WorldWideScience

Sample records for ground-based photometric detection

  1. Combining BRITE and ground-based photometry for the Beta Cephei star Nu Eridani: impact on photometric pulsation mode identification and detection of several g modes

    CERN Document Server

    Handler, G; Popowicz, A; Pigulski, A; Kuschnig, R; Zoclonska, E; Moffat, A F J; Weiss, W W; Grant, C C; Pablo, H; Whittaker, G N; Rucinski, S M; Ramiaramanantsoa, T; Zwintz, K; Wade, G A

    2016-01-01

    We report a simultaneous ground and space-based photometric study of the Beta Cephei star Nu Eridani. Half a year of observations have been obtained by four of the five satellites constituting BRITE-Constellation, supplemented with ground-based photoelectric photometry. We show that carefully combining the two data sets virtually eliminates the aliasing problem that often hampers time-series analyses. We detect 40 periodic signals intrinsic to the star in the light curves. Despite a lower detection limit we do not recover all the pressure and mixed modes previously reported in the literature, but we newly detect six additional gravity modes. This behaviour is a consequence of temporal changes in the pulsation amplitudes that we also detected for some of the p modes. We point out that the dependence of theoretically predicted pulsation amplitude on wavelength is steeper in visual passbands than those observationally measured, to the extent that the three dominant pulsation modes of Nu Eridani would be incorrec...

  2. Combining BRITE and ground-based photometry for the β Cephei star ν Eridani: impact on photometric pulsation mode identification and detection of several g modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, G.; Rybicka, M.; Popowicz, A.; Pigulski, A.; Kuschnig, R.; Zocłońska, E.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Weiss, W. W.; Grant, C. C.; Pablo, H.; Whittaker, G. N.; Ruciński, S. M.; Ramiaramanantsoa, T.; Zwintz, K.; Wade, G. A.

    2017-01-01

    We report a simultaneous ground- and space-based photometric study of the β Cephei star ν Eridani. Half a year of observations have been obtained by four of the five satellites constituting BRITE-Constellation, supplemented with ground-based photoelectric photometry. We show that carefully combining the two data sets virtually eliminates the aliasing problem that often hampers time series analyses. We detect 40 periodic signals intrinsic to the star in the light curves. Despite a lower detection limit, we do not recover all the pressure and mixed modes previously reported in the literature, but we newly detect six additional gravity modes. This behaviour is a consequence of temporal changes in the pulsation amplitudes that we also detected for some of the p modes. We point out that the dependence of theoretically predicted pulsation amplitude on wavelength is steeper in visual passbands than those observationally measured, to the extent that three dominant pulsation modes of ν Eridani would be incorrectly identified using data in optical filters only. We discuss possible reasons for this discrepancy.

  3. Combining BRITE and ground-based photometry for the β Cephei star ν Eridani: impact on photometric pulsation mode identification and detection of several g modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, G.; Rybicka, M.; Popowicz, A.; Pigulski, A.; Kuschnig, R.; Zocłońska, E.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Weiss, W. W.; Grant, C. C.; Pablo, H.; Whittaker, G. N.; Ruciński, S. M.; Ramiaramanantsoa, T.; Zwintz, K.; Wade, G. A.

    2016-10-01

    We report a simultaneous ground and space-based photometric study of the β Cephei star ν Eridani. Half a year of observations have been obtained by four of the five satellites constituting BRITE-Constellation, supplemented with ground-based photoelectric photometry. We show that carefully combining the two data sets virtually eliminates the aliasing problem that often hampers time-series analyses. We detect 40 periodic signals intrinsic to the star in the light curves. Despite a lower detection limit we do not recover all the pressure and mixed modes previously reported in the literature, but we newly detect six additional gravity modes. This behaviour is a consequence of temporal changes in the pulsation amplitudes that we also detected for some of the p modes. We point out that the dependence of theoretically predicted pulsation amplitude on wavelength is steeper in visual passbands than those observationally measured, to the extent that the three dominant pulsation modes of ν Eridani would be incorrectly identified using data in optical filters only. We discuss possible reasons for this discrepancy.

  4. Satellite Type Estination from Ground-based Photometric Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, T.; Ono, H.; Suzuki, J.; Ando, T.; Takanezawa, T.

    2016-09-01

    The optical photometric observation is potentially a powerful tool for understanding of the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) objects. At first, we measured in laboratory the surface reflectance of common satellite materials, for example, Multi-layer Insulation (MLI), mono-crystalline silicon cells, and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP). Next, we calculated visual magnitude of a satellite by simplified shape and albedo. In this calculation model, solar panels have dimensions of 2 by 8 meters, and the bus area is 2 meters squared with measured optical properties described above. Under these conditions, it clarified the brightness can change the range between 3 and 4 magnitudes in one night, but color index changes only from 1 to 2 magnitudes. Finally, we observed the color photometric data of several GEO satellites visible from Japan multiple times in August and September 2014. We obtained that light curves of GEO satellites recorded in the B and V bands (using Johnson filters) by a ground-base optical telescope. As a result, color index changed approximately from 0.5 to 1 magnitude in one night, and the order of magnitude was not changed in all cases. In this paper, we briefly discuss about satellite type estimation using the relation between brightness and color index obtained from the photometric observation.

  5. Ground-Based Detection of Exoatmospheric Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo, Patricio M.; Astudillo-Defru, Nicola

    2014-11-01

    Data acquired with HDS@Subaru for HD209458b is re-analyzed. A new pipeline performs an automated search for the exoatmospheric presence of several elements without any a-priori assumptions on its existence or strength. We analyzed thousands of lines in the full spectral range of this optical echelle spectrograph using a robust method to correct for the telluric contamination. We recover previous detections of Sodium and Halpha, and present the first strong detection of Calcium in an Extrasolar Atmosphere as well as the tentative detection of other elements. The Calcium detection is in disagreement with theoretical thermal-equilibrium models.

  6. Reevaluating the feasibility of ground-based Earth-mass microlensing planet detections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Youn Kil; Park, Hyuk; Han, Cheongho; Hwang, Kyu-Ha; Shin, In-Gu; Choi, Joon-Young, E-mail: cheongho@astroph.chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Institute for Astrophysics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 371-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-10

    An important strength of the microlensing method to detect extrasolar planets is its high sensitivity to low-mass planets. However, many believe that microlensing detections of Earth-mass planets from ground-based observation would be difficult because of limits set by finite-source effects. This view comes from the previous estimation of planet detection probability based on the fractional deviation of planetary signals; however, a proper probability estimation is required when considering the source brightness, which is directly related to the photometric precision. In this paper, we reevaluate the feasibility of low-mass planet detections by considering photometric precision for different populations of source stars. From this, we find that the contribution of improved photometric precision to the planetary signal of a giant-source event is large enough to compensate for the decrease in magnification excess caused by finite-source effects. As a result, we conclude that giant-source events are suitable targets for Earth-mass planet detections with significantly higher detection probability than events involved with source stars of smaller radii, and we predict that Earth-mass planets could be detected by prospective high-cadence surveys.

  7. Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Technology Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Leslie A.

    2014-01-13

    This GNDD Technology Roadmap is intended to provide guidance to potential researchers and help management define research priorities to achieve technology advancements for ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring science being pursued by the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team within the Office of Nuclear Detonation Detection in the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Four science-based elements were selected to encompass the entire scope of nuclear monitoring research and development (R&D) necessary to facilitate breakthrough scientific results, as well as deliver impactful products. Promising future R&D is delineated including dual use associated with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Important research themes as well as associated metrics are identified along with a progression of accomplishments, represented by a selected bibliography, that are precursors to major improvements to nuclear explosion monitoring.

  8. A matched filter method for ground-based sub-noise detection of terrestrial extrasolar planets in eclipsing binaries: application to CM Draconis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, J M; Doyle, L R; Cullers, D K

    1996-02-01

    The photometric detection of extrasolar planets by transits in eclipsing binary systems can be significantly improved by cross-correlating the observational light curves with synthetic models of possible planetary transit features, essentially a matched filter approach. We demonstrate the utility and application of this transit detection algorithm for ground-based detections of terrestrial-sized (Earth-to-Neptune radii) extrasolar planets in the dwarf M-star eclipsing binary system CM Draconis. Preliminary photometric observational data of this system demonstrate that the observational noise is well characterized as white and Gaussian at the observational time steps required for precision photometric measurements. Depending on planet formation scenarios, terrestrial-sized planets may form quite close to this low-luminosity system. We demonstrate, for example, that planets as small as 1.4 Earth radii with periods on the order of a few months in the CM Draconis system could be detected at the 99.9% confidence level in less than a year using 1-m class telescopes from the ground. This result contradicts commonly held assumptions limiting present ground-based efforts to, at best, detections of gas giant planets after several years of observation. This method can be readily extended to a number of other larger star systems with the utilization of larger telescopes and longer observing times. Its extension to spacecraft observations should also allow the determination of the presence of terrestrial-sized planets in nearly 100 other known eclipsing binary systems.

  9. Evidence for thermospheric gravity waves in the southern polar cap from ground-based vertical velocity and photometric observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Innis

    Full Text Available Zenith-directed Fabry-Perot Spectrometer (FPS and 3-Field Photometer (3FP observations of the λ630 nm emission (~240 km altitude were obtained at Davis station, Antarctica, during the austral winter of 1999. Eleven nights of suitable data were searched for significant periodicities common to vertical winds from the FPS and photo-metric variations from the 3FP. Three wave-like events were found, each of around one or more hours in duration, with periods around 15 minutes, vertical velocity amplitudes near 60 ms–1 , horizontal phase velocities around 300 ms–1 , and horizontal wavelengths from 240 to 400 km. These characteristics appear consistent with polar cap gravity waves seen by other workers, and we conclude this is a likely interpretation of our data. Assuming a source height near 125 km altitude, we determine the approximate source location by calculating back along the wave trajectory using the gravity wave property relating angle of ascent and frequency. The wave sources appear to be in the vicinity of the poleward border of the auroral oval, at magnetic local times up to 5 hours before local magnetic midnight.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (thermospheric dynamics; waves and tides

  10. Comparative performance of selected variability detection techniques in photometric time series data

    CERN Document Server

    Sokolovsky, K V; Karampelas, A; Antipin, S V; Bellas-Velidis, I; Benni, P; Bonanos, A Z; Burdanov, A Y; Derlopa, S; Hatzidimitriou, D; Khokhryakova, A D; Kolesnikova, D M; Korotkiy, S A; Lapukhin, E G; Moretti, M I; Popov, A A; Pouliasis, E; Samus, N N; Spetsieri, Z; Veselkov, S A; Volkov, K V; Yang, M; Zubareva, A M

    2016-01-01

    Photometric measurements are prone to systematic errors presenting a challenge to low-amplitude variability detection. In search for a general-purpose variability detection technique able to recover a broad range of variability types including currently unknown ones, we test 18 statistical characteristics quantifying scatter and/or correlation between brightness measurements. We compare their performance in identifying variable objects in seven time-series datasets obtained with telescopes ranging in size from a telephoto lens to 1m-class and probing variability on timescales from minutes to decades. The test datasets together include lightcurves of 127539 objects, among them 1251 variable stars of various types and represent a range of observing conditions often found in ground-based variability surveys. The real data are complemented by simulations. We propose a combination of two indices that together recover a broad range of variability types from photometric data characterized by a wide variety of sampli...

  11. Status of advanced ground-based laser interferometers for gravitational-wave detection

    CERN Document Server

    Dooley, Katherine L; Dwyer, Sheila; Puppo, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Ground-based laser interferometers for gravitational-wave (GW) detection were first constructed starting 20 years ago and as of 2010 collection of several years' worth of science data at initial design sensitivities was completed. Upgrades to the initial detectors together with construction of brand new detectors are ongoing and feature advanced technologies to improve the sensitivity to GWs. This conference proceeding provides an overview of the common design features of ground-based laser interferometric GW detectors and establishes the context for the status updates of each of the four gravitational-wave detectors around the world: Advanced LIGO, Advanced Virgo, GEO600 and KAGRA.

  12. Particle production during inflation and gravitational waves detectable by ground-based interferometers

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Jessica L.; Sorbo, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    Inflation typically predicts a quasi scale-invariant spectrum of gravitational waves. In models of slow-roll inflation, the amplitude of such a background is too small to allow direct detection without a dedicated space-based experiment such as the proposed BBO or DECIGO. In this paper we note that particle production during inflation can generate a feature in the spectrum of primordial gravitational waves. We discuss the possibility that such a feature might be detected by ground-based laser...

  13. Nulling interferometry: performance comparison between space and ground-based sites for exozodiacal disc detection

    CERN Document Server

    Defrère, D; Foresto, V Coudé du; Danchi, W C; Hartog, R den

    2008-01-01

    Characterising the circumstellar dust around nearby main sequence stars is a necessary step in understanding the planetary formation process and is crucial for future life-finding space missions such as ESA's Darwin or NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF). Besides paving the technological way to Darwin/TPF, the space-based infrared interferometers Pegase and FKSI (Fourier-Kelvin Stellar Interferometer) will be valuable scientific precursors in that respect. In this paper, we investigate the performance of Pegase and FKSI for exozodiacal disc detection and compare the results with ground-based nulling interferometers. Besides their main scientific goal (characterising hot giant extrasolar planets), Pegase and FKSI are very efficient in assessing within a few minutes the level of circumstellar dust in the habitable zone around nearby main sequence stars. They are capable of detecting exozodiacal discs respectively 5 and 1 time as dense as the solar zodiacal cloud and they outperform any ground-based instrumen...

  14. Advanced ground-based gravitational-wave detectors' potential to detect generic deviations from general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Narikawa, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the potential of the advanced ground-based gravitational-wave detectors, such as LIGO, Virgo, and KAGRA, to detect generic deviations of gravitational waveforms from the prediction of General Relativity. We use the parameterized post-Einsteinian formalism to characterize the deviations, and assess how much magnitude of the deviations are detectable by using an approximate decision scheme based on Bayesian statistics. We find that there exist detectable regions of the parameterized post-Einsteinian parameters by using a single gravitational wave event. The regions are not excluded by currently existing binary pulsar observations for the parameterized post-Einsteinian parameters at higher post-Newtonian order.

  15. Comparative performance of selected variability detection techniques in photometric time series data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolovsky, K. V.; Gavras, P.; Karampelas, A.; Antipin, S. V.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Benni, P.; Bonanos, A. Z.; Burdanov, A. Y.; Derlopa, S.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Khokhryakova, A. D.; Kolesnikova, D. M.; Korotkiy, S. A.; Lapukhin, E. G.; Moretti, M. I.; Popov, A. A.; Pouliasis, E.; Samus, N. N.; Spetsieri, Z.; Veselkov, S. A.; Volkov, K. V.; Yang, M.; Zubareva, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Photometric measurements are prone to systematic errors presenting a challenge to low-amplitude variability detection. In search for a general-purpose variability detection technique able to recover a broad range of variability types including currently unknown ones, we test 18 statistical characteristics quantifying scatter and/or correlation between brightness measurements. We compare their performance in identifying variable objects in seven time series data sets obtained with telescopes ranging in size from a telephoto lens to 1 m-class and probing variability on time-scales from minutes to decades. The test data sets together include light curves of 127 539 objects, among them 1251 variable stars of various types and represent a range of observing conditions often found in ground-based variability surveys. The real data are complemented by simulations. We propose a combination of two indices that together recover a broad range of variability types from photometric data characterized by a wide variety of sampling patterns, photometric accuracies and percentages of outlier measurements. The first index is the interquartile range (IQR) of magnitude measurements, sensitive to variability irrespective of a time-scale and resistant to outliers. It can be complemented by the ratio of the light-curve variance to the mean square successive difference, 1/η, which is efficient in detecting variability on time-scales longer than the typical time interval between observations. Variable objects have larger 1/η and/or IQR values than non-variable objects of similar brightness. Another approach to variability detection is to combine many variability indices using principal component analysis. We present 124 previously unknown variable stars found in the test data.

  16. Comparative performance of selected variability detection techniques in photometric time series data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolovsky, K. V.; Gavras, P.; Karampelas, A.; Antipin, S. V.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Benni, P.; Bonanos, A. Z.; Burdanov, A. Y.; Derlopa, S.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Khokhryakova, A. D.; Kolesnikova, D. M.; Korotkiy, S. A.; Lapukhin, E. G.; Moretti, M. I.; Popov, A. A.; Pouliasis, E.; Samus, N. N.; Spetsieri, Z.; Veselkov, S. A.; Volkov, K. V.; Yang, M.; Zubareva, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    Photometric measurements are prone to systematic errors presenting a challenge to low-amplitude variability detection. In search for a general-purpose variability detection technique able to recover a broad range of variability types including currently unknown ones, we test 18 statistical characteristics quantifying scatter and/or correlation between brightness measurements. We compare their performance in identifying variable objects in seven time-series datasets obtained with telescopes ranging in size from a telephoto lens to 1 m-class and probing variability on timescales from minutes to decades. The test datasets together include lightcurves of 127539 objects, among them 1251 variable stars of various types and represent a range of observing conditions often found in ground-based variability surveys. The real data are complemented by simulations. We propose a combination of two indices that together recover a broad range of variability types from photometric data characterized by a wide variety of sampling patterns, photometric accuracies, and percentages of outlier measurements. The first index is the interquartile range (IQR) of magnitude measurements, sensitive to variability irrespective of a timescale and resistant to outliers. It can be complemented by the ratio of the lightcurve variance to the mean square successive difference, 1/η, which is efficient in detecting variability on timescales longer than the typical time interval between observations. Variable objects have larger 1/η and/or IQR values than non-variable objects of similar brightness. Another approach to variability detection is to combine many variability indices using principal component analysis. We present 124 previously unknown variable stars found in the test data.

  17. Potential use of ground-based sensor technologies for weed detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteinatos, Gerassimos G; Weis, Martin; Andújar, Dionisio; Rueda Ayala, Victor; Gerhards, Roland

    2014-02-01

    Site-specific weed management is the part of precision agriculture (PA) that tries to effectively control weed infestations with the least economical and environmental burdens. This can be achieved with the aid of ground-based or near-range sensors in combination with decision rules and precise application technologies. Near-range sensor technologies, developed for mounting on a vehicle, have been emerging for PA applications during the last three decades. These technologies focus on identifying plants and measuring their physiological status with the aid of their spectral and morphological characteristics. Cameras, spectrometers, fluorometers and distance sensors are the most prominent sensors for PA applications. The objective of this article is to describe-ground based sensors that have the potential to be used for weed detection and measurement of weed infestation level. An overview of current sensor systems is presented, describing their concepts, results that have been achieved, already utilized commercial systems and problems that persist. A perspective for the development of these sensors is given. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. The photometric method of extrasolar planet detection revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Alan; Doyle, Laurance R.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the geometry concerning the photometric method of extrasolar planet detection, i.e., the detection of dimunition of a parent star's brightness during a planetary transit. Under the assumption that planetary orbital inclinations can be defined by a Gaussian with a sigma of 10 deg centered on the parent star's equatorial plane, Monte Carlo simulations suggest that for a given star observed at an inclination of exactly 90 deg, the probability of at least one Earth-sized or larger planet being suitably placed for transits is approximately 4%. This probability drops to 3% for a star observed at an inclination of 80 deg, and is still approximately 0.5% for a star observed at an inclination of 60 deg. If one can select 100 stars with a pre-determined inclination equal or greater than 80 deg, the probability of at least one planet being suitably configured for transits is 95%. The majority of transit events are due to planets in small-a orbits similar to the Earth and Venus; thus, the photometric method in principle is the method best suited for the detection of Earthlike planets. The photometric method also allows for testing whether or not planets can exist within binary systems. This can ge done by selecting binary systems observed at high orbital inclinations, both eclipsing binaries and wider visual binaries. For a 'real-world' example, we look at the alpha Centauri system (i = 79.2 deg). If we assume that the equatorial planes of both components coincide with the system's orbital plane, Monte Carlo simulations suggest that the probability of at least one planet (of either component) being suitably configured for transits is approximately 8%. In conclusion, we present a non-exhaustive list of solar-type stars, both single and within binary systems, which exhibit a high equatorial inclination. These objects may be considered as preliminary candidates for planetary searches via the photometric method.

  19. A Coordinated X-ray and Optical Campaign of the Nearest Massive Eclipsing Binary, delta Orionis Aa: III. Analysis of Optical Photometric MOST and Spectroscopic (Ground Based) Variations

    CERN Document Server

    Pablo, Herbert; Moffat, Anthony F J; Corcoran, Michael; Shenar, Tomer; Benvenuto, Omar; Fuller, Jim; Naze, Yael; Hoffman, Jennifer L; Miroshnichenko, Anatoly; Apellaniz, Jesus Maiz; Evans, Nancy; Eversberg, Thomas; Gayley, Ken; Gull, Ted; Hamaguch, Kenji; Hamann, Wolf-Rainer; Henrichs, Huib; Hole, Tabetha; Ignace, Richard; Iping, Rosina; Lauer, Jennifer; Leutenegger, Maurice; Lomax, Jamie; Nichols, Joy; Oskinova, Lida; Owocki, Stan; Pollock, Andy; Russell, Christopher M P; Waldron, Wayne; Buil, Christian; Garrel, Thierry; Graham, Keith; Heathcote, Bernard; Lemoult, Thierry; Li, Dong; Mauclaire, Benjamin; Potter, Mike; Ribeiro, Jose; Matthews, Jaymie; Cameron, Chris; Guenther, David; Kuschnig, Rainer; Rowe, Jason; Rucinski, Slavek; Sasselov, Dimitar; Weiss, Werner

    2015-01-01

    We report on both high-precision photometry from the MOST space telescope and ground-based spectroscopy of the triple system delta Ori A consisting of a binary O9.5II+early-B (Aa1 and Aa2) with P = 5.7d, and a more distant tertiary (O9 IV P > 400 yrs). This data was collected in concert with X-ray spectroscopy from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Thanks to continuous coverage for 3 weeks, the MOST light curve reveals clear eclipses between Aa1 and Aa2 for the ?first time in non-phased data. From the spectroscopy we have a well constrained radial velocity curve of Aa1. While we are unable to recover radial velocity variations of the secondary star, we are able to constrain several fundamental parameters of this system and determine an approximate mass of the primary using apsidal motion. We also detected second order modulations at 12 separate frequencies with spacings indicative of tidally influenced oscillations. These spacings have never been seen in a massive binary, making this system one of only a handful...

  20. Chlorine oxide in the stratospheric ozone layer Ground-based detection and measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, A.; De Zafra, R. L.; Solomon, P. M.; Barrett, J. W.; Carlson, E. R.

    1981-01-01

    Stratospheric chlorine oxide, a significant intermediate product in the catalytic destruction of ozone by atomic chlorine, has been detected and measured by a ground-based 204 GHz, millimeter-wave receiver. Data taken at latitude 42 deg N on 17 days between January 10 and February 18, 1980 yield an average chlorine oxide column density of approximately 1.05 x 10 to the 14th/sq cm or approximately 2/3 that of the average of eight in situ balloon flight measurements (excluding the anomalously high data of July 14, 1977) made over the past four years at 32 deg N. Less chlorine oxide below 35 km and a larger vertical gradient than predicted by theoretical models of the stratospheric ozone layer are found.

  1. Detection and quantification of localized groundwater inflow in small streams using ground-based infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Tobias; Weiler, Markus

    2010-05-01

    Localized groundwater (GW) inflow into small streams can be a major source of runoff during low flow periods in headwater catchments. The localization and determination of the fraction of runoff corresponding to a certain area may give insights into aquifer type, flow processes, the composition of base-flow concerning the spatial distribution of catchment storage and water quality issues. Though GW temperature has a small amplitude during the year compared to surface water, a significant temperature difference between stream water and groundwater can be expected in summer and winter. As the technical development of infrared thermography is progressing (the spatial resolution of infrared camera systems is increasing and the measuring error is decreasing) we tested ground based infrared thermography as a non-invasive and remote applicable method to detect and quantify GW entries in small streams during baseflow periods (INFRATEC). In addition, water temperature and electric conductivity of the groundwater entering the stream and of the stream water up- and downstream of localized GW inflow were measured with temperature and EC sensors. Though the zones of complete mixing were identified, point measurements and surface radiation temperatures were taken from the same areas. Discharge measurements were conducted using the salt dilution method with continuous injection. End-member mixing calculations were done using the measured EC and water temperature data and compared to the results of mixing calculations of observed water surface radiation temperatures. The discharge observations were used to validate the fraction calculations. Calculated GW entries using thermogramms had comparable deviations from the measured runoff fractions to those from direct temperature and EC measurements. This leads to the conclusion that the use of ground-based infrared thermography for the detection and quantification of localized groundwater inflows into small streams is a valuable and

  2. Ground-based complex for detection and investigation of fast optical transients in wide field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Emilio; Beskin, Grigory; Bondar, Sergey; Karpov, Sergey; Plokhotnichenko, Vladimir; de-Bur, Vjacheslav; Greco, Guiseppe; Bartolini, Corrado; Guarnieri, Adriano; Piccioni, Adalberto

    2008-07-01

    To study short stochastic optical flares of different objects (GRBs, SNs, etc) of unknown localizations as well as NEOs it is necessary to monitor large regions of sky with high time resolution. We developed a system which consists of wide-field camera (FOW is 400-600 sq.deg.) using TV-CCD with time resolution of 0.13 s to record and classify optical transients, and a fast robotic telescope aimed to perform their spectroscopic and photometric investigation just after detection. Such two telescope complex TORTOREM combining wide-field camera TORTORA and robotic telescope REM operated from May 2006 at La Silla ESO observatory. Some results of its operation, including first fast time resolution study of optical transient accompanying GRB and discovery of its fine time structure, are presented. Prospects for improving the complex efficiency are given.

  3. Tentative detection of clear-air turbulence using a ground-based Rayleigh lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauchecorne, Alain; Cot, Charles; Dalaudier, Francis; Porteneuve, Jacques; Gaudo, Thierry; Wilson, Richard; Cénac, Claire; Laqui, Christian; Keckhut, Philippe; Perrin, Jean-Marie; Dolfi, Agnès; Cézard, Nicolas; Lombard, Laurent; Besson, Claudine

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric gravity waves and turbulence generate small-scale fluctuations of wind, pressure, density, and temperature in the atmosphere. These fluctuations represent a real hazard for commercial aircraft and are known by the generic name of clear-air turbulence (CAT). Numerical weather prediction models do not resolve CAT and therefore provide only a probability of occurrence. A ground-based Rayleigh lidar was designed and implemented to remotely detect and characterize the atmospheric variability induced by turbulence in vertical scales between 40 m and a few hundred meters. Field measurements were performed at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP, France) on 8 December 2008 and 23 June 2009. The estimate of the mean squared amplitude of bidimensional fluctuations of lidar signal showed excess compared to the estimated contribution of the instrumental noise. This excess can be attributed to atmospheric turbulence with a 95% confidence level. During the first night, data from collocated stratosphere-troposphere (ST) radar were available. Altitudes of the turbulent layers detected by the lidar were roughly consistent with those of layers with enhanced radar echo. The derived values of turbulence parameters Cn2 or CT2 were in the range of those published in the literature using ST radar data. However, the detection was at the limit of the instrumental noise and additional measurement campaigns are highly desirable to confirm these initial results. This is to our knowledge the first successful attempt to detect CAT in the free troposphere using an incoherent Rayleigh lidar system. The built lidar device may serve as a test bed for the definition of embarked CAT detection lidar systems aboard airliners.

  4. On Advanced Estimation Techniques for Exoplanet Detection and Characterization using Ground-Based Coronagraphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Peter R.; Frazin, Richard; Barrett, Harrison; Caucci, Luca; Devaney, Nicholas; Furenlid, Lars; Gladysz, Szymon; Guyon, Olivier; Krist, John; Maire, Jerome; Marois, Christian; Mawet, Dimitri; Mouillet, David; Mugnier, Laurent; Perrin, Marshall; Poyneer, Lisa; Pueyo, Laurent; Savransky, Dmitry; Soummer, Remi

    2012-01-01

    The direct imaging of planets around nearby stars is exceedingly difficult. Only about 14 exoplanets have been imaged to date that have masses less than 13 times that of Jupiter. The next generation of planet-finding coronagraphs, including VLT-SPHERE, the Gemini Planet Imager, Palomar P1640, and Subaru HiCIAO have predicted contrast performance of roughly a thousand times less than would be needed to detect Earth-like planets. In this paper we review the state of the art in exoplanet imaging, most notably the method of Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI), and we investigate the potential of improving the detectability of faint exoplanets through the use of advanced statistical methods based on the concepts of the ideal observer and the Hotelling observer. We provide a formal comparison of techniques through a blind data challenge and evaluate performance using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) and Localization ROC (LROC) curves. We place particular emphasis on the understanding and modeling of realistic sources of measurement noise in ground-based AO-corrected coronagraphs. The work reported in this paper is the result of interactions between the co-authors during a week-long workshop on exoplanet imaging that was held in Squaw Valley, California, in March of 2012.

  5. Ground-based detection of the near-infrared emission from the dayside of WASP-5b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G.; van Boekel, R.; Madhusudhan, N.; Wang, H.; Nikolov, N.; Seemann, U.; Henning, Th.

    2014-04-01

    Context. Observations of secondary eclipses of hot Jupiters allow one to measure the dayside thermal emission from the planets' atmospheres. The combination of ground-based near-infrared observations and space-based observations at longer wavelengths constrains the atmospheric temperature structure and chemical composition. Aims: This work aims at detecting the thermal emission of WASP-5b, a highly irradiated dense hot Jupiter orbiting a G4V star every 1.6 days, in the J, H and K near-infrared photometric bands. The spectral energy distribution is used to constrain the temperature-pressure profile and to study the energy budget of WASP-5b. Methods: We observed two secondary-eclipse events of WASP-5b in the J, H, K bands simultaneously using the GROND instrument on the MPG/ESO 2.2 m telescope. The telescope was in nodding mode for the first observation and in staring mode for the second observation. The occultation light curves were modeled to obtain the flux ratios in each band, which were then compared with atmospheric models. Results: Thermal emission of WASP-5b is detected in the J and K bands in staring mode. The retrieved planet-to-star flux ratios are 0.168-0.052+0.050% in the J band and 0.269 ± 0.062% in the K band, corresponding to brightness temperatures of 2996-261+212 K and 2890-269+246 K, respectively. No thermal emission is detected in the H band, with a 3σ upper limit of 0.166% on the planet-to-star flux ratio, corresponding to a maximum temperature of 2779 K. On the whole, our J, H, K results can be explained by a roughly isothermal temperature profile of ~2700 K in the deep layers of the planetary dayside atmosphere that are probed at these wavelengths. Together with Spitzer observations, which probe higher layers that are found to be at ~1900 K, a temperature inversion is ruled out in the range of pressures probed by the combined data set. While an oxygen-rich model is unable to explain all the data, a carbon-rich model provides a reasonable fit

  6. Low Frequency Gravitational Wave Detection With Ground Based Atom Interferometer Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Chaibi, W; Canuel, B; Bertoldi, A; Landragin, A; Bouyer, P

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new detection strategy for gravitational waves (GWs) below few Hertz based on a correlated array of atom interferometers (AIs). Our proposal allows to reduce the Newtonian Noise (NN) which limits all ground based GW detectors below few Hertz, including previous atom interferometry-based concepts. Using an array of long baseline AI gradiometers yields several estimations of the NN, whose effect can thus be reduced via statistical averaging. Considering the km baseline of current optical detectors, a NN rejection of factor 2 could be achieved, and tested with existing AI array geometries. Exploiting the correlation properties of the gravity acceleration noise, we show that a 10-fold or more NN rejection is possible with a dedicated configuration. Considering a conservative NN model and the current developments in cold atom technology, we show that strain sensitivities below $1\\times 10^{-19}/ \\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}$ in the $ 0.3-3 \\ \\text{Hz}$ frequency band can be within reach, with a peak sensitivity o...

  7. DETECTION OF KOI-13.01 USING THE PHOTOMETRIC ORBIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shporer, Avi [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Jenkins, Jon M.; Seader, Shawn E.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Thompson, Susan E.; Twicken, Joseph D. [SETI Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Rowe, Jason F.; Sanderfer, Dwight T. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Still, Martin D. [Bay Area Environmental Research Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Welsh, William F., E-mail: ashporer@lcogt.net [Astronomy Department, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    We use the KOI-13 transiting star-planet system as a test case for the recently developed BEER algorithm, aimed at identifying non-transiting low-mass companions by detecting the photometric variability induced by the companion along its orbit. Such photometric variability is generated by three mechanisms: the beaming effect, tidal ellipsoidal distortion, and reflection/heating. We use data from three Kepler quarters, from the first year of the mission, while ignoring measurements within the transit and occultation, and show that the planet's ephemeris is clearly detected. We fit for the amplitude of each of the three effects and use the beaming effect amplitude to estimate the planet's minimum mass, which results in M{sub p} sin i = 9.2 {+-} 1.1 M{sub J} (assuming the host star parameters derived by Szabo et al.). Our results show that non-transiting star-planet systems similar to KOI-13.01 can be detected in Kepler data, including a measurement of the orbital ephemeris and the planet's minimum mass. Moreover, we derive a realistic estimate of the amplitudes uncertainties, and use it to show that data obtained during the entire lifetime of the Kepler mission of 3.5 years will allow detecting non-transiting close-in low-mass companions orbiting bright stars, down to the few Jupiter mass level. Data from the Kepler Extended Mission, if funded by NASA, will further improve the detection capabilities.

  8. Evaluation of Anomaly Detection Capability for Ground-Based Pre-Launch Shuttle Operations. Chapter 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Rodney Alexander

    2010-01-01

    This chapter will provide a thorough end-to-end description of the process for evaluation of three different data-driven algorithms for anomaly detection to select the best candidate for deployment as part of a suite of IVHM (Integrated Vehicle Health Management) technologies. These algorithms were deemed to be sufficiently mature enough to be considered viable candidates for deployment in support of the maiden launch of Ares I-X, the successor to the Space Shuttle for NASA's Constellation program. Data-driven algorithms are just one of three different types being deployed. The other two types of algorithms being deployed include a "nile-based" expert system, and a "model-based" system. Within these two categories, the deployable candidates have already been selected based upon qualitative factors such as flight heritage. For the rule-based system, SHINE (Spacecraft High-speed Inference Engine) has been selected for deployment, which is a component of BEAM (Beacon-based Exception Analysis for Multimissions), a patented technology developed at NASA's JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) and serves to aid in the management and identification of operational modes. For the "model-based" system, a commercially available package developed by QSI (Qualtech Systems, Inc.), TEAMS (Testability Engineering and Maintenance System) has been selected for deployment to aid in diagnosis. In the context of this particular deployment, distinctions among the use of the terms "data-driven," "rule-based," and "model-based," can be found in. Although there are three different categories of algorithms that have been selected for deployment, our main focus in this chapter will be on the evaluation of three candidates for data-driven anomaly detection. These algorithms will be evaluated upon their capability for robustly detecting incipient faults or failures in the ground-based phase of pre-launch space shuttle operations, rather than based oil heritage as performed in previous studies. Robust

  9. Lightning flash detection in Venus and Jupiter with spacecraft and ground-based telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yukihiro; Watanabe, Shigeto; Yamashita, Kozo; Sato, Mitsuteru

    2016-07-01

    In these decades lightning process was found to be an excellent tool to explore the Earth's atmosphere based on the knowledge of the relationship between the atmospheric dynamics and electrical charge. This relationship may be applicable to the atmospheric exploration in other planets, too. Even though extensive investigations using data obtained with spacecraft and ground-based telescopes have been carried out, we don't reach consensus on the existence of lightning in Venus. Indeed there exist some strong indications of electrical discharge both in optical and radio wave measurements. But these "evidences" are sometimes not accepted in the majority of researcher community. An infrared sensor, VIRTIS of Venus Express, doesn't find the positive indication of lightning flash at this moment. LAC on board Akatsuki is the first sensor designed for the lightning detection in Venus so that it can identify the optical flash caused by electrical discharge in the atmosphere of Venus, at least, with an optical intensity of 1/10 of the average lightning in the Earth. Unique performance of LAC compared to other equipments is the high-speed sampling rate at 32 us interval for all 32 pixels of APD matrix, enabling us to distinguish the optical lightning flash from other pulsing noises. We selected OI 777 nm line, the most expected emissions in CO2 atmosphere based on the laboratory experiment. Though, unfortunately, the first attempt of the insertion of Akatsuki into the orbit around Venus was failure in December 2010, the second one carried out in December 7 in 2015 was quite successful. We checked out the sound condition of high voltage system of LAC on January 20, 2016 for the first time after the launch. Due to some elongated orbit than that planned originally, we have umbra for ~30 min to observe the lightning flash in the night side of Venus every ~10 days after April 2016. Here we would report the preliminary observational results of LAC. Also we are also considering the

  10. SIDRA: a blind algorithm for signal detection in photometric surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mislis, D.; Bachelet, E.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bramich, D. M.; Parley, N.

    2016-01-01

    We present the Signal Detection using Random-Forest Algorithm (SIDRA). SIDRA is a detection and classification algorithm based on the Machine Learning technique (Random Forest). The goal of this paper is to show the power of SIDRA for quick and accurate signal detection and classification. We first diagnose the power of the method with simulated light curves and try it on a subset of the Kepler space mission catalogue. We use five classes of simulated light curves (CONSTANT, TRANSIT, VARIABLE, MLENS and EB for constant light curves, transiting exoplanet, variable, microlensing events and eclipsing binaries, respectively) to analyse the power of the method. The algorithm uses four features in order to classify the light curves. The training sample contains 5000 light curves (1000 from each class) and 50 000 random light curves for testing. The total SIDRA success ratio is ≥90 per cent. Furthermore, the success ratio reaches 95-100 per cent for the CONSTANT, VARIABLE, EB and MLENS classes and 92 per cent for the TRANSIT class with a decision probability of 60 per cent. Because the TRANSIT class is the one which fails the most, we run a simultaneous fit using SIDRA and a Box Least Square (BLS)-based algorithm for searching for transiting exoplanets. As a result, our algorithm detects 7.5 per cent more planets than a classic BLS algorithm, with better results for lower signal-to-noise light curves. SIDRA succeeds to catch 98 per cent of the planet candidates in the Kepler sample and fails for 7 per cent of the false alarms subset. SIDRA promises to be useful for developing a detection algorithm and/or classifier for large photometric surveys such as TESS and PLATO exoplanet future space missions.

  11. Performance study of ground-based infrared Bracewell interferometers - Application to the detection of exozodiacal dust disks with GENIE

    CERN Document Server

    Absil, O; Gondoin, P; Fabry, P; Wilhelm, R; Gitton, P; Puech, F

    2005-01-01

    Nulling interferometry, a powerful technique for high-resolution imaging of the close neighbourhood of bright astrophysical objets, is currently considered for future space missions such as Darwin or the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer (TPF-I), both aiming at Earth-like planet detection and characterization. Ground-based nulling interferometers are being studied for both technology demonstration and scientific preparation of the Darwin/TPF-I missions through a systematic survey of circumstellar dust disks around nearby stars. In this paper, we investigate the influence of atmospheric turbulence on the performance of ground-based nulling instruments, and deduce the major design guidelines for such instruments. End-to-end numerical simulations allow us to estimate the performance of the main subsystems and thereby the actual sensitivity of the nuller to faint exozodiacal disks. Particular attention is also given to the important question of stellar leakage calibration. This study is illustrated in the ...

  12. Intermittency of the turbulent processes in the Earth's magnetosphere detected from the ground-based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, Marina; Foppiano, Alberto; Ovalle, Elias; Antonova, Elizavieta; Troshichev, Oleg

    2008-11-01

    Turbulent processes in the Earth's magnetosphere are reflected in the dynamical behavior of the geomagnetic indices and other parameters determined from ground based observations. Intermittent properties of one minute Polar Cap (PC) index and auroral radio wave absorption are studied using 1995-2000 data sets. It was found that the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of both PC-index and absorption fluctuations display a strong non-Gaussian shape. This indicates that they are not characterized by a global time self-similarity but rather exhibit intermittency, as previously reported for solar wind velocity and auroral electrojet index values. In the case of the auroral absorption it was also found that intermittency strongly depends on the magnetic local time, being largest in the nighttime sector. This shows that the acceleration of precipitating particles is intermittent, especially near the substorm eye, where the level of turbulence increases. Application of the Local Intermittency Measure (LIM) technique confirms the aforementioned results to a better precision.

  13. Space-borne detection of volcanic carbon dioxide anomalies: The importance of ground-based validation networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandner, F. M.; Carn, S. A.; Corradini, S.; Merucci, L.; Salerno, G.; La Spina, A.

    2012-04-01

    We have investigated the feasibility of space-borne detection of volcanic carbon dioxide (CO2) anomalies, and their integration with ground-based observations. Three goals provide motivation to their integration: (a) development of new volcano monitoring techniques, with better spatial and temporal coverage, because pre-eruptive volcanic CO2 emissions are potentially the earliest available indicators of volcanic unrest; (b) improvement the currently very poor global CO2 source strength inventory for volcanoes, and (c) use of volcanic CO2 emissions for high altitude strong point source emission and dispersion studies. (1) Feasibility of space-borne detection of volcanic CO2 anomalies. Volcanoes are highly variable but continuous CO2 emitters, distributed globally, and emissions often occur at high altitudes. To detect strong point sources of CO2 from space, several hurdles have to be overcome: orographic clouds, unknown dispersion behavior, a high CO2 background in the troposphere, and sparse data coverage from existing satellite sensors. These obstacles can be overcome by a small field of view, enhanced spectral resolving power, and by employing repeat target mode observation strategies. The Japanese GOSAT instrument has been operational since January 2009, producing CO2 total column measurements with a repeat cycle of 3 days and a field of view of 10km. GOSAT thus has the potential to provide spatially integrated data for entire volcanic edifices, especially in target mode. Since summer 2010 we have conducted repeated target mode observations of over 20 persistently active global volcanoes including Etna (Italy), Erta Ale (Ethiopia), and Ambrym (Vanuatu), using L2 GOSAT FTS SWIR data. One of our best-studied test cases is Mt. Etna on Sicily (Italy), which reawakened in 2011 after a period of quiescence and produced a sequence of eruptive activities including lava fountaining events, coinciding with target-mode GOSAT observations conducted there since 2010. For the

  14. The potential of advanced ground-based gravitational wave detectors to detect generic deviations from general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narikawa, Tatsuya; Tagoshi, Hideyuki

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the potential of advanced ground-based gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO, Virgo, and KAGRA to detect generic deviations of gravitational waveforms from the predictions of general relativity. We use the parameterized post-Einsteinian formalism to characterize the deviations, and assess what magnitude of deviations are detectable by using an approximate decision scheme based on Bayesian statistics. We find that there exist detectable regions of the parameterized post-Einsteinian parameters for different binary masses from the observation of a single gravitational wave event. The regions are not excluded by currently existing binary pulsar observations for the parameterized post-Einsteinian parameters at higher post-Newtonian order. We also find that neglect of orbital eccentricity or tidal deformation effects do not cause a significant bias on the detectable region of generic deviations from general relativity.

  15. Ground-based detectability of terrestrial and Jovian extrasolar planets: observations of CM Draconis at Lick Observatory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, L R; Dunham, E T; Deeg, H J; Blue, J E; Jenkins, J M

    1996-06-25

    The detection of terrestrial-sized extrasolar planets from the ground has been thought to be virtually impossible due to atmospheric scintillation limits. However, we show that this is not the case especially selected (but nevertheless main sequence) stars, namely small eclipsing binaries. For the smallest of these systems, CM Draconis, several months to a few years of photometric observations with 1-m-class telescopes will be sufficient to detect the transits of any short-period planets of sizes > or = 1.5 Earth radii (RE), using cross-correlation analysis with moderately good photometry. Somewhat larger telescopes will be needed to extend this detectability to terrestrial planets in larger eclipsing binary systems. (We arbitrarily define "terrestrial planets" herein as those whose disc areas are closer to that of Earth's than Neptune's i.e., less than about 2.78 RE.) As a "spin-off" of such observations, we will also be able to detect the presence of Jovian-mass planets without transits using the timing of the eclipse minima. Eclipse minima will drift in time as the binary system is offset by a sufficiently massive planet (i.e., one Jupiter mass) about the binary/giant-planet barycenter, causing a periodic variation in the light travel time to the observer. We present here an outline of present observations taking place at the University of California Lick Observatory using the Crossley 0.9-m telescope in collaboration with other observatories (in South Korea, Crete, France, Canary Islands, and New York) to detect or constrain the existence of terrestrial planets around main sequence eclipsing binary star systems, starting with CM Draconis. We demonstrate the applicability of photometric data to the general detection of gas giant planets via eclipse minima timings in many other small-mass eclipsing binary systems as well.

  16. Detection of the Zeeman effect in atmospheric O2 using a ground-based microwave radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Murk, Axel; Larsson, Richard; Buehler, Stefan A.; Eriksson, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    In this work we study the Zeeman effect on stratospheric O2 using ground-based microwave radiometer measurements. The Zeeman effect is a phenomenon which occurs when an external magnetic field interacts with a molecule or an atom of total electron spin different from zero. Such an interaction will split an original energy level into several sub-levels [1]. In the atmosphere, oxygen is an abundant molecule which in its ground electronic state has a permanent magnetic dipole moment coming from two parallel electron spins. The interaction of the magnetic dipole moment with the Earth magnetic field leads to a Zeeman splitting of the O2 rotational transitions which polarizes the emission spectra. A special campaign was carried out in order to measure this effect in the oxygen emission line centered at 53.07 GHz in Bern (Switzerland). The measurements were possible using a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) spectrometer with 1 GHz of band width to measure the whole oxygen emission line centered at 53.07 GHz and a narrow spectrometer (4 MHz) to measure the center of the line with a very high resolution (1 kHz). Both a fixed and a rotating mirror were incorporated to the TEMPERA (TEMPERature RAdiometer) radiometer in order to be able to measure under different observational angles. This new configuration allowed us to change the angle between the observational path and the Earth magnetic field direction. The measured spectra showed a clear polarized signature when the observational angles were changed evidencing the Zeeman effect in the oxygen molecule. In addition, simulations carried out with the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS) [2] allowed us to verify the microwave measurements showing a very good agreement between model and measurements. The incorporation of this effect to the forward model will allow to extend the temperature retrievals beyond 50 km. This improvement in the forward model will be very useful for the assimilation of brightness temperatures in

  17. Indirect photometric detection of boron cluster anions electrophoretically separated in methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vítová, Lada; Fojt, Lukáš; Vespalec, Radim

    2014-04-18

    3,5-Dinitrobenzoate and picrate are light absorbing anions pertinent to indirect photometric detection of boron cluster anions in buffered methanolic background electrolytes (BGEs). Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane and morpholine have been used as buffering bases, which eliminated baseline steps, and minimized the baseline noise. In methanolic BGEs, mobilities of boron cluster anions depend on both ionic constituents of the BGE buffer. This dependence can be explained by ion pair interaction of detected anions with BGE cations, which are not bonded into ion pairs with the BGE anions. The former ion pair interaction decreases sensitivity of the indirect photometric detection.

  18. Can Ground-based Telescopes Detect The Oxygen 1.27 Micron Absorption Feature as a Biomarker in Exoplanets ?

    CERN Document Server

    Kawahara, Hajime; Takami, Michihiro; Fujii, Yuka; Kotani, Takayuki; Murakami, Naoshi; Tamura, Motohide; Guyon, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    The oxygen absorption line imprinted in the scattered light from the Earth-like planets has been considered as the most promising metabolic biomarker of the exo-life. We examine the feasibility of the detection of the oxygen 1.27 micron band from habitable exoplanets, in particular, around late-type stars with a 30 m class ground-based telescope with a future instrument. We analyzed the night airglow around 1.27 micron with IRCS/echelle spectrometer on Subaru and found that the strong telluric emission from atmospheric oxygen molecules declines by an order of magnitude by the midnight. With compilation of nearby star catalogues combined with the sky background model, we estimate the detectability of the oxygen absorption band from an Earth twin, if exists, around nearby stars. We find that the most dominant photon noise of the oxygen 1.27 micron detection comes from the night airglow if the leakage is suppressed enough to detect the planet. We conclude that the future detectors for which the detection contras...

  19. Ground-Based Direct Detection of Exoplanets with the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI)

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, James R; Doyon, Rene; Gavel, Don; Larkin, James; Levine, Marty; Oppenheimer, Ben; Palmer, David; Saddlemyer, Les; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Veran, Jean-Pierre; Wallace, Kent

    2007-01-01

    The Gemini Planet (GPI) imager is an "extreme" adaptive optics system being designed and built for the Gemini Observatory. GPI combines precise and accurate wavefront control, diffraction suppression, and a speckle-suppressing science camera with integral field and polarimetry capabilities. GPI's primary science goal is the direct detection and characterization of young, Jovian-mass exoplanets. For systems younger than 2 Gyr exoplanets more massive than 6 MJ and semimajor axes beyond 10 AU are detected with completeness greater than 50%. GPI will also discover faint debris disks, explore icy moons and minor planets in the solar system, reveal high dynamic range main-sequence binaries, and study mass loss from evolved stars. This white paper explains the role of GPI in exoplanet discovery and characterization and summarizes our recommendations to the NSF-NASA-DOE Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee ExoPlanet Task Force.

  20. Ground-based detection of sodium in the transmission spectrum of exoplanet HD209458b

    CERN Document Server

    Snellen, I A G; de Mooij, E J W; Poole, R S Le

    2008-01-01

    [Context] The first detection of an atmosphere around an extrasolar planet was presented by Charbonneau and collaborators in 2002. In the optical transmission spectrum of the transiting exoplanet HD209458b, an absorption signal from sodium was measured at a level of 0.023+-0.006%, using the STIS spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. Despite several attempts, so far only upper limits to the Na D absorption have been obtained using telescopes from the ground, and the HST result has yet to be confirmed. [Aims] The aims of this paper are to re-analyse data taken with the High Dispersion Spectrograph on the Subaru telescope, to correct for systematic effects dominating the data quality, and to improve on previous results presented in the literature. [Methods] The data reduction process was altered in several places, most importantly allowing for small shifts in the wavelength solution. The relative depth of all lines in the spectra, including the two sodium D lines, are found to correlate strongly with the c...

  1. Development Toward a Ground-Based Interferometric Phased Array for Radio Detection of High Energy Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Avva, J; Chesebro, T; Cremonisi, L; Deaconu, C; Gupta, A; Ludwig, A; Messino, W; Miki, C; Nichol, R; Oberla, E; Romero-Wolf, A; Saltzberg, D; Schlupf, C; Shipp, N; Varner, G; Vieregg, A G; Wissel, S A

    2016-01-01

    A promising method for further measurements of high energy neutrinos at the PeV scale and above is through an in-ice radio interferometric phased array, designed to look for Askaryan emission from neutrinos interacting in large volumes of glacial ice. Such a detector would be sensitive to two populations of neutrinos: the PeV-scale astrophysical neutrino flux recently detected by IceCube, and the predicted cosmogenic ultra-high energy (UHE) flux ($E>10^{17}$ eV). Characterizing these high energy neutrino populations is an important step toward understanding the most energetic cosmic accelerators, and the discovery of UHE neutrinos would allow us to probe fundamental physics at energy scales that are not achievable on Earth. We report here on studies validating the phased array technique, including measurements and a simulation of thermal noise correlations between nearby antennas, beamforming for impulsive signals, and a measurement of the expected improvement in trigger efficiency through the phased array te...

  2. A method for cloud detection and opacity classification based on ground based sky imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Ghonima

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Digital images of the sky obtained using a total sky imager (TSI are classified pixel by pixel into clear sky, optically thin and optically thick clouds. A new classification algorithm was developed that compares the pixel red-blue ratio (RBR to the RBR of a clear sky library (CSL generated from images captured on clear days. The difference, rather than the ratio, between pixel RBR and CSL RBR resulted in more accurate cloud classification. High correlation between TSI image RBR and aerosol optical depth (AOD measured by an AERONET photometer was observed and motivated the addition of a haze correction factor (HCF to the classification model to account for variations in AOD. Thresholds for clear and thick clouds were chosen based on a training image set and validated with set of manually annotated images. Misclassifications of clear and thick clouds into the opposite category were less than 1%. Thin clouds were classified with an accuracy of 60%. Accurate cloud detection and opacity classification techniques will improve the accuracy of short-term solar power forecasting.

  3. A method for cloud detection and opacity classification based on ground based sky imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Ghonima

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Digital images of the sky obtained using a total sky imager (TSI are classified pixel by pixel into clear sky, optically thin and optically thick clouds. A new classification algorithm was developed that compares the pixel red-blue ratio (RBR to the RBR of a clear sky library (CSL generated from images captured on clear days. The difference, rather than the ratio, between pixel RBR and CSL RBR resulted in more accurate cloud classification. High correlation between TSI image RBR and aerosol optical depth (AOD measured by an AERONET photometer was observed and motivated the addition of a haze correction factor (HCF to the classification model to account for variations in AOD. Thresholds for clear and thick clouds were chosen based on a training image set and validated with set of manually annotated images. Misclassifications of clear and thick clouds into the opposite category were less than 1%. Thin clouds were classified with an accuracy of 60%. Accurate cloud detection and opacity classification techniques will improve the accuracy of short-term solar power forecasting.

  4. EXONEST: Bayesian Model Selection Applied to the Detection and Characterization of Exoplanets Via Photometric Variations

    CERN Document Server

    Placek, Ben; Angerhausen, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    EXONEST is an algorithm dedicated to detecting and characterizing the photometric signatures of exoplanets, which include reflection and thermal emission, Doppler boosting, and ellipsoidal variations. Using Bayesian Inference, we can test between competing models that describe the data as well as estimate model parameters. We demonstrate this approach by testing circular versus eccentric planetary orbital models, as well as testing for the presence or absence of four photometric effects. In addition to using Bayesian Model Selection, a unique aspect of EXONEST is the capability to distinguish between reflective and thermal contributions to the light curve. A case-study is presented using Kepler data recorded from the transiting planet KOI-13b. By considering only the non-transiting portions of the light curve, we demonstrate that it is possible to estimate the photometrically-relevant model parameters of KOI-13b. Furthermore, Bayesian model testing confirms that the orbit of KOI-13b has a detectable eccentric...

  5. EXONEST: Bayesian Model Selection Applied to the Detection and Characterization of Exoplanets via Photometric Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placek, Ben; Knuth, Kevin H.; Angerhausen, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    EXONEST is an algorithm dedicated to detecting and characterizing the photometric signatures of exoplanets, which include reflection and thermal emission, Doppler boosting, and ellipsoidal variations. Using Bayesian inference, we can test between competing models that describe the data as well as estimate model parameters. We demonstrate this approach by testing circular versus eccentric planetary orbital models, as well as testing for the presence or absence of four photometric effects. In addition to using Bayesian model selection, a unique aspect of EXONEST is the potential capability to distinguish between reflective and thermal contributions to the light curve. A case study is presented using Kepler data recorded from the transiting planet KOI-13b. By considering only the nontransiting portions of the light curve, we demonstrate that it is possible to estimate the photometrically relevant model parameters of KOI-13b. Furthermore, Bayesian model testing confirms that the orbit of KOI-13b has a detectable eccentricity.

  6. EXONEST: Bayesian model selection applied to the detection and characterization of exoplanets via photometric variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placek, Ben; Knuth, Kevin H. [Physics Department, University at Albany (SUNY), Albany, NY 12222 (United States); Angerhausen, Daniel, E-mail: bplacek@albany.edu, E-mail: kknuth@albany.edu, E-mail: daniel.angerhausen@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselear Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    EXONEST is an algorithm dedicated to detecting and characterizing the photometric signatures of exoplanets, which include reflection and thermal emission, Doppler boosting, and ellipsoidal variations. Using Bayesian inference, we can test between competing models that describe the data as well as estimate model parameters. We demonstrate this approach by testing circular versus eccentric planetary orbital models, as well as testing for the presence or absence of four photometric effects. In addition to using Bayesian model selection, a unique aspect of EXONEST is the potential capability to distinguish between reflective and thermal contributions to the light curve. A case study is presented using Kepler data recorded from the transiting planet KOI-13b. By considering only the nontransiting portions of the light curve, we demonstrate that it is possible to estimate the photometrically relevant model parameters of KOI-13b. Furthermore, Bayesian model testing confirms that the orbit of KOI-13b has a detectable eccentricity.

  7. GNSS as a sea ice sensor - detecting coastal freeze states with ground-based GNSS-R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandberg, Joakim; Hobiger, Thomas; Haas, Rüdiger

    2017-04-01

    Based on the idea of using freely available signals for remote sensing, ground-based GNSS-reflectometry (GNSS-R) has found more and more applications in hydrology, oceanography, agriculture and other Earth sciences. GNSS-R is based on analysing the elevation dependent SNR patterns of GNSS signals, and traditionally only the oscillation frequency and phase have been studied to retrieve parameters from the reflecting surfaces. However, recently Strandberg et al. (2016) developed an inversion algorithm that has changed the paradigms of ground-based GNSS-R as it enables direct access to the radiometric properties of the reflector. Using the signal envelope and the rate at which the magnitude of the SNR oscillations are damped w.r.t. satellite elevation, the algorithm retrieves the roughness of the reflector surface amongst other parameters. Based on this idea, we demonstrate for the first time that a GNSS installation situated close to the coastline can detect the presence of sea-ice unambiguously. Using data from the GTGU antenna at the Onsala Space Observatory, Sweden, the time series of the derived damping parameter clearly matches the occurrence of ice in the bay where the antenna is situated. Our results were validated against visual inspection logs as well as with the help of ice charts from the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute. Our method is even sensitive to partial and intermediate ice formation stages, with clear difference in response between frazil ice and both open and solidly frozen water surfaces. As the GTGU installation is entirely built with standard geodetic equipment, the method can be applied directly to any coastal GNSS site, allowing analysis of both new and historical data. One can use the method as an automatic way of retrieving independent ground truth data for ice extent measurements for use in hydrology, cryosphere studies, and even societal interest fields such as sea transportation. Finally, the new method opens up for

  8. THE IMPACT OF THE IONOSPHERE ON GROUND-BASED DETECTION OF THE GLOBAL EPOCH OF REIONIZATION SIGNAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolowski, Marcin; Wayth, Randall B.; Tremblay, Steven E.; Tingay, Steven J.; Waterson, Mark; Tickner, Jonathan; Emrich, David; Schlagenhaufer, Franz; Kenney, David; Padhi, Shantanu, E-mail: marcin.sokolowski@curtin.edu.au [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, G.P.O Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)

    2015-11-01

    The redshifted 21 cm line of neutral hydrogen (H i), potentially observable at low radio frequencies (∼50–200 MHz), is a promising probe of the physical conditions of the intergalactic medium during Cosmic Dawn and the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). The sky-averaged H i signal is expected to be extremely weak (∼100 mK) in comparison to the Galactic foreground emission (∼10{sup 4} K). Moreover, the sky-averaged spectra measured by ground-based instruments are affected by chromatic propagation effects (∼tens of kelvin) originating in the ionosphere. We analyze data collected with the upgraded Broadband Instrument for Global Hydrogen Reionization Signal system deployed at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory to assess the significance of ionospheric effects on the detection of the global EoR signal. The ionospheric effects identified in these data are, particularly during nighttime, dominated by absorption and emission. We measure some properties of the ionosphere, such as the electron temperature (T{sub e} ≈ 470 K at nighttime), magnitude, and variability of optical depth (τ{sub 100} {sub MHz} ≈ 0.01 and δτ ≈ 0.005 at nighttime). According to the results of a statistical test applied on a large data sample, very long integrations (∼100 hr collected over approximately 2 months) lead to increased signal-to-noise ratio even in the presence of ionospheric variability. This is further supported by the structure of the power spectrum of the sky temperature fluctuations, which has flicker noise characteristics at frequencies ≳10{sup −5} Hz, but becomes flat below ≈10{sup −5} Hz. Hence, we conclude that the stochastic error introduced by the chromatic ionospheric effects tends to zero in an average. Therefore, the ionospheric effects and fluctuations are not fundamental impediments preventing ground-based instruments from integrating down to the precision required by global EoR experiments, provided that the ionospheric contribution is

  9. The impact of the ionosphere on ground-based detection of the global Epoch of Reionisation signal

    CERN Document Server

    Sokolowski, Marcin; Tremblay, Steven E; Tingay, Steven J; Waterson, Mark; Tickner, Jonathan; Emrich, David; Schlagenhaufer, Franz; Kenney, David; Padhi, Shantanu

    2015-01-01

    The redshifted 21cm line of neutral hydrogen (Hi), potentially observable at low radio frequencies (~50-200 MHz), is a promising probe of the physical conditions of the inter-galactic medium during Cosmic Dawn and the Epoch of Reionisation (EoR). The sky-averaged Hi signal is expected to be extremely weak (~100 mK) in comparison to the Galactic foreground emission (~$10^4$ K). Moreover, the sky-averaged spectra measured by ground-based instruments are affected by chromatic propagation effects (of the order of tens of Kelvins) originating in the ionosphere. We analyze data collected with the upgraded BIGHORNS system deployed at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory to assess the significance of ionospheric effects (absorption, emission and refraction) on the detection of the global EoR signal. We measure some properties of the ionosphere, such as the electron temperature ($T_e \\approx$470 K at nighttime), magnitude, and variability of optical depth ($\\tau_{100 MHz} \\approx$0.01 and $\\delta \\tau \\approx$0.0...

  10. Analysis of a dryline-like feature in northern Germany detected by ground-based microwave profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spaenkuch, Dietrich [Leibniz-Soziaetet der Wissenschaften zu Berlin e.V. (Germany); Gueldner, Juergen [Deutscher Wetterdienst, Lindenberg (Germany). Meteorologisches Observatorium Lindenberg - Richard-Assmann-Observatorium; Bender, Michael [Helmholtz-Zentrum Potsdam, Potsdam (DE). Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ); Steinhagen, Hans

    2011-08-15

    Two dryline-like humidity drops without considerable temperature change were detected by the ground-based microwave radiometer profiler (MWRP) at the Richard-Assmann-Observatory Lindenberg (52.21 N, 14.12 E) on April 28, 2007. The detailed analysis of these two events includes cloud radar and radar wind profiler measurements at the site as well as data from the surface synoptic network and from integrated water vapour (IWV) maps derived from GPS. The first more pronounced humidity drop is part of a roughly 200 km long line that meets the criterion of a classical dryline or dewpoint front, namely of a moisture gradient larger 3.5 g m{sup -3} per 100 km. This dewpoint front is ahead of an approaching cold front and is caused by strong downdraft induced by low tropospheric wind shear due to weakening of a midtropospheric high over Germany. It consisted in particular in two kernels of variable size depending on their stage. The fate of the kernels - migration, speed, unification and divorce - is described in detail. Their lifetime was a bit more than 9 hours. The second humidity drop at the site was observed after the passage of the cold front and was caused by dry advection behind the front. Both events are predicted by the numerical weather prediction model COSMO-EU of the German Weather Service to some extent.

  11. SIDRA: a blind algorithm for signal detection in photometric surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Mislis, D; Alsubai, K A; Bramich, D M; Parley, N

    2015-01-01

    We present the Signal Detection using Random-Forest Algorithm (SIDRA). SIDRA is a detection and classification algorithm based on the Machine Learning technique (Random Forest). The goal of this paper is to show the power of SIDRA for quick and accurate signal detection and classification. We first diagnose the power of the method with simulated light curves and try it on a subset of the Kepler space mission catalogue. We use five classes of simulated light curves (CONSTANT, TRANSIT, VARIABLE, MLENS and EB for constant light curves, transiting exoplanet, variable, microlensing events and eclipsing binaries, respectively) to analyse the power of the method. The algorithm uses four features in order to classify the light curves. The training sample contains 5000 light curves (1000 from each class) and 50000 random light curves for testing. The total SIDRA success ratio is $\\geq 90\\%$. Furthermore, the success ratio reaches 95 - 100$\\%$ for the CONSTANT, VARIABLE, EB, and MLENS classes and 92$\\%$ for the TRANSIT...

  12. Detection of Low-Amplitude Photometric Variability of Magnetic White Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeev, A. F.; Antonyuk, K. A.; Pit, N. V.; Moskvitin, A. S.; Grauzhanina, A. O.; Gadelshin, D. R.; Kolesnikov, S. V.; Burlakova, T. E.; Galazutdinov, G. A.; Gutaev, A. G.; Zhuchkov, R. Ya.; Ikhsanova, A. I.; Joshi, A.; Pandey, J. C.; Zhuzhulina, E. A.; Valyavin, G. G.

    2017-06-01

    We present the results of the ongoing photometric survey of magnetic white dwarfs. Variability of fluxes from WD 0009+501, GD 229, GRW+70°8247, and GD 56 has been detected. The detected variability of GD 356 is specially discussed. In case of GRW+70°8247 the V-band photometric variability amplitude is about 0fm04, the most probable period is from days to several tens of days. The degenerate GD 229 demonstrates the amplitude of the flux variation of about 0fm05 with a period between 10 and 20 days. In both cases the variability is most likely associated with rotation of these stars. These findings contradict with an idea on the existence of a special class of strong-magnetic very slowly rotating white dwarfs, the periods of which are estimated to have tens or even hundreds of years.

  13. Research on Ground-Based LWIR Hyperspectral Research on Ground-Based LWIR Hyperspectral Imaging Remote Gas Detection Imaging Remote Gas Detection%地面长波红外高光谱成像气体探测研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑为建; 雷正刚; 余春超; 杨智雄; 王海洋; 付艳鹏; 李训牛; 廖宁放; 苏君红

    2016-01-01

    The new progress of ground-based long-wave infrared remote sensing is presented ,which describes the windowing spatial and temporal modulation Fourier spectroscopy imaging in details .The prototype forms the interference fringes based on the corner-cube of spatial modulation of Michelson interferometer ,using cooled long-wave infrared photovoltaic staring FPA (focal plane array) detector .The LWIR hyperspectral ima-ging is achieved by the process of collection ,reorganization ,correction ,apodization ,FFT etc .from data cube .Noise equivalent spectral radiance (NESR) ,which is the sensitivity index of CHIPED-1 LWIR hyper-spectral imaging prototype ,can reach 5.6 × 10-8 W · (cm-1 · sr · cm2 )-1 at single sampling .The data is the same as commercial temporal modulation hyperspectral imaging spectrometer .It can prove the advantage of this technique . This technique still has space to be improved . For instance , spectral response range of CHIPED-1 LWIR hyperspectral imaging prototype can reach 11.5μm by testing the transmission curve of pol-ypropylene film .In this article ,choosing the results of outdoor high-rise and diethyl ether gas experiment as an example ,the authors research on the detecting method of 2D distribution chemical gas VOC by infrared hyper-spectral imaging .There is no observed diethyl ether gas from the infrared spectral slice of the same wave num-ber in complicated background and low concentration .By doing the difference spectrum ,the authors can see the space distribution of diethyl ether gas clearly . Hyperspectral imaging is used in the field of organic gas VOC infrared detection .Relative to wide band infrared imaging ,it has some advantages .Such as ,it has high sensitivity ,the strong anti-interference ability ,identify the variety ,and so on . Abstract The new progress of ground-based long-wave infrared remote sensing is presented ,which describes the windowing spatial and temporal modulation Fourier spectroscopy imaging in details

  14. A Coordinated X-Ray and Optical Campaign of the Nearest Massive Eclipsing Binary, δ Orionis Aa. III. Analysis of Optical Photometric (MOST) and Spectroscopic (Ground-based) Variations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pablo, H.; Richardson, N.D.; Moffat, A.F.J.; Corcoran, M.; Shenar, T.; Benvenuto, O.; Fuller, J.; Nazé, Y.; Hoffman, J.L.; Miroshnichenko, A.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Evans, N.; Eversberg, T.; Gayley, K.; Gull, T.; Hamaguchi, K.; Hamann, W.-R.; Henrichs, H.; Hole, T.; Ignace, R.; Iping, R.; Lauer, J.; Leutenegger, M.; Lomax, J.; Nichols, J.; Oskinova, L.; Owocki, S.; Pollock, A.; Russell, C.M.P.; Waldron, W.; Buil, C.; Garrel, T.; Graham, K.; Heathcote, B.; Lemoult, T.; Li, D.; Mauclaire, B.; Potter, M.; Ribeiro, J.; Matthews, J.; Cameron, C.; Guenther, D.; Kuschnig, R.; Rowe, J.; Rucinski, S.; Sasselov, D.; Weiss, W.

    2015-01-01

    We report on both high-precision photometry from the Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars (MOST) space telescope and ground-based spectroscopy of the triple system δ Ori A, consisting of a binary O9.5II+early-B (Aa1 and Aa2) with P = 5.7 days, and a more distant tertiary (O9 IV P> 400 years).

  15. SNIa detection in the SNLS photometric analysis using Morphological Component Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Möller, A; Lanusse, F; Neveu, J; Palanque-Delabrouille, N

    2015-01-01

    Detection of supernovae (SNe) and, more generally, of transient events in large surveys can provide numerous false detections. In the case of a deferred processing of survey images, this implies reconstructing complete light curves for all detections, requiring sizable processing time and resources. Optimizing the detection of transient events is thus an important issue for both present and future surveys. We present here the optimization done in the SuperNova Legacy Survey (SNLS) for the 5-year data differed photometric analysis. In this analysis, detections are derived from stacks of subtracted images with one stack per lunation. The 3-year analysis provided 300,000 detections dominated by signals of bright objects that were not perfectly subtracted. We developed a subtracted image stack treatment to reduce the number of non SN-like events using morphological component analysis. This technique exploits the morphological diversity of objects to be detected to extract the signal of interest. At the level of o...

  16. The Gaia Era: synergy between space missions and ground based surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Vallenari, A

    2008-01-01

    The Gaia mission is expected to provide highly accurate astrometric, photometric, and spectroscopic measurements for about $10^9$ objects. Automated classification of detected sources is a key part of the data processing. Here a few aspects of the Gaia classification process are presented. Information from other surveys at longer wavelengths, and from follow-up ground based observations will be complementary to Gaia data especially at faint magnitudes, and will offer a great opportunity to understand our Galaxy.

  17. Earliest recorded ground-based decameter wavelength observations of Saturn's lightning during the giant E-storm detected by Cassini spacecraft in early 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalenko, A. A.; Kalinichenko, N. N.; Rucker, H. O.; Lecacheux, A.; Fischer, G.; Zarka, P.; Zakharenko, V. V.; Mylostna, K. Y.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Abranin, E. P.; Falkovich, I. S.; Sidorchuk, K. M.; Kurth, W. S.; Kaiser, M. L.; Gurnett, D. A.

