WorldWideScience

Sample records for ground-based millimeterwave radiometry

  1. A Three-Frequency Feed for Millimeter-Wave Radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Daniel J.; Khayatian, Behrouz; Sosnowski, John B.; Johnson, Alan K.; Bruneau, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    A three-frequency millimeter-wave feed horn was developed as part of an advanced component technology task that provides components necessary for higher-frequency radiometers to meet the needs of the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission. The primary objectives of SWOT are to characterize ocean sub-mesoscale processes on 10-km and larger scales in the global oceans, and to measure the global water storage in inland surface water bodies, including rivers, lakes, reservoirs, and wetlands. In this innovation, the feed provides three separate output ports in the 87-to- 97-GHz, 125-to-135-GHz, and 161-to-183- GHz bands; WR10 for the 90-GHz channel, WR8 for the 130-GHz channel, and WR5 for the 170-GHz channel. These ports are in turn connected to individual radiometer channels that will also demonstrate component technology including new PIN-diode switches and noise diodes for internal calibration integrated into each radiometer front end. For this application, a prime focus feed is required with an edge taper of approximately 20 dB at an illumination angle of 40 deg. A single polarization is provided in each band. Preliminary requirements called for a return loss of better than 15 dB, which is achieved across all three bands. Good pattern symmetry is also obtained throughout all three-frequency bands. This three-frequency broadband millimeter-wave feed also minimizes mass and provides a common focal point for all three millimeter-wave bands.

  2. Operational profiling of temperature using ground-based microwave radiometry at Payerne: prospects and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Löhnert

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The motivation of this study is to verify theoretical expectations placed on ground-based microwave radiometer (MWR techniques and to confirm whether they are suitable for supporting key missions of national weather services, such as timely and accurate weather advisories and warnings. We evaluate reliability and accuracy of atmospheric temperature profiles retrieved continuously by the microwave profiler system HATPRO (Humidity And Temperature PROfiler operated at the aerological station of Payerne (MeteoSwiss in the time period August 2006–December 2009. Assessment is performed by comparing temperatures from the radiometer against temperature measurements from a radiosonde accounting for a total of 2107 quality-controlled all-season cases.

    In the evaluated time period, the MWR delivered reliable temperature profiles in 86% of all-weather conditions on a temporal resolution of 12–13 min. Random differences between MWR and radiosonde are down to 0.5 K in the lower boundary layer and increase to 1.7 K at 4 km height. The differences observed between MWR and radiosonde in the lower boundary layer are similar to the differences observed between the radiosonde and another in-situ sensor located on a close-by 30 m tower. Temperature retrievals from above 4 km contain less than 5% of the total information content of the measurements, which makes clear that this technique is mainly suited for continuous observations in the boundary layer. Systematic temperature differences are also observed throughout the retrieved profile and can account for up to ±0.5 K. These errors are due to offsets in the measurements of the microwave radiances that have been corrected for in data post-processing and lead to nearly bias-free overall temperature retrievals. Different reasons for the radiance offsets are discussed, but cannot be unambiguously determined retrospectively. Monitoring and, if necessary, corrections for radiance offsets as well as a real

  3. Thin ice clouds in the Arctic: cloud optical depth and particle size retrieved from ground-based thermal infrared radiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Blanchard

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiband downwelling thermal measurements of zenith sky radiance, along with cloud boundary heights, were used in a retrieval algorithm to estimate cloud optical depth and effective particle diameter of thin ice clouds in the Canadian High Arctic. Ground-based thermal infrared (IR radiances for 150 semitransparent ice clouds cases were acquired at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL in Eureka, Nunavut, Canada (80° N, 86° W. We analyzed and quantified the sensitivity of downwelling thermal radiance to several cloud parameters including optical depth, effective particle diameter and shape, water vapor content, cloud geometric thickness and cloud base altitude. A lookup table retrieval method was used to successfully extract, through an optimal estimation method, cloud optical depth up to a maximum value of 2.6 and to separate thin ice clouds into two classes: (1 TIC1 clouds characterized by small crystals (effective particle diameter  ≤  30 µm, and (2 TIC2 clouds characterized by large ice crystals (effective particle diameter  >  30 µm. The retrieval technique was validated using data from the Arctic High Spectral Resolution Lidar (AHSRL and Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR. Inversions were performed over three polar winters and results showed a significant correlation (R2 =  0.95 for cloud optical depth retrievals and an overall accuracy of 83 % for the classification of TIC1 and TIC2 clouds. A partial validation relative to an algorithm based on high spectral resolution downwelling IR radiance measurements between 8 and 21 µm was also performed. It confirms the robustness of the optical depth retrieval and the fact that the broadband thermal radiometer retrieval was sensitive to small particle (TIC1 sizes.

  4. Accuracy of retrieving temperature and humidity profiles by ground-based microwave radiometry in truly complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaro, G.; Stiperski, I.; Pospichal, B.; Rotach, M. W.

    2015-08-01

    Within the Innsbruck Box project, a ground-based microwave radiometer (RPG-HATPRO) was operated in the Inn Valley (Austria), in very complex terrain, between September 2012 and May 2013 to obtain temperature and humidity vertical profiles of the full troposphere with a specific focus on the valley boundary layer. In order to assess its performance in a deep alpine valley, the profiles obtained by the radiometer with different retrieval algorithms based on different climatologies are compared to local radiosonde data. A retrieval that is improved with respect to the one provided by the manufacturer, based on better resolved data, shows a significantly smaller root mean square error (RMSE), both for the temperature and humidity profiles. The improvement is particularly substantial at the heights close to the mountaintop level and in the upper troposphere. Lower-level inversions, common in an alpine valley, are resolved to a satisfactory degree. On the other hand, upper-level inversions (above 1200 m) still pose a significant challenge for retrieval. For this purpose, specialized retrieval algorithms were developed by classifying the radiosonde climatologies into specialized categories according to different criteria (seasons, daytime, nighttime) and using additional regressors (e.g., measurements from mountain stations). The training and testing on the radiosonde data for these specialized categories suggests that a classification of profiles that reproduces meaningful physical characteristics can yield improved targeted specialized retrievals. A novel and very promising method of improving the profile retrieval in a mountainous region is adding further information in the retrieval, such as the surface temperature at fixed levels along a topographic slope or from nearby mountaintops.

  5. The ground based plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The paper presents a report of ''The Ground Based Plan'' of the United Kingdom Science and Engineering Research Council. The ground based plan is a plan for research in astronomy and planetary science by ground based techniques. The contents of the report contains a description of:- the scientific objectives and technical requirements (the basis for the Plan), the present organisation and funding for the ground based programme, the Plan, the main scientific features and the further objectives of the Plan. (U.K.)

  6. Millimeter-Wave Thermal Analysis Development and Application to GEN IV Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wosko, Paul; Sundram, S. K.

    2012-10-16

    New millimeter-wave thermal analysis instrumentation has been developed and studied for characterization of materials required for diverse fuel and structural needs in high temperature reactor environments such as the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). A two-receiver 137 GHz system with orthogonal polarizations for anisotropic resolution of material properties has been implemented at MIT. The system was tested with graphite and silicon carbide specimens at temperatures up to 1300 ºC inside an electric furnace. The analytic and hardware basis for active millimeter-wave radiometry of reactor materials at high temperature has been established. Real-time, non contact measurement sensitivity to anisotropic surface emissivity and submillimeter surface displacement was demonstrated. The 137 GHz emissivity of reactor grade graphite (NBG17) from SGL Group was found to be low, ~ 5 %, in the 500 – 1200 °C range and increases by a factor of 2 to 4 with small linear grooves simulating fracturing. The low graphite emissivity would make millimeter-wave active radiometry a sensitive diagnostic of graphite changes due to environmentally induced stress fracturing, swelling, or corrosion. The silicon carbide tested from Ortek, Inc. was found to have a much higher emissivity at 137 GHz of ~90% Thin coatings of silicon carbide on reactor grade graphite supplied by SGL Group were found to be mostly transparent to millimeter-waves, increasing the 137 GHz emissivity of the coated reactor grade graphite to about ~14% at 1250 ºC.

  7. Photothermal Radiometry for Skin Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry Xiao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Photothermal radiometry is an infrared remote sensing technique that has been used for skin and skin appendages research, in the areas of skin hydration, hydration gradient, skin hydration depth profiling, skin thickness measurements, skin pigmentation measurements, effect of topically applied substances, transdermal drug delivery, moisture content of bio-materials, membrane permeation, and nail and hair measurements. Compared with other technologies, photothermal radiometry has the advantages of non-contact, non-destructive, quick to make a measurement (a few seconds, and being spectroscopic in nature. It is also colour blind, and can work on any arbitrary sample surfaces. It has a unique depth profiling capability on a sample surface (typically the top 20 µm, which makes it particularly suitable for skin measurements. In this paper, we present a review of the photothermal radiometry work carried out in our research group. We will first introduce the theoretical background, then illustrate its applications with experimental results.

  8. Multibaseline gravitational wave radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talukder, Dipongkar; Bose, Sukanta; Mitra, Sanjit

    2011-01-01

    We present a statistic for the detection of stochastic gravitational wave backgrounds (SGWBs) using radiometry with a network of multiple baselines. We also quantitatively compare the sensitivities of existing baselines and their network to SGWBs. We assess how the measurement accuracy of signal parameters, e.g., the sky position of a localized source, can improve when using a network of baselines, as compared to any of the single participating baselines. The search statistic itself is derived from the likelihood ratio of the cross correlation of the data across all possible baselines in a detector network and is optimal in Gaussian noise. Specifically, it is the likelihood ratio maximized over the strength of the SGWB and is called the maximized-likelihood ratio (MLR). One of the main advantages of using the MLR over past search strategies for inferring the presence or absence of a signal is that the former does not require the deconvolution of the cross correlation statistic. Therefore, it does not suffer from errors inherent to the deconvolution procedure and is especially useful for detecting weak sources. In the limit of a single baseline, it reduces to the detection statistic studied by Ballmer [Classical Quantum Gravity 23, S179 (2006).] and Mitra et al.[Phys. Rev. D 77, 042002 (2008).]. Unlike past studies, here the MLR statistic enables us to compare quantitatively the performances of a variety of baselines searching for a SGWB signal in (simulated) data. Although we use simulated noise and SGWB signals for making these comparisons, our method can be straightforwardly applied on real data.

  9. Microwave Radiometry in Remote Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmandsen, Preben

    1982-01-01

    Microwave radiometry has shown its capabilities of observing and monitoring large-scale geophysical observables from space. Examples are sea surface temperature and surface wind over the ocean, sea ice extent, concentration and category and snow cover extent and water content. At low microwave fr...

  10. Phase-space representation of electromagnetic radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaneda, Roman

    2009-01-01

    The phase-space representation of electromagnetic radiometry is founded on the electromagnetic generalized radiance tensors, which allow overcoming the limitations due to the scalar electromagnetic generalized radiances. The fundamental quantities of both scalar generalized radiometry and classical radiometry or photometry become particular cases. The transport of measurable radiometric quantities by the electromagnetic field is described in terms of the propagation of the contributions from individual radiators and their redistribution over each wavefront on propagation. A physical meaning is given to the negative values of the generalized radiance, which gives new insights into Poynting's theory of energy transport.

  11. Microwave Radiometry and Radiometers for Ocean Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    2008-01-01

    aperture radiometer technique, both yielding imaging capability without scanning. Typical applications of microwave radiometry concerning oceans are: sea salinity, sea surface temperature, wind speed and direction, sea ice detection and classification. However, in an attempt to measure properties...

  12. Millimeter-wave antennas configurations and applications

    CERN Document Server

    du Preez, Jaco

    2016-01-01

    This book comprehensively reviews the state of the art in millimeter-wave antennas, traces important recent developments and provides information on a wide range of antenna configurations and applications. While fundamental theoretical aspects are discussed whenever necessary, the book primarily focuses on design principles and concepts, manufacture, measurement techniques, and practical results. Each of the various antenna types scalable to millimeter-wave dimensions is considered individually, with coverage of leaky-wave and surface-wave antennas, printed antennas, integrated antennas, and reflector and lens systems. The final two chapters address the subject from a systems perspective, providing an overview of supporting circuitry and examining in detail diverse millimeter-wave applications, including high-speed wireless communications, radio astronomy, and radar. The vast amount of information now available on millimeter-wave systems can be daunting for researchers and designers entering the field. This b...

  13. Millimeter-wave power amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    du Preez, Jaco

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a detailed review of millimeter-wave power amplifiers, discussing design issues and performance limitations commonly encountered in light of the latest research. Power amplifiers, which are able to provide high levels of output power and linearity while being easily integrated with surrounding circuitry, are a crucial component in wireless microwave systems. The book is divided into three parts, the first of which introduces readers to mm-wave wireless systems and power amplifiers. In turn, the second focuses on design principles and EDA concepts, while the third discusses future trends in power amplifier research. The book provides essential information on mm-wave power amplifier theory, as well as the implementation options and technologies involved in their effective design, equipping researchers, circuit designers and practicing engineers to design, model, analyze, test and implement high-performance, spectrally clean and energy-efficient mm-wave systems.

  14. RFI Risk Reduction Activities Using New Goddard Digital Radiometry Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Damon; Kim, Ed; Young, Peter; Miles, Lynn; Wong, Mark; Morris, Joel

    2012-01-01

    The Goddard Radio-Frequency Explorer (GREX) is the latest fast-sampling radiometer digital back-end processor that will be used for radiometry and radio-frequency interference (RFI) surveying at Goddard Space Flight Center. The system is compact and deployable, with a mass of about 40 kilograms. It is intended to be flown on aircraft. GREX is compatible with almost any aircraft, including P-3, twin otter, C-23, C-130, G3, and G5 types. At a minimum, the system can function as a clone of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) ground-based development unit [1], or can be a completely independent system that is interfaced to any radiometer, provided that frequency shifting to GREX's intermediate frequency is performed prior to sampling. If the radiometer RF is less than 200MHz, then the band can be sampled and acquired directly by the system. A key feature of GREX is its ability to simultaneously sample two polarization channels simultaneously at up to 400MSPS, 14-bit resolution each. The sampled signals can be recorded continuously to a 23 TB solid-state RAID storage array. Data captures can be analyzed offline using the supercomputing facilities at Goddard Space Flight Center. In addition, various Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) - amenable radiometer signal processing and RFI detection algorithms can be implemented directly on the GREX system because it includes a high-capacity Xilinx Virtex-5 FPGA prototyping system that is user customizable.

  15. Ground-based observations of exoplanet atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ernst Johan Walter de

    2011-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the properties of exoplanet atmospheres. The results for ground-based near-infrared secondary eclipse observations of three different exoplanets, TrES-3b, HAT-P-1b and WASP-33b, are presented which have been obtained with ground-based telescopes as part of the GROUSE project.

  16. Chlorine oxide in the stratospheric ozone layer: ground-based detection and measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, A; DE Zafra, R L; Solomon, P M; Barrett, J W; Carlson, E R

    1981-03-13

    Stratospheric chlorine oxide, a significant intermediate product in the catalytic destruction of ozone by atomic chlorine, has been detected and measured by a ground-based 204-gigahertz, millimeter-wave receiver. Data taken at latitude 42 degrees N on 17 days between 10 January and 18 February 1980 yield an average chlorine oxide column density of approximately 1.05 x 10(14) per square centimeter or approximately 2/3 that of the average of eight in situ balloon flight measurements (excluding the anomalously high data of 14 July 1977) made over the past 4 years at 32 degrees N. We find less chlorine oxide below 35 kilometers and a larger vertical gradient than predicted by theoretical models of the stratospheric ozone layer.

  17. Chlorine oxide in the stratospheric ozone layer Ground-based detection and measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, A.; De Zafra, R. L.; Solomon, P. M.; Barrett, J. W.; Carlson, E. R.

    1981-01-01

    Stratospheric chlorine oxide, a significant intermediate product in the catalytic destruction of ozone by atomic chlorine, has been detected and measured by a ground-based 204 GHz, millimeter-wave receiver. Data taken at latitude 42 deg N on 17 days between January 10 and February 18, 1980 yield an average chlorine oxide column density of approximately 1.05 x 10 to the 14th/sq cm or approximately 2/3 that of the average of eight in situ balloon flight measurements (excluding the anomalously high data of July 14, 1977) made over the past four years at 32 deg N. Less chlorine oxide below 35 km and a larger vertical gradient than predicted by theoretical models of the stratospheric ozone layer are found.

  18. High-efficiency non-uniformity correction for wide dynamic linear infrared radiometry system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhou; Yu, Yi; Tian, Qi-Jie; Chang, Song-Tao; He, Feng-Yun; Yin, Yan-He; Qiao, Yan-Feng

    2017-09-01

    Several different integration times are always set for a wide dynamic linear and continuous variable integration time infrared radiometry system, therefore, traditional calibration-based non-uniformity correction (NUC) are usually conducted one by one, and furthermore, several calibration sources required, consequently makes calibration and process of NUC time-consuming. In this paper, the difference of NUC coefficients between different integration times have been discussed, and then a novel NUC method called high-efficiency NUC, which combines the traditional calibration-based non-uniformity correction, has been proposed. It obtains the correction coefficients of all integration times in whole linear dynamic rangesonly by recording three different images of a standard blackbody. Firstly, mathematical procedure of the proposed non-uniformity correction method is validated and then its performance is demonstrated by a 400 mm diameter ground-based infrared radiometry system. Experimental results show that the mean value of Normalized Root Mean Square (NRMS) is reduced from 3.78% to 0.24% by the proposed method. In addition, the results at 4 ms and 70 °C prove that this method has a higher accuracy compared with traditional calibration-based NUC. In the meantime, at other integration time and temperature there is still a good correction effect. Moreover, it greatly reduces the number of correction time and temperature sampling point, and is characterized by good real-time performance and suitable for field measurement.

  19. Observing Lava Flows with Spaceborne Microwave Radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, R. D.

    2017-12-01

    The interpretation of infrared observations of lava flows is well-established, both on Earth and Io, to establish flow areas and temperatures, and thereby constrain eruption rates. However, the detection of such radiation from space requires lava temperatures that are high enough to be incandescent, and a relatively clear atmosphere. The former condition is met only for a short period after eruption as the top millimeters of lava cool quickly. The latter condition may fail due to ash or water clouds on Earth, or the persistent thick clouds on Venus. Microwave radiometry, which in principle probes to depths of centimeters to decimeters, offers the prospect of detecting older flows. It furthermore is minimally sensitive to cloud.The challenge, however, is that spaceborne microwave instruments have relatively large footprints (sometimes 100km) such that the emission from relatively small flows is heavily diluted and therefore difficult to detect. Here we describe models of microwave remote sensing of recent volcanics on Earth, Venus and Titan, and present some preliminary observational studies of terrestrial volcanoes with the SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) radiometer. This spacecraft has a large antenna to yield a relatively narrow observation footprint, and a long wavelength to penetrate into volcanic rock, and thus offers the best prospects yet for volcano surveillance in microwave radiometry.

  20. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement unce...

  1. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement unce...

  2. Fuel element radiometry system for quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, Sadhana; Gaur, Swati; Sridhar, Padmini; Mukhopadhyay, P.K.; Vaidya, P.R.; Das, Sanjoy; Sinha, A.K.; Bhatt, Sameer

    2010-01-01

    An indigenous and fully automatic PC based radiometry system has been designed and developed. The system required a vibration free scanning with various automated sequential movements to scan the fuel pin of size 5.8 mm (OD) x 1055 mm (L) along its full length. A mechanical system with these requirements and precision controls has been designed. The system consists of a tightly coupled and collimated radiation source-detector unit and data acquisition and control system. It supports PLC based control electronics to control and monitor the movement of fuel element, nuclear data acquisition and analysis system and feedback system to the mechanical scanner to physically accept or reject the fuel pin based on the decision derived by the software algorithms. (author)

  3. Perspectives in radiocarbon dating by radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polach, H.A.

    1987-01-01

    Opportunities for individual contributions to the technology of radiocarbon dating over the past 40 years have been large. Meaningful developments are traced in this review of C-14 dating by gas proportional (GP) and liquid scintillation (LS) spectrometry. The performance of characteristic as well as state of the art GP and LS systems is tabulated and their merit for low-level counting of C-14 is evaluated. Future developments in radiometry will lie in the updating of existing systems to incorporate new technologies and the refinement of resolution and identification of extreme low-level signals. Parallel development with AMS, sharing on merit the ever widening applied C-14 research field, and enhanced interdisciplinary collaboration are foreseen as the scenario leading to the year 2000

  4. Perspectives in radiocarbon dating by radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polach, H.A.

    1987-01-01

    Opportunities for individual contributions to the technology of radiocarbon dating over the past 40 years have been large. Meaningful developments are traced in this review of C-14 dating by gas proportional (GP) and liquid scintillation (LS) spectrometry. The performance of characteristic as well as state of the art GP and LS systems is tabulated and their merit for low-level counting of C-14 is evaluated. Future developments in radiometry will lie in the updating of existing systems to incorporate new technologies and the refinement of resolution and identification of extreme low-level signals. Parallel development with AMS, sharing on merit the ever widening applied C-14 research field, and enhanced interdisciplinary collaboration are foreseen as the scenario leading to the year 2000. (orig.)

  5. Spectro radiometry Applied to Soil Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, T.; Chabrillat, S.; Guerrero, C.; Jimenez, M.; Lopez, F.; Palacios, A.; Pelayo, M.; Rodriguez, M.

    2012-01-01

    This work is the result of an internal course that was held in CIEMAT under the framework of activities within the Itinerario Formativo: Tecnicas experimentales de apoyo a la Investigacion I+D+I, as part of the Programa de Acciones Conjuntas de OPIs (CIEMAT, INTA and IGME) financed by the Instituto Nacional de Administracion Publica (INAP). The course was aimed at researchers, technical staff and students associated to the different OPIs introducing them to spectroradiometric techniques for determining soil properties and processes and obtain a thorough insight into the compilation and applications of spectral libraries. This course was directed and organized by CIEMAT with experts specialized in the field of spectro radiometry presenting the corresponding theory and application as well as practical work carried out in the laboratory and in the field. The course is within the research lines carried out by the group Unidad de Conservacion y Recuperacion de Suelos of the Departamento de Medio Ambiente in CIEMAT. (Author)

  6. Millimeterwave spectroscopy of transient molecules produced in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    combined with a free space glass discharge cell. Millimeterwave radiation has been produced using a frequency multiplier, the fundamental radiation source being klystrons. The spectrometer has been used to study the millimeterwave spectrum of carbon monosulfide (CS) and fluorine cyanide (FCN) produced inside the ...

  7. Millimeterwave spectroscopy of transient molecules produced in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The construction of a millimeterwave spectrometer to study the pure rotational spectra of transient molecules in the gas phase is presented. The spectrometer is a source-modulated system combined with a free space glass discharge cell. Millimeterwave radiation has been produced using a frequency multiplier, the ...

  8. Illumination compensation in ground based hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Alexander; Underwood, James

    2017-07-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has emerged as an important tool for analysing vegetation data in agricultural applications. Recently, low altitude and ground based hyperspectral imaging solutions have come to the fore, providing very high resolution data for mapping and studying large areas of crops in detail. However, these platforms introduce a unique set of challenges that need to be overcome to ensure consistent, accurate and timely acquisition of data. One particular problem is dealing with changes in environmental illumination while operating with natural light under cloud cover, which can have considerable effects on spectral shape. In the past this has been commonly achieved by imaging known reference targets at the time of data acquisition, direct measurement of irradiance, or atmospheric modelling. While capturing a reference panel continuously or very frequently allows accurate compensation for illumination changes, this is often not practical with ground based platforms, and impossible in aerial applications. This paper examines the use of an autonomous unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) to gather high resolution hyperspectral imaging data of crops under natural illumination. A process of illumination compensation is performed to extract the inherent reflectance properties of the crops, despite variable illumination. This work adapts a previously developed subspace model approach to reflectance and illumination recovery. Though tested on a ground vehicle in this paper, it is applicable to low altitude unmanned aerial hyperspectral imagery also. The method uses occasional observations of reference panel training data from within the same or other datasets, which enables a practical field protocol that minimises in-field manual labour. This paper tests the new approach, comparing it against traditional methods. Several illumination compensation protocols for high volume ground based data collection are presented based on the results. The findings in this paper are

  9. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva Yankova, Ginka; Villanueva, Héctor

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  10. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Yordanova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  11. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Georgieva Yankova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of a test of a ground-based lidar of other type. The test was performed at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. The result as an establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided...... by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from the wind vanes is also given....

  12. Monolithic millimeter-wave and picosecond electronic technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talley, W.K.; Luhmann, N.C.

    1996-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies into monolithic millimeter-wave and picosecond electronic technologies have been undertaken as a collaborative project between the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California Department of Applied Science Coherent Millimeter-Wave Group under the auspices of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at LLNL. The work involves the design and fabrication of monolithic frequency multiplier, beam control, and imaging arrays for millimeter-wave imaging and radar, as well as the development of high speed nonlinear transmission lines for ultra-wideband radar imaging, time domain materials characterization and magnetic fusion plasma applications. In addition, the Coherent Millimeter-Wave Group is involved in the fabrication of a state-of-the-art X-band (∼8-11 GHz) RF photoinjector source aimed at producing psec high brightness electron bunches for advanced accelerator and coherent radiation generation studies

  13. Pupil Plane Array Based Millimeter-Wave Imaging Radiometer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clark, Stuart

    2004-01-01

    ... real-time passive millimeter-wave camera (PMC). In addition, an imaging demonstration performed under this contract demonstrated the feasibility of building such a PMC and that it is possible to obtain near diffraction limited imagery...

  14. The millimeter-wave bolometric interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gault, Amanda Charlotte

    The Millimeter-wave Bolometric Interferometer (MBI) is a technology demonstrator for future searches for the B-mode polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). If observed, B-modes would be a direct probe of the energy scale of inflation, an energy scale that is impossible to reach with even the most sophisticated particle accelerators. In this thesis, I outline the technology differences between MBI and conventional interferometers, including the Faraday effect phase modulators (FPM) used both to control systematic effects and to allow for phase sensitive detection of signals. MBI is a four element adding interferometer with a Fizeau optical beam combiner. This allows simple scaling of the instrument to a large numbers of baselines without requiring complicated pair-wise correlations of signals. Interferometers have an advantage over imaging telescopes when measuring the CMB power spectrum as each baseline is sensitive to a single Fourier mode (angular scale) on the sky. Recovering individual baseline information with this combination scheme requires phase modulating the signal from each antenna. MBI performs this modulation with Faraday effect phase modulators. In these novel cryogenic devices a modulated magnetic field switches the phase of a millimeter-wave RF signal by +/- 90 degrees at frequencies up to a few Hertz. MBI's second season of observations occurred in the winter of 2009 at Pine Bluff Observatory a few miles west of Madsion, WI. We successfully observed interference fringes of a microwave test source located in the far field of the instrument that agree well with those expected from simulations. MBI has inspired a second generation bolometric interferometer, QUBIC, which will have hundreds of antennas and thousands of detectors. When it deploys in 2015, it will be sensitive enough to search for B-mode signals from the CMB.

  15. Ground-based Observation System Development for the Moon Hyper-spectral Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Huang, Yu; Wang, Shurong; Li, Zhanfeng; Zhang, Zihui; Hu, Xiuqing; Zhang, Peng

    2017-05-01

    The Moon provides a suitable radiance source for on-orbit calibration of space-borne optical instruments. A ground-based observation system dedicated to the hyper-spectral radiometry of the Moon has been developed for improving and validating the current lunar model. The observation instrument using a dispersive imaging spectrometer is particularly designed for high-accuracy observations of the lunar radiance. The simulation and analysis of the push-broom mechanism is made in detail for lunar observations, and the automated tracking and scanning is well accomplished in different observational condition. A three-month series of hyper-spectral imaging experiments of the Moon have been performed in the wavelength range from 400 to 1000 nm near Lijiang Observatory (Yunnan, China) at phase angles -83°-87°. Preliminary results and data comparison are presented, and it shows the instrument performance and lunar observation capability of this system are well validated. Beyond previous measurements, this observation system provides the entire lunar disk images of continuous spectral coverage by adopting the push-broom mode with special scanning scheme and leads to the further research of lunar photometric model.

  16. SCIENTIFIC EFFICIENCY OF GROUND-BASED TELESCOPES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abt, Helmut A.

    2012-01-01

    I scanned the six major astronomical journals of 2008 for all 1589 papers that are based on new data obtained from ground-based optical/IR telescopes worldwide. Then I collected data on numbers of papers, citations to them in 3+ years, the most-cited papers, and annual operating costs. These data are assigned to four groups by telescope aperture. For instance, while the papers from telescopes with an aperture >7 m average 1.29 more citations than those with an aperture of 2 to 7 m) telescopes. I wonder why the large telescopes do so relatively poorly and suggest possible reasons. I also found that papers based on archival data, such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, produce 10.6% as many papers and 20.6% as many citations as those based on new data. Also, the 577.2 papers based on radio data produced 36.3% as many papers and 33.6% as many citations as the 1589 papers based on optical/IR telescopes.

  17. Passive Millimeter-Wave Imaging for the Detection of Concealed Weapons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martin, Chris

    2005-01-01

    The passive millimeter-wave camera (PMC) is a second generation millimeter-wave (MMW) imaging system delivered to the National Institute of Justice for evaluation as a concealed weapons detection system...

  18. GPM GROUND VALIDATION CONICAL SCANNING MILLIMETER-WAVE IMAGING RADIOMETER (COSMIR) MC3E V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (COSMIR) MC3E dataset used the Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer...

  19. GPM GROUND VALIDATION CONICAL SCANNING MILLIMETER-WAVE IMAGING RADIOMETER (COSMIR) GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (COSMIR) GCPEx dataset used the Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer...

  20. Progress in millimeter-wave imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikner, David A.

    2011-03-01

    The field of millimeter-wave (MMW) imaging has progressed significantly over the last two decades. The most obvious evidence of this is the widespread use of MMW full-body scanners, now commonly found in airports. The path to this point has been the result of the work of a wide range of experts from many scientific and engineering disciplines. This article represents one perspective of this progress. The development of MMW imagers, and all their associated component technologies, image processing techniques, clever engineering, etc. has been driven by a relatively small number of interesting applications. It has been known for about 70 years that RF energy can be used to "see" through things like clouds and detect, for example, hostile aircraft. As the RF frequency goes up to 35, 100, or 340 GHz, it becomes possible to image through obscurants with much improved resolution. However, as frequency increases, attenuation increases as well, so selecting the right frequency for the application is an important point. The challenge of seeing through obscurants such as fog, smoke and dust drives one towards a MMW imaging solution. Typical applications include guiding aircraft through low visibility conditions, detecting nearby watercraft in the fog, and searching for concealed weapons. So, while these capabilities have been demonstrated numerous times over the years, the practical and affordable implementation of the systems to accomplish these goals is where the real story lies.

  1. OBT measurement of vegetation by mass spectrometry and radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamari, T.; Kakiuchi, H.; Momoshima, N.; Sugihara, S.; Baglan, N.; Uda, T.

    2011-01-01

    We carried out OBT (organically bound tritium) measurement by two different methods those are radiometry and mass spectrometry and compared the applicability of these methods for environmental tritium analysis. The dried grass sample was used for the experiments. To eliminate the exchangeable OBT, the sample was washed with tritium free water before analysis. Three times washing reduced the tritium activity in the labile sites below the detectable level. In radiometry the sample was combusted to convert the OBT as well as other hydrogen isotopes to. water and tritium activity in the water was measured by liquid scintillation counting (LSC). In mass spectrometry, the sample was kept in a glass container and 3 He produced by tritium decay was measured by mass spectrometry. The results were in good agreement suggesting applicability of these methods for environmental tritium analysis. The mass spectrometry is more suitable for environmental tritium research because of a lower detection limit than that of the LSC. (authors)

  2. Uranium Analysis by Radiometry for Clarification of Nuclear Material Accountancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusuf Nampira

    2004-01-01

    The uranium was used in the activity of the development of nuclear fuel. Using of the fissile material incurred by regulation of safeguard that is implemented by accounting of nuclear material. Referring to this mentioned, so the stream of the nuclear material used in the development require to be clarified its existence. In order to this clarification has been done by analysis of uranium in elementary material, product of development process and also the waste yielded. Pursuant to nature of radionuclide of uranium which decays by transmitted alpha and gamma radiation, the uranium can be analyzed by radiometry method. The uranium analysis use radiometry methods shall give information of total content and isotopic abundance of nuclear material. (author)

  3. Coder for radioisotopic scanning and radiometry of a man's radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, G.A.; Mukhin, V.I.; Kosterev, V.V.

    1977-01-01

    Considered are problems of theoretical and practical application of the integral method of obtaining differential information at radiometry of ionizing radiations. A design of a man's radiation spectrometer (MRS) with plastic scintillators is proposed. One-dimensional, two-dimensional and three-dimensional coders used in MRS are described. Usage of coders in MRS with organic scintillators allows one to obtain additional data on the activity distribution in the objects studied

  4. Electro-optical system analysis and design a radiometry perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Willers, Cornelius J

    2013-01-01

    The field of radiometry can be dangerous territory to the uninitiated, faced with the risk of errors and pitfalls. The concepts and tools explored in this book empower readers to comprehensively analyze, design, and optimize real-world systems. This book builds on the foundation of solid theoretical understanding, and strives to provide insight into hidden subtleties in radiometric analysis. Atmospheric effects provide opportunity for a particularly rich set of intriguing observations.

  5. Microwave and millimeter-wave remote sensing for security applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nanzer, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Microwave and millimeter-wave remote sensing techniques are fast becoming a necessity in many aspects of security as detection and classification of objects or intruders becomes more difficult. This groundbreaking resource offers you expert guidance in this burgeoning area. It provides you with a thorough treatment of the principles of microwave and millimeter-wave remote sensing for security applications, as well as practical coverage of the design of radiometer, radar, and imaging systems. You learn how to design active and passive sensors for intruder detection, concealed object detection,

  6. External calibration technique of millimeter-wave cloud radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Tao; Zhao, Zeng-Liang; Yao, Zhi-Gang; Han, Zhi-Gang; Guo, Lin-Da

    2016-10-01

    The millimeter-wave cloud radar can provide a large number of fine and reliable information for the inversion of cloud macro and micro parameters. A key link of using the millimeter-wave cloud radar to detect the cloud is that the radar must be calibrated. Due to the precision components and severe environment of millimeter-wave cloud radar, subtle changes may take place in the operation process of cloud radar, unless the cloud radar is calibrated regularly. Although the calibration system inside the cloud radar can track and monitor the main working parameters and correct the detection results, it fails to consider the characteristics of the antenna and the mutual influence among different components of cloud radar. Therefore, the external calibration for cloud radar system is very important. Combined with the actual situation of cloud radar under domestic onboard platform, this paper builds a complete external calibration technique process of cloud radar based on the calm sea, providing the theoretical support for the external calibration experiments of the airborne and even satellite-borne millimeter-wave cloud radar developed by our country.

  7. KSC ADVANCED GROUND BASED FIELD MILL V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Advanced Ground Based Field Mill (AGBFM) network consists of 34 (31 operational) field mills located at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida. The field mills...

  8. Ground-based observations of Kepler asteroseismic targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uyttterhoeven , K.; Karoff, Christoffer

    2010-01-01

    We present the ground-based activities within the different working groups of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium (KASC). The activities aim at the systematic characterization of the 5000+ KASC targets, and at the collection of ground-based follow-up time-series data of selected promising...... Kepler pulsators. So far, 36 different instruments at 31 telescopes on 23 different observatories in 12 countries are in use, and a total of more than 530 observing nights has been awarded....

  9. Kapitza thermal resistance studied by high-frequency photothermal radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horny, Nicolas; Chirtoc, Mihai; Hamaoui, Georges; Fleming, Austin; Ban, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Kapitza thermal resistance is determined using high-frequency photothermal radiometry (PTR) extended for modulation up to 10 MHz. Interfaces between 50 nm thick titanium coatings and silicon or stainless steel substrates are studied. In the used configuration, the PTR signal is not sensitive to the thermal conductivity of the film nor to its optical absorption coefficient, thus the Kapitza resistance is directly determined from single thermal parameter fits. Results of thermal resistances show the significant influence of the nature of the substrate, as well as of the presence of free electrons at the interface.

  10. Microwave experiments on the tokamak CASTOR: fundamental ECE radiometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zajac, Jaromír; Preinhaelter, Josef; Žáček, František; Nanobashvili, S.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 54, suppl. C (2004), C68-C73 ISSN 0011-4626. [Symposium on Plasma Physics and Technology /21st/. Praha, 14.06.2004-17.06.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/00/1215 Grant - others:INTAS(XE) 2001 1B-2056 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : electron cyclotron, emission, electron Bernstein waves, plasma radiometry Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.292, year: 2004

  11. Microwave Radiometry for Oil Pollution Monitoring, Measurements, and Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    1986-01-01

    Work is presently carried out in Europe to change the Status of the microwave radiometer, namely, to develop it from a research instrument to an operational instrument-especially for measuring oil pollution on the sea surface. The Technical University of Denmark (TUD), with its long experience...... in airborne microwave radiometry, is heavily involved in this process. The TUD multichannel imaging radiometer system has been flown in several large-scale oil-pollution experiments, the collected data have been analyzed, and they have revealed that care must be exercised to obtain accurate oil volume...

  12. Nonintrusive noncontacting frequency-domain photothermal radiometry of caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sharkawy, Yasser H.; Abd-Elwahab, Bassam

    2010-04-01

    Among diffusion methods, photothermal radiometry (PTR) has the ability to penetrate and yield information about an opaque medium well beyond the range of conventional optical imaging. Owing to this ability, pulsed-laser PTR has been extensively used in turbid media such as biological tissues to study the sub-surface deposition of laser radiation, a task that may be difficult or impossible for many optical methods due to excessive scattering and absorption. In this paper considers the achievements of Pulsed Photothermal Radiometry using IR camera in the investigation of physical properties of biological materials and the diagnostics of the interaction of laser radiation with biological materials. A three-dimensional heat conduction formulation with the use of three-dimensional optical diffusion is developed to derive a turbid frequency-domain PTR model. The present photo-thermal model for frequency-domain PTR may prove useful for non-contact; non-invasive, in situ evaluate the depth profilometric imaging capabilities of FDPTR in monitoring carious and artificial subsurface lesions in human teeth.

  13. Cassini radar and radiometry observations of Saturn's airless icy satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, A. A.; West, R.; Janssen, M. A.; Leyrat, C.; Bonnefoy, L.; Lellouch, E.

    2017-12-01

    The Cassini Radar is a multimode microwave sensor operating in the Ku-band, at a wavelength of 2.2 cm. While it was initially designed to examine the surface of Titan through the veil of its optically-opaque atmosphere, it is occasionally used to observe airless Saturn's moons from long ranges (>50 000 km) and, less frequently, during targeted flybys. In its active mode, the instrument measures the surface reflectivity in the backscattering direction. In its passive mode - or radiometry mode - it records the microwave thermal emission from the near-surface (typically few meters). Doing so, it provides insights into the degree of purity and maturity of the water-ice regolith of the investigated objects. In particular, it can reveal hemispheric dichotomies or regional anomalies and satellite-to-satellite variabilities which give clues into what is common and what is specific to the history of each satellite and to the processes that have shaped their surface/subsurface. In this paper, we will give an overview of the Cassini radar/radiometry observations of Saturnian icy moons, most of which have not been published yet. Now that the mission has come to an end, we will describe how the radio investigation of these objects can be pursued from Earth-based radiotelescopes.

  14. Integrated millimeter-wave corner-cube antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gearhart, Steven S.; Ling, Curtis C.; Rebeiz, Gabriel M.

    1991-01-01

    An integrated corner-reflector antennas has been designed, fabricated, and measured at millimeter-wave frequencies. The structure consists of a traveling-wave antenna integrated on a 1.2-micron dielectric membrane, and suspended in a longitudinal cavity etched in a silicon wafer. A novel traveling wave antenna design, the modified-bend antenna, with an antenna length of 1.2 lambda and spacing 0.96 lambda from the apex, results in a wideband input impedance centered at 140 Ohm and low cross-polarization levels. Measurements at 180-270 GHz show a well-defined pattern with low sidelobe levels, and a main-beam efficiency of 93 percent and 83 percent at 180 and 222 GHz, respectively. The monolithic approach allows the integration of a matching network and a Schottky-diode or SIS detector at the base of the antenna to yield a low-noise monolithic millimeter-wave receiver.

  15. WDM Phase-Modulated Millimeter-Wave Fiber Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xianbin; Prince, Kamau; Gibbon, Timothy Braidwood

    2012-01-01

    This chapter presents a computer simulation case study of two typical WDM phase-modulated millimeter-wave systems. The phase-modulated 60 GHz fiber multi-channel transmission systems employ single sideband (SSB) and double sideband subcarrier modulation (DSB-SC) schemes and present one of the lat......This chapter presents a computer simulation case study of two typical WDM phase-modulated millimeter-wave systems. The phase-modulated 60 GHz fiber multi-channel transmission systems employ single sideband (SSB) and double sideband subcarrier modulation (DSB-SC) schemes and present one...... of the latest research efforts in the rapidly emerging Radio-over-Fiber (RoF) application space for in-house access networks....

  16. Design and performance of dual-polarization lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors for millimeter-wave polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarrick, H.; Jones, G.; Johnson, B. R.; Abitbol, M. H.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bryan, S.; Day, P.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Flanigan, D.; Leduc, H. G.; Limon, M.; Mauskopf, P.; Miller, A.; Tucker, C.

    2018-02-01

    Aims: Lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs) are an attractive technology for millimeter-wave observations that require large arrays of extremely low-noise detectors. We designed, fabricated and characterized 64-element (128 LEKID) arrays of horn-coupled, dual-polarization LEKIDs optimized for ground-based CMB polarimetry. Our devices are sensitive to two orthogonal polarizations in a single spectral band centered on 150 GHz with Δν/ν = 0.2. The 65 × 65 mm square arrays are designed to be tiled into the focal plane of an optical system. We demonstrate the viability of these dual-polarization LEKIDs with laboratory measurements. Methods: The LEKID modules are tested with an FPGA-based readout system in a sub-kelvin cryostat that uses a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. The devices are characterized using a blackbody and a millimeter-wave source. The polarization properties are measured with a cryogenic stepped half-wave plate. We measure the resonator parameters and the detector sensitivity, noise spectrum, dynamic range, and polarization response. Results: The resonators have internal quality factors approaching 1 × 106. The detectors have uniform response between orthogonal polarizations and a large dynamic range. The detectors are photon-noise limited above 1 pW of absorbed power. The noise-equivalent temperatures under a 3.4 K blackbody load are 80%. The entire array is multiplexed on a single readout line, demonstrating a multiplexing factor of 128. The array and readout meet the requirements for 4 arrays to be read out simultaneously for a multiplexing factor of 512. Conclusions: This laboratory study demonstrates the first dual-polarization LEKID array optimized specifically for CMB polarimetry and shows the readiness of the detectors for on-sky observations.

  17. Circularly polarized millimeter-wave imaging for personnel screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Lechelt, Wayne M.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.

    2005-05-01

    A novel polarimetric millimeter-wave imaging technique has been developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for concealed weapon detection applications. Wideband millimeter-wave imaging systems developed at PNNL utilize low-power, coherent, millimeter-wave illumination in the 10-100 GHz range to form high-resolution images of personnel. Electromagnetic waves in these frequency ranges easily penetrate most clothing materials and are reflected from the body and any concealed items. Three-dimensional images are formed using computer image reconstruction algorithms developed to mathematically focus the received wavefronts scattered from the target. Circular polarimetric imaging can be employed to obtain additional information from the target. Circularly polarized waves incident on relatively smooth reflecting targets are typically reversed in their rotational handedness, e.g. left-hand circular polarization (LHCP) is reflected to become right-hand circular polarization (RHCP). An incident wave that is reflected twice (or any even number) of times prior to returning to the transceiver, has its handedness preserved. Sharp features such as wires and edges tend to return linear polarization, which can be considered to be a sum of both LHCP and RHCP. These characteristics can be exploited for personnel screening by allowing differentiation of smooth features, such as the body, and sharper features present in many concealed items. Additionally, imaging artifacts due to multipath can be identified and eliminated. Laboratory imaging results have been obtained in the 10-20 GHz frequency range and are presented in this paper.

  18. CLPX-Ground: University of Michigan Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains microwave radiometry data collected at the Local Scale Observation Site (LSOS) of the Cold Land Processes Field Experiment (CLPX) in Colorado,...

  19. CLPX-Ground: University of Michigan Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains microwave radiometry data collected at the Local Scale Observation Site (LSOS) of the Cold Land Processes Field Experiment (CLPX) in Colorado,...

  20. The importance of signals in the Doppler broadening range for middle-atmospheric microwave wind and ozone radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüfenacht, Rolf; Kämpfer, Niklaus

    2017-09-01

    Doppler microwave radiometry is a novel technique for the measurement of horizontal wind profiles at altitudes between 10 and 0.03 hPa, where there is a substantial lack of observations. All wind radiometers currently in use rely on ground-based observations of microwave radiation emitted by atmospheric ozone. Besides the well-known primary ozone layer in the stratosphere a secondary ozone layer forms near 10-3 hPa during nighttime. We show that the emission signal of this secondary ozone layer cannot be neglected for the retrieval of mesospheric winds and that it can even alter nighttime ozone retrievals. However, the present study also demonstrates that with a reasonably adequate representation of the atmospheric reality in the mesopause region bias-free wind retrievals throughout the entire sensitive altitude range of the instruments can be achieved during day and nighttime. By applying the improved ozone a priori setup to real observation data the average zonal wind difference to models was substantially reduced and a realistic diurnal cycle was reproduced. Moreover the presence of the high nighttime mesopause ozone signal could enable future retrievals of mean winds beyond the altitude range dominated by pressure broadening.

  1. Cryogenic radiometry in the hard X-ray range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerlach, M.; Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Muller, P.; Rabus, H.; Ulm, G.

