book explains how the system locates targets, completes target identification, tracks targets and compiles the data.

  17. Deep Stochastic Radar Models

    OpenAIRE

    Wheeler, Tim Allan; Holder, Martin; Winner, Hermann; Kochenderfer, Mykel

    2017-01-01

    Accurate simulation and validation of advanced driver assistance systems requires accurate sensor models. Modeling automotive radar is complicated by effects such as multipath reflections, interference, reflective surfaces, discrete cells, and attenuation. Detailed radar simulations based on physical principles exist but are computationally intractable for realistic automotive scenes. This paper describes a methodology for the construction of stochastic automotive radar models based on deep l...

  18. Radar: Human Safety Net

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Radar is a technology that can be used to detect distant objects not visible to the human eye. A predecessor of radar, called the telemobiloscope, was first used to detect ships in the fog in 1904 off the German coast. Many scientists have worked on the development and refinement of radar (Hertz with electromagnetic waves; Popov with determining…

  19. Radar and wind turbines; Radar en windturbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Doorn, H.

    2010-03-15

    In the last years the developments of wind parks were hampered because of their possible effect on the radar for observation of air traffic. Work is currently being done on a new assessment model for wind turbines under the auspices of the steering group National Security for the military radar systems. Air traffic control Netherlands (LVNL) will look at the options for civil radars to join in. [Dutch] In de afgelopen jaren zijn windparkontwikkelingen onder meer belemmerd vanwege mogelijke effecten op radar voor de waarneming van luchtverkeer. Onder auspicien van de stuurgroep Nationale Veiligheid voor de militaire radarsystemen op land wordt gewerkt aan een nieuw beoordelingsmodel voor windturbines. De Luchtverkeersleiding Nederland (LVNL) zal bezien in hoeverre de civiele radars hierbij kunnen aansluiten.

  20. Investigation of hopped frequency waveforms for range and velocity measurements of radar targets

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kathree, U

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the field of radar, High Range Resolution (HRR) profiles are often used to improve target tracking accuracy in range and to allow the radar system to produce an image of an object using techniques such as inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR...

  1. Understanding radar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kingsley, Simon

    1999-01-01

    What is radar? What systems are currently in use? How do they work? This book provides engineers and scientists with answers to these critical questions, focusing on actual radar systems in use today. It is a perfect resource for those just entering the field, or as a quick refresher for experienced practitioners. The book leads readers through the specialized language and calculations that comprise the complex world of radar engineering as seen in dozens of state-of-the-art radar systems. An easy to read, wide ranging guide to the world of modern radar systems.

  2. Ka-Band ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widener, K; Bharadwaj, N; Johnson, K

    2012-03-06

    The Ka-band ARM zenith radar (KAZR) is a zenith-pointing Doppler cloud radar operating at approximately 35 GHz. The KAZR is an evolutionary follow-on radar to ARM's widely successful millimeter-wavelength cloud radar (MMCR). The main purpose of the KAZR is to provide vertical profiles of clouds by measuring the first three Doppler moments: reflectivity, radial Doppler velocity, and spectra width. At the sites where the dual-polarization measurements are made, the Doppler moments for the cross-polarization channel are also available. In addition to the moments, velocity spectra are also continuously recorded for each range gate.

  3. Multidimensional radar picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waz, Mariusz

    2010-05-01

    In marine navigation systems, the three-dimensional (3D) visualization is often and often used. Echosonders and sonars working in hydroacustic systems can present pictures in three dimensions. Currently, vector maps also offer 3D presentation. This presentation is used in aviation and underwater navigation. In the nearest future three-dimensional presentation may be obligatory presentation in displays of navigation systems. A part of these systems work with radar and communicates with it transmitting data in a digital form. 3D presentation of radar picture require a new technology to develop. In the first step it is necessary to compile digital form of radar signal. The modern navigation radar do not present data in three-dimensional form. Progress in technology of digital signal processing make it possible to create multidimensional radar pictures. For instance, the RSC (Radar Scan Converter) - digital radar picture recording and transforming tool can be used to create new picture online. Using RSC and techniques of modern computer graphics multidimensional radar pictures can be generated. The radar pictures mentioned should be readable for ECDIS. The paper presents a method for generating multidimensional radar picture from original signal coming from radar receiver.

  4. C/NOFS satellite observations of equatorial ionospheric plasma structures supported by multiple ground-based diagnostics in October 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, M.; Basu, Su.; Basu, S.; Valladares, C. E.; Sheehan, R. E.; Roddy, P. A.; Groves, K. M.

    2011-10-01

    In early October 2008, the C/NOFS satellite orbited near the magnetic equator at its perigee altitude of ˜400 km at dusk in the Peruvian sector. This provided an ideal opportunity for a comparison, under the current very low solar flux condition, of equatorial ionospheric disturbances observed with the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) in situ measurements and ground-based observations available near Jicamarca Observatory. The primary objective was the comparison of plasma density disturbances measured by a Planar Langmuir Probe (PLP) instrument on the C/NOFS satellite with VHF scintillation activity at Ancon near Jicamarca for this period. Here we discuss in detail two extreme cases: one in which severe in situ disturbances were accompanied by mild scintillation on a particular day, namely, 10 October while there was little in situ disturbance with strong scintillation on 5 October. This apparent contradiction was diagnosed further by a latitudinal ground-based GPS network at Peruvian longitudes, a Digisonde, and the incoherent scatter radar (ISR) at Jicamarca. The crucial distinction was provided by the behavior of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA). The EIA was well-developed on the day having severe in situ disturbances (10 Oct). This led to lower equatorial plasma density and total electron content (TEC) at the equator and consequently reduced the scintillations detected at Ancon. On the other hand, on the day with severe scintillations (5 Oct), the EIA was not so well developed as on 10 October, leading to relatively higher equatorial plasma density and TEC. Consequently the severe scintillations at Ancon were likely caused by ionospheric structure located below the altitude of C/NOFS. The NRL SAMI2 model was utilized to gain a greater understanding of the role of neutral winds and electric fields in reproducing the TEC as a function of latitude for both classes of irregularities. Spectral studies with high resolution in situ