    2013-05-01

    We report the history of the first recorded ground-based radio detection of Saturn's lightning using the Ukrainian UTR-2 radiotelescope at frequencies from 20 to 25 MHz. The observations were performed between 29 January and 3 February 2006, during which lighting activity (E-storm) on Saturn was detected by the radio experiment onboard Cassini spacecraft. The minimum detectable flux density (1σ-level) at UTR-2 reached 40 Jy (1Jy=10-26WmHz) for narrowband observations (Δf=10kHz) and 4 Jy for broadband observations (Δf=1MHz), for an effective telescope area of ≈100,000m and integration time of 20 ms. Selection criteria including comparison of simultaneous ON/OFF-source observations were applied to distinguish detection of lightning-associated radio pulses from interference. This allowed us to identify about 70 events with signal-to-noise ratio more than 5. Measured flux densities (between 50 and 700 Jy) and burst durations (between 60 and 220 ms) are in good agreement with extrapolation of previous Cassini measurements to a ground-based observer. This first detection demonstrates the possibility of Solar System planetary lightning studies using large, present and future ground-based radio instruments. The developed methods of observations and identification criteria are also implemented on the UTR-2 radio telescope for the investigation of the next Saturn's storms. Together with recently published UTR-2 measurements of activity measured after the 2006 storm reported here, the results have significant implications for detectable planetary radio emission in our Solar System and beyond.

  18. Galaxies in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field: I. Detection, Multiband Photometry, Photometric Redshifts, and Morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Coe, D; Sánchez, S F; Jee, M; Bouwens, R; Ford, H; Coe, Dan; Benitez, Narciso; Sanchez, Sebastian F.; Jee, Myungkook; Bouwens, Rychard; Ford, Holland

    2006-01-01

    We present aperture-matched PSF-corrected BVi'z'JH photometry and Bayesian photometric redshifts (BPZ) for objects detected in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UDF), 8,042 of which are detected at the 10-sigma level (e.g., i'<29.01 or z'<28.43). Most of our objects are defined identically to those in the public STScI catalogs, enabling straightforward object-by-object comparison. We have combined detections from i', z', J+H, and B+V+i'+z' images into a single comprehensive segmentation map. Using a new program called SExSeg we are able to force this segmentation map into SExtractor for photometric analysis. The resulting photometry is corrected for the wider NIC3 PSFs using our ColorPro software. We also correct for the ACS z'-band PSF halo. The NIC3 magnitudes are found to be too faint relative to the ACS fluxes. Based on BPZ SED fits to objects of know spectroscopic redshift, we derived corrections of -0.30 +/- 0.03 mag in J and -0.18 +/- 0.04 mag in H. The offsets appear to be supported by a recent recal...

  19. Blue Skies through a Blue Sky: an attempt to detect Rayleigh scattering in an exoplanet atmosphere from a ground-based telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchsinger, Kristen; Redfield, Seth; Cauley, Paul W.; Barman, Travis S.; Jensen, Adam G.

    2017-01-01

    When studying planetary atmospheres, scattering signatures, such as Rayleigh scattering, can often be the most easily characterized signal. This is especially true in terrestrial atmospheres, where Rayleigh scattering is the dominant spectral feature in optical wavelengths. These scattering signatures, unlike molecular or atomic line absorption, are broad and continuous, and are char- acterized by a single slope. Rayleigh scattering provides an imporant glimpse into the atmospheric composition of an exoplanet's atmosphere, and a Rayleigh scattering detection on a smaller, ground-based telescope can be a useful method to identify interesting science targets for larger, space-based telescopes.We will present observations of three exoplanets using the HYDRA multi- object spectrometer on the WIYN telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory. We obtained two transits each for WASP 12b and GJ 3470b, and one transit for HD 189733b, for a range of wavelengths between 4500 Å and 9201 Å. A successful Rayleigh scattering detection in the atmospheres of these planets using this in- strument would represent a step forward in our current detection capabilities and open up the study of planetary atmospheres to smaller, ground-based telescopes.Data presented herein were obtained at the WIYN Observatory from telescope time allocated to NN-EXPLORE through the scientific partnership of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory. This work was supported by a NASA WIYN PI Data Award, administered by the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute.

  20. Intermittency of the turbulent processes in the Earth's magnetosphere detected from the ground-based measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanova, Marina [Physical Department, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (Chile); Foppiano, Alberto; Ovalle, Elias [Departmento de Geofisica, Universidad de Conception (Chile); Antonova, Elizavieta [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Troshichev, Oleg [Department of Geophysics, Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)], E-mail: mstepano@usach.cl

    2008-11-01

    Turbulent processes in the Earth's magnetosphere are reflected in the dynamical behavior of the geomagnetic indices and other parameters determined from ground based observations. Intermittent properties of one minute Polar Cap (PC) index and auroral radio wave absorption are studied using 1995-2000 data sets. It was found that the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of both PC-index and absorption fluctuations display a strong non-Gaussian shape. This indicates that they are not characterized by a global time self-similarity but rather exhibit intermittency, as previously reported for solar wind velocity and auroral electrojet index values. In the case of the auroral absorption it was also found that intermittency strongly depends on the magnetic local time, being largest in the nighttime sector. This shows that the acceleration of precipitating particles is intermittent, especially near the substorm eye, where the level of turbulence increases. Application of the Local Intermittency Measure (LIM) technique confirms the aforementioned results to a better precision.

  1. A reliable cluster detection technique using photometric redshifts: introducing the 2TecX algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    van Breukelen, Caroline

    2009-01-01

    We present a new cluster detection algorithm designed for finding high-redshift clusters using optical/infrared imaging data. The algorithm has two main characteristics. First, it utilises each galaxy's full redshift probability function, instead of an estimate of the photometric redshift based on the peak of the probability function and an associated Gaussian error. Second, it identifies cluster candidates through cross-checking the results of two substantially different selection techniques (the name 2TecX representing the cross-check of the two techniques). These are adaptations of the Voronoi Tesselations and Friends-Of-Friends methods. Monte-Carlo simulations of mock catalogues show that cross-checking the cluster candidates found by the two techniques significantly reduces the detection of spurious sources. Furthermore, we examine the selection effects and relative strengths and weaknesses of either method. The simulations also allow us to fine-tune the algorithm's parameters, and define completeness an...

  2. The Effects of the Ionosphere on Ground-based Detection of the Global 21 cm Signal from the Cosmic Dawn and the Dark Ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Abhirup; Bradley, Richard; Burns, Jack O.; Harker, Geraint; Komjathy, Attila; Lazio, T. Joseph W.

    2016-11-01

    Detection of the global H i 21 cm signal from the Cosmic Dawn and the Epoch of Reionization is the key science driver for several ongoing ground-based and future ground-/space-based experiments. The crucial spectral features in the global 21 cm signal (turning points) occur at low radio frequencies ≲ 100 {{MHz}}. In addition to the human-generated radio frequency interference, Earth’s ionosphere drastically corrupts low-frequency radio observations from the ground. In this paper, we examine the effects of time-varying ionospheric refraction, absorption, and thermal emission at these low radio frequencies and their combined effect on any ground-based global 21 cm experiment. It should be noted that this is the first study of the effect of a dynamic ionosphere on global 21 cm experiments. The fluctuations in the ionosphere are influenced by solar activity with flicker noise characteristics. The same characteristics are reflected in the ionospheric corruption to any radio signal passing through the ionosphere. As a result, any ground-based observations of the faint global 21 cm signal are corrupted by flicker noise (or 1/f noise, where f is the dynamical frequency) which scales as {ν }-2 (where ν is the frequency of radio observation) in the presence of a bright galactic foreground (\\propto {ν }-s, where s is the radio spectral index). Hence, the calibration of the ionosphere for any such experiment is critical. Any attempt to calibrate the ionospheric effects will be subject to the inaccuracies in the current ionospheric measurements using Global Positioning System (GPS) ionospheric measurements, riometer measurements, ionospheric soundings, etc. Even considering an optimistic improvement in the accuracy of GPS-total electron content measurements, we conclude that Earth’s ionosphere poses a significant challenge in the absolute detection of the global 21 cm signal below 100 MHz.

  3. Effects Of The Ionosphere On Ground-Based Detection Of The Global 21 CM Signal From The Cosmic Dawn And The Dark Ages

    CERN Document Server

    Datta, Abhirup; Burns, Jack O; Harker, Geraint; Komjathy, Attila; Lazio, T Joseph W

    2014-01-01

    Detection of global HI 21 cm signal from the Cosmic Dawn and the Epoch of Reionization is the key science driver for several ongoing ground-based and future ground/space based experiments. The crucial spectral features in the global 21cm signal (turning points) occurs at low radio frequencies < 100 MHz. In addition to the human-generated RFI (Radio Frequency Interference), Earth's ionosphere drastically corrupts low-frequency radio observations from the ground. In this paper, we examine the effects of time-varying ionospheric refraction, absorption and thermal emission at these low radio frequencies and their combined effect on any ground-based global 21cm experiment. It should be noted that this is the first study of the effect of a dynamic ionosphere on global 21cm experiments. Our results indicate that the spectral features in the global 21cm signal below 100 MHz cannot be detected from the ground under even "quiet" night-time ionospheric conditions. Any attempt to calibrate the ionospheric effect will ...

  4. Photometrics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose:The Photometrics Laboratory provides the capability to measure, analyze and characterize radiometric and photometric properties of light sources and filters,...

  5. A photometric study of the southern Blazhko star SS For Unambiguous detection of quintuplet components

    CERN Document Server

    Kolenberg, Katrien; Medupe, Thebe; Lenz, Patrick; Schmitzberger, Lukas; Shobbrook, Robert; Beck, Paul; Ngwato, Boitumelo; Lub, Jan

    2008-01-01

    We present our analysis of photometric data in the Johnson B and V filter of the southern Blazhko star SS For. In parallel, we analyzed the V observations obtained with the ASAS-3 photometry of the star gathered between 2000 and 2008. In the frequency spectra resulting from a Fourier analysis of our data, the triplet structure is detectable up to high order, both in the B and V data. Moreover, we find evidence for quintuplet components. We confirm from our data that the modulation components decrease less steeply than the harmonics of the main frequency. We derived the variations of the Fourier parameters quantifying the light curve shape over the Blazhko cycle. There is good agreement between the spectroscopic abundance and the metallicity determined from the Fourier parameters of the average light curve. SS For is peculiar as a Blazhko star because of its strong variations around minimum light.

  6. Evaluating airborne and ground based gamma spectrometry methods for detecting particulate radioactivity in the environment: A case study of Irish Sea beaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cresswell, A.J., E-mail: Alan.Cresswell@glasgow.ac.uk; Sanderson, D.C.W.

    2012-10-15

    In several places, programmes are in place to locate and recover radioactive particles that have the potential to cause detrimental health effects in any member of the public who may encounter them. A model has been developed to evaluate the use of mobile gamma spectrometry systems within such programmes, with particular emphasis on large volume (16 l) NaI(Tl) detectors mounted in low flying helicopters. This model uses a validated Monte Carlo code with assessment of local geochemistry and natural and anthropogenic background radiation concentrations and distributions. The results of the model, applied to the example of particles recovered from beaches in the vicinity of Sellafield, clearly show the ability of rapid airborne surveys conducted at 75 m ground clearance and 120 kph speeds to demonstrate the absence of sources greater than 5 MBq {sup 137}Cs within large areas (10-20 km{sup 2} h{sup -1}), and identify areas requiring further ground based investigation. Lowering ground clearance for airborne surveys to 15 m whilst maintaining speeds covering 1-2 km{sup 2} h{sup -1} can detect buried {sup 137}Cs sources of 0.5 MBq or greater activity. A survey design to detect 100 kBq {sup 137}Cs sources at 10 cm depth has also been defined, requiring surveys at < 15 m ground clearance and < 2 m s{sup -1} ground speed. The response of airborne systems to the Sellafield particles recovered to date has also been simulated, and the proportion of the existing radiocaesium background in the vicinity of the nuclear site has been established. Finally the rates of area coverage and sensitivities of both airborne and ground based approaches are compared, demonstrating the ability of airborne systems to increase the rate of particle recovery in a cost effective manner. The potential for equipment and methodological developments to improve performance are discussed. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Validated Monte Carlo simulations used to model mobile gamma spectrometry

  7. Detection of a large sample of Gamma Dor stars from Kepler space photometry and high-resolution ground-based spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Tkachenko, A; Yakushechkin, A; Debosscher, J; Degroote, P; Bloemen, S; Papics, P I; de Vries, B L; Lombaert, R; Hrudkova, M; Fremat, Y; Raskin, G; Van Winckel, H

    2013-01-01

    The space-missions MOST, CoRoT, and Kepler deliver a huge amount of high-quality photometric data suitable to study numerous pulsating stars. Our ultimate goal is a detection and analysis of an extended sample of Gamma Dor-type pulsating stars with the aim to search for observational evidence of non-uniform period spacings and rotational splittings of gravity modes in main-sequence stars typically twice as massive as the Sun. We applied an automated supervised photometric classification method to select a sample of 69 Gamma Doradus candidate stars. We used an advanced method to extract the Kepler light curves from the pixel data information using custom masks. For 36 of the stars, we obtained high-resolution spectroscopy with the HERMES spectrograph installed at the Mercator telescope. We find that all stars for which spectroscopic estimates of Teff and logg are available fall into the region of the HR diagram where the Gamma Dor and Delta Sct instability strips overlap. The stars cluster in a 700 K window in...

  8. Simultaneous determination of organophosphorous insecticides in bean samples by gas chromatography - flame photometric detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyller Bastos Borges

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The indiscriminate use of organophosphorous pesticides (OPPs in crops may leave residues in food and may cause poisoning in the applicators. A method was developed for the determination of five OPPs in bean samples by Gas Chromatography-Flame Photometric Detection (GC-FPD. Validation parameters comprised linearity between 0.24 and 8.56 μg g-1 (r = 0.9985 for diazinon; 0.23 and 8.14 μg g-1 (r = 0.9959 for methyl parathion; 0.28 and 10.25 μg g-1 (r = 0.9987 for methyl pirimiphos; 0.52 and 18.87 μg g-1 (r = 0.9955 for malathion; 0.86 and 13.67 μg g-1 (r = 0.9919 for ethion. The limits of quantification (equal to those of detection were the lowest rates of ranges mentioned above for each compound. The extraction method showed approximately 95% recovery, with CV% < 15%. Although twenty-eight bean samples obtained in the southern region of the state of Minas Gerais,Brazil, were analyzed, they failed to match any of the OPPs under analysis. The absence of OPPs in the samples could be due to the degradation that occurred between the use of OPPs and bean commercialization, levels below the detection /quantification limits and the non-use of OPPs in bean cultivation.

  9. Ground-based Detection of Deuterated Water in Comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) at IR Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganini, L.; Mumma, M. J.; Gibb, E. L.; Villanueva, G. L.

    2017-02-01

    We conducted a deep search for deuterated water (HDO) in the Oort Cloud comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy), through infrared (IR) spectroscopy with NIRSPEC at the Keck Observatory. In this Letter, we present our detections of HDO and water (H2O) in comet Lovejoy on 2015 February 4 (post-perihelion) after 1 hr integration on source. The IR observations allowed simultaneous detection of H2O and HDO, yielding production rates of 5.9 ± 0.13 × 1029 and 3.6 ± 1.0 × 1026 molecules s‑1, respectively. The simultaneous detection permitted accurate determination of the isotopic ratio (D/H) in water of 3.02 ± 0.87 × 10‑4, i.e., larger than the value for water in terrestrial oceans (or Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water, VSMOW) by a factor of 1.94 ± 0.56. This D/H ratio in water exceeds the value obtained independently at millimeter wavelengths (0.89 ± 0.25 VSMOW; pre-perihelion). We discuss these parameters in the context of origins and emphasize the need for contemporaneous measurements of HDO and H2O.

  10. Real-time flare detection in ground-based H$\\alpha$ imaging at Kanzelh\\"ohe Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Pötzi, Werner; Riegler, Gernot; Amerstorfer, Ulrike; Pock, Thomas; Temmer, Manuela; Polanec, Wolfgang; Baumgartner, Dietmar J

    2014-01-01

    Kanzelh\\"ohe Observatory (KSO) regularly performs high-cadence full-disk imaging of the solar chromosphere in the H$\\alpha$ and CaIIK spectrallines as well as the solar photosphere in white-light. In the frame of ESA's Space Situational Awareness (SSA) programme, a new system for real-time H$\\alpha$ data provision and automatic flare detection was developed at KSO. The data and events detected are published in near real-time at ESA's SSA Space Weather portal (http://swe.ssa.esa.int/web/guest/kso-federated). In this paper, we describe the H$\\alpha$ instrument, the image recognition algorithms developed, the implementation into the KSO H$\\alpha$ observing system and present the evaluation results of the real-time data provision and flare detection for a period of five months. The H$\\alpha$ data provision worked in $99.96$% of the images, with a mean time lag between image recording and online provision of 4s. Within the given criteria for the automatic image recognition system (at least three H$\\alpha$ images a...

  11. Ground-based detection of the near-infrared emission from the dayside of WASP-5b

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Guo; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Wang, Hongchi; Nikolov, Nikolay; Seemann, Ulf; Henning, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    (Abridged) WASP-5b is a highly irradiated dense hot Jupiter orbiting a G4V star every 1.6 days. We observed two secondary eclipses of WASP-5b in the J, H and K bands simultaneously. Thermal emission of WASP-5b is detected in the J and K bands. The retrieved planet-to-star flux ratios in the J and K bands are 0.168 +0.050/-0.052% and 0.269+/-0.062%, corresponding to brightness temperatures of 2996 +212/-261K and 2890 +246/-269K, respectively. No thermal emission is detected in the H band, with a 3-sigma upper limit of 0.166%, corresponding to a maximum temperature of 2779K. On the whole, our J, H, K results can be explained by a roughly isothermal temperature profile of ~2700K in the deep layers of the planetary dayside atmosphere that are probed at these wavelengths. Together with Spitzer observations, which probe higher layers that are found to be at ~1900K, a temperature inversion is ruled out in the range of pressures probed by the combined data set. While an oxygen-rich model is unable to explain all the ...

  12. Detection of a large sample of γ Doradus stars from Kepler space photometry and high-resolution ground-based spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, A.; Aerts, C.; Yakushechkin, A.; Debosscher, J.; Degroote, P.; Bloemen, S.; Pápics, P. I.; de Vries, B. L.; Lombaert, R.; Hrudkova, M.; Frémat, Y.; Raskin, G.; Van Winckel, H.

    2013-08-01

    Context. The launches of the MOST, CoRoT, and Kepler missions opened up a new era in asteroseismology, the study of stellar interiors via interpretation of pulsation patterns observed at the surfaces of large groups of stars. These space missions deliver a huge amount of high-quality photometric data suitable to study numerous pulsating stars. Aims: Our ultimate goal is a detection and analysis of an extended sample of γ Dor-type pulsating stars with the aim to search for observational evidence of non-uniform period spacings and rotational splittings of gravity modes in main-sequence stars typically twice as massive as the Sun. This kind of diagnostic can be used to deduce the internal rotation law and to estimate the amount of rotational mixing in the near core regions. Methods: We applied an automated supervised photometric classification method to select a sample of 69 Gamma Doradus (γ Dor) candidate stars. We used an advanced method to extract the Kepler light curves from the pixel data information using custom masks. For 36 of the stars, we obtained high-resolution spectroscopy with the HERMES spectrograph installed at the Mercator telescope. The spectroscopic data are analysed to determine the fundamental parameters like Teff, log g, vsini, and [M/H]. Results: We find that all stars for which spectroscopic estimates of Teff and log g are available fall into the region of the HR diagram, where the γ Dor and δ Sct instability strips overlap. The stars cluster in a 700 K window in effective temperature; log g measurements suggest luminosity class IV-V, i.e. sub-giant or main-sequence stars. From the Kepler photometry, we identify 45 γ Dor-type pulsators, 14 γ Dor/δ Sct hybrids, and 10 stars, which are classified as "possibly γ Dor/δ Sct hybrid pulsators". We find a clear correlation between the spectroscopically derived vsini and the frequencies of independent pulsation modes. Conclusions: We have shown that our photometric classification based on the

  13. Detection of water absorption in the dayside atmosphere of HD 189733 b using ground-based high-resolution spectroscopy at 3.2 microns

    CERN Document Server

    Birkby, J L; Brogi, M; de Mooij, E J W; Schwarz, H; Albrecht, S; Snellen, I A G

    2013-01-01

    We report a 5 sigma detection of water absorption features in the dayside spectrum of the hot Jupiter HD 189733 b. We used high-resolution (R~100,000) spectra taken at 3.2 microns with CRIRES on the VLT to trace the radial velocity shift of the water features in the planet's dayside atmosphere during 5 hours of its 2.2 day orbit as it approached secondary eclipse. Despite considerable telluric contamination in this wavelength regime, we detect the signal within our uncertainties at the expected combination of systemic velocity (Vsys=-3 +5-6 km/s) and planet orbital velocity (Kp=154 +14-10 km/s), and determine a H2O line contrast ratio of (1.3+/-0.2)x10^-3 with respect to the stellar continuum. We find no evidence of significant absorption or emission from other carbon-bearing molecules, such as methane, although we do note a marginal increase in the significance of our detection with the inclusion of carbon dioxide in our template spectrum. This result demonstrates that ground-based, high-resolution spectrosc...

  14. CANDELS/GOODS-S, CDFS, and ECDFS: photometric redshifts for normal and X-ray-detected galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Li-Ting; Salvato, Mara; Nandra, Kirpal; Brusa, Marcella; Bender, Ralf; Buchner, Johannes; Brightman, Murray; Georgakakis, Antonis [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Donley, Jennifer L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kocevski, Dale D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Guo, Yicheng; Barro, Guillermo; Faber, Sandra M. [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Hathi, Nimish P. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Rangel, Cyprian [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Willner, S. P.; Ashby, Matthew L. N. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Budavári, Tamás; Szalay, Alexander S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Dahlen, Tomas [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States); and others

    2014-11-20

    We present photometric redshifts and associated probability distributions for all detected sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS). This work makes use of the most up-to-date data from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and the Taiwan ECDFS Near-Infrared Survey (TENIS) in addition to other data. We also revisit multi-wavelength counterparts for published X-ray sources from the 4 Ms CDFS and 250 ks ECDFS surveys, finding reliable counterparts for 1207 out of 1259 sources (∼96%). Data used for photometric redshifts include intermediate-band photometry deblended using the TFIT method, which is used for the first time in this work. Photometric redshifts for X-ray source counterparts are based on a new library of active galactic nuclei/galaxy hybrid templates appropriate for the faint X-ray population in the CDFS. Photometric redshift accuracy for normal galaxies is 0.010 and for X-ray sources is 0.014 and outlier fractions are 4% and 5.2%, respectively. The results within the CANDELS coverage area are even better, as demonstrated both by spectroscopic comparison and by galaxy-pair statistics. Intermediate-band photometry, even if shallow, is valuable when combined with deep broadband photometry. For best accuracy, templates must include emission lines.

  15. CANDELS/GOODS-S, CDFS, ECDFS: Photometric Redshifts For Normal and for X-Ray-Detected Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, Li-Ting; Nandra, Kirpal; Brusa, Marcella; Bender, Ralf; Buchner, Johannes; Donley, Jennifer L; Kocevski, Dale D; Guo, Yicheng; Hathi, Nimish P; Rangel, Cyprian; Willner, S P; Brightman, Murray; Georgakakis, Antonis; Budavári, Tamás; Szalay, Alexander S; Ashby, Matthew L N; Barro, Guillermo; Dahlen, Tomas; Faber, Sandra M; Ferguson, Henry C; Galametz, Audrey; Grazian, Andrea; Grogin, Norman A; Huang, Kuang-Han; Koekemoer, Anton M; Lucas, Ray A; McGrath, Elizabeth; Mobasher, Bahram; Peth, Michael; Rosario, David J; Trump, Jonathan R

    2014-01-01

    We present photometric redshifts and associated probability distributions for all detected sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS). The work makes use of the most up-to-date data from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and the Taiwan ECDFS Near-Infrared Survey (TENIS) in addition to other data. We also revisit multi-wavelength counterparts for published X-ray sources from the 4Ms-CDFS and 250ks-ECDFS surveys, finding reliable counterparts for 1207 out of 1259 sources ($\\sim 96\\%$). Data used for photometric redshifts include intermediate-band photometry deblended using the TFIT method, which is used for the first time in this work. Photometric redshifts for X-ray source counterparts are based on a new library of AGN/galaxy hybrid templates appropriate for the faint X-ray population in the CDFS. Photometric redshift accuracy for normal galaxies is 0.010 and for X-ray sources is 0.014, and outlier fractions are $4\\%$ and $5.4\\%$ respectively. The results within the CANDELS...

  16. GROUND-BASED INFRARED DETECTIONS OF CO IN THE CENTAUR-COMET 29P/SCHWASSMANN-WACHMANN 1 AT 6.26 AU FROM THE SUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paganini, Lucas; Mumma, Michael J.; DiSanti, Michael A.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; Bonev, Boncho P. [Goddard Center for Astrobiology, NASA GSFC, MS 690, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Boehnhardt, Hermann; Lippi, Manuela [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Kaeufl, Hans U. [European Southern Observatory (ESO), Karl-Schwarzschildst. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Blake, Geoffrey A., E-mail: lucas.paganini@nasa.gov [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    We observed Comet 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 (hereafter, 29P) in 2012 February and May with CRIRES/VLT and NIRSPEC/Keck-II, when the comet was at 6.26 AU from the Sun and about 5.50 AU from Earth. With CRIRES, we detected five CO emission lines on several nights in each epoch, confirming the ubiquitous content and release of carbon monoxide from the nucleus. This is the first simultaneous detection of multiple lines from any (neutral) gaseous species in comet 29P at infrared wavelengths. It is also the first extraction of a rotational temperature based on the intensities of simultaneously measured spectral lines in 29P, and the retrieved rotational temperature is the lowest obtained in our infrared survey to date. We present the retrieved production rates ({approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 28} molecules s{sup -1}) and remarkably low ({approx}5 K) rotational temperatures for CO, and compare them with results from previous observations at radio wavelengths. Along with CO, we pursued detections of other volatiles, namely H{sub 2}O, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, HCN, NH{sub 3}, and CH{sub 3}OH. Although they were not detected, we present sensitive upper limits. These results establish a new record for detections by infrared spectroscopy of parent volatiles in comets at large heliocentric distances. Until now considered to be a somewhat impossible task with IR ground-based facilities, these discoveries demonstrate new opportunities for targeting volatile species in distant comets.

  17. Change detection and characterization of volcanic activity using ground based low-light and near infrared cameras to monitor incandescence and thermal signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrild, Martin; Webley, Peter; Dehn, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge and understanding of precursory events and thermal signatures are vital for monitoring volcanogenic processes, as activity can often range from low level lava effusion to large explosive eruptions, easily capable of ejecting ash up to aircraft cruise altitudes. Using ground based remote sensing techniques to monitor and detect this activity is essential, but often the required equipment and maintenance is expensive. Our investigation explores the use of low-light cameras to image volcanic activity in the visible to near infrared (NIR) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. These cameras are ideal for monitoring as they are cheap, consume little power, are easily replaced and can provide near real-time data. We focus here on the early detection of volcanic activity, using automated scripts, that capture streaming online webcam imagery and evaluate image pixel brightness values to determine relative changes and flag increases in activity. The script is written in Python, an open source programming language, to reduce the overall cost to potential consumers and increase the application of these tools across the volcanological community. In addition, by performing laboratory tests to determine the spectral response of these cameras, a direct comparison of collocated low-light and thermal infrared cameras has allowed approximate eruption temperatures and effusion rates to be determined from pixel brightness. The results of a field campaign in June, 2013 to Stromboli volcano, Italy, are also presented here. Future field campaigns to Latin America will include collaborations with INSIVUMEH in Guatemala, to apply our techniques to Fuego and Santiaguito volcanoes.

  18. Detection of IMBHs with ground-based gravitational wave observatories: A biography of a binary of black holes, from birth to death

    CERN Document Server

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau

    2009-01-01

    Even though the existence of intermediate-mass black holes has not yet been corroborated observationally, these objects are of high interest for astrophysics. Our understanding of formation and evolution of supermassive black holes (SMBHs), as well as galaxy evolution modeling and cosmography would dramatically change if an IMBH was observed. The prospect of detection and, possibly, observation and characterization of an IMBH has good chances in lower-frequency gravitational-wave (GW) astrophysics with ground-based detectors such as LIGO, Virgo and the future Einstein Telescope (ET). We present an analysis of the signal of a system of a binary of IMBHs based on a waveform model obtained with numerical relativity simulations coupled with post-Newtonian calculations at the highest available order so as to extend the waveform to lower frequencies. We find that initial LIGO and Virgo are in the position of detecting IMBHs with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of $\\sim 10$ for systems with total mass between 100 and ...

  19. Time series analysis of ground-based microwave measurements at K- and V-bands to detect temporal changes in water vapor and temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Sibananda; Sahoo, Swaroop; Pandithurai, Govindan

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based microwave measurements performed at water vapor and oxygen absorption line frequencies are widely used for remote sensing of tropospheric water vapor density and temperature profiles, respectively. Recent work has shown that Bayesian optimal estimation can be used for improving accuracy of radiometer retrieved water vapor and temperature profiles. This paper focuses on using Bayesian optimal estimation along with time series of independent frequency measurements at K- and V-bands. The measurements are used along with statistically significant but short background data sets to retrieve and sense temporal variations and gradients in water vapor and temperature profiles. To study this capability, the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM) deployed a microwave radiometer at Mahabubnagar, Telangana, during August 2011 as part of the Integrated Ground Campaign during the Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX-IGOC). In this study, temperature profiles for the first time have been estimated using short but statistically significant background information so as to improve the accuracy of the retrieved profiles as well as to be able to detect gradients. Estimated water vapor and temperature profiles are compared with those taken from the reanalysis data updated by the Earth System Research Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), to determine the range of possible errors. Similarly, root mean square errors are evaluated for a month for water vapor and temperature profiles to estimate the accuracy of the retrievals. It is found that water vapor and temperature profiles can be estimated with an acceptable accuracy by using a background information data set compiled over a period of 1 month.

  20. Ground-based Radar Detection of Near-Earth Asteroids%近地小行星地基雷达探测研究现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张翔; 季江徽

    2014-01-01

    Ground-based radar detection may act as a powerful means to determine the shape and physical properties of the asteroids in our Solar system. By measuring time delay and doppler frequency of the received echoes, radar systems provide information in ranging and radial velocity of the asteroids. Over the past few decades, more than 500 asteroids (mostly near-Earth ob jects) were detected using radar observations. There are two categories of radar detection: (1) The continuous wave detection, which is adopted to determine the roughness of an asteroid’s surface. (2) The delay-Doppler de-tection,which is likely to produce its three-dimensional model, and to define the rotational state. In the delay-Doppler detection, target asteroids are resolved in line-of-sight distance and line-of-sight velocity, providing two-dimensional images with spatial resolution as fine as meter-scale. Besides radar detection, several other techniques would also provide the shape model of the asteroids, among which the lightcurve inverse method is the most popular one to do that. In comparison with other methods, radar observation may have an advantage on spacial resolution. The lightcurves cannot reveal elaborate information on small features, and the intermediate-scale features of the inversed model are only suggestive. By contrast, radar detection produces resolved images. In this review, we present the radar observation technique and the method for recon-structing three-dimensional models of asteroids from radar measurements. In addition, we also provide several examples of asteroid models by radar detection, and then compare them with other observations for the shape reconstruction for the asteroids.%地基雷达探测是研究太阳系中小行星的重要方法。雷达探测主要有两种方式:(1)连续波探测,可得到小行星表面的粗糙度等参数;(2)延迟多普勒探测,用于反演小行星的三维形状模型并确定自转轴状态。与其他探测方法

  1. Photometric defocus observations of transiting extrasolar planets

    CERN Document Server

    Hinse, Tobias C; Yoon, Jo-Na; Lee, Chung-Uk; Kim, Yong-Gi; Kim, Chun-Hwey

    2015-01-01

    We have carried out photometric follow-up observations of bright transiting extrasolar planets using the CbNUOJ 0.6m telescope. We have tested the possibility of obtaining high photometric precision by applying the telescope defocus technique allowing the use of several hundred seconds in exposure time for a single measurement. We demonstrate that this technique is capable of obtaining a root-mean-square scatter of order sub-millimagnitude over several hours for a V $\\sim$ 10 host star typical for transiting planets detected from ground-based survey facilities. We compare our results with transit observations with the telescope operated in in-focus mode. High photometric precision is obtained due to the collection of a larger amount of photons resulting in a higher signal compared to other random and systematic noise sources. Accurate telescope tracking is likely to further contribute to lowering systematic noise by probing the same pixels on the CCD. Furthermore, a longer exposure time helps reducing the eff...

  2. Improved instrumental line shape monitoring for the ground-based, high-resolution FTIR spectrometers of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hase

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose an improved monitoring scheme for the instrumental line shape (ILS of high-resolution, ground-based FTIR (Fourier Transform InfraRed spectrometers used for chemical monitoring of the atmosphere by the Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC. Good ILS knowledge is required for the analysis of the recorded mid-infrared spectra. The new method applies a sequence of measurements using different gas cells instead of a single calibration cell. Three cells are used: cell C1 is a refillable cell offering 200 mm path length and equipped with a pressure gauge (filled with 100 Pa N2O, cells C2 and C3 are sealed cells offering 75 mm path length. C2 is filled with 5 Pa of pure N2O. Cell C3 is filled with 16 Pa N2O in 200 hPa technical air, so provides pressure-broadened N2O lines. We demonstrate that an ILS retrieval using C1 improves significantly the sensitivity of the ILS retrieval over the current calibration cells used in the network, because this cell provides narrow fully saturated N2O lines. The N2O columns derived from C2 and C3 allow the performance of a highly valuable closure experiment: adopting the ILS retrieved from C1, the N2O columns of C2 and C3 are derived. Because N2O is an inert gas, both columns should be constant on long timescales. Apparent changes in the columns would immediately attract attention and indicate either inconsistent ILS results or instrumental problems of other origin. Two different cells are applied for the closure experiment, because the NDACC spectrometers observe both stratospheric and tropospheric gases: C2 mimics signatures of stratospheric gases, whereas C3 mimics signatures of tropospheric gases.

  3. A Photometrically Detected Forming Cluster of Galaxies at Redshift 1.6 in the GOODS Field

    CERN Document Server

    Castellano, M; Trevese, D; Grazian, A; Pentericci, L; Fiore, F; Fontana, A; Giallongo, E; Santini, P; Cristiani, S; Nonino, M; Vanzella, E

    2007-01-01

    We report the discovery of a localized overdensity at z~1.6 in the GOODS-South Field, presumably a poor cluster in the process of formation. The three-dimensional galaxy density has been estimated on the basis of well calibrated photometric redshifts from the multiband photometric GOODS-MUSIC catalog using the (2+1)D technique. The density peak is embedded in the larger scale overdensity of galaxies known to exist at z=1.61 in the area. The properties of the member galaxies are compared to those of the surrounding field and we found that the two populations are significantly different supporting the reality of the structure. The reddest galaxies, once evolved according to their best fit models, have colors consistent with the red sequence of lower redshift clusters. The estimated M_200 total mass of the cluster is in the range 1.3 x 10^14 - 5.7x 10^14 Msun, depending on the assumed bias factor b. An upper limit for the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity, based on the 1Ms Chandra observations, is L_X=0.5 x 10^43 erg s^...

  4. Kepler Mission Design, Realized Photometric Performance, and Early Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, David G.; Borucki, William J.; Basri, Gibor

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler Mission, launched on 2009 March 6, was designed with the explicit capability to detect Earth-size planets in the habitable zone of solar-like stars using the transit photometry method. Results from just 43 days of data along with ground-based follow-up observations have identified five...... show great promise. To fully understand the methodology, processes, and eventually the results from the mission, we present the underlying rationale that ultimately led to the flight and ground system designs used to achieve the exquisite photometric performance. As an example of the initial...

  5. Kepler Mission Design, Realized Photometric Performance, and Early Science

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, David G; Basri, Gibor; Batalha, Natalie M; Brown, Timothy M; Caldwell, Douglas; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen; Cochran, William D; DeVore, Edna; Dunham, Edward W; Gautier, Thomas N; Geary, John C; Gilliland, Ronald L; Gould, Alan; Jenkins, Jon; Kondo, Yoji; Latham, David W; Lissauer, Jack J; Marcy, Geoffrey; Monet, David; Sasselov, Dimitar; Boss, Alan; Brownlee, Donald; Caldwell, John; Dupree, Andrea K; Howell, Steve B; Kjeldsen, Hans; Meibom, Soeren; Morrison, David; Owen, Tobias; Reitsema, Harold; Tarter, Jill; Bryson, Stephen T; Dotson, Jessie L; Gazis, Paul; Haas, Michael R; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey; Rowe, Jason F; Van Cleve, Jeffrey E; Allen, Christopher; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Clarke, Bruce D; Li, Jie; Quintana, Elisa V; Tenenbaum, Peter; Twicken, Joseph D; Wu, Hayley

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler Mission, launched on Mar 6, 2009 was designed with the explicit capability to detect Earth-size planets in the habitable zone of solar-like stars using the transit photometry method. Results from just forty-three days of data along with ground-based follow-up observations have identified five new transiting planets with measurements of their masses, radii, and orbital periods. Many aspects of stellar astrophysics also benefit from the unique, precise, extended and nearly continuous data set for a large number and variety of stars. Early results for classical variables and eclipsing stars show great promise. To fully understand the methodology, processes and eventually the results from the mission, we present the underlying rationale that ultimately led to the flight and ground system designs used to achieve the exquisite photometric performance. As an example of the initial photometric results, we present variability measurements that can be used to distinguish dwarf stars from red giants.

  6. Detection Performance Assessment of Ground-Based Phased Array Radar for Ballistic Targets%地基相控阵雷达对弹道目标的探测性能评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李星星; 姚汉英; 孙文峰

    2014-01-01

    为解决地基相控阵雷达对弹道目标探测的最优部署问题,建立弹道中段目标轨道运动和进动模型,提出弹道中段多部地基相控阵雷达的弹道目标探测概率模型,以及平均检测概率、稳定跟踪时间和资源冗余时间3种组合的雷达探测性能评估指标。依据弹道目标RCS及探测距离随观测时间的变化情况,通过仿真实验对多种部署方式下地基雷达对弹道目标探测性能评估指标的分析,得出的结论为弹道导弹防御系统中地基雷达的部署方式提供了有效的参考依据。%In order to solve the optimal deployment problem of ground-based phased array radar in detecting ballistic targets,the orbit motion and precession motion models of ballistic targets were built up,and the detection probability model for ballistic targets by using several ground-based phased array radars was proposed.Three evaluation indexes of radars'detection performance were given: average detection probability,stable tracking time and resource redundancy time .According to the variation of RCS and detection range for ballistic targets in midcourse,detection performance evaluation indexes of several radar deployment schemes were analyzed through experiments .The conclusion in this paper may provide some reference for deploying the ground-based radar in ballistic missile defense (BMD) system for targets'optimal detection.

  7. Asteroseismology of solar-type stars with Kepler: III. Ground-based data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Molenda-Żakowicz , J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the ground-based follow-up program of spectroscopic and photometric observations of solar-like asteroseismic targets for the Kepler space mission. These stars constitute a large group of more than a thousand objects which are the subject of an intensive study by the Kepler Asteroseis......We report on the ground-based follow-up program of spectroscopic and photometric observations of solar-like asteroseismic targets for the Kepler space mission. These stars constitute a large group of more than a thousand objects which are the subject of an intensive study by the Kepler...

  8. Goals, Objectives, and Requirements (GOR) of the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team for the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Leslie A.

    2014-01-13

    The goal, objectives, and requirements (GOR) presented in this document define a framework for describing research directed specifically by the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The intent of this document is to provide a communication tool for the GNDD Team with NNSA management and with its stakeholder community. It describes the GNDD expectation that much of the improvement in the proficiency of nuclear explosion monitoring will come from better understanding of the science behind the generation, propagation, recording, and interpretation of seismic, infrasound, hydroacoustic, and radionuclide signals and development of "game-changer" advances in science and technology.

  9. Goals, Objectives, and Requirements (GOR) of the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team for the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Leslie A.

    2014-01-13

    The goal, objectives, and requirements (GOR) presented in this document define a framework for describing research directed specifically by the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The intent of this document is to provide a communication tool for the GNDD Team with NNSA management and with its stakeholder community. It describes the GNDD expectation that much of the improvement in the proficiency of nuclear explosion monitoring will come from better understanding of the science behind the generation, propagation, recording, and interpretation of seismic, infrasound, hydroacoustic, and radionuclide signals and development of "game-changer" advances in science and technology.

  10. Deployment of a ground-based CIMS apparatus for the detection of organic gases in the boreal forest during the QUEST campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sellegri

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of atmospheric volatile organic compounds were performed in the Finnish Boreal forest atmosphere during spring 2003, as part of the project QUEST (Quantification of Aerosol Nucleation in the European Boundary Layer, using a ground-based Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS instrument. Based on the study of their hydrate distribution, methanol, acetonitrile, acetaldehyde, dimethyl amine (DMA, ethanol/formic acid, acetone, trimethyl amine (TMA, propanol/acetic acid, isoprene, methyl vinyl ketone (MVK and metacrolein (MaCR, monoterpenes and monoterpene oxidation product (MTOP are proposed as candidates for masses 32, 41, 44, 45, 46, 58, 59, 60, 68, 70, 136, and 168amu, respectively. It would be, to our knowledge, the first time DMA, TMA and MTOP are measured with this method. Most compounds show a clear diurnal variation with a maximum in the early night, corresponding to the onset of the noctural inversion and in agreement with independant measurements of CO. Biogenic compounds are highly correlated with each other and the ratio monoterpene/oxidation product shows a typical daily pattern of nightime maxima. However, because isoprene mixing ratios are also maximum during the early night, it is likely that it suffers of the interference from another unidentified biogenic compound. Hence mass 68amu is identified as isoprene+compound X.

  11. Deployment of a ground-based CIMS apparatus for the detection of organic gases in the boreal forest during the QUEST campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sellegri

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of atmospheric volatile organic compounds were performed in the Finnish Boreal forest atmosphere during spring 2003, as part of the project QUEST (Quantification of Aerosol Nucleation in the European Boundary Layer, using a ground-based Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS instrument. Based on the study of their hydrate distribution, Methanol, Acetonitrile, Acetaldehyde, Dimethyl Amine (DMA, Ethanol/Formic Acid, Acetone, Trimethyl Amine TMA, Propanol/Acetic Acid, Methyl Vinyl Ketone (MVK and Metacrolein (MaCR, Monoterpenes, Cis-3-hexenyl Acetate and Monoterpene Oxidation Products (MTOP are proposed as candidates for masses 33, 41, 44, 45, 46, 58, 59, 60, 70, 136, 142 and 168 amu, respectively. It would be, to our knowledge, the first time DMA, TMA, MTOP and Cis-3-hexenyl Acetate are measured with this method. A compound with mass 68 amu, which could be Isoprene has also been identified. Most compounds show a clear diurnal variation with higher concentrations at night, starting at the onset of the nocturnal inversion and in agreement with independent measurements of CO. Biogenic compounds are highly correlated with each other and the ratio monoterpene/oxidation product shows a typical daily pattern of nighttime maxima. Cis-3-hexenyl Acetate has a diurnal variation similar to the ones of Isoprene and Monoterpenes, and especially close to the diurnal variation of their oxidation products.

  12. One-step extraction for gas chromatography with flame photometric detection of 18 organophosphorus pesticides in Chinese medicine health wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qianzhen; Kong, Weijun; Qiu, Feng; Wei, Jianhe; Yang, Shihai; Zheng, Yuguo; Yang, Meihua

    2012-02-15

    An easy, rapid and selective gas chromatography with flame photometric detection (GC-FPD) method was established for simultaneously determining 18 organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) in 80 Chinese medicine (CM) health wines. This method was based on a simple one-step extraction procedure using a little solvent without any further cleanup steps. The optimized extraction solvent for the pesticides is acetone:dichloromethane (1:1, V/V) with extraction recovery of 79.0-109.1% and relative standard deviation (RSD) of 0.36-12.68%, respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) of the established GC-FPD method for all investigated pesticides ranged from 1 to 15ngmL(-1) and limits of quantification (LOQs) from 4 to 50ngmL(-1). Out of all 80 CM health wines, 18 OPPs were found in 8 samples at low concentrations of 8.2-37.9ngmL(-1). These pesticides were successfully confirmed by GC-MS. This is the first report of determining OPPs in CM health wines, providing references for monitoring the quality of CM health wine in routine analysis.

  13. Modelling systematics of ground-based transit photometry I. Implications on transit timing variations

    CERN Document Server

    von Essen, C; Mallonn, M; Tingley, B; Marcussen, M

    2016-01-01

    The transit timing variation technique (TTV) has been widely used to detect and characterize multiple planetary systems. Due to the observational biases imposed mainly by the photometric conditions and instrumentation and the high signal-to-noise required to produce primary transit observations, ground-based data acquired using small telescopes limit the technique to the follow-up of hot Jupiters. However, space-based missions such as Kepler and CoRoT have already revealed that hot Jupiters are mainly found in single systems. Thus, it is natural to question ourselves if we are properly using the observing time at hand carrying out such follow-ups, or if the use of medium-to-low quality transit light curves, combined with current standard techniques of data analysis, could be playing a main role against exoplanetary search via TTVs. The purpose of this work is to investigate to what extent ground-based observations treated with current modelling techniques are reliable to detect and characterize additional pla...

  14. Ground based materials science experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. B.; Johnston, J. C.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    The facilities at the Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory (MMSL) at the Lewis Research Center, created to offer immediate and low-cost access to ground-based testing facilities for industrial, academic, and government researchers, are described. The equipment in the MMSL falls into three categories: (1) devices which emulate some aspect of low gravitational forces, (2) specialized capabilities for 1-g development and refinement of microgravity experiments, and (3) functional duplicates of flight hardware. Equipment diagrams are included.

  15. Ground based materials science experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. B.; Johnston, J. C.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    The facilities at the Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory (MMSL) at the Lewis Research Center, created to offer immediate and low-cost access to ground-based testing facilities for industrial, academic, and government researchers, are described. The equipment in the MMSL falls into three categories: (1) devices which emulate some aspect of low gravitational forces, (2) specialized capabilities for 1-g development and refinement of microgravity experiments, and (3) functional duplicates of flight hardware. Equipment diagrams are included.

  16. The First Detection of Photometric Variability in a Y Dwarf: WISE J140518.39+553421.3

    CERN Document Server

    Cushing, Michael C; Trucks, Jesica L; Morley, Caroline V; Gizis, John E; Marley, Mark S; Fortney, Jonathan J; Kirkpatrick, J Davy; Gelino, Christopher R; Mace, Gregory N; Carey, Sean J

    2016-01-01

    We present the first detection of photometric variability of a spectroscopically-confirmed Y dwarf. The Infrared Array Camera on board the Spitzer Space Telescope was used to obtain times series photometry at 3.6 and 4.5 microns over a twenty four hour period at two different epochs separated by 149 days. Variability is evident at 4.5 um in the first epoch and at 3.6 and 4.5 um in the second epoch which suggests that the underlying cause or causes of this variability change on the timescales of months. The second-epoch [3.6] and [4.5] light curves are nearly sinusoidal in form, in phase, have periods of roughly 8.5 hours, and have semi-amplitudes of 3.5%. We find that a simple geometric spot model with a single bright spot reproduces these observations well. We also compare our measured semi-amplitudes of the second epoch light curves to predictions of the static, one-dimensional, partly cloudy and hot spot models of Morley and collaborators and find that neither set of models can reproduce the observed [3.6]...

  17. Johannes and the seven dwarfs: Kepler detection of low-level day-timescale periodic photometric variations in white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Maoz, Dan; McQuillan, Amy

    2014-01-01

    We make use of the high photometric precision of Kepler to search for periodic variations among 14 normal (DA- and DB-type, likely non-magnetic) hot white dwarfs (WDs) observed by the mission. In seven of the WDs, we detect periodic, ~2 hr to 10 d, variations, with semi-amplitudes of 40 to 2000 ppm, lower than ever seen in WDs. We consider various explanations for the observed variations: WD rotation combined with magnetic cool spots; rotation combined with magnetic dichroism; rotation combined with hot spots from an interstellar-medium accretion flow, channeled onto weak magnetic poles; transits by size ~50-200 km objects; relativistic beaming due to reflex motion caused by a cool companion WD; or reflection/re-radiation of the primary WD light by a brown-dwarf companion, or by a giant planet of about Jupiter radius, undergoing illumination phases as it orbits the WD. Each of these mechanisms could be behind some of the variable WDs, but could not be responsible for all seven variable cases. Alternatively, t...

  18. Photometric and spectroscopic detection of the primary transit of the 111-day-period planet HD 80 606 b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutou, C.; Hébrard, G.; Bouchy, F.; Eggenberger, A.; Boisse, I.; Bonfils, X.; Gravallon, D.; Ehrenreich, D.; Forveille, T.; Delfosse, X.; Desort, M.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Lovis, C.; Mayor, M.; Pepe, F.; Perrier, C.; Pont, F.; Queloz, D.; Santos, N. C.; Ségransan, D.; Udry, S.; Vidal-Madjar, A.

    2009-04-01

    We report the detection of the primary transit of the extra-solar planet HD 80 606 b, thanks to photometric and spectroscopic observations performed at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence, simultaneously with the CCD camera at the 120-cm telescope and the SOPHIE spectrograph on the 193-cm telescope. We observed the whole egress of the transit and partially its central part, in both datasets with the same timings. The ingress occurred before sunset so was not observed. The full duration of the transit was between 9.5 and 17.2 h. The data allows the planetary radius to be measured (Rp = 0.9 ± 0.10 {R}_Jup) and other parameters of the system to be refined. Radial velocity measurements show the detection of a prograde Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, and provide a hint of a spin-orbit misalignment. If confirmed, this misalignment would corroborate the hypothesis that HD 80 606 b owes its unusual orbital configuration to Kozai migration. HD 80 606 b is by far the transiting planet on the longest period detected today. Its unusually small radius reinforces the observed relationship between the planet radius and the incident flux received from the star and opens new questions for theory. Orbiting a bright star (V=9), it opens opportunities for numerous follow-up studies. Based on observations made with the 1.20-m and 1.93-m telescopes at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France, by the SOPHIE consortium (program 07A.PNP.CONS). Radial velocity and photometry tables are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/498/L5

  19. Asteroseismology of solar-type stars with Kepler: III. Ground-based data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Molenda-Żakowicz , J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the ground-based follow-up program of spectroscopic and photometric observations of solar-like asteroseismic targets for the Kepler space mission. These stars constitute a large group of more than a thousand objects which are the subject of an intensive study by the Kepler Asteroseis...

  20. Organophosphorus pesticide and ester analysis by using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with flame photometric detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiangping; Li, Dengkun; Li, Jiequan [Nanjing Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Zizhulin Street, Gulou 210003, Nanjing (China); Rose, Gavin [Department of Environment and Primary Industries, Macleod Centre, Ernest Jones Drive, Macleod, Vic 3085 (Australia); Marriott, Philip J., E-mail: philip.marriott@monash.edu [Australian Centre for Research on Separation Science, School of Chemistry, Monash University, Wellington Road, Clayton 3800 (Australia)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • GC × GC-FPD(P-mode) was applied to detection of 37 phosphorus (P)-containing compounds. • The method improves resolution of P-compounds that coelute in the first dimension. • P-compounds are analyzed with excellent sensitivity supported by cryogenic modulation. • The FPD(P-mode) selectivity allows analysis in high hydrocarbon (H/C) matrix. • Soil samples and spiked chemical weapon compounds in H/C matrix are readily screened. -- Abstract: Thirty-seven phosphorus (P)-containing compounds comprising organophosphorus pesticides and organophosphate esters were analyzed by using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with flame photometric detection in P mode (GC × GC-FPD(P)), with a non-polar/moderately polar column set. A suitable modulation temperature and period was chosen based on experimental observation. A number of co-eluting peak pairs on the {sup 1}D column were well separated in 2D space. Excellent FPD(P) detection selectivity, responding to compounds containing the P atom, produces clear 2D GC × GC plots with little interference from complex hydrocarbon matrices. Limits of detection (LOD) were within the range of 0.0021–0.048 μmol L{sup −1}, and linear calibration correlation coefficients (R{sup 2}) for all 37 P-compounds were at least 0.998. The P-compounds were spiked in 2% diesel and good reproducibility for their response areas and retention times was obtained. Spiked recoveries were 88%–157% for 5 μg L{sup −1} and 80%–138% for 10 μg L{sup −1} spiked levels. Both {sup 1}t{sub R} and {sup 2}t{sub R} shifts were noted when the content of diesel was in excess of 5% in the matrix. Soil samples were analyzed by using the developed method; some P-compounds were positively detected. In general, this study shows that GC × GC-FPD(P) is an accurate, sensitive and simple method for P-compound analysis in complicated environmental samples.

  1. Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury. IX. A photometric survey of planetary nebulae in M31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veyette, Mark J.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Balick, Bruce; Fouesneau, Morgan [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, P.O. Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Caldwell, Nelson [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Girardi, Léo [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova—INAF, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Gordon, Karl D.; Kalirai, Jason [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Rosenfield, Philip [Department of Physics and Astronomy G. Galilei, University of Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 3, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Seth, Anil C., E-mail: mveyette@uw.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

    2014-09-10

    We search the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide Field Camera 3 broadband imaging data from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey to identify detections of cataloged planetary nebulae (PNs). Of the 711 PNs currently in the literature within the PHAT footprint, we find 467 detected in the broadband. For these 467, we are able to refine their astrometric accuracy from ∼0.''3 to 0.''05. Using the resolution of the HST, we are able to show that 152 objects currently in the catalogs are definitively not PNs, and we show that 32 objects thought to be extended in ground-based images are actually point-like and therefore good PN candidates. We also find one PN candidate that is marginally resolved. If this is a PN, it is up to 0.7 pc in diameter. With our new photometric data, we develop a method of measuring the level of excitation in individual PNs by comparing broadband and narrowband imaging and describe the effects of excitation on a PN's photometric signature. Using the photometric properties of the known PNs in the PHAT catalogs, we search for more PNs, but do not find any new candidates, suggesting that ground-based emission-line surveys are complete in the PHAT footprint to F475W ≅ 24.

  2. Section on prospects for dark matter detection of the white paper on the status and future of ground-based TeV gamma-ray astronomy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrum, K.; Horan, D.; Tait, T.; Wanger, R.; Zaharijas, G.; Buckley , J.; Baltz, E. A.; Bertone, G.; Dingus, B.; Fegan, S.; Ferrer, F.; Gondolo, P.; Hall, J.; Hooper, D.; Horan, D.; Koushiappas, S.; Krawczynksi, H.; LeBohec, S.; Pohl, M.; Profumo, S.; Silk , J; Vassilev, V.; Wood , M.; Wakely, S.; High Energy Physics; FNAL; Univ. of St. Louis; Stanford Univ.; Insti. d' Astrophysique; LANL; Univ. of California; Washington Univ.; Univ. of Utah; Brown Univ.; Oxford Univ.; Iowa State Univ.; Univ. of Chicago

    2009-05-13

    This is a report on the findings of the dark matter science working group for the white paper on the status and future of TeV gamma-ray astronomy. The white paper was commissioned by the American Physical Society, and the full white paper can be found on astro-ph (arXiv:0810.0444). This detailed section discusses the prospects for dark matter detection with future gamma-ray experiments, and the complementarity of gamma-ray measurements with other indirect, direct or accelerator-based searches. We conclude that any comprehensive search for dark matter should include gamma-ray observations, both to identify the dark matter particle (through the characteristics of the gamma-ray spectrum) and to measure the distribution of dark matter in galactic halos.

  3. Frequency based detection and monitoring of small scale explosive activity by comparing satellite and ground based infrared observations at Stromboli Volcano, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, Anna; Dehn, Jonathan; Ripepe, Maurizio; Donne, Dario Delle

    2014-08-01

    Thermal activity is a common precursor to explosive volcanic activity. The ability to use these thermal precursors to monitor the volcano and obtain early warning about upcoming activity is beneficial for both human safety and infrastructure security. By using a very reliably active volcano, Stromboli Volcano in Italy, a method has been developed and tested to look at changes in the frequency of small scale explosive activity and how this activity changes prior to larger, ash producing explosive events. Thermal camera footage was used to designate parameters for typical explosions at Stromboli (size of spatter field, cooling rate, frequency of explosions) and this information was applied to characterize explosions in satellite imagery. Satellite data from The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and US/Japan designed Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) for numerous periods in 2002 to 2009 were analyzed for thermal features which were used to calculate an estimate of the level of activity during the given time period. The results at Stromboli showed a high level of small scale explosions which stop completely prior to large paroxysmal eruptive episodes. This activity also corresponds well to seismic and infrasonic records at Stromboli, indicating that this thermal infrared monitoring method may be used in conjunction with other detection methods where available, and also indicates that it may be a useful method for volcano monitoring when other methods (e.g. seismic instrumentation, infrasound arrays, etc.) are not available.

  4. Application of the Trend Filtering Algorithm for Photometric Time Series Data

    CERN Document Server

    Gopalan, Giri; van Eyken, Julian; Ciardi, David; von Braun, Kaspar; Kane, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    Detecting transient light curves (e.g., transiting planets) requires high precision data, and thus it is important to effectively filter systematic trends affecting ground based wide field surveys. We apply an implementation of the Trend Filtering Algorithm (TFA) (Kovacs et al. 2005) to the 2MASS calibration catalog and select Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) photometric time series data. TFA is successful at reducing the overall dispersion of light curves, however it may over filter intrinsic variables and increase "instantaneous" dispersion when a template set is not judiciously chosen. In an attempt to rectify these issues we modify the original literature TFA by including measurement uncertainties in its computation, including ancillary data correlated with noise, and algorithmically selecting a template set using clustering algorithms as suggested by various authors. This approach may be particularly useful for appropriately accounting for variable photometric precision surveys and/or combined data-sets. ...

  5. Application of the Trend Filtering Algorithm for Photometric Time Series Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, Giri; Plavchan, Peter; van Eyken, Julian; Ciardi, David; von Braun, Kaspar; Kane, Stephen R.

    2016-08-01

    Detecting transient light curves (e.g., transiting planets) requires high-precision data, and thus it is important to effectively filter systematic trends affecting ground-based wide-field surveys. We apply an implementation of the Trend Filtering Algorithm (TFA) to the 2MASS calibration catalog and select Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) photometric time series data. TFA is successful at reducing the overall dispersion of light curves, however, it may over-filter intrinsic variables and increase “instantaneous” dispersion when a template set is not judiciously chosen. In an attempt to rectify these issues we modify the original TFA from the literature by including measurement uncertainties in its computation, including ancillary data correlated with noise, and algorithmically selecting a template set using clustering algorithms as suggested by various authors. This approach may be particularly useful for appropriately accounting for variable photometric precision surveys and/or combined data sets. In summary, our contributions are to provide a MATLAB software implementation of TFA and a number of modifications tested on synthetics and real data, summarize the performance of TFA and various modifications on real ground-based data sets (2MASS and PTF), and assess the efficacy of TFA and modifications using synthetic light curve tests consisting of transiting and sinusoidal variables. While the transiting variables test indicates that these modifications confer no advantage to transit detection, the sinusoidal variables test indicates potential improvements in detection accuracy.

  6. Ground-based observations of exoplanet atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ernst Johan Walter de

    2011-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the properties of exoplanet atmospheres. The results for ground-based near-infrared secondary eclipse observations of three different exoplanets, TrES-3b, HAT-P-1b and WASP-33b, are presented which have been obtained with ground-based telescopes as part of the GROUSE project.

  7. Ground-based observations of exoplanet atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ernst Johan Walter de

    2011-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the properties of exoplanet atmospheres. The results for ground-based near-infrared secondary eclipse observations of three different exoplanets, TrES-3b, HAT-P-1b and WASP-33b, are presented which have been obtained with ground-based telescopes as part of the GROUSE project.

  8. Photometric and H$\\alpha$ observations of LSI+61303 detection of a $\\sim$26 day V and JHK band modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Paredes, J M; Martí, J; Fabregat, J; Coe, M J; Everall, C; Figueras, F; Jordi, C; Norton, A J; Prince, T A; Reglero, V; Roche, P; Torra, J; Unger, S J; Zamanov, R K

    1994-01-01

    We present new optical and infrared photometric observations and high resolution H$\\alpha$ spectra of the periodic radio star \\lsi. The optical photometric data set covers the time interval 1985-1993 and amounts to about a hundred nights. A period of $\\sim$26 days is found in the V band. The infrared data also present evidence for a similar periodicity, but with higher amplitude of variation (0\\rmag 2). The spectroscopic observations include 16 intermediate and high dispersion spectra of \\lsi\\ collected between January 1989 and February 1993. The H$\\alpha$ emission line profile and its variations are analyzed. Several emission line parameters -- among them the H$\\alpha$ EW and the width of the H$\\alpha$ red hump -- change strongly at or close to radio maximum, and may exhibit periodic variability. We also observe a significant change in the peak separation. The H$\\alpha$ profile of \\lsi\\ does not seem peculiar for a Be star. However, several of the observed variations of the H$\\alpha$ profile can probably be ...

  9. Close-up of primary and secondary asteroseismic CoRoT targets and the ground-based follow-up observations

    CERN Document Server

    Uytterhoeven, K; Rainer, M; Mantegazza, L; Zima, W; Aerts, C; Morel, T; Miglio, A; Lefever, K; Amado, P J; Mathias, P; Valtier, J C; Paparo, M; Benko, J M; CoRoT/SWG, the

    2007-01-01

    To optimise the science results of the asteroseismic part of the CoRoT satellite mission a complementary simultaneous ground-based observational campaign is organised for selected CoRoT targets. The observations include both high-resolution spectroscopic and multi-colour photometric data. We present the preliminary results of the analysis of the ground-based observations of three targets. A line-profile analysis of 216 high-resolution FEROS spectra of the delta Sct star HD 50844 reveals more than ten pulsation frequencies in the frequency range 5-18 c/d, including possibly one radial fundamental mode (6.92 c/d). Based on more than 600 multi-colour photometric datapoints of the beta Cep star HD180642, spanning about three years and obtained with different telescopes and different instruments, we confirm the presence of a dominant radial mode nu1=5.48695 c/d, and detect also its first two harmonics. We find evidence for a second mode nu2=0.3017 c/d, possibly a g-mode, and indications for two more frequencies in...

  10. GROUND-BASED TRANSIT OBSERVATIONS OF THE SUPER-EARTH 55 Cnc e

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Mooij, E. J. W. [Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); López-Morales, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA (United States); Karjalainen, R.; Hrudkova, M. [Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes, La Palma (Spain); Jayawardhana, Ray, E-mail: demooij@astro.utoronto.ca [Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto (Canada)

    2014-12-20

    We report the first ground-based detections of the shallow transit of the super-Earth exoplanet 55 Cnc e using a 2 m class telescope. Using differential spectrophotometry, we observed one transit in 2013 and another in 2014, with average spectral resolutions of ∼700 and ∼250, spanning the Johnson BVR photometric bands. We find a white light planet-to-star radius ratio of 0.0190{sub −0.0027}{sup +0.0023} from the 2013 observations and 0.0200{sub −0.0018}{sup +0.0017} from the 2014 observations. The two data sets combined result in a radius ratio of 0.0198{sub −0.0014}{sup +0.0013}. These values are all in agreement with previous space-based results. Scintillation noise in the data prevents us from placing strong constraints on the presence of an extended hydrogen-rich atmosphere. Nevertheless, our detections of 55 Cnc e in transit demonstrate that moderate-sized telescopes on the ground will be capable of routine follow-up observations of super-Earth candidates discovered by the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite around bright stars. We expect it also will be possible to place constraints on the atmospheric characteristics of those planets by devising observational strategies to minimize scintillation noise.

  11. Ground-Based Transit Observations of the Super-Earth 55 Cnc e

    CERN Document Server

    de Mooij, E J W; Karjalainen, R; Hrudkova, M; Jayawardhana, R

    2014-01-01

    We report the first ground-based detections of the shallow transit of the super-Earth exoplanet 55 Cnc e using a 2-meter-class telescope. Using differential spectrophotometry, we observed one transit in 2013 and another in 2014, with average spectral resolutions of ~700 and ~250, spanning the Johnson BVR photometric bands. We find a white-light planet-to-star radius ratio of 0.0190 -0.0027+0.0023 from the 2013 observations and 0.0200 -0.0018+0.0017 from the 2014 observations. The two datasets combined results in a radius ratio of 0.0198 -0.0014+0.0013. These values are all in agreement with previous space-based results. Scintillation noise in the data prevents us from placing strong constraints on the presence of an extended hydrogen-rich atmosphere. Nevertheless, our detections of 55 Cnc e in transit demonstrate that moderate-size telescopes on the ground will be capable of routine follow-up observations of super-Earth candidates discovered by the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) around bright st...

  12. Comparing Dawn, Hubble Space Telescope, and Ground-Based Interpretations of (4) Vesta

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, Vishnu; Corre, Lucille Le; Scully, Jennifer E C; Gaskell, Robert; Russell, Christopher T; Park, Ryan S; Nathues, Andreas; Raymond, Carol; Gaffey, Michael J; Sierks, Holger; Becker, Kris J; McFadden, Lucy A

    2013-01-01

    Observations of asteroid 4 Vesta by NASA's Dawn spacecraft are interesting because its surface has the largest range of albedo, color and composition of any other asteroid visited by spacecraft to date. These hemispherical and rotational variations in surface brightness and composition have been attributed to impact processes since Vesta's formation. Prior to Dawn's arrival at Vesta, its surface properties were the focus of intense telescopic investigations for nearly a hundred years. Ground-based photometric and spectroscopic observations first revealed these variations followed later by those using Hubble Space Telescope. Here we compare interpretations of Vesta's rotation period, pole, albedo, topographic, color, and compositional properties from ground-based telescopes and HST with those from Dawn. Rotational spectral variations observed from ground-based studies are also consistent with those observed by Dawn. While the interpretation of some of these features was tenuous from past data, the interpretati...

  13. Analysis of SNR for ground-based infrared detection of space object%空间目标红外地基探测的信噪比分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨帆; 宣益民; 韩玉阁

    2012-01-01

    A simulation model for sky background radiation, atmosphere transmission, and ground-based sensor was proposed. Based on the proposed model and the existing model for studying the infrared radiometric feature of a LEO satellite, a proposal for investigating the infrared detection of space object was put forward. The proposal was used to calculate the signal-to-noise ratio(SNR) of the sensor received from a modeling satellite, thereby the detection effect of satellite at different transit time was analyzed. The method to choose the best observation band in different case was advanced by comparing the character of SNR on various IR bands. It can be concluded from the results that the SNR on the near infrared band is very high when the ground sensor is in the earth's shadow and the object is sunlit. No signal is detected in the sensor when the object is in the earth's shadow. In the far infrared band, the object can be always detected either it is sunlit or in the earth's shadow. However, the SNR gets smaller when the surface temperature of the satellite is lower or the range of detection is larger. In addition, due to the sun-oriented character of the battery panels, the signal detected by the sensor varies with the solar elevation angle.%建立了天空背景辐射、大气传输和地基探测系统的仿真模型,并基于已有的低轨道卫星红外辐射特性的模型,整合了一套研究空间目标红外探测的方案.利用该方案计算了探测器对卫星探测的信噪比,分析了卫星在不同过境时间的红外地基探测的效果.通过比较不同红外波段的探测信噪特性,探究了在不同情况下如何选择最佳的观测波段.研究结果显示,当目标处于日照区而观测点在阴影区时,近红外波段的探测信噪比很高,当目标进入阴影区后该波段无探测信号.不论卫星是在日照区还是阴影区,远红外波段始终可进行探测,但是当卫星表面温度较低或者距离较

  14. GLAST and Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The launch of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope together with the advent of a new generation of ground-based gamma-ray detectors such as VERITAS, HESS, MAGIC and CANGAROO, will usher in a new era of high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics. GLAST and the ground based gamma-ray observatories will provide highly complementary capabilities for spectral, temporal and spatial studies of high energy gamma-ray sources. Joint observations will cover a huge energy range, from 20 MeV to over 20 TeV. The LAT will survey the entire sky every three hours, allowing it both to perform uniform, long-term monitoring of variable sources and to detect flaring sources promptly. Both functions complement the high-sensitivity pointed observations provided by ground-based detectors. Finally, the large field of view of GLAST will allow a study of gamma-ray emission on large angular scales and identify interesting regions of the sky for deeper studies at higher energies. In this poster, we will discuss the science returns that might result from joint GLAST/ground-based gamma-ray observations and illustrate them with detailed source simulations.

  15. GLAST and Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The launch of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope together with the advent of a new generation of ground-based gamma-ray detectors such as VERITAS, HESS, MAGIC and CANGAROO, will usher in a new era of high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics. GLAST and the ground based gamma-ray observatories will provide highly complementary capabilities for spectral, temporal and spatial studies of high energy gamma-ray sources. Joint observations will cover a huge energy range, from 20 MeV to over 20 TeV. The LAT will survey the entire sky every three hours, allowing it both to perform uniform, long-term monitoring of variable sources and to detect flaring sources promptly. Both functions complement the high-sensitivity pointed observations provided by ground-based detectors. Finally, the large field of view of GLAST will allow a study of gamma-ray emission on large angular scales and identify interesting regions of the sky for deeper studies at higher energies. In this poster, we will discuss the science returns that might result from joint GLAST/ground-based gamma-ray observations and illustrate them with detailed source simulations.

