WorldWideScience

Sample records for ground-based polarization radar

  1. Combining dual-polarization radar and ground-based observations to study the effect of riming on ice particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisseev, Dmitri; von Lerber, Annakaisa; Tiira, Jussi

    2017-04-01

    Recently a new microphysical scheme based on a single ice-phase category was proposed for the use in numerical weather prediction models. In the proposed scheme, ice particle properties are predicted and vary in time and space. One of the attributes of the proposed scheme is that the prefactor of a power-law relation that links mass and size of ice particles is determined by the rime mass fraction, while the exponent is kept constant. According to this the maximum dimensions of ice particles do not change during riming until graupel growth phase is reached. The dual-polarization radar observations given an additional insight on what are the physical properties of ice particles. Often, it is assumed that differential reflectivity should decrease because of riming. The motivation for this is that heavy riming would transform an ice particle to graupel. A graupel particle typically would have an almost spherical shape and therefore the differential reflectivity will become smaller. On the other hand, at the earlier stages ice particle shape may not change much, while its mass and therefore the density increases. This would lead to the increase of the differential reflectivity, for example. By combining ground-based observations, which allow to quantify the effect of riming on snowfall, and dual-polarization radar observations we investigate the impact of riming on ice particle properties, i.e. mass, density and shape. Furthermore, a connection between, bulk properties of ice particles, liquid water path, radar equivalent reflectivity factor and precipitation rate observations is established. The study is based on data collected during US DOE Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC) field campaign that took place in Hyytiala, Finland. A detailed analysis of two events is presented to illustrate the method.

  2. Experiments on a Ground-Based Tomographic Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoonyol Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development and experiment of three-dimensional image formation by using a ground-based tomographic synthetic aperture radar (GB-TomoSAR system. GB-TomoSAR formulates two-dimensional synthetic aperture by the motion of antennae, both in azimuth and vertical directions. After range compression, three-dimensional image focusing is performed by applying Deramp-FFT (Fast Fourier Transform algorithms, both in azimuth and vertical directions. Geometric and radiometric calibrations were applied to make an image cube, which is then projected into range-azimuth and range-vertical cross-sections for visualization. An experiment with a C-band GB-TomoSAR system with a scan length of 2.49 m and 1.86 m in azimuth and vertical-direction, respectively, shows distinctive three-dimensional radar backscattering of stable buildings and roads with resolutions similar to the theoretical values. Unstable objects such as trees and moving cars generate severe noise due to decorrelation during the eight-hour image-acquisition time.

  3. Evaluation of Radar Vegetation Indices for Vegetation Water Content Estimation Using Data from a Ground-Based SMAP Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Prashant K.; O'Neill, Peggy; Cosh, Michael; Lang, Roger; Joseph, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Vegetation water content (VWC) is an important component of microwave soil moisture retrieval algorithms. This paper aims to estimate VWC using L band active and passive radar/radiometer datasets obtained from a NASA ground-based Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) simulator known as ComRAD (Combined Radar/Radiometer). Several approaches to derive vegetation information from radar and radiometer data such as HH, HV, VV, Microwave Polarization Difference Index (MPDI), HH/VV ratio, HV/(HH+VV), HV/(HH+HV+VV) and Radar Vegetation Index (RVI) are tested for VWC estimation through a generalized linear model (GLM). The overall analysis indicates that HV radar backscattering could be used for VWC content estimation with highest performance followed by HH, VV, MPDI, RVI, and other ratios.

  4. On reconciling ground-based with spaceborne normalized radar cross section measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumgartner, Francois; Munk, Jens; Jezek, K C

    2002-01-01

    This study examines differences in the normalized radar cross section, derived from ground-based versus spaceborne radar data. A simple homogeneous half-space model, indicates that agreement between the two improves as 1) the distance from the scatterer is increased; and/or 2) the extinction...

  5. Comparison of Precipitation Observations from a Prototype Space-based Cloud Radar and Ground-based Radars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Liping; ZHANG Zhiqiang; YU Danru; YANG Hu; ZHAO Chonghui; ZHONG Lingzhi

    2012-01-01

    A prototype space-based cloud radar has been developed and was installed on an airplane to observe a precipitation system over Tianjin,China in July 2010.Ground-based S-band and Ka-band radars were used to examine the observational capability of the prototype. A cross-comparison algorithm between different wavelengths,spatial resolutions and platform radars is presented.The reflectivity biases,correlation coefficients and standard deviations between the radars are analyzed.The equivalent reflectivity bias between the S- and Ka-band radars were simulated with a given raindrop size distribution.The results indicated that reflectivity bias between the S- and Ka-band radars due to scattering properties was less than 5 dB,and for weak precipitation the bias was negligible. The prototype space-based cloud radar was able to measure a reasonable vertical profile of reflectivity,but the reflectivity below an altitude of 1.5 km above ground level was obscured by ground clutter.The measured reflectivity by the prototype space-based cloud radar was approximately 10.9 dB stronger than that by the S-band Doppler radar (SA radar),and 13.7 dB stronger than that by the ground-based cloud radar.The reflectivity measured by the SA radar was 0.4 dB stronger than that by the ground-based cloud radar.This study could provide a method for the quantitative examination of the observation ability for space-based radars.

  6. A Fast Method for Embattling Optimization of Ground-Based Radar Surveillance Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H.; Cheng, H.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, J.

    A growing number of space activities have created an orbital debris environment that poses increasing impact risks to existing space systems and human space flight. For the safety of in-orbit spacecraft, a lot of observation facilities are needed to catalog space objects, especially in low earth orbit. Surveillance of Low earth orbit objects are mainly rely on ground-based radar, due to the ability limitation of exist radar facilities, a large number of ground-based radar need to build in the next few years in order to meet the current space surveillance demands. How to optimize the embattling of ground-based radar surveillance network is a problem to need to be solved. The traditional method for embattling optimization of ground-based radar surveillance network is mainly through to the detection simulation of all possible stations with cataloged data, and makes a comprehensive comparative analysis of various simulation results with the combinational method, and then selects an optimal result as station layout scheme. This method is time consuming for single simulation and high computational complexity for the combinational analysis, when the number of stations increases, the complexity of optimization problem will be increased exponentially, and cannot be solved with traditional method. There is no better way to solve this problem till now. In this paper, target detection procedure was simplified. Firstly, the space coverage of ground-based radar was simplified, a space coverage projection model of radar facilities in different orbit altitudes was built; then a simplified objects cross the radar coverage model was established according to the characteristics of space objects orbit motion; after two steps simplification, the computational complexity of the target detection was greatly simplified, and simulation results shown the correctness of the simplified results. In addition, the detection areas of ground-based radar network can be easily computed with the

  7. Ground-based microwave weather radar observations and retrievals during the 2014 Holuhraun eruption (Bárðarbunga, Iceland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mereu, Luigi; Silvio Marzano, Frank; Barsotti, Sara; Montopoli, Mario; Yeo, Richard; Arngrimsson, Hermann; Björnsson, Halldór; Bonadonna, Costanza

    2015-04-01

    During an eruptive event the real-time forecasting of ash dispersal into the atmosphere is a key factor to prevent air traffic disasters. The ash plume is extremely hazardous to aircraft that inadvertently may fly through it. Real-time monitoring of such phenomena is crucial, particularly to obtain specific data for the initialization of eruption and dispersion models in terms of source parameters. The latter, such as plume height, ash concentration, mass flow rate and size spectra, are usually very difficult to measure or to estimate with a relatively good accuracy. Over the last years different techniques have been developed to improved ash plume detection and retrieval. Satellite-based observations, using multi-frequency visible and infrared radiometers, are usually exploited for monitoring and measuring dispersed ash clouds. The observations from geostationary orbit suffer from a relatively poor spatial resolution, whereas the low orbit level has a relatively poor temporal resolution. Moreover, the field-of-view of infrared radiometric measurements may be reduced by obstructions caused by water and ice clouds lying between the ground and the sensor's antenna. Weather radar-based observations represent an emerging technique to detect and, to a certain extent, mitigate the hazard from the ash plumes. Ground-based microwave scanning radar systems can provide the three-dimensional information about the detected ash volume with a fairly high spatial resolution every few minutes and in all weather conditions. Methodological studies have recently investigated the possibility of using single-polarization and dual-polarization ground-based radar for the remote sensing of volcanic ash cloud. In this respect, radar observations can be complementary to satellite observations. A microphysical electromagnetic characterization of volcanic ash was carried out in terms of dielectric properties, composition, size and orientation of ash particles. An extended Volcanic Ash Radar

  8. Ground based interferometric radar initial look at Longview, Blue Springs, Tuttle Creek, and Milford Dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Huazeng

    Measuring millimeter and smaller deformation has been demonstrated in the literature using RADAR. To address in part the limitations in current commercial satellite-based SAR datasets, a University of Missouri (MU) team worked with GAMMA Remote Sensing to develop a specialized (dual-frequency, polarimetric, and interferometric) ground-based real-aperture RADAR (GBIR) instrument. The GBIR device is portable with its tripod system and control electronics. It can be deployed to obtain data with high spatial resolution (i.e. on the order of 1 meter) and high temporal resolution (i.e. on the order 1 minute). The high temporal resolution is well suited for measurements of rapid deformation. From the same geodetic position, the GBIR may collect dual frequency data set using C-band and Ku-band. The overall goal of this project is to measure the deformation from various scenarios by applying the GBIR system. Initial efforts have been focusing on testing the system performance on different types of targets. This thesis details a number of my efforts on experimental and processing activities at the start of the MU GBIR imaging project. For improved close range capability, a wideband dual polarized antenna option was produced and tested. For GBIR calibration, several trihedral corner reflectors were designed and fabricated. In addition to experimental activities and site selection, I participated in advanced data processing activities. I processed GBIR data in several ways including single-look-complex (SLC) image generation, imagery registration, and interferometric processing. A number of initial-processed GBIR image products are presented from four dams: Longview, Blue Springs, Tuttle Creek, and Milford. Excellent imaging performance of the MU GBIR has been observed for various target types such as riprap, concrete, soil, rock, metal, and vegetation. Strong coherence of the test scene has been observed in the initial interferograms.

  9. A Semiautomated Multilayer Picking Algorithm for Ice-sheet Radar Echograms Applied to Ground-Based Near-Surface Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onana, Vincent De Paul; Koenig, Lora Suzanne; Ruth, Julia; Studinger, Michael; Harbeck, Jeremy P.

    2014-01-01

    Snow accumulation over an ice sheet is the sole mass input, making it a primary measurement for understanding the past, present, and future mass balance. Near-surface frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) radars image isochronous firn layers recording accumulation histories. The Semiautomated Multilayer Picking Algorithm (SAMPA) was designed and developed to trace annual accumulation layers in polar firn from both airborne and ground-based radars. The SAMPA algorithm is based on the Radon transform (RT) computed by blocks and angular orientations over a radar echogram. For each echogram's block, the RT maps firn segmented-layer features into peaks, which are picked using amplitude and width threshold parameters of peaks. A backward RT is then computed for each corresponding block, mapping the peaks back into picked segmented-layers. The segmented layers are then connected and smoothed to achieve a final layer pick across the echogram. Once input parameters are trained, SAMPA operates autonomously and can process hundreds of kilometers of radar data picking more than 40 layers. SAMPA final pick results and layer numbering still require a cursory manual adjustment to correct noncontinuous picks, which are likely not annual, and to correct for inconsistency in layer numbering. Despite the manual effort to train and check SAMPA results, it is an efficient tool for picking multiple accumulation layers in polar firn, reducing time over manual digitizing efforts. The trackability of good detected layers is greater than 90%.

  10. Comparison of airborne radar altimeter and ground-based Ku-band radar measurements on the ice cap Austfonna, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Brandt

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We compare coincident data from the European Space Agency's Airborne SAR/Interferometric Radar Altimeter System (ASIRAS with ground-based Very High Bandwidth (VHB stepped-frequency radar measurements in the Ku-band. The ASIRAS instrument obtained data from ~700 m above the surface, using a 13.5 GHz center frequency and a 1 GHz bandwidth. The ground-based VHB radar measurements were acquired using the same center frequency, but with a variable bandwidth of either 1 or 8 GHz. Four sites were visited with the VHB radar; two sites within the transition region from superimposed ice to firn, and two sites in the long-term firn area (wet-snow zone. The greater bandwidth VHB measurements show that the first peak in the airborne data is a composite of the return from the surface (i.e. air-snow interface and returns of similar or stronger amplitude from reflectors in the upper ~30 cm of the subsurface. The peak position in the airborne data is thus not necessarily a good proxy for the surface since the maximum and width of the first return depend on the degree of interference between surface and subsurface reflectors. The major response from the winter snowpack was found to be caused by units of thin crust/ice layers (0.5–2 mm surrounded by large crystals (>3 mm. In the airborne data, it is possible to track such layers for tens of kilometers. The winter snowpack lacked thicker ice layers. The last year's summer surface, characterized by a low density large crystal layer overlaying a harder denser layer, gives a strong radar response, frequently the strongest. The clear relationship observed between the VHB and ASIRAS waveforms, justifies the use of ground-based radar measurements in the validation of air- or spaceborne radars.

  11. SCENARIO AND TARGET SIMULATION FOR A GROUND BASED MULTIFUNCTION PHASED ARRAY RADAR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a scenario and target simulation which operates in non real-time to provide full closed-loop operation of the ground based multifunction phased array radar simulation system in support of ballistic missile defence experiments against countermeasure.By simulating the target scattering signature and dynamical signature,this scenario and target simulation provide re- alistic scenario source to evaluate the system performance of multifunction phased array radar,and the key algorithms verification and validation such as target tracking,multi-target imaging and target recognition.

  12. Space Fence Ground-Based Radar System Increment 1 (Space Fence Inc 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-438 Space Fence Ground-Based Radar System Increment 1 (Space Fence Inc 1) As of FY 2017...11 Track to Budget 17 Cost and Funding 18 Low Rate Initial Production 23 Foreign Military Sales 24 Nuclear Costs 24 Unit Cost...Document CLIN - Contract Line Item Number CPD - Capability Production Document CY - Calendar Year DAB - Defense Acquisition Board DAE - Defense Acquisition

  13. Comparison of the TRMM Precipitation Radar rainfall estimation with ground-based disdrometer and radar measurements in South Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidou, Melina P.; Kalogiros, John A.; Stavrakis, Adrian K.

    2016-11-01

    The performance of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) rainfall estimation algorithm is assessed, locally, in Crete island, south Greece, using data from a 2D-video disdrometer and a ground-based, X-band, polarimetric radar. A three-parameter, normalized Gamma drop size distribution is fitted to the disdrometer rain spectra; the latter are classified in stratiform and convective rain types characterized by different relations between distribution parameters. The method of moments estimates more accurately the distribution parameters than the best fit technique, which exhibits better agreement with and is more biased by the observed droplet distribution at large diameter values. Power laws between the radar reflectivity factor (Z) and the rainfall rate (R) are derived from the disdrometer data. A significant diversity of the prefactor and the exponent of the estimated power laws is observed, depending on the scattering model and the regression technique. The Z-R relationships derived from the disdrometer data are compared to those obtained from TRMM-PR data. Generally, the power laws estimated from the two datasets are different. Specifically, the greater prefactor found for the disdrometer data suggests an overestimation of rainfall rate by the TRMM-PR algorithm for light and moderate stratiform rain, which was the main rain type in the disdrometer dataset. Finally, contemporary data from the TRMM-PR and a ground-based, X-band, polarimetric radar are analyzed. Comparison of the corresponding surface rain rates for a rain event with convective characteristics indicates a large variability of R in a single TRMM-PR footprint, which typically comprises several hundreds of radar pixels. Thus, the coarse spatial resolution of TRMM-PR may lead to miss of significant high local peaks of convective rain. Also, it was found that the high temporal variability of convective rain may introduce significant errors in the estimation of bias of

  14. Validation of GPM Ka-Radar Algorithm Using a Ground-based Ka-Radar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kenji; Kaneko, Yuki; Nakagawa, Katsuhiro; Furukawa, Kinji; Suzuki, Kenji

    2016-04-01

    GPM led by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration of US (NASA) aims to observe global precipitation. The core satellite is equipped with a microwave radiometer (GMI) and a dual-frequency radar (DPR) which is the first spaceborne Ku/Ka-band dual-wavelength radar dedicated for precipitation measurement. In the DPR algorithm, measured radar reflectivity is converted to effective radar reflectivity by estimating the rain attenuation. Here, the scattering/attenuation characteristics of Ka-band radiowaves are crucial, particularly for wet snow. A melting layer observation using a dual Ka-band radar system developed by JAXA was conducted along the slope of Mt. Zao in Yamagata Prefecture, Japan. The dual Ka-band radar system consists of two nearly identical Ka-band FM-CW radars, and the precipitation systems between two radars were observed in opposite directions. From this experiment, equivalent radar reflectivity (Ze) and specific attenuation (k) were obtained. The experiments were conducted for two winter seasons. During the data analyses, it was found that k estimate easily fluctuates because the estimate is based on double difference calculation. With much temporal and spatial averaging, k-Ze relationship was obtained for melting layers. One of the results is that the height of the peak of k seems slightly higher than that of Ze. The results are compared with in-situ precipitation particle measurements.

  15. Investigation of Rainfall Characteristics Using TRMM PR and Ground Based Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, B.; Lang, T. J.; Nesbitt, S. W.; Cifelli, R.; Rutledge, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    Despite relatively good agreement between reflectivity profiles, comparisons of rainfall statistics derived from TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) deviate from ground-based radar (GR) observations in various field locations across the globe. TRMM PR rain rate probability distribution functions underestimate the occurrence of high rain rates (> 80 mm hr-1) compared with similar ground-based statistics, and similarly, GR distributes the total rain volume over a larger range of rain rates. Analysis of ten years of TRMM data over three field sites has shown that the greatest disagreements occur in the most intense convection, such as over land and during the east and break wind regimes over the Amazon and Australia, respectively. These differences are investigated further in this study. Ten years of TRMM PR data are analyzed in conjunction with data collected during two field experiments involving the NCAR S-Pol radar. S-Pol was deployed in Brazil in the Amazon during TRMM LBA in 1998-1999 and near Mazatlan, Mexico as part of the North American Monsoon Experiment (NAME) in 2004. Additionally, multiple years of data from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology CPOL radar located in Darwin, Australia, are examined to extend the robustness of the GR observations beyond the relatively short field campaigns. Polarimetric data collected by the two radars are used to characterize the differences between TRMM PR and GR observations as a function of bulk hydrometeor type. For example, profiles with significant graupel, as identified by GR, are analyzed to investigate the role of mixed phase in the PR retrievals. The vertical variability of D0 is examined as a function of reflectivity and related to the underlying microphysical conditions using the polarimetric data provided by the GR observations. Spatial variability of D0 is also explored by correlating D0 values derived from GR at different heights. Several significant changes were made to the TRMM processing algorithms in the

  16. Boost-Phase ballistic missile trajectory estimation with ground based radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Yuyan; Huang Peikang

    2006-01-01

    A conditional boost-phase trajectory estimation method based on ballistic missile (BM) information database and classification is developed to estimate and predict boos-phase BM trajectory. The main uncertain factors to describe BM dynamics equation are reduced to the control law of trajectory pitch angle in boost-phase. After the BM mass at the beginning of estimation, the BM attack angle and the modification of engine thrust denoting BM acceleration are modeled reasonably, the boost-phase BM trajectory estimation with ground based radar is well realized. The validity of this estimation method is testified by computer simulation with a typical example.

  17. Validation of TRMM Precipitation Radar Through Comparison of its Multi-Year Measurements to Ground-Based Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Liang; Meneghini, Robert

    2010-01-01

    A procedure to accurately resample spaceborne and ground-based radar data is described, and then applied to the measurements taken from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) and the ground-based Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D or WSR) for the validation of the PR measurements and estimates. Through comparisons with the well-calibrated, non-attenuated WSR at Melbourne, Florida for the period 1998-2007, the calibration of the Precipitation Radar (PR) aboard the TRMM satellite is checked using measurements near the storm top. Analysis of the results indicates that the PR, after taking into account differences in radar reflectivity factors between the PR and WSR, has a small positive bias of 0.8 dB relative to the WSR, implying a soundness of the PR calibration in view of the uncertainties involved in the comparisons. Comparisons between the PR and WSR reflectivities are also made near the surface for evaluation of the attenuation-correction procedures used in the PR algorithms. It is found that the PR attenuation is accurately corrected in stratiform rain but is underestimated in convective rain, particularly in heavy rain. Tests of the PR estimates of rainfall rate are conducted through comparisons in the overlap area between the TRMM overpass and WSR scan. Analyses of the data are made both on a conditional basis, in which the instantaneous rain rates are compared only at those pixels where both the PR and WSR detect rain, and an unconditional basis, in which the area-averaged rain rates are estimated independently for the PR and WSR. Results of the conditional rain comparisons show that the PR-derived rain is about 9% greater and 19% less than the WSR estimates for stratiform and convective storms, respectively. Overall, the PR tends to underestimate the conditional mean rain rate by 8% for all rain categories, a finding that conforms to the results of the area-averaged rain (unconditional) comparisons.

  18. Polarimetric analysis of radar backscatter from ground-based scatterometers and wheat biomass monitoring with advanced synthetic aperture radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lei; Tong, Ling; Li, Yuxia; Chen, Yan; Tan, Longfei; Guo, Caizheng

    2016-04-01

    This article presents an analysis of the scattering measurements for an entire wheat growth cycle by ground-based scatterometers at a frequency of 5.3 GHz. Since wheat ears are related to wheat growth and yield, the radar backscatter of wheat was analyzed at two different periods, i.e., with and without wheat ears. Simultaneously, parameters such as wheat and soil characteristics as well as volume scattering and soil scattering were analyzed for the two periods during the entire growth cycle. Wheat ears have been demonstrated to have a great influence on radar backscatter; therefore, a modified version of water-cloud model used for retrieving biomass should consider the effect of wheat ears. This work presents two retrieval models based on the water-cloud model and adopts the advanced integral equation model to simulate the soil backscatter before the heading stage and the backscatter from the layer under wheat ears after the heading stage. The research results showed that the biomass retrieved from the advanced synthetic aperture radar (ASAR) images to agree well with the data measured in situ after setting the modified water-cloud model for the growth stages with ears. Furthermore, it was concluded that wheat ears should form an essential component of theoretical modeling as they influence the final yield.

  19. Polarization Diversity for HF Ground Wave Radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Xiaolin; JIN Ming

    2001-01-01

    A new method of single sample polar-ization filtering is proposed.The algorithm is fast andsuitable for the polarization processing of stationaryor nonstationary polarized disturbed signals with oneor more independent sources of disturbance.An HFground wave polarimetric radar with the ability of ra-dio disturbance suppression is then introduced.Somenumerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of sin-gle sample polarization filtering method for groundwave polarimetric radar.

  20. DATA PROCESSING AND ANALYSIS TOOLS BASED ON GROUND-BASED SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Crosetto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Ground-Based SAR (GBSAR is a terrestrial remote sensing technique used to measure and monitor deformation. In this paper we describe two complementary approaches to derive deformation measurements using GBSAR data. The first approach is based on radar interferometry, while the second one exploits the GBSAR amplitude. In this paper we consider the so-called discontinuous GBSAR acquisition mode. The interferometric process is not always straightforward: it requires appropriate data processing and analysis tools. One of the main critical steps is phase unwrapping, which can critically affect the deformation measurements. In this paper we describe the procedure used at the CTTC to process and analyse discontinuous GBSAR data. In the second part of the paper we describe the approach based on GBSAR amplitude images and an image-matching method.

  1. Sub-Seasonal Variability of Tropical Rainfall Observed by TRMM and Ground-based Polarimetric Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Brenda; Rutledge, Steven; Lang, Timothy; Cifelli, Robert; Nesbitt, Stephen

    2010-05-01

    Studies of tropical precipitation characteristics from the TRMM-LBA and NAME field campaigns using ground-based polarimetric S-band data have revealed significant differences in microphysical processes occurring in the various meteorological regimes sampled in those projects. In TRMM-LMA (January-February 1999 in Brazil; a TRMM ground validation experiment), variability is driven by prevailing low-level winds. During periods of low-level easterlies, deeper and more intense convection is observed, while during periods of low-level westerlies, weaker convection embedded in widespread stratiform precipitation is common. In the NAME region (North American Monsoon Experiment, summer 2004 along the west coast of Mexico), strong terrain variability drives differences in precipitation, with larger drops and larger ice mass aloft associated with convection occurring over the coastal plain compared to convection over the higher terrain of the Sierra Madre Occidental, or adjacent coastal waters. Comparisons with the TRMM precipitation radar (PR) indicate that such sub-seasonal variability in these two regions are not well characterized by the TRMM PR reflectivity and rainfall statistics. TRMM PR reflectivity profiles in the LBA region are somewhat lower than S-Pol values, particularly in the more intense easterly regime convection. In NAME, mean reflectivities are even more divergent, with TRMM profiles below those of S-Pol. In both regions, the TRMM PR does not capture rain rates above 80 mm hr-1 despite much higher rain rates estimated from the S-Pol polarimetric data, and rain rates are generally lower for a given reflectivity from TRMM PR compared to S-Pol. These differences between TRMM PR and S-Pol may arise from the inability of Z-R relationships to capture the full variability of microphysical conditions or may highlight problems with TRMM retrievals over land. In addition to the TRMM-LBA and NAME regions, analysis of sub-seasonal precipitation variability and

  2. Precipitation and microphysical processes observed by three polarimetric X-band radars and ground-based instrumentation during HOPE

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Xinxin; Evaristo, Raquel; Simmer, Clemens; Handwerker, Jan; Trömel, Silke

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a first analysis of precipitation and related microphysical processes observed by three polarimetric X-band Doppler radars (BoXPol, JuXPol and KiXPol) in conjunction with a ground-based network of disdrometers, rain gauges and vertically pointing micro rain radars (MRRs) during the High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2) Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) during April and May 2013 in Germany. While JuXPol...

  3. MetaSensing's FastGBSAR: ground based radar for deformation monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödelsperger, Sabine; Meta, Adriano

    2014-10-01

    The continuous monitoring of ground deformation and structural movement has become an important task in engineering. MetaSensing introduces a novel sensor system, the Fast Ground Based Synthetic Aperture Radar (FastGBSAR), based on innovative technologies that have already been successfully applied to airborne SAR applications. The FastGBSAR allows the remote sensing of deformations of a slope or infrastructure from up to a distance of 4 km. The FastGBSAR can be setup in two different configurations: in Real Aperture Radar (RAR) mode it is capable of accurately measuring displacements along a linear range profile, ideal for monitoring vibrations of structures like bridges and towers (displacement accuracy up to 0.01 mm). Modal parameters can be determined within half an hour. Alternatively, in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) configuration it produces two-dimensional displacement images with an acquisition time of less than 5 seconds, ideal for monitoring areal structures like dams, landslides and open pit mines (displacement accuracy up to 0.1 mm). The MetaSensing FastGBSAR is the first ground based SAR instrument on the market able to produce two-dimensional deformation maps with this high acquisition rate. By that, deformation time series with a high temporal and spatial resolution can be generated, giving detailed information useful to determine the deformation mechanisms involved and eventually to predict an incoming failure. The system is fully portable and can be quickly installed on bedrock or a basement. The data acquisition and processing can be fully automated leading to a low effort in instrument operation and maintenance. Due to the short acquisition time of FastGBSAR, the coherence between two acquisitions is very high and the phase unwrapping is simplified enormously. This yields a high density of resolution cells with good quality and high reliability of the acquired deformations. The deformation maps can directly be used as input into an Early

  4. Intercomparison of snowfall estimates derived from the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar and the ground-based weather radar network over Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Norin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate snowfall estimates are important for both weather and climate applications. Ground-based weather radars and space-based satellite sensors are often used as viable alternatives to rain gauges to estimate precipitation in this context. In particular, the Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR on board CloudSat is proving to be a useful tool to map snowfall globally, in part due to its high sensitivity to light precipitation and its ability to provide near-global vertical structure. CloudSat snowfall estimates play a particularly important role in the high-latitude regions as other ground-based observations become sparse and passive satellite sensors suffer from inherent limitations. In this paper, snowfall estimates from two observing systems – Swerad, the Swedish national weather radar network, and CloudSat – are compared. Swerad offers a well-calibrated data set of precipitation rates with high spatial and temporal resolution, at very high latitudes. The measurements are anchored to rain gauges and provide valuable insights into the usefulness of CloudSat CPR's snowfall estimates in the polar regions. In total, 7.2 × 105 matchups of CloudSat and Swerad observations from 2008 through 2010 were intercompared, covering all but the summer months (June to September. The intercomparison shows encouraging agreement between the two observing systems despite their different sensitivities and user applications. The best agreement is observed when CloudSat passes close to a Swerad station (46–82 km, where the observational conditions for both systems are comparable. Larger disagreements outside this range suggest that both platforms have difficulty with shallow snow but for different reasons. The correlation between Swerad and CloudSat degrades with increasing distance from the nearest Swerad station, as Swerad's sensitivity decreases as a function of distance. Swerad also tends to overshoot low-level precipitating systems further away from the station

  5. Volcanic Ash Cloud Observation using Ground-based Ka-band Radar and Near-Infrared Lidar Ceilometer during the Eyjafjallajökull eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank S. Marzano

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Active remote sensing techniques can probe volcanic ash plumes, but their sensitivity at a given distance depends upon the sensor transmitted power, wavelength and polarization capability. Building on a previous numerical study at centimeter wavelength, this work aims at i simulating the distal ash particles polarimetric response of millimeter-wave radar and multi-wavelength optical lidar; ii developing and applying a model-based statistical retrieval scheme using a multi-sensor approach. The microphysical electromagnetic forward model of volcanic ash particle distribution, previously set up at microwaves, is extended to include non-spherical particle shapes, vesicular composition, silicate content and orientation phenomena for both millimeter and optical bands. Monte Carlo generation of radar and lidar signatures are driven by random variability of volcanic particle main parameters, using constraints from available data and experimental evidences. The considered case study is related to the ground-based observation of the Eyjafjallajökull (Iceland volcanic ash plume on May 15, 2010, carried out by the Atmospheric Research Station at Mace Head (Ireland with a 35-GHz Ka-band Doppler cloud radar and a 1064-nm ceilometer lidar. The detection and estimation of ash layer presence and composition is carried out using a Bayesian approach, which is trained by the Monte Carlo model-based dataset. Retrieval results are corroborated exploiting auxiliary data such as those from a ground-based microwave radiometer also positioned at Mace Head.

  6. Passive Microwave Soil Moisture Retrieval through Combined Radar/Radiometer Ground Based Simulator with Special Reference to Dielectric Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Prashant K., ,, Dr.; O'Neill, Peggy, ,, Dr.

    2014-05-01

    Soil moisture is an important element for weather and climate prediction, hydrological sciences, and applications. Hence, measurements of this hydrologic variable are required to improve our understanding of hydrological processes, ecosystem functions, and the linkages between the Earth's water, energy, and carbon cycles (Srivastava et al. 2013). The retrieval of soil moisture depends not only on parameterizations in the retrieval algorithm but also on the soil dielectric mixing models used (Behari 2005). Although a number of soil dielectric mixing models have been developed, testing these models for soil moisture retrieval has still not been fully explored, especially with SMAP-like simulators. The main objective of this work focuses on testing different dielectric models for soil moisture retrieval using the Combined Radar/Radiometer (ComRAD) ground-based L-band simulator developed jointly by NASA/GSFC and George Washington University (O'Neill et al., 2006). The ComRAD system was deployed during a field experiment in 2012 in order to provide long active/passive measurements of two crops under controlled conditions during an entire growing season. L-band passive data were acquired at a look angle of 40 degree from nadir at both horizontal & vertical polarization. Currently, there are many dielectric models available for soil moisture retrieval; however, four dielectric models (Mironov, Dobson, Wang & Schmugge and Hallikainen) were tested here and found to be promising for soil moisture retrieval (some with higher performances). All the above-mentioned dielectric models were integrated with Single Channel Algorithms using H (SCA-H) and V (SCA-V) polarizations for the soil moisture retrievals. All the ground-based observations were collected from test site-United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) OPE3, located a few miles away from NASA GSFC. Ground truth data were collected using a theta probe and in situ sensors which were then used for validation. Analysis

  7. Precipitation and microphysical processes observed by three polarimetric X-band radars and ground-based instrumentation during HOPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xinxin; Evaristo, Raquel; Simmer, Clemens; Handwerker, Jan; Trömel, Silke

    2016-06-01

    This study presents a first analysis of precipitation and related microphysical processes observed by three polarimetric X-band Doppler radars (BoXPol, JuXPol and KiXPol) in conjunction with a ground-based network of disdrometers, rain gauges and vertically pointing micro rain radars (MRRs) during the High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2) Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) during April and May 2013 in Germany. While JuXPol and KiXPol were continuously observing the central HOPE area near Forschungszentrum Jülich at a close distance, BoXPol observed the area from a distance of about 48.5 km. MRRs were deployed in the central HOPE area and one MRR close to BoXPol in Bonn, Germany. Seven disdrometers and three rain gauges providing point precipitation observations were deployed at five locations within a 5 km × 5 km region, while three other disdrometers were collocated with the MRR in Bonn. The daily rainfall accumulation at each rain gauge/disdrometer location estimated from the three X-band polarimetric radar observations showed very good agreement. Accompanying microphysical processes during the evolution of precipitation systems were well captured by the polarimetric X-band radars and corroborated by independent observations from the other ground-based instruments.

  8. Ground-based radar reflectivity mosaic of mei-yu precipitation systems over the Yangtze River-Huaihe River basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yali; Qian, Weimiao; Gong, Yu; Wang, Hongyan; Zhang, Da-Lin

    2016-11-01

    The 3D radar reflectivity produced by a mosaic software system, with measurements from 29 operational weather radars in the Yangtze River-Huaihe River Basins (YRHRB) during the mei-yu season of 2007, is compared to coincident TRMM PR observations in order to evaluate the value of the ground-based radar reflectivity mosaic in characterizing the 3D structures of mei-yu precipitation. Results show reasonable agreement in the composite radar reflectivity between the two datasets, with a correlation coefficient of 0.8 and a mean bias of -1 dB. The radar mosaic data at constant altitudes are reasonably consistent with the TRMM PR observations in the height range of 2-5 km, revealing essentially the same spatial distribution of radar echo and nearly identical histograms of reflectivity. However, at altitudes above 5 km, the mosaic data overestimate reflectivity and have slower decreasing rates with height compared to the TRMM PR observations. The areas of convective and stratiform precipitation, based on the mosaic reflectivity distribution at 3-km altitude, are highly correlated with the corresponding regions in the TRMM products, with correlation coefficients of 0.92 and 0.97 and mean relative differences of -7.9% and -2.5%, respectively. Finally, the usefulness of the mosaic reflectivity at 3-km altitude at 6-min intervals is illustrated using a mesoscale convective system that occurred over the YRHRB.

  9. Polarization changing technique in macrocosm and it's application to radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘健; 毛二可

    2004-01-01

    A new model of air-surveillance radar (named polarization changing in macrocosm radar: PCM radar), which makes use of the polarization changing technique in macrocosm, is presented in this paper. On basis of careful selection of representative 98 states of polarization in macrocosm, PCM radar can not only perform transmitting and receiving polarization matching for various targets, consequently make full use of transmitting and receiving signals of radar, but also improve the capability against active interference and jamming. Experimental test in air defense early-warning radar system demonstrates that it can effectively enhance radar performance.

  10. Ground-Based Observations of Saturn's North Polar Spot and Hexagon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Lavega, A; Lecacheux, J; Colas, F; Laques, P

    1993-04-16

    Ground-based observations of two conspicuous features near the north pole of Saturn, the polar vortex and the hexagonal wave structure, were made from July 1990 to October 1991, 10 years after their discovery. During this period the polar spot drifted in longitude, relative to system III, by -0.0353 degrees per day on average. Superimposed on this mean motion, the spot also underwent short-term rapid excursions in longitude of up to approximately 14 degrees at rates of up to approximately 1 degrees per day. The spot also exhibited irregular variations in its latitude location. A combination of these data together with those obtained by Voyager 1 and 2 in 1980 and 1981 shows that the spot drifted -0.0577 degrees per day for the 11-year interval from 1980 to 1991. The large lifetime of both features indicates that they are insensitive to the strong variations in the seasonal heating of the cloud layers in the upper polar atmosphere.

  11. Intercomparison of Vertical Structure of Storms Revealed by Ground-Based (NMQ and Spaceborne Radars (CloudSat-CPR and TRMM-PR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica M. Fall

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spaceborne radars provide great opportunities to investigate the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation. Two typical spaceborne radars for such a study are the W-band Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR and Ku-band Precipitation Radar (PR, which are onboard NASA’s CloudSat and TRMM satellites, respectively. Compared to S-band ground-based radars, they have distinct scattering characteristics for different hydrometeors in clouds and precipitation. The combination of spaceborne and ground-based radar observations can help in the identification of hydrometeors and improve the radar-based quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE. This study analyzes the vertical structure of the 18 January, 2009 storm using data from the CloudSat CPR, TRMM PR, and a NEXRAD-based National Mosaic and Multisensor QPE (NMQ system. Microphysics above, within, and below the melting layer are studied through an intercomparison of multifrequency measurements. Hydrometeors’ type and their radar scattering characteristics are analyzed. Additionally, the study of the vertical profile of reflectivity (VPR reveals the brightband properties in the cold-season precipitation and its effect on the radar-based QPE. In all, the joint analysis of spaceborne and ground-based radar data increases the understanding of the vertical structure of storm systems and provides a good insight into the microphysical modeling for weather forecasts.

  12. Mobile Ground-Based Radar Sensor for Localization and Mapping: An Evaluation of two Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Vivet

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with robotic applications using a ground‐based radar sensor for simultaneous localization and mapping problems. In mobile robotics, radar technology is interesting because of its long range and the robustness of radar waves to atmospheric conditions, making these sensors well‐suited for extended outdoor robotic applications. Two localization and mapping approaches using data obtained from a 360° field of view microwave radar sensor are presented and compared. The first method is a trajectory‐ oriented simultaneous localization and mapping technique, which makes no landmark assumptions and avoids the data association problem. The estimation of the ego‐motion makes use of the Fourier‐Mellin transform for registering radar images in a sequence, from which the rotation and translation of the sensor motion can be estimated. The second approach uses the consequence of using a rotating range sensor in high speed robotics. In such a situation, movement combinations create distortions in the collected data. Velocimetry is achieved here by explicitly analysing these measurement distortions. As a result, the trajectory of the vehicle and then the radar map of outdoor environments can be obtained. The evaluation of experimental results obtained by the two methods is presented on real‐world data from a vehicle moving at 30 km/h over a 2.5 km course.

  13. Signal processing method of a novel polarized array radar seeker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lizhong Song; Xiaolin Qiao

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel polarized radar seeker based on the polarized antenna array. A ful y polarized signal processing method for the proposed radar seeker is studied un-der the environments with electromagnetic interferences. A dual polarized antenna array is employed to transmit and receive the radar signals. The instantaneous polarization signal processing technique is used to detect and recognize the targets. The di-rection of arrival (DOA) of the target is measured through the spatial spectrum with high resolution for the polarized array radar seeker system. The ful y polarized signal model of the polarized array radar seeker is formulated and a specific signal processing algorithm is expounded. The theoretical research and numerical simulation results demonstrate that the proposed radar seeker has good performances in target detection and electronic warfare. The research results can provide an effective technical approach to develop and research the new generation radar seeker.

  14. Advancements on Radar Polarization Information Acquisition and Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Dahai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The study on radar polarization information acquisition and processing has currently been one important part of radar techniques. The development of the polarization theory is simply reviewed firstly. Subsequently, some key techniques which include polarization measurement, polarization anti-jamming, polarization recognition, imaging and parameters inversion using radar polarimetry are emphatically analyzed in this paper. The basic theories, the present states and the development trends of these key techniques are presented and some meaningful conclusions are derived.

  15. Polarization differences in airborne ground penetrating radar performance for landmine detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogaru, Traian; Le, Calvin

    2016-05-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has investigated the ultra-wideband (UWB) radar technology for detection of landmines, improvised explosive devices and unexploded ordnance, for over two decades. This paper presents a phenomenological study of the radar signature of buried landmines in realistic environments and the performance of airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in detecting these targets as a function of multiple parameters: polarization, depression angle, soil type and burial depth. The investigation is based on advanced computer models developed at ARL. The analysis includes both the signature of the targets of interest and the clutter produced by rough surface ground. Based on our numerical simulations, we conclude that low depression angles and H-H polarization offer the highest target-to-clutter ratio in the SAR images and therefore the best radar performance of all the scenarios investigated.

  16. Subtropical and Polar Cirrus Clouds Characterized by Ground-Based Lidars and CALIPSO/CALIOP Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Córdoba-Jabonero Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cirrus clouds are product of weather processes, and then their occurrence and macrophysical/optical properties can vary significantly over different regions of the world. Lidars can provide height-resolved measurements with a relatively good both vertical and temporal resolutions, making them the most suitable instrumentation for high-cloud observations. The aim of this work is to show the potential of lidar observations on Cirrus clouds detection in combination with a recently proposed methodology to retrieve the Cirrus clouds macrophysical and optical features. In this sense, a few case studies of cirrus clouds observed at both subtropical and polar latitudes are examined and compared to CALIPSO/CALIOP observations. Lidar measurements are carried out in two stations: the Metropolitan city of Sao Paulo (MSP, Brazil, 23.3°S 46.4°W, located at subtropical latitudes, and the Belgrano II base (BEL, Argentina, 78ºS 35ºW in the Antarctic continent. Optical (COD-cloud optical depth and LR-Lidar Ratio and macrophysical (top/base heights and thickness properties of both the subtropical and polar cirrus clouds are reported. In general, subtropical Cirrus clouds present lower LR values and are found at higher altitudes than those detected at polar latitudes. In general, Cirrus clouds are detected at similar altitudes by CALIOP. However, a poor agreement is achieved in the LR retrieved between ground-based lidars and space-borne CALIOP measurements, likely due to the use of a fixed (or low-variable LR value in CALIOP inversion procedures.

  17. Subtropical and Polar Cirrus Clouds Characterized by Ground-Based Lidars and CALIPSO/CALIOP Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba-Jabonero, Carmen; Lopes, Fabio J. S.; Landulfo, Eduardo; Ochoa, Héctor; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel

    2016-06-01

    Cirrus clouds are product of weather processes, and then their occurrence and macrophysical/optical properties can vary significantly over different regions of the world. Lidars can provide height-resolved measurements with a relatively good both vertical and temporal resolutions, making them the most suitable instrumentation for high-cloud observations. The aim of this work is to show the potential of lidar observations on Cirrus clouds detection in combination with a recently proposed methodology to retrieve the Cirrus clouds macrophysical and optical features. In this sense, a few case studies of cirrus clouds observed at both subtropical and polar latitudes are examined and compared to CALIPSO/CALIOP observations. Lidar measurements are carried out in two stations: the Metropolitan city of Sao Paulo (MSP, Brazil, 23.3°S 46.4°W), located at subtropical latitudes, and the Belgrano II base (BEL, Argentina, 78ºS 35ºW) in the Antarctic continent. Optical (COD-cloud optical depth and LR-Lidar Ratio) and macrophysical (top/base heights and thickness) properties of both the subtropical and polar cirrus clouds are reported. In general, subtropical Cirrus clouds present lower LR values and are found at higher altitudes than those detected at polar latitudes. In general, Cirrus clouds are detected at similar altitudes by CALIOP. However, a poor agreement is achieved in the LR retrieved between ground-based lidars and space-borne CALIOP measurements, likely due to the use of a fixed (or low-variable) LR value in CALIOP inversion procedures.

  18. A proposal on the study of solar-terrestrial coupling processes with atmospheric radars and ground-based observation network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Toshitaka; Yamamoto, Mamoru; Hashiguchi, Hiroyuki; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Ogawa, Yasunobu; Nozawa, Satonori; Miyaoka, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Akimasa

    2016-09-01

    The solar energy can mainly be divided into two categories: the solar radiation and the solar wind. The former maximizes at the equator, generating various disturbances over a wide height range and causing vertical coupling processes of the atmosphere between the troposphere and middle and upper atmospheres by upward propagating atmospheric waves. The energy and material flows that occur in all height regions of the equatorial atmosphere are named as "Equatorial Fountain." These processes from the bottom also cause various space weather effects, such as satellite communication and Global Navigation Satellite System positioning. While, the electromagnetic energy and high-energy plasma particles in the solar wind converge into the polar region through geomagnetic fields. These energy/particle inflow results in auroral Joule heating and ion drag of the atmosphere particularly during geomagnetic storms and substorms. The ion outflow from the polar ionosphere controls ambient plasma constituents in the magnetosphere and may cause long-term variation of the atmosphere. We propose to clarify these overall coupling processes in the solar-terrestrial system from the bottom and from above through high-resolution observations at key latitudes in the equator and in the polar region. We will establish a large radar with active phased array antenna, called the Equatorial Middle and Upper atmosphere radar, in west Sumatra, Indonesia. We will participate in construction of the EISCAT_3D radar in northern Scandinavia. These radars will enhance the existing international radar network. We will also develop a global observation network of compact radio and optical remote sensing equipment from the equator to polar region.

  19. Characterizing Olive Grove Canopies by Means of Ground-Based Hemispherical Photography and Spaceborne RADAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Morillo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the main strengths of active microwave remote sensing, in relation to frequency, is its capacity to penetrate vegetation canopies and reach the ground surface, so that information can be drawn about the vegetation and hydrological properties of the soil surface. All this information is gathered in the so called backscattering coefficient (s0. The subject of this research have been olive groves canopies, where which types of canopy biophysical variables can be derived by a specific optical sensor and then integrated into microwave scattering models has been investigated. This has been undertaken by means of hemispherical photographs and gap fraction procedures. Then, variables such as effective and true Leaf Area Indices have been estimated. Then, in order to characterize this kind of vegetation canopy, two models based on Radiative Transfer theory have been applied and analyzed. First, a generalized two layer geometry model made up of homogeneous layers of soil and vegetation has been considered. Then, a modified version of the Xu and Steven Water Cloud Model has been assessed integrating the canopy biophysical variables derived by the suggested optical procedure. The backscattering coefficients at various polarized channels have been acquired from RADARSAT 2 (C-band, with 38.5° incidence angle at the scene center. For the soil simulation, the best results have been reached using a Dubois scattering model and the VV polarized channel (r2 = 0.88. In turn, when effective LAI (LAIeff has been taken into account, the parameters of the scattering canopy model are better estimated (r2 = 0.89. Additionally, an inversion procedure of the vegetation microwave model with the adjusted parameters has been undertaken, where the biophysical values of the canopy retrieved by this methodology fit properly with field measured values.

  20. Remote sensing of the sea by X-band, dual-polarized, coherent weather radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forget, Philippe; Saillard, Marc; Testud, Jacques; Le Bouar, Erwan

    2010-05-01

    Remote sensing of the sea surface over large areas with high resolution (<1km) and at high time rate (<1h) is still a challenge that space-borne radiometers and radars can only satisfy. This presentation is an investigation of the use for this purpose of a ground-based, rotating, coherent X-band, dual-polarized (HH-VV) weather radar. We studied the data acquired by such a meteorological device, dedicated to precipitation measurements and operated in South of France at the top of a mountain near the Ligurian Sea. One month of data was considered. We observed that the sea signal often dominated the atmospheric signal despite the only slight inclination from horizontal of the radar beam direction. The radar signals being calibrated for weather application, both atmosphere and ocean radar equations were used to extract the normalized radar cross section (NRCS) of the sea. Other useful experimental parameters provided by the radar were the mean Doppler velocity and, to mask the undesirable rain signals, the polarization ratio. In situ measurements on wind and wave conditions were recorded by an off-shore meteorological buoy. Furthermore, the surface wind field as computed by the meteorological model MM5 over the Ligurian Sea was available at high time and space resolution during the experimental period The main results concern the variation of NRCS and Doppler velocity with wind and wave conditions. In particular, for moderate to strong winds, we generally found a very good correlation between the Doppler velocity field and the wind velocity component along the radar azimuths. The preliminary results obtained in this experiment suggest that operational weather radars can be valuable means to monitor useful wind information over large sea surfaces.

  1. Spectral invariance hypothesis study of polarized reflectance with Ground-based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (GroundMSPI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Christine L.; Kupinski, Meredith; Diner, David J.; Xu, Feng; Chipman, Russell A.

    2015-09-01

    Many models used to represent the boundary condition for the separation of atmospheric scattering from the surface reflectance in polarized remote sensing measurements assume that the polarized surface reflectance is spectrally neutral. The Spectral Invariance Hypothesis asserts that the magnitude and shape of the polarized bidirectional reflectance factor (pBRF) is equal for all wavelengths. In order to test this hypothesis, JPL's Ground-based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (GroundMSPI) is used to measure polarization information of different outdoor surface types. GroundMSPI measures the linear polarization Stokes parameters (I, Q, U), at three wavelengths, 470 nm, 660 nm, and 865 nm. The camera is mounted on a two-axis gimbal to accurately select the view azimuth and elevation directions. On clear sky days we acquired day-long scans of scenes that contain various surface types such as grass, dirt, cement, brick, and asphalt and placed a Spectralon panel in the camera field of view to provide a reflectance reference. Over the course of each day, changing solar position in the sky provides a large range of scattering angles for this study. The polarized bidirectional reflectance factor (pBRF) is measured for the three wavelengths and the best fit slope of the spectral correlation is reported. This work reports the range of best fit slopes measured for five region types.

  2. Modification of polarization filtering technique in HF ground wave radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Guoyi; Tan Zhongji; Wang Jiantao

    2006-01-01

    The polarization filter using three orthogonal linear polarization antennas can suppress more disturbances than the polarization filter using two orthogonal linear polarization antennas in HF ground wave radar. But the algorithm of the threedimension filter is relatively complicated and not suitable for real-time processing. It can't use linear and nonlinear polarization vector translation technique directly. A modified polarization filter which is simple and has same suppressing ability as the three-dimension polarization filter is given. It only has half parameters of the primary one. Some problems about estimation of polarization parameters and selection of disturbances are discussed. A method of holding the phase of radar backscatter signal constantly is put forward so that unstationary disturbance signal can be processed.

  3. Issues on Multi-polarization of GNSS-R for Passive Radar Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Wei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available GNSS Reflectometry (GNSS-R is a currently developed remote sensing technology which belongs to the passive radar domain. This paper aims to deal with some issues on multi-polarization of GNSS-R technology. Four different polarization patterns of the received GNSS-R signal are discussed, including rl, rr, rv, rh. For each polarization, formulas for calculating the surface reflectivity (Γ using dielectric constant (ε and satellite elevation angle (θ are derivated. The rationality of these formulas is validated using data from a ground-based GNSS-R soil moisture experiment. The results of this research can provide references for further GNSS-R research, including simulation, experiment design, model development and data processing.

  4. Space weather monitoring by ground-based means carried out in Polar Geophysical Center at Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzhura, Alexander

    A real-time information on geophysical processes in polar regions is very important for goals of Space Weather monitoring by the ground-based means. The modern communication systems and computer technology makes it possible to collect and process the data from remote sites without significant delays. A new acquisition equipment based on microprocessor modules and reliable in hush climatic conditions was deployed at the Roshydromet networks of geophysical observations in Arctic and is deployed at observatories in Antarctic. A contemporary system for on-line collecting and transmitting the geophysical data from the Arctic and Antarctic stations to AARI has been realized and the Polar Geophysical Center (PGC) arranged at AARI ensures the near-real time processing and analyzing the geophysical information from 11 stations in Arctic and 5 stations in Antarctic. The space weather monitoring by the ground based means is one of the main tasks standing before the Polar Geophysical Center. As studies by Troshichev and Janzhura, [2012] showed, the PC index characterizing the polar cap magnetic activity appeared to be an adequate indicator of the solar wind energy that entered into the magnetosphere and the energy that is accumulating in the magnetosphere. A great advantage of the PC index application over other methods based on satellite data is a permanent on-line availability of information about magnetic activity in both northern and southern polar caps. A special procedure agreed between Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI) and Space Institute of the Danish Technical University (DTUSpace) ensures calculation of the unified PC index in quasi-real time by magnetic data from the Thule and Vostok stations (see public site: http://pc-index.org). The method for estimation of AL and Dst indices (as indicators of state of the disturbed magnetosphere) based on data on foregoing PC indices has been elaborated and testified in the Polar Geophysical Center. It is

  5. Ground-based observations of the auroral zone and polar cap ionospheric responses to dayside transient reconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Davies

    Full Text Available Observations from the EISCAT VHF incoherent scatter radar system in northern Norway, during a run of the common programme CP-4, reveal a series of poleward-propagating F-region electron density enhancements in the pre-noon sector on 23 November 1999. These plasma density features, which are observed under conditions of a strongly southward interplanetary magnetic field, exhibit a recurrence rate of under 10 min and appear to emanate from the vicinity of the open/closed field-line boundary from where they travel into the polar cap; this is suggestive of their being an ionospheric response to transient reconnection at the day-side magnetopause (flux transfer events. Simultaneous with the density structures detected by the VHF radar, poleward-moving radar auroral forms (PMRAFs are observed by the Finland HF coherent scatter radar. It is thought that PM-RAFs, which are commonly observed near local noon by HF radars, are also related to flux transfer events, although the specific mechanism for the generation of the field-aligned irregularities within such features is not well understood. The HF observations suggest, that for much of their existence, the PMRAFs trace fossil signatures of transient reconnection rather than revealing the footprint of active reconnection itself; this is evidenced not least by the fact that the PMRAFs become narrower in spectral width as they evolve away from the region of more classical, broad cusp scatter in which they originate. Interpretation of the HF observations with reference to the plasma parameters diagnosed by the incoherent scatter radar suggests that as the PMRAFs migrate away from the reconnection site and across the polar cap, entrained in the ambient antisunward flow, the irregularities therein are generated by the presence of gradients in the electron density, with these gradients having been formed through structuring of the ionosphere in the cusp region in response to transient reconnection

  6. Mapping plasma structures in the high-latitude ionosphere using beacon satellite, incoherent scatter radar and ground-based magnetometer observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Neubert

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available In the autumn of the year 2000, four radio receivers capable of tracking various beacon satellites were set up along the southwestern coast of Greenland. They are used to reconstruct images of the ionospheric plasma density distribution via the tomographic method. In order to test and validate tomographic imaging under the highly variable conditions often prevailing in the high-latitude ionosphere, a time interval was selected when the Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar conducted measurements of the ionospheric plasma density while the radio receivers tracked a number of beacon satellites. A comparison between two-dimensional images of the plasma density distribution obtained from the radar and the satellite receivers revealed generally good agreement between radar measurements and tomographic images. Observed discrepancies can be attributed to F region plasma patches moving through the field of view with a speed of several hundred meters per second, thereby smearing out the tomographic image. A notable mismatch occurred around local magnetic midnight when a magnetospheric substorm breakup occurred in the vicinity of southwest Greenland (identified from ground-based magnetometer observations. The breakup was associated with a sudden intensification of the westward auroral electrojet which was centered at about 69 and extended up to some 73 corrected geomagnetic latitude. Ground-based magnetometer data may thus have the potential of indicating when the tomographic method is at risk and may fail. We finally outline the application of tomographic imaging, when combined with magnetic field data, to estimate ionospheric Joule heating rates.

  7. Analysis of Terminal Velocity and VHF Backscatter of Precipitation Particles Using Chung-Li VHF Radar Combined with Ground-Based Disdrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Lun Su and Yen-Hsyang Chu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The backscatter from precipitation particles observed by the vertically pointed antenna beam of the Chung-Li VHF radar and the drop size distributions measured by a ground-based disdrometer co-located at the radar site are analyzed and studied in this article. We find that the disdrometermeasured drop size distribution can be well approximated to a Gamma distribution. On the basis of this property and a power law approximation to the fallspeed-diameter relation VD = ADB, we derive the theoretical relation between terminal velocity VD and range-corrected VHF backscatter P of the precipitation particles. We find that the VD - P relation follows a power law in the form of VD = _ where _ _ both the functions of the precipitation parameters. Chu et al. (1999 first found that the relation between _ _ be empirically approximated to an exponential form of _ _ where _ a function of B and _ a factor associated with precipitation. In this article, under the assumptions of the Gamma distribution of the drop size distribution and the power-law relation between VD and D, we theoretically show that the analytical relation between _ _ follows an exponential form of _ _ where _ a function of the drop size distribution. The experimental results obtained by the Chung-Li VHF radar combined with the ground-based disdrometer measurements validate the exponential approximation to the _ _ The uses of the _ _ for the investigations of the rainfall rate and properties of drop size distribution are presented and discussed.

  8. High-Resolution Mapping of Sea Ice, Icebergs and Growlers in Kongsfjorden, Svalbard, using Ground Based Radar, Satellite, and UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauknes, T. R.; Rouyet, L.; Solbø, S. A.; Sivertsen, A.; Storvold, R.; Akbari, V.; Negrel, J.; Gerland, S.

    2016-12-01

    The dynamics of sea ­ice has a well­ recognized role in the climate system and its extent and evolution is impacted by the global warming. In addition, calving of icebergs and growlers at the tidewater glacier fronts is a component of the mass loss in polar regions. Understanding of calving and ice ­ocean interaction, in particular at tidewater glacier front remains elusive, and a problematic uncertainty in climate change projections. Studying the distribution, volumetry and motion of sea ­ice, icebergs and growlers is thus essential to understand their interactions with the environment in order to be able to predict at short­term their drifts, e.g. to mitigate the risk for shipping, and at longer term the multiple relations with climate changes. Here, we present the results from an arctic fieldwork campaign conducted in Kongsfjorden, Svalbard in April 2016, where we used different remote sensing instruments to observe dynamics of sea ice, icebergs, and growlers. We used a terrestrial radar system, imaging the study area every second minute during the observation period. At the front of the Kronebreen glacier, calving events can be detected and the drift of the generated icebergs and growlers tracked with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. During the field campaign, we collected four Radarsat-2 quad-pol images, that will be used to classify the different types of sea ice. In addition, we used small unmanned aircraft (UAS) instrumented with high resolution cameras capturing HD video and still pictures. This allows to map and measure the size of icebergs and ice floes. Such information is essential to validate sensitivity and detection limits from the ground and satellite based measurements.

  9. Interpretation of Polarization Features in Ground-Based Microwave Observations as Caused by Horizontally Aligned Oblate Raindrops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czekala, Harald; Crewell, Susanne; Simmer, Clemens; Thiele, Ariane; Hornbostel, Achim; Schroth, Arno

    2001-11-01

    Based on a comparison of ground-based radiometer measurements with microwave radiative transfer calculations, it is shown that raindrops with an oblate shape and a preferred horizontal orientation have a significant effect on microwave polarization signals when compared with spherical particle shape. Measurements with a dual-polarized 19-GHz radiometer reveal a polarization difference of as much as 18 K in the downwelling microwave radiation at 30° elevation angle. Averaging all rain observations within 19 months leads to a signal of 6 K. Model calculations covering roughly the same range of weather conditions as that inferred from the meteorological data recorded with the radiometer measurements were carried out with spherical raindrop shape and an oblate particle shape with a fixed horizontal alignment. From the model results, positive polarization difference is expected for spherical particles. This signal was never observed in the recorded data. For oblate drops, the averaged model results lead to a polarization difference of 8 K, which is in reasonable agreement with the long-term averaged observations. Case studies that compare isolated rain events usually lead to a better match of model and observations. However, there are some major discrepancies in some cases. Possible reasons for the remaining differences are the short-term variations in the cloud microphysics for which the model does not correctly account, such as variations in the melting layer, drop oscillations, or variations in the drop size distribution or angular distribution of the drop alignment. Three-dimensional effects are also important when observing small-scale heavy precipitation. Despite remaining small uncertainties, the comparison presents strong evidence that the oblate raindrop shape, with fixed horizontal alignment, is by far the better choice for accurate radiative transfer calculations than is the spherical shape. The omission of this shape effect can cause significant errors when

  10. Quantitative precipitation estimation in complex orography using quasi-vertical profiles of dual polarization radar variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montopoli, Mario; Roberto, Nicoletta; Adirosi, Elisa; Gorgucci, Eugenio; Baldini, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Weather radars are nowadays a unique tool to estimate quantitatively the rain precipitation near the surface. This is an important task for a plenty of applications. For example, to feed hydrological models, mitigate the impact of severe storms at the ground using radar information in modern warning tools as well as aid the validation studies of satellite-based rain products. With respect to the latter application, several ground validation studies of the Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) products have recently highlighted the importance of accurate QPE from ground-based weather radars. To date, a plenty of works analyzed the performance of various QPE algorithms making use of actual and synthetic experiments, possibly trained by measurement of particle size distributions and electromagnetic models. Most of these studies support the use of dual polarization variables not only to ensure a good level of radar data quality but also as a direct input in the rain estimation equations. Among others, one of the most important limiting factors in radar QPE accuracy is the vertical variability of particle size distribution that affects at different levels, all the radar variables acquired as well as rain rates. This is particularly impactful in mountainous areas where the altitudes of the radar sampling is likely several hundred of meters above the surface. In this work, we analyze the impact of the vertical profile variations of rain precipitation on several dual polarization radar QPE algorithms when they are tested a in complex orography scenario. So far, in weather radar studies, more emphasis has been given to the extrapolation strategies that make use of the signature of the vertical profiles in terms of radar co-polar reflectivity. This may limit the use of the radar vertical profiles when dual polarization QPE algorithms are considered because in that case all the radar variables used in the rain estimation process should be consistently extrapolated at the surface

  11. The optimal polarizations for achieving maximum contrast in radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, A. A.; Yueh, H. A.; Kong, J. A.; Novak, L. M.; Shin, R. T.

    1988-01-01

    There is considerable interest in determining the optimal polarizations that maximize contrast between two scattering classes in polarimetric radar images. A systematic approach is presented for obtaining the optimal polarimetric matched filter, i.e., that filter which produces maximum contrast between two scattering classes. The maximization procedure involves solving an eigenvalue problem where the eigenvector corresponding to the maximum contrast ratio is an optimal polarimetric matched filter. To exhibit the physical significance of this filter, it is transformed into its associated transmitting and receiving polarization states, written in terms of horizontal and vertical vector components. For the special case where the transmitting polarization is fixed, the receiving polarization which maximizes the contrast ratio is also obtained. Polarimetric filtering is then applies to synthetic aperture radar images obtained from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. It is shown, both numerically and through the use of radar imagery, that maximum image contrast can be realized when data is processed with the optimal polarimeter matched filter.

  12. Cloud and aerosol optics by polarized micro pulse Lidar and ground based measurements of zenith radiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgadillo, Rodrigo

    Clouds impact Earth's climate through cloud transmission and reflection properties. Clouds reflect approximately 15 percent of the incoming solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere. A key cloud radiative variable is cloud optical depth, which gives information about how much light is transmitted through a cloud. Historically, remote measurements of cloud optical depth have been limited to uniform overcast conditions and had low temporal and spatial resolution. We present a novel method to measure cloud optical depth for coastal regions from spectral zenith radiance measurements for optically thin clouds, which removes some of these limitations. Our measurement site is part of South Florida's Cloud-Aerosol-Rain Observatory (CAROb), located on Virginia Key, FL (6 km from Miami). This work is based on Marshak et al.'s method for finding cloud optical depth from vegetative sites that provide a strong spectral contrast between red and near infrared surface albedo. However, given the unique nature of our site, which contains water, vegetation, beach, and urban surface types, we found no such spectral contrast at those wavelength pairs. We measured albedo, with hyperspectral resolution, for different surface types around our measurement site to estimate the effective spectral albedo for the area centered on the site with a 5km radius. From this analysis, we found the best possible albedo contrast (573.9 and 673.1 nm) for our site. We tested the derived cloud optical depth from zenith radiance at these two wavelengths against a concurrently running polarized micro pulse LIDAR (MPL) and found good agreement.

  13. Exploration of a Polarized Surface Bidirectional Reflectance Model Using the Ground-Based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Diner

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate characterization of surface reflection is essential for retrieval of aerosols using downward-looking remote sensors. In this paper, observations from the Ground-based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (GroundMSPI are used to evaluate a surface polarized bidirectional reflectance distribution function (PBRDF model. GroundMSPI is an eight-band spectropolarimetric camera mounted on a rotating gimbal to acquire pushbroom imagery of outdoor landscapes. The camera uses a very accurate photoelastic-modulator-based polarimetric imaging technique to acquire Stokes vector measurements in three of the instrument’s bands (470, 660, and 865 nm. A description of the instrument is presented, and observations of selected targets within a scene acquired on 6 January 2010 are analyzed. Data collected during the course of the day as the Sun moved across the sky provided a range of illumination geometries that facilitated evaluation of the surface model, which is comprised of a volumetric reflection term represented by the modified Rahman-Pinty-Verstraete function plus a specular reflection term generated by a randomly oriented array of Fresnel-reflecting microfacets. While the model is fairly successful in predicting the polarized reflection from two grass targets in the scene, it does a poorer job for two manmade targets (a parking lot and a truck roof, possibly due to their greater degree of geometric organization. Several empirical adjustments to the model are explored and lead to improved fits to the data. For all targets, the data support the notion of spectral invariance in the angular shape of the unpolarized and polarized surface reflection. As noted by others, this behavior provides valuable constraints on the aerosol retrieval problem, and highlights the importance of multiangle observations.

  14. Simultaneous PMC and PMSE observations with a ground-based lidar and SuperDARN HF radar at Syowa Station, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Suzuki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A Rayleigh–Raman lidar system was installed in January 2011 at Syowa Station, Antarctica (69.0° S, 39.6° E. Polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs were detected by lidar at around 22:30 UTC (LT −3 h on 4 February 2011, which was the first day of observation. This was the first detection of PMCs over Syowa Station by lidar. On the same day, a Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN HF radar with oblique-incidence beams detected polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE between 21:30 and 23:00 UTC. This event is regarded as the last PMC activity around Syowa Station during the austral summer season (2010–2011, since no other PMC signals were detected by lidar in February 2011. This is consistent with results of PMC and mesopause temperature observations by satellite-born instruments of AIM (Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere/CIPS (Cloud Imaging and Particle Size and AURA/MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder and horizontal wind measurements taken by a separate MF radar. Doppler velocity of PMSE observed by the HF radar showed motion toward Syowa Station (westward. This westward motion is consistent with the wind velocities obtained by the MF radar. However, the PMSE region showed horizontal motion from a north-to-south direction during the PMC event. This event indicates that the apparent horizontal motion of the PMSE region can deviate from neutral wind directions and observed Doppler velocities.

  15. Simultaneous PMC and PMSE observations with a ground-based lidar and SuperDARN HF radar at Syowa Station, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, H.; Nakamura, T.; Ejiri, M. K.; Ogawa, T.; Tsutsumi, M.; Abo, M.; Kawahara, T. D.; Tomikawa, Y.; Yukimatu, A. S.; Sato, N.