  5. Frequency diversity wideband digital receiver and signal processor for solid-state dual-polarimetric weather radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Kumar Vijay

    The recent spate in the use of solid-state transmitters for weather radar systems has unexceptionably revolutionized the research in meteorology. The solid-state transmitters allow transmission of low peak powers without losing the radar range resolution by allowing the use of pulse compression waveforms. In this research, a novel frequency-diversity wideband waveform is proposed and realized to extenuate the low sensitivity of solid-state radars and mitigate the blind range problem tied with the longer pulse compression waveforms. The latest developments in the computing landscape have permitted the design of wideband digital receivers which can process this novel waveform on Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) chips. In terms of signal processing, wideband systems are generally characterized by the fact that the bandwidth of the signal of interest is comparable to the sampled bandwidth; that is, a band of frequencies must be selected and filtered out from a comparable spectral window in which the signal might occur. The development of such a wideband digital receiver opens a window for exciting research opportunities for improved estimation of precipitation measurements for higher frequency systems such as X, Ku and Ka bands, satellite-borne radars and other solid-state ground-based radars. This research describes various unique challenges associated with the design of a multi-channel wideband receiver. The receiver consists of twelve channels which simultaneously downconvert and filter the digitized intermediate-frequency (IF) signal for radar data processing. The product processing for the multi-channel digital receiver mandates a software and network architecture which provides for generating and archiving a single meteorological product profile culled from multi-pulse profiles at an increased data date. The multi-channel digital receiver also continuously samples the transmit pulse for calibration of radar receiver gain and transmit power. The multi

  6. Ground-based follow-up in relation to Kepler Asteroseismic Investigation

    CERN Document Server

    Uytterhoeven, K; Bruntt, H; De Cat, P; Frandsen, S; Gutierrez-Soto, J; Kiss, L; Kurtz, D W; Marconi, M; Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Ostensen, R; Randall, S; Southworth, J; Szabo, R

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler space mission, successfully launched in March 2009, is providing continuous, high-precision photometry of thousands of stars simultaneously. The uninterrupted time-series of stars of all known pulsation types are a precious source for asteroseismic studies. The Kepler data do not provide information on the physical parameters, such as effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and vsini, which are crucial for successful asteroseismic modelling. Additional ground-based time-series data are needed to characterize mode parameters in several types of pulsating stars. Therefore, ground-based multi-colour photometry and mid/high-resolution spectroscopy are needed to complement the space data. We present ground-based activities within KASC on selected asteroseismic Kepler targets of several pulsation types. (Based on observations made with the Isaac Newton Telescope, William Herschel Telescope, Nordic Optical Telescope, Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, Mercator Telescope (La Palma, Spain), and IAC-...

  7. BigBOSS: The Ground-Based Stage IV BAO Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlegel, David; Bebek, Chris; Heetderks, Henry; Ho, Shirley; Lampton, Michael; Levi, Michael; Mostek, Nick; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Perlmutter, Saul; Roe, Natalie; Sholl, Michael; Smoot, George; White, Martin; Dey, Arjun; Abraham, Tony; Jannuzi, Buell; Joyce, Dick; Liang, Ming; Merrill, Mike; Olsen, Knut; Salim, Samir

    2009-04-01

    The BigBOSS experiment is a proposed DOE-NSF Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment to study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure with an all-sky galaxy redshift survey. The project is designed to unlock the mystery of dark energy using existing ground-based facilities operated by NOAO. A new 4000-fiber R=5000 spectrograph covering a 3-degree diameter field will measure BAO and redshift space distortions in the distribution of galaxies and hydrogen gas spanning redshifts from 0.2< z< 3.5. The Dark Energy Task Force figure of merit (DETF FoM) for this experiment is expected to be equal to that of a JDEM mission for BAO with the lower risk and cost typical of a ground-based experiment.

  8. Comparing Dawn, Hubble Space Telescope, and Ground-Based Interpretations of (4) Vesta

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, Vishnu; Corre, Lucille Le; Scully, Jennifer E C; Gaskell, Robert; Russell, Christopher T; Park, Ryan S; Nathues, Andreas; Raymond, Carol; Gaffey, Michael J; Sierks, Holger; Becker, Kris J; McFadden, Lucy A

    2013-01-01

    Observations of asteroid 4 Vesta by NASA's Dawn spacecraft are interesting because its surface has the largest range of albedo, color and composition of any other asteroid visited by spacecraft to date. These hemispherical and rotational variations in surface brightness and composition have been attributed to impact processes since Vesta's formation. Prior to Dawn's arrival at Vesta, its surface properties were the focus of intense telescopic investigations for nearly a hundred years. Ground-based photometric and spectroscopic observations first revealed these variations followed later by those using Hubble Space Telescope. Here we compare interpretations of Vesta's rotation period, pole, albedo, topographic, color, and compositional properties from ground-based telescopes and HST with those from Dawn. Rotational spectral variations observed from ground-based studies are also consistent with those observed by Dawn. While the interpretation of some of these features was tenuous from past data, the interpretati...

  9. Re-analysis of ground-based microwave ClO measurements from Mauna Kea, 1992 to early 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Connor

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a re-analysis of upper stratospheric ClO measurements from the ground-based millimeter-wave instrument from January 1992 to February 2012. These measurements are made as part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC from Mauna Kea, Hawaii, (19.8° N, 204.5° E. Here, we use daytime and nighttime measurements together to form a day–night spectrum, from which the difference in the day and night profiles is retrieved. These results are then compared to the day–night difference profiles from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS and Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS instruments. We also compare them to our previous analyses of the same data, in which we retrieved the daytime ClO profile. The major focus will be on comparing the year-to-year and long-term changes in ClO derived by the two analysis methods, and comparing these results to the long-term changes reported by others. We conclude that the re-analyzed data set has less short-term variability and exhibits a more constant long-term trend that is more consistent with other observations. Data from 1995 to 2012 indicate a linear decline of mid-stratospheric ClO of 0.64 ± 0.15% yr−1 (2σ.