  16. The ALHAMBRA photometric system

    CERN Document Server

    Villegas, T Aparicio; Cabrera-Cano, J; Moles, M; Benitez, N; Perea, J; del Olmo, A; Fernandez-Soto, A; Cristobal-Hornillos, D; Husillos, C; Aguerri, J A L; Broadhurst, T; Castander, F J; Cepa, J; Cervino, M; Delgado, R M Gonzalez; Infante, L; Marquez, I; Masegosa, J; Martinez, V J; Prada, F; Quintana, J M; Sanchez, S F

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the characterization of the optical range of the ALHAMBRA photometric system, a 20 contiguous, equal-width, medium-band CCD system with wavelength coverage from 3500A to 9700A. The photometric description of the system is done by presenting the full response curve as a product of the filters, CCD and atmospheric transmission curves, and using some first and second order moments of this response function. We also introduce the set of standard stars that defines the system, formed by 31 classic spectrophotometric standard stars which have been used in the calibration of other known photometric systems, and 288 stars, flux calibrated homogeneously, from the Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL). Based on the NGSL, we determine the transformation equations between Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) ugriz photometry and the ALHAMBRA photometric system, in order to establish some relations between both systems. Finally we develop and discuss a strategy to calculate the photometric zero points of ...

  17. Photometric Variability in Earthshine Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Langford, Sally V.; Wyithe, J. Stuart B.; Turner, Edwin L.

    2009-01-01

    The identification of an extrasolar planet as Earth-like will depend on the detection of atmospheric signatures or surface non-uniformities. In this paper we present spatially unresolved flux light curves of Earth for the purpose of studying a prototype extrasolar terrestrial planet. Our monitoring of the photometric variability of earthshine revealed changes of up to 23 % per hour in the brightness of Earth's scattered light at around 600 nm, due to the removal of specular reflection from th...

  18. Fresnel zones for ground-based antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J. Bach

    1964-01-01

    The ordinary Fresnel zone concept is modified to include the influence of finite ground conductivity. This is important for ground-based antennas because the influence on the radiation pattern of irregularities near the antenna is determined by the amplitude and phase of the groundwave. A new...

  19. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement unce...

  20. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Yordanova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement unce...

  1. Determination of organotin compounds by headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-pulsed flame-photometric detection (HS-SPME-GC-PFPD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravo, Manuel [Universite de Pau et des Pays de L' Adour, Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique, LCABIE, UMR CNRS 5034, Pau (France); Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica y Ambiental, Instituto de Quimica, Valparaiso (Chile); Lespes, Gaetane; Gautier, Martine Potin [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica y Ambiental, Instituto de Quimica, Valparaiso (Chile); Gregori, Ida de; Pinochet, Hugo [Universite de Pau et des Pays de L' Adour, Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique, LCABIE, UMR CNRS 5034, Pau (France)

    2005-12-01

    A method based on Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME, with a 100 {mu}m PDMS-fiber) in combination with gas-chromatography and pulsed flame-photometric detection (GC-PFPD) has been investigated for simultaneous determination of eight organotin compounds. Monobutyltin (MBT), dibutyltin (DBT), tributyltin (TBT), monophenyltin (MPhT), and the semi-volatile diphenyltin (DPhT), triphenyltin (TPhT), monooctyltin (MOcT), and dioctyltin (DOcT) were determined after derivatization with sodium tetraethylborate. The conditions used for the extraction and preconcentration step were optimised by experimental design methodology. Tripropyltin (TPrT) and diheptyltin (DHepT) were used as internal standards for quantification of volatile and semi-volatile organotin compounds, respectively. The analytical precision (RSD) for ten successive injections of a standard mixture containing all the organic tin compounds ranged between 2 and 11%. The limits of detection for all the organotin compounds were sub ng (Sn) L{sup -1} in water and close to ng (Sn) kg{sup -1} in sediments. The accuracy of the method was evaluated by analysis of two certified reference material (CRM) sediment samples. The HS-SPME-GC-PFPD was then applied to the analysis of three harbour sediment samples. The results showed that headspace SPME is an attractive tool for analysis of organotin compounds in solid environmental matrices. (orig.)

  2. Development of pressurized liquid extraction and solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography and flame photometric detection for the determination of organophosphate esters in sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jianming; Gao, Zhanqi; Yuan, Wenting; He, Huan; Yang, Shaogui; Sun, Cheng

    2014-09-01

    Organophosphate esters have been extensively used as flame retardants and plasticizers. The analysis of organophosphate esters in the environment is a hot topic because many of them are toxic and persistent. We developed a novel procedure for determining organophosphate esters in sediment. In this work, pressurized liquid extraction and solid-phase microextraction are used for sample preparation to extract and concentrate the analytes, which are then analyzed by gas chromatography with flame photometric detection. The extraction parameters of pressurized liquid extraction were investigated and optimized by orthogonal design and then evaluated by range analysis and analysis of variance. Under the optimal conditions, the proposed procedure showed wide linear ranges (0.90-100 ng/g) with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.9921 to 0.9990. The detection limits of the method were in the range of 0.009-0.280 ng/g with standard deviations ranging from 2.2 to 9.5%. Recoveries of the proposed method ranged from 82.3 to 108.9% with relative standard deviations esters in real sediments with recoveries varying from 79.8 to 107.3%. The proposed method was proved to be simple, easy, and sensitive for analyzing organophosphate esters in sediment samples. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Photometric stereo endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parot, Vicente; Lim, Daryl; González, Germán; Traverso, Giovanni; Nishioka, Norman S.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. While color video endoscopy has enabled wide-field examination of the gastrointestinal tract, it often misses or incorrectly classifies lesions. Many of these missed lesions exhibit characteristic three-dimensional surface topographies. An endoscopic system that adds topographical measurements to conventional color imagery could therefore increase lesion detection and improve classification accuracy. We introduce photometric stereo endoscopy (PSE), a technique which allows high spatial frequency components of surface topography to be acquired simultaneously with conventional two-dimensional color imagery. We implement this technique in an endoscopic form factor and demonstrate that it can acquire the topography of small features with complex geometries and heterogeneous optical properties. PSE imaging of ex vivo human gastrointestinal tissue shows that surface topography measurements enable differentiation of abnormal shapes from surrounding normal tissue. Together, these results confirm that the topographical measurements can be obtained with relatively simple hardware in an endoscopic form factor, and suggest the potential of PSE to improve lesion detection and classification in gastrointestinal imaging. PMID:23864015

  4. Ground-Based Astrometry 2010-2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    target lists come from classic work such as Luyten’s (1979), to more recent all-sky surveys such as 2MASS, DENIS, and SDSS . Follow-up narrow angle...revolutionized the way astronomers work by providing huge datasets of astrometric and photometric data. More recently, SDSS , 5 2MASS, and DENIS have

  5. Ground-based photometry of the 21-day Neptune HD 106315c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendl, M.; Ehrenreich, D.; Turner, O. D.; Bayliss, D.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Giles, H.; Bouchy, F.; Marmier, M.; Udry, S.

    2017-07-01

    Space-based transit surveys such as K2 and the Transiting Exoplanets Survey Satellite (TESS) allow the detection of small transiting planets with orbital periods greater than 10 days. Few of these warm Neptunes are currently known around stars bright enough to allow for detailed follow-up observations dedicated to their atmospheric characterization. The 21-day period and 3.95 R⊕ planet HD 106315c has been discovered by K2 based on the observation of two of its transits. We observed HD 106315 using the 1.2 m Euler telescope equipped with the EulerCam camera on two occasions to confirm the transit using broadband photometry and refine the planetary period. Based on two observed transits of HD 106315c, we detect its 1 mmag transit and obtain a precise measurement of the planetary ephemerides, which are critical for planning further follow-up observations. We used the attained precision together with the predicted yield from the TESS mission to evaluate the potential for ground-based confirmation of Neptune-sized planets found by TESS. We find that one-meter class telescopes on the ground equipped with precise photometers could substantially contribute to the follow-up of 162 TESS candidates orbiting stars with magnitudes of V ≤ 14. Of these candidates, 74 planets orbit stars with V ≤ 12 and 12 planets orbit V ≤ 10, which makes them high-priority objects for atmospheric characterization with high-end instrumentation. The photometric time series data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/603/L5

  6. Homogeneous Liquid-Liquid Microextraction for Determination of Organophosphorus Pesticides in Environmental Water Samples Prior to Gas Chromatography-Flame Photometric Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berijani, Sana; Sadigh, Mirhanif; Pournamdari, Elham

    2016-07-01

    In this study, homogeneous liquid-liquid microextraction (HLLME) was developed for preconcentration and extraction of 15 organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) from water samples coupling with gas chromatography followed by a flame photometric detector (HLLME-GC-FPD). In this method, OPPs were extracted by the homogeneous phase in a ternary solvent system (water/acetic acid/chloroform). The homogeneous solution was excluded by the addition of sodium hydroxide as a phase separator reagent and a cloudy solution was formed. After centrifugation (3 min at 5,000 rpm), the fine particles of extraction solvent (chloroform) were sedimented at the bottom of the conical test tube (10.0 ± 0.5 µL). Furthermore, 0.5 µL of the sedimented phase was injected into the GC for separation and determination of OPPs. Optimal results were obtained under the following conditions: volume of the extracting solvent (chloroform), 53 µL; volume of the consolute solvent (acetic acid), 0.76 mL and concentration of sodium hydroxide, 40% (w/v). Under the optimum conditions, the enrichment factors of (260-665), the extraction percent of 75.8-104%, the dynamic linear range of 0.03-300 µg L(-1) and the limits of detection of 0.004-0.03 µg L(-1) were obtained for the OPPs. This method was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of the OPPs in environmental water samples.

  7. Improved Variable Star Search in Large Photometric Data Sets -- New Variables in CoRoT Field LRa02 Detected ba BEST II

    CERN Document Server

    Fruth, T; Cabrera, J; Chini, R; Csizmadia, Sz; Eigmüller, P; Erikson, A; Kirste, S; Lemke, R; Murphy, M; Pasternacki, T; Rauer, H; Titz-Weider, R; 10.1088/0004-6256/143/6/140

    2012-01-01

    The CoRoT field LRa02 has been observed with the Berlin Exoplanet Search Telescope II (BEST II) during the southern summer 2007/2008. A first analysis of stellar variability led to the publication of 345 newly discovered variable stars. Now, a deeper analysis of this data set was used to optimize the variability search procedure. Several methods and parameters have been tested in order to improve the selection process compared to the widely used J index for variability ranking. This paper describes an empirical approach to treat systematic trends in photometric data based upon the analysis of variance statistics that can significantly decrease the rate of false detections. Finally, the process of reanalysis and method improvement has virtually doubled the number of variable stars compared to the first analysis by Kabath et al. A supplementary catalog of 272 previously unknown periodic variables plus 52 stars with suspected variability is presented. Improved ephemerides are given for 19 known variables in the ...

  8. Photometric flow injection determination of phosphate on a PDMS microchip using an optical detection system assembled with an organic light emitting diode and an organic photodiode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Ishimatsu, Ryoichi; Yahiro, Masayuki; Adachi, Chihaya; Nakano, Koji; Imato, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    and a good linear relationship between the concentration and absorbance was observed in the concentration range 0-0.2 ppm, with a detection limit (S/N=3) of 0.02 ppm. The assembled photometric detector was also applied to the determination of phosphate by the flow injection of river water samples using the reagent solution containing MG and molybdenum ammonium in sulfuric acid. A good recovery (97-99%) for the river water samples, which had been spiked with the standard 0.08 ppm, with an RSD of ca 5% (n=5) was obtained using the constructed system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Photometric Metallicities in Bootes I

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, J; Dotter, A; Geisler, D

    2014-01-01

    We present new Stromgren and Washington data sets for the Bootes I dwarf galaxy, and combine them with the available SDSS photometry. The goal of this project is to refine a ground-based, practical, accurate method to determine age and metallicity for individual stars in Bootes I that can be selected in an unbiased imaging survey, without having to take spectra. We produce photometric metallicities from Stromgren and Washington photometry, for stellar systems with a range of $-1.0>[Fe/H]>-3.5$. To avoid the decrease in sensitivity of the Stromgren metallicity index on the lower red-giant branch, we replace the Stromgren v-filter with the broader Washington C-filter; we find that $CT_1by$ is the most successful filter combination, for individual stars with $[Fe/H]<-2.0$, to maintain ~0.2 dex $[Fe/H]$-resolution over the whole red-giant branch. We demonstrate that we can break the isochrones' age-metallicity degeneracy with these filters, using stars with log g=2.5-3.0, which have less than a 2% change in th...

  10. Space and Ground-Based Infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weems, Jon; Zell, Martin

    This chapter deals first with the main characteristics of the space environment, outside and inside a spacecraft. Then the space and space-related (ground-based) infrastructures are described. The most important infrastructure is the International Space Station, which holds many European facilities (for instance the European Columbus Laboratory). Some of them, such as the Columbus External Payload Facility, are located outside the ISS to benefit from external space conditions. There is only one other example of orbital platforms, the Russian Foton/Bion Recoverable Orbital Capsule. In contrast, non-orbital weightless research platforms, although limited in experimental time, are more numerous: sounding rockets, parabolic flight aircraft, drop towers and high-altitude balloons. In addition to these facilities, there are a number of ground-based facilities and space simulators, for both life sciences (for instance: bed rest, clinostats) and physical sciences (for instance: magnetic compensation of gravity). Hypergravity can also be provided by human and non-human centrifuges.

  11. Development of Ground-Based Plant Sentinels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    plants in response to different strains of Pseudomonas syringae. Planta . 217:767-775. De Moraes CM, Schultz JC, Mescher MC, Tumlinson JH. (2004...09-30-2004 Final Technical _ April 2001 - April 2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Developing Plants as Ground-based Sentinels 5b. GRANT...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 9 "Z Plants emit volatile mixes characteristic of exposure to both plant and animal (insect) pathogens (bacteria and fungi). The

  12. Illumination compensation in ground based hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Alexander; Underwood, James

    2017-07-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has emerged as an important tool for analysing vegetation data in agricultural applications. Recently, low altitude and ground based hyperspectral imaging solutions have come to the fore, providing very high resolution data for mapping and studying large areas of crops in detail. However, these platforms introduce a unique set of challenges that need to be overcome to ensure consistent, accurate and timely acquisition of data. One particular problem is dealing with changes in environmental illumination while operating with natural light under cloud cover, which can have considerable effects on spectral shape. In the past this has been commonly achieved by imaging known reference targets at the time of data acquisition, direct measurement of irradiance, or atmospheric modelling. While capturing a reference panel continuously or very frequently allows accurate compensation for illumination changes, this is often not practical with ground based platforms, and impossible in aerial applications. This paper examines the use of an autonomous unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) to gather high resolution hyperspectral imaging data of crops under natural illumination. A process of illumination compensation is performed to extract the inherent reflectance properties of the crops, despite variable illumination. This work adapts a previously developed subspace model approach to reflectance and illumination recovery. Though tested on a ground vehicle in this paper, it is applicable to low altitude unmanned aerial hyperspectral imagery also. The method uses occasional observations of reference panel training data from within the same or other datasets, which enables a practical field protocol that minimises in-field manual labour. This paper tests the new approach, comparing it against traditional methods. Several illumination compensation protocols for high volume ground based data collection are presented based on the results. The findings in this paper are

  13. Ground based spectroscopy of hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Ingo

    2010-05-01

    It has been shown in recent years with great success that spectroscopy of exoplanetary atmospheres is feasible using space based observatories such as the HST and Spitzer. However, with the end of the Spitzer cold-phase, space based observations in the near to mid infra-red are limited, which will remain true until the the onset of the JWST. The importance of developing methods of ground based spectroscopic analysis of known hot Jupiters is therefore apparent. In the past, various groups have attempted exoplanetary spectroscopy using ground based facilities and various techniques. Here I will present results using a novel spectral retrieval method for near to mid infra-red emission and transmission spectra of exoplanetary atmospheres taken from the ground and discuss the feasibility of future ground-based spectroscopy in a broader context. My recently commenced PhD project is under the supervision of Giovanna Tinetti (University College London) and in collaboration with J. P. Beaulieu (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris), Mark Swain and Pieter Deroo (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech).

  14. Asteroseismology of Solar-type stars with Kepler III. Ground-based Data

    CERN Document Server

    Molenda-Zakowicz, Joanna; Sousa, Sergio; Frasca, Antonio; Biazzo, Katia; Huber, Daniel; Ireland, Mike; Bedding, Tim; Stello, Dennis; Uytterhoeven, Katrien; Dreizler, Stefan; De Cat, Peter; Briquet, Maryline; Catanzaro, Giovanni; Karoff, Chistoffer; Frandsen, Soeren; Spezzi, Loredana; Catala, Claude

    2010-01-01

    We report on the ground-based follow-up program of spectroscopic and photometric observations of solar-like asteroseismic targets for the Kepler space mission. These stars constitute a large group of more than thousand objects which are the subject of an intensive study of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium Working Group 1 (KASC WG-1). The main goal of this coordinated research is the determination of the fundamental stellar atmospheric parameters, which are used for the computing of their asteroseismic models, as well as for the verification of the Kepler Input Catalogue (KIC).

  15. Optimisation of pressurised liquid extraction for elimination of sulphur interferences during determination of organotin compounds in sulphur-rich sediments by gas chromatography with flame photometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasik, Andrzej; Radke, Barbara; Bolałek, Jerzy; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2007-05-01

    A simple method for species-selective analysis of organotin compounds (OTCs) (butyl and phenyl) in sediments was developed. The sample preparation procedure was specifically optimised for sulphur-rich sediments to eliminate interferences from elemental sulphur and organosulphur compounds. Tin species were extracted from sediment samples using pressurised liquid extraction technique (PLE), ethylated - with simultaneous extraction to isooctane - in aqueous phase with sodium tetraethylborate (NaBEt(4)) and separated/detected by gas chromatography with flame photometric detection (GC-FPD). PLE operational variables (extraction temperature and pressure, solvent composition and number of static extraction steps) and extract handling routine were fine-tuned to minimise the amount of extracted interferents while keeping OTCs recovery at an acceptable level. Best results were obtained after extraction of sediment samples with methanol/water (75% v/v methanol) solution of acetic acid/sodium acetate with tropolone addition (0.6 g l(-1)). Derivatisation of low temperature, high-pressure (50 degrees C, 13.8 MPa) extracts gives isooctane extracts which are clean enough to be directly analysed by GC-FPD without any further cleanup. Interferences from elemental sulphur were completely eliminated while concentrations of other interferents were reduced to the level not impairing quantitation of OTCs under the study. No negative effects in terms of chromatographic column deterioration were observed after repeated injections of such extracts. Two certified reference materials, BCR646 and PACS-2, were analysed to assess performance of the method. Recoveries of all OTCs under the study, except MBT, were in the range of 91-114%. MBT extraction efficiency was low (34-47%) therefore the method is unsuitable for precise determinations of this compound.

  16. The ASTRODEEP Frontier Fields Catalogues: II - Photometric redshifts and rest-frame properties in Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416

    CERN Document Server

    Castellano, M; Merlin, E; Fontana, A; McLure, R J; Mármol-Queraltó, E; Mortlock, A; Parsa, S; Dunlop, J S; Elbaz, D; Balestra, I; Boucaud, A; Bourne, N; Boutsia, K; Brammer, G; Bruce, V A; Buitrago, F; Capak, P; Cappelluti, N; Ciesla, L; Comastri, A; Cullen, F; Derriere, S; Faber, S M; Giallongo, E; Grazian, A; Grillo, C; Mercurio, A; Michalowski, M; Nonino, M; Paris, D; Pentericci, L; Pilo, S; Rosati, P; Santini, P; Schreiber, C; Shu, X; Wang, T

    2016-01-01

    We present the first public release of photometric redshifts, galaxy rest-frame properties and associated magnification values in the cluster and parallel pointings of the first two Frontier Fields, Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416. We exploit a multi-wavelength catalogue ranging from HST to ground-based K and Spitzer IRAC which is specifically designed to enable detection and measurement of accurate fluxes in crowded cluster regions. The multi-band information is used to derive photometric redshifts and physical properties of sources detected either in the H-band image alone or from a stack of four WFC3 bands. To minimize systematics median photometric redshifts are assembled from six different approaches to photo-z estimates. Their reliability is assessed through a comparison with available spectroscopic samples. State of the art lensing models are used to derive magnification values on an object-by-object basis by taking into account sources positions and redshifts. We show that photometric redshifts reach a rema...

  17. Photometric multi-site campaign on the open cluster NGC 884 I. Detection of the variable stars

    CERN Document Server

    Saesen, S; Pigulski, A; Aerts, C; Handler, G; Narwid, A; Fu, J N; Zhang, C; Jiang, X J; Vanautgaerden, J; Kopacki, G; Stȩślicki, M; Acke, B; Poretti, E; Uytterhoeven, K; Gielen, C; Østensen, R; De Meester, W; Reed, M D; Kołaczkowski, Z; Michalska, G; Schmidt, E; Yakut, K; Leitner, A; Kalomeni, B; Cherix, M; Spano, M; Prins, S; Van Helshoecht, V; Zima, W; Huygen, R; Vandenbussche, B; Lenz, P; Ladjal, D; Antolín, E Puga; Verhoelst, T; De Ridder, J; Niarchos, P; Liakos, A; Lorenz, D; Dehaes, S; Reyniers, M; Davignon, G; Kim, S -L; Kim, D H; Lee, Y -J; Lee, C -U; Kwon, J -H; Broeders, E; Van Winckel, H; Vanhollebeke, E; Waelkens, C; Raskin, G; Blom, Y; Eggen, J R; Degroote, P; Beck, P; Puschnig, J; Schmitzberger, L; Gelven, G A; Steininger, B; Blommaert, J; Drummond, R; Briquet, M; Debosscher, J

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXT: Recent progress in the seismic interpretation of field beta Cep stars has resulted in improvements of the physics in the stellar structure and evolution models of massive stars. Further asteroseismic constraints can be obtained from studying ensembles of stars in a young open cluster, which all have similar age, distance and chemical composition. AIMS: To improve our comprehension of the beta Cep stars, we studied the young open cluster NGC 884 to discover new B-type pulsators, besides the two known beta Cep stars, and other variable stars. METHODS: An extensive multi-site campaign was set up to gather accurate CCD photometry time series in four filters (U, B, V, I) of a field of NGC884. Fifteen different instruments collected almost 77500 CCD images in 1286 hours. The images were calibrated and reduced to transform the CCD frames into interpretable differential light curves. Various variability indicators and frequency analyses were applied to detect variable stars in the field. Absolute photometry ...

  18. Identification of inorganic improvised explosive devices by analysis of postblast residues using portable capillary electrophoresis instrumentation and indirect photometric detection with a light-emitting diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Joseph P; Evenhuis, Christopher J; Johns, Cameron; Kazarian, Artaches A; Breadmore, Michael C; Macka, Miroslav; Hilder, Emily F; Guijt, Rosanne M; Dicinoski, Greg W; Haddad, Paul R

    2007-09-15

    A commercial portable capillary electrophoresis (CE) instrument has been used to separate inorganic anions and cations found in postblast residues from improvised explosive devices (IEDs) of the type used frequently in terrorism attacks. The purpose of this analysis was to identify the type of explosive used. The CE instrument was modified for use with an in-house miniaturized light-emitting diode (LED) detector to enable sensitive indirect photometric detection to be employed for the detection of 15 anions (acetate, benzoate, carbonate, chlorate, chloride, chlorite, cyanate, fluoride, nitrate, nitrite, perchlorate, phosphate, sulfate, thiocyanate, thiosulfate) and 12 cations (ammonium, monomethylammonium, ethylammonium, potassium, sodium, barium, strontium, magnesium, manganese, calcium, zinc, lead) as the target analytes. These ions are known to be present in postblast residues from inorganic IEDs constructed from ammonium nitrate/fuel oil mixtures, black powder, and chlorate/perchlorate/sugar mixtures. For the analysis of cations, a blue LED (470 nm) was used in conjunction with the highly absorbing cationic dye, chrysoidine (absorption maximum at 453 nm). A nonaqueous background electrolyte comprising 10 mM chrysoidine in methanol was found to give greatly improved baseline stability in comparison to aqueous electrolytes due to the increased solubility of chrysoidine and its decreased adsorption onto the capillary wall. Glacial acetic acid (0.7% v/v) was added to ensure chrysoidine was protonated and to enhance separation selectivity by means of complexation with transition metal ions. The 12 target cations were separated in less than 9.5 min with detection limits of 0.11-2.30 mg/L (calculated at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3). The anions separation system utilized a UV LED (370 nm) in conjunction with an aqueous chromate electrolyte (absorption maximum at 371 nm) consisting of 10 mM chromium(VI) oxide and 10 mM sodium chromate, buffered with 40 mM tris

  19. Seismic investigation of the γ Dor star KIC 6462033: The first results of Kepler and ground-based follow up observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusoy, C.; Ulaş, B.; Damasso, M.; Carbognani, A.; Cenadelli, D.; Stateva, I.; Iliev, I. Kh.; Dimitrov, D.

    2014-02-01

    Preliminary results on the analysis of the Kepler light curve and photometric ground-based time series of γ Dor star KIC 6462033 (TYC 3144-646-1, V = 10.83, P = 0.69686 d) are presented in order to determine pulsation frequencies.

  20. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  1. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of a test of a ground-based lidar of other type. The test was performed at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. The result as an establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided...... by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from the wind vanes is also given....

  2. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Yordanova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  3. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  4. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Georgieva Yankova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  5. Independet Component Analyses of Ground-based Exoplanetary Transits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Martins-Filho, Walter; Griffith, Caitlin Ann; Pearson, Kyle; Waldmann, Ingo; Biddle, Lauren; Zellem, Robert Thomas; Alvarez-Candal, Alvaro

    2016-10-01

    Most observations of exoplanetary atmospheres are conducted when a "Hot Jupiter" exoplanet transits in front of its host star. These Jovian-sized planets have small orbital periods, on the order of days, and therefore a short transit time, making them more ameanable to observations. Measurements of Hot Jupiter transits must achieve a 10-4 level of accuracy in the flux to determine the spectral modulations of the exoplanetary atmosphere. In order to accomplish this level of precision, we need to extract systematic errors, and, for ground-based measurements, the effects of Earth's atmosphere, from the signal due to the exoplanet, which is several orders of magnitudes smaller. Currently, the effects of the terrestrial atmosphere and the some of the time-dependent systematic errors are treated by dividing the host star by a reference star at each wavelength and time step of the transit. More recently, Independent Component Analyses (ICA) have been used to remove systematic effects from the raw data of space-based observations (Waldmann 2014,2012; Morello et al.,2015,2016). ICA is a statistical method born from the ideas of the blind-source separation studies, which can be used to de-trend several independent source signals of a data set (Hyvarinen and Oja, 2000). One strength of this method is that it requires no additional prior knowledge of the system. Here, we present a study of the application of ICA to ground-based transit observations of extrasolar planets, which are affected by Earth's atmosphere. We analyze photometric data of two extrasolar planets, WASP-1b and GJ3470b, recorded by the 61" Kuiper Telescope at Stewart Observatory using the Harris B and U filters. The presentation will compare the light curve depths and their dispersions as derived from the ICA analysis to those derived by analyses that ratio of the host star to nearby reference stars.References: Waldmann, I.P. 2012 ApJ, 747, 12, Waldamann, I. P. 2014 ApJ, 780, 23; Morello G. 2015 ApJ, 806

  6. Uncertain Photometric Redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Polsterer, Kai Lars; Gieseke, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Photometric redshifts play an important role as a measure of distance for various cosmological topics. Spectroscopic redshifts are only available for a very limited number of objects but can be used for creating statistical models. A broad variety of photometric catalogues provide uncertain low resolution spectral information for galaxies and quasars that can be used to infer a redshift. Many different techniques have been developed to produce those redshift estimates with increasing precision. Instead of providing a point estimate only, astronomers start to generate probabilistic density functions (PDFs) which should provide a characterisation of the uncertainties of the estimation. In this work we present two simple approaches on how to generate those PDFs. We use the example of generating the photometric redshift PDFs of quasars from SDSS(DR7) to validate our approaches and to compare them with point estimates. We do not aim for presenting a new best performing method, but we choose an intuitive approach t...

  7. Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury IX: A Photometric Survey of Planetary Nebulae in M31

    CERN Document Server

    Veyette, Mark J; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Balick, Bruce; Caldwell, Nelson; Fouesneau, Morgan; Girardi, Leo; Gordon, Karl; Kalirai, Jason; Rosenfield, Phil; Seth, Anil

    2014-01-01

    We search Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) broadband imaging data from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey to identify detections of cataloged planetary nebulae (PNe). Of the 711 PNe currently in the literature within the PHAT footprint, we find 467 detected in the broadband. For these 467 we are able to refine their astrometric accuracy from ~0."3 to 0."05. Using the resolution of HST, we are able to show that 152 objects currently in the catalogs are definitively not PNe, and we show that 32 objects thought to be extended in ground-based images are actually point-like and therefore good PN candidates. We also find one PN candidate that is marginally resolved. If this is a PN, it is up to 0.7 pc in diameter. With our new photometric data, we develop a method of measuring the level of excitation in individual PNe by comparing broadband and narrowband imaging and describe the effects of excitation on a PN's photometric signature....

  8. Cosmology with photometric redshift surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Blake, C; Blake, Chris; Bridle, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    We explore the utility of future photometric redshift imaging surveys for delineating the large-scale structure of the Universe, and assess the resulting constraints on the cosmological model. We perform two complementary types of analysis: (1) We quantify the statistical confidence and accuracy with which such surveys will be able to detect and measure characteristic features in the clustering power spectrum such as the acoustic oscillations and the turnover, in a model-independent fashion. For example, we show that a 10000 sq deg imaging survey with depth r = 22.5 and photometric redshift accuracy dz/(1+z) = 0.03 will detect the acoustic oscillations with 99.9% confidence, measuring the associated cosmological scale with 2% precision. Such a survey will also detect the turnover with 95% confidence, determining the corresponding scale with 20% accuracy. (2) By assuming a Lambda-CDM cosmology we calculate the confidence with which a non-zero baryon fraction can be deduced from such future surveys. After margi...

  9. Statistical Studies of Ground-Based Optical Lightning Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, C. R.; Nemzek, R. J.; Suszcynsky, D. M.

    2005-12-01

    Most extensive optical studies of lightning have been conducted from orbit, and the statistics of events collected from earth are relatively poorly documented. The time signatures of optical power measured in the presence of clouds are inevitably affected by scattering,which can distort the signatures by extending and delaying the amplitude profile in time. We have deployed two all-sky photodiode detectors, one in New Mexico and one in Oklahoma, which are gathering data alongside electric field change monitors as part of the LANL EDOTX Great Plains Array. Preliminary results show that the photodiode is sensitive to approximately 50% or more of RF events detected at ranges of up to 30 km, and still has some sensitivity at ranges in excess of 60 km (distances determined by the EDOTX field-change array). The shapes of events within this range were assessed, with focus on rise time, width, peak power, and their correlation to corresponding electric field signatures, and these are being compared with published on-orbit and ground-based data. Initial findings suggest a mean characteristic width (ratio of total detected optical energy to peak power) of 291 +/- 12 microseconds and a mean delay between the RF signal peak and optical peak of 121 +/- 17 microseconds. These values fall between prior ground-based measurements of direct return stroke emissions, and scattering-dominated on-orbit measurements. This work will promote better understanding of the correspondence between radio and optical measurements of lightning.

  10. Cross validation of gas chromatography-flame photometric detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods for measuring dialkylphosphate metabolites of organophosphate pesticides in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prapamontol, Tippawan; Sutan, Kunrunya; Laoyang, Sompong; Hongsibsong, Surat; Lee, Grace; Yano, Yukiko; Hunter, Ronald Elton; Ryan, P Barry; Barr, Dana Boyd; Panuwet, Parinya

    2014-01-01

    We report two analytical methods for the measurement of dialkylphosphate (DAP) metabolites of organophosphate pesticides in human urine. These methods were independently developed/modified and implemented in two separate laboratories and cross validated. The aim was to develop simple, cost effective, and reliable methods that could use available resources and sample matrices in Thailand and the United States. While several methods already exist, we found that direct application of these methods required modification of sample preparation and chromatographic conditions to render accurate, reliable data. The problems encountered with existing methods were attributable to urinary matrix interferences, and differences in the pH of urine samples and reagents used during the extraction and derivatization processes. Thus, we provide information on key parameters that require attention during method modification and execution that affect the ruggedness of the methods. The methods presented here employ gas chromatography (GC) coupled with either flame photometric detection (FPD) or electron impact ionization-mass spectrometry (EI-MS) with isotopic dilution quantification. The limits of detection were reported from 0.10ng/mL urine to 2.5ng/mL urine (for GC-FPD), while the limits of quantification were reported from 0.25ng/mL urine to 2.5ng/mL urine (for GC-MS), for all six common DAP metabolites (i.e., dimethylphosphate, dimethylthiophosphate, dimethyldithiophosphate, diethylphosphate, diethylthiophosphate, and diethyldithiophosphate). Each method showed a relative recovery range of 94-119% (for GC-FPD) and 92-103% (for GC-MS), and relative standard deviations (RSD) of less than 20%. Cross-validation was performed on the same set of urine samples (n=46) collected from pregnant women residing in the agricultural areas of northern Thailand. The results from split sample analysis from both laboratories agreed well for each metabolite, suggesting that each method can produce

  11. Ground-based characterization of Eurybates and Orus, two fly-by targets of the Lucy Discovery mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottola, Stefano; Marchi, Simone; Buie, Marc W.; Hellmich, Stephan; Di Martino, Mario; Proffe, Gerrit; Levison, Harold F.; Zangari, Amanda Marie

    2016-10-01

    Lucy is a proposed NASA Discovery mission designed to perform close fly-bys with six Jupiter Trojan asteroids. The mission, which is currently in the Phase A development phase, is planned to launch in 2021 and arrive at the Trojan L4 cloud in 2027.We report on ground-based light curve observations of two of Lucy's fly-by target candidates: (3548) Eurybates and (21900) Orus. The goal is to characterize their shape, spin state and photometric properties both to aid in the planning of the mission, and to complement the space-borne data.Each object has been observed over 5 apparitions in a wide range of geocentric ecliptic longitudes. Shape and spin state modeling was performed by using the convex shape inversion method (Kaasalainen, Mottola & Fulchignoni, 2002). Eurybates is a retrograde rotator with a sidereal rotation Psid=8.702724±0.000009 h. It has a moderately elongated shape with equivalent axial ratios a/b=1.08, b/c=1.16. No obvious signs of global non-convexities and/or albedo variegation are detected in its light curves. Orus is also a retrograde rotator with a period Psid=13.48617±0.00007 h. Its approximate axial ratios are a/b=1.14, b/c=1.12. The presence of a large, planar facet in the proximity of the model's North Pole suggests the presence of a large polar crater.

  12. Augmenting WFIRST Microlensing with a Ground-Based Telescope Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Gould, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Augmenting the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) microlensing campaigns with intensive observations from a ground-based network of wide-field survey telescopes would have several major advantages. First, it would enable full two-dimensional (2-D) vector microlens parallax measurements for a substantial fraction of low-mass lenses as well as planetary and binary events that show caustic crossing features. For a significant fraction of the free-floating planet (FFP) events and all caustic-crossing planetary/binary events, these 2-D parallax measurements directly lead to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) of the lens object (or lens system). For even more events, the complementary ground-based observations will yield 1-D parallax measurements. Together with the 1-D parallaxes from WFIRST alone, they can probe the entire mass range M > M_Earth. For luminous lenses, such 1-D parallax measurements can be promoted to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) by high-resolution imaging. This would provide crucial information not only about the hosts of planets and other lenses, but also enable a much more precise Galactic model. Other benefits of such a survey include improved understanding of binaries (particularly with low mass primaries), and sensitivity to distant ice-giant and gas-giant companions of WFIRST lenses that cannot be detected by WFIRST itself due to its restricted observing windows. Existing ground-based microlensing surveys can be employed if WFIRST is pointed at lower-extinction fields than is currently envisaged. This would come at some cost to the event rate. Therefore the benefits of improved characterization of lenses must be weighed against these costs.

  13. NASA's Newest Orbital Debris Ground-based Telescope Assets: MCAT and UKIRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, S. M.; Frith, J. M.; Pace, L. F.; Cowardin, H. M.; Cowardin, H. M.; Hickson, P.; Glesne, T.; Maeda, R.; Buckalew, B.; Nishimoto, D.; hide

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) will break ground on Ascension Island in 2014 to build the newest optical (0.30 - 1.06 micrometers) ground-based telescope asset dedicated to the study of orbital debris. The Meter Class Autonomous Telescope (MCAT) is a 1.3m optical telescope designed to track objects in orbits ranging from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). Ascension Island is located in the South Atlantic Ocean, offering longitudinal sky coverage not afforded by the Ground-based Electro-Optical Deep Space Surveillance (GEODSS) network. With a fast-tracking dome, a suite of visible wide-band filters, and a time-delay integration (TDI) capable camera, MCAT is capable of multiple observing modes ranging from tracking cataloged debris targets to surveying the overall debris environment. Access to the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) will extend our spectral coverage into the near- (0.8-5 micrometers) and mid- to far-infrared (8-25 micrometers) regime. UKIRT is a 3.8m telescope located on Mauna Kea on the Big Island of Hawaii. At nearly 14,000-feet and above the atmospheric inversion layer, this is one of the premier astronomical sites in the world and is an ideal setting for an infrared telescope. An unprecedented one-third of this telescope's time has been allocated to collect orbital debris data for NASA's ODPO over a 2-year period. UKIRT has several instruments available to obtain low-resolution spectroscopy in both the near-IR and the mid/far-IR. Infrared spectroscopy is ideal for constraining the material types, albedos and sizes of debris targets, and potentially gaining insight into reddening effects caused by space weathering. In addition, UKIRT will be used to acquire broadband photometric imaging at GEO with the Wide Field Camera (WFCAM) for studying known objects of interest as well as collecting data in survey-mode to discover new targets. Results from the first stage of the debris campaign will be presented. The

  14. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel E; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfectly all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean and, as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources' right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO's observations and electromagnetic follow-up. Beyond galactic foregrounds associated with seasonal variations, we find that equatorial observatories can access over $80\\%$ of the localization probability, while mid-latitudes will access closer to $70\\%$. Facilities located near the two LIGO sites can obser...

  15. Ground-based optical observation system for LEO objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, T.; Kurosaki, H.; Oda, H.; Tagawa, M.

    2015-08-01

    We propose a ground-based optical observation system for monitoring LEO objects, which uses numerous optical sensors to cover a vast region of the sky. Its potential in terms of detection and orbital determination were examined. About 30 cm LEO objects at 1000 km altitude are detectable using an 18 cm telescope, a CCD camera and the analysis software developed. Simulations and a test observation showed that two longitudinally separate observation sites with arrays of optical sensors can identify the same objects from numerous data sets and determine their orbits precisely. The proposed system may complement or replace the current radar observation system for monitoring LEO objects, like space-situation awareness, in the near future.

  16. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfectly all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean and, as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources' right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO's observations and electromagnetic follow-up. These effects can inform electromagnetic follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  17. A new method to detect long term trends of methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O total columns measured within the NDACC ground-based high resolution solar FTIR network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schneider

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Total columns measured with the ground-based solar FTIR technique are highly variable in time due to atmospheric chemistry and dynamics in the atmosphere above the measurement station. In this paper, a multiple regression model with anomalies of air pressure, total columns of hydrogen fluoride (HF and carbon monoxide (CO and tropopause height are used to reduce the variability in the methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O total columns to estimate reliable linear trends with as small uncertainties as possible. The method is developed at the Harestua station (60° N, 11° E, 600 m a.s.l. and used on three other European FTIR stations, i.e. Jungfraujoch (47° N, 8° E, 3600 m a.s.l., Zugspitze (47° N, 11° E, 3000 m a.s.l., and Kiruna (68° N, 20° E, 400 m a.s.l.. Linear CH4 trends between 0.13 ± 0.01-0.25 ± 0.02 % yr−1 were estimated for all stations in the 1996-2009 period. A piecewise model with three separate linear trends, connected at change points, was used to estimate the short term fluctuations in the CH4 total columns. This model shows a growth in 1996–1999 followed by a period of steady state until 2007. From 2007 until 2009 the atmospheric CH4 amount increases between 0.57 ± 0.22–1.15 ± 0.17 % yr−1. Linear N2O trends between 0.19 ± 0.01–0.40 ± 0.02 % yr−1 were estimated for all stations in the 1996-2007 period, here with the strongest trend at Harestua and Kiruna and the lowest at the Alp stations. From the N2O total columns crude tropospheric and stratospheric partial columns were derived, indicating that the observed difference in the N2O trends between the FTIR sites is of stratospheric origin. This agrees well with the N2O measurements by the SMR instrument onboard the Odin satellite showing the highest trends at Harestua, 0.98 ± 0.28 % yr−1, and considerably smaller trends at lower latitudes, 0.27 ± 0.25 % yr−1. The multiple regression model was compared with two other trend methods, the ordinary linear

  18. The STACEE Ground-Based Gamma-ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragan, Ken

    2002-04-01

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a ground-based instrument designed to study astrophysical sources of gamma rays in the energy range from 50 to 500 GeV using an array of heliostat mirrors at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in New Mexico. The mirrors collect Cherenkov light generated by gamma-ray air showers and concentrate it onto cameras composed of photomultiplier tubes. The STACEE instrument is now complete, and uses a total of 64 heliostats. Prototype instruments, using smaller numbers of heliostats, have previously detected gamma emission from both the Crab Nebula and the Active Galactic Nucleus Mrk421. The complete instrument has a lower threshold -- approximately 50 GeV -- than those prototypes due to superior triggering and electronics, including flash ADCs for every channel.We will discuss the performance of the complete instrument in its first full season of operation, and present preliminary results of selected observations.

  19. Atmospheric contamination for CMB ground-based observations

    CERN Document Server

    Errard, J; Akiba, Y; Arnold, K; Atlas, M; Baccigalupi, C; Barron, D; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Cukierman, A; Delabrouille, J; Dobbs, M; Ducout, A; Elleflot, T; Fabbian, G; Feng, C; Feeney, S; Gilbert, A; Goeckner-Wald, N; Halverson, N W; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Hill, C; Holzapfel, W L; Hori, Y; Inoue, Y; Jaehnig, G C; Jaffe, A H; Jeong, O; Katayama, N; Kaufman, J; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T; Jeune, M Le; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Leon, D; Linder, E; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Miller, N J; Myers, M J; Navaroli, M; Nishino, H; Okamura, T; Paar, H; Peloton, J; Poletti, D; Puglisi, G; Rebeiz, G; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Rotermund, K M; Schenck, D E; Sherwin, B D; Siritanasak, P; Smecher, G; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Tajima, O; Takakura, S; Tikhomirov, A; Tomaru, T; Whitehorn, N; Wilson, B; Yadav, A; Zahn, O

    2015-01-01

    Atmosphere is one of the most important noise sources for ground-based Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments. By increasing optical loading on the detectors, it amplifies their effective noise, while its fluctuations introduce spatial and temporal correlations between detected signals. We present a physically motivated 3d-model of the atmosphere total intensity emission in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. We derive an analytical estimate for the correlation between detectors time-ordered data as a function of the instrument and survey design, as well as several atmospheric parameters such as wind, relative humidity, temperature and turbulence characteristics. Using numerical computation, we examine the effect of each physical parameter on the correlations in the time series of a given experiment. We then use a parametric-likelihood approach to validate the modeling and estimate atmosphere parameters from the POLARBEAR-I project first season data set. We compare our results to previous st...

  20. Identification of rainy periods from ground based microwave radiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada Vittoria Bosisio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors present the results of a study aiming at detecting rainy data in measurements collected by a dual band ground-based radiometer. The proposed criterion is based on the ratio of the brightness temperatures observed in the 20-30 GHz band without need of any ancillary information. A major result obtained from the probability density of the ratio computed over one month of data is the identification of threshold values between clear sky, cloudy sky and rainy sky, respectively. A linear fit performed by using radiometric data and concurrent rain gauge measurements shows a correlation coefficient equal to 0.56 between the temperature ratio and the observed precipitation.

  1. AR Ser: photometric observations of a Blazhko star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnardeau, Michel; Hambsch, Franz-Josef

    2015-02-01

    Photometric observations in 2010-2014 of the RR Lyrae star AR Serpentis are presented and analysed. Two Blazhko modulations of comparable amplitude are detected, with the periods 89 and 108 days, and with evidence for irregularities.

  2. Spectroscopic and Photometric Observations of Kepler Asteroseismic Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Kopacki, G; Frasca, A; Catanzaro, G; Latham, D W; Niemczura, E; Narwid, A; Steslicki, M; Arentoft, T; Kubat, J; Drobek, D; Dimitrow, W; 10.1063/1.3246557

    2012-01-01

    We summarize our ground-based program of spectroscopic and photometric observations of the asteroseismic targets of the Kepler space telescope. We have already determined atmospheric parameters, projected velocity of rotation, and radial velocity of 62 Kepler asteroseismic targets and 33 other stars in the Kepler field of view. We discovered six single-lined and two double-lined spectroscopic binaries, we determined the interstellar reddening for 29 stars in the Kepler field of view, and discovered three delta Sct, two gamma Dor and 14 other variable stars in the field of NGC 6866.

  3. Ground-based observations of Kepler asteroseismic targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uyttterhoeven , K.; Karoff, Christoffer

    2010-01-01

    We present the ground-based activities within the different working groups of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium (KASC). The activities aim at the systematic characterization of the 5000+ KASC targets, and at the collection of ground-based follow-up time-series data of selected promising...

  4. Ground-Based Sub-Millimagnitude CCD Photometry of Bright Stars using Snapshot Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, Andrew W; Aldering, Greg

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate ground-based sub-millimagnitude (10^7 electrons) to be acquired in a single integration; (iii) pointing the telescope so that all stellar images fall on the same detector pixels; and (iv) using a region of the CCD detector that is free of non-linear or aberrant pixels. We describe semi-automated observations with the Supernova Integrated Field Spectrograph (SNIFS) on the University of Hawaii 2.2m telescope on Mauna Kea, with which we achieved photometric precision as good as 5.2x10^-4 (0.56 mmag) with a 5 minute cadence over a two hour interval. In one experiment, we monitored 8 stars, each separated by several degrees, and achieved sub-mmag precision with a cadence (per star) of ~17 min. Our snapshot technique is suitable for automated searches for planetary transits among multiple, bright-stars.

  5. Movable Ground Based Recovery System for Reuseable Space Flight Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver, George L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A reusable space flight launch system is configured to eliminate complex descent and landing systems from the space flight hardware and move them to maneuverable ground based systems. Precision landing of the reusable space flight hardware is enabled using a simple, light weight aerodynamic device on board the flight hardware such as a parachute, and one or more translating ground based vehicles such as a hovercraft that include active speed, orientation and directional control. The ground based vehicle maneuvers itself into position beneath the descending flight hardware, matching its speed and direction and captures the flight hardware. The ground based vehicle will contain propulsion, command and GN&C functionality as well as space flight hardware landing cushioning and retaining hardware. The ground based vehicle propulsion system enables longitudinal and transverse maneuverability independent of its physical heading.

  6. The gamma Dor CoRoT target HD49434. I-Results from the ground-based campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Uytterhoeven, K.; Mathias, P.; Poretti, E.; RAINER, M.; Martin-Ruiz, S.; Rodriguez, E.; Amado, P. J.; LeContel, D.; Jankov, S.; Niemczura, E.; Pollard, K.; Brunsden, E.; M. Paparo; Costa, V; Valtier, J.-C.

    2008-01-01

    Context: We present the results of an extensive ground-based photometric and spectroscopic campaign on the gamma Dor CoRoT target HD49434. This campaign was preparatory to the CoRoT satellite observations, which took place from October 2007 to March 2008. Results: The frequency analysis clearly shows the presence of four frequencies in the 0.2-1.7 c/d interval, as well as six frequencies in the 5-12 c/d domain. The low frequencies are typical for gamma Dor variables while the high frequencies...

  7. Determination of phosphine and other fumigants in air samples by thermal desorption and 2D heart-cutting gas chromatography with synchronous SIM/Scan mass spectrometry and flame photometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrenholtz, Svea; Hühnerfuss, Heinrich; Baur, Xaver; Budnik, Lygia Therese

    2010-12-24

    Fumigants and volatile industrial chemicals are particularly hazardous to health when a freight container is fumigated or the contaminated material is introduced into its enclosed environment. Phosphine is now increasingly used as a fumigant, after bromomethane--the former fumigant of choice--has been banned by the Montreal Protocol. We have enhanced our previously established thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) method by integrating a second gas chromatographic dimension and a flame photometric detector to allow the simultaneous detection of phosphine and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), providing a novel application. A thermal desorption system is coupled to a two dimensional gas chromatograph using both mass spectrometric and flame photometric detection (TD-2D-GC-MS/FPD). Additionally, the collection of mass spectrometric SIM and Scan data has been synchronised, so only a single analysis is now sufficient for qualitative scanning of the whole sample and for sensitive quantification. Though detection limits for the herewith described method are slightly higher than in the previous method, they are in the low μL m(-3) range, which is not only below the respective occupational exposure and intervention limits but also allows the detection of residual contamination after ventilation. The method was developed for the separation and identification of 44 volatile substances. For 12 of these compounds (bromomethane, iodomethane, dichloromethane, 1,2-dichlorethane, benzene, tetrachloromethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, toluene, trichloronitromethane, ethyl benzene, phosphine, carbon disulfide) the method was validated as we chose the target compounds due to their relevance in freight container handling.

  8. A ground-based measurement of the relativistic beaming effect in a detached double WD binary

    CERN Document Server

    Shporer, Avi; Steinfadt, Justin D R; Bildsten, Lars; Howell, Steve B; Mazeh, Tsevi

    2010-01-01

    We report on the first ground-based measurement of the relativistic beaming effect (aka Doppler boosting). We observed the beaming effect in the detached, non-interacting eclipsing double white dwarf (WD) binary NLTT 11748. Our observations were motivated by the system's high mass ratio and low luminosity ratio, leading to a large beaming-induced variability amplitude at the orbital period of 5.6 hr. We observed the system during 3 nights at the 2.0m Faulkes Telescope North with the SDSS-g' filter, and fitted the data simultaneously for the beaming, ellipsoidal and reflection effects. Our fitted relative beaming amplitude is (3.0 +/- 0.4) x 10^(-3), consistent with the expected amplitude from a blackbody spectrum given the photometric primary radial velocity amplitude and effective temperature. This result is a first step in testing the relation between the photometric beaming amplitude and the spectroscopic radial velocity amplitude in NLTT 11748 and similar systems. We did not identify any variability due t...

  9. Probing Pluto's Atmosphere Using Ground-Based Stellar Occultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicardy, Bruno; Rio de Janeiro Occultation Team, Granada Team, International Occultation and Timing Association, Royal Astronomical Society New Zealand Occultation Section, Lucky Star associated Teams

    2016-10-01

    Over the last three decades, some twenty stellar occultations by Pluto have been monitored from Earth. They occur when the dwarf planet blocks the light from a star for a few minutes as it moves on the sky. Such events led to the hint of a Pluto's atmosphere in 1985, that was fully confirmed during another occultation in 1988, but it was only in 2002 that a new occultation could be recorded. From then on, the dwarf planet started to move in front of the galactic center, which amplified by a large factor the number of events observable per year.Pluto occultations are essentially refractive events during which the stellar rays are bent by the tenuous atmosphere, causing a gradual dimming of the star. This provides the density, pressure and temperature profiles of the atmosphere from a few kilometers above the surface up to about 250 km altitude, corresponding respectively to pressure levels of about 10 and 0.1 μbar. Moreover, the extremely fine spatial resolution (a few km) obtained through this technique allows the detection of atmospheric gravity waves, and permits in principle the detection of hazes, if present.Several aspects make Pluto stellar occultations quite special: first, they are the only way to probe Pluto's atmosphere in detail, as the dwarf planet is far too small on the sky and the atmosphere is far too tenuous to be directly imaged from Earth. Second, they are an excellent example of participative science, as many amateurs have been able to record those events worldwide with valuable scientific returns, in collaboration with professional astronomers. Third, they reveal Pluto's climatic changes on decade-scales and constrain the various seasonal models currently explored.Finally, those observations are fully complementary to space exploration, in particular with the New Horizons (NH) mission. I will show how ground-based occultations helped to better calibrate some NH profiles, and conversely, how NH results provide some key boundary conditions

  10. A Fast Method for Embattling Optimization of Ground-Based Radar Surveillance Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H.; Cheng, H.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, J.

    A growing number of space activities have created an orbital debris environment that poses increasing impact risks to existing space systems and human space flight. For the safety of in-orbit spacecraft, a lot of observation facilities are needed to catalog space objects, especially in low earth orbit. Surveillance of Low earth orbit objects are mainly rely on ground-based radar, due to the ability limitation of exist radar facilities, a large number of ground-based radar need to build in the next few years in order to meet the current space surveillance demands. How to optimize the embattling of ground-based radar surveillance network is a problem to need to be solved. The traditional method for embattling optimization of ground-based radar surveillance network is mainly through to the detection simulation of all possible stations with cataloged data, and makes a comprehensive comparative analysis of various simulation results with the combinational method, and then selects an optimal result as station layout scheme. This method is time consuming for single simulation and high computational complexity for the combinational analysis, when the number of stations increases, the complexity of optimization problem will be increased exponentially, and cannot be solved with traditional method. There is no better way to solve this problem till now. In this paper, target detection procedure was simplified. Firstly, the space coverage of ground-based radar was simplified, a space coverage projection model of radar facilities in different orbit altitudes was built; then a simplified objects cross the radar coverage model was established according to the characteristics of space objects orbit motion; after two steps simplification, the computational complexity of the target detection was greatly simplified, and simulation results shown the correctness of the simplified results. In addition, the detection areas of ground-based radar network can be easily computed with the

  11. Simulation of the imaging quality of ground-based telescopes affected by atmospheric disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yubin; Kou, Songfeng; Gu, Bozhong

    2014-08-01

    Ground-based telescope imaging model is developed in this paper, the relationship between the atmospheric disturbances and the ground-based telescope image quality is studied. Simulation of the wave-front distortions caused by atmospheric turbulences has long been an important method in the study of the propagation of light through the atmosphere. The phase of the starlight wave-front is changed over time, but in an appropriate short exposure time, the atmospheric disturbances can be considered as "frozen". In accordance with Kolmogorov turbulence theory, simulating atmospheric disturbances of image model based on the phase screen distorted by atmospheric turbulences is achieved by the fast Fourier transform (FFT). Geiger mode avalanche photodiode array (APD arrays) model is used for atmospheric wave-front detection, the image is achieved by inversion method of photon counting after the target starlight goes through phase screens and ground-based telescopes. Ground-based telescope imaging model is established in this paper can accurately achieve the relationship between the quality of telescope imaging and monolayer or multilayer atmosphere disturbances, and it is great significance for the wave-front detection and optical correction in a Multi-conjugate Adaptive Optics system (MCAO).

  12. A Photometric Search for Extrasolar Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, S. B.; Everett, M.; Davis, D. R.; Weidenschilling, S. J.; McGruder, C. H., III; Gelderman, R.

    2000-10-01

    We describe a new program for the photometric detection of extrasolar planets using the 1.3 m telescope on Kitt Peak, which will be operated by a consortium of universities headed by Western Kentucky Univ. and including South Carolina State Univ., Planetary Science Institute, Boston Univ., and UC-Berkeley (SSL). This approach will complement the existing, highly successful, spectroscopic searches. The theory of photometric transit detection has been discussed by a number of authors (e.g. Borucki & Summers 1984; Howell & Merline 1995; Howell et al. 1996) and shown to be well within the capabilities of both photomultiplier and CCD observations. The first photometric transit detection was recently accomplished for the spectroscopically discovered planet orbiting HD209458 (Henry et al. 2000). The detection of extrasolar planet transits requires high photometric precision rather than accuracy. The necessary photometric precision to detect Jupiter-, Neptune-, and Earth-sized planets in orbit around F-M dwarfs is 1%, 0.1% and 0.00001%, respectively. The required precision to observe transits by Jupiter-sized extrasolar planets is easily obtained with modern CCD detectors and the differential ensemble photometric techniques pioneered by Howell et al. (1988). The use of such a technique for ultra-high precision photometry has been described in numerous papers (Charbonneau et al. 2000, Howell 2000, plus many others). Everett and Howell recently used the Kitt Peak NOAO 0.9 m telescope with the wide-field MOSAIC camera to search for extrasolar planet transits. During this run, they achieved a photometric precision of 0.024% for this dataset. With the 1.3 m telescope, we expect to reach a photometric precision of ~ 0.01% (10-4 mag). Our consortium has recently begun to refurbish and automate the 1.3 m telescope, which will be known as the Remote-Controlled Telescope (RCT). The primary instrument will be a CCD camera with a SITe 2048 x 2048 CCD having pixel well depths of 363

  13. Observing Tsunamis in the Ionosphere Using Ground Based GPS Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, D. A.; Komjathy, A.; Song, Y. Tony; Stephens, P.; Hickey, M. P.; Foster, J.

    2011-01-01

    Ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements of ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) show variations consistent with atmospheric internal gravity waves caused by ocean tsunamis following recent seismic events, including the Tohoku tsunami of March 11, 2011. We observe fluctuations correlated in time, space, and wave properties with this tsunami in TEC estimates processed using JPL's Global Ionospheric Mapping Software. These TEC estimates were band-pass filtered to remove ionospheric TEC variations with periods outside the typical range of internal gravity waves caused by tsunamis. Observable variations in TEC appear correlated with the Tohoku tsunami near the epicenter, at Hawaii, and near the west coast of North America. Disturbance magnitudes are 1-10% of the background TEC value. Observations near the epicenter are compared to estimates of expected tsunami-driven TEC variations produced by Embry Riddle Aeronautical University's Spectral Full Wave Model, an atmosphere-ionosphere coupling model, and found to be in good agreement. The potential exists to apply these detection techniques to real-time GPS TEC data, providing estimates of tsunami speed and amplitude that may be useful for future early warning systems.

  14. Tissue Engineering of Cartilage on Ground-Based Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleshcheva, Ganna; Bauer, Johann; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Egli, Marcel; Wehland, Markus; Grimm, Daniela

    2016-06-01

    Investigations under simulated microgravity offer the opportunity for a better understanding of the influence of altered gravity on cells and the scaffold-free three-dimensional (3D) tissue formation. To investigate the short-term influence, human chondrocytes were cultivated for 2 h, 4 h, 16 h, and 24 h on a 2D Fast-Rotating Clinostat (FRC) in DMEM/F-12 medium supplemented with 10 % FCS. We detected holes in the vimentin network, perinuclear accumulations of vimentin after 2 h, and changes in the chondrocytes shape visualised by F-actin staining after 4 h of FRC-exposure. Scaffold-free cultivation of chondrocytes for 7 d on the Random Positioning Machine (RPM), the FRC and the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) resulted in spheroid formation, a phenomenon already known from spaceflight experiments with chondrocytes (MIR Space Station) and thyroid cancer cells (SimBox/Shenzhou-8 space mission). The experiments enabled by the ESA-CORA-GBF programme gave us an optimal opportunity to study gravity-related cellular processes, validate ground-based facilities for our chosen cell system, and prepare long-term experiments under real microgravity conditions in space

  15. A photometricity and extinction monitor at the Apache Point Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Hogg, D W; Schlegel, D J; Gunn, J E; Hogg, David W.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Schlegel, David J.; Gunn, James E.

    2001-01-01

    An unsupervised software ``robot'' that automatically and robustly reduces and analyzes CCD observations of photometric standard stars is described. The robot measures extinction coefficients and other photometric parameters in real time and, more carefully, on the next day. It also reduces and analyzes data from an all-sky $10 \\mu m$ camera to detect clouds; photometric data taken during cloudy periods are automatically rejected. The robot reports its findings back to observers and data analysts via the World-Wide Web. It can be used to assess photometricity, and to build data on site conditions. The robot's automated and uniform site monitoring represents a minimum standard for any observing site with queue scheduling, a public data archive, or likely participation in any future National Virtual Observatory.

  16. A search for pulsations in the HgMn star HD 45975 with CoRoT photometry and ground-based spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Morel, T; Auvergne, M; Alecian, G; Ghazaryan, S; Niemczura, E; Fossati, L; Lehmann, H; Hubrig, S; Ulusoy, C; Damerdji, Y; Rainer, M; Poretti, E; Borsa, F; Scardia, M; Schmid, V S; Van Winckel, H; De Smedt, K; Papics, P I; Gameiro, J F; Waelkens, C; Fagas, M; Kaminski, K; Dimitrov, W; Baglin, A; Michel, E; Dumortier, L; Fremat, Y; Hensberge, H; Jorissen, A; Van Eck, S

    2013-01-01

    The existence of pulsations in HgMn stars is still being debated. To provide the first unambiguous observational detection of pulsations in this class of chemically peculiar objects, the bright star HD 45975 was monitored for nearly two months by the CoRoT satellite. Independent analyses of the light curve provides evidence of monoperiodic variations with a frequency of 0.7572 c/d and a peak-to-peak amplitude of ~2800 ppm. Multisite, ground-based spectroscopic observations overlapping the CoRoT observations show the star to be a long-period, single-lined binary. Furthermore, with the notable exception of mercury, they reveal the same periodicity as in photometry in the line moments of chemical species exhibiting strong overabundances (e.g., Mn and Y). In contrast, lines of other elements do not show significant variations. As found in other HgMn stars, the pattern of variability consists in an absorption bump moving redwards across the line profiles. We argue that the photometric and spectroscopic changes are...

  17. Photometric redshifts for the NGVS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raichoor, A.; Mei, S.; Erben, T.; Hildebrandt, H.; Huertas-Company, M.; Ilbert, O.; Licitra, R.; Ball, N. M.; Boissier, S.; Boselli, A.; Chen, Y.-T.; Côté, P.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Duc, P. A.; Durrell, P. R.; Ferrarese, L.; Guhathakurta, P.; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Lancon, A.; Liu, C.; MacArthur, L. A.; Muller, M.; Muñoz, R. P.; Peng, E. W.; Puzia, T. H.; Sawicki, M.; Toloba, E.; Van Waerbeke, L.; Woods, D.; Zhang, H.

    2014-12-01

    We present the photometric redshift catalog for the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS), a 104 deg^2 optical imaging survey centered on the Virgo cluster in the u^*, g, r ,i, z bandpasses at point source depth of 25-26 ABmag. It already is the new optical reference survey for the study of the Virgo cluster, and will be also used for multiple ancillary programs. To obtain photometric redshifts, we perform accurate photometry, through the PSF-homogenization of our data. We then estimate the photometric redshifts using Le Phare and BPZ codes, adding a new prior extended down to i_{AB}=12.5 mag. We assess the accuracy of our photometric redshifts as a function of magnitude and redshift using ˜80,000 spectroscopic redshifts from public surveys. For i_{AB} outliers.

  18. Fine detrending of raw Kepler and MOST photometric data of KIC 6950556 and HD 37633

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulášek, Zdeněk; Paunzen, Ernst; Zejda, Miloslav; Semenko, Evgenij; Bernhard, Klaus; Hümmerich, Stefan; Zhang, Jia; Hubrig, Swetlana; Kuschnig, Rainer; Janík, Jan; Jagelka, Miroslav

    2016-07-01

    We present a simple phenomenological method for detrending of raw Kepler and MOST photometry, which is illustrated by means of photometric data processing of two periodically variable chemically peculiar stars, KIC 6950556 and HD 37633. In principle, this method may be applied to any type of periodically variable objects and satellite or ground based photometries. As a by product, we have identified KIC 6950556 as a magnetic chemically peculiar star with an ACV type variability.

  19. Fine detrending of raw Kepler and MOST photometric data of KIC 6950556 and HD 37633

    CERN Document Server

    Mikulasek, Zdenek; Zejda, Miloslav; Semenko, Evgenij; Bernhard, Klaus; Hummerich, Stefan; Zhang, Jia; Hubrig, Swetlana; Kuschnig, Rainer; Janik, Jan; Jagelka, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    We present a simple phenomenological method for detrending of raw Kepler and MOST photometry, which is illustrated by means of photometric data processing of two periodically variable chemically peculiar stars, KIC 6950556 and HD 37633. In principle, this method may be applied to any type of periodically variable objects and satellite or ground based photometries. As a by product, we have identified KIC 6950556 as a magnetic chemically peculiar star with an ACV type variability.

  20. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel E.; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfect all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean, and as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources’ right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO’s observations and electromagnetic (EM) follow-up. Beyond galactic foregrounds associated with seasonal variations, we find that equatorial observatories can access over 80% of the localization probability, while mid-latitudes will access closer to 70%. Facilities located near the two LIGO sites can observe sources closer to their zenith than their analogs in the south, but the average observation will still be no closer than 44° from zenith. We also find that observatories in Africa or the South Atlantic will wait systematically longer before they can begin observing compared to the rest of the world though, there is a preference for longitudes near the LIGOs. These effects, along with knowledge of the LIGO antenna pattern, can inform EM follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  1. Tentative Detection of the Rotation of Eris

    CERN Document Server

    Roe, H G; Brown, M E

    2008-01-01

    We report a multi-week sequence of B-band photometric measurements of the dwarf planet Eris using the {\\it Swift} satellite. The use of an observatory in low-Earth orbit provides better temporal sampling than is available with a ground-based telescope. We find no compelling evidence for an unusually slow rotation period of multiple days, as has been suggested previously. A $\\sim$1.08 day rotation period is marginally detected at a modest level of statistical confidence ($\\sim$97%). Analysis of the combination of the $Swift$ data with the ground-based B-band measurements of \\citet{2007AJ....133...26R} returns the same period ($\\sim$1.08 day) at a slightly higher statistical confidence ($\\sim$99%).

  2. Photometric Repeatability of Scanned Imagery: UVIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Clare E.; McCullough, Peter; Baggett, Sylvia

    2017-08-01

    We provide the preliminary results of a study on the photometric repeatability of spatial scans of bright, isolated white dwarf stars with the UVIS channel of the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We analyze straight-line scans from the first pair of identical orbits of HST program 14878 to assess if sub 0.1% repeatability can be attained with WFC3/UVIS. This study is motivated by the desire to achieve better signal-to-noise in the UVIS contamination and stability monitor, in which observations of standard stars in staring mode have been taken from the installation of WFC3 in 2009 to the present to assess temporal photometric stability. Higher signal to noise in this program would greatly benefit the sensitivity to detect contamination, and to better characterize the observed small throughput drifts over time. We find excellent repeatability between identical visits of program 14878, with sub 0.1% repeatability achieved in most filters. These! results support the initiative to transition the staring mode UVIS contamination and photometric stability monitor from staring mode images to spatial scans.

  3. Ground-based near-infrared imaging of the HD141569 circumstellar disk

    CERN Document Server

    Boccaletti, A; Marchis, F; Hanh, J

    2003-01-01

    We present the first ground-based near-infrared image of the circumstellar disk around the post-Herbig Ae/Be star HD141569A initially detected with the HST. Observations were carried out in the near-IR (2.2 $\\mu$m) at the Palomar 200-inch telescope using the adaptive optics system PALAO. The main large scale asymmetric features of the disk are detected on our ground-based data. In addition, we measured that the surface brightness of the disk is slightly different than that derived by HST observations (at 1.1 $\\mu$m and 1.6 $\\mu$m). We interpret this possible color-effect in terms of dust properties and derive a minimal

  4. The ASTRODEEP Frontier Fields catalogues. II. Photometric redshifts and rest frame properties in Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, M.; Amorín, R.; Merlin, E.; Fontana, A.; McLure, R. J.; Mármol-Queraltó, E.; Mortlock, A.; Parsa, S.; Dunlop, J. S.; Elbaz, D.; Balestra, I.; Boucaud, A.; Bourne, N.; Boutsia, K.; Brammer, G.; Bruce, V. A.; Buitrago, F.; Capak, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Ciesla, L.; Comastri, A.; Cullen, F.; Derriere, S.; Faber, S. M.; Giallongo, E.; Grazian, A.; Grillo, C.; Mercurio, A.; Michałowski, M. J.; Nonino, M.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.; Pilo, S.; Rosati, P.; Santini, P.; Schreiber, C.; Shu, X.; Wang, T.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We present the first public release of photometric redshifts, galaxy rest frame properties and associated magnification values in the cluster and parallel pointings of the first two Frontier Fields, Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416. The released catalogues aim to provide a reference for future investigations of extragalactic populations in these legacy fields: from lensed high-redshift galaxies to cluster members themselves. Methods: We exploit a multiwavelength catalogue, ranging from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to ground-based K and Spitzer IRAC, which is specifically designed to enable detection and measurement of accurate fluxes in crowded cluster regions. The multiband information is used to derive photometric redshifts and physical properties of sources detected either in the H-band image alone, or from a stack of four WFC3 bands. To minimize systematics, median photometric redshifts are assembled from six different approaches to photo-z estimates. Their reliability is assessed through a comparison with available spectroscopic samples. State-of-the-art lensing models are used to derive magnification values on an object-by-object basis by taking into account sources positions and redshifts. Results: We show that photometric redshifts reach a remarkable ~3-5% accuracy. After accounting for magnification, the H-band number counts are found to be in agreement at bright magnitudes with number counts from the CANDELS fields, while extending the presently available samples to galaxies that, intrinsically, are as faint as H ~ 32-33, thanks to strong gravitational lensing. The Frontier Fields allow the galaxy stellar mass distribution to be probed, depending on magnification, at 0.5-1.5 dex lower masses with respect to extragalactic wide fields, including sources at Mstar ~ 107-108 M⊙ at z > 5. Similarly, they allow the detection of objects with intrinsic star formation rates (SFRs) >1 dex lower than in the CANDELS fields reaching 0.1-1 M⊙/yr at z ~ 6-10. The

  5. The unusual photometric variability of the PMS star GM Cep

    CERN Document Server

    Semkov, E; Peneva, S; Milanov, T; Stoyanov, K; Stateva, I; Kjurkchieva, D; Dimitrov, D; Radeva, V

    2015-01-01

    Results from UBVRI photometric observations of the pre-main sequence star GM Cep obtained in the period April 2011 - August 2014 are reported in the paper. Presented data are a continuation of our photometric monitoring of the star started in 2008. GM Cep is located in the field of the young open cluster Trumpler 37 and over the past years it has been an object of intense photometric and spectral studies. The star shows a strong photometric variability interpreted as a possible outburst from EXor type in previous studies. Our photometric data for a period of over six years show a large amplitude variability (Delta V ~ 2.3 mag.) and several deep minimums in brightness are observed. The analysis of the collected multicolor photometric data shows the typical of UX Ori variables a color reversal during the minimums in brightness. The observed decreases in brightness have a different shape, and evidences of periodicity are not detected. At the same time, high amplitude rapid variations in brightness typical for th...