    2008-01-01

    For many applications in radiometry, spectroscopy or astrophysics, absolute measurement of radiant power with low uncertainty is essential. Cryogenic electrical substitution radiometers (ESRs) are regarded as the highest-accuracy primary standard detector in radiometry, from the infrared to the ultraviolet region; in combination with tuneable monochromatized synchrotron radiation from electron storage rings, their range of operation has been extended to the soft x-ray region. ESRs are absolute thermal detectors, based on the equivalence of electrical power and radiant power that can be traced back to electrical SI units and be measured with low uncertainties. Their core piece is a cavity absorber, which is typically made of copper to achieve a short response time suitable for use with synchrotron radiation. At higher photon energies, the use of copper prevents the operation of ESRs due to increasing transmittance. A new absorber design for hard x-rays has been developed at the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the electron storage ring BESSY II. The Monte Carlo simulation code Geant4 was applied to optimize its absorptance for photon energies of up to 60 keV, resulting in a cavity absorber with a gold base and a cylindrical shell made of copper, in combination with a thermal sensitivity of around 150 mK μW -1 and a time constant of less than 3 min, which is short compared with the lifetime of many hours for the storage ring current. The measurement of the radiant power of monochromatized synchrotron radiation was achieved with relative standard uncertainties of less than 0.2%, covering the entire photon energy range of three beamlines from 50 eV to 60 keV. Monochromatized synchrotron radiation of high spectral purity was used to calibrate silicon photodiodes against the ESR for photon energies up to 60 keV with relative standard uncertainties below 0.3%. (authors)

  2. Cryogenic radiometry in the hard X-ray range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlach, M.; Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Muller, P.; Rabus, H.; Ulm, G. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig and Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    For many applications in radiometry, spectroscopy or astrophysics, absolute measurement of radiant power with low uncertainty is essential. Cryogenic electrical substitution radiometers (ESRs) are regarded as the highest-accuracy primary standard detector in radiometry, from the infrared to the ultraviolet region; in combination with tuneable monochromatized synchrotron radiation from electron storage rings, their range of operation has been extended to the soft x-ray region. ESRs are absolute thermal detectors, based on the equivalence of electrical power and radiant power that can be traced back to electrical SI units and be measured with low uncertainties. Their core piece is a cavity absorber, which is typically made of copper to achieve a short response time suitable for use with synchrotron radiation. At higher photon energies, the use of copper prevents the operation of ESRs due to increasing transmittance. A new absorber design for hard x-rays has been developed at the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the electron storage ring BESSY II. The Monte Carlo simulation code Geant4 was applied to optimize its absorptance for photon energies of up to 60 keV, resulting in a cavity absorber with a gold base and a cylindrical shell made of copper, in combination with a thermal sensitivity of around 150 mK {mu}W{sup -1} and a time constant of less than 3 min, which is short compared with the lifetime of many hours for the storage ring current. The measurement of the radiant power of monochromatized synchrotron radiation was achieved with relative standard uncertainties of less than 0.2%, covering the entire photon energy range of three beamlines from 50 eV to 60 keV. Monochromatized synchrotron radiation of high spectral purity was used to calibrate silicon photodiodes against the ESR for photon energies up to 60 keV with relative standard uncertainties below 0.3%. (authors)

  3. Cryogenic radiometry in the hard x-ray range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, M.; Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Müller, P.; Rabus, H.; Ulm, G.

    2008-10-01

    For many applications in radiometry, spectroscopy or astrophysics, absolute measurement of radiant power with low uncertainty is essential. Cryogenic electrical substitution radiometers (ESRs) are regarded as the highest-accuracy primary standard detector in radiometry, from the infrared to the ultraviolet region; in combination with tuneable monochromatized synchrotron radiation from electron storage rings, their range of operation has been extended to the soft x-ray region. ESRs are absolute thermal detectors, based on the equivalence of electrical power and radiant power that can be traced back to electrical SI units and be measured with low uncertainties. Their core piece is a cavity absorber, which is typically made of copper to achieve a short response time suitable for use with synchrotron radiation. At higher photon energies, the use of copper prevents the operation of ESRs due to increasing transmittance. A new absorber design for hard x-rays has been developed at the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the electron storage ring BESSY II. The Monte Carlo simulation code Geant4 was applied to optimize its absorptance for photon energies of up to 60 keV, resulting in a cavity absorber with a gold base and a cylindrical shell made of copper, in combination with a thermal sensitivity of around 150 mK µW-1 and a time constant of less than 3 min, which is short compared with the lifetime of many hours for the storage ring current. The measurement of the radiant power of monochromatized synchrotron radiation was achieved with relative standard uncertainties of less than 0.2%, covering the entire photon energy range of three beamlines from 50 eV to 60 keV. Monochromatized synchrotron radiation of high spectral purity was used to calibrate silicon photodiodes against the ESR for photon energies up to 60 keV with relative standard uncertainties below 0.3%.

  4. Directional Radiometry and Radiative Transfer: the Convoluted Path From Centuries-old Phenomenology to Physical Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    This Essay traces the centuries-long history of the phenomenological disciplines of directional radiometry and radiative transfer in turbid media, discusses their fundamental weaknesses, and outlines the convoluted process of their conversion into legitimate branches of physical optics.

  5. Measurement of the body surface temperature by the method of laser photothermal radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skvortsov, L A; Kirillov, V M

    2003-01-01

    The specific features of contactless measurements of the body surface temperature by the method of repetitively pulsed laser photothermal radiometry are considered and the requirements to the parameters of the laser and measurement scheme are formulated. The sensitivity of the method is estimated. The advantages of laser photothermal radiometry over the conventional passive radiometric method are discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  6. Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Technology Roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, Leslie A.

    2014-01-01

    This GNDD Technology Roadmap is intended to provide guidance to potential researchers and help management define research priorities to achieve technology advancements for ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring science being pursued by the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team within the Office of Nuclear Detonation Detection in the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Four science-based elements were selected to encompass the entire scope of nuclear monitoring research and development (R&D) necessary to facilitate breakthrough scientific results, as well as deliver impactful products. Promising future R&D is delineated including dual use associated with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Important research themes as well as associated metrics are identified along with a progression of accomplishments, represented by a selected bibliography, that are precursors to major improvements to nuclear explosion monitoring.

  7. Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Technology Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Leslie A.

    2014-01-13

    This GNDD Technology Roadmap is intended to provide guidance to potential researchers and help management define research priorities to achieve technology advancements for ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring science being pursued by the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team within the Office of Nuclear Detonation Detection in the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Four science-based elements were selected to encompass the entire scope of nuclear monitoring research and development (R&D) necessary to facilitate breakthrough scientific results, as well as deliver impactful products. Promising future R&D is delineated including dual use associated with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Important research themes as well as associated metrics are identified along with a progression of accomplishments, represented by a selected bibliography, that are precursors to major improvements to nuclear explosion monitoring.

  8. Ground-based lidar remote sensing of contrails

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, H.; Freudenthaler, V.; Homburg, F.; Sussmann, R. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Atmosphaerische Umweltforschung (IFU), Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    A ground-based scanning lidar system with built-in CCD camera has been developed to investigate aerosols and persistent contrails in air traffic corridors with respect to growth and microphysical and optical properties. By calibrating CCD camera images with lidar information the optical depth of larger areas of contrail cover within the 40 degree viewing angle of the camera can be determined. This technique has been extended to investigate contrails in AVHRR satellite images. (orig.) 144 figs., 42 tabs., 497 refs.

  9. Silicon carbide optics for space and ground based astronomical telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robichaud, Joseph; Sampath, Deepak; Wainer, Chris; Schwartz, Jay; Peton, Craig; Mix, Steve; Heller, Court

    2012-09-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) optical materials are being applied widely for both space based and ground based optical telescopes. The material provides a superior weight to stiffness ratio, which is an important metric for the design and fabrication of lightweight space telescopes. The material also has superior thermal properties with a low coefficient of thermal expansion, and a high thermal conductivity. The thermal properties advantages are important for both space based and ground based systems, which typically need to operate under stressing thermal conditions. The paper will review L-3 Integrated Optical Systems - SSG’s (L-3 SSG) work in developing SiC optics and SiC optical systems for astronomical observing systems. L-3 SSG has been fielding SiC optical components and systems for over 25 years. Space systems described will emphasize the recently launched Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) developed for JHU-APL and NASA-GSFC. Review of ground based applications of SiC will include supporting L-3 IOS-Brashear’s current contract to provide the 0.65 meter diameter, aspheric SiC secondary mirror for the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST).

  10. Ground-Based Lidar for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Ozone Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J.; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than 10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures.

  11. Handbook of RF, microwave, and millimeter-wave components

    CERN Document Server

    Smolskiy, Sergey M; Kochemasov, Victor N

    2012-01-01

    This unique and comprehensive resource offers you a detailed treatment of the operations principles, key parameters, and specific characteristics of active and passive RF, microwave, and millimeter-wave components. The book covers both linear and nonlinear components that are used in a wide range of application areas, from communications and information sciences, to avionics, space, and military engineering. This practical book presents descriptions and clear examples and of the best materials and products used in the field, including laminates, prepregs, substrates; microstrip, coaxial and wa

  12. Millimeter-wave imaging on GAMMA 10 and LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mase, A.; Negishi, H.; Oyama, N.

    2000-01-01

    Millimeter-wave imaging system in the frequency range of 70-140 GHz was developed for diagnostics of magnetically confined plasmas. It successfully measures time evolutions of three-dimensional (radial and axial) profiles of line density and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) in the plug cell of the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. It is also being installed in Large Helical Device (LHD). In order to cover the frequency range of the second harmonic ECE on LHD, a novel detector using monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) technology is designed and fabricated. The optical system consisting of an ellipsoidal and a flat mirrors is constructed and evaluated experimentally at 140 GHz. (author)

  13. Millimeter-Waves Structures on Benzocyclobutene Dielectric Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Di Massa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The need of low-loss substrate materials with stable dielectric performances is a strong requirement when working at millimeter frequencies, where standard dielectrics exhibit prohibitive losses. In this paper, the authors focus their attention on a polymer material, the benzocyclobutene (BCB, having a low dielectric constant and a low loss tangent, with a stable behavior up to THz frequencies. A specific in-house manufacture technology is described to realize millimeter-wave structures on a BCB dielectric substrate. Experimental validations on BCB-based circuits and antennas prototypes are discussed.

  14. Millimeter-Wave Transmittance and Reflectance Measurement on Pure and Diluted Carbonyl Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, Konstantin; Chen, Shu; Li, Zijing; Afsar, Mohammed

    2010-03-01

    Transmittance and reflectance measurements on highly absorbing carbonyl iron materials over a broad millimeter-wave frequency range have been performed. Frequency dependence of the complex dielectric permittivity of carbonyl iron diluted composite and pure powdered materials have been determined in the millimeter waves for the first time. The measurements have been employed using a free-space quasi-optical millimeter-wave spectrometer equipped with a set of high power backward wave oscillators as sources of coherent radiation, tunable in the range from 30 -- 120 GHz. Significant transmission zone of the millimeter-wave radiation at frequency around 60 GHz has been observed in transmittance spectra for the carbonyl iron materials.

  15. Enhancement of ionic conductivity in stabilized zirconia ceramics under millimeter-wave irradiation heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Akira; Ayano, Keiko; Hayashi, Hidetaka

    2011-01-01

    Ionic conductivity in yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramics under millimeter-wave irradiation heating was compared with that obtained using conventional heating. The former was found to result in higher conductivity than the latter. Enhancement of the ionic conductivity and the reduction in activation energy seemed to depend on self-heating resulting from the millimeter-wave irradiation. Millimeter-wave irradiation heating restricted the degradation in conductivity accompanying over-substitution, suggesting the optimum structure that provided the maximum conductivity could be different between the two heating methods.

  16. Independent Component Analysis applied to Ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Filho, Walter; Griffith, Caitlin; Pearson, Kyle; Waldmann, Ingo; Alvarez-Candal, Alvaro; Zellem, Robert Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Transit measurements of Jovian-sized exoplanetary atmospheres allow one to study the composition of exoplanets, largely independent of the planet’s temperature profile. However, measurements of hot-Jupiter transits must archive a level of accuracy in the flux to determine the spectral modulation of the exoplanetary atmosphere. To accomplish this level of precision, we need to extract systematic errors, and, for ground-based measurements, the effects of Earth’s atmosphere, from signal due to the exoplanet, which is several orders of magnitude smaller. The effects of the terrestrial atmosphere and some of the time-dependent systematic errors of ground-based transit measurements are treated mainly by dividing the host star by a reference star at each wavelength and time step of the transit. Recently, Independent Component Analysis (ICA) have been used to remove systematics effects from the raw data of space-based observations (Waldmann, 2014, 2012; Morello et al., 2016, 2015). ICA is a statistical method born from the ideas of the blind-source separations studies, which can be used to de-trend several independent source signals of a data set (Hyvarinen and Oja, 2000). This technique requires no additional prior knowledge of the data set. In addition, this technique has the advantage of requiring no reference star. Here we apply the ICA to ground-based photometry of the exoplanet XO-2b recorded by the 61” Kuiper Telescope and compare the results of the ICA to those of a previous analysis from Zellem et al. (2015), which does not use ICA. We also simulate the effects of various conditions (concerning the systematic errors, noise and the stability of object on the detector) to determine the conditions under which an ICA can be used with high precision to extract the light curve of exoplanetary photometry measurements

  17. Augmenting WFIRST Microlensing with a Ground-Based Telescope Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Gould, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Augmenting the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) microlensing campaigns with intensive observations from a ground-based network of wide-field survey telescopes would have several major advantages. First, it would enable full two-dimensional (2-D) vector microlens parallax measurements for a substantial fraction of low-mass lenses as well as planetary and binary events that show caustic crossing features. For a significant fraction of the free-floating planet (FFP) events and all caustic-crossing planetary/binary events, these 2-D parallax measurements directly lead to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) of the lens object (or lens system). For even more events, the complementary ground-based observations will yield 1-D parallax measurements. Together with the 1-D parallaxes from WFIRST alone, they can probe the entire mass range M > M_Earth. For luminous lenses, such 1-D parallax measurements can be promoted to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) by high-resolution imaging. This would provide crucial information not only about the hosts of planets and other lenses, but also enable a much more precise Galactic model. Other benefits of such a survey include improved understanding of binaries (particularly with low mass primaries), and sensitivity to distant ice-giant and gas-giant companions of WFIRST lenses that cannot be detected by WFIRST itself due to its restricted observing windows. Existing ground-based microlensing surveys can be employed if WFIRST is pointed at lower-extinction fields than is currently envisaged. This would come at some cost to the event rate. Therefore the benefits of improved characterization of lenses must be weighed against these costs.

  18. Identifying explosives using broadband millimeter-wave imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherall, James C.; Yam, Kevin; Barber, Jeffrey; Smith, Barry T.; Smith, Peter R.; Greca, Joseph

    2017-05-01

    Millimeter wave imaging is employed in Advanced Technology Imaging (AIT) systems to screen personnel for concealed explosives and weapons. AIT systems deployed in airports auto-detect potential threats by highlighting their location on a generic outline of a person using imaging data collected over a range of frequency. We show how the spectral information from the imaging data can be used to identify the composition of an anomalous object, in particular if it is an explosive material. The discriminative value of the technique was illustrated on military sheet explosive using millimeter-wave reflection data at frequencies 18 - 40 GHz, and commercial explosives using 2 - 18 GHz, but the free-space measurement was limited to a single horn with a large-area sample. This work extends the method to imaging data collected at high resolution with a 18 - 40 GHz imaging system. The identification of explosives is accomplished by extracting the dielectric constant from the free-space, multifrequency data. The reflection coefficient is a function of frequency because of propagation effects associated with the material's complex dielectric constant, which include interference from multiple reflections and energy loss in the sample. The dielectric constant is obtained by numerically fitting the reflection coefficient as a function of frequency to an optical model. In principal, the implementation of this technique in standoff imaging systems would allow threat assessment to be accomplished within the scope of millimeter-wave screening.

  19. Lidar to lidar calibration of Ground-based Lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Garcia, Sergio; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the result of the lidar to lidar calibration performed for ground-based lidar. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference lidar wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding...... lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from the reference lidar measurements are given for information only....

  20. Photothermal radiometry monitoring of light curing in resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrano-Arjona, M. A.; Medina-Esquivel, R.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2007-10-01

    Real time measurement of thermal diffusivity during the evolution of the light curing process in dental resins is reported using photothermal radiometry. The curing is induced by a non-modulated blue light beam, and at the same time, a modulated red laser beam is sent onto the sample, generating a train of thermal waves that produce modulated infrared radiation. The monitoring of this radiation permits to follow the time evolution of the process. The methodology is applied to two different commercially available light curing resin-based composites. In all cases thermal diffusivity follows a first order kinetics with similar stabilization characteristic times. Analysis of this kinetics permits to exhibit the close relationship of increase in thermal diffusivity with the decrease in monomer concentration and extension of the polymerization in the resin, induced by the curing light. It is also shown that the configuration in which the resin is illuminated by the modulated laser can be the basis for the development of an in situ technique for the determination of the degree of curing.

  1. The Traceable Radiometry Underpinning Terrestrial and Helio Studies (TRUTHS) mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Paul D.; Fox, Nigel P.; Lobb, Daniel; Friend, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    TRUTHS (Traceable Radiometry Underpinning Terrestrial- and Helio-Studies) is a proposed small satellite mission to enable a space-based climate observing system capable of delivering data of the quality needed to provide the information needed by policy makers to make robust mitigation and adaptation decisions. This is achieved by embedding trust and confidence in the data and derived information (tied to international standards) from both its own measurements and by upgrading the performance and interoperability of other EO platforms, such as the Sentinels by in-flight reference calibration. TRUTHS would provide measurements of incoming (total and spectrally resolved) and global reflected spectrally and spatially (50 m) solar radiation at the 0.3% uncertainty level. These fundamental climate data products can be convolved into the building blocks for many ECVs and EO applications as envisaged by the 2015 ESA science strategy; in a cost effective manner. We describe the scientific drivers for the TRUTHS mission and how the requirements for the climate benchmarking and cross-calibration reference sensor are both complementary and simply implemented, with a small additional complexity on top of heritage calibration schemes. The calibration scheme components and the route to SI-traceable Earth-reflected solar spectral radiance and solar spectral irradiance are described.

  2. Evaluating Ground-based Proxies for Solar Irradiance Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor); Jordan, Stuart

    2003-01-01

    In order to determine what ground-based proxies are best for evaluating solar irradiance variation before the advent of space observations, it is necessary to test these proxies against space observations. We have tested sunspot number, total sunspot area, and sunspot umbral area against the Nimbus-7 measurements of total solar irradiance variation cover the eleven year period 1980-1990. The umbral area yields the best correlation and the total sunspot area yields the poorest. Reasons for expecting the umbral area to yield the best correlation are given, the statistical procedure followed to obtain the results is described, and the value of determining the best proxy is discussed. The latter is based upon the availability of an excellent database from the Greenwich Observatory obtained over the period 1876-1976, which can be used to estimate the total solar irradiance variation before sensitive space observations were available. The ground-based observations used were obtained at the Coimbra Solar Observatory. The analysis was done at Goddard using these data and data from the Nimbus-7 satellite.

  3. Ground-Based Global Positioning System (GPS) Meteorology Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor (IPW)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ground-Based Global Positioning System (GPS) Meteorology Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor (IPW) data set measures atmospheric water vapor using ground-based...

  4. Gravitational wave radiometry: Mapping a stochastic gravitational wave background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, Sanjit; Dhurandhar, Sanjeev; Souradeep, Tarun; Lazzarini, Albert; Mandic, Vuk; Ballmer, Stefan; Bose, Sukanta

    2008-01-01

    detectors that will be sensitive to sources within a thousand times larger spatial volume, could provide promising data sets for GW radiometry

  5. Normality Analysis for RFI Detection in Microwave Radiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Camps

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Radio-frequency interference (RFI present in microwave radiometry measurements leads to erroneous radiometric results. Sources of RFI include spurious signals and harmonics from lower frequency bands, spread-spectrum signals overlapping the “protected” band of operation, or out-of-band emissions not properly rejected by the pre-detection filters due to its finite rejection. The presence of RFI in the radiometric signal modifies the detected power and therefore the estimated antenna temperature from which the geophysical parameters will be retrieved. In recent years, techniques to detect the presence of RFI in radiometric measurements have been developed. They include time- and/or frequency domain analyses, or time and/or frequency domain statistical analysis of the received signal which, in the absence of RFI, must be a zero-mean Gaussian process. Statistical analyses performed to date include the calculation of the Kurtosis, and the Shapiro-Wilk normality test of the received signal. Nevertheless, statistical analysis of the received signal could be more extensive, as reported in the Statistics literature. The objective of this work is the study of the performance of a number of normality tests encountered in the Statistics literature when applied to the detection of the presence of RFI in the radiometric signal, which is Gaussian by nature. A description of the normality tests and the RFI detection results for different kinds of RFI are presented in view of determining an omnibus test that can deal with the blind spots of the currently used methods.

  6. RECONSTRUCTION OF SKY ILLUMINATION DOMES FROM GROUND-BASED PANORAMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Coubard

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of the sky illumination is important for radiometric corrections and for computer graphics applications such as relighting or augmented reality. We propose an approach to compute environment maps, representing the sky radiance, from a set of ground-based images acquired by a panoramic acquisition system, for instance a mobile-mapping system. These images can be affected by important radiometric artifacts, such as bloom or overexposure. A Perez radiance model is estimated with the blue sky pixels of the images, and used to compute additive corrections in order to reduce these radiometric artifacts. The sky pixels are then aggregated in an environment map, which still suffers from discontinuities on stitching edges. The influence of the quality of estimated sky radiance on the simulated light signal is measured quantitatively on a simple synthetic urban scene; in our case, the maximal error for the total sensor radiance is about 10%.

  7. Satellite and Ground Based Monitoring of Aerosol Plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, Martin; Dorling, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    Plumes of atmospheric aerosol have been studied using a range of satellite and ground-based techniques. The Sea-viewing WideField-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) has been used to observe plumes of sulphate aerosol and Saharan dust around the coast of the United Kingdom. Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) was retrieved from SeaWiFS for two events; a plume of Saharan dust transported over the United Kingdom from Western Africa and a period of elevated sulphate experienced over the Easternregion of the UK. Patterns of AOT are discussed and related to the synoptic and mesoscale weather conditions. Further observation of the sulphate aerosol event was undertaken using the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer instrument(AVHRR). Atmospheric back trajectories and weather conditions were studied in order to identify the meteorological conditions which led to this event. Co-located ground-based measurements of PM 10 and PM 2.5 were obtained for 4sites within the UK and PM 2.5/10 ratios were calculated in order to identify any unusually high or low ratios(indicating the dominant size fraction within the plume)during either of these events. Calculated percentiles ofPM 2.5/10 ratios during the 2 events examined show that these events were notable within the record, but were in noway unique or unusual in the context of a 3 yr monitoring record. Visibility measurements for both episodes have been examined and show that visibility degradation occurred during both the sulphate aerosol and Saharan dust episodes

  8. Active millimeter-wave imaging using a raster scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hülsmann, Axel; Liebelt, Andreas; Tessmann, Axel; Leuther, Arnulf; Schlechtweg, Michael; Ambacher, Oliver

    2009-05-01

    A millimeter-wave imaging system has been developed operating at a center frequency of 94 GHz. The system has a single stationary mounted transmit and receive lensed horn antenna and two moving mirrors in x and y. The beam is generated by a FMCW-radar module. The final beam aperture is an off-set parabolic mirror which focuses the beam to a small spot at 2 m distance. Key component of the FMCW radar module is a MMIC, which includes a VCO, a MPA/HPA, two Lange-couplers, an LNA , a Wilkenson splitter, and an I/Q-mixer. This MMIC is fabricated using IAF's 100 nm metamorphic HEMT process.

  9. Broadband notch filter design for millimeter-wave plasma diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtula, V; Michelsen, P K; Leipold, F; Salewski, M; Korsholm, S B; Meo, F; Nielsen, S K; Stejner, M; Moseev, D; Johansen, T

    2010-10-01

    Notch filters are integrated in plasma diagnostic systems to protect millimeter-wave receivers from intensive stray radiation. Here we present a design of a notch filter with a center frequency of 140 GHz, a rejection bandwidth of ∼900 MHz, and a typical insertion loss below 2 dB in the passband of ±9 GHz. The design is based on a fundamental rectangular waveguide with eight cylindrical cavities coupled by T-junction apertures formed as thin slits. Parameters that affect the notch performance such as physical lengths and conductor materials are discussed. The excited resonance mode in the cylindrical cavities is the fundamental TE(11). The performance of the constructed filter is measured using a vector network analyzer monitoring a total bandwidth of 30 GHz. We compare the measurements with numerical simulations.

  10. Millimeter-wave spectra of the Jovian planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Joanna; Steffes, Paul G.

    1991-01-01

    The millimeter wave portion of the electromagnetic spectrum is critical for understanding the subcloud atmospheric structure of the Jovian planets (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune). This research utilizes a combination of laboratory measurements, computer modeling, and radio astronomical observation in order to obtain a better understanding of the millimeter-wave spectra of the Jovian planets. The pressure broadened absorption from gaseous ammonia (NH3) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) was measured in the laboratory under simulated conditions for the Jovian atmospheres. Researchers developed new formalisms for computing the absorptivity of gaseous NH3 and H2S based on their laboratory measurements. They developed a radiative transfer and thermochemical model to predict the abundance and distribution of absorbing constituents in the Jovian atmospheres. They used the model to compute the millimeter wave emission from the Jovian planets.

  11. Multi-parameter-fitting procedure for photothermal infrared radiometry on multilayered and bulk-absorbing solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorr, Peter; Gruss, Christian

    2001-01-01

    Photothermal infrared radiometry has been used for the measurement of thermophysical, optical, and geometrical properties of multilayered samples of paint on a metallic substrate. A special data normalization is applied to reduce the number of sensitive parameters which makes the identification task for the remaining parameters easier. The normalization stabilizes the evaluation of the photothermal signal and makes the infrared radiometry more attractive for applications in the industrial environment. It is shown that modeling and multi-parameter-fitting can be applied successfully to the normalized data for the determination of layer thicknesses. As a side product we can calculate some other physical properties of the sample. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  12. Segmented Chirped-Pulse Millimeter-Wave Spectroscopy for Astrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Benjamin E.; Steber, Amanda; Gruet, Sébastien; Schnell, Melanie

    2016-06-01

    The ability to detect molecules in the interstellar medium (ISM) is afforded to us by the collaboration of state-of-the-art observations, like from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), and high-resolution laboratory spectra. Here, we present our use of a commercial segmented chirped-pulse Fourier transform millimeter-wave rotational spectrometer to study simple oxygen-containing organic molecules. Our spectrometer operates in the region 75 - 110 GHz, providing an overlap with ALMA's Band 3 and allowing direct comparison of our laboratory spectra with observational data. We have measured rotational spectra of 1,2-propanediol[1, 2, 3] and methyl acetate[4, 5] in this spectral range at room temperature - both have been previously studied in the microwave and millimeter-wave regions. The rotational spectrum of the former in the 3 mm region shows eight different conformers to date. Spectral bandwidth overlap with ALMA Band 3 will allow for easier detection of new chemicals in the ISM. [1] Caminati, W., J. Mol. Spectrosc., 86(1), 193-201, 1981. [2] Lovas, F. J., Plusquellic, D. F., Pate, B. H., Neill, J. T., Muckle, M. T. and Remijan, A. J., J. Mol. Spectrosc., 257(1), 82-93, 2009. [3] Bossa, J. -B., Ordu, M. H., Müller, H. S. P., Lewen, F. and Schlemmer, S., Astron. Astrophys., 570, A12, 2014. [4] Tudorie, M., Kleiner, I., Hougen, J. T., Melandri, S., Sutikdja, L. W. and Stahl, W., J. Mol. Spectrosc., 269, 211-225, 2011. [5] Nguyen, H. V. L., Kleiner, I., Shipman, S. T., Mae, Y., Hirose, K., Hatanaka, S. and Kobayashi, K., J. Mol. Spectrosc., 299, 17-21, 2014.

  13. Modern Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Power Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Robert J.; Luhmann, Neville C.; Booske, John H.; Nusinovich, Gregory S.

    2005-04-01

    A comprehensive study of microwave vacuum electronic devices and their current and future applications While both vacuum and solid-state electronics continue to evolve and provide unique solutions, emerging commercial and military applications that call for higher power and higher frequencies to accommodate massive volumes of transmitted data are the natural domain of vacuum electronics technology. Modern Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Power Electronics provides systems designers, engineers, and researchers-especially those with primarily solid-state training-with a thoroughly up-to-date survey of the rich field of microwave vacuum electronic device (MVED) technology. This book familiarizes the R&D and academic communities with the capabilities and limitations of MVED and highlights the exciting scientific breakthroughs of the past decade that are dramatically increasing the compactness, efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and reliability of this entire class of devices. This comprehensive text explores a wide range of topics: * Traveling-wave tubes, which form the backbone of satellite and airborne communications, as well as of military electronic countermeasures systems * Microfabricated MVEDs and advanced electron beam sources * Klystrons, gyro-amplifiers, and crossed-field devices * "Virtual prototyping" of MVEDs via advanced 3-D computational models * High-Power Microwave (HPM) sources * Next-generation microwave structures and circuits * How to achieve linear amplification * Advanced materials technologies for MVEDs * A Web site appendix providing a step-by-step walk-through of a typical MVED design process Concluding with an in-depth examination of emerging applications and future possibilities for MVEDs, Modern Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Power Electronics ensures that systems designers and engineers understand and utilize the significant potential of this mature, yet continually developing technology. SPECIAL NOTE: All of the editors' royalties realized from

  14. Ground Based Monitoring of Cloud Activity on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlies, Paul; Hayes, Alexander; Rojo, Patricio; Ádámkovics, Máté; Turtle, Elizabeth; Buratti, Bonnie

    2014-11-01

    We will report on the latest results of an on-going ground based monitoring campaign of Saturn’s moon Titan using the SINFONI (Spectrograph for INtegral Field Observations in the Near Infrared) instrument on the Very Large Telescope (VLT). Presently, much is still unknown about the complex and dynamic hydrologic system of Titan as observations have yet to be made through an entire Titan year (29.7 Earth years). Because of the limited ability to observe Titan with Cassini, a combined ground and spaced-based approach provides a steady cadence of observation throughout the duration of a Titan year. We will present the results of observations to date using the adaptive optics (AO) mode (weather dependent) of SINFONI. We have been regularly observing Titan since April 2014 for the purpose of monitoring and identifying clouds and have also been in collaboration with the Cassini team that has concurrent ISS observations and historical VIMS observations of clouds. Our discussion will focus on the various algorithms and approaches used for cloud identification and analysis. Currently, we are entering into a very interesting time for clouds and Titan hydrology as Saturn moves into north polar summer for the first time since Cassini entered the Saturnian system. The increased insolation that this will bring to the north, where the majority of the liquid methane lakes reside, will give us our first observations of the potentially complex interplay between surface liquid and atmospheric conditions. By carefully monitoring and characterizing clouds (size, optical depth, altitude, etc.) we will also be able to derive constraints that can help to guide and validate GCMs. Since the beginning of our observations, no clouds have been observed through ground based observations, while Cassini has only observed a single cloud event in the north polar region over Ligeia Mare. We will provide an update on the latest results of our cloud monitoring campaign and discuss how this

  15. Reconstructing Fire Records from Ground-Based Routine Aerosol Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Zhao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Long-term fire records are important to understanding the trend of biomass burning and its interactions with air quality and climate at regional and global scales. Traditionally, such data have been compiled from ground surveys or satellite remote sensing. To obtain aerosol information during a fire event to use in analyzing air quality, we propose a new method of developing a long-term fire record for the contiguous United States using an unconventional data source: ground-based aerosol monitoring. Assisted by satellite fire detection, the mass concentration, size distribution, and chemical composition data of surface aerosols collected from the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE network are examined to identify distinct aerosol characteristics during satellite-detected fire and non-fire periods. During a fire episode, elevated aerosol concentrations and heavy smoke are usually recorded by ground monitors and satellite sensors. Based on the unique physical and chemical characteristics of fire-dominated aerosols reported in the literature, we analyzed the surface aerosol observations from the IMPROVE network during satellite-detected fire events to establish a set of indicators to identify fire events from routine aerosol monitoring data. Five fire identification criteria were chosen: (1 high concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 (particles smaller than 2.5 and 10 in diameters, respectively; (2 a high PM2.5/PM10 ratio; (3 high organic carbon (OC/PM2.5 and elemental carbon (EC/PM2.5 ratios; (4 a high potassium (K/PM2.5 ratio; and (5 a low soil/PM2.5 ratio. Using these criteria, we are able to identify a number of fire episodes close to 15 IMPROVE monitors from 2001 to 2011. Most of these monitors are located in the Western and Central United States. In any given year within the study period fire events often occurred between April and September, especially in the two months of April and September. This ground-based fire

  16. Modeling the detectability of vesicoureteral reflux using microwave radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo F; Stauffer, Paul R; De Luca, Valeria; Bardati, Fernando; Snow, Brent W

    2010-01-01

    We present the modeling efforts on antenna design, frequency selection and receiver sensitivity estimation to detect vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) using microwave (MW) radiometry as warm urine from the bladder maintained at fever range temperature using a MW hyperthermia device reflows into the kidneys. The radiometer center frequency (f c ), frequency band (Δf) and aperture radius (r a ) of the physical antenna for kidney temperature monitoring are determined using a simplified universal antenna model with a circular aperture. Anatomical information extracted from the computed tomography (CT) images of children aged 4-6 years is used to construct a layered 3D tissue model. Radiometric antenna efficiency is evaluated in terms of the ratio of the power collected from the target at depth to the total power received by the antenna (η). The power ratio of the theoretical antenna is used to design a microstrip log spiral antenna with directional radiation pattern over f c ± Δf/2. Power received by the log spiral from the deep target is enhanced using a thin low-loss dielectric matching layer. A cylindrical metal cup is proposed to shield the antenna from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Transient thermal simulations are carried out to determine the minimum detectable change in the antenna brightness temperature (δT B ) for 15-25 mL urine refluxes at 40-42 0 C located 35 mm from the skin surface. Theoretical antenna simulations indicate maximum η over 1.1-1.6 GHz for r a = 30-40 mm. Simulations of the 35 mm radius tapered log spiral yielded a higher power ratio over f c ± Δf/2 for the 35-40 mm deep targets in the presence of an optimal matching layer. Radiometric temperature calculations indicate δT B ≥ 0.1 K for the 15 mL urine at 40 0 C and 35 mm depth. Higher η and δT B were observed for the antenna and matching layer inside the metal cup. Reflection measurements of the log spiral in a saline phantom are in agreement with the simulation data. The

  17. Modeling the detectability of vesicoureteral reflux using microwave radiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arunachalam, Kavitha [Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai (India); Maccarini, Paolo F; Stauffer, Paul R [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); De Luca, Valeria [Department of Information Tech and Electrical Eng., ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Bardati, Fernando [Department of Computer Science, Systems and Production, University of Rome, Tor Vergata, Roma (Italy); Snow, Brent W, E-mail: akavitha@iitm.ac.i [University of Utah and Primary Children' s Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2010-09-21

    We present the modeling efforts on antenna design, frequency selection and receiver sensitivity estimation to detect vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) using microwave (MW) radiometry as warm urine from the bladder maintained at fever range temperature using a MW hyperthermia device reflows into the kidneys. The radiometer center frequency (f{sub c}), frequency band ({Delta}f) and aperture radius (r{sub a}) of the physical antenna for kidney temperature monitoring are determined using a simplified universal antenna model with a circular aperture. Anatomical information extracted from the computed tomography (CT) images of children aged 4-6 years is used to construct a layered 3D tissue model. Radiometric antenna efficiency is evaluated in terms of the ratio of the power collected from the target at depth to the total power received by the antenna ({eta}). The power ratio of the theoretical antenna is used to design a microstrip log spiral antenna with directional radiation pattern over f{sub c} {+-} {Delta}f/2. Power received by the log spiral from the deep target is enhanced using a thin low-loss dielectric matching layer. A cylindrical metal cup is proposed to shield the antenna from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Transient thermal simulations are carried out to determine the minimum detectable change in the antenna brightness temperature ({delta}T{sub B}) for 15-25 mL urine refluxes at 40-42 {sup 0}C located 35 mm from the skin surface. Theoretical antenna simulations indicate maximum {eta} over 1.1-1.6 GHz for r{sub a} = 30-40 mm. Simulations of the 35 mm radius tapered log spiral yielded a higher power ratio over f{sub c} {+-} {Delta}f/2 for the 35-40 mm deep targets in the presence of an optimal matching layer. Radiometric temperature calculations indicate {delta}T{sub B} {>=} 0.1 K for the 15 mL urine at 40 {sup 0}C and 35 mm depth. Higher {eta} and {delta}T{sub B} were observed for the antenna and matching layer inside the metal cup. Reflection measurements

  18. Ground-based measurements of the 1.3 to 0.3 mm spectrum of Jupiter and Saturn, and their detailed calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Juan R.; Serabyn, Eugene; Wiedner, Martina C.; Moreno, Raphäel; Orton, Glenn

    2017-07-01

    One of the legacies of the now retired Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) is presented in this paper. We measured for the first time the emission of the giant planets Jupiter and Saturn across the 0.3 to 1.3 mm wavelength range using a Fourier Transform Spectrometer mounted on the 10.4 m dish of the CSO at Mauna Kea, Hawaii, 4100 m above sea level. A careful calibration, including the evaluation of the antenna performance over such a wide wavelength range and the removal of the Earth's atmosphere effects, has allowed the detection of broad absorption lines on those planets' atmospheres. The calibrated data allowed us to verify the predictions of standard models for both planets in this spectral region, and to confirm the absolute radiometry in the case of Jupiter. Besides their physical interest, the results are also important as both planets are calibration references in the current era of operating ground-based and space-borne submillimeter instruments.

  19. Ground-based measurements of the 1.3 to 0.3 millimeter spectrum of Jupiter and Saturn, and their detailed calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Juan R; Serabyn, Eugene; Wiedner, Martina C; Moreno, Raphäel; Orton, Glenn

    2017-07-01

    One of the legacies of the now retired Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) is presented in this paper. We measured for the first time the emission of the giant planets Jupiter and Saturn across the 0.3 to 1.3 mm wavelength range using a Fourier Transform Spectrometer mounted on the 10.4-meter dish of the CSO at Mauna Kea, Hawaii, 4100 meters above sea level. A careful calibration, including the evaluation of the antenna performance over such a wide wavelength range and the removal of the Earth's atmosphere effects, has allowed the detection of broad absorption lines on those planets' atmospheres. The calibrated data allowed us to verify the predictions of standard models for both planets in this spectral region, and to confirm the absolute radiometry in the case of Jupiter. Besides their physical interest, the results are also important as both planets are calibration references in the current era of operating ground-based and space-borne submillimeter instruments.

  20. Time series inversion of spectra from ground-based radiometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Christensen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Retrieving time series of atmospheric constituents from ground-based spectrometers often requires different temporal averaging depending on the altitude region in focus. This can lead to several datasets existing for one instrument, which complicates validation and comparisons between instruments. This paper puts forth a possible solution by incorporating the temporal domain into the maximum a posteriori (MAP retrieval algorithm. The state vector is increased to include measurements spanning a time period, and the temporal correlations between the true atmospheric states are explicitly specified in the a priori uncertainty matrix. This allows the MAP method to effectively select the best temporal smoothing for each altitude, removing the need for several datasets to cover different altitudes. The method is compared to traditional averaging of spectra using a simulated retrieval of water vapour in the mesosphere. The simulations show that the method offers a significant advantage compared to the traditional method, extending the sensitivity an additional 10 km upwards without reducing the temporal resolution at lower altitudes. The method is also tested on the Onsala Space Observatory (OSO water vapour microwave radiometer confirming the advantages found in the simulation. Additionally, it is shown how the method can interpolate data in time and provide diagnostic values to evaluate the interpolated data.

  1. Bridge Testing With Ground-Based Interferometric Radar: Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiara, P.; Morelli, A.

    2010-05-01

    The research of innovative non-contact techniques aimed at the vibration measurement of civil engineering structures (also for damage detection and structural health monitoring) is continuously directed to the optimization of measures and methods. Ground-Based Radar Interferometry (GBRI) represents the more recent technique available for static and dynamic control of structures and ground movements. Dynamic testing of bridges and buildings in operational conditions are currently performed: (a) to assess the conformity of the structure to the project design at the end of construction; (b) to identify the modal parameters (i.e. natural frequencies, mode shapes and damping ratios) and to check the variation of any modal parameters over the years; (c) to evaluate the amplitude of the structural response to special load conditions (i.e. strong winds, earthquakes, heavy railway or roadway loads). If such tests are carried out by using a non-contact technique (like GBRI), the classical issues of contact sensors (like accelerometers) are easily overtaken. This paper presents and discusses the results of various tests carried out on full-scale bridges by using a Stepped Frequency-Continuous Wave radar system.

  2. Use of ground-based wind profiles in mesoscale forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlatter, Thomas W.

    1985-01-01

    A brief review is presented of recent uses of ground-based wind profile data in mesoscale forecasting. Some of the applications are in real time, and some are after the fact. Not all of the work mentioned here has been published yet, but references are given wherever possible. As Gage and Balsley (1978) point out, sensitive Doppler radars have been used to examine tropospheric wind profiles since the 1970's. It was not until the early 1980's, however, that the potential contribution of these instruments to operational forecasting and numerical weather prediction became apparent. Profiler winds and radiosonde winds compare favorably, usually within a few m/s in speed and 10 degrees in direction (see Hogg et al., 1983), but the obvious advantage of the profiler is its frequent (hourly or more often) sampling of the same volume. The rawinsonde balloon is launched only twice a day and drifts with the wind. In this paper, I will: (1) mention two operational uses of data from a wind profiling system developed jointly by the Wave Propagation and Aeronomy Laboratories of NOAA; (2) describe a number of displays of these same data on a workstation for mesoscale forecasting developed by the Program for Regional Observing and Forecasting Services (PROFS); and (3) explain some interesting diagnostic calculations performed by meteorologists of the Wave Propagation Laboratory.

  3. Environmental impacts of PV systems -- Ground-based vs BIPV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, A.E.; Hill, R.; Hynes, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    This study is part of the ExternE program of the European Commission on the external costs of the photovoltaic (PV) fuel cycle. The objective of this paper is the quantitative evaluation of the main environmental impacts of two selected PV systems--the ground-based 1MWp system in Toledo, Spain and the 40 kWp building integrated facade in Newcastle upon Tyne, NE England, using the methodology of life cycle analysis (LCA). Both systems use silicon wafer technology at present, but the Newcastle facade was also studied with the incorporation CdTe modules. The results of the LCA show that atmospheric emissions are the priority impacts with respect to the assessed PV systems. Comparing Si wafer systems, the CO 2 emissions were 88 t/GWh for the Toledo PV plant and 143t/GWh for the BIPV facade. If the facade had used electrodeposited CdTe, the CO 2 emissions would fall to about 50t/GWh

  4. Characterizing GEO Titan Transtage Fragmentations using Ground-based Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowardin, H.; Anz-Meador, P.

    2016-01-01

    In a continued effort to better characterize the Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) environment, NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) utilizes various ground-based optical assets to acquire photometric and spectral data of known debris associated with fragmentations in or near GEO. The Titan IIIC Transtage upper stage is known to have fragmented four times. Two of the four fragmentations were in GEO while a third Transtage fragmented in GEO transfer orbit. The forth fragmentation occurred in Low Earth Orbit. In order to better assess what may be causing these fragmentations, the NASA ODPO recently acquired a Titan Transtage test and display article that was previously in the custody of the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG) in Tucson, Arizona. After initial inspections at AMARG demonstrated that the test article was of sufficient fidelity to be of interest, the test article was brought to JSC to continue material analysis and historical documentation of the Titan Transtage. The Transtage will be a subject of forensic analysis using spectral measurements to compare with telescopic data; as well, a scale model will be created to use in the Optical Measurement Center for photometric analysis of an intact Transtage, including a BRDF. The following presentation will provide a review of the Titan Transtage, the current analysis that has been done to date, and the future work to be completed in support of characterizing the GEO and near GEO orbital debris environment.

  5. Ground-based detection of G star superflares with NGTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, James A. G.; Wheatley, Peter J.; Pugh, Chloe E.; Gänsicke, Boris T.; Gillen, Edward; Broomhall, Anne-Marie; Armstrong, David J.; Burleigh, Matthew R.; Chaushev, Alexander; Eigmüller, Philipp; Erikson, Anders; Goad, Michael R.; Grange, Andrew; Günther, Maximilian N.; Jenkins, James S.; McCormac, James; Raynard, Liam; Thompson, Andrew P. G.; Udry, Stéphane; Walker, Simon; Watson, Christopher A.; West, Richard G.

    2018-04-01

    We present high cadence detections of two superflares from a bright G8 star (V = 11.56) with the Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS). We improve upon previous superflare detections by resolving the flare rise and peak, allowing us to fit a solar flare inspired model without the need for arbitrary break points between rise and decay. Our data also enables us to identify substructure in the flares. From changing starspot modulation in the NGTS data we detect a stellar rotation period of 59 hours, along with evidence for differential rotation. We combine this rotation period with the observed ROSAT X-ray flux to determine that the star's X-ray activity is saturated. We calculate the flare bolometric energies as 5.4^{+0.8}_{-0.7}× 10^{34}and 2.6^{+0.4}_{-0.3}× 10^{34}erg and compare our detections with G star superflares detected in the Kepler survey. We find our main flare to be one of the largest amplitude superflares detected from a bright G star. With energies more than 100 times greater than the Carrington event, our flare detections demonstrate the role that ground-based instruments such as NGTS can have in assessing the habitability of Earth-like exoplanets, particularly in the era of PLATO.

  6. Ground-based measurements of UV Index (UVI at Helwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Farouk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available On October 2010 UV Index (UVI ground-based measurements were carried out by weather station at solar laboratory in NRIAG. The daily variation has maximum values in spring and summer days, while minimum values in autumn and winter days. The low level of UVI between 2.55 and 2.825 was found in December, January and February. The moderate level of UVI between 3.075 and 5.6 was found in March, October and November. The high level of UVI between 6.7 and 7.65 was found in April, May and September. The very high level of UVI between 8 and 8.6 was found in June, July and August. High level of radiation over 6 months per year including 3 months with a very high level UVI. According to the equation {UVI=a[SZA]b} the UVI increases with decreasing SZA by 82% on a daily scale and 88% on a monthly scale. Helwan exposure to a high level of radiation over 6 months per year including 3 months with a very high level UVI, so it is advisable not to direct exposure to the sun from 11 am to 2:00 pm.

  7. Observing Tsunamis in the Ionosphere Using Ground Based GPS Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, D. A.; Komjathy, A.; Song, Y. Tony; Stephens, P.; Hickey, M. P.; Foster, J.

    2011-01-01

    Ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements of ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) show variations consistent with atmospheric internal gravity waves caused by ocean tsunamis following recent seismic events, including the Tohoku tsunami of March 11, 2011. We observe fluctuations correlated in time, space, and wave properties with this tsunami in TEC estimates processed using JPL's Global Ionospheric Mapping Software. These TEC estimates were band-pass filtered to remove ionospheric TEC variations with periods outside the typical range of internal gravity waves caused by tsunamis. Observable variations in TEC appear correlated with the Tohoku tsunami near the epicenter, at Hawaii, and near the west coast of North America. Disturbance magnitudes are 1-10% of the background TEC value. Observations near the epicenter are compared to estimates of expected tsunami-driven TEC variations produced by Embry Riddle Aeronautical University's Spectral Full Wave Model, an atmosphere-ionosphere coupling model, and found to be in good agreement. The potential exists to apply these detection techniques to real-time GPS TEC data, providing estimates of tsunami speed and amplitude that may be useful for future early warning systems.

  8. Passive millimeter-wave imaging technology for phased-array systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christopher A.; Clark, Stuart E.; Lovberg, John A.; Kolinko, Vladimir G.

    2003-08-01

    Trex Enterprises has developed a passive millimeter-wave imaging system incorporating a number of new technologies. The system has a pupil-plane architecture that uses a phased array, flat panel antenna and a phase processor based upon millimeter-wave optics. The production and operation of a 232-element W-band phased array and processor poses a number of technical problems including minimizing losses in the front end and adjusting the phase lengths of the processor. The system also has 192 frequency processor cards that perform real-time Fourier analysis of W-band signals over an 18 GHz bandwidth using millimeter-wave optics. Production of a suitable phase and frequency processor in large quantities that form good beams and maintain signal strength requires the adoption of new materials and design strategies. The refinement of these technologies at W-band frequencies allowed Trex Enterprises to produce an imager which is both compact and suitable for large-scale production. In this paper, we will discuss the design and production of the millimeter-wave components unique to this system architecture. We will also present the performance of these components and how they affect the performance of the millimeter-wave imager as a whole. An integrated front end is tested to determine the accuracy of the beam-forming network in producing antenna patterns.