  10. Re-analysis of ground-based microwave ClO measurements from Mauna Kea, 1992 to early 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Connor

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a re-analysis of upper stratospheric ClO measurements from the ground-based millimeter-wave instrument from January 1992 to February 2012. These measurements are made as part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC from Mauna Kea, Hawaii, (19.8° N, 204.5° E. Here, we use daytime and nighttime measurements together to form a day-night spectrum, from which the difference in the day and night profiles is retrieved. These results are then compared to the day-night difference profiles from the UARS and Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS instruments. We also compare them to our previous analyses of the same data, in which we retrieved the daytime ClO profile. The major focus will be on comparing the year-to-year and long-term changes in ClO derived by the two analysis methods. We conclude that the re-analyzed data set has less short-term variability and exhibits a more constant long-term trend. Data from 1995–2012 indicate a linear decline of mid-stratospheric ClO of 0.64 ± 0.08% yr−1.

  11. Extended lateral heating of the nighttime ionosphere by ground-based VLF transmitters

    OpenAIRE

    İnan, Umran Savaş; Graf, K. L.; Spasojevic, M.; Marshall, R. A.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Foust, F. R.

    2013-01-01

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: SPACE PHYSICS, VOL. 118, 7783–7797, doi:10.1002/2013JA019337, 2013 Extended lateral heating of the nighttime ionosphere by ground-based VLF transmitters K. L. Graf,1 M. Spasojevic,1 R. A. Marshall,2 N. G. Lehtinen,1 F. R. Foust,1 and U. S. Inan1,3 Received 16 August 2013; revised 9 October 2013; accepted 11 November 2013; published 3 December 2013. [1] The effects of ground-based very low frequency (VLF) transmitters on the lower ionospher...

  12. Status of advanced ground-based laser interferometers for gravitational-wave detection

    CERN Document Server

    Dooley, Katherine L; Dwyer, Sheila; Puppo, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Ground-based laser interferometers for gravitational-wave (GW) detection were first constructed starting 20 years ago and as of 2010 collection of several years' worth of science data at initial design sensitivities was completed. Upgrades to the initial detectors together with construction of brand new detectors are ongoing and feature advanced technologies to improve the sensitivity to GWs. This conference proceeding provides an overview of the common design features of ground-based laser interferometric GW detectors and establishes the context for the status updates of each of the four gravitational-wave detectors around the world: Advanced LIGO, Advanced Virgo, GEO600 and KAGRA.

  13. Asteroseismology of solar-type stars with Kepler: III. Ground-based data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Molenda-Żakowicz , J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the ground-based follow-up program of spectroscopic and photometric observations of solar-like asteroseismic targets for the Kepler space mission. These stars constitute a large group of more than a thousand objects which are the subject of an intensive study by the Kepler Asteroseis......We report on the ground-based follow-up program of spectroscopic and photometric observations of solar-like asteroseismic targets for the Kepler space mission. These stars constitute a large group of more than a thousand objects which are the subject of an intensive study by the Kepler...

  14. Estimation of solar irradiance using ground-based whole sky imagers

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, Soumyabrata; Lee, Yee Hui; Winkler, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Ground-based whole sky imagers (WSIs) can provide localized images of the sky of high temporal and spatial resolution, which permits fine-grained cloud observation. In this paper, we show how images taken by WSIs can be used to estimate solar radiation. Sky cameras are useful here because they provide additional information about cloud movement and coverage, which are otherwise not available from weather station data. Our setup includes ground-based weather stations at the same location as the imagers. We use their measurements to validate our methods.

  15. Radar Backscatter Study of Sea Ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    in controlling the "state" of the ice ( temperatura and salinity) are shown in Figure 4.3-79. The salinity profile is a typical irregular c-shaped...the University of Kansas to provide well- controlled systematic studies to relate radar backscatter return to sea ice and to pin down some of the...34..,. : . - " ... ,. -.. .... .. .. ... ,,, ... ... _ ., ’.. . . , 72. Profiles of the parameters most important in controlling the "state" of the ice (temperature and salinity

  16. Processing of laser radar data for the extraction of an along-the-levee-crown elevation profile for levee remediation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Michael J.; McGill, Thomas E.; Taylor, Stacy R.

    2004-09-01

    Using LiDAR data collected on the levees along the Rio Grande River in New Mexico and Texas, an algorithm has been developed to automatically extract longitudinal elevation profiles. This algorithm consists of a series of filters, interpretation of geophysical properties, and digitized levee centerlines. The series of filters, in order of operation, include an alignment buffer filter, bare-earth filter, sampling filter and a maximum value filter. The result of the filter configuration is a 3-D polyline that models the levee crest. This algorithm allows for efficient identification of portions of levee that are lower than original design specifications. A comparison between the LiDAR levee crown extraction filter and a least-cost-path technique are offered.

  17. Localization and Mapping Using Only a Rotating FMCW Radar Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Chapuis

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Rotating radar sensors are perception systems rarely used in mobile robotics. This paper is concerned with the use of a mobile ground-based panoramic radar sensor which is able to deliver both distance and velocity of multiple targets in its surrounding. The consequence of using such a sensor in high speed robotics is the appearance of both geometric and Doppler velocity distortions in the collected data. These effects are, in the majority of studies, ignored or considered as noise and then corrected based on proprioceptive sensors or localization systems. Our purpose is to study and use data distortion and Doppler effect as sources of information in order to estimate the vehicle’s displacement. The linear and angular velocities of the mobile robot are estimated by analyzing the distortion of the measurements provided by the panoramic Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW radar, called IMPALA. Without the use of any proprioceptive sensor, these estimates are then used to build the trajectory of the vehicle and the radar map of outdoor environments. In this paper, radar-only localization and mapping results are presented for a ground vehicle moving at high speed.