  6. The Unusual Photometric Variability of the PMS Star GM Cep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semkov, E. H.; Ibryamov, S. I.; Peneva, S. P.; Milanov, T. R.; Stoyanov, K. A.; Stateva, I. K.; Kjurkchieva, D. P.; Dimitrov, D. P.; Radeva, V. S.

    2015-03-01

    Results from UBVRI photometric observations of the pre-main sequence star GM Cep obtained in the period 2011 April-2014 August are reported in the paper. Presented data are a continuation of our photometric monitoring of the star started in 2008. GM Cep is located in the field of the young open cluster Trumpler 37 and over the past years it has been an object of intense photometric and spectral studies. The star shows a strong photometric variability interpreted as a possible outburst from EXor type in previous studies. Our photometric data for a period of over six years show a large amplitude variability (ΔV ~ 2.3 mag) and several deep minimums in brightness are observed. The analysis of the collected multicolour photometric data show the typical of UX Ori variables a colour reversal during the minimums in brightness. The observed decreases in brightness have a different shape, and evidences of periodicity are not detected. At the same time, high amplitude rapid variations in brightness typical for the classical T Tauri stars also present on the light curve of GM Cep. The spectrum of GM Cep shows the typical of classical T Tauri stars wide Hα emission line and absorption lines of some metals. We calculate the outer radius of the Hα emitting region as 10.4 ± 0.5 R⊙ and the accretion rate as 1.8 × 10- 7 M⊙ yr- 1.

  7. Sensitive determination of carbohydrates labelled with p-nitroaniline by capillary electrophoresis with photometric detection using a 406 nm light-emitting diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momenbeik, Fariborz; Johns, Cameron; Breadmore, Michael C; Hilder, Emily F; Macka, Miroslav; Haddad, Paul R

    2006-10-01

    p-Nitroaniline was explored as a derivatising reagent for UV absorbance detection of carbohydrates after separation by CE. This derivatising agent has three advantages: first, it has excellent water solubility; second, it has high molar absorptivity; and third, it is possible to obtain sensitive detection using a UV or blue light-emitting diode (LED) as the light source. The labelling reaction took less than 30 min to complete with high reaction yield. The separation process was modelled and optimised using an artificial neural network. Nine carbohydrates were separated by a CE system within 16 min using a 0.17 M boric acid buffer at pH 9.7. On-column LED detection at 406 nm allowed the detection of carbohydrates with good detection limits (quantification in the concentration range of 2.6-200 microM. This method was applied successfully to the determination of component carbohydrates in some food samples.

  8. A combined spectroscopic and photometric stellar activity study of Epsilon Eridani

    CERN Document Server

    Giguere, Matthew J; Zhang, Cyril X Y; Matthews, Jaymie M; Cameron, Chris; Henry, Gregory W

    2016-01-01

    We present simultaneous ground-based radial velocity (RV) measurements and space-based photometric measurements of the young and active K dwarf Epsilon Eridani. These measurements provide a data set for exploring methods of identifying and ultimately distinguishing stellar photospheric velocities from Keplerian motion. We compare three methods we have used in exploring this data set: Dalmatian, an MCMC spot modeling code that fits photometric and RV measurements simultaneously; the FF$'$ method, which uses photometric measurements to predict the stellar activity signal in simultaneous RV measurements; and H$\\alpha$ analysis. We show that our H$\\alpha$ measurements are strongly correlated with photometry from the Microvariability and Oscillations of STars (MOST) instrument, which led to a promising new method based solely on the spectroscopic observations. This new method, which we refer to as the HH$'$ method, uses H$\\alpha$ measurements as input into the FF$'$ model. While the Dalmatian spot modeling analysi...

  9. Southern Cosmology Survey I: Optical Cluster Detections and Predictions for the Southern Common-Area Millimeter-Wave Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Menanteau, Felipe; Jimenez, Raul; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Verde, Licia; Kosowsky, Arthur; Moodley, Kavilan; Roche, Nathan

    2008-01-01

    We present first results from the Southern Cosmology Survey, a new multiwavelength survey of the southern sky coordinated with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), a recently commissioned ground-based mm-band Cosmic Microwave Background experiment. This article presents a full analysis of archival optical multi-band imaging data covering an 8 square degree region near right ascension 23 hours and declination -55 degrees, obtained by the Blanco 4-m telescope and Mosaic-II camera in late 2005. We describe the pipeline we have developed to process this large data volume, obtain accurate photometric redshifts, and detect optical clusters. Our cluster finding process uses the combination of a matched spatial filter, photometric redshift probability distributions and richness estimation. We present photometric redshifts, richness estimates, luminosities, and masses for 8 new optically-selected clusters with mass greater than $3\\times10^{14}M_{\\sun}$ at redshifts out to 0.7. We also present estimates for the expec...

  10. Express immunochromatographic detection of antibodies against Brucella abortus in cattle sera based on quantitative photometric registration and modulated cut-off level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotnikov, Dmitriy V; Byzova, Nadezhda A; Zherdev, Anatoly V; Eskendirova, Saule Z; Baltin, Kairat K; Mukanov, Kasim K; Ramankulov, Erlan M; Sadykhov, Elchin G; Dzantiev, Boris B

    2015-01-01

    An immunochromatographic test system was developed for rapid detection of the levels of specific IgG antibodies to Brucella abortus lipopolysaccharide, as a tool for diagnosis of brucellosis in cattle. The pilot test strips were examined using blood sera from sick (78 samples) and healthy (35 samples) cows. The results obtained by immunochromatographic assay, using a portable optical densitometer for digital video detection, correlate well with the results obtained by immunoenzyme assay and are in agreement with the results of the disease diagnosis. The new test system allows detection of antibodies within 10 min and can be proposed as an alternative to the methods available for serodiagnosis of brucellosis.

  11. Calibrating Photometric Redshifts of Luminous Red Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Padmanabhan, N; Schlegel, D J; Bridges, T J; Brinkmann, J; Cannon, R; Connolly, A J; Croom, S M; Csabai, I; Drinkwater, M; Eisenstein, D J; Hewett, P C; Loveday, J; Nichol, R C; Pimbblet, K A; De Propris, R; Schneider, D P; Scranton, R; Seljak, U; Shanks, T; Szapudi, I; Szalay, A S; Wake, D; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Budavari, Tamas; Schlegel, David J.; Bridges, Terry; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Cannon, Russell; Connolly, Andrew J.; Croom, Scott M.; Csabai, Istvan; Drinkwater, Michael; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Hewett, Paul C.; Loveday, Jon; Nichol, Robert C.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Propris, Roberto De; Schneider, Donald P.; Scranton, Ryan; Seljak, Uros; Shanks, Tom; Szapudi, Istvan; Szalay, Alexander S.; Wake, David

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the construction of a photometric redshift catalogue of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), emphasizing the principal steps necessary for constructing such a catalogue -- (i) photometrically selecting the sample, (ii) measuring photometric redshifts and their error distributions, (iii) and estimating the true redshift distribution. We compare two photometric redshift algorithms for these data and find that they give comparable results. Calibrating against the SDSS and SDSS-2dF spectroscopic surveys, we find that the photometric redshift accuracy is $\\sigma \\sim 0.03$ for redshifts less than 0.55 and worsens at higher redshift ($\\sim 0.06$). These errors are caused by photometric scatter, as well as systematic errors in the templates, filter curves, and photometric zeropoints. We also parametrize the photometric redshift error distribution with a sum of Gaussians, and use this model to deconvolve the errors from the measured photometric redshift distribution to est...

  12. Photometric monitoring of Luminous Blue Variables

    CERN Document Server

    Buemi, Carla; Leto, Paolo; Schilliro', Francesco; Trigilio, Corrado; Umana, Grazia; Bernabei, Stefano; Cutispoto, Giuseppe; Messina, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    We present some preliminary results from our program of intensive near-infrared photometric monitoring of a sample of confirmed and candidate Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) conducted from 2008 to 2010. Clear long-term variability has been observed for Wray 17-96 and V481 Sct, with overall brightness variation greater than 1 mag in the J band. Other sources, such as LBV 1806-20 showed detectable variability with amplitudes of few tenths of a magnitude with time-scale of about 60 days.

  13. Photometric monitoring of Luminous Blue Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buemi, Carla; Distefano, Elisa; Leto, Paolo; Schillirò, Francesco; Trigilio, Corrado; Umana, Grazia; Bernabei, Stefano; Cutispoto, Giuseppe; Messina, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    We present some preliminary results from our program of intensive near-infrared photometric monitoring of a sample of confirmed and candidate Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) conducted from 2008 to 2010. Clear long-term variability has been observed for Wray 17-96 and V481 Sct, with overall brightness variation greater than 1 mag in the J band. Other sources, such as LBV 1806-20 showed detectable variability with amplitudes of few tenths of a magnitude with a time-scale of about 60 days.

  14. The Variability of the BRITE-est Wolf-Rayet star gamma Velorum. Photometric and Spectroscopic Evidence of Colliding Winds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Noel; St-Jean, Lucas; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; St. Louis, Nicole; Post Russell, Christopher Michael; Shenar, Tomer; Pablo, Herbert; Hill, Grant M.; Ramiaramanantsoa, Tahina; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael F.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the first results of an intensive photometric and spectroscopic campaign on the bright WC+O binary, gamma Velorum. The system was observed with two-color photometry with the BRITE-Constellation nanosatellites for six months, while we collected ~500 optical spectra in parallel from ground-based observatories. We report on the spectroscopic orbit and the evidence of colliding winds, both spectroscopically and photometrically. We find evidence of an inverse relationship between the orbital separation and the observed flux. Through a comparison with multiple spectra and the red/blue filter responses, we find that the flux excess seen photometrically is caused by the excess line emission at periastron. We have begun to quantify these variations and will compare them with smoothed-particle hydrodynamics simulations. We will further constrain these processes using XMM-Newton X-ray spectroscopy that will be obtained in late-2016 in parallel with further optical photometric and spectroscopic observations.

  15. One Moon, many measurements 2: Photometric corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, S.; Yokota, Y.; Boardman, J.; Green, R.; Haruyama, J.; Isaacson, P.; Mall, U.; Matsunaga, T.; Ohtake, M.; Pieters, C.; Staid, M.; Sunshine, J.; Yamamoto, S.

    2013-09-01

    Observations of the lunar surface within the past 10 years have been made with various lunar remote sensing instruments, the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) onboard the Chandrayaan-1 mission, the Spectral Profiler (SP), the Multiband Imager (MI), the Terrain Camera (TC) onboard the SELENE mission, and the ground based USGS Robotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) for some of them. The lunar phase functions derived from these datasets, which are used in the photometric modeling to correct for the various illumination conditions of the data, are compared to assess their differences and similarity in order to improve interpretations of lunar surface spectra. The phase functions are found to be similar across various phase angles except in the 0-20° range. Differences across the 0-20° range likely result from two different inputs in the photometric modeling of the M3 and SP data: (1) M3 has larger emission angles due to the characteristics of the instrument and the attitude of the spacecraft, and (2) M3 viewing geometry was derived from the local topography whereas SP used a spherical Moon (no topography). The combination of these two different inputs affects the phase function at small phase angles where shadows play a more substantial role, with spatial resolution differences between M3 and SP being another possible source for the differences. SP data are found to be redder (i.e., steeper slope with increasing wavelengths) than MI, M3 and ROLO. Finally, the M3 overall reflectance is also found to be lower than that the other instruments (i.e., MI, SP, and ROLO), generally at least 10% darker than MI. These differences can be observed at local scales in specific examples at hundreds of meters resolutions. At regional and global scales, the same differences are found, which demonstrates the overall stability of the various datasets. The observations from M3, TC, SP and MI are very stable and agree well; however caution should be used when making interpretations based on the

  16. Techniques to extend the reach of ground based gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Sheila

    2016-03-01

    While the current generation of advanced ground based detectors will open the gravitational wave universe to observation, ground based interferometry has the potential to extend the reach of these observatories to high redshifts. Several techniques have the potential to improve the advanced detectors beyond design sensitivity, including the use of squeezed light, upgraded suspensions, and possibly new optical coatings, new test mass materials, and cryogenic suspensions. To improve the sensitivity by more than a factor of 10 compared to advanced detectors new, longer facilities will be needed. Future observatories capable of hosting interferometers 10s of kilometers long have the potential to extend the reach of gravitational wave astronomy to cosmological distances, enabling detection of binary inspirals from throughout the history of star formation.

  17. Post-column reaction for simultaneous analysis of chromatic and leuco forms of malachite green and crystal violet by high-performance liquid chromatography with photometric detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J.L.; Meinertz, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    The chromatic and leuco forms of malachite green and crystal violet were readily separated and detected by a sensitive and selective high-performance liquid chromatographic procedure. The chromatic and leuco forms of the dyes were separated within 11 min on a C18 column with a mobile phase of 0.05 M sodium acetate and 0.05 M acetic acid in water (19%) and methanol (81%). A reaction chamber, containing 10% PbO2 in Celite 545, was placed between the column and the spectrophotometric detector to oxidize the leuco forms of the dyes to their chromatic forms. Chromatic and leuco malachite green were quantified by their absorbance at 618 nm; and chromatic and leuco Crystal Violet by their absorbance at 588 nm. Detection limits for chromatic and leuco forms of both dyes ranged from 0.12 to 0.28 ng. A linear range of 1 to 100 ng was established for both forms of the dyes.

  18. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory : determination of organophosphate pesticides in whole water by continuous liquid-liquid extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography with flame photometric detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Virendra K.; Wydoski, Duane S.

    2003-01-01

    A method for the isolation of 20 parent organophosphate pesticides and 5 organophosphate pesticide degradates from natural-water samples is described. Compounds are extracted from water samples with methylene chloride using a continuous liquid-liquid extractor for 6 hours. The solvent is evaporated using heat and a flow of nitrogen to a volume of 1 milliliter and solvent exchanged to ethyl acetate. Extracted compounds are determined by capillary-column gas chromatography with flame photometric detection. Single-operator derived method detection limits in three water-matrix samples ranged from 0.003 to 0.009 microgram per liter. Method performance was validated by spiking all compounds in three different matrices at three different concentrations. Eight replicates were analyzed at each concentration in each matrix. Mean recoveries of most method compounds spiked in surface-water samples ranged from 54 to 137 percent and those in ground-water samples ranged from 40 to 109 percent for all pesticides. Recoveries in reagent-water samples ranged from 42 to 104 percent for all pesticides. The only exception was O-ethyl-O-methyl-S-propylphosphorothioate, which had variable recovery in all three matrices ranging from 27 to 79 percent. As a result, the detected concentration of O-ethyl-O-methyl-S-propylphosphorothioate in samples is reported in this method with an estimated remark code. Based on the performance issue, two more compounds, disulfoton and ethion monoxon, also will be reported in this method with an estimated remark code. Estimated-value compounds, which are ?E-coded? in the data base, do not meet the performance criteria for unqualified quantification, but are retained in the method because the compounds are important owing to high use or potential environmental effects and because analytical performance has been consistent and reproducible.

  19. Photometric Study of Selected Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, Vasilij G.; Velichko, Feodor P.; Checha, Vitaly A.; Krugly, Yurij N.

    2014-07-01

    We performed photometric observations for eleven asteroids. New rotation periods were determined for five asteroids: 2812 Scaltriti (7.596 h), 4716 Urey (6.2 h), 7446 Hadrianus (3.402 h), (26657) 2000 SX293 (2.8 - 3.8 h), and (54063) 2000 GC136 (5.154 h).

  20. On specific features of investigation of fluid flows by photometric techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vologdin, V. A.; Davydov, V. V.; Velichko, E. N.

    2016-08-01

    Specific features of investigation of the fluid flow structure in a pipeline by photometric techniques are considered. The applicability of the photometric techniques based on the Doppler effect to such studies is discussed. A new method for detecting defects on inner walls of a pipeline that involves the use of the laser radiation scattered from particles in a flowing fluid is suggested.

  1. Ground-Based Observing Campaign of Briz-M Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, S. M.; Buckalew, B.; Frith, J.; Cowardin, H. M.; Hickson, P.; Matney, M.; Anz-Meador, P.

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) completed the installation of the Meter Class Autonomous Telescope (MCAT) on Ascension Island. MCAT is a 1.3m optical telescope designed with a fast tracking capability for observing orbital debris at all orbital regimes (Low-Erath orbits to Geosyncronous (GEO) orbits) from a low latitude site. This new asset is dedicated year-round for debris observations, and its location fills a geographical gap in the Ground-based Electro Optical Space Surveillance (GEODSS) network. A commercial off the shelf (COTS) research grade 0.4m telescope (named the Benbrook telescope) will also be installed on Ascension at the end of 2016. This smaller version is controlled by the same master software, designed by Euclid Research, and can be tasked to work independently or in concert with MCAT. Like MCAT, it has a the same suite of filters, a similar field of view, and a fast-tracking Astelco mount, and is also capable of tracking debris at all orbital regimes. These assets are well suited for targeted campagins or surveys of debris. Since 2013, NASA's ODPO has also had extensive access to the 3.8m infrared UKIRT telescope, located on Mauna Kea. At nearly 14,000-ft, this site affords excellent conditions for collecting both photometery and spectroscopy at near-IR (0.9 - 2.5 micrometers SWIR) and thermal-IR (8 - 25 micrometers; LWIR) regimes, ideal for investigating material properties as well as thermal characteristics and sizes of debris. For the purposes of understanding orbital debris, taking data in both survey mode as well as targeting individual objects for more in-depth characterizations are desired. With the recent break-ups of Briz-M rocket bodies, we have collected a suite of data in the optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared of in-tact objects as well as those classified as debris. A break-up at GEO of a Briz-M rocket occurred in January, 2016, well timed for the first remote observing survey-campaign with MCAT. Access to

  2. A novel detection approach based on chromophore-decolorizing with free radical and application to photometric determination of copper with acid chrome dark blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong-Wen; Chen, Fang-Fang; Chen, Ling; Zeng, Teng; Pan, Lu-Ting; Li, Jian-Hua; Luo, Hua-Fei

    2007-03-21

    A novel detection approach named chromophore-decolorizing with free radicals is developed for determination of trace heavy metal. The hydroxyl radicals (HO) generated from Fe(III) and hydrogen peroxide will oxidize the free chromophore into almost colorless products. The copper-acid chrome dark blue (ACDB) complexation was investigated at pH 5.07. In the presence of Fe(III) and hydrogen peroxide, the excess ACDB was decolorized in the Cu-ACDB reaction solution, and the final solution contained only one color compound, the Cu-ACDB complex. After oxidation of free hydroxyl radicals, the complexation becomes sensitive and selective and it has been used for the quantitation of trace amounts of Cu(II) dissolved in natural water. Beer's law is obeyed in the range from 0 to 0.500 microg mL(-1) Cu(II) and the limit of detection is only 6 microg L(-1) Cu(II). Besides, the Cu-ACDB complex formed was characterized.

  3. On-line capillary isotachophoresis-capillary zone electrophoresis analysis of bromate in drinking waters in an automated analyzer with coupled columns and photometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marák, Jozef; Staňová, Andrea; Vaváková, Veronika; Hrenáková, Martina; Kaniansky, Dušan

    2012-12-07

    A new, sensitive, and robust analytical method based on capillary zone electrophoresis with on-line capillary isotachophoresis sample pretreatment (ITP-CZE) using a column-coupling (CC) arrangement of automated capillary electrophoretic analyzer was developed for determination of bromate in different type of drinking water samples. Both columns were provided with contact-less conductivity detectors and in CZE step UV detection at 200 nm wavelength was used. Electroosmotic flow of the buffer solutions was suppressed with the addition of 0.1% or 0.05% (m/v) methylhydroxyethylcellulose into the leading and terminating electrolyte, respectively. Hydrodynamic and electroosmotic flows of the buffer solutions were successfully suppressed and therefore, only the electrophoretic transport of ions was significant. Limit of detection for bromate approaching 0.6 μg/L was achieved. Good repeatabilities of migration time (RSD less than 0.3%) and peak area (RSD less than 4.0%) at concentration level 1 μg/L were obtained. Robustness of proposed ITP-CZE method and validation parameters were evaluated. Developed automated ITP-CZE method was applied to the determination of bromate in drinking water samples with different content of inorganic macroconstituents without the need of further sample preparation.

  4. Determination of organotin compounds in biological samples using accelerated solvent extraction, sodium tetraethylborate ethylation, and multicapillary gas chromatography-flame photometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasik, Andrzej; Ciesielski, Tomasz

    2004-03-01

    A method has been developed for species-selective analysis of organotin compounds in solid, biological samples. The procedure is based on accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) of analytes and includes extraction of the tin species with a methanol-water (90% methanol) solution of acetic acid/sodium acetate containing tropolone (0.03% w/ v), their ethylation with NaBEt(4), and separation and detection by GC-FPD. The analytical procedure was optimized with an unspiked sample of harbor porpoise ( Phocoena phocoena) liver. Effects of ASE operational variables (extraction temperature and pressure, solvent composition, number of static extraction steps) are discussed. Method detection limits (MDL) were in the range 6-10 ng(Sn) g(-1) dry weight and 7-17 ng(Sn) g(-1) dry weight for butyl- and phenyltin compounds, respectively. Recoveries were comparable with or better than those obtained by use of other procedures reported in the literature. The analytical procedure was validated by analysis of NIES No. 11 (fish tissue) certified reference material.

  5. Intercomparison of ground-based ozone and NO2 measurements during the MANTRA 2004 campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Strong

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The MANTRA (Middle Atmosphere Nitrogen TRend Assessment 2004 campaign took place in Vanscoy, Saskatchewan, Canada (52° N, 107° W from 3 August to 15 September, 2004. In support of the main balloon launch, a suite of five zenith-sky and direct-Sun-viewing UV-visible ground-based spectrometers was deployed, primarily measuring ozone and NO2 total columns. Three Fourier transform spectrometers (FTSs that were part of the balloon payload also performed ground-based measurements of several species, including ozone. Ground-based measurements of ozone and NO2 differential slant column densities from the zenith-viewing UV-visible instruments are presented herein. They are found to partially agree within NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change standards for instruments certified for process studies and satellite validation. Vertical column densities of ozone from the zenith-sky UV-visible instruments, the FTSs, a Brewer spectrophotometer, and ozonesondes are compared, and found to agree within the combined error estimates of the instruments (15%. NO2 vertical column densities from two of the UV-visible instruments are compared, and are also found to agree within combined error (15%.

  6. The Dependence of Signal-To-Noise Ratio (S/N) Between Star Brightness and Background on the Filter Used in Images Taken by the Vulcan Photometric Planet Search Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena-Werth, Jose

    1998-01-01

    The Vulcan Photometric Planet Search is the ground-based counterpart of Kepler Mission Proposal. The Kepler Proposal calls for the launch of telescope to look intently at a small patch of sky for four year. The mission is designed to look for extra-solar planets that transit sun-like stars. The Kepler Mission should be able to detect Earth-size planets. This goal requires an instrument and software capable of detecting photometric changes of several parts per hundred thousand in the flux of a star. The goal also requires the continuous monitoring of about a hundred thousand stars. The Kepler Mission is a NASA Discovery Class proposal similar in cost to the Lunar Prospector. The Vulcan Search is also a NASA project but based at Lick Observatory. A small wide-field telescope monitors various star fields successively during the year. Dozens of images, each containing tens of thousands of stars, are taken any night that weather permits. The images are then monitored for photometric changes of the order of one part in a thousand. These changes would reveal the transit of an inner-orbit Jupiter-size planet similar to those discovered recently in spectroscopic searches. In order to achieve a one part in one thousand photometric precision even the choice of a filter used in taking an exposure can be critical. The ultimate purpose of an filter is to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of one's observation. Ideally, filters reduce the sky glow cause by street lights and, thereby, make the star images more distinct. The higher the S/N, the higher is the chance to observe a transit signal that indicates the presence of a new planet. It is, therefore, important to select the filter that maximizes the S/N.

  7. Comparison of hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of organosulfur pesticides in environmental and beverage samples by gas chromatography with flame photometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jun; Hu, Bin

    2008-06-06

    Two methods based on hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME) and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), have been critically compared for the analysis of organosulfur pesticides (OSPs) in environmental and beverage samples by gas chromatography-flame photometric detection (GC-FPD). Experimental conditions including extraction solvent, solvent volume, extraction time, temperature and ionic strength have been investigated for both HF-LPME and DLLME. Under the optimal conditions, the limits of detection for the six target OSPs (malathion, chlorpyrifos, buprofezin, triazophos, carbosulfan and pyridaben) obtained by HF-LPME-GC-FPD and DLLME-GC-FPD were ranged from 1.16 microg/L to 48.48 microg/L and 0.21 microg/L to 3.05 microg/L, respectively. The relative standard deviations (RSDs, n=5) were in the range of 3.4-8.0% and 8.5-13.7%with the enrichment factors (EFs) of 27-530 and 176-946 folds for HF-LPME-GC-FPD and DLLME-GC-FPD, respectively. Both methods were found to be simple, fast, efficient, and inexpensive. Compared with HF-LPME, the advantages of DLLME technique were less extraction time, suitable for batches of samples pretreatment simultaneously, a higher extraction capacity when analyzing simple samples such as water samples. While for the analysis of complicated matrix samples such as soil and beverage samples, HF-LPME was demonstrated to be more robust and more suitable. Both methods were applied to the analysis of six OSPs in different waters, soil and beverage samples, and no target OSPs was found in these samples. For analysis of the spiked samples, the recovery of 81.7-114.4% with RSDs of 0.6-9.6% were obtained for HF-LPME, and the recovery of 78.5-117.2% with RSDs of 0.6-11.9% were obtained for DLLME.

  8. Ground-based observations of Kepler asteroseismic targets

    CERN Document Server

    Uytterhoeven, K; Southworth, J; Randall, S; Ostensen, R; Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Marconi, M; Kurtz, D W; Kiss, L; Gutierrez-Soto, J; Frandsen, S; De Cat, P; Bruntt, H; Briquet, M; Zhang, X B; Telting, J H; Steslicki, M; Ripepi, V; Pigulski, A; Paparo, M; Oreiro, R; Choong, Ngeow Chow; Niemczura, E; Nemec, J; Narwid, A; Mathias, P; Martin-Ruiz, S; Lehman, H; Kopacki, G; Karoff, C; Jackiewicz, J; Henden, A A; Handler, G; Grigachene, A; Green, E M; Garrido, R; Machado, L Fox; Debosscher, J; Creevey, O L; Catanzaro, G; Bognar, Z; Biazzo, K; Bernabei, S

    2010-01-01

    We present the ground-based activities within the different working groups of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium (KASC). The activities aim at the systematic characterization of the 5000+ KASC targets, and at the collection of ground-based follow-up time-series data of selected promising Kepler pulsators. So far, 35 different instruments at 30 telescopes on 22 different observatories in 12 countries are in use, and a total of more than 530 observing nights has been awarded. (Based on observations made with the Isaac Newton Telescope, William Herschel Telescope, Nordic Optical Telescope, Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, Mercator Telescope (La Palma, Spain), and IAC-80 (Tenerife, Spain). Also based on observations taken at the observatories of Sierra Nevada, San Pedro Martir, Vienna, Xinglong, Apache Point, Lulin, Tautenburg, Loiano, Serra la Nave, Asiago, McDonald, Skinakas, Pic du Midi, Mauna Kea, Steward Observatory, Bialkow Observatory of the Wroclaw University, Piszkesteto Mountain Station, Observato...

  9. Photometric Redshift and Classification for the XMM-COSMOS Sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salvato, M.; Hasinger, G.; Ilbert, O.; Zamorani, G.; Brusa, M.; Scoville, N. Z.; Rau, A.; Capak, P.; Arnouts, S.; Aussel, H.; Bolzonella, M.; Buongiorno, A.; Cappelluti, N.; Caputi, K.; Civano, F.; Cook, R.; Elvis, M.; Gilli, R.; Jahnke, K.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Impey, C. D.; Lamareille, F.; Le Floch, E.; Lilly, S.; Mainieri, V.; McCarthy, P.; McCracken, H.; Mignoli, M.; Mobasher, B.; Murayama, T.; Sasaki, S.; Sanders, D. B.; Schiminovich, D.; Shioya, Y.; Shopbell, P.; Silverman, J.; Smolcic, V.; Surace, J.; Taniguchi, Y.; Thompson, D.; Trump, J. R.; Urry, M.; Zamojski, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present photometric redshifts and spectral energy distribution (SED) classifications for a sample of 1542 optically identified sources detected with XMM in the COSMOS field. Our template fitting classifies 46 sources as stars and 464 as nonactive galaxies, while the remaining 1032 require templat

  10. Photometric Redshift and Classification for the XMM-COSMOS Sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salvato, M.; Hasinger, G.; Ilbert, O.; Zamorani, G.; Brusa, M.; Scoville, N. Z.; Rau, A.; Capak, P.; Arnouts, S.; Aussel, H.; Bolzonella, M.; Buongiorno, A.; Cappelluti, N.; Caputi, K.; Civano, F.; Cook, R.; Elvis, M.; Gilli, R.; Jahnke, K.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Impey, C. D.; Lamareille, F.; Le Floch, E.; Lilly, S.; Mainieri, V.; McCarthy, P.; McCracken, H.; Mignoli, M.; Mobasher, B.; Murayama, T.; Sasaki, S.; Sanders, D. B.; Schiminovich, D.; Shioya, Y.; Shopbell, P.; Silverman, J.; Smolcic, V.; Surace, J.; Taniguchi, Y.; Thompson, D.; Trump, J. R.; Urry, M.; Zamojski, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present photometric redshifts and spectral energy distribution (SED) classifications for a sample of 1542 optically identified sources detected with XMM in the COSMOS field. Our template fitting classifies 46 sources as stars and 464 as nonactive galaxies, while the remaining 1032 require

  11. Ground-Based Calibration Of A Microwave Landing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriazes, John J.; Scott, Marshall M., Jr.; Willis, Alfred D.; Erdogan, Temel; Reyes, Rolando

    1996-01-01

    System of microwave instrumentation and data-processing equipment developed to enable ground-based calibration of microwave scanning-beam landing system (MSBLS) at distances of about 500 to 1,000 ft from MSBLS transmitting antenna. Ensures accuracy of MSBLS near touchdown point, without having to resort to expense and complex logistics of aircraft-based testing. Modified versions prove useful in calibrating aircraft instrument landing systems.

  12. Determination of lycopene in tissues and plasma of rats by normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with photometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froescheis, O; Moalli, S; Liechti, H; Bausch, J

    2000-03-10

    An analytical method for the determination of lycopene in tissues and plasma of rats is described. The method was validated for the determination of lycopene in liver and plasma with respect to selectivity, linearity, accuracy, recovery and precision. Following precipitation of proteins with water-ethanol plasma was extracted with hexane; tissues were extracted with acetone followed by precipitation of proteins with water-ethanol and extraction of lycopene with hexane. Separation and quantification of geometrical isomers of lycopene was achieved by normal-phase HPLC with UV/VIS detection at 471 nm. The method proved to be selective and specific for lycopene in plasma and liver. Detector response was linear in the range from 2 ng/g to 10 microg/g liver and 0.5 ng/ml to 2 microg/ml plasma, respectively. Average recoveries ranged from 96 to 101% in spiked liver samples and from 91 to 94% in spiked plasma samples. Intra-day variability (C.V.) was < or = 6% and < or = 5% in liver and plasma, respectively. Inter-day precision was < or = 9% for liver samples and < or = 6% for plasma samples. The procedures were successfully applied to the sample analysis of pharmacokinetic and metabolism studies.

  13. Semi-supervised Learning for Photometric Supernova Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, Joseph W; Freeman, Peter E; Schafer, Chad M; Poznanski, Dovi

    2011-01-01

    We present a semi-supervised method for photometric supernova typing. Our approach is to first use the nonlinear dimension reduction technique diffusion map to detect structure in a database of supernova light curves and subsequently employ random forest classification on a spectroscopically confirmed training set to learn a model that can predict the type of each newly observed supernova. We demonstrate that this is an effective method for supernova typing. As supernova numbers increase, our semi-supervised method efficiently utilizes this information to improve classification, a property not enjoyed by template based methods. Applied to supernova data simulated by Kessler et al. (2010b) to mimic those of the Dark Energy Survey, our methods achieve (cross-validated) 96% Type Ia purity and 86% Type Ia efficiency on the spectroscopic sample, but only 56% Type Ia purity and 48% efficiency on the photometric sample due to their spectroscopic followup strategy. To improve the performance on the photometric sample...

  14. Planck 2013 results. VIII. HFI photometric calibration and mapmaking

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Armitage-Caplan, C; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bertincourt, B; Bielewicz, P; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bridges, M; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chen, X; Chiang, L -Y; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Filliard, C; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Lellouch, E; Leonardi, R; Leroy, C; Lesgourgues, J; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Maurin, L; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Moreno, R; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rusholme, B; Santos, D; Savini, G; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sureau, F; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Techene, S; Terenzi, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the processing applied to the HFI cleaned time-ordered data to produce photometrically calibrated maps. HFI observes the sky over a broad range of frequencies, from 100 to 857 GHz. To get the best accuracy on the calibration on such a large range, two different photometric calibration schemes have to be used. The 545 and 857 \\GHz\\ data are calibrated using Uranus and Neptune flux density measurements, compared with models of their atmospheric emissions to calibrate the data. The lower frequencies (below 353 GHz) are calibrated using the cosmological microwave background dipole.One of the components of this anisotropy results from the orbital motion of the satellite in the Solar System, and is therefore time-variable. Photometric calibration is thus tightly linked to mapmaking, which also addresses low frequency noise removal. The 2013 released HFI data show some evidence for apparent gain variations of the HFI bolometers' detection chain. These variations were identified by comparing obse...

  15. Ground-Based Lidar for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Ozone Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J.; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than 10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures.

  16. Ground-based lidar for atmospheric boundary layer ozone measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-05-20

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than ±10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures.

  17. Photometric and Obscurational Completeness

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, R A

    2005-01-01

    We report a method that uses "completeness" to estimate the number of exrasolar planets discovered by an observing program with a direct-imaging instrument. We develop a completeness function for Earth-like planets on "habitable" orbits for an instrument with a central field obscuration, uniform sensitivity in an annular detection zone, and limiting sensitivity that is expressed as a "delta magnitude" with respect to the star, determined by systematic effects (given adequate exposure time). We demonstrate our method of estimation by applying it to our understanding of the coronagraphic version of the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF-C) mission as of October 2004. We establish an initial relationship between the size, quality, and stability of the instrument's optics and its ability to meet mission science requirements. We provide options for increasing the fidelity and versatility of the models on which our method is based, and we discuss how the method could be extended to model the TPF-C mission as a whole, t...

  18. Photometric study of IC 2156

    CERN Document Server

    Tadross, A L

    2015-01-01

    The optical UBVRI photometric analysis has been established using SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY (SDSS database) in order to estimate the astrophysical parameters of poorly studied open star cluster IC 2156. The results of the present study are compared with a previous one of ours, which relied on the 2MASS JHK infrared photometry. The stellar density distributions and color-magnitude diagrams of the cluster are used to determine the geometrical structure; limited radius, core and tidal radii, the distances from the Sun, from the Galactic plane and from the Galactic center. Also, the main photometric parameters; age, distance modulus, color excesses, membership, total mass, luminosity, mass functions and relaxation time; have been estimated.

  19. Overconfidence in Photometric Redshift Estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Wittman, David; Tobin, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    We describe a new test of photometric redshift performance given a spectroscopic redshift sample. This test complements the traditional comparison of redshift {\\it differences} by testing whether the probability density functions $p(z)$ have the correct {\\it width}. We test two photometric redshift codes, BPZ and EAZY, on each of two data sets and find that BPZ is consistently overconfident (the $p(z)$ are too narrow) while EAZY produces approximately the correct level of confidence. We show that this is because EAZY models the uncertainty in its spectral energy distribution templates, and that post-hoc smoothing of the BPZ $p(z)$ provides a reasonable substitute for detailed modeling of template uncertainties. Either remedy still leaves a small surplus of galaxies with spectroscopic redshift very far from the peaks. Thus, better modeling of low-probability tails will be needed for high-precision work such as dark energy constraints with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and other large surveys.

  20. A search for pulsations in the HgMn star HD 45975 with CoRoT photometry and ground-based spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, T.; Briquet, M.; Auvergne, M.; Alecian, G.; Ghazaryan, S.; Niemczura, E.; Fossati, L.; Lehmann, H.; Hubrig, S.; Ulusoy, C.; Damerdji, Y.; Rainer, M.; Poretti, E.; Borsa, F.; Scardia, M.; Schmid, V. S.; Van Winckel, H.; De Smedt, K.; Pápics, P. I.; Gameiro, J. F.; Waelkens, C.; Fagas, M.; Kamiński, K.; Dimitrov, W.; Baglin, A.; Michel, E.; Dumortier, L.; Frémat, Y.; Hensberge, H.; Jorissen, A.; Van Eck, S.

    2014-01-01

    The existence of pulsations in HgMn stars is still being debated. To provide the first unambiguous observational detection of pulsations in this class of chemically peculiar objects, the bright star HD 45975 was monitored for nearly two months by the CoRoT satellite. Independent analyses of the light curve provide evidence of monoperiodic variations with a frequency of 0.7572 d-1 and a peak-to-peak amplitude of ~2800 ppm. Multisite, ground-based spectroscopic observations overlapping the CoRoT observations show the star to be a long-period, single-lined binary. Furthermore, with the notable exception of mercury, they reveal the same periodicity as in photometry in the line moments of chemical species exhibiting strong overabundances (e.g., Mn and Y). In contrast, lines of other elements do not show significant variations. As found in otherHgMn stars, the pattern of variability consists in an absorption bump moving redwards across the line profiles. We argue that the photometric and spectroscopic changes are more consistent with an interpretation in terms of rotational modulation of spots at the stellar surface. In this framework, the existence of pulsations producing photometric variations above the ~50 ppm level is unlikely in HD 45975. This provides strong constraints on the excitation/damping of pulsation modes in this HgMn star. The CoRoT space mission was developed and is operated by the French space agency CNES, with participation of ESA's RSSD and Science Programmes, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany, and Spain. This work is based on observations collected at La Silla and Paranal Observatories, ESO (Chile), with the HARPS and UVES spectrographs at the 3.6-m and very large telescopes, under programmes LP185.D-0056 and 287.D-5066. It is also based on observations made with the Mercator Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma by the Flemish Community, at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias

  1. Quantitative determination of wine highly volatile sulfur compounds by using automated headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-pulsed flame photometric detection. Critical study and optimization of a new procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Ricardo; Lapeña, Ana Cristina; Cacho, Juan; Ferreira, Vicente

    2007-03-02

    The quantitative determination of wine volatile sulfur compounds by automated headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) with a carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane (CAR-PDMS) fiber and subsequent gas chromatography-pulsed flame photometric detection (GC-PFPD) has been evaluated. The direct extraction of the sulfur compounds in 5 ml of wine has been found to suffer from matrix effects and short linear ranges, problems which could not be solved by the use of different internal standards or by multiple headspace SPME. These problems were attributed to saturation of the fiber and to competitive effects between analytes, internal standards and other wine volatiles. Another problem was the oxidation of analytes during the procedure. The reduction in sample volume by a factor 50 (0.1 ml diluted with water or brine) brought about a reduction in the amount of sulfur compounds taken in the fiber by a factor just 3.3. Consequently, a new procedure has been proposed. In a sealed vial containing 4.9 ml of saturated NaCl brine, the air is thoroughly displaced with nitrogen, and the wine (0.1 ml) and the internal standards (0.02 ml) are further introduced with a syringe through the vial septum. This sample is extracted at 35 degrees C for 20 min. This procedure makes a satisfactory determination possible of hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol, ethanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, diethyl sulfide and dimethyl disulfide. The linear dynamic ranges cover the normal ranges of occurrence of these analytes in wine with typical r2 between 0.9823 and 0.9980. Reproducibility in real samples ranges from 10 to 20% and repeatability is better than 10% in most cases. The method accuracy is satisfactory, with errors below 20% for hydrogen sulfide and mostly below 10% for the other compounds. The proposed method has been applied to the analysis of 34 Spanish wines.

  2. Biosensors for EVA: Improved Instrumentation for Ground-based Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, B.; Ellerby, G.; Zou, F.; Scott, P.; Jin, C.; Lee, S. M. C.; Coates, J.

    2010-01-01

    During lunar excursions in the EVA suit, real-time measurement of metabolic rate is required to manage consumables and guide activities to ensure safe return to the base. Metabolic rate, or oxygen consumption (VO2), is normally measured from pulmonary parameters but cannot be determined with standard techniques in the oxygen-rich environment of a spacesuit. Our group has developed novel near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) methods to calculate muscle oxygen saturation (SmO 2), hematocrit, and pH, and we recently demonstrated that we can use our NIRS sensor to measure VO 2 on the leg during cycling. Our NSBRI project has 4 objectives: (1) increase the accuracy of the metabolic rate calculation through improved prediction of stroke volume; (2) investigate the relative contributions of calf and thigh oxygen consumption to metabolic rate calculation for walking and running; (3) demonstrate that the NIRS-based noninvasive metabolic rate methodology is sensitive enough to detect decrement in VO 2 in a space analog; and (4) improve instrumentation to allow testing within a spacesuit. Over the past year we have made progress on all four objectives, but the most significant progress was made in improving the instrumentation. The NIRS system currently in use at JSC is based on fiber optics technology. Optical fiber bundles are used to deliver light from a light source in the monitor to the patient, and light reflected back from the patient s muscle to the monitor for spectroscopic analysis. The fiber optic cables are large and fragile, and there is no way to get them in and out of the test spacesuit used for ground-based studies. With complimentary funding from the US Army, we undertook a complete redesign of the sensor and control electronics to build a novel system small enough to be used within the spacesuit and portable enough to be used by a combat medic. In the new system the filament lamp used in the fiber optic system was replaced with a novel broadband near infrared

  3. Biosensors for EVA: Improved Instrumentation for Ground-based Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, B.; Ellerby, G.; Zou, F.; Scott, P.; Jin, C.; Lee, S. M. C.; Coates, J.

    2010-01-01

    During lunar excursions in the EVA suit, real-time measurement of metabolic rate is required to manage consumables and guide activities to ensure safe return to the base. Metabolic rate, or oxygen consumption (VO2), is normally measured from pulmonary parameters but cannot be determined with standard techniques in the oxygen-rich environment of a spacesuit. Our group has developed novel near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) methods to calculate muscle oxygen saturation (SmO 2), hematocrit, and pH, and we recently demonstrated that we can use our NIRS sensor to measure VO 2 on the leg during cycling. Our NSBRI project has 4 objectives: (1) increase the accuracy of the metabolic rate calculation through improved prediction of stroke volume; (2) investigate the relative contributions of calf and thigh oxygen consumption to metabolic rate calculation for walking and running; (3) demonstrate that the NIRS-based noninvasive metabolic rate methodology is sensitive enough to detect decrement in VO 2 in a space analog; and (4) improve instrumentation to allow testing within a spacesuit. Over the past year we have made progress on all four objectives, but the most significant progress was made in improving the instrumentation. The NIRS system currently in use at JSC is based on fiber optics technology. Optical fiber bundles are used to deliver light from a light source in the monitor to the patient, and light reflected back from the patient s muscle to the monitor for spectroscopic analysis. The fiber optic cables are large and fragile, and there is no way to get them in and out of the test spacesuit used for ground-based studies. With complimentary funding from the US Army, we undertook a complete redesign of the sensor and control electronics to build a novel system small enough to be used within the spacesuit and portable enough to be used by a combat medic. In the new system the filament lamp used in the fiber optic system was replaced with a novel broadband near infrared

  4. Intercomparison of stratospheric nitrogen dioxide columns retrieved from ground-based DOAS and FTIR and satellite DOAS instruments over the subtropical Izana station

    OpenAIRE

    Robles-Gonzalez, Cristina; Navarro-Comas, Mónica; Puentedura, Olga; Schneider, Matthias; Hase, Frank; Garcia, Omaira; Blumenstock, Thomas; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    A 13-year analysis (2000–2012) of the NO2 vertical column densities derived from ground-based (GB) instruments and satellites has been carried out over the Izaña NDACC (Network for the Detection of the Atmospheric Composition Change) subtropical site. Ground-based DOAS (differential optical absorption spectroscopy) and FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) instruments are intercompared to test mutual consistency and then used for validation of stratospheric NO2 fro...

  5. Learning Photometric Invariance for Object Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Álvarez, J.M.; Gevers, T.; López, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Color is a powerful visual cue in many computer vision applications such as image segmentation and object recognition. However, most of the existing color models depend on the imaging conditions that negatively affect the performance of the task at hand. Often, a reflection model (e.g., Lambertian o

  6. The STACEE-32 Ground Based Gamma-ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hanna, D S; Boone, L M; Chantell, M C; Conner, Z; Covault, C E; Dragovan, M; Fortin, P; Gregorich, D T; Hinton, J A; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Oser, S; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Schütte, D R; Theoret, C G; Tümer, T O; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J A

    2002-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment detector in its initial configuration (STACEE-32). STACEE is a new ground-based gamma ray detector using the atmospheric Cherenkov technique. In STACEE, the heliostats of a solar energy research array are used to collect and focus the Cherenkov photons produced in gamma-ray induced air showers. The large Cherenkov photon collection area of STACEE results in a gamma-ray energy threshold below that of previous detectors.

  7. The STACEE Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gingrich, D M; Bramel, D; Carson, J; Covault, C E; Fortin, P; Hanna, D S; Hinton, J A; Jarvis, A; Kildea, J; Lindner, T; Müller, C; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Theoret, C G; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J A

    2005-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) in its complete configuration. STACEE uses the heliostats of a solar energy research facility to collect and focus the Cherenkov photons produced in gamma-ray induced air showers. The light is concentrated onto an array of photomultiplier tubes located near the top of a tower. The large Cherenkov photon collection area of STACEE results in a gamma-ray energy threshold below that of previous ground-based detectors. STACEE is being used to observe pulsars, supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei, and gamma-ray bursts.

  8. Research on target accuracy for ground-based lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ling; Shi, Ruoming

    2009-05-01

    In ground based Lidar system, the targets are used in the process of registration, georeferencing for point cloud, and also can be used as check points. Generally, the accuracy of capturing the flat target center is influenced by scanning range and scanning angle. In this research, the experiments are designed to extract accuracy index of the target center with 0-90°scan angles and 100-195 meter scan ranges using a Leica HDS3000 laser scanner. The data of the experiments are listed in detail and the related results are analyzed.

  9. Photometric CCD observations of four Pre-cataclysmic binary candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, R.; Vogt, N.; Colque, Juan Pablo

    We present preliminary results of differential photometric observations of Abell 65, HZ 9, GD 1401 and BPM 46460, obtained between September and December 2006 with the 42 cm telescope of the Cerro Armazones Observatory which belongs to the Universidad Catolica del Norte, Antofagasta. All four stars are close red dwarf/white dwarf binaries which could have formed be recent common envelope events. In two of the four cases we detected (or confirmed) significant variability. In one of them, the central star of a planetary nebula Abell 65, we confirmed the rather strong photometric variability with a period very near to 24 hours (Bond and Livio, 1990). In the white dwarf binary HZ9 we detected, for the first time, photometric variations with a period near 0.58 days which corresponds to the known orbital period (Lanning and Pesch, 1981; Stauffer, 1987). The amplitude of this variation is 0.08 mag, it probably refers to reflection of the white dwarf radiation on the surface of the red companion. - These observations are part of a larger on-going project which pretends to identify and to study pre-cataclysmic binaries by means of photometric and spectroscopic methods and to improve, this way, the hitherto poor statistics on the properties of these interesting stars.

  10. Evaluation of atmospheric dust prediction models using ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terradellas, Enric; María Baldasano, José; Cuevas, Emilio; Basart, Sara; Huneeus, Nicolás; Camino, Carlos; Dundar, Cinhan; Benincasa, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    An important step in numerical prediction of mineral dust is the model evaluation aimed to assess its performance to forecast the atmospheric dust content and to lead to new directions in model development and improvement. The first problem to address the evaluation is the scarcity of ground-based routine observations intended for dust monitoring. An alternative option would be the use of satellite products. They have the advantage of a large spatial coverage and a regular availability. However, they do have numerous drawbacks that make the quantitative retrievals of aerosol-related variables difficult and imprecise. This work presents the use of different ground-based observing systems for the evaluation of dust models in the Regional Center for Northern Africa, Middle East and Europe of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and Assessment System (SDS-WAS). The dust optical depth at 550 nm forecast by different models is regularly compared with the AERONET measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) for 40 selected stations. Photometric measurements are a powerful tool for remote sensing of the atmosphere allowing retrieval of aerosol properties, such as AOD. This variable integrates the contribution of different aerosol types, but may be complemented with spectral information that enables hypotheses about the nature of the particles. Comparison is restricted to cases with low Ångström exponent values in order to ensure that coarse mineral dust is the dominant aerosol type. Additionally to column dust load, it is important to evaluate dust surface concentration and dust vertical profiles. Air quality monitoring stations are the main source of data for the evaluation of surface concentration. However they are concentrated in populated and industrialized areas around the Mediterranean. In the present contribution, results of different models are compared with observations of PM10 from the Turkish air quality network for

  11. Photometric Characteristics of Lunar Terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Hapke, Bruce W.; Denevi, Brett W.; Robinson, Mark

    2016-10-01

    The photometric properties of the lunar depend on albedo, surface roughness, porosity, and the internal/external structure of particles. Hapke parameter maps derived using a bidirectional reflectance model [Hapke, 2012] from Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) images demonstrated the spatial and spectral variation of the photometric properties of the Moon [Sato et al., 2014]. Using the same methodology, here we present the photometric characteristics of typical lunar terrains, which were not systematically analyzed in the previous study.We selected five representative terrain types: mare, highland, swirls, and two Copernican (fresh) crater ejecta (one mare and one highlands example). As for the datasets, we used ~39 months of WAC repeated observations, and for each image pixel, we computed latitude, longitude, incidence, emission, and phase angles using the WAC GLD100 stereo DTM [Scholten et al., 2012]. To obtain similar phase and incidence angle ranges, all sampling sites are near the equator and in the vicinity of Reiner Gamma. Three free Hapke parameters (single scattering albedo: w, HG2 phase function parameter: c, and angular width of SHOE: hs) were then calculated for the seven bands (321-689 nm). The remaining parameters were fixed by simplifying the model [Sato et al., 2014].The highlands, highland ejecta, and swirl (Reiner Gamma) showed clearly higher w than the mare and mare ejecta. The derived c values were lower (less backscattering) for the swirl and higher (more backscattering) for the highlands (and ejecta) relative to the other sites. Forward scattering materials such as unconsolidated transparent crystalline materials might be relatively enriched in the swirl. In the highlands, anorthositic agglutinates with dense internal scattering could be responsible for the strong backscattering. The mare and mare ejecta showed continuously decreasing c from UV to visible wavelengths. This might be caused by the FeO-rich pyroxene

  12. Ground-Based Global Positioning System (GPS) Meteorology Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor (IPW)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ground-Based Global Positioning System (GPS) Meteorology Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor (IPW) data set measures atmospheric water vapor using ground-based...

  13. The Derivation, Properties and Value of Kepler's Combined Differential Photometric Precision

    OpenAIRE

    Christiansen, Jessie L.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Barclay, Thomas S.; Burke, Christopher J.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Li, Jie; Seader, Shawn; Jeffrey C. Smith; Stumpe, Martin C.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Thompson, Susan E.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Van Cleve, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    The Kepler Mission is searching for Earth-size planets orbiting solar-like stars by simultaneously observing >160,000 stars to detect sequences of transit events in the photometric light curves. The Combined Differential Photometric Precision (CDPP) is the metric that defines the ease with which these weak terrestrial transit signatures can be detected. An understanding of CDPP is invaluable for evaluating the completeness of the Kepler survey and inferring the underlying planet population. T...

  14. Assessment of Systematic Chromatic Errors that Impact Sub-1% Photometric Precision in Large-Area Sky Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Li, T S; Marshall, J L; Tucker, D; Kessler, R; Annis, J; Bernstein, G M; Boada, S; Burke, D L; Finley, D A; James, D J; Kent, S; Lin, H; Marriner, J; Mondrik, N; Nagasawa, D; Rykoff, E S; Scolnic, D; Walker, A R; Wester, W; Abbott, T M C; Allam, S; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Capozzi, D; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Crocce, M; Cunha, C E; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Doel, P; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gaztanaga, E; Goldstein, D A; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Maia, M A G; Melchior28, P; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Mohr, J J; Neilsen, E; Nichol, R C; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Tarle, G; Thomas, D; Vikram, V

    2016-01-01

    Meeting the science goals for many current and future ground-based optical large-area sky surveys requires that the calibrated broadband photometry is stable in time and uniform over the sky to 1% precision or better. Past surveys have achieved photometric precision of 1-2% by calibrating the survey's stellar photometry with repeated measurements of a large number of stars observed in multiple epochs. The calibration techniques employed by these surveys only consider the relative frame-by-frame photometric zeropoint offset and the focal plane position-dependent illumination corrections, which are independent of the source color. However, variations in the wavelength dependence of the atmospheric transmission and the instrumental throughput induce source color-dependent systematic errors. These systematic errors must also be considered to achieve the most precise photometric measurements. In this paper, we examine such systematic chromatic errors using photometry from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) as an example...

  15. Optimal multihump filter for photometric redshifts

    OpenAIRE

    Budavari, Tamas; Szalay, Alexander S.; Csabai, Istvan; Connolly, Andrew J.; Tsvetanov, Zlatan

    2001-01-01

    We propose a novel type filter for multicolor imaging to improve on the photometric redshift estimation of galaxies. An extra filter - specific to a certain photometric system - may be utilized with high efficiency. We present a case study of the Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys and show that one extra exposure could cut down the mean square error on photometric redshifts by 34% over the z

  16. Ground-based observation of emission lines from the corona of a red-dwarf star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, J H; Wichmann, R

    2001-08-02

    All 'solar-like' stars are surrounded by coronae, which contain magnetically confined plasma at temperatures above 106 K. (Until now, only the Sun's corona could be observed in the optical-as a shimmering envelope during a total solar eclipse.) As the underlying stellar 'surfaces'-the photospheres-are much cooler, some non-radiative process must be responsible for heating the coronae. The heating mechanism is generally thought to be magnetic in origin, but is not yet understood even for the case of the Sun. Ultraviolet emission lines first led to the discovery of the enormous temperature of the Sun's corona, but thermal emission from the coronae of other stars has hitherto been detectable only from space, at X-ray wavelengths. Here we report the detection of emission from highly ionized iron (Fe XIII at 3,388.1 A) in the corona of the red-dwarf star CN Leonis, using a ground-based telescope. The X-ray flux inferred from our data is consistent with previously measured X-ray fluxes, and the non-thermal line width of 18.4 km s-1 indicates great similarities between solar and stellar coronal heating mechanisms. The accessibility and spectral resolution (45,000) of the ground-based instrument are much better than those of X-ray satellites, so a new window to the study of stellar coronae has been opened.

  17. Proceedings of the 2011 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetovsky, Marvin A. [Editor; Patterson, Eileen F. [Editor; Sandoval, Marisa N. [Editor

    2011-09-13

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2011: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 13-15 September, 2011 in Tucson, Arizona. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), National Science Foundation (NSF), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States' capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  18. Ground-based Observations of the Solar Sources of Space Weather (Invited Review)

    CERN Document Server

    Veronig, Astrid M

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring of the Sun and its activity is a task of growing importance in the frame of space weather research and awareness. Major space weather disturbances at Earth have their origin in energetic outbursts from the Sun: solar flares, coronal mass ejections and associated solar energetic particles. In this review we discuss the importance and complementarity of ground-based and space-based observations for space weather studies. The main focus is drawn on ground-based observations in the visible range of the spectrum, in particular in the diagnostically manifold H$\\alpha$ spectral line, which enables us to detect and study solar flares, filaments, filament eruptions, and Moreton waves. Existing H$\\alpha$ networks such as the GONG and the Global High-Resolution H$\\alpha$ Network are discussed. As an example of solar observations from space weather research to operations, we present the system of real-time detection of H$\\alpha$ flares and filaments established at Kanzelh\\"ohe Observatory (KSO; Austria) in the...

  19. Proceedings of the 27th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetovsky, Marvin A. [Editor; Benson, Jody [Editor; Patterson, Eileen F. [Editor

    2005-09-20

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 27th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 20-22 September, 2005 in Rancho Mirage, California. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  20. Proceedings of the 29th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetovsky, Marvin A. [Editor; Benson, Jody [Editor; Patterson, Eileen F. [Editor

    2007-09-25

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 29th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 25-27 September, 2007 in Denver, Colorado. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  1. Proceedings of the 28th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetovsky, Marvin A. [Editor; Benson, Jody [Editor; Patterson, Eileen F. [Editor

    2006-09-19

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 28th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 19-21 September, 2006 in Orlando, Florida. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  2. Proceedings of the 30th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetovsky, Marv A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aguilar-chang, Julio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arrowsmith, Marie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arrowsmith, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baker, Diane [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Begnaud, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harste, Hans [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maceira, Monica [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patton, Howard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Phillips, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Randall, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Revelle, Douglas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowe, Charlotte [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stead, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steck, Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitaker, Rod [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yang, Xiaoning [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-09-23

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 30th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 23-25 September, 2008 in Portsmouth, Virginia. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States’ capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  3. Proceedings of the 2010 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetovsky, Marvin A [Editor; Patterson, Eileen F [Editor

    2010-09-21

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2010: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 21-23 September, 2010 in Orlando, Florida,. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, National Science Foundation (NSF), Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  4. Proceedings of the 2009 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetovsky, Marv A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aguilar - Chang, Julio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson, Dale [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arrowsmith, Marie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arrowsmith, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baker, Diane [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Begnaud, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harste, Hans [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maceira, Monica [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patton, Howard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Phillips, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Randall, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowe, Charlotte [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stead, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steck, Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitaker, Rod [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yang, Xiaoning ( David ) [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-09-21

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2009: Ground -Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 21-23 September, 2009 in Tucson, Arizona,. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States’ capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  5. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriner, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  6. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriner, John; /Fermilab

    2012-06-29

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  7. Transit Detection in the MEarth Survey of Nearby M Dwarfs: Bridging the Clean-First, Search-Later Divide

    CERN Document Server

    Berta, Zachory K; Charbonneau, David; Burke, Christopher J; Falco, Emilio E

    2012-01-01

    In the effort to characterize the masses, radii, and atmospheres of potentially habitable exoplanets, there is an urgent need to find examples of such planets transiting nearby M dwarfs. The MEarth Project is an ongoing effort to do so, as a ground-based photometric survey designed to detect exoplanets as small as 2 Earth radii transiting mid-to-late M dwarfs within 33 pc of the Sun. Unfortunately, identifying transits of such planets in photometric monitoring is complicated both by the intrinsic stellar variability that is common among these stars and by the nocturnal cadence, atmospheric variations, and instrumental systematics that often plague Earth-bound observatories. Here we summarize the challenges MEarth faces, and address them with a new framework to detect shallow exoplanet transits in wiggly and irregularly-spaced light curves. In contrast to previous methods that clean trends from light curves before searching for transits, this framework assesses the significance of individual transits simultane...

  8. Ground-based Observations of the Solar Sources of Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronig, A. M.; Pötzi, W.

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring of the Sun and its activity is a task of growing importance in the frame of space weather research and awareness. Major space weather disturbances at Earth have their origin in energetic outbursts from the Sun: solar flares, coronal mass ejections and associated solar energetic particles. In this review we discuss the importance and complementarity of ground-based and space-based observations for space weather studies. The main focus is drawn on ground-based observations in the visible range of the spectrum, in particular in the diagnostically manifold Hα spectral line, which enables us to detect and study solar flares, filaments (prominences), filament (prominence) eruptions, and Moreton waves. Existing Hα networks such as the GONG and the Global High-Resolution Hα Network are discussed. As an example of solar observations from space weather research to operations, we present the system of real-time detection of Hα flares and filaments established at Kanzelhöhe Observatory (KSO; Austria) in the frame of the space weather segment of the ESA Space Situational Awareness programme (swe.ssa.esa.int). An evaluation of the system, which is continuously running since July 2013 is provided, covering an evaluation period of almost 2.5 years. During this period, KSO provided 3020 hours of real-time Hα observations at the ESA SWE portal. In total, 824 Hα flares were detected and classified by the real-time detection system, including 174 events of Hα importance class 1 and larger. For the total sample of events, 95 % of the automatically determined flare peak times lie within ±5 min of the values given in the official optical flares reports (by NOAA and KSO), and 76 % of the start times. The heliographic positions determined are better than ±5°. The probability of detection of flares of importance 1 or larger is 95 %, with a false alarm rate of 16 %. These numbers confirm the high potential of automatic flare detection and alerting from ground-based

  9. Comparison of OMI UV observations with ground-based measurements at high northern latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bernhard

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Dutch-Finnish Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI on board NASA's Aura spacecraft provides estimates of erythemal (sunburning ultraviolet (UV dose rates and erythemal daily doses. These data were compared with ground-based measurements at 13 stations located throughout the Arctic and Scandinavia from 60 to 83° N. The study corroborates results from earlier work, but is based on a longer time series (eight vs. two years and considers additional data products, such as the erythemal dose rate at the time of the satellite overpass. Furthermore, systematic errors in satellite UV data resulting from inaccuracies in the surface albedo climatology used in the OMI UV algorithm are systematically assessed. At times when the surface albedo is correctly known, OMI data typically exceed ground-based measurements by 0–11%. When the OMI albedo climatology exceeds the actual albedo, OMI data may be biased high by as much as 55%. In turn, when the OMI albedo climatology is too low, OMI data can be biased low by up to 59%. Such large negative biases may occur when reflections from snow and ice, which increase downwelling UV irradiance, are misinterpreted as reflections from clouds, which decrease the UV flux at the surface. Results suggest that a better OMI albedo climatology would greatly improve the accuracy of OMI UV data products even if year-to-year differences of the actual albedo cannot be accounted for. A pathway for improving the OMI albedo climatology is discussed. Results also demonstrate that ground-based measurements from the center of Greenland, where high, homogenous surface albedo is observed year round, are ideally suited to detect systematic problems or temporal drifts in estimates of surface UV irradiance from space.

  10. THE DISTANCE TO THE MASSIVE GALACTIC CLUSTER WESTERLUND 2 FROM A SPECTROSCOPIC AND HST PHOTOMETRIC STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas Alvarez, Carlos A.; Kobulnicky, Henry A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Dept. 3905, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Bradley, David R.; Kannappan, Sheila J.; Norris, Mark A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, CB 3255, Phillips Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3255 (United States); Cool, Richard J. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Miller, Brendan P., E-mail: cvargasa@uwyo.edu, E-mail: chipk@uwyo.edu, E-mail: davidbradley512@gmail.com, E-mail: sheila@physics.unc.edu, E-mail: manorris@physics.unc.edu, E-mail: rcool@obs.carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: mbrendan@umich.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 745 Dennison Building, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    We present a spectroscopic and photometric determination of the distance to the young Galactic open cluster Westerlund 2 using WFPC2 imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based optical spectroscopy. HST imaging in the F336W, F439W, F555W, and F814W filters resolved many sources previously undetected in ground-based observations and yielded photometry for 1136 stars. We identified 15 new O-type stars, along with two probable binary systems, including MSP 188 (O3 + O5.5). We fit reddened spectral energy distributions based on the Padova isochrones to the photometric data to determine individual reddening parameters R{sub V} and A{sub V} for O-type stars in Wd2. We find average values (R{sub V} ) = 3.77 {+-} 0.09 and (A{sub V} ) = 6.51 {+-} 0.38 mag, which result in a smaller distance than most other spectroscopic and photometric studies. After a statistical distance correction accounting for close unresolved binaries (factor of 1.08), our spectroscopic and photometric data on 29 O-type stars yield that Westerlund 2 has a distance (d) = 4.16 {+-} 0.07 (random) +0.26 (systematic) kpc. The cluster's age remains poorly constrained, with an upper limit of 3 Myr. Finally, we report evidence of a faint mid-IR polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ring surrounding the well-known binary candidate MSP 18, which appears to lie at the center of a secondary stellar grouping within Westerlund 2.

  11. Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astronomy: Parameter Estimation and Tests of General Relativity with Space- and Ground-Based Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Salvatore

    2016-07-01

    With the discovery of the binary-black-hole (BBH) coalescence GW150914 the era of gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy has started. It has recently been shown that BBH with masses comparable to or higher than GW150914 would be visible in the Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA) band a few years before they finally merge in the band of ground-based detectors. This would allow for premerger electromagnetic alerts, dramatically increasing the chances of a joint detection, if BBHs are indeed luminous in the electromagnetic band. In this Letter we explore a quite different aspect of multiband GW astronomy, and verify if, and to what extent, measurement of masses and sky position with eLISA could improve parameter estimation and tests of general relativity with ground-based detectors. We generate a catalog of 200 BBHs and find that having prior information from eLISA can reduce the uncertainty in the measurement of source distance and primary black hole spin by up to factor of 2 in ground-based GW detectors. The component masses estimate from eLISA will not be refined by the ground based detectors, whereas joint analysis will yield precise characterization of the newly formed black hole and improve consistency tests of general relativity.

  12. Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astronomy: Parameter Estimation and Tests of General Relativity with Space- and Ground-Based Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Salvatore

    2016-07-29

    With the discovery of the binary-black-hole (BBH) coalescence GW150914 the era of gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy has started. It has recently been shown that BBH with masses comparable to or higher than GW150914 would be visible in the Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA) band a few years before they finally merge in the band of ground-based detectors. This would allow for premerger electromagnetic alerts, dramatically increasing the chances of a joint detection, if BBHs are indeed luminous in the electromagnetic band. In this Letter we explore a quite different aspect of multiband GW astronomy, and verify if, and to what extent, measurement of masses and sky position with eLISA could improve parameter estimation and tests of general relativity with ground-based detectors. We generate a catalog of 200 BBHs and find that having prior information from eLISA can reduce the uncertainty in the measurement of source distance and primary black hole spin by up to factor of 2 in ground-based GW detectors. The component masses estimate from eLISA will not be refined by the ground based detectors, whereas joint analysis will yield precise characterization of the newly formed black hole and improve consistency tests of general relativity.

  13. First observations of W Virginis stars with K2: detection of period doubling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachy, E.; Molnár, L.; Jurkovic, M. I.; Smolec, R.; Moskalik, P. A.; Pál, A.; Szabados, L.; Szabó, R.

    2017-02-01

    We present the first analysis of W Vir stars observed by the Kepler space telescope in the K2 mission. Clear cycle-to-cycle variation were detected in the light curves of KT Sco and the globular cluster member M80-V1. While the variations in the former star seems to be irregular on the short time scale of the K2 data, the latter appears to experience period doubling in its pulsation. Ground-based colour data confirmed that both stars are W Vir-type pulsators, while a comparison with historical photometric time-series data revealed drastic period changes in both stars. For comparison we reexamine ground-based observations of W Vir, the prototype of the class, and conclude that it shows period doubling instead of mode beating. These results support the notion that nonlinear dynamics plays an important role in the pulsation of W Virginis-type stars.

  14. First observations of W Virginis stars with K2: detection of period doubling

    CERN Document Server

    Plachy, E; Jurkovic, M I; Smolec, R; Moskalik, P A; Pál, A; Szabados, L; Szabó, R

    2016-01-01

    We present the first analysis of W Vir stars observed by the Kepler space telescope in the K2 mission. Clear cycle-to-cycle variation were detected in the light curves of KT Sco and the globular cluster member M80-V1. While the variations in the former star seems to be irregular on the short time scale of the K2 data, the latter appears to experience period doubling in its pulsation. Ground-based colour data confirmed that both stars are W Vir-type pulsators, while a comparison with historical photometric time-series data revealed drastic period changes in both stars. For comparison we reexamine ground-based observations of W Vir, the prototype of the class, and conclude that it shows period doubling instead of mode beating. These results support the notion that nonlinear dynamics plays an important role in the pulsation of W Virginis-type stars.

  15. Progress in the ULTRA 1-m ground-based telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Robert C.; Martin, Robert N.; Twarog, Bruce; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara; Taghavi, Ray; Hale, Rick; Etzel, Paul; Fesen, Rob; Shawl, Steve

    2006-06-01

    We present the technical status of the Ultra Lightweight Telescope for Research in Astronomy (ULTRA) program. The program is a 3-year Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) program funded by NSF. The MRI is a collaborative effort involving Composite Mirror Applications, Inc. (CMA), University of Kansas, San Diego State University and Dartmouth College. Objectives are to demonstrate the feasibility of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite mirror technology for ground-based optical telescopes. CMA is spearheading the development of surface replication techniques to produce the optics, fabricating the 1m glass mandrel, and constructing the optical tube assembly (OTA). Presented will be an overview and status of the 1-m mandrel fabrication, optics development, telescope design and CFRP telescope fabrication by CMA for the ULTRA Telescope.

  16. Optical vortex coronagraphs on ground-based telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, Charles

    2007-01-01

    The optical vortex coronagraph is potentially a remarkably effective device, at least for an ideal unobstructed telescope. Most ground-based telescopes however suffer from central obscuration and also have to operate through the aberrations of the turbulent atmosphere. This note analyzes the performance of the optical vortex in these circumstances and compares to some other designs, showing that it performs similarly in this situation. There is a large class of coronagraphs of this general type, and choosing between them in particular applications depends on details of performance at small off-axis distances and uniformity of response in the focal plane. Issues of manufacturability to the necessary tolerances are also likely to be important.

  17. Unique cell culture systems for ground based research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Marian L.

    1990-01-01

    The horizontally rotating fluid-filled, membrane oxygenated bioreactors developed at NASA Johnson for spacecraft applications provide a powerful tool for ground-based research. Three-dimensional aggregates formed by cells cultured on microcarrier beads are useful for study of cell-cell interactions and tissue development. By comparing electron micrographs of plant seedlings germinated during Shuttle flight 61-C and in an earth-based rotating bioreactor it is shown that some effects of microgravity are mimicked. Bioreactors used in the UAH Bioreactor Laboratory will make it possible to determine some of the effects of altered gravity at the cellular level. Bioreactors can be valuable for performing critical, preliminary-to-spaceflight experiments as well as medical investigations such as in vitro tumor cell growth and chemotherapeutic drug response; the enrichment of stem cells from bone marrow; and the effect of altered gravity on bone and muscle cell growth and function and immune response depression.