  9. OBSERVATIONAL SELECTION EFFECTS WITH GROUND-BASED GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Holz, Daniel E. [University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Katsavounidis, Erik [LIGO, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2017-01-20

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfect all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean, and as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources’ right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO’s observations and electromagnetic (EM) follow-up. Beyond galactic foregrounds associated with seasonal variations, we find that equatorial observatories can access over 80% of the localization probability, while mid-latitudes will access closer to 70%. Facilities located near the two LIGO sites can observe sources closer to their zenith than their analogs in the south, but the average observation will still be no closer than 44° from zenith. We also find that observatories in Africa or the South Atlantic will wait systematically longer before they can begin observing compared to the rest of the world; though, there is a preference for longitudes near the LIGOs. These effects, along with knowledge of the LIGO antenna pattern, can inform EM follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  10. Monitoring Hydraulic Fracturing Using Ground-Based Controlled Source Electromagnetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, M. S.; Trevino, S., III; Everett, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing allows hydrocarbon production in low permeability formations. Imaging the distribution of fluid used to create a hydraulic fracture can aid in the characterization of fracture properties such as extent of plume penetration as well as fracture azimuth and symmetry. This could contribute to improving the efficiency of an operation, for example, in helping to determine ideal well spacing or the need to refracture a zone. A ground-based controlled-source electromagnetics (CSEM) technique is ideal for imaging the fluid due to the change in field caused by the difference in the conductive properties of the fluid when compared to the background. With advances in high signal to noise recording equipment, coupled with a high-power, broadband transmitter we can show hydraulic fracture extent and azimuth with minimal processing. A 3D finite element code is used to model the complete well casing along with the layered subsurface. This forward model is used to optimize the survey design and isolate the band of frequencies with the best response. In the field, the results of the modeling are also used to create a custom pseudorandom numeric (PRN) code to control the frequencies transmitted through a grounded dipole source. The receivers record the surface voltage across two grounded dipoles, one parallel and one perpendicular to the transmitter. The data are presented as the displays of amplitude ratios across several frequencies with the associated spatial information. In this presentation, we show multiple field results in multiple basins in the United States along with the CSEM theory used to create the survey designs.

  11. SAFARI 2000 AERONET Ground-based Aerosol Data, Dry Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) is an optical ground-based aerosol monitoring network and data archive system. AERONET measurements of the...

  12. Photonic Implementation of 4-QAM/QPSK Electrical Modulation at Millimeter-Wave Frequency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xianbin; Jensen, Jesper Bevensee; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2008-01-01

    We propose a photonic method for generating millimeter-wave 4-QAM/QPSK modulated signals. The method is based on optical phase modulation by multilevel electrical signals and optical carrier-suppression. Simulation results are presented for 2.5 Gsymbol/s 4-QAM and QPSK signals at a 36 GHz carrier....... Furthermore, this method can be extended to generate millimeter-wave m-PSK signals and can be incorporated into broadband radio-over-fiber systems to support wireless/ wireline converged access network.......We propose a photonic method for generating millimeter-wave 4-QAM/QPSK modulated signals. The method is based on optical phase modulation by multilevel electrical signals and optical carrier-suppression. Simulation results are presented for 2.5 Gsymbol/s 4-QAM and QPSK signals at a 36 GHz carrier...

  13. Millimeter-Wave Dielectric Properties of Single Crystal Ferroelectric and Dielectric Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCloy, John S.; Korolev, Konstantin A.; Li, Zijing; Afsar, Mohammed N.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2011-01-03

    Transmittance measurements on various single crystal ferroelectric materials over a broad millimeter-wave frequency range have been performed. Frequency dependence of the complex dielectric permittivity has been determined in the millimeter wave region for the first time. The measurements have been employed using a free-space quasi-optical millimeter-wave spectrometer equipped with a set of high power backward wave oscillators (BWOs) as sources of coherent radiation, tunable in the range from 30 - 120 GHz. The uncertainties and possible sources of instrumentation and measurement errors related to the free-space millimeter-wave technique are discussed. This work has demonstrated that precise MMW permittivities can be obtained even on small thin crystals using the BWO quasi-optical approach.

  14. Near-field millimeter-wave imaging for weapon detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheen, D.M.; McMakin, D.L.; Collins, H.D.; Hall, T.E.

    1992-11-01

    Various millimeter-wave imaging systems capable of imaging through clothing for the detection of contraband metal, plastic, or ceramic weapons, have been developed at PNL. Two dimensional scanned holographic systems, developed at 35, 90, and 350 GHz, are used to obtain high resolution images of metal and plastic targets concealed by clothing. Coherent single-frequency amplitude and phase data, which is gathered over a two-dimensional scanned aperture, is reconstructed to the target plane using a holographic wavefront reconstruction technique. Practical weapon detection systems require high-speed scanning. To achieve this goal, a 35 GHz linear sequentially switched array has been built and integrated into a high speed linear scanner. This system poses special challenges on calibration / signal processing of the holographic system. Further, significant improvements in speed are required to achieve real time operation. Toward this goal, a wideband scanned system which allows for a two-dimensional image formation from a one-dimensional scanned (or array) system has been developed . Signal / image processing techniques developed and implemented for this technique are a variation on conventional synthetic aperture radar (SAR) techniques which eliminate far-field and narrow bandwidth requirements. Performance of this technique is demonstrated with imaging results obtained from a K{sub a}-band system.

  15. Near-field millimeter-wave imaging for weapon detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheen, D.M.; McMakin, D.L.; Collins, H.D.; Hall, T.E.

    1992-11-01

    Various millimeter-wave imaging systems capable of imaging through clothing for the detection of contraband metal, plastic, or ceramic weapons, have been developed at PNL. Two dimensional scanned holographic systems, developed at 35, 90, and 350 GHz, are used to obtain high resolution images of metal and plastic targets concealed by clothing. Coherent single-frequency amplitude and phase data, which is gathered over a two-dimensional scanned aperture, is reconstructed to the target plane using a holographic wavefront reconstruction technique. Practical weapon detection systems require high-speed scanning. To achieve this goal, a 35 GHz linear sequentially switched array has been built and integrated into a high speed linear scanner. This system poses special challenges on calibration / signal processing of the holographic system. Further, significant improvements in speed are required to achieve real time operation. Toward this goal, a wideband scanned system which allows for a two-dimensional image formation from a one-dimensional scanned (or array) system has been developed . Signal / image processing techniques developed and implemented for this technique are a variation on conventional synthetic aperture radar (SAR) techniques which eliminate far-field and narrow bandwidth requirements. Performance of this technique is demonstrated with imaging results obtained from a K[sub a]-band system.

  16. Millimeter-wave molecular line observations of the Tornado nebula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, D.; Oka, T.; Tanaka, K.; Matsumura, S.; Miura, K.; Takekawa, S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of millimeter-wave molecular line observations of the Tornado Nebula (G357.7-0.1), which is a bright radio source behind the Galactic center region. A 15' × 15' area was mapped in the J = 1-0 lines of CO, 13 CO, and HCO + with the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope. The Very Large Array archival data of OH at 1720 MHz were also reanalyzed. We found two molecular clouds with separate velocities, V LSR = –14 km s –1 and +5 km s –1 . These clouds show rough spatial anti-correlation. Both clouds are associated with OH 1720 MHz emissions in the area overlapping with the Tornado Nebula. The spatial and velocity coincidence indicates violent interaction between the clouds and the Tornado Nebula. Modestly excited gas prefers the position of the Tornado 'head' in the –14 km s –1 cloud, also suggesting the interaction. Virial analysis shows that the +5 km s –1 cloud is more tightly bound by self-gravity than the –14 km s –1 cloud. We propose a formation scenario for the Tornado Nebula; the +5 km s –1 cloud collided into the –14 km s –1 cloud, generating a high-density layer behind the shock front, which activates a putative compact object by Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion to eject a pair of bipolar jets.

  17. Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Signal Power Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadziabdic, Dzenan

    concentrate on single-tone performance, this study also encompasses two-tone intermodulation distortion measurements. An 8GHz two-stage power amplifier (PA) MMIC was developed. Harmonic tuning was performed to enhance the power-added efficiency (PAE). The transistors were biased in deep class-AB where low......Among the major limitations in high-speed communications and highresolution radars is the lack of efficient and powerful signal sources with low distortion. Microwave and millimeter-wave (mm-wave) signal power is needed for signal transmission. Progress in signal generation stems largely from...... distortion and high PAE were observed. The estimated output power of 42.5 dBm and PAE of 31.3% are comparable to the state-of-the-art results reported for GaN HEMT amplifiers. Wireless communication systems planned in the near future will operate at E-band, around 71-86 GHz, and require mm-wave-PAs to boost...

  18. Survey on the radon gas content and surface gamma radiometry in the cape Fort William area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo, Marco

    1998-01-01

    The Ecuadorian Commission of Atomic Energy, during the last years have carried out investigations on the presence of Radon in the Ecuador with a numberless of purposes: radon in polluted spaces, contamination of radon in mining work, radon applied to detection of uranium and exploration of uranium, getting outputs that in their due moment have been published in several reports through the CEEA. Within the Antarctic Ecuadorian Program, it was expounded carry out investigation, on the presence of the gas radon and superficial gamma radiometry in pint Fort William. This study enlarges to the Bransfield Strait, utilizing portable equipment, and allowed to carry out studies in inhospitable zones, where an infrastructure does not exist in order to could employ more complex equipment. The bank of data gotten on radiometry and emanometry will apply to fields of radioprotection, geophysics and geology

  19. Ground-based monitoring of solar radiation in Moldova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aculinin, Alexandr; Smicov, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    Integrated measurements of solar radiation in Kishinev, Moldova have been started by Atmospheric Research Group (ARG) at the Institute of Applied Physics from 2003. Direct, diffuse and total components of solar and atmospheric long-wave radiation are measured by using of the radiometric complex at the ground-based solar radiation monitoring station. Measurements are fulfilled at the stationary and moving platforms equipped with the set of 9 broadband solar radiation sensors overlapping wavelength range from UV-B to IR. Detailed description of the station can be found at the site http://arg.phys.asm.md. Ground station is placed in an urban environment of Kishinev city (47.00N; 28.56E). Summary of observation data acquired at the station in the course of short-term period from 2004 to 2009 are presented below. Solar radiation measurements were fulfilled by using CM11(280-3000 nm) and CH1 sensors (Kipp&Zonen). In the course of a year maximum and minimum of monthly sums of total radiation was ~706.4 MJm-2 in June and ~82.1MJm-2 in December, respectively. Monthly sums of direct solar radiation (on horizontal plane) show the maximum and minimum values of the order ~456.9 MJm-2 in July and ~25.5MJm-2 in December, respectively. In an average, within a year should be marked the predominance of direct radiation over the scattered radiation, 51% and 49%, respectively. In the course of a year, the percentage contribution of the direct radiation into the total radiation is ~55-65% from May to September. In the remaining months, the percentage contribution decreases and takes the minimum value of ~ 28% in December. In an average, annual sum of total solar radiation is ~4679.9 MJm-2. For the period from April to September accounts for ~76% of the annual amount of total radiation. Annual sum of sunshine duration accounts for ~2149 hours, which is of ~ 48% from the possible sunshine duration. In an average, within a year maximum and minimum of sunshine duration is ~ 304 hours in

  20. Ground-based Space Weather Monitoring with LOFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Michael; van Haarlem, Michiel; Lawrence, Gareth; Reid, Simon; Bos, Andre; Rawlings, Steve; Salvini, Stef; Mitchell, Cathryn; Soleimani, Manuch; Amado, Sergio; Teresa, Vital

    As one of the first of a new generation of radio instruments, the International LOFAR Telescope (ILT) will provide a number of unique and novel capabilities for the astronomical community. These include remote configuration and operation, dynamic real-time processing and system response, and the ability to provide multiple simultaneous streams of data to a community whose scientific interests run the gamut from lighting in the atmospheres of distant planets to the origins of the universe itself. The LOFAR (LOw Frequency ARray) system is optimized for a frequency range from 30-240 MHz and consists of multiple antenna fields spread across Europe. In the Netherlands, a total 36 LOFAR stations are nearing completion with an initial 8 international stations currently being deployed in Germany, France, Sweden, and the UK. Digital beam-forming techniques make the LOFAR system agile and allow for rapid repointing of the telescope as well as the potential for multiple simultaneous observations. With its dense core array and long interferometric baselines, LOFAR has the potential to achieve unparalleled sensitivity and spatial resolution in the low frequency radio regime. LOFAR will also be one of the first radio observatories to feature automated processing pipelines to deliver fully calibrated science products to its user community. As we discuss in this presentation, the same capabilities that make LOFAR a powerful tool for radio astronomy also provide an excellent platform upon which to build a ground-based monitoring system for space weather events. For example, the ability to monitor Solar activity in near real-time is one of the key scientific capabilities being developed for LOFAR. With only a fraction of its total observing capacity, LOFAR will be able to provide continuous monitoring of the Solar spectrum over the entire 10-240 MHz band down to microsecond timescales. Autonomous routines will scan these incoming spectral data for evidence of Solar flares and be

  1. Biosensors for EVA: Improved Instrumentation for Ground-based Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, B.; Ellerby, G.; Zou, F.; Scott, P.; Jin, C.; Lee, S. M. C.; Coates, J.

    2010-01-01

    During lunar excursions in the EVA suit, real-time measurement of metabolic rate is required to manage consumables and guide activities to ensure safe return to the base. Metabolic rate, or oxygen consumption (VO2), is normally measured from pulmonary parameters but cannot be determined with standard techniques in the oxygen-rich environment of a spacesuit. Our group has developed novel near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) methods to calculate muscle oxygen saturation (SmO 2), hematocrit, and pH, and we recently demonstrated that we can use our NIRS sensor to measure VO 2 on the leg during cycling. Our NSBRI project has 4 objectives: (1) increase the accuracy of the metabolic rate calculation through improved prediction of stroke volume; (2) investigate the relative contributions of calf and thigh oxygen consumption to metabolic rate calculation for walking and running; (3) demonstrate that the NIRS-based noninvasive metabolic rate methodology is sensitive enough to detect decrement in VO 2 in a space analog; and (4) improve instrumentation to allow testing within a spacesuit. Over the past year we have made progress on all four objectives, but the most significant progress was made in improving the instrumentation. The NIRS system currently in use at JSC is based on fiber optics technology. Optical fiber bundles are used to deliver light from a light source in the monitor to the patient, and light reflected back from the patient s muscle to the monitor for spectroscopic analysis. The fiber optic cables are large and fragile, and there is no way to get them in and out of the test spacesuit used for ground-based studies. With complimentary funding from the US Army, we undertook a complete redesign of the sensor and control electronics to build a novel system small enough to be used within the spacesuit and portable enough to be used by a combat medic. In the new system the filament lamp used in the fiber optic system was replaced with a novel broadband near infrared

  2. Oxygen A-band Spectroscopy: An Overlooked Resource for Ground-Based Inference of Physical and Radiative Properties of Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A. B.; Min, Q.; Barker, H. W.

    2011-12-01

    It is less risky to infer climatically-relevant properties of clouds by remote sensing using modalities that exploit climatically-important wavelengths. For instance, to study the energy budget a retrieval of cloud optical depth performed in the solar spectrum is more credible than one that uses microwaves, largely because it is sensitive to the 2nd moment of the particle size distribution (PSD) that determines scattering properties---hence cloud reflectivity and transmitivity. On the other hand, estimates of cloud and precipitable water paths based on passive microwave radiometry are more appropriate for hydrological cycle studies, largely because they are primarily sensitive to the key 3rd-order moment of the PSD. Although highly attractive due to superior spatial resolution, mm-wave cloud radar delivers the 6th moment of the PSD, which is not of any immediate use. This active measurement can be processed into information about the desired lower-order PSD moments, but at the cost of making assumptions about the cloud microphysics that may sometimes be questionable. From this risk management standpoint, we will argue that the O2 A-band spectroscopy (759--771~nm) is an under-exploited resource in cloud remote sensing that can constrain retrievals of cloud optical depth or pressure thickness from ground stations such as the US DOE's ARM facilities. In other words, it should work well as a cloud remote sensing asset in synergy with more common ground-based instrumentation, including multi-spectral shortwave radiometers, hyper-spectral thermal IR spectrometers, multi-channel microwave radiometers, and mm-wave radars. But O2 A-band can bring to the table more unique information about clouds. At high enough spectral resolution, A-band spectra have been shown to respond strongly to deviations from the single/unbroken cloud layer scenario, i.e., fully 3D clouds. In particular, A-band has the surprising capability (for a passive sensor) of detecting the presence of more

  3. Fundamental principles of absolute radiometry and the philosophy of this NBS program (1968 to 1971)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, J.

    1972-01-01

    A description is given work performed on a program to develop an electrically calibrated detector (also called absolute radiometer, absolute detector, and electrically calibrated radiometer) that could be used to realize, maintain, and transfer a scale of total irradiance. The program includes a comprehensive investigation of the theoretical basis of absolute detector radiometry, as well as the design and construction of a number of detectors. A theoretical analysis of the sources of error is also included.

  4. Concealed weapons detection with an improved passive millimeter-wave imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christopher A.; Kolinko, Vladimir G.

    2004-08-01

    Trex Enterprises has developed a second-generation passive millimeter-wave imaging system for detection of concealed weapons and explosives at standoff ranges. Passive millimeter-wave sensors form an image from naturally emitted blackbody radiation in the millimeter-wave portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Radiation at this wavelength passes through most types of clothing, allowing the user to acquire an image of any articles on a suspect"s person that differ significantly from the human body in their reflectivity or radiometric temperature at millimeter-wave wavelengths. Trex Enterprises previously demonstrated a first-generation concealed weapon detection system with the ability to detect handguns and knives under heavy clothing at a range of 27". The second-generation imager, while similar in concept, has an improved field-of-view and a much reduced size and weight. The imager is to be put through a battery of tests by both Trex Enterprises and the National Institute Of Justice to determine its ability to detect both metallic and non-metallic knives and handguns as well as various types of explosive devices. The tests will be conducted indoors and outdoors at various ranges.

  5. Low-cost millimeter-wave transceiver module using SMD packaged MMICs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijningen, M. van; Gauthier, G.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to realize low-cost millimeter-wave modules using only SMD packaged MMICs integrated on a single organic substrate. This approach is demonstrated on a 38 GHz transceiver module for point-to-point LMDS communication systems. The required SMD package technology and

  6. Low-Cost Millimeter-Wave Transceiver Module using SMD packaged MMICs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to realize low-cost millimeter-wave modules using only SMD packaged MMICs integrated on a single organic substrate. This approach is demonstrated on a 38 GHz transceiver module for point-to-point LMDS communication systems. The required SMD package technology and

  7. Millimeter-Wave Integrated Circuit Design for Wireless and Radar Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Krozer, Viktor; Vidkjær, Jens

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a quadrature voltage-controlled oscillator (QVCO), frequency doubler, and sub-harmonic mixer (SHM) for a millimeter-wave (mm-wave) front-end implemented in a high-speed InP DHBT technology. The QVCO exhibits large tuning range from 38 to 47.8 GHz with an output power around -...

  8. A Continuous Millimeter-Wave Imaging Scanner for Art Conservation Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Younus

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A monochromatic continuous millimeter-wave imaging system coupled with an infrared temperature sensor has been used to investigate artistic objects such as painting artworks or antiquities preserved at the museum of Aquitaine. Especially, 2D and 3D analyses have been performed in order to reveal the internal structure of a nearly 3500-year-old sealed Egyptian jar.

  9. Exoplanets -New Results from Space and Ground-based Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udry, Stephane

    The exploration of the outer solar system and in particular of the giant planets and their environments is an on-going process with the Cassini spacecraft currently around Saturn, the Juno mission to Jupiter preparing to depart and two large future space missions planned to launch in the 2020-2025 time frame for the Jupiter system and its satellites (Europa and Ganymede) on the one hand, and the Saturnian system and Titan on the other hand [1,2]. Titan, Saturn's largest satellite, is the only other object in our Solar system to possess an extensive nitrogen atmosphere, host to an active organic chemistry, based on the interaction of N2 with methane (CH4). Following the Voyager flyby in 1980, Titan has been intensely studied from the ground-based large telescopes (such as the Keck or the VLT) and by artificial satellites (such as the Infrared Space Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope) for the past three decades. Prior to Cassini-Huygens, Titan's atmospheric composition was thus known to us from the Voyager missions and also through the explorations by the ISO. Our perception of Titan had thus greatly been enhanced accordingly, but many questions remained as to the nature of the haze surrounding the satellite and the composition of the surface. The recent revelations by the Cassini-Huygens mission have managed to surprise us with many discoveries [3-8] and have yet to reveal more of the interesting aspects of the satellite. The Cassini-Huygens mission to the Saturnian system has been an extraordinary success for the planetary community since the Saturn-Orbit-Insertion (SOI) in July 2004 and again the very successful probe descent and landing of Huygens on January 14, 2005. One of its main targets was Titan. Titan was revealed to be a complex world more like the Earth than any other: it has a dense mostly nitrogen atmosphere and active climate and meteorological cycles where the working fluid, methane, behaves under Titan conditions the way that water does on

  10. Intercomparison of O3 profiles observed by SCIAMACHY and ground based microwave instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Palm

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Ozone profiles retrieved from limb scattering measurements of the SCIAMACHY instrument based on the satellite ENVISAT are compared to ground-based low altitude resolution remote sensors. All profiles are retrieved using optimal estimation. Following the work of Rodgers and Connor (2003 the retrievals of the ground-based instruments are simulated using the SCIAMACHY retrieval. The SCIAMACHY results and the results of the ground-based microwave radiometer in Bremen and Ny Ålesund agree within the expected covariance of the intercomparison.

  11. CO measurements from the ACE-FTS satellite instrument: data analysis and validation using ground-based, airborne and spaceborne observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Clerbaux

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE mission was launched in August 2003 to sound the atmosphere by solar occultation. Carbon monoxide (CO, a good tracer of pollution plumes and atmospheric dynamics, is one of the key species provided by the primary instrument, the ACE-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS. This instrument performs measurements in both the CO 1-0 and 2-0 ro-vibrational bands, from which vertically resolved CO concentration profiles are retrieved, from the mid-troposphere to the thermosphere. This paper presents an updated description of the ACE-FTS version 2.2 CO data product, along with a comprehensive validation of these profiles using available observations (February 2004 to December 2006. We have compared the CO partial columns with ground-based measurements using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and millimeter wave radiometry, and the volume mixing ratio profiles with airborne (both high-altitude balloon flight and airplane observations. CO satellite observations provided by nadir-looking instruments (MOPITT and TES as well as limb-viewing remote sensors (MIPAS, SMR and MLS were also compared with the ACE-FTS CO products. We show that the ACE-FTS measurements provide CO profiles with small retrieval errors (better than 5% from the upper troposphere to 40 km, and better than 10% above. These observations agree well with the correlative measurements, considering the rather loose coincidence criteria in some cases. Based on the validation exercise we assess the following uncertainties to the ACE-FTS measurement data: better than 15% in the upper troposphere (8–12 km, than 30% in the lower stratosphere (12–30 km, and than 25% from 30 to 100 km.

  12. Precursor Analysis for Flight- and Ground-Based Anomaly Risk Significance Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Frank

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the precursor analysis for flight and ground based anomaly risk significance. It includes information on accident precursor analysis, real models vs. models, and probabilistic analysis.

  13. Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System Mixed Broadcast Ephemeris Data (daily files) from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Mixed Broadcast Ephemeris Data (daily files) from the NASA Crustal Dynamics Data...

  14. CLPX-Ground: Ground-based L and Ku band polarimetric scatterometry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes ground-based radar observations carried out at the Fraser Experimental Forest Headquarters, Colorado, USA (39.95 N, 105.9 W), between 17-26...

  15. SAFARI 2000 AERONET Ground-based Aerosol Data, Dry Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) is an optical ground-based aerosol monitoring network and data archive system. AERONET measurements of the column-integrated...

  16. Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System Combined Broadcast Ephemeris Data (hourly files) from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Combined Broadcast Ephemeris Data (hourly files of all distinct navigation messages...

  17. Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System Combined Broadcast Ephemeris Data (daily files) from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Combined Broadcast Ephemeris Data (daily files of all distinct navigation messages...

  18. Chasing Small Exoplanets with Ground-Based Near-Infrared Transit Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon, K. D.; Barentsen, G.; Vinicius, Z.; Vanderburg, A.; Coughlin, J.; Thompson, S.; Mullally, F.; Barclay, T.; Quintana, E.

    2017-11-01

    I will present results from a ground-based survey to measure the infrared radius and other properties of small K2 exoplanets and candidates. The survey is preparation for upcoming discoveries from TESS and characterization with JWST.

  19. Integrated Coherent Radio-over-Fiber Units for Millimeter-Wave Wireless Access

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stöhr, A.; Babiel, S.; Chuenchom, M.

    2015-01-01

    For providing wireless access as a complementary access technology to direct optical access, supporting 1–10 Gb/s per client, we propose a novel scheme based upon the transparent integration of coherent Radio-over-Fiber (CRoF) units with next generation optical access (NGOA) networks using dense...... WDM and a centralized electronic signal processing in the optical line termination to mitigate distortions and to achieve low costs. This paper will concentrate on recent key technological developments that were achieved within the European IPHOBAC-NG project for constructing such CRoF units capable......Ge-based millimeter-wave RF amplifier technology will be reported. In addition, a new coherent optical heterodyne radio-over–fiber scheme is proposed for seamless integration of next generation millimeter-wave wireless access systems into a next generation passive optical network employing dense or even ultra...

  20. Benzocyclobutene as Substrate Material for Planar Millimeter-Wave Structures: Dielectric Characterization and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzo, Sandra; Venneri, Ignazio; di Massa, Giuseppe; Borgia, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The application of benzocyclobutene (BCB) polymer as dielectric substrate material for millimeter-wave microstrip structures is investigated in this paper to face the problem of large losses due to standard dielectrics in the high microwave range. Dielectric properties of BCB are characterized from S-parameter measurements on a conductor-backed coplanar waveguide (CBCPW) using the polymer as substrate material. Excellent features, with a low loss tangent and a stable dielectric constant, are demonstrated within the measurement range from 11 GHz to 65 GHz. As a validation of BCB high frequency performances, the design and experimental characterization of a V-band array on BCB substrate is presented. Measurement results on both matching and radiation characteristics of the millimeter-wave array are discussed.

  1. Transmitter Systems and Bidirectional RF Front-End for Millimeter-Wave Communications

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Po-Yi

    2015-01-01

    In this dissertation, millimeter-wave transmitter systems and a bidirectional transceiver front-end circuit are presented. To reach high data rate for next generation communication systems, complex modulation schemes such as QAM are necessary to take advantage of the signal bandwidth. In a transmitter system, higher-order QAM not only requires the PA to operate in linear region, while the output power and efficiency are maintained, but also requires the calibrations for the modulator to minim...

  2. Noise Performance of Millimeter-wave Silicon Based Mixed Tunneling Avalanche Transit Time(MITATT) Diode

    OpenAIRE

    Aritra Acharyya; Moumita Mukherjee; J. P. Banerjee

    2010-01-01

    A generalized method for small-signal simulation of avalanche noise in Mixed Tunneling Avalanche Transit Time (MITATT) device is presented in this paper where the effect of series resistance is taken into account. The method is applied to a millimeter-wave Double Drift Region (DDR) MITATT device based on Silicon to obtain noise spectral density and noise measure as a function of frequency for different values of series resistance. It is found that noise measure of the dev...

  3. High power millimeter-wave free electron laser based on recirculating electrostatic accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung-Cheol; Kim, Sun-Kook; Jeong, Young-Uk; Cho, Sung-Oh; Lee, Jongmin

    1995-01-01

    Progress in the development of a high power, millimeter-wave free electron laser driven by a recirculating electrostatic accelerator is reported. The energy and the current of electron beam are 430 keV and 2 A, respectively. The expected average output power is above 10 kW at the wavelength of 3-10 mm. Minimizing of the beam loss is a key issue for CW operation of the FEL with high efficiency. (author)

  4. Millimeter-wave Wireless LAN and its Extension toward 5G Heterogeneous Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Sakaguchi, Kei; Mohamed, Ehab Mahmoud; Kusano, Hideyuki; Mizukami, Makoto; Miyamoto, Shinichi; Rezagah, Roya; Takinami, Koji; Takahashi, Kazuaki; Shirakata, Naganori; Peng, Hailan; Yamamoto, Toshiaki; Namba, Shinobu

    2015-01-01

    Millimeter-wave (mmw) frequency bands, especially 60 GHz unlicensed band, are considered as a promising solution for gigabit short range wireless communication systems. IEEE standard 802.11ad, also known as WiGig, is standardized for the usage of the 60 GHz unlicensed band for wireless local area networks (WLANs). By using this mmw WLAN, multi-Gbps rate can be achieved to support bandwidth-intensive multimedia applications. Exhaustive search along with beamforming (BF) is usually used to over...

  5. Nondestructive Measurement of Sugar Content in Apples by Millimeter-Wave Reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Makoto; Mase, Atsushi; Uchino, Kiichiro

    2012-02-01

    A millimeter-wave reflectometer has been developed for the nondestructive measurement of the sugar content in apples. The intensity of the reflected wave from fruit was confirmed to depend on the sugar content and temperature by performing reflectometry with a vector network analyzer of aqueous sucrose solutions. Moreover, the developed reflectometer was applied to the sugar content measurement of apples. We obtained a strong, almost linear relationship between the intensity of the reflected wave and the sugar content in apples.

  6. Experimental Implementation of a Passive Millimeter-Wave Fast Sequential Lobing Radiometric Seeker Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Rossi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the theory of operation of a passive millimeter-wave seeker sensor using a fast electronic sequential-lobing technique and the experimental validation obtained through laboratory trials. The paper analyzes in detail the theoretical performance of a difference channel sensor and a pseudo-monopulse sensor deriving agile formulas for the estimation of target angular tracking accuracy and the subsequent experimental validation.

  7. Experimental Implementation of a Passive Millimeter-Wave Fast Sequential Lobing Radiometric Seeker Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Massimiliano Rossi; Riccardo Maria Liberati; Marco Frasca; Mauro Angelini

    2018-01-01

    The paper investigates the theory of operation of a passive millimeter-wave seeker sensor using a fast electronic sequential-lobing technique and the experimental validation obtained through laboratory trials. The paper analyzes in detail the theoretical performance of a difference channel sensor and a pseudo-monopulse sensor deriving agile formulas for the estimation of target angular tracking accuracy and the subsequent experimental validation.

  8. Development and Testing of a Refractory Millimeter-Wave Absorbent Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambot, Thomas; Myrabo, Leik; Murakami, David; Parkin, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Central to the Millimeter-Wave Thermal Launch System (MTLS) is the millimeter-wave absorbent heat exchanger. We have developed metallic and ceramic variants, with the key challenge being the millimeter-wave absorbent coatings for each. The ceramic heat exchanger came to fruition first, demonstrating for the first time 1800 K peak surface temperatures under illumination by a 110 GHz Gaussian beam. Absorption efficiencies of up to 80 are calculated for mullite heat exchanger tubes and up to 50 are calculated for alumina tubes. These are compared with estimates based on stratified layer and finite element analyses. The problem of how to connect the 1800 K end of the ceramic tubes to a graphite outlet manifold and nozzle is solved by press fitting, or by threading the ends of the ceramic tubes and screwing them into place. The problem of how to connect the ceramic tubes to a metallic or nylon inlet pipe is solved by using soft compliant PTFE and PVC tubes that accommodate thermal deformations of the ceramic tubes during startup and operation. We show the resulting heat exchangers in static tests using argon and helium as propellants.

  9. Content-Based Multi-Channel Network Coding Algorithm in the Millimeter-Wave Sensor Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kai; Wang, Di; Hu, Long

    2016-07-01

    With the development of wireless technology, the widespread use of 5G is already an irreversible trend, and millimeter-wave sensor networks are becoming more and more common. However, due to the high degree of complexity and bandwidth bottlenecks, the millimeter-wave sensor network still faces numerous problems. In this paper, we propose a novel content-based multi-channel network coding algorithm, which uses the functions of data fusion, multi-channel and network coding to improve the data transmission; the algorithm is referred to as content-based multi-channel network coding (CMNC). The CMNC algorithm provides a fusion-driven model based on the Dempster-Shafer (D-S) evidence theory to classify the sensor nodes into different classes according to the data content. By using the result of the classification, the CMNC algorithm also provides the channel assignment strategy and uses network coding to further improve the quality of data transmission in the millimeter-wave sensor network. Extensive simulations are carried out and compared to other methods. Our simulation results show that the proposed CMNC algorithm can effectively improve the quality of data transmission and has better performance than the compared methods.

  10. Content-Based Multi-Channel Network Coding Algorithm in the Millimeter-Wave Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Lin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available With the development of wireless technology, the widespread use of 5G is already an irreversible trend, and millimeter-wave sensor networks are becoming more and more common. However, due to the high degree of complexity and bandwidth bottlenecks, the millimeter-wave sensor network still faces numerous problems. In this paper, we propose a novel content-based multi-channel network coding algorithm, which uses the functions of data fusion, multi-channel and network coding to improve the data transmission; the algorithm is referred to as content-based multi-channel network coding (CMNC. The CMNC algorithm provides a fusion-driven model based on the Dempster-Shafer (D-S evidence theory to classify the sensor nodes into different classes according to the data content. By using the result of the classification, the CMNC algorithm also provides the channel assignment strategy and uses network coding to further improve the quality of data transmission in the millimeter-wave sensor network. Extensive simulations are carried out and compared to other methods. Our simulation results show that the proposed CMNC algorithm can effectively improve the quality of data transmission and has better performance than the compared methods.

  11. RF Performance of Layer-Structured Broadband Passive Millimeter-Wave Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunio Sakakibara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Low profile and simple configuration are advantageous for RF module in passive millimeter-wave imaging system. High sensitivity over broad operation bandwidth is also necessary to detect right information from weak signal. We propose a broadband layer-structured module with low profile, simple structure, and ease of manufacture. This module is composed of a lens antenna and a detector module that consists of a detector circuit and a broadband microstrip-to-waveguide transition. The module forms a layer structure as a printed substrate with detector circuit is fixed between two metal plates with horn antennas and back-short waveguides. We developed a broadband passive millimeter-wave imaging module composed of a lens antenna and a detector module in this work. The gain and the antenna efficiency were measured, and the broadband operation was observed for the lens antenna. For the detector module, peak sensitivity was 8100 V/W. Furthermore, the detector module recognized a difference in the absorber’s temperature. The designs of the lens antenna and the detector module are presented and the RF performances of these components are reported. Finally, passive millimeter-wave imaging of a car, a human, and a metal plate in clothes is demonstrated in this paper.

  12. A laboratory module on radiometry, photometry and colorimetry for an undergraduate optics course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Robert D.

    2014-07-01

    The bachelor's degree in Physics at Loyola University Chicago requires both an upper-division course in Optics as well as a companion Optics Laboratory course. Recently, the laboratory course has undergone dramatic changes. Traditional weekly laboratories have been replaced with three laboratory modules, where students focus on a single topic over several weeks after which the students submit a laboratory report written in the style of a journal article following American Institute of Physics style manual. With this method, students are able to gain a deeper understanding of the specific topic areas of radiometry, photometry and colorimetry, lens design and aberrations, and polarization and interference while using industry-standard equipment and simulation software. In particular, this work will provide the details of the laboratory module on radiometry, photometry and colorimetry where students use a photoradiometer and integrating sphere to characterize the optical properties of an LCD monitor, light bulb and a fiber optic light source calculating properties such as luminous flux, luminous intensity, luminance, CIE color coordinates, NTSC ratio, color temperature and luminous efficacy.

  13. Determination of thermal and physical properties of port-wine stain lesions using pulsed photothermal radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, J. Stuart; Jacques, Steven L.; Wright, William H.

    1992-06-01

    A method for quantitative characterization of port wine stain (PWS) is presented. Pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) uses a non-invasive infrared radiometry system to measure changes in surface temperature induced by pulsed radiation. When a pulsed laser is used to irradiate a PWS, an initial temperature jump (T-jump) is seen due to the heating of the epidermis as a result of melanin absorption. Subsequently, heat generated in the subsurface blood vessels due to hemoglobin absorption is detected by PPTR as a delayed thermal wave as the heat diffuses toward the skin surface. The time delay and magnitude of the delayed PPTR signal indicate the depth and thickness of the PWS. In this report, we present an initial clinical study of PPTR measurements on PWS patients. Computer simulations of various classes of PWS illustrate how the PPTR signal depends on the concentration of epidermal melanin, and depth and thickness of the PWS. The goal of this research is to provide a means of characterizing PWS before initiating therapy, guiding laser dosimetry, and advising the patient as to the time course and efficacy of the planned protocol.

  14. Study and evaluation of radiometry in photo therapeutic treatment of the neonatal hyperbilirubinaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caly, Jose Pucci

    2009-01-01

    Phototherapy is a procedure established more than 50 years ago in the treatment of the newborn jaundice. However there is no a standard method to quantify the photo therapeutic dose in published clinical studies, hindering the comparison of previous studies on photo therapeutic effectiveness, as well as the establishment of safe and predictable doses. The photo therapeutic dose depends, among other factors, on the effective mean irradiance produced by the photo therapeutic unit. There are no standard procedures, however, neither to quantify the effective irradiance, nor to estimate the mean effective irradiance. As a consequence, large measurement variations in a same photo therapeutic unit are observed using different commercially available radiometers, as a consequence of the vast diversity of spectral responsivities of the instruments. An objective of this work was to adapt and to apply the bases of the wideband ultraviolet radiometry to quantify the available irradiance from photo therapeutic units, establishing procedures that allow us to compare measured irradiances from different sources, using radiometers presenting different spectral responsivities. Another objective was to characterize samples of photo therapeutic units commonly used, focusing the problem of the estimation of the effective mean irradiance from photo therapeutic units, proposing a method to estimate of the effective irradiance from focused sources. The experimental results allow us to conclude that it is not only necessary to standardize the photo therapeutic radiometry, but also the method of estimation of the effective mean irradiance. (author)

  15. Using x-radiometry to count resin-bonded layers in aramid ballistic cloth composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, R.E.; Golis, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The army paratroopers and support ground troops (PASGT) helmet is a composite consisting of nominally 19 layers thickness aramid ballistic cloth heat-bonded in a press with rolled-on phenolic resin. Inadvertent omission or poor fitting of layers during hot pressing can significantly weaken the helmet and thereby drastically impair its effectiveness under combat conditions. Currently, helmets are accepted or rejected on a lot basis using ballistic projectile penetration destructive tests on a statistically significant sample from each lot. A Phase I small business innovative research (SBIR) was performed to access the feasibility of nondestructively counting layers by through-transmission x-radiometry, a technique that would allow 100 percent testing of helmets for layer count if proved feasible. Tests were conducted on flat panels, crown panels containing gaps, and actual helmets using 14-18 keV Pu x-rays from a 30-mCi Cm-244 source, a sodium iodide scintillation counter, several collimators, and a multichannel analyzer. The infusing of resin into artificially produced lateral gaps in the crown specimen and into actual lateral gaps in the helmet during press-curing impaired the effectiveness of the radiometric method by introducing high radiometric density material into the beam path. It is concluded that radiometry should be combined with visual inspection to assure helmet integrity. Modified approaches are discussed

  16. BigBOSS: The Ground-Based Stage IV BAO Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlegel, David; Bebek, Chris; Heetderks, Henry; Ho, Shirley; Lampton, Michael; Levi, Michael; Mostek, Nick; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Perlmutter, Saul; Roe, Natalie; Sholl, Michael; Smoot, George; White, Martin; Dey, Arjun; Abraham, Tony; Jannuzi, Buell; Joyce, Dick; Liang, Ming; Merrill, Mike; Olsen, Knut; Salim, Samir

    2009-04-01

    The BigBOSS experiment is a proposed DOE-NSF Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment to study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure with an all-sky galaxy redshift survey. The project is designed to unlock the mystery of dark energy using existing ground-based facilities operated by NOAO. A new 4000-fiber R=5000 spectrograph covering a 3-degree diameter field will measure BAO and redshift space distortions in the distribution of galaxies and hydrogen gas spanning redshifts from 0.2< z< 3.5. The Dark Energy Task Force figure of merit (DETF FoM) for this experiment is expected to be equal to that of a JDEM mission for BAO with the lower risk and cost typical of a ground-based experiment.

  17. Asteroseismology of solar-type stars with Kepler: III. Ground-based data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Molenda-Żakowicz , J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the ground-based follow-up program of spectroscopic and photometric observations of solar-like asteroseismic targets for the Kepler space mission. These stars constitute a large group of more than a thousand objects which are the subject of an intensive study by the Kepler Asteroseis......We report on the ground-based follow-up program of spectroscopic and photometric observations of solar-like asteroseismic targets for the Kepler space mission. These stars constitute a large group of more than a thousand objects which are the subject of an intensive study by the Kepler...

  18. Ground-Based VIS/NIR Reflectance Spectra of 25143 Itokawa: What Hayabusa will See and How Ground-Based Data can Augment Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas, Faith; Abell, P. A.; Jarvis, K. S.

    2004-01-01

    Planning for the arrival of the Hayabusa spacecraft at asteroid 25143 Itokawa includes consideration of the expected spectral information to be obtained using the AMICA and NIRS instruments. The rotationally-resolved spatial coverage the asteroid we have obtained with ground-based telescopic spectrophotometry in the visible and near-infrared can be utilized here to address expected spacecraft data. We use spectrophotometry to simulate the types of data that Hayabusa will receive with the NIRS and AMICA instruments, and will demonstrate them here. The NIRS will cover a wavelength range from 0.85 m, and have a dispersion per element of 250 Angstroms. Thus, we are limited in coverage of the 1.0 micrometer and 2.0 micrometer mafic silicate absorption features. The ground-based reflectance spectra of Itokawa show a large component of olivine in its surface material, and the 2.0 micrometer feature is shallow. Determining the olivine to pyroxene abundance ratio is critically dependent on the attributes of the 1.0- and 2.0 micrometer features. With a cut-off near 2,1 micrometer the longer edge of the 2.0- feature will not be obtained by NIRS. Reflectance spectra obtained using ground-based telescopes can be used to determine the regional composition around space-based spectral observations, and possibly augment the longer wavelength spectral attributes. Similarly, the shorter wavelength end of the 1.0 micrometer absorption feature will be partially lost to the NIRS. The AMICA filters mimic the ECAS filters, and have wavelength coverage overlapping with the NIRS spectral range. We demonstrate how merging photometry from AMICA will extend the spectral coverage of the NIRS. Lessons learned from earlier spacecraft to asteroids should be considered.

  19. Solar cosmic ray effects in atmospheric chemistry evidenced from ground- based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumilov, O.; Kasatkina, E.; Turyansky, V.

    Solar protons with a relatively soft energy spectrum (E450 MeV) of Ground Level Event (GLE) type can penetrate below 30 km and cause neutron flow enhancement detected by ground-based neutron monitors. Atmospheric effects of such high-energy particles seem to be more pronounced and appeared variations of total content of some atmospheric parameters that can be detected by ground-based devices. It was shown earlier that some GLEs cause considerable ozone total content decreases (up to 25%), or so-called ozone "miniholes" at high latitudes. This work presents ground-based measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) total content made at Murmansk, Kola Peninsula (corrected geomagnetic latitude: 64.8) during and after GLE of 2 May 1998. Nitrogen dioxide was measured by zenith viewing spectrophotometer in wavelength region between 435-450 nm. An increase (about of 20%) in total column of NO2 has been recorded after 2 May 1998 GLE by this facility. Model calculations based on gas phase photochemical theory quantitatively agree with observations. In addition to satellite measurements the information obtained by ground-based devices will be helpful to study atmospheric effects of cosmic ray events. This work was supported by the RFBR grants 01-05-64850 and 01-05-26226).

  20. Modern developments for ground-based monitoring of fire behavior and effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin C. Hardy; Robert Kremens; Matthew B. Dickinson

    2010-01-01

    Advances in electronic technology over the last several decades have been staggering. The cost of electronics continues to decrease while system performance increases seemingly without limit. We have applied modern techniques in sensors, electronics and instrumentation to create a suite of ground based diagnostics that can be used in laboratory (~ 1 m2), field scale...

  1. Retrieval of liquid water cloud properties from ground-based remote sensing observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knist, C.L.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate ground-based remotely sensed microphysical and optical properties of liquid water clouds are essential references to validate satellite-observed cloud properties and to improve cloud parameterizations in weather and climate models. This requires the evaluation of algorithms for retrieval of

  2. Real-time threat evaluation in a ground based air defence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a military environment a ground based air defence operator is required to evaluate the tactical situation in real-time and protect Defended Assets (DAs) on the ground against aerial threats by assigning available Weapon Systems (WSs) to engage enemy aircraft. Since this aerial environment requires rapid operational ...

  3. Coastal wind study based on Sentinel-1 and ground-based scanning lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Badger, Merete; Pena Diaz, Alfredo

    Winds in the coastal zone have importance for near-shore wind farm planning. Recently the Danish Energy Agency gave new options for placing offshore wind farms much closer to the coastlines than previously. The new tender areas are located from 3 to 8 km from the coast. Ground-based scanning lida...... projects and satellite data from Copernicus Sentinel-1....

  4. Ground-based remote sensing scheme for monitoring aerosol-cloud interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarna, K.; Russchenberg, H.W.J.

    2016-01-01

    A new method for continuous observation of aerosol–cloud interactions with ground-based remote sensing instruments is presented. The main goal of this method is to enable the monitoring of the change of the cloud droplet size due to the change in the aerosol concentration. We use high-resolution

  5. Ground-based remote sensing scheme for monitoring aerosol–cloud interactions (discussion)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarna, K.; Russchenberg, H.W.J.

    2015-01-01

    A method for continuous observation of aerosol–cloud interactions with ground-based remote sensing instruments is presented. The main goal of this method is to enable the monitoring of cloud microphysical changes due to the changing aerosol concentration. We use high resolution measurements from

  6. On reconciling ground-based with spaceborne normalized radar cross section measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumgartner, Francois; Munk, Jens; Jezek, K C

    2002-01-01

    This study examines differences in the normalized radar cross section, derived from ground-based versus spaceborne radar data. A simple homogeneous half-space model, indicates that agreement between the two improves as 1) the distance from the scatterer is increased; and/or 2) the extinction...

  7. Ground-based LIDAR: a novel approach to quantify fine-scale fuelbed characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.L. Loudermilk; J.K. Hiers; J.J. O’Brien; R.J. Mitchell; A. Singhania; J.C. Fernandez; W.P. Cropper; K.C. Slatton

    2009-01-01

    Ground-based LIDAR (also known as laser ranging) is a novel technique that may precisely quantify fuelbed characteristics important in determining fire behavior. We measured fuel properties within a south-eastern US longleaf pine woodland at the individual plant and fuelbed scale. Data were collected using a mobile terrestrial LIDAR unit at sub-cm scale for individual...