    2013-10-01

    A Rayleigh-Raman lidar system was installed in January 2011 at Syowa Station, Antarctica (69.0° S, 39.6° E). Polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) were detected by lidar at around 22:30 UTC (LT -3 h) on 4 February 2011, which was the first day of observation. This was the first detection of PMCs over Syowa Station by lidar. On the same day, a Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) HF radar with oblique-incidence beams detected polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) between 21:30 and 23:00 UTC. This event is regarded as the last PMC activity around Syowa Station during the austral summer season (2010-2011), since no other PMC signals were detected by lidar in February 2011. This is consistent with results of PMC and mesopause temperature observations by satellite-born instruments of AIM (Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere)/CIPS (Cloud Imaging and Particle Size) and AURA/MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder) and horizontal wind measurements taken by a separate MF radar. Doppler velocity of PMSE observed by the HF radar showed motion toward Syowa Station (westward). This westward motion is consistent with the wind velocities obtained by the MF radar. However, the PMSE region showed horizontal motion from a north-to-south direction during the PMC event. This event indicates that the apparent horizontal motion of the PMSE region can deviate from neutral wind directions and observed Doppler velocities.

  16. A Gaussian Random Field Approach for Merging Radar and Ground-Based Rainfall Data on Small Spatial and Temporal Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebsbach, K.; Friederichs, P.

    2014-12-01

    The generation of reliable precipitation products that explicitly account for spatial and temporal structures of precipitation events requires a combination of data with a variety of error structures and temporal resolutions. In-situ measurements are relatively accurate, but available only at sparse and irregularly distributed locations, whereas remote measurements cover areas but suffer from spatially and temporally inhomogeneous systematic errors. Besides gauge measurements are available on coarser spatial and temporal resolution in contrast to remote sensing measurements which are given on a fine spatial and temporal resolution. In our study we use precipitation rates from the composit of two X-band radars in Bonn and Jülich in Germany. Our aim is to formulate a statistical space-time model that aggregates and disaggregates precipitation rates from radar and gauge observations. We model a Gaussian random field as underlying process, where we face the task of dealing with a large non-Gaussian data set. To start the analysis of the unadjusted radar rainfall rates, we follow the work of D. Allcroft and C. Glasbey (2003) and transform the data to a truncated Gaussian distribution. The advantage of the latent variable approach is that it takes account of the occurence of rainfall and the intensity using a single process. We proceed by estimating the empirical correlation from these transformed values with maximum likelihood methods and fit a parametric correlation function that gives rise to a Gaussian random field. Since the transformation gives censored values to dry locations, we simulate values for this area that lie below some threshold and extend the Gaussian field to the whole domain. In order to merge gauge and radar data for precipitation, we first aggregate the data to a scale on which the comparison is reasonable and then disaggregate again back to smaller desirable scales. The disaggregation step consists of calculating the difference between radar

  17. Simulation of polar atmospheric microwave and sub-millimetre spectra for characterizing potential new ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnham, David; Turner, Emma; Ford, George; Pumphrey, Hugh; Withington, Stafford

    2016-04-01

    Advanced detector technologies from the fields of astronomy and telecommunications are offering the potential to address key atmospheric science challenges with new instrumental methods. Adoption of these technologies in ground-based passive microwave and sub-millimetre radiometry could allow new measurements of chemical species and winds in the polar middle atmosphere for verifying meteorological data-sets and atmospheric models. A site study to assess the feasibility of new polar observations is performed by simulating the downwelling clear-sky submillimetre spectrum over 10-2000 GHz (30 mm to 150 microns) at two Arctic and two Antarctic locations under different seasonal and diurnal conditions. Vertical profiles for temperature, pressure and 28 atmospheric gases are constructed by combining radiosonde, meteorological reanalysis, and atmospheric chemistry model data. The sensitivity of the simulated spectra to the choice of water vapour continuum model and spectroscopic line database is explored. For the atmospheric trace species hypobromous acid (HOBr), hydrogen bromide (HBr), perhydroxyl radical (HO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) the emission lines producing the largest change in brightness temperature are identified and minimum integration times and maximum receiver noise temperatures estimated. The optimal lines for all species are shown to vary significantly between location and scenario, strengthening the case for future hyperspectral instruments that measure over a broad frequency range. We also demonstrate the feasibility of measuring horizontal wind profiles above Halley station, Antarctica with time resolution as high as 0.5hr using simulated spectroradiometric observations of Doppler-shifted ozone (O3) and carbon monoxide (CO) lines in the 230-250 GHz region. The techniques presented provide a framework that can be applied to the retrieval of additional atmospheric parameters and be taken forward to simulate and guide the design of future microwave and sub

  18. The signal selection and processing method for polarization measurement radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG YuLiang; WANG XueSong; LI YongZhen; XIAO ShunPing

    2009-01-01

    Based on the ambiguity function, a novel signal processing method for the polarization measurement radar is developed. One advantage of this method is that the two orthogonal polarized signals do not have to be perpendicular to each other, which is required by traditional methods. The error due to the correlation of the two transmitting signals in the traditional method, can be reduced by this new approach. A concept called ambiguity function matrix (AFM) is introduced based on this method. AFM is a promising tool for the signal selection and design in the polarization scattering matrix measurement. The waveforms of the polarimetric radar are categorized and analyzed based on AFM in this paper. The signal processing flow of this method is explained. And the polarization scattering matrix measurement performance is testified by simulation. Furthermore, this signal processing method can be used in the inter-pulse interval measurement technique as well as in the instantaneous measurement technique.

  19. An overview of NLC-91: A rocket/radar study of the polar summer mesosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, R.A. (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)); Kopp, E.; Witt, G.; Swartz, W.E.

    1993-11-19

    In late July and early August of 1991, a major suborbital scientific campaign (NLC-91) involving scientists from eight countries was conducted as ESRANGE, Kiruna, Sweden and at Heiss Island, Russia. The purpose of the program was to investigate the chemical, dynamical, and electrodynamical properties of the polar summer mesosphere. Thirty one rocket flights were coordinated with two coherent radar facilities, EISCAT and CUPRI, and with other ground-based observatories and facilities. This permitted direct comparison between the in situ measurements and those obtained by remote sensing of the mesosphere via continuous ground-based monitoring. The primary objectives of the campaign were to study noctilucent clouds (NLCs) and polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSEs), including their possible relationship to local aerosols and/or small scale turbulence. This overview describes the scientific program, discusses the geophysical conditions during launch activities, and review some of the preliminary results. More detailed results can be found in the papers which follow. 22 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Ground-based Radar Detection of Near-Earth Asteroids%近地小行星地基雷达探测研究现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张翔; 季江徽

    2014-01-01

    Ground-based radar detection may act as a powerful means to determine the shape and physical properties of the asteroids in our Solar system. By measuring time delay and doppler frequency of the received echoes, radar systems provide information in ranging and radial velocity of the asteroids. Over the past few decades, more than 500 asteroids (mostly near-Earth ob jects) were detected using radar observations. There are two categories of radar detection: (1) The continuous wave detection, which is adopted to determine the roughness of an asteroid’s surface. (2) The delay-Doppler de-tection,which is likely to produce its three-dimensional model, and to define the rotational state. In the delay-Doppler detection, target asteroids are resolved in line-of-sight distance and line-of-sight velocity, providing two-dimensional images with spatial resolution as fine as meter-scale. Besides radar detection, several other techniques would also provide the shape model of the asteroids, among which the lightcurve inverse method is the most popular one to do that. In comparison with other methods, radar observation may have an advantage on spacial resolution. The lightcurves cannot reveal elaborate information on small features, and the intermediate-scale features of the inversed model are only suggestive. By contrast, radar detection produces resolved images. In this review, we present the radar observation technique and the method for recon-structing three-dimensional models of asteroids from radar measurements. In addition, we also provide several examples of asteroid models by radar detection, and then compare them with other observations for the shape reconstruction for the asteroids.%地基雷达探测是研究太阳系中小行星的重要方法。雷达探测主要有两种方式:(1)连续波探测,可得到小行星表面的粗糙度等参数;(2)延迟多普勒探测,用于反演小行星的三维形状模型并确定自转轴状态。与其他探测方法

  1. Polarization discrimination between repeater false-target and radar target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI LongFei; WANG XueSong; XIAO ShunPing

    2009-01-01

    High fidelity repeater false-target badly affects a radar system's detecting, tracking, and data processing. It is an available approach of confronting false-target for radar that discriminates firstly and then eliminates. Whereas for the technique progress about the repeater false-target jam, it is more and more difficult to discriminate this jam in the time-domain, frequency-domain, or space-domain. The technique using polarization information to discriminate the target and false-target is discussed in this paper. With the difference that false-target signal vector's polarization ratio is fixed and target echo signal vector's polarization ratio is variational along with radar transmission signal's polarization, we transform the discrimination problem to beeline distinguish problem in the 2-dim complex space. The distributing characteristic expression of the false-target discrimination statistic is constructed, with which the discrimination ratio of false-target is analyzed. For the target case, the decomposed model of target scattering matrix and the concept of distinguish quantity are proposed. Then, the discrimination ratio of target can be forecasted according to target distinguish quantity. Thus, the performance of discrimination method has been analyzed integrally. The simulation results demonstrate the method in this paper is effective on the discrimination of target and false-target.

  2. Improving Quantitative Precipitation Estimation via Data Fusion of High-Resolution Ground-based Radar Network and CMORPH Satellite-based Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifelli, R.; Chen, H.; Chandrasekar, V.; Xie, P.

    2015-12-01

    A large number of precipitation products at multi-scales have been developed based upon satellite, radar, and/or rain gauge observations. However, how to produce optimal rainfall estimation for a given region is still challenging due to the spatial and temporal sampling difference of different sensors. In this study, we develop a data fusion mechanism to improve regional quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) by utilizing satellite-based CMORPH product, ground radar measurements, as well as numerical model simulations. The CMORPH global precipitation product is essentially derived based on retrievals from passive microwave measurements and infrared observations onboard satellites (Joyce et al. 2004). The fine spatial-temporal resolution of 0.05o Lat/Lon and 30-min is appropriate for regional hydrologic and climate studies. However, it is inadequate for localized hydrometeorological applications such as urban flash flood forecasting. Via fusion of the Regional CMORPH product and local precipitation sensors, the high-resolution QPE performance can be improved. The area of interest is the Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) Metroplex, which is the largest land-locked metropolitan area in the U.S. In addition to an NWS dual-polarization S-band WSR-88DP radar (i.e., KFWS radar), DFW hosts the high-resolution dual-polarization X-band radar network developed by the center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA). This talk will present a general framework of precipitation data fusion based on satellite and ground observations. The detailed prototype architecture of using regional rainfall instruments to improve regional CMORPH precipitation product via multi-scale fusion techniques will also be discussed. Particularly, the temporal and spatial fusion algorithms developed for the DFW Metroplex will be described, which utilizes CMORPH product, S-band WSR-88DP, and X-band CASA radar measurements. In order to investigate the uncertainties associated with each

  3. Coordinated polar spacecraft, geosynchronous spacecraft, and ground-based observations of magnetopause processes and their coupling to the ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Le

    2004-12-01

    an indirect cause of the observed Pc5 pulsations. During the same interval, two flux transfer events were also observed in the magnetosphere near the oscillating magnetopause. Their ground signatures were identified in the CANOPUS data. The time delays of the FTE signatures from the Polar spacecraft to the ground stations enable us to estimate that the longitudinal extent of the reconnection X-line at the magnetopause was ~43° or ~5.2 RE. The coordinated in-situ and ground-based observations suggest that FTEs are produced by transient reconnection taking place along a single extended X-line at the magnetopause, as suggested in the models by Scholer (1988 and Southwood et al. (1988. The observations from this study suggest that the reconnection occurred in two different forms simultaneously in the same general region at the dayside magnetopause: 1 continuous reconnection with a pulsed reconnection rate, and 2 transient reconnection as flux transfer events.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (Magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers; Magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions; MHD waves and instabilities

  4. Dual HF radar study of the subauroral polarization stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Makarevich

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The dual HF radars comprising the Tasman International Geophysical Environment Radar (TIGER system often observe localized high-velocity F-region plasma flows (≥1500 m/s in the midnight sector (20:00–02:00 MLT at magnetic latitudes as low as Λ=60° S. The flow channels exhibit large variability in the latitudinal extent and electric field strength, and are similar to the subauroral polarization stream or SAPS, a plasma convection feature thought to be related to the polarization electric field due to the charge separation during substorm and storm development. In this study, the 2-D plasma drift velocity within the channel is derived for each of the two TIGER radars from the maximum velocities measured in all 16 radar beams within the latitudinally narrow channel, and the time variation of the subauroral electric field is examined near substorm onset. It is demonstrated that the flow channel often does not have a clear onset, rather it manifests differently in different phases of its evolution and can persist for at least two substorm cycles. During the growth phase the electric fields within the flow channel are difficult to distinguish from those of the background auroral convection but they start to increase near substorm onset and peak during the recovery phase, in contrast to what has been reported previously for auroral convection which peaks just before the substorm onset and falls sharply at the substorm onset. The response times to substorm onset range from −5 to +40 min and show some dependence on the substorm location with longer delays observed for substorms eastward of the radars' viewing area. The propagation velocity of the high-velocity region is also investigated by comparing the observations from the two closely-spaced TIGER radars. The observations are consistent with the notion that the polarization electric field is established with the energetic ions drifting westward and equatorward from the initial substorm

  5. MST radar and polarization lidar observations of tropical cirrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Bhavani Kumar

    Full Text Available Significant gaps in our understanding of global cirrus effects on the climate system involve the role of frequently occurring tropical cirrus. Much of the cirrus in the atmosphere is largely due to frequent cumulus and convective activity in the tropics. In the Indian sub-tropical region, the deep convective activity is very prominent from April to December, which is a favorable period for the formation of deep cumulus clouds. The fibrous anvils of these clouds, laden with ice crystals, are one of the source mechanisms for much of the cirrus in the atmosphere. In the present study, several passages of tropical cirrus were investigated by simultaneously operating MST radar and a co-located polarization lidar at the National MST Radar Facility (NMRF, Gadanki (13.45° N, 79.18° E, India to understand its structure, the background wind field and the microphysics at the cloud boundaries. The lidar system used is capable of measuring the degree of depolarization in the laser backscatter. It has identified several different cirrus structures with a peak linear depolarization ratio (LDR in the range of 0.1 to 0.32. Simultaneous observations of tropical cirrus by the VHF Doppler radar indicated a clear enhancement of reflectivity detected in the vicinity of the cloud boundaries, as revealed by the lidar and are strongly dependent on observed cloud LDR. An inter-comparison of radar reflectivity observed for vertical and oblique beams reveals that the radar-enhanced reflectivity at the cloud boundaries is also accompanied by significant aspect sensitivity. These observations indicate the presence of anisotropic turbulence at the cloud boundaries. Radar velocity measurements show that boundaries of cirrus are associated with enhanced horizontal winds, significant vertical shear in the horizontal winds and reduced vertical velocity. Therefore, these measurements indicate that a circulation at the cloud boundaries suggest an entrainment taking place close to

  6. Improvements to the OMI O2-O2 operational cloud algorithm and comparisons with ground-based radar-lidar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepijn Veefkind, J.; de Haan, Johan F.; Sneep, Maarten; Levelt, Pieternel F.

    2016-12-01

    The OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument on board NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura satellite) OMCLDO2 cloud product supports trace gas retrievals of for example ozone and nitrogen dioxide. The OMCLDO2 algorithm derives the effective cloud fraction and effective cloud pressure using a DOAS (differential optical absorption spectroscopy) fit of the O2-O2 absorption feature around 477 nm. A new version of the OMI OMCLDO2 cloud product is presented that contains several improvements, of which the introduction of a temperature correction on the O2-O2 slant columns and the updated look-up tables have the largest impact. Whereas the differences in the effective cloud fraction are on average limited to 0.01, the differences of the effective cloud pressure can be up to 200 hPa, especially at cloud fractions below 0.3. As expected, the temperature correction depends on latitude and season. The updated look-up tables have a systematic effect on the cloud pressure at low cloud fractions. The improvements at low cloud fractions are very important for the retrieval of trace gases in the lower troposphere, for example for nitrogen dioxide and formaldehyde. The cloud pressure retrievals of the improved algorithm are compared with ground-based radar-lidar observations for three sites at mid-latitudes. For low clouds that have a limited vertical extent the comparison yields good agreement. For higher clouds, which are vertically extensive and often contain several layers, the satellite retrievals give a lower cloud height. For high clouds, mixed results are obtained.

  7. Probing non-tensorial polarizations of stochastic gravitational-wave backgrounds with ground-based laser interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Nishizawa, Atsushi; Hayama, Kazuhiro; Kawamura, Seiji; Sakagami, Masa-aki

    2009-01-01

    In a general metric theory of gravitation in four dimensions, six polarizations of a gravitational wave are allowed: two scalar and two vector modes, in addition to two tensor modes in general relativity. Such additional polarization modes appear due to additional degrees of freedom in modified theories of gravitation or theories with extra dimensions. Thus, observations of gravitational waves can be utilized to constrain the extended models of gravitation. In this paper, we investigate detectability of additional polarization modes of gravitational waves, particularly focusing on a stochastic gravitational-wave background, with laser-interferometric detectors on the Earth. We found that multiple detectors can separate the mixture of polarization modes in detector outputs, and that they have almost the same sensitivity to each polarization mode of stochastic gravitational-wave background.

  8. Depolarization ratio of polar stratospheric clouds in coastal Antarctica: comparison analysis between ground-based Micro Pulse Lidar and space-borne CALIOP observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Córdoba-Jabonero

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs play an important role in polar ozone depletion, since they are involved in diverse ozone destruction processes (chlorine activation, denitrification. The degree of that ozone reduction is depending on the type of PSCs, and hence on their occurrence. Therefore PSC characterization, mainly focused on PSC-type discrimination, is widely demanded. The backscattering (R and volume linear depolarization (δV ratios are the parameters usually used in lidar measurements for PSC detection and identification. In this work, an improved version of the standard NASA/Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL-4, which includes a built-in depolarization detection module, has been used for PSC observations above the coastal Antarctic Belgrano II station (Argentina, 77.9° S 34.6° W, 256 m a.s.l. since 2009. Examination of the MPL-4 δV feature as a suitable index for PSC-type discrimination is based on the analysis of the two-channel data, i.e., the parallel (p- and perpendicular (s- polarized MPL signals. This study focuses on the comparison of coincident δV-profiles as obtained from ground-based MPL-4 measurements during three Antarctic winters with those reported from the space-borne lidar CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization aboard the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation satellite in the same period (83 simultaneous cases are analysed for 2009–2011 austral winter times. Three different approaches are considered for the comparison analysis between both lidar profile data sets in order to test the degree of agreement: the correlation coefficient (CC, as a measure of the relationship between both PSC vertical structures; the mean differences together with their root mean square (RMS values found between data sets; and the percentage differences (BIAS, parameter also used in profiling comparisons between CALIOP and other ground-based lidar systems. All of them are examined as a function

  9. Ability of a dual polarized X-band radar to estimate rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diss, S.; Testud, J.; Lavabre, J.; Ribstein, P.; Moreau, E.; Parent du Chatelet, J.

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study is to assess rainfall estimates by a dual polarized X-band radar. This study was part of the European project FRAMEA (Flood forecasting using Radar in Alpine and Mediterranean Areas). Two radars were set up near the small town of Collobrières in South Eastern France. The first radar was a dual polarized X-band radar (Hydrix ®) associated with a ZPHI ® algorithm while the second one was an S-band radar (Météo France). We compared radar rainfall data with measurements obtained by two rain gauge networks (Météo France and Cemagref). During the experiments from February 2006 to June 2007, four significant rainfall events occurred. The accuracy of the rain rate obtained with both S-band and X-band radars decreased significantly beyond 60 km, in particular for the X-band radar. At closer ranges, such as 30-60 km from the radars, the X-band and the S-band radar retrievals showed similar performance with Nash criteria around 0.80 for the X-band radar and 0.75 for the S-band radar. Furthermore, the X-band radar did not require calibration on rainfall records, which tends to make it a useful method to assess rainfall in areas without a rain gauge network.

  10. Detection Performance Assessment of Ground-Based Phased Array Radar for Ballistic Targets%地基相控阵雷达对弹道目标的探测性能评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李星星; 姚汉英; 孙文峰

    2014-01-01

    为解决地基相控阵雷达对弹道目标探测的最优部署问题,建立弹道中段目标轨道运动和进动模型,提出弹道中段多部地基相控阵雷达的弹道目标探测概率模型,以及平均检测概率、稳定跟踪时间和资源冗余时间3种组合的雷达探测性能评估指标。依据弹道目标RCS及探测距离随观测时间的变化情况,通过仿真实验对多种部署方式下地基雷达对弹道目标探测性能评估指标的分析,得出的结论为弹道导弹防御系统中地基雷达的部署方式提供了有效的参考依据。%In order to solve the optimal deployment problem of ground-based phased array radar in detecting ballistic targets,the orbit motion and precession motion models of ballistic targets were built up,and the detection probability model for ballistic targets by using several ground-based phased array radars was proposed.Three evaluation indexes of radars'detection performance were given: average detection probability,stable tracking time and resource redundancy time .According to the variation of RCS and detection range for ballistic targets in midcourse,detection performance evaluation indexes of several radar deployment schemes were analyzed through experiments .The conclusion in this paper may provide some reference for deploying the ground-based radar in ballistic missile defense (BMD) system for targets'optimal detection.

  11. Synthesizing radar maps of polar regions with a Doppler-only method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulston, M S; Muhleman, D O

    1997-06-10

    A method for producing a radar-reflectivity map of the polar regions of the Moon or a planet from polar orbit with only the frequency shift of the reflected signals is described and simulated. A Radon transform of the reflectivity is obtained during multiple passes over the pole. Inversion of this Radon transform enables a map of radar reflectivity to be synthesized.

  12. Using a Ground Based radar interferometer during emergency: the case of A3 motorway (Salerno Reggio-Calabria) treated by landslide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Ventisette, Chiara; Intrieri, Emanuele; Luzi, Guido; Casagli, Nicola

    2010-05-01

    An application of Ground Based radar interferometry (GB-InSAR) technique to monitor a landslide threatening infrastructures in emergency conditions is presented. During December 2008 and January 2009 intense rainfalls occurred in Italy, especially in the southern regions. These rain events occurred in the last days of January, worsened the already critical hydrogeological conditions of some areas and triggered many landslides. One of these landslides, named Santa Trada landslide, is located close to a periodical stream called Fiumara di Santa Trada, near Villa San Giovanni municipality (Reggio Calabria, Calabria Region). The volume involved is about 100 000 m3. This estimate represents the case of a collapse of the landslide which destabilize a larger part of the slope, involving other areas delimited by some fractures observed upstream. Nevertheless the landslide does not directly threaten the roadway, its complete collapse would hit the pillars of a motorway viaduct. Through GB-InSAR data it has been possible to obtain an overview of the area affected by movement and to quantify the displacements magnitude. The main benefit of the system was not only limited to the capability of fully characterizing the landslide in spatial terms, it also permitted emergency operators to follow, during the whole campaign, the evolution of the mass movement and to study its cinematic behaviour. This aspect is fundamental to evaluate the volume of the material involved and to assess the temporal evolution of the risk scenario. The GB-InSAR installed at Santa Trada points up toward the landslide from a distance of 250 m. The apparatus produces a synthesized radar image of the observed area every 6 minutes, night and day, with a pixel resolution of about 0.75 m in range and 1.2 m on average in cross range, performing a millimeter accuracy on the final displacement maps. The interferometric analysis of sequences of consecutive images allows the operator to derive the entire line of

  13. Radar polarization studies of volcanic and impact cratered terrains on the Earth, Venus, and the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Bruce Allan

    The results of four research projects which utilized imaging radar polarization data for remote sensing of volcanic and impact cratered terrains on the Earth, Venus, and the Moon are presented. The first project is an analysis of airborne multi-polarization radar data. A technique is developed for decomposing the polarized radar echo into components attributed to quasi-specular, small-perturbation, and 'dihedral' mechanisms. The second and third projects analyze the geomorphology and radar polarization properties of deposits on two volcanoes, Sif and Gula Montes, in western Eistla Regio, Venus. These analyses utilize radar images collected at Arecibo Observatory in 1988 (spatial resolution 1 km). Changes in the radar brightness of lava flows with downslope distance from possible vents are inconsistent with trends observed for single terrestrial lava flow. This observation, coupled with evidence of multiple eruptive vents, suggests that most of the large flows in western Eistla Regio are formed by coalescence of numerous smaller flows. The third project also compares the radar polarization properties of volcanic deposits on Sif and Gula Montes to data for terrestrial lava flows and a smooth desert area. The fourth project presents a study of lunar crater rays using high-resolution (30 m) radar images collected at Haystack Observatory, and focuses on the bright ray in Mare Serenitatis and ray segments attributed to Tycho and Copernicus craters.

  14. The variability of tropical ice cloud properties as a function of the large-scale context from ground-based radar-lidar observations over Darwin, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Protat

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The statistical properties of non-precipitating tropical ice clouds over Darwin, Australia are characterized using ground-based radar-lidar observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Program. The ice cloud properties analysed are the frequency of ice cloud occurrence, the morphological properties (cloud top height and thickness, cloud fraction as derived considering a typical large-scale model grid box, and the microphysical and radiative properties (ice water content, visible extinction, effective radius, terminal fall speed, and total concentration. The variability of these tropical ice cloud properties is then studied as a function of the large-scale cloud regimes derived from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP, the amplitude and phase of the Madden–Julian Oscillation (MJO, and the large-scale atmospheric regime as derived from a long-term record of radiosonde observations over Darwin. The rationale for characterizing this variability is to provide an observational basis to which model outputs can be compared for the different regimes or large-scale characteristics and from which new parameterizations accounting for the large-scale context can be derived.

    The mean vertical variability of ice cloud occurrence and microphysical properties is large (1.5 order of magnitude for ice water content and extinction, a factor 3 in effective radius, and three orders of magnitude in concentration, typically. 98% of ice clouds in our dataset are characterized by either a small cloud fraction (smaller than 0.3 or a very large cloud fraction (larger than 0.9. Our results also indicate that, at least in the northern Australian region, the upper part of the troposphere can be split into three distinct layers characterized by different statistically-dominant microphysical processes. The variability of the ice cloud properties as a function of the large-scale atmospheric regime, cloud regime, and MJO phase

  15. Evidence for thermospheric gravity waves in the southern polar cap from ground-based vertical velocity and photometric observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Innis

    Full Text Available Zenith-directed Fabry-Perot Spectrometer (FPS and 3-Field Photometer (3FP observations of the λ630 nm emission (~240 km altitude were obtained at Davis station, Antarctica, during the austral winter of 1999. Eleven nights of suitable data were searched for significant periodicities common to vertical winds from the FPS and photo-metric variations from the 3FP. Three wave-like events were found, each of around one or more hours in duration, with periods around 15 minutes, vertical velocity amplitudes near 60 ms–1 , horizontal phase velocities around 300 ms–1 , and horizontal wavelengths from 240 to 400 km. These characteristics appear consistent with polar cap gravity waves seen by other workers, and we conclude this is a likely interpretation of our data. Assuming a source height near 125 km altitude, we determine the approximate source location by calculating back along the wave trajectory using the gravity wave property relating angle of ascent and frequency. The wave sources appear to be in the vicinity of the poleward border of the auroral oval, at magnetic local times up to 5 hours before local magnetic midnight.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (thermospheric dynamics; waves and tides

  16. Radar Speckle Displacement Interferometry to Study Moon's Polar Axis Behaviour in the Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holin, I. V.

    2002-01-01

    Radar Speckle Displacement Interferometry (RSDI) is a new on principle Earth-based radar technique which allows precise measurement of instantaneous rotational-progressive motion components of distant bodies. It is based on the effect of speckle displacement or far coherence of speckled radar fields scattered by rough surfaces of moving objects. RSDI examinations in practice of radar astronomy have been successfully initiated in 2001-2002 both in Europe and in the USA In particular, RSDI is considered as one of most promising ground-based techniques to solve the problem of Mercury's obliquity and librations. It was proposed in how Moon's physical librations can be measured. Below RSDI possibilities are discussed as applied to estimation of Moon's instantaneous spin axis orientation in the sky and its variation with time.

  17. A Polarization Technique for Mitigating Low Grazing Angle Radar Sea Clutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-03

    A Polarization Technique for Mitigating Low-Grazing-Angle Radar Sea Clutter Molly K. Crane MIT Lincoln Laboratory Lexington, MA 02420 Email...MA 02420 Email: mabel.ramirez@ll.mit.edu Abstract—Traditional detection schemes in conventional mar- itime surveillance radars may suffer serious...effective means of enhancing target detection in sea clutter, MIT Lincoln Laboratory (MIT LL) collected a fully polarimetric X-band radar dataset on

  18. Oblique Projection Polarization Filtering-Based Interference Suppressions for Radar Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Bin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The interferences coming from the radar members degrade the detection and recognition performance of the radar sensor networks (RSNs if the waveforms of the radar members are nonorthogonal. In this paper, we analyze the interferences by exploring the polarization information of the electromagnetic (EM waves. Then, we propose the oblique projection polarization filtering- (OPPF- based scheme to suppress the interferences while keeping the amplitude and phase of its own return in RSNs, even if the polarized states of the radar members are not orthogonal. We consider the cooperative RSNs environment where the polarization information of each radar member is known to all. The proposed method uses all radar members' polarization information to establish the corresponding filtering operator. The Doppler-shift and its uncertainty are independent of the polarization information, which contributes that the interferences can be suppressed without the utilization of the spatial, the temporal, the frequency, the time-delay and the Doppler-shift information. Theoretical analysis and the mathematical deduction show that the proposed scheme is a valid and simple implementation. Simulation results also demonstrate that this method can obtain a good filtering performance when dealing with the problem of interference suppressions for RSNs.

  19. Basics of Polar-Format algorithm for processing Synthetic Aperture Radar images.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a background to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image formation using the Polar Format (PFA) processing algorithm. This is meant to be an aid to those tasked to implement real-time image formation using the Polar Format processing algorithm.

  20. Study on the method of polarization suppression of cheating jamming in pulse Doppler radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Lizhong; Qiao Xiaolin; Meng Xiande; Jin Ming

    2005-01-01

    A jamming suppression method based on polarization signal detection is proposed under common range and velocity cheating jammingfor pulse Doppler radar. On the basis of the separation of the target and the jamming, the range and velocity track on the true target are realized. Firstly the signal processing model of the full polarization pulse Doppler radar is introduced. Secondly the method of correct target separation is discussed, which is the twice detections of energy and polarization state on the two dimension resolution cells of range and velocity of the radar echo. Finally the simulations are performed and the results prove the validity. What' s more, multiple range and velocity cheating jamming can be suppressed at the same time if the target and the jamming are different in the polarization domain.

  1. Arecibo radar imagery of Mars: II. Chryse-Xanthe, polar caps, and other regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, John K.; Nolan, Michael C.

    2017-01-01

    other ice processes in the dichotomy boundary region. The first delay-Doppler images of the radar-bright features from the north and south polar icecaps are presented. Both poles show the circular polarization inversion and high reflectivity characteristic of coherent volume backscatter from relatively clean ice. The south polar feature is primarily backscatter from the residual CO2 icecap (with a lesser contribution from the polar layered deposits), whose finite optical depth probably accounts for the feature's strong S/X-band wavelength dependence. Conversely, the north polar radar feature appears to be mostly backscatter from the H2O-ice-rich polar layered deposits rather than from the thin residual H2O cap. The north polar region shows additional radar-bright features from Korolev Crater and a few other outlying circumpolar ice deposits.

  2. Polar Remote Sensing by CryoSat-type Radar Altimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenseng, Lars

    observations, but the thickness and thereby the mass of the sea-ice is subject to large uncertainties. Satellite observations of the icecaps are also affected by errors in the margin zones, where the largest changes takes place. The development of a new type of radar altimeter, named the SAR altimeter....... Furthermore, a method has been developed to separate radar signals returned by ice floes from radar signals returned from the sea between the ice floes. When heights measured over ice floes and heights measured over ocean can be separated, the height by which the ice floe is above the sea surface can...

  3. Polarization sensitivity of monopulse radar boresight error induced by large, ogive radomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kelce S.

    1994-12-01

    The dependence of Boresight Error (BSE) on incident Electric Field (E-Field) polarization tilt angle is investigated. BSE, defined as the angular difference between a target's actual and radar-indicated position, is influenced by the radome used to protect the antenna. A reliable computer model for predicting the BSE of electrically large radar-radome systems has been demonstrated and used to investigate the dependence of radome-induced BSE for various combinations of scan angle, element polarization, and incident E-Field polarization. The analysis includes a development of a transmission/depolarization model to justify the results of the computer model. Results compare very well with empirical, published, and experimentally measured data for specific scan angle and polarization cases considered. Generally, BSE exhibits a noticeable dependence on E-Field polarization, except under limited scanning conditions for specific linearly polarized antenna apertures.

  4. Radar measurement of ionospheric scintillation in the polar region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knepp, Dennis L.

    2015-10-01

    This paper considers several estimators that use radar data to measure the S4 scintillation index that characterizes the severity of amplitude scintillation that may occur during RF propagation through ionospheric irregularities. S4 is defined to be the standard deviation of the fluctuations in received power normalized by division by the mean power. Estimates of S4 are based on radar returns obtained during track of targets which may themselves have intrinsic radar cross-section fluctuations. Key to this work is the consideration of thresholding, which is used in many radars to remove (from further processing) signals whose SNR is considered too low. We consider several estimators here. The "direct" estimator attempts to estimate S4 through the direct calculation of the mean and standard deviation of the SNR from a number of radar returns. The maximum likelihood (ML) estimator uses multiple hypothesis testing and the assumption of Nakagami-m statistics to estimate the scintillation index that best fits the radar returns from some number of pulses. The ML estimator has perfect knowledge of the number of radar returns that are below the threshold. The direct estimator is accurate for the case where there is no threshold and there are many returns or samples from which to estimate S4. However, the direct estimator is flawed (especially for strong scintillation) if deep fades that fall below the radar threshold are ignored. The modified ML estimator here is based on the ML technique but is useful if the count of missed returns is unavailable. We apply the modified ML estimator to several years of radar tracks of large calibration satellites to obtain the statistics of UHF scintillation as viewed from the early warning radar at Thule, Greenland. One-way S4 was measured from 5000 low Earth orbit tracks during the 3 year period after solar maximum in May 2000. The data are analyzed to quantify the exceedance or the level of scintillation experienced at various

  5. Evidence of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes Observed by SuperDARN SANAE HF Radar in Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    Olakunle Ogunjobi; Venkataraman Sivakumar; Judy Ann Elizabeth Stephenson; and William Tafon Sivla

    2015-01-01

    We report on the polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) occurrence probability over SANAE (South African National Antarctic Expedition) IV, for the first time. A matching coincidence method is described and implemented for PMSE extraction from SuperDARN (Super Dual Auroral Radar Network) HF radar. Several SuperDARN-PMSE characteristics are studied during the summer period from years 2005 - 2007. The seasonal and interannual SuperDARN-PMSE variations in relation to the mesospheric neutral winds...

  6. Electromagnetic energy deposition rate in the polar upper thermosphere derived from the EISCAT Svalbard radar and CUTLASS Finland radar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fujiwara

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available From simultaneous observations of the European incoherent scatter Svalbard radar (ESR and the Cooperative UK Twin Located Auroral Sounding System (CUTLASS Finland radar on 9 March 1999, we have derived the height distributions of the thermospheric heating rate at the F region height in association with electromagnetic energy inputs into the dayside polar cap/cusp region. The ESR and CUTLASS radar observations provide the ionospheric parameters with fine time-resolutions of a few minutes. Although the geomagnetic activity was rather moderate (Kp=3+~4, the electric field obtained from the ESR data sometimes shows values exceeding 40 mV/m. The estimated passive energy deposition rates are also larger than 150 W/kg in the upper thermosphere over the ESR site during the period of the enhanced electric field. In addition, enhancements of the Pedersen conductivity also contribute to heating the upper thermosphere, while there is only a small contribution for thermospheric heating from the direct particle heating due to soft particle precipitation in the dayside polar cap/cusp region. In the same period, the CUTLASS observations of the ion drift show the signature of poleward moving pulsed ionospheric flows with a recurrence rate of about 10–20 min. The estimated electromagnetic energy deposition rate shows the existence of the strong heat source in the dayside polar cap/cusp region of the upper thermosphere in association with the dayside magnetospheric phenomena of reconnections and flux transfer events.

  7. An integrated approach to monitoring the calibration stability of operational dual-polarization radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccarono, Mattia; Bechini, Renzo; Chandrasekar, Chandra V.; Cremonini, Roberto; Cassardo, Claudio

    2016-11-01

    The stability of weather radar calibration is a mandatory aspect for quantitative applications, such as rainfall estimation, short-term weather prediction and initialization of numerical atmospheric and hydrological models. Over the years, calibration monitoring techniques based on external sources have been developed, specifically calibration using the Sun and calibration based on ground clutter returns. In this paper, these two techniques are integrated and complemented with a self-consistency procedure and an intercalibration technique. The aim of the integrated approach is to implement a robust method for online monitoring, able to detect significant changes in the radar calibration. The physical consistency of polarimetric radar observables is exploited using the self-consistency approach, based on the expected correspondence between dual-polarization power and phase measurements in rain. This technique allows a reference absolute value to be provided for the radar calibration, from which eventual deviations may be detected using the other procedures. In particular, the ground clutter calibration is implemented on both polarization channels (horizontal and vertical) for each radar scan, allowing the polarimetric variables to be monitored and hardware failures to promptly be recognized. The Sun calibration allows monitoring the calibration and sensitivity of the radar receiver, in addition to the antenna pointing accuracy. It is applied using observations collected during the standard operational scans but requires long integration times (several days) in order to accumulate a sufficient amount of useful data. Finally, an intercalibration technique is developed and performed to compare colocated measurements collected in rain by two radars in overlapping regions. The integrated approach is performed on the C-band weather radar network in northwestern Italy, during July-October 2014. The set of methods considered appears suitable to establish an online tool to

  8. Broadband polarization interferometric time-integrating acousto-optic correlator for random noise radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangtaek; Wagner, Kelvin H.; Narayanan, Ram M.; Zhou, Wei

    2005-10-01

    We describe a time-integrating acousto-optic correlator (TIAOC) developed for imaging and target detection using a wideband random-noise radar system. This novel polarization interferometric in-line TIAOC uses an intensity-modulated laser diode for the random noise reference and a polarization-switching, self-collimating acoustic shear-mode gallium phosphide (GaP) acousto-optic device for traveling-wave modulation of the radar returns. The time-integrated correlation output is detected on a 1-D charge-coupled device (CCD) detector array and calibrated and demodulated in real time to produce the complex radar range profile. The complex radar reflectivity is measured in more than 150 radar range bins in parallel on the 3000 pixels of the CCD, improving target acquisition speeds and sensitivities by 150 over previous serial analog correlator approaches. The polarization interferometric detection of the correlation using the undiffracted light as the reference allows us to use the full acousto-optic device (AOD) bandwidth as the system bandwidth. Also, the experimental result shows the fully complex random-noise signal correlation and coherent demodulation without an explicit carrier, demonstrating that optically processed random-noise radars do not need a stable local oscillator.

  9. Exploring microphysical, radiative, dynamic and thermodynamic processes driving fog and low stratus clouds using ground-based Lidar and Radar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeffelin, Martial

    2016-04-01

    Radiation fog formation is largely influenced by the chemical composition, size and number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei and by heating/cooling and drying/moistening processes in a shallow mixing layer near the surface. Once a fog water layer is formed, its development and dissipation become predominantly controlled by radiative cooling/heating, turbulent mixing, sedimentation and deposition. Key processes occur in the atmospheric surface layer, directly in contact with the soil and vegetation, and throughout the atmospheric column. Recent publications provide detailed descriptions of these processes for idealized cases using very high-resolution models and proper representation of microphysical processes. Studying these processes in real fog situations require atmospheric profiling capabilities to monitor the temporal evolution of key parameters at several heights (surface, inside the fog, fog top, free troposphere). This could be done with in-situ sensors flown on tethered balloons or drones, during dedicated intensive field campaigns. In addition Backscatter Lidars, Doppler Lidars, Microwave Radiometers and Cloud Doppler Radars can provide more continuous, yet precise monitoring of key parameters throughout the fog life cycle. The presentation will describe how Backscatter Lidars can be used to study the height and kinetics of aerosol activation into fog droplets. Next we will show the potential of Cloud Doppler Radar measurements to characterize the temporal evolution of droplet size, liquid water content, sedimentation and deposition. Contributions from Doppler Lidars and Microwave Radiometers will be discussed. This presentation will conclude on the potential to use Lidar and Radar remote sensing measurements to support operational fog nowcasting.

  10. Quality Control and Calibration of the Dual-Polarization Radar at Kwajalein, RMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, David A.; Wolff, David B.; Carey, Lawrence D.; Tokay, Ali

    2010-01-01

    southwest of Hawaii and 1400 miles east of Guam in the tropical North Pacific Ocean. This tropical oceanic location is important because the majority of rain, and therefore the majority of atmospheric heating, occurs in the tropics where limited ground-based radar data are available.

  11. A Support Vector Machine Hydrometeor Classification Algorithm for Dual-Polarization Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta Roberto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm based on a support vector machine (SVM is proposed for hydrometeor classification. The training phase is driven by the output of a fuzzy logic hydrometeor classification algorithm, i.e., the most popular approach for hydrometer classification algorithms used for ground-based weather radar. The performance of SVM is evaluated by resorting to a weather scenario, generated by a weather model; the corresponding radar measurements are obtained by simulation and by comparing results of SVM classification with those obtained by a fuzzy logic classifier. Results based on the weather model and simulations show a higher accuracy of the SVM classification. Objective comparison of the two classifiers applied to real radar data shows that SVM classification maps are spatially more homogenous (textural indices, energy, and homogeneity increases by 21% and 12% respectively and do not present non-classified data. The improvements found by SVM classifier, even though it is applied pixel-by-pixel, can be attributed to its ability to learn from the entire hyperspace of radar measurements and to the accurate training. The reliability of results and higher computing performance make SVM attractive for some challenging tasks such as its implementation in Decision Support Systems for helping pilots to make optimal decisions about changes inthe flight route caused by unexpected adverse weather.

  12. Finland HF and Esrange MST radar observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ogawa

    Full Text Available Peculiar near range echoes observed in summer with the SuperDARN HF radar in Finland are presented. The echoes were detected at four frequencies of 9, 11, 13 and 15 MHz at slant ranges of 105–250 km for about 100 min. Interferometer measurements indicate that the echoes are returned from 80–100 km altitudes with elevation angles of 20°–60°. Echo power (< 16 dB, Doppler velocity (between –30 and + 30 ms-1 and spectral width (< 60 ms-1 fluctuate with periods of several to 20 min, perhaps due to short–period atmospheric gravity waves. When the HF radar detected the echoes, a vertical incidence MST radar, located at Esrange in Sweden (650 km north of the HF radar site, observed polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE at altitudes of 80–90 km. This fact suggests that the near range HF echoes are PMSE at HF band, although both radars did not probe a common volume. With increasing radar frequency, HF echo ranges are closer to the radar site and echo power becomes weaker. Possible mechanisms to explain these features are discussed.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; thermospheric dynamics; waves and tides; instruments and techniques

  13. Wavefront curvature limitations and compensation to polar format processing for synthetic aperture radar images.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-01-01

    Limitations on focused scene size for the Polar Format Algorithm (PFA) for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image formation are derived. A post processing filtering technique for compensating the spatially variant blurring in the image is examined. Modifications to this technique to enhance its robustness are proposed.

  14. Polarization-Based Radar Detection in Sea Clutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-27

    Cisco AP - Agilent E4438C [ESG) - WiFi channel 1 [2412 - 20MHzPi/4DQPSKat MHz,±10MHz) 2412 MHz . • Digitizer - 20dBm - GaGel44002U...polarization multiple-input multiple-output channel state information at the transmitter Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency dual-polarized...Topics that are considered in this report include the following: • Background research describing channel modeling that led to observations of PMD in RF

  15. Comparison of natural and artificial forcing to study the dynamic behaviour of bell towers in low wind context by means of ground-based radar interferometry: the case of the Leaning Tower in Pisa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchisio, Mario; Piroddi, Luca; Ranieri, Gaetano; Calcina, Sergio V.; Farina, Paolo

    2014-10-01

    The study of Cultural Heritage assets needs the application of non-destructive and non-invasive monitoring techniques. In particular, monuments and historical buildings which are open to the visitors and/or subject to important stress must be studied for their dynamic response. In the last 10 years the new ground-based radar interferometry technology has been developed allowing to monitor displacements from a point of sight far from the studied targets. It virtually provides a continuous mapping of displacements of the observed structures up to 10 µm with a range resolution of 0.75 m. In this paper, the application of ground-based interferometry on one very important historical building, the Leaning Tower of Pisa in Italy, is reported. The analysis of these kind of structures is important to catch their dynamic response to natural actions in general, and also to assess the effects due to pedestrian and users, and consequently to define functional capabilities and levels of acceptable dynamic stress. The studied structure was subject to artificial loading by synchronous movement of about 20 people. Artificial forcing led the structure to a resonance condition with the same frequency of the one due to the natural noise excitation, which was separately measured, and with an oscillation amplitude more than thirty times greater than the natural one (in conditions of weak wind). During the passive stages of the survey the recorded structural vibrations were very closed to the instrumental sensitivity, making difficult to distinguish vibration amplitudes amplifications of various segments at various heights. Through the spectral analysis of the acquired data it was possible to estimate the vibration frequencies of the first modal shapes of the structure along two orthogonal directions. The power spectra of the passive survey data have the same maximum frequency of the active but contain more noise at low frequency.

  16. POLARIZATION TRACK” AT ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVE SCATTERING BY COMPOSITE RADAR OBJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Kozlov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to introduction the main notions which allows us to create a theoretical foundation of man-made small-scale object “polarization track” against random surface. The existing of this effect was established using the experimental results. In the article the problems of small-scale man-made radar object polarization “track ” on the surface are investigated An analysis both statistical effects and measured values was made with the use of emergence principle and polarization proximity (distance notions.

  17. Detection-Discrimination Method for Multiple Repeater False Targets Based on Radar Polarization Echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. W. ZONG

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Multiple repeat false targets (RFTs, created by the digital radio frequency memory (DRFM system of jammer, are widely used in practical to effectively exhaust the limited tracking and discrimination resource of defence radar. In this paper, common characteristic of radar polarization echoes of multiple RFTs is used for target recognition. Based on the echoes from two receiving polarization channels, the instantaneous polarization radio (IPR is defined and its variance is derived by employing Taylor series expansion. A detection-discrimination method is designed based on probability grids. By using the data from microwave anechoic chamber, the detection threshold of the method is confirmed. Theoretical analysis and simulations indicate that the method is valid and feasible. Furthermore, the estimation performance of IPRs of RFTs due to the influence of signal noise ratio (SNR is also covered.

  18. Dual-polarization C-band weather radar algorithms for rain rate estimation and hydrometeor classification in an alpine region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Paulitsch

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Dual polarization is becoming the standard for new weather radar systems. In contrast to conventional weather radars, where the reflectivity is measured in one polarization plane only, a dual polarization radar provides transmission in either horizontal, vertical, or both polarizations while receiving both the horizontal and vertical channels simultaneously. Since hydrometeors are often far from being spherical, the backscatter and propagation are different for horizontal and vertical polarization. Comparing the reflected horizontal and vertical power returns and their ratio and correlation, information on size, shape, and material density of cloud and precipitation particles can be obtained. The use of polarimetric radar variables can therefore increase the accuracy of the rain rate estimation compared to standard Z-R relationships of non-polarimetric radars. It is also possible to derive the type of precipitation from dual polarization parameters, although this is not an easy task, since there is no clear discrimination between the different values. Fuzzy logic approaches have been shown to work well with overlapping conditions and imprecisely defined class output.

    In this paper the implementation of different polarization algorithms for the new Austrian weather radar on Mt. Valluga is described, and first results from operational use are presented. This study also presents first observations of rain events in August 2007 during the test run of the radar. Further, the designated rain rate estimation and hydrometeor classification algorithms are explained.

  19. Velocity profiles inside volcanic clouds from three-dimensional scanning microwave dual-polarization Doppler radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montopoli, Mario

    2016-07-01

    In this work, velocity profiles within a volcanic tephra cloud obtained by dual-polarization Doppler radar acquisitions with three-dimensional (3-D) mechanical scanning capability are analyzed. A method for segmenting the radar volumes into three velocity regimes: vertical updraft, vertical fallout, and horizontal wind advection within a volcanic tephra cloud using dual-polarization Doppler radar moments is proposed. The horizontal and vertical velocity components within the regimes are retrieved using a novel procedure that makes assumptions concerning the characteristics of the winds inside these regimes. The vertical velocities retrieved are combined with 1-D simulations to derive additional parameters including particle fallout, mass flux, and particle sizes. The explosive event occurred on 23 November 2013 at the Mount Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy), is considered a demonstrative case in which to analyze the radar Doppler signal inside the tephra column. The X-band radar (3 cm wavelength) in the Catania, Italy, airport observed the 3-D scenes of the Etna tephra cloud ~32 km from the volcano vent every 10 min. From the radar-derived vertical velocity profiles of updraft, particle fallout, and horizontal transportation, an exit velocity of 150 m/s, mass flux rate of 1.37 • 107 kg/s, particle fallout velocity of 18 m/s, and diameters of precipitating tephra particles equal to 0.8 cm are estimated on average. These numbers are shown to be consistent with theoretical 1-D simulations of plume dynamics and local reports at the ground, respectively. A thickness of 3 ± 0.36 km for the downwind ash cloud is also inferred by differentiating the radar-derived cloud top and the height of transition between the convective and buoyancy regions, the latter being inferred by the estimated vertical updraft velocity profile. The unique nature of the case study as well as the novelty of the segmentation and retrieval methods presented potentially give new insights into the

  20. Observation of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes using the Northernmost MST Radar at Eureka (80 deg N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarnalingam, N.; Hocking, W.; Janches, D.; Drummond, J.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate long-term Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSEs) observations conducted by the northern most geographically located MST radar at Eureka (80 deg N, 86 deg W). While PMSEs are a well recognized summer phenomenon in the polar regions, previous calibrated studies at Resolute Bay and Eureka using 51.5 MHz and33 MHz radars respectively, showed that PMSE backscatter signal strengths are relatively weak in the polar cap sites, compared to the auroral zone sites (Swarnalingam et al., 2009b; Singer et al., 2010). Complications arise with PMSEs in which the echo strength is controlled by the electrons, which are, in turn, influenced by heavily charged ice particles as well as the variability in the D-region plasma. In recent years, PMSE experiments were conducted inside the polar cap utilizing a 51 MHz radar located at Eureka. In this paper, we investigate calibrated observations, conducted during 2009-2015. Seasonal and diurnal variations of the backscatter signal strengths are discussed and compared to previously published results from the ALOMAR radar, which is a radar of similar design located in the auroral zone at Andenes, Norway (69 deg N, 16 deg E). At Eureka, while PMSEs are present with a daily occurrence rate which is comparable to the rate observed at the auroral zone site for at least two seasons, they show a great level of inter-annual variability. The occurrence rate for the strong echoes tends to be low. Furthermore, comparison of the absolute backscatter signal strengths at these two sites clearly indicates that the PMSE backscatter signal strength at Eureka is weak. Although this difference could be caused by several factors, we investigate the intensity of the neutral air turbulence at Eureka from the measurements of the Doppler spectrum of the PMSE backscatter signals. We found that the level of the turbulence intensity at Eureka is weak relative to previously reported results from three high latitude sites.

  1. Arctic and Antarctic polar mesosphere summer echoes observed with oblique incidence HF radars: analysis using simultaneous MF and VHF radar data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ogawa

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSEs have been well studied using vertical incidence VHF radars at northern high-latitudes. In this paper, two PMSE events detected with the oblique incidence SuperDARN HF radars at Hankasalmi, Finland (62.3° N and Syowa Station, Antarctica (69.0° S, are analyzed, together with simultaneous VHF and medium-frequency (MF radar data. Altitude resolutions of the HF radars in the mesosphere and the lower thermosphere are too poor to know exact PMSE altitudes. However, a comparison of Doppler velocity from the HF radar and neutral wind velocity from the MF radar shows that PMSEs at the HF band appeared at altitudes within 80-90km, which are consistent with those from previous vertical incidence HF-VHF radar results. The HF-VHF PMSE occurrences exhibit a semidiurnal behavior, as observed by other researchers. It is found that in one event, PMSEs occurred when westward semidiurnal winds with large amplitude at 85-88km altitudes attained a maximum. When the HF-VHF PMSEs were observed at distances beyond 180km from MF radar sites, the MF radars detected no appreciable signatures of echo enhancement.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; thermospheric dynamics; waves and tides

  2. Impact of dual-polarization radar technology and Twitter on the Hattiesburg, Mississippi tornado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Alexis L; Arnold, Brent W; Cooper, Guy Paul; Yeager, Violet; Stake, Josh; Ali, Mohammed; Calderone, Richard C; Wilkinson, James; Hsu, Edbert; Parrillo, Steven; Piper, Steven; Subbarao, Italo

    2013-12-01

    Dual-Polarization Radar and Twitter were analyzed to determine the impact on injuries sustained by the Hattiesburg EF-4 tornado. Tracking data provided from the Dual-Pol radar systems in National Weather Service Jackson were reviewed. Twitter data from four local Twitter handles were obtained. The change in tweets and followers for the day of the storm were compared to historical averages. A Student t-test was utilized in determining statistical significance (ptornado. An Injury Severity Score (ISS) was calculated for trauma records related to the tornado. Radar detection of the tornado gave approximately 30 minutes of advanced warning time. Statistical significance in follower growth was seen in all four Twitter handles. Out of 50 patients, the average ISS was 3.9 with a range of 1 to 29. There were zero fatalities. An ISS average of 3.9 was significantly less than two previous tornadoes of similar strength that occurred prior to increased usage of Dual-pol radar and Twitter as a means for communicating severe weather information. Early detection from Dual-pol radar improved warning time. Tweets informed citizens to seek appropriate shelter. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2013;7:585-592).

  3. Method for providing a polarization filter for processing synthetic aperture radar image data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Pascale C. (Inventor); vanZyl, Jakob J. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A polarization filter can maximize the signal-to-noise ratio of a polarimetric SAR and help discriminate between targets or enhance image features, e.g., enhance contract between different types of target. The method disclosed is based on the Stokes matrix/Stokes vector representation, so the targets of interest can be extended targets, and the method can also be applied to the case of bistatic polarimetric radars.

  4. Operational Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Initiation Forecasting Utilizing S-Band Dual-Polarization Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    cells exhibit considerably more complexity in their charge distributions, the tripole model is adequate to explain lightning formation. Although...application of dual-polarization weather radar. Part II: Warm- and cold- season applications. J. Operational Meteor., 1 (20), 243-264. Kumjian, M. R...Res., 94, 13151–13167. 60 Wolf, P., 2006: Anticipating the initiation, cessation , and frequency of cloud-to-ground lightning, utilizing WSR

  5. Towards Assessing the Information Content of Dual-Polarization Radar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangrande, S. E.; McGraw, R. L.; Fierce, L.; Zhang, G.

    2016-12-01

    Improving utilization of dual polarization radar measurements, including for the retrieval of larger-scale rainfall accumulation, detailed phase partitioning and drop size distributions (DSDs), is one potential path toward developing or improving process-level cloud models and parameterizations for climate prediction. There are known and immediate demands for high-quality rainfall-accumulation maps to act as a key component for continuous climate-model-forcing datasets. Similarly, the monitoring of particle size and phase evolution may serve as key constraint for modeled deep convective processes. Whereas there is no shortage of dual-polarization retrieval methodologies for the key geophysical quantities of interest (e.g., precipitation estimates, DSD), less emphasis has been on the use of dual-polarization quantities as constraints for such retrievals. Here, we explore an application of linear programming to dual-polarization retrievals. This effort builds on Twomey's work, "Information content of remote sensing", which uses algebraic covariance matrix/eigenvalue analysis. Linear programming is used to perform geometric-type analysis (e.g., obtaining nested bounds to feasible sets of conditions consistent with the measurement constraints) beyond the capability of variance-based methods. Key motivating questions can be expressed as, `What are the upper and lower bounds on quantities of interest such as rainfall rate, consistent with a given set of dual polarization radar measurements?'

  6. On determining the noon polar cap boundary from SuperDARN HF radar backscatter characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pinnock

    Full Text Available Previous work has shown that ionospheric HF radar backscatter in the noon sector can be used to locate the footprint of the magnetospheric cusp particle precipitation. This has enabled the radar data to be used as a proxy for the location of the polar cap boundary, and hence measure the flow of plasma across it to derive the reconnection electric field in the ionosphere. This work used only single radar data sets with a field of view limited to ~2 h of local time. In this case study using four of the SuperDARN radars, we examine the boundary determined over 6 h of magnetic local time around the noon sector and its relationship to the convection pattern. The variation with longitude of the latitude of the radar scatter with cusp characteristics shows a bay-like feature. It is shown that this feature is shaped by the variation with longitude of the poleward flow component of the ionospheric plasma and may be understood in terms of cusp ion time-of-flight effects. Using this interpretation, we derive the time-of-flight of the cusp ions and find that it is consistent with approximately 1 keV ions injected from a subsolar reconnection site. A method for deriving a more accurate estimate of the location of the open-closed field line boundary from HF radar data is described.

    Key words: Ionosphere (ionosphere–magnetosphere interactions; plasma convection · Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause · cusp · and boundary layers

  7. Dual-polarization phase shift processing with the Python ARM Radar Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, S. M.; Lang, T. J.; Mühlbauer, K.; Helmus, J.; North, K.

    2016-12-01

    Weather radars that measure backscatter returns at two orthogonal polarizations can give unique insight into storm macro and microphysics. Phase shift between the two polarizations caused by anisotropy in the liquid water path can be used as a constraint in rainfall rate and drop size distribution retrievals, and has the added benefit of being robust to attenuation and radar calibration. The measurement is complicated, however, by the impact of phase shift on backscatter in the presence of large drops and when the pulse volume is not filled uniformly by scatterers (known as partial beam filling). This has led to a signal processing challenge of separating the underlying desired signal from the transient signal, a challenge that has attracted many diverse solutions. To this end, the Python-ARM Radar Toolkit (Py-ART) [1] becomes increasingly important. By providing an open architecture for implementation of retrieval techniques, Py-ART has attracted three very different approaches to the phase processing problem: a fully variational technique, a finite impulse response filter technique [2], and a technique based on a linear programming [3]. These either exist within the toolkit or in another open source package that uses the Py-ART architecture. This presentation will provide an overview of differential phase and specific differential phase observed at C- and S-band frequencies, the signal processing behind the three aforementioned techniques, and some examples of their application. The goal of this presentation is to highlight the importance of open source architectures such as Py-ART for geophysical retrievals. [1] Helmus, J.J. & Collis, S.M., (2016). The Python ARM Radar Toolkit (Py-ART), a Library for Working with Weather Radar Data in the Python Programming Language. JORS. 4(1), p.e25. DOI: http://doi.org/10.5334/jors.119[2] Timothy J. Lang, David A. Ahijevych, Stephen W. Nesbitt, Richard E. Carbone, Steven A. Rutledge, and Robert Cifelli, 2007: Radar

  8. Hail statistics for Germany derived from single-polarization radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puskeiler, Marc; Kunz, Michael; Schmidberger, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Despite the considerable damage potential related to severe hailstorms, knowledge about the local hail probability in Germany is very limited. Constructing a reliable hail probability map is challenging due largely to the lack of direct hail observations. In our study, we suggest a reasonable method by which to estimate hail signals from 3D radar reflectivity measured by conventional single-polarization radars between 2005 and 2011. Evaluating the radar-derived hail days with loss data from a building and an agricultural insurance company confirmed the reliability of the method and the results as expressed, for example, by a Heidke Skill Score HSS of 0.7. Overall, radar-derived hail days demonstrate very high spatial variability, which reflects the local-scale nature of deep moist convection. Nonetheless, systematic patterns related to climatic conditions and orography can also be observed. On the large scale, the number of hail days substantially increases from north to south, which may plausibly be explained by the higher thermal instability in the south. At regional and local scales, several hot spots with elevated hail frequency can be identified, in most cases downstream of the mountains. Several other characteristics including convective energy related to the events identified, differences in track lengths, and seasonal cycles are discussed.

  9. Detection of hail signatures from single-polarization C-band radar reflectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Michael; Kugel, Petra I. S.

    2015-02-01

    Five different criteria that estimate hail signatures from single-polarization radar data are statistically evaluated over a 15-year period by categorical verification against loss data provided by a building insurance company. The criteria consider different levels or thresholds of radar reflectivity, some of them complemented by estimates of the 0 °C level or cloud top temperature. Applied to reflectivity data from a single C-band radar in southwest Germany, it is found that all criteria are able to reproduce most of the past damage-causing hail events. However, the criteria substantially overestimate hail occurrence by up to 80%, mainly due to the verification process using damage data. Best results in terms of highest Heidke Skill Score HSS or Critical Success Index CSI are obtained for the Hail Detection Algorithm (HDA) and the Probability of Severe Hail (POSH). Radar-derived hail probability shows a high spatial variability with a maximum on the lee side of the Black Forest mountains and a minimum in the broad Rhine valley.

  10. Rankin Inlet PolarDARN radar observations of duskward moving Sun-aligned optical forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Koustov

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available On 15 February 2007, several duskward moving sun-aligned (SA auroral forms have been observed by the all-sky camera at Resolute Bay, Nunavut (Canada. Concurrent observations with the Rankin Inlet (RANK PolarDARN HF radar within the field-of-view of the camera showed signatures of moving auroral forms in all signal parameters with the most remarkable effects being the echo power drop and velocity reversal as the arc reached a specific radar beam/gate. Spatial and temporal variations of the velocity in the vicinity of the SA form are investigated. It is shown that the form-associated convection reversal was located poleward (duskward of the global-scale convection reversal associated with the dawn cell of the large-scale convection pattern. Thus, the RANK radar was monitoring the polar cap portion of the global-scale convection pattern and its transition from the IMF By<0 to the By>0 situation. Magnetic perturbations associated with the SA form passing the zenith of several magnetometers are investigated. It is shown that although magnetometer signatures of the moving form were clear, the convection pattern derivation from magnetometer records alone is not straightforward.

  11. Aspect sensitivity measurements of polar mesosphere summer echoes using coherent radar imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. B. Chilson

    Full Text Available The Esrange VHF radar (ESRAD, located in northern Sweden (67.88° N, 21.10° E, has been used to investigate polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE. During July and August of 1998, coherent radar imaging (CRI was used to study the dynamic evolution of PMSE with high temporal and spatial resolution. A CRI analysis provides an estimate of the angular brightness distribution within the radar’s probing volume. The brightness distribution is directly related to the radar reflectivity. Consequently, these data are used to investigate the aspect sensitivity of PMSE. In addition to the CRI analysis, the full correlation analysis (FCA is used to derive estimates of the prevailing three-dimensional wind associated with the observed PMSE. It is shown that regions within the PMSE with enhanced aspect sensitivity have a correspondingly high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR. Although this relationship has been investigated in the past, the present study allows for an estimation of the aspect sensitivity independent of the assumed scattering models and avoids the complications of comparing echo strengths from vertical and off-vertical beams over large horizontal separations, as in the Doppler Beam Swinging (DBS method. Regions of enhanced aspect sensitivity were additionally shown to correlate with the wave-perturbation induced downward motions of air parcels embedded in the PMSE.

    Key words. Ionosphere (polar ionosphere Meteorology and Atmospheric Dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics Radio Science (Interferometry

  12. 雷达极化问题和铁氧体变极化技术%Problem of Radar Polarization and Technique ofFerrite Variable Polarization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋仁培; 苏丽萍

    2001-01-01

    描述了雷达极化问题的基本概念,提出了两类铁氧体全(变)极化器的机制。从理论上解决了这种器件的收发功能,并介绍了它在极化雷达中可实现极化扫描和接收的功能。%In this paper ,a basic conception of the problem on radar polarimetry is described. Two types of ferrite all-variable polarizer and its polarization mechanism are proposed. The polarizer acts as all polarization received/transmitted, it can be used in polarization-scan and polarization-receive technique in polarimetric radar.

  13. Broadband and Broad-angle Polarization-independent Metasurface for Radar Cross Section Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hengyi; Gu, Changqing; Chen, Xinlei; Li, Zhuo; Liu, Liangliang; Xu, Bingzheng; Zhou, Zicheng

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a broadband and broad-angle polarization-independent random coding metasurface structure is proposed for radar cross section (RCS) reduction. An efficient genetic algorithm is utilized to obtain the optimal layout of the unit cells of the metasurface to get a uniform backscattering under normal incidence. Excellent agreement between the simulation and experimental results show that the proposed metasurface structure can significantly reduce the radar cross section more than 10 dB from 17 GHz to 42 GHz when the angle of incident waves varies from 10° to 50°. The proposed coding metasurface provides an efficient scheme to reduce the scattering of the electromagnetic waves.

  14. Analysis on phase information of polarized radar in moni toring vegetation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    T-matrix method was employed to analyze the relation between the co-polarization phase difference of back scattering of vegetation and its geometrical and physical parameters, and the effect from the frequency and the incident angle of radar based on this kind of relation. The results showed that the phase difference is affected by the geometrical parameters (such as the shape, the growth state of watfie and leafage etc.) and the physical parameters (such as the real part and the imaginary part of the dielectric constant etc.) in different ways. In addition, the frequency and the incident angle of radar have heavy effect on the results. All of these are significant in assorting crop and monitoring vegetation.``

  15. Evaluation of Antarctic polar stratospheric clouds data obtained by ground based lidars (at Dome C, McMurdo and Dumont D'Urville) and the satellite based CALIOP lidar system versus a subset of CCMVAL-2 chemistry-climate models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snels, Marcel; Fierli, Federico; de Muro, Mauro; Cagnazzo, Chiara; Cairo, Francesco; Di Liberto, Luca

    2016-04-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds play an important role in the ozone depletion process in polar regions and are thus strongly linked to climate changes. Long term observations are needed to monitor the presence of PSCs and to compare to climate models. The last decades PSCs in Antarctica have been observed by using the CALIOP lidar system on the CALIPSO satellite and by ground based lidars at Dumont D'Urville, McMurdo, Casey, and since 2014 at Dome C. We evaluate the Antarctic PSC observational databases of CALIPSO and the ground-based lidars of NDACC (Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes) located in McMurdo and Dumont D'Urville and Dome C stations and provide a process-oriented evaluation of PSC in a subset of CCMVAL-2 chemistry-climate models. Lidar observatories have a decadal coverage, albeit with discontinuities, spanning from 1992 to today hence offering a unique database. A clear issue is the representativeness of ground-based long-term data series of the Antarctic stratosphere conditions that may limit their value in climatological studies and model evaluation. The comparison with the CALIPSO observations with a global coverage is, hence, a key issue. In turn, models can have a biased representation of the stratospheric conditions and of the PSC microphysics leading to large discrepancies in PSC occurrence and composition. Point-to-point comparison is difficult due to sparseness of the database and to intrinsic differences in spatial distribution between models and observations. However, a statistical analysis of PSC observations shows a satisfactory agreement between ground-based and satellite borne-lidar. The differences may be attributed to averaging processes for data with a bad signal to noise ratio, which tends to smear out the values of the optical parameters. Data from some Chemistry Climate models (CCMs) having provided PSC surface areas on daily basis have been evaluated using the same diagnostic type that may be derived CALIPSO (i

  16. First Measurements of Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes by a Tri-static Radar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Hoz, C.