  18. Spatial-angular modeling of ground-based biaxial lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agishev, Ravil R.

    1997-10-01

    Results of spatial-angular LIDAR modeling based on an efficiency criterion introduced are represented. Their analysis shows that a low spatial-angular efficiency of traditional VIS and NIR systems is a main cause of a low S/BR ratio at the photodetector input. It determines the considerable measurements errors and the following low accuracy of atmospheric optical parameters retrieval. As we have shown, the most effective protection against intensive sky background radiation for ground-based biaxial LIDAR's consist in forming of their angular field according to spatial-angular efficiency criterion G. Some effective approaches to high G-parameter value achievement to achieve the receiving system optimization are discussed.

  19. Understanding the Laminar Distribution of Tropospheric Ozone from Ground-Based, Airborne, Spaceborne, and Modeling Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newchurch, Mike; Johnson, Matthew S.; Huang, Guanyu; Kuang, Shi; Wang, Lihua; Chance, Kelly; Liu, Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Laminar ozone structure is a ubiquitous feature of tropospheric-ozone distributions resulting from dynamic and chemical atmospheric processes. Understanding the characteristics of these ozone laminae and the mechanisms responsible for producing them is important to outline the transport pathways of trace gases and to quantify the impact of different sources on tropospheric background ozone. In this study, we present a new method to detect ozone laminae to understand their climatological characteristics of occurrence frequency in terms of thickness and altitude. We employ both ground-based and airborne ozone lidar measurements and other synergistic observations and modeling to investigate the sources and mechanisms such as biomass burning transport, stratospheric intrusion, lightning-generated NOx, and nocturnal low-level jets that are responsible for depleted or enhanced tropospheric ozone layers. Spaceborne (e.g., OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument), TROPOMI (Tropospheric Monitoring Instrument), TEMPO (Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution)) measurements of these laminae will observe greater horizontal extent and lower vertical resolution than balloon-borne or lidar measurements will quantify. Using integrated ground-based, airborne, and spaceborne observations in a modeling framework affords insight into how to gain knowledge of both the vertical and horizontal evolution of these ubiquitous ozone laminae.

  20. Ground-based and spacecraft observations of lightning activity on Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharenko, V.; Mylostna, C.; Konovalenko, A.; Zarka, P.; Fischer, G.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Litvinenko, G.; Rucker, H.; Sidorchuk, M.; Ryabov, B.; Vavriv, D.; Ryabov, V.; Cecconi, B.; Coffre, A.; Denis, L.; Fabrice, C.; Pallier, L.; Schneider, J.; Kozhyn, R.; Vinogradov, V.; Mukha, D.; Weber, R.; Shevchenko, V.; Nikolaenko, V.

    2012-02-01

    In late 2007, Saturn electrostatic discharges (SED) were simultaneously observed at the radio telescope UTR-2 and with the Cassini spacecraft. Observations at UTR-2 were performed with a multichannel receiver in the frequency range 12-33 MHz, and those performed on Cassini-with a swept frequency receiver that is part of the RPWS (Radio and Plasma Wave Science) instrument in the frequency band 1.8-16 MHz. We got a very good coincidence between data of UTR-2 and Cassini. It is shown for the first time that ground-based radio astronomy lets us detect Saturn's lightning with a high degree of reliability despite terrestrial interferences. This is the necessary basis for further detailed study of the temporal and spectral characteristics of the SEDs with ground based radio telescopes. Based on six observation sessions, several parameters of SEDs were determined, in particularly a correlation of 0.77±0.15 between the average intensity of storms and the e-folding time.

  1. CuBANz: Photometric redshift estimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samui, Saumyadip; Pal, Shanoli Samui

    2016-09-01

    CuBANz is a photometric redshift estimator code for high redshift galaxies that uses the back propagation neural network along with clustering of the training set, making it very efficient. The training set is divided into several self learning clusters with galaxies having similar photometric properties and spectroscopic redshifts within a given span. The clustering algorithm uses the color information (i.e. u-g, g-r etc.) rather than the apparent magnitudes at various photometric bands, as the photometric redshift is more sensitive to the flux differences between different bands rather than the actual values. The clustering method enables accurate determination of the redshifts. CuBANz considers uncertainty in the photometric measurements as well as uncertainty in the neural network training. The code is written in C.

  2. TOMS and Ground-based Measurements: Long-term Trends, Spatial Variability, Cloud Effects, and Data Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, H. A.; Dahlback, A.; Stamnes, K.; Høyskar, B.; Olsen, R.; Schmidlin, F.; Tsay, S.

    2003-12-01

    ozone column amounts are very insensitive to the choice of ozone profile for SZA < 65o. We also show how the TOMS measurements can be used to detect drift in ground-based filter instruments over time.

  3. Short timescale variables in stellar clusters: From Gaia to ground-based telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Roelens, Maroussia; Eyer, Laurent; Mowlavi, Nami; Lecoeur-Taïbi, Isabelle; Rimoldini, Lorenzo; Palaversa, Lovro; Süveges, Maria; Charnas, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Combined studies of variable stars and stellar clusters open great horizons, and they allow us to improve our understanding of stellar cluster formation and stellar evolution. In that prospect, the Gaia mission will provide astrometric, photometric, and spectroscopic data for about one billion stars of the Milky Way. This will represent a major census of stellar clusters, and it will drastically increase the number of known variable stars. In particular, the peculiar Gaia scanning law offers the opportunity to investigate the rather unexplored domain of short timescale variability (from tens of seconds to a dozen of hours), bringing invaluable clues to the fields of stellar physics and stellar aggregates. We assess the Gaia capabilities in terms of short timescale variability detection, using extensive light-curve simulations for various variable object types. We show that Gaia can detect periodic variability phenomena with amplitude variations larger than a few millimagnitudes. Additionally, we plan to perfo...

  4. ASTEP South: a first photometric analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Crouzet, N; Mékarnia, D; Szulágyi, J; Abe, L; Agabi, A; Fanteï-Caujolle, Y; Gonçalves, I; Barbieri, M; Schmider, F -X; Rivet, J -P; Bondoux, E; Challita, Z; Pouzenc, C; Fressin, F; Valbousquet, F; Blazit, A; Bonhomme, S; Daban, J -B; Gouvret, C; Bayliss, D; Zhou, G

    2012-01-01

    The ASTEP project aims at detecting and characterizing transiting planets from Dome C, Antarctica, and qualifying this site for photometry in the visible. The first phase of the project, ASTEP South, is a fixed 10 cm diameter instrument pointing continuously towards the celestial South pole. Observations were made almost continuously during 4 winters, from 2008 to 2011. The point-to-point RMS of 1-day photometric lightcurves can be explained by a combination of expected statistical noises, dominated by the photon noise up to magnitude 14. This RMS is large, from 2.5 mmag at R=8 to 6% at R=14, because of the small size of ASTEP South and the short exposure time (30 s). Statistical noises should be considerably reduced using the large amount of collected data. A 9.9-day period eclipsing binary is detected, with a magnitude R=9.85. The 2-season lightcurve folded in phase and binned into 1000 points has a RMS of 1.09 mmag, for an expected photon noise of 0.29 mmag. The use of the 4 seasons of data with a better d...

  5. Ground-based Transit Observation of the Habitable-zone Super-Earth K2-3d

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Akihiko; Livingston, John; Narita, Norio; Hirano, Teruyuki; Onitsuka, Masahiro; Ryu, Tsuguru; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko

    2016-12-01

    We report the first ground-based transit observation of K2-3d, a 1.5 R ⊕ planet supposedly within the habitable zone around a bright M-dwarf host star, using the Okayama 188 cm telescope and the multi(grz)-band imager MuSCAT. Although the depth of the transit (0.7 mmag) is smaller than the photometric precisions (1.2, 0.9, and 1.2 mmag per 60 s for the g, r, and z bands, respectively), we marginally but consistently identify the transit signal in all three bands, by taking advantage of the transit parameters from K2, and by introducing a novel technique that leverages multi-band information to reduce the systematics caused by second-order extinction. We also revisit previously analyzed Spitzer transit observations of K2-3d to investigate the possibility of systematic offsets in transit timing, and find that all the timing data can be explained well by a linear ephemeris. We revise the orbital period of K2-3d to be 44.55612 ± 0.00021 days, which corrects the predicted transit times for 2019, i.e., the era of the James Webb Space Telescope, by ∼80 minutes. Our observation demonstrates that (1) even ground-based, 2 m class telescopes can play an important role in refining the transit ephemeris of small-sized, long-period planets, and (2) a multi-band imager is useful to reduce the systematics of atmospheric origin, in particular for bluer bands and for observations conducted at low-altitude observatories.

  6. Theoretical validation of ground-based microwave ozone observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ricaud

    Full Text Available Ground-based microwave measurements of the diurnal and seasonal variations of ozoneat 42±4.5 and 55±8 km are validated by comparing with results from a zero-dimensional photochemical model and a two-dimensional (2D chemical/radiative/dynamical model, respectively. O3 diurnal amplitudes measured in Bordeaux are shown to be in agreement with theory to within 5%. For the seasonal analysis of O3 variation, at 42±4.5 km, the 2D model underestimates the yearly averaged ozone concentration compared with the measurements. A double maximum oscillation (~3.5% is measured in Bordeaux with an extended maximum in September and a maximum in February, whilst the 2D model predicts only a single large maximum (17% in August and a pronounced minimum in January. Evidence suggests that dynamical transport causes the winter O3 maximum by propagation of planetary waves, phenomena which are not explicitly reproduced by the 2D model. At 55±8 km, the modeled yearly averaged O3 concentration is in very good agreement with the measured yearly average. A strong annual oscillation is both measured and modeled with differences in the amplitude shown to be exclusively linked to temperature fields.

  7. Models of ionospheric VLF absorption of powerful ground based transmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M. B.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Inan, U. S.

    2012-12-01

    Ground based Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) radio transmitters play a role in precipitation of energetic Van Allen electrons. Initial analyses of the contribution of VLF transmitters to radiation belt losses were based on early models of trans-ionospheric propagation known as the Helliwell absorption curves, but some recent studies have found that the model overestimates (by 20-100 dB) the VLF energy reaching the magnetosphere. It was subsequently suggested that conversion of wave energy into electrostatic modes may be responsible for the error. We utilize a newly available extensive record of VLF transmitter energy reaching the magnetosphere, taken from the DEMETER satellite, and perform a direct comparison with a sophisticated full wave model of trans-ionospheric propagation. Although the model does not include the effect of ionospheric irregularities, it correctly predicts the average total power injected into the magnetosphere within several dB. The results, particularly at nighttime, appear to be robust against the variability of the ionospheric electron density. We conclude that the global effect of irregularity scattering on whistler mode conversion to quasi-electrostatic may be no larger than 6 dB.

  8. Atmospheric Refraction Path Integrals in Ground-Based Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Mathar, R J

    2004-01-01

    The basic effect of the earth's atmospheric refraction on telescope operation is the reduction of the true zenith angle to the apparent zenith angle, associated with prismatic aberrations due to the dispersion in air. If one attempts coherent superposition of star images in ground-based interferometry, one is in addition interested in the optical path length associated with the refracted rays. In a model of a flat earth, the optical path difference between these is not concerned as the translational symmetry of the setup means no net effect remains. Here, I evaluate these interferometric integrals in the more realistic arrangement of two telescopes located on the surface of a common earth sphere and point to a star through an atmosphere which also possesses spherical symmetry. Some focus is put on working out series expansions in terms of the small ratio of the baseline over the earth radius, which allows to bypass some numerics which otherwise is challenged by strong cancellation effects in building the opti...

  9. Experiments on a Ground-Based Tomographic Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoonyol Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development and experiment of three-dimensional image formation by using a ground-based tomographic synthetic aperture radar (GB-TomoSAR system. GB-TomoSAR formulates two-dimensional synthetic aperture by the motion of antennae, both in azimuth and vertical directions. After range compression, three-dimensional image focusing is performed by applying Deramp-FFT (Fast Fourier Transform algorithms, both in azimuth and vertical directions. Geometric and radiometric calibrations were applied to make an image cube, which is then projected into range-azimuth and range-vertical cross-sections for visualization. An experiment with a C-band GB-TomoSAR system with a scan length of 2.49 m and 1.86 m in azimuth and vertical-direction, respectively, shows distinctive three-dimensional radar backscattering of stable buildings and roads with resolutions similar to the theoretical values. Unstable objects such as trees and moving cars generate severe noise due to decorrelation during the eight-hour image-acquisition time.

  10. A comparative study of satellite and ground-based phenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, S; Stöckli, R; Appenzeller, C; Vidale, P L

    2007-05-01

    Long time series of ground-based plant phenology, as well as more than two decades of satellite-derived phenological metrics, are currently available to assess the impacts of climate variability and trends on terrestrial vegetation. Traditional plant phenology provides very accurate information on individual plant species, but with limited spatial coverage. Satellite phenology allows monitoring of terrestrial vegetation on a global scale and provides an integrative view at the landscape level. Linking the strengths of both methodologies has high potential value for climate impact studies. We compared a multispecies index from ground-observed spring phases with two types (maximum slope and threshold approach) of satellite-derived start-of-season (SOS) metrics. We focus on Switzerland from 1982 to 2001 and show that temporal and spatial variability of the multispecies index correspond well with the satellite-derived metrics. All phenological metrics correlate with temperature anomalies as expected. The slope approach proved to deviate strongly from the temporal development of the ground observations as well as from the threshold-defined SOS satellite measure. The slope spring indicator is considered to indicate a different stage in vegetation development and is therefore less suited as a SOS parameter for comparative studies in relation to ground-observed phenology. Satellite-derived metrics are, however, very susceptible to snow cover, and it is suggested that this snow cover should be better accounted for by the use of newer satellite sensors.

  11. Ground-based measurements of UV Index (UVI at Helwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Farouk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available On October 2010 UV Index (UVI ground-based measurements were carried out by weather station at solar laboratory in NRIAG. The daily variation has maximum values in spring and summer days, while minimum values in autumn and winter days. The low level of UVI between 2.55 and 2.825 was found in December, January and February. The moderate level of UVI between 3.075 and 5.6 was found in March, October and November. The high level of UVI between 6.7 and 7.65 was found in April, May and September. The very high level of UVI between 8 and 8.6 was found in June, July and August. High level of radiation over 6 months per year including 3 months with a very high level UVI. According to the equation {UVI=a[SZA]b} the UVI increases with decreasing SZA by 82% on a daily scale and 88% on a monthly scale. Helwan exposure to a high level of radiation over 6 months per year including 3 months with a very high level UVI, so it is advisable not to direct exposure to the sun from 11 am to 2:00 pm.

  12. A Ground-based Measurement of the Relativistic Beaming Effect in a Detached Double White Dwarf Binary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shporer, Avi; Kaplan, David L.; Steinfadt, Justin D. R.; Bildsten, Lars; Howell, Steve B.; Mazeh, Tsevi

    2010-12-01

    We report on the first ground-based measurement of the relativistic beaming effect (aka Doppler boosting). We observed the beaming effect in the detached, non-interacting eclipsing double white dwarf (WD) binary NLTT 11748. Our observations were motivated by the system's high mass-ratio and low-luminosity ratio, leading to a large beaming-induced variability amplitude at the orbital period of 5.6 hr. We observed the system during three nights at the 2.0 m Faulkes Telescope North with the SDSS-g' filter and fitted the data simultaneously for the beaming, ellipsoidal, and reflection effects. Our fitted relative beaming amplitude is (3.0 ± 0.4) × 10-3, consistent with the expected amplitude from a blackbody spectrum given the photometric primary radial velocity (RV) amplitude and effective temperature. This result is a first step in testing the relation between the photometric beaming amplitude and the spectroscopic RV amplitude in NLTT 11748 and similar systems. We did not identify any variability due to the ellipsoidal or reflection effects, consistent with their expected undetectable amplitude for this system. Low-mass, helium-core WDs are expected to reside in binary systems, where in some of those systems the binary companion is a faint C/O WD and the two stars are detached and non-interacting, as in the case of NLTT 11748. The beaming effect can be used to search for the faint binary companion in those systems using wide-band photometry.

  13. Photometric redshift and classification for the XMM-COSMOS sources

    CERN Document Server

    Salvato, M; Ilbert, O; Zamorani, G; Brusa, M; Scoville, N; Rau, A; Capak, P; Arnouts, S; Aussel, H; Bolzonella, M; Buongiorno, A; Cappelluti, N; Caputi, K; Civano, F; Cook, R; Elvis, M; Gilli, R; Jahnke, K; Kartaltepe, J S; Impey, C D; Lamareille, F; Le Floc'h, E; Lilly, S; Mainieri, V; McCarthy, P; McCracken, H; Mignoli, M; Mobasher, B; Murayama, T; Sasaki, S; Sanders, D B; Schiminovich, D; Shioya, Y; Shopbell, P; Silvermann, J; Smolcic, V; Surace, J; Taniguchi, Y; Thompson, D; Trump, J R; Urry, M; Zamojski, M

    2008-01-01

    We present photometric redshifts and spectral energy distribution (SED) classifications for a sample of 1542 optically identified sources detected with XMM in the COSMOS field. Our template fitting classifies 46 sources as stars and 464 as non-active galaxies, while the remaining 1032 require templates with an AGN contribution. High accuracy in the derived photometric redshifts was accomplished as the result of 1) photometry in up to 30 bands with high significance detections, 2) a new set of SED templates including 18 hybrids covering the far-UV to mid-infrared, which have been constructed by the combination of AGN and non-active galaxies templates, and 3) multi-epoch observations that have been used to correct for variability (most important for type 1 AGN). The reliability of the photometric redshifts is evaluated using the sub-sample of 442 sources with measured spectroscopic redshifts. We achieved an accuracy of $\\sigma_{\\Delta z/(1+z_{spec})} = 0.014$ for i$_{AB}^*<$22.5 ($\\sigma_{\\Delta z/(1+z_{spec...

  14. Ground-based Gamma-Ray Observations of Pulsars and their Nebulae: Towards a New Order

    CERN Document Server

    De Jager, O C

    2005-01-01

    The excellent sensitivity and high resolution capability of wide FoV ground-based imaging atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes allow us for the first time to resolve the morphological structures of pulsar wind nebulae (PWN) which are older and more extended than the Crab Nebula. VHE gamma-ray observations of such extended nebulae (with field strengths below ~ 20 micro Gauss) probe the electron component corresponding to the unseen extreme ultraviolet (EUV) synchrotron component, which measures electron injection from earlier evolutionary epochs. VHE observations of PWN therefore introduce a new window on PWN research. This review paper also identifies conditions for maximal VHE visbility of PWN. Regarding pulsar pulsed emission, it is becoming clear that the threshold energies of current telescopes are not sufficient to probe the pulsed gamma-ray component from canonical pulsars. Theoretical estimates of pulsed gamma-ray emission from millisecond pulsars seem to converge and it becomes clear that such detections w...

  15. On the Interpretation of Gravity Wave Measurements by Ground-Based Lidars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Dörnbrack

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper asks the simple question: How can we interpret vertical time series of middle atmosphere gravity wave measurements by ground-based temperature lidars? Linear wave theory is used to show that the association of identified phase lines with quasi-monochromatic waves should be considered with great care. The ambient mean wind has a substantial effect on the inclination of the detected phase lines. The lack of knowledge about the wind might lead to a misinterpretation of the vertical propagation direction of the observed gravity waves. In particular, numerical simulations of three archetypal atmospheric mountain wave regimes show a sensitivity of virtual lidar observations on the position relative to the mountain and on the scale of the mountain.

  16. Space life sciences: ground-based iron-ion biology and physics, including shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This session of the 35th Scientific Assembly of COSPAR focuses on recent advances in ground-based studies of high-energy (mainly 1 GeV/nucleon) iron ions. The theme is interdisciplinary in nature and encompasses both physics and biology reports. Manned space missions, including those of the International Space Station and the planned Mars mission, will require the extended presence of crew members in space. As such, a better understanding in shielding design--in radiation detection as well as radio-protection based on simulating studies--is much needed. On the other hand, a better understanding of the basic mechanisms that modulate radiation sensitivity; in determining DNA double strand breaks, chromosomal aberrations, and the induction of apoptosis, will provide important information for an interventional approach.

  17. Finding extraterrestrial life using ground-based high-resolution spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Snellen, Ignas; Poole, Rudolf Le; Brogi, Matteo; Birkby, Jayne

    2013-01-01

    Exoplanet observations promise one day to unveil the presence of extraterrestrial life. Atmospheric compounds in strong chemical disequilibrium would point to large-scale biological activity just as oxygen and methane do in the Earth's atmosphere. The cancellation of both the Terrestrial Planet Finder and Darwin missions means that it is unlikely that a dedicated space telescope to search for biomarker gases in exoplanet atmospheres will be launched within the next 25 years. Here we show that ground-based telescopes provide a strong alternative for finding biomarkers in exoplanet atmospheres through transit observations. Recent results on hot Jupiters show the enormous potential of high-dispersion spectroscopy to separate the extraterrestrial and telluric signals making use of the Doppler shift of the planet. The transmission signal of oxygen from an Earth-twin orbiting a small red dwarf star is only a factor 3 smaller than that of carbon monoxide recently detected in the hot Jupiter tau Bootis b, albeit such...

  18. Modelling multimodal photometric redshift regression with noisy observations

    CERN Document Server

    Kügler, S D

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we are trying to extent the existing photometric redshift regression models from modeling pure photometric data back to the spectra themselves. To that end, we developed a PCA that is capable of describing the input uncertainty (including missing values) in a dimensionality reduction framework. With this "spectrum generator" at hand, we are capable of treating the redshift regression problem in a fully Bayesian framework, returning a posterior distribution over the redshift. This approach allows therefore to approach the multimodal regression problem in an adequate fashion. In addition, input uncertainty on the magnitudes can be included quite naturally and lastly, the proposed algorithm allows in principle to make predictions outside the training values which makes it a fascinating opportunity for the detection of high-redshifted quasars.

  19. Calibrating photometric redshift distributions with cross-correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Schulz, A E

    2009-01-01

    The next generation of proposed galaxy surveys will increase the number of galaxies with photometric redshifts by two orders of magnitude, drastically expanding both redshift range and detection threshold from the current state of the art. Obtaining spectra for a fair sub-sample of this new data could be cumbersome and expensive. However, adequate calibration of the true redshift distribution of galaxies is vital to tapping the potential of these surveys. We examine a promising alternative to direct spectroscopic follow up: calibration of the redshift distribution of photometric galaxies via cross-correlation with an overlapping spectroscopic survey whose members trace the same density field. We review the theory, develop a pipeline, apply it to mock data from N-body simulations, and examine the properties of this redshift distribution estimator. We demonstrate that the method is effective, but the estimator is weakened by two factors. 1) The correlation function of the spectroscopic sample must be measured i...

  20. A Photometric Machine-Learning Method to Infer Stellar Metallicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Adam A.

    2015-01-01

    Following its formation, a star's metal content is one of the few factors that can significantly alter its evolution. Measurements of stellar metallicity ([Fe/H]) typically require a spectrum, but spectroscopic surveys are limited to a few x 10(exp 6) targets; photometric surveys, on the other hand, have detected > 10(exp 9) stars. I present a new machine-learning method to predict [Fe/H] from photometric colors measured by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The training set consists of approx. 120,000 stars with SDSS photometry and reliable [Fe/H] measurements from the SEGUE Stellar Parameters Pipeline (SSPP). For bright stars (g' machine-learning method is similar to the scatter in [Fe/H] measurements from low-resolution spectra..

  1. Spectroscopic analysis of stellar mass black-hole mergers in our local universe with ground-based gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagwat, Swetha; Brown, Duncan; Ballmer, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by the recent discoveries of binary black-hole mergers by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (Advanced LIGO), we investigate the prospects of ground based detectors to perform a spectroscopic analysis of signals emitted during the ringdown of the Kerr black-hole formed by a stellar mass binary black-hole merger. We investigate the detectability and resolvability of the sub-dominant modes l = m = 3, l = m = 4 and l = 2;m = 1. We find that new ground-based facilities such as Einstein Telescope or Cosmic Explorer could measure multiple ringdown modes in over 300 events per year. We also investigate detector tuning for ringdown oriented searches.

  2. An evaluation of IASI-NH3 with ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammers, Enrico; Palm, Mathias; Van Damme, Martin; Vigouroux, Corinne; Smale, Dan; Conway, Stephanie; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Jones, Nicholas; Nussbaumer, Eric; Warneke, Thorsten; Petri, Christof; Clarisse, Lieven; Clerbaux, Cathy; Hermans, Christian; Lutsch, Erik; Strong, Kim; Hannigan, James W.; Nakajima, Hideaki; Morino, Isamu; Herrera, Beatriz; Stremme, Wolfgang; Grutter, Michel; Schaap, Martijn; Wichink Kruit, Roy J.; Notholt, Justus; Coheur, Pierre-F.; Erisman, Jan Willem

    2016-08-01

    Global distributions of atmospheric ammonia (NH3) measured with satellite instruments such as the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) contain valuable information on NH3 concentrations and variability in regions not yet covered by ground-based instruments. Due to their large spatial coverage and (bi-)daily overpasses, the satellite observations have the potential to increase our knowledge of the distribution of NH3 emissions and associated seasonal cycles. However the observations remain poorly validated, with only a handful of available studies often using only surface measurements without any vertical information. In this study, we present the first validation of the IASI-NH3 product using ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) observations. Using a recently developed consistent retrieval strategy, NH3 concentration profiles have been retrieved using observations from nine Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) stations around the world between 2008 and 2015. We demonstrate the importance of strict spatio-temporal collocation criteria for the comparison. Large differences in the regression results are observed for changing intervals of spatial criteria, mostly due to terrain characteristics and the short lifetime of NH3 in the atmosphere. The seasonal variations of both datasets are consistent for most sites. Correlations are found to be high at sites in areas with considerable NH3 levels, whereas correlations are lower at sites with low atmospheric NH3 levels close to the detection limit of the IASI instrument. A combination of the observations from all sites (Nobs = 547) give a mean relative difference of -32.4 ± (56.3) %, a correlation r of 0.8 with a slope of 0.73. These results give an improved estimate of the IASI-NH3 product performance compared to the previous upper-bound estimates (-50 to +100 %).

  3. Steps toward determination of the size and structure of the broad-line region in active galatic nuclei. 8: An intensive HST, IUE, and ground-based study of NGC 5548

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korista, K. T.; Alloin, D.; Barr, P.; Clavel, J.; Cohen, R. D.; Crenshaw, D. M.; Evans, I. N.; Horne, K.; Koratkar, A. P.; Kriss, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    We present the data and initial results from a combined Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/IUE/ground-based spectroscopic monitoring campaign on the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 that was undertaken in order to address questions that require both higher temporal resolution and higher signal-to-noise ratios than were obtained in our previous multiwavelength monitoring of this galaxy in 1988-1989. IUE spectra were obtained once every 2 days for a period of 74 days beginning on 1993 March 14. During the last 39 days of this campaign, spectroscopic observations were also made with the HST Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) on a daily basis. Ground-based observations, consisting of 165 optical spectra and 77 photometric observations (both CCD imaging and aperture photometry), are reported for the period 1992 October-1993 September, although many of the data are concentrated around the time of the satellite-based program. These data constitute a fifth year of intensive optical monitoring of this galaxy. In this contribution we describe the acquisition and reduction of all of the satellite and ground-based data obtained in this program. We describe in detail various photometric problems with the FOS and explain how we identified and corrected for various anomalies.

  4. Photometrical Observations "SBIRS GEO-2"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhov, P. P.; Epishev, V. P.; Karpenko, G. F.; Sukhov, K. P.; Kudak, V. I.

    Photometrical observations GSS "SBIRS GEO 2" in B,V,R filters were carried near the equinoxes 2014-2015. Used velocity electrophotometer based on the FEU-79 in the pulse-counting mode. Received more than 25 light curves. From the known dimensions are defined; effective reflecting area - Sγλ, the spectral reflectance index - γλ, periods of light variation. Color-indices showed that in the reflected light flux from the GSS prevails "red" component. In the light curves are periodically dips and specular flash. This shows that GSS orbit is not in a static position specified triaxial orientation as in dynamic motion. Assumed following dynamics of the satellite "SBIRS GEO 2" in orbit. Helical scanning the Earth's surface visible infrared sensors satellite occurs with a period P1 = 15.66 sec. and swinging of the GSS about the direction of the motion vector of the satellite in an orbit with P2 = 62.64 sec., from the northern to the southern pole. Thus, during the period of swinging GSS going on 2 scan the visible part of the northern and southern hemispheres. In some dates observations dynamics work satellite in orbit changed.

  5. Photometric determinants of perceived transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manish; Anderson, Barton L

    2006-03-01

    Photometric constraints for the perception of transparency were investigated using stereoscopic textured displays. A contrast discontinuity divided the textured displays into two lateral halves, with one (reference) half fixed. Observers adjusted the luminance range within the other (test) half in order to perform two tasks: (i) indicate the highest luminance range for which the test side is perceived to be transparent, and (ii) indicate the lowest luminance range for which the test side is seen as being in plain view. Settings were obtained for multiple values of test mean luminance, in order to map out the perceptual locus of transition between transparency and non-transparency. The results revealed a systematic violation of Metelli's magnitude constraint in predicting the percept of transparency. Observer settings were approximated instead by a constraint based on perceived contrast (which matched Michelson contrast for the textures used). The results also revealed large asymmetries between darkening and lightening transparency. When the test was darker than the reference, settings were highly consistent across observers and closely followed the Michelson-contrast prediction. When the test was lighter, however, there was greater variability across observers, with two observers exhibiting shifts toward Metelli's magnitude constraint. Moreover, each observer's setting reliability was significantly worse for lightening transparency than darkening transparency. These results suggest that (polarity-preserving) darkening serves as an additional cue to perceptual transparency.

  6. A New Approach to Space Situational Awareness using Small Ground-Based Telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anheier, Norman C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chen, Cliff S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This report discusses a new SSA approach evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) that may lead to highly scalable, small telescope observing stations designed to help manage the growing space surveillance burden. Using the methods and observing tools described in this report, the team was able to acquire and track very faint satellites (near Pluto’s apparent brightness). Photometric data was collected and used to correlate object orbital position as a function of atomic clock-derived time. Object apparent brightness was estimated by image analysis and nearby star calibration. The measurement performance was only limited by weather conditions, object brightness, and the sky glow at the observation site. In the future, these new SSA technologies and techniques may be utilized to protect satellite assets, detect and monitor orbiting debris fields, and support Outer Space Treaty monitoring and transparency.

  7. Color-redshift Relations and Photometric Redshift Estimations of Quasars in Large Sky Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, X B; Zhou, X; Wu, Xue-Bing; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Xu

    2004-01-01

    With a recently constructed composite quasar spectrum and the \\chi^2 minimization technique, we demonstrated a general method to estimate the photometric redshifts of a large sample of quasars by deriving the theoretical color-redshift relations and comparing the theoretical colors with the observed ones. We estimated the photometric redshifts from the 5-band SDSS photometric data of 18678 quasars in the first major data release of SDSS and compare them with the spectroscopic redshifts. The redshift difference is smaller than 0.1 for 47% of quasars and 0.2 for 68 % of them. Based on the calculation of the theoretical color-color diagrams of stars, galaxies and quasars in both the SDSS and BATC photometric systems, we expected that with the BATC system of 15 intermediate filters we would be able to select candidates of high redshift quasars more efficiently than in the SDSS, provided the BATC survey could detect objects with magnitude fainter than 21.

  8. Novel Methods for Predicting Photometric Redshifts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We calculate photometric redshifts from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Main Galaxy Sample, The Galaxy Evolution Explorer All Sky Survey, and The Two Micron All Sky...

  9. Ground-based Measurements of Next Generation Spectroradiometric Standard Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate, radiometric standards are essential to the future of ground- and space-based astronomy and astrophysics. While astronomers tend to think of “standard stars” as available calibration sources, progress at NIST to accurately calibrate inexpensive, easy to use photodiode detectors as spectroradiometric standards from 200 nm to 1800 nm allows referencing astronomical measurements to these devices. Direction-, time-, and wavelength-dependent transmission of Earth’s atmosphere is the single largest source of error for ground-based radiometric measurement of astronomical objects. Measurements and impacts of atmospheric extinction - scattering and absorption - on imaging radiometric and spectroradiometric measurements are described. The conclusion is that accurate real-time measurement of extinction in the column of atmosphere through which standard star observations are made, over the spectral region being observed and over the field of view of the telescope are required. New techniques to directly and simultaneously measure extinction in the column of atmosphere through which observations are made are required. Our direct extinction measurement solution employs three small facility-class instruments working in parallel: a lidar to measure rapidly time variable transmission at three wavelengths with uncertainty of 0.25% per airmass, a spectrophotometer to measure rapidly wavelength variable extinction with sub-1% precision per nanometer resolution element from 350 to 1050nm, and a wide-field camera to measure angularly variable extinction over the field of view. These instruments and their operation will be described. We assert that application of atmospheric metadata provided by this instrument suite corrects for a significant fraction of systematic errors currently limiting radiometric precision, and provides a major step towards measurements that are provably dominated by random noise.

  10. Ozone profiles above Kiruna from two ground-based radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Niall J.; Walker, Kaley A.; Raffalski, Uwe; Kivi, Rigel; Gross, Jochen; Manney, Gloria L.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents new atmospheric ozone concentration profiles retrieved from measurements made with two ground-based millimetre-wave radiometers in Kiruna, Sweden. The instruments are the Kiruna Microwave Radiometer (KIMRA) and the Millimeter wave Radiometer 2 (MIRA 2). The ozone concentration profiles are retrieved using an optimal estimation inversion technique, and they cover an altitude range of ˜ 16-54 km, with an altitude resolution of, at best, 8 km. The KIMRA and MIRA 2 measurements are compared to each other, to measurements from balloon-borne ozonesonde measurements at Sodankylä, Finland, and to measurements made by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the Aura satellite. KIMRA has a correlation of 0.82, but shows a low bias, with respect to the ozonesonde data, and MIRA 2 shows a smaller magnitude low bias and a 0.98 correlation coefficient. Both radiometers are in general agreement with each other and with MLS data, showing high correlation coefficients, but there are differences between measurements that are not explained by random errors. An oscillatory bias with a peak of approximately ±1 ppmv is identified in the KIMRA ozone profiles over an altitude range of ˜ 18-35 km, and is believed to be due to baseline wave features that are present in the spectra. A time series analysis of KIMRA ozone for winters 2008-2013 shows the existence of a local wintertime minimum in the ozone profile above Kiruna. The measurements have been ongoing at Kiruna since 2002 and late 2012 for KIMRA and MIRA 2, respectively.

  11. Project management for complex ground-based instruments: MEGARA plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Vargas, María. Luisa; Pérez-Calpena, Ana; Gil de Paz, Armando; Gallego, Jesús; Carrasco, Esperanza; Cedazo, Raquel; Iglesias, Jorge

    2014-08-01

    The project management of complex instruments for ground-based large telescopes is a challenge itself. A good management is a clue for project success in terms of performance, schedule and budget. Being on time has become a strict requirement for two reasons: to assure the arrival at the telescope due to the pressure on demanding new instrumentation for this first world-class telescopes and to not fall in over-costs. The budget and cash-flow is not always the expected one and has to be properly handled from different administrative departments at the funding centers worldwide distributed. The complexity of the organizations, the technological and scientific return to the Consortium partners and the participation in the project of all kind of professional centers working in astronomical instrumentation: universities, research centers, small and large private companies, workshops and providers, etc. make the project management strategy, and the tools and procedures tuned to the project needs, crucial for success. MEGARA (Multi-Espectrógrafo en GTC de Alta Resolución para Astronomía) is a facility instrument of the 10.4m GTC (La Palma, Spain) working at optical wavelengths that provides both Integral-Field Unit (IFU) and Multi-Object Spectrograph (MOS) capabilities at resolutions in the range R=6,000-20,000. The project is an initiative led by Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain) in collaboration with INAOE (Mexico), IAA-CSIC (Spain) and Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain). MEGARA is being developed under contract with GRANTECAN.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: COSMOS photometric redshift catalog (Ilbert+, 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilbert, O.; Capak, P.; Salvato, M.; Aussel, H.; McCracken, H. J.; Sanders, D. B.; Scoville, N.; Kartaltepe, J.; Arnouts, S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Mobasher, B.; Taniguchi, Y.; Lamareille, F.; Leauthaud, A.; Sasaki, S.; Thompson, D.; Zamojski, M.; Zamorani, G.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Brusa, M.; Caputi, K. I.; Carollo, C. M.; Contini, T.; Cook, R.; Coppa, G.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; de Ravel, L.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Hasinger, G.; Iovino, A.; Kampczyk, P.; Kneib, J.-P.; Knobel, C.; Kovac, K.; Le Borgne, J. F.; Le Brun, V.; Fevre, O. L.; Lilly, S.; Looper, D.; Maier, C.; Mainieri, V.; Mellier, Y.; Mignoli, M.; Murayama, T.; Pello, R.; Peng, Y.; Perez-Montero, E.; Renzini, A.; Ricciardelli, E.; Schiminovich, D.; Scodeggio, M.; Shioya, Y.; Silverman, J.; Surace, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tasca, L.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Zucca, E.

    2017-03-01

    Compared with the previous optical/NIR catalog (Capak et al., 2007ApJS..172...99C, Cat. II/284), the new photometry implements 14 new medium/narrowband data from the Subaru Telescope, deep ground-based NIR data (J and K bands), and Spitzer-IRAC data. The spectroscopic sample used to calibrate/test the photo-z is 10 times larger at i+AB1.5. Hereafter, we detail the photometric and spectroscopic data used to measure the photo-z. Fluxes are measured in 30 bands from data taken on the Subaru (4200-9000Åg), CFHT (3900-21500Å), UKIRT (12500Å), Spitzer (3.6-8um), and GALEX (1500.2300Å) telescopes. We refer to P. Capak et al. (2008, in preparation) for a complete description of the observations, data reduction, and the photometry catalog. Photometric catalogue from P. Capak Photo-z catalogue from O. Ilbert PIs of the photometric data: D.B. Sanders, N. Scoville, Y. Tanigushi Data reducers: H. Aussel, P. Capak, H. McCracken, M. Salvato, S. Sasaki,D. Thompson, O. Ilbert, J. Kartaltepe, E. Le Floc'h, D. Looper, D.B. Sanders, N. Scoville Spectroscopic redshifts for validation from the zCOSMOS team (PI S. Lilly), from J. Kartaltepe and from P. Capak Identification of the Xray sources in the optical catalogue M. Brusa, G. Hasinger and the COSMOS/XMM team. (1 data file).

  13. The uBVI Photometric System. I. Motivation, Implementation, and Calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Bond, H E

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the design principles for a CCD-based photometric system that is highly optimized for ground-based measurement of the size of the Balmer jump in stellar energy distributions. It is shown that, among ultraviolet filters in common use, the Thuan-Gunn u filter is the most efficient for this purpose. This filter is combined with the standard Johnson-Kron-Cousins B, V, and I bandpasses to constitute the uBVI photometric system. Model stellar atmospheres are used to calibrate color-color diagrams for the uBVI system in terms of the fundamental stellar parameters of effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity. The u-B index is very sensitive to log g, but also to [Fe/H]. It is shown that an analog of the Str\\"omgren c_1 index, defined as (u-B)-(B-V), is much less metallicity dependent, but still sensitive to log g. The effect of interstellar reddening on u-B is determined through synthetic photometric calculations, and practical advice is given on dealing with flat fields, atmospheri...

  14. Photometric Study of the Possible Cool Quadruple System PY Virginis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, L. Y.; Qian, S. B.; Liu, N. P.; Liu, L.; Jiang, L. Q.

    2013-02-01

    Complete CCD photometric light curves in BV(RI)c bands obtained in 2012 for the short-period close binary system PY Virginis are presented. A new photometric analysis with the Wilson—Van Hamme code shows that PY Vir is an A-type marginal contact binary system. The absolute parameters of PY Vir are derived using spectroscopic and photometric solutions. Combining new determined times of minimum light with others published in the literature, the O - C diagram of the binary star is investigated. A periodic variation, with a period of 5.22(±0.05) years and an amplitude of 0.0075(±0.0004) days, was discovered. Since the spectrum of a third component has been detected by Rucinski et al., we consider this cyclic period oscillation to be the result of the light-time effect due to the presence of a third body. This third component may also be a binary itself. Therefore, PY Vir should be a quadruple system composed of two cool-type binary systems. This system is a good astrophysical laboratory to study the formation and evolution of close binaries and multiple systems.

  15. A Fourteen-Band Photometric Study of A2443

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Lue Wen; Yan-Bin Yang; Qi-Rong Yuan; Xu Zhou; Jun Ma; Zhao-Ji Jiang

    2007-01-01

    We present a multi-color photometric study of the galaxy cluster A2443 (z = 0.108) with the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) system. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in 14 intermediate bands are obtained for 5975 detected from ~1deg2 of the BATC images. Color-color diagrams are used for star-galaxy separation, then a photometric redshift technique is applied to the galaxy sample for cluster membership determination. There are 301 galaxies with photometric redshifts between 0.08 and 0.14 determined as member candidates of A2443, including 289 new ones. Based on this enlarged sample, the luminosity function and color magnitude relation of the cluster are studied. With an evolutionary synthesis model, we find that the fainter galaxies tend to have longer time scales of star formation than the brighter ones. Morphologically, we show an elongated spatial distribution associating with the galaxy cluster ZwCl 2224.2+ 1651, which contains more blue galaxies. This result indicates that galaxy cluster ZwCl 2224.2+1651 may be falling into A2443, and cluster-cluster interaction could have triggered star formation activities in ZwCl 2224.2+1651.

  16. Ground-based Transit Observation of the Habitable-zone super-Earth K2-3d

    CERN Document Server

    Fukui, Akihiko; Narita, Norio; Hirano, Teruyuki; Onitsuka, Masahiro; Ryu, Tsuguru; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko

    2016-01-01

    We report the first ground-based transit observation of K2-3d, a 1.5 R_Earth planet supposedly within the habitable zone around a bright M-dwarf host star, using the Okayama 188-cm telescope and the multi(grz)-band imager MuSCAT. Although the depth of the transit (0.7 mmag) is smaller than the photometric precisions (1.2, 0.9, and 1.2 mmag per 60 s for g, r, and z bands, respectively), we marginally but consistently identify the transit signal in all three bands, by taking advantage of the transit parameters from K2, and by introducing a novel technique that leverages multi-band information to reduce the systematics caused by second-order extinction. We also revisit previously analyzed Spitzer transit observations of K2-3d to investigate the possibility of systematic offsets in transit timing, and find that all the timing data can be explained well by a linear ephemeris. We revise the orbital period of K2-3d to be 44.55612 \\pm 0.00021 days, which corrects the predicted transit times in 2019, i.e., the JWST er...

  17. The gamma Dor CoRoT target HD49434. I-Results from the ground-based campaign

    CERN Document Server

    Uytterhoeven, K; Poretti, E; Rainer, M; Martin-Ruiz, S; Rodríguez, E; Amado, P J; LeContel, D; Jankov, S; Niemczura, E; Pollard, K; Brunsden, E; Paparo, M; Costa, V; Valtier, J -C; Garrido, R; Marin, A J; Suárez, J C; Kilmartin, P H; Chapellier, E; Rodriguez-Lopez, C; Aceituno, F J; Casanova, V; Rolland, A; Olivares, I

    2008-01-01

    Context: We present the results of an extensive ground-based photometric and spectroscopic campaign on the gamma Dor CoRoT target HD49434. This campaign was preparatory to the CoRoT satellite observations, which took place from October 2007 to March 2008. Results: The frequency analysis clearly shows the presence of four frequencies in the 0.2-1.7 c/d interval, as well as six frequencies in the 5-12 c/d domain. The low frequencies are typical for gamma Dor variables while the high frequencies are common for delta Sct pulsators. We propose the frequency 2.666 c/d as a possible rotational frequency. All modes, for which an identification was possible, seem to be high-degree modes (3 <= l <= 8). We did not find evidence for a possible binary nature of HD49434. The element abundances we derived are consistent with the values obtained in previous analyses. Conclusions: We classify the gamma Dor star HD49434 as a hybrid pulsator, which pulsates simultaneously in p- and g-modes. This finding makes HD49434 an e...

  18. A novel technique for extracting clouds base height using ground based imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Hirsch

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The height of a cloud in the atmospheric column is a key parameter in its characterization. Several remote sensing techniques (passive and active, either ground-based or on space-borne platforms and in-situ measurements are routinely used in order to estimate top and base heights of clouds. In this article we present a novel method that combines thermal imaging from the ground and sounded wind profile in order to derive the cloud base height. This method is independent of cloud types, making it efficient for both low boundary layer and high clouds. In addition, using thermal imaging ensures extraction of clouds' features during daytime as well as at nighttime. The proposed technique was validated by comparison to active sounding by ceilometers (which is a standard ground based method, to lifted condensation level (LCL calculations, and to MODIS products obtained from space. As all passive remote sensing techniques, the proposed method extracts only the height of the lowest cloud layer, thus upper cloud layers are not detected. Nevertheless, the information derived from this method can be complementary to space-borne cloud top measurements when deep-convective clouds are present. Unlike techniques such as LCL, this method is not limited to boundary layer clouds, and can extract the cloud base height at any level, as long as sufficient thermal contrast exists between the radiative temperatures of the cloud and its surrounding air parcel. Another advantage of the proposed method is its simplicity and modest power needs, making it particularly suitable for field measurements and deployment at remote locations. Our method can be further simplified for use with visible CCD or CMOS camera (although nighttime clouds will not be observed.

  19. Mountain wave PSC dynamics and microphysics from ground-based lidar measurements and meteorological modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Reichardt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The day-long observation of a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC by two co-located ground-based lidars at the Swedish research facility Esrange (67.9° N, 21.1° E on 16 January 1997 is analyzed in terms of PSC dynamics and microphysics. Mesoscale modeling is utilized to simulate the meteorological setting of the lidar measurements. Microphysical properties of the PSC particles are retrieved by comparing the measured particle depolarization ratio and the PSC-averaged lidar ratio with theoretical optical data derived for different particle shapes. In the morning, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT particles and then increasingly coexisting liquid ternary aerosol (LTA were detected as outflow from a mountain wave-induced ice PSC upwind Esrange. The NAT PSC is in good agreement with simulations for irregular-shaped particles with length-to-diameter ratios between 0.75 and 1.25, maximum dimensions from 0.7 to 0.9 µm, and a number density from 8 to 12 cm-3 and the coexisting LTA droplets had diameters from 0.7 to 0.9 µm, a refractive index of 1.39 and a number density from 7 to 11 cm-3. The total amount of condensed HNO3 was in the range of 8–12 ppbv. The data provide further observational evidence that NAT forms via deposition nucleation on ice particles as a number of recently published papers suggest. By early afternoon the mountain-wave ice PSC expanded above the lidar site. Its optical data indicate a decrease in minimum particle size from 3 to 1.9 µm with time. Later on, following the weakening of the mountain wave, wave-induced LTA was observed only. Our study demonstrates that ground-based lidar measurements of PSCs can be comprehensively interpreted if combined with mesoscale meteorological data.

  20. Evaluation of satellite soil moisture products over Norway using ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesfeller, A.; Lahoz, W. A.; Jeu, R. A. M. de; Dorigo, W.; Haugen, L. E.; Svendby, T. M.; Wagner, W.

    2016-03-01

    In this study we evaluate satellite soil moisture products from the advanced SCATterometer (ASCAT) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) over Norway using ground-based observations from the Norwegian water resources and energy directorate. The ASCAT data are produced using the change detection approach of Wagner et al. (1999), and the AMSR-E data are produced using the VUA-NASA algorithm (Owe et al., 2001, 2008). Although satellite and ground-based soil moisture data for Norway have been available for several years, hitherto, such an evaluation has not been performed. This is partly because satellite measurements of soil moisture over Norway are complicated owing to the presence of snow, ice, water bodies, orography, rocks, and a very high coastline-to-area ratio. This work extends the European areas over which satellite soil moisture is validated to the Nordic regions. Owing to the challenging conditions for soil moisture measurements over Norway, the work described in this paper provides a stringent test of the capabilities of satellite sensors to measure soil moisture remotely. We show that the satellite and in situ data agree well, with averaged correlation (R) values of 0.72 and 0.68 for ASCAT descending and ascending data vs in situ data, and 0.64 and 0.52 for AMSR-E descending and ascending data vs in situ data for the summer/autumn season (1 June-15 October), over a period of 3 years (2009-2011). This level of agreement indicates that, generally, the ASCAT and AMSR-E soil moisture products over Norway have high quality, and would be useful for various applications, including land surface monitoring, weather forecasting, hydrological modelling, and climate studies. The increasing emphasis on coupled approaches to study the earth system, including the interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere, will benefit from the availability of validated and improved soil moisture satellite datasets, including those

  1. Comparing Aerosol Retrievals from Ground-Based Instruments at the Impact-Pm Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupinski, M.; Bradley, C. L.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Xu, F.; Diner, D. J.; Clements, C. B.; Camacho, C.

    2016-12-01

    Detection of aerosol types, components having different size and chemical composition, over urban areas is important for understanding their impact on health and climate. In particular, sustained contact with size-differentiated airborne particulate matter: PM10 and PM2.5 can lead to adverse health effects such as asthma attacks, heart and lung diseases, and premature mortality. Multi-angular polarimetric measurements have been advocated in recent years as an additional tool to better understand and retrieve the aerosol properties needed for improved predictions of aerosol impart on air quality and climate. We deployed the ground-based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (GroundMSPI) for accurate spectropolarimetric and radiance measurements co-located with the AERONET CIMEL sun photometer and a Halo Doppler 18 m resolution lidar from San José State University at the Garland-Fresno Air Quality supersite in Fresno, CA on July 7 during the Imaging Polarimetric Assessment and Characterization of Tropospheric Particulate Matter (ImPACT-PM) field experiment. GroundMSPI sampled the atmospheric scattering phase function in and 90 degrees out of the principal plane every 15 minutes in an automated manner, utilizing the 2-axis gimbal mount in elevation and azimuth. The goal of this work is verify atmospheric measurement of GroundMSPI with the coincident CIMEL sun photometer and ground-based lidar. Diffuse-sky radiance measurements of GroundMSPI are compared with the CIMEL sun photometer throughout the day. AERONET aerosol parameters such as size, shape, and index of refraction as well as lidar aerosol extinction profiles will be used in a forward radiative transfer model to compare with GroundMSPI observations and optimize these parameters to best match GroundMSPI data.

  2. Spectroscopic analysis of stellar mass black-hole mergers in our local universe with ground-based gravitational wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bhagwat, Swetha; Ballmer, Stefan W

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the recent discoveries of binary black-hole mergers by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (Advanced LIGO), we investigate the prospects of ground-based detectors to perform a spectroscopic analysis of signals emitted during the ringdown of the final Kerr black-hole formed by a stellar mass binary black-hole merger. Although it is unlikely that Advanced LIGO can measure multiple modes of the ringdown, assuming an optimistic rate of 240 Gpc$^{-3}$yr$^{-1}$, upgrades to the existing LIGO detectors could measure multiple ringdown modes in $\\sim$6 detections per year. New ground-based facilities such as Einstein Telescope or Cosmic Explorer could measure multiple ringdown modes in over 300 events per year. We perform Monte-Carlo injections of $10^{6}$ binary black-hole mergers in a search volume defined by a sphere of radius 1500 Mpc centered at the detector, for various proposed ground-based detector models. We assume a uniform random distribution in component masses of ...

  3. Ground Based Investigation of Electrostatic Accelerometer in HUST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y.; Zhou, Z.

    2013-12-01

    High-precision electrostatic accelerometers with six degrees of freedom (DOF) acceleration measurement were successfully used in CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions which to measure the Earth's gravity field. In our group, space inertial sensor based on the capacitance transducer and electrostatic control technique has been investigated for test of equivalence principle (TEPO), searching non-Newtonian force in micrometer range, and satellite Earth's field recovery. The significant techniques of capacitive position sensor with the noise level at 2×10-7pF/Hz1/2 and the μV/Hz1/2 level electrostatic actuator are carried out and all the six servo loop controls by using a discrete PID algorithm are realized in a FPGA device. For testing on ground, in order to compensate one g earth's gravity, the fiber torsion pendulum facility is adopt to measure the parameters of the electrostatic controlled inertial sensor such as the resolution, and the electrostatic stiffness, the cross couple between different DOFs. A short distance and a simple double capsule equipment the valid duration about 0.5 second is set up in our lab for the free fall tests of the engineering model which can directly verify the function of six DOF control. Meanwhile, high voltage suspension method is also realized and preliminary results show that the horizontal axis of acceleration noise is about 10-8m/s2/Hz1/2 level which limited mainly by the seismic noise. Reference: [1] Fen Gao, Ze-Bing Zhou, Jun Luo, Feasibility for Testing the Equivalence Principle with Optical Readout in Space, Chin. Phys. Lett. 28(8) (2011) 080401. [2] Z. Zhu, Z. B. Zhou, L. Cai, Y. Z. Bai, J. Luo, Electrostatic gravity gradiometer design for the advanced GOCE mission, Adv. Sp. Res. 51 (2013) 2269-2276. [3] Z B Zhou, L Liu, H B Tu, Y Z Bai, J Luo, Seismic noise limit for ground-based performance measurements of an inertial sensor using a torsion balance, Class. Quantum Grav. 27 (2010) 175012. [4] H B Tu, Y Z Bai, Z B Zhou, L Liu, L

  4. Comparing distinct ground-based lightning location networks covering the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Lotte; Leijnse, Hidde; Schmeits, Maurice; Beekhuis, Hans; Poelman, Dieter; Evers, Läslo; Smets, Pieter

    2015-04-01

    Lightning can be detected using a ground-based sensor network. The Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) monitors lightning activity in the Netherlands with the so-called FLITS-system; a network combining SAFIR-type sensors. This makes use of Very High Frequency (VHF) as well as Low Frequency (LF) sensors. KNMI has recently decided to replace FLITS by data from a sub-continental network operated by Météorage which makes use of LF sensors only (KNMI Lightning Detection Network, or KLDN). KLDN is compared to the FLITS system, as well as Met Office's long-range Arrival Time Difference (ATDnet), which measures Very Low Frequency (VLF). Special focus lies on the ability to detect Cloud to Ground (CG) and Cloud to Cloud (CC) lightning in the Netherlands. Relative detection efficiency of individual flashes and lightning activity in a more general sense are calculated over a period of almost 5 years. Additionally, the detection efficiency of each system is compared to a ground-truth that is constructed from flashes that are detected by both of the other datasets. Finally, infrasound data is used as a fourth lightning data source for several case studies. Relative performance is found to vary strongly with location and time. As expected, it is found that FLITS detects significantly more CC lightning (because of the strong aptitude of VHF antennas to detect CC), though KLDN and ATDnet detect more CG lightning. We analyze statistics computed over the entire 5-year period, where we look at CG as well as total lightning (CC and CG combined). Statistics that are considered are the Probability of Detection (POD) and the so-called Lightning Activity Detection (LAD). POD is defined as the percentage of reference flashes the system detects compared to the total detections in the reference. LAD is defined as the fraction of system recordings of one or more flashes in predefined area boxes over a certain time period given the fact that the reference detects at least one

  5. Project ORION: Orbital Debris Removal Using Ground-Based Sensors and Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    About 100,000 pieces of 1 to 10-cm debris in low-Earth orbit are too small to track reliably but large enough to cripple or destroy spacecraft. The ORION team studied the feasibility of removing the debris with ground-based laser impulses. Photoablation experiments were surveyed and applied to likely debris materials. Laser intensities needed for debris orbit modification call for pulses on the order of lOkJ or continuous wave lasers on the order of 1 MW. Adaptive optics are necessary to correct for atmospheric turbulence. Wavelength and pulse duration windows were found that limit beam degradation due to nonlinear atmospheric processes. Debris can be detected and located to within about 10 microrads with existing radar and passive optical technology. Fine targeting would be accomplished with laser illumination, which might also be used for detection. Bistatic detection with communications satellites may also be possible. We recommend that existing technology be used to demonstrate the concept at a loss of about $20 million. We calculate that an installation to clear altitudes up to 800 km of 1 to 10-cm debris over 2 years of operation would cost about $80 million. Clearing altitudes up to 1,500 km would take about 3 years and cost about $160 million.

  6. A Ground-Based Search for Thermal Emission from the Exoplanet TrES-1

    CERN Document Server

    Knutson, Heather A; Deming, Drake; Richardson, L Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Eclipsing planetary systems give us an important window on extrasolar planet atmospheres. By measuring the depth of the secondary eclipse, when the planet moves behind the star, we can estimate the strength of the thermal emission from the day side of the planet. Attaining a ground-based detection of one of these eclipses has proven to be a significant challenge, as time-dependent variations in instrument throughput and atmospheric seeing and absorption overwhelm the small signal of the eclipse at infrared wavelengths. We gathered a series of simultaneous L grism spectra of the transiting planet system TrES-1 and a nearby comparison star of comparable brightness, allowing us to correct for these effects in principle. Combining the data from two eclipses, we demonstrate a detection sensitivity of 0.15% in the eclipse depth relative to the stellar flux. This approaches the sensitivity required to detect the planetary emission, which theoretical models predict should lie between 0.05-0.1% of the stellar flux in ...

  7. Unsupervised learning in persistent sensing for target recognition by wireless ad hoc networks of ground-based sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortos, William S.

    2008-04-01

    In previous work by the author, effective persistent and pervasive sensing for recognition and tracking of battlefield targets were seen to be achieved, using intelligent algorithms implemented by distributed mobile agents over a composite system of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for persistence and a wireless network of unattended ground sensors for pervasive coverage of the mission environment. While simulated performance results for the supervised algorithms of the composite system are shown to provide satisfactory target recognition over relatively brief periods of system operation, this performance can degrade by as much as 50% as target dynamics in the environment evolve beyond the period of system operation in which the training data are representative. To overcome this limitation, this paper applies the distributed approach using mobile agents to the network of ground-based wireless sensors alone, without the UAV subsystem, to provide persistent as well as pervasive sensing for target recognition and tracking. The supervised algorithms used in the earlier work are supplanted by unsupervised routines, including competitive-learning neural networks (CLNNs) and new versions of support vector machines (SVMs) for characterization of an unknown target environment. To capture the same physical phenomena from battlefield targets as the composite system, the suite of ground-based sensors can be expanded to include imaging and video capabilities. The spatial density of deployed sensor nodes is increased to allow more precise ground-based location and tracking of detected targets by active nodes. The "swarm" mobile agents enabling WSN intelligence are organized in a three processing stages: detection, recognition and sustained tracking of ground targets. Features formed from the compressed sensor data are down-selected according to an information-theoretic algorithm that reduces redundancy within the feature set, reducing the dimension of samples used in the target

  8. The effect of photometric and geometric context on photometric and geometric lightness effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Thomas Y; Brainard, David H

    2014-01-24

    We measured the lightness of probe tabs embedded at different orientations in various contextual images presented on a computer-controlled stereo display. Two background context planes met along a horizontal roof-like ridge. Each plane was a graphic rendering of a set of achromatic surfaces with the simulated illumination for each plane controlled independently. Photometric context was varied by changing the difference in simulated illumination intensity between the two background planes. Geometric context was varied by changing the angle between them. We parsed the data into separate photometric effects and geometric effects. For fixed geometry, varying photometric context led to linear changes in both the photometric and geometric effects. Varying geometric context did not produce a statistically reliable change in either the photometric or geometric effects.

  9. Photometric redshifts for the CFHTLS-Wide

    CERN Document Server

    Brimioulle, Fabrice; Seitz, Stella; Bender, Ralf; Snigula, Jan

    2008-01-01

    We want to derive bias free, accurate photometric redshifts for those fields of the CFHTLS-Wide data which are covered in the u*, g', r', i' and z' filters and are public on January 2008. These are 37 square degrees in the W1, W3 and W4 fields with photometric data for a total of 2.597.239 galaxies. We use the photometric redshift code PHOTO-z of Bender et al. (2001). We compare our redshifts for the W1, W3 and W4 fields to about 7500 spectroscopic redshifts from the VVDS therein. For galaxies with 17.5 <= i' AB <= 22.5 the accuracies and outlier rates become sigma=0.033, eta~2 % for W1, sigma=0.037, eta~2% for W3 and sigma=0.035, eta~2.5 % outliers for W4 fields. For the total galaxy sample with about 9000 spectroscopic redshifts from VVDS, DEEP2 or SDSS we obtain a sigma=0.04 and eta~5.7% for the PHOTO-z redshifts. We consider the photometric redshifts of Erben et al. (2008) which were obtained with exactly the same photometric catalog using the BPZ-redshift code and compare them with our computed red...

  10. Photometric Variability of the Be Star Population

    CERN Document Server

    Labadie-Bartz, Jonathan; McSwain, M Virginia; Bjorkman, J E; Bjorkman, K S; Lund, Michael B; Rodriguez, Joseph E; Stassun, Keivan G; Stevens, Daniel J; Gaudi, B Scott; James, David J; Kuhn, Rudolf B; Siverd, Robert J; Beatty, Thomas G

    2016-01-01

    Be stars have generally been characterized by the emission lines in their spectra, and especially the time variability of those spectroscopic features. They are known to also exhibit photometric variability at multiple timescales, but have not been broadly compared and analyzed by that behavior. We have taken advantage of the advent of wide-field, long-baseline, and high-cadence photometric surveys that search for transiting exoplanets to perform a comprehensive analysis of brightness variations among a large number of known Be stars. The photometric data comes from the KELT transit survey, with a typical cadence of 30 minutes, baseline of up to ten years, photometric precision of about 1%, and coverage of about 60% of the sky. We analyze KELT light curves of 610 known Be stars in both the Northern and Southern hemispheres in an effort to study their variability. Consistent with other studies of Be star variability, we find most of the stars to be photometrically variable. We derive lower limits on the fracti...

  11. Ground-based monitoring of solar radiation in Moldova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aculinin, Alexandr; Smicov, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    Integrated measurements of solar radiation in Kishinev, Moldova have been started by Atmospheric Research Group (ARG) at the Institute of Applied Physics from 2003. Direct, diffuse and total components of solar and atmospheric long-wave radiation are measured by using of the radiometric complex at the ground-based solar radiation monitoring station. Measurements are fulfilled at the stationary and moving platforms equipped with the set of 9 broadband solar radiation sensors overlapping wavelength range from UV-B to IR. Detailed description of the station can be found at the site http://arg.phys.asm.md. Ground station is placed in an urban environment of Kishinev city (47.00N; 28.56E). Summary of observation data acquired at the station in the course of short-term period from 2004 to 2009 are presented below. Solar radiation measurements were fulfilled by using CM11(280-3000 nm) and CH1 sensors (Kipp&Zonen). In the course of a year maximum and minimum of monthly sums of total radiation was ~706.4 MJm-2 in June and ~82.1MJm-2 in December, respectively. Monthly sums of direct solar radiation (on horizontal plane) show the maximum and minimum values of the order ~456.9 MJm-2 in July and ~25.5MJm-2 in December, respectively. In an average, within a year should be marked the predominance of direct radiation over the scattered radiation, 51% and 49%, respectively. In the course of a year, the percentage contribution of the direct radiation into the total radiation is ~55-65% from May to September. In the remaining months, the percentage contribution decreases and takes the minimum value of ~ 28% in December. In an average, annual sum of total solar radiation is ~4679.9 MJm-2. For the period from April to September accounts for ~76% of the annual amount of total radiation. Annual sum of sunshine duration accounts for ~2149 hours, which is of ~ 48% from the possible sunshine duration. In an average, within a year maximum and minimum of sunshine duration is ~ 304 hours in

  12. Ground-based Space Weather Monitoring with LOFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Michael; van Haarlem, Michiel; Lawrence, Gareth; Reid, Simon; Bos, Andre; Rawlings, Steve; Salvini, Stef; Mitchell, Cathryn; Soleimani, Manuch; Amado, Sergio; Teresa, Vital

    As one of the first of a new generation of radio instruments, the International LOFAR Telescope (ILT) will provide a number of unique and novel capabilities for the astronomical community. These include remote configuration and operation, dynamic real-time processing and system response, and the ability to provide multiple simultaneous streams of data to a community whose scientific interests run the gamut from lighting in the atmospheres of distant planets to the origins of the universe itself. The LOFAR (LOw Frequency ARray) system is optimized for a frequency range from 30-240 MHz and consists of multiple antenna fields spread across Europe. In the Netherlands, a total 36 LOFAR stations are nearing completion with an initial 8 international stations currently being deployed in Germany, France, Sweden, and the UK. Digital beam-forming techniques make the LOFAR system agile and allow for rapid repointing of the telescope as well as the potential for multiple simultaneous observations. With its dense core array and long interferometric baselines, LOFAR has the potential to achieve unparalleled sensitivity and spatial resolution in the low frequency radio regime. LOFAR will also be one of the first radio observatories to feature automated processing pipelines to deliver fully calibrated science products to its user community. As we discuss in this presentation, the same capabilities that make LOFAR a powerful tool for radio astronomy also provide an excellent platform upon which to build a ground-based monitoring system for space weather events. For example, the ability to monitor Solar activity in near real-time is one of the key scientific capabilities being developed for LOFAR. With only a fraction of its total observing capacity, LOFAR will be able to provide continuous monitoring of the Solar spectrum over the entire 10-240 MHz band down to microsecond timescales. Autonomous routines will scan these incoming spectral data for evidence of Solar flares and be

  13. Sonneberg Sky Patrol Archive - Photometric Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Spasovic, Milan; Lange, Christian; Jovanovic, Dragan; Schrimpf, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The Sonneberg Sky Patrol archive so far has not yet been analyzed systematically. In this paper we present first steps towards an automated photometric analysis aiming at the search for variable stars and transient phenomena like novae. Early works on the sky patrol plates showed that photometric accuracy can be enhanced with fitting algorithms. The procedure used was a manually supported click-and-fit-routine, not suitable for automatic analysis of vast amount of photographic plates. We will present our progress on deconvolution of overlapping sources on the plates and compare photometric analysis using different methods. Our goal is to get light curves of sufficient quality from sky patrol plates, which can be classified with machine learning algorithms. The development of an automated scheme for finding transient events is in progress and the first results are very promising.

  14. Defining Photometric Peculiar Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Gaitan, S; Pignata, G; Forster, F; Gutierrez, C P; Bufano, F; Galbany, L; Folatelli, G; Phillips, M M; Hamuy, M; Anderson, J P; de Jaeger, T

    2014-01-01

    We present a new photometric identification technique for SN 1991bg-like type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), i.e. objects with light-curve characteristics such as later primary maxima and absence of secondary peak in redder filters. This method is capable of selecting out this sub-group from the normal type Ia population. Furthermore, we find that recently identified peculiar sub-types such as SNe Iax and super-Chandrasekhar SNe Ia have similar photometric characteristics as 91bg-like SNe Ia, namely the absence of secondary maxima and shoulders at longer wavelengths, and can also be classified with our technique. The similarity of these different SN Ia sub-groups perhaps suggests common physical conditions. This typing methodology permits the photometric identification of peculiar SNe Ia in large up-coming wide field surveys either to study them further or to obtain a pure sample of normal SNe Ia for cosmological studies.

  15. Defining photometric peculiar type Ia supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González-Gaitán, S.; Pignata, G.; Förster, F.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Bufano, F.; Galbany, L.; Hamuy, M.; De Jaeger, T. [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Hsiao, E. Y.; Phillips, M. M. [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Folatelli, G. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Kavli IPMU, WPI) (Japan); Anderson, J. P., E-mail: sgonzale@das.uchile.cl [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Casilla 19, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-11-10

    We present a new photometric identification technique for SN 1991bg-like type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), i.e., objects with light curve characteristics such as later primary maxima and the absence of a secondary peak in redder filters. This method is capable of selecting this sub-group from the normal type Ia population. Furthermore, we find that recently identified peculiar sub-types such as SNe Iax and super-Chandrasekhar SNe Ia have photometric characteristics similar to 91bg-like SNe Ia, namely, the absence of secondary maxima and shoulders at longer wavelengths, and can also be classified with our technique. The similarity of these different SN Ia sub-groups perhaps suggests common physical conditions. This typing methodology permits the photometric identification of peculiar SNe Ia in large upcoming wide-field surveys either to study them further or to obtain a pure sample of normal SNe Ia for cosmological studies.

  16. A ground-based near-infrared emission spectrum of the exoplanet HD 189733b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Mark R; Deroo, Pieter; Griffith, Caitlin A; Tinetti, Giovanna; Thatte, Azam; Vasisht, Gautam; Chen, Pin; Bouwman, Jeroen; Crossfield, Ian J; Angerhausen, Daniel; Afonso, Cristina; Henning, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Detection of molecules using infrared spectroscopy probes the conditions and compositions of exoplanet atmospheres. Water (H(2)O), methane (CH(4)), carbon dioxide (CO(2)), and carbon monoxide (CO) have been detected in two hot Jupiters. These previous results relied on space-based telescopes that do not provide spectroscopic capability in the 2.4-5.2 microm spectral region. Here we report ground-based observations of the dayside emission spectrum for HD 189733b between 2.0-2.4 microm and 3.1-4.1 microm, where we find a bright emission feature. Where overlap with space-based instruments exists, our results are in excellent agreement with previous measurements. A feature at approximately 3.25 microm is unexpected and difficult to explain with models that assume local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions at the 1 bar to 1 x 10(-6) bar pressures typically sampled by infrared measurements. The most likely explanation for this feature is that it arises from non-LTE emission from CH(4), similar to what is seen in the atmospheres of planets in our own Solar System. These results suggest that non-LTE effects may need to be considered when interpreting measurements of strongly irradiated exoplanets.

  17. Solar tower atmospheric Cherenkov effect experiment (STACEE) for ground based gamma ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, D.; Chantell, M. C.; Coppi, P.; Covault, C. E.; Dragovan, M.; Gregorich, D. T.; Hanna, D. S.; Mukherjee, R.; Ong, R. A.; Oser, S.; Ragan, K.; Tümer, O. T.; Williams, D. A.