  8. Using NURBS type phantoms for the investigation of morphological factors affecting pulmonary anthropo-radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farah, J.; Broggio, D.; Franck, D.

    2010-01-01

    As existing phantoms used for the calibration of dosimetry measurements, notably in anthropo-radiometry, exhibit a poor anatomic realism because of their crude geometries, compositions and densities, and some other drawbacks, the authors, within the frame of improvement of calibration techniques, report the combined use of Mesh and NURBS-type phantoms (Non Uniform Rational B-Splines) which allow smooth shapes and finer geometries to be replicated. More precisely, they report the application of this type of phantoms to the modelling of a thorax and of a ribcage. They describe the protocols used to generate these phantoms and how some variations are introduced to take morphological characteristics (for example a female thorax) as well as various gamma ray distributions into account. Results are discussed in terms of validation of phantoms, and morphology variation

  9. Depth determination of chromophores in human skin by pulsed photothermal radiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milner, T.E. [Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic (United States)]|[Department of Physics, Harvey Mudd College, Claremont, California 91711 (United States); Smithies, D.J. [Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic (United States); Goodman, D.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550. (United States); Nelson, J.S. [Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic (United States)]|[Departments of Dermatology and Surgery, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California 92715 (United States); Goodman, D.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550. (United States); Lau, A. [Finch University of Health Sciences/The Chicago Medical School, North Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    1996-07-01

    We report on the application of pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) to determine the depth of {ital in}-{ital vitro} and {ital in}-{ital vivo} subsurface chromophores in biological materials. Measurements provided by PPTR in combination with a nonnegative constrained conjugate-gradient algorithm are used to determine the initial temperature distribution in a biological material immediately following pulsed laser irradiation. Within the experimental error, chromophore depths (50{endash}450 {mu}m) in 55 {ital in}-{ital vitro} collagen phantoms determined by PPTR and optical low-coherence reflectometry are equivalent. The depths of port-wine-stain blood vessels determined by PPTR correlate very well with their locations found by computer-assisted microscopic observation of histologic sections. The mean blood-vessel depth deduced from PPTR and histologic observation is statistically indistinguishable ({ital p}{lt}0.94). {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  10. Photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence examination of demineralized and remineralized dental lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellen, A; Mandelis, A [Center for Advanced Diffusion-Wave Technologies, University of Toronto, 5 King' s College Road, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3G8 (Canada); Finer, Y, E-mail: mandelis@mie.utoronto.c [Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, 124 Edward Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1G6 (Canada)

    2010-03-01

    Dental caries involves continuous challenges of acid-induced mineral loss and a counteracting process of mineral recovery. As an emerging non-destructive methodology, photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence (PTR-LUM) has shown promise in measuring changes in tooth mineral content. Human molars (n=37) were subjected to demineralization in acid gel (pH 4.5, 10 days), followed by incubation in remineralisation solutions (pH 6.7, 4 weeks) without or with fluoride (1 or 1000 ppm). PTR-LUM frequency scans (1 Hz - 1 kHz) were performed prior to and during demineralization and remineralization treatments. Transverse Micro-Radiography (TMR) analysis followed at treatment conclusion. The non-fluoridated group exhibited opposite amplitude and phase trends to those of the highly fluoridated group: smaller phase lag and larger amplitude. These results point to a complex interplay between surface and subsurface processes during remineralization, confining the thermal-wave centroid toward the dominating layer.

  11. Radiation safety aspects during nondestructive testing of reactor shielding components by gamma radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, S.; Jose, M.T.; Venkatraman, B.

    2016-01-01

    In nuclear facilities, effective shielding of radioactive components and structures are essential to ensure radiation protection to operating personnel. The shield structures are made of lead, steel and concrete with varying thickness of up to 1200 mm. It needs to be verified for shielding integrity, presence of voids, blowholes and defects to avoid exposure to workers and to public at large. Radiometry using gamma source serves as excellent tool for non-destructive examination of such structures and components. Gamma sources of high activity up to 50 Curies (gamma camera type) depending on the thickness of component have to be used. During the testing exposure to the operating personnel needs to be minimized, this requires certain safety procedures to be followed. This paper focuses the methodology to be adapted by means of selection of source, effective training of personnel, compliance with safety requirements and maintenance of source devices

  12. Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) GLONASS Broadcast Ephemeris Data (hourly files) from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) GLObal NAvigation Satellite System (GLONASS) Broadcast Ephemeris Data (hourly files)...

  13. Study of Skin Phantoms by Photothermal Radiometry in Frequency Domain and Multivariate Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichardo-Molina, J. L.; Gutiérez-Juárez, G.; Landa-Hernandez, A.; Barbosa-Garcia, O.; Ivanov, R.; Huerta-Franco, M. R.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper the use of the photothermal radiometry technique in the frequency domain (PRTF) and the use of multivariate methods in the study of two types of skin phantoms: (a) one in which skin pigmentation was simulated dyeing the gel phantom and (b) the other consists of exposure of animal skin samples to different degrees of thermal damage. In experiment (a), gel phantoms were prepared with different concentrations of methylene blue (MB). The mean values of the radiometry signal (RS) show significant differences in only those cases in which changes in the concentration of MB were higher than 0.38 mM. This result was confirmed with a t test for independent samples of the data ( p analysis (PCA) demonstrated that it is possible to discriminate between phantoms with changes in molar concentration equal to 0.38 mM (for the phase signal). In the case of experiment (b), the following four groups of pork skin samples were analyzed: one consists of samples of fresh skin, while the other three consist of samples exposed to thermal damage at 45 °C (the exposure time was 4 s) and 80 °C (exposure times were 4 s and 8 s, respectively). The mean values of the RS for each group of samples did not show a clear visual discrimination. However, the t test for independent samples applied to the data demonstrated significant differences only between fresh skin and skin exposure to thermal damage at 80 °C (with exposure times of 4 s and 8 s). PCA was used to discriminate between the four different skin samples.

  14. Rapid, non-destructive and non-contact inspection of solid foods by means of photothermal radiometry; thermal effusivity and initial heating coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbertsen, A.; Bicanic, D.D.; Gielen, J.L.W.; Chirtoc, M.

    2004-01-01

    CO2-laser photothermal radiometry (PTR) was demonstrated to be suitable for the nondestructive and non-contact characterization (both optical and thermal) of solid phase agricultural commodities (fres vegetables, fruits) and confectionery products (candy).

  15. DTU-ESA millimeter-wave validation standard antenna – requirements and design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pivnenko, Sergey; Kim, Oleksiy S.; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2014-01-01

    Inter-comparisons and validations of antenna measurement ranges are useful tools allowing the detection of various problems in the measurement procedures, thus leading to improvements of the measurement accuracy and facilitating better understanding of the measurement techniques. The maximum value...... stability over a given operational temperature range. In addition, VAST antennas must possess electrical characteristics that are typical for satellite antennas and challenging to measure. A multi-band millimeter-wave VAST (mm-VAST) antenna for the K/Ka-bands and Q/V bands is currently under development...

  16. Millimeter-wave spectra and variability of bright, compact radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelson, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    Observations at 2.7 mm and at 1.5 cm were used to study the millimeter spectra and variability of 176 bright, compact radio sources. More than 20 percent of the flat-spectrum sources, but none of the steep-spectrum sources, were seen to vary at 1.5 cm by at least 30 percent over ten months. This is consistent with the hypothesis that flat-spectrum sources are compact and possibly beamed, while steep-spectrum sources are not. These data can also be used to choose sources for VLBI observations and for calibration of millimeter-wave observations.

  17. Design procedure for millimeter-wave InP DHBT stacked power amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Squartecchia, Michele; Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Midili, Virginio

    2015-01-01

    The stacked-transistor concept for power amplifiers (PA) has been investigated in this work. Specifically, this architecture has been applied in the design of millimeter-wave monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs) using indium phosphide (InP) double heterojunction bipolar transistors...... (DHBTs). In this paper we describe the design methodology adopted and the results obtained at 86 GHz and 140 GHz. In the former case, 14.5 dBm of output power at the compression point, 14.5 dB of gain and 19.6 % of PAE are obtained from a four-transistor power cell. At 140 GHz, the same architecture...

  18. Permanent-magnet helical undulator for a millimeter-wave free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jongmin; Jeong, Young-Uk; Lee, Byung-Cheol; Kim, Sun-Kook; Cho, Sung-Oh

    1995-01-01

    Permanent-magnet helical undulator for a millimeter-wave free-electron laser was designed and constructed. The configuration of the undulator is based on bifilar-type permanent-magnet helical undulator and Halbach-type planar undulator. This new configuration shows enhanced magnetic field and low field error. Period, total length and peak magnetic-field amplitude of the undulator is 36 mm, 900 mm and 1.44 kG, respectively. Adiabatic tapering of the magnetic field in end sides of the undulator was achieved using stepped soft-iron tubes. (author)

  19. Efficient Preamble Design Technique for Millimeter-Wave Cellular Systems with Beamforming

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Dae Geun; Kim, Yeong Jun; Cho, Yong Soo

    2016-01-01

    The processing time for beam training in millimeter-wave (mmWave) cellular systems can be significantly reduced by a code division multiplexing (CDM)-based technique, where multiple beams are transmitted simultaneously with their corresponding Tx beam IDs (BIDs) in the preamble. However, mmWave cellular systems with CDM-based preambles require a large number of cell IDs (CIDs) and BIDs, and a high computational complexity for CID and BID (CBID) searches. In this paper, a new preamble design t...

  20. [Development of a ground-based experimental facility for space waste material processing with microorganism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Wei-dang; Guo, Shuang-sheng; Wang, Xiao-xia; Fu, Lan

    2004-06-01

    To develop a ground-based experimental facility for microorganism waste processing, which will be used to recover nutrient from plant inedible biomass essential for growth and development of plants. After technical parameters and performance requirements were defined, planning demonstration, drawing design, fabrication, debug and plant inedible residue-biodegradation tests by microorganisms were conducted. The facility worked well, and the parameters, such as energy consumption, volume and weight, met the design requirement. The water-treated quality and the ability of treating plant residual by microorganism were better than the demands. The ground-based results demonstrated that total organic carbon (TOC) degradation above 92.1%, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction over 95.5% could be maintained. The facility has reasonable technical indexes, and smooth and reliable performances. Its major working principle is suitable for the demand of space conditions. It is capable of being utilized for biodegradation of plant inedible biomass in space.

  1. Modelling systematics of ground-based transit photometry I. Implications on transit timing variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, C.; Cellone, S.; Mallonn, M.

    2016-01-01

    The transit timing variation technique (TTV) has been widely used to detect and characterize multiple planetary systems. Due to the observational biases imposed mainly by the photometric conditions and instrumentation and the high signal-to-noise required to produce primary transit observations...... the observing time at hand carrying out such follow-ups, or if the use of medium-to-low quality transit light curves, combined with current standard techniques of data analysis, could be playing a main role against exoplanetary search via TTVs. The purpose of this work is to investigate to what extent ground......-based observations treated with current modelling techniques are reliable to detect and characterize additional planets in already known planetary systems. To meet this goal, we simulated typical primary transit observations of a hot Jupiter mimicing an existing system, Qatar-1. To resemble ground-based observations...

  2. Monitoring of rainfall by ground-based passive microwave systems: models, measurements and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Marzano

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A large set of ground-based multi-frequency microwave radiometric simulations and measurements during different precipitation regimes are analysed. Simulations are performed for a set of frequencies from 22 to 60 GHz, representing the channels currently available on an operational ground-based radiometric system. Results are illustrated in terms of comparisons between measurements and model data in order to show that the observed radiometric signatures can be attributed to rainfall scattering and absorption. An inversion algorithm has been developed, basing on the simulated data, to retrieve rain rate from passive radiometric observations. As a validation of the approach, we have analyzed radiometric measurements during rain events occurred in Boulder, Colorado, and at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Program's Southern Great Plains (SGP site in Lamont, Oklahoma, USA, comparing rain rate estimates with available simultaneous rain gauge data.

  3. Combined Characterisation of GOME and TOMS Total Ozone Using Ground-Based Observations from the NDSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, J.-C.; VanRoozendael, M.; Simon, P. C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Goutail, F.; Andersen, S. B.; Arlander, D. W.; BuiVan, N. A.; Claude, H.; deLaNoee, J.; hide

    1998-01-01

    Several years of total ozone measured from space by the ERS-2 GOME, the Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), and the ADEOS TOMS, are compared with high-quality ground-based observations associated with the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC), over an extended latitude range and a variety of geophysical conditions. The comparisons with each spaceborne sensor are combined altogether for investigating their respective solar zenith angle (SZA) dependence, dispersion, and difference of sensitivity. The space- and ground-based data are found to agree within a few percent on average. However, the analysis highlights for both Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) and TOMS several sources of discrepancies, including a dependence on the SZA at high latitudes and internal inconsistencies.

  4. Troposphere Reassessment in the scope of MC/MF Ground Based Augmentation System (GBAS)

    OpenAIRE

    Guilbert, Alizé; Milner, Carl; Macabiau, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    International audience; In civil aviation, there is currently a demand for greater airspace capacity and efficiency. In order to meet these long term goals, services must be expanded to provide more reliable and robust approach and landing operations in all weather conditions, globally. One potential application would be to use the Ground Based Augmentation System (GBAS) to enable Cat II /III precision approaches, the most stringent operation currently defined and with the lowest separation m...

  5. The SPARC water vapor assessment II: intercomparison of satellite and ground-based microwave measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedoluha, Gerald E.; Kiefer, Michael; Lossow, Stefan; Gomez, R. Michael; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Lainer, Martin; Forkman, Peter; Christensen, Ole Martin; Oh, Jung Jin; Hartogh, Paul; Anderson, John; Bramstedt, Klaus; Dinelli, Bianca M.; Garcia-Comas, Maya; Hervig, Mark; Murtagh, Donal; Raspollini, Piera; Read, William G.; Rosenlof, Karen; Stiller, Gabriele P.; Walker, Kaley A.

    2017-12-01

    As part of the second SPARC (Stratosphere-troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate) water vapor assessment (WAVAS-II), we present measurements taken from or coincident with seven sites from which ground-based microwave instruments measure water vapor in the middle atmosphere. Six of the ground-based instruments are part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) and provide datasets that can be used for drift and trend assessment. We compare measurements from these ground-based instruments with satellite datasets that have provided retrievals of water vapor in the lower mesosphere over extended periods since 1996. We first compare biases between the satellite and ground-based instruments from the upper stratosphere to the upper mesosphere. We then show a number of time series comparisons at 0.46 hPa, a level that is sensitive to changes in H2O and CH4 entering the stratosphere but, because almost all CH4 has been oxidized, is relatively insensitive to dynamical variations. Interannual variations and drifts are investigated with respect to both the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS; from 2004 onwards) and each instrument's climatological mean. We find that the variation in the interannual difference in the mean H2O measured by any two instruments is typically ˜ 1%. Most of the datasets start in or after 2004 and show annual increases in H2O of 0-1 % yr-1. In particular, MLS shows a trend of between 0.5 % yr-1 and 0.7 % yr-1 at the comparison sites. However, the two longest measurement datasets used here, with measurements back to 1996, show much smaller trends of +0.1 % yr-1 (at Mauna Loa, Hawaii) and -0.1 % yr-1 (at Lauder, New Zealand).

  6. The crop growth research chamber: A ground-based facility for CELSS research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David L.

    1990-01-01

    A ground based facility for the study of plant growth and development under stringently controlled environments is being developed by the Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) program at the Ames Research Center. Several Crop Growth Research Chambers (CGRC) and laboratory support equipment provide the core of this facility. The CGRC is a closed (sealed) system with a separate recirculating atmosphere and nutrient delivery systems. The atmospheric environment, hydroponic environment, systems controls, and data acquisition are discussed.

  7. Ground-based follow-up of the Gaia-RVS radial velocity standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubiran, C.; Jasniewicz, G.; Zurbach, C.; Crifo, F.; Sartoretti, P.; Katz, D.; Marchal, O.; Panuzzo, P.; Udry, S.

    2016-12-01

    The RVS spectrograph on board of Gaia having no calibration device, radial velocity standards are needed to calibrate the zero-point of the instrument. We have prepared a list of 2798 such stars, well distributed over the sky, and compiled ˜25 000 individual RV measurements from ground-based velocimeters. For a fraction of these stars, their stability at the 300 ms level during the Gaia mission has still to be assessed. The catalogue and follow-up programme are presented.

  8. Testing a ground-based canopy model using the wind river canopy crane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Van Pelt; Malcolm P. North

    1999-01-01

    A ground-based canopy model that estimates the volume of occupied space in forest canopies was tested using the Wind River Canopy Crane. A total of 126 trees in a 0.25 ha area were measured from the ground and directly from a gondola suspended from the crane. The trees were located in a low elevation, old-growth forest in the southern Washington Cascades. The ground-...

  9. NASA Requirements for Ground-Based Pressure Vessels and Pressurized Systems (PVS). Revision C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greulich, Owen Rudolf

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to ensure the structural integrity of PVS through implementation of a minimum set of requirements for ground-based PVS in accordance with this document, NASA Policy Directive (NPD) 8710.5, NASA Safety Policy for Pressure Vessels and Pressurized Systems, NASA Procedural Requirements (NPR) 8715.3, NASA General Safety Program Requirements, applicable Federal Regulations, and national consensus codes and standards (NCS).

  10. The SPARC water vapor assessment II: intercomparison of satellite and ground-based microwave measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Nedoluha

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available As part of the second SPARC (Stratosphere–troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate water vapor assessment (WAVAS-II, we present measurements taken from or coincident with seven sites from which ground-based microwave instruments measure water vapor in the middle atmosphere. Six of the ground-based instruments are part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC and provide datasets that can be used for drift and trend assessment. We compare measurements from these ground-based instruments with satellite datasets that have provided retrievals of water vapor in the lower mesosphere over extended periods since 1996. We first compare biases between the satellite and ground-based instruments from the upper stratosphere to the upper mesosphere. We then show a number of time series comparisons at 0.46 hPa, a level that is sensitive to changes in H2O and CH4 entering the stratosphere but, because almost all CH4 has been oxidized, is relatively insensitive to dynamical variations. Interannual variations and drifts are investigated with respect to both the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS; from 2004 onwards and each instrument's climatological mean. We find that the variation in the interannual difference in the mean H2O measured by any two instruments is typically  ∼  1%. Most of the datasets start in or after 2004 and show annual increases in H2O of 0–1 % yr−1. In particular, MLS shows a trend of between 0.5 % yr−1 and 0.7 % yr−1 at the comparison sites. However, the two longest measurement datasets used here, with measurements back to 1996, show much smaller trends of +0.1 % yr−1 (at Mauna Loa, Hawaii and −0.1 % yr−1 (at Lauder, New Zealand.

  11. Intercomparison of ground-based ozone and NO2 measurements during the MANTRA 2004 campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Strong

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The MANTRA (Middle Atmosphere Nitrogen TRend Assessment 2004 campaign took place in Vanscoy, Saskatchewan, Canada (52° N, 107° W from 3 August to 15 September, 2004. In support of the main balloon launch, a suite of five zenith-sky and direct-Sun-viewing UV-visible ground-based spectrometers was deployed, primarily measuring ozone and NO2 total columns. Three Fourier transform spectrometers (FTSs that were part of the balloon payload also performed ground-based measurements of several species, including ozone. Ground-based measurements of ozone and NO2 differential slant column densities from the zenith-viewing UV-visible instruments are presented herein. They are found to partially agree within NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change standards for instruments certified for process studies and satellite validation. Vertical column densities of ozone from the zenith-sky UV-visible instruments, the FTSs, a Brewer spectrophotometer, and ozonesondes are compared, and found to agree within the combined error estimates of the instruments (15%. NO2 vertical column densities from two of the UV-visible instruments are compared, and are also found to agree within combined error (15%.

  12. Study of the unknown hemisphere of mercury by ground-based astronomical facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksanfomality, L. V.

    2011-08-01

    The short exposure method proved to be very productive in ground-based observations of Mercury. Telescopic observations with short exposures, together with computer codes for the processing of data arrays of many thousands of original electronic photos, make it possible to improve the resolution of images from ground-based instruments to almost the diffraction limit. The resulting composite images are comparable with images from spacecrafts approaching from a distance of about 1 million km. This paper presents images of the hemisphere of Mercury in longitude sectors 90°-180°W, 215°-350°W, and 50°-90°W, including, among others, areas not covered by spacecraft cameras. For the first time a giant S basin was discovered in the sector of longitudes 250°-290°W, which is the largest formation of this type on terrestrial planets. Mercury has a strong phase effects. As a result, the view of the surface changes completely with the change in the planetary phase. But the choice of the phase in the study using spacecrafts is limited by orbital characteristics of the mission. Thus, ground-based observations of the planet provide a valuable support.

  13. Remote detection and ecological monitoring of the industrial and natural nuclei activity of radioactive elements based on passive microwave radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistyakova, Liliya K.; Chistyakov, Vyacheslav Y.; Losev, Dmitry V.; Penin, Sergei T.; Tarabrin, Yurij K.; Yakubov, Vladimir P.; Yurjev, Igor A.

    1998-12-01

    The passive remote method of microwave radiometry and its instrumental realization for express diagnostics of radioactive elements in the atmosphere have been discussed. Analysis of the microwave radiation due to ionization and dissociation of atmospheric components interacting with radioactive elements is carried out. The photochemical processes resulting in background microwave radiation power have been discussed. As an example, the results of natural experiment of detecting the atomic hydrogen radiation in the plume of emissions of nuclear cycle processing plants have been presented.

  14. Limitations in distance and frequency due to chromatic dispersion in fibre-optic microwave and millimeter-wave links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gliese, Ulrik Bo; Nielsen, Søren Nørskov; Nielsen, Søren Nørskov

    1996-01-01

    Chromatic dispersion significantly limits the distance and/or frequency in fibre-optic microwave and millimeter-wave links based on direct detection due to a decrease of the carrier to noise ratio. The limitations in links based on coherent remote heterodyne detection, however, are far less signi...

  15. Limitations in distance and frequency due to chromatic dispersion in fibre-optic microwave and millimeter-wave links

    OpenAIRE

    Gliese, Ulrik Bo; Nielsen, Søren Nørskov; Nielsen, Søren Nørskov

    1996-01-01

    Chromatic dispersion significantly limits the distance and/or frequency in fibre-optic microwave and millimeter-wave links based on direct detection due to a decrease of the carrier to noise ratio. The limitations in links based on coherent remote heterodyne detection, however, are far less significant, and are primarily due to an increase of the phase noise

  16. Use of Gaussian Beam Tracing in the Design of Millimeter-Wave Diagnostics on ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Heeseok; Bitter, Manfred; Tobias, Ben; Park, Hyeon; Zolfaghari, Ali

    2016-10-01

    When the wavelength of the radiation being studied is comparable to the size optical components, the diffraction effect cannot be ignored. Gaussian beam tracing (GBT) can be used by treating the propagation of the light as a beam with certain size rather than a ray used in geometrical optics when analyzing the optics of millimeter-wave diagnostics. Gaussian optics is an effective way to represent diffraction effect because of its ability to show the beam size and the intensity that could be altered from diffraction. GBT has been used in two millimeter-wave diagnostics suited to ITER geometry. The first is in a design of a Gaussian telescope for correction of transmission line misalignment in the ITER LFS reflectometer due to motion of the vessel during heating to operating temperature from room temperature. The second is a new concept of using spherical mirrors for electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) and assessing its promise of a more realistic method of ECEI in ITER than previous idea of using a cylindrical mirror that requires large access ports that can be exposed to intense neutron radiation. The spherical mirror promises a smaller aperture on the first wall of ITER. The simulation of GBT of the two applications are analyzed and discussed. This work is supported by US DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  17. Recollections of Tucson Operations The Millimeter-Wave Observatory of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Gordon, M A

    2005-01-01

    This book is a personal account of the evolution of millimeter-wave astronomy at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. It begins with the construction of the hugely successful, but flawed, 36 ft radio telescope on Kitt Peak, Arizona, and continues through the funding of its ultimate successor, the Atacama Large Millimeter-wave Array (ALMA), being constructed on a 5.000 m (16.500 ft) site in northern Chile. The book describes the behind-the-scene activities of the NRAO Tucson staff. These include the identification and solution of technical problems, the scheduling and support of visiting astronomers, and the preparations and the politics of the proposal to replace the 36 ft telescope with a 25 m telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The book also describes the installation of a new 12 m surface and the involvement of the Tucson staff in the ALMA project. Finally, it describes events leading to the closing of the 36 ft telescope and, eventually, of the NRAO offices in Tucson.

  18. System design development for microwave and millimeter-wave materials processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feher, Lambert; Thumm, Manfred

    2002-06-01

    The most notable effect in processing dielectrics with micro- and millimeter-waves is volumetric heating of these materials, offering the opportunity of very high heating rates for the samples. In comparison to conventional heating where the heat transfer is diffusive and depends on the thermal conductivity of the material, the microwave field penetrates the sample and acts as an instantaneous heat source at each point of the sample. By this unique property, microwave heating at 2.45 GHz and 915 MHz ISM (Industrial, Medical, Scientific) frequencies is established as an important industrial technology since more than 50 years ago. Successful application of microwaves in industries has been reported e.g. by food processing systems, domestic ovens, rubber industry, vacuum drying etc. The present paper shows some outlines of microwave system development at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM by transferring properties from the higher frequency regime (millimeter-waves) to lower frequency applications. Anyway, the need for using higher frequencies like 24 GHz (ISM frequency) for industrial applications has to be carefully verified with respect to special physical/engineering advantages or to limits the standard microwave technology meets for the specific problem.

  19. A Novel Millimeter-Wave, Low-Loss, Electronically Controlled Phase Shifter for Monolithic, Beam-Steering Phased-Array Antenna Application

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarabandi, Kamal

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the accomplishments made on the project entitled "A Novel Millimeter-Wave, Low-Loss, Electronically Controlled Phase Shifter for Monolithic, Beam-Steering...

  20. Toward High Altitude Airship Ground-Based Boresight Calibration of Hyperspectral Pushbroom Imaging Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiwu Zhang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the single linear hyperspectral pushbroom imaging based on a high altitude airship (HAA without a three-axis stabilized platform is much more than that based on the spaceborne and airborne. Due to the effects of air pressure, temperature and airflow, the large pitch and roll angles tend to appear frequently that create pushbroom images highly characterized with severe geometric distortions. Thus, the in-flight calibration procedure is not appropriate to apply to the single linear pushbroom sensors on HAA having no three-axis stabilized platform. In order to address this problem, a new ground-based boresight calibration method is proposed. Firstly, a coordinate’s transformation model is developed for direct georeferencing (DG of the linear imaging sensor, and then the linear error equation is derived from it by using the Taylor expansion formula. Secondly, the boresight misalignments are worked out by using iterative least squares method with few ground control points (GCPs and ground-based side-scanning experiments. The proposed method is demonstrated by three sets of experiments: (i the stability and reliability of the method is verified through simulation-based experiments; (ii the boresight calibration is performed using ground-based experiments; and (iii the validation is done by applying on the orthorectification of the real hyperspectral pushbroom images from a HAA Earth observation payload system developed by our research team—“LanTianHao”. The test results show that the proposed boresight calibration approach significantly improves the quality of georeferencing by reducing the geometric distortions caused by boresight misalignments to the minimum level.

  1. Retrieval and analysis of atmospheric XCO2 using ground-based spectral observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xiu-Chun; Lei, Li-Ping; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Masafumi, Ohashi; Takahiro, Kuroki; Zeng, Zhao-Cheng; Zhang, Bing

    2014-07-01

    Atmospheric CO2 column concentration (column-averaged dry air mole fractions of atmospheric carbon dioxide) data obtained by ground-based hyperspectral observation is an important source of data for the verification and improvement of the results of CO2 retrieval based on satellite hyperspectral observation. However, few studies have been conducted on atmospheric CO2 column concentration retrieval based on ground-based spectral hyperspectral observation in China. In the present study, we carried out the ground-based hyperspectral observation in Xilingol Grassland, Inner Mongolia of China by using an observation system which is consisted of an optical spectral analyzer, a sun tracker, and some other elements. The atmospheric CO2 column concentration was retrieved using the observed hyperspectral data. The effect of a wavelength shift of the observation spectra and the meteorological parameters on the retrieval precision of the atmospheric CO2 concentration was evaluated and analyzed. The results show that the mean value of atmospheric CO2 concentration was 390.9 microg x mL(-1) in the study area during the observing period from July to September. The shift of wavelength in the range between -0.012 and 0.042 nm will generally lead to 1 microg x mL(-1) deviation in the CO2 retrievals. This study also revealed that the spectral transmittance was sensitive to meteorological parameters in the wavelength range of 6 357-6 358, 6 360-6 361, and 6 363-6 364 cm(-1). By comparing the CO2 retrievals derived from the meteorological parameters observed in synchronous and non-synchronous time, respectively, with the spectral observation, it was showed that the concentration deviation caused by using the non-synchronously observed meteorological parameters is ranged from 0.11 to 4 microg x mL(-1). These results can be used as references for the further improvement of retrieving CO2 column concentration based on spectral observation.

  2. Specifying the Earth's Plasmasphere With Data Assimilation of Ground-Based Field-Line Resonance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Anders; McCarthy, Nicholas; Rivera, Samuell; Ober, Daniel; Zesta, Eftyhia; Chi, Peter; Moldwin, Mark; Ridley, Aaron

    The plasmasphere is an important medium for propagation of the waves which contribute to the decay and acceleration of energetic particles in the radiation belts and ring current. Accurate knowledge of the plasmasphere evolution is important for accurately predicting the evolution of the energetic particle populations. A variety of routine measurements provide information about the plasmasphere, including ground-based and space-based magnetic field-line resonance measurements, space based in-situ plasma density measurements, whistler wave measurements, TEC measurements from GPS receivers, and in some cases global EUV images. Combining these measurements with a physics-based model through a data assimilation scheme should, in principle, allow a better specification of the plasmasphere. Other information which can be used include information about the global magnetic and electric fields from a combination of measurements and models, for example AMIE. In this presentation we will discuss modeling the plasmasphere using these data. A particular advantage of ground-based measurements over space-based measurements are the longevity of the magnetometer and VLF stations, the potentially greater simultaneous coverage in local time and L-shell (as opposed to single-point satellite measurements), and the lower cost of maintaining the networks. In this paper we will explore using a network of ground-based magnetometers to constrain the evolution of the plas-masphere through a data assimilation scheme. We will use the Ober et al. [1997] plasmasphere model, a particle filter data assimilation scheme, and simulated or actual field-line resonance measurements from the McMAC, MEASURE, SAMBA, and CARISMA, magnetometer arrays.

  3. Recent changes in stratospheric aerosol budget from ground-based and satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaykin, Sergey; Godin-Beekmann, Sophie; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain; Portafaix, Thierry; Begue, Nelson; Vernier, Jean-Paul; DeLand, Matthew; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Leblanc, Thierry

    2017-04-01

    Stratospheric aerosol budget plays an important role in climate variability and ozone chemistry. Observations of stratospheric aerosol by ground-based lidars represent a particular value as they ensure the continuity and coherence of stratospheric aerosol record. Ground-based lidars remain indispensable for complementing and validating satellite instruments and for filling gaps between satellite missions. On the other hand, geophysical interpretation of local observations is complicated without the knowledge of global distribution of stratospheric aerosol, which calls for a combined analysis of ground-based and space-borne observations. The present study aims at characterizing global and regional variability of stratospheric aerosol over the last 5 years using various sets of observations. We use the data provided by three lidars operated within NDACC (Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change) at Haute-Provence, (44° N), Mauna Loa (21° N) and Maido (21° S) sites together with quasi-global-coverage aerosol measurements by CALIOP and OMPS satellite instruments. The local and space-borne measurements are shown to be in good agreement allowing for their synergetic use. Since the late 2012 stratospheric aerosol remained at background levels throughout the globe. Eruptions of Kelud volcano at 4° S in February 2014 and Calbuco volcano at 41° S in April 2015 resulted in a remarkable enhancement of stratospheric AOD at a wide latitude range. We explore meridional dispersion and lifetime of volcanic plumes in consideration of global atmospheric circulation. A focus is made on the poleward transport of volcanic aerosol and its detection at the mid-latitude Haute-Provence observatory. We show that the moderate eruptions in the Southern hemisphere leave a measurable imprint on the Northern mid-latitude aerosol loading. Having identified the volcanically-perturbed periods from local and global observations we examine the evolution of non-volcanic (background

  4. Summer planetary-scale oscillations: aura MLS temperature compared with ground-based radar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Meek

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The advent of satellite based sampling brings with it the opportunity to examine virtually any part of the globe. Aura MLS mesospheric temperature data are analysed in a wavelet format for easy identification of possible planetary waves (PW and aliases masquerading as PW. A calendar year, 2005, of eastward, stationary, and westward waves at a selected latitude is shown in separate panels for wave number range −3 to +3 for period range 8 h to 30 days (d. Such a wavelet analysis is made possible by Aura's continuous sampling at all latitudes 82° S–82° N. The data presentation is suitable for examination of years of data. However this paper focuses on the striking feature of a "dish-shaped" upper limit to periods near 2 d in mid-summer, with longer periods appearing towards spring and fall, a feature also commonly seen in radar winds. The most probable cause is suggested to be filtering by the summer jet at 70–80 km, the latter being available from ground based medium frequency radar (MFR. Classically, the phase velocity of a wave must be greater than that of the jet in order to propagate through it. As an attempt to directly relate satellite and ground based sampling, a PW event of period 8d and wave number 2, which appears to be the original rather than an alias, is compared with ground based radar wind data. An appendix discusses characteristics of satellite data aliases with regard to their periods and amplitudes.

  5. GROMOS-C, a novel ground-based microwave radiometer for ozone measurement campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, S.; Murk, A.; Kämpfer, N.

    2015-07-01

    Stratospheric ozone is of major interest as it absorbs most harmful UV radiation from the sun, allowing life on Earth. Ground-based microwave remote sensing is the only method that allows for the measurement of ozone profiles up to the mesopause, over 24 hours and under different weather conditions with high time resolution. In this paper a novel ground-based microwave radiometer is presented. It is called GROMOS-C (GRound based Ozone MOnitoring System for Campaigns), and it has been designed to measure the vertical profile of ozone distribution in the middle atmosphere by observing ozone emission spectra at a frequency of 110.836 GHz. The instrument is designed in a compact way which makes it transportable and suitable for outdoor use in campaigns, an advantageous feature that is lacking in present day ozone radiometers. It is operated through remote control. GROMOS-C is a total power radiometer which uses a pre-amplified heterodyne receiver, and a digital fast Fourier transform spectrometer for the spectral analysis. Among its main new features, the incorporation of different calibration loads stands out; this includes a noise diode and a new type of blackbody target specifically designed for this instrument, based on Peltier elements. The calibration scheme does not depend on the use of liquid nitrogen; therefore GROMOS-C can be operated at remote places with no maintenance requirements. In addition, the instrument can be switched in frequency to observe the CO line at 115 GHz. A description of the main characteristics of GROMOS-C is included in this paper, as well as the results of a first campaign at the High Altitude Research Station at Jungfraujoch (HFSJ), Switzerland. The validation is performed by comparison of the retrieved profiles against equivalent profiles from MLS (Microwave Limb Sounding) satellite data, ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast) model data, as well as our nearby NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric

  6. The use of handheld radiometry for the identification of stratigraphic characteristics of Paraiba Basin units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Ebenezer Moreno de; Villar, Heldio Pereira; Lima, Ricardo de Andrade; Lima Filho, Mario

    2000-01-01

    A study on the use of radiometric techniques for the identification of stratigraphic characteristics of Paraiba Basin units was carried out with handheld instrumentation. The area chosen ran from north Pernambuco to south Paraiba. The presence of radioactive material had been previously determined. For this work a portable scintillometer was fixed to the door of a vehicle, on the outside, with the probe directed downwards. Background radiation was measured as 40 cps (counts per second). The scintillometer has an alarm which sounds whenever the measured count rate rises above a pre-established figure, 100 cps in the present case. Monitoring then proceeded manually. In sites where the count rate was much higher than 100 cps, the probe was lowered to the soil surface. Local coordinates were obtained by GPS. Therefore, an isoradioactivity map of the area could be drawn. The comparison between this map and local geological charts showed significant correlation between observed count rates and geologic formations. Low count rates were indicative of the Barreiras formation, whereas the highest rates were obtained for the Gramame formation (with urano-phosphatic lythotypes). It is concluded that handheld radiometry is a useful tool in geological charting, is special in areas where stratigraphic units have been masked by environmental changes and human activities. (author)

  7. Dental diagnostic clinical instrument ("Canary") development using photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, R. J.; Sivagurunathan, K.; Garcia, J.; Matvienko, A.; Mandelis, A.; Abrams, S.

    2010-03-01

    Since 1999, our group at the CADIFT, University of Toronto, has developed the application of Frequency Domain Photothermal Radiometry (PTR) and Luminescence (LUM) to dental caries detection. Various cases including artificial caries detection have been studied and some of the inherent advantages of the adaptation of this technique to dental diagnostics in conjunction with modulated luminescence as a dual-probe technique have been reported. Based on these studies, a portable, compact diagnostic instrument for dental clinic use has been designed, assembled and tested. A semiconductor laser, optical fibers, a thermoelectric cooled mid-IR detector, and a USB connected data acquisition card were used. Software lock-in amplifier techniques were developed to compute amplitude and phase of PTR and LUM signals. In order to achieve fast measurement and acceptable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for clinical application, swept sine waveforms were used. As a result sampling and stabilization time for each measurement point was reduced to a few seconds. A sophisticated software interface was designed to simultaneously record intra-oral camera images with PTR and LUM responses. Preliminary results using this instrument during clinical trials in a dental clinic showed this instrument could detect early caries both from PTR and LUM signals.

  8. Quantitative evaluation of the kinetics of human enamel simulated caries using photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellen, Adam; Mandelis, Andreas; Finer, Yoav; Amaechi, Bennett T.

    2011-07-01

    Photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence (PTR-LUM) is an emerging nondestructive methodology applied toward the characterization and quantification of dental caries. We evaluate the efficacy of PTR-LUM in vitro to detect, monitor, and quantify human enamel caries. Artificial caries are created in extracted human molars (n = 15) using an acidified gel system (pH 4.5) for 10 or 40 days. PTR-LUM frequency scans (1 Hz-1 kHz) are performed before and during demineralization. Transverse microradiography (TMR) analysis, the current gold standard, follows at treatment conclusion to determine the mineral loss and depth of the artificially demineralized lesions. A theoretical model is applied to PTR experimental data to evaluate the changes in optothermophysical properties of demineralized enamel as a function of time. Higher optical scattering coefficients and poorer thermophysical properties are characteristic of the growing demineralized lesions, as verified by TMR, where the generated microporosities of the subsurface lesion confine the thermal-wave centroid. Enhanced optical scattering coefficients of demineralized lesions result in poorer luminescence yield due to scattering of both incident and converted luminescent photons. PTR-LUM sensitivity to changes in tooth mineralization coupled with opto-thermophysical property extraction illustrates the technique's potential for nondestructive quantification of enamel caries.

  9. Investigation of protein and lipid metabolism in thyroid pathology using whole-body radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorobets, V.F.; Matveenko, E.G.

    1987-01-01

    Radiometry of the whole body and its organs was employed to study certain aspects of protein-aminoacid and lipid metabolism in patients with thyroid diseases. Metabolism of human serum 131 I-albumin was studied in 12 patients with neurocirculatory dystonia, in 13 patients with diffuse toxic goiter (in 10 before and after drug therapy) and in 9 controls. 75 Se-methionine aminoacid metabolism was investigated in 9 patients with toxic thyroid adenoma and in 13 controls. The body cell mass was determined in 82 patients with thyrotoxicosis by a measurable amount of 40 K. These data were compared with those of 249 healthy persons. An increase in catabolism of labeled albumin, intensification of labeled methionine metabolism at the tissue level, signs of a decrease in the total amount of metabolic albumin in the body were revealed. Intensification of protein metabolism resulted in a decrease in the body cell mass of these patients. After adequate therapy the above indices of protein metabolism in patients with thyrotoxicosis returned to normal. The assimilation of fatty acids and neutral fat was disturbed both in thyrotoxicosis and hypothyroidism

  10. Pulsed photothermal radiometry in investigation of tissue destruction caused by CO2 laser action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebotareva, Galina P.; Zubov, Boris V.; Nikitin, Alexander P.; Rakcheev, Anatolii P.; Alexeeva, Larisa R.

    1994-12-01

    Pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) of tissue based on the analysis of thermal radiation kinetics measured from tissue at laser heating is an effective method of laser-tissue interaction investigation. The processes of destruction under laser radiation action (coagulation, fusion and welding), which are characterized by definite dynamics of temperature in the region of laser heating, have been studied. The amplitude and kinetics of the thermal signal registered by PPTR technique depend on space and temporal temperature changes in the zone of heating, which is conditioned by the regime of laser action and internal processes in tissue. In the present study the investigation of thermal tissue destruction under action of high-power pulsed CO2 and YAG:Er-laser radiation has been carried out using PPTR. Soft and hard tissues have been examined. The nonlinear dependencies of thermal emission kinetics, the thermal signal amplitude, and the integral absorption on laser energy density are presented and discussed. We represent PPTR as a technique which can be used for the definition of the destruction threshold and for the regulation of laser action on tissue. PPTR method has been applied in clinics with the aim of more accurate definition of CO2 pulsed medical laser radiation dose for treatment of patients with different dermatological diseases.

  11. Assessment of Satellite Ocean Colour Radiometry and Derived Geophysical Products. Chapter 6.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Frederic; Franz, Bryan A.

    2014-01-01

    Standardization of methods to assess and assign quality metrics to satellite ocean color radiometry and derived geophysical products has become paramount with the inclusion of the marine reflectance and chlorophyll-a concentration (Chla) as essential climate variables (ECV; [1]) and the recognition that optical remote sensing of the oceans can only contribute to climate research if and when a continuous succession of satellite missions can be shown to collectively provide a consistent, long-term record with known uncertainties. In 20 years, the community has made significant advancements toward that objective, but providing a complete uncertainty budget for all products and for all conditions remains a daunting task. In the retrieval of marine water-leaving radiance from observed top-of-atmosphere radiance, the sources of uncertainties include those associated with propagation of sensor noise and radiometric calibration and characterization errors, as well as a multitude of uncertainties associated with the modeling and removal of effects from the atmosphere and sea surface. This chapter describes some common approaches used to assess quality and consistency of ocean color satellite products and reviews the current status of uncertainty quantification in the field. Its focus is on the primary ocean color product, the spectrum of marine reflectance Rrs, but uncertainties in some derived products such as the Chla or inherent optical properties (IOPs) will also be considered.

  12. Spectro radiometry Applied to Soil Science; Espectrorradiometria Aplicada a la Ciencia del Suelo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, T.; Chabrillat, S.; Guerrero, C.; Jimenez, M.; Lopez, F.; Palacios, A.; Pelayo, M.; Rodriguez, M.

    2012-07-01

    This work is the result of an internal course that was held in CIEMAT under the framework of activities within the ''Itinerario Formativo: Tecnicas experimentales de apoyo a la Investigacion I+D+I'', as part of the Programa de Acciones Conjuntas de OPIs (CIEMAT, INTA and IGME) financed by the Instituto Nacional de Administracion Publica (INAP). The course was aimed at researchers, technical staff and students associated to the different OPIs introducing them to spectroradiometric techniques for determining soil properties and processes and obtain a thorough insight into the compilation and applications of spectral libraries. This course was directed and organized by CIEMAT with experts specialized in the field of spectro radiometry presenting the corresponding theory and application as well as practical work carried out in the laboratory and in the field. The course is within the research lines carried out by the group Unidad de Conservacion y Recuperacion de Suelos of the Departamento de Medio Ambiente in CIEMAT. (Author)

  13. Dental diagnostic clinical instrument ('Canary') development using photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, R J; Sivagurunathan, K; Garcia, J; Matvienko, A; Mandelis, A [Center for Advanced Diffusion Wave Technologies (CADIFT), Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King' s College Road, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3G8 (Canada); Abrams, S, E-mail: mandelis@mie.utoronto.c [Quantum Dental Technologies, 748 Briar Hill Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, M6B 1L3 (Canada)

    2010-03-01

    Since 1999, our group at the CADIFT, University of Toronto, has developed the application of Frequency Domain Photothermal Radiometry (PTR) and Luminescence (LUM) to dental caries detection. Various cases including artificial caries detection have been studied and some of the inherent advantages of the adaptation of this technique to dental diagnostics in conjunction with modulated luminescence as a dual-probe technique have been reported. Based on these studies, a portable, compact diagnostic instrument for dental clinic use has been designed, assembled and tested. A semiconductor laser, optical fibers, a thermoelectric cooled mid-IR detector, and a USB connected data acquisition card were used. Software lock-in amplifier techniques were developed to compute amplitude and phase of PTR and LUM signals. In order to achieve fast measurement and acceptable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for clinical application, swept sine waveforms were used. As a result sampling and stabilization time for each measurement point was reduced to a few seconds. A sophisticated software interface was designed to simultaneously record intra-oral camera images with PTR and LUM responses. Preliminary results using this instrument during clinical trials in a dental clinic showed this instrument could detect early caries both from PTR and LUM signals.

  14. Dental diagnostic clinical instrument (Canary) development using photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, R J; Sivagurunathan, K; Garcia, J; Matvienko, A; Mandelis, A; Abrams, S

    2010-01-01

    Since 1999, our group at the CADIFT, University of Toronto, has developed the application of Frequency Domain Photothermal Radiometry (PTR) and Luminescence (LUM) to dental caries detection. Various cases including artificial caries detection have been studied and some of the inherent advantages of the adaptation of this technique to dental diagnostics in conjunction with modulated luminescence as a dual-probe technique have been reported. Based on these studies, a portable, compact diagnostic instrument for dental clinic use has been designed, assembled and tested. A semiconductor laser, optical fibers, a thermoelectric cooled mid-IR detector, and a USB connected data acquisition card were used. Software lock-in amplifier techniques were developed to compute amplitude and phase of PTR and LUM signals. In order to achieve fast measurement and acceptable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for clinical application, swept sine waveforms were used. As a result sampling and stabilization time for each measurement point was reduced to a few seconds. A sophisticated software interface was designed to simultaneously record intra-oral camera images with PTR and LUM responses. Preliminary results using this instrument during clinical trials in a dental clinic showed this instrument could detect early caries both from PTR and LUM signals.

  15. Experimental investigation on the caries characteristic of dental tissues by photothermal radiometry scanning imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Liu, Jun-yan; Wang, Xiao-chun; Wang, Yang

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a one-dimensional (1D) thermal-wave model coupled diffuse-photon-density-wave for three-layer dental tissues using modulated laser stimulation was employed to illustrate the relationship between dental caries characteristic (i.e. caries layer thickness, optical absorption coefficient and optical scattering coefficient) and photothermal radiometry (PTR) signal. Experimental investigation of artificial caries was carried out using PTR scanning imaging. The PTR amplitude and phase delay were increased with dental demineralized treatment. The local caries characteristic parameters were obtained by the best-fitting method based on the 1D thermal-wave model. The PTR scanning imaging measurements illustrated that the optical absorption coefficient and scattering coefficient of caries region were much higher than those of the healthy enamel area. The demineralization thickness of caries region was measured by PTR scanning imaging and its average value shows in good agreement with the digital microscope. Experimental results show that PTR scanning imaging has the merits of high contrast for local inhomogeneity of dental caries; furthermore, this method is an allowance to provide a flexibility for non-contact quantitative evaluation of dental caries.