    2015-12-01

    Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) have been observed for the first time by a tri-static radar system comprising the EISCAT VHF (224 MHz, 0.67 m Bragg wavelength) active radar in Tromso (Norway) and passive receiving stations in Kiruna, (Sweden) and Sodankyla (Finland). The antennas at the receiving stations, originally part of the EISCAT tri-static UHF radar system at 930 MHz, have been refitted with new feeder systems at the VHF frequency of the transmitter in Tromso. The refitted radar system opens new opportunities to study PMSE for its own sake and as a tracer of the dynamics of the polar mesosphere, a region that is difficult to investigate by other means. The measurements show that very frequently both remote receiving antennas detect coherent signals that are much greater than the regular incoherent scattering due to thermal electrons and coinciding in time and space with PMSE measured by the transmitter station in Tromso. This represents further evidence that PMSE is not aspect sensitive, as was already indicated by a less sensitive radar system in a bi-static configuration, and implying that the underlying atmospheric turbulence, at least at sub-meter scales, is isotropic in agreement with Kolmogorov's hypothesis. Measurements also show that the vertical rate of fall of persistent features of PMSE is the same as the vertical line of sight velocity inferred from the doppler shift of the PMSE signals. This equivalence forms the basis for using PMSE as a tracer of the dynamics of the background mesosphere. Thus, it is possible to measure the 3-dimensional velocity field in the PMSE layer over the intersection volume of the three antennas. Since the signals have large signal-to-noise ratios (up to 30 dB), the inferred velocities have high accuracies and good time resolutions. This affords the possibility to make estimates of momentum flux in the mesosphere deposited by overturning gravity waves. Gravity wave momentum flux is believed to be the engine of a

  17. Meteor head echo polarization at 930 MHz studied with the EISCAT UHF HPLA radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wannberg

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The polarization characteristics of 930-MHz meteor head echoes have been studied for the first time, using data obtained in a series of radar measurements carried out with the tristatic EISCAT UHF high power, large aperture (HPLA radar system in October 2009. An analysis of 44 tri-static head echo events shows that the polarization of the echo signal recorded by the Kiruna receiver often fluctuates strongly on time scales of tens of microseconds, illustrating that the scattering process is essentially stochastic. On longer timescales (> milliseconds, more than 90 % of the recorded events show an average polarization signature that is independent of meteor direction of arrival and echo strength and equal to that of an incoherent-scatter return from underdense plasma filling the tristatic observation volume. This shows that the head echo plasma targets scatter isotropically, which in turn implies that they are much smaller than the 33-cm wavelength and close to spherically symmetric, in very good agreement with results from a previous EISCAT UHF study of the head echo RCS/meteor angle-of-incidence relationship.

    Significant polarization is present in only three events with unique target trajectories. These all show a larger effective target cross section transverse to the trajectory than parallel to it. We propose that the observed polarization may be a signature of a transverse charge separation plasma resonance in the region immediately behind the meteor head, similar to the resonance effects previously discussed in connection with meteor trail echoes by Herlofson, Billam and Browne, Jones and Jones and others.

  18. Exploring single polarization X-band weather radar potentials for local meteorological and hydrological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Conti, Francesco; Francipane, Antonio; Pumo, Dario; Noto, Leonardo V.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential use of a low-cost single polarization X-band weather radar, verified by a disdrometer and a dense rain gauge network, installed as a supporting tool for hydrological applications and for monitoring the urban area of Palermo (Italy). Moreover, this study focuses on studying the temporal variability of the Z-R relation for Mediterranean areas. The radar device is provided with an automatic operational ground-clutter filter developed by the producer. Attention has been paid to the development of blending procedures between radar measurements and other auxiliary instruments and to their suitability for both meteorological and hydrological applications. A general scheme enveloping these procedures and achieving the combination of data retrieved from the weather radar, the optical disdrometer, and the rain gauge network distributed within the monitored area has been designed. The first step of the procedure consists in the calibration of the radar equation by comparing the match between the radar raw data and the disdrometer reflectivity. The second step is the calibration of the Z-R relationship based on the retrieval of parameters that optimize the transformation of disdrometer reflectivity into rainfall intensity, starting from the disdrometer rainfall intensity measurements. The Z-R calibration has been applied to the disdrometer measurements retrieved during a 1 year observation period, after a preliminary segmentation into separated rainfall events. This analysis allows for the characterization of the variability of the Z-R relationship from event to event, deriving some considerations about its predictability as well. Results obtained from this analysis provide a geographical specific record, for the Mediterranean area, for the study of the spatial variability of the Z-R relationship. Finally, the set of operational procedures also includes a correction procedure of radar estimates based on rain gauge data. Each

  19. A Dual-polarized Microstrip Subarray Antenna for an Inflatable L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzki, Mark; Huang, John

    1999-01-01

    Inflatable technology has been identified as a potential solution to the problem of achieving small mass, high packaging efficiency, and reliable deployment for future NASA spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) antennas. Presently, there exists a requirement for a dual-polarized L-band SAR antenna with an aperture size of 10m x 3m, a center frequency of 1.25GHz, a bandwidth of 80MHz, electronic beam scanning, and a mass of less than 100kg. The work presented below is part of the ongoing effort to develop such an inflatable antenna array.

  20. Geometric considerations of polar mesospheric summer echoes in tilted beams using coherent radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, S.; Stober, G.; Chau, J. L.; Latteck, R.

    2014-11-01

    We present observations of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) using the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System in Northern Norway (69.30° N, 16.04° E). The radar is able to resolve PMSE at high spatial and temporal resolution and to perform pulse-to-pulse beam steering. In this experiment, 81 oblique beam directions were used with off-zenith angles up to 25°. For each beam pointing direction and range gate, coherent radar imaging was applied to determine the mean backscatter location. The location of the mean scatterer in the beam volume was calculated by the deviation from the nominal off-zenith angle of the brightest pixel. It shows that in tilted beams with an off-zenith angle greater than 5°, structures appear at the altitudinal edges of the PMSE layer. Our results indicate that the mean influence of the location of the maximum depends on the tilt of the beam and on the observed area of the PMSE layer. At the upper/lower edge of the PMSE layer, the mean backscatter has a greater/smaller off-zenith angle than the nominal off-zenith angle. This effect intensifies with greater off-zenith beam pointing direction, so the beam filling factor plays an important role in the observation of PMSE layers for oblique beams.

  1. Diversity on subtropical and polar cirrus clouds properties as derived from both ground-based lidars and CALIPSO/CALIOP measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba-Jabonero, Carmen; Lopes, Fabio J. S.; Landulfo, Eduardo; Cuevas, Emilio; Ochoa, Héctor; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Cirrus (Ci) cloud properties can change significantly from place to place over the globe as a result of weather processes, reflecting their likely different radiative and climate implications. In this work Cirrus clouds (Ci) features observed in late autumn/early winter season at both subtropical and polar latitudes are examined and compared to CALIPSO/CALIOP observations. Lidar measurements were carried out in three stations: São Paulo (MSP, Brazil) and Tenerife (SCO, Canary Islands, Spain), as subtropical sites, and the polar Belgrano II base (BEL, Argentina) in the Antarctic continent. The backscattering ratio (BSR) profiles and the top and base heights of the Ci layers together to their Cirrus Cloud Optical Depth (CCOD) and Lidar Ratio (LR) for Ci clouds were derived. In addition, temperatures at the top and base boundaries of the Ci clouds were also obtained from local radiosoundings to verify pure ice Ci clouds occurrence using a given temperature top threshold ( 70 km far), inferring the irregular extension and inhomogeneity of the Ci clouds over each study area. These considerations can be useful for assimilation of the Ci features into climate models and evaluation of future space-borne lidar observations of Ci clouds, especially for the future ESA/Copernicus-Sentinel and ESA/EarthCARE missions.

  2. Multi-radar observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes during the PHOCUS campaign on 20-22 July 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belova, E.; Kirkwood, S.; Latteck, R.; Zecha, M.; Pinedo, H.; Hedin, J.; Gumbel, J.

    2014-10-01

    During the PHOCUS rocket campaign, on 20-22 July 2011, the observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) were made by three mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere radars, operating at about 50 MHz. One radar, ESRAD is located at Esrange in Sweden, where the rocket was launched, two other radars, MAARSY and MORRO, are located 250 km north-west and 200 km north of the ESRAD, respectively, on the other side of the Scandinavian mountain ridge. We compared PMSE as measured by these three radars in terms of their strength, spectral width and wave modulation. Time-altitude maps of PMSE strength look very similar for all three radars. Cross-correlations with maximum values 0.5-0.6 were found between the signal powers over the three days of observations for each pair of radars. By using cross-spectrum analysis of PMSE signals, we show that some waves with periods of a few hours were observed by all three radars. Unlike the strengths, simultaneous values of PMSE spectral width, which is related to turbulence, sometimes differ significantly between the radars. For interpretation of the results we suggested that large-scale fields of neutral temperature, ice particles and electron density, which are more or less uniform over 150-250 km horizontal extent were ‘modulated’ by waves and smaller patches of turbulence.

  3. First complete regional view of the Pensacola-Pole Basin from PolarGAP radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Tom; Ferraccioli, Fausto; Corr, Hugh; Forsberg, René; Matsuoka, Kenichi; Olesen, Arne; Seddon, Sam; Casal, Tania

    2017-04-01

    The broad region around South Pole, including the Support Force Ice Stream, is one of the most poorly understood on our planet. Critically, uncertainties in bedrock elevation of over a kilometre in this area have been shown to generate variations in modelled volumes of ice loss under warmer climatic scenarios equivalent to 1.68 m global sea level change. During the 2015-16 field season the European Space Agency PolarGAP project collected 38,000 km of new integrated aerogeophysical data across this region. The focus of this successful survey was collecting airborne gravity data to fill the southern polar gap in satellite gravity coverage required for global geoid models. Coincident airborne radar, aeromagnetic and airborne Lidar data will make a significant additional contribution to understanding this critical, but poorly understood region. Here we present the first compilation of the airborne radar data from the PolarGAP survey. To assess the impact of sub-ice topography on ice flow we compare the new bedrock topography with satellite measurements of ice flow velocity. We show that the upstream part of the Support Force Ice Stream flows within the 150 km wide Pensacola Pole Basin, which is generally 650 m below sea level and extends from the coast to South Pole. The fastest ice flow is offset from a 25 km wide over-deepened axial trough, up to 1800 m below sea level. Our data broadly supports the patterns of bed roughness and internal layer deformation identified by previous authors, with presently enhanced ice flow linked to smooth bed and buckled ice sheet internal layers. Upstream of South Pole limited internal layer deformation suggests that the observed smooth bed morphology is a relict feature. Together our new dataset provides both new constraints for ice sheet models and gives new information about the evolution of the East Antarctic Ice sheet in this previously un-explored region.

  4. CfRadial - CF NetCDF for Radar and Lidar Data in Polar Coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, M. J.; Lee, W. C.; Michelson, D.; Curtis, M.

    2016-12-01

    Since 1990, NCAR has supported over 20 different data formats for radar and lidar data in polar coordinates. Researchers, students and operational users spend unnecessary time handling a multitude of unique formats. CfRadial grew out of the need to simplify the use of these data and thereby to improve efficiency in research and operations. CfRadial adopts the well-known NetCDF framework, along with the Climate and Forecasting (CF) conventions such that data and metadata are accurately represented. Mobile platforms are also supported. The first major release, CfRadial version 1.1, occurred in February 2011, followed by minor updates. CfRadial has been adopted by NCAR as well as other agencies in the US and the UK. CfRadial development was boosted in 2015 through a two-year NSF EarthCube grant to improve CF in general. Version 1.4 was agreed upon in May 2016, adding explicit support for quality control fields and spectra. In Europe and Australia, EUMETNET OPERA's HDF5-based ODIM_H5 standard has been rapidly embraced as the modern standard for exchanging weather radar data for operations. ODIM_H5 exploits data groups, hierarchies, and built-in compression, characteristics that have been added to NetCDF4. A meeting of the WMO Task Team on Weather Radar Data Exchange (TT-WRDE) was held at NCAR in Boulder in July 2016, with a goal of identifying a single global standard for radar and lidar data in polar coordinates. CfRadial and ODIM_H5 were considered alongside the older and more rigid table-driven WMO BUFR and GRIB2 formats. TT-WRDE recommended that CfRadial 1.4 be merged with the sweep-oriented structure of ODIM_H5, making use of NetCDF groups, to produce a single format that will encompass the best ideas of both formats. That has led to the emergence of the CfRadial 2.0 standard. This format should meet the objectives of both the NSF EarthCube CF 2.0 initiative and the WMO TT-WRDE. It has the added benefit of improving data exchange between operational and research

  5. Detection of Ground Clutter from Weather Radar Using a Dual-Polarization and Dual-Scan Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Hossein Golbon-Haghighi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel dual-polarization and dual-scan (DPDS classification algorithm is developed for clutter detection in weather radar observations. Two consecutive scans of dual-polarization radar echoes are jointly processed to estimate auto- and cross-correlation functions. Discriminants are then defined and estimated in order to separate clutter from weather based on their physical and statistical properties. An optimal Bayesian classifier is used to make a decision on clutter presence from the estimated discriminant functions. The DPDS algorithm is applied to the data collected with the KOUN polarimetric radar and compared with the existing detection methods. It is shown that the DPDS algorithm yields a higher probability of detection and lower false alarm rate in clutter detection.

  6. PCN magnetic index and average convection velocity in the polar cap inferred from SuperDARN radar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, R. A. D.; Koustov, A. V.; Boteler, D.; Makarevich, R. A.

    2009-07-01

    The relationship between the polar cap north (PCN) magnetic index and the average convection velocity of the plasma flow across the polar cap is investigated using data from both the Rankin Inlet (RKN) polar cap Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radar and the entire SuperDARN network. Correlation between the PCN index and the average velocity, determined from the median RKN line of sight (LOS) velocity, maximizes near magnetic noon and midnight when the radar field of view is roughly aligned with the noon-midnight meridian. For observations between 1000 and 1100 MLT, a roughly linear increase of the average velocity was found for a PCN index between 0 and 2, but the rate of increase is ˜2 times faster than in previous publications in which the average velocity was estimated from DMSP ion drift measurements. Comparisons between the PCN index with the cross-polar cap velocity estimated from (1) SuperDARN convection maps and (2) median RKN LOS velocities show similar trends. Both the average cross-polar cap velocity (estimated by two methods) and the cross-polar cap potential show a tendency for saturation at PCN > 2. No significant seasonal change in the nature of the relationships was found.

  7. First Measurements of Aspect Sensitivity of Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes by a Bistatic Radar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Hoz, C.; Pinedo, H.; Havnes, O.; Kosch, M. J.; Senior, A.; Rietveld, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) have been observed for the first time by a bistatic radar system comprising the EISCAT VHF (224 MHz) active radar in Tromso (Norway) and the receiving EISCAT_3D demonstrator array located in Kiruna, (Sweden). The receiving system is 234 km southeast from the transmitting radar and its line of sight to the mesosphere above Tromso has an elevation angle of 21 degrees implying an aspect angle of the scattered signals in that direction of 69 degrees. This is the first time that a truly bistatic configuration has been employed to measure the angle dependence of the scattering mechanism of PMSE which otherwise has been measured only in monostatic configurations. The bistatic configuration is unencumbered by drawbacks of the monostatic configuration that cannot reach angles greater than about 20 degrees due to antenna beam pattern degradation and the use of models to extrapolate the angle dependence of the scattered signals. Strong scattering was observed over prolonged periods on several days by the demonstrator array in July of 2011. These measurements are at variance with previous aspect angle measurements that have reported aspect angles no greater than about 15 degrees. These results indicate that the turbulent irregularities that produce the scattering have a high degree of isotropy, which is more in line with Kolmogorov's hypothesis of a universal scaling of turbulence based on the assumption of homogeneity and isotropy in the inertial regime of turbulence which applies also to the Batchelor regime (due to large Schmidt numbers) believed to be the case for PMSE.

  8. Evidence of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes Observed by SuperDARN SANAE HF Radar in Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olakunle Ogunjobi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE occurrence probability over SANAE (South African National Antarctic Expedition IV, for the first time. A matching coincidence method is described and implemented for PMSE extraction from SuperDARN (Super Dual Auroral Radar Network HF radar. Several SuperDARN-PMSE characteristics are studied during the summer period from years 2005 - 2007. The seasonal and interannual SuperDARN-PMSE variations in relation to the mesospheric neutral winds are studied and presented in this paper. The occurrence probability of SuperDARN-PMSE on the day-to-day scale show, predominantly, diurnal variation, with a broader peak between 12 - 14 LT and distinct minimum of 22 LT. The SuperDARN-PMSE occurrence probability rate is high in the summer solstice. Seasonal variations show a connection between the SuperDARN-PMSE occurrence probability rate and mesospheric temperature from SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry. The seasonal trend for both meridional and zonal winds is very stable year-to-year. Analysis of the neutral wind variations indicates the importance of pole-to-pole circulations in SuperDARN-PMSE generation.

  9. Cross-polarization borehole radar system with a RF analog optical transmission link. Hikaridenso ni yoru chokko henpa bore hole radar keisoku system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miwa, T.; Sato, M.; Niitsuma, H. (Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1994-05-01

    The cross-polarization borehole radar system (BRS) was reported. The RF analogue optical transmission system (using the optical fiber cable) was introduced into the signal transmission between the sonde and the surface station to broaden the band and to heighten the S/N ratio. The sonde consisted of cable head (to transmit the trigger signal), receiving antenna, and transmitting antenna. The transmitting antenna was excited by the trigger signal from the surface to generate the pulse by the pulse generator. The signal received by the receiving antenna was sent to the oscilloscope on the surface. The field test of cross-polarization borehole system revealed that the effect of noise associated with the BRS employing the eccentric cable did not appear on the BRS. Examples of field test of the cross-polarization borehole measurement system employing the BRS were described. 4 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Validation of attenuation, beam blockage, and calibration estimation methods using two dual polarization X band weather radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederich, M.; Ryzhkov, A.; Simmer, C.; Mühlbauer, K.

    2011-12-01

    The amplitude a of radar wave reflected by meteorological targets can be misjudged due to several factors. At X band wavelength, attenuation of the radar beam by hydro meteors reduces the signal strength enough to be a significant source of error for quantitative precipitation estimation. Depending on the surrounding orography, the radar beam may be partially blocked when scanning at low elevation angles, and the knowledge of the exact amount of signal loss through beam blockage becomes necessary. The phase shift between the radar signals at horizontal and vertical polarizations is affected by the hydrometeors that the beam travels through, but remains unaffected by variations in signal strength. This has allowed for several ways of compensating for the attenuation of the signal, and for consistency checks between these variables. In this study, we make use of several weather radars and gauge network measuring in the same area to examine the effectiveness of several methods of attenuation and beam blockage corrections. The methods include consistency checks of radar reflectivity and specific differential phase, calculation of beam blockage using a topography map, estimating attenuation using differential propagation phase, and the ZPHI method proposed by Testud et al. in 2000. Results show the high effectiveness of differential phase in estimating attenuation, and potential of the ZPHI method to compensate attenuation, beam blockage, and calibration errors.

  11. Observation of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes using the northernmost MST radar at Eureka (80°N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarnalingam, N.; Hocking, W.; Janches, D.; Drummond, J.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate long-term Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSEs) observations conducted by the northernmost geographically located MST radar at Eureka (80°N, 86°W). While PMSEs are a well recognized summer phenomenon in the polar regions, previous calibrated studies at Resolute Bay and Eureka using 51.5 MHz and 33 MHz radars respectively, showed that PMSE backscatter signal strengths are relatively weak in the polar cap sites, compared to the auroral zone sites (Swarnalingam et al., 2009b; Singer et al., 2010). Complications arise with PMSEs in which the echo strength is controlled by the electrons, which are, in turn, influenced by heavily charged ice particles as well as the variability in the D-region plasma. In recent years, PMSE experiments were conducted inside the polar cap utilizing a 51 MHz radar located at Eureka. In this paper, we investigate calibrated observations, conducted during 2009-2015. Seasonal and diurnal variations of the backscatter signal strengths are discussed and compared to previously published results from the ALOMAR radar, which is a radar of similar design located in the auroral zone at Andenes, Norway (69°N, 16°E). At Eureka, while PMSEs are present with a daily occurrence rate which is comparable to the rate observed at the auroral zone site for at least two seasons, they show a great level of inter-annual variability. The occurrence rate for the strong echoes tends to be low. Furthermore, comparison of the absolute backscatter signal strengths at these two sites clearly indicates that the PMSE backscatter signal strength at Eureka is weak. Although this difference could be caused by several factors, we investigate the intensity of the neutral air turbulence at Eureka from the measurements of the Doppler spectrum of the PMSE backscatter signals. We found that the level of the turbulence intensity at Eureka is weak relative to previously reported results from three high latitude sites.

  12. Coupling X-band dual-polarized mini-radars and hydro-meteorological forecast models: the HYDRORAD project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picciotti, E.; Marzano, F. S.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Kalogiros, J.; Fessas, Y.; Volpi, A.; Cazac, V.; Pace, R.; Cinque, G.; Bernardini, L.; De Sanctis, K.; Di Fabio, S.; Montopoli, M.; Anagnostou, M. N.; Telleschi, A.; Dimitriou, E.; Stella, J.

    2013-05-01

    Hydro-meteorological hazards like convective outbreaks leading to torrential rain and floods are among the most critical environmental issues world-wide. In that context weather radar observations have proven to be very useful in providing information on the spatial distribution of rainfall that can support early warning of floods. However, quantitative precipitation estimation by radar is subjected to many limitations and uncertainties. The use of dual-polarization at high frequency (i.e. X-band) has proven particularly useful for mitigating some of the limitation of operational systems, by exploiting the benefit of easiness to transport and deploy and the high spatial and temporal resolution achievable at small antenna sizes. New developments on X-band dual-polarization technology in recent years have received the interest of scientific and operational communities in these systems. New enterprises are focusing on the advancement of cost-efficient mini-radar network technology, based on high-frequency (mainly X-band) and low-power weather radar systems for weather monitoring and hydro-meteorological forecasting. Within the above context, the main objective of the HYDRORAD project was the development of an innovative integrated decision support tool for weather monitoring and hydro-meteorological applications. The integrated system tool is based on a polarimetric X-band mini-radar network which is the core of the decision support tool, a novel radar products generator and a hydro-meteorological forecast modelling system that ingests mini-radar rainfall products to forecast precipitation and floods. The radar products generator includes algorithms for attenuation correction, hydrometeor classification, a vertical profile reflectivity correction, a new polarimetric rainfall estimators developed for mini-radar observations, and short-term nowcasting of convective cells. The hydro-meteorological modelling system includes the Mesoscale Model 5 (MM5) and the Army Corps

  13. Coupling X-band dual-polarized mini-radars and hydro-meteorological forecast models: the HYDRORAD project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Picciotti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydro-meteorological hazards like convective outbreaks leading to torrential rain and floods are among the most critical environmental issues world-wide. In that context weather radar observations have proven to be very useful in providing information on the spatial distribution of rainfall that can support early warning of floods. However, quantitative precipitation estimation by radar is subjected to many limitations and uncertainties. The use of dual-polarization at high frequency (i.e. X-band has proven particularly useful for mitigating some of the limitation of operational systems, by exploiting the benefit of easiness to transport and deploy and the high spatial and temporal resolution achievable at small antenna sizes. New developments on X-band dual-polarization technology in recent years have received the interest of scientific and operational communities in these systems. New enterprises are focusing on the advancement of cost-efficient mini-radar network technology, based on high-frequency (mainly X-band and low-power weather radar systems for weather monitoring and hydro-meteorological forecasting. Within the above context, the main objective of the HYDRORAD project was the development of an innovative mbox{integrated} decision support tool for weather monitoring and hydro-meteorological applications. The integrated system tool is based on a polarimetric X-band mini-radar network which is the core of the decision support tool, a novel radar products generator and a hydro-meteorological forecast modelling system that ingests mini-radar rainfall products to forecast precipitation and floods. The radar products generator includes algorithms for attenuation correction, hydrometeor classification, a vertical profile reflectivity correction, a new polarimetric rainfall estimators developed for mini-radar observations, and short-term nowcasting of convective cells. The hydro-meteorological modelling system includes the Mesoscale Model 5

  14. Effect of Beam Scanning on Target Polarization Scattering Matrix Observed by Fully Polarimetric Phased-array Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Mianquan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The polarization feature of a fully Polarimetric Phased-Array Radar (PPAR antenna varies according to the beam-scanning angle, thereby introducing two problems on the target Polarization Scattering Matrix (PSM measurement. First, the antenna polarization basis is defined within the vertical cross-section of an electromagnetic wave propagation direction, and the polarization basis of each beam direction angle is not identical, resulting in the PSM of a fixed-posture target observed by PPAR being not identical for different beam-scanning angles. Second, the cross polarization of the PPAR antenna increases with increasing beamscanning angle, resulting in a crosstalk among the elements of PSM observed by PPAR. This study focuses on the analysis of the abovementioned two aspects of the effect of beam scanning on target PSM observed by PPAR. The results will establish a more accurate observation of the equation for the precision PSM measurement of PPAR.

  15. Sea-ice deformation state from synthetic aperture radar imagery - Part I: comparison of C- and L-band and different polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dierking, Wolfgang; Dall, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present a quantitative comparison of L- and C-band airborne synthetic aperture radar imagery acquired at like- and cross-polarizations over deformed sea ice under winter conditions. The parameters characterizing the deformation state of the ice are determined at both radar bands...... and at different polarizations. The separation of deformed and level ice is based on a target detection technique. The threshold is set such that image pixels with intensities equal to or larger than the highest 2% of the level-ice intensity distribution are classified as deformed ice, independent of the radar...... are very sensitive to the radar frequency. Aeral fractions are larger, and average distances are smaller at L-band than at C-band because of the much higher intensity contrast between the deformed and level ice at L-band. The differences between polarizations at one radar band are smaller but not always...

  16. Solution uniquity of an inverse VLF problem: A case-study of the polar, ground-based, VLF radio signal disturbances caused by the ultra-energetic relativistic electron precipitations and of their southern boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remenets, G. F.; Astafiev, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    Here we present the results of a case study of the rare, abnormal, qualitatively specific behavior of Aldra (northern Norway) and GBR (UK) VLF transmitter signals (10-16 kHz) received at Kola Peninsula. The abnormal amplitude and the phase disturbances of signals were used as a proxy for ultra-energetic relativistic (solar?) electron precipitation (URE, ∼100 MeV) into the middle polar atmosphere. The disturbances have been observed under quiet or moderately disturbed geomagnetic activity. Based on bearing results, it was established that the abnormal variations of the electric conductivity of ionized middle atmosphere (of a sporadic Ds layer under the regular ionosphere D layer) were characterized by the following: (i) the time function of height h(t) of an effective spherical waveguide between the Earth surface and the sporadic Ds layer shows a minimum value equal to ∼30 km and (ii) the reflection coefficient R(t) of radio wave with a grazing angle of incidence from a virtual boundary with height h(t) has a minimum value equal to ∼0.4. The southern boundaries of the ultra-energetic relativistic electron precipitations have been found as well. They turned out to be not southerly than 61 degree of magnetic latitude and similar to the ones obtained in our previous study of the events for other dates under the similar geophysical conditions although we do not know anything definite about the rigidity and density of the electron fluxes. A used calculation method of analysis is based on a necessary condition that a number n of input data should be greater than a number m of output parameter-functions. We have stated by numerical testing that a decrease of n from 6 to 4 generates a lack of uniqueness of an inverse VLF problem solution for m = 2. It is important for future VLF ground-based monitoring of the URE precipitation events.

  17. A Dual Polarization, Active, Microstrip Antenna for an Orbital Imaging Radar System Operating at L-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kenneth C.; Huang, John

    2000-01-01

    A highly successful Earth orbiting synthetic antenna aperture radar (SAR) system, known as the SIR-C mission, was carried into orbit in 1994 on a U.S. Shuttle (Space Transportation System) mission. The radar system was mounted in the cargo bay with no need to fold, or in any other way reduce the size of the antennas for launch. Weight and size were not limited for the L-Band, C-Band, and X-Band radar systems of the SIR-C radar imaging mission; the set of antennas weighed 10,500 kg, the L-Band antenna having the major share of the weight. This paper treats designing an L-Band antenna functionally similar to that used for SIR-C, but at a fraction of the cost and at a weight in the order of 250 kg. Further, the antenna must be folded to fit into the small payload shroud of low cost booster rocket systems. Over 31 square meters of antenna area is required. This low weight, foldable, electronic scanning antenna is for the proposed LightSAR radar system which is to be placed in Earth orbit on a small, dedicated space craft at the lowest possible cost for an efficient L- Band radar imaging system. This LightSAR spacecraft radar is to be continuously available for at least five operational years, and have the ability to map or repeat-map any area on earth within a few days of any request. A microstrip patch array, with microstrip transmission lines heavily employed in the aperture and in the corporate feed network, was chosen as the low cost approach for this active dual-polarization, 80 MHz (6.4%) bandwidth antenna design.

  18. Soil moisture retrieval using ground based bistatic scatterometer data at X-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Dileep Kumar; Prasad, Rajendra; Kumar, Pradeep; Vishwakarma, Ajeet Kumar

    2017-02-01

    Several hydrological phenomenon and applications need high quality soil moisture information of the top Earth surface. The advent of technologies like bistatic scatterometer can retrieve soil moisture information with high accuracy and hence used in present study. The radar data is acquired by specially designed ground based bistatic scatterometer system in the specular direction of 20-70° incidence angles at steps of 5° for HH and VV polarizations. This study provides first time comprehensive evaluation of different machine learning algorithms for the retrieval of soil moisture using the X-band bistatic scatterometer measurements. The comparison of different artificial neural network (ANN) models such as back propagation artificial neural network (BPANN), radial basis function artificial neural network (RBFANN), generalized regression artificial neural network (GRANN) along with linear regression model (LRM) are used to estimate the soil moisture. The performance indices such as %Bias, Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) and Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) are used to evaluate the performances of the machine learning techniques. Among different models employed in this study, the BPANN is found to have marginally higher performance in case of HH polarization while RBFANN is found suitable with VV polarization followed by GRANN and LRM. The results obtained are of considerable scientific and practical value to the wider scientific community for the number of practical applications and research studies in which radar datasets are used.

  19. Aspect sensitivity of polar mesosphere summer echoes based on ESRAD MST radar measurements in Kiruna, Sweden in 1997–2010

    OpenAIRE

    Smirnova, M.; E. Belova; S. Kirkwood

    2012-01-01

    Aspect sensitivities of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) measured with the ESRAD 50 MHz radar in 1997–2010 are studied using the full correlation analysis technique. Half of PMSE detected each year are found to be highly aspect sensitive. Yearly median values of the aspect sensitivity parameter θs, characterising the half-width of the scatterers' polar diagram, are 2.9–3.7° depending on the year. The other half of the PMSE have θ...

  20. Evidence for water ice on the moon: Results for anomalous polar craters from the LRO Mini-RF imaging radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spudis, P. D.; Bussey, D. B. J.; Baloga, S. M.; Cahill, J. T. S.; Glaze, L. S.; Patterson, G. W.; Raney, R. K.; Thompson, T. W.; Thomson, B. J.; Ustinov, E. A.

    2013-10-01

    The Mini-RF radar instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft mapped both lunar poles in two different RF wavelengths (complete mapping at 12.6 cm S-band and partial mapping at 4.2 cm X-band) in two look directions, removing much of the ambiguity of previous Earth- and spacecraft-based radar mapping of the Moon's polar regions. The poles are typical highland terrain, showing expected values of radar cross section (albedo) and circular polarization ratio (CPR). Most fresh craters display high values of CPR in and outside the crater rim; the pattern of these CPR distributions is consistent with high levels of wavelength-scale surface roughness associated with the presence of block fields, impact melt flows, and fallback breccia. A different class of polar crater exhibits high CPR only in their interiors, interiors that are both permanently dark and very cold (less than 100 K). Application of scattering models developed previously suggests that these anomalously high-CPR deposits exhibit behavior consistent with the presence of water ice. If this interpretation is correct, then both poles may contain several hundred million tons of water in the form of relatively "clean" ice, all within the upper couple of meters of the lunar surface. The existence of significant water ice deposits enables both long-term human habitation of the Moon and the creation of a permanent cislunar space transportation system based upon the harvest and use of lunar propellant.

  1. Evidence for Water Ie on the Moon: Results for Anomalous Polar Craters from the LRO Mini-RF Imaging Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spudis, P.D.; Bussey, D. B. J.; Baloga, S. M.; Cahill, J. T. S.; Glaze, L. S.; Patterson, G. W.; Raney, R. K.; Thompson, T. W.; Thomson, B. J.; Ustinov, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    The Mini-RF radar instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft mapped both lunar poles in two different RF wavelengths (complete mapping at 12.6 cm S-band and partial mapping at 4.2 cm X-band) in two look directions, removing much of the ambiguity of previous Earth- and spacecraft-based radar mapping of the Moon's polar regions. The poles are typical highland terrain, showing expected values of radar cross section (albedo) and circular polarization ratio (CPR). Most fresh craters display high values of CPR in and outside the crater rim; the pattern of these CPR distributions is consistent with high levels of wavelength-scale surface roughness associated with the presence of block fields, impact melt flows, and fallback breccia. A different class of polar crater exhibits high CPR only in their interiors, interiors that are both permanently dark and very cold (less than 100 K). Application of scattering models developed previously suggests that these anomalously high-CPR deposits exhibit behavior consistent with the presence of water ice. If this interpretation is correct, then both poles may contain several hundred million tons of water in the form of relatively "clean" ice, all within the upper couple of meters of the lunar surface. The existence of significant water ice deposits enables both long-term human habitation of the Moon and the creation of a permanent cislunar space transportation system based upon the harvest and use of lunar propellant.

  2. Evidence for Water Ice on the Moon: Results for Anomalous Polar Craters from the LRO Mini-RF Imaging Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spudis, P. D.; Bussey, D. B. J.; Baloga, S. M.; Cahill, J. T. S.; Glaze, L. S.; Patterson, G. W.; Raney, R. K.; Thompson, T. W.; Thomson, B. J.; Ustinov, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    The Mini-RF radar instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft mapped both lunar poles in two different RF wavelengths (complete mapping at 12.6 cm S-band and partial mapping at 4.2 cm X-band) in two look directions, removing much of the ambiguity of previous Earth- and spacecraft-based radar mapping of the Moon's polar regions. The poles are typical highland terrain, showing expected values of radar cross section (albedo) and circular polarization ratio (CPR). Most fresh craters display high values of CPR in and outside the crater rim; the pattern of these CPR distributions is consistent with high levels of wavelength-scale surface roughness associated with the presence of block fields, impact melt flows, and fallback breccia. A different class of polar crater exhibits high CPR only in their interiors, interiors that are both permanently dark and very cold (less than 100 K). Application of scattering models developed previously suggests that these anomalously high-CPR deposits exhibit behavior consistent with the presence of water ice. If this interpretation is correct, then both poles may contain several hundred million tons of water in the form of relatively "clean" ice, all within the upper couple of meters of the lunar surface. The existence of significant water ice deposits enables both long-term human habitation of the Moon and the creation of a permanent cislunar space transportation system based upon the harvest and use of lunar propellant.

  3. A comparison of overshoot modelling with observations of polar mesospheric summer echoes at radar frequencies of 56 and 224 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havnes, O.; Pinedo, H.; La Hoz, C.; Senior, A.; Hartquist, T. W.; Rietveld, M. T.; Kosch, M. J.

    2015-06-01

    We have compared radar observations of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSEs) modulated by artificial electron heating, at frequencies of 224 MHz (EISCAT VHF) and 56 MHz (MORRO). We have concentrated on 1 day of observation, lasting ~ 3.8 h. The MORRO radar, with its much wider beam, observes one or more PMSE layers all the time while the VHF radar observes PMSEs in 69% of the time. Statistically there is a clear difference between how the MORRO and the VHF radar backscatter reacts to the heater cycling (48 s heater on and 168 s heater off). While MORRO often reacts by having its backscatter level increased when the heater is switched on, as predicted by Scales and Chen (2008), the VHF radar nearly always sees the "normal" VHF overshoot behaviour with an initial rapid reduction of backscatter. However, in some heater cycles we do see a substantial recovery of the VHF backscatter after its initial reduction to levels several times above that just before the heater was switched on. For the MORRO radar a recovery during the heater-on phase is much more common. The reaction when the heater was switched off was a clear overshoot for nearly all VHF cases but less so for MORRO. A comparison of individual curves for the backscatter values as a function of time shows, at least for this particular day, that in high layers above ~ 85 km height, both radars see a reduction of the backscatter as the heater is switched on, with little recovery during the heater-on time. These variations are well described by present models. On the other hand, the backscatter in low layers at 81-82 km can be quite different, with modest or no reduction in backscatter as the heater is switched on, followed by a strong recovery for both radars to levels several times above that of the undisturbed PMSEs. This simultaneous, nearly identical behaviour at the two very different radar frequencies is not well described by present modelling.

  4. Early geomorphological evolution of the North Polar Layered Deposits, Mars, from SHARAD radar-facies mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerozzi, Stefano; Holt, John W.

    2014-05-01

    The north polar layered deposits (NPLD) are the largest accumulation of water ice in the northern hemisphere of Mars. Since their discovery, they are thought to hold a valuable record of recent climate change within their stratigraphy (Murray et al., Icarus, 1972; Cutts, JGR, 1973b), yet little is known about their age and accumulation history. Due to exposures in trough walls, detailed stratigraphy of the uppermost layers and their evolution have been studied extensively since the first Mariner 9 images of the NPLD (e.g. Soderblom et al., JGR, 1973). However, large portions of the polar cap are still unmapped and no detailed studies of the lowermost layered deposits have been performed to date, primarily due to a general lack of visible exposures. Correlation of reflectors within radargrams acquired by the Shallow Radar (SHARAD) (Seu et al., Planet. Space Sci., 2004) onboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter makes a detailed stratigraphic reconstruction of the NPLD possible. An extensive set of radargrams is available over Planum Boreum and individual reflectors can be traced over hundreds of kilometers (Seu et al., JGR, 2007a; Putzig et al., Icarus, 2009; Holt et al., Nature, 2010) with a theoretical vertical resolution of ~9 m in water ice (Seu et al., JGR, 2007a). In this study, we present a highly-detailed stratigraphic reconstruction of the first ~500 m of the NPLD at a scale down to the single reflector. A set of 8 horizons was tracked across 700+ radargrams, and thicknesses were calculated for each stratigraphic interval assuming a bulk composition of water ice. Along with the quantitative analysis of derived isopach maps, this study is based on the qualitative comparison of "radar facies" in different locations of Planum Boreum with techniques borrowed from traditional sequence stratigraphy. In general, the NPLD is characterized by uniform layering. However, important layer extent and thickness variations are observed within the lowermost sequence. Limited

  5. WHIRL WIND DETECTION AND IDENTIFICATION IN INDONESIA UTILIZING SINGLE POLARIZATION DOPPLER WEATHER RADAR VOLUMETRIC DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Whirl wind occurrence frequency in Indonesia tends increasing in the last five years. Geospatial data from National Agency for Disaster Management (BNPB recorded 72 cases with the impact of the two victims died, ten injured, 485 people were evacuated, and 1285 buildings were destroyed at period of January-June 2015. Based on the impact, early warning through remote sensing by using single polarization Doppler weather radar is need to be efforted. Whirl wind detection is done by identifying the characteristic pattern of the rotating convective cloud system by hook echo, analyzing the exsistance of vortex and rotation, and the strength of turbulence. The results show horizontal wind profile with a rotational pattern at CAPPI (V and HWIND (V by the altitude of 0.5 km, strong turbulence through product CAPPI (W 0.5 km ranged of 1.75-2.05 ms-1, the vertical wind profile by product VVP (V with a maximum value updraft reaches more than 20 knots at a 100-200 meters height, strong horizontal wind shear through HSHEAR (V and CAPPI (HSHEAR altitude of 0.5 km with a range of 6.23 to 10.12 ms-1/km. SWI and SSA show that the cloud base height is very low ranged from 200-600 meters with a maximum reflectivity reached 61.5 dBZ by top cloud height reached 14 km, while the product CAPPI (Z 0.5 km and CMAX (Z is very difficult to identify patterns hook echo. The results of remote sensing are very representative with the physical properties of whirl wind even whirl wind in a smaller scale.

  6. Whirl Wind Detection and Identification in Indonesia Utilizing Single Polarization Doppler Weather Radar Volumetric Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Abdullah; Hidayati, Sabitul

    2016-06-01

    Whirl wind occurrence frequency in Indonesia tends increasing in the last five years. Geospatial data from National Agency for Disaster Management (BNPB) recorded 72 cases with the impact of the two victims died, ten injured, 485 people were evacuated, and 1285 buildings were destroyed at period of January-June 2015. Based on the impact, early warning through remote sensing by using single polarization Doppler weather radar is need to be efforted. Whirl wind detection is done by identifying the characteristic pattern of the rotating convective cloud system by hook echo, analyzing the exsistance of vortex and rotation, and the strength of turbulence. The results show horizontal wind profile with a rotational pattern at CAPPI (V) and HWIND (V) by the altitude of 0.5 km, strong turbulence through product CAPPI (W) 0.5 km ranged of 1.75-2.05 ms-1, the vertical wind profile by product VVP (V) with a maximum value updraft reaches more than 20 knots at a 100-200 meters height, strong horizontal wind shear through HSHEAR (V) and CAPPI (HSHEAR) altitude of 0.5 km with a range of 6.23 to 10.12 ms-1/km. SWI and SSA show that the cloud base height is very low ranged from 200-600 meters with a maximum reflectivity reached 61.5 dBZ by top cloud height reached 14 km, while the product CAPPI (Z) 0.5 km and CMAX (Z) is very difficult to identify patterns hook echo. The results of remote sensing are very representative with the physical properties of whirl wind even whirl wind in a smaller scale.

  7. VHF radar observations of turbulent structures in the polar mesopause region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Czechowsky

    Full Text Available The mobile SOUSY VHF Radar was operated in the summer of 1987 during the MAC/SINE campaign in northern Norway to study the polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE. Measurements of the spectral width indicate that two types of structures occur. In general mesospheric layers are bifurcated exhibiting a narrow spectral width and a well-defined aspect sensitivity. However, for about 10% of the observation time cells of enhanced turbulence characterized by extremely broad spectral widths appear predominantly in the upper sublayer above 86 km. Identification and separation of beam and shear broadening allows a determination of the turbulence-induced component of the spectral width. This case study reveals that during several events these cloud-like structures of enhanced turbulence move with an apparent velocity of several tens of meters per second which is almost identical with the phase trace velocity of simultaneously observed waves. Since, at that time, the Richardson number was less than a quarter, it was concluded that these turbulent cells were generated by a Kelvin-Helmholtz mechanism. The horizontal extent of these structures was calculated to be less than 40 km. A general relation between spectral width and echo power was not detected. The turbulent component of the spectral width was used to calculate typical values of the energy dissipation rate at times where narrow spectral width dominates and during periods of enhanced turbulence. In addition, the outer scale of the inertial subrange (buoyancy scale was estimated. For the first time the occurrence and motion of this type of structures of enhanced spectral width is analyzed and discussed in detail.

  8. Retrieving mesospheric winds and gravity waves using high resolution radar measurements of polar mesospheric summer echoes with MAARSY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stober, G.; Sommer, S.; Schult, C.; Chau, J. L.; Latteck, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) located at the northern Norwegian island of Andøya (69.3 ° N, 16° E) observes polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) on a regular basis. This backscatter turned out to be an ideal tracer of atmospheric dynamics and to investigate the wind field at the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT) at high spatial and temporal scales. MAARSY is dedicated to explore the polar mesosphere at such high resolution and employs an active phased array antenna with the capability to steer the beam on a pulse-to-pulse basis, which permits to perform systematic scanning of PMSE and to investigate the horizontal structure of the backscatter. The radar also uses a 16 channel receiver system for interferometric applications e.g. mean angle of arrival analysis or coherent radar imaging. Here we present measurements using these features of MAARSY to study the wind field at the MLT applying sophisticated wind analysis algorithms such as velocity azimuth display or volume velocity processing to derive gravity wave parameters such as horizontal wave length, phase speed and propagation direction. Further, we compare the interferometrically corrected and uncorrected wind measurements to emphasize the importance to account for likely edge effects using PMSE as tracer of the dynamics. The observations indicate huge deviations from the nominal beam pointing direction at the upper and lower edges of the PMSE altering the wind analysis.

  9. Web-based Tools for Educators: Outreach Activities of the Polar Radar for Ice Sheet Measurements (PRISM) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaten, D. A.; Holvoet, J. F.; Gogineni, S.

    2003-12-01

    The Radar Systems and Remote Sensing Laboratory at the University of Kansas (KU) has implemented extensive outreach activities focusing on Polar Regions as part of the Polar Radar for Ice Sheet Measurements (PRISM) project. The PRISM project is developing advanced intelligent remote sensing technology that involves radar systems, an autonomous rover, and communications systems to measure detailed ice sheet characteristics, and to determine bed conditions (frozen or wet) below active ice sheets in both Greenland and Antarctica. These measurements will provide a better understanding of the response of polar ice sheets to global climate change and the resulting impact the ice sheets will have on sea level rise. Many of the research and technological development aspects of the PRISM project, such as robotics, radar systems, climate change and exploration of harsh environments, can kindle an excitement and interest in students about science and technology. These topics form the core of our K-12 education and training outreach initiatives, which are designed to capture the imagination of young students, and prompt them to consider an educational path that will lead them to scientific or engineering careers. The K-12 PRISM outreach initiatives are being developed and implemented in a collaboration with the Advanced Learning Technology Program (ALTec) of the High Plains Regional Technology in Education Consortium (HPR*TEC). ALTec is associated with the KU School of Education, and is a well-established educational research center that develops and hosts web tools to enable teachers nationwide to network, collaborate, and share resources with other teachers. An example of an innovative and successful web interface developed by ALTec is called TrackStar. Teachers can use TrackStar over the Web to develop interactive, resource-based lessons (called tracks) on-line for their students. Once developed, tracks are added to the TrackStar database and can be accessed and modified

  10. Rainfall Estimation and Performance Characterization Using an X-band Dual-Polarization Radar in the San Francisco Bay Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifelli, R.; Chen, H.; Chandra, C. V.

    2016-12-01

    The San Francisco Bay area is home to over 5 million people. In February 2016, the area also hosted the NFL Super bowl, bringing additional people and focusing national attention to the region. Based on the El Nino forecast, public officials expressed concern for heavy rainfall and flooding with the potential for threats to public safety, costly flood damage to infrastructure, negative impacts to water quality (e.g., combined sewer overflows) and major disruptions in transportation. Mitigation of the negative impacts listed above requires accurate precipitation monitoring (quantitative precipitation estimation-QPE) and prediction (including radar nowcasting). The proximity to terrain and maritime conditions as well as the siting of existing NEXRAD radars are all challenges in providing accurate, short-term near surface rainfall estimates in the Bay area urban region. As part of a collaborative effort between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Earth System Research Laboratory, Colorado State University (CSU), and Santa Clara Valley Water District (SCVWD), an X-band dual-polarization radar was deployed in Santa Clara Valley in February of 2016 to provide support for the National Weather Service during the Super Bowl and NOAA's El Nino Rapid Response field campaign. This high-resolution radar was deployed on the roof of one of the buildings at the Penitencia Water Treatment Plant. The main goal was to provide detailed precipitation information for use in weather forecasting and assists the water district in their ability to predict rainfall and streamflow with real-time rainfall data over Santa Clara County especially during a potentially large El Nino year. The following figure shows the radar's coverage map, as well as sample reflectivity observations on March 06, 2016, at 00:04UTC. This paper presents results from a pilot study from February, 2016 to May, 2016 demonstrating the use of X-band weather radar for quantitative precipitation

  11. Operational C-Band Dual-Polarization Radar QPE for the Subtropical Complex Terrain of Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadong Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex terrain poses significant challenges to the radar based quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE because of blockages to the lower tilts of radar observations. The blockages often force the use of higher tilts data to estimate precipitation at the ground and result in errors due to vertical variations of the radar variables. To obtain accurate radar QPEs in the subtropical complex terrain of Taiwan, a vertically corrected composite algorithm (VCCA was developed for two C-band polarimetric radars. The new algorithm corrects higher tilt radar variables with the vertical profile of reflectivity (VPR or vertical profile of specific differential phase (VPSDP and estimates rainfall rate at the ground through an automated combination of R-Z and R-KDP relations. The VCCA was assessed with three precipitation cases of different regimes including typhoon, mei-yu, and summer stratiform precipitation events. The results showed that a combination of R-Z and R-KDP relations provided more accurate QPEs than each alone because R-Z provides better rainfall estimates for light rains and R-KDP relation is more suitable for heavy rains. The vertical profile corrections for reflectivity and specific differential phase significantly reduced radar QPE errors caused by inadequate sampling of the orographic enhancement of precipitation near the ground.

  12. Impact of frequency and polarization diversity on a terahertz radar's imaging performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Ken B.; Dengler, Robert J.; Llombart, Nuria

    2011-05-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's 675 GHz, 25 m standoff imaging radar can achieve >1 Hz real time frame rates over 40x40 cm fields of view for rapid detection of person-borne concealed weapons. In its normal mode of operation, the radar generates imagery based solely on the time-of-flight, or range, between the radar and target. With good clothing penetration at 675 GHz, a hidden object will be detectable as an anomaly in the range-to-surface profile of a subject. Here we report on results of two modifications in the radar system that were made to asses its performance using somewhat different detection approaches. First, the radar's operating frequency and bandwidth were cut in half, to 340 GHz and 13 GHz, where there potential system advantages include superior transmit power and clothing penetration, as well as a lower cost of components. In this case, we found that the twofold reduction in range and cross-range resolution sharply limited the quality of through-clothes imagery, although some improvement is observed for detection of large targets concealed by very thick clothing. The second radar modification tested involved operation in a fully polarimetric mode, where enhanced image contrast might occur between surfaces with different material or geometric characteristics. Results from these tests indicated that random speckle dominates polarimetric power imagery, making it an unattractive approach for contrast improvement. Taken together, the experiments described here underscore the primary importance of high resolution imaging in THz radar applications for concealed weapons detection.

  13. 偏振雷达观测强对流雹暴云%Polarization Radar Observations on Hailstorms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鸿发; 郄秀书; 王致君; 张义军

    2001-01-01

    Detailed echo information of horizontal reflectivity ZH and differential reflectivity ZiDR were obtained by C-band dual linear polarization weather radar observations of four hailstorms in evolution process in August 1990. And based on polarization radar principles, we have analysed these echo parameters and polarization characteristic in their different evolution stages, and found ZoR echo column is a distinct echo signature for discriminating fallhails. We have also used ZH and ZoR dual parameters technique to identify hails from mixed rains and hails, and analysic the results.%根据偏振雷达原理,用C波段双线偏振天气雷达观测得到4例强对流雹暴演变过程的水平反射率ZH(dBZ)和差分反射率ZDR(dB)垂直剖面RHI定量回波资料,分析了这些雹云不同演变阶段的回波参量和偏振特性的关系,说明ZH、ZDR双参量对判别降雹有着明显优势,用雨滴谱的ZH-ZDR分布边界关系对这些雹云回波进行判别降雹分析,给出我国用偏振雷达观测和识别冰雹的研究结果。

  14. Ground based materials science experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. B.; Johnston, J. C.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    The facilities at the Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory (MMSL) at the Lewis Research Center, created to offer immediate and low-cost access to ground-based testing facilities for industrial, academic, and government researchers, are described. The equipment in the MMSL falls into three categories: (1) devices which emulate some aspect of low gravitational forces, (2) specialized capabilities for 1-g development and refinement of microgravity experiments, and (3) functional duplicates of flight hardware. Equipment diagrams are included.

  15. Ground based materials science experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. B.; Johnston, J. C.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    The facilities at the Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory (MMSL) at the Lewis Research Center, created to offer immediate and low-cost access to ground-based testing facilities for industrial, academic, and government researchers, are described. The equipment in the MMSL falls into three categories: (1) devices which emulate some aspect of low gravitational forces, (2) specialized capabilities for 1-g development and refinement of microgravity experiments, and (3) functional duplicates of flight hardware. Equipment diagrams are included.

  16. Development of a multiple-field-of-view multiple-scattering polarization lidar: comparison with cloud radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Hajime; Sato, Kaori; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Makino, Toshiyuki; Jin, Yoshitaka; Shimizu, Atsushi; Takano, Toshiaki; Fujikawa, Masahiro

    2016-12-26

    We developed a multiple-field-of-view multiple-scattering polarization lidar (MFMSPL) to study the microphysics of optically thick clouds. Designed to measure enhanced backscattering and depolarization ratio comparable to space-borne lidar, the system consists of four sets of parallel and perpendicular channels mounted with different zenith angles. Depolarization ratios from water clouds were large as observed by MFMSPL compared to those observed by conventional lidar. Cloud top heights and depolarization ratios tended to be larger for outer MFMSPL channels than for vertically pointing channels. Co-located 95 GHz cloud radar and MFMSPL observations showed reasonable agreement at the observed cloud top height.

  17. Dual-polarization radar rainfall estimation in Korea according to raindrop shapes obtained by using a 2-D video disdrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hae-Lim; Suk, Mi-Kyung; Park, Hye-Sook; Lee, Gyu-Won; Ko, Jeong-Seok

    2016-08-01

    Polarimetric measurements are sensitive to the sizes, concentrations, orientations, and shapes of raindrops. Thus, rainfall rates calculated from polarimetric radar are influenced by the raindrop shapes and canting. The mean raindrop shape can be obtained from long-term raindrop size distribution (DSD) observations, and the shapes of raindrops can play an important role in polarimetric rainfall algorithms based on differential reflectivity (ZDR) and specific differential phase (KDP). However, the mean raindrop shape is associated with the variation of the DSD, which can change depending on precipitation types and climatic regimes. Furthermore, these relationships have not been studied extensively on the Korean Peninsula. In this study, we present a method to find optimal polarimetric rainfall algorithms for the Korean Peninsula by using data provided by both a two-dimensional video disdrometer (2DVD) and the Bislsan S-band dual-polarization radar. First, a new axis-ratio relation was developed to improve radar rainfall estimations. Second, polarimetric rainfall algorithms were derived by using different axis-ratio relations. The rain gauge data were used to represent the ground truth situation, and the estimated radar-point hourly mean rain rates obtained from the different polarimetric rainfall algorithms were compared with the hourly rain rates measured by a rain gauge. The daily calibration biases of horizontal reflectivity (ZH) and differential reflectivity (ZDR) were calculated by comparing ZH and ZDR radar measurements with the same parameters simulated by the 2DVD. Overall, the derived new axis ratio was similar to the existing axis ratio except for both small particles (≤ 2 mm) and large particles (≥ 5.5 mm). The shapes of raindrops obtained by the new axis-ratio relation carried out with the 2DVD were more oblate than the shapes obtained by the existing relations. The combined polarimetric rainfall relations using ZDR and KDP were more efficient than

  18. An evaluation of International Reference Ionosphere electron density in the polar cap and cusp using EISCAT Svalbard radar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merete Bjoland, Lindis; Belyey, Vasyl; Løvhaug, Unni Pia; La Hoz, Cesar

    2016-09-01

    Incoherent scatter radar measurements are an important source for studies of ionospheric plasma parameters. In this paper the EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR) long-term database is used to evaluate the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model. The ESR started operations in 1996, and the accumulated database up to 2012 thus covers 16 years, giving an overview of the ionosphere in the polar cap and cusp during more than one solar cycle. Data from ESR can be used to obtain information about primary plasma parameters: electron density, electron and ion temperature, and line-of-sight plasma velocity from an altitude of about 50 and up to 1600 km. Monthly averages of electron density and temperature and ion temperature and composition are also provided by the IRI model from an altitude of 50 to 2000 km. We have compared electron density data obtained from the ESR with the predicted electron density from the IRI-2016 model. Our results show that the IRI model in general fits the ESR data well around the F2 peak height. However, the model seems to underestimate the electron density at lower altitudes, particularly during winter months. During solar minimum the model is also less accurate at higher altitudes. The purpose of this study is to validate the IRI model at polar latitudes.

  19. Retrieve the soil moisture from radar backscattering coefficient using ALOS/PALSAR polarization (HH/VV) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buho, Hoshino; Ruichen, Jia; Nawata, Hiroshi; Abdelaziz, Karamalla; Yoda, Kiyotsugu; Abdel, Babiker

    Mesquite (Prosopis spp) are ever green leguminous trees or shrubs. These species are native to North and South America. They were introduced to Sudan in 1917 from South Africa and Egypt and planted in Khartoum state in central Sudan (Broun and Massey, 1929). Mesquite was originally favored as sand dunes stabilizer and as fodder for livestock. However, sparse stands will often form impenetrable thickets formations that hinder movement of humans and animals. Many infestations are along waterways, both natural and constructed, however, plants can grow also well in drier areas away from water sites. Even in natural rangelands it is an aggressive competitor and can quickly invade upland country. Mesquite thickets can out-compete other vegetation, interfere with mustering and block access to watering places. The sharp thorns can injure animals and puncture vehicle tyres. Seeds can stay dormant for years, and therefore seedlings can re-appear in areas that have been previously cleared. The main objective of Remote Sensing Method for Mesquite Control (RSMMC) is to identify pattern and extend of mesquite spread along spatial and temporal variations using remote sensing means, as main part of mesquite control. Estimation of soil moisture by inversion of SAR data can be performed using physical or semi-empirical approaches. The physical approach uses backscattering models that are capable of reproducing the radar backscattering coefficient from the sensor configuration (wavelength, polarization, and incidence angle) and soil parameters (soil moisture and surface roughness for bare soils). This study adopted calculation of PALSAR L-band radar backscattering coefficient (dB), to estimate soil moisture distribution area based on TDR soil moisture ground measurement data. To retrieve soil moisture (mv) from a single radar configuration, it is necessary to establish a relationship between the radar backscattering coefficient (dB) and soil moisture (mv) measurement.

  20. IFP V4.0:a polar-reformatting image formation processor for synthetic aperture radar.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichel, Paul H.

    2005-09-01

    IFP V4.0 is the fourth generation of an extraordinarily powerful and flexible image formation processor for spotlight mode synthetic aperture radar. It has been successfully utilized in processing phase histories from numerous radars and has been instrumental in the development of many new capabilities for spotlight mode SAR. This document provides a brief history of the development of IFP, a full exposition of the signal processing steps involved, and a short user's manual for the software implementing this latest iteration.

  1. Pulse Doppler radar

    CERN Document Server

    Alabaster, Clive

    2012-01-01

    This book is a practitioner's guide to all aspects of pulse Doppler radar. It concentrates on airborne military radar systems since they are the most used, most complex, and most interesting of the pulse Doppler radars; however, ground-based and non-military systems are also included. It covers the fundamental science, signal processing, hardware issues, systems design and case studies of typical systems. It will be a useful resource for engineers of all types (hardware, software and systems), academics, post-graduate students, scientists in radar and radar electronic warfare sectors and milit

  2. Digital interpolators for polar format processing. [of synthetic aperture radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, John W.; Hudson, Ralph E.; Bayma, Robert W.; Nelson, Jeffrey E.

    1989-01-01

    The polar format approach to SAR image formation requires data to be interpolated from a warped grid onto a Cartesian lattice. In general, this requires that data be interpolated between varying sampling rates. In this paper, frequency-domain optimality criteria for polar format interpolators are defined and justified, and an approach to designing the corresponding digital filters is described.

  3. Detection of potentially hazardous convective clouds with a dual-polarized C-band radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Adachi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A method for forecasting very short-term rainfall to detect potentially hazardous convective cloud that produces heavy local rainfall was developed using actual volumetric C-band polarimetric radar data. Because the rainfall estimation algorithm used in this method removed the effect of ice particles based on polarimetric measurements, it was immune to the high reflectivity associated with hail. The reliability of the algorithm was confirmed by comparing the rainfall rate estimated from the polarimetric radar measurements at the lowest elevation angle with that obtained from an optical disdrometer on the ground. The rainfall rate estimated from polarimetric data agreed well with the results obtained from the disdrometer, and was much more reliable than results derived from reflectivity alone. Two small cumulus cells were analyzed, one of which developed and later produced heavy rainfall, whereas the other did not. Observations made by polarimetric radar with a volumetric scan revealed that a high vertical maximum intensity of rainfall rate and a vertical area of enhanced differential reflectivity extending above the freezing level, often termed a high ZDR column, were clearly formed about 10 min prior to the onset of heavy rainfall on the ground. The onset time of the heavy rainfall could be estimated in advance from the polarimetric data, which agreed fairly well with observations. These polarimetric characteristics were not observed for the cumulus cell that did not produce heavy rainfall. The results suggest that both the vertical maximum intensity of the rainfall rate and a high ZDR column, estimated from polarimetric measurements, can be used to identify potentially hazardous clouds. Furthermore, this study shows that polarimetric radar measurements with high spatial and temporal resolutions are invaluable for disaster reduction.

  4. Detection of potentially hazardous convective clouds with a dual-polarized C-band radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Yamauchi, H.; Onogi, S.

    2013-10-01

    A method for forecasting very short-term rainfall to detect potentially hazardous convective cloud that produces heavy local rainfall was developed using actual volumetric C-band polarimetric radar data. Because the rainfall estimation algorithm used in this method removed the effect of ice particles based on polarimetric measurements, it was immune to the high reflectivity associated with hail. The reliability of the algorithm was confirmed by comparing the rainfall rate estimated from the polarimetric radar measurements at the lowest elevation angle with that obtained from optical disdrometers on the ground. The rainfall rate estimated from polarimetric data agreed well with the results obtained from the disdrometers, and was much more reliable than results derived from reflectivity alone. Two small cumulus cells were analyzed, one of which developed and later produced heavy rainfall, whereas the other did not. Observations made by polarimetric radar with a volumetric scan revealed that a high vertical maximum intensity of rainfall rate and a vertical area of enhanced differential reflectivity extending above the freezing level, often termed a high ZDR column, were clearly formed about 10 min prior to the onset of heavy rainfall on the ground. The onset time of the heavy rainfall could be estimated in advance from the polarimetric data, which agreed fairly well with observations. These polarimetric characteristics were not observed for the cumulus cell that did not produce heavy rainfall. The results suggest that both the vertical maximum intensity of the rainfall rate and a high ZDR column, estimated from polarimetric measurements, can be used to identify potentially hazardous clouds. Furthermore, this study shows that polarimetric radar measurements with high spatial and temporal resolutions are invaluable for disaster reduction.

  5. EISCAT and ESRAD radars observations of polar mesosphere winter echoes during solar proton events on 11-12 November 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belova, E.; Kirkwood, S.; Sergienko, T. [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna (Sweden)

    2013-09-01

    Polar mesosphere winter echoes (PMWE) were detected by two radars, ESRAD at 52 MHz located near Kiruna, Sweden, and EISCAT at 224 MHz located near Tromsoe, Norway, during the strong solar proton event on 11-12 November 2004. PMWE maximum volume reflectivity was estimated to be 3 x 10{sup -15}m{sup -1} for ESRAD and 2 x 10{sup -18}m{sup -1} for EISCAT. It was found that the shape of the echo power spectrum is close to Gaussian inside the PMWE layers, and outside of them it is close to Lorentzian, as for the standard ion line of incoherent scatter (IS). The EISCAT PMWE spectral width is about 5-7 m{sup -1} at 64-67 km and 7-10 m{sup -1} at 68-70 km. At the lower altitudes the PMWE spectral widths are close to those for the IS ion line derived from the EISCAT data outside the layers. At the higher altitudes the PMWE spectra are broader by 2-4 m{sup -1} than those for the ion line. The ESRAD PMWE spectral widths at 67-72 km altitude are 3-5 m{sup -1}, that is, 2-4 m{sup -1} larger than ion line spectral widths modelled for the ESRAD radar. The PMWE spectral widths for both EISCAT and ESRAD showed no dependence on the echo strength. It was found that all these facts cannot be explained by turbulent origin of the echoes. We suggested that evanescent perturbations in the electron gas generated by the incident infrasound waves may explain the observed PMWE spectral widths. However, a complete theory of radar scatter from this kind of disturbance needs to be developed before a full conclusion can be made. (orig.)

  6. Climatological features of electron density in the polar ionosphere from long-term observations of EISCAT/ESR radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, H.T.; Ma, S.Y.; Fan, Y. [Wuhan Univ. (China). School of Electronics Information; CNEM (France). Key Lab of Geospace Environmental and Geodesy; Liu, Y.C. [Wuhan Univ. (China). School of Electronics Information; Schlegel, K. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS), Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, climatological features of the polar F2-region electron density (N{sub e}) are investigated by means of statistical analysis using long-term observations from the European Incoherent Scatter UHF radar (called EISCAT in the following) and the EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR) during periods of quiet to moderate geomagnetic activity. Field-aligned measurements by the EISCAT and ESR radars operating in CP-1 and CP-2 modes are used in this study, covering the years 1988-1999 for EISCAT and 1999-2003 for ESR. The data are sorted by season (equinox, summer and winter) and solar cycle phase (maximum, minimum, rising and falling). Some novel and interesting results are presented as follows: (1) The well-known winter anomaly is evident during the solar maximum at EISCAT, but it dies out at the latitude of the ESR; (2) The daytime peaks of N{sub e} at EISCAT for all seasons during solar maximum lag about 1-2 h behind those at ESR, with altitudes about 10-30 km lower. (3) In addition to the daytime peak, it is revealed that there is another peak just before magnetic midnight at ESR around solar maximum, especially in winter and at equinox. The day-time ionization peak around magnetic noon observed by ESR can be attributed to soft particle precipitation in the cusp region, whereas the pre-midnight N{sub e} maximum seems likely to be closely related to substorm events which frequently break out during that time sector, in particular for the winter case. (4) Semiannual variations are found at EISCAT during solar minimum and the falling phase of the solar cycle; at the rising phase, however, the EISCAT observations show no obvious seasonal variations. (orig.)