  18. Open-loop GPS signal tracking at low elevation angles from a ground-based observation site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyerle, Georg; Zus, Florian

    2017-01-01

    A 1-year data set of ground-based GPS signal observations aiming at geometric elevation angles below +2° is analysed. Within the "GLESER" measurement campaign about 2600 validated setting events were recorded by the "OpenGPS" open-loop tracking receiver at an observation site located at 52.3808° N, 13.0642° E between January and December 2014. The measurements confirm the feasibility of open-loop signal tracking down to geometric elevation angles of -1 to -1.5° extending the corresponding closed-loop tracking range by up to 1°. The study is based on the premise that observations of low-elevation events by a ground-based receiver may serve as test cases for space-based radio occultation measurements, even if the latter proceed at a significantly faster temporal scale. The results support the conclusion that the open-loop Doppler model has negligible influence on the derived carrier frequency profile for strong signal-to-noise density ratios above about 30 dB Hz. At lower signal levels, however, the OpenGPS receiver's dual-channel design, which tracks the same signal using two Doppler models differing by 10 Hz, uncovers a notable bias. The repeat patterns of the GPS orbit traces in terms of azimuth angle reveal characteristic signatures in both signal amplitude and Doppler frequency with respect to the topography close to the observation site. Mean vertical refractivity gradients, extracted from ECMWF meteorological fields, correlate weakly to moderately with observed signal amplitude fluctuations at geometric elevation angles between +1 and +2°. Results from multiple phase screen simulations support the interpretation that these fluctuations are at least partly produced by atmospheric multipath; at negative elevation angles diffraction at the ground surface seems to contribute.

  19. Ground-Based VIS/NIR Reflectance Spectra of 25143 Itokawa: What Hayabusa will See and How Ground-Based Data can Augment Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas, Faith; Abell, P. A.; Jarvis, K. S.

    2004-01-01

    Planning for the arrival of the Hayabusa spacecraft at asteroid 25143 Itokawa includes consideration of the expected spectral information to be obtained using the AMICA and NIRS instruments. The rotationally-resolved spatial coverage the asteroid we have obtained with ground-based telescopic spectrophotometry in the visible and near-infrared can be utilized here to address expected spacecraft data. We use spectrophotometry to simulate the types of data that Hayabusa will receive with the NIRS and AMICA instruments, and will demonstrate them here. The NIRS will cover a wavelength range from 0.85 m, and have a dispersion per element of 250 Angstroms. Thus, we are limited in coverage of the 1.0 micrometer and 2.0 micrometer mafic silicate absorption features. The ground-based reflectance spectra of Itokawa show a large component of olivine in its surface material, and the 2.0 micrometer feature is shallow. Determining the olivine to pyroxene abundance ratio is critically dependent on the attributes of the 1.0- and 2.0 micrometer features. With a cut-off near 2,1 micrometer the longer edge of the 2.0- feature will not be obtained by NIRS. Reflectance spectra obtained using ground-based telescopes can be used to determine the regional composition around space-based spectral observations, and possibly augment the longer wavelength spectral attributes. Similarly, the shorter wavelength end of the 1.0 micrometer absorption feature will be partially lost to the NIRS. The AMICA filters mimic the ECAS filters, and have wavelength coverage overlapping with the NIRS spectral range. We demonstrate how merging photometry from AMICA will extend the spectral coverage of the NIRS. Lessons learned from earlier spacecraft to asteroids should be considered.

  20. Study on the Application Technology of Ground-based InSAR%地基雷达干涉技术应用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱志伟; 汪学琴; 岳顺; 郭献涛; 桑杰

    2015-01-01

    近年来,地基合成孔径雷达干涉技术的应用领域不断地扩展.本文详细地介绍了变形监测系统IBIS,并对其监测原理进行了简单概括.不仅对地基InSAR技术近期的应用及发展进行归纳总结,而且对该技术存在的问题从大气改正、断点校正及数据融合等方面进行深入的分析和讨论.通过对地基雷达干涉技术的应用研究分析,说明其在变形监测中将具有更为广泛的应用前景.%In recent years, the application field of ground-based synthetic aperture radar interferometry technique has been expanded. This paper introduces the deformation monitoring system IBIS and summarized the principle of monitoring briefly. Not only the application and development of InSAR technology are summarized in this paper, and the existing problems such as the atmospheric correction, breakpoint adjustment and the data fusion are analyzed and discussed in depth. Through the application research of ground radar interferometry analysis, this technology has broad application prospects in deformation monitoring.

  1. Analysis of Dual- and Full-Circular Polarimetric SAR Modes for Rice Phenology Monitoring: An Experimental Investigation through Ground-Based Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta Izumi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Circularly polarized synthetic aperture radar (CP-SAR is known to be insensitive to polarization mismatch losses caused by the Faraday rotation effect and antenna misalignment. Additionally, the dual-circular polarimetric (DCP mode has proven to have more polarimetric information than that of the corresponding mode of linear polarization, i.e., the dual-linear polarimetric (DLP mode. Owing to these benefits, this paper investigates the feasibility of CP-SAR for rice monitoring. A ground-based CP-radar system was exploited, and C-band anechoic chamber data of a self-cultivated Japanese rice paddy were acquired from germination to ripening stages. Temporal variations of polarimetric observables derived from full-circular polarimetric (FCP and DCP as well as synthetically generated DLP data are analyzed and assessed with regard to their effectiveness in phenology retrieval. Among different observations, the H / α ¯ plane and triangle plots obtained by three scattering components (surface, double-bounce, and volume scattering for both the FCP and DCP modes are confirmed to have reasonable capability in discriminating the relevant intervals of rice growth.

  2. Operational optical turbulence forecast for the service mode of top-class ground based telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masciadri, Elena; Lascaux, Franck; Turchi, Alessio; Fini, Luca

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution we present the most relevant results obtained in the context of a feasibility study (MOSE) undertaken for ESO. The principal aim of the project was to quantify the performances of an atmospherical non-hydrostatical mesoscale model (Astro-Meso-NH code) in forecasting all the main atmospherical parameters relevant for the ground-based astronomical observations and the optical turbulence (CN2 and associated integrated astroclimatic parameters) above Cerro Paranal (site of the VLT) and Cerro Armazones (site of the E-ELT). A detailed analysis on the score of success of the predictive capacities of the system have been carried out for all the astroclimatic as well as for the atmospherical parameters. Considering the excellent results that we obtained, this study proved the opportunity to implement on these two sites an automatic system to be run nightly in an operational configuration to support the scheduling of scientific programs as well as of astronomical facilities (particularly those supported by AO systems) of the VLT and the E-ELT. At the end of 2016 a new project for the implementation of a demonstrator of an operational system to be run on the two ESO's sites will start. The fact that the system can be run simultaneously on the two sites is an ancillary appealing feature of the system. Our team is also responsible for the implementation of a similar automatic system at Mt.Graham, site of the LBT (ALTA Project). Our system/method will permit therefore to make a step ahead in the framework of the Service Mode for new generation telescopes. Among the most exciting achieved results we cite the fact that we proved to be able to forecast CN2 profiles with a vertical resolution as high as 150 m. Such a feature is particularly crucial for all WFAO systems that require such detailed information on the OT vertical stratification on the whole 20 km above the ground. This important achievement tells us that all the WFAO systems can rely on automatic