  16. Tests of the gravitational redshift effect in space-born and ground-based experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavilova, I. B.

    2018-02-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of experiments as concerns with the tests of the gravitational redshift (GRS) effect in ground-based and space-born experiments. In particular, we consider the GRS effects in the gravitational field of the Earth, the major planets of the Solar system, compact stars (white dwarfs and neutron stars) where this effect is confirmed with a higher accuracy. We discuss availabilities to confirm the GRS effect for galaxies and galaxy clusters in visible and X-ray ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  17. Development of ground-based wind energy in DOM and Corsica - Joint CGEDD / CGEIET report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joannis de Verclos, Christian de; Albrecht, Patrick; Iselin, Philippe; Legait, Benoit; Vignolles, Denis

    2012-09-01

    Addressing the peculiar cases of the French overseas districts (DOM: Guadeloupe, Martinique, Guyana, Mayotte, La Reunion) and Corsica, this report analyzes four main topics: the objectives and challenges of ground-based wind energy (sustainable development, not-interconnected areas, and public service of electricity supply), the local situations and their cartography, the legal issues and the possible evolution options (energy law, environmental law, urban planning law, local community law), and the modalities of devolution of project. The authors highlight the issues which require a new legal framework, notably governance and the devolution procedure

  18. Methane Emissions from Bangladesh: Bridging the Gap Between Ground-based and Space-borne Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, C.; Bennartz, R.; Hornberger, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    Gaining an understanding of methane (CH4) emission sources and atmospheric dispersion is an essential part of climate change research. Large-scale and global studies often rely on satellite observations of column CH4 mixing ratio whereas high-spatial resolution estimates rely on ground-based measurements. Extrapolation of ground-based measurements on, for example, rice paddies to broad region scales is highly uncertain because of spatio-temporal variability. We explore the use of ground-based river stage measurements and independent satellite observations of flooded area along with satellite measurements of CH4 mixing ratio to estimate the extent of methane emissions. Bangladesh, which comprises most of the Ganges Brahmaputra Meghna (GBM) delta, is a region of particular interest for studying spatio-temporal variation of methane emissions due to (1) broadscale rice cultivation and (2) seasonal flooding and atmospheric convection during the monsoon. Bangladesh and its deltaic landscape exhibit a broad range of environmental, economic, and social circumstances that are relevant to many nations in South and Southeast Asia. We explore the seasonal enhancement of CH4 in Bangladesh using passive remote sensing spectrometer CH4 products from the SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). The seasonal variation of CH4 is compared to independent estimates of seasonal flooding from water gauge stations and space-based passive microwave water-to-land fractions from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Microwave Imager (TRMM-TMI). Annual cycles in inundation (natural and anthropogenic) and atmospheric CH4 concentrations show highly correlated seasonal signals. NOAA's HYSPLIT model is used to determine atmospheric residence time of ground CH4 fluxes. Using the satellite observations, we can narrow the large uncertainty in extrapolation of ground-based CH4 emission estimates from rice paddies

  19. The laser calibration system for the STACEE ground-based gamma ray detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hanna, D

    2002-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the laser system used for calibration monitoring of components of the STACEE detector. STACEE is a ground based gamma ray detector which uses the heliostats of a solar power facility to collect and focus Cherenkov light onto a system of secondary optics and photomultiplier tubes. To monitor the gain and check the linearity and timing properties of the phototubes and associated electronics, a system based on a dye laser, neutral density filters and optical fibres has been developed. In this paper we describe the system and present some results from initial tests made with it.

  20. Ground-Based Meteorological Data (daily, 24 hour files) from Co-Located Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System GLONASS (GLObal NAvigation Satellite System) Receivers from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Meteorological Data (daily, 24 hour files) from instruments co-located with Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) GLONASS...

  1. Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) GLONASS Broadcast Ephemeris Data (sub-hourly files) from NASA CDDIS - Cloned

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) GLObal NAvigation Satellite System (GLONASS) Broadcast Ephemeris Data (sub-hourly...

  2. Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) SBAS Broadcast Ephemeris Data (sub-hourly files) from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Satellite-Based Augmentation System (SBAS) Broadcast Ephemeris Data (sub-hourly...

  3. Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) QZSS Broadcast Ephemeris Data (daily files) from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Quasi-Zenith Satellite System (QZSS) Broadcast Ephemeris Data (daily files) from the...

  4. Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Galileo Broadcast Ephemeris Data (sub-hourly files) from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Galileo Broadcast Ephemeris Data (sub-hourly files) from the NASA Crustal Dynamics...

  5. Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) SBAS Broadcast Ephemeris Data (daily files) from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Satellite-Based Augmentation System (SBAS) Broadcast Ephemeris Data (daily files)...

  6. Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) GPS Broadcast Ephemeris Data (hourly files) from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) GPS Broadcast Ephemeris Data (hourly files) from the NASA Crustal Dynamics Data...

  7. Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) QZSS Broadcast Ephemeris Data (hourly files) from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Quasi-Zenith Satellite System (QZSS) Broadcast Ephemeris Data (hourly files) from the...

  8. Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) GPS Broadcast Ephemeris Data (sub-hourly files) from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) GPS Broadcast Ephemeris Data (sub-hourly files) from the NASA Crustal Dynamics Data...

  9. Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Beidou Broadcast Ephemeris Data (hourly files) from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Beidou Broadcast Ephemeris Data (hourly files) from the NASA Crustal Dynamics Data...

  10. Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Galileo Broadcast Ephemeris Data (hourly files) from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Galileo Broadcast Ephemeris Data (hourly files) from the NASA Crustal Dynamics Data...

  11. Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Galileo Broadcast Ephemeris Data (daily files) from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Galileo Broadcast Ephemeris Data (daily files) from the NASA Crustal Dynamics Data...

  12. Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) SBAS Broadcast Ephemeris Data (hourly files) from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Satellite-Based Augmentation System (SBAS) Broadcast Ephemeris Data (hourly files)...

  13. Exploring the relationship between monitored ground-based and satellite aerosol measurements over the City of Johannesburg

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Garland, Rebecca M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This project studied the relationship between aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on the Terra satellite, and ground-based monitored particulate matter (PM) mass concentrations measured...

  14. Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Observation Data (30-second sampling, hourly files) from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Observation Data (30-second sampling, hourly files) from the NASA Crustal Dynamics...

  15. Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) QZSS Broadcast Ephemeris Data (sub-hourly files) from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Quasi-Zenith Satellite System (QZSS) Broadcast Ephemeris Data (sub-hourly files) from...

  16. Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Beidou Broadcast Ephemeris Data (sub-hourly files) from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Beidou Broadcast Ephemeris Data (sub-hourly files) from the NASA Crustal Dynamics...

  17. Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System Observation Summary Data (30-second sampling, daily files) from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Observation Summary Data (30-second sampling, daily files of all distinct navigation...

  18. Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) GPS Broadcast Ephemeris Data (daily files) from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) GPS Broadcast Ephemeris Data (daily files) from the NASA Crustal Dynamics Data...

  19. Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System Mixed Broadcast Ephemeris Data (sub-hourly files) from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Mixed Broadcast Ephemeris Data (sub-hourly files) from the NASA Crustal Dynamics Data...

  20. Information Technology Management: Select Controls for the Information Security of the Ground-Based Midcourse Defense Communications Network

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Truex, Kathryn M; Lamar, Karen J; Leighton, George A; Woodruff, Courtney E; Brunetti, Tina N; Russell, Dawn M

    2006-01-01

    ... to the Ground-Based Midcourse Defense Communications Network should read this report to reduce the risk of interruption, misuse, modification, and unauthorized access to information in the system...

  1. Proceedings of the 2011 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetovsky, Marvin A.; Patterson, Eileen F.; Sandoval, Marisa N.

    2011-01-01

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2011: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 13-15 September, 2011 in Tucson, Arizona. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), National Science Foundation (NSF), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States' capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  2. Validation of ozone monitoring instrument ultraviolet index against ground-based UV index in Kampala, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyimbwa, Dennis; Dahlback, Arne; Ssenyonga, Taddeo; Chen, Yi-Chun; Stamnes, Jakob J; Frette, Øyvind; Hamre, Børge

    2015-10-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) overpass solar ultraviolet (UV) indices have been validated against the ground-based UV indices derived from Norwegian Institute for Air Research UV measurements in Kampala (0.31° N, 32.58° E, 1200 m), Uganda for the period between 2005 and 2014. An excessive use of old cars, which would imply a high loading of absorbing aerosols, could cause the OMI retrieval algorithm to overestimate the surface UV irradiances. The UV index values were found to follow a seasonal pattern with maximum values in March and October. Under all-sky conditions, the OMI retrieval algorithm was found to overestimate the UV index values with a mean bias of about 28%. When only days with radiation modification factor greater than or equal to 65%, 70%, 75%, and 80% were considered, the mean bias between ground-based and OMI overpass UV index values was reduced to 8%, 5%, 3%, and 1%, respectively. The overestimation of the UV index by the OMI retrieval algorithm was found to be mainly due to clouds and aerosols.

  3. Retrieval of tropospheric HCHO in El Salvador using ground based DOAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarca, W.; Gamez, K.; Rudamas, C.

    2017-12-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is the most abundant carbonyl in the atmosphere, being an intermediate product in the oxidation of most volatile organic compounds (VOCs). HCHO is carcinogenic, and highly water soluble [1]. HCHO can originate from biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion and has been observed from satellite and ground-based sensors by using the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique [2].DOAS products can be used for air quality monitoring, validation of chemical transport models, validation of satellite tropospheric column density retrievals, among others [3]. In this study, we report on column density levels of HCHO measured by ground based Multi-Axis -DOAS in different locations of El Salvador in March, 2015. We have not observed large differences of the HCHO column density values at different viewing directions. This result points out a reasonably polluted and hazy atmosphere in the measuring sites, as reported by other authors [4]. Average values ranging from 1016 to 1017 molecules / cm2 has been obtained. The contribution of vehicular traffic and biomass burning to the column density levels in these sites of El Salvador will be discussed. [1] A. R. Garcia et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys. 6, 4545 (2006) [2] E. Peters et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys. 12, 11179 (2012) [3] T. Vlemmix, et al. Atmos. Meas. Tech., 8, 941-963, 2015 [4] A. Heckel et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys. 5, (2005)

  4. Extreme weather monitoring system with combination of micro-satellites and ground-based observation networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y.; Sato, M.; Castro, E. C.; Ishida, T.; Marciano, J. J.; Kubota, H.; Yamashita, K.

    2017-12-01

    Thunderstorm causes torrential rainfall and is the energy source of typhoon. In these decades it has been revealed that lightning discharge is a very good proxy of thunderstorm activity. However, operational and sustainable observation system that can provide sufficient information of lightning strokes has not been constructed in Asia. On the other hand, 50-kg micro-satellite is now one of the operational tools for remote-sensing, which could be fabricated also by developing countries. International project to promote the combination of the micro-satellites and ground-based observation networks, supported by programs of SATREPS by DOST and JST-JICA, e-ASIA by JST and other Asian agencies and Core-to-core by JSPS, is now going under international agreement among Asian countries. We will establish a new way to obtain very detail semi-real time information of thunderstorm and typhoon activities, using visible stereo and thermal infrared imaging by target pointing with 50-kg micro-satellite, and ground-based networks consisting of lightning sensors, AWS and infrasound sensors, that cannot be achieved only with existing observation methods. Based on these new techniques together with advanced radar system and drop/radio sondes, we will try to construct the cutting-edge observation system to monitor the development of thunderstorm and typhoon, which may greatly contribute to the prediction of disasters and the public alerting system.

  5. Ground based magnetometers: The workhorse of the magnetospheric-ionospheric community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerloev, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    For decades ground based magnetometers have proven to be the workhorse of magnetosphere-ionosphere physics and their importance is indisputable. SuperMAG is the next logical step for the ground magnetometer community to take in the development of a user friendly data service enabling an understanding as well as monitoring of the global electric current system. The data set provided by the ground magnetometer community is truly unique since it provide continuous and nearly global measurement of a fundamental parameter - the ground level magnetic field perturbations. The very strength of this data set also resulted in painstaking and labor-intensive data-handling, which effectively limited research. Analysts faced several inherent complications: confusing or even unknown coordinate systems, a multitude of data artifacts and errors, unknown baselines, and even difficulties obtaining data. These problems have resulted in a serious underutilization of data from magnetometers. In this paper we present a solution to these complications (the SuperMAG initiative) which is a worldwide collaboration of organizations and national agencies that currently operate more than 300 ground based magnetometers. SuperMAG provides easy access to validated ground magnetic field perturbations in the same coordinate system, identical time resolution and with a common baseline removal approach. The purpose of SuperMAG it to help scientists, teachers, students and the general public have easy access to measurements of the Earth's magnetic field. The presentation will focus on current and future SuperMAG capabilities illustrating the potential for now-casting and eventually forecasting.

  6. A New Technique to Observe ENSO Activity via Ground-Based GPS Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suparta, Wayan; Iskandar, Ahmad; Singh, Mandeep Singh Jit

    In an attempt to study the effects of global climate change in the tropics for improving global climate model, this paper aims to detect the ENSO events, especially El Nino phase by using ground-based GPS receivers. Precipitable water vapor (PWV) obtained from the Global Positioning System (GPS) Meteorology measurements in line with the sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTa) are used to connect their response to El Niño activity. The data gathered from four selected stations over the Southeast Asia, namely PIMO (Philippines), KUAL (Malaysia), NTUS (Singapore) and BAKO (Indonesia) for the year of 2009/2010 were processed. A strong correlation was observed for PIMO station with a correlation coefficient of -0.90, significantly at the 99 % confidence level. In general, the relationship between GPS PWV and SSTa at all stations on a weekly basis showed with a negative correlation. The negative correlation indicates that during the El Niño event, the PWV variation was in decreased trend. Decreased trend of PWV value is caused by a dry season that affected the GPS signals in the ocean-atmospheric coupling. Based on these promising results, we can propose that the ground-based GPS receiver is capable used to monitor ENSO activity and this is a new prospective method that previously unexplored.

  7. Proceedings of the 2011 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetovsky, Marvin A. [Editor; Patterson, Eileen F. [Editor; Sandoval, Marisa N. [Editor

    2011-09-13

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2011: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 13-15 September, 2011 in Tucson, Arizona. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), National Science Foundation (NSF), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States' capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  8. Proceedings of the 28th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetovsky, Marvin A.; Benson, Jody; Patterson, Eileen F.

    2006-01-01

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 28th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 19-21 September, 2006 in Orlando, Florida. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  9. Proceedings of the 28th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetovsky, Marvin A. [Editor; Benson, Jody [Editor; Patterson, Eileen F. [Editor

    2006-09-19

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 28th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 19-21 September, 2006 in Orlando, Florida. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  10. Proceedings of the 27th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetovsky, Marvin A. [Editor; Benson, Jody [Editor; Patterson, Eileen F. [Editor

    2005-09-20

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 27th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 20-22 September, 2005 in Rancho Mirage, California. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  11. De-mystifying earned value management for ground based astronomy projects, large and small

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Timothy; Brennan, Patricia; Mueller, Mark

    2014-08-01

    The scale and complexity of today's ground based astronomy projects have justifiably required Principal Investigator's and their project teams to adopt more disciplined management processes and tools in order to achieve timely and accurate quantification of the progress and relative health of their projects. Earned Value Management (EVM) is one such tool. Developed decades ago and used extensively in the defense and construction industries, and now a requirement of NASA projects greater than $20M; EVM has gained a foothold in ground-based astronomy projects. The intent of this paper is to de-mystify EVM by discussing the fundamentals of project management, explaining how EVM fits with existing principles, and describing key concepts every project can use to implement their own EVM system. This paper also discusses pitfalls to avoid during implementation and obstacles to its success. The authors report on their organization's most recent experience implementing EVM for the GMT-Consortium Large Earth Finder (G-CLEF) project. G-CLEF is a fiber-fed, optical echelle spectrograph that has been selected as a first light instrument for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT), planned for construction at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile's Atacama Desert region.

  12. Recent successes and emerging challenges for coordinated satellite/ground-based magnetospheric exploration and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelopoulos, Vassilis

    With the availability of a distributed constellation of spacecraft (THEMIS, Geotail, Cluster) and increased capability ground based arrays (SuperDARN, THEMIS/GBOs), it is now pos-sible to infer simply from timing significant information regarding mapping of magnetospheric phenomena. Optical, magnetometer and radar data can pinpoint the location and nature of onset signatures. On the other hand, magnetic field modeling constrained by physical bound-aries (such as the isotropy boundary) the measured magnetic field and total pressure values at a distibuted network of satellites has proven to do a much better job at correlating ionospheric precipitation and diffuse auroral boundaries to magnetospheric phenomena, such as the inward boundary of the dipolarization fronts. It is now possible to routinely compare in-situ measured phase space densities of ion and electron distributions during ionosphere -magnetosphere con-junctions, in the absense of potential drops. It is also possible to not only infer equivalent current systems from the ground, but use reconstruction of the ionospheric current system from space to determine the full electrodynamics evolution of the ionosphere and compare with radars. Assimilation of this emerging ground based and global magnetospheric panoply into a self consistent magnetospheric model will likely be one of the most fruitful endeavors in magnetospheric exploration during the next few years.

  13. Proceedings of the 29th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetovsky, Marvin A.; Benson, Jody; Patterson, Eileen F.

    2007-01-01

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 29th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 25-27 September, 2007 in Denver, Colorado. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  14. Informing hydrological models with ground-based time-lapse relative gravimetry: potential and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Christiansen, Lars; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Coupled hydrogeophysical inversion emerges as an attractive option to improve the calibration and predictive capability of hydrological models. Recently, ground-based time-lapse relative gravity (TLRG) measurements have attracted increasing interest because there is a direct relationship between ...... in gravity due to unmonitored non-hydrological effects, and the requirement of a gravitationally stable reference station. Application of TLRG in hydrology should be combined with other geophysical and/or traditional monitoring methods.......Coupled hydrogeophysical inversion emerges as an attractive option to improve the calibration and predictive capability of hydrological models. Recently, ground-based time-lapse relative gravity (TLRG) measurements have attracted increasing interest because there is a direct relationship between...... the signal and the change in water mass stored in the subsurface. Thus, no petrophysical relationship is required for coupled hydrogeophysical inversion. Two hydrological events were monitored with TLRG. One was a natural flooding event in the periphery of the Okavango Delta, Botswana, and one was a forced...

  15. "Slow-scanning" in Ground-based Mid-infrared Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsawa, Ryou; Sako, Shigeyuki; Miyata, Takashi; Kamizuka, Takafumi; Okada, Kazushi; Mori, Kiyoshi; Uchiyama, Masahito S.; Yamaguchi, Junpei; Fujiyoshi, Takuya; Morii, Mikio; Ikeda, Shiro

    2018-04-01

    Chopping observations with a tip-tilt secondary mirror have conventionally been used in ground-based mid-infrared observations. However, it is not practical for next generation large telescopes to have a large tip-tilt mirror that moves at a frequency larger than a few hertz. We propose an alternative observing method, a "slow-scanning" observation. Images are continuously captured as movie data, while the field of view is slowly moved. The signal from an astronomical object is extracted from the movie data by a low-rank and sparse matrix decomposition. The performance of the "slow-scanning" observation was tested in an experimental observation with Subaru/COMICS. The quality of a resultant image in the "slow-scanning" observation was as good as in a conventional chopping observation with COMICS, at least for a bright point-source object. The observational efficiency in the "slow-scanning" observation was better than that in the chopping observation. The results suggest that the "slow-scanning" observation can be a competitive method for the Subaru telescope and be of potential interest to other ground-based facilities to avoid chopping.

  16. The Polarization-Sensitive Bolometers for SPICA and their Potential Use for Ground-Based Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveret, Vincent

    2018-01-01

    CEA is leading the development of Safari-POL, an imaging-polarimeter aboard the SPICA space observatory (ESA M5). SPICA will be able to reach unprecedented sensitivities thanks to its cooled telescope and its ultra-sensitive detectors. The detector assembly of Safari-POL holds three arrays that are cooled down to 50 mK and correspond to three spectral bands : 100, 200 and 350 microns. The detectors (silicon bolometers), benefit from the Herschel/PACS legacy and are also a big step forward in term of sensitivity (improved by two orders of magnitude compared to PACS bolometers) and for polarimetry capabilities. Indeed, each pixel is intrinsically sensitive to two polarization components (Horizontal and Vertical). We will present the Safari-POL concept, the first results of measurements made on the detectors, and future plans for possible ground-based instruments using this technology. We will also present the example of the ArTéMiS camera, installed at APEX, that was developped as a ground-based conterpart of the PACS photometer.

  17. Proceedings of the 27th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetovsky, Marvin A.; Benson, Jody; Patterson, Eileen F.

    2005-01-01

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 27th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 20-22 September, 2005 in Rancho Mirage, California. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  18. Ground-based VHE γ ray astronomy with air Cherenkov imaging telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzoyan, R.

    2000-01-01

    The history of astronomy has been one of the scientific discovery following immediately the introduction of new technology. In this report, we will review shortly the basic development of the atmospheric air Cherenkov light detection technique, particularly the imaging telescope technique, which in the last years led to the firm establishment of a new branch in experimental astronomy, namely ground-based very high-energy (VHE) γ ray astronomy. Milestones in the technology and in the analysis of imaging technique will be discussed. The design of the 17 m diameter MAGIC Telescope, being currently under construction, is based on the development of new technologies for all its major parts and sets new standards in the performance of the ground-based γ detectors. MAGIC is one of the next major steps in the development of the technique being the first instrument that will allow one to carry out measurements also in the not yet investigated energy gap i.e. between 10 and 300 GeV

  19. Proceedings of the 2009 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetovsky, Marv A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aguilar - Chang, Julio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson, Dale [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arrowsmith, Marie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arrowsmith, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baker, Diane [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Begnaud, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harste, Hans [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maceira, Monica [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patton, Howard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Phillips, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Randall, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowe, Charlotte [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stead, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steck, Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitaker, Rod [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yang, Xiaoning ( David ) [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-09-21

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2009: Ground -Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 21-23 September, 2009 in Tucson, Arizona,. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States’ capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  20. Proceedings of the 30th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetovsky, Marv A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aguilar-chang, Julio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arrowsmith, Marie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arrowsmith, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baker, Diane [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Begnaud, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harste, Hans [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maceira, Monica [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patton, Howard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Phillips, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Randall, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Revelle, Douglas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowe, Charlotte [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stead, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steck, Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitaker, Rod [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yang, Xiaoning [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-09-23

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 30th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 23-25 September, 2008 in Portsmouth, Virginia. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States’ capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  1. Proceedings of the 2010 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetovsky, Marvin A [Editor; Patterson, Eileen F [Editor

    2010-09-21

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2010: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 21-23 September, 2010 in Orlando, Florida,. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, National Science Foundation (NSF), Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  2. Proceedings of the 29th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetovsky, Marvin A. [Editor; Benson, Jody [Editor; Patterson, Eileen F. [Editor

    2007-09-25

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 29th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 25-27 September, 2007 in Denver, Colorado. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  3. Proceedings of the 2010 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetovsky, Marvin A.; Patterson, Eileen F.

    2010-01-01

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2010: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 21-23 September, 2010 in Orlando, Florida,. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, National Science Foundation (NSF), Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  4. Coordinated ground-based and geosynchronous satellite-based measurements of auroral pulsations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suszcynsky, David M.; Borovsky, Joseph E.; Thomsen, Michelle F.; McComas, David J.; Belian, Richard D.

    1996-09-01

    We describe a technique that uses a ground-based all-sky video camera and geosynchronous satellite-based plasma and energetic particle detectors to study ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling as it relates to the aurora. The video camera system was deployed in Eagle, Alaska for a seven month period at the foot of the magnetic field line that threads geosynchronous satellite 1989-046. Since 1989-046 corotates with the earth, its footprint remains nearly fixed in the vicinity of Eagle, allowing for routine continuous monitoring of an auroral field line at its intersections with the ground and with geosynchronous orbit. As an example of the utility of this technique, we present coordinated ground-based and satellite based observations during periods of auroral pulsations and compare this data to the predictions of both the relaxation oscillator theory and flow cyclotron maser theory for the generation of pulsating aurorae. The observed plasma and energetic particle characteristics at geosynchronous orbit during pulsating aurorae displays are found to be in agreement with the predictions of both theories lending further support that a cyclotron resonance mechanism is responsible for auroral pulsations.

  5. Predicting Electron Population Characteristics in 2-D Using Multispectral Ground-Based Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Guy; Michell, Robert; Samara, Marilia; Hampton, Donald; Jahn, Jorg-Micha

    2018-01-01

    Ground-based imaging and in situ sounding rocket data are compared to electron transport modeling for an active inverted-V type auroral event. The Ground-to-Rocket Electrodynamics-Electrons Correlative Experiment (GREECE) mission successfully launched from Poker Flat, Alaska, on 3 March 2014 at 11:09:50 UT and reached an apogee of approximately 335 km over the aurora. Multiple ground-based electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) imagers were positioned at Venetie, Alaska, and aimed toward magnetic zenith. The imagers observed the intensity of different auroral emission lines (427.8, 557.7, and 844.6 nm) at the magnetic foot point of the rocket payload. Emission line intensity data are correlated with electron characteristics measured by the GREECE onboard electron spectrometer. A modified version of the GLobal airglOW (GLOW) model is used to estimate precipitating electron characteristics based on optical emissions. GLOW predicted the electron population characteristics with 20% error given the observed spectral intensities within 10° of magnetic zenith. Predictions are within 30% of the actual values within 20° of magnetic zenith for inverted-V-type aurora. Therefore, it is argued that this technique can be used, at least in certain types of aurora, such as the inverted-V type presented here, to derive 2-D maps of electron characteristics. These can then be used to further derive 2-D maps of ionospheric parameters as a function of time, based solely on multispectral optical imaging data.

  6. Electrodynamics and temporal characteristics of the East African ionosphere inferred from ground-based observations (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damtie, B.; Negussie, M.; Radichella, S.; Nava, B.; Yizengaw, E.; Groves, K. M.

    2010-12-01

    Information on the characteristics of the equatorial ionosphere inferred from observations is vital to understand its electrodynamics. In this paper we present the characteristics of the East African ionosphere inferred from ground based observations. These observations are made using chain of GPS receivers and the daily and seasonally characteristics of the ionosphere are presented. We have also used an empirical model to reproduce these observations. This is done by comparing the total electron content (TEC) measurements obtained from a ground-based GPS receiver and the corresponding values obtained from the empirical model, which is driven solely by the daily values of F10.7 solar index as input. We found that the model is capable of reproducing the measurement values quite well in the time intervals 0200- 0400 UT for a year. Also, we have shown that the model gives better approximation of the real measurements in June and December Solstices than in March and October equinox. We have discussed the possible electrodynamics scenarios that could yield these observational results.

  7. Development of a Ground-Based Atmospheric Monitoring Network for the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sprovieri F.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Consistent, high-quality measurements of atmospheric mercury (Hg are necessary in order to better understand Hg emissions, transport, and deposition on a global scale. Although the number of atmospheric Hg monitoring stations has increased in recent years, the available measurement database is limited and there are many regions of the world where measurements have not been extensively performed. Long-term atmospheric Hg monitoring and additional ground-based monitoring sites are needed in order to generate datasets that will offer new insight and information about the global scale trends of atmospheric Hg emissions and deposition. In the framework of the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS project, a coordinated global observational network for atmospheric Hg is being established. The overall research strategy of GMOS is to develop a state-of-the-art observation system able to provide information on the concentration of Hg species in ambient air and precipitation on the global scale. This network is being developed by integrating previously established ground-based atmospheric Hg monitoring stations with newly established GMOS sites that are located both at high altitude and sea level locations, as well as in climatically diverse regions. Through the collection of consistent, high-quality atmospheric Hg measurement data, we seek to create a comprehensive assessment of atmospheric Hg concentrations and their dependence on meteorology, long-range atmospheric transport and atmospheric emissions.

  8. Development and calibration of a ground-based active collector for cloud- and fogwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kins, L.; Junkermann, W.; Meixner, F.X.; Muller, K.P.; Ehhalt, D.H.

    1986-04-01

    In spring 1985, field experiments were started to study the scavenging processes of atmospheric trace substances. Besides the chemical analysis of precipitation sample, these studies required simultaneous collection of cloud water for chemical analysis. In particular, a ground-based cloud water collector was needed, suitable for use on the top of a TV-tower. Existing designs of ground-based cloud or fogwater samplers be divided into two general classes: a) passive collectors, which utilize the ambient wind to impact the droplets on the collection surface; b) active collectors, which accelerate the droplets to a certain velocity as they approach the collection surface. Teflon-strings are extended between two disks which are 1m apart. The disadvantage of this collector, for these experiments, was that the collector strings are always exposed to the ambient air, so that contamination by aerosol impact during dry periods can not be excluded. Furthermore, because of the length of the strings, impacted droplets need a certain time to drain off, during which they remain exposed to the ambient air stream and continue to scavenge trace gases.

  9. Potential use of ground-based sensor technologies for weed detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteinatos, Gerassimos G; Weis, Martin; Andújar, Dionisio; Rueda Ayala, Victor; Gerhards, Roland

    2014-02-01

    Site-specific weed management is the part of precision agriculture (PA) that tries to effectively control weed infestations with the least economical and environmental burdens. This can be achieved with the aid of ground-based or near-range sensors in combination with decision rules and precise application technologies. Near-range sensor technologies, developed for mounting on a vehicle, have been emerging for PA applications during the last three decades. These technologies focus on identifying plants and measuring their physiological status with the aid of their spectral and morphological characteristics. Cameras, spectrometers, fluorometers and distance sensors are the most prominent sensors for PA applications. The objective of this article is to describe-ground based sensors that have the potential to be used for weed detection and measurement of weed infestation level. An overview of current sensor systems is presented, describing their concepts, results that have been achieved, already utilized commercial systems and problems that persist. A perspective for the development of these sensors is given. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Preparing for TESS: Precision Ground-based Light-curves of Newly Discovered Transiting Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiting; Stefansson, Gudmundur; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Monson, Andy; Hebb, Leslie; Wisniewski, John; Huehnerhoff, Joseph

    2018-01-01

    NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), to be launched in early 2018, is expected to catalog a myriad of transiting exoplanet candidates ranging from Earth-sized to gas giants, orbiting a diverse range of stellar types in the solar neighborhood. In particular, TESS will find small planets orbiting the closest and brightest stars, and will enable detailed atmospheric characterizations of planets with current and future telescopes. In the TESS era, ground-based follow-up resources will play a critical role in validating and confirming the planetary nature of the candidates TESS will discover. Along with confirming the planetary nature of exoplanet transits, high precision ground-based transit observations allow us to put further constraints on exoplanet orbital parameters and transit timing variations. In this talk, we present new observations of transiting exoplanets recently discovered by the K2 mission, using the optical diffuser on the 3.5m ARC Telescope at Apache Point Observatory. These include observations of the mini-Neptunes K2-28b and K2-104b orbiting early-to-mid M-dwarfs. In addition, other recent transit observations performed using the robotic 30cm telescope at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile will be presented.

  11. Prospects for Ground-Based Detection and Follow-up of TESS-Discovered Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varakian, Matthew; Deming, Drake

    2018-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will monitor over 200,000 main sequence dwarf stars for exoplanetary transits, with the goal of discovering small planets orbiting stars that are bright enough for follow-up observations. We here evaluate the prospects for ground-based transit detection and follow-up of the TESS-discovered planets. We focus particularly on the TESS planets that only transit once during each 27.4 day TESS observing window per region, and we calculate to what extent ground-based recovery of additional transits will be possible. Using simulated exoplanet systems from Sullivan et al. and assuming the use of a 60-cm telescope at a high quality observing site, we project the S/N ratios for transits of such planets. We use Phoenix stellar models for stars with surface temperatures from 2500K to 12000K, and we account for limb darkening, red atmospheric noise, and missed transits due to the day-night cycle and poor weather.

  12. Ultra-Wideband Phased Array for Millimeter-Wave 5G and ISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Markus H.; Volakis, John L.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2016-01-01

    Growing mobile data consumption has prompted the exploration of the millimeter-wave spectrum for large bandwidth, high speed communications. However, the allocated bands are spread across a wide swath of spectrum: fifth generation mobile architecture (5G): 28, 38, 39, 64-71 GHz, as well as Industrial, Scientific, and Medical bands (ISM): 24 and 60 GHz. Moreover, high gain phased arrays are required to overcome the significant path loss associated with these frequencies. Further, it is necessary to incorporate several of these applications in a single, small size and low cost platform. To this end, we have developed a scanning, Ultra-Wideband (UWB) array which covers all 5G, ISM, and other mm-W bands from 24-72 GHz. Critically, this is accomplished using mass-production Printed Circuit Board (PCB) fabrication.

  13. Ultra-Wideband Array in PCB for Millimeter-Wave 5G and ISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Markus H.; Volakis, John L.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2017-01-01

    Growing mobile data consumption has prompted the exploration of the millimeter-wave spectrum for large bandwidth, high speed communications. However, the allocated bands are spread across a wide swath of spectrum: Fifth generation mobile architecture (5G): 28, 38, 39, 6471 GHz; Industrial, Scientific, and Medical bands (ISM): 24, 60 GHz. Moreover, high gain phased arrays are required to overcome the significant path loss associated with these frequencies. Further, it is necessary to incorporate several of these applications in a single, small size and low cost platform. To this end, we have developed a scanning, Ultra-Wideband (UWB) array which covers all 5G, ISM, and other mm-W bands from 2472 GHz. Critically, this is accomplished using mass-production Printed Circuit Board (PCB) fabrication. The results of this work are presented in this poster.

  14. Multi-Band Multi-Tone Tunable Millimeter-Wave Frequency Synthesizer For Satellite Beacon Transmitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design and test results of a multi-band multi-tone tunable millimeter-wave frequency synthesizer, based on a solid-state frequency comb generator. The intended application of the synthesizer is in a satellite beacon transmitter for radio wave propagation studies at K-band (18 to 26.5 GHz), Q-band (37 to 42 GHz), and E-band (71 to 76 GHz). In addition, the architecture for a compact beacon transmitter, which includes the multi-tone synthesizer, polarizer, horn antenna, and power/control electronics, has been investigated for a notional space-to-ground radio wave propagation experiment payload on a small satellite. The above studies would enable the design of robust high throughput multi-Gbps data rate future space-to-ground satellite communication links.

  15. Optical single sideband millimeter-wave signal generation and transmission using 120° hybrid coupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhiwei; Peng, Miao; Zhou, Hui; Chen, Ming; Jiang, Leyong; Tan, Li; Dai, Xiaoyu; Xiang, Yuanjiang

    2018-03-01

    We propose a novel 60 GHz optical single sideband (OSSB) millimeter-wave (mm-wave) signal generation scheme using 120° hybrid coupler based on external integrated Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM). The proposed scheme shows that the bit error ratio (BER) performance is improved by suppressing the +2nd-order sideband. Meanwhile, the transmission distance is extended as only the optical +1st-order sideband is modulated by using 5 Gbit/s baseband signal while the carrier is blank, owing to the elimination of walk-off effect suffered from fiber dispersion. The simulation results demonstrated that the eye diagrams of the generated 60 GHz OSSB signal keep open and clear after 100 km standard single-mode fiber (SSMF). In addition, the proposed scheme can achieve 2 dB receiver sensitivity improvements than the conventional 90° hybrid coupler when transmitted over 100 km SSMF at a BER of 10-9.

  16. Analysis of Rectangular Folded-Waveguide Millimeter-Wave Slow-wave Structures using Conformal Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumathy, M.; Vinoy, K. J.; Datta, S. K.

    2009-03-01

    An analysis of rectangular folded-waveguide slow-wave structure was developed using conformal mapping technique through Schwarz’s polygon transformation and closed form expressions for the lumped capacitance and inductance per period of the slow-wave structure were derived in terms of the physical dimensions of the structure, incorporating the effects of the beam hole in the lumped parameters. The lumped parameters were subsequently interpreted for obtaining the dispersion and interaction impedance characteristics of the structure. The analysis was benchmarked for two typical millimeter-wave structures, one operating in Ka-band and the other operating in Q-band, against measurement and 3D electromagnetic modeling using MAFIA.

  17. Optical and millimeter-wave radio seamless MIMO transmission based on a radio over fiber technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Atsushi; Kuri, Toshiaki; Hosako, Iwao; Kawanishi, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Yuki; Yasumura, Yoshihiro; Kitayama, Ken-ichi

    2012-12-31

    Multi-input multi-output (MIMO) transmission of two millimeter-wave radio signals seamlessly converted from polarization-division-multiplexed quadrature-phase-shift-keying optical signals is successfully demonstrated, where a radio access unit basically consisting of only optical-to-electrical converters and a radio receiver performs total signal equalization of both the optical and the radio paths and demodulation with digital signal processing (DSP). Orthogonally polarized optical components that are directly converted to two-channel radio components can be demultiplexed and demodulated with high-speed DSP as in optical digital coherent detection. 20-Gbaud optical and radio seamless MIMO transmission provides a total capacity of 74.4 Gb/s with a forward error correction overhead of 7%.

  18. Novel design for microstrip to stripline transitions for millimeter-wave application in LTCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Huang, Qi-bo; Zhu, Zheng-xian; Xu, Hui; Zhang, Bo

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents two transitions between microstrip and stripline in Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramic technology, including a vertical transition and a coplanar transition for millimeter-wave application. These interconnects are simulated and optimized by a three-dimensional electromagnetic field simulator. Simulation results show that the return loss of microstrip to stripline vertical transition is less than -22 dB, and insertion losses are greater than 0.5 dB up to 35 GHz, and greater than 1 dB up to 40 GHz. Similarly, the return loss of the coplanar transition is less than -32 dB and insertion loss is better than 0.5 dB. LTCC test structures were fabricated and the performance of all transitions was successfully validated by scattering parameter measurements up to 40 GHz.

  19. The imaging algorithm of millimeter-wave forward-looking SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Li, Xingguang; Chen, Dianren

    2017-01-01

    It is studied a new type millimeter-wave forward-looking synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging algorithm in this paper, analyzes the imaging principle, echo model of point target is given, deduced the forward-looking synthetic aperture radar RD imaging algorithm, and using MATLAB imaging simulation of point target in 6, a point target simulation results from the peak of 64 * 64 slice contour and azimuth, distance to the envelope of the imaging results were analyzed, found that the distance and azimuth focusing effect is good and the side lobe does not appear distorted and tilted, proved that the system of the millimeter wave synthetic aperture radar imaging of forward-looking , simulation results demonstrate the validity of the system.

  20. Effects of Millimeter-Wave Electromagnetic Radiation on the Experimental Model of Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivachenko, I B; Medvedev, D S; Molodtsova, I D; Panteleev, S S; Sokolov, A Yu; Lyubashina, O A

    2016-02-01

    Effects of millimeter-wave electromagnetic radiation (40 GHz frequency, 0.01 mW power) on the spontaneous fi ring of convergent neurons of the spinal trigeminal nucleus and their responses to electrical stimulation of the dura mater were studied in neurophysiological experiments on rats. Irradiation of the area of cutaneous receptive fields of spinal trigeminal nucleus reversibly inhibited both spontaneous discharges and activity induced by electrical stimulation of the dura mater. The second and third exposures to electromagnetic radiation with an interval of 10 min were ineffective. These results suggest that suppression of neuronal excitability in the spinal trigeminal ganglion can be a mechanism of the anti-migraine effects of electromagnetic radiation observed in clinical practice.

  1. A practical double-sided frequency selective surface for millimeter-wave applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohyuddin, Wahab; Woo, Dong Sik; Choi, Hyun Chul; Kim, Kang Wook

    2018-02-01

    Analysis, design, and implementation of a practical, high-rejection frequency selective surface (FSS) are presented in this paper. An equivalent circuit model is introduced for predicting the frequency response of the FSS. The FSS consists of periodic square loop structures fabricated on both sides of the thin dielectric substrate by using the low-cost chemical etching technique. The proposed FSS possesses band-stop characteristics and is implemented to suppress the 170 GHz signal with attenuation of more than 45 dB with insensitivity to an angle of incident plane wave over 20°. Good agreement is observed among calculated, simulated, and measured results. The proposed FSS filter can be used in various millimeter-wave applications such as the protection of imaging diagnostic systems from high spurious input power.

  2. Some thoughts about millimeter-wave drivers for future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nusinovich, Gregory S.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, an attempt is made to overview some problems important for the development of high-power millimeter-wave drivers for future linear colliders. Since the microwave pulse duration required at high frequencies is much shorter than at low ones, two options seem possible. The first one is to develop 'moderate' power level, long-pulse tubes based on relatively reliable technology and then greatly compress these microwave pulses. The second one is to operate at much higher voltages and to directly generate very high-power pulses of the required length. Besides discussing pros and cons of these options, an overview of the methods of mode selection in oversized microwave circuits required for producing multimegawatt power at millimeter wavelengths is presented. Also the issue of thermal limitations caused by microwave losses in circuit walls is discussed, and some scaling laws for the maximum power and pulse duration are given

  3. Cylindrical Three-Dimensional Millimeter-Wave Imaging via Compressive Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Millimeter-wave (MMW imaging techniques have been used for the detection of concealed weapons and contraband carried by personnel. However, the future application of the new technology may be limited by its large number of antennas. In order to reduce the complexity of the hardware, a novel MMW imaging method based on compressive sensing (CS is proposed in this paper. The MMW images can be reconstructed from the significantly undersampled backscattered data via the CS approach. Thus the number of antennas and the cost of system can be further reduced than those based on the traditional imaging methods that obey the Nyquist sampling theorem. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated by numerical simulations as well as by real measured data of objects.

  4. Wafer scale millimeter-wave integrated circuits based on epitaxial graphene in high data rate communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibpour, Omid; He, Zhongxia Simon; Strupinski, Wlodek; Rorsman, Niklas; Zirath, Herbert

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, the demand for high data rate wireless communications has increased dramatically, which requires larger bandwidth to sustain multi-user accessibility and quality of services. This can be achieved at millimeter wave frequencies. Graphene is a promising material for the development of millimeter-wave electronics because of its outstanding electron transport properties. Up to now, due to the lack of high quality material and process technology, the operating frequency of demonstrated circuits has been far below the potential of graphene. Here, we present monolithic integrated circuits based on epitaxial graphene operating at unprecedented high frequencies (80-100 GHz). The demonstrated circuits are capable of encoding/decoding of multi-gigabit-per-second information into/from the amplitude or phase of the carrier signal. The developed fabrication process is scalable to large wafer sizes.

  5. Random-Access Technique for Self-Organization of 5G Millimeter-Wave Cellular Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasper Meynard Arana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The random-access (RA technique is a key procedure in cellular networks and self-organizing networks (SONs, but the overall processing time of this technique in millimeter-wave (mm-wave cellular systems with directional beams is very long because RA preambles (RAPs should be transmitted in all directions of Tx and Rx beams. In this paper, two different types of preambles (RAP-1 and RAP-2 are proposed to reduce the processing time in the RA stage. After analyzing the correlation property, false-alarm probability, and detection probability of the proposed RAPs, we perform simulations to show that the RAP-2 is suitable for RA in mm-wave cellular systems with directional beams because of the smaller processing time and high detection probability in multiuser environments.

  6. Review of 3D Printed Millimeter-Wave and Terahertz Passive Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The 3D printing technology is catching attention nowadays. It has certain advantages over the traditional fabrication processes. We give a chronical review of the 3D printing technology from the time it was invented. This technology has also been used to fabricate millimeter-wave (mmWave and terahertz (THz passive devices. Though promising results have been demonstrated, the challenge lies in the fabrication tolerance improvement such as dimensional tolerance and surface roughness. We propose the design methodology of high order device to circumvent the dimensional tolerance and suggest specific modelling of the surface roughness of 3D printed devices. It is believed that, with the improvement of the 3D printing technology and related subjects in material science and mechanical engineering, the 3D printing technology will become mainstream for mmWave and THz passive device fabrication.

  7. Coordinated Ground-Based Observations and the New Horizons Fly-by of Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Eliot; Young, Leslie; Parker, Joel; Binzel, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The New Horizons (NH) spacecraft is scheduled to make its closest approach to Pluto on July 14, 2015. NH carries seven scientific instruments, including separate UV and Visible-IR spectrographs, a long-focal-length imager, two plasma-sensing instruments and a dust counter. There are three arenas in particular in which ground-based observations should augment the NH instrument suite in synergistic ways: IR spectra at wavelengths longer than 2.5 µm (i.e., longer than the NH Ralph spectrograph), stellar occultation observations near the time of the fly-by, and thermal surface maps and atmospheric CO abundances based on ALMA observations - we discuss the first two of these. IR spectra in the 3 - 5 µm range cover the CH4 absorption band near 3.3 µm. This band can be an important constraint on the state and areal extent of nitrogen frost on Pluto's surface. If this band depth is close to zero (as was observed by Olkin et al. 2007), it limits the area of nitrogen frost, which is bright at that wavelength. Combined with the NH observations of nitrogen frost at 2.15 µm, the ground-based spectra will determine how much nitrogen frost is diluted with methane, which is a basic constraint on the seasonal cycle of sublimation and condensation that takes place on Pluto (and similar objects like Triton and Eris). There is a fortuitous stellar occultation by Pluto on 29-JUN-2015, only two weeks before the NH closest approach. The occulted star will be the brightest ever observed in a Pluto event, about 2 magnitudes brighter than Pluto itself. The track of the event is predicted to cover parts of Australia and New Zealand. Thanks to HST and ground based campaigns to find a TNO target reachable by NH, the position of the shadow path will be known at the +/-100 km level, allowing SOFIA and mobile ground-based observers to reliably cover the central flash region. Ground-based & SOFIA observations in visible and IR wavelengths will characterize the haze opacity and vertical

  8. Justifying a Set of Basic Characteristics of High Temperature Cold Accumulators in Their Designing for the Ground-Based Systems

    OpenAIRE

    E. S. Khromov; O. P. Matveeva

    2015-01-01

    The ground-based systems use a wide variety of heat-emitting equipment. For temperature control of equipment and facilities, the thermal management systems (TMS) are included in the ground-based systems. However, in operation, the off-nominal situations with increased heat emission are possible. To avoid overheating of equipment or environment in facilities, where equipment is placed, is possible through completing a set of TMS by high-temperature cold accumulators (CA).When filling CA by the...