  7. EISCAT and ESRAD radars observations of polar mesosphere winter echoes during solar proton events on 11–12 November 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Belova

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Polar mesosphere winter echoes (PMWE were detected by two radars, ESRAD at 52 MHz located near Kiruna, Sweden, and EISCAT at 224 MHz located near Tromsø, Norway, during the strong solar proton event on 11–12 November 2004. PMWE maximum volume reflectivity was estimated to be 3 × 10−15 m−1 for ESRAD and 2 × 10−18 m−1 for EISCAT. It was found that the shape of the echo power spectrum is close to Gaussian inside the PMWE layers, and outside of them it is close to Lorentzian, as for the standard ion line of incoherent scatter (IS. The EISCAT PMWE spectral width is about 5–7 m s−1 at 64–67 km and 7–10 m s−1 at 68–70 km. At the lower altitudes the PMWE spectral widths are close to those for the IS ion line derived from the EISCAT data outside the layers. At the higher altitudes the PMWE spectra are broader by 2–4 m s−1 than those for the ion line. The ESRAD PMWE spectral widths at 67–72 km altitude are 3–5 m s−1, that is, 2–4 m s−1 larger than ion line spectral widths modelled for the ESRAD radar. The PMWE spectral widths for both EISCAT and ESRAD showed no dependence on the echo strength. It was found that all these facts cannot be explained by turbulent origin of the echoes. We suggested that evanescent perturbations in the electron gas generated by the incident infrasound waves may explain the observed PMWE spectral widths. However, a complete theory of radar scatter from this kind of disturbance needs to be developed before a full conclusion can be made.

  8. Benchmarking attenuation correction procedures for six years of single-polarized C-band weather radar observations in South-West Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Jacobi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Rainfall-induced attenuation is a major source of underestimation for radar-based precipitation estimation at C-band. Unconstrained gate-by-gate correction procedures are known to be inherently unstable and thus not suited for unsupervised attenuation correction. In this study, we evaluate three different procedures to constrain gate-by-gate attenuation correction using reflectivity as the only input. These procedures are benchmarked against rainfall estimates from uncorrected radar data, using six years of radar observations from the single-polarized C-band radar in South-West Germany. The precipitation estimation error is obtained by comparing the radar-based estimates to rain gauge observations. All attenuation correction procedures benchmarked in this study lead to an effective improvement of precipitation estimation. The first method caps the corrections if the rain intensity increase exceeds a factor of two. The second method decreases the parameters of the attenuation correction iteratively for every radar beam calculation until attaining a stability criterion. The second method outperforms the first method and leads to a consistent distribution of path-integrated attenuation along the radar beam. As a third method, we propose a slight modification of Kraemer's approach which allows users to exert better control over attenuation correction by introducing an additional constraint that prevents unplausible corrections in cases of dramatic signal losses.

  9. Cassini RADAR observations of lakes and seas in the Northern Polar region of Titan: Bathymetry and Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrogiuseppe, Marco; Hayes, Alex; Poggiali, Valerio; Lunine, Jonathan; Seu, Roberto; Hofgartner, Jason; Le Gall, Alice; Lorenz, Ralph; Mitri, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    Recent observations by the Cassini spacecraft has revealed its RADAR to be an invaluable tool for investigating Titan's seas and lakes. The T91 (May 2013) observation of Ligeia Mare, Titan's second largest sea, has demonstrated the capabilities of the RADAR, in its altimeter mode, to measure depth, composition and seafloor topography. The 104 (August 2014) observation provided similar data over the largest sea, Kraken Mare, and the T108 (January 2015) flyby acquired an altimetry pass over Punga Mare. The T49 (December 2007) altimetry pass over Ontario Lacus, the largest southern liquid body, has also been processed to retrieve subsurface echoes. Cassini's final flyby of Titan, T126 (April 2017), is the next and unique opportunity to observe an area in the Northern Polar region of Titan, where several small - medium size (5 - 30 km) lakes are present and have been previously imaged by Cassini. In our presentation, we will report the integrated results of these investigations and discuss them in the overall context of Titan's hydrologic cycle.

  10. First observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes by SuperDARN Zhongshan radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, E. X.; Hu, H. Q.; Hosokawa, K.; Liu, R. Y.; Wu, Z. S.; Xing, Z. Y.

    2013-11-01

    We report the first observations of PMSE by SuperDARN Zhongshan radar in Antarctica and present a statistical analysis of PMSE from 2010 to 2012. The seasonal variations of occurrence are consistent with those before, with an obvious enhancement at the beginning of summer and a maximum several days after summer solstice. The special features of diurnal variations were observed because of high geomagnetic latitude of Zhongshan Station, which is that the maximum is near local midnight and the secondary maximum appears 1-2 h after the local noon. The results proved that the auroral particle precipitation plays a fairly important role in the PMSE occurrence.

  11. Aspect sensitivity of polar mesosphere summer echoes based on ESRAD MST radar measurements in Kiruna, Sweden in 1997-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, M.; Belova, E.; Kirkwood, S.

    2012-03-01

    Aspect sensitivities of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) measured with the ESRAD 50 MHz radar in 1997-2010 are studied using the full correlation analysis technique. Half of PMSE detected each year are found to be highly aspect sensitive. Yearly median values of the aspect sensitivity parameter θs, characterising the half-width of the scatterers' polar diagram, are 2.9-3.7° depending on the year. The other half of the PMSE have θs values larger than 9-11° and cannot be evaluated using the ESRAD vertical beam only. PMSE aspect sensitivity reveals an altitude dependence, namely, the scatter becomes more isotropic with increasing height. This result is consistent with that reported in other studies. No dependence of PMSE aspect sensitivity on backscattered power for any year was identified. In the paper the limitations of the in-beam and off-vertical beam methods for estimation of PMSE aspect sensitivity are discussed. We conclude that both methods should be combined in order to get complete information about PMSE aspect sensitivity and to estimate correctly PMSE absolute strength.

  12. Aspect sensitivity of polar mesosphere summer echoes based on ESRAD MST radar measurements in Kiruna, Sweden in 1997–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Smirnova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Aspect sensitivities of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE measured with the ESRAD 50 MHz radar in 1997–2010 are studied using the full correlation analysis technique. Half of PMSE detected each year are found to be highly aspect sensitive. Yearly median values of the aspect sensitivity parameter θs, characterising the half-width of the scatterers' polar diagram, are 2.9–3.7° depending on the year. The other half of the PMSE have θs values larger than 9–11° and cannot be evaluated using the ESRAD vertical beam only. PMSE aspect sensitivity reveals an altitude dependence, namely, the scatter becomes more isotropic with increasing height. This result is consistent with that reported in other studies. No dependence of PMSE aspect sensitivity on backscattered power for any year was identified. In the paper the limitations of the in-beam and off-vertical beam methods for estimation of PMSE aspect sensitivity are discussed. We conclude that both methods should be combined in order to get complete information about PMSE aspect sensitivity and to estimate correctly PMSE absolute strength.

  13. Quantifying the effect of riming on snowfall using ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisseev, Dmitri; von Lerber, Annakaisa; Tiira, Jussi

    2017-04-01

    Ground-based observations of ice particle size distribution and ensemble mean density are used to quantify the effect of riming on snowfall. The rime mass fraction is derived from these measurements by following the approach that is used in a single ice-phase category microphysical scheme proposed for the use in numerical weather prediction models. One of the characteristics of the proposed scheme is that the prefactor of a power law relation that links mass and size of ice particles is determined by the rime mass fraction, while the exponent does not change. To derive the rime mass fraction, a mass-dimensional relation representative of unrimed snow is also determined. To check the validity of the proposed retrieval method, the derived rime mass fraction is converted to the effective liquid water path that is compared to microwave radiometer observations. Since dual-polarization radar observations are often used to detect riming, the impact of riming on dual-polarization radar variables is studied for differential reflectivity measurements. It is shown that the relation between rime mass fraction and differential reflectivity is ambiguous, other factors such as change in median volume diameter need also be considered. Given the current interest on sensitivity of precipitation to aerosol pollution, which could inhibit riming, the importance of riming for surface snow accumulation is investigated. It is found that riming is responsible for 5% to 40% of snowfall mass. The study is based on data collected at the University of Helsinki field station in Hyytiälä during U.S. Department of Energy Biogenic Aerosols Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC) field campaign and the winter 2014/2015. In total 22 winter storms were analyzed, and detailed analysis of two events is presented to illustrate the study.

  14. Dual-Polarization Observations of Precipitation: State of the Art in Operational and Research Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, C. V.; Moisseev, D. N.; Baldini, L.; Bechini, R.; Cremonini, R.; Wolff, D. B.; Petersen, W. A.; Junyent, F.; Chen, H.; Beauchamp, R.

    2016-12-01

    Dual-polarization weather radars have been widely used for rainfall measurement applications and studies of the microphysical characteristics of precipitation. Ground-based, dual-polarization radar systems form the cornerstones of national severe weather warning and forecasting infrastructure in many developed countries. As a result of the improved performance of dual-polarization radars for these applications, large scale dual-polarization upgrades are being planned for India and China. In addition to national forecast and warning operations, dual-polarization radars have also been used for satellite ground validation activities. The operational Dual-Polarization radars in the US are mostly S band systems whereas in Europe are mostly C band systems. In addition a third class of systems is emerging in urban regions where networks of X band systems are being deployed operationally. There are successful networks planned or already deployed in big cities such as Dallas Fort Worth, Tokyo or Beijing. These X band networks are developing their own operational domain. In summary a large infrastructure in terms of user specified products and dual use of operational research applications are also emerging in these systems. This paper will discuss some of the innovative uses of the operational dual-polarization radar networks for research purposes, with references to calibration, hydrometeor classification and quantitative precipitation estimation. Additional application to the study of precipitation processes will also be discussed.

  15. Reconciling Ground-Based and Space-Based Estimates of the Frequency of Occurrence and Radiative Effect of Clouds around Darwin, Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Protat, Alain; Young, Stuart; McFarlane, Sally A.; L' Ecuyer, Tristan; Mace, Gerald G.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Long, Charles N.; Berry, Elizabeth; Delanoe, Julien

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate whether estimates of the cloud frequency of occurrence and associated cloud radiative forcing as derived from ground-based and satellite active remote sensing and radiative transfer calculations can be reconciled over a well instrumented active remote sensing site located in Darwin, Australia, despite the very different viewing geometry and instrument characteristics. It is found that the ground-based radar-lidar combination at Darwin does not detect most of the cirrus clouds above 10 km (due to limited lidar detection capability and signal obscuration by low-level clouds) and that the CloudSat radar - Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) combination underreports the hydrometeor frequency of occurrence below 2 km height, due to instrument limitations at these heights. The radiative impact associated with these differences in cloud frequency of occurrence is large on the surface downwelling shortwave fluxes (ground and satellite) and the top-of atmosphere upwelling shortwave and longwave fluxes (ground). Good agreement is found for other radiative fluxes. Large differences in radiative heating rate as derived from ground and satellite radar-lidar instruments and RT calculations are also found above 10 km (up to 0.35 Kday-1 for the shortwave and 0.8 Kday-1 for the longwave). Given that the ground-based and satellite estimates of cloud frequency of occurrence and radiative impact cannot be fully reconciled over Darwin, caution should be exercised when evaluating the representation of clouds and cloud-radiation interactions in large-scale models and limitations of each set of instrumentation should be considered when interpreting model-observations differences.

  16. High resolution observations of sporadic-E layers within the polar cap ionosphere using a new incoherent scatter radar experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Damtie

    Full Text Available High resolution observations of sporadic-E layers using a new experiment with the EISCAT (European Incoherent SCATter Svalbard radar (ESR are presented. The observations were made by means of a new type of hardware, which was connected in parallel with the standard receiver. The radar beam was aligned with the geomagnetic field. The experiment applies a new modulation principle. Two phase codes, one with 22 bits and the other with 5 bits, were transmitted at separate frequencies. Each bit was further modulated by a 5-bit Barker code. The basic bit length of both transmissions was 6 µs. Instead of storing the lagged products of the ionospheric echoes in the traditional way, samples of both the transmitted pulses and the ionospheric echoes were taken at intervals of 1 µs and stored on hard disk. The lagged products were calculated later in an off-line analysis. In the analysis a sidelobe-free Barker decoding technique was used. The experiment produces range ambiguities, which were removed by mathematical inversion. Sporadic-E layers were observed at 105–115 km altitudes, and they are displayed with a 150-m range resolution and a 10-s time resolution. The layers show sometimes complex shapes, including triple peaked structures. The thickness of these sublayers is of the order of 1–2 km and they may be separated by 5 km in range. While drifting downwards, the sublayers merge together to form a single layer. The plasma inside a layer is found to have a longer correlation length than that of the surrounding plasma. This may be an indication of heavy ions inside the layer. The field-aligned ion velocity is also calculated. It reveals shears in the meridional wind, which suggests that shears probably also exist in the zonal wind. Hence the wind shear mechanism is a possible generation mechanism of the layer. However, observations from the coherent SuperDARN radar indicate the presence of an ionospheric electric field pointing in the sector between

  17. Ground-based observations of exoplanet atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ernst Johan Walter de

    2011-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the properties of exoplanet atmospheres. The results for ground-based near-infrared secondary eclipse observations of three different exoplanets, TrES-3b, HAT-P-1b and WASP-33b, are presented which have been obtained with ground-based telescopes as part of the GROUSE project.

  18. Ground-based observations of exoplanet atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ernst Johan Walter de

    2011-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the properties of exoplanet atmospheres. The results for ground-based near-infrared secondary eclipse observations of three different exoplanets, TrES-3b, HAT-P-1b and WASP-33b, are presented which have been obtained with ground-based telescopes as part of the GROUSE project.

  19. Simulation study for measurement of horizontal wind profiles in the polar stratosphere and mesosphere using ground-based observations of ozone and carbon monoxide lines in the 230-250 GHz region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnham, David A.; Ford, George P.; Moffat-Griffin, Tracy; Pumphrey, Hugh C.

    2016-07-01

    Meteorological and atmospheric models are being extended up to 80 km altitude but there are very few observing techniques that can measure stratospheric-mesospheric winds at altitudes between 20 and 80 km to verify model datasets. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of horizontal wind profile measurements using ground-based passive millimetre-wave spectroradiometric observations of ozone lines centred at 231.28, 249.79, and 249.96 GHz. Vertical profiles of horizontal winds are retrieved from forward and inverse modelling simulations of the line-of-sight Doppler-shifted atmospheric emission lines above Halley station (75°37' S, 26°14' W), Antarctica. For a radiometer with a system temperature of 1400 K and 30 kHz spectral resolution observing the ozone 231.28 GHz line we estimate that 12 h zonal and meridional wind profiles could be determined over the altitude range 25-74 km in winter, and 28-66 km in summer. Height-dependent measurement uncertainties are in the range 3-8 m s-1 and vertical resolution ˜ 8-16 km. Under optimum observing conditions at Halley a temporal resolution of 1.5 h for measuring either zonal or meridional winds is possible, reducing to 0.5 h for a radiometer with a 700 K system temperature. Combining observations of the 231.28 GHz ozone line and the 230.54 GHz carbon monoxide line gives additional altitude coverage at 85 ± 12 km. The effects of clear-sky seasonal mean winter/summer conditions, zenith angle of the received atmospheric emission, and spectrometer frequency resolution on the altitude coverage, measurement uncertainty, and height and time resolution of the retrieved wind profiles have been determined.

  20. Analysis of the substorm trigger phase using multiple ground-based instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauristie, K.; Pulkkinen, T.I.; Pellinen, R.J. [Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    The authors discuss in detail the observation of an event of auroral activity fading during the trigger, or growth phase of a magnetic storm. This event was observed by all-sky cameras, EISCAT radar and magnetometers, riometers, and pulsation magnetometers, from ground based stations in Finland and Scandanavia. Based on their detailed analysis, they present a possible cause for the observed fading.

  1. Mars Express MARSIS Radar: A Prediction of the Effect of Overlying Ice on Detecting Polar Basal Lakes and Inter-Glacial Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, W. M.; Plaut, J. J.; Gurnett, D. A.; Picardi, G.

    2004-01-01

    The penetration of the MARSIS radar signal into the polar ice mass is modeled to determine the capability of the instrument to locate sub-glacial aquifers. As a ground penetrating radar, the orbiting MARSIS transmits a signal greater than 1 W between 1-5 MHz. In this work we will investigate the effect of ice conductive losses on the radar-detection of subsurface aquifers. Based on wave propagation analysis, it is found that for a bulk ice conductivity below 10-5 S/m, conductive losses in the medium are not significant. However, if the bulk ice conductivity is relatively large (greater than 10-5 S/m), the reflected signal from any deep aquifer will be absorbed as it propagates in the lossy ice medium limiting the probing depth.

  2. Ka-band bistatic ground-based SAR using noise signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, K.; Mogyla, A.; Vyplavin, P.; Palamarchuk, V.; Zemlyaniy, O.; Tarasenko, V.; Zaets, N.; Skretsanov, V.; Shubniy, A.; Glamazdin, V.; Natarov, M.; Nechayev, O.

    2008-01-01

    Currently, one of the actual problems is remote monitoring of technical state of large objects. Different methods can be used for that purpose. The most promising of them relies on application of ground based synthetic aperture radars (SAR) and differential interferometry. We have designed and tested Ground Based Noise Waveform SAR based on noise radar technology [1] and synthetic aperture antennas [2]. It enabled to build an instrument for precise all-weather monitoring of large objects in real-time. We describe main performance of ground-based interferometric SAR which uses continuous Ka-band noise waveform as a probe signal. Besides, results of laboratory trials and evaluation of its main performance are presented as well.

  3. Circular polarized stepped frequency ground-penetrating radar for humanitarian demining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaysen, Jesper; Jakobsen, Kaj B.; Appel-Hansen, Joergen

    2001-10-01

    A cavity backed coplanar waveguide to coplanar strip - fed logarithmic uniplanar spiral antenna, which covers a 9 to 1 band-width with a return loss better than 10 dB from 0.4 to 3.8 GHz is presented. A wideband balun, with an insertion loss of less than 3 dB in the frequency band of operation, was developed for the balanced antenna feed. To aid the balun and antenna design, a method of moment computer program, was used to predict the performance of the spiral antenna. Measurements in an anechoic are made in order to verify the simulated far-field radiation pattern, the simulated polarisation, and the simulated input impedance. Additional advantage of the fabricated antenna is the low cost FR-4 substrate used for the antenna combined with the advantages of the uniplanar circuit, makes this configuration suitable as a low-cost wideband antenna. The constructed uniplanar spiral antenna is very well suited to be used in a stepped frequency ground penetrating radar for humanitarian demining due to the very wide bandwidth, relative small size. Successful detection of a small 5.4 cm non-metallic AP-mines in a pseudo minefield are presented.

  4. Iceberg and ship detection and classification in single, dual and quad polarized synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Carl

    Iceberg and ship identification in satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data is an essential part of offering an operational iceberg surveillance program. Identification here refers to detection of ocean SAR targets and then classification of these targets as iceberg, ship, or unknown. Maximizing the detection and minimizing incorrect classification of iceberg and ship targets are required. Because coarser resolution satellite SAR data is at times not as intuitive as satellite optical data for manual human interpreted target classification, this process can be labor intensive, subjective, and error prone. Therefore, it is desired that an automated method for iceberg or ship identification be implemented. The methodology investigated here follows a well known standard in supervised pattern recognition, the maximum likelihood-quadratic discriminant function. The goal here in this thesis is to build class models from known iceberg and ship targets. Each class model is based on features that describe targets such as brightness, texture, and shape. Based on these descriptors as training input into the discriminant functions, future unknown targets can be compared with the class model for best fit. The best fit (or minimum distance) is used to assign class status for these unknown targets. One major consideration when using this type of pattern recognition approach is feature selection. Feature selection is based on the notion that some subset (subspace) of the descriptive metrics will lead to improved classification accuracy when comparing discriminant functions. Sequential forward selection and variants of exhaustive search algorithms are implemented and compared. RADARSAT-1, ENVSIAT AP (HH/HV), and EMISAR SAR iceberg and ship targets are used for algorithm training, feature selection, and performance estimation.

  5. Full-polarization radar remote sensing and data mining for tropical crops mapping: a successful SVM-based classification model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denize, J.; Corgne, S.; Todoroff, P.; LE Mezo, L.

    2015-12-01

    In Reunion, a tropical island of 2,512 km², 700 km east of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean, constrained by a rugged relief, agricultural sectors are competing in highly fragmented agricultural land constituted by heterogeneous farming systems from corporate to small-scale farming. Policymakers, planners and institutions are in dire need of reliable and updated land use references. Actually conventional land use mapping methods are inefficient under the tropic with frequent cloud cover and loosely synchronous vegetative cycles of the crops due to a constant temperature. This study aims to provide an appropriate method for the identification and mapping of tropical crops by remote sensing. For this purpose, we assess the potential of polarimetric SAR imagery associated with associated with machine learning algorithms. The method has been developed and tested on a study area of 25*25 km thanks to 6 RADARSAT-2 images in 2014 in full-polarization. A set of radar indicators (backscatter coefficient, bands ratios, indices, polarimetric decompositions (Freeman-Durden, Van zyl, Yamaguchi, Cloude and Pottier, Krogager), texture, etc.) was calculated from the coherency matrix. A random forest procedure allowed the selection of the most important variables on each images to reduce the dimension of the dataset and the processing time. Support Vector Machines (SVM), allowed the classification of these indicators based on a learning database created from field observations in 2013. The method shows an overall accuracy of 88% with a Kappa index of 0.82 for the identification of four major crops.

  6. Mesospheric observations with the EISCAT UHF radar during polar cap absorption events: 1. Electron densities and negative ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collis, P.N. (EISCAT Scientific Association Kiruna (SE)); Rietveld, M.T. (EISCAT Scientific Association, Ramfjordbotn, (NO))

    1990-12-01

    Observations of mesospheric electron density were obtained by the EISCAT UHF radar during several polar cap absorption events (PCA's) in 1989. Both the latitudinal extent and the detailed vertical distribution of the excess ionisation were determined. Continuous observations over more than two days during one event allowed an investigation of the variations in electron density during four twilight intervals. It is shown that at sunrise, at heights above 70 km, electrons are released by ultraviolet photodetachment of a high-affinity negative ion, which may be NO{sub 3}{sup -}. Below 66 km altitude, the increase of electron density is delayed by about 30 min, indicating that the time taken for neutral oxygen species to build up is a controlling factor in producing the free electrons at these heights. Both these processes are operative between 66 and 70 km altitude. Nighttime profiles of the ratio of negative ion number density to electron number density are deduced, and empirical relationships of electron concentration at heights between 60 and 70 km are determined as a function of simultaneously observed proton flux.

  7. ESTIMATED MEAN OF POLARIZATION INVARIANTS OF COMPOSITE OBJECT USING THE ON-OFF SCATTERING RESULTS OF SINGLE-POSITION RADAR MEASUREMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The real work is devoted to analytical definition of average values of polarizing invariants of compound radar ob- jects at on-off dispersion on the basis of one-position measurements. Analytical results are confirmed with data of pilot studies. In work the problem of analytical definition of average values of polarizing invariants at dispersion of the electro- magnetic waves compound radar objects including both an extended (diffraction element, and casual set of the simple (dot centers of secondary dispersion for a case of an on-off radar-location by results of one-position measurements is con- sidered. The data of pilot studies confirming analytical results are provided. At the same time full expression for the third parameter of Stokes of the field disseminated by a compound object shows the fact that Stokes's parameters of the wave disseminated by a compound object can't be determined by the sum of parameters of Stokes of the waves disseminated by each of object elements, but substantially are defined by communications between conditions of polarization of lenses. This fact completely accords with the principle of an emerdzhentnost which claims that integrated properties of system can't be defined only by the sum of properties of her elements, but are defined also by communications between system elements.

  8. DEM extraction and its accuracy analysis with ground-based SAR interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, J.; Yue, J. P.; Li, L. H.

    2014-03-01

    Two altimetry models extracting DEM (Digital Elevation Model) with the GBSAR (Ground-Based Synthetic Aperture Radar) technology are studied and their accuracies are analyzed in detail. The approximate and improved altimetry models of GBSAR were derived from the spaceborne radar altimetry based on the principles of the GBSAR technology. The error caused by the parallel ray approximation in the approximate model was analyzed quantitatively, and the results show that the errors cannot be ignored for the ground-based radar system. For the improved altimetry model, the elevation error expression can be acquired by simulating and analyzing the error propagation coefficients of baseline length, wavelength, differential phase and range distance in the mathematical model. By analyzing the elevation error with the baseline and range distance, the results show that the improved altimetry model is suitable for high-precision DEM and the accuracy can be improved by adjusting baseline and shortening slant distance.

  9. Analysis of Volcanic Deposits on Venus Using Radar Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, M.; Carter, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    The atmosphere of Venus is relatively transparent at radio wavelengths, providing an opportunity to examine its volcanic planetary surface using radar. The highest resolution radar images come from the Magellan mission, which mapped 98% of Venus's surface by transmitting and receiving unidirectionally polarized radio waves. Upgrades to the ground-based Arecibo telescope in 1999 allowed further imaging of the surface of Venus at conjunction in 1999, 2001, and 2004 by the transmission of a circularly polarized beam at 12.6cm wavelength and then the reception of two orthogonal circular polarization components [Carter et al., 2006]. We apply the Stokes vector method to the Arecibo measurements to calculate the circular polarization ratio (CPR), an indication of surface roughness, and the degree of linear polarization (DLP), a measure of whether there is subsurface scattering of the radar wave. We combine both the CPR and DLP datasets to enable a more holistic geologic interpretation of Magellan images. This allows us to examine geographic variations in high-altitude, high-emissivity regions such Beta Regio, and to investigate regions that may contain young lava flows such as Themis Regio. Our approach permits a more precise geologic mapping of the textures of coronas and lava flow fields, including the identification of abnormally rugged lava flows. The data were also used to search for pyroclastics emanating from large and intermediate sized volcanoes within the region visible to Arecibo.

  10. An Ultra-Wideband, Microwave Radar for Measuring Snow Thickness on Sea Ice and Mapping Near-Surface Internal Layers in Polar Firn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzer, Ben; Gomez-Garcia, Daniel; Leuschen, Carl; Paden, John; Rodriguez-Morales, Fernando; Patel, Azsa; Markus, Thorsten; Holt, Benjamin; Gogineni, Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Sea ice is generally covered with snow, which can vary in thickness from a few centimeters to >1 m. Snow cover acts as a thermal insulator modulating the heat exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere, and it impacts sea-ice growth rates and overall thickness, a key indicator of climate change in polar regions. Snow depth is required to estimate sea-ice thickness using freeboard measurements made with satellite altimeters. The snow cover also acts as a mechanical load that depresses ice freeboard (snow and ice above sea level). Freeboard depression can result in flooding of the snow/ice interface and the formation of a thick slush layer, particularly in the Antarctic sea-ice cover. The Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) has developed an ultra-wideband, microwave radar capable of operation on long-endurance aircraft to characterize the thickness of snow over sea ice. The low-power, 100mW signal is swept from 2 to 8GHz allowing the air/snow and snow/ ice interfaces to be mapped with 5 c range resolution in snow; this is an improvement over the original system that worked from 2 to 6.5 GHz. From 2009 to 2012, CReSIS successfully operated the radar on the NASA P-3B and DC-8 aircraft to collect data on snow-covered sea ice in the Arctic and Antarctic for NASA Operation IceBridge. The radar was found capable of snow depth retrievals ranging from 10cm to >1 m. We also demonstrated that this radar can be used to map near-surface internal layers in polar firn with fine range resolution. Here we describe the instrument design, characteristics and performance of the radar.

  11. Analysis of Dual- and Full-Circular Polarimetric SAR Modes for Rice Phenology Monitoring: An Experimental Investigation through Ground-Based Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta Izumi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Circularly polarized synthetic aperture radar (CP-SAR is known to be insensitive to polarization mismatch losses caused by the Faraday rotation effect and antenna misalignment. Additionally, the dual-circular polarimetric (DCP mode has proven to have more polarimetric information than that of the corresponding mode of linear polarization, i.e., the dual-linear polarimetric (DLP mode. Owing to these benefits, this paper investigates the feasibility of CP-SAR for rice monitoring. A ground-based CP-radar system was exploited, and C-band anechoic chamber data of a self-cultivated Japanese rice paddy were acquired from germination to ripening stages. Temporal variations of polarimetric observables derived from full-circular polarimetric (FCP and DCP as well as synthetically generated DLP data are analyzed and assessed with regard to their effectiveness in phenology retrieval. Among different observations, the H / α ¯ plane and triangle plots obtained by three scattering components (surface, double-bounce, and volume scattering for both the FCP and DCP modes are confirmed to have reasonable capability in discriminating the relevant intervals of rice growth.

  12. Ground-based optical observation system for LEO objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, T.; Kurosaki, H.; Oda, H.; Tagawa, M.

    2015-08-01

    We propose a ground-based optical observation system for monitoring LEO objects, which uses numerous optical sensors to cover a vast region of the sky. Its potential in terms of detection and orbital determination were examined. About 30 cm LEO objects at 1000 km altitude are detectable using an 18 cm telescope, a CCD camera and the analysis software developed. Simulations and a test observation showed that two longitudinally separate observation sites with arrays of optical sensors can identify the same objects from numerous data sets and determine their orbits precisely. The proposed system may complement or replace the current radar observation system for monitoring LEO objects, like space-situation awareness, in the near future.

  13. A radar backscattering mechanism of ocean surface in response to rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinan; Zheng, Quanan; Liu, Ren; Duncan, James H.

    2012-11-01

    The characteristics of ocean surface in response to rainfall and its radar back-scatter are simultaneously measured in laboratory. The experiment is carried out in a water pool that is 1.22 m by 1.22 m with a water depth of 0.3 m. Artificial rainfall is generated from an array of hypodermic needles. The surface characteristics including crowns, stalks, secondary droplets and ring waves are measured with a cinematic Laser-Induced-Florescence (LIF) technique. Our experimental results show that impinging raindrops on the water surface generate various water surface structures with different relative sizes. Among them stalks and crowns comprise the dominant radar backscattering. On the basis of these laboratory experiments and theories of radar scattering from a rough surface, a near-resonance radar backscattering model for quantifying the dependence of the radar return intensity on rain rate on the ocean surface is developed. The model explains the radar response to rain rate simultaneously observed by C-band ASAR and ground-based weather radar. The physical model provides reasonable mechanisms to explain the frequency dependence and polarization behavior of radar signatures from rain cells on the ocean surface. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation, Division of Ocean Sciences under grant OCE962107.

  14. Mesospheric observations with the EISCAT UHF radar during polar cap absorption events: 3. Comparison with simultaneous EISCAT VHF measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Rietveld

    Full Text Available Mesospheric observations were obtained by the EISCAT UHF and VHF radars during the solar proton event of March 1990. We present the first comparison of incoherent-scatter spectral measurements from the middle mesosphere using simultaneous, co-located observations by the two radars. VHF spectra observed with a vertical antenna were found to be significantly narrower than model predictions, in agreement with earlier UHF results. For antenna pointing directions that were significantly away from the vertical, the wider VHF radar beam gave rise to broadening of the observed spectra due to vertical shears in the horizontal wind. In this configuration, UHF spectral measurements were found to be more suitable for aeronomical applications. Both radar systems provide consistent and reliable estimates of the neutral wind. Spectral results using both the multipulse and pulse-to-pulse schemes were intercompared and their suitability for application to combined mesosphere – lower thermosphere studies investigated.Key words. Mesophere · Lower thermosphere · EISCAT UHF radar · EISCAT VHF radar

  15. Fresnel zones for ground-based antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J. Bach

    1964-01-01

    The ordinary Fresnel zone concept is modified to include the influence of finite ground conductivity. This is important for ground-based antennas because the influence on the radiation pattern of irregularities near the antenna is determined by the amplitude and phase of the groundwave. A new...

  16. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement unce...

  17. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Yordanova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement unce...

  18. Polarization utilization in radar target reconstruction: C-wide (Multi-frequency) band relationship of a target's characteristic operators with its unique set of natural eigenfrequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerner, W. M.; Huynen, J. R.; Mathur, N. C.; Foo, B. Y.; Nespor, J. D.

    1983-12-01

    During the tenure of this initiation contract on Polarization Utilization in Radar Target Identification a center of excellence for research in high resolution radar polarimetry was established within the Electromagnetic Imaging Division (EMID), Communications Laboratory (CL), Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) with the express purpose of advancing theoretical, computational and experimental methods for radar target detection in clutter; separation of useful target vector signal from noise and clutter; classification of targets and/or clutter; target and/or clutter imaging, as well as target identification. To assist us in this endeavor, the College of Engineering, UIC, initially made available 2,200 sq. ft. laboratory space which now has expanded to 9,000 sq. ft. within SEL-4209/4210/4211 with adjacent side rooms, housing the CL-office, work and laboratory space for 18 research assistants and a DEC-VAX 11/750 and 780 Research Computer Processing System with some peripheral image processing, printing, color-graphics processors which were made available with partial funding from DoD-research offices and need to be further expanded.

  19. A Wing Pod-based Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar on HIAPER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivekanandan, Jothiram; Tsai, Peisang; Ellis, Scott; Loew, Eric; Lee, Wen-Chau; Emmett, Joanthan

    2014-05-01

    One of the attractive features of a millimeter wave radar system is its ability to detect micron-sized particles that constitute clouds with lower than 0.1 g m-3 liquid or ice water content. Scanning or vertically-pointing ground-based millimeter wavelength radars are used to study stratocumulus (Vali et al. 1998; Kollias and Albrecht 2000) and fair-weather cumulus (Kollias et al. 2001). Airborne millimeter wavelength radars have been used for atmospheric remote sensing since the early 1990s (Pazmany et al. 1995). Airborne millimeter wavelength radar systems, such as the University of Wyoming King Air Cloud Radar (WCR) and the NASA ER-2 Cloud Radar System (CRS), have added mobility to observe clouds in remote regions and over oceans. Scientific requirements of millimeter wavelength radar are mainly driven by climate and cloud initiation studies. Survey results from the cloud radar user community indicated a common preference for a narrow beam W-band radar with polarimetric and Doppler capabilities for airborne remote sensing of clouds. For detecting small amounts of liquid and ice, it is desired to have -30 dBZ sensitivity at a 10 km range. Additional desired capabilities included a second wavelength and/or dual-Doppler winds. Modern radar technology offers various options (e.g., dual-polarization and dual-wavelength). Even though a basic fixed beam Doppler radar system with a sensitivity of -30 dBZ at 10 km is capable of satisfying cloud detection requirements, the above-mentioned additional options, namely dual-wavelength, and dual-polarization, significantly extend the measurement capabilities to further reduce any uncertainty in radar-based retrievals of cloud properties. This paper describes a novel, airborne pod-based millimeter wave radar, preliminary radar measurements and corresponding derived scientific products. Since some of the primary engineering requirements of this millimeter wave radar are that it should be deployable on an airborne platform

  20. Initial Results from the DEEPWAVE Airborne and Ground-Based Measurement Program in New Zealand in 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, Dave; Smith, Ron; Taylor, Mike; Doyle, Jim; Eckermann, Steve; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Rapp, Markus; Williams, Biff; Bossert, Katrina; Pautet, Dominique

    2015-04-01

    The deep-propagating gravity wave experiment (DEEPWAVE) was performed on and over New Zealand, Tasmania, the Tasman Sea, and the Southern Ocean with core airborne measurements extending from 5 June to 21 July 2014 and supporting ground-based measurements beginning in late May and extending beyond the airborne component. DEEPWAVE employed two aircraft, the NSF/NCAR GV and the German DLR Falcon. The GV carried the standard flight-level instruments, dropsondes, and the Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP). It also hosted new airborne lidar and imaging instruments built specifically to allow quantification of gravity waves (GWs) from sources at lower altitudes (e.g., orography, convection, jet streams, fronts, and secondary GW generation) throughout the stratosphere and into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). The new GV lidars included a Rayleigh lidar measuring atmospheric density and temperature from ~20-60 km and a sodium resonance lidar measuring sodium density and temperature at ~75-100 km. An airborne Advanced Mesosphere Temperature Mapper (AMTM) was also developed for the GV, and together with additional IR "wing" cameras, imaged the OH airglow temperature and/or intensity fields extending ~900 km across the GV flight track. The DLR Falcon was equipped with its standard flight-level instruments and an aerosol Doppler lidar able to measure radial winds below the Falcon where aerosol backscatter was sufficient. Additional ground-based instruments included a 449 MHz boundary layer radar, balloons at multiple sites, two ground-based Rayleigh lidars, a second ground-based AMTM, a Fabry Perot interferometer measuring winds and temperatures at ~87 and 95 km, and a meteor radar measuring winds from ~80-100 km. DEEPWAVE performed 26 GV flights, 13 Falcon flights, and an extensive series of ground-based measurements whether or not the aircraft were flying. Together, these observed many diverse cases of GW forcing, propagation, refraction, and dissipation

  1. Storm Microphysics and Kinematics at the ARM-SGP site using Dual Polarized Radar Observations at Multiple Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Alyssa A.

    This research utilizes observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility at the Southern Great Plains location to investigate the kinematic and microphysical processes present in various types of weather systems. The majority of the data used was collected during the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E), and utilizes the network of scanning radars to arrive at a multi-Doppler wind retrieval and is compared to vertical wind measurements from a centrally located profiling radar. Microphysical compositions of the storms are analyzed using a multi-wavelength hydrometeor identification algorithm utilizing the strengths of each of the radar wavelengths available (X, C, S). When available, a comparison is done between observational analysis and simulated model output from the Weather Research Forecasting model with Spectral-bin Microphysics (WRF-SBM) using bulk statistics to look at reflectivity, vertical motions, and microphysics.

  2. Space and Ground-Based Infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weems, Jon; Zell, Martin

    This chapter deals first with the main characteristics of the space environment, outside and inside a spacecraft. Then the space and space-related (ground-based) infrastructures are described. The most important infrastructure is the International Space Station, which holds many European facilities (for instance the European Columbus Laboratory). Some of them, such as the Columbus External Payload Facility, are located outside the ISS to benefit from external space conditions. There is only one other example of orbital platforms, the Russian Foton/Bion Recoverable Orbital Capsule. In contrast, non-orbital weightless research platforms, although limited in experimental time, are more numerous: sounding rockets, parabolic flight aircraft, drop towers and high-altitude balloons. In addition to these facilities, there are a number of ground-based facilities and space simulators, for both life sciences (for instance: bed rest, clinostats) and physical sciences (for instance: magnetic compensation of gravity). Hypergravity can also be provided by human and non-human centrifuges.

  3. The Value of Dual-Polarization Radar in Diagnosing the Complex Microphysical Evolution of an Intense Snowband

    OpenAIRE

    Picca, Joey; Schultz, David; Colle, Brian; Ganetis, Sara; Novak, David; Sienkiewicz, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The northeast U.S. extratropical cyclone of 8–9 February 2013 produced blizzard conditions and over 0.6–0.9 m (2–3 feet) of snow from Long Island through eastern New England. A surprising aspect of this blizzard was the development and rapid weakening of a snowband to the northwest of the cyclone center with radar reflectivity factor exceeding 55 dBZ. Because the radar reflectivity within snowbands in winter storms rarely exceeds 40 dBZ, this event warranted further investigation. The h...

  4. Development of Ground-Based Plant Sentinels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    plants in response to different strains of Pseudomonas syringae. Planta . 217:767-775. De Moraes CM, Schultz JC, Mescher MC, Tumlinson JH. (2004...09-30-2004 Final Technical _ April 2001 - April 2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Developing Plants as Ground-based Sentinels 5b. GRANT...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 9 "Z Plants emit volatile mixes characteristic of exposure to both plant and animal (insect) pathogens (bacteria and fungi). The

  5. Illumination compensation in ground based hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Alexander; Underwood, James

    2017-07-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has emerged as an important tool for analysing vegetation data in agricultural applications. Recently, low altitude and ground based hyperspectral imaging solutions have come to the fore, providing very high resolution data for mapping and studying large areas of crops in detail. However, these platforms introduce a unique set of challenges that need to be overcome to ensure consistent, accurate and timely acquisition of data. One particular problem is dealing with changes in environmental illumination while operating with natural light under cloud cover, which can have considerable effects on spectral shape. In the past this has been commonly achieved by imaging known reference targets at the time of data acquisition, direct measurement of irradiance, or atmospheric modelling. While capturing a reference panel continuously or very frequently allows accurate compensation for illumination changes, this is often not practical with ground based platforms, and impossible in aerial applications. This paper examines the use of an autonomous unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) to gather high resolution hyperspectral imaging data of crops under natural illumination. A process of illumination compensation is performed to extract the inherent reflectance properties of the crops, despite variable illumination. This work adapts a previously developed subspace model approach to reflectance and illumination recovery. Though tested on a ground vehicle in this paper, it is applicable to low altitude unmanned aerial hyperspectral imagery also. The method uses occasional observations of reference panel training data from within the same or other datasets, which enables a practical field protocol that minimises in-field manual labour. This paper tests the new approach, comparing it against traditional methods. Several illumination compensation protocols for high volume ground based data collection are presented based on the results. The findings in this paper are

  6. Ground based spectroscopy of hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Ingo

    2010-05-01

    It has been shown in recent years with great success that spectroscopy of exoplanetary atmospheres is feasible using space based observatories such as the HST and Spitzer. However, with the end of the Spitzer cold-phase, space based observations in the near to mid infra-red are limited, which will remain true until the the onset of the JWST. The importance of developing methods of ground based spectroscopic analysis of known hot Jupiters is therefore apparent. In the past, various groups have attempted exoplanetary spectroscopy using ground based facilities and various techniques. Here I will present results using a novel spectral retrieval method for near to mid infra-red emission and transmission spectra of exoplanetary atmospheres taken from the ground and discuss the feasibility of future ground-based spectroscopy in a broader context. My recently commenced PhD project is under the supervision of Giovanna Tinetti (University College London) and in collaboration with J. P. Beaulieu (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris), Mark Swain and Pieter Deroo (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech).

  7. Status and Prospects of Radar Polarimetry Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xuesong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Radar polarimetry is an applied fundamental science field that is focused on understanding interaction processes between radar waves and targets and disclosing their mechanisms. Radar polarimetry has significant application prospects in the fields of microwave remote sensing, earth observation, meteorological measurement, battlefield reconnaissance, anti-interference, target recognition, and so on. This study briefly reviews the development history of radar polarization theory and technology. Next, the state of the art of several key technologies within radar polarimetry, including the precise acquisition of radar polarization information, polarization-sensitive array signal processing, target polarization characteristics, polarization antiinterference, and target polarization classification and recognition, is summarized. Finally, the future developments of radar polarization technology are considered.

  8. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  9. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of a test of a ground-based lidar of other type. The test was performed at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. The result as an establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided...... by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from the wind vanes is also given....

  10. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Yordanova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  11. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  12. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Georgieva Yankova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  13. Measurements of radar ground returns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loor, G.P. de

    1974-01-01

    The ground based measurement techniques for the determination of the radar back-scatter of vegetation and soils as used in The Netherlands will be described. Two techniques are employed: one covering a large sample area (> 1000 m2) but working at low grazing angels only and one (short range) coverin

  14. EISCAT Svalbard radar observations of SPEAR-induced E- and F-region spectral enhancements in the polar cap ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Dhillon

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The Space Plasma Exploration by Active Radar (SPEAR facility has successfully operated in the high-power heater and low-power radar modes and has returned its first results. The high-power results include observations of SPEAR-induced ion and plasma line spectral enhancements recorded by the EISCAT Svalbard UHF incoherent scatter radar system (ESR, which is collocated with SPEAR. These SPEAR-enhanced spectra possess features that are consistent with excitation of both the purely growing mode and the parametric decay instability. In this paper, we present observations of upper and lower E-region SPEAR-induced ion and plasma line enhancements, together with F-region spectral enhancements, which indicate excitation of both instabilities and which are consistent with previous theoretical treatments of instability excitation in sporadic E-layers. In agreement with previous observations, spectra from the lower E-region have the single-peaked form characteristic of collisional plasma. Our observations of the SPEAR-enhanced E-region spectra suggest the presence of variable drifting regions of patchy overdense plasma, which is a finding also consistent with previous results.

  15. The Next Generation Airborne Polarimetric Doppler Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivekanandan, J.; Lee, Wen-Chau; Loew, Eric; Salazar, Jorge; Chandrasekar, V.

    2013-04-01

    NCAR's Electra Doppler radar (ELDORA) with a dual-beam slotted waveguide array using dual-transmitter, dual-beam, rapid scan and step-chirped waveform significantly improved the spatial scale to 300m (Hildebrand et al. 1996). However, ELDORA X-band radar's penetration into precipitation is limited by attenuation and is not designed to collect polarimetric measurements to remotely estimate microphysics. ELDORA has been placed on dormancy because its airborne platform (P3 587) was retired in January 2013. The US research community has strongly voiced the need to continue measurement capability similar to the ELDORA. A critical weather research area is quantitative precipitation estimation/forecasting (QPE/QPF). In recent years, hurricane intensity change involving eye-eyewall interactions has drawn research attention (Montgomery et al., 2006; Bell and Montgomery, 2006). In the case of convective precipitation, two issues, namely, (1) when and where convection will be initiated, and (2) determining the organization and structure of ensuing convection, are key for QPF. Therefore collocated measurements of 3-D winds and precipitation microphysics are required for achieving significant skills in QPF and QPE. Multiple radars in dual-Doppler configuration with polarization capability estimate dynamical and microphysical characteristics of clouds and precipitation are mostly available over land. However, storms over complex terrain, the ocean and in forest regions are not observable by ground-based radars (Bluestein and Wakimoto, 2003). NCAR/EOL is investigating potential configurations for the next generation airborne radar that is capable of retrieving dynamic and microphysical characteristics of clouds and precipitation. ELDORA's slotted waveguide array radar is not compatible for dual-polarization measurements. Therefore, the new design has to address both dual-polarization capability and platform requirements to replace the ELDORA system. NCAR maintains a C-130

  16. Large phased-array radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookner, Eli, Dr.

    1988-12-01

    Large phased-array radars can play a very important part in arms control. They can be used to determine the number of RVs being deployed, the type of targeting of the RVs (the same or different targets), the shape of the deployed objects, and possibly the weight and yields of the deployed RVs. They can provide this information at night as well as during the day and during rain and cloud covered conditions. The radar can be on the ground, on a ship, in an airplane, or space-borne. Airborne and space-borne radars can provide high resolution map images of the ground for reconnaissance, of anti-ballistic missile (ABM) ground radar installations, missile launch sites, and tactical targets such as trucks and tanks. The large ground based radars can have microwave carrier frequencies or be at HF (high frequency). For a ground-based HF radar the signal is reflected off the ionosphere so as to provide over-the-horizon (OTH) viewing of targets. OTH radars can potentially be used to monitor stealth targets and missile traffic.

  17. Studies of polar mesosphere summer echoes with the EISCAT VHF and UHF radars: Information contained in the spectral shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelnikova, Irina; Rapp, Markus

    2010-01-01

    The nature of PMSE in the VHF and UHF frequency range is considered taking into account the shape of corresponding Doppler spectra. Assuming a turbulence-based model of PMSE it is argued that for cases where a VHF radar detects strong PMSE, the UHF radar could either detect enhanced coherent scattering caused by the same physical process as in the VHF (i.e., turbulence with large charged ice particles), there could be incoherent scattering modified by the charged ice particles, or there could be a mixture of both. In order to distinguish these cases a simple but robust method is introduced to characterize the shape of the Doppler spectra derived from observations at both frequencies. Spectral shapes are quantified with one simple fitting parameter of a generalized fit to the autocorrelation function (=Fourier transform of the Doppler spectrum). This parameter takes a value of 1 for a Lorentzian spectrum indicative of pure incoherent scatter from the D-region, a value of 2 for coherent scatter owing to turbulence, and a value of less than 1 for incoherent scatter modified by the presence of charged aerosol particles. This method is applicable to observations at altitudes between ˜70 and ˜90 km. Simultaneous observations with the EISCAT VHF and UHF radar are presented in which all three cases mentioned above are identified. For the case of incoherent scatter modified by the presence of charged aerosol particles we quantify the radius of the involved ice particles to exceed ˜5 nm. Most importantly, however, for the case where the UHF-signal exceeded the incoherent scatter signal significantly, the spectrum revealed a clear Gaussian shape indicative of a coherent scattering process with identical spectral width as for the VHF-observations. This finding gives strong support that both echoes are created by the same turbulence-based mechanism and not by different mechanisms as speculated by several previous authors.

  18. Ground Based Retrievals of Small Ice Crystals and Water Phase in Arctic Cirrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Subhashree; Mitchell, David L.; DeSlover, Daniel

    2009-03-01

    The microphysical properties of cirrus clouds are uncertain due to the problem of ice particles shattering at the probe inlet upon sampling. To facilitate better estimation of small ice crystal concentrations in cirrus clouds, a new ground-based remote sensing technique has been used in combination with in situ aircraft measurements. Data from the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted at the north slope of Alaska (winter 2004), have been used to test a new method for retrieving the liquid water path (LWP) and ice water path (IWP) in mixed phase clouds. The framework of the retrieval algorithm consists of the modified anomalous diffraction approximation or MADA (for mixed phase cloud optical properties), a radar reflectivity-ice microphysics relationship and a temperature-dependent ice particle size distribution (PSD) scheme. Cloud thermal emission measurements made by the ground-based Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) yield information on the total water path (TWP) while reflectivity measurements from the Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR) are used to derive the IWP. The AERI is also used to indicate the concentration of small ice crystals (DBeer's law absorption. While this is still a work in progress, the anticipated products from this AERI-radar retrieval scheme are the IWP, LWP, small-to-large ice crystal number concentration ratio and effective diameter for cirrus, as well as the ice particle number concentration for a given ice water content (IWC).

  19. A joint Cluster and ground-based instruments study of two magnetospheric substorm events on 1 September 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Draper

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a coordinated ground- and space-based multi-instrument study of two magnetospheric substorm events that occurred on 1 September 2002, during the interval from 18:00 UT to 24:00 UT. Data from the Cluster and Polar spacecraft are considered in combination with ground-based magnetometer and HF radar data. During the first substorm event the Cluster spacecraft, which were in the Northern Hemisphere lobe, are to the west of the main region affected by the expansion phase. Nevertheless, substorm signatures are seen by Cluster at 18:25 UT (just after the expansion phase onset as seen on the ground at 18:23 UT, despite the ~5 RE} distance of the spacecraft from the plasma sheet. The Cluster spacecraft then encounter an earthward-moving diamagnetic cavity at 19:10 UT, having just entered the plasma sheet boundary layer. The second substorm expansion phase is preceded by pseudobreakups at 22:40 and 22:56 UT, at which time thinning of the near-Earth, L=6.6, plasma sheet occurs. The expansion phase onset at 23:05 UT is seen simultaneously in the ground magnetic field, in the magnetotail and at Polar's near-Earth position. The response in the ionospheric flows occurs one minute later. The second substorm better fits the near-Earth neutral line model for substorm onset than the cross-field current instability model.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (Magnetosphereionosphere interactions; Magnetic reconnection; Auroral phenomenon

  20. Thin ice clouds in the Arctic: cloud optical depth and particle size retrieved from ground-based thermal infrared radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Yann; Royer, Alain; O'Neill, Norman T.; Turner, David D.; Eloranta, Edwin W.

    2017-06-01

    Multiband downwelling thermal measurements of zenith sky radiance, along with cloud boundary heights, were used in a retrieval algorithm to estimate cloud optical depth and effective particle diameter of thin ice clouds in the Canadian High Arctic. Ground-based thermal infrared (IR) radiances for 150 semitransparent ice clouds cases were acquired at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) in Eureka, Nunavut, Canada (80° N, 86° W). We analyzed and quantified the sensitivity of downwelling thermal radiance to several cloud parameters including optical depth, effective particle diameter and shape, water vapor content, cloud geometric thickness and cloud base altitude. A lookup table retrieval method was used to successfully extract, through an optimal estimation method, cloud optical depth up to a maximum value of 2.6 and to separate thin ice clouds into two classes: (1) TIC1 clouds characterized by small crystals (effective particle diameter ≤ 30 µm), and (2) TIC2 clouds characterized by large ice crystals (effective particle diameter > 30 µm). The retrieval technique was validated using data from the Arctic High Spectral Resolution Lidar (AHSRL) and Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR). Inversions were performed over three polar winters and results showed a significant correlation (R2 = 0.95) for cloud optical depth retrievals and an overall accuracy of 83 % for the classification of TIC1 and TIC2 clouds. A partial validation relative to an algorithm based on high spectral resolution downwelling IR radiance measurements between 8 and 21 µm was also performed. It confirms the robustness of the optical depth retrieval and the fact that the broadband thermal radiometer retrieval was sensitive to small particle (TIC1) sizes.

  1. Radar backscatter properties of milo and soybeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, T. F.; Ulaby, F. T.; Metzler, T.

    1975-01-01

    The radar backscatter from fields of milo and soybeans was measured with a ground based radar as a function of frequency (8-18 GHz), polarization (HH and VV) and angle of incidence (0 deg-70 deg) during the summer of 1974. Supporting ground truth was gathered contemporaneously with the backscatter data. At nadir sigma deg of milo correlated highly, r = 0.96, with soil moisture in the milo field at 8.6 GHz but decreased to a value of r = 0.78 at a frequency of 17.0 GHz. Correlation studies of the variations of sigma deg with soil moisture in the soybean fields were not possible due to a lack of a meaningful soil moisture dynamic range. At the larger angles of incidence, however, sigma deg of soybeans did appear to be dependent on precipitation. It is suggested this phenomenon was caused by the rain altering plant geometry. In general sigma deg of both milo and soybeans had a relatively small dynamic range at the higher angles of incidence and showed no significant dependence on the measured crop parameters.

  2. Investigation of the foam influence on the wind-wave momentum exchange and cross-polarization microwave radar return within laboratory modeling of atmosphere-ocean boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, Daniil; Troitskaya, Yuliya; Vdovin, Maxim; Ermoshkin, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    The effect of foam presence on the transfer processes and the parameters of the surface roughness within the laboratory simulation of wind-wave interaction was carried out on the Thermostratified Wind-Wave Tank (TSWiWaT) IAP, using a specially designed foam generator. The parameters of air flow profiles and waves elevation were measured with scanning Pitot gauge and wire wave gauges respectively in the range of equivalent wind speed U10 from 12 to 38 m/s (covering strong winds) on the clean water and with foam. It was shown that the foam reduces the amplitudes and slopes of the waves in comparison with the clean water in the hole range of wind speeds investigated, and the peak frequency and wave numbers remain almost constant. The drag coefficient calculating by profiling method demonstrated similar behavior (almost independent on U10) for case of foam and increased compared with clear water, particularly noticeable for low wind speeds. Simultaneously the investigations of influence of the foam on the peculiarity of the microwave radio back scattering of X-diapason was investigated. These measurements were carried for different sensing angles (30, 40 i 50 degrees from vertical) and for four polarizations: co-polarized HH and VV, and de-polarized HV and VH. It was shown that foam leads to decrease of specific radar cross section of the wavy surface in comparison with clean water. The work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grants No. 15-35-20953, 14-05-00367, 16-55-52022) and project ASIST of FP7. The experiment is supported by Russian Science Foundation (Agreement No. 15-17-20009), radilocation measurments are partially supported by Russian Science Foundation (Agreement No. 14-17-00667).

  3. Understanding and optimizing microstrip patch antenna cross polarization radiation on element level for demanding phased array antennas in weather radar applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollbracht, D.

    2015-11-01

    The antenna cross polarization suppression (CPS) is of significant importance for the accurate calculation of polarimetric weather radar moments. State-of-the-art reflector antennas fulfill these requirements, but phased array antennas are changing their CPS during the main beam shift, off-broadside direction. Since the cross polarization (x-pol) of the array pattern is affected by the x-pol element factor, the single antenna element should be designed for maximum CPS, not only at broadside, but also for the complete angular electronic scan (e-scan) range of the phased array antenna main beam positions. Different methods for reducing the x-pol radiation from microstrip patch antenna elements, available from literature sources, are discussed and summarized. The potential x-pol sources from probe fed microstrip patch antennas are investigated. Due to the lack of literature references, circular and square shaped X-Band radiators are compared in their x-pol performance and the microstrip patch antenna size variation was analyzed for improved x-pol pattern. Furthermore, the most promising technique for the reduction of x-pol radiation, namely "differential feeding with two RF signals 180° out of phase", is compared to single fed patch antennas and thoroughly investigated for phased array applications with simulation results from CST MICROWAVE STUDIO (CST MWS). A new explanation for the excellent port isolation of dual linear polarized and differential fed patch antennas is given graphically. The antenna radiation pattern from single fed and differential fed microstrip patch antennas are analyzed and the shapes of the x-pol patterns are discussed with the well-known cavity model. Moreover, two new visual based electromagnetic approaches for the explanation of the x-pol generation will be given: the field line approach and the surface current distribution approach provide new insight in understanding the generation of x-pol component in microstrip patch antenna radiation

  4. Anisotropy of seasonal snow measured by polarimetric phase differences in radar time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinss, Silvan; Löwe, Henning; Proksch, Martin; Lemmetyinen, Juha; Wiesmann, Andreas; Hajnsek, Irena

    2016-08-01

    The snow microstructure, i.e., the spatial distribution of ice and pores, generally shows an anisotropy which is driven by gravity and temperature gradients and commonly determined from stereology or computer tomography. This structural anisotropy induces anisotropic mechanical, thermal, and dielectric properties. We present a method based on radio-wave birefringence to determine the depth-averaged, dielectric anisotropy of seasonal snow with radar instruments from space, air, or ground. For known snow depth and density, the birefringence allows determination of the dielectric anisotropy by measuring the copolar phase difference (CPD) between linearly polarized microwaves propagating obliquely through the snowpack. The dielectric and structural anisotropy are linked by Maxwell-Garnett-type mixing formulas. The anisotropy evolution of a natural snowpack in Northern Finland was observed over four winters (2009-2013) with the ground-based radar instrument "SnowScat". The radar measurements indicate horizontal structures for fresh snow and vertical structures in old snow which is confirmed by computer tomographic in situ measurements. The temporal evolution of the CPD agreed in ground-based data compared to space-borne measurements from the satellite TerraSAR-X. The presented dataset provides a valuable basis for the development of new snow metamorphism models which include the anisotropy of the snow microstructure.

  5. Radar activities of the DFVLR Institute for Radio Frequency Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keydel, W.

    1983-01-01

    Aerospace research and the respective applications microwave tasks with respect to remote sensing, position finding and communication are discussed. The radar activities are directed at point targets, area targets and volume targets; they center around signature research for earth and ocean remote sensing, target recognition, reconnaissance and camouflage and imaging and area observation radar techniques (SAR and SLAR). The radar activities cover a frequency range from 1 GHz up to 94 GHz. The radar program is oriented to four possible application levels: ground, air, shuttle orbits and satellite orbits. Ground based studies and measurements, airborne scatterometers and imaging radars, a space shuttle radar, the MRSE, and follow on experiments are considered.

  6. Radar activities of the DFVLR Institute for Radio Frequency Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keydel, W.

    1983-01-01

    Aerospace research and the respective applications microwave tasks with respect to remote sensing, position finding and communication are discussed. The radar activities are directed at point targets, area targets and volume targets; they center around signature research for earth and ocean remote sensing, target recognition, reconnaissance and camouflage and imaging and area observation radar techniques (SAR and SLAR). The radar activities cover a frequency range from 1 GHz up to 94 GHz. The radar program is oriented to four possible application levels: ground, air, shuttle orbits and satellite orbits. Ground based studies and measurements, airborne scatterometers and imaging radars, a space shuttle radar, the MRSE, and follow on experiments are considered.

  7. Autonomous landing of a helicopter UAV with a ground-based multisensory fusion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dianle; Zhong, Zhiwei; Zhang, Daibing; Shen, Lincheng; Yan, Chengping

    2015-02-01

    In this study, this paper focus on the vision-based autonomous helicopter unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) landing problems. This paper proposed a multisensory fusion to autonomous landing of an UAV. The systems include an infrared camera, an Ultra-wideband radar that measure distance between UAV and Ground-Based system, an PAN-Tilt Unit (PTU). In order to identify all weather UAV targets, we use infrared cameras. To reduce the complexity of the stereovision or one-cameral calculating the target of three-dimensional coordinates, using the ultra-wideband radar distance module provides visual depth information, real-time Image-PTU tracking UAV and calculate the UAV threedimensional coordinates. Compared to the DGPS, the test results show that the paper is effectiveness and robustness.

  8. Building Damage Assessment Using Multisensor Dual-Polarized Synthetic Aperture Radar Data for the 2016 M 6.2 Amatrice Earthquake, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadra Karimzadeh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available On 24 August 2016, the M 6.2 Amatrice earthquake struck central Italy, well-known as a seismically active region, causing considerable damage to buildings in the town of Amatrice and the surrounding area. Damage from this earthquake was assessed quantitatively by means of multitemporal synthetic aperture radar (SAR coherence and SAR intensity methods using dual-polarized SAR data obtained from the Sentinel-1 (VV, VH and ALOS-2 (HH, HV satellites. We developed linear discriminant functions based on three items: (1 the differential coherence values; (2 the differential backscattering intensity values of pre- and post-event images; and (3 a binary damage map of the optical pre- and post-event imagery. The accuracy of the proposed model was 84% for the Sentinel-1 data and 76% for the ALOS-2 data. The damage proxy maps deduced from the linear discriminant functions can be useful in the parcel-by-parcel assessment of building damage and development of spatial models for the allocation of urban search and rescue operations.

  9. Long-periodic strong radar echoes in the summer polar D region correlated with oscillations of high-speed solar wind streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Sook; Kirkwood, Sheila; Shepherd, Gordon G.; Kwak, Young-Sil; Kim, Kyung-Chan

    2013-08-01

    We report long-periodic oscillations of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSEs) correlated with high-speed solar wind streams (HSSs) as observed between 1 June and 8 August in the solar minimum years 2006 and 2008. PMSEs (80-90 km altitudes) were observed by 52 MHz VHF radar measurements at Esrange, Sweden (67.8°N, 20.4°E). Correlations between PMSE volume reflectivity/counts, HSSs, and AE index are primarily found at 7-day, 9-day, and 13-day periodicities as well as 9-day and 13.5-day periodicities in 2006 and 2008, respectively. The observations show that the effects of HSSs appear in PMSEs. During corotating interaction region (CIR)-induced HSSs, the long-lasting enhancement of PMSEs, geomagnetic disturbances, and D-region ionization suggests that a favorable condition in generating PMSEs can be provided by the precipitating energetic electrons (>30 keV), which are frequently multiplied in the magnetosphere during HSSs.

  10. Ground-based observations of Kepler asteroseismic targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uyttterhoeven , K.; Karoff, Christoffer

    2010-01-01

    We present the ground-based activities within the different working groups of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium (KASC). The activities aim at the systematic characterization of the 5000+ KASC targets, and at the collection of ground-based follow-up time-series data of selected promising...

  11. Using multi-polarization C- and L-band synthetic aperture radar to estimate biomass and soil moisture of wheat fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mehdi; McNairn, Heather

    2017-06-01

    Biomass and soil moisture are two important parameters for agricultural crop monitoring and yield estimation. In this study, the Water Cloud Model (WCM) was coupled with the Ulaby soil moisture model to estimate both biomass and soil moisture for spring wheat fields in a test site in western Canada. This study exploited both C-band (RADARSAT-2) and L-band (UAVSAR) Synthetic Aperture Radars (SARs) for this purpose. The WCM-Ulaby model was calibrated for three polarizations (HH, VV and HV). Subsequently two of these three polarizations were used as inputs to an inversion procedure, to retrieve either soil moisture or biomass without the need for any ancillary data. The model was calibrated for total canopy biomass, the biomass of only the wheat heads, as well as for different wheat growth stages. This resulted in a calibrated WCM-Ulaby model for each sensor-polarization-phenology-biomass combination. Validation of model retrievals led to promising results. RADARSAT-2 (HH-HV) estimated total wheat biomass with root mean square (RMSE) and mean average (MAE) errors of 78.834 g/m2 and 58.438 g/m2; soil moisture with errors of 0.078 m3/m3 (RMSE) and 0.065 m3/m3 (MAE) are reported. During the period of crop ripening, L-band estimates of soil moisture had accuracies of 0.064 m3/m3 (RMSE) and 0.057 m3/m3 (MAE). RADARSAT-2 (VV-HV) produced interesting results for retrieval of the biomass of the wheat heads. In this particular case, the biomass of the heads was estimated with accuracies of 38.757 g/m2 (RSME) and 33.152 g/m2 (MAE). For wider implementation this model will require additional data to strengthen the model accuracy and confirm estimation performance. Nevertheless this study encourages further research given the importance of wheat as a global commodity, the challenge of cloud cover in optical monitoring and the potential of direct estimation of the weight of heads where wheat production lies.

  12. Movable Ground Based Recovery System for Reuseable Space Flight Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver, George L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A reusable space flight launch system is configured to eliminate complex descent and landing systems from the space flight hardware and move them to maneuverable ground based systems. Precision landing of the reusable space flight hardware is enabled using a simple, light weight aerodynamic device on board the flight hardware such as a parachute, and one or more translating ground based vehicles such as a hovercraft that include active speed, orientation and directional control. The ground based vehicle maneuvers itself into position beneath the descending flight hardware, matching its speed and direction and captures the flight hardware. The ground based vehicle will contain propulsion, command and GN&C functionality as well as space flight hardware landing cushioning and retaining hardware. The ground based vehicle propulsion system enables longitudinal and transverse maneuverability independent of its physical heading.

  13. Terahertz radar cross section measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Heiselberg, Henning; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2010-01-01

    We perform angle- and frequency-resolved radar cross section (RCS) measurements on objects at terahertz frequencies. Our RCS measurements are performed on a scale model aircraft of size 5-10 cm in polar and azimuthal configurations, and correspond closely to RCS measurements with conventional radar...