    1997-05-01

    The STACEE experiment is being developed to study very high energy astrophysical gamma rays between 50 and 500 GeV. During the last few years this previously unexplored region has received much attention due to the detection of sources up to about 10 GeV by the EGRET instrument on board the CGRO. However, the paucity of detected sources at ~1 TeV indicates that fundamental processes working within these sources and/or in the intergalactic space are responsible for the cutoff in the photon spectra of the EGRET sources. The cutoff or the spectral change of these sources can be observed with ground-based Cherenkov detectors with a very low threshold. The use of large arrays of mirrors at solar power facilities is a promising way of lowering the threshold. Using this concept a series of tests were conducted at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) at Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque, NM) with a full size prototype of the STACEE telescope system. The tests show that STACEE will be capable of meaningful exploration of the gamma-ray sky between 50 and 500 GeV with good sensitivity.

  18. The Effect of Pulsar Timing Noise and Glitches on Timing Analysis for Ground Based Telescopes Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oña-Wilhelmi, E.; de Jager, O. C.; Contreras, J. L.; de los Reyes, R.; Fonseca, V.; López, M.; Lucarelli, F.; MAGIC Collaboration

    2003-07-01

    Pulsed emission from a number of gamma-ray pulsars is expected to be detectable with next generation ground-based gamma-ray telescopes such as MAGIC and possibly H.E.S.S. within a few hours of observations. The sensitivity is however not sufficient to enable a detection within a few seconds as reached by radio surveys. In some cases we may be fortunate to do a period search given a few hours' data, but if the signal is marginal, the correct period parameters must be known to allow a folding of the gamma-ray arrival times. The residual phases are then sub jected to a test for uniformity from which the significance of a signal can be assessed. If contemporary radio parameters are not available, we have to extrap olate archival radio parameters to the observation time in question. Such an extrap olation must then be accurate enough to avoid significant pulse smearing. The pulsar ephemerides from the archival data of HartRAO and Princeton (b etween 1989 and 1998) provide an excellent opportunity to study the accuracy of extrap olations of such ephemerides to the present moment, if an appropriate time shift is intro duced. The aim of this study is to investigate the smear in the gamma-ray pulse profile during a single night of observations.

  19. FINDING EXTRATERRESTRIAL LIFE USING GROUND-BASED HIGH-DISPERSION SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snellen, I. A. G.; Le Poole, R.; Brogi, M.; Birkby, J. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Postbus 9513, 2300-RA Leiden (Netherlands); De Kok, R. J. [SRON, Sorbonnelaan 2, 3584-CA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-02-20

    Exoplanet observations promise one day to unveil the presence of extraterrestrial life. Atmospheric compounds in strong chemical disequilibrium would point to large-scale biological activity just as oxygen and methane do in the Earth's atmosphere. The cancellation of both the Terrestrial Planet Finder and Darwin missions means that it is unlikely that a dedicated space telescope to search for biomarker gases in exoplanet atmospheres will be launched within the next 25 years. Here we show that ground-based telescopes provide a strong alternative for finding biomarkers in exoplanet atmospheres through transit observations. Recent results on hot Jupiters show the enormous potential of high-dispersion spectroscopy to separate the extraterrestrial and telluric signals, making use of the Doppler shift of the planet. The transmission signal of oxygen from an Earth-twin orbiting a small red dwarf star is only a factor of three smaller than that of carbon monoxide recently detected in the hot Jupiter {tau} Booetis b, albeit such a star will be orders of magnitude fainter. We show that if Earth-like planets are common, the planned extremely large telescopes can detect oxygen within a few dozen transits. Ultimately, large arrays of dedicated flux-collector telescopes equipped with high-dispersion spectrographs can provide the large collecting area needed to perform a statistical study of life-bearing planets in the solar neighborhood.

  20. Simulated forecasts for primordial B -mode searches in ground-based experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, David; Dunkley, Joanna; Thorne, Ben; Næss, Sigurd

    2017-02-01

    Detecting the imprint of inflationary gravitational waves on the B -mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is one of the main science cases for current and next-generation CMB experiments. In this work we explore some of the challenges that ground-based facilities will have to face in order to carry out this measurement in the presence of galactic foregrounds and correlated atmospheric noise. We present forecasts for stage-3 (S3) and planned stage-4 (S4) experiments based on the analysis of simulated sky maps using a map-based Bayesian foreground-cleaning method. Our results thus consistently propagate the uncertainties on foreground parameters such as spatially varying spectral indices, as well as the bias on the measured tensor-to-scalar ratio r caused by an incorrect modeling of the foregrounds. We find that S3 and S4-like experiments should be able to put constraints on r of the order σ (r )=(0.5 - 1.0 )×10-2 and σ (r )=(0.5 - 1.0 )×10-3 respectively, assuming instrumental systematic effects are under control. We further study deviations from the fiducial foreground model, finding that, while the effects of a second polarized dust component would be minimal on both S3 and S4, a 2% polarized anomalous dust emission component would be clearly detectable by stage-4 experiments.

  1. A ground-based near-infrared emission spectrum of the exoplanet HD 189733b

    CERN Document Server

    Swain, Mark R; Griffith, Caitlin A; Tinetti, Giovanna; Thatte, Azam; Vasisht, Gautam; Chen, Pin; Bouwman, Jeroen; Crossfield, Ian J; Angerhausen, Daniel; Afonso, Cristina; Henning, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Detection of molecules using infrared spectroscopy probes the conditions and compositions of exoplanet atmospheres. Water (H2O), methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and carbon monoxide (CO) have been detected in two hot Jupiters. These previous results relied on space-based telescopes that do not provide spectroscopic capability in the 2.4 - 5.2 micron spectral region. Here we report ground-based observations of the dayside emission spectrum for HD 189733b between 2.0-2.4 micron and 3.1-4.1 micron, where we find a bright emission feature. Where overlap with space-based instruments exists, our results are in excellent agreement with previous measurements. A feature at ~3.25 micron is unexpected and difficult to explain with models that assume local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions at the 1 bar to 1 x 10-6 bar pressures typically sampled by infrared measurements. The most likely explanation for this feature is that it arises from non-LTE emission from CH4, similar to what is seen in the atmospheres o...

  2. Remote sensing of Sonoran Desert vegetation structure and phenology with ground-based LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankey, Joel B.; Munson, Seth M.; Webb, Robert H.; Wallace, Cynthia S.A.; Duran, Cesar M.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term vegetation monitoring efforts have become increasingly important for understanding ecosystem response to global change. Many traditional methods for monitoring can be infrequent and limited in scope. Ground-based LiDAR is one remote sensing method that offers a clear advancement to monitor vegetation dynamics at high spatial and temporal resolution. We determined the effectiveness of LiDAR to detect intra-annual variability in vegetation structure at a long-term Sonoran Desert monitoring plot dominated by cacti, deciduous and evergreen shrubs. Monthly repeat LiDAR scans of perennial plant canopies over the course of one year had high precision. LiDAR measurements of canopy height and area were accurate with respect to total station survey measurements of individual plants. We found an increase in the number of LiDAR vegetation returns following the wet North American Monsoon season. This intra-annual variability in vegetation structure detected by LiDAR was attributable to a drought deciduous shrub Ambrosia deltoidea, whereas the evergreen shrub Larrea tridentata and cactus Opuntia engelmannii had low variability. Benefits of using LiDAR over traditional methods to census desert plants are more rapid, consistent, and cost-effective data acquisition in a high-resolution, 3-dimensional context. We conclude that repeat LiDAR measurements can be an effective method for documenting ecosystem response to desert climatology and drought over short time intervals and at detailed-local spatial scale.

  3. Gravitational waves from merging intermediate-mass black holes : II Event rates at ground-based detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Shinkai, Hisa-aki; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Based on a dynamical formation model of a super-massive black-hole (SMBH), we estimate expected observational profile of gravitational wave at ground-based detectors, such as KAGRA or advanced LIGO/VIRGO. Focusing that the second generation of detectors have enough sensitivity from 10 Hz and up (especially with KAGRA due to its location at less seismic noise), we are able to detect the ring-down gravitational wave of a BH of the mass $M 1$ per year for $\\rho=10$. Thus if we observe a BH with more than $100 M_\\odot$ in future gravitational wave observations, our model naturally explains its source.

  4. Application of Bayesian Neural Networks to Energy Reconstruction in EAS Experiments for ground-based TeV Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Ying; Lan, JieQin; Gao, WeiWei

    2016-01-01

    A toy detector array has been designed to simulate the detection of cosmic rays in Extended Air Shower(EAS) Experiments for ground-based TeV Astrophysics. The primary energies of protons from the Monte-Carlo simulation have been reconstructed by the algorithm of Bayesian neural networks (BNNs) and a standard method like the LHAASO experiment\\cite{lhaaso-ma}, respectively. The result of the energy reconstruction using BNNs has been compared with the one using the standard method. Compared to the standard method, the energy resolutions are significantly improved using BNNs. And the improvement is more obvious for the high energy protons than the low energy ones.

  5. Photometric Calibrations for the SIRTF Infrared Spectrograph

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, P W; Herter, T L; Armus, L; Houck, J; Sloan, G

    2002-01-01

    The SIRTF InfraRed Spectrograph (IRS) is faced with many of the same calibration challenges that were experienced in the ISO SWS calibration program, owing to similar wavelength coverage and overlapping spectral resolutions of the two instruments. Although the IRS is up to ~300 times more sensitive and without moving parts, imposing unique calibration challenges on their own, an overlap in photometric sensitivities of the high-resolution modules with the SWS grating sections allows lessons, resources, and certain techniques from the SWS calibration programs to be exploited. We explain where these apply in an overview of the IRS photometric calibration planning.

  6. Observation of TGFs onboard "Vernov" satellite and TGEs in ground-based experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolov, Vitaly; Panasyuk, Mikhail; Svertilov, Sergey; Garipov, Gali; Iyudin, Anatoly; Klimov, Pavel; Morozenko, Violetta; Maximov, Ivan; Mishieva, Tatiana; Klimov, Stanislav; Pozanenko, Alexey; Rothkaehl, Hanna

    2016-04-01

    "Vernov" satellite with RELEC experiment on-board was launched on 2014 July, 8 into a polar solar-synchronous orbit. The payload includes DRGE gamma-ray spectrometer providing measurements in 10-3000 keV energy range with four detectors directed to atmosphere. Total area of DRGE detectors is ~500 cm2. The data were recorded both in monitoring and gamma by gamma modes with timing accuracy ~15 us. Several TGF candidates with 10-40 gammas in a burst with duration instruments on-board "Vernov" satellite shows the absence of significant electromagnetic pulses around correspondent time moments. Comparison with WWLLN lightning network data base also indicates that there were no thunderstorms connected with most of detected TGF candidates. Possible connection of these flashes with electron precipitations is discussed. Ground-based experiments, with similar gamma-spectrometers were conducted, to study the spectral, temporal and spatial characteristics of TGEs in 20-3000 keV energy range, as well, as to search the fast hard X-ray and gamma-ray flashes possibly appearing at the moment of lightning. The time of each gamma-quantum interaction was recorded with an ~15 us s accuracy together with detailed spectral data. Measurements were done on the ground at Moscow region, and at mountain altitude in Armenia at Aragatz station. During the time interval covering spring, summer and autumn of 2015 a number of TGEs were detected. Measured low-energy gamma-ray spectra usually contain a set of lines that can be interpreted as radiation of Rn-222 daughter isotopes. The increase of Rn-222 radiation was detected during rainfalls with thunderstorm, as well, as during rainy weather without thunderstorms. Variations of Rn-222 radiation dominate at low energies (measure low energy gamma-radiation from the electrons accelerated in thunderclouds. There were no significant flashes with duration of ~1ms detected in coincidence with a nearby lightnings.

  7. Identifying and removing micro-drift in ground-based electromagnetic induction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smedt, Philippe; Delefortrie, Samuël; Wyffels, Francis

    2016-08-01

    As the application of ground-based frequency domain electromagnetic induction (FDEM) surveys is on the rise, so increases the need for processing strategies that allow exploiting the full potential of these often large survey datasets. While a common issue is the detection of baseline drift affecting FDEM measurements, the impact of residual corrugations present after initial drift removal is less documented. Comparable to the influence of baseline drift, this 'micro-drift' introduces aberrant data fluctuations through time, independent of the true subsurface variability. Here, we present a method to detect micro-drift in drift-corrected FDEM survey data, therefore allowing its removal. The core of the procedure lies in approaching survey datasets as a time series. Hereby, discrete multi-level wavelet decomposition is used to isolate micro-drift in FDEM data. Detected micro-drift is then excluded in subsequent signal reconstruction to produce a more accurate FDEM dataset. While independently executed from ancillary information, tie-line measurements are used to evaluate the reliability and pitfalls of the procedure. This demonstrates how data levelling without evaluation data can increase subjectivity of the procedure, and shows the flexibility and efficiency of the approach in detecting minute drift effects. We corroborated the method through its application on three experimental field datasets, consisting of both quadrature and in-phase measurements gathered with different FDEM instruments. Through a 1D assessment of micro-drift, we show how it impacts FDEM survey data, and how it can be identified and accounted for in straightforward processing steps.

  8. Exploring the Potential of Integral Field Spectroscopy for Observing Extrasolar Planet Transits: Ground-based Observations of the Atmospheric Na in HD 209458b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arribas, Santiago; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Sparks, William B.; López-Martín, Luis; Mediavilla, Evencio; Gómez-Alvarez, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    We explore the use of integral field spectroscopy (IFS) for observing extrasolar planet transits. Although this technique should find its full potential in space-based observations (e.g., James Webb Space Telescope, Terrestrial Planet Finder), we have tested its basics with ground-based time-series observations of HD 209458b obtained with the William Herschel Telescope optical fiber system INTEGRAL during a transit in 2004 August 17/18. For this analysis we have used 5550 spectra (from a potential of ~30,000) obtained in 150 exposures during a period of more than 7 hr. We have found that IFS offers three fundamental advantages with respect to previously used methods (based on imaging or standard slit spectroscopy). First, it improves the effective signal-to-noise ratio in photon-limited observations by distributing the light coming from the star into the two dimensions of the detector. Second, this type of IFS data allows us to ``autocalibrate'' instrumental and background effects. Third, since the star image characteristics (i.e., seeing, spatial shifts, etc.) as well as its photometric properties are extracted from the same data cube, it is possible to decorrelate photometric instabilities induced by point-spread function (or instrument) variations. These data have also allowed us to explore the accuracy limits of ground-based relative spectrophotometry. This was done using a photometric index that probes the Na D lines, for which we obtained a nominal 1 σ error of ~1.0 × 10-4. This result, based on observations of only one transit, indicates that this type of ground observation can constrain the characterization of the transmission spectrum of extrasolar planets, especially if they cover multiple transits under good weather conditions. The present observations are compatible with no extra Na D depression during the transit. Although this result seems to be inconsistent with the recently reported Hubble Space Telescope STIS findings, we point out its limited

  9. Spectral features of Earth-like planets and their detectability at different orbital distances around F, G, and K-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Hedelt, Pascal; Godolt, Mareike; Gebauer, Stefanie; Grenfell, John Lee; Rauer, Heike; Schreier, Franz; Selsis, Franck; Trautmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the spectral appearance of Earth-like exoplanets in the HZ of different main sequence stars at different orbital distances. We furthermore discuss for which of these scenarios biomarker absorption bands may be detected during primary or secondary transit with near-future telescopes and instruments.We analyze the spectra taking into account different filter bandpasses of two photometric instruments planned to be mounted to the JWST. We analyze in which filters and for which scenarios molecular absorption bands are detectable when using the space-borne JWST or the ground-based telescope E-ELT. Absorption bands of CO2, H2O, CH4 and O3 are clearly visible in high-resolution spectra as well as in the filters of photometric instruments. However, only during primary eclipse bands of CO2, H2O and O3 are detectable for all scenarios when using photometric instruments and an E-ELT telescope setup. CH4 is only detectable at the outer HZ of the K star since here the atmospheric modeling results in very hig...

  10. Photometric Redshifts of Galaxies in COSMOS

    CERN Document Server

    Mobasher, B; Scoville, N Z; Dahlen, T; Salvato, M; Aussel, H; Thompson, D J; Feldmann, R; Tasca, L; Lefèvre, O; Lilly, S; Carollo, C M; Kartaltepe, J S; McCracken, H; Mould, J; Renzini, A; Sanders, D B; Shopbell, P L; Taniguchi, Y; Ajiki, M; Shioya, Y; Contini, T; Giavalisco, M; Ilbert, O; Iovino, A; Le Brun, V; Mainieri, V; Mignoli, M; Scodeggio, M

    2006-01-01

    We measure photometric redshifts and spectral types for galaxies in the COSMOS survey. We use template fitting technique combined with luminosity function priors and with the option to simultaneously estimate dust extinction (i.e. E(B-V)) for each galaxy.Our estimated redshifts are accurate to i<25 and z~1.2. Using simulations with sampling and noise characteristics similar to those in COSMOS, the accuracy and reliability is estimated for the photometric redshifts as a function of the magnitude limits of the sample, S/N ratios and the number of bands used. From the simulations we find that the ratio of derived 95% confidence interval in the redshift probability distribution to the estimated photometric redshift (D95) can be used to identify and exclude the catastrophic failures in the photometric redshift estimates. We compare the derived redshifts with high-reliability spectroscopic redshifts for a sample of 868 normal galaxies with z < 1.2 from zCOSMOS. Considering different scenarios, depending on us...

  11. System for clinical photometric stereo endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durr, Nicholas J.; González, Germán.; Lim, Daryl; Traverso, Giovanni; Nishioka, Norman S.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.; Parot, Vicente

    2014-02-01

    Photometric stereo endoscopy is a technique that captures information about the high-spatial-frequency topography of the field of view simultaneously with a conventional color image. Here we describe a system that will enable photometric stereo endoscopy to be clinically evaluated in the large intestine of human patients. The clinical photometric stereo endoscopy system consists of a commercial gastroscope, a commercial video processor, an image capturing and processing unit, custom synchronization electronics, white light LEDs, a set of four fibers with diffusing tips, and an alignment cap. The custom pieces that come into contact with the patient are composed of biocompatible materials that can be sterilized before use. The components can then be assembled in the endoscopy suite before use. The resulting endoscope has the same outer diameter as a conventional colonoscope (14 mm), plugs into a commercial video processor, captures topography and color images at 15 Hz, and displays the conventional color image to the gastroenterologist in real-time. We show that this system can capture a color and topographical video in a tubular colon phantom, demonstrating robustness to complex geometries and motion. The reported system is suitable for in vivo evaluation of photometric stereo endoscopy in the human large intestine.

  12. Ground-based Infrared Observations of Water Vapor and Hydrogen Peroxide in the Atmosphere of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encrenaz, T.; Greathouse, T. K.; Bitner, M.; Kruger, A.; Richter, M. J.; Lacy, J. H.; Bézard, B.; Fouchet, T.; Lefevre, F.; Forget, F.; Atreya, S. K.

    2008-11-01

    Ground-based observations of water vapor and hydrogen peroxide have been obtained in the thermal infrared range, using the TEXES instrument at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, for different times of the seasonal cycle.

  13. Informing hydrological models with ground-based time-lapse relative gravimetry: potential and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Christiansen, Lars; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Coupled hydrogeophysical inversion emerges as an attractive option to improve the calibration and predictive capability of hydrological models. Recently, ground-based time-lapse relative gravity (TLRG) measurements have attracted increasing interest because there is a direct relationship between ...

  14. Changes in ground-based solar ultraviolet radiation during fire episodes: a case study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wright, CY

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available about the relationship between fires and solar UVR without local high-quality column or ground-based ambient air pollution (particulate matter in particular) data; however, the threat to public health from fires was acknowledged....

  15. System Identification and Automatic Mass Balancing of Ground-Based Three-Axis Spacecraft Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    System Identification and Automatic Mass Balancing of Ground-Based Three-Axis Spacecraft Simulator Jae-Jun Kim∗ and Brij N. Agrawal † Department of...TITLE AND SUBTITLE System Identification and Automatic Mass Balancing of Ground-Based Three-Axis Spacecraft Simulator 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...and Dynamics, Vol. 20, No. 4, July-August 1997, pp. 625-632. 6Schwartz, J. L. and Hall, C. D., “ System Identification of a Spherical Air-Bearing

  16. On the realistic validation of photometric redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, R.; Lin, C.-A.; Ishida, E. E. O.; Gieseke, F.; de Souza, R. S.; Costa-Duarte, M. V.; Hattab, M. W.; Krone-Martins, A.

    2017-07-01

    Two of the main problems encountered in the development and accurate validation of photometric redshift (photo-z) techniques are the lack of spectroscopic coverage in the feature space (e.g. colours and magnitudes) and the mismatch between the photometric error distributions associated with the spectroscopic and photometric samples. Although these issues are well known, there is currently no standard benchmark allowing a quantitative analysis of their impact on the final photo-z estimation. In this work, we present two galaxy catalogues, Teddy and Happy, built to enable a more demanding and realistic test of photo-z methods. Using photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and spectroscopy from a collection of sources, we constructed data sets that mimic the biases between the underlying probability distribution of the real spectroscopic and photometric sample. We demonstrate the potential of these catalogues by submitting them to the scrutiny of different photo-z methods, including machine learning (ML) and template fitting approaches. Beyond the expected bad results from most ML algorithms for cases with missing coverage in the feature space, we were able to recognize the superiority of global models in the same situation and the general failure across all types of methods when incomplete coverage is convoluted with the presence of photometric errors - a data situation which photo-z methods were not trained to deal with up to now and which must be addressed by future large-scale surveys. Our catalogues represent the first controlled environment allowing a straightforward implementation of such tests. The data are publicly available within the COINtoolbox (https://github.com/COINtoolbox/photoz_catalogues).

  17. A decade of dark matter searches with ground-based Cherenkov telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doro, Michele, E-mail: michele.doro@pd.infn.it [University and INFN Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Department of Physics and CERES, Campus Universitat Autonoma Barcelona, 08135 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2014-04-01

    In the general scenario of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMP), dark matter (DM) can be observed via astrophysical gamma-rays because photons are produced in various DM annihilation or decay processes, either as broad-band or line emission, or because of the secondary processes of charged particles in the final stages of the annihilations or the decays. The energy range of the former processes is accessible by current ground-based Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs, like H.E.S.S., MAGIC and VERITAS). The strengths of this technique are (a) the expected DM gamma-ray spectra show peculiar features like bumps, spikes and cutoff that make them clearly distinguishable from the smoother astrophysical spectra and (b) the expected DM spectrum is universal and therefore by observing two or more DM targets with the same spectrum, a clear identification (besides detection) of DM would be enabled. The role of IACTs may gain more importance in the future as the results from the LHC may hint to a DM particle with mass at the TeV or above, where the IACTs sensitivity is unsurpassed by other experiments. In this contribution, a review of the search for DM with the current generation of IACT will be presented.

  18. Ground-based analysis of volcanic ash plumes using a new multispectral thermal infrared camera approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D.; Ramsey, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic plumes are complex mixtures of mineral, lithic and glass fragments of varying size, together with multiple gas species. These plumes vary in size dependent on a number of factors, including vent diameter, magma composition and the quantity of volatiles within a melt. However, determining the chemical and mineralogical properties of a volcanic plume immediately after an eruption is a great challenge. Thermal infrared (TIR) satellite remote sensing of these plumes is routinely used to calculate the volcanic ash particle size variations and sulfur dioxide concentration. These analyses are commonly performed using high temporal, low spatial resolution satellites, which can only reveal large scale trends. What is lacking is a high spatial resolution study specifically of the properties of the proximal plumes. Using the emissive properties of volcanic ash, a new method has been developed to determine the plume's particle size and petrology in spaceborne and ground-based TIR data. A multispectral adaptation of a FLIR TIR camera has been developed that simulates the TIR channels found on several current orbital instruments. Using this instrument, data of volcanic plumes from Fuego and Santiaguito volcanoes in Guatemala were recently obtained Preliminary results indicate that the camera is capable of detecting silicate absorption features in the emissivity spectra over the TIR wavelength range, which can be linked to both mineral chemistry and particle size. It is hoped that this technique can be expanded to isolate different volcanic species within a plume, validate the orbital data, and ultimately to use the results to better inform eruption dynamics modelling.

  19. Ground-Based Phase of Spaceflight Experiment "Biosignal" Using Autonomic Microflurimeter "Fluor-K"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorieva, O. V.; Gal'chuk, S. V.; Rudimov, E. G.; Buravkova, L. B.

    2013-02-01

    The majority of flight experiments with the use of cell cultures and equipment like KUBIK and CRIOGEM carried out on board of the satellites (Bion, Foton) and ISS only allows the after-flight biosamples to be analyzed. As far as with few exceptions, the real-time cellular parameters registration for a long period is hard to be implemented. We developed the "Fluor-K" equipment - precision, small-sized, autonomous, two-channel, programmed fluorimeter. This device is designed for registration of differential fluorescent signal from organic and non-organic objects of microscale in small volumes (cellular organelles suspensions, animal and human cells, unicellular algae, bacteria, various fluorescent colloid solutions). Beside that, "Fluor-K" allows simultaneous detection of temperature. The ground-based tests of the device proved successful. The developed software can support experimental schedules while real-time data registration with the built-in storage device allows changes in selected parameters to be analyzed using wide range of fluorescent probes.

  20. Complementing the ground-based CMB Stage-4 experiment on large scales with the PIXIE satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Calabrese, Erminia; Dunkley, Jo

    2016-01-01

    We present forecasts for cosmological parameters from future Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data measured by the Stage-4 (S4) generation of ground-based experiments in combination with large-scale anisotropy data from the PIXIE satellite. We demonstrate the complementarity of the two experiments and focus on science targets that benefit from their combination. We show that a cosmic-variance-limited measurement of the optical depth to reionization provided by PIXIE, with error $\\sigma(\\tau)=0.002$, is vital for enabling a 5$\\sigma$ detection of the sum of the neutrino masses when combined with a CMB-S4 lensing measurement, and with lower-redshift constraints on the growth of structure and the distance-redshift relation. Parameters characterizing the epoch of reionization will also be tightly constrained; PIXIE's $\\tau$ constraint converts into $\\sigma(\\rm{z_{re}})=0.2$ for the mean time of reionization, and a kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich measurement from S4 gives $\\sigma(\\Delta \\rm{z_{re}})=0.03$ for the du...

  1. Comparative study on earthquake and ground based transmitter induced radiation belt electron precipitation at middle latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Sidiropoulos

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We examined (peak-to-background flux ratio p/b > 20 energetic electron bursts in the presence of VLF activity, as observed from the DEMETER satellite at low altitudes (~700 km. Our statistical analysis of measurements during two 6-month periods suggests that: (a the powerful transmitter NWC causes the strongest effects on the inner radiation belts in comparison with other ground-based VLF transmitters, (b the NWC transmitter was responsible for only ~1.5 % of total electron bursts examined during the 6-month period (1 July 2008 to 31 December 2008, (c VLF transmitter-related electron bursts are accompanied by the presence of a narrow band emission centered at the radiating frequency emission, whereas the earthquake-related electron bursts are accompanied by the presence of broadband emissions from a few kHz to >20 KHz, (d daytime events are less preferable than nighttime events, but this asymmetry was found to be less evident when the powerful transmitter NWC was turned off and (d seismic activity most probably dominated the electromagnetic interactions producing the electron precipitation at middle latitudes. The results of this study support the proposal that the detection of radiation belt electron precipitation, besides other kinds of studies, is a useful tool for earthquake prediction research.

  2. Hybrid onboard and ground based digital channelizer beam-forming for SATCOM interference mitigation and protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wenhao; Wang, Gang; Tian, Xin; Pham, Khanh; Blasch, Erik; Chen, Genshe

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we propose a novel beam-forming power allocation method for a satellite communication (SATCOM) multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) system to mitigate the co-channel interference (CCI) as well as limiting the signal leakage to the adversary users. In SATCOM systems, the beam-forming technique is a conventional way of avoiding interference, controlling the antenna beams, and mitigating undesired signals. We propose to use an advanced beam-forming technique which considers the number of independent channels used and transmitting power deployed to reduce and mitigate the unintentional interference effect. With certain quality of service (QoS) for the SATCOM system, independent channels components will be selected. It is desired to use less and stronger channel components when possible. On the other hand, considering that SATCOM systems often face the problem that adversary receiver detects the signal, a proposed power allocation method can efficiently reduce the received power at the adversary receiver. To reduce the computational burden on the transponder in order to minimize the size, mass, power consumption and delay for the satellite, we apply a hybrid onboard and ground based beam-forming design to distribute the calculation between the transponder and ground terminals. Also the digital channelizer beam-forming (DCB) technique is employed to achieve dynamic spatial control.

  3. Simulated forecasts for primordial B-mode searches in ground-based experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, David; Naess, Sigurd; Thorne, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Detecting the imprint of inflationary gravitational waves on the $B$-mode polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) is one of the main science cases for current and next-generation CMB experiments. In this work we explore some of the challenges that ground-based facilities will have to face in order to carry out this measurement in the presence of Galactic foregrounds and correlated atmospheric noise. We present forecasts for Stage-3 (S3) and planned Stage-4 (S4) experiments based on the analysis of simulated sky maps using a map-based Bayesian foreground cleaning method. Our results thus consistently propagate the uncertainties on foreground parameters such as spatially-varying spectral indices, as well as the bias on the measured tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$ caused by an incorrect modelling of the foregrounds. We find that S3 and S4-like experiments should be able to put constraints on $r$ of the order $\\sigma(r)=(0.5-1.0)\\times10^{-2}$ and $\\sigma(r)=(0.5-1.0)\\times10^{-3}$ respectively, assuming...

  4. The Diabolo photometer and the future of ground-based millimetric bolometer devices

    CERN Document Server

    Désert, F X; Camus, P; Giard, M; Pointecouteau, E; Aghanim, N; Bernard, J P; Coron, N; Lamarre, J M; Marty, P; Delabrouille, J; Soglasnova, V; Camus, Ph.; Marty, Ph.

    2001-01-01

    The millimetric atmospheric windows at 1 and 2 mm are interesting targets for cosmological studies. Two broad areas appear leading this field: 1) the search for high redshift star-forming galaxies and 2) the measurement of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in clusters of galaxies at all redshifts. The Diabolo photometer is a dual-channel photometer working at 1.2 and 2.1 mm and dedicated to high angular resolution measurements of the Sunyaev--Zel'dovich effect towards distant clusters. It uses 2 by 3 bolometers cooled down to 0.1 K with a compact open dilution cryostat. The high resolution is provided by the IRAM 30 m telescope. The result of several Winter campaigns are reported here, including the first millimetric map of the SZ effect that was obtained by Pointecouteau et al. (2001) on RXJ1347-1145, the non-detection of a millimetric counterpart to the radio decrement towards PC1643+4631 and 2 mm number count upper limits. We discuss limitations in ground-based single-dish millimetre observations, namely sky ...

  5. Heavy precipitation retrieval from combined satellite observations and ground-based lightning measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugnai, A.; Dietrich, S.; Casella, D.; di Paola, F.; Formenton, M.; Sanò, P.

    2010-09-01

    We have developed a series of algorithms for the retrieval of precipitation (especially, heavy precipitation) over the Mediterranean area using satellite observations from the available microwave (MW) radiometers onboard low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites and from the visible-infrared (VIS-IR) SEVIRI radiometer onboard the European geosynchronous (GEO) satellite Meteosat Second Generation (MSG), in conjunction with lightning data from ground-based networks - such as ZEUS and LINET. These are: • A new approach for precipitation retrieval from space (which we call the Cloud Dynamics and Radiation Database approach, CDRD) that incorporates lightning and environmental/dynamical information in addition to the upwelling microwave brightness temperatures (TB’s) so as to reduce the retrieval uncertainty and improve the retrieval performance; • A new combined MW-IR technique for producing frequent precipitation retrievals from space (which we call PM-GCD technique), that uses passive-microwave (PM) retrievals in conjunction with lightning information and the Global Convection Detection (GCD) technique to discriminate deep convective clouds within the GEO observations; • A new morphing approach (which we call the Lightning-based Precipitation Evolving Technique, L-PET) that uses the available lightning measurements for propagating the rainfall estimates from satellite-borne MW radiometers to a much higher time resolution than the MW observations. We will present and discuss our combined MW/IR/lightning precipitation algorithms and analyses with special reference to some case studies over the western Mediterranean.

  6. Evidence of rock slope breathing using ground-based InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouyet, Line; Kristensen, Lene; Derron, Marc-Henri; Michoud, Clément; Blikra, Lars Harald; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Lauknes, Tom Rune

    2017-07-01

    Ground-Based Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (GB-InSAR) campaigns were performed in summer 2011 and 2012 in the Romsdalen valley (Møre & Romsdal county, western Norway) in order to assess displacements on Mannen/Børa rock slope. Located 1 km northwest, a second GB-InSAR system continuously monitors the large Mannen rockslide. The availability of two GB-InSAR positions creates a wide coverage of the rock slope, including a slight dataset overlap valuable for validation. A phenomenon of rock slope breathing is detected in a remote and hard-to-access area in mid-slope. Millimetric upward displacements are recorded in August 2011. Analysis of 2012 GB-InSAR campaign, combined with the large dataset from the continuous station, shows that the slope is affected by inflation/deflation phenomenon between 5 and 10 mm along the line-of-sight. The pattern is not homogenous in time and inversions of movement have a seasonal recurrence. These seasonal changes are confirmed by satellite InSAR observations and can possibly be caused by hydrogeological variations. In addition, combination of GB-InSAR results, in situ measurements and satellite InSAR analyses contributes to a better overview of movement distribution over the whole area.

  7. A blind deconvolution method for ground based telescopes and Fizeau interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Prato, M; Bonettini, S; Rebegoldi, S; Bertero, M; Boccacci, P

    2015-01-01

    In the case of ground-based telescopes equipped with adaptive optics systems, the point spread function (PSF) is only poorly known or completely unknown. Moreover, an accurate modeling of the PSF is in general not available. Therefore in several imaging situations the so-called blind deconvolution methods, aiming at estimating both the scientific target and the PSF from the detected image, can be useful. A blind deconvolution problem is severely ill-posed and, in order to reduce the extremely large number of possible solutions, it is necessary to introduce sensible constraints on both the scientific target and the PSF. In a previous paper we proposed a sound mathematical approach based on a suitable inexact alternating minimization strategy for minimizing the generalized Kullback-Leibler divergence, assuring global convergence. In the framework of this method we showed that an important constraint on the PSF is the upper bound which can be derived from the knowledge of its Strehl ratio. The efficacy of the ap...

  8. Atmospheric aerosol characterization with a ground-based SPEX spectropolarimetric instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. van Harten

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of atmospheric aerosols is important for understanding their impact on health and climate. A wealth of aerosol parameters can be retrieved from multi-angle, multi-wavelength radiance and polarization measurements of the clear sky. We developed a ground-based SPEX instrument (groundSPEX for accurate spectropolarimetry, based on the passive, robust, athermal and snapshot spectral polarization modulation technique, and hence ideal for field deployment. It samples the scattering phase function in the principal plane in an automated fashion, using a motorized pan/tilt unit and automatic exposure time detection. Extensive radiometric and polarimetric calibrations were performed, yielding values for both random noise and systematic uncertainties. The absolute polarimetric accuracy at low degrees of polarization is established to be ~ 5 × 10−3. About 70 measurement sequences have been performed throughout four clear-sky days at Cabauw, the Netherlands. Several aerosol parameters were retrieved: aerosol optical thickness, effective radius, and complex refractive index for fine and coarse mode. The results are in good agreement with the co-located AERONET products, with a correlation coefficient of ρ = 0.932 for the total aerosol optical thickness at 550 nm.

  9. Rosetta in context: Ground-based observations of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snodgrass, C.

    2014-04-01

    collaboration with the large and enthusiastic community of amateur comet observers, especially in 2015 when the comet is brighter (see also talks in the proamsessions at EPSC). The comet has been recovered (in late February 2014), with early indications from VLT photometry suggesting that activity had indeed already started beyond 4 AU from the Sun, as predicted[1]. Its activity level, as measured by the dust brightness, will be followed all year and used to make further predictions about the future activity. The comet is observable until November 2014 using large telescopes (primarily in the Southern hemisphere), and is getting brighter as it approaches the Sun. In addition to photometric observations, visible wavelength spectroscopy will be attempted during 2014, to constrain gas emissions. Polarimetric observations and high resolution imaging with the HST are also proposed. A wide range of observational techniques and wavelength ranges will be covered by the campaign in 2015 as the comet reaches perihelion. I will present an update on the ground-based observation campaign in support of the Rosetta mission, the current status of various observation programmes at the time of the EPSC conference, and results on the 2014 activity of the comet, for comparison with early Rosetta results. I will also discuss how well the 2014 observations match with our earlier predictions, and make an assessment of how active the comet appears to be relative to previous orbits. I will also describe what further observations are planned in 2015, and how these will support the primary 'escort' phase of the mission.

  10. Subtropical and Polar Cirrus Clouds Characterized by Ground-Based Lidars and CALIPSO/CALIOP Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Córdoba-Jabonero Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cirrus clouds are product of weather processes, and then their occurrence and macrophysical/optical properties can vary significantly over different regions of the world. Lidars can provide height-resolved measurements with a relatively good both vertical and temporal resolutions, making them the most suitable instrumentation for high-cloud observations. The aim of this work is to show the potential of lidar observations on Cirrus clouds detection in combination with a recently proposed methodology to retrieve the Cirrus clouds macrophysical and optical features. In this sense, a few case studies of cirrus clouds observed at both subtropical and polar latitudes are examined and compared to CALIPSO/CALIOP observations. Lidar measurements are carried out in two stations: the Metropolitan city of Sao Paulo (MSP, Brazil, 23.3°S 46.4°W, located at subtropical latitudes, and the Belgrano II base (BEL, Argentina, 78ºS 35ºW in the Antarctic continent. Optical (COD-cloud optical depth and LR-Lidar Ratio and macrophysical (top/base heights and thickness properties of both the subtropical and polar cirrus clouds are reported. In general, subtropical Cirrus clouds present lower LR values and are found at higher altitudes than those detected at polar latitudes. In general, Cirrus clouds are detected at similar altitudes by CALIOP. However, a poor agreement is achieved in the LR retrieved between ground-based lidars and space-borne CALIOP measurements, likely due to the use of a fixed (or low-variable LR value in CALIOP inversion procedures.

  11. Retrieval of aerosol composition using ground-based remote sensing measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yisong; Li, Zhengqiang; Zhang, Ying; Li, Donghui; Li, Kaitao

    2016-04-01

    The chemical composition and mixing states of ambient aerosol are the main factors deciding aerosol microphysical and optical properties, and thus have significant impacts on regional or global climate change and air quality. Traditional approaches to detect atmospheric aerosol composition include sampling with laboratory analysis and in-situ measurements. They can accurately acquire aerosol components, however, the sampling or air exhausting could change the status of ambient aerosol or lead to some mass loss. Additionally, aerosol is usually sampled at the surface level so that it is difficult to detect the columnar aerosol properties. Remote sensing technology, however, can overcome these problems because it is able to detect aerosol information of entire atmosphere by optical and microphysical properties without destructing the natural status of ambient aerosol. This paper introduces a method to acquire aerosol composition by the remote sensing measurements of CIMEL CE318 ground-based sun-sky radiometer. A six component aerosol model is used in this study, including one strong absorbing component Black Carbon (BC), two partly absorbing components Brown Carbon (BrC) and Mineral Dust (MD), two scattering components Ammonia Sulfate-like (AS) and Sea Salt (SS), and Aerosol Water uptake (AW). Sensitivity analysis are performed to find the most sensitive parameters to each component and retrieval method for each component is accordingly developed. Different mixing models such as Maxwell-Garnett (MG), Bruggeman (BR) and Volume Average (VA) are also studied. The residual minimization method is used by comparing remote sensing measurements and simulation outputs to find the optimization of aerosol composition (including volume fraction and mass concentration of each component). This method is applied to measurements obtained from Beijing site under different weather conditions, including polluted haze, dust storm and clean days, to investigate the impacts of mixing

  12. Subtropical and Polar Cirrus Clouds Characterized by Ground-Based Lidars and CALIPSO/CALIOP Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba-Jabonero, Carmen; Lopes, Fabio J. S.; Landulfo, Eduardo; Ochoa, Héctor; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel

    2016-06-01

    Cirrus clouds are product of weather processes, and then their occurrence and macrophysical/optical properties can vary significantly over different regions of the world. Lidars can provide height-resolved measurements with a relatively good both vertical and temporal resolutions, making them the most suitable instrumentation for high-cloud observations. The aim of this work is to show the potential of lidar observations on Cirrus clouds detection in combination with a recently proposed methodology to retrieve the Cirrus clouds macrophysical and optical features. In this sense, a few case studies of cirrus clouds observed at both subtropical and polar latitudes are examined and compared to CALIPSO/CALIOP observations. Lidar measurements are carried out in two stations: the Metropolitan city of Sao Paulo (MSP, Brazil, 23.3°S 46.4°W), located at subtropical latitudes, and the Belgrano II base (BEL, Argentina, 78ºS 35ºW) in the Antarctic continent. Optical (COD-cloud optical depth and LR-Lidar Ratio) and macrophysical (top/base heights and thickness) properties of both the subtropical and polar cirrus clouds are reported. In general, subtropical Cirrus clouds present lower LR values and are found at higher altitudes than those detected at polar latitudes. In general, Cirrus clouds are detected at similar altitudes by CALIOP. However, a poor agreement is achieved in the LR retrieved between ground-based lidars and space-borne CALIOP measurements, likely due to the use of a fixed (or low-variable) LR value in CALIOP inversion procedures.

  13. Periodic Optical Variability of Radio Detected Ultracool Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, Leon K; Boyle, Richard P; Golden, Aaron; Singh, Navtej; Sheehan, Brendan; Zavala, Robert T; Butler, Ray F

    2013-01-01

    A fraction of very low mass stars and brown dwarfs are known to be radio active, in some cases producing periodic pulses. Extensive studies of two such objects have also revealed optical periodic variability and the nature of this variability remains unclear. Here we report on multi-epoch optical photometric monitoring of six radio detected dwarfs, spanning the $\\sim$M8 - L3.5 spectral range, conducted to investigate the ubiquity of periodic optical variability in radio detected ultracool dwarfs. This survey is the most sensitive ground-based study carried out to date in search of periodic optical variability from late-type dwarfs, where we obtained 250 hours of monitoring, delivering photometric precision as low as $\\sim$0.15%. Five of the six targets exhibit clear periodicity, in all cases likely associated with the rotation period of the dwarf, with a marginal detection found for the sixth. Our data points to a likely association between radio and optical periodic variability in late-M/early-L dwarfs, alth...

  14. Validation of ACE and OSIRIS ozone and NO2 measurements using ground-based instruments at 80° N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pazmino

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Optical Spectrograph and Infra-Red Imager System (OSIRIS and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE have been taking measurements from space since 2001 and 2003, respectively. This paper presents intercomparisons between ozone and NO2 measured by the ACE and OSIRIS satellite instruments and by ground-based instruments at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL, which is located at Eureka, Canada (80° N, 86° W and is operated by the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC. The ground-based instruments included in this study are four zenith-sky differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS instruments, one Bruker Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR and four Brewer spectrophotometers. Ozone total columns measured by the DOAS instruments were retrieved using new Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC guidelines and agree to within 3.2%. The DOAS ozone columns agree with the Brewer spectrophotometers with mean relative differences that are smaller than 1.5%. This suggests that for these instruments the new NDACC data guidelines were successful in producing a homogenous and accurate ozone dataset at 80° N. Satellite 14–52 km ozone and 17–40 km NO2 partial columns within 500 km of PEARL were calculated for ACE-FTS Version 2.2 (v2.2 plus updates, ACE-FTS v3.0, ACE-MAESTRO (Measurements of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation v1.2 and OSIRIS SaskMART v5.0x ozone and Optimal Estimation v3.0 NO2 data products. The new ACE-FTS v3.0 and the validated ACE-FTS v2.2 partial columns are nearly identical, with mean relative differences of 0.0 ± 0.2% and −0.2 ± 0.1% for v2.2 minus v3.0 ozone and NO2, respectively. Ozone columns were constructed from 14–52 km satellite and 0–14 km ozonesonde partial columns and compared with the ground-based total column measurements. The satellite-plus-sonde measurements agree

  15. Comparison of the Hazard Mapping System (HMS) fire product to ground-based fire records in Georgia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xuefei; Yu, Chao; Tian, Di; Ruminski, Mark; Robertson, Kevin; Waller, Lance A.; Liu, Yang

    2016-03-01

    Biomass burning has a significant and adverse impact on air quality, climate change, and various ecosystems. The Hazard Mapping System (HMS) detects fires using data from multiple satellite sensors in order to maximize its fire detection rate. However, to date, the detection rate of the HMS fire product for small fires has not been well studied, especially using ground-based fire records. This paper utilizes the 2011 fire information compiled from ground observations and burn authorizations in Georgia to assess the comprehensiveness of the HMS active fire product. The results show that detection rates of the hybrid HMS increase substantially by integrating multiple satellite instruments. The detection rate increases dramatically from 3% to 80% with an increase in fire size from less than 0.02 km2 to larger than 2 km2, resulting in detection of approximately 12% of all recorded fires which represent approximately 57% of the total area burned. The spatial pattern of detection rates reveals that grid cells with high detection rates are generally located in areas where large fires occur frequently. The seasonal analysis shows that overall detection rates in winter and spring (12% and 13%, respectively) are higher than those in summer and fall (3% and 6%, respectively), mainly because of higher percentages of large fires (>0.19 km2) that occurred in winter and spring. The land cover analysis shows that detection rates are 2-7 percentage points higher in land cover types that are prone to large fires such as forestland and shrub land.

  16. Ground-Based Observations of Unusual Atmospheric Light Emissions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨静; 陆高鹏; 杜艰; 潘蔚琳

    2014-01-01

    Unusual atmospheric light emissions were observed from a station located in Shandong Province of East China. The main morphology of these events includes a bright glowing spot, which differs distinctly from any type of transient luminous events (TLEs) well recognized in literature, such as sprites, halos, elves, gigantic jets, blue jets, and blue starters. A comparison between the observations of four such light emission events and the data from lightning detection networks reveals no correlation between these events and the intense lightning activity in the adjacent area. The events reported in this paper may imply the existence of a new phenomenon with a mechanism that remains to be investigated with further observation and complementary lightning measurement.

  17. Magnetoseismology ground-based remote sensing of Earth's magnetosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Menk, Frederick W

    2013-01-01

    Written by a researcher at the forefront of the field, this first comprehensive account of magnetoseismology conveys the physics behind these movements and waves, and explains how to detect and investigate them. Along the way, it describes the principles as applied to remote sensing of near-Earth space and related remote sensing techniques, while also comparing and intercalibrating magnetoseismology with other techniques. The example applications include advanced data analysis techniques that may find wider used in areas ranging from geophysics to medical imaging, and remote sensing using radar systems that are of relevance to defense surveillance systems. As a result, the book not only reviews the status quo, but also anticipates new developments. With many figures and illustrations, some in full color, plus additional computational codes for analysis and evaluation. Aimed at graduate readers, the text assumes knowledge of electromagnetism and physical processes at degree level, but introductory chapters wil...

  18. Ozone tropospheric and stratospheric trends (1995-2008) over Western Europe from ground-based FTIR network observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigouroux, Corinne; Demoulin, Philippe; Blumenstock, Thomas; Schneider, Matthias; Klyft, Jon; Palm, Mathias; Gardiner, Tom

    2010-05-01

    Five ground-based stations in Western Europe, from 79°N to 28°N, all part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC), have joined their efforts to homogenize and optimize the retrievals of ozone profiles from FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) solar absorption spectra. Using the optimal estimation method, distinct vertical information can be obtained in four layers: ground--10 km, 10--18 km, 18--27 km, and 27--42 km, in addition to total column amounts. A bootstrap resampling method has been implemented to determine annual partial and total column trends1. Vigouroux et al. (2008)2 applied this method to the ozone data and discussed the trends of the total columns and of the partial columns in the above four layers, over the period 1995-2004. Here, we present and discuss an update of this analysis for the 1995-2008 period. We obtain, among others, that at all the stations, the ozone total columns trends are non significant while the trends in the upper stratospheric layer (27-42 km) are significantly positive. 1 Gardiner, T., Forbes, A., Woods, P., De Mazière, M., Vigouroux, C., Mahieu, E., Demoulin, P., Velazco, V., Notholt, J., Blumenstock, T., Hase, F., Kramer, I., Sussmann, R., Stremme, W., Mellqvist, J., Strandberg, A., Ellingsen, K., and Gauss, M.: Method for evaluating trends in greenhouse gases from ground-based remote FTIR measurements over Europe, ACP, 8, 6719-6727, 2008. 2 Vigouroux, C., De Mazière, M., Demoulin, P., Servais, C., Hase, F., Blumenstock, T., Kramer, I., Schneider, M., Mellqvist, J., Strandberg, A., Velazco, V., Notholt, J., Sussmann, R., Stremme, W., Rockmann, A., Gardiner, T., Coleman, M., and Woods, P. : Evaluation of tropospheric and stratospheric ozone trends over Western Europe from ground-based FTIR network observations, ACP, 8, 6865-6886, 2008.

  19. Tropospheric BrO column densities in the Arctic derived from satellite: retrieval and comparison to ground-based measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sihler

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available During polar spring, halogen radicals like bromine monoxide (BrO play an important role in the chemistry of tropospheric ozone destruction. Satellite measurements of the BrO distribution have become a particularly useful tool to investigate this probably natural phenomenon, but the separation of stratospheric and tropospheric partial columns of BrO is challenging. In this study, an algorithm was developed to retrieve tropospheric vertical column densities of BrO from data of high-resolution spectroscopic satellite instruments such as the second Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2. Unlike recently published approaches, the presented algorithm is capable of separating the fraction of BrO in the activated troposphere from the total BrO column solely based on remotely measured properties. The presented algorithm furthermore allows to estimate a realistic measurement error of the tropospheric BrO column. The sensitivity of each satellite pixel to BrO in the boundary layer is quantified using the measured UV radiance and the column density of the oxygen collision complex O4. A comparison of the sensitivities with CALIPSO LIDAR observations demonstrates that clouds shielding near-surface trace-gas columns can be reliably detected even over ice and snow. Retrieved tropospheric BrO columns are then compared to ground-based BrO measurements from two Arctic field campaigns in the Amundsen Gulf and at Barrow in 2008 and 2009, respectively. Our algorithm was found to be capable of retrieving enhanced near-surface BrO during both campaigns in good agreement with ground-based data. Some differences between ground-based and satellite measurements observed at Barrow can be explained by both elevated and shallow surface layers of BrO. The observations strongly suggest that surface release processes are the dominating source of BrO and that boundary layer meteorology influences the vertical distribution.

  20. Tropospheric BrO column densities in the Arctic from satellite: retrieval and comparison to ground-based measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sihler

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available During polar spring, halogen radicals like bromine monoxide (BrO play an important role in the chemistry of tropospheric ozone destruction. Satellite measurements of the BrO-distribution have become a particularly useful tool to investigate this probably natural phenomenon, but the separation of stratospheric and tropospheric partial columns of BrO is challenging. In this study, an algorithm was developed to retrieve tropospheric vertical column densities of BrO from data of high-resolution spectroscopic satellite instruments such as the second Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2. Unlike recently published approaches, the presented algorithm is capable of separating the fraction of BrO in the activated troposphere from the total BrO column solely based on remotely measured properties. The sensitivity of each satellite pixel to BrO in the boundary-layer is quantified using the measured UV-radiance and the column density of the oxygen collision complex O4. A comparison of the sensitivities with CALIPSO LIDAR observations demonstrates that clouds shielding near-surface trace-gas columns can be reliably detected even over ice and snow. Retrieved tropospheric BrO columns are then compared to ground-based BrO measurements from two Arctic field campaigns in the Amundsen Gulf and at Barrow in 2008 and 2009, respectively. Our algorithm was found to be capable of retrieving enhanced near-surface BrO during both campaigns in good agreement to ground-based data. Some differences between ground-based and satellite measurements observed at Barrow can be explained by both, elevated and shallow surface layers of BrO. The observations strongly suggest that surface release processes are the dominating source of BrO and that boundary-layer meteorology influences the vertical distribution.

  1. A HUBBLE DIAGRAM FROM TYPE II SUPERNOVAE BASED SOLELY ON PHOTOMETRY: THE PHOTOMETRIC COLOR METHOD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Jaeger, T.; González-Gaitán, S.; Galbany, L.; Hamuy, M.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Kuncarayakti, H. [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Santiago (Chile); Anderson, J. P. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Casilla 19, Santiago (Chile); Phillips, M. M.; Campillay, A.; Castellón, S.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Morrell, N. [Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Observatories, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Stritzinger, M. D.; Contreras, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Bolt, L. [Argelander Institut für Astronomie, Universität Bonn, Auf dem Hgel 71, D-53111 Bonn (Germany); Burns, C. R. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Folatelli, G. [Instituto de Astrofísica de La Plata, CONICET, Paseo del Bosque S/N, B1900FWA, La Plata (Argentina); Freedman, W. L. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Krisciunas, K. [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Krzeminski, W., E-mail: dthomas@das.uchile.cl [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warszawa (Poland); and others

    2015-12-20

    We present a Hubble diagram of SNe II using corrected magnitudes derived only from photometry, with no input of spectral information. We use a data set from the Carnegie Supernovae Project I for which optical and near-infrared light curves were obtained. The apparent magnitude is corrected by two observables, one corresponding to the slope of the plateau in the V band and the second a color term. We obtain a dispersion of 0.44 mag using a combination of the (V − i) color and the r band and we are able to reduce the dispersion to 0.39 mag using our golden sample. A comparison of our photometric color method (PCM) with the standardized candle method (SCM) is also performed. The dispersion obtained for the SCM (which uses both photometric and spectroscopic information) is 0.29 mag, which compares with 0.43 mag from the PCM for the same SN sample. The construction of a photometric Hubble diagram is of high importance in the coming era of large photometric wide-field surveys, which will increase the detection rate of supernovae by orders of magnitude. Such numbers will prohibit spectroscopic follow up in the vast majority of cases, and hence methods must be deployed which can proceed using solely photometric data.

  2. Application of Stochastic Modeling to Analysis of Photometric Reverberation Mapping Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Ying; Kochanek, C. S.; Kozłowski, Szymon; Peterson, B. M.

    2016-03-01

    We use both simulated and real quasar light curves to explore modeling photometric reverberation-mapping (RM) data as a stochastic process. We do this using modifications to our previously developed RM method based on modeling quasar variability as a damped random walk. We consider the feasibility of one- and two-band photometric RM and compare the results with those from spectroscopic RM. We find that our method for two-band photometric RM can be competitive with spectroscopic RM only for strong (large equivalent width) lines like Hα and Hβ, and that the one-band method is also feasible but requires very high precision photometry. We fail to robustly detect Hα lags in single-band quasar light curves from OGLE-III and OGLE-IV despite the outstanding cadence and time span of the data, on account of photometric uncertainties in the range 0.02-0.04 mag. Simulations suggest that success could be achieved if the photometric uncertainties were of order 0.01 mag. Single-band RM for all lines and two-band RM for lower equivalent width lines are likely only feasible for statistical estimates of mean lags for large samples of active galactic nuclei of similar properties (e.g., luminosity) rather than for individual quasars. Our approach is directly applicable to the time-domain programs within ongoing and future wide-field imaging surveys and could provide robust lag measurements for an unprecedented number of systems.

  3. "Sniffing" Jupiter's moon Europa through ground-based IR observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganini, Lucas; Mumma, Michael J.; Hurford, Terry; Roth, Lorenz; Villanueva, Geronimo Luis

    2016-10-01

    The ability to sample possible plumes from the subsurface ocean in Europa represents a major step in our search for extraterrestrial life. If plumes exist, sampling the effluent material would provide insights into their chemistry and relevant information about the prospect that life could exist, or now exists, within the ocean. Most of the difficulties in detecting plumes come from the less frequent observational coverage of Europa, which contrasts strongly with the frequent Cassini flybys of Enceladus (Spencer & Nimmo 2013). Recent observations have been taken with HST/STIS in 2014/2015, but results have shown no evident confirmation of the 2012 plume detection (Roth et al. 2014, 2015). Future in situ observations (Europa Mission) will provide definitive insights, but not before the spacecraft's arrival in ~2025, thus an interim approach is needed to inform such space mission planning and to complement existing observations at other wavelengths.In 2015, we initiated a strong campaign to build a comprehensive survey of possible plumes on Europa through high-resolution IR spectroscopy with Keck/NIRSPEC. We were awarded 10 nights out of 15 total nights available for Key Strategic Mission Support projects for the 2016A, 2016B, 2017A, and 2017B semesters under NASA time with the Keck Observatory. In 2016A, we observed Europa during 10 half-nights and will continue to do so for another 10 half-nights in 2017A. We target a serendipitous search of gaseous activity from Europa to confirm and constrain the chemical composition of possible Europan plumes that can aid the investigation of physical processes underlying (or on) its surface. Ultimately, we seek to: (1) provide information that can inform planning for NASA's Europa mission, (2) further our current understanding of Europa's gas environment, and (3) complement studies that are currently underway with other facilities (like the Hubble Space Telescope). In this presentation, we will discuss preliminary results

  4. Color-Redshift Relations and Photometric Redshift Estimations of Quasars in Large Sky Surveys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Bing Wu; Wei Zhang; Xu Zhou

    2004-01-01

    With a recently constructed composite quasar spectrum and the χ2 minimization technique, we describe a general method for estimating the photometric redshifts of a large sample of quasars by deriving theoretical color-redshift relations and comparing the theoretical colors with the observed ones. We estimated the photometric redshifts from the 5-band SDSS photometric data of 18678 quasars in the first major data release of SDSS and compared them with their spectroscopic redshifts. The difference is less than 0.1 for 47% of the quasars and less than 0.2for 68%. Based on the calculation of the theoretical color-color diagrams of stars,galaxies and quasars both on the SDSS system and on the BATC system, we expect that we would be able to select candidates of high redshift quasars more efficaciously with the latter than with the former, provided the BATC survey can detect objects with magnitudes fainter than 21.

  5. The ACS survey of globular clusters. XIII. Photometric calibration in comparison with Stetson standards

    CERN Document Server

    Hempel, Maren; Anderson, Jay; Aparicio, Antonio; Bedin, Luigi R; Chaboyer, Brian; Majewski, Steven R; Marín-Franch, Antonio; Milone, Antonino; Paust, Nathaniel E Q; Piotto, Giampaolo; Reid, I Neill; Rosenberg, Alfred; Siegel, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In this study we compare the photometric data of 34 Milky Way globular clusters, observed within the ACS Treasury Program (PI: Ata Sarajedini) with the corresponding ground-based data, provided by the Photometric Standard Field Catalogs of Stetson (2000, 2005). We focus on the transformation between the HST/ACS F606W to V-band and F814W to I-band only. The goal is to assess the validity of the filter transformation equations by Sirianni et al.(2005) with respect to their dependence on metallicity, Horizontal Branch morphology, mass and integrated (V-I) colour of the various globular clusters. Such a dependence is expected due to the fact that the transformation equations are based on the observations of only one globular cluster, i.e., NGC 2419. Surprisingly, the correlation between offset and metallicity is found to be weak, with a low level significance. The correlation between offset and Horizontal Branch structure, as well as total cluster mass is still weaker. Based on the available data we do not find t...

  6. Photometric and Spectroscopic analysis of lensed re-ionising sources at the frontier of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporte, N.; Ellis, R.; Roberts-Borsani, G.; Infante, L.; Zheng, W.; Bauer, F. E.; Bina, D.; Chilingarian, I.; Kim, S.; Pelló, R.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Richard, J.; Troncoso-Iribarren, P.; Streblyanska, A.

    2016-12-01

    Our team is performing an automatic search for very distant sources using HST, VLT, Magellan, Gemini, Spitzer and ALMA dataset around Frontier Fields aiming to study the nature and properties of sources during the epoch of reionization. In this paper, we report on our photometric sample selection, the photometric properties of our z>6 candidates and the evolution of galaxy number densities during the first billion years from a statistical point of view. Thanks to the huge depth of HST FF data, we identified several z>7 candidates selected in previous HST surveys as mid-z interlopers that could bias our conclusions on the evolution of the first galaxies. We also briefly discuss several interesting objects that will benefit from the arrival of the JWST. The spectroscopic follow-up has just started, and our team is observing a sample of z>7 sources with ground-based spectrographs in order to confirm the redshift of these objects and add robust constraints on their physical properties.

  7. Evaluation of tropospheric and stratospheric ozone trends over Western Europe from ground-based FTIR network observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Vigouroux

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the European project UFTIR (Time series of Upper Free Troposphere observations from an European ground-based FTIR network, six ground-based stations in Western Europe, from 79° N to 28° N, all equipped with Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR instruments and part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, have joined their efforts to evaluate the trends of several direct and indirect greenhouse gases over the period 1995–2004. The retrievals of CO, CH4, C2H6, N2O, CHClF2, and O3 have been optimized. Using the optimal estimation method, some vertical information can be obtained in addition to total column amounts. A bootstrap resampling method has been implemented to determine annual partial and total column trends for the target gases. The present work focuses on the ozone results. The retrieved time series of partial and total ozone columns are validated with ground-based correlative data (Brewer, Dobson, UV-Vis, ozonesondes, and Lidar. The observed total column ozone trends are in agreement with previous studies: 1 no total column ozone trend is seen at the lowest latitude station Izaña (28° N; 2 slightly positive total column trends are seen at the two mid-latitude stations Zugspitze and Jungfraujoch (47° N, only one of them being significant; 3 the highest latitude stations Harestua (60° N, Kiruna (68° N and Ny-Ålesund (79° N show significant positive total column trends. Following the vertical information contained in the ozone FTIR retrievals, we provide partial columns trends for the layers: ground-10 km, 10–18 km, 18–27 km, and 27–42 km, which helps to distinguish the contributions from dynamical and chemical changes on the total column ozone trends. We obtain no statistically significant trends in the ground-10 km layer for five out of the six ground-based stations. We find significant positive trends for the lowermost

  8. Evaluation of tropospheric and stratospheric ozone trends over Western Europe from ground-based FTIR network observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Vigouroux

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Within the European project UFTIR (Time series of Upper Free Troposphere observations from an European ground-based FTIR network, six ground-based stations in Western Europe, from 79° N to 28° N, all equipped with Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR instruments and part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, have joined their efforts to evaluate the trend of several direct and indirect greenhouse gases over the period 1995–2004. The retrievals of CO, CH4, C2H6, N2O, CHClF2, and O3 have been optimized. Using the optimal estimation method, some vertical information can be obtained in addition to total column amounts. A bootstrap resampling method has been implemented to determine annual partial and total column trends for the target gases. The present work focuses on the ozone results. The retrieved time series of partial and total ozone columns are validated with ground-based correlative data (Brewer, Dobson, UV-Vis, ozonesondes, and Lidar. The observed total column ozone trends are in agreement with previous studies: 1 no total column ozone trend is seen at the lowest latitude station Izaña (28° N; 2 slightly positive total column trends are seen at the two mid-latitude stations Zugspitze and Jungfraujoch (47° N, only one of them being significant; 3 the highest latitude stations Harestua (60° N, Kiruna (68° N and Ny-Ålesund (79° N show significant positive total column trends. Following the vertical information contained in the ozone FTIR retrievals, we provide partial columns trends for the layers: ground-10 km, 10–18 km, 18–27 km, and 27–42 km, which helps to distinguish the contributions from dynamical and chemical changes on the total column ozone trends. We obtain no statistically significant trends in the ground–10 km layer for five out of the six ground-based stations. We find significant positive trends for the lowermost

  9. Characterization of subarctic vegetation using ground based remote sensing methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnell, D.; Garnello, A.; Palace, M. W.; Sullivan, F.; Herrick, C.; Anderson, S. M.; Crill, P. M.; Varner, R. K.

    2014-12-01

    Stordalen mire is located at 68°21'N and 19°02'E in the Swedish subarctic. Climate monitoring has revealed a warming trend spanning the past 150 years affecting the mires ability to hold stable palsa/hummock mounds. The micro-topography of the landscape has begun to degrade into thaw ponds changing the vegetation cover from ombrothrophic to minerotrophic. Hummocks are ecologically important due to their ability to act as a carbon sinks. Thaw ponds and sphagnum rich transitional zones have been documented as sources of atmospheric CH4. An objective of this project is to determine if a high resolution three band camera (RGB) and a RGNIR camera could detect differences in vegetation over five different site types. Species composition was collected for 50 plots with ten repetitions for each site type: palsa/hummock, tall shrub, semi-wet, tall graminoid, and wet. Sites were differentiated based on dominating species and features consisting of open water presence, sphagnum spp. cover, graminoid spp. cover, or the presence of dry raised plateaus/mounds. A pole based camera mount was used to collect images at a height of ~2.44m from the ground. The images were cropped in post-processing to fit a one-square meter quadrat. Texture analysis was performed on all images, including entropy, lacunarity, and angular second momentum. Preliminary results suggested that site type influences the number of species present. The p-values for the ability to predict site type using a t-test range from <0.0001 to 0.0461. A stepwise discriminant analysis on site type vs. texture yielded a 10% misclassification rate. Through the use of a stepwise regression of texture variables, actual vs. predicted percent of vegetation coverage provided R squared values of 0.73, 0.71, 0.67, and 0.89 for C. bigelowii, R. chamaemorus, Sphagnum spp., and open water respectively. These data have provided some support to the notion that texture analyses can be used for classification of mire site types. Future

  10. Measurement of photometric characteristics of daylighting systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydinli, S.; Kaase, H. [Technical Univ., Berlin (Germany); Kischkoweit-Lopin, M. [Institut fuer Licht- und Bautechnik an der FH Koln, Cologne (Germany); Scartezzini, J. L.; Michel, L. [Ecole Poytechnuque Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Wienold, J.; Apian-Bennewitz, P. [Frauenhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Freiburg (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    The photometric properties of daylighting systems determine the quality of the daylighting in the interior of a building, as well as the possible energy savings by the daylight responsive artificial lighting control systems. Photometric characteristics of daylighting systems and the principles of their measurements in laboratory facilities are described. Characteristics that depend on light incidence and observation of radiation can be measured using integrating sphere photometers or goniophotometers. Luminous transmittance measurements are usually carried out using integrating sphere photometers (cheaper and less time -consuming than measurements with a goniometer). Although the principles involved in the measurement are well understood, results frequently show certain deviations. The various errors that might be responsible for these deviations, whether attributable to the method, or the instrument, or the sample, are also discussed. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Photometric Variability of Four Coronally Active Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. C. Pandey; K. P. Singh; R. Sagar; S. A. Drake

    2002-03-01

    We present photometric observations of four stars that are optical counterparts of soft X-ray/EUV sources, namely 1ES 0829+15.9, 1ES0920-13.6, 2RE J110159+223509 and 1ES 1737+61.2. We have discovered periodic variability in two of the stars, viz., MCC 527 (1ES 0829+15.9; Period = 0.828 ± 0.0047) and HD 81032 (1ES 0920-13.6; Period = ∼ 57.02 ± 0.560 days). HD 95559 (2RE J110159+223509) is found to show a period of 3. HD 160934 (1ES1737+61.2) also shows photometric variability but needs to be monitored further for finding its period. These stars most likely belong to the class of chromospherically active stars.

  12. Asteroid taxonomic signatures from photometric phase curves

    CERN Document Server

    Oszkiewicz, D A; Wasserman, L H; Muinonen, K; Penttilä, A; Pieniluoma, T; Trilling, D E; Thomas, C A

    2012-01-01

    We explore the correlation between an asteroid's taxonomy and photometric phase curve using the H, G12 photometric phase function, with the shape of the phase function described by the single parameter G12. We explore the usability of G12 in taxonomic classification for individual objects, asteroid families, and dynamical groups. We conclude that the mean values of G12 for the considered taxonomic complexes are statistically different, and also discuss the overall shape of the G12 distribution for each taxonomic complex. Based on the values of G12 for about half a million asteroids, we compute the probabilities of C, S, and X complex membership for each asteroid. For an individual asteroid, these probabilities are rather evenly distributed over all of the complexes, thus preventing meaningful classification. We then present and discuss the G12 distributions for asteroid families, and predict the taxonomic complex preponderance for asteroid families given the distribution of G12 in each family. For certain ast...

  13. Photometric Period of the Star PZ Mon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonyuk, K. A.; Bondar', N. I.; Pit', N. V.

    2017-09-01

    Results are presented from a search for periodic variations in the brightness and color indices of the active star PZ Mon based on many years of photometric data from 1992 to 2015. The photometric period derived from the entire set of observations is 34.16 days, but the period may vary by 1.5% within individual intervals. The color index V-R varies with the same period. These variations are indicative of reddening of the star with decreasing brightness. A correlation between the values exists over the entire observation interval. The variations in B-V occur over an interval of 26-28 days. A nonuniqueness in these variations shows up in a brightness-color index diagram: a reduction in the color index with decreasing brightness is observed in some epochs, which can be explained in terms of a spottedness model by the presence of cold, as well as hot, formations on the star's surface.

  14. Gamma photometric redshifts for long gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Bagoly, Z; Mészáros, A; Mészáros, P; Horváth, I; Balázs, L G; Vavrek, R

    2003-01-01

    It is known that the soft tail of the gamma-ray bursts' spectra show excesses from the exact power-law dependence. In this article we show that this departure can be detected in the peak flux ratios of different BATSE DISCSC energy channels. This effect allows to estimate the redshift of the bright long gamma-ray bursts in the BATSE Catalog. A verification of these redshifts is obtained for the 8 GRB which have both BATSE DISCSC data and measured optical spectroscopic redshifts. There is good correlation between the measured and esti redshifts, and the average error is $\\Delta z \\approx 0.33$. The method is similar to the photometric redshift estimation of galaxies in the optical range, hence it can be called as "gamma photometric redshift estimation". The estimated redshifts for the long bright gamma-ray bursts are up to $z \\simeq 4$. For the the faint long bursts - which should be up to $z \\simeq 20$ - the redshifts cannot be determined unambiguously with this method.

  15. Uncertain Photometric Redshifts with Deep Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Isanto, A.

    2017-06-01

    The need for accurate photometric redshifts estimation is a topic that has fundamental importance in Astronomy, due to the necessity of efficiently obtaining redshift information without the need of spectroscopic analysis. We propose a method for determining accurate multi-modal photo-z probability density functions (PDFs) using Mixture Density Networks (MDN) and Deep Convolutional Networks (DCN). A comparison with a Random Forest (RF) is performed.