  3. A joint Cluster and ground-based instruments study of two magnetospheric substorm events on 1 September 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Draper

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a coordinated ground- and space-based multi-instrument study of two magnetospheric substorm events that occurred on 1 September 2002, during the interval from 18:00 UT to 24:00 UT. Data from the Cluster and Polar spacecraft are considered in combination with ground-based magnetometer and HF radar data. During the first substorm event the Cluster spacecraft, which were in the Northern Hemisphere lobe, are to the west of the main region affected by the expansion phase. Nevertheless, substorm signatures are seen by Cluster at 18:25 UT (just after the expansion phase onset as seen on the ground at 18:23 UT, despite the ~5 RE} distance of the spacecraft from the plasma sheet. The Cluster spacecraft then encounter an earthward-moving diamagnetic cavity at 19:10 UT, having just entered the plasma sheet boundary layer. The second substorm expansion phase is preceded by pseudobreakups at 22:40 and 22:56 UT, at which time thinning of the near-Earth, L=6.6, plasma sheet occurs. The expansion phase onset at 23:05 UT is seen simultaneously in the ground magnetic field, in the magnetotail and at Polar's near-Earth position. The response in the ionospheric flows occurs one minute later. The second substorm better fits the near-Earth neutral line model for substorm onset than the cross-field current instability model.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (Magnetosphereionosphere interactions; Magnetic reconnection; Auroral phenomenon

  4. Space-Borne and Ground-Based InSAR Data Integration: The Åknes Test Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Bardi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This work concerns a proposal of the integration of InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar data acquired by ground-based (GB and satellite platforms. The selected test site is the Åknes rockslide, which affects the western Norwegian coast. The availability of GB-InSAR and satellite InSAR data and the accessibility of a wide literature make the landslide suitable for testing the proposed procedure. The first step consists of the organization of a geodatabase, performed in the GIS environment, containing all of the available data. The second step concerns the analysis of satellite and GB-InSAR data, separately. Two datasets, acquired by RADARSAT-2 (related to a period between October 2008 and August 2013 and by a combination of TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X (acquired between July 2010 and October 2012, both of them in ascending orbit, processed applying SBAS (Small BAseline Subset method, are available. GB-InSAR data related to five different campaigns of measurements, referred to the summer seasons of 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2012, are available, as well. The third step relies on data integration, performed firstly from a qualitative point of view and later from a semi-quantitative point of view. The results of the proposed procedure have been validated by comparing them to GPS (Global Positioning System data. The proposed procedure allowed us to better define landslide sectors in terms of different ranges of displacements. From a qualitative point of view, stable and unstable areas have been distinguished. In the sector concerning movement, two different sectors have been defined thanks to the results of the semi-quantitative integration step: the first sector, concerning displacement values higher than 10 mm, and the 2nd sector, where the displacements did not exceed a 10-mm value of displacement in the analyzed period.

  5. Thin ice clouds in the Arctic: cloud optical depth and particle size retrieved from ground-based thermal infrared radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Yann; Royer, Alain; O'Neill, Norman T.; Turner, David D.; Eloranta, Edwin W.

    2017-06-01

    Multiband downwelling thermal measurements of zenith sky radiance, along with cloud boundary heights, were used in a retrieval algorithm to estimate cloud optical depth and effective particle diameter of thin ice clouds in the Canadian High Arctic. Ground-based thermal infrared (IR) radiances for 150 semitransparent ice clouds cases were acquired at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) in Eureka, Nunavut, Canada (80° N, 86° W). We analyzed and quantified the sensitivity of downwelling thermal radiance to several cloud parameters including optical depth, effective particle diameter and shape, water vapor content, cloud geometric thickness and cloud base altitude. A lookup table retrieval method was used to successfully extract, through an optimal estimation method, cloud optical depth up to a maximum value of 2.6 and to separate thin ice clouds into two classes: (1) TIC1 clouds characterized by small crystals (effective particle diameter ≤ 30 µm), and (2) TIC2 clouds characterized by large ice crystals (effective particle diameter > 30 µm). The retrieval technique was validated using data from the Arctic High Spectral Resolution Lidar (AHSRL) and Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR). Inversions were performed over three polar winters and results showed a significant correlation (R2 = 0.95) for cloud optical depth retrievals and an overall accuracy of 83 % for the classification of TIC1 and TIC2 clouds. A partial validation relative to an algorithm based on high spectral resolution downwelling IR radiance measurements between 8 and 21 µm was also performed. It confirms the robustness of the optical depth retrieval and the fact that the broadband thermal radiometer retrieval was sensitive to small particle (TIC1) sizes.

  6. Identification of active release planes using ground-based differential InSAR at the Randa rock slope instability, Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gischig

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Five ground-based differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (GB-DInSAR surveys were conducted between 2005 and 2007 at the rock slope instability at Randa, Switzerland. Resultant displacement maps revealed, for the first time, the presence of an active basal rupture zone and a lateral release surface daylighting on the exposed 1991 failure scarp. Structures correlated with the boundaries of interferometric displacement domains were confirmed using a helicopter-based LiDAR DTM and oblique aerial photography. Former investigations at the site failed to conclusively detect these active release surfaces essential for kinematic and hazard analysis of the instability, although their existence had been hypothesized. The determination of the basal and lateral release planes also allowed a more accurate estimate of the currently unstable volume of 5.7±1.5 million m3. The displacement patterns reveal that two different kinematic behaviors dominate the instability, i.e. toppling above 2200 m and translational failure below. In the toppling part of the instability the areas with the highest GB-DInSAR displacements correspond to areas of enhanced micro-seismic activity. The observation of only few strongly active discontinuities daylighting on the 1991 failure surface points to a rather uniform movement in the lower portion of the instability, while most of the slip occurs along the basal rupture plane. Comparison of GB-DInSAR displacements with mapped discontinuities revealed correlations between displacement patterns and active structures, although spatial offsets occur as a result of the effective resolution of GB-DInSAR. Similarly, comparisons with measurements from total station surveys generally showed good agreement. Discrepancies arose in several cases due to local movement of blocks, the size of which could not be resolved using GB-DInSAR.