  14. Efficient Ways to Learn Weather Radar Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing; Yeary, M. B.; Zhang, Guifu

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. weather radar network is currently being upgraded with dual-polarization capability. Weather radar polarimetry is an interdisciplinary area of engineering and meteorology. This paper presents efficient ways to learn weather radar polarimetry through several basic and practical topics. These topics include: 1) hydrometeor scattering model…

  15. Efficient Ways to Learn Weather Radar Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing; Yeary, M. B.; Zhang, Guifu

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. weather radar network is currently being upgraded with dual-polarization capability. Weather radar polarimetry is an interdisciplinary area of engineering and meteorology. This paper presents efficient ways to learn weather radar polarimetry through several basic and practical topics. These topics include: 1) hydrometeor scattering model…

  16. Statistical characteristics of the polar ionospheric scale height around the peak height of F2 layer with observations of the ESR radar: Disturbed days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Zheng; Yuan, Zhigang; Huang, Shiyong; Wang, Dedong

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, based on observations of the European Incoherent Scatter Svalbard Radar (ESR) between 1997 and 2008, we analyzed variations of HmF2, the ionospheric scale height around the peak height of F2 layer (hmF2) at high latitude with geomagnetic activities, as well as variations of the HmF2 with the local time (LT), season and solar activity under disturbed conditions (2 < Kp ≤ 5). We found that the HmF2 shows a significant increment with enhancements of geomagnetic activities. In addition, based on a linear regression, the correlation and fitting coefficients are shown, which quantitatively describe the correlations between polar HmF2 and geomagnetic activity index Kp. The HmF2 shows a diurnal variation with a maximum early in the morning and a minimum around noon in disturbed days (2 < Kp ≤ 5), which is more complex in comparison with that in quiet days. However, in summer and autumn, the HmF2 in disturbed days shows a bulge during 06:00-11:00 LT instead of the continuous decline under quiet condition. We consider that the ESR was under the cusp region during the period so that the bulge might be related to the high-energy particles precipitating into the ionosphere resulting in changes of the electron density profile. The HmF2 has the highest seasonal magnitude in summer and the lowest seasonal magnitude in winter generally. The seasonal magnitude of the HmF2 in autumn is lower than that in spring and larger than that in winter under low solar activity, while the HmF2 shows the same seasonal variations in spring and autumn under moderate and high solar activities.

  17. A multi-sensor study of the impact of ground-based glaciogenic seeding on clouds and precipitation over mountains in Wyoming. Part I: Project description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Binod; Geerts, Bart

    2016-12-01

    The AgI Seeding Cloud Impact Investigation (ASCII) campaign was conducted in early 2012 and 2013 over two mountain ranges in southern Wyoming to examine the impact of ground-based glaciogenic seeding on snow growth in winter orographic clouds. The campaign was supported by a network of ground-based instruments, including microwave radiometers, two profiling Ka-band Micro-Rain Radars (MRRs), a Doppler on Wheels (DOW) X-band radar, and a Parsivel disdrometer. The University of Wyoming King Air operated the profiling Wyoming Cloud Radar, the Wyoming Cloud Lidar, and in situ cloud and precipitation particle probes. The characteristics of the orographic clouds, flow field, and upstream stability profiles in 27 intensive observation periods (IOPs) are described here. A composite analysis of the impact of seeding on snow growth is presented in Part II of this study (Pokharel et al., 2017).

  18. Use of Dual-Polarization Radar Variables to Assess Low-Level Wind Shear in Severe Thunderstorm Near-storm Environments in the Tennessee Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Christina C.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Kumjian, Matthew; Carey, Lawerence D.; Petersen, Walter A.

    2011-01-01

    The upgrade of the National Weather Service (NWS) network of S ]band dual-polarization radars is currently underway, and the incorporation of polarimetric information into the real ]time forecasting process will enhance the forecaster fs ability to assess thunderstorms and their near ]storm environments. Recent research has suggested that the combination of polarimetric variables differential reflectivity (ZDR) and specific differential phase (KDP) can be useful in the assessment of low level wind shear within a thunderstorm. In an environment with strong low ]level veering of the wind, ZDR values will be largest along the right inflow edge of the thunderstorm near a large gradient in horizontal reflectivity (indicative of large raindrops falling with a relative lack of smaller drops), and take the shape of an arc. Meanwhile, KDP values, which are proportional to liquid water content and indicative of a large number of smaller drops, are maximized deeper into the forward flank precipitation shield than the ZDR arc as the smaller drops are being advected further from the updraft core by the low level winds than the larger raindrops. Using findings from previous work, three severe weather events that occurred in North Alabama were examined in order to assess the utility of these signatures in determining the potential for tornadic activity. The first case is from October 26, 2010, where a large number of storms indicated tornadic potential from a standard reflectivity and velocity analysis but very few storms actually produced tornadoes. The second event is from February 28, 2011, where tornadic storms were present early on in the event, but as the day progressed, the tornado threat transitioned to a high wind threat. The third case is from April 27, 2011, where multiple rounds of tornadic storms ransacked the Tennessee Valley. This event provides a dataset including multiple modes of tornadic development, including QLCS and supercell structures. The overarching goal

  19. Structure and dynamics of the Earth's polar ionosphere: recent results inferred from incoherent scatter sounders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontaine, Dominique [CETP-CNRS, 10-12 Avenue de l' Europe, 78140 Velizy (France)

    2002-08-01

    For 20 years, a large part of ionospheric research has been devoted to high latitudes and in particular to the range 60-70 deg. where an oval of auroras permanently encircles each pole. The auroral light emissions are accompanied by the production of ionization, electric currents and fields. Indeed, the auroral latitudes play a dominant role in the ionospheric electrodynamics because electric fields and currents reach thus at their largest intensities. Observations from low-altitude satellites and from ground-based facilities have contributed to the analysis and modelling of the structure and dynamics of the auroral ionosphere. The results illustrated here are inferred from observations of the European Japanese incoherent scatter radars (EISCAT) based in North Scandinavia. Recently, the field of view of the EISCAT facilities has been extended toward the pole with two radars built in 1996 and 2000 at Spitzbergen (78 deg. N): the EISCAT Svalbard radars. Other ground-based instruments (magnetometers, photometers, etc) have also been deployed at the same location. At first sight, the ionization production in the polar ionosphere is expected to be weak because of the reduced solar illumination. The first observations reveal, in contrast, the presence of intense and variable structures, which are still under investigation. To develop our understanding of these events, we discuss the theoretical results given by the particle penetration from solar origin, and of its effects into the dayside polar ionosphere.

  20. Polarization Utilization in Radar Target Reconstruction: C-Wide (Multi-Frequency) Band Relationship of a Target’s Characteristic Operators with Its Unique Set of Natural Eigenfrequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-14

    Dr. Karl Steinbach, MERADCOM-Ft. Belvoir; Mr. William Fischbein and Dr. Vahakn Nalbandian of DELCS-R-T-GSTA Laboratories and their colleagues; Mr...Ground-Based Stationary Targets Em- Mr. William Fischbein bedded in Ground & Tropospheric (201) 544-5218 Clutter Utilizing High-Resolution

  1. Quantum radar

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzagorta, Marco

    2011-01-01

    This book offers a concise review of quantum radar theory. Our approach is pedagogical, making emphasis on the physics behind the operation of a hypothetical quantum radar. We concentrate our discussion on the two major models proposed to date: interferometric quantum radar and quantum illumination. In addition, this book offers some new results, including an analytical study of quantum interferometry in the X-band radar region with a variety of atmospheric conditions, a derivation of a quantum radar equation, and a discussion of quantum radar jamming.This book assumes the reader is familiar w

  2. Pc5 Oscillation Analysis by the Satellite and Ground-Based Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. Potapov; T. Polyushkina; T. L. Zhang; H. Zhao; A. Guglielmi; J. Kultima

    2005-01-01

    Large amplitude Pc5 event was observed in the space and on ground on August 3, 2001, about three hours after contact of the strong discontinuity in the solar wind with the magnetosphere according to data from ACE and Wind satellites. The Pc5 amplitude was as high as 15 nT in the tail of magnetosphere and about 5 nT at the ground based stations. In the magnetosphere Pc5 waves were observed by Cluster and Polar satellites, which occupied positions in the morning part of the near tail at the close field lines but were parted by distance of 11.5 Re, mainly along the x-axis of the GSM coordinate system. Both compressional and transverse components of the Pc5 wave activity were observed in the space, with the transverse component having the larger amplitude. Time delay between the Cluster and Polar satellites was about 8 minutes, which could be interpreted as a wave propagation from the geomagnetic tail to the Earth with the 150km/s group velocity.The ground-based Pc5 activity was analysed by using data from the Image magnetometer network. Doubtless demonstrations of a field line resonant structure were found in variations of amplitude and polarization with latitude. Finnish chain of search coil magnetometers observed modulated Pc1 emission simultaneously with the Pc5 wave train. A possibility of non-linear impact of Pc5 wave energy on the plasma and waves in the magnetosphere is discussed.

  3. Solar diameter, eclipses and transits: the importance of ground-based observations

    CERN Document Server

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2012-01-01

    According to satellite measurements the difference between polar and equatorial radius does not exceed 10 milliarcsec. These measurements are differential, and the absolute value of the solar diameter is not precisely known to a level of accuracy needed for finding variations during years or decades. Moreover the lifetime of a satellite is limited, and its calibration is not stable. This shows the need to continue ground-based observations of the Sun exploiting in particular the methods less affected by atmospheric turbulence, as the planetary transits and the total and annular eclipses. The state of art, the advantages and the limits of these two methods are here considered.

  4. Radar Chart

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Radar Chart collection is an archived product of summarized radar data. The geographic coverage is the 48 contiguous states of the United States. These hourly...

  5. First-generation Science Cases for Ground-based Terahertz Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Satoki; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Nakamura, Masanori; Asada, Keiichi; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Urata, Yuji; Wang, Ming-Jye; Wang, Wei-Hao; Takahashi, Satoko; Tang, Ya-Wen; Chang, Hsian-Hong; Huang, Kuiyun; Morata, Oscar; Otsuka, Masaaki; Lin, Kai-Yang; Tsai, An-Li; Lin, Yen-Ting; Srinivasan, Sundar; Martin-Cocher, Pierre; Pu, Hung-Yi; Kemper, Francisca; Patel, Nimesh; Grimes, Paul; Huang, Yau-De; Han, Chih-Chiang; Huang, Yen-Ru; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Lin, Lupin Chun-Che; Zhang, Qizhou; Keto, Eric; Burgos, Roberto; Chen, Ming-Tang; Inoue, Makoto; Ho, Paul T P

    2015-01-01

    Ground-based observations at terahertz (THz) frequencies are a newly explorable area of astronomy for the next ten years. We discuss science cases for a first-generation 10-m class THz telescope, focusing on the Greenland Telescope as an example of such a facility. We propose science cases and provide quantitative estimates for each case. The largest advantage of ground-based THz telescopes is their higher angular resolution (~ 4 arcsec for a 10-m dish), as compared to space or airborne THz telescopes. Thus, high-resolution mapping is an important scientific argument. In particular, we can isolate zones of interest for Galactic and extragalactic star-forming regions. The THz windows are suitable for observations of high-excitation CO lines and [N II] 205 um lines, which are scientifically relevant tracers of star formation and stellar feedback. Those lines are the brightest lines in the THz windows, so that they are suitable for the initiation of ground-based THz observations. THz polarization of star-forming...

  6. Phase-coherent mapping of gravitational-wave backgrounds using ground-based laser interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Joseph D; Cornish, Neil J; Gair, Jonathan; Mingarelli, Chiara M F; van Haasteren, Rutger

    2015-01-01

    We extend the formalisms developed in Gair et al. and Cornish and van Haasteren to create maps of gravitational-wave backgrounds using a network of ground-based laser interferometers. We show that in contrast to pulsar timing arrays, which are insensitive to half of the gravitational-wave sky (the curl modes), a network of ground-based interferometers is sensitive to both the gradient and curl components of the background. The spatial separation of a network of interferometers, or of a single interferometer at different times during its rotational and orbital motion around the Sun, allows for recovery of both components. We derive expressions for the response functions of a laser interferometer in the small-antenna limit, and use these expressions to calculate the overlap reduction function for a pair of interferometers. We also construct maximum-likelihood estimates of the + and x-polarization modes of the gravitational-wave sky in terms of the response matrix for a network of ground-based interferometers, e...

  7. Cloud Base Height and Effective Cloud Emissivity Retrieval with Ground-Based Infrared Interferometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Lin-Jun; LU Da-Ren

    2012-01-01

    Based on ground-based Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) observations in Shouxian, Anhui province, China, the authors retrieve the cloud base height (CBH) and effective cloud emissivity by using the minimum root-mean-square difference method. This method was originally developed for satellite remote sensing. The high-temporal-resolution retrieval results can depict the trivial variations of the zenith clouds continu- ously. The retrieval results are evaluated by comparing them with observations by the cloud radar. The compari- son shows that the retrieval bias is smaller for the middle and low cloud, especially for the opaque cloud. When two layers of clouds exist, the retrieval results reflect the weighting radiative contribution of the multi-layer cloud. The retrieval accuracy is affected by uncertainties of the AERI radiances and sounding profiles, in which the role of uncertainty in the temperature profile is dominant.

  8. Plans of a test bed for ionospheric modelling based on Fennoscandian ground-based instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauristie, Kirsti; Kero, Antti; Verronen, Pekka T.; Aikio, Anita; Vierinen, Juha; Lehtinen, Markku; Turunen, Esa; Pulkkinen, Tuija; Virtanen, Ilkka; Norberg, Johannes; Vanhamäki, Heikki; Kallio, Esa; Kestilä, Antti; Partamies, Noora; Syrjäsuo, Mikko

    2016-07-01

    One of the recommendations for teaming among research groups in the COSPAR/ILWS roadmap is about building test beds in which coordinated observing supports model development. In the presentation we will describe a test bed initiative supporting research on ionosphere-thermosphere-magnetosphere interactions. The EISCAT incoherent scatter radars with their future extension, EISCAT3D, form the backbone of the proposed system. The EISCAT radars are surrounded by versatile and dense arrays of ground-based instrumentation: magnetometers and auroral cameras (the MIRACLE and IMAGE networks), ionospheric tomography receivers (the TomoScand network) and other novel technology for upper atmospheric probing with radio waves (e.g. the KAIRA facility, riometers and the ionosonde maintained by the Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory). As a new opening, close coordination with the Finnish national cubesat program is planned. We will investigate opportunities to establish a cost efficient nanosatellite program which would support the ground-based observations in a systematic and persistent manner. First experiences will be gathered with the Aalto-1 and Aalto-2 satellites, latter of which will be the Finnish contribution to the international QB50 mission. We envisage close collaboration also in the development of data analysis tools with the goal to integrate routines and models from different research groups to one system, where the different elements support each other. In the longer run we are aiming for a modelling framework with observational guidance which gives a holistic description on ionosphere-thermosphere processes and this way enables reliable forecasts on upper atmospheric space weather activity.

  9. Microwave signatures of ice hydrometeors from ground-based observations above Summit, Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pettersen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Multi-instrument, ground-based measurements provide unique and comprehensive datasets of the atmosphere for a specific location over long periods of time and resulting data compliments past and existing global satellite observations. This paper explores the effect of ice hydrometeors on ground-based, high frequency passive microwave measurements and attempts to isolate an ice signature for summer seasons at Summit, Greenland from 2010–2013. Data from a combination of passive microwave, cloud radar, radiosonde, and ceilometer were examined to isolate the ice signature at microwave wavelengths. By limiting the study to a cloud liquid water path of 40 g m−2 or less, the cloud radar can identify cases where the precipitation was dominated by ice. These cases were examined using liquid water and gas microwave absorption models, and brightness temperatures were calculated for the high frequency microwave channels: 90, 150, and 225 GHz. By comparing the measured brightness temperatures from the microwave radiometers and the calculated brightness temperature using only gas and liquid contributions, any residual brightness temperature difference is due to emission and scattering of microwave radiation from the ice hydrometeors in the column. The ice signature in the 90, 150, and 225 GHz channels for the Summit Station summer months was isolated. This measured ice signature was then compared to an equivalent brightness temperature difference calculated with a radiative transfer model including microwave single scattering properties for several ice habits. Initial model results compare well against the four years of summer season isolated ice signature in the high-frequency microwave channels.

  10. CRRES/Ground-based multi-instrument observations of an interval of substorm activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. Yeoman

    Full Text Available Observations are presented of data taken during a 3-h interval in which five clear substorm onsets/intensifications took place. During this interval ground-based data from the EISCAT incoherent scatter radar, a digital CCD all sky camera, and an extensive array of magnetometers were recorded. In addition data from the CRRES and DMSP spacecraft, whose footprints passed over Scandinavia very close to most of the ground-based instrumentation, are available. The locations and movements of the substorm current system in latitude and longitude, determined from ground and spacecraft magnetic field data, have been correlated with the locations and propagation of increased particle precipitation in the E-region at EISCAT, increased particle fluxes measured by CRRES and DMSP, with auroral luminosity and with ionospheric convection velocities. The onsets and propagation of the injection of magnetospheric particle populations and auroral luminosity have been compared. CRRES was within or very close to the substorm expansion phase onset sector during the interval. The onset region was observed at low latitudes on the ground, and has been confirmed to map back to within L=7 in the magnetotail. The active region was then observed to propagate tailward and poleward. Delays between the magnetic signature of the substorm field aligned currents and field dipolarisation have been measured. The observations support a near-Earth plasma instability mechanism for substorm expansion phase onset.

  11. Polarization Filtering of SAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Pascale C.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of polarization filtering of synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) returns provide hybrid method applied to either (1) maximize signal-to-noise ratio of return from given target or (2) enhance contrast between targets of two different types (that have different polarization properties). Method valid for both point and extended targets and for both monostatic and bistatic radars as well as SAR. Polarization information in return signals provides more complete description of radar-scattering properties of targets and used to obtain additional information about targets for use in classifying them, discriminating between them, or enhancing features of radar images.

  12. Radar Fundamentals, Presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Jenn, David

    2008-01-01

    Topics include: introduction, radar functions, antennas basics, radar range equation, system parameters, electromagnetic waves, scattering mechanisms, radar cross section and stealth, and sample radar systems.

  13. Radar Fundamentals, Presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Jenn, David

    2008-01-01

    Topics include: introduction, radar functions, antennas basics, radar range equation, system parameters, electromagnetic waves, scattering mechanisms, radar cross section and stealth, and sample radar systems.

  14. An englacial image and water pathways of the Fourcade glacier on King George Island, Antarctic Peninsula, inferred from ground-penetrating radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEE; Joohan; KIM; Ki; Young; HONG; Jong; Kuk; JIN; Young; Keun

    2010-01-01

    The distribution of small fractures and water content of the Fourcade glacier on King George Island, Antarctica, was investigated in November 2006 and December 2007 by two ground-based (470-and 490-m-long profiles) and one helicopter-borne (470-m-long profile) ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys using 50-, 100-, and 500-MHz antennas. Radar images in the pre-migrated GPR sections are characterized by a smooth ice surface and irregular bed topography, numerous diffraction hyperbolas in the ice and at the glacier bed, strong scattering noise, and near-surface folded layers. Scattering noise above a mound in the center of the profiles is associated with an area of dense fractures extending down from the ice surface that has relatively low reflection strength. Near the northeast ends of the profiles where few englacial fractures occur, scattering noise may result from the presence of warmer ice. A water-filled conduit and an air-filled cavity are interpreted as the source of two distinct hyperbolas in sub-glacial valleys based on the polarity of the reflections. Through migration velocity analysis on 106 hyperbolas, radar velocities were obtained for the 100-MHz ground-based profile. Using the velocities and Paren’s mixture formula, we calculated the water content of the ice to have been in the range of 0.00–0.09. High water content occurs near the glacier margin, in sub-glacial valleys, and in zones of scattering noise.

  15. Orbit Determination Using a Decametric Line-of-Sight Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazer, G.; Meehan, D.; Rutten, M.; Gordon, N.

    2013-09-01

    The paper investigates the effectiveness of a ground-based bistatic decametric line-of-sight radar for orbit determination of low Earth orbit satellites. Radar observations of the Hubble Space Telescope are used to demonstrate our approach. We present methods for initial orbit determination and for the case of improving an a-priori established orbit descriptor. We discuss the suitability of this class of radar for wide-field space situational awareness and consider a SSA architecture that uses this class of radar to cue high-accuracy narrow field-of-view optical sensors as part of a wide-field high-accuracy system for SSA.

  16. Precision in ground based solar polarimetry: Simulating the role of adaptive optics

    CERN Document Server

    Nagaraju, K

    2012-01-01

    Accurate measurement of polarization in spectral lines is important for the reliable inference of magnetic fields on the Sun. For ground based observations, polarimetric precision is severely limited by the presence of Earth's atmosphere. Atmospheric turbulence (seeing) produces signal fluctuations which combined with the non-simultaneous nature of the measurement process cause intermixing of the Stokes parameters known as seeing induced polarization cross-talk. Previous analysis of this effect (Judge et al., 2004) suggests that cross-talk is reduced not only with increase in modulation frequency but also by compensating the seeing induced image aberrations by an Adaptive Optics (AO) system. However, in those studies the effect of higher order image aberrations than those corrected by the AO system was not taken into account. We present in this paper an analysis of seeing induced cross-talk in the presence of higher order image aberrations through numerical simulation. In this analysis we find that the amount...

  17. Radar equations for modern radar

    CERN Document Server

    Barton, David K

    2012-01-01

    Based on the classic Radar Range-Performance Analysis from 1980, this practical volume extends that work to ensure applicability of radar equations to the design and analysis of modern radars. This unique book helps you identify what information on the radar and its environment is needed to predict detection range. Moreover, it provides equations and data to improve the accuracy of range calculations. You find detailed information on propagation effects, methods of range calculation in environments that include clutter, jamming and thermal noise, as well as loss factors that reduce radar perfo

  18. Real-Time Ionospheric Plasma Density Estimates in the Polar Cap using Simultaneous Dual Frequency Doppler Measurements at the SuperDARN McMurdo Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaleta, J.; Bristow, W. A.

    2012-12-01

    SuperDARN radars estimate plasma drift velocities from the Doppler shift observed on signals scattered from field-aligned density irregularities. The radars operate in the range of 8 MHz to 20 MHz and have ray paths covering a wide range of elevation angles, in order to maximize the range over which the scattering conditions are satisfied. Upward-propagating electromagnetic signals in this frequency range can be significantly refracted by the ionospheric plasma. The propagation paths of the refracted signals are bent earthward and at some point along this refracted path propagate perpendicular to the local magnetic field and scatter on the field-aligned density irregularities. The refraction results from gradients of the index of refraction in the ionospheric plasma. The index inside the ionosphere is lower than its free-space value, which depresses the measured line of sight velocity relative to the actual velocity of the plasma. One way to account for the depression of the measured velocity is to estimate the index of refraction in the scattering region by making multiple velocities measurements at different operating frequencies. Together with the appropriate plasma dispersion relations, multiple frequency measurements can be used to construct relations for the index of refraction, plasma density and the line of sight velocity correction factor as functions of frequency weighted measured velocity differences. Recent studies have used frequency-switching events spanning many days during traditional SuperDARN radar operation to build a statistical estimate for index of refraction, which is insensitive to the real-time spatial dynamics of the ionosphere. This statistical approach has motivated the development of a new mode of radar operation that provides simultaneous dual frequency measurements in order to resolve the temporal and spatial dynamics of the index of refraction calculations. Newly-developed multi-channel capabilities available in the SuperDARN radar

  19. Ground-based Optical Observations of Geophysical Phenomena: Aurora Borealis and Meteors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, Marilia

    2010-10-01

    Advances in low-light level imaging technology have enabled significant improvements in the ground based study of geophysical phenomena. In this talk we focus on two such phenomena that occur in the Earth's ionosphere: aurorae and meteors. Imaging the aurora which is created by the interplay of the Earth's magnetosphere, ionosphere and atmosphere, provides a tool for remote sensing physical processes that are otherwise very difficult to study. By quantifying the intensities, scale sizes and lifetimes of auroral structures, we can gain significant insight into the physics behind the generation of the aurora and the interaction of the magnetosphere with the solar wind. Additionally, the combination of imaging with radars provides complimentary data and therefore more information than either method on its own. Meteor observations are a perfect example of this because the radar can accurately determine only the line-of-sight component of velocity, while imaging provides the direction of motion, the perpendicular velocity and brightness (a proxy for mass), therefore enabling a much more accurate determination of the full velocity vector and mass.

  20. Coupling Fine-Scale Root and Canopy Structure Using Ground-Based Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brady S. Hardiman

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystem physical structure, defined by the quantity and spatial distribution of biomass, influences a range of ecosystem functions. Remote sensing tools permit the non-destructive characterization of canopy and root features, potentially providing opportunities to link above- and belowground structure at fine spatial resolution in functionally meaningful ways. To test this possibility, we employed ground-based portable canopy LiDAR (PCL and ground penetrating radar (GPR along co-located transects in forested sites spanning multiple stages of ecosystem development and, consequently, of structural complexity. We examined canopy and root structural data for coherence (i.e., correlation in the frequency of spatial variation at multiple spatial scales ≤10 m within each site using wavelet analysis. Forest sites varied substantially in vertical canopy and root structure, with leaf area index and root mass more becoming even vertically as forests aged. In all sites, above- and belowground structure, characterized as mean maximum canopy height and root mass, exhibited significant coherence at a scale of 3.5–4 m, and results suggest that the scale of coherence may increase with stand age. Our findings demonstrate that canopy and root structure are linked at characteristic spatial scales, which provides the basis to optimize scales of observation. Our study highlights the potential, and limitations, for fusing LiDAR and radar technologies to quantitatively couple above- and belowground ecosystem structure.

  1. GLAST and Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The launch of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope together with the advent of a new generation of ground-based gamma-ray detectors such as VERITAS, HESS, MAGIC and CANGAROO, will usher in a new era of high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics. GLAST and the ground based gamma-ray observatories will provide highly complementary capabilities for spectral, temporal and spatial studies of high energy gamma-ray sources. Joint observations will cover a huge energy range, from 20 MeV to over 20 TeV. The LAT will survey the entire sky every three hours, allowing it both to perform uniform, long-term monitoring of variable sources and to detect flaring sources promptly. Both functions complement the high-sensitivity pointed observations provided by ground-based detectors. Finally, the large field of view of GLAST will allow a study of gamma-ray emission on large angular scales and identify interesting regions of the sky for deeper studies at higher energies. In this poster, we will discuss the science returns that might result from joint GLAST/ground-based gamma-ray observations and illustrate them with detailed source simulations.

  2. GLAST and Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The launch of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope together with the advent of a new generation of ground-based gamma-ray detectors such as VERITAS, HESS, MAGIC and CANGAROO, will usher in a new era of high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics. GLAST and the ground based gamma-ray observatories will provide highly complementary capabilities for spectral, temporal and spatial studies of high energy gamma-ray sources. Joint observations will cover a huge energy range, from 20 MeV to over 20 TeV. The LAT will survey the entire sky every three hours, allowing it both to perform uniform, long-term monitoring of variable sources and to detect flaring sources promptly. Both functions complement the high-sensitivity pointed observations provided by ground-based detectors. Finally, the large field of view of GLAST will allow a study of gamma-ray emission on large angular scales and identify interesting regions of the sky for deeper studies at higher energies. In this poster, we will discuss the science returns that might result from joint GLAST/ground-based gamma-ray observations and illustrate them with detailed source simulations.

  3. Coordinated ground-based, low altitude satellite and Cluster observations on global and local scales during a transient post-noon sector excursion of the magnetospheric cusp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opgenoorth, H.J.; Lockwood, M.; Alcayde, D.

    2001-01-01

    in Canada, Greenland and Scandinavia. After an initial eastward and later poleward expansion of the flow-channel between 13:20 and 13:40 UT, the four Cluster spacecraft, and the field line footprints covered by the eastward looking scan cycle of the Sondre Stromfjord incoherent scatter radar were engulfed...... formed to the west and north of the radar. From a detailed analysis of the coordinated Cluster and ground-based data, it was found that this extraordinary transient convection pattern, indeed, had moved the cusp precipitation from its former pre-noon position into the late post-noon sector, allowing...

  4. Tentative detection of clear-air turbulence using a ground-based Rayleigh lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauchecorne, Alain; Cot, Charles; Dalaudier, Francis; Porteneuve, Jacques; Gaudo, Thierry; Wilson, Richard; Cénac, Claire; Laqui, Christian; Keckhut, Philippe; Perrin, Jean-Marie; Dolfi, Agnès; Cézard, Nicolas; Lombard, Laurent; Besson, Claudine

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric gravity waves and turbulence generate small-scale fluctuations of wind, pressure, density, and temperature in the atmosphere. These fluctuations represent a real hazard for commercial aircraft and are known by the generic name of clear-air turbulence (CAT). Numerical weather prediction models do not resolve CAT and therefore provide only a probability of occurrence. A ground-based Rayleigh lidar was designed and implemented to remotely detect and characterize the atmospheric variability induced by turbulence in vertical scales between 40 m and a few hundred meters. Field measurements were performed at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP, France) on 8 December 2008 and 23 June 2009. The estimate of the mean squared amplitude of bidimensional fluctuations of lidar signal showed excess compared to the estimated contribution of the instrumental noise. This excess can be attributed to atmospheric turbulence with a 95% confidence level. During the first night, data from collocated stratosphere-troposphere (ST) radar were available. Altitudes of the turbulent layers detected by the lidar were roughly consistent with those of layers with enhanced radar echo. The derived values of turbulence parameters Cn2 or CT2 were in the range of those published in the literature using ST radar data. However, the detection was at the limit of the instrumental noise and additional measurement campaigns are highly desirable to confirm these initial results. This is to our knowledge the first successful attempt to detect CAT in the free troposphere using an incoherent Rayleigh lidar system. The built lidar device may serve as a test bed for the definition of embarked CAT detection lidar systems aboard airliners.

  5. New-Measurement Techniques to Diagnose Charged Dust and Plasma Layers in the Near-Earth Space Environment Using Ground-Based Ionospheric Heating Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoudian, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Recently, experimental observations have shown that radar echoes from the irregularitysource region associated with mesospheric dusty space plasmas may be modulated by radio wave heating with ground-based ionospheric heating facilities. These experiments show great promise as a diagnostic for the associated dusty plasma in the Near-Earth Space Environment which is believed to have links to global change. This provides an alternative to more complicated and costly space-based observational app...

  6. Planetary Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neish, Catherine D.; Carter, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of planetary radar, and the primary scientific discoveries that have been made using this technique. The chapter starts by describing the different types of radar systems and how they are used to acquire images and accurate topography of planetary surfaces and probe their subsurface structure. It then explains how these products can be used to understand the properties of the target being investigated. Several examples of discoveries made with planetary radar are then summarized, covering solar system objects from Mercury to Saturn. Finally, opportunities for future discoveries in planetary radar are outlined and discussed.

  7. Seven years of middle-atmospheric CO in the Arctic by ground based radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Niall; Palm, Mathias; Raffalski, Uwe; Larsson, Richard; Notholt, Justus

    2016-04-01

    During polar winter, carbon monoxide (CO) is a well-suited tracer for middle atmospheric dynamics and for studying the polar vortex boundary: In polar night the chemical reactions involving atmospheric carbon monoxide are negligible due to the lack of sunlight and, as a result, the gas exhibits strong vertical and horizontal gradients in the stratosphere and mesosphere. Due to the upcoming likely gap in satellite profiling instruments, and in order to maintain a long-term global record of atmospheric trace gas concentrations, current and future satellite missions must be inter-calibrated using measurements from ground-based instruments around the globe. The Kiruna Microwave Radiometer (KIMRA), installed at the Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna, Sweden (67.8 N, 20.4 E), has been measuring microwave spectra of emissions from atmospheric CO since 2007. This contribution presents the CO concentration record which has been retrieved from KIMRA measurements using different temperature datasets: measurements from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program - F18 and model output from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. The concentration profiles, retrieved between 40 and 80 km altitude, are compared to data from the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Aura satellite and are used to examine the concentration gradient across the polar vortex edge.

  8. A Potential Integrated Multiwavelength Radar System at the Medicina Radiotelescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montebugnoli, S.; Salerno, E.; Pupillo, G.; Pluchino, S.

    2009-03-01

    Ground-based radars provide a powerful tool for detection, tracking and identification of the space debris fragments orbiting around Earth at different altitudes. The Medicina Radioastronomical Station is an Italian radio observation facility that is here proposed as receiving part of a bistatic radar system for detecting and tracking space debris at different orbital regions (from Low Earth Orbits up to Geostationary Earth Orbits).

  9. Ground-based observations of Kepler asteroseismic targets

    CERN Document Server

    Uytterhoeven, K; Southworth, J; Randall, S; Ostensen, R; Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Marconi, M; Kurtz, D W; Kiss, L; Gutierrez-Soto, J; Frandsen, S; De Cat, P; Bruntt, H; Briquet, M; Zhang, X B; Telting, J H; Steslicki, M; Ripepi, V; Pigulski, A; Paparo, M; Oreiro, R; Choong, Ngeow Chow; Niemczura, E; Nemec, J; Narwid, A; Mathias, P; Martin-Ruiz, S; Lehman, H; Kopacki, G; Karoff, C; Jackiewicz, J; Henden, A A; Handler, G; Grigachene, A; Green, E M; Garrido, R; Machado, L Fox; Debosscher, J; Creevey, O L; Catanzaro, G; Bognar, Z; Biazzo, K; Bernabei, S

    2010-01-01

    We present the ground-based activities within the different working groups of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium (KASC). The activities aim at the systematic characterization of the 5000+ KASC targets, and at the collection of ground-based follow-up time-series data of selected promising Kepler pulsators. So far, 35 different instruments at 30 telescopes on 22 different observatories in 12 countries are in use, and a total of more than 530 observing nights has been awarded. (Based on observations made with the Isaac Newton Telescope, William Herschel Telescope, Nordic Optical Telescope, Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, Mercator Telescope (La Palma, Spain), and IAC-80 (Tenerife, Spain). Also based on observations taken at the observatories of Sierra Nevada, San Pedro Martir, Vienna, Xinglong, Apache Point, Lulin, Tautenburg, Loiano, Serra la Nave, Asiago, McDonald, Skinakas, Pic du Midi, Mauna Kea, Steward Observatory, Bialkow Observatory of the Wroclaw University, Piszkesteto Mountain Station, Observato...

  10. Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Technology Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Leslie A.

    2014-01-13

    This GNDD Technology Roadmap is intended to provide guidance to potential researchers and help management define research priorities to achieve technology advancements for ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring science being pursued by the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team within the Office of Nuclear Detonation Detection in the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Four science-based elements were selected to encompass the entire scope of nuclear monitoring research and development (R&D) necessary to facilitate breakthrough scientific results, as well as deliver impactful products. Promising future R&D is delineated including dual use associated with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Important research themes as well as associated metrics are identified along with a progression of accomplishments, represented by a selected bibliography, that are precursors to major improvements to nuclear explosion monitoring.

  11. Land Cover Characterization and Classification of Arctic Tundra Environments by Means of Polarized Synthetic Aperture X- and C-Band Radar (PolSAR and Landsat 8 Multispectral Imagery — Richards Island, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Ullmann

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the potential of polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR data of dual-polarized TerraSAR-X (HH/VV and quad-polarized Radarsat-2 was examined in combination with multispectral Landsat 8 data for unsupervised and supervised classification of tundra land cover types of Richards Island, Canada. The classification accuracies as well as the backscatter and reflectance characteristics were analyzed using reference data collected during three field work campaigns and include in situ data and high resolution airborne photography. The optical data offered an acceptable initial accuracy for the land cover classification. The overall accuracy was increased by the combination of PolSAR and optical data and was up to 71% for unsupervised (Landsat 8 and TerraSAR-X and up to 87% for supervised classification (Landsat 8 and Radarsat-2 for five tundra land cover types. The decomposition features of the dual and quad-polarized data showed a high sensitivity for the non-vegetated substrate (dominant surface scattering and wetland vegetation (dominant double bounce and volume scattering. These classes had high potential to be automatically detected with unsupervised classification techniques.

  12. Incidence angle normalization of radar backscatter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    NASA’s Soil Moisture Passive Active (SMAP) satellite (~2014) will include a radar system that will provide L-band multi-polarization backscatter at a constant incidence angle of 40º. During the pre-launch phase of the project there is a need for observations that will support the radar-based soil mo...

  13. Ground-Based Calibration Of A Microwave Landing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriazes, John J.; Scott, Marshall M., Jr.; Willis, Alfred D.; Erdogan, Temel; Reyes, Rolando

    1996-01-01

    System of microwave instrumentation and data-processing equipment developed to enable ground-based calibration of microwave scanning-beam landing system (MSBLS) at distances of about 500 to 1,000 ft from MSBLS transmitting antenna. Ensures accuracy of MSBLS near touchdown point, without having to resort to expense and complex logistics of aircraft-based testing. Modified versions prove useful in calibrating aircraft instrument landing systems.

  14. Ground-Based Lidar for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Ozone Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J.; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than 10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures.

  15. Ground-based lidar for atmospheric boundary layer ozone measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-05-20

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than ±10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures.

  16. Nighttime Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements Using a Ground-based Lunar Photometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkoff, Tim; Omar, Ali; Haggard, Charles; Pippin, Margaret; Tasaddaq, Aasam; Stone, Tom; Rodriguez, Jon; Slutsker, Ilya; Eck, Tom; Holben, Brent; hide

    2015-01-01

    In recent years it was proposed to combine AERONET network photometer capabilities with a high precision lunar model used for satellite calibration to retrieve columnar nighttime AODs. The USGS lunar model can continuously provide pre-atmosphere high precision lunar irradiance determinations for multiple wavelengths at ground sensor locations. When combined with measured irradiances from a ground-based AERONET photometer, atmospheric column transmissions can determined yielding nighttime column aerosol AOD and Angstrom coefficients. Additional demonstrations have utilized this approach to further develop calibration methods and to obtain data in polar regions where extended periods of darkness occur. This new capability enables more complete studies of the diurnal behavior of aerosols, and feedback for models and satellite retrievals for the nighttime behavior of aerosols. It is anticipated that the nighttime capability of these sensors will be useful for comparisons with satellite lidars such as CALIOP and CATS in additional to ground-based lidars in MPLNET at night, when the signal-to-noise ratio is higher than daytime and more precise AOD comparisons can be made.

  17. Five-day planetary waves in the middle atmosphere from Odin satellite data and ground-based instruments in Northern Hemisphere summer 2003, 2004, 2005 and 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Belova

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies have shown that 5-day planetary waves modulate noctilucent clouds and the closely related Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE at the summer mesopause. Summer stratospheric winds should inhibit wave propagation through the stratosphere and, although some numerical models (Geisler and Dickinson, 1976 do show a possibility for upward wave propagation, it has also been suggested that the upward propagation may in practice be confined to the winter hemisphere with horizontal propagation of the wave from the winter to the summer hemisphere at mesosphere heights causing the effects observed at the summer mesopause. It has further been proposed (Garcia et al., 2005 that 5-day planetary waves observed in the summer mesosphere could be excited in-situ by baroclinic instability in the upper mesosphere. In this study, we first extract and analyze 5-day planetary wave characteristics on a global scale in the middle atmosphere (up to 54 km in temperature, and up to 68 km in ozone concentration using measurements by the Odin satellite for selected days during northern hemisphere summer from 2003, 2004, 2005 and 2007. Second, we show that 5-day temperature fluctuations consistent with westward-traveling 5-day waves are present at the summer mesopause, using local ground-based meteor-radar observations. Finally we examine whether any of three possible sources of the detected temperature fluctuations at the summer mesopause can be excluded: upward propagation from the stratosphere in the summer-hemisphere, horizontal propagation from the winter-hemisphere or in-situ excitation as a result of the baroclinic instability. We find that in one case, far from solstice, the baroclinic instability is unlikely to be involved. In one further case, close to solstice, upward propagation in the same hemisphere seems to be ruled out. In all other cases, all or any of the three proposed mechanisms are consistent with the observations.

  18. System-level view of geospace dynamics: Challenges for high-latitude ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, E.

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, research programs including GEM, CEDAR, GEMSIS, GO Canada, and others are focusing on how geospace works as a system. Coupling sits at the heart of system level dynamics. In all cases, coupling is accomplished via fundamental processes such as reconnection and plasma waves, and can be between regions, energy ranges, species, scales, and energy reservoirs. Three views of geospace are required to attack system level questions. First, we must observe the fundamental processes that accomplish the coupling. This "observatory view" requires in situ measurements by satellite-borne instruments or remote sensing from powerful well-instrumented ground-based observatories organized around, for example, Incoherent Scatter Radars. Second, we need to see how this coupling is controlled and what it accomplishes. This demands quantitative observations of the system elements that are being coupled. This "multi-scale view" is accomplished by networks of ground-based instruments, and by global imaging from space. Third, if we take geospace as a whole, the system is too complicated, so at the top level we need time series of simple quantities such as indices that capture important aspects of the system level dynamics. This requires a "key parameter view" that is typically provided through indices such as AE and DsT. With the launch of MMS, and ongoing missions such as THEMIS, Cluster, Swarm, RBSP, and ePOP, we are entering a-once-in-a-lifetime epoch with a remarkable fleet of satellites probing processes at key regions throughout geospace, so the observatory view is secure. With a few exceptions, our key parameter view provides what we need. The multi-scale view, however, is compromised by space/time scales that are important but under-sampled, combined extent of coverage and resolution that falls short of what we need, and inadequate conjugate observations. In this talk, I present an overview of what we need for taking system level research to its next level, and how

  19. SMAP RADAR Calibration and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R. D.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; Chaubel, M. J.; Spencer, M.; Chan, S. F.; Chen, C. W.; Fore, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission launched on Jan 31, 2015. The mission employs L-band radar and radiometer measurements to estimate soil moisture with 4% volumetric accuracy at a resolution of 10 km, and freeze-thaw state at a resolution of 1-3 km. Immediately following launch, there was a three month instrument checkout period, followed by six months of level 1 (L1) calibration and validation. In this presentation, we will discuss the calibration and validation activities and results for the L1 radar data. Early SMAP radar data were used to check commanded timing parameters, and to work out issues in the low- and high-resolution radar processors. From April 3-13 the radar collected receive only mode data to conduct a survey of RFI sources. Analysis of the RFI environment led to a preferred operating frequency. The RFI survey data were also used to validate noise subtraction and scaling operations in the radar processors. Normal radar operations resumed on April 13. All radar data were examined closely for image quality and calibration issues which led to improvements in the radar data products for the beta release at the end of July. Radar data were used to determine and correct for small biases in the reported spacecraft attitude. Geo-location was validated against coastline positions and the known positions of corner reflectors. Residual errors at the time of the beta release are about 350 m. Intra-swath biases in the high-resolution backscatter images are reduced to less than 0.3 dB for all polarizations. Radiometric cross-calibration with Aquarius was performed using areas of the Amazon rain forest. Cross-calibration was also examined using ocean data from the low-resolution processor and comparing with the Aquarius wind model function. Using all a-priori calibration constants provided good results with co-polarized measurements matching to better than 1 dB, and cross-polarized measurements matching to about 1 dB in the beta release. During the

  20. Estimation of rain rate by microwave radiometry and active radar during CLEOPATRA `92

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, M.T. [Inst. of Radioengineering and Electronics, RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Hagen, M. [Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere, DLR Oberpfaffenhofen, Wessling (Germany); Evtushenko, A.V. [Inst. of Radioengineering and Electronics, RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kutuza, B.G. [Inst. of Radioengineering and Electronics, RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Meischner, P.F. [Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere, DLR Oberpfaffenhofen, Wessling (Germany); Petrenko, B.Z. [Inst. of Radioengineering and Electronics, RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-11-01

    Microwave radiometers operating at wavelengths 0.3, 0.8, 1.35 and 2.25 cm were used to estimate rain rates from ground during CLEOPATRA (Meischner et al., 1993). The systems were similar to those planned for the forthcoming PRIRODA mission. They were mainly operated looking at a fixed elevation of 75 . A model for estimation of the microwave emission of a rain layer taking into account polarization effects is briefly described. Originally designed for the evaluation of space borne measurements it was modified for ground based measurements and used to retrieve different rain parameters of interest. Intercomparisons with simultaneous measurements by the polarimetric Doppler radar POLDIRAD of DLR (Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt) and rain gauges provided the base for validation of the algorithm for rain rate estimations. Agreement strongly depends on the type of rain event characterized by the homogeneity of the rain clouds and by different drop size distributions influencing especially the radar measurements. Passive microwave radiometer measurements and active polarimetric radar measurements ideally complement each other in rain rate estimations from space as well as from ground. Ground based active radar is of importance in estimating small scale structures in time and space, such reducing possible errors of the radiometer measurements and for the selection of appropriate parameters for the rain model. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ein Mikrowellenradiometersystem mit den Wellenlaengen 0,3; 0,8; 1,35 und 2,25 cm wurde eingesetzt, um Regenraten am Grund waehrend CLEOPATRA (Meischner et al., 1993) zu messen. Das System entspricht einer Konfiguration, die mit der zukuenftigen PRIRODA Mission auf der russischen Raumstation MIR fliegen soll. Die Messungen wurden weitgehend unter einem festen Elevationswinkel von 75 durchgefuehrt. Ein Modell zur Bestimmung der emittierten Mikrowellenstrahlung unter Beruecksichtigung polarimetrischer Effekte wird kurz beschrieben

  1. Intermittency of the turbulent processes in the Earth's magnetosphere detected from the ground-based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, Marina; Foppiano, Alberto; Ovalle, Elias; Antonova, Elizavieta; Troshichev, Oleg

    2008-11-01

    Turbulent processes in the Earth's magnetosphere are reflected in the dynamical behavior of the geomagnetic indices and other parameters determined from ground based observations. Intermittent properties of one minute Polar Cap (PC) index and auroral radio wave absorption are studied using 1995-2000 data sets. It was found that the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of both PC-index and absorption fluctuations display a strong non-Gaussian shape. This indicates that they are not characterized by a global time self-similarity but rather exhibit intermittency, as previously reported for solar wind velocity and auroral electrojet index values. In the case of the auroral absorption it was also found that intermittency strongly depends on the magnetic local time, being largest in the nighttime sector. This shows that the acceleration of precipitating particles is intermittent, especially near the substorm eye, where the level of turbulence increases. Application of the Local Intermittency Measure (LIM) technique confirms the aforementioned results to a better precision.

  2. Detecting and mitigating wind turbine clutter for airspace radar systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Qin

    2013-01-01

    It is well recognized that a wind turbine has a large radar cross-section (RCS) and, due to the movement of the blades, the wind turbine will generate a Doppler frequency shift. This scattering behavior may cause severe interferences on existing radar systems including static ground-based radars and spaceborne or airborne radars. To resolve this problem, efficient techniques or algorithms should be developed to mitigate the effects of wind farms on radars. Herein, one transponder-based mitigation technique is presented. The transponder is not a new concept, which has been proposed for calibrating high-resolution imaging radars. It modulates the radar signal in a manner that the retransmitted signals can be separated from the scene echoes. As wind farms often occupy only a small area, mitigation processing in the whole radar operation will be redundant and cost inefficient. Hence, this paper uses a transponder to determine whether the radar is impacted by the wind farms. If so, the effects of wind farms are then mitigated with subsequent Kalman filtering or plot target extraction algorithms. Taking airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and pulse Doppler radar as the examples, this paper provides the corresponding system configuration and processing algorithms. The effectiveness of the mitigation technique is validated by numerical simulation results.

  3. Simulated forecasts for primordial B -mode searches in ground-based experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, David; Dunkley, Joanna; Thorne, Ben; Næss, Sigurd

    2017-02-01

    Detecting the imprint of inflationary gravitational waves on the B -mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is one of the main science cases for current and next-generation CMB experiments. In this work we explore some of the challenges that ground-based facilities will have to face in order to carry out this measurement in the presence of galactic foregrounds and correlated atmospheric noise. We present forecasts for stage-3 (S3) and planned stage-4 (S4) experiments based on the analysis of simulated sky maps using a map-based Bayesian foreground-cleaning method. Our results thus consistently propagate the uncertainties on foreground parameters such as spatially varying spectral indices, as well as the bias on the measured tensor-to-scalar ratio r caused by an incorrect modeling of the foregrounds. We find that S3 and S4-like experiments should be able to put constraints on r of the order σ (r )=(0.5 - 1.0 )×10-2 and σ (r )=(0.5 - 1.0 )×10-3 respectively, assuming instrumental systematic effects are under control. We further study deviations from the fiducial foreground model, finding that, while the effects of a second polarized dust component would be minimal on both S3 and S4, a 2% polarized anomalous dust emission component would be clearly detectable by stage-4 experiments.

  4. Atmospheric aerosol characterization with a ground-based SPEX spectropolarimetric instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. van Harten

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of atmospheric aerosols is important for understanding their impact on health and climate. A wealth of aerosol parameters can be retrieved from multi-angle, multi-wavelength radiance and polarization measurements of the clear sky. We developed a ground-based SPEX instrument (groundSPEX for accurate spectropolarimetry, based on the passive, robust, athermal and snapshot spectral polarization modulation technique, and hence ideal for field deployment. It samples the scattering phase function in the principal plane in an automated fashion, using a motorized pan/tilt unit and automatic exposure time detection. Extensive radiometric and polarimetric calibrations were performed, yielding values for both random noise and systematic uncertainties. The absolute polarimetric accuracy at low degrees of polarization is established to be ~ 5 × 10−3. About 70 measurement sequences have been performed throughout four clear-sky days at Cabauw, the Netherlands. Several aerosol parameters were retrieved: aerosol optical thickness, effective radius, and complex refractive index for fine and coarse mode. The results are in good agreement with the co-located AERONET products, with a correlation coefficient of ρ = 0.932 for the total aerosol optical thickness at 550 nm.

  5. Recent advances in geologic mapping by radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, T. G.

    1984-01-01

    Quantitative techniques are available which allow the analysis of SAR images for the derivation of geological surface and process data. In conjunction with calibrated radar sensors operating at several incidence angles, wavelengths, and polarizations, the compilation of multiparameter radar signatures of lithological and geomorphic units can accordingly proceed for geological mapping in unknown areas. While radar image tone can be used in arid zones to derive surface micromorphology, heavily vegetated tropical regions require the analysis of radar image texture by means of Fourier techniques which decompose the image into bandpasses that represent different scales of texture.

  6. Techniques for Radar Imaging Based on MUSIC Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    At first, the radar target scattering centers model and MUSIC algorithm are analyzed in this paper. How to efficiently set the parameters of the MUSIC algorithms is given by a great deal of simulated radar data in experiments. After that, according to measured data from two kinds of plane targets on fully polarized and high range resolution radar system, the author mainly investigated particular utilization of MUSIC algorithm in radar imaging. And two-dimensional radar images are generated for two targets measured in compact range. In the end, a conclusion is drew about the relation of radar target scattering properties and imaging results.

  7. Modeling Characteristics Of Surfaces For Radar Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Zyl, Jakob J.; Zebker, Howard A.; Durden, Stephen L.

    1992-01-01

    Paper reviews mathematical models of polarimetric radar backscattering characteristics of various types of terrain; forests, grasslands, and lava fields. Represents approach to imaging radar polarimetry in which one accumulates models predicting realistic polarization signatures and represent distinct scattering processes, without attempting full vector solutions of Maxwell's equations in all cases. Idea to develop ability to invert models to identify unknown terrain depicted in polarimetric radar images. Describes models, major scattering characteristics predicted by models, and interpretation of characteristics in terms of dominant scattering mechanisms. Models predict realistic polarization signatures.

  8. Radar for Mapping Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barath, F. T.; Jordan, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    X-band system has 100-m2 resolution. Wide swath imaging radar of synthetic aperature type transmits signal to ground station for subsequent processing into imagery. Concept meets functional requirements for continuously mapping sea ice in north and south polar regions.

  9. Augmenting WFIRST Microlensing with a Ground-Based Telescope Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Gould, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Augmenting the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) microlensing campaigns with intensive observations from a ground-based network of wide-field survey telescopes would have several major advantages. First, it would enable full two-dimensional (2-D) vector microlens parallax measurements for a substantial fraction of low-mass lenses as well as planetary and binary events that show caustic crossing features. For a significant fraction of the free-floating planet (FFP) events and all caustic-crossing planetary/binary events, these 2-D parallax measurements directly lead to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) of the lens object (or lens system). For even more events, the complementary ground-based observations will yield 1-D parallax measurements. Together with the 1-D parallaxes from WFIRST alone, they can probe the entire mass range M > M_Earth. For luminous lenses, such 1-D parallax measurements can be promoted to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) by high-resolution imaging. This would provide crucial information not only about the hosts of planets and other lenses, but also enable a much more precise Galactic model. Other benefits of such a survey include improved understanding of binaries (particularly with low mass primaries), and sensitivity to distant ice-giant and gas-giant companions of WFIRST lenses that cannot be detected by WFIRST itself due to its restricted observing windows. Existing ground-based microlensing surveys can be employed if WFIRST is pointed at lower-extinction fields than is currently envisaged. This would come at some cost to the event rate. Therefore the benefits of improved characterization of lenses must be weighed against these costs.

  10. The STACEE-32 Ground Based Gamma-ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hanna, D S; Boone, L M; Chantell, M C; Conner, Z; Covault, C E; Dragovan, M; Fortin, P; Gregorich, D T; Hinton, J A; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Oser, S; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Schütte, D R; Theoret, C G; Tümer, T O; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J A

    2002-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment detector in its initial configuration (STACEE-32). STACEE is a new ground-based gamma ray detector using the atmospheric Cherenkov technique. In STACEE, the heliostats of a solar energy research array are used to collect and focus the Cherenkov photons produced in gamma-ray induced air showers. The large Cherenkov photon collection area of STACEE results in a gamma-ray energy threshold below that of previous detectors.

  11. The STACEE Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gingrich, D M; Bramel, D; Carson, J; Covault, C E; Fortin, P; Hanna, D S; Hinton, J A; Jarvis, A; Kildea, J; Lindner, T; Müller, C; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Theoret, C G; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J A

    2005-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) in its complete configuration. STACEE uses the heliostats of a solar energy research facility to collect and focus the Cherenkov photons produced in gamma-ray induced air showers. The light is concentrated onto an array of photomultiplier tubes located near the top of a tower. The large Cherenkov photon collection area of STACEE results in a gamma-ray energy threshold below that of previous ground-based detectors. STACEE is being used to observe pulsars, supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei, and gamma-ray bursts.

  12. Research on target accuracy for ground-based lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ling; Shi, Ruoming

    2009-05-01

    In ground based Lidar system, the targets are used in the process of registration, georeferencing for point cloud, and also can be used as check points. Generally, the accuracy of capturing the flat target center is influenced by scanning range and scanning angle. In this research, the experiments are designed to extract accuracy index of the target center with 0-90°scan angles and 100-195 meter scan ranges using a Leica HDS3000 laser scanner. The data of the experiments are listed in detail and the related results are analyzed.

  13. Multi-variable X-band radar observation and tracking of ash plume from Mt. Etna volcano on November 23, 2013 event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montopoli, Mario; Vulpiani, Gianfranco; Riccci, Matteo; Corradini, Stefano; Merucci, Luca; Marzano, Frank S.

    2015-04-01

    Ground based weather radar observations of volcanic ash clouds are gaining momentum after recent works which demonstrated their potential use either as stand alone tool or in combination with satellite retrievals. From an operational standpoint, radar data have been mainly exploited to derive the height of ash plume and its temporal-spatial development, taking into account the radar limitation of detecting coarse ash particles (from approximately 20 microns to 10 millimeters and above in terms of particle's radius). More sophisticated radar retrievals can include airborne ash concentration, ash fall rate and out-flux rate. Marzano et al. developed several volcanic ash radar retrieval (VARR) schemes, even though their practical use is still subject to a robust validation activity. The latter is made particularly difficult due to the lack of field campaigns with multiple observations and the scarce repetition of volcanic events. The radar variable, often used to infer the physical features of actual ash clouds, is the radar reflectivity named ZHH. It is related to ash particle size distribution and it shows a nice power law relationship with ash concentration. This makes ZHH largely used in radar-volcanology studies. However, weather radars are often able to detect Doppler frequency shifts and, more and more, they have a polarization-diversity capability. The former means that wind speed spectrum of the ash cloud is potentially inferable, whereas the latter implies that variables other than ZHH are available. Theoretically, these additional radar variables are linked to the degree of eccentricity of ash particles, their orientation and density as well as the presence of strong turbulence effects. Thus, the opportunity to refine the ash radar estimates so far developed can benefit from the thorough analysis of radar Doppler and polarization diversity. In this work we show a detailed analysis of Doppler shifts and polarization variables measured by the X band radar

  14. Ground-Based Global Positioning System (GPS) Meteorology Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor (IPW)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ground-Based Global Positioning System (GPS) Meteorology Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor (IPW) data set measures atmospheric water vapor using ground-based...

  15. Statistical Studies of Ground-Based Optical Lightning Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, C. R.; Nemzek, R. J.; Suszcynsky, D. M.

    2005-12-01

    Most extensive optical studies of lightning have been conducted from orbit, and the statistics of events collected from earth are relatively poorly documented. The time signatures of optical power measured in the presence of clouds are inevitably affected by scattering,which can distort the signatures by extending and delaying the amplitude profile in time. We have deployed two all-sky photodiode detectors, one in New Mexico and one in Oklahoma, which are gathering data alongside electric field change monitors as part of the LANL EDOTX Great Plains Array. Preliminary results show that the photodiode is sensitive to approximately 50% or more of RF events detected at ranges of up to 30 km, and still has some sensitivity at ranges in excess of 60 km (distances determined by the EDOTX field-change array). The shapes of events within this range were assessed, with focus on rise time, width, peak power, and their correlation to corresponding electric field signatures, and these are being compared with published on-orbit and ground-based data. Initial findings suggest a mean characteristic width (ratio of total detected optical energy to peak power) of 291 +/- 12 microseconds and a mean delay between the RF signal peak and optical peak of 121 +/- 17 microseconds. These values fall between prior ground-based measurements of direct return stroke emissions, and scattering-dominated on-orbit measurements. This work will promote better understanding of the correspondence between radio and optical measurements of lightning.

  16. Project ORION: Orbital Debris Removal Using Ground-Based Sensors and Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    About 100,000 pieces of 1 to 10-cm debris in low-Earth orbit are too small to track reliably but large enough to cripple or destroy spacecraft. The ORION team studied the feasibility of removing the debris with ground-based laser impulses. Photoablation experiments were surveyed and applied to likely debris materials. Laser intensities needed for debris orbit modification call for pulses on the order of lOkJ or continuous wave lasers on the order of 1 MW. Adaptive optics are necessary to correct for atmospheric turbulence. Wavelength and pulse duration windows were found that limit beam degradation due to nonlinear atmospheric processes. Debris can be detected and located to within about 10 microrads with existing radar and passive optical technology. Fine targeting would be accomplished with laser illumination, which might also be used for detection. Bistatic detection with communications satellites may also be possible. We recommend that existing technology be used to demonstrate the concept at a loss of about $20 million. We calculate that an installation to clear altitudes up to 800 km of 1 to 10-cm debris over 2 years of operation would cost about $80 million. Clearing altitudes up to 1,500 km would take about 3 years and cost about $160 million.

  17. Ground-based remote sensing scheme for monitoring aerosol–cloud interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sarna

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A method for continuous observation of aerosol–cloud interactions with ground-based remote sensing instruments is presented. The main goal of this method is to enable the monitoring of cloud microphysical changes due to the changing aerosol concentration. We use high resolution measurements from lidar, radar and radiometer which allow to collect and compare data continuously. This method is based on a standardised data format from Cloudnet and can be implemented at any observatory where the Cloudnet data set is available. Two example study cases were chosen from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Program deployment at Graciosa Island, Azores, Portugal in 2009 to present the method. We show the Pearson Product–Moment Correlation Coefficient, r, and the Coefficient of Determination, r2 for data divided into bins of LWP, each of 10 g m−2. We explain why the commonly used way of quantity aerosol cloud interactions by use of an ACI index (ACIr,τ = dln re,τ/dlnα is not the best way of quantifying aerosol–cloud interactions.

  18. Evidence of rock slope breathing using ground-based InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouyet, Line; Kristensen, Lene; Derron, Marc-Henri; Michoud, Clément; Blikra, Lars Harald; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Lauknes, Tom Rune

    2017-07-01

    Ground-Based Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (GB-InSAR) campaigns were performed in summer 2011 and 2012 in the Romsdalen valley (Møre & Romsdal county, western Norway) in order to assess displacements on Mannen/Børa rock slope. Located 1 km northwest, a second GB-InSAR system continuously monitors the large Mannen rockslide. The availability of two GB-InSAR positions creates a wide coverage of the rock slope, including a slight dataset overlap valuable for validation. A phenomenon of rock slope breathing is detected in a remote and hard-to-access area in mid-slope. Millimetric upward displacements are recorded in August 2011. Analysis of 2012 GB-InSAR campaign, combined with the large dataset from the continuous station, shows that the slope is affected by inflation/deflation phenomenon between 5 and 10 mm along the line-of-sight. The pattern is not homogenous in time and inversions of movement have a seasonal recurrence. These seasonal changes are confirmed by satellite InSAR observations and can possibly be caused by hydrogeological variations. In addition, combination of GB-InSAR results, in situ measurements and satellite InSAR analyses contributes to a better overview of movement distribution over the whole area.

  19. Radar Observations of Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostro, S. J.

    2003-05-01

    During the past 25 years, radar investigations have provided otherwise unavailable information about the physical and dynamical properties of more than 200 asteroids. Measurements of the distribution of echo power in time delay and Doppler frequency provide two-dimensional images with spatial resolution as fine as a decameter. Sequences of delay-Doppler images can be used to produce geologically detailed three-dimensional models, to define the rotation state precisely, to constrain the internal density distribution, and to estimate the trajectory of the object's center of mass. Radar wavelengths (4 to 13 cm) and the observer's control of transmitted and received polarizations make the observations sensitive to near-surface bulk density and macroscopic structure. Since delay-Doppler positional measurements are orthogonal to optical angle measurements and typically have much finer fractional precision, they are powerful for refining orbits and prediction ephemerides. Radar astrometry can add decades or centuries to the interval over which an asteroid's close Earth approaches can accurately be predicted and can significantly refine collision probability estimates based on optical astrometry alone. In the highly unlikely case that a small body is on course for an Earth collision in this century, radar reconnaissance would almost immediately distinguish between an impact trajectory and a near miss and would dramatically reduce the difficulty and cost of any effort to prevent the collision. The sizes and rotation periods of radar-detected asteroids span more than four orders of magnitude. These observations have revealed both stony and metallic objects, elongated and nonconvex shapes as well as nearly featureless spheroids, small-scale morphology ranging from smoother than the lunar regolith to rougher than the rockiest terrain on Mars, craters and diverse linear structures, non-principal-axis spin states, contact binaries, and binary systems.

  20. Weather Radar Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — These data represent Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) weather radar stations within the US. The NEXRAD radar stations are...

  1. To See the Unseen: A History of Planetary Radar Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butrica, Andrew J.

    1996-01-01

    This book relates the history of planetary radar astronomy from its origins in radar to the present day and secondarily to bring to light that history as a case of 'Big Equipment but not Big Science'. Chapter One sketches the emergence of radar astronomy as an ongoing scientific activity at Jodrell Bank, where radar research revealed that meteors were part of the solar system. The chief Big Science driving early radar astronomy experiments was ionospheric research. Chapter Two links the Cold War and the Space Race to the first radar experiments attempted on planetary targets, while recounting the initial achievements of planetary radar, namely, the refinement of the astronomical unit and the rotational rate and direction of Venus. Chapter Three discusses early attempts to organize radar astronomy and the efforts at MIT's Lincoln Laboratory, in conjunction with Harvard radio astronomers, to acquire antenna time unfettered by military priorities. Here, the chief Big Science influencing the development of planetary radar astronomy was radio astronomy. Chapter Four spotlights the evolution of planetary radar astronomy at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a NASA facility, at Cornell University's Arecibo Observatory, and at Jodrell Bank. A congeries of funding from the military, the National Science Foundation, and finally NASA marked that evolution, which culminated in planetary radar astronomy finding a single Big Science patron, NASA. Chapter Five analyzes planetary radar astronomy as a science using the theoretical framework provided by philosopher of science Thomas Kuhn. Chapter Six explores the shift in planetary radar astronomy beginning in the 1970s that resulted from its financial and institutional relationship with NASA Big Science. Chapter Seven addresses the Magellan mission and its relation to the evolution of planetary radar astronomy from a ground-based to a space-based activity. Chapters Eight and Nine discuss the research carried out at ground-based

  2. Ground Based GPS Phase Measurements for Atmospheric Sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    based GPS observations for the correction of radar observations. 6 REFERENCES Alber, C., R. Ware, C. Rocken, and J. Braun, A new method for sensing ...rocken@ucar.edu Award #: N00014-97-1-0258 LONG-TERM GOAL The goal is to develop GPS remote sensing techniques to determine atmospheric signal delay and...agrees best with the observations in a least squares sense is selected. The corresponding refractivity profile is then selected. • We tested this

  3. Coordinated ground-based, low altitude satellite and Cluster observations on global and local scales during a transient post-noon sector excursion of the magnetospheric cusp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Opgenoorth

    Full Text Available On 14 January 2001, the four Cluster spacecraft passed through the northern magnetospheric mantle in close conjunction to the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR and approached the post-noon dayside magnetopause over Green-land between 13:00 and 14:00 UT. During that interval, a sudden reorganisation of the high-latitude dayside convection pattern occurred after 13:20 UT, most likely caused by a direction change of the Solar wind magnetic field. The result was an eastward and poleward directed flow-channel, as monitored by the SuperDARN radar network and also by arrays of ground-based magnetometers in Canada, Greenland and Scandinavia. After an initial eastward and later poleward expansion of the flow-channel between 13:20 and 13:40 UT, the four Cluster spacecraft, and the field line footprints covered by the eastward looking scan cycle of the Söndre Strömfjord incoherent scatter radar were engulfed by cusp-like precipitation with transient magnetic and electric field signatures. In addition, the EISCAT Svalbard Radar detected strong transient effects of the convection reorganisation, a poleward moving precipitation, and a fast ion flow-channel in association with the auroral structures that suddenly formed to the west and north of the radar. From a detailed analysis of the coordinated Cluster and ground-based data, it was found that this extraordinary transient convection pattern, indeed, had moved the cusp precipitation from its former pre-noon position into the late post-noon sector, allowing for the first and quite unexpected encounter of the cusp by the Cluster spacecraft. Our findings illustrate the large amplitude of cusp dynamics even in response to moderate solar wind forcing. The global ground-based data proves to be an invaluable tool to monitor the dynamics and width of the affected magnetospheric regions.