  16. OMC/INTEGRAL photometric observations of pulsating components in eclipsing binaries and characterization of DY Aqr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso-Garzón, J.; Montesinos, B.; Moya, A.; Mas-Hesse, J. M.; Martín-Ruiz, S.

    2014-10-01

    We present the search for eclipsing binaries with a pulsating component in the first catalogue of optically variable sources observed by Optical Monitoring Camera (OMC)/INTEGRAL, which contains photometric data for more than 1000 eclipsing binaries. Five objects were found and a detailed analysis of one of them, DY Aqr, has been performed. Photometric and spectroscopic observations of DY Aqr were obtained to analyse the binary system and the pulsational characteristics of the primary component. By applying the binary modelling software PHOEBE to the OMC and ground-based photometric light curves, and to the radial velocity curve obtained using echelle high-resolution spectroscopy, the physical parameters of the system have been determined. Frequency analysis of the residual data has been performed using Fourier techniques to identify pulsational frequencies. We have built a grid of theoretical models to classify spectroscopically the primary component as an A7.5V star (plus or minus one spectral subtype). The best orbital fit was obtained for a semidetached system configuration. According to the binary modelling, the primary component has Teff = 7625 ± 125 K and log g = 4.1 ± 0.1 and the secondary component has Teff = 3800 ± 200 K and log g = 3.3 ± 0.1, although it is too faint to isolate its spectral features. From the analysis of the residuals, we have found a main pulsation frequency at 23.37 d-1, which is typical of a δ Scuti star. In the O-C diagram, no evidence of orbital period changes over the last 8 yr has been found.

  17. A Blind Test of Hapke's Photometric Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfenstein, P.; Shepard, M. K.

    2003-01-01

    Hapke's bidirectional reflectance equation is a versatile analytical tool for predicting (i.e. forward modeling) the photometric behavior of a particulate surface from the observed optical and structural properties of its constituents. Remote sensing applications of Hapke s model, however, generally seek to predict the optical and structural properties of particulate soil constituents from the observed photometric behavior of a planetary surface (i.e. inverse-modeling). Our confidence in the latter approach can be established only if we ruthlessly test and optimize it. Here, we summarize preliminary results from a blind-test of the Hapke model using laboratory measurements obtained with the Bloomsburg University Goniometer (B.U.G.). The first author selected eleven well-characterized powder samples and measured the spectrophotometric behavior of each. A subset of twenty undisclosed examples of the photometric measurement sets were sent to the second author who fit the data using the Hapke model and attempted to interpret their optical and mechanical properties from photometry alone.

  18. Photometric redshifts in the SWIRE Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Rowan-Robinson, Michael; Oliver, Seb; Trichas, Markos; Berta, Stefano; Lonsdale, Carol; Smith, Gene; Shupe, David; Surace, Jason; Arnouts, Stephane; LeFevre, Olivier; Afonso-Luis, Alejandro; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia; Polletta, Maria; Farrah, Duncan; Vaccari, Mattia

    2008-01-01

    We present the SWIRE Photometric Redshift Catalogue, 1024750 redshifts of unprecedented reliability and accuracy. Our method is based on fixed galaxy and QSO templates applied to data at 0.36-4.5 mu, and on a set of 4 infrared emission templates fitted to infrared excess data at 3.6-170 mu. The code involves two passes through the data, to try to optimize recognition of AGN dust tori. A few carefully justified priors are used and are the key to supression of outliers. Extinction, A_V, is allowed as a free parameter. We use a set of 5982 spectroscopic redshifts, taken from the literature and from our own spectroscopic surveys, to analyze the performance of our method as a function of the number of photometric bands used in the solution and the reduced chi^2. For 7 photometric bands the rms value of (z_{phot}-z_{spec})/(1+z_{spec}) is 3.5%, and the percentage of catastrophic outliers is ~1%. We discuss the redshift distributions at 3.6 and 24 mu. In individual fields, structure in the redshift distribution corr...

  19. GravityCam: ground-based wide-field high-resolution imaging and high-speed photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominik, Martin; Mackay, Craig; Steele, Iain; Snodgrass, Colin; Hirsch, Michael; Gråe Jørgensen, Uffe; Hundertmark, Markus; Rebolo, Rafael; Horne, Keith; Bridle, Sarah; Sicardy, Bruno; Bramich, Daniel; Alsubai, Khalid

    2015-12-01

    The image blurring by the Earth's atmosphere generally poses a substantial limitation to ground-based observations. While opportunities in space are scarce, lucky imaging can correct over a much larger patch of sky and with much fainter reference stars. We propose the first of a new kind of versatile instruments, "GravityCam", composed of ~100 EMCCDs, that will open up two entirely new windows to ground-based astronomy: (1) wide-field high-resolution imaging, and (2) wide-field high-speed photometry. Potential applications include (a) a gravitational microlensing survey going 4 magnitudes deeper than current efforts, and thereby gaining a factor 100 in mass at the same sensitivity, which means probing down to Lunar mass or even below, (b) extra-solar planet hunting via transits in galactic bulge fields, with high time resolution well-suited for transit timing variation studies, (c) variable stars in crowded fields, with sensitivity to very short periods, (d) asteroseismology with many bright stars in one pointing, (e) serendipitous occultations of stars by small solar system bodies, giving access to the small end of the Kuiper Belt size distribution and potentially leading to the first detection of true Oort cloud objects, while predicted occultations at high time resolution can reveal atmospheres, satellites, or rings, (f) general data mining of the high-speed variable sky (down to 40 ms cadence).

  20. DEM Development from Ground-Based LiDAR Data: A Method to Remove Non-Surface Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneesh Sharma

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Topography and land cover characteristics can have significant effects on infiltration, runoff, and erosion processes on watersheds. The ability to model the timing and routing of surface water and erosion is affected by the resolution of the digital elevation model (DEM. High resolution ground-based Light Detecting and Ranging (LiDAR technology can be used to collect detailed topographic and land cover characteristic data. In this study, a method was developed to remove vegetation from ground-based LiDAR data to create high resolution DEMs. Research was conducted on intensively studied rainfall–runoff plots on the USDA-ARS Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed in Southeast Arizona. LiDAR data were used to generate 1 cm resolution digital surface models (DSM for 5 plots. DSMs created directly from LiDAR data contain non-surface objects such as vegetation cover. A vegetation removal method was developed which used a slope threshold and a focal mean filter method to remove vegetation and create bare earth DEMs. The method was validated on a synthetic plot, where rocks and vegetation were added incrementally. Results of the validation showed a vertical error of ±7.5 mm in the final DEM.

  1. Regaining the FORS: making optical ground-based transmission spectroscopy of exoplanets with VLT+FORS2 possible again

    CERN Document Server

    Boffin, Henri M J; Blanchard, Guillaume; Gonzalez, Oscar; Moehler, Sabine; Gibson, Neale; Ancker, Mario van den; Smoker, Jonathan; Anderson, Joseph; Hummel, Christian; Dobrzycka, Danuta; Smette, Alain; Rupprecht, Gero

    2016-01-01

    Transmission spectroscopy facilitates the detection of molecules and/or clouds in the atmospheres of exoplanets. Such studies rely heavily on space-based or large ground-based observatories, as one needs to perform time- resolved, high signal-to-noise spectroscopy. The FORS2 instrument at ESO's Very Large Telescope is the obvious choice for performing such studies, and was indeed pioneering the field in 2010. After that, however, it was shown to suffer from systematic errors caused by the Longitudinal Atmospheric Dispersion Corrector (LADC). This was successfully addressed, leading to a renewed interest for this instrument as shown by the number of proposals submitted to perform transmission spectroscopy of exoplanets. We present here the context, the problem and how we solved it, as well as the recent results obtained. We finish by providing tips for an optimum strategy to do transmission spectroscopy with FORS2, in the hope that FORS2 may become the instrument of choice for ground-based transmission spectro...

  2. NO2 DOAS measurements from ground and space: comparison of ground based measurements and OMI data in Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, C.; Stremme, W.; Grutter, M.

    2012-04-01

    The combination of satellite data and ground based measurements can provide valuable information about atmospheric chemistry and air quality. In this work we present a comparison between measured ground based NO2 differential columns at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) in Mexico City, using the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique and NO2 total columns measured by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard the Aura satellite using the same measurement technique. From these data, distribution maps of average NO2 above the Mexico basin were constructed and hot spots inside the city could be identified. In addition, a clear footprint was detected from the Tula industrial area, ~50 km northwest of Mexico City, where a refinery, a power plant and other industries are located. A less defined footprint was identified in the Cuernavaca basin, South of Mexico City, and the nearby cities of Toluca and Puebla do not present strong enhancements in the NO2 total columns. With this study we expect to cross-validate space and ground measurements and provide useful information for future studies.

  3. Comparison of ground-based FTIR and Brewer O3 total column with data from two different IASI algorithms and from OMI and GOME-2 satellite instruments

    OpenAIRE

    Blumenstock, T.; J.-M. Flaud; P. Chelin; Eremenko, M.; A. Redondas; Hase, F.; Schneider, M; C. Viatte; Orphal, J

    2011-01-01

    An intercomparison of ozone total column measurements derived from various platforms is presented in this work. Satellite data from Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2) are compared with data from two ground-based spectrometers (Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometer FTIR and Brewer), located at the Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) super-site of Izaña (Tenerife), m...

  4. DES Science Portal: Computing Photometric Redshifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gschwend, Julia [LIneA, Rio de Janeiro

    2016-01-01

    An important challenge facing photometric surveys for cosmological purposes, such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES), is the need to produce reliable photometric redshifts (photo-z). The choice of adequate algorithms and configurations and the maintenance of an up-to-date spectroscopic database to build training sets, for example, are challenging tasks when dealing with large amounts of data that are regularly updated and constantly growing. In this paper, we present the first of a series of tools developed by DES, provided as part of the DES Science Portal, an integrated web-based data portal developed to facilitate the scientific analysis of the data, while ensuring the reproducibility of the analysis. We present the DES Science Portal photometric redshift tools, starting from the creation of a spectroscopic sample to training the neural network photo-z codes, to the final estimation of photo-zs for a large photometric catalog. We illustrate this operation by calculating well calibrated photo-zs for a galaxy sample extracted from the DES first year (Y1A1) data. The series of processes mentioned above is run entirely within the Portal environment, which automatically produces validation metrics, and maintains the provenance between the different steps. This system allows us to fine tune the many steps involved in the process of calculating photo-zs, making sure that we do not lose the information on the configurations and inputs of the previous processes. By matching the DES Y1A1 photometry to a spectroscopic sample, we define different training sets that we use to feed the photo-z algorithms already installed at the Portal. Finally, we validate the results under several conditions, including the case of a sample limited to i<22.5 with the color properties close to the full DES Y1A1 photometric data. This way we compare the performance of multiple methods and training configurations. The infrastructure presented here is an effcient way to test several methods of

  5. The VLT observations of the HDF-S NICMOS field photometric catalog and high redshift galaxy candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Fontana, A; Fosbury, R A E; Giallongo, E; Hook, R N; Poli, F; Renzini, A; Rosati, P; Viezzer, R

    1999-01-01

    We present the deep UBVRI observations of the HDF-S NICMOS field obtained as part of the Science Verification of the VLT Unit 1 telescope. The images have been used to construct object catalogs and to obtain photometric redshifts. The effective field of view is $\\simeq 70\\times70$ arcsec$^2$, and the formal $5\\sigma$ limiting magnitudes (in a 2 FWHM aperture) are 26.3, 27.8, 27.5, 26.9, 25.2 in the $U$, $B$, $V$, $R$ and $I$ bands, respectively. Thanks to the sub-arcsecond image quality, relatively long exposure time, and large collecting area of the VLT, this is the deepest set of multicolor images ever obtained from a ground-based telescope. Galaxy counts have been derived independently in each band, and show no significant departures from previous data from wider areas. A multicolor photometric catalog of all the galaxies selected in the $R$ band has also been obtained and used to derive photometric redshifts for all galaxies with $R \\leq 26.5 $, using also the J,H and K magnitudes from the NICMOS deep obs...

  6. Ground-based follow-up in relation to Kepler Asteroseismic Investigation

    CERN Document Server

    Uytterhoeven, K; Bruntt, H; De Cat, P; Frandsen, S; Gutierrez-Soto, J; Kiss, L; Kurtz, D W; Marconi, M; Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Ostensen, R; Randall, S; Southworth, J; Szabo, R

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler space mission, successfully launched in March 2009, is providing continuous, high-precision photometry of thousands of stars simultaneously. The uninterrupted time-series of stars of all known pulsation types are a precious source for asteroseismic studies. The Kepler data do not provide information on the physical parameters, such as effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and vsini, which are crucial for successful asteroseismic modelling. Additional ground-based time-series data are needed to characterize mode parameters in several types of pulsating stars. Therefore, ground-based multi-colour photometry and mid/high-resolution spectroscopy are needed to complement the space data. We present ground-based activities within KASC on selected asteroseismic Kepler targets of several pulsation types. (Based on observations made with the Isaac Newton Telescope, William Herschel Telescope, Nordic Optical Telescope, Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, Mercator Telescope (La Palma, Spain), and IAC-...

  7. BigBOSS: The Ground-Based Stage IV BAO Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlegel, David; Bebek, Chris; Heetderks, Henry; Ho, Shirley; Lampton, Michael; Levi, Michael; Mostek, Nick; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Perlmutter, Saul; Roe, Natalie; Sholl, Michael; Smoot, George; White, Martin; Dey, Arjun; Abraham, Tony; Jannuzi, Buell; Joyce, Dick; Liang, Ming; Merrill, Mike; Olsen, Knut; Salim, Samir

    2009-04-01

    The BigBOSS experiment is a proposed DOE-NSF Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment to study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure with an all-sky galaxy redshift survey. The project is designed to unlock the mystery of dark energy using existing ground-based facilities operated by NOAO. A new 4000-fiber R=5000 spectrograph covering a 3-degree diameter field will measure BAO and redshift space distortions in the distribution of galaxies and hydrogen gas spanning redshifts from 0.2< z< 3.5. The Dark Energy Task Force figure of merit (DETF FoM) for this experiment is expected to be equal to that of a JDEM mission for BAO with the lower risk and cost typical of a ground-based experiment.

  8. Ka-band bistatic ground-based SAR using noise signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, K.; Mogyla, A.; Vyplavin, P.; Palamarchuk, V.; Zemlyaniy, O.; Tarasenko, V.; Zaets, N.; Skretsanov, V.; Shubniy, A.; Glamazdin, V.; Natarov, M.; Nechayev, O.

    2008-01-01

    Currently, one of the actual problems is remote monitoring of technical state of large objects. Different methods can be used for that purpose. The most promising of them relies on application of ground based synthetic aperture radars (SAR) and differential interferometry. We have designed and tested Ground Based Noise Waveform SAR based on noise radar technology [1] and synthetic aperture antennas [2]. It enabled to build an instrument for precise all-weather monitoring of large objects in real-time. We describe main performance of ground-based interferometric SAR which uses continuous Ka-band noise waveform as a probe signal. Besides, results of laboratory trials and evaluation of its main performance are presented as well.

  9. Retrieval of sulphur dioxide from a ground-based thermal infrared imaging camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Prata

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in uncooled detector technology now offer the possibility of using relatively inexpensive thermal (7 to 14 μm imaging devices as tools for studying and quantifying the behaviour of hazardous gases and particulates in atmospheric plumes. An experimental fast-sampling (60 Hz ground-based uncooled thermal imager (Cyclops, operating with four spectral channels at central wavelengths of 8.6, 10, 11, and 12 μm and one broadband channel (7–14 μm, has been tested at several volcanoes and at two industrial sites, where SO2 was a major constituent of the plumes. This paper presents new algorithms, which include atmospheric corrections to the data and better calibrations to show that SO2 slant column density can be reliably detected and quantified. Our results indicate that it is relatively easy to identify and discriminate SO2 in plumes, but more challenging to quantify the column densities. A full description of the retrieval algorithms, illustrative results and a detailed error analysis are provided. The Noise-Equivalent Temperature Difference (NEΔT of the spectral channels, a fundamental measure of the quality of the measurements, lies between 0.4–0.8 K, resulting in slant column density errors of 20%. Frame averaging and improved NEΔT's can reduce this error to less than 10%, making a stand-off, day or night operation of an instrument of this type very practical for both monitoring industrial SO2 emissions and for SO2 column densities and emission measurements at active volcanoes. The imaging camera system may also be used to study thermal radiation from meteorological clouds and from the atmosphere.

  10. Validation of MOPITT carbon monoxide using ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectrometer data from NDACC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Rebecca R.; Deeter, Merritt N.; Worden, Helen M.; Gille, John; Edwards, David P.; Hannigan, James W.; Jones, Nicholas B.; Paton-Walsh, Clare; Griffith, David W. T.; Smale, Dan; Robinson, John; Strong, Kimberly; Conway, Stephanie; Sussmann, Ralf; Hase, Frank; Blumenstock, Thomas; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Langerock, Bavo

    2017-06-01

    The Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) satellite instrument provides the longest continuous dataset of carbon monoxide (CO) from space. We perform the first validation of MOPITT version 6 retrievals using total column CO measurements from ground-based remote-sensing Fourier transform infrared spectrometers (FTSs). Validation uses data recorded at 14 stations, that span a wide range of latitudes (80° N to 78° S), in the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). MOPITT measurements are spatially co-located with each station, and different vertical sensitivities between instruments are accounted for by using MOPITT averaging kernels (AKs). All three MOPITT retrieval types are analyzed: thermal infrared (TIR-only), joint thermal and near infrared (TIR-NIR), and near infrared (NIR-only). Generally, MOPITT measurements overestimate CO relative to FTS measurements, but the bias is typically less than 10 %. Mean bias is 2.4 % for TIR-only, 5.1 % for TIR-NIR, and 6.5 % for NIR-only. The TIR-NIR and NIR-only products consistently produce a larger bias and lower correlation than the TIR-only. Validation performance of MOPITT for TIR-only and TIR-NIR retrievals over land or water scenes is equivalent. The four MOPITT detector element pixels are validated separately to account for their different uncertainty characteristics. Pixel 1 produces the highest standard deviation and lowest correlation for all three MOPITT products. However, for TIR-only and TIR-NIR, the error-weighted average that includes all four pixels often provides the best correlation, indicating compensating pixel biases and well-captured error characteristics. We find that MOPITT bias does not depend on latitude but rather is influenced by the proximity to rapidly changing atmospheric CO. MOPITT bias drift has been bound geographically to within ±0.5 % yr-1 or lower at almost all locations.

  11. Ground-based remote sensing of tropospheric water vapour isotopologues within the project MUSICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M.; Barthlott, S.; Hase, F.; González, Y.; Yoshimura, K.; García, O. E.; Sepúlveda, E.; Gomez-Pelaez, A.; Gisi, M.; Kohlhepp, R.; Dohe, S.; Blumenstock, T.; Wiegele, A.; Christner, E.; Strong, K.; Weaver, D.; Palm, M.; Deutscher, N. M.; Warneke, T.; Notholt, J.; Lejeune, B.; Demoulin, P.; Jones, N.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Smale, D.; Robinson, J.

    2012-12-01

    Within the project MUSICA (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water), long-term tropospheric water vapour isotopologue data records are provided for ten globally distributed ground-based mid-infrared remote sensing stations of the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change). We present a new method allowing for an extensive and straightforward characterisation of the complex nature of such isotopologue remote sensing datasets. We demonstrate that the MUSICA humidity profiles are representative for most of the troposphere with a vertical resolution ranging from about 2 km (in the lower troposphere) to 8 km (in the upper troposphere) and with an estimated precision of better than 10%. We find that the sensitivity with respect to the isotopologue composition is limited to the lower and middle troposphere, whereby we estimate a precision of about 30‰ for the ratio between the two isotopologues HD16O and H216O. The measurement noise, the applied atmospheric temperature profiles, the uncertainty in the spectral baseline, and the cross-dependence on humidity are the leading error sources. We introduce an a posteriori correction method of the cross-dependence on humidity, and we recommend applying it to isotopologue ratio remote sensing datasets in general. In addition, we present mid-infrared CO2 retrievals and use them for demonstrating the MUSICA network-wide data consistency. In order to indicate the potential of long-term isotopologue remote sensing data if provided with a well-documented quality, we present a climatology and compare it to simulations of an isotope incorporated AGCM (Atmospheric General Circulation Model). We identify differences in the multi-year mean and seasonal cycles that significantly exceed the estimated errors, thereby indicating deficits in the modeled atmospheric water cycle.

  12. Validation of stratospheric temperature profiles from a ground-based microwave radiometer with other techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Haefele, Alexander; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature trends has become recognized as an important indicator of climate change, because different climate forcing mechanisms exhibit distinct vertical warming and cooling patterns. For example, the cooling of the stratosphere is an indicator for climate change as it provides evidence of natural and anthropogenic climate forcing just like surface warming. Despite its importance, our understanding of the observed stratospheric temperature trend and our ability to test simulations of the stratospheric response to emissions of greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances remains limited. One of the main reason is because stratospheric long-term datasets are sparse and obtained trends differ from one another. Different techniques allow to measure stratospheric temperature profiles as radiosonde, lidar or satellite. The main advantage of microwave radiometers against these other instruments is a high temporal resolution with a reasonable good spatial resolution. Moreover, the measurement at a fixed location allows to observe local atmospheric dynamics over a long time period, which is crucial for climate research. This study presents an evaluation of the stratospheric temperature profiles from a newly ground-based microwave temperature radiometer (TEMPERA) which has been built and designed at the University of Bern. The measurements from TEMPERA are compared with the ones from other different techniques such as in-situ (radiosondes), active remote sensing (lidar) and passive remote sensing on board of Aura satellite (MLS) measurements. In addition a statistical analysis of the stratospheric temperature obtained from TEMPERA measurements during four years of data has been performed. This analysis evidenced the capability of TEMPERA radiometer to monitor the temperature in the stratosphere for a long-term. The detection of some singular sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) during the analyzed period shows the necessity of these

  13. Quantifying the effect of riming on snowfall using ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisseev, Dmitri; von Lerber, Annakaisa; Tiira, Jussi

    2017-04-01

    Ground-based observations of ice particle size distribution and ensemble mean density are used to quantify the effect of riming on snowfall. The rime mass fraction is derived from these measurements by following the approach that is used in a single ice-phase category microphysical scheme proposed for the use in numerical weather prediction models. One of the characteristics of the proposed scheme is that the prefactor of a power law relation that links mass and size of ice particles is determined by the rime mass fraction, while the exponent does not change. To derive the rime mass fraction, a mass-dimensional relation representative of unrimed snow is also determined. To check the validity of the proposed retrieval method, the derived rime mass fraction is converted to the effective liquid water path that is compared to microwave radiometer observations. Since dual-polarization radar observations are often used to detect riming, the impact of riming on dual-polarization radar variables is studied for differential reflectivity measurements. It is shown that the relation between rime mass fraction and differential reflectivity is ambiguous, other factors such as change in median volume diameter need also be considered. Given the current interest on sensitivity of precipitation to aerosol pollution, which could inhibit riming, the importance of riming for surface snow accumulation is investigated. It is found that riming is responsible for 5% to 40% of snowfall mass. The study is based on data collected at the University of Helsinki field station in Hyytiälä during U.S. Department of Energy Biogenic Aerosols Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC) field campaign and the winter 2014/2015. In total 22 winter storms were analyzed, and detailed analysis of two events is presented to illustrate the study.

  14. Ground-based remote sensing of tropospheric water vapour isotopologues within the project MUSICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schneider

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the project MUSICA (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water, long-term tropospheric water vapour isotopologue data records are provided for ten globally distributed ground-based mid-infrared remote sensing stations of the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change. We present a new method allowing for an extensive and straightforward characterisation of the complex nature of such isotopologue remote sensing datasets. We demonstrate that the MUSICA humidity profiles are representative for most of the troposphere with a vertical resolution ranging from about 2 km (in the lower troposphere to 8 km (in the upper troposphere and with an estimated precision of better than 10%. We find that the sensitivity with respect to the isotopologue composition is limited to the lower and middle troposphere, whereby we estimate a precision of about 30‰ for the ratio between the two isotopologues HD16O and H216O. The measurement noise, the applied atmospheric temperature profiles, the uncertainty in the spectral baseline, and the cross-dependence on humidity are the leading error sources. We introduce an a posteriori correction method of the cross-dependence on humidity, and we recommend applying it to isotopologue ratio remote sensing datasets in general. In addition, we present mid-infrared CO2 retrievals and use them for demonstrating the MUSICA network-wide data consistency. In order to indicate the potential of long-term isotopologue remote sensing data if provided with a well-documented quality, we present a climatology and compare it to simulations of an isotope incorporated AGCM (Atmospheric General Circulation Model. We identify differences in the multi-year mean and seasonal cycles that significantly exceed the estimated errors, thereby indicating deficits in the modeled atmospheric water cycle.

  15. Ground-based remote sensing of tropospheric water vapour isotopologues within the project MUSICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schneider

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Within the project MUSICA (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water, long-term tropospheric water vapour isotopologues data records are provided for ten globally distributed ground-based mid-infrared remote sensing stations of the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change. We present a new method allowing for an extensive and straightforward characterisation of the complex nature of such isotopologue remote sensing datasets. We demonstrate that the MUSICA humidity profiles are representative for most of the troposphere with a vertical resolution ranging from about 2 km (in the lower troposphere to 8 km (in the upper troposphere and with an estimated precision of better than 10%. We find that the sensitivity with respect to the isotopologue composition is limited to the lower and middle troposphere, whereby we estimate a precision of about 30‰ for the ratio between the two isotopologues HD16O and H216O. The measurement noise, the applied atmospheric temperature profiles, the uncertainty in the spectral baseline, and interferences from humidity are the leading error sources. We introduce an a posteriori correction method of the humidity interference error and we recommend applying it for isotopologue ratio remote sensing datasets in general. In addition, we present mid-infrared CO2 retrievals and use them for demonstrating the MUSICA network-wide data consistency.

    In order to indicate the potential of long-term isotopologue remote sensing data if provided with a well-documented quality, we present a climatology and compare it to simulations of an isotope incorporated AGCM (Atmospheric General Circulation Model. We identify differences in the multi-year mean and seasonal cycles that significantly exceed the estimated errors, thereby indicating deficits in the modeled atmospheric water cycle.

  16. Fine spectral structures in Jovian decametric radio emission observed by ground-based radio telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, M.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Shaposhnikov, V. E.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Rucker, H. O.

    2014-04-01

    Jupiter with the largest planetary magnetosphere in the solar system emits intense coherent non-thermal radio emission in a wide frequency range. This emission is a result of a complicated interaction between the dynamic Jovian magnetosphere and energetic particles supplying the free energy from planetary rotation and the interaction between Jupiter and the Galilean moons. Decametric radio emission (DAM) is the strongest component of Jovian radiation observed in a frequency range from few MHz up to 40 MHz. This emission is generated via cyclotron maser mechanism in sources located along Jovian magnetic field lines. Depending on the time scales the Jovian DAMexhibits different complex spectral structures. We present the observations of the Jovian decametric radio emission using the large ground-based radio telescope URAN- 2 (Poltava, Ukraine) operated in the decametric frequency range. This telescope is one of the largest low frequency telescopes in Europe equipped with high performance digital radio spectrometers. The antenna array of URAN-2 consists of 512 crossed dipoles with an effective area of 28 000m2 and beam pattern size of 3.5 x 7 deg. (at 25 MHz). The instrument enables continuous observations of the Jovian radio during long period of times. Jovian DAM was observed continuously since Sep. 2012 (depending on Jupiter visibility) with relatively high time-frequency resolution (4 kHz - 100ms) in the broad frequency range (8-32MHz). We have detected a big amount of the fine spectral structures in the dynamic spectra of DAM such as trains of S-bursts, quasi-continuous narrowband emission, narrow-band splitting events and zebra stripe-like patterns. We analyzed mainly the fine structures associated with non-Io controlled DAM. We discuss how the observed narrowband structures which most probably are related to the propagation of the decametric radiation in the Jupiter's ionosphere can be used to study the plasma parameters in the inner Jovian magnetosphere.

  17. First ground-based FTIR-observations of methane in the tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Petersen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Total column concentrations and volume mixing ratio profiles of methane have been retrieved from ground-based solar absorption FTIR spectra in the near-infrared recorded in Paramaribo (Suriname. The methane FTIR observations are compared with TM5 model simulations and satellite observations from SCIAMACHY, and represent the first validation of SCIAMACHY retrievals in the tropics using ground-based remote sensing techniques. Apart from local biomass burning features, our methane FTIR observations agree well with the SCIAMACHY retrievals and TM5 model simulations.

  18. Extended lateral heating of the nighttime ionosphere by ground-based VLF transmitters

    OpenAIRE

    İnan, Umran Savaş; Graf, K. L.; Spasojevic, M.; Marshall, R. A.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Foust, F. R.

    2013-01-01

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: SPACE PHYSICS, VOL. 118, 7783–7797, doi:10.1002/2013JA019337, 2013 Extended lateral heating of the nighttime ionosphere by ground-based VLF transmitters K. L. Graf,1 M. Spasojevic,1 R. A. Marshall,2 N. G. Lehtinen,1 F. R. Foust,1 and U. S. Inan1,3 Received 16 August 2013; revised 9 October 2013; accepted 11 November 2013; published 3 December 2013. [1] The effects of ground-based very low frequency (VLF) transmitters on the lower ionospher...

  19. Estimation of solar irradiance using ground-based whole sky imagers

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, Soumyabrata; Lee, Yee Hui; Winkler, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Ground-based whole sky imagers (WSIs) can provide localized images of the sky of high temporal and spatial resolution, which permits fine-grained cloud observation. In this paper, we show how images taken by WSIs can be used to estimate solar radiation. Sky cameras are useful here because they provide additional information about cloud movement and coverage, which are otherwise not available from weather station data. Our setup includes ground-based weather stations at the same location as the imagers. We use their measurements to validate our methods.

  20. Determination of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in small samples by microbore ion chromatography and photometric, atomic absorption spectrometry and total-reflection X-ray fluorescence detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinner, T.; Hoffmann, P.; Ortner, H. M.

    1993-02-01

    Iron(II) and iron(III) are determined after separation on an ion Chromatographie column by various detection systems. "On-line" detection was achieved by the use of a photometer with a flow cell of 0.8 μl; for "off-line" detection, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry or total-reflection X-ray fluorescence were used. The applicability of the methods is shown for standard solutions and atmospheric samples. As a typical result, 50 μg/l of iron can be determined in a 10 μl sample with a nucrobore ion chromatograph-photometer and atomic absorption system and 40 μg/l of iron in a microbore ion chromatograph-total-reflection X-ray fluorescence combination.

  1. Photometric Properties of the Most Massive High-Redshift Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Brant; Li, Yuexing; Cox, Thomas J.; Hernquist, Lars; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2007-09-01

    We calculate the observable properties of the most massive high-redshift galaxies in the hierarchical formation scenario where stellar spheroid and supermassive black hole growth are fueled by gas-rich mergers. Combining high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of the hierarchical formation of a z~6 quasar, stellar population synthesis models, template active galactic nucleus (AGN) spectra, prescriptions for interstellar and intergalactic absorption, and the response of modern telescopes, the photometric evolution of galaxies destined to host z~6 quasars is modeled at redshifts z~4-14. These massive galaxies, with enormous stellar masses of M*~1011.5-1012 Msolar and star formation rates of SFR~103-104 Msolar yr-1 at z>~7, satisfy a variety of photometric selection criteria based on Lyman break techniques, including V-band dropouts at z>~5, i-band dropouts at z>~6, and z-band dropouts at z>~7. The observability of the most massive high-redshift galaxies is assessed and compared with a wide range of existing and proposed photometric surveys, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS)/Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), National Optical Astronomy Observatory Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS), UKIRT Infared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Shallow Survey, Ultradeep Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA), Dark Universe Explorer (DUNE), Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS), Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP). Massive stellar spheroids descended from z~6 quasars will likely be detected at z~4 by existing surveys, but owing to their low number densities the discovery of quasar progenitor galaxies at z>7 will likely require future surveys of large portions of the sky (>~0.5%) at wavelengths λ>~1 μm. The detection of rare, starbursting, massive galaxies at redshifts z>~6 would provide support for the

  2. Cepheids with the eyes of photometric space telescopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molnár László

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Space photometric missions have been steadily accumulating observations of Cepheids in recent years, leading to a flow of new discoveries. In this short review we summarize the findings provided by the early missions such as WIRE, MOST, and CoRoT, and the recent results of the Kepler and K2 missions. The surprising and fascinating results from the high-precision, quasi-continuous data include the detection of the amplitude increase of Polaris, and exquisite details about V1154 Cyg within the original Kepler field of view. We also briefly discuss the current opportunities with the K2 mission, and the prospects of the TESS space telescope regarding Cepheids.

  3. Soil moisture on Polish territory - comparison of satellite and ground-based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojek, Edyta; Łukowski, Mateusz; Marczewski, Wojciech; Usowicz, Bogusław

    2014-05-01

    Assessment of water resources due to changing climatic conditions in time and space is still very uncertain. The territory of Poland has a limited resource of waters, occasionally resulting in small agricultural droughts. From the other side intense rainfalls, floods or run-offs, causing soil erosion are observed. Therefore, it is important to predict and prevent of this adverse phenomena. Huge spatial variability of soil moisture does not allow for accurate estimation of its distribution using ground-based measurements. SMOS soil moisture data are quite much inherently consistent in time and space, but their validation is still a challenge for further use in the climate and hydrology studies. This is the motivation for the research: to examine soil moisture from SMOS and ground based stations of the SWEX network held over eastern Poland. The presented results are related to changes of the soil moisture on regional scales for Poland in the period 2010-2013. Some results with SMOS L2 data are extended on continental scales for Europe. Time series from ground and satellite SMOS data sources were compared by regression methods. The region of Poland indicates clearly some genetic spatial distributions in weekly averaged values. In continental scales, the country territory contrasts evidently to Lithuania and in Polesie, and indicates seasonal cycling observed in archives and well known traditional records. The central part of Poland is repeatedly susceptible on droughts with soil moisture values ranging from about 0.02 to 0.20 m3 m-3. SMOS data allows on creating systematic drought data for Poland and watching annual changes, and differences to other drought services kept on national scales for agricultural purposes. We bound that drought susceptibility to the content of sand clay components and the land use there. Lack of rainfall in the late 2011 summer, caused a significant deficit of water in soil moisture content (below 0.05 m3 m-3) throughout the entire country

  4. Photometric Redshifts for the SDSS Early Data Release

    CERN Document Server

    Csabai, I; Connolly, A J; Szalay, A S; Györy, Z; Benítez, N; Annis, J; Brinkmann, J; Eisenstein, D J; Fukugita, M; Gunn, J; Kent, S; Lupton, R; Nichol, R C; Stoughton, C; Csabai, Istvan; Budavari, Tamas; Connolly, Andrew J.; Szalay, Alexander S.; Gyory, Zsuzsanna; Benitez, Narciso; Annis, Jim; Brinkmann, Jon; Eisenstein, Daniel; Fukugita, Masataka; Gunn, Jim; Kent, Stephen; Lupton, Robert; Nichol, Robert C.; Stoughton, Chris

    2003-01-01

    The Early Data Release from the Sloan Digital Sky survey provides one of the largest multicolor photometric catalogs currently available to the astronomical community. In this paper we present the first application of photometric redshifts to the $\\sim 6$ million extended sources within these data (with 1.8 million sources having $r' < 21$). Utilizing a range of photometric redshift techniques, from empirical to template and hybrid techniques, we investigate the statistical and systematic uncertainties present within the redshift estimates for the EDR data. For $r'<21$ we find that the redshift estimates provide realistic redshift histograms with an rms uncertainty in the photometric redshift relation of 0.035 at $r'<18$ and rising to 0.1 at $r'<21$. We conclude by describing how these photometric redshifts and derived quantities, such as spectral type, restframe colors and absolute magnitudes, are stored within the SDSS database. We provide sample queries for searching on photometric redshifts an...

  5. Ground-Based Deep-Space Ladar for Satellite Detection: A Parametric Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    306-309 (July/August 1985). 19. Degnan, J. J. and Klein, B. J. - Optical Antenna Gain. 2: Receiving Antennas," Applied Optics, 13: 2397-2401 (October...Degnan, J. J. " Optical Antenna Gain. 1: Transmitting Anten- nas," Applied Optics, 13: 2134-2141 (September 1974). 44. -. " Optical Antenna Gain. 3

  6. The Passive, Ground-Based, Electro-Optical Detection of Synchronous Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-06-19

    Lincoln Laboratory, M.I.T. (16 August 1974), DDC AD-785137/1. 47 12. V. J. Santilli and G. B. Conger III, Adv. Electron. Electron Phys. 33A, 219...Air Force Systems Command, USAF Andrews AFB Washington, DC 20331 12. REPORT DATE 19 June 1978 13. NUMBER OF PAGES 54 14. MONITORING

  7. (DCT-FY08) Target Detection Using Multiple Modality Airborne and Ground Based Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    by using key point matching [13] to determine whether they are correct matches. As shown in [13], correct and incorrect matches have different... occlusions due to planes, and to determine whether two images can be considered neighbors for the mosaicing step [40]. 2) Alpha Blending...Transactions on Information Theory, vol. 14, pp. 462–467, 1968. [15] M. Carlberg, J. Andrews , P. Gao, and A. Zakhor, “Fast surface reconstruction and

  8. Ground-Based VIS/NIR Reflectance Spectra of 25143 Itokawa: What Hayabusa will See and How Ground-Based Data can Augment Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas, Faith; Abell, P. A.; Jarvis, K. S.

    2004-01-01

    Planning for the arrival of the Hayabusa spacecraft at asteroid 25143 Itokawa includes consideration of the expected spectral information to be obtained using the AMICA and NIRS instruments. The rotationally-resolved spatial coverage the asteroid we have obtained with ground-based telescopic spectrophotometry in the visible and near-infrared can be utilized here to address expected spacecraft data. We use spectrophotometry to simulate the types of data that Hayabusa will receive with the NIRS and AMICA instruments, and will demonstrate them here. The NIRS will cover a wavelength range from 0.85 m, and have a dispersion per element of 250 Angstroms. Thus, we are limited in coverage of the 1.0 micrometer and 2.0 micrometer mafic silicate absorption features. The ground-based reflectance spectra of Itokawa show a large component of olivine in its surface material, and the 2.0 micrometer feature is shallow. Determining the olivine to pyroxene abundance ratio is critically dependent on the attributes of the 1.0- and 2.0 micrometer features. With a cut-off near 2,1 micrometer the longer edge of the 2.0- feature will not be obtained by NIRS. Reflectance spectra obtained using ground-based telescopes can be used to determine the regional composition around space-based spectral observations, and possibly augment the longer wavelength spectral attributes. Similarly, the shorter wavelength end of the 1.0 micrometer absorption feature will be partially lost to the NIRS. The AMICA filters mimic the ECAS filters, and have wavelength coverage overlapping with the NIRS spectral range. We demonstrate how merging photometry from AMICA will extend the spectral coverage of the NIRS. Lessons learned from earlier spacecraft to asteroids should be considered.

  9. First Ground-Based Observation of Sprites Over Southern Africa and Estimation of Their Physical and Optical Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nnadih, O.; Martinez, P.; Kosch, M.; Lotz, S.; Fullekrug, M.

    2016-12-01

    We present the first ground-based observations of sprites over convective thunderstorms in southern Africa. The observations, acquired during the austral summer of 2015/16. show sprites with dendritic, carrot, angel and jellyfish-like shapes. The sprite locations are compared with lightning locations and peak amplitudes determined from the lightning detection network operated by the South African Weather Service, and also with the lightning locations reported by the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WLLN) and Low Frequency radio waveforms of the electric field strength recorded in the conjugate hemisphere in South-West England. The charge moment of the lightning discharges causing sprites is inferred from Extremely Low Frequency magnetic field measurements recorded at remote distances. These measurements reveal that a number of the sprites that we observed were triggered below and above the charge moment threshold for sprite production.

  10. Estimates of the Planet Yield from Ground-Based High-Contrast Imaging Observations as a Function of Stellar Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Crepp, Justin R

    2011-01-01

    We use Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the number of extrasolar planets that are directly detectable in the solar-neighborhood using current and forthcoming high-contrast imaging instruments. Our calculations take into account the important factors that govern the likelihood for imaging a planet, including the statistical properties of nearby stars, correlations between star and planet properties, observational effects, and selection criteria. We consider several different ground-based surveys and express the resulting yields as a function of stellar mass. Selecting targets based on their youth and visual brightness, we find that strong correlations between star mass and planet properties are required to reproduce high-contrast imaging results to date. Using the most recent empirical findings for the occurrence rate of planets from RV surveys, our simulations indicate that extrapolation of the Doppler planet population to separations accessible to high-contrast instruments provides excellent agreement bet...

  11. Photometric Solutions of Some Contact ASAS Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Gezer, I

    2015-01-01

    We present the first light curve solution of 6 contact binary systems which are chosen from the ASAS catalog. The photometric elements and the estimated absolute parameters of all systems are obtained with the light curve analyses. We calculated the values of degree of contact for the systems. The location of the targets on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and the mass-radius plane is compared to the other well-known contact binaries and the evolutionary status of the systems are also discussed.

  12. Photometric solutions of some contact ASAS binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezer, İ.; Bozkurt, Z.

    2016-04-01

    We present the first light curve solution of 6 contact binary systems which are chosen from the ASAS catalog. The photometric elements and the estimated absolute parameters of all systems are obtained with the light curve analyses. We calculated the values of degree of contact for the systems. The location of the targets on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and the mass-radius plane is compared to the other well-known contact binaries and the evolutionary status of the systems are also discussed.

  13. Hyperspectral photometric stereo for a single capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Keisuke; Sato, Imari; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2017-03-01

    We present a single-capture photometric stereo method using a hyperspectral camera. A spectrally and spatially designed illumination enables a point-wise estimation of reflectance spectra and surface normals from a single hyperspectral image. The illumination works as a reflectance probe in wide spectral regions where reflectance spectra are measured, and the full spectra are estimated by interpolation. It also works as the resource for shadings in other spectral regions. The accuracy of estimation is evaluated in a simulation. Also, we prepare an experimental setup and demonstrate a surface reconstruction against a real scene.

  14. Difficult cases in photometric studies of asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, Anna; Pilcher, Frederick; Oszkiewicz, Dagmara; Bartczak, Przemysław; Santana-Ros, Toni; Kamiński, Krzysztof; Urakawa, Seitaro; Ogłoza, Waldemar; Fauvaud, Stéphane; Kankiewicz, Paweł; Kudak, Viktor; Żejmo, Michał; Nishiyama, Kota; Okumura, Shin-ichiro; Nimura, Tokuhiro; Hirsch, Roman; Konstanciak, Izabella; Tychoniec, Łukasz; Figas, Michał

    2016-06-01

    We present a photometric campaign targeted at asteroids that display both long periods of rotation and small amplitudes of brightness variations. Our aim is to debias available sample of spin and shape modelled asteroids and to correct previous wrong period determinations. Our newest findings are corrected period determinations for asteroids (279) Thule (P=23.896h ± 0.005 h), (673) Edda (P=22.340h ± 0.004 h), and (737) Arequipa (P=7.0259h ± 0.0003 h). Supporting lightcurves are presented in this paper.

  15. Photometric study of the eclipsing binary ET Psc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özalp, G. Z.; Özkardeş, B.

    2016-03-01

    We present the photometric solution of the eclipsing binary ET Psc (GSC 00608-00490). The ASAS V-band photometric data of the system was modelled using the Wilson-Devinney method. The result shows that the eclipsing pair could be classified as A-subtype of W UMa-type binary system. The absolute dimensions of the system were also estimated based on the photometric solution.

  16. On reconciling ground-based with spaceborne normalized radar cross section measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumgartner, Francois; Munk, Jens; Jezek, K C

    2002-01-01

    This study examines differences in the normalized radar cross section, derived from ground-based versus spaceborne radar data. A simple homogeneous half-space model, indicates that agreement between the two improves as 1) the distance from the scatterer is increased; and/or 2) the extinction...

  17. Precision simulation of ground-based lensing data using observations from space

    CERN Document Server

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Leauthaud, Alexie; Massey, Richard J; Rhodes, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Current and upcoming wide-field, ground-based, broad-band imaging surveys promise to address a wide range of outstanding problems in galaxy formation and cosmology. Several such uses of ground-based data, especially weak gravitational lensing, require highly precise measurements of galaxy image statistics with careful correction for the effects of the point-spread function (PSF). In this paper, we introduce the SHERA (SHEar Reconvolution Analysis) software to simulate ground-based imaging data with realistic galaxy morphologies and observing conditions, starting from space-based data (from COSMOS, the Cosmological Evolution Survey) and accounting for the effects of the space-based PSF. This code simulates ground-based data, optionally with a weak lensing shear applied, in a model-independent way using a general Fourier space formalism. The utility of this pipeline is that it allows for a precise, realistic assessment of systematic errors due to the method of data processing, for example in extracting weak len...

  18. Analysis of the substorm trigger phase using multiple ground-based instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauristie, K.; Pulkkinen, T.I.; Pellinen, R.J. [Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    The authors discuss in detail the observation of an event of auroral activity fading during the trigger, or growth phase of a magnetic storm. This event was observed by all-sky cameras, EISCAT radar and magnetometers, riometers, and pulsation magnetometers, from ground based stations in Finland and Scandanavia. Based on their detailed analysis, they present a possible cause for the observed fading.

  19. Ground-based LIDAR: a novel approach to quantify fine-scale fuelbed characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.L. Loudermilk; J.K. Hiers; J.J. O’Brien; R.J. Mitchell; A. Singhania; J.C. Fernandez; W.P. Cropper; K.C. Slatton

    2009-01-01

    Ground-based LIDAR (also known as laser ranging) is a novel technique that may precisely quantify fuelbed characteristics important in determining fire behavior. We measured fuel properties within a south-eastern US longleaf pine woodland at the individual plant and fuelbed scale. Data were collected using a mobile terrestrial LIDAR unit at sub-cm scale for individual...

  20. Use of neural networks in ground-based aerosol retrievals from multi-angle spectropolarimetric observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Noia, A.; Hasekamp, O.P.; Harten, G. van; Rietjens, J.H.H.; Smit, J.M.; Snik, F.; Henzing, J.S.; Boer, J. de; Keller, C.U.; Volten, H.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the use of a neural network algorithm for the retrieval of the aerosol properties from ground-based spectropolarimetric measurements is discussed. The neural network is able to retrieve the aerosol properties with an accuracy that is almost comparable to that of an iterative retrieval

  1. Retrieval of liquid water cloud properties from ground-based remote sensing observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knist, C.L.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate ground-based remotely sensed microphysical and optical properties of liquid water clouds are essential references to validate satellite-observed cloud properties and to improve cloud parameterizations in weather and climate models. This requires the evaluation of algorithms for retrieval of

  2. Ground-based remote sensing scheme for monitoring aerosol–cloud interactions (discussion)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarna, K.; Russchenberg, H.W.J.

    2015-01-01

    A method for continuous observation of aerosol–cloud interactions with ground-based remote sensing instruments is presented. The main goal of this method is to enable the monitoring of cloud microphysical changes due to the changing aerosol concentration. We use high resolution measurements from lid

  3. Ground-based remote sensing scheme for monitoring aerosol-cloud interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarna, K.; Russchenberg, H.W.J.

    2016-01-01

    A new method for continuous observation of aerosol–cloud interactions with ground-based remote sensing instruments is presented. The main goal of this method is to enable the monitoring of the change of the cloud droplet size due to the change in the aerosol concentration. We use high-resolution mea

  4. Low Power Ground-Based Laser Illumination for Electric Propulsion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, Michael R.; Oleson, Steven R.

    1994-01-01

    A preliminary evaluation of low power, ground-based laser powered electric propulsion systems is presented. A review of available and near-term laser, photovoltaic, and adaptive optic systems indicates that approximately 5-kW of ground-based laser power can be delivered at an equivalent one-sun intensity to an orbit of approximately 2000 km. Laser illumination at the proper wavelength can double photovoltaic array conversion efficiencies compared to efficiencies obtained with solar illumination at the same intensity, allowing a reduction in array mass. The reduced array mass allows extra propellant to be carried with no penalty in total spacecraft mass. The extra propellant mass can extend the satellite life in orbit, allowing additional revenue to be generated. A trade study using realistic cost estimates and conservative ground station viewing capability was performed to estimate the number of communication satellites which must be illuminated to make a proliferated system of laser ground stations economically attractive. The required number of satellites is typically below that of proposed communication satellite constellations, indicating that low power ground-based laser beaming may be commercially viable. However, near-term advances in low specific mass solar arrays and high energy density batteries for LEO applications would render the ground-based laser system impracticable.

  5. Validation of the CrIS fast physical NH3 retrieval with ground-based FTIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Dammers

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Presented here is the validation of the CrIS (Cross-track Infrared Sounder fast physical NH3 retrieval (CFPR column and profile measurements using ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR observations. We use the total columns and profiles from seven FTIR sites in the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC to validate the satellite data products. The overall FTIR and CrIS total columns have a positive correlation of r  =  0.77 (N  =  218 with very little bias (a slope of 1.02. Binning the comparisons by total column amounts, for concentrations larger than 1.0  ×  1016 molecules cm−2, i.e. ranging from moderate to polluted conditions, the relative difference is on average ∼ 0–5 % with a standard deviation of 25–50 %, which is comparable to the estimated retrieval uncertainties in both CrIS and the FTIR. For the smallest total column range (< 1.0  × 1016 molecules cm−2 where there are a large number of observations at or near the CrIS noise level (detection limit the absolute differences between CrIS and the FTIR total columns show a slight positive column bias. The CrIS and FTIR profile comparison differences are mostly within the range of the single-level retrieved profile values from estimated retrieval uncertainties, showing average differences in the range of  ∼ 20 to 40 %. The CrIS retrievals typically show good vertical sensitivity down into the boundary layer which typically peaks at  ∼ 850 hPa (∼ 1.5 km. At this level the median absolute difference is 0.87 (std  =  ±0.08 ppb, corresponding to a median relative difference of 39 % (std  =  ±2 %. Most of the absolute and relative profile comparison differences are in the range of the estimated retrieval uncertainties. At the surface, where CrIS typically has lower sensitivity, it tends to overestimate in low-concentration conditions and underestimate

  6. Suitability of ground-based SfM-MVS for monitoring glacial and periglacial processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piermattei, Livia; Carturan, Luca; de Blasi, Fabrizio; Tarolli, Paolo; Dalla Fontana, Giancarlo; Vettore, Antonio; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2016-05-01

    Photo-based surface reconstruction is rapidly emerging as an alternative survey technique to lidar (light detection and ranging) in many fields of geoscience fostered by the recent development of computer vision algorithms such as structure from motion (SfM) and dense image matching such as multi-view stereo (MVS). The objectives of this work are to test the suitability of the ground-based SfM-MVS approach for calculating the geodetic mass balance of a 2.1 km2 glacier and for detecting the surface displacement of a neighbouring active rock glacier located in the eastern Italian Alps. The photos were acquired in 2013 and 2014 using a digital consumer-grade camera during single-day field surveys. Airborne laser scanning (ALS, otherwise known as airborne lidar) data were used as benchmarks to estimate the accuracy of the photogrammetric digital elevation models (DEMs) and the reliability of the method. The SfM-MVS approach enabled the reconstruction of high-quality DEMs, which provided estimates of glacial and periglacial processes similar to those achievable using ALS. In stable bedrock areas outside the glacier, the mean and the standard deviation of the elevation difference between the SfM-MVS DEM and the ALS DEM was -0.42 ± 1.72 and 0.03 ± 0.74 m in 2013 and 2014, respectively. The overall pattern of elevation loss and gain on the glacier were similar with both methods, ranging between -5.53 and + 3.48 m. In the rock glacier area, the elevation difference between the SfM-MVS DEM and the ALS DEM was 0.02 ± 0.17 m. The SfM-MVS was able to reproduce the patterns and the magnitudes of displacement of the rock glacier observed by the ALS, ranging between 0.00 and 0.48 m per year. The use of natural targets as ground control points, the occurrence of shadowed and low-contrast areas, and in particular the suboptimal camera network geometry imposed by the morphology of the study area were the main factors affecting the accuracy of photogrammetric DEMs negatively

  7. Ground-based Observational Characterization of Transiting Hot-Jupiter Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G.

    2016-09-01

    Transiting exoplanets are currently among the most favorable targets for atmospheric studies of exoplanets. Such special orbital geometry enables transits and secondary eclipses to be observable, which refer to the events when planets move in front of or behind host stars. Corresponding observations would result in transmission spectroscopy or emission spectroscopy, which are extremely powerful in the investigation of atmospheric compositions and temperature structures. Based on these two techniques, this thesis presents photometric observations on the secondary eclipses of three hot Jupiters using GROND (Gamma-Ray Burst Optical and Near-infrared Detector) mounted on the MPG 2.2 m telescope, and spectroscopic observations on the transits of another two hot Jupiters using DBSP (Double Spectrograph), TSpec (Triple Spectrograph), and COSMIC (Carnegie Observatories Spectroscopic Multislit and Imaging Camera) mounted on the Palomar 5.1 Hale telescope. The primary goal is to search for any detectable signals of atmospheric origin, and to study potential atmospheric diversity among hot Jupiters with various physical properties. The photometric observations on the secondary eclipses of WASP-5 b, WASP-46 b, and WASP-43 b are detailed in Chapter 3, 4, and 5, respectively. The dips of secondary eclipse have been significantly detected for all three hot Jupiters in the K band, along with some possible detection or 3σ upper limit in the J or H band. These near-infrared eclipse detection measures the thermal emission from the deep dayside atmosphere. It is the first time to detect any thermal emission in the near infrared for WASP-5 b and WASP-46 b. Our GROND measurements indicate a roughly isothermal temperature profile of around 2700 K in the deep layers of WASP-5 b's dayside atmosphere. Together with Spitzer observations, which probe higher layers with a temperature of around 1900 K, a temperature inversion is ruled out in the probed pressure range. While an oxygen

  8. Ground-Based Lidar Measurements During the CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ) Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkoff, Timothy; Qian, Li; Kleidman, Richard; Stewart, Sebastian; Welton, Ellsworth; Li, Zhu; Holbem, Brent

    2008-01-01

    The CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ) field campaign was carried out between June 26th and August 29th of 2007 in the multi-state Maryland-Virginia-Pennsylvania region of the U.S. to study aerosol properties and cloud-aerosol interactions during overpasses of the CALIPSO satellite. Field work was conducted on selected days when CALIPSO ground tracks occurred in the region. Ground-based measurements included data from multiple Cimel sunphotometers that were placed at intervals along a segment of the CALIPSO ground-track. These measurements provided sky radiance and AOD measurements to enable joints inversions and comparisons with CALIPSO retrievals. As part of this activity, four ground-based lidars provided backscatter measurements (at 523 nm) in the region. Lidars at University of Maryland Baltimore County (Catonsville, MD) and Goddard Space Flight Center (Greenbelt, MD) provided continuous data during the campaign, while two micro-pulse lidar (MPL) systems were temporarily stationed at various field locations directly on CALIPSO ground-tracks. As a result, thirteen on-track ground-based lidar observations were obtained from eight different locations in the region. In some cases, nighttime CALIPSO coincident measurements were also obtained. In most studies reported to date, ground-based lidar validation efforts for CALIPSO rely on systems that are at fixed locations some distance away from the satellite ground-track. The CATZ ground-based lidar data provide an opportunity to examine vertical structure properties of aerosols and clouds both on and off-track simultaneously during a CALIPSO overpass. A table of available ground-based lidar measurements during this campaign will be presented, along with example backscatter imagery for a number of coincident cases with CALIPSO. Results indicate that even for a ground-based measurements directly on-track, comparisons can still pose a challenge due to the differing spatio-temporal properties of the ground and satellite

  9. Multiple asteroid systems : Dimensions and thermal properties from Spitzer Space Telescope and ground-based observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchis, F.; Enriquez, J. E.; Emery, J. P.; Mueller, M.; Baek, M.; Pollock, J.; Assafin, M.; Vieira Martins, R.; Berthier, J.; Vachier, F.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Lim, L. F.; Reichart, D. E.; Ivarsen, K. M.; Haislip, J. B.; LaCluyze, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    We collected mid-IR spectra from 5.2 to 38 μm using the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph of 28 asteroids representative of all established types of binary groups. Photometric lightcurves were also obtained for 14 of them during the Spitzer observations to provide the context of the

  10. Asteroid models from the Lowell Photometric Database

    CERN Document Server

    Durech, J; Oszkiewicz, D; Vanco, R

    2016-01-01

    We use the lightcurve inversion method to derive new shape models and spin states of asteroids from the sparse-in-time photometry compiled in the Lowell Photometric Database. To speed up the time-consuming process of scanning the period parameter space through the use of convex shape models, we use the distributed computing project Asteroids@home, running on the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) platform. This way, the period-search interval is divided into hundreds of smaller intervals. These intervals are scanned separately by different volunteers and then joined together. We also use an alternative, faster, approach when searching the best-fit period by using a model of triaxial ellipsoid. By this, we can independently confirm periods found with convex models and also find rotation periods for some of those asteroids for which the convex-model approach gives too many solutions. From the analysis of Lowell photometric data of the first 100,000 numbered asteroids, we derived 328 new ...

  11. Photometric Redshift Estimation Using Spectral Connectivity Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Freeman, P E; Lee, A B; Richards, J W; Schafer, C M

    2009-01-01

    The development of fast and accurate methods of photometric redshift estimation is a vital step towards being able to fully utilize the data of next-generation surveys within precision cosmology. In this paper we apply a specific approach to spectral connectivity analysis (SCA; Lee & Wasserman 2009) called diffusion map. SCA is a class of non-linear techniques for transforming observed data (e.g., photometric colours for each galaxy, where the data lie on a complex subset of p-dimensional space) to a simpler, more natural coordinate system wherein we apply regression to make redshift predictions. As SCA relies upon eigen-decomposition, our training set size is limited to ~ 10,000 galaxies; we use the Nystrom extension to quickly estimate diffusion coordinates for objects not in the training set. We apply our method to 350,738 SDSS main sample galaxies, 29,816 SDSS luminous red galaxies, and 5,223 galaxies from DEEP2 with CFHTLS ugriz photometry. For all three datasets, we achieve prediction accuracies on ...

  12. Photometric Redshifts in the IRAC Shallow Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodwin, M; Brown, M; Ashby, M; Bian, C; Brand, K; Dey, A; Eisenhardt, P; Eisenstein, D; Gonzalez, A; Huang, J; Kochanek, C; McKenzie, E; Pahre, M; Smith, H; Soifer, B; Stanford, S; Stern, D; Elston, R

    2006-06-13

    Accurate photometric redshifts are calculated for nearly 200,000 galaxies to a 4.5 micron flux limit of {approx} 13 {micro}Jy in the 8.5 deg{sup 2} Spitzer/IRAC Shallow survey. Using a hybrid photometric redshift algorithm incorporating both neural-net and template-fitting techniques, calibrated with over 15,000 spectroscopic redshifts, a redshift accuracy of {sigma} = 0.06 (1+z) is achieved for 95% of galaxies at 0 < z < 1.5. The accuracy is {sigma} = 0.12 (1 + z) for 95% of AGN at 0 < z < 3. Redshift probability functions, central to several ongoing studies of the galaxy population, are computed for the full sample. We demonstrate that these functions accurately represent the true redshift probability density, allowing the calculation of valid confidence intervals for all objects. These probability functions have already been used to successfully identify a population of Spitzer-selected high redshift (z > 1) galaxy clusters. We present one such spectroscopically confirmed cluster at = 1.24, ISCS J1434.2+3426. Finally, we present a measurement of the 4.5 {micro}m-selected galaxy redshift distribution.

  13. Ground-Based Near-Earth Object Studies in the post-Russian (Chelyabinsk) Meteor Airburst World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, E.; Ryan, W. H.

    2013-09-01

    , several of which are the fastest rotators in the Solar System. The rotation rate of an object can imply important information about its internal composition and degree of fracture, and thereby its collisional history. In particular, objects with sub-hour rotation periods are likely to have a non-negligible tensile strength. Knowing the material strength of a PHO has a direct bearing on any threat reduction plan. To address the renewed focus on asteroid threats, we will present new data obtained via photometric and spectroscopic techniques on the physical properties of several Earth-approaching asteroids that are potentially hazardous. We will discuss methods and techniques being employed to further reduce the threat of objects that may hit the Earth or airburst in the upper atmosphere, and the role ground-based telescopic monitoring plays in that endeavor.

  14. Single Transit Candidates from K2: Detection and Period Estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Osborn, H P; Brown, D J A; McCormac, J; Doyle, A P; Louden, T M; Kirk, J; Spake, J J; Lam, K W F; Walker, S R; Faedi, F; Pollacco, D L

    2015-01-01

    Photometric surveys such as Kepler have the precision to identify exoplanet and eclipsing binary candidates from only a single transit. K2, with its 75d campaign duration, is ideally suited to detect significant numbers of single-eclipsing objects. Here we develop a Bayesian transit-fitting tool ("Namaste: An Mcmc Analysis of Single Transit Exoplanets") to extract orbital information from single transit events. We achieve favourable results testing this technique on known Kepler planets, and apply the technique to 7 candidates identified from a targeted search of K2 campaigns 1, 2 and 3. We find EPIC203311200 to host an excellent exoplanet candidate with a period, assuming zero eccentricity, of $540 ^{+410}_{-230}$ days and a radius of $0.51 \\pm 0.05 R_{Jup}$. We also find six further transit candidates for which more follow-up is required to determine a planetary origin. Such a technique could be used in the future with TESS, PLATO and ground-based photometric surveys such as NGTS, potentially allowing the d...

  15. Constraints on the Bulk Composition of Uranus from Herschel PACS and ISO LWS Photometry, SOFIA FORCAST Photometry and Spectroscopy, and Ground-Based Photometry of its Thermal Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Glenn; Mueller, Thomas; Burgdorf, Martin; Fletcher, Leigh; de Pater, Imke; Atreya, Sushil; Adams, Joseph; Herter, Terry; Keller, Luke; Sidher, Sunil; Sinclair, James; Fujiyoshi, Takuya

    2016-04-01

    We present thermal infrared observations of the disk of Uranus at 17-200 μm to deduce its global thermal structure and bulk composition. We combine 17-200 μm filtered photometric measurements by the Herschel PACS and ISO LWS instruments and 19-35 μm filtered photometry and spectroscopy by the SOFIA FORCAST instrument, supplemented by 17-25 μm ground-based photometric filtered imaging of Uranus. Previous analysis of infrared spectroscopic measurements of the disk of Uranus made by the Spitzer IRS instrument yielded a model for the disk-averaged temperature profile and stratospheric composition (Orton et al. 2014a Icarus 243,494; 2014b Icarus 243, 471) that were consistent with submillimeter spectroscopy by the Herschel SPIRE instrument (Swinyard et al. 2014, MNRAS 440, 3658). Our motivation to observe the 17-35 μm spectrum was to place more stringent constraints on the global para-H2 / ortho-H2 ratio in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere than the ISO SWS results of Fouchet et al. (2003, Icarus 161, 127), who examined H2 quadrupole lines. We will discuss the consistency of these observations with a higher para-H2 fraction than implied by local thermal equilibrium, which would resolve a discrepancy between the Spitzer-based model and observations of HD lines by the Herschel PACS experiment (Feuchtgruber et al. 2013 Astron. & Astrophys. 551, A126). Constraints on the global para-H2 fraction allow for more precise analysis of the far-infrared spectrum, which is sensitive to the He:H2 ratio, a quantity that was not constrained by the Spitzer IRS spectra. The derived model, which assumed the ratio derived by the Voyager-2 IRIS/radio-science occultation experiment (Conrath et al. 1987 J. Geophys. Res. 92, 15003), is inconsistent with 70-200 μm PACS photometry (Mueller et al. 2016 Astron. & Astrophys. submittted) and ISO LWS photometric measurements. However, the model can be made consistent with the observations if the fraction of He relative to H2 were

  16. The BAST algorithm for transit detection

    CERN Document Server

    Renner, S; Erikson, A; Hedelt, P; Kabath, P; Titz, R; Voss, H

    2008-01-01

    The pioneer space mission for photometric exoplanet searches, CoRoT, steadily monitors about 12000 stars in each of its fields of view. Transit detection algorithms are applied to derive promising planetary candidates, which are then followed-up with ground-based observations. We present BAST (Berlin Automatic Search for Transits), a new algorithm for periodic transit detection, and test it on simulated CoRoT data. BAST searches for box-shaped signals in normalized, filtered, variability-fitted, and unfolded light curves. A low-pass filter is applied to remove high-frequency signals, and linear fits to subsections of data are subtracted to remove the star's variability. A search for periodicity is then performed in transit events identified above a given detection threshold. Some criteria are defined to better separate planet candidates from binary stars. From the analysis of simulated CoRoT light curves, we show that the BAST detection performance is similar to that of the Box-fitting Least-Square (BLS) meth...

  17. Metrology of ground-based satellite validation: co-location mismatch and smoothing issues of total ozone comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Verhoelst

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Comparisons with ground-based correlative measurements constitute a key component in the validation of satellite data on atmospheric composition. The error budget of these comparisons contains not only the measurement errors but also several terms related to differences in sampling and smoothing of the inhomogeneous and variable atmospheric field. A versatile system for Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs, named OSSSMOSE, is used here to quantify these terms. Based on the application of pragmatic observation operators onto high-resolution atmospheric fields, it allows a simulation of each individual measurement, and consequently, also of the differences to be expected from spatial and temporal field variations between both measurements making up a comparison pair. As a topical case study, the system is used to evaluate the error budget of total ozone column (TOC comparisons between GOME-type direct fitting (GODFITv3 satellite retrievals from GOME/ERS2, SCIAMACHY/Envisat, and GOME-2/MetOp-A, and ground-based direct-sun and zenith–sky reference measurements such as those from Dobsons, Brewers, and zenith-scattered light (ZSL-DOAS instruments, respectively. In particular, the focus is placed on the GODFITv3 reprocessed GOME-2A data record vs. the ground-based instruments contributing to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC. The simulations are found to reproduce the actual measurements almost to within the measurement uncertainties, confirming that the OSSE approach and its technical implementation are appropriate. This work reveals that many features of the comparison spread and median difference can be understood as due to metrological differences, even when using strict co-location criteria. In particular, sampling difference errors exceed measurement uncertainties regularly at most mid- and high-latitude stations, with values up to 10 % and more in extreme cases. Smoothing difference errors only

  18. Metrology of ground-based satellite validation: co-location mismatch and smoothing issues of total ozone comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoelst, T.; Granville, J.; Hendrick, F.; Köhler, U.; Lerot, C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Redondas, A.; Van Roozendael, M.; Lambert, J.-C.

    2015-12-01

    Comparisons with ground-based correlative measurements constitute a key component in the validation of satellite data on atmospheric composition. The error budget of these comparisons contains not only the measurement errors but also several terms related to differences in sampling and smoothing of the inhomogeneous and variable atmospheric field. A versatile system for Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs), named OSSSMOSE, is used here to quantify these terms. Based on the application of pragmatic observation operators onto high-resolution atmospheric fields, it allows a simulation of each individual measurement, and consequently, also of the differences to be expected from spatial and temporal field variations between both measurements making up a comparison pair. As a topical case study, the system is used to evaluate the error budget of total ozone column (TOC) comparisons between GOME-type direct fitting (GODFITv3) satellite retrievals from GOME/ERS2, SCIAMACHY/Envisat, and GOME-2/MetOp-A, and ground-based direct-sun and zenith-sky reference measurements such as those from Dobsons, Brewers, and zenith-scattered light (ZSL-)DOAS instruments, respectively. In particular, the focus is placed on the GODFITv3 reprocessed GOME-2A data record vs. the ground-based instruments contributing to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). The simulations are found to reproduce the actual measurements almost to within the measurement uncertainties, confirming that the OSSE approach and its technical implementation are appropriate. This work reveals that many features of the comparison spread and median difference can be understood as due to metrological differences, even when using strict co-location criteria. In particular, sampling difference errors exceed measurement uncertainties regularly at most mid- and high-latitude stations, with values up to 10 % and more in extreme cases. Smoothing difference errors only play a role in the

  19. Airborne & Ground-based measurements of atmospheric CO2 using the 1.57-μm laser absorption spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaizawa, D.; Kawakami, S.; Nakajima, M.; Tanaka, T.; Miyamoto, Y.; Morino, I.; Uchino, O.; Asai, K.

    2009-12-01

    Greenhouse gases observing satellite (GOSAT) started the measurement of global CO2 abundances to reveal its continental inventory using two passive remote sensors. The goal that the sensor needs to be done is to achieve an 1% relative accuracy in order to reduce uncertainties of CO2 budget. Nevertheless, in the future global CO2 monitoring, more accurate measurement of global tropospheric CO2 abundances with the monthly regional scale are required to improve the knowledge of CO2 exchanges among the land, ocean, and atmosphere. In order to fulfill demands, a laser remote sensor, such as DIAL or laser absorption spectrometer (LAS), is a potential candidate of future space-based missions. Nowadays, those technologies are required to demonstrate an accuracy of the few-ppm level through airborne & ground-based measurements. We developed the prototype of the 1.57um LAS for a step of the next missions and perform it at the ground-based and airborne platform to show the properly validated performance in the framework of GOSAT validation. Our CO2 LAS is consisted of all optical fiber circuits & compact receiving /transmitting optics to achieve the portable, flexible and rigid system. The optical sources of on- and off-line are distributed feedback lasers, which are tuned at the strong and weak position of the R12 line in the (30012rate and combined and amplified using an erbium doped fiber amplifier. Scattered signals from the hard target are collected by the 11cm receiving telescope and detected and stored into the laptop computer. After that, we evaluated the atmospheric CO2 density using the meteorological parameters and ratio between the on- and off-line signals. The resultant of the ground-based measurement of 3km optical length indicated that the statistical error of the path averaged atmospheric CO2 density is less than 2.8ppm with 25 minutes averaging. The variation of the path averaged atmospheric CO2 is also quite consistent with that obtained from the in

  20. TOPICAL REVIEW: Predictions for the rates of compact binary coalescences observable by ground-based gravitational-wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Antonucci, F.; Aoudia, S.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M.; Aronsson, M.; Arun, K. G.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D. E.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th S.; Behnke, B.; Beker, M. G.; Belczynski, K.; Benacquista, M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bigotta, S.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birindelli, S.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Blomberg, A.; Boccara, C.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Boyle, M.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Budzyński, R.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Burmeister, O.; Buskulic, D.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campagna, E.; Campsie, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chassande Mottin, E.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Colacino, C. N.; Colas, J.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Corda, C.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coulon, J. P.; Coward, D.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Culter, R. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Danilishin, S. L.; Dannenberg, R.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dari, A.; Das, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Davier, M.; Davies, G.; Davis, A.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; DeBra, D.; Degallaix, J.; del Prete, M.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Devanka, P.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Emilio, M. Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doomes, E. E.; Dorsher, S.; Douglas, E. S. D.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Dueck, J.; Dumas, J. C.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Farr, B. F.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Flaminio, R.; Flanigan, M.; Flasch, K.; Foley, S.; Forrest, C.; Forsi, E.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J. D.; Franc, J.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garofoli, J. A.; Garufi, F.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gholami, I.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Greverie, C.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hall, P.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E.; Hoyland, D.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Jaranowski, P.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kanner, J.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, H.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Krause, T.; Kringel, V.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kullman, J.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lang, M.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lazzarini, A.; Leaci, P.; Leong, J.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Li, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Lin, H.