  7. Phased-array radar design application of radar fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffrey, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Phased-Array Radar Design is a text-reference designed for electrical engineering graduate students in colleges and universities as well as for corporate in-house training programs for radar design engineers, especially systems engineers and analysts who would like to gain hands-on, practical knowledge and skills in radar design fundamentals, advanced radar concepts, trade-offs for radar design and radar performance analysis.

  8. Precision simulation of ground-based lensing data using observations from space

    CERN Document Server

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Leauthaud, Alexie; Massey, Richard J; Rhodes, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Current and upcoming wide-field, ground-based, broad-band imaging surveys promise to address a wide range of outstanding problems in galaxy formation and cosmology. Several such uses of ground-based data, especially weak gravitational lensing, require highly precise measurements of galaxy image statistics with careful correction for the effects of the point-spread function (PSF). In this paper, we introduce the SHERA (SHEar Reconvolution Analysis) software to simulate ground-based imaging data with realistic galaxy morphologies and observing conditions, starting from space-based data (from COSMOS, the Cosmological Evolution Survey) and accounting for the effects of the space-based PSF. This code simulates ground-based data, optionally with a weak lensing shear applied, in a model-independent way using a general Fourier space formalism. The utility of this pipeline is that it allows for a precise, realistic assessment of systematic errors due to the method of data processing, for example in extracting weak len...

  9. Simulation of the imaging quality of ground-based telescopes affected by atmospheric disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yubin; Kou, Songfeng; Gu, Bozhong

    2014-08-01

    Ground-based telescope imaging model is developed in this paper, the relationship between the atmospheric disturbances and the ground-based telescope image quality is studied. Simulation of the wave-front distortions caused by atmospheric turbulences has long been an important method in the study of the propagation of light through the atmosphere. The phase of the starlight wave-front is changed over time, but in an appropriate short exposure time, the atmospheric disturbances can be considered as "frozen". In accordance with Kolmogorov turbulence theory, simulating atmospheric disturbances of image model based on the phase screen distorted by atmospheric turbulences is achieved by the fast Fourier transform (FFT). Geiger mode avalanche photodiode array (APD arrays) model is used for atmospheric wave-front detection, the image is achieved by inversion method of photon counting after the target starlight goes through phase screens and ground-based telescopes. Ground-based telescope imaging model is established in this paper can accurately achieve the relationship between the quality of telescope imaging and monolayer or multilayer atmosphere disturbances, and it is great significance for the wave-front detection and optical correction in a Multi-conjugate Adaptive Optics system (MCAO).

  10. Ground-based LIDAR: a novel approach to quantify fine-scale fuelbed characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.L. Loudermilk; J.K. Hiers; J.J. O’Brien; R.J. Mitchell; A. Singhania; J.C. Fernandez; W.P. Cropper; K.C. Slatton

    2009-01-01

    Ground-based LIDAR (also known as laser ranging) is a novel technique that may precisely quantify fuelbed characteristics important in determining fire behavior. We measured fuel properties within a south-eastern US longleaf pine woodland at the individual plant and fuelbed scale. Data were collected using a mobile terrestrial LIDAR unit at sub-cm scale for individual...

  11. Use of neural networks in ground-based aerosol retrievals from multi-angle spectropolarimetric observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Noia, A.; Hasekamp, O.P.; Harten, G. van; Rietjens, J.H.H.; Smit, J.M.; Snik, F.; Henzing, J.S.; Boer, J. de; Keller, C.U.; Volten, H.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the use of a neural network algorithm for the retrieval of the aerosol properties from ground-based spectropolarimetric measurements is discussed. The neural network is able to retrieve the aerosol properties with an accuracy that is almost comparable to that of an iterative retrieval

  12. Retrieval of liquid water cloud properties from ground-based remote sensing observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knist, C.L.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate ground-based remotely sensed microphysical and optical properties of liquid water clouds are essential references to validate satellite-observed cloud properties and to improve cloud parameterizations in weather and climate models. This requires the evaluation of algorithms for retrieval of

  13. Ground-based remote sensing scheme for monitoring aerosol–cloud interactions (discussion)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarna, K.; Russchenberg, H.W.J.

    2015-01-01

    A method for continuous observation of aerosol–cloud interactions with ground-based remote sensing instruments is presented. The main goal of this method is to enable the monitoring of cloud microphysical changes due to the changing aerosol concentration. We use high resolution measurements from lid

  14. Ground-based remote sensing scheme for monitoring aerosol-cloud interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarna, K.; Russchenberg, H.W.J.

    2016-01-01

    A new method for continuous observation of aerosol–cloud interactions with ground-based remote sensing instruments is presented. The main goal of this method is to enable the monitoring of the change of the cloud droplet size due to the change in the aerosol concentration. We use high-resolution mea

  15. Low Power Ground-Based Laser Illumination for Electric Propulsion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, Michael R.; Oleson, Steven R.

    1994-01-01

    A preliminary evaluation of low power, ground-based laser powered electric propulsion systems is presented. A review of available and near-term laser, photovoltaic, and adaptive optic systems indicates that approximately 5-kW of ground-based laser power can be delivered at an equivalent one-sun intensity to an orbit of approximately 2000 km. Laser illumination at the proper wavelength can double photovoltaic array conversion efficiencies compared to efficiencies obtained with solar illumination at the same intensity, allowing a reduction in array mass. The reduced array mass allows extra propellant to be carried with no penalty in total spacecraft mass. The extra propellant mass can extend the satellite life in orbit, allowing additional revenue to be generated. A trade study using realistic cost estimates and conservative ground station viewing capability was performed to estimate the number of communication satellites which must be illuminated to make a proliferated system of laser ground stations economically attractive. The required number of satellites is typically below that of proposed communication satellite constellations, indicating that low power ground-based laser beaming may be commercially viable. However, near-term advances in low specific mass solar arrays and high energy density batteries for LEO applications would render the ground-based laser system impracticable.