    Key words. Magnetospheric cusp, ionosphere, reconnection, convection flow-channel, Cluster, ground-based observations

  4. Polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE: Review of observations and current understanding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rapp

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE are very strong radar echoes primarily studied in the VHF wavelength range from altitudes close to the polar summer mesopause. Radar waves are scattered at irregularities in the radar refractive index which at mesopause altitudes is effectively determined by the electron number density. For efficient scatter, the electron number density must reveal structures at the radar half wavelength (Bragg condition for monostatic radars; ~3 m for typical VHF radars. The question how such small scale electron number density structures are created in the mesopause region has been a longstanding open scientific question for almost 30 years. This paper reviews experimental and theoretical milestones on the way to an advanced understanding of PMSE. Based on new experimental results from in situ observations with sounding rockets, ground based observations with radars and lidars, numerical simulations with microphysical models of the life cycle of mesospheric aerosol particles, and theoretical considerations regarding the diffusivity of electrons in the ice loaded complex plasma of the mesopause region, a consistent explanation for the generation of these radar echoes has been developed. The main idea is that mesospheric neutral air turbulence in combination with a significantly reduced electron diffusivity due to the presence of heavy charged ice aerosol particles (radii ~5–50 nm leads to the creation of structures at spatial scales significantly smaller than the inner scale of the neutral gas turbulent velocity field itself. Importantly, owing to their very low diffusivity, the plasma structures acquire a very long lifetime, i.e., 10 min to hours in the presence of particles with radii between 10 and 50 nm. This leads to a temporal decoupling of active neutral air turbulence and the existence of small scale plasma structures and PMSE and thus readily explains observations proving the absence of neutral air turbulence at

  5. The STACEE Ground-Based Gamma-ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragan, Ken

    2002-04-01

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a ground-based instrument designed to study astrophysical sources of gamma rays in the energy range from 50 to 500 GeV using an array of heliostat mirrors at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in New Mexico. The mirrors collect Cherenkov light generated by gamma-ray air showers and concentrate it onto cameras composed of photomultiplier tubes. The STACEE instrument is now complete, and uses a total of 64 heliostats. Prototype instruments, using smaller numbers of heliostats, have previously detected gamma emission from both the Crab Nebula and the Active Galactic Nucleus Mrk421. The complete instrument has a lower threshold -- approximately 50 GeV -- than those prototypes due to superior triggering and electronics, including flash ADCs for every channel.We will discuss the performance of the complete instrument in its first full season of operation, and present preliminary results of selected observations.

  6. Atmospheric contamination for CMB ground-based observations

    CERN Document Server

    Errard, J; Akiba, Y; Arnold, K; Atlas, M; Baccigalupi, C; Barron, D; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Cukierman, A; Delabrouille, J; Dobbs, M; Ducout, A; Elleflot, T; Fabbian, G; Feng, C; Feeney, S; Gilbert, A; Goeckner-Wald, N; Halverson, N W; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Hill, C; Holzapfel, W L; Hori, Y; Inoue, Y; Jaehnig, G C; Jaffe, A H; Jeong, O; Katayama, N; Kaufman, J; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T; Jeune, M Le; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Leon, D; Linder, E; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Miller, N J; Myers, M J; Navaroli, M; Nishino, H; Okamura, T; Paar, H; Peloton, J; Poletti, D; Puglisi, G; Rebeiz, G; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Rotermund, K M; Schenck, D E; Sherwin, B D; Siritanasak, P; Smecher, G; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Tajima, O; Takakura, S; Tikhomirov, A; Tomaru, T; Whitehorn, N; Wilson, B; Yadav, A; Zahn, O

    2015-01-01

    Atmosphere is one of the most important noise sources for ground-based Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments. By increasing optical loading on the detectors, it amplifies their effective noise, while its fluctuations introduce spatial and temporal correlations between detected signals. We present a physically motivated 3d-model of the atmosphere total intensity emission in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. We derive an analytical estimate for the correlation between detectors time-ordered data as a function of the instrument and survey design, as well as several atmospheric parameters such as wind, relative humidity, temperature and turbulence characteristics. Using numerical computation, we examine the effect of each physical parameter on the correlations in the time series of a given experiment. We then use a parametric-likelihood approach to validate the modeling and estimate atmosphere parameters from the POLARBEAR-I project first season data set. We compare our results to previous st...

  7. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel E; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfectly all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean and, as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources' right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO's observations and electromagnetic follow-up. Beyond galactic foregrounds associated with seasonal variations, we find that equatorial observatories can access over $80\\%$ of the localization probability, while mid-latitudes will access closer to $70\\%$. Facilities located near the two LIGO sites can obser...

  8. Progress in the ULTRA 1-m ground-based telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Robert C.; Martin, Robert N.; Twarog, Bruce; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara; Taghavi, Ray; Hale, Rick; Etzel, Paul; Fesen, Rob; Shawl, Steve

    2006-06-01

    We present the technical status of the Ultra Lightweight Telescope for Research in Astronomy (ULTRA) program. The program is a 3-year Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) program funded by NSF. The MRI is a collaborative effort involving Composite Mirror Applications, Inc. (CMA), University of Kansas, San Diego State University and Dartmouth College. Objectives are to demonstrate the feasibility of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite mirror technology for ground-based optical telescopes. CMA is spearheading the development of surface replication techniques to produce the optics, fabricating the 1m glass mandrel, and constructing the optical tube assembly (OTA). Presented will be an overview and status of the 1-m mandrel fabrication, optics development, telescope design and CFRP telescope fabrication by CMA for the ULTRA Telescope.

  9. Identification of rainy periods from ground based microwave radiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada Vittoria Bosisio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors present the results of a study aiming at detecting rainy data in measurements collected by a dual band ground-based radiometer. The proposed criterion is based on the ratio of the brightness temperatures observed in the 20-30 GHz band without need of any ancillary information. A major result obtained from the probability density of the ratio computed over one month of data is the identification of threshold values between clear sky, cloudy sky and rainy sky, respectively. A linear fit performed by using radiometric data and concurrent rain gauge measurements shows a correlation coefficient equal to 0.56 between the temperature ratio and the observed precipitation.

  10. Optical vortex coronagraphs on ground-based telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, Charles

    2007-01-01

    The optical vortex coronagraph is potentially a remarkably effective device, at least for an ideal unobstructed telescope. Most ground-based telescopes however suffer from central obscuration and also have to operate through the aberrations of the turbulent atmosphere. This note analyzes the performance of the optical vortex in these circumstances and compares to some other designs, showing that it performs similarly in this situation. There is a large class of coronagraphs of this general type, and choosing between them in particular applications depends on details of performance at small off-axis distances and uniformity of response in the focal plane. Issues of manufacturability to the necessary tolerances are also likely to be important.

  11. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfectly all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean and, as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources' right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO's observations and electromagnetic follow-up. These effects can inform electromagnetic follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  12. Unique cell culture systems for ground based research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Marian L.

    1990-01-01

    The horizontally rotating fluid-filled, membrane oxygenated bioreactors developed at NASA Johnson for spacecraft applications provide a powerful tool for ground-based research. Three-dimensional aggregates formed by cells cultured on microcarrier beads are useful for study of cell-cell interactions and tissue development. By comparing electron micrographs of plant seedlings germinated during Shuttle flight 61-C and in an earth-based rotating bioreactor it is shown that some effects of microgravity are mimicked. Bioreactors used in the UAH Bioreactor Laboratory will make it possible to determine some of the effects of altered gravity at the cellular level. Bioreactors can be valuable for performing critical, preliminary-to-spaceflight experiments as well as medical investigations such as in vitro tumor cell growth and chemotherapeutic drug response; the enrichment of stem cells from bone marrow; and the effect of altered gravity on bone and muscle cell growth and function and immune response depression.

  13. Spatial-angular modeling of ground-based biaxial lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agishev, Ravil R.

    1997-10-01

    Results of spatial-angular LIDAR modeling based on an efficiency criterion introduced are represented. Their analysis shows that a low spatial-angular efficiency of traditional VIS and NIR systems is a main cause of a low S/BR ratio at the photodetector input. It determines the considerable measurements errors and the following low accuracy of atmospheric optical parameters retrieval. As we have shown, the most effective protection against intensive sky background radiation for ground-based biaxial LIDAR's consist in forming of their angular field according to spatial-angular efficiency criterion G. Some effective approaches to high G-parameter value achievement to achieve the receiving system optimization are discussed.

  14. Bistatic radar

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, Nick

    2004-01-01

    Annotation his book is a major extension of a chapter on bistatic radar written by the author for the Radar Handbook, 2nd edition, edited by Merrill Skolnik. It provides a history of bistatic systems that points out to potential designers the applications that have worked and the dead-ends not worth pursuing. The text reviews the basic concepts and definitions, and explains the mathematical development of relationships, such as geometry, Ovals of Cassini, dynamic range, isorange and isodoppler contours, target doppler, and clutter doppler spread.Key Features * All development and analysis are

  15. HMF sectors since 1926: Comparison of two ground-based data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltula, T.; Mursula, K.

    In this paper, we compare two recent long-term data sets of daily HMF sector polarities since 1926 based on ground-based geomagnetic measurements: the combined data set by Echer and Svalgaard [Echer, E., Svalgaard, L. Asymmetry in the Rosenberg-Coleman effect around solar minimum revealed by wavelet analysis of the interplanetary magnetic field polarity data (1927-2002). Geophys. Res. Lett. 31, 12808, 2004] (ES data set) and a three-station data set derived by Vennerstroem et al. [Vennerstroem, S., Zieger, B., Friis-Christensen, E. An improved method of inferring interplanetary sector structure, 1905-present. J. Geophys. Res. 106 (15), 16011-16020, 2001] (VZF data set). The Rosenberg-Coleman rule is consistently valid in the ES data during the last 80 years, but fails in the VZF data set in the early cycles. There is a clear bias (T sector dominance) in the VZF data that is not observed in satellite measurements collected in the OMNI-2 data set, or in the ES data. Also, there is a difference on the success rates between the two sectors in the VZF data. Therefore, we conclude that the ES data set is more reliable, especially in cycles 16-18, in reproducing the HMF sector structure. Both data sets reproduce the southward shift of the heliospheric current sheet during the OMNI-2 interval. However, only the more reliable ES data set depicts this systematically also during the early cycles 16-18.

  16. PSC and volcanic aerosol routine observations in Antarctica by UV-visible ground-based spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkissian, A.; Pommereau, J. P.; Goutail, F.

    1994-01-01

    Polar statospheric clouds (PSC) and stratospheric aerosol can be observed by ground-based UV-visible spectrometry by looking at the variation of the color of the sky during twilight. A radiative transfer model shows that reddenings are caused by high altitude (22-28 km) thin layers of scatterers, while low altitude (12-20 km) thick ones result in blueings. The color index method applied on 4 years of observations at Dumont d'Urville (67 deg S), from 1988 to 1991, shows that probably because the station is located at the edge of the vortex, dense PSC are uncommon. More unexpected is the existence of a systematic seasonal variation of the color of the twilight sky - bluer at spring - which reveals the formation of a dense scattering layer at or just above the tropopause at the end of the winter. Large scattering layers are reported above the station in 1991, first in August around 12-14 km, later in September at 22-24 km. They are attributed to volcanic aerosol from Mt Hudson and Mt Pinatubo respectively, which erupted in 1991. Inspection of the data shows that the lowest entered rapidly into the polar vortex but not the highest which remained outside, demonstrating that the vortex was isolated at 22-26 km.

  17. Overview and Initial Results from the DEEPWAVE Airborne and Ground-Based Measurement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    The deep-propagating gravity wave experiment (DEEPWAVE) was performed on and over New Zealand, the Tasman Sea, and the Southern Ocean with core airborne measurements extending from 5 June to 21 July 2014 and supporting ground-based measurements spanning a longer interval. The NSF/NCAR GV employed standard flight-level measurements and new airborne lidar and imaging measurements of gravity waves (GWs) from sources at lower altitudes throughout the stratosphere and into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). The new GV lidars included a Rayleigh lidar measuring atmospheric density and temperature from ~20-60 km and a sodium resonance lidar measuring sodium density and temperature at ~75-105 km. An airborne Advanced Mesosphere Temperature Mapper (AMTM) and two IR "wing" cameras imaged the OH airglow temperature and/or intensity fields extending ~900 km across the GV flight track. The DLR Falcon was equipped with its standard flight-level instruments and an aerosol Doppler lidar measuring radial winds below the Falcon. DEEPWAVE also included extensive ground-based measurements in New Zealand, Tasmania, and Southern Ocean Islands. DEEPWAVE performed 26 GV flights and 13 Falcon flights, and ground-based measurements occurred whether or not the aircraft were flying. Collectively, many diverse cases of GW forcing, propagation, refraction, and dissipation spanning altitudes of 0-100 km were observed. Examples include strong mountain wave (MW) forcing and breaking in the lower and middle stratosphere, weak MW forcing yielding MW penetration into the MLT having very large amplitudes and momentum fluxes, MW scales at higher altitudes ranging from ~10-250 km, large-scale trailing waves from orography refracting into the polar vortex and extending to high altitudes, GW generation by deep convection, large-scale GWs arising from jet stream sources, and strong MWs in the MLT arising from strong surface flow over a small island. DEEPWAVE yielded a number of surprises, among

  18. Mountain wave PSC dynamics and microphysics from ground-based lidar measurements and meteorological modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Reichardt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The day-long observation of a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC by two co-located ground-based lidars at the Swedish research facility Esrange (67.9° N, 21.1° E on 16 January 1997 is analyzed in terms of PSC dynamics and microphysics. Mesoscale modeling is utilized to simulate the meteorological setting of the lidar measurements. Microphysical properties of the PSC particles are retrieved by comparing the measured particle depolarization ratio and the PSC-averaged lidar ratio with theoretical optical data derived for different particle shapes. In the morning, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT particles and then increasingly coexisting liquid ternary aerosol (LTA were detected as outflow from a mountain wave-induced ice PSC upwind Esrange. The NAT PSC is in good agreement with simulations for irregular-shaped particles with length-to-diameter ratios between 0.75 and 1.25, maximum dimensions from 0.7 to 0.9 µm, and a number density from 8 to 12 cm-3 and the coexisting LTA droplets had diameters from 0.7 to 0.9 µm, a refractive index of 1.39 and a number density from 7 to 11 cm-3. The total amount of condensed HNO3 was in the range of 8–12 ppbv. The data provide further observational evidence that NAT forms via deposition nucleation on ice particles as a number of recently published papers suggest. By early afternoon the mountain-wave ice PSC expanded above the lidar site. Its optical data indicate a decrease in minimum particle size from 3 to 1.9 µm with time. Later on, following the weakening of the mountain wave, wave-induced LTA was observed only. Our study demonstrates that ground-based lidar measurements of PSCs can be comprehensively interpreted if combined with mesoscale meteorological data.

  19. Sentinel-1 and ground-based sensors for a continuous monitoring of the Corvara landslide kinematic (South Tirol, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlögel, Romy; Darvishi, Mehdi; Cuozzo, Giovanni; Kofler, Christian; Rutzinger, Martin; Zieher, Thomas; Toschi, Isabella; Remondino, Fabio

    2017-04-01

    Sentinel-1 mission allows us to have Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) acquisitions over large areas every 6 days with spatial resolution of 20 m. This new open-source generation of satellites has enhanced the capabilities for continuously studying earth surface changes. Over the past two decades, several studies have demonstrated the potential of Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) for detecting and quantifying land surface deformation. DInSAR limitations and challenges are linked to the SAR properties and the field conditions (especially in Alpine environments) leading to spatial and temporal decorrelation of the SAR signal. High temporal decorrelation can be caused by changes in vegetation (particularly in non-urban areas), atmospheric conditions or high ground surface velocity. In this study, kinematics of the complex and vegetated Corvara landslide, situated in Val Badia (South Tirol, Italy), are monitored by a network of 3 permanent and 13 monthly Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) stations. The slope displacement rates are found to be highly unsteady and reach several meters a year. This analysis focuses on evaluating the limitations of Sentinel-1 imagery processed with Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) technique in comparison to ground-based measurements for assessing the landslide kinematic linked to meteorological conditions. Selecting some particular acquisitions, coherence thresholds and unwrapping processes gives various results in terms of reliability and accuracy supporting the understanding of the landslide velocity field. The evolution of the coherence and phase signals are studied according to the changing field conditions and the monitored ground-based displacements. DInSAR deformation maps and residual topographic heights are finally compared with difference of high resolution Digital Elevation Models at local scale. This research is conducted within the project LEMONADE (http://lemonade.mountainresearch.at) funded

  20. Nordic Snow Radar Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmetyinen, Juha; Kontu, Anna; Pulliainen, Jouni; Vehviläinen, Juho; Rautiainen, Kimmo; Wiesmann, Andreas; Mätzler, Christian; Werner, Charles; Rott, Helmut; Nagler, Thomas; Schneebeli, Martin; Proksch, Martin; Schüttemeyer, Dirk; Kern, Michael; Davidson, Malcolm W. J.

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the Nordic Snow Radar Experiment (NoSREx) campaign was to provide a continuous time series of active and passive microwave observations of snow cover at a representative location of the Arctic boreal forest area, covering a whole winter season. The activity was a part of Phase A studies for the ESA Earth Explorer 7 candidate mission CoReH2O (Cold Regions Hydrology High-resolution Observatory). The NoSREx campaign, conducted at the Finnish Meteorological Institute Arctic Research Centre (FMI-ARC) in Sodankylä, Finland, hosted a frequency scanning scatterometer operating at frequencies from X- to Ku-band. The radar observations were complemented by a microwave dual-polarization radiometer system operating from X- to W-bands. In situ measurements consisted of manual snow pit measurements at the main test site as well as extensive automated measurements on snow, ground and meteorological parameters. This study provides a summary of the obtained data, detailing measurement protocols for each microwave instrument and in situ reference data. A first analysis of the microwave signatures against snow parameters is given, also comparing observed radar backscattering and microwave emission to predictions of an active/passive forward model. All data, including the raw data observations, are available for research purposes through the European Space Agency and the Finnish Meteorological Institute. A consolidated dataset of observations, comprising the key microwave and in situ observations, is provided through the ESA campaign data portal to enable easy access to the data.

  1. The interdependence of continental warm cloud properties derived from unexploited solar background signal in ground-based lidar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Chiu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We have extensively analysed the interdependence between cloud optical depth, droplet effective radius, liquid water path (LWP and geometric thickness for stratiform warm clouds using ground-based observations. In particular, this analysis uses cloud optical depths retrieved from untapped solar background signal that is previously unwanted and needs to be removed in most lidar applications. Combining these new optical depth retrievals with radar and microwave observations at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Climate Research Facility in Oklahoma during 2005–2007, we have found that LWP and geometric thickness increase and follow a power-law relationship with cloud optical depth regardless of the presence of drizzle; LWP and geometric thickness in drizzling clouds can be generally 20–40% and at least 10% higher than those in non-drizzling clouds, respectively. In contrast, droplet effective radius shows a negative correlation with optical depth in drizzling clouds, while it increases with optical depth and reaches an asymptote of 10 μm in non-drizzling clouds. This asymptotic behaviour in non-drizzling clouds is found in both droplet effective radius and optical depth, making it possible to use simple thresholds of optical depth, droplet size, or a combination of these two variables for drizzle delineation. This paper demonstrates a new way to enhance ground-based cloud observations and drizzle delineations using existing lidar networks.

  2. Radar detection

    CERN Document Server

    DiFranco, Julius

    2004-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive tutorial exposition of radar detection using the methods and techniques of mathematical statistics. The material presented is as current and useful to today's engineers as when the book was first published by Prentice-Hall in 1968 and then republished by Artech House in 1980. The book is divided into six parts.

  3. Ka-Band ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widener, K; Bharadwaj, N; Johnson, K

    2012-03-06

    The Ka-band ARM zenith radar (KAZR) is a zenith-pointing Doppler cloud radar operating at approximately 35 GHz. The KAZR is an evolutionary follow-on radar to ARM's widely successful millimeter-wavelength cloud radar (MMCR). The main purpose of the KAZR is to provide vertical profiles of clouds by measuring the first three Doppler moments: reflectivity, radial Doppler velocity, and spectra width. At the sites where the dual-polarization measurements are made, the Doppler moments for the cross-polarization channel are also available. In addition to the moments, velocity spectra are also continuously recorded for each range gate.

  4. Emulation of Forward-looking Radar Technology for Threat Detection in Rough Terrain Environments: A Scattering and Imaging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    ground -based, ultra-wideband (UWB) radars with the capability to simultaneously penetrate the ground , and image concealed landmines and improvised...electromagnetic, ground - penetrating radar , rough terrain, target detection, time-reversal imaging 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION...developed at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL)—is the low-frequency, UWB synchronous impulse reconstruction (SIRE), imaging ground - penetrating radar

  5. Radar Investigations of Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostro, S.

    2004-05-01

    Radar investigations have provided otherwise unavailable information about the physical and dynamical properties of about 230 asteroids. Measurements of the distribution of echo power in time delay (range) and Doppler frequency (line-of-sight velocity) provide two-dimensional images with spatial resolution as fine as a decameter. Sequences of delay-Doppler images can be used to produce geologically detailed three-dimensional models, to define the rotation state precisely, to constrain the internal density distribution, and to estimate the trajectory of the object's center of mass. Radar wavelengths (4 to 13 cm) and the observer's control of transmitted and received polarizations make the observations sensitive to near-surface bulk density and macroscopic structure. Since delay-Doppler measurements are orthogonal to optical angle measurements and typically have much finer fractional precision, they are powerful for refining orbits and prediction ephemerides. Such astrometric measurements can add decades or centuries to the interval over which an asteroid's close Earth approaches can accurately be predicted and can significantly refine collision probability estimates based on optical astrometry alone. In the highly unlikely case that a small body is on course for an Earth collision in this century, radar reconnaissance would almost immediately distinguish between an impact trajectory and a near miss and would dramatically reduce the difficulty and cost of any effort to prevent the collision. The sizes and rotation periods of radar-detected asteroids span more than four orders of magnitude. The observations have revealed both stony and metallic objects, elongated and nonconvex shapes as well as nearly featureless spheroids, small-scale morphology ranging from smoother than the lunar regolith to rougher than the rockiest terrain on Mars, craters and diverse linear structures, non-principal-axis spin states, contact binaries, and binary systems.

  6. Probing Pluto's Atmosphere Using Ground-Based Stellar Occultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicardy, Bruno; Rio de Janeiro Occultation Team, Granada Team, International Occultation and Timing Association, Royal Astronomical Society New Zealand Occultation Section, Lucky Star associated Teams

    2016-10-01

    Over the last three decades, some twenty stellar occultations by Pluto have been monitored from Earth. They occur when the dwarf planet blocks the light from a star for a few minutes as it moves on the sky. Such events led to the hint of a Pluto's atmosphere in 1985, that was fully confirmed during another occultation in 1988, but it was only in 2002 that a new occultation could be recorded. From then on, the dwarf planet started to move in front of the galactic center, which amplified by a large factor the number of events observable per year.Pluto occultations are essentially refractive events during which the stellar rays are bent by the tenuous atmosphere, causing a gradual dimming of the star. This provides the density, pressure and temperature profiles of the atmosphere from a few kilometers above the surface up to about 250 km altitude, corresponding respectively to pressure levels of about 10 and 0.1 μbar. Moreover, the extremely fine spatial resolution (a few km) obtained through this technique allows the detection of atmospheric gravity waves, and permits in principle the detection of hazes, if present.Several aspects make Pluto stellar occultations quite special: first, they are the only way to probe Pluto's atmosphere in detail, as the dwarf planet is far too small on the sky and the atmosphere is far too tenuous to be directly imaged from Earth. Second, they are an excellent example of participative science, as many amateurs have been able to record those events worldwide with valuable scientific returns, in collaboration with professional astronomers. Third, they reveal Pluto's climatic changes on decade-scales and constrain the various seasonal models currently explored.Finally, those observations are fully complementary to space exploration, in particular with the New Horizons (NH) mission. I will show how ground-based occultations helped to better calibrate some NH profiles, and conversely, how NH results provide some key boundary conditions

  7. Independet Component Analyses of Ground-based Exoplanetary Transits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Martins-Filho, Walter; Griffith, Caitlin Ann; Pearson, Kyle; Waldmann, Ingo; Biddle, Lauren; Zellem, Robert Thomas; Alvarez-Candal, Alvaro

    2016-10-01

    Most observations of exoplanetary atmospheres are conducted when a "Hot Jupiter" exoplanet transits in front of its host star. These Jovian-sized planets have small orbital periods, on the order of days, and therefore a short transit time, making them more ameanable to observations. Measurements of Hot Jupiter transits must achieve a 10-4 level of accuracy in the flux to determine the spectral modulations of the exoplanetary atmosphere. In order to accomplish this level of precision, we need to extract systematic errors, and, for ground-based measurements, the effects of Earth's atmosphere, from the signal due to the exoplanet, which is several orders of magnitudes smaller. Currently, the effects of the terrestrial atmosphere and the some of the time-dependent systematic errors are treated by dividing the host star by a reference star at each wavelength and time step of the transit. More recently, Independent Component Analyses (ICA) have been used to remove systematic effects from the raw data of space-based observations (Waldmann 2014,2012; Morello et al.,2015,2016). ICA is a statistical method born from the ideas of the blind-source separation studies, which can be used to de-trend several independent source signals of a data set (Hyvarinen and Oja, 2000). One strength of this method is that it requires no additional prior knowledge of the system. Here, we present a study of the application of ICA to ground-based transit observations of extrasolar planets, which are affected by Earth's atmosphere. We analyze photometric data of two extrasolar planets, WASP-1b and GJ3470b, recorded by the 61" Kuiper Telescope at Stewart Observatory using the Harris B and U filters. The presentation will compare the light curve depths and their dispersions as derived from the ICA analysis to those derived by analyses that ratio of the host star to nearby reference stars.References: Waldmann, I.P. 2012 ApJ, 747, 12, Waldamann, I. P. 2014 ApJ, 780, 23; Morello G. 2015 ApJ, 806

  8. Spaceborne Autonomous and Ground Based Relative Orbit Control for the TerraSAR-X/TanDEM-X Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardaens, J. S.; D'Amico, S.; Kazeminejad, B.; Montenbruck, O.; Gill, E.

    2007-01-01

    . The goal of the ground segment is thus to regularly correct this configuration by performing small orbit correction maneuvers on TDX. The ground station contacts are limited due to the geographic position of the station and the costs for contact time. Only with a polar ground station a contact visibility is possible every orbit for LEO satellites. TSX and TDX use only the Weilheim ground station (in the southern part of Germany) during routine operations. This station allows two scheduled contact per day for the nominal orbit configuration, meaning that the satellite conditions can be checked with an interval of 12 hours. While this limitation is usually not critical for single satellite operations, the visibility constraints drive the achievable orbit control accuracy for a LEO formation if a ground based approach is chosen. Along-track position uncertainties and maneuver execution errors affect the relative motion and can be compensated only after a ground station contact.

  9. An autonomous receiver/digital signal processor applied to ground-based and rocket-borne wave experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowski, M. P.; LaBelle, J.; McGaw, D. G.; Broughton, M. C.

    2016-07-01

    The programmable combined receiver/digital signal processor platform presented in this article is designed for digital downsampling and processing of general waveform inputs with a 66 MHz initial sampling rate and multi-input synchronized sampling. Systems based on this platform are capable of fully autonomous low-power operation, can be programmed to preprocess and filter the data for preselection and reduction, and may output to a diverse array of transmission or telemetry media. We describe three versions of this system, one for deployment on sounding rockets and two for ground-based applications. The rocket system was flown on the Correlation of High-Frequency and Auroral Roar Measurements (CHARM)-II mission launched from Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska, in 2010. It measured auroral "roar" signals at 2.60 MHz. The ground-based systems have been deployed at Sondrestrom, Greenland, and South Pole Station, Antarctica. The Greenland system synchronously samples signals from three spaced antennas providing direction finding of 0-5 MHz waves. It has successfully measured auroral signals and man-made broadcast signals. The South Pole system synchronously samples signals from two crossed antennas, providing polarization information. It has successfully measured the polarization of auroral kilometric radiation-like signals as well as auroral hiss. Further systems are in development for future rocket missions and for installation in Antarctic Automatic Geophysical Observatories.

  10. Observing Tsunamis in the Ionosphere Using Ground Based GPS Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, D. A.; Komjathy, A.; Song, Y. Tony; Stephens, P.; Hickey, M. P.; Foster, J.

    2011-01-01

    Ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements of ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) show variations consistent with atmospheric internal gravity waves caused by ocean tsunamis following recent seismic events, including the Tohoku tsunami of March 11, 2011. We observe fluctuations correlated in time, space, and wave properties with this tsunami in TEC estimates processed using JPL's Global Ionospheric Mapping Software. These TEC estimates were band-pass filtered to remove ionospheric TEC variations with periods outside the typical range of internal gravity waves caused by tsunamis. Observable variations in TEC appear correlated with the Tohoku tsunami near the epicenter, at Hawaii, and near the west coast of North America. Disturbance magnitudes are 1-10% of the background TEC value. Observations near the epicenter are compared to estimates of expected tsunami-driven TEC variations produced by Embry Riddle Aeronautical University's Spectral Full Wave Model, an atmosphere-ionosphere coupling model, and found to be in good agreement. The potential exists to apply these detection techniques to real-time GPS TEC data, providing estimates of tsunami speed and amplitude that may be useful for future early warning systems.

  11. Tissue Engineering of Cartilage on Ground-Based Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleshcheva, Ganna; Bauer, Johann; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Egli, Marcel; Wehland, Markus; Grimm, Daniela

    2016-06-01

    Investigations under simulated microgravity offer the opportunity for a better understanding of the influence of altered gravity on cells and the scaffold-free three-dimensional (3D) tissue formation. To investigate the short-term influence, human chondrocytes were cultivated for 2 h, 4 h, 16 h, and 24 h on a 2D Fast-Rotating Clinostat (FRC) in DMEM/F-12 medium supplemented with 10 % FCS. We detected holes in the vimentin network, perinuclear accumulations of vimentin after 2 h, and changes in the chondrocytes shape visualised by F-actin staining after 4 h of FRC-exposure. Scaffold-free cultivation of chondrocytes for 7 d on the Random Positioning Machine (RPM), the FRC and the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) resulted in spheroid formation, a phenomenon already known from spaceflight experiments with chondrocytes (MIR Space Station) and thyroid cancer cells (SimBox/Shenzhou-8 space mission). The experiments enabled by the ESA-CORA-GBF programme gave us an optimal opportunity to study gravity-related cellular processes, validate ground-based facilities for our chosen cell system, and prepare long-term experiments under real microgravity conditions in space

  12. Theoretical validation of ground-based microwave ozone observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ricaud

    Full Text Available Ground-based microwave measurements of the diurnal and seasonal variations of ozoneat 42±4.5 and 55±8 km are validated by comparing with results from a zero-dimensional photochemical model and a two-dimensional (2D chemical/radiative/dynamical model, respectively. O3 diurnal amplitudes measured in Bordeaux are shown to be in agreement with theory to within 5%. For the seasonal analysis of O3 variation, at 42±4.5 km, the 2D model underestimates the yearly averaged ozone concentration compared with the measurements. A double maximum oscillation (~3.5% is measured in Bordeaux with an extended maximum in September and a maximum in February, whilst the 2D model predicts only a single large maximum (17% in August and a pronounced minimum in January. Evidence suggests that dynamical transport causes the winter O3 maximum by propagation of planetary waves, phenomena which are not explicitly reproduced by the 2D model. At 55±8 km, the modeled yearly averaged O3 concentration is in very good agreement with the measured yearly average. A strong annual oscillation is both measured and modeled with differences in the amplitude shown to be exclusively linked to temperature fields.

  13. Models of ionospheric VLF absorption of powerful ground based transmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M. B.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Inan, U. S.

    2012-12-01

    Ground based Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) radio transmitters play a role in precipitation of energetic Van Allen electrons. Initial analyses of the contribution of VLF transmitters to radiation belt losses were based on early models of trans-ionospheric propagation known as the Helliwell absorption curves, but some recent studies have found that the model overestimates (by 20-100 dB) the VLF energy reaching the magnetosphere. It was subsequently suggested that conversion of wave energy into electrostatic modes may be responsible for the error. We utilize a newly available extensive record of VLF transmitter energy reaching the magnetosphere, taken from the DEMETER satellite, and perform a direct comparison with a sophisticated full wave model of trans-ionospheric propagation. Although the model does not include the effect of ionospheric irregularities, it correctly predicts the average total power injected into the magnetosphere within several dB. The results, particularly at nighttime, appear to be robust against the variability of the ionospheric electron density. We conclude that the global effect of irregularity scattering on whistler mode conversion to quasi-electrostatic may be no larger than 6 dB.

  14. Atmospheric Refraction Path Integrals in Ground-Based Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Mathar, R J

    2004-01-01

    The basic effect of the earth's atmospheric refraction on telescope operation is the reduction of the true zenith angle to the apparent zenith angle, associated with prismatic aberrations due to the dispersion in air. If one attempts coherent superposition of star images in ground-based interferometry, one is in addition interested in the optical path length associated with the refracted rays. In a model of a flat earth, the optical path difference between these is not concerned as the translational symmetry of the setup means no net effect remains. Here, I evaluate these interferometric integrals in the more realistic arrangement of two telescopes located on the surface of a common earth sphere and point to a star through an atmosphere which also possesses spherical symmetry. Some focus is put on working out series expansions in terms of the small ratio of the baseline over the earth radius, which allows to bypass some numerics which otherwise is challenged by strong cancellation effects in building the opti...

  15. A comparative study of satellite and ground-based phenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, S; Stöckli, R; Appenzeller, C; Vidale, P L

    2007-05-01

    Long time series of ground-based plant phenology, as well as more than two decades of satellite-derived phenological metrics, are currently available to assess the impacts of climate variability and trends on terrestrial vegetation. Traditional plant phenology provides very accurate information on individual plant species, but with limited spatial coverage. Satellite phenology allows monitoring of terrestrial vegetation on a global scale and provides an integrative view at the landscape level. Linking the strengths of both methodologies has high potential value for climate impact studies. We compared a multispecies index from ground-observed spring phases with two types (maximum slope and threshold approach) of satellite-derived start-of-season (SOS) metrics. We focus on Switzerland from 1982 to 2001 and show that temporal and spatial variability of the multispecies index correspond well with the satellite-derived metrics. All phenological metrics correlate with temperature anomalies as expected. The slope approach proved to deviate strongly from the temporal development of the ground observations as well as from the threshold-defined SOS satellite measure. The slope spring indicator is considered to indicate a different stage in vegetation development and is therefore less suited as a SOS parameter for comparative studies in relation to ground-observed phenology. Satellite-derived metrics are, however, very susceptible to snow cover, and it is suggested that this snow cover should be better accounted for by the use of newer satellite sensors.

  16. Satellite Type Estination from Ground-based Photometric Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, T.; Ono, H.; Suzuki, J.; Ando, T.; Takanezawa, T.

    2016-09-01

    The optical photometric observation is potentially a powerful tool for understanding of the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) objects. At first, we measured in laboratory the surface reflectance of common satellite materials, for example, Multi-layer Insulation (MLI), mono-crystalline silicon cells, and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP). Next, we calculated visual magnitude of a satellite by simplified shape and albedo. In this calculation model, solar panels have dimensions of 2 by 8 meters, and the bus area is 2 meters squared with measured optical properties described above. Under these conditions, it clarified the brightness can change the range between 3 and 4 magnitudes in one night, but color index changes only from 1 to 2 magnitudes. Finally, we observed the color photometric data of several GEO satellites visible from Japan multiple times in August and September 2014. We obtained that light curves of GEO satellites recorded in the B and V bands (using Johnson filters) by a ground-base optical telescope. As a result, color index changed approximately from 0.5 to 1 magnitude in one night, and the order of magnitude was not changed in all cases. In this paper, we briefly discuss about satellite type estimation using the relation between brightness and color index obtained from the photometric observation.

  17. Ground-based measurements of UV Index (UVI at Helwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Farouk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available On October 2010 UV Index (UVI ground-based measurements were carried out by weather station at solar laboratory in NRIAG. The daily variation has maximum values in spring and summer days, while minimum values in autumn and winter days. The low level of UVI between 2.55 and 2.825 was found in December, January and February. The moderate level of UVI between 3.075 and 5.6 was found in March, October and November. The high level of UVI between 6.7 and 7.65 was found in April, May and September. The very high level of UVI between 8 and 8.6 was found in June, July and August. High level of radiation over 6 months per year including 3 months with a very high level UVI. According to the equation {UVI=a[SZA]b} the UVI increases with decreasing SZA by 82% on a daily scale and 88% on a monthly scale. Helwan exposure to a high level of radiation over 6 months per year including 3 months with a very high level UVI, so it is advisable not to direct exposure to the sun from 11 am to 2:00 pm.

  18. Cloud and precipitation properties from ground-based remote sensing instruments in East Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Gorodetskaya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A new comprehensive cloud-precipitation-meteorological observatory has been established at Princess Elisabeth base, located in the escarpment zone of Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica. The observatory consists of a set of ground-based remote sensing instruments (ceilometer, infrared pyrometer and vertically profiling precipitation radar combined with automatic weather station measurements of near-surface meteorology, radiative fluxes, and snow accumulation. In this paper, the observatory is presented and the potential for studying the evolution of clouds and precipitating systems is illustrated by case studies. It is shown that the synergetic use of the set of instruments allows for distinguishing ice, mixed-phase and precipitating clouds, including some information on their vertical extent. In addition, wind-driven blowing snow events can be distinguished from deeper precipitating systems. Cloud properties largely affect the surface radiative fluxes, with liquid-containing clouds dominating the radiative impact. A statistical analysis of all measurements (in total 14 months mainly occurring in summer/autumn indicates that these liquid-containing clouds occur during as much as 20% of the cloudy periods. The cloud occurrence shows a strong bimodal distribution with clear sky conditions 51% of the time and complete overcast conditions 35% of the time. Snowfall occurred 17% of the cloudy periods with a predominance of light precipitation and only rare events with snowfall > 1 mm h−1 water equivalent (w.e.. Three of such intensive snowfall events occurred during 2011 contributing to anomalously large annual snow accumulation. This is the first deployment of a precipitation radar in Antarctica allowing to assess the contribution of the snowfall to the local surface mass balance. It is shown that on the one hand large accumulation events (>10 mm w.e. day−1 during the measurement period of 26 months were always associated with snowfall, but that

  19. Limitations of Radar Coordinates

    OpenAIRE

    Bini, Donato; Lusanna, Luca; Mashhoon, Bahram

    2004-01-01

    The construction of a radar coordinate system about the world line of an observer is discussed. Radar coordinates for a hyperbolic observer as well as a uniformly rotating observer are described in detail. The utility of the notion of radar distance and the admissibility of radar coordinates are investigated. Our results provide a critical assessment of the physical significance of radar coordinates.

  20. Shifts in the eruptive styles at Stromboli in 2010–2014 revealed by ground-based InSAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Traglia, Federico; Battaglia, Maurizio; Nolesini, Teresa; Lagomarsino, Daniela; Casaglia, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Ground-Based Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (GBInSAR) is an efficient technique for capturing short, subtle episodes of conduit pressurization in open vent volcanoes like Stromboli (Italy), because it can detect very shallow magma storage, which is difficult to identify using other methods. This technique allows the user to choose the optimal radar location for measuring the most significant deformation signal, provides an exceptional geometrical resolution, and allows for continuous monitoring of the deformation. Here, we present and model ground displacements collected at Stromboli by GBInSAR from January 2010 to August 2014. During this period, the volcano experienced several episodes of intense volcanic activity, culminated in the effusive flank eruption of August 2014. Modelling of the deformation allowed us to estimate a source depth of 482 ± 46 m a.s.l. The cumulative volume change was 4.7 ± 2.6 × 105 m3. The strain energy of the source was evaluated 3–5 times higher than the surface energy needed to open the 6–7 August eruptive fissure. The analysis proposed here can help forecast shifts in the eruptive style and especially the onset of flank eruptions at Stromboli and at similar volcanic systems (e.g. Etna, Piton de La Fournaise, Kilauea).

  1. Analysis of a dryline-like feature in northern Germany detected by ground-based microwave profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spaenkuch, Dietrich [Leibniz-Soziaetet der Wissenschaften zu Berlin e.V. (Germany); Gueldner, Juergen [Deutscher Wetterdienst, Lindenberg (Germany). Meteorologisches Observatorium Lindenberg - Richard-Assmann-Observatorium; Bender, Michael [Helmholtz-Zentrum Potsdam, Potsdam (DE). Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ); Steinhagen, Hans

    2011-08-15

    Two dryline-like humidity drops without considerable temperature change were detected by the ground-based microwave radiometer profiler (MWRP) at the Richard-Assmann-Observatory Lindenberg (52.21 N, 14.12 E) on April 28, 2007. The detailed analysis of these two events includes cloud radar and radar wind profiler measurements at the site as well as data from the surface synoptic network and from integrated water vapour (IWV) maps derived from GPS. The first more pronounced humidity drop is part of a roughly 200 km long line that meets the criterion of a classical dryline or dewpoint front, namely of a moisture gradient larger 3.5 g m{sup -3} per 100 km. This dewpoint front is ahead of an approaching cold front and is caused by strong downdraft induced by low tropospheric wind shear due to weakening of a midtropospheric high over Germany. It consisted in particular in two kernels of variable size depending on their stage. The fate of the kernels - migration, speed, unification and divorce - is described in detail. Their lifetime was a bit more than 9 hours. The second humidity drop at the site was observed after the passage of the cold front and was caused by dry advection behind the front. Both events are predicted by the numerical weather prediction model COSMO-EU of the German Weather Service to some extent.

  2. Development of Deep Learning Based Data Fusion Approach for Accurate Rainfall Estimation Using Ground Radar and Satellite Precipitation Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.; Chandra, C. V.; Tan, H.; Cifelli, R.; Xie, P.

    2016-12-01

    Rainfall estimation based on onboard satellite measurements has been an important topic in satellite meteorology for decades. A number of precipitation products at multiple time and space scales have been developed based upon satellite observations. For example, NOAA Climate Prediction Center has developed a morphing technique (i.e., CMORPH) to produce global precipitation products by combining existing space based rainfall estimates. The CMORPH products are essentially derived based on geostationary satellite IR brightness temperature information and retrievals from passive microwave measurements (Joyce et al. 2004). Although the space-based precipitation products provide an excellent tool for regional and global hydrologic and climate studies as well as improved situational awareness for operational forecasts, its accuracy is limited due to the sampling limitations, particularly for extreme events such as very light and/or heavy rain. On the other hand, ground-based radar is more mature science for quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE), especially after the implementation of dual-polarization technique and further enhanced by urban scale radar networks. Therefore, ground radars are often critical for providing local scale rainfall estimation and a "heads-up" for operational forecasters to issue watches and warnings as well as validation of various space measurements and products. The CASA DFW QPE system, which is based on dual-polarization X-band CASA radars and a local S-band WSR-88DP radar, has demonstrated its excellent performance during several years of operation in a variety of precipitation regimes. The real-time CASA DFW QPE products are used extensively for localized hydrometeorological applications such as urban flash flood forecasting. In this paper, a neural network based data fusion mechanism is introduced to improve the satellite-based CMORPH precipitation product by taking into account the ground radar measurements. A deep learning system is

  3. Magnetoseismology ground-based remote sensing of Earth's magnetosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Menk, Frederick W

    2013-01-01

    Written by a researcher at the forefront of the field, this first comprehensive account of magnetoseismology conveys the physics behind these movements and waves, and explains how to detect and investigate them. Along the way, it describes the principles as applied to remote sensing of near-Earth space and related remote sensing techniques, while also comparing and intercalibrating magnetoseismology with other techniques. The example applications include advanced data analysis techniques that may find wider used in areas ranging from geophysics to medical imaging, and remote sensing using radar systems that are of relevance to defense surveillance systems. As a result, the book not only reviews the status quo, but also anticipates new developments. With many figures and illustrations, some in full color, plus additional computational codes for analysis and evaluation. Aimed at graduate readers, the text assumes knowledge of electromagnetism and physical processes at degree level, but introductory chapters wil...

  4. Validation of ACE and OSIRIS ozone and NO2 measurements using ground-based instruments at 80° N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pazmino

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Optical Spectrograph and Infra-Red Imager System (OSIRIS and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE have been taking measurements from space since 2001 and 2003, respectively. This paper presents intercomparisons between ozone and NO2 measured by the ACE and OSIRIS satellite instruments and by ground-based instruments at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL, which is located at Eureka, Canada (80° N, 86° W and is operated by the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC. The ground-based instruments included in this study are four zenith-sky differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS instruments, one Bruker Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR and four Brewer spectrophotometers. Ozone total columns measured by the DOAS instruments were retrieved using new Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC guidelines and agree to within 3.2%. The DOAS ozone columns agree with the Brewer spectrophotometers with mean relative differences that are smaller than 1.5%. This suggests that for these instruments the new NDACC data guidelines were successful in producing a homogenous and accurate ozone dataset at 80° N. Satellite 14–52 km ozone and 17–40 km NO2 partial columns within 500 km of PEARL were calculated for ACE-FTS Version 2.2 (v2.2 plus updates, ACE-FTS v3.0, ACE-MAESTRO (Measurements of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation v1.2 and OSIRIS SaskMART v5.0x ozone and Optimal Estimation v3.0 NO2 data products. The new ACE-FTS v3.0 and the validated ACE-FTS v2.2 partial columns are nearly identical, with mean relative differences of 0.0 ± 0.2% and −0.2 ± 0.1% for v2.2 minus v3.0 ozone and NO2, respectively. Ozone columns were constructed from 14–52 km satellite and 0–14 km ozonesonde partial columns and compared with the ground-based total column measurements. The satellite-plus-sonde measurements agree

  5. RADAR PPI Scope Overlay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — RADAR PPI Scope Overlays are used to position a RADAR image over a station at the correct resolution. The archive maintains several different RADAR resolution types,...

  6. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel E.; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfect all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean, and as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources’ right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO’s observations and electromagnetic (EM) follow-up. Beyond galactic foregrounds associated with seasonal variations, we find that equatorial observatories can access over 80% of the localization probability, while mid-latitudes will access closer to 70%. Facilities located near the two LIGO sites can observe sources closer to their zenith than their analogs in the south, but the average observation will still be no closer than 44° from zenith. We also find that observatories in Africa or the South Atlantic will wait systematically longer before they can begin observing compared to the rest of the world though, there is a preference for longitudes near the LIGOs. These effects, along with knowledge of the LIGO antenna pattern, can inform EM follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  7. Ground-based Measurements of Next Generation Spectroradiometric Standard Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate, radiometric standards are essential to the future of ground- and space-based astronomy and astrophysics. While astronomers tend to think of “standard stars” as available calibration sources, progress at NIST to accurately calibrate inexpensive, easy to use photodiode detectors as spectroradiometric standards from 200 nm to 1800 nm allows referencing astronomical measurements to these devices. Direction-, time-, and wavelength-dependent transmission of Earth’s atmosphere is the single largest source of error for ground-based radiometric measurement of astronomical objects. Measurements and impacts of atmospheric extinction - scattering and absorption - on imaging radiometric and spectroradiometric measurements are described. The conclusion is that accurate real-time measurement of extinction in the column of atmosphere through which standard star observations are made, over the spectral region being observed and over the field of view of the telescope are required. New techniques to directly and simultaneously measure extinction in the column of atmosphere through which observations are made are required. Our direct extinction measurement solution employs three small facility-class instruments working in parallel: a lidar to measure rapidly time variable transmission at three wavelengths with uncertainty of 0.25% per airmass, a spectrophotometer to measure rapidly wavelength variable extinction with sub-1% precision per nanometer resolution element from 350 to 1050nm, and a wide-field camera to measure angularly variable extinction over the field of view. These instruments and their operation will be described. We assert that application of atmospheric metadata provided by this instrument suite corrects for a significant fraction of systematic errors currently limiting radiometric precision, and provides a major step towards measurements that are provably dominated by random noise.

  8. Ozone profiles above Kiruna from two ground-based radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Niall J.; Walker, Kaley A.; Raffalski, Uwe; Kivi, Rigel; Gross, Jochen; Manney, Gloria L.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents new atmospheric ozone concentration profiles retrieved from measurements made with two ground-based millimetre-wave radiometers in Kiruna, Sweden. The instruments are the Kiruna Microwave Radiometer (KIMRA) and the Millimeter wave Radiometer 2 (MIRA 2). The ozone concentration profiles are retrieved using an optimal estimation inversion technique, and they cover an altitude range of ˜ 16-54 km, with an altitude resolution of, at best, 8 km. The KIMRA and MIRA 2 measurements are compared to each other, to measurements from balloon-borne ozonesonde measurements at Sodankylä, Finland, and to measurements made by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the Aura satellite. KIMRA has a correlation of 0.82, but shows a low bias, with respect to the ozonesonde data, and MIRA 2 shows a smaller magnitude low bias and a 0.98 correlation coefficient. Both radiometers are in general agreement with each other and with MLS data, showing high correlation coefficients, but there are differences between measurements that are not explained by random errors. An oscillatory bias with a peak of approximately ±1 ppmv is identified in the KIMRA ozone profiles over an altitude range of ˜ 18-35 km, and is believed to be due to baseline wave features that are present in the spectra. A time series analysis of KIMRA ozone for winters 2008-2013 shows the existence of a local wintertime minimum in the ozone profile above Kiruna. The measurements have been ongoing at Kiruna since 2002 and late 2012 for KIMRA and MIRA 2, respectively.

  9. Project management for complex ground-based instruments: MEGARA plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Vargas, María. Luisa; Pérez-Calpena, Ana; Gil de Paz, Armando; Gallego, Jesús; Carrasco, Esperanza; Cedazo, Raquel; Iglesias, Jorge

    2014-08-01

    The project management of complex instruments for ground-based large telescopes is a challenge itself. A good management is a clue for project success in terms of performance, schedule and budget. Being on time has become a strict requirement for two reasons: to assure the arrival at the telescope due to the pressure on demanding new instrumentation for this first world-class telescopes and to not fall in over-costs. The budget and cash-flow is not always the expected one and has to be properly handled from different administrative departments at the funding centers worldwide distributed. The complexity of the organizations, the technological and scientific return to the Consortium partners and the participation in the project of all kind of professional centers working in astronomical instrumentation: universities, research centers, small and large private companies, workshops and providers, etc. make the project management strategy, and the tools and procedures tuned to the project needs, crucial for success. MEGARA (Multi-Espectrógrafo en GTC de Alta Resolución para Astronomía) is a facility instrument of the 10.4m GTC (La Palma, Spain) working at optical wavelengths that provides both Integral-Field Unit (IFU) and Multi-Object Spectrograph (MOS) capabilities at resolutions in the range R=6,000-20,000. The project is an initiative led by Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain) in collaboration with INAOE (Mexico), IAA-CSIC (Spain) and Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain). MEGARA is being developed under contract with GRANTECAN.

  10. Polar cloud observatory at Ny-Ålesund in GRENE Arctic Climate Change Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanouchi, Takashi; Takano, Toshiaki; Shiobara, Masataka; Okamoto, Hajime; Koike, Makoto; Ukita, Jinro

    2016-04-01

    Cloud is one of the main processes in the climate system and especially a large feed back agent for Arctic warming amplification (Yoshimori et al., 2014). From this reason, observation of polar cloud has been emphasized and 95 GHz cloud profiling radar in high precision was established at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard in 2013 as one of the basic infrastructure in the GRENE (Green Network of Excellence Program) Arctic Climate Change Research Project. The radar, "FALCON-A", is a FM-CW (frequency modulated continuous wave) Doppler radar, developed for Arctic use by Chiba University (PI: T. Takano) in 2012, following its prototype, "FALCON-1" which was developed in 2006 (Takano et al., 2010). The specifications of the radar are, central frequency: 94.84 GHz; antenna power: 1 W; observation height: up to 15 km; range resolution: 48 m; beam width: 0.2 degree (15 m at 5 km); Doppler width: 3.2 m/s; time interval: 10 sec, and capable of archiving high sensitivity and high spatial and time resolution. An FM-CW type radar realizes similar sensitivity with much smaller parabolic antennas separated 1.4 m from each other used for transmitting and receiving the wave. Polarized Micro-Pulse Lidar (PMPL, Sigma Space MPL-4B-IDS), which is capable to measure the backscatter and depolarization ratio, has also been deployed to Ny-Ålesund in March 2012, and now operated to perform collocated measurements with FALCON-A. Simultaneous measurement data from collocated PMPL and FALCON-A are available for synergetic analyses of cloud microphysics. Cloud mycrophysics, such as effective radius of ice particles and ice water content, are obtained from the analysis based on algorithm, which is modified for ground-based measurements from Okamoto's retrieval algorithm for satellite based cloud profiling radar and lidar (CloudSat and CALIPSO; Okamoto et al., 2010). Results of two years will be shown in the presentation. Calibration is a point to derive radar reflectivity (dBZ) from original intensity data

  11. Dust optical properties retrieved from ground-based polarimetric measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengqiang; Goloub, Philippe; Blarel, Luc; Damiri, Bahaiddin; Podvin, Thierry; Jankowiak, Isabelle

    2007-03-20

    We have systematically processed one year of sunphotometer measurements (recorded at five AERONET/PHOTONS sites in Africa) in order to assess mineral dust optical properties with the use of a new polarimetry-based algorithm. We consider the Cimel CE318 polarized sunphotometer version to obtain single-scattering albedo, scattering phase matrix elements F(11) and F(12) for dust aerosols selected with Angström exponents ranging from -0.05 to 0.25. Retrieved F(11) and F(12) differ significantly from those of spherical particles. The degree of linear polarization -F(12)/F(11) for single scattering of atmospheric total column dust aerosols in the case of unpolarized incident light is systematically retrieved for the first time to our knowledge from sunphotometer measurements and shows consistency with previous laboratory characterizations of nonspherical particles.

  12. Characterization of aerosol pollution events in France using ground-based and POLDER-2 satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kacenelenbogen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the relationship between daily fine particle mass concentration (PM2.5 and columnar aerosol optical thickness derived from the Polarization and Directionality of Earth's Reflectances (POLDER satellite sensor. The study is focused over France during the POLDER-2 lifetime between April and October 2003. We have first compared the POLDER derived aerosol optical thickness (AOT with integrated volume size distribution derived from ground-based Sun Photometer observations. The good correlation (R=0.72 with sub-micron volume fraction indicates that POLDER derived AOT is sensitive to the fine aerosol mass concentration. Considering 1974 match-up data points over 28 fine particle monitoring sites, the POLDER-2 derived AOT is fairly well correlated with collocated PM2.5 measurements, with a correlation coefficient of 0.55. The correlation coefficient reaches a maximum of 0.80 for particular sites. We have analyzed the probability to find an appropriate air quality category (AQC as defined by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA from POLDER-2 AOT measurements. The probability can be up to 88.8% (±3.7% for the "Good" AQC and 89.1% (±3.6% for the "Moderate" AQC.

  13. Simulated forecasts for primordial B-mode searches in ground-based experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, David; Naess, Sigurd; Thorne, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Detecting the imprint of inflationary gravitational waves on the $B$-mode polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) is one of the main science cases for current and next-generation CMB experiments. In this work we explore some of the challenges that ground-based facilities will have to face in order to carry out this measurement in the presence of Galactic foregrounds and correlated atmospheric noise. We present forecasts for Stage-3 (S3) and planned Stage-4 (S4) experiments based on the analysis of simulated sky maps using a map-based Bayesian foreground cleaning method. Our results thus consistently propagate the uncertainties on foreground parameters such as spatially-varying spectral indices, as well as the bias on the measured tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$ caused by an incorrect modelling of the foregrounds. We find that S3 and S4-like experiments should be able to put constraints on $r$ of the order $\\sigma(r)=(0.5-1.0)\\times10^{-2}$ and $\\sigma(r)=(0.5-1.0)\\times10^{-3}$ respectively, assuming...

  14. Advances in bistatic radar

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, Nick

    2007-01-01

    Advances in Bistatic Radar updates and extends bistatic and multistatic radar developments since publication of Willis' Bistatic Radar in 1991. New and recently declassified military applications are documented. Civil applications are detailed including commercial and scientific systems. Leading radar engineers provide expertise to each of these applications. Advances in Bistatic Radar consists of two major sections: Bistatic/Multistatic Radar Systems and Bistatic Clutter and Signal Processing. Starting with a history update, the first section documents the early and now declassified military

  15. The PHOCUS Project: Particle Interactions in the Polar Summer Mesosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbel, J.; Hedin, J.; Khaplanov, M.

    2012-12-01

    On the morning of July 21, 2011, the PHOCUS sounding rocket was launched from Esrange, Sweden, into strong noctilucent clouds (NLC) and polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) observed by the Esrange lidar and the ESRAD MST radar. The aim of the PHOCUS project (Particles, Hydrogen and Oxygen Chemistry in the Upper Summer mesosphere) is to study mesospheric particles (ice and meteoric smoke) and their interaction with their neutral and charged environment. Starting out from first ideas in 2005, PHOCUS has developed into a comprehensive venture that connects to a number of new and renewed scientific questions. Interactions of interest comprise the charging and nucleation of particles, the relationship between meteoric smoke and ice, and the influence of these particles on gas-phase chemistry. This presentation gives an overview of the campaign and scientific results. The backbone of the campaign was a sounding rocket with 18 instruments from 8 scientific groups in Sweden, Norway, Germany, Austria and the USA. Atmospheric composition and ice particle properties were probed by a set of optical instruments from Stockholm University, in collaboration with the University in Trondheim. Exciting new instrument developments concerned microwave radiometers for in situ measurements of water vapour at 183 and 558 GHz by Chalmers University of Technology. Charged particles were probed by impact detectors from the University of Colorado, the University of Tromsø and the Leibniz Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP), complemented by direct particle sampling from Stockholm University. The neutral and charged background state of the atmosphere was quantified by the Technical University Graz, IAP, and the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment. Important ground-based instrumentation included the Esrange lidar, the ESRAD MST radar, the SkiYMET meteor radar and EISCAT.

  16. Radar Subsurface Imaging by Phase Shift Migration Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Hui; Benedix, Wolf-Stefan; Plettemeier, Dirk; Ciarletti, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the phase shift migration based Syn- thetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is described and applied on radar imaging for dual polarized ground penetrating radar system (GPR). Conventional techniques for SAR imaging focusing use the matched filter concept and convolve the measurement data with a filter impulse response (convolution kernel) which is modified by the range. In fact, conventional techniques for SAR imaging technique can be considered as ray-tracing based SAR imaging technique....

  17. Integrating radar and laser-based remote sensing techniques for monitoring structural deformation of archaeological monuments

    OpenAIRE

    Tapete D.; Casagli N.; Luzi G.; Fanti R.; Gigli G.; Leva D.

    2013-01-01

    Ground-Based Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (GBInSAR) and Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) were purposely integrated to obtain 3D interferometric radar point clouds to facilitate the spatial interpretation of displacements affecting archaeological monuments. The paper describes the procedure to implement this integrated approach in the real-world situations of surveillance of archaeological and built heritage. Targeted tests were carried out on the case study of the Domus Tiberiana s...

  18. Ground Based Investigation of Electrostatic Accelerometer in HUST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y.; Zhou, Z.

    2013-12-01

    High-precision electrostatic accelerometers with six degrees of freedom (DOF) acceleration measurement were successfully used in CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions which to measure the Earth's gravity field. In our group, space inertial sensor based on the capacitance transducer and electrostatic control technique has been investigated for test of equivalence principle (TEPO), searching non-Newtonian force in micrometer range, and satellite Earth's field recovery. The significant techniques of capacitive position sensor with the noise level at 2×10-7pF/Hz1/2 and the μV/Hz1/2 level electrostatic actuator are carried out and all the six servo loop controls by using a discrete PID algorithm are realized in a FPGA device. For testing on ground, in order to compensate one g earth's gravity, the fiber torsion pendulum facility is adopt to measure the parameters of the electrostatic controlled inertial sensor such as the resolution, and the electrostatic stiffness, the cross couple between different DOFs. A short distance and a simple double capsule equipment the valid duration about 0.5 second is set up in our lab for the free fall tests of the engineering model which can directly verify the function of six DOF control. Meanwhile, high voltage suspension method is also realized and preliminary results show that the horizontal axis of acceleration noise is about 10-8m/s2/Hz1/2 level which limited mainly by the seismic noise. Reference: [1] Fen Gao, Ze-Bing Zhou, Jun Luo, Feasibility for Testing the Equivalence Principle with Optical Readout in Space, Chin. Phys. Lett. 28(8) (2011) 080401. [2] Z. Zhu, Z. B. Zhou, L. Cai, Y. Z. Bai, J. Luo, Electrostatic gravity gradiometer design for the advanced GOCE mission, Adv. Sp. Res. 51 (2013) 2269-2276. [3] Z B Zhou, L Liu, H B Tu, Y Z Bai, J Luo, Seismic noise limit for ground-based performance measurements of an inertial sensor using a torsion balance, Class. Quantum Grav. 27 (2010) 175012. [4] H B Tu, Y Z Bai, Z B Zhou, L Liu, L

  19. Ground-Based Observing Campaign of Briz-M Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, S. M.; Buckalew, B.; Frith, J.; Cowardin, H. M.; Hickson, P.; Matney, M.; Anz-Meador, P.

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) completed the installation of the Meter Class Autonomous Telescope (MCAT) on Ascension Island. MCAT is a 1.3m optical telescope designed with a fast tracking capability for observing orbital debris at all orbital regimes (Low-Erath orbits to Geosyncronous (GEO) orbits) from a low latitude site. This new asset is dedicated year-round for debris observations, and its location fills a geographical gap in the Ground-based Electro Optical Space Surveillance (GEODSS) network. A commercial off the shelf (COTS) research grade 0.4m telescope (named the Benbrook telescope) will also be installed on Ascension at the end of 2016. This smaller version is controlled by the same master software, designed by Euclid Research, and can be tasked to work independently or in concert with MCAT. Like MCAT, it has a the same suite of filters, a similar field of view, and a fast-tracking Astelco mount, and is also capable of tracking debris at all orbital regimes. These assets are well suited for targeted campagins or surveys of debris. Since 2013, NASA's ODPO has also had extensive access to the 3.8m infrared UKIRT telescope, located on Mauna Kea. At nearly 14,000-ft, this site affords excellent conditions for collecting both photometery and spectroscopy at near-IR (0.9 - 2.5 micrometers SWIR) and thermal-IR (8 - 25 micrometers; LWIR) regimes, ideal for investigating material properties as well as thermal characteristics and sizes of debris. For the purposes of understanding orbital debris, taking data in both survey mode as well as targeting individual objects for more in-depth characterizations are desired. With the recent break-ups of Briz-M rocket bodies, we have collected a suite of data in the optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared of in-tact objects as well as those classified as debris. A break-up at GEO of a Briz-M rocket occurred in January, 2016, well timed for the first remote observing survey-campaign with MCAT. Access to

  20. Meteorological radar methods for validating space observations of precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Otto W.

    1991-01-01

    Meteorological approaches to verification of space measurements of rainfall are examined; validation of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) observations is expected to depend significantly on ground-based radars. Two methods of comparison are initially contemplated. TRMM rainfall data over time periods of a month for large areas (500 x 500 km) are averaged and compared with similarly averaged ground truth measurements. Both the rainfall and height distribution data from TRMM are compared with the instantaneous values observed at one or more 'ground truth' stations and from airborne radar and radiometers as available.

  1. A CubeSat for Calibrating Ground-Based and Sub-Orbital Millimeter-Wave Polarimeters (CalSat)

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Bradley R; Drysdale, Timothy D; Kalman, Andrew; Fujikawa, Steve; Keating, Brian; Kaufman, Jon

    2015-01-01

    We describe a low-cost, open-access, CubeSat-based calibration instrument that is designed to support ground-based and sub-orbital experiments searching for various polarization signals in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). All modern CMB polarization experiments require a robust calibration program that will allow the effects of instrument-induced signals to be mitigated during data analysis. A bright, compact, and linearly polarized astrophysical source with polarization properties known to adequate precision does not exist. Therefore, we designed a space-based millimeter-wave calibration instrument, called CalSat, to serve as an open-access calibrator, and this paper describes the results of our design study. The calibration source on board CalSat is composed of five "tones" with one each at 47.1, 80.0, 140, 249 and 309 GHz. The five tones we chose are well matched to (i) the observation windows in the atmospheric transmittance spectra, (ii) the spectral bands commonly used in polarimeters by the CMB c...

  2. Analysis of Sea Spikes in Radar Sea Clutter Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melief, H.W.; Greidanus, H.; Genderen, P. van; Hoogeboom, P.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract—In this paper three sets of high-resolution, coherent, and polarimetric radar sea clutter data are analyzed and compared with radar sea clutter models. The nature of the data allows a thorough analysis of the power, polarization and velocity of the sea clutter. It is shown that these

  3. Analysis of Sea Spikes in Radar Sea Clutter Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melief, H.W.; Greidanus, H.; Genderen, P. van; Hoogeboom, P.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract—In this paper three sets of high-resolution, coherent, and polarimetric radar sea clutter data are analyzed and compared with radar sea clutter models. The nature of the data allows a thorough analysis of the power, polarization and velocity of the sea clutter. It is shown that these quanti

  4. Tropospheric BrO column densities in the Arctic derived from satellite: retrieval and comparison to ground-based measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sihler

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available During polar spring, halogen radicals like bromine monoxide (BrO play an important role in the chemistry of tropospheric ozone destruction. Satellite measurements of the BrO distribution have become a particularly useful tool to investigate this probably natural phenomenon, but the separation of stratospheric and tropospheric partial columns of BrO is challenging. In this study, an algorithm was developed to retrieve tropospheric vertical column densities of BrO from data of high-resolution spectroscopic satellite instruments such as the second Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2. Unlike recently published approaches, the presented algorithm is capable of separating the fraction of BrO in the activated troposphere from the total BrO column solely based on remotely measured properties. The presented algorithm furthermore allows to estimate a realistic measurement error of the tropospheric BrO column. The sensitivity of each satellite pixel to BrO in the boundary layer is quantified using the measured UV radiance and the column density of the oxygen collision complex O4. A comparison of the sensitivities with CALIPSO LIDAR observations demonstrates that clouds shielding near-surface trace-gas columns can be reliably detected even over ice and snow. Retrieved tropospheric BrO columns are then compared to ground-based BrO measurements from two Arctic field campaigns in the Amundsen Gulf and at Barrow in 2008 and 2009, respectively. Our algorithm was found to be capable of retrieving enhanced near-surface BrO during both campaigns in good agreement with ground-based data. Some differences between ground-based and satellite measurements observed at Barrow can be explained by both elevated and shallow surface layers of BrO. The observations strongly suggest that surface release processes are the dominating source of BrO and that boundary layer meteorology influences the vertical distribution.