  9. Energetic molecular outflow near AFGL 961: millimeter-wave and infrared observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lada, C.J.; Gautier, T.N. III

    1982-01-01

    We report detailed millimeter-wave and near-infrared spectroscopy of the dynamically active region around the infrared source AFGL 961, near the Rosette nebula. Millimeter-wave 12 CO observations are used to study the high-velocity molecular flow around AFGL 961. These observations show that the high-velocity flow has a maximum extent of at least 6' or 2.9 pc at the distance of AFGL 961. The flow is found to be anisotropic, with redshifted high-velocity emission considerably more extended than blueshifted high-velocity emission. However, the flow does not appear to be as highly collimated as some other sources of high-velocity bipolar outflow. We also find the emission profiles to be asymmetric in velocity such that the integrated intensity of the redshifted high-velocity emission is on average 2.5 times greater than that of the blueshifted emission. The mass of the gas involved in the flow is determined to be approximately 19 M/sub sun/, and the kinetic energy of this gas is estimated to be about 8 x 10 46 ergs. These observations are interpreted as evidence that an energetic bipolar outflow of molecular gas is occurring near AFGL 961. The momentum of the outflowing molecular gas is large, and it is shown that this places strong constraints on possible physical mechanisms which may be driving the outflow. The near-infrared spectrum of AFGL 961 from 1.4-2.4 μm was obtained in order to study the conditions immediately around the infrared source which may be driving the molecular outflow

  10. Concealed explosive detection on personnel using a wideband holographic millimeter-wave imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Collins, H. D.; Hall, Thomas E.; Severtsen, Ronald H.

    1996-06-01

    A novel wideband millimeter-wave imaging system is presently being developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) that will allow rapid inspection of personnel for concealed explosives, handguns, or other threats. Millimeter-wavelength electromagnetic waves are effective for this application since they readily penetrate common clothing materials, while being partially reflected from the person under surveillance as well as any concealed items. To form an image rapidly, a linear array of 128 antennas is used to electronically scan over a horizontal aperture of 0.75 meters, while the linear array is mechanically swept over a vertical aperture of 2 meters. At each point over this 2-D aperture, coherent wideband data reflected from the target is gathered using wide-beamwidth antennas. The data is recorded coherently, and reconstructed (focused) using an efficient image reconstruction algorithm developed at PNNL. This algorithm works in the near-field of both the target and the scanned aperture and preserves the diffraction limited resolution of less than one-wavelength. The wide frequency bandwidth is used to provide depth resolution, which allows the image to be fully focused over a wide range of depths, resulting in a full 3-D image. This is not possible in a normal optical (or quasi-optical) imaging system. This system has been extensively tested using concealed metal and plastic weapons, and has recently been tested using real plastic explosives (C-4 and RDX) and simulated liquid explosives concealed on personnel. Millimeter-waves do not penetrate the human body, so it is necessary to view the subject from several angles in order to fully inspect for concealed weapons. Full animations containing 36 - 72 frames recorded from subjects rotated by 5 - 10 degrees, have been found to be extremely useful for rapid, effective inspection of personnel.

  11. Atomic oxygen effects on boron nitride and silicon nitride: A comparison of ground based and space flight data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, J. B.; Lan, E. H.; Smith, C. A.; Whatley, W. J.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of atomic oxygen on boron nitride (BN) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) were evaluated in a low Earth orbit (LEO) flight experiment and in a ground based simulation facility. In both the inflight and ground based experiments, these materials were coated on thin (approx. 250A) silver films, and the electrical resistance of the silver was measured in situ to detect any penetration of atomic oxygen through the BN and Si3N4 materials. In the presence of atomic oxygen, silver oxidizes to form silver oxide, which has a much higher electrical resistance than pure silver. Permeation of atomic oxygen through BN, as indicated by an increase in the electrical resistance of the silver underneath, was observed in both the inflight and ground based experiments. In contrast, no permeation of atomic oxygen through Si3N4 was observed in either the inflight or ground based experiments. The ground based results show good qualitative correlation with the LEO flight results, indicating that ground based facilities such as the one at Los Alamos National Lab can reproduce space flight data from LEO.

  12. FOREWORD: The 11th International Conference on New Developments and Applications in Optical Radiometry (NEWRAD 2011) The 11th International Conference on New Developments and Applications in Optical Radiometry (NEWRAD 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikonen, Erkki

    2012-04-01

    The NEWRAD Conferences bring together people from the National Metrology Institutes and the principal user communities of advanced radiometry, including Earth observation and climate communities. The eleventh NEWRAD Conference was held in Hawaii, USA, between 18 and 23 September 2011. The Conference was organized by the Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, Maui, at the Grand Wailea resort. The organization was a joint Pacific effort, where handling of the submitted abstracts and website administration were taken care of by KRISS (Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science) and NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology), respectively. As satellite activities, the working groups of CCPR (Consultative Committee for Photometry and Radiometry) and the MOBY project arranged meetings at the Grand Wailea before and after the Conference. The Conference was attended by more than a hundred registered participants from five continents, which matches the number of foreign participants of NEWRAD 2008 at KRISS. A total of 153 papers were presented at NEWRAD 2011, of which 10 were invited talks and 100 posters. The poster sessions during the extended lunch breaks created a stimulating atmosphere for lively discussions and exchange of ideas. A technical visit was arranged to the astronomical observatory at the summit of Haleakala volcano, where some of the world's most advanced telescope systems are operated. The relaxed Hawaiian life, nearby ocean and excellent weather conditions gave an unprecedented flavour to this NEWRAD Conference. The abstract classification system was renewed for NEWRAD 2011, consisting of the following categories: EAO: Earth observation SSR: Solar/stellar radiometry SBR: Source-based radiometry OPM: Optical properties of materials/components DBR: Detector-based radiometry SFR: Single/few-photon radiometry. The new system worked well for refereeing and program purposes. Conference proceedings containing two-page extended abstracts were

  13. Electromagnetic optimization of dual-mode antennas for radiometry-controlled heating of superficial tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccarini, Paolo F.; Rolfsnes, Hans O.; Neuman, Daniel G., Jr.; Johnson, Jessi E.; Juang, Titania; Jacobsen, Svein; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2005-04-01

    The large variance of survival in the treatment of large superficial tumors indicates that the efficacy of current therapies can be dramatically improved. Hyperthermia has shown significant enhancement of response when used in combination with chemotherapy and/or radiation. Control of temperature is a critical factor for treatment quality (and thus effectiveness), since the response of tumor and normal cells is significantly different over a range of just a few degrees (41-45°). For diffuse spreading tumors, microwave conformal arrays have been shown to be a sound solution to deposit the power necessary to reach the goal temperature throughout the targeted tissue. Continuous temperature monitoring is required for feedback control of power to compensate for physiologic (e.g. blood perfusion and dielectric properties) changes. Microwave radiometric thermometry has been proposed to complement individual fluoroptic probes to non-invasively map superficial and sub-surface temperatures. The challenge is to integrate the broadband antenna used for radiometric sensing with the high power antenna used for power deposition. A modified version of the dual concentric conductor antenna presented previously is optimized for such use. Several design challenges are presented including preventing unwanted radiating modes and thermal and electromagnetic coupling between the two antennas, and accommodating dielectric changes of the target tissue. Advanced 3D and planar 2D simulation software are used to achieve an initial optimized design, focused on maintaining appropriate radiation efficiency and pattern for both heating and radiometry antennas. A cutting edge automated measurement system has been realized to characterize the antennas in a tissue equivalent material and to confirm the simulation results. Finally, the guidelines for further development and improvement of this initial design are presented together with a preliminary implementation of the feedback program to be used

  14. Quantitative evaluation of simulated human enamel caries kinetics using photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellen, Adam; Mandelis, Andreas; Finer, Yoav; Amaechi, Bennett T.

    2011-03-01

    Photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence (PTR-LUM) is a non-destructive methodology applied toward the detection, monitoring and quantification of dental caries. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of PTRLUM to detect incipient caries lesions and quantify opto-thermophysical properties as a function of treatment time. Extracted human molars (n=15) were exposed to an acid demineralization gel (pH 4.5) for 10 or 40 days in order to simulate incipient caries lesions. PTR-LUM frequency scans (1 Hz - 1 kHz) were performed prior to and during demineralization. Transverse Micro-Radiography (TMR) analysis followed at treatment conclusion. A coupled diffusephoton- density-wave and thermal-wave theoretical model was applied to PTR experimental amplitude and phase data across the frequency range of 4 Hz - 354 Hz, to quantitatively evaluate changes in thermal and optical properties of sound and demineralized enamel. Excellent fits with small residuals were observed experimental and theoretical data illustrating the robustness of the computational algorithm. Increased scattering coefficients and poorer thermophysical properties were characteristic of demineralized lesion bodies. Enhanced optical scattering coefficients of demineralized lesions resulted in poorer luminescence yield due to scattering of both incident and converted luminescent photons. Differences in the rate of lesion progression for the 10-day and 40-day samples points to a continuum of surface and diffusion controlled mechanism of lesion formation. PTR-LUM sensitivity to changes in tooth mineralization coupled with opto-thermophysical property extraction illustrates the technique's potential for non-destructive quantification of enamel caries.

  15. Characterization of the properties of a material by modulated photothermal radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham-Tu-Quoc, Sang

    2014-01-01

    Modulated photothermal radiometry, a remote non-intrusive technique, was used to measure the thickness and the thermal diffusivity of a metal plate and to characterize a layer on a substrate. A thermal model of 3D heating was developed with considering the thermal exchange by convection for a plate and the thermal resistance of the interface for a layer on a substrate. The sensibility analysis and the multi-parameter studies on the phase shift were performed by the code developed with the Matlab software. Simple formulas were obtained to determine the thickness and the thermal diffusivity of a plate and the ratio of the thermal effusivities for a layer on a substrate. The obtained formulas were experimentally validated for 100 μm - 500 μm plate thickness of various metals (stainless steel 304L, nickel, titanium, tungsten, molybdenum, zinc and iron). The uncertainty of the measurements was lower than 10 % for thickness and lower than 15 % for thermal diffusivity determination. The same technique was applied in the study on Zircaloy-4 cladding that may be of particular interest for the nuclear industry. It was found that the presence of the oxide layer of some μm thickness had practically no effect on the thickness and the thermal diffusivity measurements of Zircaloy-4 cladding. However, the observed effect of a phase shift on high frequency (≥ 1 kHz) may open new perspectives and widen the field of the method application for semi-transparent layers and for very thin layers (of less than μm thickness). (author) [fr

  16. Vegetation optical depth measured by microwave radiometry as an indicator of tree mortality risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, K.; Anderegg, W.; Sala, A.; Martínez-Vilalta, J.; Konings, A. G.

    2017-12-01

    Increased drought-related tree mortality has been observed across several regions in recent years. Vast spatial extent and high temporal variability makes field monitoring of tree mortality cumbersome and expensive. With global coverage and high temporal revisit, satellite remote sensing offers an unprecedented tool to monitor terrestrial ecosystems and identify areas at risk of large drought-driven tree mortality events. To date, studies that use remote sensing data to monitor tree mortality have focused on external climatic thresholds such as temperature and evapotranspiration. However, this approach fails to consider internal water stress in vegetation - which can vary across trees even for similar climatic conditions due to differences in hydraulic behavior, soil type, etc - and may therefore be a poor basis for measuring mortality events. There is a consensus that xylem hydraulic failure often precedes drought-induced mortality, suggesting depleted canopy water content shortly before onset of mortality. Observations of vegetation optical depth (VOD) derived from passive microwave are proportional to canopy water content. In this study, we propose to use variations in VOD as an indicator of potential tree mortality. Since VOD accounts for intrinsic water stress undergone by vegetation, it is expected to be more accurate than external climatic stress indicators. Analysis of tree mortality events in California, USA observed by airborne detection shows a consistent relationship between mortality and the proposed VOD metric. Although this approach is limited by the kilometer-scale resolution of passive microwave radiometry, our results nevertheless demonstrate that microwave-derived estimates of vegetation water content can be used to study drought-driven tree mortality, and may be a valuable tool for mortality predictions if they can be combined with higher-resolution variables.

  17. Development of a Millimeter-Wave Beam Position and Profile Monitor for Transmission Efficiency Improvement in an ECRH System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimozuma T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In a high power Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH system, a long-distance and low-loss transmission system is required to realize effective heating of nuclear fusion-relevant plasmas. A millimeter-wave beam position and profile monitor, which can be used in a high-power, evacuated, and cooled transmission line, is proposed, designed, manufactured, and tested. The beam monitor consists of a reflector, Peltier-device array and a heat-sink. It was tested using simulated electric heater power or gyrotron output power. The data obtained from the monitor were well agreed with the heat source position and profile. The methods of data analysis and mode-content analysis of a propagating millimeter-wave in the corrugated wave-guide are proposed.

  18. Ground-based acoustic parametric generator impact on the atmosphere and ionosphere in an active experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. G. Rapoport

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop theoretical basics of active experiments with two beams of acoustic waves, radiated by a ground-based sound generator. These beams are transformed into atmospheric acoustic gravity waves (AGWs, which have parameters that enable them to penetrate to the altitudes of the ionospheric E and F regions where they influence the electron concentration of the ionosphere. Acoustic waves are generated by the ground-based parametric sound generator (PSG at the two close frequencies. The main idea of the experiment is to design the output parameters of the PSG to build a cascade scheme of nonlinear wave frequency downshift transformations to provide the necessary conditions for their vertical propagation and to enable penetration to ionospheric altitudes. The PSG generates sound waves (SWs with frequencies f1 = 600 and f2 = 625 Hz and large amplitudes (100–420 m s−1. Each of these waves is modulated with the frequency of 0.016 Hz. The novelty of the proposed analytical–numerical model is due to simultaneous accounting for nonlinearity, diffraction, losses, and dispersion and inclusion of the two-stage transformation (1 of the initial acoustic waves to the acoustic wave with the difference frequency Δf = f2 − f1 in the altitude ranges 0–0.1 km, in the strongly nonlinear regime, and (2 of the acoustic wave with the difference frequency to atmospheric acoustic gravity waves with the modulational frequency in the altitude ranges 0.1–20 km, which then reach the altitudes of the ionospheric E and F regions, in a practically linear regime. AGWs, nonlinearly transformed from the sound waves, launched by the two-frequency ground-based sound generator can increase the transparency of the ionosphere for the electromagnetic waves in HF (MHz and VLF (kHz ranges. The developed theoretical model can be used for interpreting an active experiment that includes the PSG impact on the atmosphere–ionosphere system

  19. Monitoring greenhouse gas emissions in Australian landscapes: Comparing ground based mobile surveying data to GOSAT observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, S.; Iverach, C.; Kelly, B. F. J.

    2016-12-01

    Climate change is threatening the health and stability of the natural world and human society. Such concerns were emphasized at COP21 conference in Paris 2015 which highlighted the global need to improve our knowledge of sources of greenhouse gas and to develop methods to mitigate the effects of their emissions. Ongoing spatial and temporal measurements of greenhouse gases at both point and regional scales is important for clarification of climate change mechanisms and accounting. The Greenhouse gas Observing SATellite (GOSAT) is designed to monitor the global distribution of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) from orbit. As existing ground monitoring stations are limited and still unevenly distributed, satellite observations provide important frequent, spatially extensive, but low resolution observations. Recent developments in portable laser based greenhouse gas measurement systems have enabled the rapid measurement of greenhouse gases in ppb at the ground surface. This study was conducted to map major sources of CO2 and CH4 in the eastern states of Australia at the landscape scale and to compare the results to GOSAT observations. During April 2016 we conducted a regional CH4 and CO2 mobile survey, using an LGR greenhouse gas analyzer. Measurements were made along a 4000 KM circuit through major cities, country towns, dry sclerophyll forests, coastal wetlands, coal mining regions, coal seam gas developments, dryland farming and irrigated agricultural landscapes. The ground-based survey data were then compared with the data (L2) from GOSAT. Ground-based mobile surveys showed that there are clear statistical differences in the ground level atmospheric concentration of CH4 and CO2 associated with all major changes in land use. These changes extend for kilometers, and cover one or more GOSAT pixels. In the coal mining districts the ground-level atmospheric concentration of CH4 exceeded 2 ppm for over 40 km, yet this was not discernable in the retrieved data (L2

  20. GOMOS ozone profile validation using ground-based and balloon sonde measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. E. van Gijsel

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The validation of ozone profiles retrieved by satellite instruments through comparison with data from ground-based instruments is important to monitor the evolution of the satellite instrument, to assist algorithm development and to allow multi-mission trend analyses.

    In this study we compare ozone profiles derived from GOMOS night-time observations with measurements from lidar, microwave radiometer and balloon sonde. Collocated pairs are analysed for dependence on several geophysical and instrument observational parameters. Validation results are presented for the operational ESA level 2 data (GOMOS version 5.00 obtained during nearly seven years of observations and a comparison using a smaller dataset from the previous processor (version 4.02 is also included.

    The profiles obtained from dark limb measurements (solar zenith angle >107° when the provided processing flag is properly considered match the ground-based measurements within ±2 percent over the altitude range 20 to 40 km. Outside this range, the pairs start to deviate more and there is a latitudinal dependence: in the polar region where there is a higher amount of straylight contamination, differences start to occur lower in the mesosphere than in the tropics, whereas for the lower part of the stratosphere the opposite happens: the profiles in the tropics reach less far down as the signal reduces faster because of the higher altitude at which the maximum ozone concentration is found compared to the mid and polar latitudes. Also the bias is shifting from mostly negative in the polar region to more positive in the tropics

    Profiles measured under "twilight" conditions are often matching the ground-based measurements very well, but care has to be taken in all cases when dealing with "straylight" contaminated profiles.

    For the selection criteria applied here (data within 800 km, 3 degrees in equivalent latitude, 20 h (5 h above 50 km and a relative

  1. Laser Guidestar Satellite for Ground-based Adaptive Optics Imaging of Geosynchronous Satellites and Astronomical Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, W. A.; Cahoy, K.; Males, J.; Carlton, A.; Yoon, H.

    2015-12-01

    Real-time observation and monitoring of geostationary (GEO) satellites with ground-based imaging systems would be an attractive alternative to fielding high cost, long lead, space-based imagers, but ground-based observations are inherently limited by atmospheric turbulence. Adaptive optics (AO) systems are used to help ground telescopes achieve diffraction-limited seeing. AO systems have historically relied on the use of bright natural guide stars or laser guide stars projected on a layer of the upper atmosphere by ground laser systems. There are several challenges with this approach such as the sidereal motion of GEO objects relative to natural guide stars and limitations of ground-based laser guide stars; they cannot be used to correct tip-tilt, they are not point sources, and have finite angular sizes when detected at the receiver. There is a difference between the wavefront error measured using the guide star compared with the target due to cone effect, which also makes it difficult to use a distributed aperture system with a larger baseline to improve resolution. Inspired by previous concepts proposed by A.H. Greenaway, we present using a space-based laser guide starprojected from a satellite orbiting the Earth. We show that a nanosatellite-based guide star system meets the needs for imaging GEO objects using a low power laser even from 36,000 km altitude. Satellite guide star (SGS) systemswould be well above atmospheric turbulence and could provide a small angular size reference source. CubeSatsoffer inexpensive, frequent access to space at a fraction of the cost of traditional systems, and are now being deployed to geostationary orbits and on interplanetary trajectories. The fundamental CubeSat bus unit of 10 cm cubed can be combined in multiple units and offers a common form factor allowing for easy integration as secondary payloads on traditional launches and rapid testing of new technologies on-orbit. We describe a 6U CubeSat SGS measuring 10 cm x 20 cm x

  2. A Miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer for a Global Ground-Based Column Carbon Monitoring Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Emily L.; Melroy, Hilary R.; Miller, J. Houston; McLinden, Matthew L.; Ott, Lesley E.; Holben, Brent

    2012-01-01

    We present progress in the development of a passive, miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer (mini-LHR) that will measure key greenhouse gases (C02, CH4, CO) in the atmospheric column as well as their respective altitude profiles, and O2 for a measure of atmospheric pressure. Laser heterodyne radiometry is a spectroscopic method that borrows from radio receiver technology. In this technique, a weak incoming signal containing information of interest is mixed with a stronger signal (local oscillator) at a nearby frequency. In this case, the weak signal is sunlight that has undergone absorption by a trace gas of interest and the local oscillator is a distributive feedback (DFB) laser that is tuned to a wavelength near the absorption feature of the trace gas. Mixing the sunlight with the laser light, in a fast photoreceiver, results in a beat signal in the RF. The amplitude of the beat signal tracks the concentration of the trace gas in the atmospheric column. The mini-LHR operates in tandem with AERONET, a global network of more than 450 aerosol sensing instruments. This partnership simplifies the instrument design and provides an established global network into which the mini-LHR can rapidly expand. This network offers coverage in key arctic regions (not covered by OCO-2) where accelerated warming due to the release of CO2 and CH4 from thawing tundra and permafrost is a concern as well as an uninterrupted data record that will both bridge gaps in data sets and offer validation for key flight missions such as OCO-2, OCO-3, and ASCENDS. Currently, the only ground global network that routinely measures multiple greenhouse gases in the atmospheric column is TCCON (Total Column Carbon Observing Network) with 18 operational sites worldwide and two in the US. Cost and size of TCCON installations will limit the potential for expansion, We offer a low-cost $30Klunit) solution to supplement these measurements with the added benefit of an established aerosol optical depth

  3. The Holy Grail of Resource Assessment: Low Cost Ground-Based Measurements with Good Accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, Bill; Smith, Benjamin

    2017-06-22

    Using performance data from some of the millions of installed photovoltaic (PV) modules with micro-inverters may afford the opportunity to provide ground-based solar resource data critical for developing PV projects. The method used back-solves for the direct normal irradiance (DNI) and the diffuse horizontal irradiance (DHI) from the micro-inverter ac production data. When the derived values of DNI and DHI were then used to model the performance of other PV systems, the annual mean bias deviations were within +/- 4%, and only 1% greater than when the PV performance was modeled using high quality irradiance measurements. An uncertainty analysis shows the method better suited for modeling PV performance than using satellite-based global horizontal irradiance.

  4. Implications of cloud obscuration on ground-based laser systems for strategic defense. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavis, M.T.; Levinson, S.W.; Parker, K.M.

    1990-03-12

    The evolution and the current status of the Strategic Defense System Phase II Ground-Based Laser (GBL) System Concept is reviewed in this report. In particular, the impact of clouds on system configuration and site selection is discussed. By using current models of correlated probabilities of cloud-free line of sight and cloud-free arc (CFLOS4D and CFARC) for several ground stations with cloud realizations provided by the Boehm Saw Tooth generator, we have determined the number of ground sites required to achieve various levels of desired system weather availability. We briefly describe potential improvements in the models and discuss the necessity for using the Whole Sky Imager results now being generated to validate these models with empirical data, thereby lending further credibility to GBL System Concepts.

  5. Autonomous landing of a helicopter UAV with a ground-based multisensory fusion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dianle; Zhong, Zhiwei; Zhang, Daibing; Shen, Lincheng; Yan, Chengping

    2015-02-01

    In this study, this paper focus on the vision-based autonomous helicopter unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) landing problems. This paper proposed a multisensory fusion to autonomous landing of an UAV. The systems include an infrared camera, an Ultra-wideband radar that measure distance between UAV and Ground-Based system, an PAN-Tilt Unit (PTU). In order to identify all weather UAV targets, we use infrared cameras. To reduce the complexity of the stereovision or one-cameral calculating the target of three-dimensional coordinates, using the ultra-wideband radar distance module provides visual depth information, real-time Image-PTU tracking UAV and calculate the UAV threedimensional coordinates. Compared to the DGPS, the test results show that the paper is effectiveness and robustness.

  6. Airborne and ground based lidar measurements of the atmospheric pressure profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, C. Laurence; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Dombrowski, Mark; Weng, Chi Y.

    1989-01-01

    The first high accuracy remote measurements of the atmospheric pressure profile have been made. The measurements were made with a differential absorption lidar system that utilizes tunable alexandrite lasers. The absorption in the trough between two lines in the oxygen A-band near 760 nm was used for probing the atmosphere. Measurements of the two-dimensional structure of the pressure field were made in the troposphere from an aircraft looking down. Also, measurements of the one-dimensional structure were made from the ground looking up. Typical pressure accuracies for the aircraft measurements were 1.5-2 mbar with a 30-m vertical resolution and a 100-shot average (20 s), which corresponds to a 2-km horizontal resolution. Typical accuracies for the upward viewing ground based measurements were 2.0 mbar for a 30-m resolution and a 100-shot average.

  7. Compact binary coalescences in the band of ground-based gravitational-wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandel, Ilya; O'Shaughnessy, Richard

    2010-01-01

    As the ground-based gravitational-wave telescopes LIGO, Virgo and GEO 600 approach the era of first detections, we review the current knowledge of the coalescence rates and the mass and spin distributions of merging neutron-star and black-hole binaries. We emphasize the bi-directional connection between gravitational-wave astronomy and conventional astrophysics. Astrophysical input will make possible informed decisions about optimal detector configurations and search techniques. Meanwhile, rate upper limits, detected merger rates and the distribution of masses and spins measured by gravitational-wave searches will constrain astrophysical parameters through comparisons with astrophysical models. Future developments necessary to the success of gravitational-wave astronomy are discussed.

  8. Space situational awareness satellites and ground based radiation counting and imaging detector technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, Frank, E-mail: frank.jansen@dlr.de [DLR Institute of Space Systems, Robert-Hooke-Str. 7, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Behrens, Joerg [DLR Institute of Space Systems, Robert-Hooke-Str. 7, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Pospisil, Stanislav [Czech Technical University, IEAP, 12800 Prague 2, Horska 3a/22 (Czech Republic); Kudela, Karel [Slovak Academy of Sciences, IEP, 04001 Kosice, Watsonova 47 (Slovakia)

    2011-05-15

    We review the current status from the scientific and technological point of view of solar energetic particles, solar and galactic cosmic ray measurements as well as high energy UV-, X- and gamma-ray imaging of the Sun. These particles and electromagnetic data are an important tool for space situational awareness (SSA) aspects like space weather storm predictions to avoid failures in space, air and ground based technological systems. Real time data acquisition, position and energy sensitive imaging are demanded by the international space weather forecast services. We present how newly developed, highly miniaturized radiation detectors can find application in space in view of future SSA related satellites as a novel space application due to their counting and imaging capabilities.

  9. Integrated interpretation of helicopter and ground-based geophysical data recorded within the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podgorski, Joel E.; Green, Alan G.; Kalscheuer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    ) data recorded across most of the delta, (ii) 2D models and images derived from ground-based electrical resistance tomographic, transient electromagnetic, and high resolution seismic reflection/refraction tomographic data acquired at four selected sites in western and north-central regions of the delta...... on the arcuate nature of its front and the semi-conical shape of its upper surface in the HTEM resistivity model. Moderate to high resistivity subhorizontal layers are consistent with this interpretation. The deepest unit is the basement with very high resistivity, high P-wave velocity, and low or complex......Integration of information from the following sources has been used to produce a much better constrained and more complete four-unit geological/hydrological model of the Okavango Delta than previously available: (i) a 3D resistivity model determined from helicopter time-domain electromagnetic (HTEM...

  10. Space debris removal by ground-based lasers: main conclusions of the European project CLEANSPACE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmiller, Bruno; Jacquelard, Christophe; Eckel, Hans-Albert; Wnuk, Edwin

    2014-11-01

    Studies show that the number of debris in low Earth orbit is exponentially growing despite future debris release mitigation measures considered. Specifically, the already existing population of small and medium debris (between 1 cm and several dozens of cm) is today a concrete threat to operational satellites. A ground-based laser solution which can remove, at low expense and in a nondestructive way, hazardous debris around selected space assets appears as a highly promising answer. This solution is studied within the framework of the CLEANSPACE project which is part of the FP7 space program. The overall CLEANSPACE objective is: to propose an efficient and affordable global system architecture, to tackle safety regulation aspects, political implications and future collaborations, to develop affordable technological bricks, and to establish a roadmap for the development and the future implantation of a fully functional laser protection system. This paper will present the main conclusions of the CLEANSPACE project.

  11. Coastal wind study based on Sentinel-1 and ground-based scanning lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Badger, Merete; Pena Diaz, Alfredo

    Winds in the coastal zone have importance for near-shore wind farm planning. Recently the Danish Energy Agency gave new options for placing offshore wind farms much closer to the coastlines than previously. The new tender areas are located from 3 to 8 km from the coast. Ground-based scanning lidar...... located on land can partly cover this area out to around 15 km. In order to improve wind farm planning for near-shore coastal areas, the project‘Reducing the Uncertainty of Near-shore Energy estimates from meso- and micro-scale wind models’ (RUNE) is established. The measurement campaign starts October....... The various observation types have advantages and limitations; one advantage of both the Sentinel-1 and the scanning lidar is that they both observe wind fields covering a large area and so can be combined for studying the spatial variability of winds. Sentinel-1 are being processed near-real-time at DTU Wind...

  12. Conference on the exploitation, maintenance and resale of ground-based photovoltaic plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesner, Sven; Christmann, Ralf; Bozonnat, Cedric; Le Pivert, Xavier; Vaassen, Willi; Dumoulin, Cedric; Kiefer, Klaus; Semmel, Andreas; Doose, Eckhard; Bion, Alain; Sanches, Frederico; Daval, Xavier; Pampouille, Antoine; Goetze, Holger; Stahl, Wolf-Ruediger; Merere, Karine

    2017-11-01

    This document gathers contributions and debate contents of a conference. A first set of contributions addressed the situation and recent developments of ground-based photovoltaic power plants in France and in Germany with presentations of legal frameworks in these both countries. The second set addressed the optimisation of such power plants: meteorological prediction and follow-up at the service of production, risks to which these power plants are exposed during operation, and the issue of right price and good practices for maintenance contracts for these plants. A round table addressed the issue of the balance between optimisation and established practices in a new economic framework. The next set of contributions addressed reasons for and effects of the resale of photovoltaic fleet during their exploitation: actors and financing solutions, value components, point of attention and legal view on re-financing contracts. A round table discussed trends and success factors for the re-financing of photovoltaic projects

  13. Quantifying greenhouse gas emissions from coal fires using airborne and ground-based methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Mark A.; Radke, Lawrence F.; Heffern, Edward L.; O'Keefe, Jennifer M.K.; Smeltzer, Charles; Hower, James C.; Hower, Judith M.; Prakash, Anupma; Kolker, Allan; Eatwell, Robert J.; ter Schure, Arnout; Queen, Gerald; Aggen, Kerry L.; Stracher, Glenn B.; Henke, Kevin R.; Olea, Ricardo A.; Román-Colón, Yomayara

    2011-01-01

    Coal fires occur in all coal-bearing regions of the world and number, conservatively, in the thousands. These fires emit a variety of compounds including greenhouse gases. However, the magnitude of the contribution of combustion gases from coal fires to the environment is highly uncertain, because adequate data and methods for assessing emissions are lacking. This study demonstrates the ability to estimate CO2 and CH4 emissions for the Welch Ranch coal fire, Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA, using two independent methods: (a) heat flux calculated from aerial thermal infrared imaging (3.7–4.4 t d−1 of CO2 equivalent emissions) and (b) direct, ground-based measurements (7.3–9.5 t d−1 of CO2 equivalent emissions). Both approaches offer the potential for conducting inventories of coal fires to assess their gas emissions and to evaluate and prioritize fires for mitigation.

  14. Ground-based airglow imaging interferometer. Part 1: instrument and observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Haiyang; Tang, Yuanhe; Hua, Dengxin; Liu, Hanchen; Cao, Xiangang; Duan, Xiaodong; Jia, Qijie; Qu, Ouyang; Wu, Yong

    2013-12-20

    A ground-based airglow imaging interferometer (GBAII) is proposed to measure simultaneously the temperature and wind in the mesopause region by using airglow emissions of the O2(0-1) band. Since it employs a wide angle Michelson interferometer with a large air gap, combined with the rotational temperature measurement, both the phase and spectral information can be obtained from the imaging results. Based on the optimization and calibrations for the optical system in the laboratory, we developed and assembled a prototype of a GBAII, and carried out one observation at the observatory of Xi'an University of Technology on 12 June 2012. The observed temperatures fall mainly on the range of 167-196 K, while both the zonal and meridional winds faintly show the feature of half-day oscillation. The consistent trends between the observation results and the standard atmospheric models suggest that the GBAII has achieved our basic design goals.

  15. Status and plans for future generations of ground-based interferometric gravitational wave antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Seiji

    2003-01-01

    Several medium- to large-scale ground-based interferometric gravitational-wave antennas have been constructed around the world. Although these antennas of the first generation could detect gravitational waves within a few years, it is necessary to improve the sensitivity of the detectors significantly with advanced technologies to ensure more frequent detection of gravitational waves. Stronger seismic isolation and reduction of thermal noise, especially using cryogenic mirrors, are among the most important technologies that can lead us to the realization of advanced detectors. Some of the advanced technologies are already implemented in some of the existing detectors and others are currently being investigated for the future-generation detectors such as advanced LIGO, LCGT, upgrade of GEO600, AIGO, and EURO. We expect that such advanced detectors will eventually open a new window to the universe and establish a new field, 'gravitational wave astronomy'

  16. A novel technique for extracting clouds base height using ground based imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Hirsch

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The height of a cloud in the atmospheric column is a key parameter in its characterization. Several remote sensing techniques (passive and active, either ground-based or on space-borne platforms and in-situ measurements are routinely used in order to estimate top and base heights of clouds. In this article we present a novel method that combines thermal imaging from the ground and sounded wind profile in order to derive the cloud base height. This method is independent of cloud types, making it efficient for both low boundary layer and high clouds. In addition, using thermal imaging ensures extraction of clouds' features during daytime as well as at nighttime. The proposed technique was validated by comparison to active sounding by ceilometers (which is a standard ground based method, to lifted condensation level (LCL calculations, and to MODIS products obtained from space. As all passive remote sensing techniques, the proposed method extracts only the height of the lowest cloud layer, thus upper cloud layers are not detected. Nevertheless, the information derived from this method can be complementary to space-borne cloud top measurements when deep-convective clouds are present. Unlike techniques such as LCL, this method is not limited to boundary layer clouds, and can extract the cloud base height at any level, as long as sufficient thermal contrast exists between the radiative temperatures of the cloud and its surrounding air parcel. Another advantage of the proposed method is its simplicity and modest power needs, making it particularly suitable for field measurements and deployment at remote locations. Our method can be further simplified for use with visible CCD or CMOS camera (although nighttime clouds will not be observed.

  17. Ground based mobile isotopic methane measurements in the Front Range, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, B. H.; Rella, C.; Petron, G.; Sherwood, O.; Mielke-Maday, I.; Schwietzke, S.

    2014-12-01

    Increased development of unconventional oil and gas resources in North America has given rise to attempts to monitor and quantify fugitive emissions of methane from the industry. Emission estimates of methane from oil and gas basins can vary significantly from one study to another as well as from EPA or State estimates. New efforts are aimed at reconciling bottom-up, or inventory-based, emission estimates of methane with top-down estimates based on atmospheric measurements from aircraft, towers, mobile ground-based vehicles, and atmospheric models. Attributing airborne measurements of regional methane fluxes to specific sources is informed by ground-based measurements of methane. Stable isotopic measurements (δ13C) of methane help distinguish between emissions from the O&G industry, Confined Animal Feed Operations (CAFO), and landfills, but analytical challenges typically limit meaningful isotopic measurements to individual point sampling. We are developing a toolbox to use δ13CH4 measurements to assess the partitioning of methane emissions for regions with multiple methane sources. The method was applied to the Denver-Julesberg Basin. Here we present data from continuous isotopic measurements obtained over a wide geographic area by using MegaCore, a 1500 ft. tube that is constantly filled with sample air while driving, then subsequently analyzed at slower rates using cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS). Pressure, flow and calibration are tightly controlled allowing precise attribution of methane enhancements to their point of collection. Comparisons with point measurements are needed to confirm regional values and further constrain flux estimates and models. This effort was made in conjunction with several major field campaigns in the Colorado Front Range in July-August 2014, including FRAPPÉ (Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment), DISCOVER-AQ, and the Air Water Gas NSF Sustainability Research Network at the University of Colorado.

  18. Ali Observatory in Tibet: a unique northern site for future CMB ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Meng

    2015-08-01

    Ground-based CMB observations have been performed at the South Pole and the Atacama desert in Chile. However, a significant fraction of the sky can not be observed from just these two sites. For a full sky coverage from the ground in the future, a northern site for CMB observation, in particular CMB polarization, is required. Besides the long-thought site in Greenland, the high altitude Tibet plateau provides another opportunity. I will describe the Ali Observatory in Tibet, located at N32°19', E80°01', as a potential site for ground-based CMB observations. The new site is located on almost 5100m mountain, near Gar town, where is an excellent site for both infrared and submillimeter observations. Study with the long-term database of ground weather stations and archival satellite data has been performed. The site has enough relative height on the plateau and is accessible by car. The Shiquanhe town is 40 mins away by driving, and a recently opened airport with 40 mins driving, the site also has road excess, electricity, and optical fiber with fast internet. Preliminary measurement of the Precipitable Water Vapor is ~one quarter less than 0.5mm per year and the long term monitoring is under development. In addition, surrounding higher sites are also available and could be further developed if necessary. Ali provides unique northern sky coverage and together with the South Pole and the Atacama desert, future CMB observations will be able to cover the full sky from ground.

  19. Pars distalis vasculature: Discovery Shuttle STS-29 rats compared to ground-based antiorthostatic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, A; Pattison, T; Schechter, J

    1991-11-01

    The anterior pituitary glands of male, adult Long Evans rats carried 5 days in the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-29) have been compared with two groups of ground-based controls. All of the animals were part of a study (SE82-08) into the effects of gravity versus a microgravity environment on fracture healing. All had sustained a right, mid-shaft fibular osteotomy. The duration of the study was 10 days, and animals in all groups were weight bearing for the 5 days prior to shuttle lift off. The three experimental groups consisted of four rats each: flight (F) and two ground-based control groups, weight bearing (WB) and suspended (S). The suspension group was in a Holton/Sweeney head-down suspension apparatus (antiorthostatic) for the final 5 days of the study. The anterior pituitary glands of F and WB rats were essentially identical. The vasculature and parenchymal cells appeared unaffected in both instances. However, the anterior pituitary glands of S rats were dramatically altered. The vasculature was widely expanded with proteinaceous deposition covering the lumenal endothelial surfaces, and entrapping numerous platelets and aggregates of red blood cells. Parenchymal cells were highly vacuolated, occasionally with membranous vacuoles, but most often revealing large, clear cytoplasmic zones unlined by any membranes. Whereas profiles of exocytosis were numerous in F rats, and present in WB rats, they were essentially absent in S rats. These results indicate that weightlessness over a 5-day flight period does not influence the structural integrity of the anterior pituitary gland and may in fact promote secretory granule release. However, the head-down tilt model, frequently used to study fracture repair under conditions that mimic weightlessness, has a profound impact on the vasculature of the anterior pituitary gland which then affects the structural and functional characteristics of the parenchymal cells.

  20. Validation of OMI UV measurements against ground-based measurements at a station in Kampala, Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyimbwa, Dennis; Dahlback, Arne; Stamnes, Jakob; Hamre, Børge; Frette, Øyvind; Ssenyonga, Taddeo; Chen, Yi-Chun

    2015-04-01

    We present solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiance data measured with a NILU-UV instrument at a ground site in Kampala (0.31°N, 32.58°E), Uganda for the period 2005-2014. The data were analyzed and compared with UV irradiances inferred from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) for the same period. Kampala is located on the shores of lake Victoria, Africa's largest fresh water lake, which may influence the climate and weather conditions of the region. Also, there is an excessive use of worn cars, which may contribute to a high anthropogenic loading of absorbing aerosols. The OMI surface UV algorithm does not account for absorbing aerosols, which may lead to systematic overestimation of surface UV irradiances inferred from OMI satellite data. We retrieved UV index values from OMI UV irradiances and validated them against the ground-based UV index values obtained from NILU-UV measurements. The UV index values were found to follow a seasonal pattern similar to that of the clouds and the rainfall. OMI inferred UV index values were overestimated with a mean bias of about 28% under all-sky conditions, but the mean bias was reduced to about 8% under clear-sky conditions when only days with radiation modification factor (RMF) greater than 65% were considered. However, when days with RMF greater than 70, 75, and 80% were considered, OMI inferred UV index values were found to agree with the ground-based UV index values to within 5, 3, and 1%, respectively. In the validation we identified clouds/aerosols, which were present in 88% of the measurements, as the main cause of OMI inferred overestimation of the UV index.

  1. Validation of Ground-based Optical Estimates of Auroral Electron Precipitation Energy Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, D. L.; Grubbs, G. A., II; Conde, M.; Lynch, K. A.; Michell, R.; Zettergren, M. D.; Samara, M.; Ahrns, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    One of the major energy inputs into the high latitude ionosphere and mesosphere is auroral electron precipitation. Not only does the kinetic energy get deposited, the ensuing ionization in the E and F-region ionosphere modulates parallel and horizontal currents that can dissipate in the form of Joule heating. Global models to simulate these interactions typically use electron precipitation models that produce a poor representation of the spatial and temporal complexity of auroral activity as observed from the ground. This is largely due to these precipitation models being based on averages of multiple satellite overpasses separated by periods much longer than typical auroral feature durations. With the development of regional and continental observing networks (e.g. THEMIS ASI), the possibility of ground-based optical observations producing quantitative estimates of energy deposition with temporal and spatial scales comparable to those known to be exhibited in auroral activity become a real possibility. Like empirical precipitation models based on satellite overpasses such optics-based estimates are subject to assumptions and uncertainties, and therefore require validation. Three recent sounding rocket missions offer such an opportunity. The MICA (2012), GREECE (2014) and Isinglass (2017) missions involved detailed ground based observations of auroral arcs simultaneously with extensive on-board instrumentation. These have afforded an opportunity to examine the results of three optical methods of determining auroral electron energy flux, namely 1) ratio of auroral emissions, 2) green line temperature vs. emission altitude, and 3) parametric estimates using white-light images. We present comparisons from all three methods for all three missions and summarize the temporal and spatial scales and coverage over which each is valid.

  2. Multidisciplinary Approach for Earthquake Atmospheric Precursors Validation by Joint Satellite and Ground Based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounov, D. P.; Pulinets, S. A.; Hattori, K.; Liu, J. G.; Parrot, M.; Kafatos, M.; Yang, T. F.; Jhuang, H.; Taylor, P.; Ohyama, K.; Kon, S.

    2010-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that there were electromagnetic (EM) effects in the atmosphere/ionosphere caused by some strong earthquakes. Several major earthquakes are accompanied by an intensification of the vertical transport of charged aerosols in the lower atmosphere. These processes lead to the generation of external electric currents in specific regions of the atmosphere and the modifications, by DC electric fields, in the ionosphere-atmosphere electric circuit. Our methodology of integrated satellite terrestrial framework (ISTF) is based on the use of multi-sensor data and a cross-correlation between ground and satellite observations to record any atmospheric thermal anomalies and ionospheric perturbations associated with these activities. We record thermal infrared data from the Aqua, GOES, POES satellites and DEMETER provides space plasma variations related to the growth of the DC electric field. Simultaneously we continuously monitor ground-based multi-parameter GPS/TEC, ion concentration, radon, and magnetic field array data. We integrate these joint observations into the Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling (LAIC) model. The significance of this combined satellite and ground-based analysis is that it permits us to generate hindcasts of historical seismicity in Japan, Taiwan (2003-2009) and recent catastrophic events in Italy (M6.3, 2009), Haiti (M7.0, 2010) and Chile (M8.8, 2010). This joint analysis of ground and satellite data during the time of major earthquakes has shown the presence of persistent anomalies in the atmosphere over regions of maximum stress (along plate boundaries), and are not of meteorological origin, since they are stationary over the same region. Our approach provides the framework for a multidisciplinary validation of earthquake precursors and we are looking forward to validating this approach over high seismicity regions.

  3. Nutritional status assessment in semiclosed environments: ground-based and space flight studies in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. M.; Davis-Street, J. E.; Rice, B. L.; Nillen, J. L.; Gillman, P. L.; Block, G.

    2001-01-01

    Adequate nutrition is critical during long-term spaceflight, as is the ability to easily monitor dietary intake. A comprehensive nutritional status assessment profile was designed for use before, during and after flight. It included assessment of both dietary intake and biochemical markers of nutritional status. A spaceflight food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was developed to evaluate intake of key nutrients during spaceflight. The nutritional status assessment protocol was evaluated during two ground-based closed-chamber studies (60 and 91 d; n = 4/study), and was implemented for two astronauts during 4-mo stays on the Mir space station. Ground-based studies indicated that the FFQ, administered daily or weekly, adequately estimated intake of key nutrients. Chamber subjects maintained prechamber energy intake and body weight. Astronauts tended to eat 40--50% of WHO-predicted energy requirements, and lost >10% of preflight body mass. Serum ferritin levels were lower after the chamber stays, despite adequate iron intake. Red blood cell folate concentrations were increased after the chamber studies. Vitamin D stores were decreased by > 40% on chamber egress and after spaceflight. Mir crew members had decreased levels of most nutritional indices, but these are difficult to interpret given the insufficient energy intake and loss of body mass. Spaceflight food systems can provide adequate intake of macronutrients, although, as expected, micronutrient intake is a concern for any closed or semiclosed food system. These data demonstrate the utility and importance of nutritional status assessment during spaceflight and of the FFQ during extended-duration spaceflight.

  4. Introducing the VISAGE project - Visualization for Integrated Satellite, Airborne, and Ground-based data Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatlin, P. N.; Conover, H.; Berendes, T.; Maskey, M.; Naeger, A. R.; Wingo, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    A key component of NASA's Earth observation system is its field experiments, for intensive observation of particular weather phenomena, or for ground validation of satellite observations. These experiments collect data from a wide variety of airborne and ground-based instruments, on different spatial and temporal scales, often in unique formats. The field data are often used with high volume satellite observations that have very different spatial and temporal coverage. The challenges inherent in working with such diverse datasets make it difficult for scientists to rapidly collect and analyze the data for physical process studies and validation of satellite algorithms. The newly-funded VISAGE project will address these issues by combining and extending nascent efforts to provide on-line data fusion, exploration, analysis and delivery capabilities. A key building block is the Field Campaign Explorer (FCX), which allows users to examine data collected during field campaigns and simplifies data acquisition for event-based research. VISAGE will extend FCX's capabilities beyond interactive visualization and exploration of coincident datasets, to provide interrogation of data values and basic analyses such as ratios and differences between data fields. The project will also incorporate new, higher level fused and aggregated analysis products from the System for Integrating Multi-platform data to Build the Atmospheric column (SIMBA), which combines satellite and ground-based observations into a common gridded atmospheric column data product; and the Validation Network (VN), which compiles a nationwide database of coincident ground- and satellite-based radar measurements of precipitation for larger scale scientific analysis. The VISAGE proof-of-concept will target "golden cases" from Global Precipitation Measurement Ground Validation campaigns. This presentation will introduce the VISAGE project, initial accomplishments and near term plans.

  5. An evaluation of IASI-NH3 with ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Dammers

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Global distributions of atmospheric ammonia (NH3 measured with satellite instruments such as the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI contain valuable information on NH3 concentrations and variability in regions not yet covered by ground-based instruments. Due to their large spatial coverage and (bi-daily overpasses, the satellite observations have the potential to increase our knowledge of the distribution of NH3 emissions and associated seasonal cycles. However the observations remain poorly validated, with only a handful of available studies often using only surface measurements without any vertical information. In this study, we present the first validation of the IASI-NH3 product using ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR observations. Using a recently developed consistent retrieval strategy, NH3 concentration profiles have been retrieved using observations from nine Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC stations around the world between 2008 and 2015. We demonstrate the importance of strict spatio-temporal collocation criteria for the comparison. Large differences in the regression results are observed for changing intervals of spatial criteria, mostly due to terrain characteristics and the short lifetime of NH3 in the atmosphere. The seasonal variations of both datasets are consistent for most sites. Correlations are found to be high at sites in areas with considerable NH3 levels, whereas correlations are lower at sites with low atmospheric NH3 levels close to the detection limit of the IASI instrument. A combination of the observations from all sites (Nobs = 547 give a mean relative difference of −32.4 ± (56.3 %, a correlation r of 0.8 with a slope of 0.73. These results give an improved estimate of the IASI-NH3 product performance compared to the previous upper-bound estimates (−50 to +100 %.