  16. Asteroseismology of solar-type stars with Kepler: III. Ground-based data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Molenda-Żakowicz , J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the ground-based follow-up program of spectroscopic and photometric observations of solar-like asteroseismic targets for the Kepler space mission. These stars constitute a large group of more than a thousand objects which are the subject of an intensive study by the Kepler Asteroseis...

  17. Radar Signature Calculation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: The calculation, analysis, and visualization of the spatially extended radar signatures of complex objects such as ships in a sea multipath environment and...

  18. Doppler radar physiological sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Lubecke, Victor M; Droitcour, Amy D; Park, Byung-Kwon; Singh, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Presents a comprehensive description of the theory and practical implementation of Doppler radar-based physiological monitoring. This book includes an overview of current physiological monitoring techniques and explains the fundamental technology used in remote non-contact monitoring methods. Basic radio wave propagation and radar principles are introduced along with the fundamentals of physiological motion and measurement. Specific design and implementation considerations for physiological monitoring radar systems are then discussed in detail. The authors address current research and commercial development of Doppler radar based physiological monitoring for healthcare and other applications.

  19. Retrieval and validation of O3 measurements from ground-based FTIR spectrometer at equatorial station: Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takele Kenea, S.; Mengistu Tsidu, G.; Blumenstock, T.; Hase, F.; von Clarmann, T.; Stiller, G. P.

    2012-09-01

    Since May 2009 high-resolution Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) solar absorption spectra are recorded at Addis Ababa (9.01° N latitude, 38.76° E longitude, 2443 m altitude a.s.l.), Ethiopia. The vertical profiles and total column amounts of ozone (O3) are deduced from the spectra by using the retrieval code PROFFIT (V9.5) and regularly determined instrumental line shape (ILS). A detailed error analysis of the O3 retrieval is performed. Averaging kernels analysis of the target gas shows that the major contribution to the retrieved information always comes from the measurement. We obtained 2.1 degrees of freedom on average for signals in the retrieval of O3 from the observed FTIR spectra. We have compared the FTIR retrieval of ozone Volume Mixing Ratio (VMR) profiles and column amounts with the coincident satellite observations of Microwave Limb Sounding (MLS), Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) and Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), Atmospheric Infrared Sounding (AIRS) and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2) instrument. The mean relative differences are generally found below +15% in the altitude range of 27 to 36 km for comparison of VMR profiles made between MLS and MIPAS, whereas comparison with TES has shown below 9.4% relative difference. Furthermore, the mean relative difference is positive above 31 km, suggesting positive bias in the FTIR measurement of O3 VMR with respect to MLS, MIPAS and TES. The overall comparisons of column amounts of satellite measurements with the ground-based FTIR instruments show better agreement exhibiting mean relative differences of ground-based FTIR with respect to MLS and GOME-2 within +0.4% to +4.0% and corresponding standard deviations of 2.2 to 4.3% whereas, in the case of OMI, TES, AIRS, the mean relative differences are from -0.38 to -6.8%. Thus, the retrieved O3 VMR and column amounts from a tropical site, Addis Ababa, is found to exhibit

  20. Dual-polarizaration Phased Antenna Array for Wind Profiler Radar%风廓线气象雷达双极化相控阵天线系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张赟霞

    2012-01-01

    A dual polarization antenna array which is used in wind profiler is introduced in this paper.It uses a dual-polarization element with separated configuration and a two-storied feed network to achieve a compact configuration and a simple connected mode.Then we validated the scanning VSWR of the element by simulation and determined the dual-polarization element's specifically structure.The tested parameter and the pattern of the antenna array are introduced in the end.%文中介绍了一种运用于风廓线气象雷达的双极化相控阵天线系统,通过双极化天线单元的分离式设计以及馈电网络分层架构,使得天馈系统结构紧凑,连接形式简洁;然后对分离式双极化天线单元进行了仿真,分析其扫描驻波并最终确定了2种极化辐射单元的位置关系和具体尺寸.最后给出了天线阵列实测的典型技术参数和方向图.

  1. ARM Cloud Radar Simulator Package for Global Climate Models Value-Added Product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuying [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Xie, Shaocheng [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    It has been challenging to directly compare U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility ground-based cloud radar measurements with climate model output because of limitations or features of the observing processes and the spatial gap between model and the single-point measurements. To facilitate the use of ARM radar data in numerical models, an ARM cloud radar simulator was developed to converts model data into pseudo-ARM cloud radar observations that mimic the instrument view of a narrow atmospheric column (as compared to a large global climate model [GCM] grid-cell), thus allowing meaningful comparison between model output and ARM cloud observations. The ARM cloud radar simulator value-added product (VAP) was developed based on the CloudSat simulator contained in the community satellite simulator package, the Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP) Observation Simulator Package (COSP) (Bodas-Salcedo et al., 2011), which has been widely used in climate model evaluation with satellite data (Klein et al., 2013, Zhang et al., 2010). The essential part of the CloudSat simulator is the QuickBeam radar simulator that is used to produce CloudSat-like radar reflectivity, but is capable of simulating reflectivity for other radars (Marchand et al., 2009; Haynes et al., 2007). Adapting QuickBeam to the ARM cloud radar simulator within COSP required two primary changes: one was to set the frequency to 35 GHz for the ARM Ka-band cloud radar, as opposed to 94 GHz used for the CloudSat W-band radar, and the second was to invert the view from the ground to space so as to attenuate the beam correctly. In addition, the ARM cloud radar simulator uses a finer vertical resolution (100 m compared to 500 m for CloudSat) to resolve the more detailed structure of clouds captured by the ARM radars. The ARM simulator has been developed following the COSP workflow (Figure 1) and using the capabilities available in COSP

  2. Combined radar and telemetry system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T.; Young, Derek; Chou, Tina; Hsieh, Lung-Hwa; Conover, Kurt; Heintzleman, Richard

    2017-08-01

    A combined radar and telemetry system is described. The combined radar and telemetry system includes a processing unit that executes instructions, where the instructions define a radar waveform and a telemetry waveform. The processor outputs a digital baseband signal based upon the instructions, where the digital baseband signal is based upon the radar waveform and the telemetry waveform. A radar and telemetry circuit transmits, simultaneously, a radar signal and telemetry signal based upon the digital baseband signal.