  5. Tropospheric BrO column densities in the Arctic from satellite: retrieval and comparison to ground-based measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sihler

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available During polar spring, halogen radicals like bromine monoxide (BrO play an important role in the chemistry of tropospheric ozone destruction. Satellite measurements of the BrO-distribution have become a particularly useful tool to investigate this probably natural phenomenon, but the separation of stratospheric and tropospheric partial columns of BrO is challenging. In this study, an algorithm was developed to retrieve tropospheric vertical column densities of BrO from data of high-resolution spectroscopic satellite instruments such as the second Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2. Unlike recently published approaches, the presented algorithm is capable of separating the fraction of BrO in the activated troposphere from the total BrO column solely based on remotely measured properties. The sensitivity of each satellite pixel to BrO in the boundary-layer is quantified using the measured UV-radiance and the column density of the oxygen collision complex O4. A comparison of the sensitivities with CALIPSO LIDAR observations demonstrates that clouds shielding near-surface trace-gas columns can be reliably detected even over ice and snow. Retrieved tropospheric BrO columns are then compared to ground-based BrO measurements from two Arctic field campaigns in the Amundsen Gulf and at Barrow in 2008 and 2009, respectively. Our algorithm was found to be capable of retrieving enhanced near-surface BrO during both campaigns in good agreement to ground-based data. Some differences between ground-based and satellite measurements observed at Barrow can be explained by both, elevated and shallow surface layers of BrO. The observations strongly suggest that surface release processes are the dominating source of BrO and that boundary-layer meteorology influences the vertical distribution.

  6. Radar-to-Radar Interference Suppression for Distributed Radar Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-Qin Wang; Huaizong Shao

    2014-01-01

    Radar sensor networks, including bi- and multi-static radars, provide several operational advantages, like reduced vulnerability, good system flexibility and an increased radar cross-section. However, radar-to-radar interference suppression is a major problem in distributed radar sensor networks. In this paper, we present a cross-matched filtering-based radar-to-radar interference suppression algorithm. This algorithm first uses an iterative filtering algorithm to suppress the radar-to-radar ...

  7. Comparison of HRDI wind measurements with radar and rocket observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrage, M.D.; Skinner, W.R.; Marshall, A.R.; Hays, P.B.; Lieberman, R.S.; Gell, D.A.; Ortland, D.A.; Morton, Y.T.; Wu, D.L.; Franke, S.J.; Schmidlin, F.J.; Vincent, R.A.

    1993-06-18

    This paper reports wind measurements in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere made by the high resolution doppler imager (HRDI) on board the upper atmosphere research satellite (UARS). These measurements are correlated with ground based radar and rocket measurements. The HRDI makes measurements by observing doppler shifts in molecular oxygen lines. The intercomparison helps to validate the remote sensing results, helps to verify the on board calibration system, and also gives a common measurement which other measurements systems can be compared against.

  8. Cross-validation Methodology between Ground and GPM Satellite-based Radar Rainfall Product over Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) Metroplex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.; Chandrasekar, V.; Biswas, S.

    2015-12-01

    -band CASA radars. In addition, we focuses on the cross-comparison between rainfall estimation from this ground based QPE system and GPM rainfall products. The observations collected during the GPM satellite overpasses over DFW area will be used extensively in this study. Data alignment for better comparison will also be presented.

  9. Ground-based observations of Saturn's H3+ aurora and ring rain from Keck in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, J.; Melin, H.; Stallard, T.; Provan, G.; Moore, L.; Badman, S. V.; Baines, K. H.; Miller, S.; Cowley, S. W. H.

    2014-12-01

    The ground-based 10-metre Keck telescope was used to probe Saturn's H3+ ionosphere in 2013. The slit on the high resolution near infrared spectrometer (NIRSPEC; (R~25,000) was aligned pole-to-pole along Saturn's rotational axis at local noon. This is also aligned (within uncertainties) to the effectively dipolar magnetic field. Four polar/auroral regions of Saturn's ionosphere were measured simultaneously as the planet rotated: 1) the northern noon main auroral oval; 2) the northern midnight main oval; 3) the northern polar cap and 4) the southern main oval at noon. The results here contain twenty-three H3+ temperatures, column densities and total emissions located at the above regions spread over timescales of both hours and days. The main findings of this study are that ionospheric temperatures in the northern main oval are cooler than their southern counterparts by tens of K; supportive of the hypothesis that the total thermospheric heating rate (Joule heating and ion drag) is inversely proportional to magnetic field strength. The main oval H3+ density and emission is lower at northern midnight than at noon, and this is in agreement with an electron influx peaking at 08:00 Saturn local time and having a minimum at midnight. When ordering the northern main oval parameters of H3+ as a function of the oscillation period seen in Saturn's magnetic field - the planetary period oscillation (PPO) phase - we see a large peak in H3+ density and emission at ˜110° phase, with a full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of ˜40°. This seems to indicate that the influx of electrons associated with the PPO phase at 90° is responsible at least in part for the behavior of all H3+ parameters. In addition to the auroral/polar data we also present the latest results from observations of Saturn's mid-to-low latitude H3+ emission. This emission is thought to be modulated by charged water product influx which flows into the planet along magnetic field lines from Saturn's rings, i.e. ring

  10. Detection of the Zeeman effect in atmospheric O2 using a ground-based microwave radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Murk, Axel; Larsson, Richard; Buehler, Stefan A.; Eriksson, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    In this work we study the Zeeman effect on stratospheric O2 using ground-based microwave radiometer measurements. The Zeeman effect is a phenomenon which occurs when an external magnetic field interacts with a molecule or an atom of total electron spin different from zero. Such an interaction will split an original energy level into several sub-levels [1]. In the atmosphere, oxygen is an abundant molecule which in its ground electronic state has a permanent magnetic dipole moment coming from two parallel electron spins. The interaction of the magnetic dipole moment with the Earth magnetic field leads to a Zeeman splitting of the O2 rotational transitions which polarizes the emission spectra. A special campaign was carried out in order to measure this effect in the oxygen emission line centered at 53.07 GHz in Bern (Switzerland). The measurements were possible using a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) spectrometer with 1 GHz of band width to measure the whole oxygen emission line centered at 53.07 GHz and a narrow spectrometer (4 MHz) to measure the center of the line with a very high resolution (1 kHz). Both a fixed and a rotating mirror were incorporated to the TEMPERA (TEMPERature RAdiometer) radiometer in order to be able to measure under different observational angles. This new configuration allowed us to change the angle between the observational path and the Earth magnetic field direction. The measured spectra showed a clear polarized signature when the observational angles were changed evidencing the Zeeman effect in the oxygen molecule. In addition, simulations carried out with the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS) [2] allowed us to verify the microwave measurements showing a very good agreement between model and measurements. The incorporation of this effect to the forward model will allow to extend the temperature retrievals beyond 50 km. This improvement in the forward model will be very useful for the assimilation of brightness temperatures in

  11. Ground-based monitoring of solar radiation in Moldova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aculinin, Alexandr; Smicov, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    Integrated measurements of solar radiation in Kishinev, Moldova have been started by Atmospheric Research Group (ARG) at the Institute of Applied Physics from 2003. Direct, diffuse and total components of solar and atmospheric long-wave radiation are measured by using of the radiometric complex at the ground-based solar radiation monitoring station. Measurements are fulfilled at the stationary and moving platforms equipped with the set of 9 broadband solar radiation sensors overlapping wavelength range from UV-B to IR. Detailed description of the station can be found at the site http://arg.phys.asm.md. Ground station is placed in an urban environment of Kishinev city (47.00N; 28.56E). Summary of observation data acquired at the station in the course of short-term period from 2004 to 2009 are presented below. Solar radiation measurements were fulfilled by using CM11(280-3000 nm) and CH1 sensors (Kipp&Zonen). In the course of a year maximum and minimum of monthly sums of total radiation was ~706.4 MJm-2 in June and ~82.1MJm-2 in December, respectively. Monthly sums of direct solar radiation (on horizontal plane) show the maximum and minimum values of the order ~456.9 MJm-2 in July and ~25.5MJm-2 in December, respectively. In an average, within a year should be marked the predominance of direct radiation over the scattered radiation, 51% and 49%, respectively. In the course of a year, the percentage contribution of the direct radiation into the total radiation is ~55-65% from May to September. In the remaining months, the percentage contribution decreases and takes the minimum value of ~ 28% in December. In an average, annual sum of total solar radiation is ~4679.9 MJm-2. For the period from April to September accounts for ~76% of the annual amount of total radiation. Annual sum of sunshine duration accounts for ~2149 hours, which is of ~ 48% from the possible sunshine duration. In an average, within a year maximum and minimum of sunshine duration is ~ 304 hours in

  12. Biosensors for EVA: Improved Instrumentation for Ground-based Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, B.; Ellerby, G.; Zou, F.; Scott, P.; Jin, C.; Lee, S. M. C.; Coates, J.

    2010-01-01

    During lunar excursions in the EVA suit, real-time measurement of metabolic rate is required to manage consumables and guide activities to ensure safe return to the base. Metabolic rate, or oxygen consumption (VO2), is normally measured from pulmonary parameters but cannot be determined with standard techniques in the oxygen-rich environment of a spacesuit. Our group has developed novel near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) methods to calculate muscle oxygen saturation (SmO 2), hematocrit, and pH, and we recently demonstrated that we can use our NIRS sensor to measure VO 2 on the leg during cycling. Our NSBRI project has 4 objectives: (1) increase the accuracy of the metabolic rate calculation through improved prediction of stroke volume; (2) investigate the relative contributions of calf and thigh oxygen consumption to metabolic rate calculation for walking and running; (3) demonstrate that the NIRS-based noninvasive metabolic rate methodology is sensitive enough to detect decrement in VO 2 in a space analog; and (4) improve instrumentation to allow testing within a spacesuit. Over the past year we have made progress on all four objectives, but the most significant progress was made in improving the instrumentation. The NIRS system currently in use at JSC is based on fiber optics technology. Optical fiber bundles are used to deliver light from a light source in the monitor to the patient, and light reflected back from the patient s muscle to the monitor for spectroscopic analysis. The fiber optic cables are large and fragile, and there is no way to get them in and out of the test spacesuit used for ground-based studies. With complimentary funding from the US Army, we undertook a complete redesign of the sensor and control electronics to build a novel system small enough to be used within the spacesuit and portable enough to be used by a combat medic. In the new system the filament lamp used in the fiber optic system was replaced with a novel broadband near infrared

  13. Biosensors for EVA: Improved Instrumentation for Ground-based Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, B.; Ellerby, G.; Zou, F.; Scott, P.; Jin, C.; Lee, S. M. C.; Coates, J.

    2010-01-01

    During lunar excursions in the EVA suit, real-time measurement of metabolic rate is required to manage consumables and guide activities to ensure safe return to the base. Metabolic rate, or oxygen consumption (VO2), is normally measured from pulmonary parameters but cannot be determined with standard techniques in the oxygen-rich environment of a spacesuit. Our group has developed novel near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) methods to calculate muscle oxygen saturation (SmO 2), hematocrit, and pH, and we recently demonstrated that we can use our NIRS sensor to measure VO 2 on the leg during cycling. Our NSBRI project has 4 objectives: (1) increase the accuracy of the metabolic rate calculation through improved prediction of stroke volume; (2) investigate the relative contributions of calf and thigh oxygen consumption to metabolic rate calculation for walking and running; (3) demonstrate that the NIRS-based noninvasive metabolic rate methodology is sensitive enough to detect decrement in VO 2 in a space analog; and (4) improve instrumentation to allow testing within a spacesuit. Over the past year we have made progress on all four objectives, but the most significant progress was made in improving the instrumentation. The NIRS system currently in use at JSC is based on fiber optics technology. Optical fiber bundles are used to deliver light from a light source in the monitor to the patient, and light reflected back from the patient s muscle to the monitor for spectroscopic analysis. The fiber optic cables are large and fragile, and there is no way to get them in and out of the test spacesuit used for ground-based studies. With complimentary funding from the US Army, we undertook a complete redesign of the sensor and control electronics to build a novel system small enough to be used within the spacesuit and portable enough to be used by a combat medic. In the new system the filament lamp used in the fiber optic system was replaced with a novel broadband near infrared

  14. Ground-based Space Weather Monitoring with LOFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Michael; van Haarlem, Michiel; Lawrence, Gareth; Reid, Simon; Bos, Andre; Rawlings, Steve; Salvini, Stef; Mitchell, Cathryn; Soleimani, Manuch; Amado, Sergio; Teresa, Vital

    As one of the first of a new generation of radio instruments, the International LOFAR Telescope (ILT) will provide a number of unique and novel capabilities for the astronomical community. These include remote configuration and operation, dynamic real-time processing and system response, and the ability to provide multiple simultaneous streams of data to a community whose scientific interests run the gamut from lighting in the atmospheres of distant planets to the origins of the universe itself. The LOFAR (LOw Frequency ARray) system is optimized for a frequency range from 30-240 MHz and consists of multiple antenna fields spread across Europe. In the Netherlands, a total 36 LOFAR stations are nearing completion with an initial 8 international stations currently being deployed in Germany, France, Sweden, and the UK. Digital beam-forming techniques make the LOFAR system agile and allow for rapid repointing of the telescope as well as the potential for multiple simultaneous observations. With its dense core array and long interferometric baselines, LOFAR has the potential to achieve unparalleled sensitivity and spatial resolution in the low frequency radio regime. LOFAR will also be one of the first radio observatories to feature automated processing pipelines to deliver fully calibrated science products to its user community. As we discuss in this presentation, the same capabilities that make LOFAR a powerful tool for radio astronomy also provide an excellent platform upon which to build a ground-based monitoring system for space weather events. For example, the ability to monitor Solar activity in near real-time is one of the key scientific capabilities being developed for LOFAR. With only a fraction of its total observing capacity, LOFAR will be able to provide continuous monitoring of the Solar spectrum over the entire 10-240 MHz band down to microsecond timescales. Autonomous routines will scan these incoming spectral data for evidence of Solar flares and be

  15. Aerosol optical properties over the Svalbard region of Arctic: ground-based measurements and satellite remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Babu, S. Suresh

    2016-05-01

    In view of the increasing anthropogenic presence and influence of aerosols in the northern polar regions, long-term continuous measurements of aerosol optical parameters have been investigated over the Svalbard region of Norwegian Arctic (Ny-Ålesund, 79°N, 12°E, 8 m ASL). This study has shown a consistent enhancement in the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients during spring. The relative dominance of absorbing aerosols is more near the surface (lower single scattering albedo), compared to that at the higher altitude. This is indicative of the presence of local anthropogenic activities. In addition, long-range transported biomass burning aerosols (inferred from the spectral variation of absorption coefficient) also contribute significantly to the higher aerosol absorption in the Arctic spring. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) estimates from ground based Microtop sun-photometer measurements reveals that the columnar abundance of aerosols reaches the peak during spring season. Comparison of AODs between ground based and satellite remote sensing indicates that deep blue algorithm of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) retrievals over Arctic snow surfaces overestimate the columnar AOD.

  16. Quality Control of Differential Propagation Phase Shift for Dual Linear Polarization Radar%双线偏振雷达差分传播相移的质量控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜牧云; 刘黎平; 胡志群; 余蓉

    2012-01-01

    Data processing and quality control is the foundation of the application of dual-linear polarization Doppler radar. Based on the observation in field experiments by a Cband Polarization Doppler Radar on Wheel (CPDRW), the difference of differential propagation phase shift ΦDP between precipitation and ground clutter and its relationship with signal-to-noise ratio SNR are analyzed and a new data analyzing and processing methodology is suggested. According to this new method, the useless ΦDP data can be given up and the KDP data with higher accuracy can be acquired. Analysis indicates that ΦDP data are vulnerable to the influence of the non-meteorological target like ground clutter and usually appears large fluctuations. Φ DP data are also sensitive to the variability of SNR and cross-correlation coefficient ρ Hv(0) , especially the latter. It appears abnormal fluctuations with the quality of related SNR and ρ Hv(0) becomes poor and that will affect the quality of the estimation of KDP data if no appropriate quality control scheme is adopted. U-sing this kind of KDP data, obvious errors in the quantitative application of precipitation estimation and precipitation particle morphology recognition can be obtained. In this new method, the abnormal volatility of ΦDP data combining with reflectivity factor ZH and radial velocity VT information is used to isolate the ground clutter, and then improper data are eliminated in the quantitative application such as quantitative precipitation estimation or attenuation correction. According to SNR and ρHV(0), the meteorological data is divided into good, poor and bad categories. For the good data, the fluctuation is smaller, the increasing trend with distances which accords with theoretical expectations is evident, so the preprocessing algorithms and estimate KDP data can be used directly; for the poor data, although the fluctuation is more pronounced than the good data, the data continuity begins to become poor and there

  17. Tracking Theory for Airborne Surveillance Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-01

    transformation is a geometric one: using the current AEW aircraft position, the maps are translated into radar-centered polar coor- dinates. The second...interference ratio. The resultant polar , AEW- relative measurements are translated into "absolute" coordinates for input to the tracker using the current...postulates any trajectory which begins in scan 2. During expansion of G5 or G6, however, this would not be the case. GI1. BDD : one target, observed in three

  18. Radar model fusion of asteroid (4179) Toutatis via its optical images observed by Chang'e-2 probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Xiao, Ting; Liu, Peng; Sun, Lei; Huang, Jiangchuan; Tang, Xianglong

    2016-06-01

    Asteroid (4179) Toutatis has been modeling by ground-based radar observations until Dec 13th, 2012, when distinct optical images of Toutatis were captured during the Chang'e-2 flyby at the shortest distance for the first time. The surface details on Toutatis in the optical images are abundant enough to reinforce the radar model descriptions. Under this context, we customized a method of frequency domain data fusion, which combines the topography information of radar model and the 3rd dimension information estimated from optical image by shape from shading algorithm, and gave out a new Toutatis' radar model. A model with abundant surface characteristics had been resulted.

  19. The PHARUS Project; Real Time Digital Processing of Airborne Polarimetric Radar Signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, H.; Hoogeboom, P.; Koomen, P.J.; Snoeij, P.

    1992-01-01

    The Dutch PHARUS project aims for the developrlenÈ of a polarimetric C-band aircraft SAR, to be finalized in 1994. The PHARUS systen consists of three subsystens: the radar, the subsystem for the onboard data processing and recording and the ground-based subsystem for SAR processing. PHARUS is a ver

  20. SuperDARN scalar radar equations

    CERN Document Server

    Berngardt, O I; Potekhin, A P

    2016-01-01

    The quadratic scalar radar equations are obtained for SuperDARN radars that are suitable for the analysis and interpretation of experimental data. The paper is based on a unified approach to the obtaining radar equations for the monostatic and bistatic sounding with use of hamiltonian optics and ray representation of scalar Green's function and without taking into account the polarization effects. The radar equation obtained is the sum of several terms corresponding to the propagation and scattering over the different kinds of trajectories, depending on their smoothness and the possibility of reflection from the ionosphere. It is shown that the monostatic sounding in the media with significant refraction, unlike the case of refraction-free media, should be analyzed as a combination of monostatic and bistatic scattering. This leads to strong dependence of scattering amplitude on background ionospheric density due to focusing mechanism and appearance of new (bistatic) areas of effective scattering with signific...

  1. Satellite and ground-based sensors for the Urban Heat Island analysis in the city of Rome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabrizi, Roberto; Bonafoni, Stefania; Biondi, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the trend of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) of Rome is analyzed by both ground-based weather stations and a satellite-based infrared sensor. First, we have developed a suitable algorithm employing satellite brightness temperatures for the estimation of the air temperature belonging...... to the layer of air closest to the surface. UHI spatial characteristics have been assessed using air temperatures measured by both weather stations and brightness temperature maps from the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) on board ENVISAT polar-orbiting satellite. In total, 634 daytime...... and nighttime scenes taken between 2003 and 2006 have been processed. Analysis of the Canopy Layer Heat Island (CLHI) during summer months reveals a mean growth in magnitude of 3-4 K during nighttime and a negative or almost zero CLHI intensity during daytime, confirmed by the weather stations. © 2010...

  2. Key Ground-Based and Space-Based Assets to Disentangle Magnetic Field Sources in the Earth's Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulliat, A.; Matzka, J.; Masson, A.; Milan, S. E.

    2016-10-01

    The magnetic field measured on the ground or in space is the addition of several sources: from flows within the Earth's core to electric currents in distant regions of the magnetosphere. Properly separating and characterizing these sources requires appropriate observations, both ground-based and space-based. In the present paper, we review the existing observational infrastructure, from magnetic observatories and magnetometer arrays on the ground to satellites in low-Earth (Swarm) and highly elliptical (Cluster) orbits. We also review the capability of SuperDARN to provide polar ionospheric convection patterns supporting magnetic observations. The past two decades have been marked by exciting new developments in all observation types. We review these developments, focusing on how they complement each other and how they have led or could lead in the near future to improved separation and modeling of the geomagnetic sources.

  3. Scheme of adaptive polarization filtering based on Kalman model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Lizhong; Qi Haiming; Qiao Xiaolin; Meng Xiande

    2006-01-01

    A new kind of adaptive polarization filtering algorithm in order to suppress the angle cheating interference for the active guidance radar is presented. The polarization characteristic of the interference is dynamically tracked by using Kalman estimator under variable environments with time. The polarization filter parameters are designed according to the polarization characteristic of the interference, and the polarization filtering is finished in the target cell. The system scheme of adaptive polarization filter is studied and the tracking performance of polarization filter and improvement of angle measurement precision are simulated. The research results demonstrate this technology can effectively suppress the angle cheating interference in guidance radar and is feasible in engineering.

  4. A Guide to Designing Future Ground-based CMB Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, W. L.K. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Kavli Inst. for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Menlo, Park, CA (United States); Errard, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Dvorkin, C. [Inst. for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States); Kuo, C. L. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Kavli Inst. for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Menlo, Park, CA (United States); Lee, A. T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); McDonald, P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Slosar, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zahn, O. [Univ. of California, Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), CA (United States)

    2014-02-18

    In this follow-up work to the High Energy Physics Community Summer Study 2013 (HEP CSS 2013, a.k.a. Snowmass), we explore the scientific capabilities of a future Stage-IV Cosmic Microwave Background polarization experiment (CMB-S4) under various assumptions on detector count, resolution, and sky coverage. We use the Fisher matrix technique to calculate the expected uncertainties in cosmological parameters in vΛCDM that are especially relevant to the physics of fundamental interactions, including neutrino masses, effective number of relativistic species, dark-energy equation of state, dark-matter annihilation, and inflationary parameters. To further chart the landscape of future cosmology probes, we include forecasted results from the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) signal as measured by DESI to constrain parameters that would benefit from low redshift information. We find the following best 1-σ constraints: σ(Mv ) = 15 meV, σ(Neff ) = 0.0156, Dark energy Figure of Merit = 303, σ(pann) = 0.00588 x 3 x 10-26 cm3/s/GeV, σ( ΩK) = 0.00074, σ(ns) = 0.00110, σ( αs) = 0.00145, and σ(r) = 0.00009. We also detail the dependences of the parameter constraints on detector count, resolution, and sky coverage.

  5. PENGGUNAAN SECONDARY SURVEILLANCE RADAR UNTUK PENENTUAN POSISI PESAWAT UDARA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhmad Hafidz Irfandi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Republik Indonesia merupakan negara kepulauan terbesar di dunia yang memiliki lebih dari 17.000 pulau dengan pertumbuhan demografi yang sangat pesat, hal ini menjadikan Indonesia sebagai negara berpenduduk terbesar ke-empat di dunia. Pesawat udara merupakan alat transportasi yang paling efektif dalam mendukung mobilitas penduduk.Navigasi atau pandu arah adalah penentuan kedudukan (position dan arah perjalanan baik di medan sebenarnya atau di peta. Navigasi ini dilakukan pada pesawat udara yang dipandu dari darat melalui sinyal yang dipancarkan oleh instrumen terpasang pada menara (ground base maupun sinyal dari satelit (satellite base.Dalam navigasi ada beberapa macam radar yang umum digunakan yaitu Primary Surveillance Radar (PSR dan Secondary Surveillance Radar (SSR.Kedua jenis radar baik PSR maupun SSR mempunyai cara kerja berbeda. Pada PSR sifatnya aktif dan pesawat yang ditargetkan sifatnya pasif.Karena PSR hanya menerima pantulan gelombang radio dari refleksi pesawat tersebut (echo.Sedangkan pesawat itu sendiri tidak ikut aktif dengan pancaran sinyal radar di bawah. Pada SSR, baik radar maupun pesawat kedua-duanya aktif. Hal ini dapat dilakukan karena pesawat terbang telah dilengkapi dengan transponder. Pesawat-pesawat yang tidak dilengkapi transponder tidak akan dapat dilihat pada radar scope seperti identifikasi pesawat, ketinggiannya, dan lain-lain.SSR merupakan peralatan untuk mendeteksi dan mengetahui posisi dan data target yang ada di sekelilingnya secara aktif, dimana pesawat ikut aktif jika menerima pancaran sinyal Radio Frequency (RF radar sekunder. Pancaran radar ini berupa pulsa-pulsa mode, pesawat yang dipasangi transponder, akan menerima pulsa-pulsa tersebut dan akan menjawab berupa pulsa-pulsa code ke sistem penerima radar.

  6. Dust forecast over North Africa: verification with satellite and ground based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Aditi; Kumar, Sumit; George, John P.

    2016-05-01

    Arid regions of North Africa are considered as one of the major dust source. Present study focuses on the forecast of aerosol optical depth (AOD) of dust over different regions of North Africa. NCMRWF Unified Model (NCUM) produces dust AOD forecasts at different wavelengths with lead time upto 240 hr, based on 00UTC initial conditions. Model forecast of dust AOD at 550 nm up to 72 hr forecast, based on different initial conditions are verified against satellite and ground based observations of total AOD during May-June 2014 with the assumption that except dust, presence of all other aerosols type are negligible. Location specific and geographical distribution of dust AOD forecast is verified against Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) station observations of total and coarse mode AOD. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) dark target and deep blue merged level 3 total aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550 nm and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) retrieved dust AOD at 532 nm are also used for verification. CALIOP dust AOD was obtained by vertical integration of aerosol extinction coefficient at 532 nm from the aerosol profile level 2 products. It is found that at all the selected AERONET stations, the trend in dust AODs is well predicted by NCUM up to three days advance. Good correlation, with consistently low bias (~ +/-0.06) and RMSE (~ 0.2) values, is found between model forecasts and point measurements of AERONET, except over one location Cinzana (Mali). Model forecast consistently overestimated the dust AOD compared to CALIOP dust AOD, with a bias of 0.25 and RMSE of 0.40.

  7. An empirical RBF model of the magnetosphere parameterized by interplanetary and ground-based drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyganenko, N. A.; Andreeva, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    In our recent paper (Andreeva and Tsyganenko, 2016), a novel method was proposed to model the magnetosphere directly from spacecraft data, with no a priori knowledge nor ad hoc assumptions about the geometry of the magnetic field sources. The idea was to split the field into the toroidal and poloidal parts and then expand each part into a weighted sum of radial basis functions (RBF). In the present work we take the next step forward by having developed a full-fledged model of the near magnetosphere, based on a multiyear set of space magnetometer data (1995-2015) and driven by ground-based and interplanetary input parameters. The model consolidates the largest ever amount of data and has been found to provide the best ever merit parameters, in terms of both the overall RMS residual field and record-high correlation coefficients between the observed and model field components. By experimenting with different combinations of input parameters and their time-averaging intervals, we found the best so far results to be given by the ram pressure Pd, SYM-H, and N-index by Newell et al. (2007). In addition, the IMF By has also been included as a model driver, with a goal to more accurately represent the IMF penetration effects. The model faithfully reproduces both externally and internally induced variations in the global distribution of the geomagnetic field and electric currents. Stronger solar wind driving results in a deepening of the equatorial field depression and a dramatic increase of its dawn-dusk asymmetry. The Earth's dipole tilt causes a consistent deformation of the magnetotail current sheet and a significant north-south asymmetry of the polar cusp depressions on the dayside. Next steps to further develop the new approach are also discussed.

  8. Observation of TGFs onboard "Vernov" satellite and TGEs in ground-based experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolov, Vitaly; Panasyuk, Mikhail; Svertilov, Sergey; Garipov, Gali; Iyudin, Anatoly; Klimov, Pavel; Morozenko, Violetta; Maximov, Ivan; Mishieva, Tatiana; Klimov, Stanislav; Pozanenko, Alexey; Rothkaehl, Hanna

    2016-04-01

    "Vernov" satellite with RELEC experiment on-board was launched on 2014 July, 8 into a polar solar-synchronous orbit. The payload includes DRGE gamma-ray spectrometer providing measurements in 10-3000 keV energy range with four detectors directed to atmosphere. Total area of DRGE detectors is ~500 cm2. The data were recorded both in monitoring and gamma by gamma modes with timing accuracy ~15 us. Several TGF candidates with 10-40 gammas in a burst with duration instruments on-board "Vernov" satellite shows the absence of significant electromagnetic pulses around correspondent time moments. Comparison with WWLLN lightning network data base also indicates that there were no thunderstorms connected with most of detected TGF candidates. Possible connection of these flashes with electron precipitations is discussed. Ground-based experiments, with similar gamma-spectrometers were conducted, to study the spectral, temporal and spatial characteristics of TGEs in 20-3000 keV energy range, as well, as to search the fast hard X-ray and gamma-ray flashes possibly appearing at the moment of lightning. The time of each gamma-quantum interaction was recorded with an ~15 us s accuracy together with detailed spectral data. Measurements were done on the ground at Moscow region, and at mountain altitude in Armenia at Aragatz station. During the time interval covering spring, summer and autumn of 2015 a number of TGEs were detected. Measured low-energy gamma-ray spectra usually contain a set of lines that can be interpreted as radiation of Rn-222 daughter isotopes. The increase of Rn-222 radiation was detected during rainfalls with thunderstorm, as well, as during rainy weather without thunderstorms. Variations of Rn-222 radiation dominate at low energies (measure low energy gamma-radiation from the electrons accelerated in thunderclouds. There were no significant flashes with duration of ~1ms detected in coincidence with a nearby lightnings.

  9. Simulation of submillimetre atmospheric spectra for characterising potential ground-based remote sensing observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Emma C.; Withington, Stafford; Newnham, David A.; Wadhams, Peter; Jones, Anna E.; Clancy, Robin

    2016-11-01

    The submillimetre is an understudied region of the Earth's atmospheric electromagnetic spectrum. Prior technological gaps and relatively high opacity due to the prevalence of rotational water vapour lines at these wavelengths have slowed progress from a ground-based remote sensing perspective; however, emerging superconducting detector technologies in the fields of astronomy offer the potential to address key atmospheric science challenges with new instrumental methods. A site study, with a focus on the polar regions, is performed to assess theoretical feasibility by simulating the downwelling (zenith angle = 0°) clear-sky submillimetre spectrum from 30 mm (10 GHz) to 150 µm (2000 GHz) at six locations under annual mean, summer, winter, daytime, night-time and low-humidity conditions. Vertical profiles of temperature, pressure and 28 atmospheric gases are constructed by combining radiosonde, meteorological reanalysis and atmospheric chemistry model data. The sensitivity of the simulated spectra to the choice of water vapour continuum model and spectroscopic line database is explored. For the atmospheric trace species hypobromous acid (HOBr), hydrogen bromide (HBr), perhydroxyl radical (HO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) the emission lines producing the largest change in brightness temperature are identified. Signal strengths, centre frequencies, bandwidths, estimated minimum integration times and maximum receiver noise temperatures are determined for all cases. HOBr, HBr and HO2 produce brightness temperature peaks in the mK to µK range, whereas the N2O peaks are in the K range. The optimal submillimetre remote sensing lines for the four species are shown to vary significantly between location and scenario, strengthening the case for future hyperspectral instruments that measure over a broad wavelength range. The techniques presented here provide a framework that can be applied to additional species of interest and taken forward to simulate retrievals and guide the

  10. Airborne Radar Observations of Severe Hailstorms: Implications for Future Spaceborne Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Tian, Lin; Li, Lihua; McLinden, Matthew; Cervantes, Jaime I.

    2013-01-01

    A new dual-frequency (Ku and Ka band) nadir-pointing Doppler radar on the high-altitude NASA ER-2 aircraft, called the High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP), has collected data over severe thunderstorms in Oklahoma and Kansas during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). The overarching motivation for this study is to understand the behavior of the dualwavelength airborne radar measurements in a global variety of thunderstorms and how these may relate to future spaceborne-radar measurements. HIWRAP is operated at frequencies that are similar to those of the precipitation radar on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (Ku band) and the upcoming Global Precipitation Measurement mission satellite's dual-frequency (Ku and Ka bands) precipitation radar. The aircraft measurements of strong hailstorms have been combined with ground-based polarimetric measurements to obtain a better understanding of the response of the Ku- and Ka-band radar to the vertical distribution of the hydrometeors, including hail. Data from two flight lines on 24 May 2011 are presented. Doppler velocities were approx. 39m/s2at 10.7-km altitude from the first flight line early on 24 May, and the lower value of approx. 25m/s on a second flight line later in the day. Vertical motions estimated using a fall speed estimate for large graupel and hail suggested that the first storm had an updraft that possibly exceeded 60m/s for the more intense part of the storm. This large updraft speed along with reports of 5-cm hail at the surface, reflectivities reaching 70 dBZ at S band in the storm cores, and hail signals from polarimetric data provide a highly challenging situation for spaceborne-radar measurements in intense convective systems. The Ku- and Ka-band reflectivities rarely exceed approx. 47 and approx. 37 dBZ, respectively, in these storms.

  11. SMAP RADAR Processing and Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R. D.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; Kwoun, O.; Chaubell, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    targets. Candidate targets include the Amazon rain forest and a model-corrected global ocean measurement. Radio frequency interference (RFI) signals are expected in the L-band frequency window used by the SMAP radar because many other users also operate in this band. Based on results of prior studies at JPL, SMAP L1 radar processing will use a "Slow-time thresholding" or STT algorithm to handle RFI contamination. The STT technique looks at the slow-time series associated with a given range sample, sets an appropriate threshold, and identifies any samples that rise above this threshold as RFI events. The RFI events are removed and the data are azimuth compressed without those samples. Faraday rotation affects L-band signals by rotating the polarization vector during propagation through the ionosphere. This mixes HH, VV, HV, and VH results with each other introducing another source of error. The SMAP radar is not fully polarimetric so the radar data do not provide a correction by themselves. Instead a correction must be derived from other sources. L1 radar processing will use estimates of Faraday rotation derived from externally supplied GPS-based measurements of the ionosphere total electron content (TEC). This work is supported by the SMAP project at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology.

  12. Coordinated ground-based and Cluster observations of large amplitude global magnetospheric oscillations during a fast solar wind speed interval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. R. Mann

    Full Text Available We present magnetospheric observations of very large amplitude global scale ULF waves, from 9 and 10 December 2000 when the upstream solar wind speed exceeded 600 km/s. We characterise these ULF waves using ground-based magnetometer, radar and optical instrumentation on both the dawn and dusk flanks; we find evidence to support the hypothesis that discrete frequency field line resonances (FLRs were being driven by magnetospheric waveguide modes. During the early part of this interval, Cluster was on an outbound pass from the northern dusk side magnetospheric lobe into the magnetosheath, local-time conjugate to the Canadian sector. In situ magnetic fluctuations, observed by Cluster FGM, show evidence of quasi-periodic motion of the magnetosheath boundary layer with the same period as the ULF waves seen on the ground. Our observations represent the first simultaneous magnetometer, radar and optical observations of the characteristics of FLRs, and confirm the potential importance of ULF waves for magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling, particularly via the generation and modulation of electron precipitation into the ionosphere. The in situ Cluster measurements support the hypothesis that, during intervals of fast solar wind speed, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI can excite magnetospheric waveguide modes which bathe the flank magnetosphere with discrete frequency ULF wave power and drive large amplitude FLRs. 

    Paper submitted to the special issue devoted to "Cluster: First scientific results", Ann. Geophysicae, 19, 10/11/12, 2001.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers; MHD waves and instabilities; solar wind-magnetosphere interactions

  13. A CubeSat for Calibrating Ground-Based and Sub-Orbital Millimeter-Wave Polarimeters (CalSat)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bradley R.; Vourch, Clement J.; Drysdale, Timothy D.; Kalman, Andrew; Fujikawa, Steve; Keating, Brian; Kaufman, Jon

    2015-10-01

    We describe a low-cost, open-access, CubeSat-based calibration instrument that is designed to support ground-based and sub-orbital experiments searching for various polarization signals in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). All modern CMB polarization experiments require a robust calibration program that will allow the effects of instrument-induced signals to be mitigated during data analysis. A bright, compact and linearly polarized astrophysical source with polarization properties known to adequate precision does not exist. Therefore, we designed a space-based millimeter-wave calibration instrument, called CalSat, to serve as an open-access calibrator, and this paper describes the results of our design study. The calibration source on board CalSat is composed of five “tones” with one each at 47.1, 80.0, 140, 249 and 309GHz. The five tones we chose are well matched to (i) the observation windows in the atmospheric transmittance spectra, (ii) the spectral bands commonly used in polarimeters by the CMB community and (iii) the Amateur Satellite Service bands in the Table of Frequency Allocations used by the Federal Communications Commission. CalSat would be placed in a polar orbit allowing visibility from observatories in the Northern Hemisphere, such as Mauna Kea in Hawaii and Summit Station in Greenland, and the Southern Hemisphere, such as the Atacama Desert in Chile and the South Pole. CalSat also would be observable by balloon-borne instruments launched from a range of locations around the world. This global visibility makes CalSat the only source that can be observed by all terrestrial and sub-orbital observatories, thereby providing a universal standard that permits comparison between experiments using appreciably different measurement approaches.

  14. A CubeSat for Calibrating Ground-Based and Sub-Orbital Millimeter-Wave Polarimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bradley

    2016-06-01

    We describe a low-cost, open-access, CubeSat-based calibration instrument that is designed to support ground-based and sub-orbital experiments searching for various polarization signals in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). All modern CMB polarization experiments require a robust calibration program that will allow the effects of instrument-induced signals to be mitigated during data analysis. A bright, compact, and linearly polarized astrophysical source with polarization properties known to adequate precision does not exist. Therefore, we designed a space-based millimeter-wave calibration instrument, called CalSat, to serve as an open-access calibrator, and this paper describes the results of our design study. The calibration source on board CalSat is composed of five "tones'" with one each at 47.1, 80.0, 140, 249 and 309 GHz. The five tones we chose are well matched to (i) the observation windows in the atmospheric transmittance spectra, (ii) the spectral bands commonly used in polarimeters by the CMB community, and (iii) The Amateur Satellite Service bands in the Table of Frequency Allocations used by the Federal Communications Commission. CalSat will be placed in a polar orbit allowing visibility from observatories in the Northern Hemisphere, such as Mauna~Kea in Hawaii and Summit Station in Greenland, and the Southern Hemisphere, such as the Atacama Desert in Chile and the South Pole. CalSat also will be observable by balloon-borne instruments launched from a range of locations around the world. This global visibility makes CalSat the only source that can be observed by all terrestrial and sub-orbital observatories, thereby providing a universal standard that permits comparison between experiments using appreciably different measurement approaches.

  15. Ionospheric Plasma Circulation Associated with Polar Cap Arcs Detached from the Auroral Oval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakymenko, K.; Koustov, A. V.; Hosokawa, K.; Shiokawa, K.

    2015-12-01

    Joint observations of the OMTI all-sky camera at Resolute Bay, NWT (Canada), the SuperDARN radars and Swarm satellites are considered to investigate horizontal plasma flows and vertical field-aligned currents (FACs) associated with polar cap arcs "detached" from the auroral oval but not penetrated deep into the polar cap. All cases are for the near winter solstice, positive IMF Bz and mostly dominating IMF By. We show that the arcs are usually co-exist with strong flow shears driven by electric fields of the converging type. The shears, being added to the background flow, produce unusual convection patterns, for example reverse (sunward) flows on the nightside, several MLT hours away from the noon-midnight line. We also investigate the distribution of FACs in the arcs' vicinity, both duskward and dawnward, for several Swarm passes. Electron density data onboard Swarm satellites are used to identify the arc and auroral oval boundaries, along with the ground-based optics. The data suggest that the arcs correspond to a separate current system excited in addition to the background plasma circulation governed by the reconnection processes.Joint observations of the OMTI all-sky camera at Resolute Bay, NWT (Canada), the SuperDARN radars and Swarm satellites are considered to investigate horizontal plasma flows and vertical field-aligned currents (FACs) associated with polar cap arcs "detached" from the auroral oval but not penetrated deep into the polar cap. All cases are for the near winter solstice, positive IMF Bz and mostly dominating IMF By. We show that the arcs are usually co-exist with strong flow shears driven by electric fields of the converging type. The shears, being added to the background flow, produce unusual convection patterns, for example reverse (sunward) flows on the nightside, several MLT hours away from the noon-midnight line. We also investigate the distribution of FACs in the arcs' vicinity, both duskward and dawnward, for several Swarm passes

  16. Target-adaptive polarimetric synthetic aperture radar target discrimination using maximum average correlation height filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadjadi, Firooz A; Mahalanobis, Abhijit

    2006-05-01

    We report the development of a technique for adaptive selection of polarization ellipse tilt and ellipticity angles such that the target separation from clutter is maximized. From the radar scattering matrix [S] and its complex components, in phase and quadrature phase, the elements of the Mueller matrix are obtained. Then, by means of polarization synthesis, the radar cross section of the radar scatters are obtained at different transmitting and receiving polarization states. By designing a maximum average correlation height filter, we derive a target versus clutter distance measure as a function of four transmit and receive polarization state angles. The results of applying this method on real synthetic aperture radar imagery indicate a set of four transmit and receive angles that lead to maximum target versus clutter discrimination. These optimum angles are different for different targets. Hence, by adaptive control of the state of polarization of polarimetric radar, one can noticeably improve the discrimination of targets from clutter.

  17. Ground-Based Midcourse Defense (GMD) Sea-Based X-Band Radar (SBX) Placement and Operation, Adak, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-03

    can swim freely in the ocean and includes fish, squids, and marine mammals. Most species of nektonic animals live near the sea surface, where food is...living in rural areas of Alaska are partially or wholly dependent on the harvesting of natural resources for food and other living necessities. To...emissions time of up to 5 hours per day. The main beam would be GMO SBX Placement and Operation at Adak, Alaska EA 4-11 constantly moving and would

  18. Ground-based Infrared Observations of Water Vapor and Hydrogen Peroxide in the Atmosphere of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encrenaz, T.; Greathouse, T. K.; Bitner, M.; Kruger, A.; Richter, M. J.; Lacy, J. H.; Bézard, B.; Fouchet, T.; Lefevre, F.; Forget, F.; Atreya, S. K.

    2008-11-01

    Ground-based observations of water vapor and hydrogen peroxide have been obtained in the thermal infrared range, using the TEXES instrument at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, for different times of the seasonal cycle.

  19. Informing hydrological models with ground-based time-lapse relative gravimetry: potential and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Christiansen, Lars; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Coupled hydrogeophysical inversion emerges as an attractive option to improve the calibration and predictive capability of hydrological models. Recently, ground-based time-lapse relative gravity (TLRG) measurements have attracted increasing interest because there is a direct relationship between ...

  20. Changes in ground-based solar ultraviolet radiation during fire episodes: a case study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wright, CY

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available about the relationship between fires and solar UVR without local high-quality column or ground-based ambient air pollution (particulate matter in particular) data; however, the threat to public health from fires was acknowledged....

  1. Adaptive radar resource management

    CERN Document Server

    Moo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Radar Resource Management (RRM) is vital for optimizing the performance of modern phased array radars, which are the primary sensor for aircraft, ships, and land platforms. Adaptive Radar Resource Management gives an introduction to radar resource management (RRM), presenting a clear overview of different approaches and techniques, making it very suitable for radar practitioners and researchers in industry and universities. Coverage includes: RRM's role in optimizing the performance of modern phased array radars The advantages of adaptivity in implementing RRMThe role that modelling and

  2. Radar and ARPA manual

    CERN Document Server

    Bole, A G

    2013-01-01

    Radar and ARPA Manual focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of electronic navigation. The manual first discusses basic radar principles, including principles of range and bearing measurements and picture orientation and presentation. The text then looks at the operational principles of radar systems. Function of units; aerial, receiver, and display principles; transmitter principles; and sitting of units on board ships are discussed. The book also describes target detection, Automatic Radar Plotting Aids (ARPA), and operational controls of radar systems, and then discusses radar plo

  3. System Identification and Automatic Mass Balancing of Ground-Based Three-Axis Spacecraft Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    System Identification and Automatic Mass Balancing of Ground-Based Three-Axis Spacecraft Simulator Jae-Jun Kim∗ and Brij N. Agrawal † Department of...TITLE AND SUBTITLE System Identification and Automatic Mass Balancing of Ground-Based Three-Axis Spacecraft Simulator 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...and Dynamics, Vol. 20, No. 4, July-August 1997, pp. 625-632. 6Schwartz, J. L. and Hall, C. D., “ System Identification of a Spherical Air-Bearing

  4. A comparison of PMSE and other ground-based observations during the NLC-91 campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, S.; Cho, J.; Hall, C. M.; Hoppe, U.-P.; Murtagh, D. P.; Stegman, J.; Swartz, W. E.; Van Eyken, A. P.; Wannberg, G.; Witt, G.

    1995-01-01

    During the period July-August 1991, observations were made of Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) at 46.9 MHz and 224 MHz by the CUPRI and EISCAT radars, respectively, at two sites in northern Scandinavia. Those observations are compared here with observations of noctilucent clouds, nergetic particle precipitation and magnetic disturbances. The appearance and morphology of PMSE are found to be closely correlated at the two frequencies and the two sites, 200 km apart. No correlation is found between PMSE and noctilucent clouds or magnetic disturbance. No correlation is found between energetic particle precipitation and the appearance of PMSE at 46.9 MHz for the whole time period. At 224 MHz, there is no evidence for a correlation before the beginning of August and only one event suggesting a possible correlation after the beginning of August. A minimum in occurrence for PMSE is found between 16 and 21 UT (17-22 LST) which may be related to an expected minimum in background wind strength in that time interval.

  5. Decrypting geophysical signals at Stromboli Volcano (Italy): Integration of seismic and Ground-Based InSAR displacement data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Traglia, F; Cauchie, L; Casagli, N; Saccorotti, G

    2014-04-28

    We present the integration of seismic and Ground-Based Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar system (GBInSAR) displacement data at Stromboli Volcano. Ground deformation in the area of summit vents is positively correlated with both seismic tremor amplitude and cumulative amplitudes of very long period (VLP) signals associated with Strombolian explosions. Changes in VLP amplitudes precede by a few days the variations in ground deformation and seismic tremor. We propose a model where the arrival of fresh, gas-rich magma from depth enhances gas slug formation, promoting convection and gas transfer throughout the conduit system. At the shallowest portion of the conduit, an increase in volatile content causes a density decrease, expansion of the magmatic column and augmented degassing activity, which respectively induce inflation of the conduit, and increased tremor amplitudes. The temporal delay between increase of VLP and tremor amplitudes/conduit inflation can be interpreted in terms of the different timescales characterizing bulk gas transfer versus slug formation and ascent.

  6. To the question on accuracy of forest heights’ measurements by the TanDEM-X radar interferometry data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Chimitdorzhiev

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the validation results of the InSAR method for determining the forest canopy height, based on TanDEM-X and ALOS PALSAR data. The research conducted on the territory of the Baikal-Kudara forest area of the Republic of Buryatia (52°10'N, 106°48'E. Forest vegetation is represented mainly by conifers – pine, and spruce, with a small admixture of deciduous trees – aspen, birch, etc. The forest vegetation height was determined by subtracting the digital elevation model (DEM of the digital terrain model (DTM. DEM is built according to the L-band (wavelength of 23.5 cm ALOS PALSAR satellite with horizontal co-polarization mode. In the investigation it was assumed that a radar signal of ALOS PALSAR passes all forest thickness and reflected from the underlying surface, made it possible to recover terrain under forest canopy. DTM has been built using the TanDEM-X data (wavelength 3 cm. In this case, it was assumed that the radar echoes scattered from a some virtual phase centers of scattering surface, which characterizes the upper limit of the continuous forest canopy. To check the accuracy of satellite definitions of forest height in study area were made high-precision geodetic measurement of trees heights using electronic total station and the coordinates of geographic control points using differential GPS receivers. The discrepancy between the satellite and ground-based measurements at 11 test sites did not exceed 2 m, which is mainly due to the difference in measurement techniques: height of individual trees by ground methods and continuous forest canopy height using radar interferometry.

  7. Radar detection of drones responding to honeybee queen pheromone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loper, G M; Wolf, W W; Taylor, O R

    1993-09-01

    The response of honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) drones to queen pheromone(s) (either natural from a mated queen, or synthetic from a lure) was recorded using an X-band, ground-based radar. The distribution of drones (insect targets on the radar screen) changed from a scattered distribution to a line concentration (downwind) when the pheromone was released. Displacement within the line concentration was toward the pheromone. This response was seen as far as 800±15 m downwind from a lure with 10 mg of synthetic 9-oxodec-trans-2-enoic acid (9-ODA) and as far as 420±15 m from a mated queen. These studies demonstrate that queen pheromone can be detected by drones at much greater distances than previously believed and illustrate how X-band radar may be used to establish the distances at which insects of similar or larger size respond to pheromones.

  8. Planetary Radars Operating Centre PROC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catallo, C.; Flamini, E.; Seu, R.; Alberti, G.

    2007-12-01

    an operative experimental platform, where a specific payload ( to be developed by the Italian Industry) a GPR will be accommodated on-board the Italian Space Agency stratospheric balloon and the data analysed by PROC; as a minimum two flight campaigns over polar regions are foreseen. The system shall be capable of acquiring radar data upon scientists requests in order to help them refine their models, experiment new algorithms, improve data interpretation capabilities. The paper also describes how the system will be integrated in the PROC, sharing the operational resources and aiding scientists to increase their knowledge in the field of surface radar sounding. A specific PROC Web facility is foreseen to allow data gathering, request submission, data exchange and dissemination.

  9. Climatology of clouds and precipitation over East Antarctica using ground-based remote sensing at the Princess Elizabeth station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souverijns, Niels; Gossart, Alexandra; Gorodetskaya, Irina; Lhermitte, Stef; Van Tricht, Kristof; Mangold, Alexander; Laffineur, Quentin; Van Lipzig, Nicole

    2016-04-01

    The surface mass balance of the Antarctic ice sheet is highly dependent on the interaction between clouds and precipitation. Our understanding of these processes is challenged by the limited availability of observations over the area and problems in Antarctic climate simulations by state-of-the-art climate models. Improvements are needed in this field, as the Antarctic ice sheet is expected to become a dominant contributor to sea level rise in the 21st century. In 2010, an observational site was established at the Princess Elisabeth (PE) Antarctic station. PE is located in the escarpment area of Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica (72°S, 23°E). The instruments consist of several ground-based remote sensing instruments: a ceilometer (measuring cloud-base height and vertical structure), a 24-GHz Micro Rain Radar (MRR; providing vertical profiles of radar effective reflectivity and Doppler velocity), and a pyrometer (measuring effective cloud base temperature). An automatic weather station provides info on boundary-layer meteorology (temperature, wind speed and direction, humidity, pressure), as well as broadband radiative fluxes and snow height changes. This set of instruments can be used to infer the role of clouds in the Antarctic climate system, their interaction with radiation and their impact on precipitation. Cloud and precipitation characteristics are derived from 5-year-long measurement series, which is unprecedented for the Antarctic region. Here, we present an overview of the cloud and precipitation climatology. Statistics on cloud occurrence are calculated on annual / seasonal basis and a distinction between liquid / mixed phase and ice clouds is made. One can discriminate between liquid-bearing and ice-only clouds by investigating the ceilometer attenuated backscatter, since liquid phase clouds have a much higher signal. Furthermore, by using pyrometer measurements, we are able to identify the range of temperatures at which liquid / ice clouds are

  10. Principles of modern radar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Carpentier, Michel H

    1988-01-01

    Introduction to random functions ; signal and noise : the ideal receiver ; performance of radar systems equipped with ideal receivers ; analysis of the operating principles of some types of radar ; behavior of real targets, fluctuation of targets ; angle measurement using radar ; data processing of radar information, radar coverage ; applications to electronic scanning antennas to radar ; introduction to Hilbert spaces.

  11. Radar Range Sidelobe Reduction Using Adaptive Pulse Compression Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lihua; Coon, Michael; McLinden, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Pulse compression has been widely used in radars so that low-power, long RF pulses can be transmitted, rather than a highpower short pulse. Pulse compression radars offer a number of advantages over high-power short pulsed radars, such as no need of high-power RF circuitry, no need of high-voltage electronics, compact size and light weight, better range resolution, and better reliability. However, range sidelobe associated with pulse compression has prevented the use of this technique on spaceborne radars since surface returns detected by range sidelobes may mask the returns from a nearby weak cloud or precipitation particles. Research on adaptive pulse compression was carried out utilizing a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) waveform generation board and a radar transceiver simulator. The results have shown significant improvements in pulse compression sidelobe performance. Microwave and millimeter-wave radars present many technological challenges for Earth and planetary science applications. The traditional tube-based radars use high-voltage power supply/modulators and high-power RF transmitters; therefore, these radars usually have large size, heavy weight, and reliability issues for space and airborne platforms. Pulse compression technology has provided a path toward meeting many of these radar challenges. Recent advances in digital waveform generation, digital receivers, and solid-state power amplifiers have opened a new era for applying pulse compression to the development of compact and high-performance airborne and spaceborne remote sensing radars. The primary objective of this innovative effort is to develop and test a new pulse compression technique to achieve ultrarange sidelobes so that this technique can be applied to spaceborne, airborne, and ground-based remote sensing radars to meet future science requirements. By using digital waveform generation, digital receiver, and solid-state power amplifier technologies, this improved pulse compression

  12. Passive MIMO Radar Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    cumulative distribution function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 CORA COvert RAdar...PaRaDe), developed by the Insti- tute of Electronic Systems at the Warsaw University of Technology [59, 60]; COvert RAdar ( CORA ), developed by the German

  13. Weather Radar Impact Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent an inventory of the national impacts of wind turbine interference with NEXRAD radar stations. This inventory was developed by the NOAA Radar...

  14. Reconstruction of cloud geometry using a scanning cloud radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, F.; Winkler, C.; Zinner, T.

    2015-06-01

    Clouds are one of the main reasons of uncertainties in the forecasts of weather and climate. In part, this is due to limitations of remote sensing of cloud microphysics. Present approaches often use passive spectral measurements for the remote sensing of cloud microphysical parameters. Large uncertainties are introduced by three-dimensional (3-D) radiative transfer effects and cloud inhomogeneities. Such effects are largely caused by unknown orientation of cloud sides or by shadowed areas on the cloud. Passive ground-based remote sensing of cloud properties at high spatial resolution could be crucially improved with this kind of additional knowledge of cloud geometry. To this end, a method for the accurate reconstruction of 3-D cloud geometry from cloud radar measurements is developed in this work. Using a radar simulator and simulated passive measurements of model clouds based on a large eddy simulation (LES), the effects of different radar scan resolutions and varying interpolation methods are evaluated. In reality, a trade-off between scan resolution and scan duration has to be found as clouds change quickly. A reasonable choice is a scan resolution of 1 to 2°. The most suitable interpolation procedure identified is the barycentric interpolation method. The 3-D reconstruction method is demonstrated using radar scans of convective cloud cases with the Munich miraMACS, a 35 GHz scanning cloud radar. As a successful proof of concept, camera imagery collected at the radar location is reproduced for the observed cloud cases via 3-D volume reconstruction and 3-D radiative transfer simulation. Data sets provided by the presented reconstruction method will aid passive spectral ground-based measurements of cloud sides to retrieve microphysical parameters.

  15. Digital LPI Radar Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Peng Ghee; Teng, Haw Kiad

    2001-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The function of a Low Probability ofIntercept (LPI) radar is to prevent its interception by an Electronic Support (ES) receiver. This objective is generally achieved through the use of a radar waveform that is mismatched to those waveforms for which an ES receiver is tuned. This allows the radar to achieve a processing gain, with respect to the ES receiver, that is equal to the time-bandwidth product ofthe radar waveform. This...

  16. Evaluation of turbulent dissipation rate retrievals from Doppler Cloud Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Shupe

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Turbulent dissipation rate retrievals from cloud radar Doppler velocity measurements are evaluated using independent, in situ observations in Arctic stratocumulus clouds. In situ validation data sets of dissipation rate are derived using sonic anemometer measurements from a tethered balloon and high frequency pressure variation observations from a research aircraft, both flown in proximity to stationary, ground-based radars. Modest biases are found among the data sets in particularly low- or high-turbulence regimes, but in general the radar-retrieved values correspond well with the in situ measurements. Root mean square differences are typically a factor of 4–6 relative to any given magnitude of dissipation rate. These differences are no larger than those found when comparing dissipation rates computed from tethered-balloon and meteorological tower-mounted sonic anemometer measurements made at spatial distances of a few hundred meters. Temporal lag analyses suggest that approximately half of the observed differences are due to spatial sampling considerations, such that the anticipated radar-based retrieval uncertainty is on the order of a factor of 2–3. Moreover, radar retrievals are clearly able to capture the vertical dissipation rate structure observed by the in situ sensors, while offering substantially more information on the time variability of turbulence profiles. Together these evaluations indicate that radar-based retrievals can, at a minimum, be used to determine the vertical structure of turbulence in Arctic stratocumulus clouds.

  17. Network radar countermeasure systems integrating radar and radar countermeasures

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Qiuxi

    2016-01-01

    This is the very first book to present the network radar countermeasure system. It explains in detail the systematic concept of combining radar and radar countermeasures from the perspective of the information acquisition of target location, the optimization of the reconnaissance and detection, the integrated attack of the signals and facilities, and technological and legal developments concerning the networked system. It achieves the integration of the initiative and passivity, detection and jamming. The book explains how the system locates targets, completes target identification, tracks targets and compiles the data.

  18. Deep Stochastic Radar Models

    OpenAIRE

    Wheeler, Tim Allan; Holder, Martin; Winner, Hermann; Kochenderfer, Mykel

    2017-01-01

    Accurate simulation and validation of advanced driver assistance systems requires accurate sensor models. Modeling automotive radar is complicated by effects such as multipath reflections, interference, reflective surfaces, discrete cells, and attenuation. Detailed radar simulations based on physical principles exist but are computationally intractable for realistic automotive scenes. This paper describes a methodology for the construction of stochastic automotive radar models based on deep l...

  19. Radar: Human Safety Net

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Radar is a technology that can be used to detect distant objects not visible to the human eye. A predecessor of radar, called the telemobiloscope, was first used to detect ships in the fog in 1904 off the German coast. Many scientists have worked on the development and refinement of radar (Hertz with electromagnetic waves; Popov with determining…

  20. Using TRMM and GPM precipitation radar for calibration of weather radars in the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisologo, Irene; Bookhagen, Bodo; Smith, Taylor; Heistermann, Maik

    2016-04-01

    Torrential and sustained rainfall from tropical cyclones, monsoons, and thunderstorms frequently impact the Philippines. In order to predict, assess, and measure storm impact, it is imperative to have a reliable and accurate monitoring system in place. In 2011, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical, and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) established a weather radar network of ten radar devices, eight of which are single-polarization S-band radars and two dual-polarization C-band radars. Because of a low-density hydrometeorological monitoring networks in the Philippines, calibration of weather radars becomes a challenging, but important task. In this study, we explore the potential of scrutinizing the calibration of ground radars by using the observations from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). For this purpose, we compare different TRMM level 1 and 2 orbital products from overpasses over the Philippines, and compare these products to reflectivities observed by the Philippine ground radars. Differences in spatial resolution are addressed by computing adequate zonal statistics of the local radar bins located within the corresponding TRMM cell in space and time. The wradlib package (Heistermann et al. 2013; Heistermann et al. 2015) is used to process the data from the Subic S-band single-polarization weather radar. These data will be analyzed in conjunction with TRMM data for June to August 2012, three months of the wet season. This period includes the enhanced monsoon of 2012, locally called Habagat 2012, which brought sustained intense rainfall and massive floods in several parts of the country including the most populated city of Metro Manila. References Heistermann, M., Jacobi, S., Pfaff, T. (2013): Technical Note: An open source library for processing weather radar data (wradlib). Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 17, 863-871, doi: 10.5194/hess-17-863-2013. Heistermann, M., S. Collis, M. J. Dixon, S. Giangrande, J. J. Helmus, B. Kelley, J

  1. Detection of buried pipes by polarimetric borehole radar; Polarimetric borehole radar ni yoru maisetsukan no kenshutsu jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, M.; Niitsuma, H. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Nakauchi, T. [Osaka Gas Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    If the borehole radar is utilized for detection of buried pipes, the underground radar measurement becomes possible even in the situation where the mesurement on the earth surface is difficult, for example, such a place as under the road where there is much traffic. However, since buried pipes are horizontally installed and the existing borehole radar can send/receive only vertical polarization, the measurement conducted comes to be poor in efficiency from a viewpoint of the polarization utilization. Therefore, by introducing the polarimetric borehole radar to the detection of buried pipes, a basic experiment was conducted for the effective detection of horizontal buried pipes. Proposing the use of a slot antenna which can send/receive horizontal polarization in borehole in addition to a dipole antenna which sends/receives vertical polarization, developed was a step frequency type continuous wave radar of a network analyzer basis. As a result of the experiment, it was confirmed that reflection from buried pipes is largely dependent on polarization. Especially, it was found that in the slot dipole cross polarization mesurement, reflection from buried pipes can be emphasized. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Radar and wind turbines; Radar en windturbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Doorn, H.

    2010-03-15

    In the last years the developments of wind parks were hampered because of their possible effect on the radar for observation of air traffic. Work is currently being done on a new assessment model for wind turbines under the auspices of the steering group National Security for the military radar systems. Air traffic control Netherlands (LVNL) will look at the options for civil radars to join in. [Dutch] In de afgelopen jaren zijn windparkontwikkelingen onder meer belemmerd vanwege mogelijke effecten op radar voor de waarneming van luchtverkeer. Onder auspicien van de stuurgroep Nationale Veiligheid voor de militaire radarsystemen op land wordt gewerkt aan een nieuw beoordelingsmodel voor windturbines. De Luchtverkeersleiding Nederland (LVNL) zal bezien in hoeverre de civiele radars hierbij kunnen aansluiten.

  3. Multi-point ground-based ULF magnetic field observations in Europe during seismic active periods in 2004 and 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Prattes

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of ground-based Ultra Low Frequency (ULF magnetic field measurements observed from June to August 2004 during the Bovec earthquake on 12 July 2004. Further we give information about the seismic activity in the local observatory region for an extended time span 2004 and 2005. ULF magnetic field data are provided by the South European Geomagnetic Array (SEGMA where the experience and heritage from the CHInese MAGnetometer (CHIMAG fluxgate magnetometer comes to application. The intensities of the horizontal H and vertical Z magnetic field and the polarization ratio R of the vertical and horizontal magnetic field intensity are analyzed taking into consideration three SEGMA observatories located at different close distances and directions from the earthquake epicenter. We observed a significant increase of high polarization ratios during strong seismic activity at the observatory nearest to the Bovec earthquake epicenter. Apart from indirect ionospheric effects electromagnetic noise could be emitted in the lithosphere due to tectonic effects in the earthquake focus region causing anomalies of the vertical magnetic field intensity. Assuming that the measured vertical magnetic field intensities are of lithospheric origin, we roughly estimate the amplitude of electromagnetic noise in the Earths crust considering an average electrical conductivity of <σ>=10−3 S/m and a certain distance of the observatory to the earthquake epicenter.

  4. Processing and Analysis of Polarimetric Ship Signatures from MARSIE: Report on Results for Polar Epsilon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    DRE-series trihedral corner reflectors (TCRs) mounted on tripods, two active radar calibrators (ARCs) (borrowed from CCRS) and an Ashtech GPS...polarimetry results include observations of ship target radar cross section for co-polarization and cross -polarization channels, the reduction in the...estimate the ship velocity for the case of airborne SAR geometry. The total radar cross section (RCS) as a function of linear polarization state has

  5. Basics and first experiments demonstrating isolation improvements in the agile polarimetric FM-CW radar – PARSAX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krasnov, O.A.; Babur, G.P.; Wang, Z.; Ligthart, L.P.; Van der Zwan, F.

    2010-01-01

    The article describes the IRCTR PARSAX radar system, the S-band high-resolution Doppler polarimetric frequency modulated continuous wave (FM-CW) radar with dual-orthogonal sounding signals, which has the possibility to measure all elements of the radar target polarization scattering matrix

  6. Metrology of ground-based satellite validation: co-location mismatch and smoothing issues of total ozone comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Verhoelst

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Comparisons with ground-based correlative measurements constitute a key component in the validation of satellite data on atmospheric composition. The error budget of these comparisons contains not only the measurement errors but also several terms related to differences in sampling and smoothing of the inhomogeneous and variable atmospheric field. A versatile system for Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs, named OSSSMOSE, is used here to quantify these terms. Based on the application of pragmatic observation operators onto high-resolution atmospheric fields, it allows a simulation of each individual measurement, and consequently, also of the differences to be expected from spatial and temporal field variations between both measurements making up a comparison pair. As a topical case study, the system is used to evaluate the error budget of total ozone column (TOC comparisons between GOME-type direct fitting (GODFITv3 satellite retrievals from GOME/ERS2, SCIAMACHY/Envisat, and GOME-2/MetOp-A, and ground-based direct-sun and zenith–sky reference measurements such as those from Dobsons, Brewers, and zenith-scattered light (ZSL-DOAS instruments, respectively. In particular, the focus is placed on the GODFITv3 reprocessed GOME-2A data record vs. the ground-based instruments contributing to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC. The simulations are found to reproduce the actual measurements almost to within the measurement uncertainties, confirming that the OSSE approach and its technical implementation are appropriate. This work reveals that many features of the comparison spread and median difference can be understood as due to metrological differences, even when using strict co-location criteria. In particular, sampling difference errors exceed measurement uncertainties regularly at most mid- and high-latitude stations, with values up to 10 % and more in extreme cases. Smoothing difference errors only

  7. Metrology of ground-based satellite validation: co-location mismatch and smoothing issues of total ozone comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoelst, T.; Granville, J.; Hendrick, F.; Köhler, U.; Lerot, C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Redondas, A.; Van Roozendael, M.; Lambert, J.-C.