  6. Comparing Aerosol Retrievals from Ground-Based Instruments at the Impact-Pm Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupinski, M.; Bradley, C. L.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Xu, F.; Diner, D. J.; Clements, C. B.; Camacho, C.

    2016-12-01

    Detection of aerosol types, components having different size and chemical composition, over urban areas is important for understanding their impact on health and climate. In particular, sustained contact with size-differentiated airborne particulate matter: PM10 and PM2.5 can lead to adverse health effects such as asthma attacks, heart and lung diseases, and premature mortality. Multi-angular polarimetric measurements have been advocated in recent years as an additional tool to better understand and retrieve the aerosol properties needed for improved predictions of aerosol impart on air quality and climate. We deployed the ground-based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (GroundMSPI) for accurate spectropolarimetric and radiance measurements co-located with the AERONET CIMEL sun photometer and a Halo Doppler 18 m resolution lidar from San José State University at the Garland-Fresno Air Quality supersite in Fresno, CA on July 7 during the Imaging Polarimetric Assessment and Characterization of Tropospheric Particulate Matter (ImPACT-PM) field experiment. GroundMSPI sampled the atmospheric scattering phase function in and 90 degrees out of the principal plane every 15 minutes in an automated manner, utilizing the 2-axis gimbal mount in elevation and azimuth. The goal of this work is verify atmospheric measurement of GroundMSPI with the coincident CIMEL sun photometer and ground-based lidar. Diffuse-sky radiance measurements of GroundMSPI are compared with the CIMEL sun photometer throughout the day. AERONET aerosol parameters such as size, shape, and index of refraction as well as lidar aerosol extinction profiles will be used in a forward radiative transfer model to compare with GroundMSPI observations and optimize these parameters to best match GroundMSPI data.

  7. Network operability of ground-based microwave radiometers: Calibration and standardization efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospichal, Bernhard; Löhnert, Ulrich; Küchler, Nils; Czekala, Harald

    2017-04-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR) are already widely used by national weather services and research institutions all around the world. Most of the instruments operate continuously and are beginning to be implemented into data assimilation for atmospheric models. Especially their potential for continuously observing boundary-layer temperature profiles as well as integrated water vapor and cloud liquid water path makes them valuable for improving short-term weather forecasts. However until now, most MWR have been operated as stand-alone instruments. In order to benefit from a network of these instruments, standardization of calibration, operation and data format is necessary. In the frame of TOPROF (COST Action ES1303) several efforts have been undertaken, such as uncertainty and bias assessment, or calibration intercomparison campaigns. The goal was to establish protocols for providing quality controlled (QC) MWR data and their uncertainties. To this end, standardized calibration procedures for MWR have been developed and recommendations for radiometer users compiled. Based on the results of the TOPROF campaigns, a new, high-accuracy liquid-nitrogen calibration load has been introduced for MWR manufactured by Radiometer Physics GmbH (RPG). The new load improves the accuracy of the measurements considerably and will lead to even more reliable atmospheric observations. Next to the recommendations for set-up, calibration and operation of ground-based MWR within a future network, we will present homogenized methods to determine the accuracy of a running calibration as well as means for automatic data quality control. This sets the stage for the planned microwave calibration center at JOYCE (Jülich Observatory for Cloud Evolution), which will be shortly introduced.

  8. Calibration of ground-based microwave radiometers - Accuracy assessment and recommendations for network users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospichal, Bernhard; Küchler, Nils; Löhnert, Ulrich; Crewell, Susanne; Czekala, Harald; Güldner, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR) are becoming widely used in atmospheric remote sensing and start to be routinely operated by national weather services and other institutions. However, common standards for calibration of these radiometers and a detailed knowledge about the error characteristics is needed, in order to assimilate the data into models. Intercomparisons of calibrations by different MWRs have rarely been done. Therefore, two calibration experiments in Lindenberg (2014) and Meckenheim (2015) were performed in the frame of TOPROF (Cost action ES1303) in order to assess uncertainties and differences between various instruments. In addition, a series of experiments were taken in Oklahoma in autumn 2014. The focus lay on the performance of the two main instrument types, which are currently used operationally. These are the MP-Profiler series by Radiometrics Corporation as well as the HATPRO series by Radiometer Physics GmbH (RPG). Both instrument types are operating in two frequency bands, one along the 22 GHz water vapour line, the other one at the lower wing of the 60 GHz oxygen absorption complex. The goal was to establish protocols for providing quality controlled (QC) MWR data and their uncertainties. To this end, standardized calibration procedures for MWR were developed and recommendations for radiometer users were compiled. We focus here mainly on data types, integration times and optimal settings for calibration intervals, both for absolute (liquid nitrogen, tipping curve) as well as relative (hot load, noise diode) calibrations. Besides the recommendations for ground-based MWR operators, we will present methods to determine the accuracy of the calibration as well as means for automatic data quality control. In addition, some results from the intercomparison of different radiometers will be discussed.

  9. Magnetospheric Perturbations Related to IMF Discontinuity Passing Through the Magnetosheath: THEMIS and Ground-Based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, A. V.; Suvorova, A. V.

    2010-12-01

    We present a case event of THEMIS and ground-based observations of the magnetopause and geomagnetic field perturbations related to passing a discontinuity of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) through the magnetosheath. As observed by the ACE upstream monitor, the IMF discontinuity is rotational, i.e. it is characterized by sudden change of the IMF orientation without any changes in solar wind plasma characteristics. The normal to IMF rotation plane is inclined duskward and northward. During passing through the magnetosheath the discontinuity is not rotational any more: THEMIS detects substantial depletion of the magnetosheath at the leading edge of discontinuity and very strong compression at the trailing edge, where the total magnetosheath pressure is revealed to be 3 times higher than the upstream solar wind dynamic pressure. The magnetosheath compression is contributed by enhanced thermal ion and magnetic pressures. This spatial heterogeneity in the magnetosheath pressure causes a local distortion of the Chapman-Ferraro current (CFR) and, hence, transient outward and inward magnetopause motion, respectively, with amplitude more than 1.5 Re. The transient motion results in a local significant distortion of the magnetopause shape that is revealed as a substantial deviation of the magnetopause normal from its nominal direction. Inside the magnetosphere, the CFR distortion is detected by THEMIS as a bipolar magnetic impulse with very high amplitude of ~40 nT. The INTERMAGNET network of ground-based magnetometers allows tracing the movement of the CFR distortion related to the discontinuity propagation through the magnetosheath. We find that the bipolar impulse in horizontal component of geomagnetic field propagates from south to north and from dawn to dusk that is in good agreement with the IMF discontinuity orientation observed by ACE.

  10. Microwave signatures of ice hydrometeors from ground-based observations above Summit, Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pettersen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Multi-instrument, ground-based measurements provide unique and comprehensive data sets of the atmosphere for a specific location over long periods of time and resulting data compliment past and existing global satellite observations. This paper explores the effect of ice hydrometeors on ground-based, high-frequency passive microwave measurements and attempts to isolate an ice signature for summer seasons at Summit, Greenland, from 2010 to 2013. Data from a combination of passive microwave, cloud radar, radiosonde, and ceilometer were examined to isolate the ice signature at microwave wavelengths. By limiting the study to a cloud liquid water path of 40 g m−2 or less, the cloud radar can identify cases where the precipitation was dominated by ice. These cases were examined using liquid water and gas microwave absorption models, and brightness temperatures were calculated for the high-frequency microwave channels: 90, 150, and 225 GHz. By comparing the measured brightness temperatures from the microwave radiometers and the calculated brightness temperature using only gas and liquid contributions, any residual brightness temperature difference is due to emission and scattering of microwave radiation from the ice hydrometeors in the column. The ice signature in the 90, 150, and 225 GHz channels for the Summit Station summer months was isolated. This measured ice signature was then compared to an equivalent brightness temperature difference calculated with a radiative transfer model including microwave single-scattering properties for several ice habits. Initial model results compare well against the 4 years of summer season isolated ice signature in the high-frequency microwave channels.

  11. Mixed-field GCR Simulations for Radiobiological Research using Ground Based Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Rusek, Adam; Cucinotta, Francis

    Space radiation is comprised of a large number of particle types and energies, which have differential ionization power from high energy protons to high charge and energy (HZE) particles and secondary neutrons produced by galactic cosmic rays (GCR). Ground based accelerators such as the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are used to simulate space radiation for radiobiology research and dosimetry, electronics parts, and shielding testing using mono-energetic beams for single ion species. As a tool to support research on new risk assessment models, we have developed a stochastic model of heavy ion beams and space radiation effects, the GCR Event-based Risk Model computer code (GERMcode). For radiobiological research on mixed-field space radiation, a new GCR simulator at NSRL is proposed. The NSRL-GCR simulator, which implements the rapid switching mode and the higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, can integrate multiple ions into a single simulation to create GCR Z-spectrum in major energy bins. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, a GCR reference field is proposed after extensive simulation studies using the GERMcode. The GCR reference field is shown to reproduce the Z and LET spectra of GCR behind shielding within 20 percents accuracy compared to simulated full GCR environments behind shielding. A major challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3-years in relation to simulations with cell and animal models of human risks. We discuss possible approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation with extended exposure of up to a few weeks and fractionation approaches at a GCR simulator.

  12. High-Altitude Airborne Platform Characterisation of Adaptive Optic Corrected Ground Based Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennet, F.; Petkovic, M.; Sheard, B.; Greene, B.

    Adaptive optics can be used for more than astronomical imaging with large telescopes. The Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics (RSAA) and the Space Environment Management Research Centre (SERC) at the Mount Stromlo Observatory in Canberra, Australia, have been developing adaptive optics (AO) for space environment management. Turbulence in the atmosphere causes optical signals to become degraded during propagation, which reduces the effective aperture of your transmitting or receiving telescope. An AO system measures and corrects for the turbulence in the atmosphere, allowing for greater resolution of optical signals. AO can be used to correct a laser beam propagating from the ground into space, or high-altitude airborne platform. The AO system performance depends heavily on the chosen site and system design. In order to properly design and implement a cost-effective AO system to propagate a laser into orbit, we propose using high-altitude platforms to measure AO system performance directly as a precursor in-orbit measurements. SERC plan on demonstrating remote manoeuvre of an orbiting object using photon pressure from an AO corrected high power ground based laser. The manoeuvre target will be a suitable piece of debris, or a dedicated satellite mission which is instrumented and tracked to measure the applied photon pressure and resulting orbit perturbation. High-altitude airborne platforms such as weather balloons or UAVs enable us to efficiently de-risk elements of this program by validating our numerical simulations of AO system performance with actual measurements. We are then able to confidently move towards in-orbit measurement of an AO corrected ground based laser, and remote manoeuvre with photon pressure. We present simulations along with experimental results for the development of array detectors which can be used to directly measure AO system performance.

  13. Automated cloud classification using a ground based infra-red camera and texture analysis techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumi, Emal; Kerr, David; Coupland, Jeremy M.; Sandford, Andrew P.; Brettle, Mike J.

    2013-10-01

    Clouds play an important role in influencing the dynamics of local and global weather and climate conditions. Continuous monitoring of clouds is vital for weather forecasting and for air-traffic control. Convective clouds such as Towering Cumulus (TCU) and Cumulonimbus clouds (CB) are associated with thunderstorms, turbulence and atmospheric instability. Human observers periodically report the presence of CB and TCU clouds during operational hours at airports and observatories; however such observations are expensive and time limited. Robust, automatic classification of cloud type using infrared ground-based instrumentation offers the advantage of continuous, real-time (24/7) data capture and the representation of cloud structure in the form of a thermal map, which can greatly help to characterise certain cloud formations. The work presented here utilised a ground based infrared (8-14 μm) imaging device mounted on a pan/tilt unit for capturing high spatial resolution sky images. These images were processed to extract 45 separate textural features using statistical and spatial frequency based analytical techniques. These features were used to train a weighted k-nearest neighbour (KNN) classifier in order to determine cloud type. Ground truth data were obtained by inspection of images captured simultaneously from a visible wavelength colour camera at the same installation, with approximately the same field of view as the infrared device. These images were classified by a trained cloud observer. Results from the KNN classifier gave an encouraging success rate. A Probability of Detection (POD) of up to 90% with a Probability of False Alarm (POFA) as low as 16% was achieved.

  14. High time resolution observations of the polar stratosphere and mesosphere using a ground-based 230-250 GHz microwave radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnham, D. A.; Espy, P. J.; Clilverd, M. A.; Maxfield, D. J.; Hartogh, P.; Holmén, K.; Blindheim, S.; Horne, R. B.

    2012-04-01

    Microwave radiometry is used to measure thermal emission by the Doppler- and pressure-broadened molecular rotational lines of atmospheric gases, from which vertical abundance profiles can be determined. Since solar radiation is not required for the measurement, the technique has the advantage that continuous observations are possible including throughout the polar winter. We describe the development of a passive microwave radiometer [Espy, P. J., P. Hartogh, and K. Holmen (2006), Proc. SPIE, 6362, 63620P, doi:10.1117/12.688953] for ground-based remote sensing of the polar middle atmosphere. The instrument measures nitric oxide (NO), ozone (O3), and carbon monoxide (CO) vertical profiles over the altitude range 35-90 km with time resolution as high as 15 minutes, allowing the diurnal variability of trace chemical species to be investigated. Heterodyne detection of atmospheric emission at 230 GHz and 250 GHz (wavelength ~1.25 mm) with a receiver noise temperature of 300 K is achieved using a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixer cooled to 4 K. The down-converted signals at 1.35 GHz and 2.10 GHz are analysed using both a moderate-resolution (28 kHz, 220 MHz bandwidth) and a high-resolution (14 kHz, 40 MHz bandwidth) chirp-transform spectrometer (CTS). The instrument was operated semi-autonomously at Troll station (72° 01'S 02° 32'E, 1270 m above sea level), Antarctica during 2008-10 and at the Arctic LIDAR Observatory for Middle Atmosphere Research (ALOMAR, 69° 16'N, 16° 00'E, 380 m above sea level), northern Norway during 2011-12. NO volume mixing ratio (VMR) profiles have been inverted from calibrated brightness temperature spectra of the NO line centred at 250.796 GHz, observed above Troll station, using the Microwave Observation Line Estimation and Retrieval (MOLIERE) version 5 code. A priori pressure, temperature, ozone, water vapour, and NO profiles above 30 km were calculated using the Sodankylä Ion and Neutral Chemistry (SIC, version 6

  15. A Ground-based validation of GOSAT-observed atmospheric CO2 in Inner-Mongolian grasslands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, X; Lei, L; Zeng, Z; Kawasaki, M; Oohasi, M

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is a long-lived greenhouse gas that significantly contributes to global warming. Long-term and continuous measurements of atmospheric CO 2 to investigate its global distribution and concentration variations are important for accurately understanding its potential climatic effects. Satellite measurements from space can offer atmospheric CO 2 data for climate change research. For that, ground-based measurements are required for validation and improving the precision of satellite-measured CO 2 . We implemented observation experiment of CO 2 column densities in the Xilinguole grasslands in Inner Mongolia, China, using a ground-based measurement system, which mainly consists of an optical spectrum analyzer (OSA), a sun tracker and a notebook controller. Measurements from our ground-based system were analyzed and compared with those from the Greenhouse gas Observation SATellite (GOSAT). The ground-based measurements had an average value of 389.46 ppm, which was 2.4 ppm larger than from GOSAT, with a standard deviation of 3.4 ppm. This result is slightly larger than the difference between GOSAT and the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON). This study highlights the usefulness of the ground-based OSA measurement system for analyzing atmospheric CO 2 column densities, which is expected to supplement the current TCCON network

  16. Comparison of Ground-Based and Satellite-Derived Solar UV Index Levels at Six South African Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadet, Jean-Maurice; Bencherif, Hassan; Portafaix, Thierry; Lamy, Kévin; Ncongwane, Katlego; Coetzee, Gerrie J R; Wright, Caradee Y

    2017-11-14

    South Africa has been measuring the ground-based solar UV index for more than two decades at six sites to raise awareness about the impacts of the solar UV index on human health. This paper is an exploratory study based on comparison with satellite UV index measurements from the OMI/AURA experiment. Relative UV index differences between ground-based and satellite-derived data ranged from 0 to 45% depending on the site and year. Most of time, these differences appear in winter. Some ground-based stations' data had closer agreement with satellite-derived data. While the ground-based instruments are not intended for long-term trend analysis, they provide UV index information for public awareness instead, with some weak signs suggesting such long-term trends may exist in the ground-based data. The annual cycle, altitude, and latitude effects clearly appear in the UV index data measured in South Africa. This variability must be taken into account for the development of an excess solar UV exposure prevention strategy.

  17. Comparison of Ground-Based and Satellite-Derived Solar UV Index Levels at Six South African Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Maurice Cadet

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available South Africa has been measuring the ground-based solar UV index for more than two decades at six sites to raise awareness about the impacts of the solar UV index on human health. This paper is an exploratory study based on comparison with satellite UV index measurements from the OMI/AURA experiment. Relative UV index differences between ground-based and satellite-derived data ranged from 0 to 45% depending on the site and year. Most of time, these differences appear in winter. Some ground-based stations’ data had closer agreement with satellite-derived data. While the ground-based instruments are not intended for long-term trend analysis, they provide UV index information for public awareness instead, with some weak signs suggesting such long-term trends may exist in the ground-based data. The annual cycle, altitude, and latitude effects clearly appear in the UV index data measured in South Africa. This variability must be taken into account for the development of an excess solar UV exposure prevention strategy.

  18. Development and application of cryogenic radiometry with hard X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerlach, Martin

    2008-01-01

    To establish cryogenic radiometry with hard X-ray radiation for photon energies of up to 60 keV, a novel type of cavity absorber had to be developed for the cryogenic radiometer SYRES I, which is deployed by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) as primary standard detector at the electron storage ring BESSY II. This new type of cavity absorber allows for the complete absorption of hard X-ray radiation in combination with an appropriate sensitivity and an adequate time constant for the measurement of synchrotron radiation at BESSY II. As the process of fabrication of different types of absorbers is very time-consuming, the interaction of hard X-ray radiation with different absorber materials and geometries was studied intensively by using the Monte Carlo simulation code Geant4. The accuracy of the simulations was verified comparing them to scattering experiments performed at a wavelength shifter beamline at BESSY II with a calibrated energy dispersive detector. It was shown that Geant4 describes the photo-effect, including fluorescence as well as Compton- and Rayleigh scattering, with high accuracy. The simulations and experiments resulted in a cavity absorber with a gold base 550 μm in thickness and a cylindrical shell made of copper 90 μm in thickness to reduce losses caused by fluorescence and scattered radiation. Monochromatized synchrotron radiation of high spectral purity was then used to calibrate semiconductor photodiodes, which can be used as compact and inexpensive secondary standard detectors, against a cryogenic radiometer, covering the entire photon energy range of three beamlines from 50 eV to 60 keV with relative uncertainties of less than 0.5 %. Furthermore the spatial homogeneity of the spectral responsivity, the transmittance and the linearity of the photodiodes was investigated. Through a direct comparison of the free-air ionization chamber PK100, a primary detector standard of PTB used in dosimetry, and the cryogenic radiometer SYRES

  19. Terra and Aqua MODIS Design, Radiometry, and Geometry in Support of Land Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Wolfe, Robert; Barnes, William; Guenther, Bruce; Vermote, Eric; Saleous, Nazmi; Salomonson, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) mission includes the construction and launch of two nearly identical Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments. The MODIS proto-flight model (PFM) is onboard the EOS Terra satellite (formerly EOS AM-1) launched on December 18, 1999 and hereafter referred to as Terra MODIS. Flight model-1 (FM1) is onboard the EOS Aqua satellite (formerly EOS PM-1) launched on May 04, 2002 and referred to as Aqua MODIS. MODIS was developed based on the science community s desire to collect multiyear continuous datasets for monitoring changes in the Earth s land, oceans and atmosphere, and the human contributions to these changes. It was designed to measure discrete spectral bands, which includes many used by a number of heritage sensors, and thus extends the heritage datasets to better understand both long- and short-term changes in the global environment (Barnes and Salomonson 1993; Salomonson et al. 2002; Barnes et al. 2002). The MODIS development, launch, and operation were managed by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, Maryland. The sensors were designed, built, and tested by Raytheon/ Santa Barbara Remote Sensing (SBRS), Goleta, California. Each MODIS instrument offers 36 spectral bands, which span the spectral region from the visible (0.41 m) to long-wave infrared (14.4 m). MODIS collects data at three different nadir spatial resolutions: 0.25, 0.5, and 1 km. Key design specifications, such as spectral bandwidths, typical scene radiances, required signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) or noise equivalent temperature differences (NEDT), and primary applications of each MODIS spectral band are summarized in Table 7.1. These parameters were the basis for the MODIS design. More details on the evolution of the NASA EOS and development of the MODIS instruments are provided in Chap. 1. This chapter focuses on the MODIS sensor design, radiometry, and geometry as they apply to land remote sensing. With near

  20. TEMIS UV product validation using NILU-UV ground-based measurements in Thessaloniki, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zempila, Melina-Maria; van Geffen, Jos H. G. M.; Taylor, Michael; Fountoulakis, Ilias; Koukouli, Maria-Elissavet; van Weele, Michiel; van der A, Ronald J.; Bais, Alkiviadis; Meleti, Charikleia; Balis, Dimitrios

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to cross-validate ground-based and satellite-based models of three photobiological UV effective dose products: the Commission Internationale de l'Éclairage (CIE) erythemal UV, the production of vitamin D in the skin, and DNA damage, using high-temporal-resolution surface-based measurements of solar UV spectral irradiances from a synergy of instruments and models. The satellite-based Tropospheric Emission Monitoring Internet Service (TEMIS; version 1.4) UV daily dose data products were evaluated over the period 2009 to 2014 with ground-based data from a Norsk Institutt for Luftforskning (NILU)-UV multifilter radiometer located at the northern midlatitude super-site of the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (LAP/AUTh), in Greece. For the NILU-UV effective dose rates retrieval algorithm, a neural network (NN) was trained to learn the nonlinear functional relation between NILU-UV irradiances and collocated Brewer-based photobiological effective dose products. Then the algorithm was subjected to sensitivity analysis and validation. The correlation of the NN estimates with target outputs was high (r = 0. 988 to 0.990) and with a very low bias (0.000 to 0.011 in absolute units) proving the robustness of the NN algorithm. For further evaluation of the NILU NN-derived products, retrievals of the vitamin D and DNA-damage effective doses from a collocated Yankee Environmental Systems (YES) UVB-1 pyranometer were used. For cloud-free days, differences in the derived UV doses are better than 2 % for all UV dose products, revealing the reference quality of the ground-based UV doses at Thessaloniki from the NILU-UV NN retrievals. The TEMIS UV doses used in this study are derived from ozone measurements by the SCIAMACHY/Envisat and GOME2/MetOp-A satellite instruments, over the European domain in combination with SEVIRI/Meteosat-based diurnal cycle of the cloud cover fraction per 0. 5° × 0. 5° (lat × long) grid cells. TEMIS

  1. The use of products from ground-based GNSS observations in meteorological nowcasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terradellas, E.; Callado, A.; Pascual, R.; Téllez, B.

    2009-09-01

    Heavy rainfall is often focalized in areas of moisture convergence. A close relationship between precipitation and fast variations of vertically-integrated water vapour (IWV) has been found in numerous cases. Furthermore, a latency of several tens of minutes of the precipitation relative to a rapid increase of the water vapour contents appears to be a common truth. Therefore, continuous monitoring of atmospheric humidity and its spatial distribution is crucial to the operational forecaster for a proper nowcasting of heavy rainfall events. Radiosonde releases yield measurements of atmospheric humidity, but they are very sparse and present a limited time resolution of 6 to 12 hours. The microwave signals continuously broadcasted by the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) satellites are influenced by the water vapour as they travel through the atmosphere to ground-based receivers. The total zenith delay (ZTD) of these signals, a by-product of the geodetic processing, is already operationally assimilated into numerical weather prediction (NWP) models and has positive impact on the prediction of precipitation events, as it has been reported after the analysis of parallel runs. Estimates of IWV retrieved from ground-based GNSS observations may also constitute a source of information on the horizontal distribution and the time evolution of atmospheric humidity that can be presented to the forecaster. Several advantages can be attributed to the ground-based GNSS as a meteorological observing system. First, receiving networks can be built and maintained at a relatively low cost, which it can, additionally, be shared among different users. Second, the quality of the processed observations is insensitive to the weather conditions and, third, the temporal resolution of its products is very high. On the other hand, the current latency of the data disposal, ranging between one and two hours, is acceptable for the NWP community, but appears to be excessive for nowcasting

  2. Proteomic and Epigenetic Analysis of Rice after Seed Spaceflight and Ground-Base Ion Radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Sun, Yeqing; Peng, Yuming; Zhao, Qian; Wen, Bin; Yang, Jun

    Highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as main factor causing biological effects to plant seeds. In previous work, we compared the proteomic profiles of rice plants growing after seed spaceflights to ground controls by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) with mass spectrometry and found that the protein expression profiles were changed and differentially expressed proteins participated in most of the biological processes of rice. To further evaluate the dosage effects of space radiation and compare between low- and high-dose ion effects, we carried out three independent ground-base ionizing radiation experiments with different cumulative doses (low-dose range: 2~1000mGy, high-dose range: 2000~20000mGy) to rice seeds and performed proteomic analysis of seedlings. We found that protein expression profiles showed obvious boundaries between low- and high-dose radiation groups. Rates of differentially expressed proteins presented a dose-dependent effect, it reached the highest value at 2000mGy dosage point in all three radiation experiments coincidently; while proteins responded to low-dose radiations preferred to change their expressions at the minimum dosage (2mGy). Proteins participating in rice biological processes also responded differently between low- and high-dose radiations: proteins involved in energy metabolism and photosynthesis tended to be regulated after low-dose radiations while stress responding, protein folding and cell redox homeostasis related proteins preferred to change their expressions after high-dose radiations. By comparing the proteomic profiles between ground-base radiations and spaceflights, it was worth noting that ground-base low-dose ion radiation effects shared similar biological effects as space environment. In addition, we discovered that protein nucleoside diphosphate kinase 1 (NDPK1) showed obvious increased regulation after spaceflights and ion radiations. NDPK1 catalyzes nucleotide metabolism

  3. TEMIS UV product validation using NILU-UV ground-based measurements in Thessaloniki, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-M. Zempila

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to cross-validate ground-based and satellite-based models of three photobiological UV effective dose products: the Commission Internationale de l'Éclairage (CIE erythemal UV, the production of vitamin D in the skin, and DNA damage, using high-temporal-resolution surface-based measurements of solar UV spectral irradiances from a synergy of instruments and models. The satellite-based Tropospheric Emission Monitoring Internet Service (TEMIS; version 1.4 UV daily dose data products were evaluated over the period 2009 to 2014 with ground-based data from a Norsk Institutt for Luftforskning (NILU-UV multifilter radiometer located at the northern midlatitude super-site of the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (LAP/AUTh, in Greece. For the NILU-UV effective dose rates retrieval algorithm, a neural network (NN was trained to learn the nonlinear functional relation between NILU-UV irradiances and collocated Brewer-based photobiological effective dose products. Then the algorithm was subjected to sensitivity analysis and validation. The correlation of the NN estimates with target outputs was high (r = 0. 988 to 0.990 and with a very low bias (0.000 to 0.011 in absolute units proving the robustness of the NN algorithm. For further evaluation of the NILU NN-derived products, retrievals of the vitamin D and DNA-damage effective doses from a collocated Yankee Environmental Systems (YES UVB-1 pyranometer were used. For cloud-free days, differences in the derived UV doses are better than 2 % for all UV dose products, revealing the reference quality of the ground-based UV doses at Thessaloniki from the NILU-UV NN retrievals. The TEMIS UV doses used in this study are derived from ozone measurements by the SCIAMACHY/Envisat and GOME2/MetOp-A satellite instruments, over the European domain in combination with SEVIRI/Meteosat-based diurnal cycle of the cloud cover fraction per 0. 5° × 0. 5

  4. Ground-based aerosol characterization during the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, J.; Rizzo, L. V.; Morgan, W. T.; Coe, H.; Johnson, B.; Haywood, J.; Longo, K.; Freitas, S.; Andreae, M. O.; Artaxo, P.

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigates the physical and chemical characteristics of aerosols at ground level at a site heavily impacted by biomass burning. The site is located near Porto Velho, Rondônia, in the southwestern part of the Brazilian Amazon rainforest, and was selected for the deployment of a large suite of instruments, among them an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor. Our measurements were made during the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment, which consisted of a combination of aircraft and ground-based measurements over Brazil, aimed to investigate the impacts of biomass burning emissions on climate, air quality, and numerical weather prediction over South America. The campaign took place during the dry season and the transition to the wet season in September/October 2012. During most of the campaign, the site was impacted by regional biomass burning pollution (average CO mixing ratio of 0.6 ppm), occasionally superimposed by intense (up to 2 ppm of CO), freshly emitted biomass burning plumes. Aerosol number concentrations ranged from ~1000 cm-3 to peaks of up to 35 000 cm-3 (during biomass burning (BB) events, corresponding to an average submicron mass mean concentrations of 13.7 μg m-3 and peak concentrations close to 100 μg m-3. Organic aerosol strongly dominated the submicron non-refractory composition, with an average concentration of 11.4 μg m-3. The inorganic species, NH4, SO4, NO3, and Cl, were observed, on average, at concentrations of 0.44, 0.34, 0.19, and 0.01 μg m-3, respectively. Equivalent black carbon (BCe) ranged from 0.2 to 5.5 μg m-3, with an average concentration of 1.3 μg m-3. During BB peaks, organics accounted for over 90% of total mass (submicron non-refractory plus BCe), among the highest values described in the literature. We examined the ageing of biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) using the changes in the H : C and O : C ratios, and found that throughout most of the aerosol processing (O : C ≅ 0

  5. Ground based aerosol characterization during the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, J.; Rizzo, L. V.; Morgan, W. T.; Coe, H.; Johnson, B.; Haywood, J.; Longo, K.; Freitas, S.; Andreae, M. O.; Artaxo, P.

    2014-05-01

    This paper investigates the physical and chemical characteristics of aerosols at ground level at a site heavily impacted by biomass burning. The site is located near Porto Velho, Rondônia, in the Southwestern part of the Brazilian Amazon forest, and was selected for the deployment of a large suite of instruments, among them an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor. Our measurements were made during the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment, which consisted of a combination of aircraft and ground based measurements over Brazil, aiming to investigate the impacts of biomass burning emissions on climate, air quality, and numerical weather prediction over South America. The campaign took place during the dry season and the transition to the wet season in September/October 2012. During most of the campaign, the site was impacted by regional biomass burning pollution (average CO mixing ratio of 0.6 ppm), occasionally superimposed by intense (up to 2 ppm of CO), freshly emitted biomass burning plumes. Aerosol number concentrations ranged from ∼1000 cm-3 to peaks of up to 35 000 cm-3 during biomass burning (BB) events, corresponding to an average submicron mass mean concentrations of 13.7 μg m-3 and peak concentrations close to 100 μg m-3. Organic aerosol strongly dominated the submicron non-refractory composition, with an average concentration of 11.4 μg m-3. The inorganic species, NH4, SO4, NO3, and Cl, were observed on average at concentrations of 0.44, 0.34, 0.19, and 0.01 μg m-3, respectively. Equivalent Black Carbon (BCe) ranged from 0.2 to 5.5 μg m-3, with an average concentration of 1.3 μg m-3. During BB peaks, organics accounted for over 90% of total mass (submicron non-refractory plus BCe), among the highest values described in the literature. We examined the ageing of Biomass Burning Organic Aerosol (BBOA) using the changes in the H : C and O : C ratios, and found that throughout most of the aerosol processing (O : C ≅ 0.25 to

  6. Sub-Seasonal Variability of Tropical Rainfall Observed by TRMM and Ground-based Polarimetric Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Brenda; Rutledge, Steven; Lang, Timothy; Cifelli, Robert; Nesbitt, Stephen

    2010-05-01

    Studies of tropical precipitation characteristics from the TRMM-LBA and NAME field campaigns using ground-based polarimetric S-band data have revealed significant differences in microphysical processes occurring in the various meteorological regimes sampled in those projects. In TRMM-LMA (January-February 1999 in Brazil; a TRMM ground validation experiment), variability is driven by prevailing low-level winds. During periods of low-level easterlies, deeper and more intense convection is observed, while during periods of low-level westerlies, weaker convection embedded in widespread stratiform precipitation is common. In the NAME region (North American Monsoon Experiment, summer 2004 along the west coast of Mexico), strong terrain variability drives differences in precipitation, with larger drops and larger ice mass aloft associated with convection occurring over the coastal plain compared to convection over the higher terrain of the Sierra Madre Occidental, or adjacent coastal waters. Comparisons with the TRMM precipitation radar (PR) indicate that such sub-seasonal variability in these two regions are not well characterized by the TRMM PR reflectivity and rainfall statistics. TRMM PR reflectivity profiles in the LBA region are somewhat lower than S-Pol values, particularly in the more intense easterly regime convection. In NAME, mean reflectivities are even more divergent, with TRMM profiles below those of S-Pol. In both regions, the TRMM PR does not capture rain rates above 80 mm hr-1 despite much higher rain rates estimated from the S-Pol polarimetric data, and rain rates are generally lower for a given reflectivity from TRMM PR compared to S-Pol. These differences between TRMM PR and S-Pol may arise from the inability of Z-R relationships to capture the full variability of microphysical conditions or may highlight problems with TRMM retrievals over land. In addition to the TRMM-LBA and NAME regions, analysis of sub-seasonal precipitation variability and

  7. Validation of CALIPSO space-borne-derived attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles using a ground-based lidar in Athens, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Mamouri

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We present initial aerosol validation results of the space-borne lidar CALIOP -onboard the CALIPSO satellite- Level 1 attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles, using coincident observations performed with a ground-based lidar in Athens, Greece (37.9° N, 23.6° E. A multi-wavelength ground-based backscatter/Raman lidar system is operating since 2000 at the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA in the framework of the European Aerosol Research LIdar NETwork (EARLINET, the first lidar network for tropospheric aerosol studies on a continental scale. Since July 2006, a total of 40 coincidental aerosol ground-based lidar measurements were performed over Athens during CALIPSO overpasses. The ground-based measurements were performed each time CALIPSO overpasses the station location within a maximum distance of 100 km. The duration of the ground–based lidar measurements was approximately two hours, centred on the satellite overpass time. From the analysis of the ground-based/satellite correlative lidar measurements, a mean bias of the order of 22% for daytime measurements and of 8% for nighttime measurements with respect to the CALIPSO profiles was found for altitudes between 3 and 10 km. The mean bias becomes much larger for altitudes lower that 3 km (of the order of 60% which is attributed to the increase of aerosol horizontal inhomogeneity within the Planetary Boundary Layer, resulting to the observation of possibly different air masses by the two instruments. In cases of aerosol layers underlying Cirrus clouds, comparison results for aerosol tropospheric profiles become worse. This is attributed to the significant multiple scattering effects in Cirrus clouds experienced by CALIPSO which result in an attenuation which is less than that measured by the ground-based lidar.

  8. Tomato pastes and their moisture content as determined via the measurements of thermal effusivity by means of infrared photothermal radiometry and inverse photopyroelectric technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bicanic, D.D.; Neamtu, C.; Manojlovic, M.; Linden, van der D.; Dadarlat, D.; Gijsbertsen, A.; Kurtanjek, Z.; Posavec, K.

    2004-01-01

    Infrared photothermal radiometry and inverse photopyroelectric method were used to determine thermal effusivity for tomato pastes characterised by a varying dry matter content. Unlike commonly adapted techniques, the two methods used here are reasonably fast and do not require the application of

  9. Scope of Jovian lightning observation by ground-based and spacecraft instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Sato, M.; Nakajima, K.

    2009-12-01

    It is suggested by recent observational and theoretical studies that the thunderstorms, i.e., strong moist convective clouds in Jupiter’s atmosphere are very important not only as an essential ingredient of meteorology of Jupiter but also as a potentially very useful “probe” of the water abundance of the deep atmosphere, which is crucial to constrain the behavior of volatiles in early solar system. We would propose the lightning observation with properly designed optical device onboard Jovian system orbiter and with the ground-based telescope. Based on detailed analysis of cloud motions by Galileo orbiter, Gierasch et al. proposed that the thunderstorms can produce the small scale eddies and ultimately drive the belt/zone structure. Moreover, the belt zone structure helps the development of thunderstorms in the belt region in accordance with observation; the belt/zone structure and thunderstorms may be in a symbiotic relation. This framework is a refined version of shallow origin theory, but, although it is a very fantastic idea, quantitative verification remains to be done. Most recent numerical modeling by our group calculated all three types of cloud, i.e., H2O, NH3, and, NH4SH. One of the most important findings is the existence of distinct, quasi-periodic temporal variation of the convective cloud activity; explosion of cloud activity extending all over the computational domain occurs separated by quiet period of order of 10 days. Another surprising finding is that the period of the active/break cycle is roughly proportional to the amount of condensable component in the sub-cloud layer. This strong correspondence between the deep volatile abundance and temporal variability of cloud convection implies a new method to probe the deep atmosphere. We believe JGO with other optical equipments especially for atmospheric spectral imaging is the ideal platform for the lightning detector. Comparing quantitative lightning activity with ambient cloud motion and

  10. TESTING GROUND BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES TO REFINE ELECTROMAGNETIC SURVEYS NORTH OF THE 300 AREA HANFORD WASHINGTON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN SW

    2010-12-02

    Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys were flown during fiscal year (FY) 2008 within the 600 Area in an attempt to characterize the underlying subsurface and to aid in the closure and remediation design study goals for the 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU). The rationale for using the AEM surveys was that airborne surveys can cover large areas rapidly at relatively low costs with minimal cultural impact, and observed geo-electrical anomalies could be correlated with important subsurface geologic and hydrogeologic features. Initial interpretation of the AEM surveys indicated a tenuous correlation with the underlying geology, from which several anomalous zones likely associated with channels/erosional features incised into the Ringold units were identified near the River Corridor. Preliminary modeling resulted in a slightly improved correlation but revealed that more information was required to constrain the modeling (SGW-39674, Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Report, 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, 600 Area, Hanford Site). Both time-and frequency domain AEM surveys were collected with the densest coverage occurring adjacent to the Columbia River Corridor. Time domain surveys targeted deeper subsurface features (e.g., top-of-basalt) and were acquired using the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} system along north-south flight lines with a nominal 400 m (1,312 ft) spacing. The frequency domain RESOLVE system acquired electromagnetic (EM) data along tighter spaced (100 m [328 ft] and 200 m [656 ft]) north-south profiles in the eastern fifth of the 200-PO-1 Groundwater OU (immediately adjacent to the River Corridor). The overall goal of this study is to provide further quantification of the AEM survey results, using ground based geophysical methods, and to link results to the underlying geology and/or hydrogeology. Specific goals of this project are as follows: (1) Test ground based geophysical techniques for the efficacy in delineating underlying geology; (2) Use ground

  11. MetaSensing's FastGBSAR: ground based radar for deformation monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödelsperger, Sabine; Meta, Adriano

    2014-10-01

    The continuous monitoring of ground deformation and structural movement has become an important task in engineering. MetaSensing introduces a novel sensor system, the Fast Ground Based Synthetic Aperture Radar (FastGBSAR), based on innovative technologies that have already been successfully applied to airborne SAR applications. The FastGBSAR allows the remote sensing of deformations of a slope or infrastructure from up to a distance of 4 km. The FastGBSAR can be setup in two different configurations: in Real Aperture Radar (RAR) mode it is capable of accurately measuring displacements along a linear range profile, ideal for monitoring vibrations of structures like bridges and towers (displacement accuracy up to 0.01 mm). Modal parameters can be determined within half an hour. Alternatively, in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) configuration it produces two-dimensional displacement images with an acquisition time of less than 5 seconds, ideal for monitoring areal structures like dams, landslides and open pit mines (displacement accuracy up to 0.1 mm). The MetaSensing FastGBSAR is the first ground based SAR instrument on the market able to produce two-dimensional deformation maps with this high acquisition rate. By that, deformation time series with a high temporal and spatial resolution can be generated, giving detailed information useful to determine the deformation mechanisms involved and eventually to predict an incoming failure. The system is fully portable and can be quickly installed on bedrock or a basement. The data acquisition and processing can be fully automated leading to a low effort in instrument operation and maintenance. Due to the short acquisition time of FastGBSAR, the coherence between two acquisitions is very high and the phase unwrapping is simplified enormously. This yields a high density of resolution cells with good quality and high reliability of the acquired deformations. The deformation maps can directly be used as input into an Early

  12. TESTING GROUND BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES TO REFINE ELECTROMAGNETIC SURVEYS NORTH OF THE 300 AREA, HANFORD, WASHINGTON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, S.W.

    2010-01-01

    Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys were flown during fiscal year (FY) 2008 within the 600 Area in an attempt to characterize the underlying subsurface and to aid in the closure and remediation design study goals for the 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU). The rationale for using the AEM surveys was that airborne surveys can cover large areas rapidly at relatively low costs with minimal cultural impact, and observed geo-electrical anomalies could be correlated with important subsurface geologic and hydrogeologic features. Initial interpretation of the AEM surveys indicated a tenuous correlation with the underlying geology, from which several anomalous zones likely associated with channels/erosional features incised into the Ringold units were identified near the River Corridor. Preliminary modeling resulted in a slightly improved correlation but revealed that more information was required to constrain the modeling (SGW-39674, Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Report, 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, 600 Area, Hanford Site). Both time-and frequency domain AEM surveys were collected with the densest coverage occurring adjacent to the Columbia River Corridor. Time domain surveys targeted deeper subsurface features (e.g., top-of-basalt) and were acquired using the HeliGEOTEM(reg s ign) system along north-south flight lines with a nominal 400 m (1,312 ft) spacing. The frequency domain RESOLVE system acquired electromagnetic (EM) data along tighter spaced (100 m (328 ft) and 200 m (656 ft)) north-south profiles in the eastern fifth of the 200-PO-1 Groundwater OU (immediately adjacent to the River Corridor). The overall goal of this study is to provide further quantification of the AEM survey results, using ground based geophysical methods, and to link results to the underlying geology and/or hydrogeology. Specific goals of this project are as follows: (1) Test ground based geophysical techniques for the efficacy in delineating underlying geology; (2) Use ground

  13. Evaluation of the National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB) Using Ground-Based Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Y.; Sengupta, M.; Habte, A.; Lopez, A.

    2017-12-01

    Solar resource is essential for a wide spectrum of applications including renewable energy, climate studies, and solar forecasting. Solar resource information can be obtained from ground-based measurement stations and/or from modeled data sets. While measurements provide data for the development and validation of solar resource models and other applications modeled data expands the ability to address the needs for increased accuracy and spatial and temporal resolution. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed and regular updates modeled solar resource through the National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB). The recent NSRDB dataset was developed using the physics-based Physical Solar Model (PSM) and provides gridded solar irradiance (global horizontal irradiance (GHI), direct normal irradiance (DNI), and diffuse horizontal irradiance) at a 4-km by 4-km spatial and half-hourly temporal resolution covering 18 years from 1998-2015. A comprehensive validation of the performance of the NSRDB (1998-2015) was conducted to quantify the accuracy of the spatial and temporal variability of the solar radiation data. Further, the study assessed the ability of NSRDB (1998-2015) to accurately capture inter-annual variability, which is essential information for solar energy conversion projects and grid integration studies. Comparisons of the NSRDB (1998-2015) with nine selected ground-measured data were conducted under both clear- and cloudy-sky conditions. These locations provide a high quality data covering a variety of geographical locations and climates. The comparison of the NSRDB to the ground-based data demonstrated that biases were within +/- 5% for GHI and +/-10% for DNI. A comprehensive uncertainty estimation methodology was established to analyze the performance of the gridded NSRDB and includes all sources of uncertainty at various time-averaged periods, a method that is not often used in model evaluation. Further, the study analyzed the inter

  14. System Architecture-based Design Methodology for Monitoring the Ground-based Augmentation System: Category I - Integrity Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Elias, Paulo; Saotome, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: This paper has described a method to accomplish the Ground-Based Augmentation System signal-in-space integrity risk monitoring for a ground station specified by ICAO, Annex 10, Vol. 1 and RTCA DO-245A, which is a mandatory requirement to meet the certification aspects for a Ground-Based Augmentation System station. The proposed methodology was based on the Risk Tree Analysis technique, which is an optional way to design and develop an engineering solution named as integrity risk monit...

  15. A Ground-Based Validation System of Teleoperation for a Space Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueqian Wang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Teleoperation of space robots is very important for future on-orbit service. In order to assure the task is accomplished successfully, ground experiments are required to verify the function and validity of the teleoperation system before a space robot is launched. In this paper, a ground-based validation subsystem is developed as a part of a teleoperation system. The subsystem is mainly composed of four parts: the input verification module, the onboard verification module, the dynamic and image workstation, and the communication simulator. The input verification module, consisting of hardware and software of the master, is used to verify the input ability. The onboard verification module, consisting of the same hardware and software as the onboard processor, is used to verify the processor's computing ability and execution schedule. In addition, the dynamic and image workstation calculates the dynamic response of the space robot and target, and generates emulated camera images, including the hand-eye cameras, global-vision camera and rendezvous camera. The communication simulator provides fidelity communication conditions, i.e., time delays and communication bandwidth. Lastly, we integrated a teleoperation system and conducted many experiments on the system. Experiment results show that the ground system is very useful for verified teleoperation technology.

  16. Atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (OCS) variation from 1992-2004 by ground-based solar FTIR spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutscher, N. M.; Jones, N. B.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Wood, S. W.; Murcray, F. J.

    2006-03-01

    Analysis of ground-based high-resolution solar FTIR absorption spectra from four sites was performed to determine trends and variability in OCS columns over the period 1992-2004. The sites were Wollongong, Australia (34.45° S, 150.88° E), Lauder, New Zealand (45.0° S, 169.7° E), Arrival Heights, Antarctica (77.8° S, 166.6° E) and Mauna Loa, Hawaii (19.5° N, 155.6° W). Small but significant long-term trends of -0.18±0.02% yr-1 above Hawaii, -0.30±0.12% yr-1 above Wollongong and -0.29±0.14% yr-1 above Lauder, were seen. No significant trend was seen above Arrival Heights. A large peak-to-peak seasonal difference observed in 1996-1997 above Wollongong and reported earlier was confirmed, but not repeated in later years. This seasonal feature correlated with particularly high water vapour columns present during late summer and early autumn, and suggests a link to warm oceanic airmasses. Seasonal variation of approximately 6% per year is observed in the total column in other years for all four locations.