  3. Comparison of CloudSat and TRMM radar reflectivities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K D Sindhu; G S Bhat

    2013-08-01

    Comparison of reflectivity data of radars onboard CloudSat and TRMM is performed using coincident overpasses. The contoured frequency by altitude diagrams (CFADs) are constructed for two cases: (a) only include collocated vertical profiles that are most likely to be raining and (b) include all collocated profiles along with cloudy pixels falling within a distance of about 50 km from the centre point of coincidence. Our analysis shows that for both cases, CloudSat underestimates the radar reflectivity by about 10 dBZ compared to that of TRMM radar below 15 km altitude. The difference is well outside the uncertainty value of ∼2 dBZ of each radar. Further, CloudSat reflectivity shows a decreasing trend while that of TRMM radar an increasing trend below 4 km height. Basically W-band radar that CloudSat flies suffers strong attenuation in precipitating clouds and its reflectivity value rarely exceeds 20 dBZ though its technical specification indicates the upper measurement limit to be 40 dBZ. TRMM radar, on the other hand, cannot measure values below 17 dBZ. In fact combining data from these two radars seems to give a better overall spatial structure of convective clouds.

  4. Monitoring of Civil Infrastructures by Interferometric Radar: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieraccini, Massimiliano

    2013-01-01

    Ground-based radar interferometry is an increasingly popular technique for monitoring civil infrastructures. Many research groups, professionals, and companies have tested it in different operative scenarios, so it is time for a first systematic survey of the case studies reported in the literature. This review is addressed especially to the engineers and scientists interested to consider the applicability of the technique to their practice, so it is focused on the issues of the practical cases rather than on theory and principles, which are now well consolidated. PMID:24106454

  5. Ground Observation and Correction of P-band Radar Imaging Ionospheric Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Ning

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available For high resolution space-borne P-band SAR system, ionospheric effects could cause serious phase errors. These errors are causally related to the radar frequency and the TEC of ionosphere and make the image quality degraded. To guarantee the image quality, the ionosphere errors must be emended. Based on the mismatched filter model caused by ionosphere, it is pointed out that accurate ionosphere TEC is the key for phase error correction, a high precision ionosphere TEC measurement method is further put forward by using the phase errors of SAR echoes, which is validated by processing the data of a ground based P-band radar with well focused radar image of the international space station obtained. The results indicate that the method can effectively increase the accuracy of ionosphere TEC estimation, and thus improve the radar imaging quality, it is applicable to low frequency space-borne SAR systems for reducing the ionosphere effects.

  6. Radar Speckle Displacement Interferometry to Study Moon's Polar Axis Behaviour in the Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holin, I. V.

    2002-01-01

    Radar Speckle Displacement Interferometry (RSDI) is a new on principle Earth-based radar technique which allows precise measurement of instantaneous rotational-progressive motion components of distant bodies. It is based on the effect of speckle displacement or far coherence of speckled radar fields scattered by rough surfaces of moving objects. RSDI examinations in practice of radar astronomy have been successfully initiated in 2001-2002 both in Europe and in the USA In particular, RSDI is considered as one of most promising ground-based techniques to solve the problem of Mercury's obliquity and librations. It was proposed in how Moon's physical librations can be measured. Below RSDI possibilities are discussed as applied to estimation of Moon's instantaneous spin axis orientation in the sky and its variation with time.

  7. Polarization differences in airborne ground penetrating radar performance for landmine detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogaru, Traian; Le, Calvin

    2016-05-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has investigated the ultra-wideband (UWB) radar technology for detection of landmines, improvised explosive devices and unexploded ordnance, for over two decades. This paper presents a phenomenological study of the radar signature of buried landmines in realistic environments and the performance of airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in detecting these targets as a function of multiple parameters: polarization, depression angle, soil type and burial depth. The investigation is based on advanced computer models developed at ARL. The analysis includes both the signature of the targets of interest and the clutter produced by rough surface ground. Based on our numerical simulations, we conclude that low depression angles and H-H polarization offer the highest target-to-clutter ratio in the SAR images and therefore the best radar performance of all the scenarios investigated.

  8. The Next Generation Airborne Polarimetric Doppler Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivekanandan, J.; Lee, Wen-Chau; Loew, Eric; Salazar, Jorge; Chandrasekar, V.

    2013-04-01

    NCAR's Electra Doppler radar (ELDORA) with a dual-beam slotted waveguide array using dual-transmitter, dual-beam, rapid scan and step-chirped waveform significantly improved the spatial scale to 300m (Hildebrand et al. 1996). However, ELDORA X-band radar's penetration into precipitation is limited by attenuation and is not designed to collect polarimetric measurements to remotely estimate microphysics. ELDORA has been placed on dormancy because its airborne platform (P3 587) was retired in January 2013. The US research community has strongly voiced the need to continue measurement capability similar to the ELDORA. A critical weather research area is quantitative precipitation estimation/forecasting (QPE/QPF). In recent years, hurricane intensity change involving eye-eyewall interactions has drawn research attention (Montgomery et al., 2006; Bell and Montgomery, 2006). In the case of convective precipitation, two issues, namely, (1) when and where convection will be initiated, and (2) determining the organization and structure of ensuing convection, are key for QPF. Therefore collocated measurements of 3-D winds and precipitation microphysics are required for achieving significant skills in QPF and QPE. Multiple radars in dual-Doppler configuration with polarization capability estimate dynamical and microphysical characteristics of clouds and precipitation are mostly available over land. However, storms over complex terrain, the ocean and in forest regions are not observable by ground-based radars (Bluestein and Wakimoto, 2003). NCAR/EOL is investigating potential configurations for the next generation airborne radar that is capable of retrieving dynamic and microphysical characteristics of clouds and precipitation. ELDORA's slotted waveguide array radar is not compatible for dual-polarization measurements. Therefore, the new design has to address both dual-polarization capability and platform requirements to replace the ELDORA system. NCAR maintains a C-130