    2010-09-01

    We present an up-to-date, comprehensive summary of the rates for all types of compact binary coalescence sources detectable by the initial and advanced versions of the ground-based gravitational-wave detectors LIGO and Virgo. Astrophysical estimates for compact-binary coalescence rates depend on a number of assumptions and unknown model parameters and are still uncertain. The most confident among these estimates are the rate predictions for coalescing binary neutron stars which are based on extrapolations from observed binary pulsars in our galaxy. These yield a likely coalescence rate of 100 Myr-1 per Milky Way Equivalent Galaxy (MWEG), although the rate could plausibly range from 1 Myr-1 MWEG-1 to 1000 Myr-1 MWEG-1 (Kalogera et al 2004 Astrophys. J. 601 L179; Kalogera et al 2004 Astrophys. J. 614 L137 (erratum)). We convert coalescence rates into detection rates based on data from the LIGO S5 and Virgo VSR2 science runs and projected sensitivities for our advanced detectors. Using the detector sensitivities derived from these data, we find a likely detection rate of 0.02 per year for Initial LIGO-Virgo interferometers, with a plausible range between 2 × 10-4 and 0.2 per year. The likely binary neutron-star detection rate for the Advanced LIGO-Virgo network increases to 40 events per year, with a range between 0.4 and 400 per year.

  1. Investigating the long-term evolution of subtropical ozone profiles applying ground-based FTIR spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. E. García

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the long-term evolution of subtropical ozone profile time series (1999–2010 obtained from ground-based FTIR (Fourier Transform InfraRed spectrometry at the Izaña Observatory ozone super-site. Different ozone retrieval strategies are examined, analysing the influence of an additional temperature retrieval and different constraints. The theoretical assessment reveals that the FTIR system is able to resolve four independent ozone layers with a precision of better than 6% in the troposphere and of better than 3% in the lower, middle and upper stratosphere. This total error includes the smoothing error, which dominates the random error budget. Furthermore, we estimate that the measurement noise as well as uncertainties in the applied atmospheric temperature profiles and instrumental line shape are leading error sources. We show that a simultaneous temperature retrieval can significantly reduce the total random errors and that a regular determination of the instrumental line shape is important for producing a consistent long-term dataset. These theoretical precision estimates are empirically confirmed by daily intercomparisons with Electro Chemical Cell (ECC sonde profiles. In order to empirically document the long-term stability of the FTIR ozone profile data we compare the linear trends and seasonal cycles as obtained from the FTIR and ECC time series. Concerning seasonality, in winter both techniques observe stratospheric ozone profiles that are typical middle latitude profiles (low tropopause, low ozone maximum concentrations and in summer/autumn profiles that are typical tropical profiles (high tropopause, high maximum concentrations. The linear trends estimated from the FTIR and the ECC datasets agree within their error bars. For the FTIR time series, we observe a significant negative trend in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere of about −0.2% yr−1 and a significant positive trend in the middle and

  2. Investigating the long-term evolution of subtropical ozone profiles applying ground-based FTIR spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, O. E.; Schneider, M.; Redondas, A.; González, Y.; Hase, F.; Blumenstock, T.; Sepúlveda, E.

    2012-11-01

    This study investigates the long-term evolution of subtropical ozone profile time series (1999-2010) obtained from ground-based FTIR (Fourier Transform InfraRed) spectrometry at the Izaña Observatory ozone super-site. Different ozone retrieval strategies are examined, analysing the influence of an additional temperature retrieval and different constraints. The theoretical assessment reveals that the FTIR system is able to resolve four independent ozone layers with a precision of better than 6% in the troposphere and of better than 3% in the lower, middle and upper stratosphere. This total error includes the smoothing error, which dominates the random error budget. Furthermore, we estimate that the measurement noise as well as uncertainties in the applied atmospheric temperature profiles and instrumental line shape are leading error sources. We show that a simultaneous temperature retrieval can significantly reduce the total random errors and that a regular determination of the instrumental line shape is important for producing a consistent long-term dataset. These theoretical precision estimates are empirically confirmed by daily intercomparisons with Electro Chemical Cell (ECC) sonde profiles. In order to empirically document the long-term stability of the FTIR ozone profile data we compare the linear trends and seasonal cycles as obtained from the FTIR and ECC time series. Concerning seasonality, in winter both techniques observe stratospheric ozone profiles that are typical middle latitude profiles (low tropopause, low ozone maximum concentrations) and in summer/autumn profiles that are typical tropical profiles (high tropopause, high maximum concentrations). The linear trends estimated from the FTIR and the ECC datasets agree within their error bars. For the FTIR time series, we observe a significant negative trend in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere of about -0.2% yr-1 and a significant positive trend in the middle and upper stratosphere of about +0

  3. Historical Trends in Ground-Based Optical Space Surveillance System Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, M.; Shroyer, L.

    In the spirit of the 50th anniversary of the launch of the first man-made satellite, an historical overview of ground-based optical space surveillance systems is provided. Specific emphasis is given on gathering metrics to analyze design trends. The subject of space surveillance spans the history of spaceflight: from the early tracking cameras at missile ranges, the first observations of Sputnik, to the evolution towards highly capable commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) systems, and much in between. Whereas previous reviews in the literature have been limited in scope to specific time periods, operational programs, countries, etc., a broad overview of a wide range of sources is presented. This review is focused on systems whose primary design purpose can be classified as Space Object Identification (SOI) or Orbit Determination (OD). SOI systems are those that capture images or data to determine information about the satellite itself, such as attitude, features, and material composition. OD systems are those that produce estimates of the satellite position, usually in the form of orbital elements or a time history of tracking angles. Systems are also categorized based on the orbital regime in which their targets reside, which has been simplified in this study to either Low Earth Orbit (LEO) or Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). The systems are further classified depending on the industry segment (government/commercial or academic), and whether the program is foreign or domestic. In addition to gathering metrics on systems designed solely for man-made satellite observations, it is interesting to find examples of other systems being similarly used. Examples include large astronomical telescopes being used for GEO debris surveys and anomaly resolution for deep-space probes. Another interesting development is the increase in number and capability of COTS systems, some of which are specifically marketed to consumers as satellite trackers. After describing the results of the

  4. A study of remotely sensed aerosol properties from ground-based sun and sky scanning radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, David M.

    . The sensitivity of absorption properties is evaluated and quantified with respect to aerosol retrieval uncertainty. Using clustering analysis, aerosol absorption and size relationships provide a simple method to classify aerosol mixing states and origins and potentially improve aerosol retrievals from ground-based and satellite-based instrumentation.

  5. Evaluation of Six High-Resolution Satellite and Ground-Based Precipitation Products over Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mou Leong Tan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Satellite precipitation products (SPPs potentially constitute an alternative to sparse rain gauge networks for assessing the spatial distribution of precipitation. However, applications of these products are still limited due to the lack of robust quality assessment. This study compares daily, monthly, seasonal, and annual rainfall amount at 342 rain gauges over Malaysia to estimations using five SPPs (3B42RT, 3B42V7, GPCP-1DD, PERSIANN-CDR, and CMORPH and a ground-based precipitation product (APHRODITE. The performance of the precipitation products was evaluated from 2003 to 2007 using continuous (RMSE, R2, ME, MAE, and RB and categorical (ACC, POD, FAR, CSI, and HSS statistical approaches. Overall, 3B42V7 and APHRODITE performed the best, while the worst performance was shown by GPCP-1DD. 3B42RT, 3B42V7, and PERSIANN-CDR slightly overestimated observed precipitation by 2%, 4.7%, and 2.1%, respectively. By contrast, APHRODITE and CMORPH significantly underestimated precipitations by 19.7% and 13.2%, respectively, whereas GPCP-1DD only slightly underestimated by 2.8%. All six precipitation products performed better in the northeast monsoon than in the southwest monsoon. The better performances occurred in eastern and southern Peninsular Malaysia and in the north of East Malaysia, which receives higher rainfall during the northeast monsoon, whereas poor performances occurred in the western and dryer Peninsular Malaysia. All precipitation products underestimated the no/tiny (<1 mm/day and extreme (≥20 mm/day rainfall events, while they overestimated low (1–20 mm/day rainfall events. 3B42RT and 3B42V7 showed the best ability to detect precipitation amounts with the highest HSS value (0.36. Precipitations during flood events such as those which occurred in late 2006 and early 2007 were estimated the best by 3B42RT and 3B42V7, as shown by an R2 value ranging from 0.49 to 0.88 and 0.52 to 0.86, respectively. These results on SPPs’ uncertainties

  6. Ground-based search for the brightest transiting planets with the Multi-site All-Sky CAmeRA - MASCARA

    CERN Document Server

    Snellen, Ignas; Navarro, Ramon; Bettonvil, Felix; Kenworthy, Matthew; de Mooij, Ernst; Otten, Gilles; ter Horst, Rik; Poole, Rudolf le

    2012-01-01

    The Multi-site All-sky CAmeRA MASCARA is an instrument concept consisting of several stations across the globe, with each station containing a battery of low-cost cameras to monitor the near-entire sky at each location. Once all stations have been installed, MASCARA will be able to provide a nearly 24-hr coverage of the complete dark sky, down to magnitude 8, at sub-minute cadence. Its purpose is to find the brightest transiting exoplanet systems, expected in the V=4-8 magnitude range - currently not probed by space- or ground-based surveys. The bright/nearby transiting planet systems, which MASCARA will discover, will be the key targets for detailed planet atmosphere observations. We present studies on the initial design of a MASCARA station, including the camera housing, domes, and computer equipment, and on the photometric stability of low-cost cameras showing that a precision of 0.3-1% per hour can be readily achieved. We plan to roll out the first MASCARA station before the end of 2013. A 5-station MASCA...

  7. Ground-based near-UV observations of 15 transiting exoplanets: Constraints on their atmospheres and no evidence for asymmetrical transits

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Jake D; Biddle, Lauren I; Smart, Brianna M; Zellem, Robert T; Teske, Johanna K; Hardegree-Ullman, Kevin K; Griffith, Caitlin C; Leiter, Robin M; Cates, Ian T; Nieberding, Megan N; Smith, Carter-Thaxton W; Thompson, Robert M; Hofmann, Ryan; Berube, Michael P; Nguyen, Chi H; Small, Lindsay C; Guvenen, Blythe C; Richardson, Logan; McGraw, Allison; Raphael, Brandon; Crawford, Benjamin E; Robertson, Amy N; Tombleson, Ryan; Carleton, Timothy M; Towner, Allison P M; Walker-LaFollette, Amanda M; Hume, Jeffrey R; Watson, Zachary T; Jones, Christen K; Lichtenberger, Matthew J; Hoglund, Shelby R; Cook, Kendall L; Crossen, Cory A; Jorgensen, Curtis R; Thompson, James M Romine Alejandro R; Villegas, Christian F; Wilson, Ashley A; Sanford, Brent; Taylor, Joanna M

    2016-01-01

    Transits of exoplanets observed in the near-UV have been used to study the scattering properties of their atmospheres and possible star-planet interactions. We observed the primary transits of 15 exoplanets (CoRoT-1b, GJ436b, HAT-P-1b, HAT-P-13b, HAT-P-16b, HAT-P-22b, TrES-2b, TrES-4b, WASP-1b, WASP-12b, WASP-33b, WASP-36b, WASP-44b, WASP-48b, and WASP-77Ab) in the near-UV and several optical photometric bands to update their planetary parameters, ephemerides, search for a wavelength dependence in their transit depths to constrain their atmospheres, and determine if asymmetries are visible in their light curves. Here we present the first ground-based near-UV light curves for 12 of the targets (CoRoT-1b, GJ436b, HAT-P-1b, HAT-P-13b, HAT-P-22b, TrES-2b, TrES-4b, WASP-1b, WASP-33b, WASP-36b, WASP-48b, and WASP-77Ab). We find that none of the near-UV transits exhibit any non-spherical asymmetries, this result is consistent with recent theoretical predictions by Ben-Jaffel et al. and Turner et al. The multi-wavele...

  8. Asteroid models from the Lowell photometric database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ďurech, J.; Hanuš, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Vančo, R.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Information about shapes and spin states of individual asteroids is important for the study of the whole asteroid population. For asteroids from the main belt, most of the shape models available now have been reconstructed from disk-integrated photometry by the lightcurve inversion method. Aims: We want to significantly enlarge the current sample (~350) of available asteroid models. Methods: We use the lightcurve inversion method to derive new shape models and spin states of asteroids from the sparse-in-time photometry compiled in the Lowell Photometric Database. To speed up the time-consuming process of scanning the period parameter space through the use of convex shape models, we use the distributed computing project Asteroids@home, running on the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) platform. This way, the period-search interval is divided into hundreds of smaller intervals. These intervals are scanned separately by different volunteers and then joined together. We also use an alternative, faster, approach when searching the best-fit period by using a model of triaxial ellipsoid. By this, we can independently confirm periods found with convex models and also find rotation periods for some of those asteroids for which the convex-model approach gives too many solutions. Results: From the analysis of Lowell photometric data of the first 100 000 numbered asteroids, we derived 328 new models. This almost doubles the number of available models. We tested the reliability of our results by comparing models that were derived from purely Lowell data with those based on dense lightcurves, and we found that the rate of false-positive solutions is very low. We also present updated plots of the distribution of spin obliquities and pole ecliptic longitudes that confirm previous findings about a non-uniform distribution of spin axes. However, the models reconstructed from noisy sparse data are heavily biased towards more elongated bodies with high

  9. Sentinel-1 and ground-based sensors for a continuous monitoring of the Corvara landslide kinematic (South Tirol, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlögel, Romy; Darvishi, Mehdi; Cuozzo, Giovanni; Kofler, Christian; Rutzinger, Martin; Zieher, Thomas; Toschi, Isabella; Remondino, Fabio

    2017-04-01

    Sentinel-1 mission allows us to have Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) acquisitions over large areas every 6 days with spatial resolution of 20 m. This new open-source generation of satellites has enhanced the capabilities for continuously studying earth surface changes. Over the past two decades, several studies have demonstrated the potential of Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) for detecting and quantifying land surface deformation. DInSAR limitations and challenges are linked to the SAR properties and the field conditions (especially in Alpine environments) leading to spatial and temporal decorrelation of the SAR signal. High temporal decorrelation can be caused by changes in vegetation (particularly in non-urban areas), atmospheric conditions or high ground surface velocity. In this study, kinematics of the complex and vegetated Corvara landslide, situated in Val Badia (South Tirol, Italy), are monitored by a network of 3 permanent and 13 monthly Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) stations. The slope displacement rates are found to be highly unsteady and reach several meters a year. This analysis focuses on evaluating the limitations of Sentinel-1 imagery processed with Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) technique in comparison to ground-based measurements for assessing the landslide kinematic linked to meteorological conditions. Selecting some particular acquisitions, coherence thresholds and unwrapping processes gives various results in terms of reliability and accuracy supporting the understanding of the landslide velocity field. The evolution of the coherence and phase signals are studied according to the changing field conditions and the monitored ground-based displacements. DInSAR deformation maps and residual topographic heights are finally compared with difference of high resolution Digital Elevation Models at local scale. This research is conducted within the project LEMONADE (http://lemonade.mountainresearch.at) funded

  10. Validation of TRMM Precipitation Radar Through Comparison of its Multi-Year Measurements to Ground-Based Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Liang; Meneghini, Robert

    2010-01-01

    A procedure to accurately resample spaceborne and ground-based radar data is described, and then applied to the measurements taken from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) and the ground-based Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D or WSR) for the validation of the PR measurements and estimates. Through comparisons with the well-calibrated, non-attenuated WSR at Melbourne, Florida for the period 1998-2007, the calibration of the Precipitation Radar (PR) aboard the TRMM satellite is checked using measurements near the storm top. Analysis of the results indicates that the PR, after taking into account differences in radar reflectivity factors between the PR and WSR, has a small positive bias of 0.8 dB relative to the WSR, implying a soundness of the PR calibration in view of the uncertainties involved in the comparisons. Comparisons between the PR and WSR reflectivities are also made near the surface for evaluation of the attenuation-correction procedures used in the PR algorithms. It is found that the PR attenuation is accurately corrected in stratiform rain but is underestimated in convective rain, particularly in heavy rain. Tests of the PR estimates of rainfall rate are conducted through comparisons in the overlap area between the TRMM overpass and WSR scan. Analyses of the data are made both on a conditional basis, in which the instantaneous rain rates are compared only at those pixels where both the PR and WSR detect rain, and an unconditional basis, in which the area-averaged rain rates are estimated independently for the PR and WSR. Results of the conditional rain comparisons show that the PR-derived rain is about 9% greater and 19% less than the WSR estimates for stratiform and convective storms, respectively. Overall, the PR tends to underestimate the conditional mean rain rate by 8% for all rain categories, a finding that conforms to the results of the area-averaged rain (unconditional) comparisons.

  11. Summer-time Mass Balance of Wolverine Glacier, Alaska, Derived from Ground-based Time-lapse Microgravity Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, E. V.; Muto, A.; Babcock, E.

    2016-12-01

    Monitoring the mass balance of alpine glaciers is important because alpine glaciers presently account for about half of the cryospheric contribution to the global sea-level rise. Mass balance measurements of alpine glaciers have predominantly relied upon glaciological and hydrological methods. However, these methods can be logistically costly and have potential extrapolation errors. Remote sensing approaches, such as gravimetric methods using data from GRACE satellite missions, have provided monthly mass-balance estimates of aggregates of alpine glaciers but their spatial resolution is far too large for studying a single glacier. On the other hand, ground-based time-lapse microgravity geophysical measurements can potentially circumvent some of the disadvantages of the glaciological and hydrological methods. It may detect the change in a single glacier's mass and its spatial distribution. We conducted ground-based time-lapse microgravity surveys on Wolverine Glacier, Alaska, in May and August of 2016, using a Scintrex CG-5 Autograv gravimeter. We collected data at seventy-nine individual stations on the glacier, roughly five stations per square kilometer. We included repeat-station and base-station measurements made at least twice a day for instrumental drift control. The uncertainty of our gravity measurements is better than 0.03 mGal, which is about 0.7 meters water equivalent of surface mass balance. Our summer-time mass balance of Wolverine Glacier determined from the time-lapse gravity measurements is independent of that derived from the stake-network or stream-gauge measurements, and could provide spatial insight into the mass balance process on Wolverine Glacier and similar glaciers.

  12. Comparison of ground-based FTIR and Brewer O3 total column with data from two different IASI algorithms and from OMI and GOME-2 satellite instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Blumenstock

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available An intercomparison of ozone total column measurements derived from various platforms is presented in this work. Satellite data from Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI, Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2 are compared with data from two ground-based spectrometers (Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometer FTIR and Brewer, located at the Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC super-site of Izaña (Tenerife, measured during a campaign from March to June 2009. These ground-based observing systems have already been demonstrated to perform consistent, precise and accurate ozone total column measurements. An excellent agreement between ground-based and OMI/GOME-2 data is observed. Results from two different algorithms for deriving IASI ozone total column are also compared: the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT/ESA operational algorithm and the LISA (Laboratoire Inter-universitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques algorithm. A better agreement was found with LISA's analytical approach based on an altitude-dependent Tikhonov-Philips regularization: correlations are 0.94 and 0.89 compared to FTIR and Brewer, respectively; while the operational IASI ozone columns (based on neural network analysis show correlations of 0.90 and 0.85, respectively, compared to the O3 columns obtained from FTIR and Brewer.

  13. Multi-band gravitational-wave astronomy: parameter estimation and tests of general relativity with space and ground-based detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Vitale, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    With the discovery of the black hole binary (BBH) coalescence GW150914 the era of gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy has started. It has recently been shown that BBH with masses comparable to or higher than GW150914 would be visible in the eLISA band a few years before they finally merge in the band of ground-based detectors. This would allow for pre-merger electromagnetic alerts, dramatically increasing the chances of a joint detection, if BBH are indeed luminous in the electromagnetic band. In this paper we explore a quite different aspect of multi-band GW astronomy, and verify if, and to what extent, measurement of masses and sky position with eLISA could improve parameter estimation and tests of general relativity with ground-based detectors. We generate a catalog of 200 BBH and find that having prior information from eLISA can reduce the uncertainty in the measurement of source distance and primary black hole spin by up to factor of 2 in ground-based GW detectors. The component masses estimate from eLISA ...

  14. A decadal cirrus clouds climatology from ground-based and spaceborne lidars above the south of France (43.9° N–5.7° E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hoareau

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study provides an analysis of cirrus cloud properties at midlatitude in the southern part of France from ground-based and spaceborne lidars. A climatology of cirrus cloud properties and their evolution over more than 12 yr is presented and compared to other mid-latitude climatological studies. Cirrus clouds occur ~37% of the total observation time and remain quasi-constant across seasons with a variation within ~5% around the mean occurrence. Similar results are obtained from CALIOP and the ground-based lidar, with a mean difference in occurrence of ~5% between both instruments. From the ground-based lidar data, a slight decrease in occurrence of ~3% per decade is observed but found statistically insignificant. Based on a clustering analysis of cirrus cloud parameters, three distinct classes have been identified and investigations concerning their origin are discussed. Properties of these different classes are analysed, showing that thin cirrus in the upper troposphere represent ~50% of cloud cover detected in summer and fall, decreasing by 15–20% for other seasons.

  15. Photometric Variability in the CSTAR Field: Results from the 2008 Data Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Songhu; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Xu; Zhou, Ji-Lin; Fu, Jian-Ning; Yang, Ming; Liu, Huigen; Xie, Jiwei; Wang, Lifan; Wang, Lingzhi; Wittenmyer, R. A.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Feng, Long-Long; Gong, Xuefei; Lawrence, J. S.; Liu, Qiang; Luong-Van, D. M.; Ma, Jun; Peng, Xiyan; Storey, J. W. V.; Wu, Zhenyu; Yan, Jun; Yang, Huigen; Yang, Ji; Yuan, Xiangyan; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhang, Xiaojia; Zhu, Zhenxi; Zou, Hu

    2015-06-01

    The Chinese Small Telescope Array (CSTAR) is the first telescope facility built at Dome A, Antarctica. During the 2008 observing season, the installation provided long-baseline and high-cadence photometric observations in the i-band for 18,145 targets within 20 {{deg }2} CSTAR field around the South Celestial Pole for the purpose of monitoring the astronomical observing quality of Dome A and detecting various types of photometric variability. Using sensitive and robust detection methods, we discover 274 potential variables from this data set, 83 of which are new discoveries. We characterize most of them, providing the periods, amplitudes, and classes of variability. The catalog of all these variables is presented along with the discussion of their statistical properties.

  16. Photometric Variability in the CSTAR Field: Results From the 2008 Data Set

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Songhu; Zhou, Xu; Zhou, Ji-Lin; Fu, Jian-Ning; Yang, Ming; Liu, Huigen; Xie, Jiwei; Wang, Lifan; Wang, Lingzhi; Wittenmyer, R A; Ashley, M C B; Feng, Long-Long; Gong, Xuefei; Lawrence, J S; Liu, Qiang; Luong-Van, D M; Ma, Jun; Peng, Xiyan; Storey, J W V; Wu, Zhenyu; Yan, Jun; Yang, Huigen; Yang, Ji; Yuan, Xiangyan; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhang, Xiaojia; Zhu, Zhenxi; Zou, Hu

    2015-01-01

    The Chinese Small Telescope ARray (CSTAR) is the first telescope facility built at Dome A, Antarctica. During the 2008 observing season, the installation provided long-baseline and high-cadence photometric observations in the i-band for 18,145 targets within 20 deg2 CSTAR field around the South Celestial Pole for the purpose of monitoring the astronomical observing quality of Dome A and detecting various types of photometric variability. Using sensitive and robust detection methods, we discover 274 potential variables from this data set, 83 of which are new discoveries. We characterize most of them, providing the periods, amplitudes and classes of variability. The catalog of all these variables is presented along with the discussion of their statistical properties.

  17. Planck 2013 results. VIII. HFI photometric calibration and mapmaking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Planck Collaboration,; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.;

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the processing applied to the HFI cleaned time-ordered data to produce photometrically calibrated maps. HFI observes the sky over a broad range of frequencies, from 100 to 857 GHz. To get the best accuracy on the calibration on such a large range, two different photometric ca...

  18. Characterization of extrasolar terrestrial planets from diurnal photometric variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, E B; Seager, S; Turner, E L

    2001-08-30

    The detection of massive planets orbiting nearby stars has become almost routine, but current techniques are as yet unable to detect terrestrial planets with masses comparable to the Earth's. Future space-based observatories to detect Earth-like planets are being planned. Terrestrial planets orbiting in the habitable zones of stars-where planetary surface conditions are compatible with the presence of liquid water-are of enormous interest because they might have global environments similar to Earth's and even harbour life. The light scattered by such a planet will vary in intensity and colour as the planet rotates; the resulting light curve will contain information about the planet's surface and atmospheric properties. Here we report a model that predicts features that should be discernible in the light curve obtained by low-precision photometry. For extrasolar planets similar to Earth, we expect daily flux variations of up to hundreds of per cent, depending sensitively on ice and cloud cover as well as seasonal variations. This suggests that the meteorological variability, composition of the surface (for example, ocean versus land fraction) and rotation period of an Earth-like planet could be derived from photometric observations. Even signatures of Earth-like plant life could be constrained or possibly, with further study, even uniquely determined.

  19. Photometrical research geostationary satellite "SBIRS GEO-2"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhov, P. P.; Epishev, V. P; Sukhov, K. P; Kudak, V. I.

    The multicolor photometrical observations GSS "Sbirs Geo-2" were carried in B,V,R filters out during the autumn equinox 2014 and spring 2015 y. Periodic appearance of many light curves and dips of mirror reflections suggests that the GSS was not in orbit in a static position, predetermined three-axis orientation and in dynamic motion. On the basis of computer modeling suggests the following dynamics GSS "Sbirs Geo-2" in orbit. Helically scanning the visible Earth's surface infrared satellite sensors come with period P1 = 15.66 sec. and the rocking of the GSS about the direction of the motion vector of the satellite in orbit with P2 = 62.64 sec., most likely with the purpose to survey the greatest possible portion of the earth's surface.

  20. Photometric Supernova Classification With Machine Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Lochner, Michelle; Peiris, Hiranya V; Lahav, Ofer; Winter, Max K

    2016-01-01

    Automated photometric supernova classification has become an active area of research in recent years in light of current and upcoming imaging surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Telescope (LSST), given that spectroscopic confirmation of type for all supernovae discovered with these surveys will be impossible. Here, we develop a multi-faceted classification pipeline, combining existing and new approaches. Our pipeline consists of two stages: extracting descriptive features from the light curves and classification using a machine learning algorithm. Our feature extraction methods vary from model-dependent techniques, namely SALT2 fits, to more independent techniques fitting parametric models to curves, to a completely model-independent wavelet approach. We cover a range of representative machine learning algorithms, including naive Bayes, k-nearest neighbors, support vector machines, artificial neural networks and boosted decision trees. We test the pipeline on simulated multi-ba...

  1. Hierarchical Bayesian inference of galaxy redshift distributions from photometric surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Leistedt, Boris; Peiris, Hiranya V

    2016-01-01

    Accurately characterizing the redshift distributions of galaxies is essential for analysing deep photometric surveys and testing cosmological models. We present a technique to simultaneously infer redshift distributions and individual redshifts from photometric galaxy catalogues. Our model constructs a piecewise constant representation (effectively a histogram) of the distribution of galaxy types and redshifts, the parameters of which are efficiently inferred from noisy photometric flux measurements. This approach can be seen as a generalization of template-fitting photometric redshift methods and relies on a library of spectral templates to relate the photometric fluxes of individual galaxies to their redshifts. We illustrate this technique on simulated galaxy survey data, and demonstrate that it delivers correct posterior distributions on the underlying type and redshift distributions, as well as on the individual types and redshifts of galaxies. We show that even with uninformative priors, large photometri...

  2. New insights on the accuracy of photometric redshift measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Massarotti, M; Buzzoni, A; Valls-Gabaud, D

    2001-01-01

    We use the deepest and most complete redshift catalog currently available (the Hubble Deep Field (HDF) North supplemented by new HDF South redshift data) to minimize residuals between photometric and spectroscopic redshift estimates. The good agreement at z_spec 2.0, the systematic shift between photometric and spectroscopic redshifts decreases when the modeling of the absorption by the interstellar and intergalactic media is refined. As a result, in the entire redshift range 0 < z < 6, residuals between photometric and spectroscopic redshifts are roughly halved. For objects fainter than the spectroscopic limit, the main source of uncertainty in photometric redshifts is related to photometric errors, and can be assessed with Monte Carlo simulations.

  3. Photometric Supernova Classification with Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochner, Michelle; McEwen, Jason D.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Lahav, Ofer; Winter, Max K.

    2016-08-01

    Automated photometric supernova classification has become an active area of research in recent years in light of current and upcoming imaging surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, given that spectroscopic confirmation of type for all supernovae discovered will be impossible. Here, we develop a multi-faceted classification pipeline, combining existing and new approaches. Our pipeline consists of two stages: extracting descriptive features from the light curves and classification using a machine learning algorithm. Our feature extraction methods vary from model-dependent techniques, namely SALT2 fits, to more independent techniques that fit parametric models to curves, to a completely model-independent wavelet approach. We cover a range of representative machine learning algorithms, including naive Bayes, k-nearest neighbors, support vector machines, artificial neural networks, and boosted decision trees (BDTs). We test the pipeline on simulated multi-band DES light curves from the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge. Using the commonly used area under the curve (AUC) of the Receiver Operating Characteristic as a metric, we find that the SALT2 fits and the wavelet approach, with the BDTs algorithm, each achieve an AUC of 0.98, where 1 represents perfect classification. We find that a representative training set is essential for good classification, whatever the feature set or algorithm, with implications for spectroscopic follow-up. Importantly, we find that by using either the SALT2 or the wavelet feature sets with a BDT algorithm, accurate classification is possible purely from light curve data, without the need for any redshift information.

  4. Entry Dispersion Analysis for the Hayabusa Spacecraft using Ground Based Optical Observation

    CERN Document Server

    Yamaguchi, T; Yagi, M; Tholen, D J

    2011-01-01

    Hayabusa asteroid explorer successfully released the sample capsule to Australia on June 13, 2010. Since the Earth reentry phase of sample return was critical, many backup plans for predicting the landing location were prepared. This paper investigates the reentry dispersion using ground based optical observation as a backup observation for radiometric observation. Several scenarios are calculated and compared for the reentry phase of the Hayabusa to evaluate the navigation accuracy of the ground-based observation. The optical observation doesn't require any active reaction from a spacecraft, thus these results show that optical observations could be a steady backup strategy even if a spacecraft had some trouble. We also evaluate the landing dispersion of the Hayabusa only with the optical observation.

  5. Ground-based walking training improves quality of life and exercise capacity in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, Sally L; Ng, L W Cindy; McKeough, Zoe J; Jenkins, Sue; Hill, Kylie; Eastwood, Peter R; Hillman, David R; Cecins, Nola; Spencer, Lissa M; Jenkins, Christine; Alison, Jennifer A

    2014-10-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of ground-based walking training on health-related quality of life and exercise capacity in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). People with COPD were randomised to either a walking group that received supervised, ground-based walking training two to three times a week for 8-10 weeks, or a control group that received usual medical care and did not participate in exercise training. 130 out of 143 participants (mean±sd age 69±8 years, forced expiratory volume in 1 s 43±15% predicted) completed the study. Compared to the control group, the walking group demonstrated greater improvements in the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire total score (mean difference -6 points (95% CI -10- -2), pimproves quality of life and endurance exercise capacity in people with COPD.

  6. Validation of Aura OMI by Aircraft and Ground-Based Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPeters, R. D.; Petropavlovskikh, I.; Kroon, M.

    2006-12-01

    Both aircraft-based and ground-based measurements have been used to validate ozone measurements by the OMI instrument on Aura. Three Aura Validation Experiment (AVE) flights have been conducted, in November 2004 and June 2005 with the NASA WB57, and in January/February 2005 with the NASA DC-8. On these flights, validation of OMI was primarily done using data from the CAFS (CCD Actinic Flux Spectroradiometer) instrument, which is used to measure total column ozone above the aircraft. These measurements are used to differentiate changes in stratospheric ozone from changes in total column ozone. Also, changes in ozone over high clouds measured by OMI were checked in a flight over tropical storm Arlene on a flight on June 11th. Ground-based measurements were made during the SAUNA campaign in Sodankyla, Finland, in March and April 2006. Both total column ozone and the ozone vertical distribution were validated.

  7. REMOTE SENSING OF WATER VAPOR CONTENT USING GROUND-BASED GPS DATA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Spatial and temporal resolution of water vapor content is useful in improving the accuracy of short-term weather prediction.Dense and continuously tracking regional GPS arrays will play an important role in remote sensing atmospheric water vapor content.In this study,a piecewise linear solution method was proposed to estimate the precipitable water vapor (PWV) content from ground-based GPS observations in Hong Kong.To evaluate the solution accuracy of the water vapor content sensed by GPS,the upper air sounding data (radiosonde) that are collected locally was used to calculate the precipitable water vapor during the same period.One-month results of PWV from both ground-based GPS sensing technique and radiosonde method are in agreement within 1~2 mm.This encouraging result will motivate the GPS meteorology application based on the establishment of a dense GPS array in Hong Kong.

  8. DEM extraction and its accuracy analysis with ground-based SAR interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, J.; Yue, J. P.; Li, L. H.

    2014-03-01

    Two altimetry models extracting DEM (Digital Elevation Model) with the GBSAR (Ground-Based Synthetic Aperture Radar) technology are studied and their accuracies are analyzed in detail. The approximate and improved altimetry models of GBSAR were derived from the spaceborne radar altimetry based on the principles of the GBSAR technology. The error caused by the parallel ray approximation in the approximate model was analyzed quantitatively, and the results show that the errors cannot be ignored for the ground-based radar system. For the improved altimetry model, the elevation error expression can be acquired by simulating and analyzing the error propagation coefficients of baseline length, wavelength, differential phase and range distance in the mathematical model. By analyzing the elevation error with the baseline and range distance, the results show that the improved altimetry model is suitable for high-precision DEM and the accuracy can be improved by adjusting baseline and shortening slant distance.

  9. The effect of photometric and geometric context on photometric and geometric lightness effects

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Thomas Y.; Brainard, David H

    2014-01-01

    We measured the lightness of probe tabs embedded at different orientations in various contextual images presented on a computer-controlled stereo display. Two background context planes met along a horizontal roof-like ridge. Each plane was a graphic rendering of a set of achromatic surfaces with the simulated illumination for each plane controlled independently. Photometric context was varied by changing the difference in simulated illumination intensity between the two background planes. Geo...

  10. Investigating the long-term evolution of subtropical ozone profiles applying ground-based FTIR spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    García, O.E.; Schneider, M; A. Redondas; Y. González; Hase, F.; Blumenstock, T.; Sepúlveda, E.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the long-term evolution of subtropical ozone profile time series (1999–2010) obtained from ground-based FTIR (Fourier Transform InfraRed) spectrometry at the Izaña Observatory ozone super-site. Different ozone retrieval strategies are examined, analysing the influence of an additional temperature retrieval and different constraints. The theoretical assessment reveals that the FTIR system is able to resolve four independent ozone layers with a precision of better than 6...

  11. Space Fence Ground-Based Radar System Increment 1 (Space Fence Inc 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-438 Space Fence Ground-Based Radar System Increment 1 (Space Fence Inc 1) As of FY 2017...11 Track to Budget 17 Cost and Funding 18 Low Rate Initial Production 23 Foreign Military Sales 24 Nuclear Costs 24 Unit Cost...Document CLIN - Contract Line Item Number CPD - Capability Production Document CY - Calendar Year DAB - Defense Acquisition Board DAE - Defense Acquisition

  12. NASA Requirements for Ground-Based Pressure Vessels and Pressurized Systems (PVS). Revision C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greulich, Owen Rudolf

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to ensure the structural integrity of PVS through implementation of a minimum set of requirements for ground-based PVS in accordance with this document, NASA Policy Directive (NPD) 8710.5, NASA Safety Policy for Pressure Vessels and Pressurized Systems, NASA Procedural Requirements (NPR) 8715.3, NASA General Safety Program Requirements, applicable Federal Regulations, and national consensus codes and standards (NCS).

  13. Comparison of NO2 vertical profiles from satellite and ground based measurements over Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni, Pavan; Bortoli, Daniele; Costa, Maria João; Silva, Ana Maria; Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Giovanelli, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    The Intercomparison of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) vertical profiles, derived from the satellite based HALogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) measurements and from the ground based UV-VIS spectrometer GASCOD (Gas Analyzer Spectrometer Correlating Optical Differences) observations at the Mario Zucchelli Station (MZS), in Antarctica, are done for the first time. It is shown here that both datasets are in good agreement showing the same features in terms of magnitude, profile structure, a...

  14. Predictions for the Rates of Compact Binary Coalescences Observable by Ground-based Gravitational-wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G; Allwine, E; Ceron, E Amador; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Antonucci, F; Aoudia, S; Arain, M A; Araya, M; Arun, K G; Aso, Y; Aston, S; Astone, P; Atkinson, D E; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barker, D; Barnum, S; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Bartlett, J; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Beker, M G; Belczynski, K; Benacquista, M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bigotta, S; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birindelli, S; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Blomberg, A; Boccara, C; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bork, R; Born, M; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Boyle, M; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Buckleitner, D; Budzyński, R; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Burmeister, O; Buskulic, D; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campagna, E; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chalermsongsak, T; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Clark, D; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R C; Corda, C; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coulon, J -P; Coward, D; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Culter, R M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dari, A; Das, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Davier, M; Davies, G; Davis, A; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Degallaix, J; del Prete, M; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Devanka, P; Dhurandhar, S; Di Cintio, A; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doomes, E E; Douglas, E S D; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Dueck, J; Dumas, J -C; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Faltas, Y; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Flasch, K; Foley, S; Forrest, C; Forsi, E; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garofoli, J A; Garufi, F; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gholami, I; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Goetz, E A; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hall, P; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E; Hoyland, D; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh--Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Jackson, B; Jaranowski, P; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kanner, J; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, H; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Krause, T; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kullman, J; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Landry, M; Lang, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Leong, J; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Li, J; Li, T G F; Lin, H; Lindquist, P E; Lockerbie, N A; Lodhia, D; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lu, P; Luan, J; Lubinski, M; Lucianetti, A; Lück, H; Lundgren, A; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mackowski, J M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Mak, C; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIvor, G; McKechan, D J A; Meadors, G; Mehmet, M; Meier, T; Melatos, A; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Menéndez, D F; Mercer, R A; Merill, L; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyer, M S; Miao, H; Michel, C; Milano, L; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mino, Y; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Mohan, M; Mohanty, S D; Mohapatra, S R P; Moraru, D; Moreau, J; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Morgia, A; Morioka, T; Mors, K; Mosca, S; Moscatelli, V; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; MowLowry, C; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Müller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P G; Nash, T; Nawrodt, R; Nelson, J; Neri, I; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Numata, K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Ogin, G H; Oldenburg, R G; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Page, A; Pagliaroli, G; Palladino, L; Palomba, C; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Papa, M A; Pardi, S; Pareja, M; Parisi, M; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Pekowsky, L; Penn, S; Peralta, C; Perreca, A; Persichetti, G; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pietka, M; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H J; Plissi, M V; Poggiani, R; Postiglione, F; Prato, M; Predoi, V; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Quetschke, V; Raab, F J; Rabaste, O; Rabeling, D S; Radke, T; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Rakhmanov, M; Rankins, B; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Re, V; Reed, C M; Reed, T; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ricci, F; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Roberts, P; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Rocchi, A; Roddy, S; Röver, C; Rogstad, S; Rolland, L; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Sakosky, M; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; de la Jordana, L Sancho; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Santamaría, L; Santostasi, G; Saraf, S; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Satterthwaite, M; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schulz, B; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D; Shafer, D; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Singer, A; Sintes, A M; Skelton, G; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, N D; Somiya, K; Sorazu, B; Speirits, F C; Stein, A J; Stein, L C; Steinlechner, S; Steplewski, S; Stochino, A; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Strigin, S; Stroeer, A; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sung, M; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, J R; Taylor, R; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Thüring, A; Titsler, C; Tokmakov, K V; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Torres, C; Torrie, C I; Tournefier, E; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Trummer, J; Tseng, K; Tucker, R S; Ugolini, D; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vaishnav, B; Vajente, G; Vallisneri, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; van der Putten, S; van der Sluys, M V; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vaulin, R; Vavoulidis, M; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Veltkamp, C; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Villar, A; Vinet, J -Y; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L; Wanner, A; Ward, R L; Was, M; Wei, P; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Wen, L; Wen, S; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D; Whiting, B F; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, L; Willke, B; Winkelmann, L; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yamamoto, K; Yeaton-Massey, D; Yoshida, S; Yu, P; Yvert, M; Zanolin, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Z; Zhao, C; Zimmermann, P J Z; Zotov, N; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J

    2010-01-01

    We present an up-to-date, comprehensive summary of the rates for all types of compact binary coalescence sources detectable by the Initial and Advanced versions of the ground-based gravitational-wave detectors LIGO and Virgo. Astrophysical estimates for compact-binary coalescence rates depend on a number of assumptions and unknown model parameters, and are still uncertain. The most confident among these estimates are the rate predictions for coalescing binary neutron stars which are based on extrapolations from observed binary pulsars in our Galaxy. These yield a likely coalescence rate of 100 per Myr per Milky Way Equivalent Galaxy (MWEG), although the rate could plausibly range from 1 per Myr per MWEG to 1000 per Myr per MWEG. We convert coalescence rates into detection rates based on data from the LIGO S5 and Virgo VSR2 science runs and projected sensitivities for our Advanced detectors. Using the detector sensitivities derived from these data, we find a likely detection rate of 0.02 per year for Initial L...

  15. The Application of a Vestoid-Derived Photometric Model to the Surface of (4) Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, M.; Buratti, B. J.; Li, J.; Denevi, B. W.; Nathues, A.; Reddy, V.; Schroeder, S.; Hoffmann, M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Filacchione, G.; Ammannito, E.; Capaccioni, F.; Duffard, R.; Zhao, H.; Rhoades, H.; Mayes, D.; Barajas, T.; Truong, T.; Foster, J.; Dawn Science Team

    2011-12-01

    In anticipation of the Dawn Mission to Vesta, we conducted a ground-based campaign of Bessel BVRI filter photometry of five V-type near-Earth asteroids over a wide range of solar phase angle. Our disk-integrated photometry gave us access to solar phase geometries not available to ground-based observers of (4) Vesta but will be experienced by the Dawn spacecraft throughout its approach and mapping phases. The majority of our observations were obtained at the JPL 0.6-m Table Mountain Observatory but multiple nights were also contributed by the Calar Alto 1.2-m and 2.2-m telescopes, as well as the Purple Mountain 1-m Schmidt. Restricting our data to the vestoids with low light-curve amplitude, our disk-integrated photometry allowed us to derive f(α), assuming a spherical body, expressed as a fourth-order polynomial plus an exponential term. By scaling with a relative reflectance spectrum, our model can be expanded to cover a wavelength range from the optical to the near-IR. Our model was further constrained by Dawn photometry of (4) Vesta generated from approach and orbit insertion optical navigation images, when the disk of (4) Vesta was less than the field-of-view of the camera. In this work, we will focus on the application of our vestoid-derived photometric model on calibrated disk-resolved Dawn Framing Camera (FC) filter images Dawn Visual and Infrared (VIR) spectral cubes of (4) Vesta obtained during the early stages of Dawn's mapping mission. We shall explore and validate our model across a wide range of surface albedo and terrain types. Deviations from our model will likely give clues towards variations in texture and surface scattering properties. This work was funded by NASA.

  16. First-generation Science Cases for Ground-based Terahertz Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Satoki; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Nakamura, Masanori; Asada, Keiichi; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Urata, Yuji; Wang, Ming-Jye; Wang, Wei-Hao; Takahashi, Satoko; Tang, Ya-Wen; Chang, Hsian-Hong; Huang, Kuiyun; Morata, Oscar; Otsuka, Masaaki; Lin, Kai-Yang; Tsai, An-Li; Lin, Yen-Ting; Srinivasan, Sundar; Martin-Cocher, Pierre; Pu, Hung-Yi; Kemper, Francisca; Patel, Nimesh; Grimes, Paul; Huang, Yau-De; Han, Chih-Chiang; Huang, Yen-Ru; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Lin, Lupin Chun-Che; Zhang, Qizhou; Keto, Eric; Burgos, Roberto; Chen, Ming-Tang; Inoue, Makoto; Ho, Paul T P

    2015-01-01

    Ground-based observations at terahertz (THz) frequencies are a newly explorable area of astronomy for the next ten years. We discuss science cases for a first-generation 10-m class THz telescope, focusing on the Greenland Telescope as an example of such a facility. We propose science cases and provide quantitative estimates for each case. The largest advantage of ground-based THz telescopes is their higher angular resolution (~ 4 arcsec for a 10-m dish), as compared to space or airborne THz telescopes. Thus, high-resolution mapping is an important scientific argument. In particular, we can isolate zones of interest for Galactic and extragalactic star-forming regions. The THz windows are suitable for observations of high-excitation CO lines and [N II] 205 um lines, which are scientifically relevant tracers of star formation and stellar feedback. Those lines are the brightest lines in the THz windows, so that they are suitable for the initiation of ground-based THz observations. THz polarization of star-forming...

  17. Interactive dynamic three-dimensional scene for the ground-based three-dimensional display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Peining; Sang, Xinzhu; Guo, Nan; Chen, Duo; Yan, Binbin; Wang, Kuiru; Dou, Wenhua; Xiao, Liquan

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) displays provides valuable tools for many fields, such as scientific experiment, education, information transmission, medical imaging and physical simulation. Ground based 360° 3D display with dynamic and controllable scene can find some special applications, such as design and construction of buildings, aeronautics, military sand table and so on. It can be utilized to evaluate and visualize the dynamic scene of the battlefield, surgical operation and the 3D canvas of art. In order to achieve the ground based 3D display, the public focus plane should be parallel to the camera's imaging planes, and optical axes should be offset to the center of public focus plane in both vertical and horizontal directions. Virtual cameras are used to display 3D dynamic scene with Unity 3D engine. Parameters of virtual cameras for capturing scene are designed and analyzed, and locations of virtual cameras are determined by the observer's eye positions in the observing space world. An interactive dynamic 3D scene for ground based 360° 3D display is demonstrated, which provides high-immersion 3D visualization.

  18. Limitation of Ground-based Estimates of Solar Irradiance Due to Atmospheric Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Guoyong; Cahalan, Robert F.; Holben, Brent N.

    2003-01-01

    The uncertainty in ground-based estimates of solar irradiance is quantitatively related to the temporal variability of the atmosphere's optical thickness. The upper and lower bounds of the accuracy of estimates using the Langley Plot technique are proportional to the standard deviation of aerosol optical thickness (approx. +/- 13 sigma(delta tau)). The estimates of spectral solar irradiance (SSI) in two Cimel sun photometer channels from the Mauna Loa site of AERONET are compared with satellite observations from SOLSTICE (Solar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment) on UARS (Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite) for almost two years of data. The true solar variations related to the 27-day solar rotation cycle observed from SOLSTICE are about 0.15% at the two sun photometer channels. The variability in ground-based estimates is statistically one order of magnitude larger. Even though about 30% of these estimates from all Level 2.0 Cimel data fall within the 0.4 to approx. 0.5% variation level, ground-based estimates are not able to capture the 27-day solar variation observed from SOLSTICE.

  19. Kepler and Ground-based Transits of the Exo-Neptune HAT-P-11b

    CERN Document Server

    Deming, Drake; Jackson, Brian; Peterson, Steven W; Agol, Eric; Knutson, Heather A; Jennings, Donald E; Haase, Flynn; Bays, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    We analyze 26 archival Kepler transits of the exo-Neptune HAT-P-11b, supplemented by ground-based transits observed in the blue (B-band) and near-IR (J-band). Both the planet and host star are smaller than previously believed; our analysis yields Rp=4.31 +/-0.06 Earth-radii, and Rs = 0.683 +/-0.009 solar radii, both about 3-sigma smaller than the discovery values. Our ground-based transit data at wavelengths bracketing the Kepler bandpass serve to check the wavelength dependence of stellar limb darkening, and the J-band transit provides a precise and independent constraint on the transit duration. Both the limb darkening and transit duration from our ground-based data are consistent with the new Kepler values for the system parameters. Our smaller radius for the planet implies that its gaseous envelope can be less extensive than previously believed, being very similar to the H-He envelope of GJ436b and Kepler-4b. HAT-P-11 is an active star, and signatures of star spot crossings are ubiquitous in the Kepler tr...

  20. Structure and evolution of Pluto's Atmosphere from ground-based stellar occultations between 2002 and 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, Erick; Sicardy, Bruno; Rio de Janeiro occultation team, Granada occultation team, International Occultation and Timing Association

    2016-10-01

    Ground-Based stellar occultations probe Pluto's atmosphere from about 3 km altitude (~ 10 μbar pressure level) up to 260 km altitude (~0.1 μbar). Our main goal is to derive Pluto's atmosphere evolution using thirteen ground-based occultations observed between 2002 and 2015 (plus 2016, if available). We consistently analyze the light curves using the Dias et al. (ApJ 811, 53, 2015) model, and confirm the general pressure increase by a factor of about 1.5 between 2002 and 2015 and a factor of almost three between 1988 and 2015. Implications for Pluto's seasonal evolution will be briefly discussed in the context of the New Horizons (NH) findings.Ground-based-derived temperature profiles will be compared with NH's results, where we use new temperature boundary conditions in our inversion procedures, as given by NH near 260 km altitude. Although the profiles reasonably agree, significant discrepancies are observed both in the deeper stratospheric zone (altitude topographic features revealed by NH.Finally, possible correlations between spike activity in the occultation light-curves and local underlying presence of free nitrogen ice terrains will be investigated.Part of the research leading to these results has received funding from the European Research Council under the European Community's H2020 (2014-2020/ ERC Grant Agreement n 669416 "LUCKY STAR").

  1. Flow Characteristics of Tidewater Glaciers in Greenland and Alaska using Ground-Based LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnegan, D. C.; Stearns, L. A.; Hamilton, G. S.; O'Neel, S.

    2010-12-01

    LiDAR scanning systems have been employed to characterize and quantify multi-temporal glacier and ice sheet changes for nearly three decades. Until recently, LiDAR scanning systems were limited to airborne and space-based platforms which come at a significant cost to deploy and are limited in spatial and temporal sampling capabilities necessary to compare with in-situ field measurements. Portable ground-based LiDAR scanning systems are now being used as a glaciological tool. We discuss research efforts to employ ground-based near-infrared LiDAR systems at two differing tidewater glacier systems in the spring of 2009; Helheim Glacier in southeast Greenland and Columbia Glacier in southeast Alaska. Preliminary results allow us to characterize short term displacement rates and detailed observations of calving processes. These results highlight the operational limitations and capabilities of commercially available LiDAR systems, and allow us to identify optimal operating characteristics for monitoring small to large-scale tidewater glaciers in near real-time. Furthermore, by identifying the operational limitations of these sensors it allows for optimal design characteristics of new sensors necessary to meet ground-based calibration and validation requirements of ongoing scientific missions.

  2. Phase-coherent mapping of gravitational-wave backgrounds using ground-based laser interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Joseph D; Cornish, Neil J; Gair, Jonathan; Mingarelli, Chiara M F; van Haasteren, Rutger

    2015-01-01

    We extend the formalisms developed in Gair et al. and Cornish and van Haasteren to create maps of gravitational-wave backgrounds using a network of ground-based laser interferometers. We show that in contrast to pulsar timing arrays, which are insensitive to half of the gravitational-wave sky (the curl modes), a network of ground-based interferometers is sensitive to both the gradient and curl components of the background. The spatial separation of a network of interferometers, or of a single interferometer at different times during its rotational and orbital motion around the Sun, allows for recovery of both components. We derive expressions for the response functions of a laser interferometer in the small-antenna limit, and use these expressions to calculate the overlap reduction function for a pair of interferometers. We also construct maximum-likelihood estimates of the + and x-polarization modes of the gravitational-wave sky in terms of the response matrix for a network of ground-based interferometers, e...

  3. A Ground-Based Array to Observe Geospace Electrodynamics During Adverse Space Weather Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, J. J.; Eccles, J. V.; Rice, D.

    2004-05-01

    Geomagnetic Storms occur with surprising frequency and create adverse space weather conditions. During these periods, our knowledge and ability to specify or forecast in adequate detail for user needs is negligible. Neither experimental observations nor theoretical developments have made a significant new impact on the problem for over two decades. Although we can now map Total Electron Content (TEC) in the ionosphere over a continent with sufficient resolution to see coherent long-lived structures, these do not provide constraints on the geospace electrodynamics that is at the heart of our lack of understanding. We present arguments for the need of a continental deployment of ground-based sensors to stepwise advance our understanding of the geospace electrodynamics when it is most adverse from a space weather perspective and also most frustrating from an understanding of Magnetosphere-Ionosphere coupling. That a continental-scale deployment is more productive at addressing the problem than a realizable global distribution is shown. Each measurement is discussed from the point-of-view of either providing new knowledge or becoming a key for future real-time specification and forecasting for user applications. An example of a storm database from one mid-latitude station for the 31 March 2002 is used as a conceptual point in a ground-based array. The presentation focuses on scientific questions that have eluded a quantitative solution for over three decades and view a ground-based array as an "IGY" type of catalyst for answering these questions.

  4. The CU Airborne MAX-DOAS instrument: ground based validation, and vertical profiling of aerosol extinction and trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baidar, S.; Oetjen, H.; Coburn, S.; Dix, B.; Ortega, I.; Sinreich, R.; Volkamer, R.

    2012-09-01

    The University of Colorado Airborne Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument uses solar stray light remote sensing to detect and quantify multiple trace gases, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2), glyoxal (CHOCHO), formaldehyde (HCHO), water vapor (H2O), nitrous acid (HONO), iodine monoxide (IO), bromine monoxide (BrO), and oxygen dimers (O4) at multiple wavelengths (360 nm, 477 nm, 577 nm and 632 nm) simultaneously, and sensitively in the open atmosphere. The instrument is unique, in that it presents the first systematic implementation of MAX-DOAS on research aircraft, i.e. (1) includes measurements of solar stray light photons from nadir, zenith, and multiple elevation angles forward and below the plane by the same spectrometer/detector system, and (2) features a motion compensation system that decouples the telescope field of view (FOV) from aircraft movements in real-time (CHOCHO, HCHO, and H2O mixing ratios and aerosol extinction coefficients, ɛ, at 477nm calculated from O4 measurements from a low approach at Brackett airfield inside the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB) are presented. These profiles contain ~ 12 degrees of freedom (DOF) over a 3.5 km altitude range, independent of signal-to-noise at which the trace gas is detected. The boundary layer NO2 concentration, and the integral aerosol extinction over height (aerosol optical depth, AOD) agrees well with nearby ground-based in-situ NO2 measurement, and AERONET station. The detection limits of NO2, CHOCHO, HCHO, ɛ360, ɛ477 from 30 s integration time spectra recorded forward of the plane are 5 ppt, 3 ppt, 100 ppt, 0.004 km-1, 0.002 km-1 in the free troposphere (FT), and 30 ppt, 16 ppt, 540 ppt, 0.012 km-1, 0.006 km-1 inside the boundary layer (BL), respectively. Mobile column observations of trace gases and aerosols are complimentary to in-situ observations, and help bridge the spatial scales probed by ground-based observations, satellites, and predicted by atmospheric

  5. Limits on the infrared photometric monitoring of brown dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Bailer-Jones, C A L

    2003-01-01

    Recent monitoring programs of ultra cool field M and L dwarfs (low mass stars or brown dwarfs) have uncovered low amplitude photometric I-band variations which may be associated with an inhomogeneous distribution of photospheric condensates. Further evidence hints that this distribution may evolve on very short timescales, specifically of order a rotation period or less. In an attempt to study this behaviour in more detail, we have carried out a pilot program to monitor three L dwarfs in the near infrared where these objects are significantly brighter than at shorter wavelengths. We present a robust data analysis method for improving the precision and reliability of infrared photometry. No significant variability was detected in either the J or Km bands in 2M1439 and SDSS1203 above a peak-to-peak amplitude of 0.04 mag (0.08 mag for 2M1112). The main limiting factor in achieving lower detection limits is suspected to be second order extinction effects in the Earth's atmosphere, on account of the very different...

  6. Further Studies of Forest Structure Parameter Retrievals Using the Echidna® Ground-Based Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahler, A. H.; Yao, T.; Zhao, F.; Yang, X.; Schaaf, C.; Wang, Z.; Li, Z.; Woodcock, C. E.; Culvenor, D.; Jupp, D.; Newnham, G.; Lovell, J.

    2012-12-01

    Ongoing work with the Echidna® Validation Instrument (EVI), a full-waveform, ground-based scanning lidar (1064 nm) developed by Australia's CSIRO and deployed by Boston University in California conifers (2008) and New England hardwood and softwood (conifer) stands (2007, 2009, 2010), confirms the importance of slope correction in forest structural parameter retrieval; detects growth and disturbance over periods of 2-3 years; provides a new way to measure the between-crown clumping factor in leaf area index retrieval using lidar range; and retrieves foliage profiles with more lower-canopy detail than a large-footprint aircraft scanner (LVIS), while simulating LVIS foliage profiles accurately from a nadir viewpoint using a 3-D point cloud. Slope correction is important for accurate retrieval of forest canopy structural parameters, such as mean diameter at breast height (DBH), stem count density, basal area, and above-ground biomass. Topographic slope can induce errors in parameter retrievals because the horizontal plane of the instrument scan, which is used to identify, measure, and count tree trunks, will intersect trunks below breast height in the uphill direction and above breast height in the downhill direction. A test of three methods at southern Sierra Nevada conifer sites improved the range of correlations of these EVI-retrieved parameters with field measurements from 0.53-0.68 to 0.85-0.93 for the best method. EVI scans can detect change, including both growth and disturbance, in periods of two to three years. We revisited three New England forest sites scanned in 2007-2009 or 2007-2010. A shelterwood stand at the Howland Experimental Forest, Howland, Maine, showed increased mean DBH, above-ground biomass and leaf area index between 2007 and 2009. Two stands at the Harvard Forest, Petersham, Massachusetts, suffered reduced leaf area index and reduced stem count density as the result of an ice storm that damaged the stands. At one stand, broken tops were

  7. Comparison of Thermal Structure Results from Venus Express and Ground Based Observations since Vira

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Sanjay

    2016-07-01

    An international team was formed in 2013 through the International Space Studies Institute (Bern, Switzerland) to compare recent results of the Venus atmospheric thermal structure from spacecraft and ground based observations made since the Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA) was developed (Kliore et al., 1985, Keating et al., 1985). Five experiments on European Space Agency's Venus Express orbiter mission have yielded results on the atmospheric structure during is operational life (April 2006 - November 2014). Three of these were from occultation methods: at near infrared wavelengths from solar occultations, (SOIR, 70 - 170 km), at ultraviolet wavelengths from stellar occultations (SPICAV, 90-140 km), and occultation of the VEx-Earth radio signal (VeRa, 40-90 km). In-situ drag measurements from three different techniques (accelerometry, torque, and radio tracking, 130 - 200 km) were also obtained using the spacecraft itself while passive infrared remote sensing was used by the VIRTIS experiment (70 - 120 km). The only new data in the -40-70 km altitude range are from radio occultation, as no new profiles of the deep atmosphere have been obtained since the VeGa 2 lander measurements in 1985 (not included in VIRA). Some selected ground based results available to the team were also considered by team in the inter comparisons. The temperature structure in the lower thermosphere from disk resolved ground based observations (except for one ground based investigation), is generally consistent with the Venus Express results. These experiments sampled at different periods, at different locations and at different local times and have different vertical and horizontal resolution and coverage. The data were therefore binned in latitude and local time bins and compared, ignoring temporal variations over the life time of the Venus Express mission and assumed north-south symmetry. Alternating warm and cooler layers are present in the 120-160 altitude range in results

  8. THE APPARATUS FOR ALIGNMENT OF THE PHOTOMETRIC LAMP FILAMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Dlugunovich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During photometric measurements involving the use of photometric lamps it is necessary that the filament of lamp takes a strictly predetermined position with respect to the photodetector and the optical axis of the photometric setup. The errors in positioning of alignment filament with respect to the optical axis of the measuring system lead to increase the uncertainty of measurement of the photometric characteristics of the light sources. A typical method for alignment of filament of photometric lamps is based on the use a diopter tubes (telescopes. Using this method, the mounting of filament to the required position is carried out by successive approximations, which requires special concentration and a lot of time. The aim of this work is to develop an apparatus for alignment which allows simultaneous alignment of the filament of lamps in two mutually perpendicular planes. The method and apparatus for alignment of the photometric lamp filament during measurements of the photometric characteristics of light sources based on two digital video cameras is described in this paper. The apparatus allows to simultaneously displaying the image of lamps filament on the computer screen in two mutually perpendicular planes. The apparatus eliminates a large number of functional units requiring elementwise alignment and reduces the time required to carry out the alignment. The apparatus also provides the imaging of lamps filament with opaque coated on the bulb. The apparatus is used at the National standard of light intensity and illuminance units of the Republic of Belarus. 

  9. A Highly Sensitive Multicommuted Flow Analysis Procedure for Photometric Determination of Molybdenum in Plant Materials without a Solvent Extraction Step

    OpenAIRE

    Felisberto G. Santos; Boaventura F. Reis

    2017-01-01

    A highly sensitive analytical procedure for photometric determination of molybdenum in plant materials was developed and validated. This procedure is based on the reaction of Mo(V) with thiocyanate ions (SCN−) in acidic medium to form a compound that can be monitored at 474 nm and was implemented employing a multicommuted flow analysis setup. Photometric detection was performed using an LED-based photometer coupled to a flow cell with a long optical path length (200 mm) to achieve high sensit...

  10. Photometric normalization of LROC WAC images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, H.; Denevi, B.; Robinson, M. S.; Hapke, B. W.; McEwen, A. S.; LROC Science Team

    2010-12-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) acquires near global coverage on a monthly basis. The WAC is a push frame sensor with a 90° field of view (FOV) in BW mode and 60° FOV in 7-color mode (320 nm to 689 nm). WAC images are acquired during each orbit in 10° latitude segments with cross track coverage of ~50 km. Before mosaicking, WAC images are radiometrically calibrated to remove instrumental artifacts and to convert at sensor radiance to I/F. Images are also photometrically normalized to common viewing and illumination angles (30° phase), a challenge due to the wide angle nature of the WAC where large differences in phase angle are observed in a single image line (±30°). During a single month the equatorial incidence angle drifts about 28° and over the course of ~1 year the lighting completes a 360° cycle. The light scattering properties of the lunar surface depend on incidence(i), emission(e), and phase(p) angles as well as soil properties such as single-scattering albedo and roughness that vary with terrain type and state of maturity [1]. We first tested a Lommel-Seeliger Correction (LSC) [cos(i)/(cos(i) + cos(e))] [2] with a phase function defined by an exponential decay plus 4th order polynomial term [3] which did not provide an adequate solution. Next we employed a LSC with an exponential 2nd order decay phase correction that was an improvement, but still exhibited unacceptable frame-to-frame residuals. In both cases we fitted the LSC I/F vs. phase angle to derive the phase corrections. To date, the best results are with a lunar-lambert function [4] with exponential 2nd order decay phase correction (LLEXP2) [(A1exp(B1p)+A2exp(B2p)+A3) * cos(i)/(cos(e) + cos(i)) + B3cos(i)]. We derived the parameters for the LLEXP2 from repeat imaging of a small region and then corrected that region with excellent results. When this correction was applied to the whole Moon the results were less than optimal - no surprise given the

  11. Ground-based microwave weather radar observations and retrievals during the 2014 Holuhraun eruption (Bárðarbunga, Iceland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mereu, Luigi; Silvio Marzano, Frank; Barsotti, Sara; Montopoli, Mario; Yeo, Richard; Arngrimsson, Hermann; Björnsson, Halldór; Bonadonna, Costanza

    2015-04-01

    During an eruptive event the real-time forecasting of ash dispersal into the atmosphere is a key factor to prevent air traffic disasters. The ash plume is extremely hazardous to aircraft that inadvertently may fly through it. Real-time monitoring of such phenomena is crucial, particularly to obtain specific data for the initialization of eruption and dispersion models in terms of source parameters. The latter, such as plume height, ash concentration, mass flow rate and size spectra, are usually very difficult to measure or to estimate with a relatively good accuracy. Over the last years different techniques have been developed to improved ash plume detection and retrieval. Satellite-based observations, using multi-frequency visible and infrared radiometers, are usually exploited for monitoring and measuring dispersed ash clouds. The observations from geostationary orbit suffer from a relatively poor spatial resolution, whereas the low orbit level has a relatively poor temporal resolution. Moreover, the field-of-view of infrared radiometric measurements may be reduced by obstructions caused by water and ice clouds lying between the ground and the sensor's antenna. Weather radar-based observations represent an emerging technique to detect and, to a certain extent, mitigate the hazard from the ash plumes. Ground-based microwave scanning radar systems can provide the three-dimensional information about the detected ash volume with a fairly high spatial resolution every few minutes and in all weather conditions. Methodological studies have recently investigated the possibility of using single-polarization and dual-polarization ground-based radar for the remote sensing of volcanic ash cloud. In this respect, radar observations can be complementary to satellite observations. A microphysical electromagnetic characterization of volcanic ash was carried out in terms of dielectric properties, composition, size and orientation of ash particles. An extended Volcanic Ash Radar

  12. The CU Airborne MAX-DOAS instrument: ground based validation, and vertical profiling of aerosol extinction and trace gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Baidar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The University of Colorado Airborne Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS instrument uses solar stray light remote sensing to detect and quantify multiple trace gases, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2, glyoxal (CHOCHO, formaldehyde (HCHO, water vapor (H2O, nitrous acid (HONO, iodine monoxide (IO, bromine monoxide (BrO, and oxygen dimers (O4 at multiple wavelengths (360 nm, 477 nm, 577 nm and 632 nm simultaneously, and sensitively in the open atmosphere. The instrument is unique, in that it presents the first systematic implementation of MAX-DOAS on research aircraft, i.e. (1 includes measurements of solar stray light photons from nadir, zenith, and multiple elevation angles forward and below the plane by the same spectrometer/detector system, and (2 features a motion compensation system that decouples the telescope field of view (FOV from aircraft movements in real-time (< 0.35° accuracy. Sets of solar stray light spectra collected from nadir to zenith scans provide some vertical profile information within 2 km above and below the aircraft altitude, and the vertical column density (VCD below the aircraft is measured in nadir view. Maximum information about vertical profiles is derived simultaneously for trace gas concentrations and aerosol extinction coefficients over similar spatial scales and with a vertical resolution of typically 250 m during aircraft ascent/descent.

    The instrument is described, and data from flights over California during the CalNex and CARES air quality field campaigns is presented. Horizontal distributions of NO2 VCDs (below the aircraft maps are sampled with typically 1 km resolution, and show good agreement with two ground based CU MAX-DOAS instruments (slope 0.95 ± 0.09, R2 = 0.86. As a case study vertical profiles of NO2, CHOCHO, HCHO, and H2O mixing ratios and aerosol extinction coefficients

  13. Remote Sensing of Sonoran Desert Vegetation Structure and Phenology with Ground-Based LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel B. Sankey

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Long-term vegetation monitoring efforts have become increasingly important for understanding ecosystem response to global change. Many traditional methods for monitoring can be infrequent and limited in scope. Ground-based LiDAR is one remote sensing method that offers a clear advancement to monitor vegetation dynamics at high spatial and temporal resolution. We determined the effectiveness of LiDAR to detect intra-annual variability in vegetation structure at a long-term Sonoran Desert monitoring plot dominated by cacti, deciduous and evergreen shrubs. Monthly repeat LiDAR scans of perennial plant canopies over the course of one year had high precision. LiDAR measurements of canopy height and area were accurate with respect to total station survey measurements of individual plants. We found an increase in the number of LiDAR vegetation returns following the wet North American Monsoon season. This intra-annual variability in vegetation structure detected by LiDAR was attributable to a drought deciduous shrub Ambrosia deltoidea, whereas the evergreen shrub Larrea tridentata and cactus Opuntia engelmannii had low variability. Benefits of using LiDAR over traditional methods to census desert plants are more rapid, consistent, and cost-effective data acquisition in a high-resolution, 3-dimensional context. We conclude that repeat LiDAR measurements can be an effective method for documenting ecosystem response to desert climatology and drought over short time intervals and at detailed-local spatial scale.

  14. Photometric Redshift Estimation on SDSS Data Using Random Forests

    CERN Document Server

    Carliles, Samuel; Heinis, Sebastien; Priebe, Carey; Szalay, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Given multiband photometric data from the SDSS DR6, we estimate galaxy redshifts. We employ a Random Forest trained on color features and spectroscopic redshifts from 80,000 randomly chosen primary galaxies yielding a mapping from color to redshift such that the dif