    2015-12-01

    Comparisons with ground-based correlative measurements constitute a key component in the validation of satellite data on atmospheric composition. The error budget of these comparisons contains not only the measurement errors but also several terms related to differences in sampling and smoothing of the inhomogeneous and variable atmospheric field. A versatile system for Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs), named OSSSMOSE, is used here to quantify these terms. Based on the application of pragmatic observation operators onto high-resolution atmospheric fields, it allows a simulation of each individual measurement, and consequently, also of the differences to be expected from spatial and temporal field variations between both measurements making up a comparison pair. As a topical case study, the system is used to evaluate the error budget of total ozone column (TOC) comparisons between GOME-type direct fitting (GODFITv3) satellite retrievals from GOME/ERS2, SCIAMACHY/Envisat, and GOME-2/MetOp-A, and ground-based direct-sun and zenith-sky reference measurements such as those from Dobsons, Brewers, and zenith-scattered light (ZSL-)DOAS instruments, respectively. In particular, the focus is placed on the GODFITv3 reprocessed GOME-2A data record vs. the ground-based instruments contributing to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). The simulations are found to reproduce the actual measurements almost to within the measurement uncertainties, confirming that the OSSE approach and its technical implementation are appropriate. This work reveals that many features of the comparison spread and median difference can be understood as due to metrological differences, even when using strict co-location criteria. In particular, sampling difference errors exceed measurement uncertainties regularly at most mid- and high-latitude stations, with values up to 10 % and more in extreme cases. Smoothing difference errors only play a role in the

  8. Understanding radar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kingsley, Simon

    1999-01-01

    What is radar? What systems are currently in use? How do they work? This book provides engineers and scientists with answers to these critical questions, focusing on actual radar systems in use today. It is a perfect resource for those just entering the field, or as a quick refresher for experienced practitioners. The book leads readers through the specialized language and calculations that comprise the complex world of radar engineering as seen in dozens of state-of-the-art radar systems. An easy to read, wide ranging guide to the world of modern radar systems.

  9. Autonomous Navigation Airborne Forward-Looking SAR High Precision Imaging with Combination of Pseudo-Polar Formatting and Overlapped Sub-Aperture Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueming Peng

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous navigation airborne forward-looking synthetic aperture radar (SAR observes the anterior inferior wide area with a short cross-track dimensional linear array as azimuth aperture. This is an application scenario that is drastically different from that of side-looking space-borne or air-borne SAR systems, which acquires azimuth synthetic aperture with along-track dimension platform movement. High precision imaging with a combination of pseudo-polar formatting and overlapped sub-aperture algorithm for autonomous navigation airborne forward-looking SAR imaging is presented. With the suggested imaging method, range dimensional imaging is operated with wide band signal compression. Then, 2D pseudo-polar formatting is operated. In the following, azimuth synthetic aperture is divided into several overlapped sub-apertures. Intra sub-aperture IFFT (Inverse Fast Fourier Transform, wave front curvature phase error compensation, and inter sub-aperture IFFT are operated sequentially to finish azimuth high precision imaging. The main advantage of the proposed algorithm is its extremely high precision and low memory cost. The effectiveness and performance of the proposed algorithm are demonstrated with outdoor GBSAR (Ground Based Synthetic Aperture Radar experiments, which possesses the same imaging geometry as the airborne forward-looking SAR (short azimuth aperture, wide azimuth swath. The profile response of the trihedral angle reflectors, placed in the imaging scene, reconstructed with the proposed imaging algorithm and back projection algorithm are compared and analyzed.

  10. Multidimensional radar picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waz, Mariusz

    2010-05-01

    In marine navigation systems, the three-dimensional (3D) visualization is often and often used. Echosonders and sonars working in hydroacustic systems can present pictures in three dimensions. Currently, vector maps also offer 3D presentation. This presentation is used in aviation and underwater navigation. In the nearest future three-dimensional presentation may be obligatory presentation in displays of navigation systems. A part of these systems work with radar and communicates with it transmitting data in a digital form. 3D presentation of radar picture require a new technology to develop. In the first step it is necessary to compile digital form of radar signal. The modern navigation radar do not present data in three-dimensional form. Progress in technology of digital signal processing make it possible to create multidimensional radar pictures. For instance, the RSC (Radar Scan Converter) - digital radar picture recording and transforming tool can be used to create new picture online. Using RSC and techniques of modern computer graphics multidimensional radar pictures can be generated. The radar pictures mentioned should be readable for ECDIS. The paper presents a method for generating multidimensional radar picture from original signal coming from radar receiver.

  11. Mesoscale ionospheric electrodynamics of omega bands determined from ground-based electromagnetic and satellite optical observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Amm

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available We present ground-based electromagnetic data from the MIRACLE and BEAR networks and satellite optical observations from the UVI and PIXIE instruments on the Polar satellite of an omega band event over Northern Scandinavia on 26 June 1998, which occured close to the morning side edge of a substorm auroral bulge. Our analysis of the data concentrates on one omega band period from 03:18-03:27 UT, for which we use the method of characteristics combined with an analysis of the UVI and PIXIE data to derive a time series of instantaneous, solely data-based distributions of the mesoscale ionospheric electrodynamic parameters with a 1-min time resolution. In addition, the AMIE method is used to derive global Hall conductance patterns. Our results show that zonally alternating regions of enhanced ionospheric conductances ("tongues" up to ~60S and low conductance regions are associated with the omega bands. The tongues have a poleward extension of ~400km from their base and a zonal extension of ~380km. While they are moving coherently eastward with a velocity of ~770ms-1, the structures are not strictly stationary. The current system of the omega band can be described as a superposition of two parts: one consists of anticlockwise rotating Hall currents around the tongues, along with Pedersen currents, with a negative divergence in their centers. The sign of this system is reversing in the low conductance areas. It causes the characteristic ground magnetic signature. The second part consists of zonally aligned current wedges of westward flowing Hall currents and is mostly magnetically invisible below the ionosphere. This system dominates the field-aligned current (FAC pattern and causes alternating upward and downward FAC at the flanks of the tongues with maximum upward FAC of ~25µA m-2. The total FAC of ~2MA are comparable to the ones diverted inside a westward traveling surge. Throughout the event, the overwhelming part of the FAC

  12. C/NOFS satellite observations of equatorial ionospheric plasma structures supported by multiple ground-based diagnostics in October 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, M.; Basu, Su.; Basu, S.; Valladares, C. E.; Sheehan, R. E.; Roddy, P. A.; Groves, K. M.

    2011-10-01

    In early October 2008, the C/NOFS satellite orbited near the magnetic equator at its perigee altitude of ˜400 km at dusk in the Peruvian sector. This provided an ideal opportunity for a comparison, under the current very low solar flux condition, of equatorial ionospheric disturbances observed with the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) in situ measurements and ground-based observations available near Jicamarca Observatory. The primary objective was the comparison of plasma density disturbances measured by a Planar Langmuir Probe (PLP) instrument on the C/NOFS satellite with VHF scintillation activity at Ancon near Jicamarca for this period. Here we discuss in detail two extreme cases: one in which severe in situ disturbances were accompanied by mild scintillation on a particular day, namely, 10 October while there was little in situ disturbance with strong scintillation on 5 October. This apparent contradiction was diagnosed further by a latitudinal ground-based GPS network at Peruvian longitudes, a Digisonde, and the incoherent scatter radar (ISR) at Jicamarca. The crucial distinction was provided by the behavior of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA). The EIA was well-developed on the day having severe in situ disturbances (10 Oct). This led to lower equatorial plasma density and total electron content (TEC) at the equator and consequently reduced the scintillations detected at Ancon. On the other hand, on the day with severe scintillations (5 Oct), the EIA was not so well developed as on 10 October, leading to relatively higher equatorial plasma density and TEC. Consequently the severe scintillations at Ancon were likely caused by ionospheric structure located below the altitude of C/NOFS. The NRL SAMI2 model was utilized to gain a greater understanding of the role of neutral winds and electric fields in reproducing the TEC as a function of latitude for both classes of irregularities. Spectral studies with high resolution in situ

  13. Advances in Ice Penetrating Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paden, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    Radars have been employed for ice remote sensing since the mid-twentieth century. The original application in radioglaciology was to obtain ice thickness: an essential parameter in ice flux calculations and boundary condition in ice flow models. Later, radars were used to estimate basal conditions and track laterally persistent features in the ice. The Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheet's recent hardware advances include multichannel systems and radar suites covering the usable frequency spectrum. These advances coupled with increased interest in the polar regions result in a concomitant exponential growth in data. We focus on a few results that have come from these changes. Multichannel radar systems improved clutter rejection and enabled 3D imaging. Using computer vision algorithms, we have automated the process of extracting the ice bottom surface in 3D imagery for complex topographies including narrow glacier channels where the ice surface and ice bottom merge together within the 3D images. We present results of wide swath imaging which have enabled narrow, 2-3 km wide, glacier channels to be fully imaged in a single pass. When radar data are available across the frequency spectrum, we have the ability to enhance target detection and measure frequency dependent properties. For example, we can couple HF sounder measurements in warmer ice where scattering attenuates and hides the signal of interest with VHF sounder measurements in cooler ice which have much improved resolution from a single flight line. We present examples of improved bed detection with coupled HF and VHF imagery in a temperate to cold ice transition that show the strong frequency dependence of englacial scattering. To handle the increased data rate, we developed a standard processing chain and data product for CReSIS radar systems, including legacy systems. Application specific GIS tools are an essential part and enable us to merge other data products during data analysis. By using imagery

  14. Ground-based follow-up in relation to Kepler Asteroseismic Investigation

    CERN Document Server

    Uytterhoeven, K; Bruntt, H; De Cat, P; Frandsen, S; Gutierrez-Soto, J; Kiss, L; Kurtz, D W; Marconi, M; Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Ostensen, R; Randall, S; Southworth, J; Szabo, R

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler space mission, successfully launched in March 2009, is providing continuous, high-precision photometry of thousands of stars simultaneously. The uninterrupted time-series of stars of all known pulsation types are a precious source for asteroseismic studies. The Kepler data do not provide information on the physical parameters, such as effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and vsini, which are crucial for successful asteroseismic modelling. Additional ground-based time-series data are needed to characterize mode parameters in several types of pulsating stars. Therefore, ground-based multi-colour photometry and mid/high-resolution spectroscopy are needed to complement the space data. We present ground-based activities within KASC on selected asteroseismic Kepler targets of several pulsation types. (Based on observations made with the Isaac Newton Telescope, William Herschel Telescope, Nordic Optical Telescope, Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, Mercator Telescope (La Palma, Spain), and IAC-...

  15. BigBOSS: The Ground-Based Stage IV BAO Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlegel, David; Bebek, Chris; Heetderks, Henry; Ho, Shirley; Lampton, Michael; Levi, Michael; Mostek, Nick; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Perlmutter, Saul; Roe, Natalie; Sholl, Michael; Smoot, George; White, Martin; Dey, Arjun; Abraham, Tony; Jannuzi, Buell; Joyce, Dick; Liang, Ming; Merrill, Mike; Olsen, Knut; Salim, Samir

    2009-04-01

    The BigBOSS experiment is a proposed DOE-NSF Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment to study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure with an all-sky galaxy redshift survey. The project is designed to unlock the mystery of dark energy using existing ground-based facilities operated by NOAO. A new 4000-fiber R=5000 spectrograph covering a 3-degree diameter field will measure BAO and redshift space distortions in the distribution of galaxies and hydrogen gas spanning redshifts from 0.2< z< 3.5. The Dark Energy Task Force figure of merit (DETF FoM) for this experiment is expected to be equal to that of a JDEM mission for BAO with the lower risk and cost typical of a ground-based experiment.

  16. Comparing Dawn, Hubble Space Telescope, and Ground-Based Interpretations of (4) Vesta

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, Vishnu; Corre, Lucille Le; Scully, Jennifer E C; Gaskell, Robert; Russell, Christopher T; Park, Ryan S; Nathues, Andreas; Raymond, Carol; Gaffey, Michael J; Sierks, Holger; Becker, Kris J; McFadden, Lucy A

    2013-01-01

    Observations of asteroid 4 Vesta by NASA's Dawn spacecraft are interesting because its surface has the largest range of albedo, color and composition of any other asteroid visited by spacecraft to date. These hemispherical and rotational variations in surface brightness and composition have been attributed to impact processes since Vesta's formation. Prior to Dawn's arrival at Vesta, its surface properties were the focus of intense telescopic investigations for nearly a hundred years. Ground-based photometric and spectroscopic observations first revealed these variations followed later by those using Hubble Space Telescope. Here we compare interpretations of Vesta's rotation period, pole, albedo, topographic, color, and compositional properties from ground-based telescopes and HST with those from Dawn. Rotational spectral variations observed from ground-based studies are also consistent with those observed by Dawn. While the interpretation of some of these features was tenuous from past data, the interpretati...

  17. Frequency diversity wideband digital receiver and signal processor for solid-state dual-polarimetric weather radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Kumar Vijay

    The recent spate in the use of solid-state transmitters for weather radar systems has unexceptionably revolutionized the research in meteorology. The solid-state transmitters allow transmission of low peak powers without losing the radar range resolution by allowing the use of pulse compression waveforms. In this research, a novel frequency-diversity wideband waveform is proposed and realized to extenuate the low sensitivity of solid-state radars and mitigate the blind range problem tied with the longer pulse compression waveforms. The latest developments in the computing landscape have permitted the design of wideband digital receivers which can process this novel waveform on Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) chips. In terms of signal processing, wideband systems are generally characterized by the fact that the bandwidth of the signal of interest is comparable to the sampled bandwidth; that is, a band of frequencies must be selected and filtered out from a comparable spectral window in which the signal might occur. The development of such a wideband digital receiver opens a window for exciting research opportunities for improved estimation of precipitation measurements for higher frequency systems such as X, Ku and Ka bands, satellite-borne radars and other solid-state ground-based radars. This research describes various unique challenges associated with the design of a multi-channel wideband receiver. The receiver consists of twelve channels which simultaneously downconvert and filter the digitized intermediate-frequency (IF) signal for radar data processing. The product processing for the multi-channel digital receiver mandates a software and network architecture which provides for generating and archiving a single meteorological product profile culled from multi-pulse profiles at an increased data date. The multi-channel digital receiver also continuously samples the transmit pulse for calibration of radar receiver gain and transmit power. The multi

  18. Transmission Properties of Radar Wave through Reentry Plasma Sheath

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Zheng-ping; MA Zhao-guo; LIU Jing; LI Zhong-ping; ZHANG Da-hai

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, by taking into account the coupling of the ionization of ablation gas and atmosphere, an electrons density distribution model is built. Using this model, the transmission properties of different polarization radar wave through sheath are evaluated on the basis of the transmission matrix theory. Then, we discuss the effects of the electrons density, the added magnetic field, and the radar wave frequency on the transmission properties. As a result of this investigation,greater transmission power could be gained in order to efficiently shorten communication blackout,by reducing the electrons density or choosing proper added magnetic field and the frequency of the radar wave according to the different polarization form of the radar wave.

  19. First ground-based FTIR-observations of methane in the tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Petersen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Total column concentrations and volume mixing ratio profiles of methane have been retrieved from ground-based solar absorption FTIR spectra in the near-infrared recorded in Paramaribo (Suriname. The methane FTIR observations are compared with TM5 model simulations and satellite observations from SCIAMACHY, and represent the first validation of SCIAMACHY retrievals in the tropics using ground-based remote sensing techniques. Apart from local biomass burning features, our methane FTIR observations agree well with the SCIAMACHY retrievals and TM5 model simulations.

  20. Extended lateral heating of the nighttime ionosphere by ground-based VLF transmitters

    OpenAIRE

    İnan, Umran Savaş; Graf, K. L.; Spasojevic, M.; Marshall, R. A.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Foust, F. R.

    2013-01-01

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: SPACE PHYSICS, VOL. 118, 7783–7797, doi:10.1002/2013JA019337, 2013 Extended lateral heating of the nighttime ionosphere by ground-based VLF transmitters K. L. Graf,1 M. Spasojevic,1 R. A. Marshall,2 N. G. Lehtinen,1 F. R. Foust,1 and U. S. Inan1,3 Received 16 August 2013; revised 9 October 2013; accepted 11 November 2013; published 3 December 2013. [1] The effects of ground-based very low frequency (VLF) transmitters on the lower ionospher...

  1. Status of advanced ground-based laser interferometers for gravitational-wave detection

    CERN Document Server

    Dooley, Katherine L; Dwyer, Sheila; Puppo, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Ground-based laser interferometers for gravitational-wave (GW) detection were first constructed starting 20 years ago and as of 2010 collection of several years' worth of science data at initial design sensitivities was completed. Upgrades to the initial detectors together with construction of brand new detectors are ongoing and feature advanced technologies to improve the sensitivity to GWs. This conference proceeding provides an overview of the common design features of ground-based laser interferometric GW detectors and establishes the context for the status updates of each of the four gravitational-wave detectors around the world: Advanced LIGO, Advanced Virgo, GEO600 and KAGRA.

  2. Asteroseismology of solar-type stars with Kepler: III. Ground-based data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Molenda-Żakowicz , J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the ground-based follow-up program of spectroscopic and photometric observations of solar-like asteroseismic targets for the Kepler space mission. These stars constitute a large group of more than a thousand objects which are the subject of an intensive study by the Kepler Asteroseis......We report on the ground-based follow-up program of spectroscopic and photometric observations of solar-like asteroseismic targets for the Kepler space mission. These stars constitute a large group of more than a thousand objects which are the subject of an intensive study by the Kepler...

  3. Estimation of solar irradiance using ground-based whole sky imagers

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, Soumyabrata; Lee, Yee Hui; Winkler, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Ground-based whole sky imagers (WSIs) can provide localized images of the sky of high temporal and spatial resolution, which permits fine-grained cloud observation. In this paper, we show how images taken by WSIs can be used to estimate solar radiation. Sky cameras are useful here because they provide additional information about cloud movement and coverage, which are otherwise not available from weather station data. Our setup includes ground-based weather stations at the same location as the imagers. We use their measurements to validate our methods.

  4. Radar efficiency and the calculation of decade-long PMSE backscatter cross-section for the Resolute Bay VHF radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Swarnalingam

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The Resolute Bay VHF radar, located in Nunavut, Canada (75.0° N, 95.0° W and operating at 51.5 MHz, has been used to investigate Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE since 1997. PMSE are a unique form of strong coherent radar echoes, and their understanding has been a challenge to the scientific community since their discovery more than three decades ago. While other high latitude radars have recorded strong levels of PMSE activities, the Resolute Bay radar has observed relatively lower levels of PMSE strengths. In order to derive absolute measurements of PMSE strength at this site, a technique is developed to determine the radar efficiency using cosmic (sky noise variations along with the help of a calibrated noise source. VHF radars are only rarely calibrated, but determination of efficiency is even less common. Here we emphasize the importance of efficiency for determination of cross-section measurements. The significant advantage of this method is that it can be directly applied to any MST radar system anywhere in the world as long as the sky noise variations are known. The radar efficiencies for two on-site radars at Resolute Bay are determined. PMSE backscatter cross-section is estimated, and decade-long PMSE strength variations at this location are investigated. It was noticed that the median of the backscatter cross-section distribution remains relatively unchanged, but over the years a great level of variability occurs in the high power tail of the distribution.

  5. Titan Polar Landscape Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    With the ongoing Cassini-era observations and studies of Titan it is clear that the intensity and distribution of surface processes (particularly fluvial erosion by methane and Aeolian transport) has changed through time. Currently however, alternate hypotheses substantially differ among specific scenarios with respect to the effects of atmospheric evolution, seasonal changes, and endogenic processes. We have studied the evolution of Titan's polar region through a combination of analysis of imaging, elevation data, and geomorphic mapping, spatially explicit simulations of landform evolution, and quantitative comparison of the simulated landscapes with corresponding Titan morphology. We have quantitatively evaluated alternate scenarios for the landform evolution of Titan's polar terrain. The investigations have been guided by recent geomorphic mapping and topographic characterization of the polar regions that are used to frame hypotheses of process interactions, which have been evaluated using simulation modeling. Topographic information about Titan's polar region is be based on SAR-Topography and altimetry archived on PDS, SAR-based stereo radar-grammetry, radar-sounding lake depth measurements, and superposition relationships between geomorphologic map units, which we will use to create a generalized topographic map.

  6. W-band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widener, KB; Johnson, K

    2005-01-05

    The W-band Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Cloud Radar (WACR) systems are zenith pointing Doppler radars that probe the extent and composition of clouds at 95.04 GHz. The main purpose of this radar is to determine cloud boundaries (e.g., cloud bottoms and tops). This radar reports estimates for the first three spectra moments for each range gate up to 15 km. The 0th moment is reflectivity, the 1st moment is radial velocity, and the 2nd moment is spectral width. Also available are the raw spectra files. Unlike the millimeter wavelength cloud radar (MMCR), the WACR does not use pulse coding and operates in only copolarization and cross-polarization modes.

  7. Investigating storm-enhanced density and polar tongue of ionization development during the 22 October 1999 great storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Ildiko; Lovell, Brian C.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate large-scale plasma density increases occurring during the 22 October 1999 great storm and focus on storm-enhanced density (SED) and polar tongue of ionization (TOI) development. Observations include two-hourly Global Ionosphere Map series coupled with multi-instrument in situ, space-based, and ground-based data plots, with Super Dual Auroral Radar Network two-cell convection maps and with model-generated neutral wind vector maps. Results demonstrate the equatorial electrojet events occurring in the Australian and American sectors, the high-density plasma features, and their underlying plasma transportation processes. During the main phase, a series of four prompt penetration electric field (PPEF) events occurred with subauroral polarization stream E field development forming a plasmaspheric drainage plume. These E field events caused the repeated development of equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA), SED bulge, and SED plume during the local dusk-midnight hours in those sectors that covered these local times. Showing a westward movement in accordance with their local time dependence, the EIA-SED structure developed first in the American sector, later on over the Pacific, and finally in the Australian sector. The SED plume plasma found its way into the polar cap through the dayside cusp region, created in the north some large polar cap enhancements reaching up to seven times of the quiet time levels, and evolved in each hemisphere into a polar TOI. We speculate that the enhanced growth of EIA, transporting high-density solar-produced plasma to the SED bulge via strong net eastward E field effects, and the mechanical effects of equatorward neutral winds contributed to the polar TOI's increasingly better development.

  8. Noise Radar Technology as an Interference Prevention Method

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In some applications, such as automotive and marine/navigation, hundreds of radars may operate in a small environment (e.g., a road complex or a strait) and in an allocated frequency band with limited width. Therefore, a compatibility problem between different radars arises that is not easily solved by time, frequency, space, or polarization diversity. The advent of fast digital signal processing and signal generation techniques makes it possible to use waveform diversity to solve this probl...

  9. Signatures of moving polar cap arcs in the F-region PolarDARN echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Koustov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Joint observations of the all-sky camera at Resolute Bay (Nunavut, Canada and the Polar Dual Auroral Radar Network (PolarDARN HF radars at Rankin Inlet and Inuvik (Canada are considered to establish radar signatures of poleward moving polar cap arcs "detaching" from the auroral oval. Common features of the events considered are enhanced power or echo occurrence in the wake of the arcs and enhanced spectral width of these echoes. When the arcs were oriented along some of the radar beams, velocity reversals at the arc location were observed with the directions of the arc-associated flows corresponding to a converging electric field. For the event of 9 December 2007, two arcs were poleward progressing almost along the central beams of the Inuvik radar at the speed close to the E × B drift of the bulk of the F-region plasma as inferred from HF Doppler velocities and from independent measurements by the Resolute Bay ionosonde. In global-scale convection maps inferred from all Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN radar measurements, the polar cap arcs were often seen close to the reversal line of additional mesoscale convection cells located poleward of the normal cells related to the auroral oval.

  10. Radar imaging of solar system ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harcke, Leif J.

    We map the planet Mercury and Jupiter's moons Ganymede and Callisto using Earth-based radar telescopes and find that all of these have regions exhibiting high, depolarized radar backscatter and polarization inversion (m c > 1). Both characteristics suggest significant volume scattering from water ice or similar cold-trapped volatiles. Synthetic aperture radar mapping of Mercury's north and south polar regions at fine (6 km) resolution at 3.5 cm wavelength corroborates the results of previous 13 cm investigations of enhanced backscatter and polarization inversion (0.9 caused by simple double-bounce geometries, since the bright, reflective regions do not appear on the radar-facing wall but, instead, in shadowed regions not directly aligned with the radar look direction. Thermal models require the existence of such a layer to preserve ice deposits in craters at other than high polar latitudes. The additional attenuation (factor 1.64 +/- 15%) of the 3.5 cm wavelength data from these experiments over previous 13 cm radar observations is consistent with a range of layer thickness from 0 +/- 11 to 35 +/- 15 cm, depending on the assumed scattering law exponent n. Our 3.5 cm wavelength bistatic aperture synthesis observations of the two outermost Galilean satellites of Jupiter, Ganymede and Callisto, resolve the north-south ambiguity of previous images, and confirm the disk-integrated enhanced backscatter and polarization inversion noted in prior investigations. The direct imaging technique more clearly shows that higher backscatter are as are associated with the terrain that has undergone recent resurfacing, such as the sulci and the impact crater basins. The leading hemispheres of both moons have somewhat higher (20% +/- 5%) depolarized echoes than their trailing hemispheres, suggesting additional wavelength-scale structure in the regolith. Two improvements to existing delay-Doppler techniques enhance data reduction. First, correlation using subsets of the standard

  11. Radiation in fog: quantification of the impact on fog liquid water based on ground-based remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wærsted, Eivind G.; Haeffelin, Martial; Dupont, Jean-Charles; Delanoë, Julien; Dubuisson, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    Radiative cooling and heating impact the liquid water balance of fog and therefore play an important role in determining their persistence or dissipation. We demonstrate that a quantitative analysis of the radiation-driven condensation and evaporation is possible in real time using ground-based remote sensing observations (cloud radar, ceilometer, microwave radiometer). Seven continental fog events in midlatitude winter are studied, and the radiative processes are further explored through sensitivity studies. The longwave (LW) radiative cooling of the fog is able to produce 40-70 g m-2 h-1 of liquid water by condensation when the fog liquid water path exceeds 30 g m-2 and there are no clouds above the fog, which corresponds to renewing the fog water in 0.5-2 h. The variability is related to fog temperature and atmospheric humidity, with warmer fog below a drier atmosphere producing more liquid water. The appearance of a cloud layer above the fog strongly reduces the LW cooling relative to a situation with no cloud above; the effect is strongest for a low cloud, when the reduction can reach 100 %. Consequently, the appearance of clouds above will perturb the liquid water balance in the fog and may therefore induce fog dissipation. Shortwave (SW) radiative heating by absorption by fog droplets is smaller than the LW cooling, but it can contribute significantly, inducing 10-15 g m-2 h-1 of evaporation in thick fog at (winter) midday. The absorption of SW radiation by unactivated aerosols inside the fog is likely less than 30 % of the SW absorption by the water droplets, in most cases. However, the aerosols may contribute more significantly if the air mass contains a high concentration of absorbing aerosols. The absorbed radiation at the surface can reach 40-120 W m-2 during the daytime depending on the fog thickness. As in situ measurements indicate that 20-40 % of this energy is transferred to the fog as sensible heat, this surface absorption can contribute

  12. Retrieving fog liquid water content using a new 94 GHz FMCW cloud radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, F.; Thies, B.; Bendix, J.

    2010-07-01

    The vertical distribution of the liquid water content (LWC) in fog and low stratus is a critical microphysical parameter since it essentially influences the interaction between these low level clouds and the solar and terrestrial radiation. Despite of this importance there are only few investigations concerning LWC-profiles during fog events, which are mainly restricted to balloon borne measurements and suffer from a low temporal resolution. Therefore, no continuous records covering the whole life cycle of fog events can be provided for climatology studies. A new ground based frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) cloud radar has the po-tential to fill this lack of knowledge. Working at a frequency of 94 GHz (wavelength 3 mm) it is ideal for monitoring low level water clouds. The radar can detect clouds at a minimum height range of ~30 m and provides a vertical resolution of 4m: This offers the potential to retrieve detailed vertical structures of fog and low stratus. The reconstruction of the LWC-profile can be accomplished due to the close relationship be-tween the cloud LWC and the detected radar reflectivity. However, this relationship depends strongly on the drop size distribution within the cloud. The strength of the radar reflectivity is related to the sixth power of the drop size distribution and the LWC is related to the latter by the third power. Former studies yielded the existence of different fog evolutionary stages with characteristical drop size distributions. In order to explore the effect of the different drop size distribution on the relationship between the radar reflectivity and the LWC we conducted radiative transfer calculations with characteristical drop size distributions and LWC-profiles taken from the literature. For this purpose we adapted the radiative transfer model (RTM) QuickBeam developed for the Cloudsat satellite to our ground based microwave radar. Beside the adaptation to the verti-cal resolution of the ground based cloud

  13. Evaluation of turbulent dissipation rate retrievals from Doppler cloud radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Shupe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbulent dissipation rate retrievals from cloud radar Doppler velocity measurements are evaluated using independent, in situ observations in Arctic stratocumulus clouds. In situ validation data sets of dissipation rate are derived using sonic anemometer measurements from a tethered balloon and high frequency pressure variation observations from a research aircraft, both flown in proximity to stationary, ground-based radars. Modest biases are found among the data sets in particularly low- or high-turbulence regimes, but in general the radar-retrieved values correspond well with the in situ measurements. Root mean square differences are typically a factor of 4–6 relative to any given magnitude of dissipation rate. These differences are no larger than those found when comparing dissipation rates computed from tethered-balloon and 15-m tower sonic measurements made at spatial distances of a few hundred meters. Moreover, radar retrievals are able to capture the vertical dissipation rate structure observed by the in situ sensors, while offering substantially more information on the time variability of turbulence profiles. Together these evaluations indicate that radar-based retrievals can, at a minimum, be used to determine the vertical structure of turbulence in Arctic stratocumulus clouds.

  14. Localization and Mapping Using Only a Rotating FMCW Radar Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Chapuis

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Rotating radar sensors are perception systems rarely used in mobile robotics. This paper is concerned with the use of a mobile ground-based panoramic radar sensor which is able to deliver both distance and velocity of multiple targets in its surrounding. The consequence of using such a sensor in high speed robotics is the appearance of both geometric and Doppler velocity distortions in the collected data. These effects are, in the majority of studies, ignored or considered as noise and then corrected based on proprioceptive sensors or localization systems. Our purpose is to study and use data distortion and Doppler effect as sources of information in order to estimate the vehicle’s displacement. The linear and angular velocities of the mobile robot are estimated by analyzing the distortion of the measurements provided by the panoramic Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW radar, called IMPALA. Without the use of any proprioceptive sensor, these estimates are then used to build the trajectory of the vehicle and the radar map of outdoor environments. In this paper, radar-only localization and mapping results are presented for a ground vehicle moving at high speed.

  15. Ground-Based VIS/NIR Reflectance Spectra of 25143 Itokawa: What Hayabusa will See and How Ground-Based Data can Augment Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas, Faith; Abell, P. A.; Jarvis, K. S.

    2004-01-01

    Planning for the arrival of the Hayabusa spacecraft at asteroid 25143 Itokawa includes consideration of the expected spectral information to be obtained using the AMICA and NIRS instruments. The rotationally-resolved spatial coverage the asteroid we have obtained with ground-based telescopic spectrophotometry in the visible and near-infrared can be utilized here to address expected spacecraft data. We use spectrophotometry to simulate the types of data that Hayabusa will receive with the NIRS and AMICA instruments, and will demonstrate them here. The NIRS will cover a wavelength range from 0.85 m, and have a dispersion per element of 250 Angstroms. Thus, we are limited in coverage of the 1.0 micrometer and 2.0 micrometer mafic silicate absorption features. The ground-based reflectance spectra of Itokawa show a large component of olivine in its surface material, and the 2.0 micrometer feature is shallow. Determining the olivine to pyroxene abundance ratio is critically dependent on the attributes of the 1.0- and 2.0 micrometer features. With a cut-off near 2,1 micrometer the longer edge of the 2.0- feature will not be obtained by NIRS. Reflectance spectra obtained using ground-based telescopes can be used to determine the regional composition around space-based spectral observations, and possibly augment the longer wavelength spectral attributes. Similarly, the shorter wavelength end of the 1.0 micrometer absorption feature will be partially lost to the NIRS. The AMICA filters mimic the ECAS filters, and have wavelength coverage overlapping with the NIRS spectral range. We demonstrate how merging photometry from AMICA will extend the spectral coverage of the NIRS. Lessons learned from earlier spacecraft to asteroids should be considered.

  16. Study on the Application Technology of Ground-based InSAR%地基雷达干涉技术应用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱志伟; 汪学琴; 岳顺; 郭献涛; 桑杰

    2015-01-01

    近年来,地基合成孔径雷达干涉技术的应用领域不断地扩展.本文详细地介绍了变形监测系统IBIS,并对其监测原理进行了简单概括.不仅对地基InSAR技术近期的应用及发展进行归纳总结,而且对该技术存在的问题从大气改正、断点校正及数据融合等方面进行深入的分析和讨论.通过对地基雷达干涉技术的应用研究分析,说明其在变形监测中将具有更为广泛的应用前景.%In recent years, the application field of ground-based synthetic aperture radar interferometry technique has been expanded. This paper introduces the deformation monitoring system IBIS and summarized the principle of monitoring briefly. Not only the application and development of InSAR technology are summarized in this paper, and the existing problems such as the atmospheric correction, breakpoint adjustment and the data fusion are analyzed and discussed in depth. Through the application research of ground radar interferometry analysis, this technology has broad application prospects in deformation monitoring.

  17. Space-Borne and Ground-Based InSAR Data Integration: The Åknes Test Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Bardi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This work concerns a proposal of the integration of InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar data acquired by ground-based (GB and satellite platforms. The selected test site is the Åknes rockslide, which affects the western Norwegian coast. The availability of GB-InSAR and satellite InSAR data and the accessibility of a wide literature make the landslide suitable for testing the proposed procedure. The first step consists of the organization of a geodatabase, performed in the GIS environment, containing all of the available data. The second step concerns the analysis of satellite and GB-InSAR data, separately. Two datasets, acquired by RADARSAT-2 (related to a period between October 2008 and August 2013 and by a combination of TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X (acquired between July 2010 and October 2012, both of them in ascending orbit, processed applying SBAS (Small BAseline Subset method, are available. GB-InSAR data related to five different campaigns of measurements, referred to the summer seasons of 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2012, are available, as well. The third step relies on data integration, performed firstly from a qualitative point of view and later from a semi-quantitative point of view. The results of the proposed procedure have been validated by comparing them to GPS (Global Positioning System data. The proposed procedure allowed us to better define landslide sectors in terms of different ranges of displacements. From a qualitative point of view, stable and unstable areas have been distinguished. In the sector concerning movement, two different sectors have been defined thanks to the results of the semi-quantitative integration step: the first sector, concerning displacement values higher than 10 mm, and the 2nd sector, where the displacements did not exceed a 10-mm value of displacement in the analyzed period.

  18. Identification of active release planes using ground-based differential InSAR at the Randa rock slope instability, Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gischig

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Five ground-based differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (GB-DInSAR surveys were conducted between 2005 and 2007 at the rock slope instability at Randa, Switzerland. Resultant displacement maps revealed, for the first time, the presence of an active basal rupture zone and a lateral release surface daylighting on the exposed 1991 failure scarp. Structures correlated with the boundaries of interferometric displacement domains were confirmed using a helicopter-based LiDAR DTM and oblique aerial photography. Former investigations at the site failed to conclusively detect these active release surfaces essential for kinematic and hazard analysis of the instability, although their existence had been hypothesized. The determination of the basal and lateral release planes also allowed a more accurate estimate of the currently unstable volume of 5.7±1.5 million m3. The displacement patterns reveal that two different kinematic behaviors dominate the instability, i.e. toppling above 2200 m and translational failure below. In the toppling part of the instability the areas with the highest GB-DInSAR displacements correspond to areas of enhanced micro-seismic activity. The observation of only few strongly active discontinuities daylighting on the 1991 failure surface points to a rather uniform movement in the lower portion of the instability, while most of the slip occurs along the basal rupture plane. Comparison of GB-DInSAR displacements with mapped discontinuities revealed correlations between displacement patterns and active structures, although spatial offsets occur as a result of the effective resolution of GB-DInSAR. Similarly, comparisons with measurements from total station surveys generally showed good agreement. Discrepancies arose in several cases due to local movement of blocks, the size of which could not be resolved using GB-DInSAR.

  19. Signal Processing System for the CASA Integrated Project I Radars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharadwaj, Nitin; Chandrasekar, V.; Junyent, Francesc

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes the waveform design space and signal processing system for dual-polarization Doppler weather radar operating at X band. The performance of the waveforms is presented with ground clutter suppression capability and mitigation of range velocity ambiguity. The operational waveform is designed based on operational requirements and system/hardware requirements. A dual Pulse Repetition Frequency (PRF) waveform was developed and implemented for the first generation X-band radars deployed by the Center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA). This paper presents an evaluation of the performance of the waveforms based on simulations and data collected by the first-generation CASA radars during operations.

  20. Phased-array radar design application of radar fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffrey, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Phased-Array Radar Design is a text-reference designed for electrical engineering graduate students in colleges and universities as well as for corporate in-house training programs for radar design engineers, especially systems engineers and analysts who would like to gain hands-on, practical knowledge and skills in radar design fundamentals, advanced radar concepts, trade-offs for radar design and radar performance analysis.

  1. Precision simulation of ground-based lensing data using observations from space

    CERN Document Server

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Leauthaud, Alexie; Massey, Richard J; Rhodes, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Current and upcoming wide-field, ground-based, broad-band imaging surveys promise to address a wide range of outstanding problems in galaxy formation and cosmology. Several such uses of ground-based data, especially weak gravitational lensing, require highly precise measurements of galaxy image statistics with careful correction for the effects of the point-spread function (PSF). In this paper, we introduce the SHERA (SHEar Reconvolution Analysis) software to simulate ground-based imaging data with realistic galaxy morphologies and observing conditions, starting from space-based data (from COSMOS, the Cosmological Evolution Survey) and accounting for the effects of the space-based PSF. This code simulates ground-based data, optionally with a weak lensing shear applied, in a model-independent way using a general Fourier space formalism. The utility of this pipeline is that it allows for a precise, realistic assessment of systematic errors due to the method of data processing, for example in extracting weak len...

  2. Simulation of the imaging quality of ground-based telescopes affected by atmospheric disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yubin; Kou, Songfeng; Gu, Bozhong

    2014-08-01

    Ground-based telescope imaging model is developed in this paper, the relationship between the atmospheric disturbances and the ground-based telescope image quality is studied. Simulation of the wave-front distortions caused by atmospheric turbulences has long been an important method in the study of the propagation of light through the atmosphere. The phase of the starlight wave-front is changed over time, but in an appropriate short exposure time, the atmospheric disturbances can be considered as "frozen". In accordance with Kolmogorov turbulence theory, simulating atmospheric disturbances of image model based on the phase screen distorted by atmospheric turbulences is achieved by the fast Fourier transform (FFT). Geiger mode avalanche photodiode array (APD arrays) model is used for atmospheric wave-front detection, the image is achieved by inversion method of photon counting after the target starlight goes through phase screens and ground-based telescopes. Ground-based telescope imaging model is established in this paper can accurately achieve the relationship between the quality of telescope imaging and monolayer or multilayer atmosphere disturbances, and it is great significance for the wave-front detection and optical correction in a Multi-conjugate Adaptive Optics system (MCAO).

  3. Ground-based LIDAR: a novel approach to quantify fine-scale fuelbed characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.L. Loudermilk; J.K. Hiers; J.J. O’Brien; R.J. Mitchell; A. Singhania; J.C. Fernandez; W.P. Cropper; K.C. Slatton

    2009-01-01

    Ground-based LIDAR (also known as laser ranging) is a novel technique that may precisely quantify fuelbed characteristics important in determining fire behavior. We measured fuel properties within a south-eastern US longleaf pine woodland at the individual plant and fuelbed scale. Data were collected using a mobile terrestrial LIDAR unit at sub-cm scale for individual...

  4. Use of neural networks in ground-based aerosol retrievals from multi-angle spectropolarimetric observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Noia, A.; Hasekamp, O.P.; Harten, G. van; Rietjens, J.H.H.; Smit, J.M.; Snik, F.; Henzing, J.S.; Boer, J. de; Keller, C.U.; Volten, H.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the use of a neural network algorithm for the retrieval of the aerosol properties from ground-based spectropolarimetric measurements is discussed. The neural network is able to retrieve the aerosol properties with an accuracy that is almost comparable to that of an iterative retrieval

  5. Retrieval of liquid water cloud properties from ground-based remote sensing observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knist, C.L.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate ground-based remotely sensed microphysical and optical properties of liquid water clouds are essential references to validate satellite-observed cloud properties and to improve cloud parameterizations in weather and climate models. This requires the evaluation of algorithms for retrieval of

  6. Ground-based remote sensing scheme for monitoring aerosol–cloud interactions (discussion)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarna, K.; Russchenberg, H.W.J.

    2015-01-01

    A method for continuous observation of aerosol–cloud interactions with ground-based remote sensing instruments is presented. The main goal of this method is to enable the monitoring of cloud microphysical changes due to the changing aerosol concentration. We use high resolution measurements from lid

  7. Ground-based remote sensing scheme for monitoring aerosol-cloud interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarna, K.; Russchenberg, H.W.J.

    2016-01-01

    A new method for continuous observation of aerosol–cloud interactions with ground-based remote sensing instruments is presented. The main goal of this method is to enable the monitoring of the change of the cloud droplet size due to the change in the aerosol concentration. We use high-resolution mea

  8. Low Power Ground-Based Laser Illumination for Electric Propulsion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, Michael R.; Oleson, Steven R.

    1994-01-01

    A preliminary evaluation of low power, ground-based laser powered electric propulsion systems is presented. A review of available and near-term laser, photovoltaic, and adaptive optic systems indicates that approximately 5-kW of ground-based laser power can be delivered at an equivalent one-sun intensity to an orbit of approximately 2000 km. Laser illumination at the proper wavelength can double photovoltaic array conversion efficiencies compared to efficiencies obtained with solar illumination at the same intensity, allowing a reduction in array mass. The reduced array mass allows extra propellant to be carried with no penalty in total spacecraft mass. The extra propellant mass can extend the satellite life in orbit, allowing additional revenue to be generated. A trade study using realistic cost estimates and conservative ground station viewing capability was performed to estimate the number of communication satellites which must be illuminated to make a proliferated system of laser ground stations economically attractive. The required number of satellites is typically below that of proposed communication satellite constellations, indicating that low power ground-based laser beaming may be commercially viable. However, near-term advances in low specific mass solar arrays and high energy density batteries for LEO applications would render the ground-based laser system impracticable.

  9. Asteroseismology of solar-type stars with Kepler: III. Ground-based data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Molenda-Żakowicz , J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the ground-based follow-up program of spectroscopic and photometric observations of solar-like asteroseismic targets for the Kepler space mission. These stars constitute a large group of more than a thousand objects which are the subject of an intensive study by the Kepler Asteroseis...

  10. Ground-Based Lidar Measurements During the CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ) Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkoff, Timothy; Qian, Li; Kleidman, Richard; Stewart, Sebastian; Welton, Ellsworth; Li, Zhu; Holbem, Brent

    2008-01-01

    The CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ) field campaign was carried out between June 26th and August 29th of 2007 in the multi-state Maryland-Virginia-Pennsylvania region of the U.S. to study aerosol properties and cloud-aerosol interactions during overpasses of the CALIPSO satellite. Field work was conducted on selected days when CALIPSO ground tracks occurred in the region. Ground-based measurements included data from multiple Cimel sunphotometers that were placed at intervals along a segment of the CALIPSO ground-track. These measurements provided sky radiance and AOD measurements to enable joints inversions and comparisons with CALIPSO retrievals. As part of this activity, four ground-based lidars provided backscatter measurements (at 523 nm) in the region. Lidars at University of Maryland Baltimore County (Catonsville, MD) and Goddard Space Flight Center (Greenbelt, MD) provided continuous data during the campaign, while two micro-pulse lidar (MPL) systems were temporarily stationed at various field locations directly on CALIPSO ground-tracks. As a result, thirteen on-track ground-based lidar observations were obtained from eight different locations in the region. In some cases, nighttime CALIPSO coincident measurements were also obtained. In most studies reported to date, ground-based lidar validation efforts for CALIPSO rely on systems that are at fixed locations some distance away from the satellite ground-track. The CATZ ground-based lidar data provide an opportunity to examine vertical structure properties of aerosols and clouds both on and off-track simultaneously during a CALIPSO overpass. A table of available ground-based lidar measurements during this campaign will be presented, along with example backscatter imagery for a number of coincident cases with CALIPSO. Results indicate that even for a ground-based measurements directly on-track, comparisons can still pose a challenge due to the differing spatio-temporal properties of the ground and satellite

  11. Radar Signature Calculation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: The calculation, analysis, and visualization of the spatially extended radar signatures of complex objects such as ships in a sea multipath environment and...

  12. Doppler radar physiological sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Lubecke, Victor M; Droitcour, Amy D; Park, Byung-Kwon; Singh, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Presents a comprehensive description of the theory and practical implementation of Doppler radar-based physiological monitoring. This book includes an overview of current physiological monitoring techniques and explains the fundamental technology used in remote non-contact monitoring methods. Basic radio wave propagation and radar principles are introduced along with the fundamentals of physiological motion and measurement. Specific design and implementation considerations for physiological monitoring radar systems are then discussed in detail. The authors address current research and commercial development of Doppler radar based physiological monitoring for healthcare and other applications.

  13. Space Solar Power Technology Demonstration for Lunar Polar Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, M. W.; Fikes, J. C.; Howell, J.; Mankins, J. C.

    2002-01-01

    A solar power generation station on a mountaintop near the moon's North or South pole can receive sunlight 708 hours per lunar day, for continuous power generation. Power can be beamed from this station over long distances using a laser-based wireless power transmission system and a photo-voltaic receiver. This beamed energy can provide warmth, electricity, and illumination for a robotic rover to perform scientific experiments in cold, dark craters where no other power source is practical. Radio-frequency power transmission may also be demonstrated in lunar polar applications to locate and recover sub-surface deposits of volatile material, such as water ice. High circular polarization ratios observered in data from Clementine spacecraft and Arecibo radar reflections from the moon's South pole suggest that water ice is indeed present in certain lunar polar craters. Data from the Lunar Prospector spacecraft's epi-thermal neutron spectrometer also indicate that hydrogen is present at the moon's poles. Space Solar Power technology enables investigation of these craters, which may contain a billion-year-old stratigraphic record of tremendous scientific value. Layers of ice, preserved at the moon's poles, could help us determine the sequence and composition of comet impacts on the moon. Such ice deposits may even include distinct strata deposited by secondary ejecta following significant Earth (ocean) impacts, linked to major extinctions of life on Earth. Ice resources at the moon's poles could provide water and air for human exploration and development of space as well as rocket propellant for future space transportation. Technologies demonstrated and matured via lunar polar applications can also be used in other NASA science missions (Valles Marineris, Phobos, Deimos, Mercury's poles, asteroids, etc.) and in future large-scale SSP systems to beam energy from space to Earth. Ground-based technology demonstrations are proceeding to mature the technology for such a near

  14. ARM Cloud Radar Simulator Package for Global Climate Models Value-Added Product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuying [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Xie, Shaocheng [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    It has been challenging to directly compare U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility ground-based cloud radar measurements with climate model output because of limitations or features of the observing processes and the spatial gap between model and the single-point measurements. To facilitate the use of ARM radar data in numerical models, an ARM cloud radar simulator was developed to converts model data into pseudo-ARM cloud radar observations that mimic the instrument view of a narrow atmospheric column (as compared to a large global climate model [GCM] grid-cell), thus allowing meaningful comparison between model output and ARM cloud observations. The ARM cloud radar simulator value-added product (VAP) was developed based on the CloudSat simulator contained in the community satellite simulator package, the Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP) Observation Simulator Package (COSP) (Bodas-Salcedo et al., 2011), which has been widely used in climate model evaluation with satellite data (Klein et al., 2013, Zhang et al., 2010). The essential part of the CloudSat simulator is the QuickBeam radar simulator that is used to produce CloudSat-like radar reflectivity, but is capable of simulating reflectivity for other radars (Marchand et al., 2009; Haynes et al., 2007). Adapting QuickBeam to the ARM cloud radar simulator within COSP required two primary changes: one was to set the frequency to 35 GHz for the ARM Ka-band cloud radar, as opposed to 94 GHz used for the CloudSat W-band radar, and the second was to invert the view from the ground to space so as to attenuate the beam correctly. In addition, the ARM cloud radar simulator uses a finer vertical resolution (100 m compared to 500 m for CloudSat) to resolve the more detailed structure of clouds captured by the ARM radars. The ARM simulator has been developed following the COSP workflow (Figure 1) and using the capabilities available in COSP

  15. Combined radar and telemetry system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T.; Young, Derek; Chou, Tina; Hsieh, Lung-Hwa; Conover, Kurt; Heintzleman, Richard

    2017-08-01

    A combined radar and telemetry system is described. The combined radar and telemetry system includes a processing unit that executes instructions, where the instructions define a radar waveform and a telemetry waveform. The processor outputs a digital baseband signal based upon the instructions, where the digital baseband signal is based upon the radar waveform and the telemetry waveform. A radar and telemetry circuit transmits, simultaneously, a radar signal and telemetry signal based upon the digital baseband signal.

  16. Monitoring of Civil Infrastructures by Interferometric Radar: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieraccini, Massimiliano

    2013-01-01

    Ground-based radar interferometry is an increasingly popular technique for monitoring civil infrastructures. Many research groups, professionals, and companies have tested it in different operative scenarios, so it is time for a first systematic survey of the case studies reported in the literature. This review is addressed especially to the engineers and scientists interested to consider the applicability of the technique to their practice, so it is focused on the issues of the practical cases rather than on theory and principles, which are now well consolidated. PMID:24106454

  17. Ground Observation and Correction of P-band Radar Imaging Ionospheric Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Ning

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available For high resolution space-borne P-band SAR system, ionospheric effects could cause serious phase errors. These errors are causally related to the radar frequency and the TEC of ionosphere and make the image quality degraded. To guarantee the image quality, the ionosphere errors must be emended. Based on the mismatched filter model caused by ionosphere, it is pointed out that accurate ionosphere TEC is the key for phase error correction, a high precision ionosphere TEC measurement method is further put forward by using the phase errors of SAR echoes, which is validated by processing the data of a ground based P-band radar with well focused radar image of the international space station obtained. The results indicate that the method can effectively increase the accuracy of ionosphere TEC estimation, and thus improve the radar imaging quality, it is applicable to low frequency space-borne SAR systems for reducing the ionosphere effects.

  18. The Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruption from a microwave weather radar perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Marzano

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The sub-glacial Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruptions of April and May 2010 are analyzed and quantitatively interpreted by using ground-based weather radar data and volcanic ash radar retrieval (VARR technique. The Eyjafjöll eruptions have been continuously monitored by the Keflavík C-band weather radar, located at a distance of about 155 km from the volcano vent. Considering that the Eyjafjöll volcano is approximately 20 km far from the Atlantic Ocean and that the northerly winds stretched the plume toward the mainland Europe, weather radars are the only means to provide an estimate of the total ejected tephra. The VARR methodology is summarized and applied to available radar time series to estimate the plume maximum height, ash particle category, ash volume, ash fallout and ash concentration every 5 min near the vent. Estimates of the discharge rate of eruption, based on the retrieved ash plume top height, are provided together with an evaluation of the total erupted mass and volume. Deposited ash at ground is also retrieved from radar data by empirically reconstructing the vertical profile of radar reflectivity and estimating the near-surface ash fallout. Radar-based retrieval results cannot be compared with ground measurements, due to the lack of the latter, but further demonstrate the unique contribution of these remote sensing products to the understating and modelling of explosive volcanic ash eruptions.

  19. The Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruption from a microwave weather radar perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Marzano

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The sub-glacial Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruptions of April and May 2010 are analyzed and quantitatively interpreted by using ground-based weather radar data and the Volcanic Ash Radar Retrieval (VARR technique. The Eyjafjöll eruptions have been continuously monitored by the Keflavík C-band weather radar, located at a distance of about 155 km from the volcano vent. Considering that the Eyjafjöll volcano is approximately 20 km from the Atlantic Ocean and that the northerly winds stretched the plume toward the mainland Europe, weather radars are the only means to provide an estimate of the total ejected tephra. The VARR methodology is summarized and applied to available radar time series to estimate the plume maximum height, ash particle category, ash volume, ash fallout and ash concentration every 5 min near the vent. Estimates of the discharge rate of eruption, based on the retrieved ash plume top height, are provided together with an evaluation of the total erupted mass and volume. Deposited ash at ground is also retrieved from radar data by empirically reconstructing the vertical profile of radar reflectivity and estimating the near-surface ash fallout. Radar-based retrieval results cannot be compared with ground measurements, due to the lack of the latter, but further demonstrate the unique contribution of these remote sensing products to the understating and modelling of explosive volcanic ash eruptions.

  20. Ground-based characterization of Eurybates and Orus, two fly-by targets of the Lucy Discovery mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottola, Stefano; Marchi, Simone; Buie, Marc W.; Hellmich, Stephan; Di Martino, Mario; Proffe, Gerrit; Levison, Harold F.; Zangari, Amanda Marie

    2016-10-01

    Lucy is a proposed NASA Discovery mission designed to perform close fly-bys with six Jupiter Trojan asteroids. The mission, which is currently in the Phase A development phase, is planned to launch in 2021 and arrive at the Trojan L4 cloud in 2027.We report on ground-based light curve observations of two of Lucy's fly-by target candidates: (3548) Eurybates and (21900) Orus. The goal is to characterize their shape, spin state and photometric properties both to aid in the planning of the mission, and to complement the space-borne data.Each object has been observed over 5 apparitions in a wide range of geocentric ecliptic longitudes. Shape and spin state modeling was performed by using the convex shape inversion method (Kaasalainen, Mottola & Fulchignoni, 2002). Eurybates is a retrograde rotator with a sidereal rotation Psid=8.702724±0.000009 h. It has a moderately elongated shape with equivalent axial ratios a/b=1.08, b/c=1.16. No obvious signs of global non-convexities and/or albedo variegation are detected in its light curves. Orus is also a retrograde rotator with a period Psid=13.48617±0.00007 h. Its approximate axial ratios are a/b=1.14, b/c=1.12. The presence of a large, planar facet in the proximity of the model's North Pole suggests the presence of a large polar crater.

  1. Comparing multiple model-derived aerosol optical properties to spatially collocated ground-based and satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocko, Ilissa B.; Ginoux, Paul A.

    2017-04-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols are a key factor governing Earth's climate and play a central role in human-caused climate change. However, because of aerosols' complex physical, optical, and dynamical properties, aerosols are one of the most uncertain aspects of climate modeling. Fortunately, aerosol measurement networks over the past few decades have led to the establishment of long-term observations for numerous locations worldwide. Further, the availability of datasets from several different measurement techniques (such as ground-based and satellite instruments) can help scientists increasingly improve modeling efforts. This study explores the value of evaluating several model-simulated aerosol properties with data from spatially collocated instruments. We compare aerosol optical depth (AOD; total, scattering, and absorption), single-scattering albedo (SSA), Ångström exponent (α), and extinction vertical profiles in two prominent global climate models (Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, GFDL, CM2.1 and CM3) to seasonal observations from collocated instruments (AErosol RObotic NETwork, AERONET, and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization, CALIOP) at seven polluted and biomass burning regions worldwide. We find that a multi-parameter evaluation provides key insights on model biases, data from collocated instruments can reveal underlying aerosol-governing physics, column properties wash out important vertical distinctions, and improved models does not mean all aspects are improved. We conclude that it is important to make use of all available data (parameters and instruments) when evaluating aerosol properties derived by models.

  2. A Study of the Elements Copper through Uranium in Sirius A: Contributions from STIS and Ground-Based Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, C. R.; Ayres, T. R.; Castelli, F.; Gulliver, A. F.; Monier, R.; Wahlgren, G. M.

    2016-08-01

    We determine abundances or upper limits for all of the 55 stable elements from copper to uranium for the A1 Vm star Sirius. The purpose of the study is to assemble the most complete picture of elemental abundances with the hope of revealing the chemical history of the brightest star in the sky, apart from the Sun. We also explore the relationship of this hot metallic-line (Am) star to its cooler congeners, as well as the hotter, weakly- or non-magnetic Mercury-manganese (HgMn) stars. Our primary observational material consists of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spectra taken with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph in the ASTRAL project. We have also used archival material from the COPERNICUS satellite, and from the HST Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph, as well as ground-based spectra from Furenlid, Westin, Kurucz, Wahlgren, and their coworkers, ESO spectra from the UVESPOP project, and NARVAL spectra retrieved from PolarBase. Our analysis has been primarily by spectral synthesis, and in this work we have had the great advantage of extensive atomic data unavailable to earlier workers. We find most abundances as well as upper limits range from 10 to 100 times above solar values. We see no indication of the huge abundance excesses of 1000 or more that occur among many chemically peculiar stars of the upper main sequence. The picture of Sirius as a hot Am star is reinforced.

  3. Observations of Blazar S5 0716+714 With Ground Based Telescopes and the Spitzer Infrared Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Jeffery; Lacy, M.; Morton, A.; Travagli, T.; Mulaveesala, M.; Santiago, J.; Rapp, S.; Stefaniak, L.

    2006-12-01

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) to be launched in 2007 has a proposed observing list that includes AGNs and Polars bright enough to be observed optically by amateurs and students. This observing list is maintained by the Global Telescope Network (GTN). One of our targets, S5 0716+714, was observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope MIPS and IRAC instruments and also using ground based telescopes. Observations were made in seven infrared bands with Spitzer. Additional observations made from the ground by students, amateur astronomers, and college observatories in R,V, and I were nearly simultaneous with the Spitzer observations. This data were used to construct light curves over the course of the observation and the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) of the target using all the sources. These data were compared to models of the dust emission from the torus, synchrotron emission from the radio core, and thermal emission from the accretion disk to determine the relative importance of the different emission mechanisms in this object as a function of wavelength. Results were compared to observations of 4C 29.45 made last year. This research was supported by the Spitzer Science Center, the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, and the California Department of Education's Specialized Secondary Program.

  4. Intermittency of the turbulent processes in the Earth's magnetosphere detected from the ground-based measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanova, Marina [Physical Department, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (Chile); Foppiano, Alberto; Ovalle, Elias [Departmento de Geofisica, Universidad de Conception (Chile); Antonova, Elizavieta [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Troshichev, Oleg [Department of Geophysics, Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)], E-mail: mstepano@usach.cl

    2008-11-01

    Turbulent processes in the Earth's magnetosphere are reflected in the dynamical behavior of the geomagnetic indices and other parameters determined from ground based observations. Intermittent properties of one minute Polar Cap (PC) index and auroral radio wave absorption are studied using 1995-2000 data sets. It was found that the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of both PC-index and absorption fluctuations display a strong non-Gaussian shape. This indicates that they are not characterized by a global time self-similarity but rather exhibit intermittency, as previously reported for solar wind velocity and auroral electrojet index values. In the case of the auroral absorption it was also found that intermittency strongly depends on the magnetic local time, being largest in the nighttime sector. This shows that the acceleration of precipitating particles is intermittent, especially near the substorm eye, where the level of turbulence increases. Application of the Local Intermittency Measure (LIM) technique confirms the aforementioned results to a better precision.

  5. A study of the elements copper through uranium in Sirius A: Contributions from STIS and ground-based spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Cowley, Charles R; Castelli, Fiorella; Gulliver, Austin F; Monier, Richard; Wahlgren, Glenn

    2016-01-01

    We determine abundances or upper limits for all of the 55 stable elements from copper to uranium for the A1 Vm star Sirius. The purpose of the study is to assemble the most complete picture of elemental abundances with the hope of revealing the chemical history of the brightest star in the sky, apart from the Sun. We also explore the relationship of this hot metallic-line (Am) star to its cooler congeners, as well as the hotter, weakly- or non-magnetic mercury-manganese (HgMn) stars. Our primary observational material consists of {\\em Hubble Space Telescope} ($HST$) spectra taken with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) in the ASTRAL project. We have also used archival material from the %\\citep/{ayr10}. $COPERNICUS$ satellite, and from the $HST$ Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS), as well as ground-based spectra from Furenlid, Westin, Kurucz, Wahlgren, and their coworkers, ESO spectra from the UVESPOP project, and NARVAL spectra retrieved from PolarBase. Our analysis has been primarily by...

  6. Analytical Research by Computer Simulation of Developmental Polarimetric/Frequency Agile Pulsed Radars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    one and one half meters radar length, made up of five reflectors randomly spaced, and having a radar cross section of five square meters each (Figures...1. Odd bounce scattering matrix (flat plate, trihedral corner reflector ) for linear polarization (see Figure 6) 2. Even bounce scattering matrix...is radar cross - section in meters squared R is range to target in meters Ls is system loss (unitless) Because this analysis is performed in the voltage

  7. Compact U-Slotted Antenna for Broadband Radar Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Costanzo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The original U-shaped patch antenna is properly modified in this work to provide a compact and broadband antenna configuration with reduced cross-polar effects, well suitable for modern radar applications. The proposed antenna layout is applied to design, realize, and test two different prototypes working at P-band and C-band, typically adopted for ground-penetrating radar. The experimental results successfully demonstrate a large operating bandwidth between 15% and 20%, a significant reduction of size (about half of the standard configuration, and a low cross-polarization level within the operating frequency range.

  8. Characterizing Polar Mesospheric Summer Echo Edge Effect Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, J.; Bahcivan, H.

    2013-12-01

    Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSEs) form in the summer mesopause region, between altitudes of 80 and 90 km. This phenomenon occurs in this region because of the extremely cold temperatures that allow for ice particles to develop, sediment, and grow to sizes as large as ~20 nm. Because these ice particles are immersed in the plasma of the D-region, electrons can attach to the ice surfaces and charge them. There are two trains of thought when it comes to the backscatter seen in sounding rocket and radar measurements of PMSEs. The first assumes that the structure of the PMSEs is driven by turbulent velocity fields and that radar detections are due to turbulent scattering. The second theory on the scatter from PMSE structures is that the echoes result from multiple sharp small-scale ledges that produce an edge scatter. In decomposing sounding rocket data, results have indicated that both scattering mechanisms play a role in PMSE backscatter. However, whereas the turbulent scatter theory is well developed, the physics behind the sharp-edge phenomena in the edge scattering theory has not been explained to date. We investigate the formation of the sharp edges in electron density detected by sounding rockets and in backscattered power detected by ground-based radars during PMSE regions by exploring the initial process by which PMSEs form using a one dimensional (1D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The simulation, adapted from the Plasma Theory and Simulation Group at UC Berkley, starts with the ice particles immersed in a warm electron-ion plasma and allows for the charging process of the ice particles. Starting with an initial Gaussian distribution of ice particles, we show that as the ice particles charge, they increase in mass more quickly (i.e. accumulate more electrons and ions) at the edges of the PMSE structure. This increased mass decreases the diffusion rates of the edges and 'freezes' the edges of the PMSE. This result demonstrates that the reason for the

  9. Flare-induced changes of the photospheric magnetic field in a δ-spot deduced from ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gömöry, P.; Balthasar, H.; Kuckein, C.; Koza, J.; Veronig, A. M.; González Manrique, S. J.; Kučera, A.; Schwartz, P.; Hanslmeier, A.

    2017-06-01

    Aims: Changes of the magnetic field and the line-of-sight velocities in the photosphere are being reported for an M-class flare that originated at a δ-spot belonging to active region NOAA 11865. Methods: High-resolution ground-based near-infrared spectropolarimetric observations were acquired simultaneously in two photospheric spectral lines, Fe i 10783 Å and Si i 10786 Å, with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter at the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) in Tenerife on 2013 October 15. The observations covered several stages of the M-class flare. Inversions of the full-Stokes vector of both lines were carried out and the results were put into context using (extreme)-ultraviolet filtergrams from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Results: The active region showed high flaring activity during the whole observing period. After the M-class flare, the longitudinal magnetic field did not show significant changes along the polarity inversion line (PIL). However, an enhancement of the transverse magnetic field of approximately 550 G was found that bridges the PIL and connects umbrae of opposite polarities in the δ-spot. At the same time, a newly formed system of loops appeared co-spatially in the corona as seen in 171 Å filtergrams of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board SDO. However, we cannot exclude that the magnetic connection between the umbrae already existed in the upper atmosphere before the M-class flare and became visible only later when it was filled with hot plasma. The photospheric Doppler velocities show a persistent upflow pattern along the PIL without significant changes due to the flare. Conclusions: The increase of the transverse component of the magnetic field after the flare together with the newly formed loop system in the corona support recent predictions of flare models and flare observations. The movie associated to Figs. 4 and 5 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  10. Expert System for the Tornado Ground-Based Check-Out System,

    Science.gov (United States)

    demonstrator, supporting the TORNADO check-out system, has been developed and tested. The expert system , called TORRES (TORNADO Radar Readiness Expert ...flight. The expert system is also able to exclude errors, that were generated by other systems capable of changing the state of the radar system and... System ), supports debriefing staff with various levels of experience. The scope of the error detection encompasses the TORNADO Terrain Following and

  11. 双线偏振雷达差分反射率因子系统误差订正%System Bias Calibration of Differential Reflectivity for Dual Linear Polarization Radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜牧云; 刘黎平; 胡志群

    2013-01-01

    Differential reflectivity ZDR can have noticeable deviation which does not change with the space accumulation because of the influence of radar itself.So radar calibration is essential and critical to high quality data and products.At the present,the radar data observed at vertical incidence is commonly used to calibrate system bias of ZDR.This method,however,cannot be implemented with some radar because the antenna has elevation limit determined by the structural configuration of the antenna's pedestal.In this case,the light rain and dry aggregated snow are used as natural reflectors for ZDR calibration due to these two atmospheric scatters with low variability of intrinsic ZDR at high elevation angle and the intrinsic ZDR is close to zero.Based on the observation in field experiment by a C-band polarimetric Doppler radar on Wheel which was built in the State Key Laboratory of Severe Weather,Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences.In this paper,taking the calibration result of vertical scan data as a reference,the difference of calibration of ZDR by light rain and dry aggregated snow at the highest elevation of volume scan mode is analyzed.The results of analysis indicate that both light rain and dry aggregated snow can calibrate ZDR very well,but dry aggregated snow exhibits much lower variability of ZDR than light rain (even at high elevation) and,therefore,can be considered as the optimal weather target for calibration of ZDR.It becomes the best alternate method for system bias calibration of ZDR by vertical scan data.%差分反射率因子ZDR易受雷达系统自身的影响而产生明显偏差,这种偏差是不随空间积累而改变的.为了保证雷达资料及其产品的质量,根据中国气象科学研究院灾害天气国家重点实验室车载C波段双线偏振多普勒雷达(C-band Polarimetric Doppler Radar on Wheel,CPDRW)的外场试