  17. Spent coffee grounds-based activated carbon preparation for sequestering of malachite green

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jun-Wei; Lam, Keat-Ying; Bashir, Mohammed J. K.; Yeong, Yin-Fong; Lam, Man-Kee; Ho, Yeek-Chia

    2016-11-01

    The key of reported work was to optimize the fabricating factors of spent coffee grounds-based activated carbon (SCG-bAC) used to sequester Malachite Green (MG) form aqueous solution via adsorption process. The fabricating factors of impregnation ratio with ortho-phosphoric acid, activation temperature and activation time were simultaneously optimized by central composite design (CCD) of response surface methodology (RSM) targeting on maximum removal of MG. At the optimum condition, 96.3% of MG was successfully removed by SCG-bAC at the impregnation ratio with ortho-phosphoric acid of 0.50, activation temperature of 554°C and activation time of 31.4 min. Statistical model that could predict the MG removal percentage was also derived and had been statistically confirmed to be significant. Subsequently, the MG adsorption equilibrium data was found well-fitted to Langmuir isotherm model, indicating the predominance of monolayer adsorption of MG on SCG-bAC surface. To conclude, the findings from the this study unveil the potential of spent coffee grounds as an alternative precursor in fabricating low-cost AC for the treatment of wastewater loaded with MG pollutant.

  18. Real-time threat evaluation in a ground based air defence environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JN Roux

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In a military environment a ground based air defence operator is required to evaluate the tactical situation in real-time and protect Defended Assets (DAs on the ground against aerial threats by assigning available Weapon Systems (WSs to engage enemy aircraft. Since this aerial environment requires rapid operational planning and decision making in stress situations, the associated responsibilities are typically divided between a number of operators and computerized systems that aid these operators during the decision making processes. One such a Decision Support System (DSS, a threat evaluation and weapon assignment system, assigns threat values to aircraft (with respect to DAs in real-time and uses these values to propose possible engagements of observed enemy aircraft by anti-aircraft WSs. In this paper a design of the threat evaluation part of such a DSS is put forward. The design follows the structured approach suggested in [Roux JN & van Vuuren JH, 2007, Threat evaluation and weapon assignment decision support: A review of the state of the art, ORiON, 23(2, pp. 151-187], phasing in a suite of increasingly complex qualitative and quantitative model components as more (reliable data become available.

  19. Ground-Based Phase of Spaceflight Experiment "Biosignal" Using Autonomic Microflurimeter "Fluor-K"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorieva, O. V.; Gal'chuk, S. V.; Rudimov, E. G.; Buravkova, L. B.

    2013-02-01

    The majority of flight experiments with the use of cell cultures and equipment like KUBIK and CRIOGEM carried out on board of the satellites (Bion, Foton) and ISS only allows the after-flight biosamples to be analyzed. As far as with few exceptions, the real-time cellular parameters registration for a long period is hard to be implemented. We developed the "Fluor-K" equipment - precision, small-sized, autonomous, two-channel, programmed fluorimeter. This device is designed for registration of differential fluorescent signal from organic and non-organic objects of microscale in small volumes (cellular organelles suspensions, animal and human cells, unicellular algae, bacteria, various fluorescent colloid solutions). Beside that, "Fluor-K" allows simultaneous detection of temperature. The ground-based tests of the device proved successful. The developed software can support experimental schedules while real-time data registration with the built-in storage device allows changes in selected parameters to be analyzed using wide range of fluorescent probes.

  20. Continuous ground-based aerosol Lidar observation during seasonal pollution events at Wuxi, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Man Sing; Qin, Kai; Lian, Hong; Campbell, James R.; Lee, Kwon Ho; Sheng, Shijie

    2017-04-01

    Haze pollution has long been a significant research topic and challenge in China, with adverse effects on air quality, agricultural production, as well as human health. In coupling with ground-based Lidar measurements, air quality observation, meteorological data, and backward trajectories model, two typical haze events at Wuxi, China are analyzed respectively, depicting summer and winter scenarios. Results indicate that the winter haze pollution is a compound pollution process mainly affected by calm winds that induce pollution accumulation near the surface. In the summer case, with the exception of influence from PM2.5 concentrations, ozone is the main pollutant and regional transport is also a significant influencing factor. Both events are marked by enhanced PM2.5 concentrations, driven by anthropogenic emissions of pollutants such as vehicle exhaust and factory fumes. Meteorological factors such as wind speed/direction and relative humidity are also contributed. These results indicate how the vertical profile offered by routine regional Lidar monitoring helps aid in understanding local variability and trends, which may be adapted for developing abatement strategies that improve air quality.

  1. A ground-based optical transmission spectrum of WASP-6b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordán, Andrés; Espinoza, Néstor; Rabus, Markus [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 7820436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Eyheramendy, Susana [Departmento de Estadística, Facultad de Matemáticas, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 7820436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Sing, David K. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Désert, Jean-Michel [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Bakos, Gáspár Á. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); López-Morales, Mercedes; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Maxted, Pierre F. L. [Astrophysics Group, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Triaud, Amaury H. M. J. [Department of Physics, and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    We present a ground-based optical transmission spectrum of the inflated sub-Jupiter-mass planet WASP-6b. The spectrum was measured in 20 spectral channels from 480 nm to 860 nm using a series of 91 spectra over a complete transit event. The observations were carried out using multi-object differential spectrophotometry with the Inamori-Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph on the Baade Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. We model systematic effects on the observed light curves using principal component analysis on the comparison stars and allow for the presence of short and long memory correlation structure in our Monte Carlo Markov Chain analysis of the transit light curves for WASP-6. The measured transmission spectrum presents a general trend of decreasing apparent planetary size with wavelength and lacks evidence for broad spectral features of Na and K predicted by clear atmosphere models. The spectrum is consistent with that expected for scattering that is more efficient in the blue, as could be caused by hazes or condensates in the atmosphere of WASP-6b. WASP-6b therefore appears to be yet another massive exoplanet with evidence for a mostly featureless transmission spectrum, underscoring the importance that hazes and condensates can have in determining the transmission spectra of exoplanets.

  2. CO2 Total Column Variability From Ground-Based FTIR Measurements Over Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylon, J. L.; Stremme, W.; Plaza, E.; Bezanilla, A.; Grutter, M.; Hase, F.; Blumenstock, T.

    2014-12-01

    There are now several space missions dedicated to measure greenhouse gases in order to improve the understanding of the carbon cycle. Ground based measurement sites are of great value in the validation process, however there are only a few stations in tropical latitudes. We present measurements of solar-absorption infrared spectra recorded on two locations over Central Mexico: the High-Altitude Station Altzomoni (19.12 N, 98.65 W), located in the Izta-Popo National Park outside of Mexico City; and the UNAM's Atmospheric Observatory (19.32 N, 99.17 W) in Mexico City. These measurements were performed using a high resolution Fourier transform infrared spectrometer FTIR (Bruker, HR 120/5) at Altzomoni and a moderate resolution FTIR (Bruker, Vertex 80) within the city. In this work, we present the first results for total vertical columns of CO2 derived from near-infrared spectra recorded at both locations using the retrieval code PROFFIT. We present the seasonal cycle and variability from the measurements, as well as the full diagnostics of the retrieval in order assess its quality and discuss the differences of both instruments and locations (altitudes, urban vs remote). This work aims to contribute to generate high quality datasets for satellite validation.

  3. Ground-based measurements of galactic cosmic ray fragmentation in shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmerling, W.

    1992-01-01

    The mean free path for nuclear interactions of galactic cosmic-rays is comparable to shielding and tissue thicknesses present in human interplanetary exploration, resulting in a significant fraction of nuclear reaction products at depth. In order to characterize the radiation field, the energy spectrum, the angular distribution, and the multiplicity of each type of secondary particles must also be known as a function of depth. Reactions can take place anywhere in a thick absorber; therefore, it is necessary to know these quantities as a function of particle energy for all particles produced. HZE transport methods are used to predict the radiation field; they are dependent on models of the interaction of man-made systems with the space environment to an even greater extent than methods used for other types of radiation. Hence, there is a major need to validate these transport codes by comparison with experimental data. The most cost-effective method of validation is a comparison with ground-based experimental measurements. A research program to provide such validation measurements using neon, iron and other accelerated heavy ion beams will be discussed and illustrated using results from ongoing experiments and their comparison with current transport codes. The extent to which physical measurements yield radiobiological predictions will be discussed.

  4. The emission function of ground-based light sources: State of the art and research challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano Lamphar, Héctor Antonio

    2018-05-01

    To understand the night sky radiance generated by the light emissions of urbanised areas, different researchers are currently proposing various theoretical approaches. The distribution of the radiant intensity as a function of the zenith angle is one of the most unknown properties on modelling skyglow. This is due to the collective effects of the artificial radiation emitted from the ground-based light sources. The emission function is a key property in characterising the sky brightness under arbitrary conditions, therefore it is required by modellers, environmental engineers, urban planners, light pollution researchers, and experimentalists who study the diffuse light of the night sky. As a matter of course, the emission function considers the public lighting system, which is in fact the main generator of the skyglow. Still, another class of light-emitting devices are gaining importance since their overuse and the urban sprawl of recent years. This paper will address the importance of the emission function in modelling skyglow and the factors involved in its characterization. On this subject, the author's intention is to organise, integrate, and evaluate previously published research in order to state the progress of current research toward clarifying this topic.

  5. A case for using ground-based thermal inertia measurements to detect Martian caves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groemer, Gernot; Foresta, Luca; Turetschek, Thomas; Bothe, Claudia; Boyd, Andrea; Dinkelaker, Aline; Dissertori, Markus; Fasching, David; Fischer, Monika; Föger, Daniel; Frischauf, Norbert; Fritsch, Lukas; Fuchs, Harald; Gautsch, Christoph; Gerard, Stephan; Goetzloff, Linda; Gołebiowska, Izabella; Gorur, Paavan; Groemer, Gerhard; Groll, Petra; Haider, Christian; Haider, Olivia; Hauth, Eva; Hauth, Stefan; Hettrich, Sebastian; Jais, Wolfgang; Jones, Natalie; Taj-Eddine, Kamal; Karl, Alexander; Kauerhoff, Tilo; Khan, Muhammad Shadab; Kjeldsen, Andreas; Klauck, Jan; Losiak, Anna; Luger, Markus; Luger, Thomas; Luger, Ulrich; McArthur, Jane; Moser, Linda; Neuner, Julia; Orgel, Csilla; Ori, Gian Gabriele; Paternesi, Roberta; Peschier, Jarno; Pfeil, Isabella; Prock, Silvia; Radinger, Josef; Ragonig, Christoph; Ramirez, Barbara; Ramo, Wissam; Rampey, Mike; Sams, Arnold; Sams, Elisabeth; Sams, Sebastian; Sandu, Oana; Sans, Alejandra; Sansone, Petra; Scheer, Daniela; Schildhammer, Daniel; Scornet, Quentin; Sejkora, Nina; Soucek, Alexander; Stadler, Andrea; Stummer, Florian; Stumptner, Willibald; Taraba, Michael; Tlustos, Reinhard; Toferer, Ernst; Winter, Egon; Zanella-Kux, Katja

    2014-05-01

    Martian caves are regarded as one of the most interesting locations in which to search for life on the planet. Data obtained during the MARS2013 expedition at Hamar Laghdad Ridge in the Tafilalt region of Morocco indicate that even small cavities can display thermal behavior that is characteristic for caves. For example, temperature in a cavity equaled 14°C±0.1°C before sunrise, which was higher than the temperature of the ambient air (10°C±0.1°C) and proximate rocks (9°C±0.1°C) at the same time. Within 30 min after sunrise, when the temperature of surrounding rocks corresponded to 15°C, this thermal relationship reversed. Measurements were conducted under simulated spaceflight conditions, including near-real-time interpretation of data that were acquired in a complex flight planning environment. We conclude that using ground-based thermal contrast measurements, in 7-14 μm band before and after sunset, is an effective method for Mars astronauts to identify caves, possibly superior to usage of space-based or ground-penetrating data.

  6. Ground-based studies of tropisms in hardware developed for the European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correll, Melanie J.; Edelmann, Richard E.; Hangarter, Roger P.; Mullen, Jack L.; Kiss, John Z.

    Phototropism and gravitropism play key roles in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism, but red light induces positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. The blue-light response is controlled by the phototropins while the red-light response is mediated by the phytochrome family of photoreceptors. In order to better characterize root phototropism, we plan to perform experiments in microgravity so that this tropism can be more effectively studied without the interactions with the gravity response. Our experiments are to be performed on the European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS), which provides an incubator, lighting system, and high resolution video that are on a centrifuge palette. These experiments will be performed at μg, 1g (control) and fractional g-levels. In order to ensure success of this mission on the International Space Station, we have been conducting ground-based studies on growth, phototropism, and gravitropism in experimental unique equipment (EUE) that was designed for our experiments with Arabidopsis seedlings. Currently, the EMCS and our EUE are scheduled for launch on space shuttle mission STS-121. This project should provide insight into how the blue- and red-light signaling systems interact with each other and with the gravisensing system.

  7. Debris search around (486958) 2014 MU69: Results from SOFIA and ground-based occultation campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Eliot F.; Buie, Marc W.; Porter, Simon Bernard; Zangari, Amanda Marie; Stern, S. Alan; Ennico, Kimberly; Reach, William T.; Pfueller, Enrico; Wiedemann, Manuel; Fraser, Wesley Cristopher; Camargo, Julio; Young, Leslie; Wasserman, Lawrence H.; New Horizons MU69 Occultation Team

    2017-10-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft is scheduled to fly by the cold classical KBO 2014 MU69 on 1-Jan-2019. The spacecraft speed relative to the MU69 will be in excess of 14 km/s. At these encounter velocities, impact with debris could be fatal to the spacecraft. We report on searches for debris in the neighborhood of MU69 conducted from SOFIA and ground-based sites. SOFIA observed the star field around MU69 on 10-Jul-2017 (UT) with their Focal Plane Imager (FPI+), operating at 20 Hz from 7:25 to 8:10 UT, spanning the time of the predicted occultation. Several large fixed telescopes observed the 3-Jun-2017, 10-Jul-2017 and/or the 17-Jul-2017 occultation events, including the 4-meter SOAR telescope, the 8-meter Gemini South telescope, and many 16-inch portable telescopes that were arranged in picket fences in South Africa and Argentina. We report on the light curves from these observing platforms and constraints on the optical depth due to debris or rings within the approximate Hill sphere (about 60,000 km across) of MU69. This work was supported by the New Horizons mission and NASA, with astrometric support from the Gaia mission and logistical support from Argentina and the US embassies in Buenos Aires and CapeTown. At SOAR, data acquisition has been done with a Raptor camera (visitor instrument) funded by the Observatorio Nacional/MCTIC.

  8. Performance evaluation of the Herschel/SPIRE imaging Fourier transform spectrometer through ground-based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Locke D.; Naylor, David A.; Swinyard, Bruce M.

    2010-06-01

    The Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) is one of three scientific instruments onboard the European Space Agency (ESA)'s Herschel Space Observatory. Herschel was successfully launched on 14 May 2009; routine science observations commenced in late 2009. Medium resolution spectroscopy with SPIRE is accomplished via an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (IFTS) of the Mach-Zehnder configuration. Although pre-launch performance verification and calibration measurements were conducted with the SPIRE instrument mounted in an evacuated cryostat at cryogenic temperatures, it was not possible to simulate fully the expected in-flight conditions. This paper compares the performance of the SPIRE IFTS, as measured during ground-based tests, with theoretical simulations. In turn, these results are used to provide an estimate of the in-flight instrument performance. This paper includes a discussion of key aspects of the SPIRE IFTS including the spectrometer dual-input compensation scheme, instrument line shape and the overall instrument sensitivity. As a case study, the derived instrument performance is used to investigate SPIRE's utility in observing astronomical line emission from the starburst galaxy M82.

  9. GROUND-BASED TRANSIT OBSERVATIONS OF THE SUPER-EARTH 55 Cnc e

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Mooij, E. J. W. [Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); López-Morales, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA (United States); Karjalainen, R.; Hrudkova, M. [Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes, La Palma (Spain); Jayawardhana, Ray, E-mail: demooij@astro.utoronto.ca [Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto (Canada)

    2014-12-20

    We report the first ground-based detections of the shallow transit of the super-Earth exoplanet 55 Cnc e using a 2 m class telescope. Using differential spectrophotometry, we observed one transit in 2013 and another in 2014, with average spectral resolutions of ∼700 and ∼250, spanning the Johnson BVR photometric bands. We find a white light planet-to-star radius ratio of 0.0190{sub −0.0027}{sup +0.0023} from the 2013 observations and 0.0200{sub −0.0018}{sup +0.0017} from the 2014 observations. The two data sets combined result in a radius ratio of 0.0198{sub −0.0014}{sup +0.0013}. These values are all in agreement with previous space-based results. Scintillation noise in the data prevents us from placing strong constraints on the presence of an extended hydrogen-rich atmosphere. Nevertheless, our detections of 55 Cnc e in transit demonstrate that moderate-sized telescopes on the ground will be capable of routine follow-up observations of super-Earth candidates discovered by the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite around bright stars. We expect it also will be possible to place constraints on the atmospheric characteristics of those planets by devising observational strategies to minimize scintillation noise.

  10. Coupling Fine-Scale Root and Canopy Structure Using Ground-Based Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brady S. Hardiman

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystem physical structure, defined by the quantity and spatial distribution of biomass, influences a range of ecosystem functions. Remote sensing tools permit the non-destructive characterization of canopy and root features, potentially providing opportunities to link above- and belowground structure at fine spatial resolution in functionally meaningful ways. To test this possibility, we employed ground-based portable canopy LiDAR (PCL and ground penetrating radar (GPR along co-located transects in forested sites spanning multiple stages of ecosystem development and, consequently, of structural complexity. We examined canopy and root structural data for coherence (i.e., correlation in the frequency of spatial variation at multiple spatial scales ≤10 m within each site using wavelet analysis. Forest sites varied substantially in vertical canopy and root structure, with leaf area index and root mass more becoming even vertically as forests aged. In all sites, above- and belowground structure, characterized as mean maximum canopy height and root mass, exhibited significant coherence at a scale of 3.5–4 m, and results suggest that the scale of coherence may increase with stand age. Our findings demonstrate that canopy and root structure are linked at characteristic spatial scales, which provides the basis to optimize scales of observation. Our study highlights the potential, and limitations, for fusing LiDAR and radar technologies to quantitatively couple above- and belowground ecosystem structure.

  11. Architectural design of a ground-based deep-space optical reception antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, E. L.

    1989-01-01

    An architectural design of a ground-based antenna (telescope) for receiving optical communications from deep space is presented. Physical and optical parameters, and their effect on the performance and cost considerations, are described. The channel capacity of the antenna is 100 kbits/s from Saturn and 5 Mbits/s from Mars. A novel sunshade is designed to permit optical communication even when the deep-space laser source is as close to the sun as 12 deg. Inserts in the tubes of the sunshade permit operations at solar elongations as small as 6 or 3 deg. The Nd:YAG source laser and the Fraunhofer filter (a narrow-band predetection optical filter) are tuned to match the Doppler shifts of the source and background. A typical Saturn-to-earth data link can reduce its source power requirement from 8.2 W to 2 W of laser output by employing a Fraunhofer filter instead of a conventional multilayer dielectric filter.

  12. Reaching for the stars - New developments in ground-based astronomy

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    I will briefly review the state-of-the-art in ground-based astronomy - both on the telescope side and the instrument side. Interesting parallels can be drawn in cost, construction and operations with the particle physics facilities. I will then present some recent results in the two hottest topics in astronomy, driving the requests for more advanced facilities: exoplanets and the hunt for life beyond the solar system (calling for Extremely Large Telescope); and cosmology and the understanding of dark energy (calling for large survey telescopes). This will lead to a description of the latest telescope project developments on the ground: the on-going construction of the Large Synoptic Telescope on a quest to better understand dark energy, and the start of the construction of three Extremely Large Telescopes by European and US-led international consortia, hoping to find life on planets around nearby stars.   ATS Seminars Organisers: H. Burkhardt (BE), M. Modena (TE), T. Stora (EN) Coffee / tea will ...

  13. A ground-based near-infrared emission spectrum of the exoplanet HD 189733b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Mark R; Deroo, Pieter; Griffith, Caitlin A; Tinetti, Giovanna; Thatte, Azam; Vasisht, Gautam; Chen, Pin; Bouwman, Jeroen; Crossfield, Ian J; Angerhausen, Daniel; Afonso, Cristina; Henning, Thomas

    2010-02-04

    Detection of molecules using infrared spectroscopy probes the conditions and compositions of exoplanet atmospheres. Water (H(2)O), methane (CH(4)), carbon dioxide (CO(2)), and carbon monoxide (CO) have been detected in two hot Jupiters. These previous results relied on space-based telescopes that do not provide spectroscopic capability in the 2.4-5.2 microm spectral region. Here we report ground-based observations of the dayside emission spectrum for HD 189733b between 2.0-2.4 microm and 3.1-4.1 microm, where we find a bright emission feature. Where overlap with space-based instruments exists, our results are in excellent agreement with previous measurements. A feature at approximately 3.25 microm is unexpected and difficult to explain with models that assume local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions at the 1 bar to 1 x 10(-6) bar pressures typically sampled by infrared measurements. The most likely explanation for this feature is that it arises from non-LTE emission from CH(4), similar to what is seen in the atmospheres of planets in our own Solar System. These results suggest that non-LTE effects may need to be considered when interpreting measurements of strongly irradiated exoplanets.

  14. Ground-Based Robotic Sensing of an Agricultural Sub-Canopy Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, A.; Peschel, J.

    2015-12-01

    Airborne remote sensing is a useful method for measuring agricultural crop parameters over large areas; however, the approach becomes limited to above-canopy characterization as a crop matures due to reduced visual access of the sub-canopy environment. During the growth cycle of an agricultural crop, such as soybeans, the micrometeorology of the sub-canopy environment can significantly impact pod development and reduced yields may result. Larger-scale environmental conditions aside, the physical structure and configuration of the sub-canopy matrix will logically influence local climate conditions for a single plant; understanding the state and development of the sub-canopy could inform crop models and improve best practices but there are currently no low-cost methods to quantify the sub-canopy environment at a high spatial and temporal resolution over an entire growth cycle. This work describes the modification of a small tactical and semi-autonomous, ground-based robotic platform with sensors capable of mapping the physical structure of an agricultural row crop sub-canopy; a soybean crop is used as a case study. Point cloud data representing the sub-canopy structure are stored in LAS format and can be used for modeling and visualization in standard GIS software packages.

  15. Evidence of Urban Precipitation Anomalies from Satellite and Ground-Based Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Manyin, M.; Negri, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Urbanization is one of the extreme cases of land use change. Most of world's population has moved to urban areas. Although currently only 1.2% of the land is considered urban, the spatial coverage and density of cities are expected to rapidly increase in the near future. It is estimated that by the year 2025, 60% of the world's population will live in cities. Human activity in urban environments also alters weather and climate processes. However, our understanding of urbanization on the total Earth-weather-climate system is incomplete. Recent literature continues to provide evidence that anomalies in precipitation exist over and downwind of major cities. Current and future research efforts are actively seeking to verify these literature findings and understand potential cause-effect relationships. The novelty of this study is that it utilizes rainfall data from multiple satellite data sources (e.g. TRMM precipitation radar, TRMM-geosynchronous-rain gauge merged product, and SSM/I) and ground-based measurements to identify spatial anomalies and temporal trends in precipitation for cities around the world. Early results will be presented and placed within the context of weather prediction, climate assessment, and societal applications.

  16. a Ground-Based LIDAR and Imaging Spectrometer Synchronous Experiment on Vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, T.; Luo, X.; Chen, H.; Hui, J.

    2017-09-01

    Extraction of vegetation canopy structure parameters is of great significance for researching global ecosystem and environment. Focused on the effective synergy between active and passive sensors, we carried out some ground-based observations about different vegetation on different terrains. In different experimental sites, a light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data and an imaging spectrum data of typical vegetation were collected from different directions and angles. Meanwhile, a variety of canopy structure parameters, including plant height, crown breadth, leaf area index, etc, were measured. The whole observed results form a comprehensive ground synchronous data set corresponding to flight data and provide data support for development and validation of synergic retrieval methods of vegetation canopy structure parameters. Our specific experimental objectives and design are introduced, including the selection of sampling plots, arrangement of observation stations, acquisition of active and passive data, and measurement of auxiliary data. The processing and practical applications of those obtained synchronous data are also discussed. Finally, our experimental experience is summarized and it is a valuable reference for remote sensing researchers.

  17. Evidence of rock slope breathing using ground-based InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouyet, Line; Kristensen, Lene; Derron, Marc-Henri; Michoud, Clément; Blikra, Lars Harald; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Lauknes, Tom Rune

    2017-07-01

    Ground-Based Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (GB-InSAR) campaigns were performed in summer 2011 and 2012 in the Romsdalen valley (Møre & Romsdal county, western Norway) in order to assess displacements on Mannen/Børa rock slope. Located 1 km northwest, a second GB-InSAR system continuously monitors the large Mannen rockslide. The availability of two GB-InSAR positions creates a wide coverage of the rock slope, including a slight dataset overlap valuable for validation. A phenomenon of rock slope breathing is detected in a remote and hard-to-access area in mid-slope. Millimetric upward displacements are recorded in August 2011. Analysis of 2012 GB-InSAR campaign, combined with the large dataset from the continuous station, shows that the slope is affected by inflation/deflation phenomenon between 5 and 10 mm along the line-of-sight. The pattern is not homogenous in time and inversions of movement have a seasonal recurrence. These seasonal changes are confirmed by satellite InSAR observations and can possibly be caused by hydrogeological variations. In addition, combination of GB-InSAR results, in situ measurements and satellite InSAR analyses contributes to a better overview of movement distribution over the whole area.

  18. Ground-based infrared surveys: imaging the thermal fields at volcanoes and revealing the controlling parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaleo, Michele; Walter, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Temperature monitoring is a widespread procedure in the frame of volcano hazard monitoring. Indeed temperature changes are expected to reflect changes in volcanic activity. We propose a new approach, within the thermal monitoring, which is meant to shed light on the parameters controlling the fluid pathways and the fumarole sites by using infrared measurements. Ground-based infrared cameras allow one to remotely image the spatial distribution, geometric pattern and amplitude of fumarole fields on volcanoes at metre to centimetre resolution. Infrared mosaics and time series are generated and interpreted, by integrating geological field observations and modeling, to define the setting of the volcanic degassing system at shallow level. We present results for different volcano morphologies and show that lithology, structures and topography control the appearance of fumarole field by the creation of permeability contrasts. We also show that the relative importance of those parameters is site-dependent. Deciphering the setting of the degassing system is essential for hazard assessment studies because it would improve our understanding on how the system responds to endogenous or exogenous modification.

  19. Component design challenges for the ground-based SP-100 nuclear assembly test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markley, R.A.; Disney, R.K.; Brown, G.B.

    1989-01-01

    The SP-100 ground engineering system (GES) program involves a ground test of the nuclear subsystems to demonstrate their design. The GES nuclear assembly test (NAT) will be performed in a simulated space environment within a vessel maintained at ultrahigh vacuum. The NAT employs a radiation shielding system that is comprised of both prototypical and nonprototypical shield subsystems to attenuate the reactor radiation leakage and also nonprototypical heat transport subsystems to remove the heat generated by the reactor. The reactor is cooled by liquid lithium, which will operate at temperatures prototypical of the flight system. In designing the components for these systems, a number of design challenges were encountered in meeting the operational requirements of the simulated space environment (and where necessary, prototypical requirements) while also accommodating the restrictions of a ground-based test facility with its limited available space. This paper presents a discussion of the design challenges associated with the radiation shield subsystem components and key components of the heat transport systems

  20. Monitoring geospace disturbances through coordinated space-borne and ground-based magnetometer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasis, Georgios

    2014-05-01

    Recently automated methods of deriving the characteristics of ultra low frequency (ULF) waves in the magnetosphere have been developed (Balasis et al., 2012, 2013), which can be effectively applied to the huge datasets from the new ESA Swarm mission, in order to retrieve, on an operational basis, new information about the near-Earth electromagnetic environment. Processing Swarm measurements with these methods will help to elucidate the processes influencing the generation and propagation of ULF waves, which in turn play a crucial role in magnetospheric dynamics. Moreover, a useful platform based on a combination of wavelet transforms and artificial neural networks has been developed to monitor the wave evolution from the outer boundaries of Earth's magnetosphere through the topside ionosphere down to the surface. Data from a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite (CHAMP) and two magnetospheric missions (Cluster and Geotail) along with three ground-based magnetic networks (CARISMA, GIMA and IMAGE), during the Halloween 2003 magnetic superstorm when the Cluster and CHAMP spacecraft were in good local time (LT) conjunction, are used to demonstrate the potential of the analysis technique in studying wave evolution in detail.

  1. Ionospheric scintillations at Guilin detected by GPS ground-based and radio occultation observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yuhua

    2011-03-01

    The occurrence of ionospheric scintillations with S4 ⩾ 0.2 was studied using GPS measurements at Guilin, China (25.29°N, 110.33°E; geomagnetic: 15.04°N, 181.98°E), a station located near the northern crest of the equatorial anomaly. The results are presented for data collected from January 2009 to March 2010. The results show that nighttime amplitude scintillations only took place in February and March of the considered years, while daytime amplitude scintillations occurred in August and December of 2009. Nighttime amplitude scintillations, observed in the south of Guilin, always occurred with phase scintillations, TEC (Total Electron Content) depletions, and ROT (Rate Of change of TEC) fluctuations. However, TEC depletions and ROT fluctuations were weak during daytime amplitude scintillations, and daytime amplitude scintillations always took place simultaneously for most of the GPS satellites which appeared over Guilin in different azimuth directions. Ground-based GPS scintillation/TEC observations recorded at Guilin and signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) measurements obtained from GPS-COSMIC radio occultation indicate that nighttime and daytime scintillations are very likely caused by ionospheric F region irregularities and sporadic E, respectively. Moreover, strong daytime amplitude scintillations may be associated with the plasma density enhancements in ionospheric E region caused by the Perseid and Geminid meteor shower activities.

  2. Mobile Ground-Based Radar Sensor for Localization and Mapping: An Evaluation of two Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Vivet

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with robotic applications using a ground-based radar sensor for simultaneous localization and mapping problems. In mobile robotics, radar technology is interesting because of its long range and the robustness of radar waves to atmospheric conditions, making these sensors well-suited for extended outdoor robotic applications. Two localization and mapping approaches using data obtained from a 360° field of view microwave radar sensor are presented and compared. The first method is a trajectory-oriented simultaneous localization and mapping technique, which makes no landmark assumptions and avoids the data association problem. The estimation of the ego-motion makes use of the Fourier-Mellin transform for registering radar images in a sequence, from which the rotation and translation of the sensor motion can be estimated. The second approach uses the consequence of using a rotating range sensor in high speed robotics. In such a situation, movement combinations create distortions in the collected data. Velocimetry is achieved here by explicitly analysing these measurement distortions. As a result, the trajectory of the vehicle and then the radar map of outdoor environments can be obtained. The evaluation of experimental results obtained by the two methods is presented on real-world data from a vehicle moving at 30 km/h over a 2.5 km course.

  3. Combination of space- and ground-based astrometric observations to create astrometric catalogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondrák, J.; Štefka, V.

    2008-09-01

    Modern space-based astrometric observations made by Hipparcos satellite yielded two principal catalogs in optical wavelength: Hipparcos and Tycho. These catalogs, that recently celebrated ten years of existence, contain star positions with unprecedented accuracy. However, their proper motions are, due to a relatively short interval of Hipparcos mission, quite often not as good as their formal standard errors indicate. This deficiency is especially significant for about twenty per cent of double or multiple stars contained in these catalogs. The combination with ground-based astrometric observations that have much longer history is therefore very important for improving the Hipparcos proper motions. Significant improvement in this respect was achieved during the past years by creating combined catalogs, such as Tycho-2, FK6, GC+HIP, TYC2+HIP, or ARIHIP. Yet a large and important group of astrometric observations of latitude/universal time variations, made in the programs of monitoring Earth orientation, stood apart from these activities. Recently we started to use these observations, covering almost the whole 20th century, to create astrometric catalogs EOC-1, EOC-2, EOC-3 and most recently EOC-4. To construct them, we used the Earth orientation observations in combination with the above mentioned catalogs. The latter two, EOC-3 and EOC-4, contain not only the ``classical'' linear proper motions, but also periodic changes due to orbital motions, for a substantial portion of the observed stars.

  4. Astrometric Star Catalogues as Combination of Hipparcos/Tycho Catalogues with Ground-Based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondrak, J.

    The successful ESA mission Hipparcos provided very precise parallaxes, positions and proper motions of many stars in optical wavelength. Therefore, it is a primary representation of International Celestial Reference System in this wavelength. However, the shortness of the mission (less than four years) causes some problems with proper motions of the stars that are double or multiple. Therefore, a combination of the positions measured by Hipparcos satellite with ground-based observations with much longer history provides a better reference frame that is more stable in time. Several examples of such combinations are presented (ACT, TYCHO-2, FK6, GC+HIP, TYC2+HIP, ARIHIP) and briefly described. The stress is put on the most recent Earth Orientation Catalogue (EOC) that uses about 4.4 million optical observations of latitude/universal time variations (made during the twentieth century at 33 observatories in Earth orientation programmes), in combination with some of the above mentioned combined catalogues. The second version of the new catalogue EOC-2 contains 4418 objects, and the precision of their proper motions is far better than that of Hipparcos Catalogue.

  5. Preparatory study of a ground-based space radiobiology program in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, M.; Kraft, G.; O'Neill, P.; Reitz, G.; Sabatier, L.; Schneider, U.

    Space radiation has long been acknowledged as a potential showstopper for long duration manned interplanetary missions. Our knowledge of biological effects of cosmic radiation in deep space is almost exclusively derived from ground-based accelerator experiments with heavy ions in animal or in vitro models. In an effort to gain more information on space radiation risk and to develop countermeasures, NASA initiated several years ago a Space Radiation Health Program, which is currently supporting biological experiments performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Accelerator-based radiobiology research in the field of space radiation research is also under way in Russia and Japan. The European Space Agency (ESA) has recently established an ambitious exploration program (AURORA), and within this program it has been decided to include a space radiation research program. Europe has a long tradition in radiobiology research at accelerators, generally focussing on charged-particle cancer therapy. This expertise can be adapted to address the issue of space radiation risk. To support research in this field in Europe, ESA issued a call for tender in 2005 for a preliminary study of investigations on biological effects of space radiation (IBER). This study will provide guidance on future ESA-supported activities in space radiation research by identifying the most appropriate European accelerator facilities to be targeted for cooperation, and by drafting a roadmap for future research activities. The roadmap will include a prioritisation of research topics, and a detailed proposal for experimental campaigns for the following 5 10 years.

  6. NASA HRP Plans for Collaboration at the IBMP Ground-Based Experimental Facility (NEK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.

    2016-01-01

    NASA and IBMP are planning research collaborations using the IBMP Ground-based Experimental Facility (NEK). The NEK offers unique capabilities to study the effects of isolation on behavioral health and performance as it relates to spaceflight. The NEK is comprised of multiple interconnected modules that range in size from 50-250m(sup3). Modules can be included or excluded in a given mission allowing for flexibility of platform design. The NEK complex includes a Mission Control Center for communications and monitoring of crew members. In an effort to begin these collaborations, a 2-week mission is planned for 2017. In this mission, scientific studies will be conducted to assess facility capabilities in preparation for longer duration missions. A second follow-on 2-week mission may be planned for early in 2018. In future years, long duration missions of 4, 8 and 12 months are being considered. Missions will include scenarios that simulate for example, transit to and from asteroids, the moon, or other interplanetary travel. Mission operations will be structured to include stressors such as, high workloads, communication delays, and sleep deprivation. Studies completed at the NEK will support International Space Station expeditions, and future exploration missions. Topics studied will include communication, crew autonomy, cultural diversity, human factors, and medical capabilities.

  7. Ground-based thermal imaging of stream surface temperatures: Technique and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, Scott A.; Petre, Sally J.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated a ground-based handheld thermal imaging system for measuring water temperatures using data from eight southwestern USA streams and rivers. We found handheld thermal imagers could provide considerably more spatial information on water temperature (for our unit one image = 19,600 individual temperature measurements) than traditional methods could supply without a prohibitive amount of effort. Furthermore, they could provide measurements of stream surface temperature almost instantaneously compared with most traditional handheld thermometers (e.g., >20 s/reading). Spatial temperature analysis is important for measurement of subtle temperature differences across waterways, and identification of warm and cold groundwater inputs. Handheld thermal imaging is less expensive and equipment intensive than airborne thermal imaging methods and is useful under riparian canopies. Disadvantages of handheld thermal imagers include their current higher expense than thermometers, their susceptibility to interference when used incorrectly, and their slightly lower accuracy than traditional temperature measurement methods. Thermal imagers can only measure surface temperature, but this usually corresponds to subsurface temperatures in well-mixed streams and rivers. Using thermal imaging in select applications, such as where spatial investigations of water temperature are needed, or in conjunction with stationary temperature data loggers or handheld electronic or liquid-in-glass thermometers to characterize stream temperatures by both time and space, could provide valuable information on stream temperature dynamics. These tools will become increasingly important to fisheries biologists as costs continue to decline.

  8. Characterization of aerosol pollution events in France using ground-based and POLDER-2 satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kacenelenbogen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the relationship between daily fine particle mass concentration (PM2.5 and columnar aerosol optical thickness derived from the Polarization and Directionality of Earth's Reflectances (POLDER satellite sensor. The study is focused over France during the POLDER-2 lifetime between April and October 2003. We have first compared the POLDER derived aerosol optical thickness (AOT with integrated volume size distribution derived from ground-based Sun Photometer observations. The good correlation (R=0.72 with sub-micron volume fraction indicates that POLDER derived AOT is sensitive to the fine aerosol mass concentration. Considering 1974 match-up data points over 28 fine particle monitoring sites, the POLDER-2 derived AOT is fairly well correlated with collocated PM2.5 measurements, with a correlation coefficient of 0.55. The correlation coefficient reaches a maximum of 0.80 for particular sites. We have analyzed the probability to find an appropriate air quality category (AQC as defined by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA from POLDER-2 AOT measurements. The probability can be up to 88.8% (±3.7% for the "Good" AQC and 89.1% (±3.6% for the "Moderate" AQC.

  9. New efforts using helicopter-borne and ground based electromagnetics for mineral exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, U.; Siemon, B.; Noell, U.; Gutzmer, J.; Spitzer, K.; Becken, M.

    2014-12-01

    Throughout the last decades mineral resources, especially rare earth elements, gained a steadily growing importance in industry and therefore as well in exploration. New targets for mineral investigations came into focus and known sources have been and will be revisited. Since most of the mining for mineral resources in the past took place in the upper hundred metres below surface new techniques made deeper mining economically feasible. Consequently, mining engineers need the best possible knowledge about the full spatial extent of prospective geological structures, including their maximum depths. Especially in Germany and Europe, politics changed in terms not to rely only on the global mineral trade market but on national resources, if available. BGR and partners therefore started research programs on different levels to evaluate and develop new technologies on environmental friendly, non-invasive spatial exploration using airborne and partly ground-based electromagnetic methods. Mining waste heaps have been explored for valuable residual minerals (research project ROBEHA), a promising tin bearing ore body is being explored by airborne electromagnetics (research project E3) and a new airborne technology is aimed at to be able to reach investigation depths of about 1 km (research project DESMEX). First results of the projects ROBEHA and E3 will be presented and the project layout of DESMEX will be discussed.

  10. Ground-based PIV and numerical flow visualization results from the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pline, Alexander D.; Werner, Mark P.; Hsieh, Kwang-Chung

    1991-01-01

    The Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE) is a Space Transportation System flight experiment to study both transient and steady thermocapillary fluid flows aboard the United States Microgravity Laboratory-1 (USML-1) Spacelab mission planned for June, 1992. One of the components of data collected during the experiment is a video record of the flow field. This qualitative data is then quantified using an all electric, two dimensional Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique called Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT), which uses a simple space domain particle tracking algorithm. Results using the ground based STDCE hardware, with a radiant flux heating mode, and the PDT system are compared to numerical solutions obtained by solving the axisymmetric Navier Stokes equations with a deformable free surface. The PDT technique is successful in producing a velocity vector field and corresponding stream function from the raw video data which satisfactorily represents the physical flow. A numerical program is used to compute the velocity field and corresponding stream function under identical conditions. Both the PDT system and numerical results were compared to a streak photograph, used as a benchmark, with good correlation.

  11. Ground-based grasslands data to support remote sensing and ecosystem modeling of terrestrial primary production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, R.J.; Turner, R.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Scurlock, J.M.O. [King`s College London, (England); Jennings, S.V. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Estimating terrestrial net primary production (NPP) using remote- sensing tools and ecosystem models requires adequate ground-based measurements for calibration, parameterization, and validation. These data needs were strongly endorsed at a recent meeting of ecosystem modelers organized by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme`s (IGBP`s) Data and Information System (DIS) and its Global Analysis, Interpretation, and Modelling (GAIM) Task Force. To meet these needs, a multinational, multiagency project is being coordinated by the IGBP DIS to compile existing NPP data from field sites and to regionalize NPP point estimates to various-sized grid cells. Progress at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on compiling NPP data for grasslands as part of the IGBP DIS data initiative is described. Site data and associated documentation from diverse field studies are being acquired for selected grasslands and are being reviewed for completeness, consistency, and adequacy of documentation, including a description of sampling methods. Data are being compiled in a database with spatial, temporal, and thematic characteristics relevant to remote sensing and global modeling. NPP data are available from the ORNL Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) for biogeochemical dynamics. The ORNL DAAC is part of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System, of the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  12. Comparison of GOME tropospheric NO2 columns with NO2 profiles deduced from ground-based in situ measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Schaub

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen dioxide (NO2 vertical tropospheric column densities (VTCs retrieved from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME are compared to coincident ground-based tropospheric NO2 columns. The ground-based columns are deduced from in situ measurements at different altitudes in the Alps for 1997 to June 2003, yielding a unique long-term comparison of GOME NO2 VTC data retrieved by a collaboration of KNMI (Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute and BIRA/IASB (Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy with independently derived tropospheric NO2 profiles. A first comparison relates the GOME retrieved tropospheric columns to the tropospheric columns obtained by integrating the ground-based NO2 measurements. For a second comparison, the tropospheric profiles constructed from the ground-based measurements are first multiplied with the averaging kernel (AK of the GOME retrieval. The second approach makes the comparison independent from the a priori NO2 profile used in the GOME retrieval. This allows splitting the total difference between the column data sets into two contributions: one that is due to differences between the a priori and the ground-based NO2 profile shapes, and another that can be attributed to uncertainties in both the remaining retrieval parameters (such as, e.g., surface albedo or aerosol concentration and the ground-based in situ NO2 profiles. For anticyclonic clear sky conditions the comparison indicates a good agreement between the columns (n=157, R=0.70/0.74 for the first/second comparison approach, respectively. The mean relative difference (with respect to the ground-based columns is −7% with a standard deviation of 40% and GOME on average slightly underestimating the ground-based columns. Both data sets show a similar seasonal behaviour with a distinct maximum of spring NO2 VTCs. Further analysis indicates small GOME columns being systematically smaller than the ground-based ones. The influence of different shapes in the a

  13. System-on-Package Platform with Thick Benzocyclobutene Layer for Millimeter-Wave Antenna Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Namcheol; Kim, Youngmin; Min, Ilhong; Ryoo, Yeon-mi; Seo, Kwang-Seok

    2012-02-01

    Integrated antennas operating at millimeter-wave (mm-wave) frequency have been implemented on a benzocyclobutene (BCB)-based system-on-package (SOP) substrate. A novel BCB-based SOP substrate with a Si bump and a Si cavity was proposed to increase the BCB thickness, thus enhancing the gain of the microstrip patch array antenna and reducing the transfer loss of the transmission line. The mechanical issues of adhesion and stress of BCB are studied. The adhesion between gold and BCB was improved significantly by the insertion of a layer of Si oxide (SiO2) by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). SiO2 can also reduce the wafer bow by stress compensation. Wafer bow of whole structure was decreased from 79.3 to 55.2 µm by the insertion of a 1-µm-thick SiO2 layer. A series-fed 1 ×8 linear array antenna is impedance matched well at 77 GHz. The process flow including BCB chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) was described. The proposed SOP substrate can be a candidate for overcoming the constraint of BCB thickness.

  14. A blind green bank telescope millimeter-wave survey for redshifted molecular absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanekar, N.; Gupta, A.; Carilli, C. L.; Stocke, J. T.; Willett, K. W.

    2014-01-01

    We present the methodology for 'blind' millimeter-wave surveys for redshifted molecular absorption in the CO/HCO + rotational lines. The frequency range 30-50 GHz appears optimal for such surveys, providing sensitivity to absorbers at z ≳ 0.85. It is critical that the survey is 'blind', i.e., based on a radio-selected sample, including sources without known redshifts. We also report results from the first large survey of this kind, using the Q-band receiver on the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to search for molecular absorption toward 36 sources, 3 without known redshifts, over the frequency range 39.6-49.5 GHz. The GBT survey has a total redshift path of Δz ≈ 24, mostly at 0.81 < z < 1.91, and a sensitivity sufficient to detect equivalent H 2 column densities ≳ 3 × 10 21 cm –2 in absorption at 5σ significance (using CO-to-H 2 and HCO + -to-H 2 conversion factors of the Milky Way). The survey yielded no confirmed detections of molecular absorption, yielding the 2σ upper limit n(z = 1.2) < 0.15 on the redshift number density of molecular gas at column densities N(H 2 ) ≳ 3 × 10 21 cm –2 .

  15. Monolithic millimeter-wave diode array beam controllers: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjogren, L. B.; Liu, H.-X. L.; Wang, F.; Liu, T.; Wu, W.; Qin, X.-H.; Chung, E.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Maserjian, J.

    1992-01-01

    In the current work, multi-function beam control arrays have been fabricated and have successfully demonstrated amplitude control of transmitted beams in the W and D bands (75-170 GHz). While these arrays are designed to provide beam control under DC bias operation, new designs for high-speed electronic and optical control are under development. These arrays will fill a need for high-speed watt-level beam switches in pulsed reflectometer systems under development for magnetic fusion plasma diagnostics. A second experimental accomplishment of the current work is the demonstration in the 100-170 GHz (D band) frequency range of a new technique for the measurement of the transmission phase as well as amplitude. Transmission data can serve as a means to extract ('de-embed') the grid parameters; phase information provides more complete data to assist in this process. Additional functions of the array beam controller yet to be tested include electronically controlled steering and focusing of a reflected beam. These have application in the areas of millimeter-wave electronic scanning radar and reflectometry, respectively.

  16. 60-GHz Millimeter-wave Over Fiber with Directly Modulated Dual-mode Laser Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Lin, Chi-Hsiang; Lin, Chun-Ting; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2016-01-01

    A directly modulated dual-mode laser diode (DMLD) with third-order intermodulation distortion (IMD3) suppression is proposed for a 60-GHz millimeter-wave over fiber (MMWoF) architecture, enabling new fiber-wireless communication access to cover 4-km single-mode-fiber (SMF) and 3-m wireless 16-QAM OFDM transmissions. By dual-mode injection-locking, the throughput degradation of the DMLD is mitigated with saturation effect to reduce its threshold, IMD3 power and relative intensity noise to 7.7 mA, −85 dBm and −110.4 dBc/Hz, respectively, providing huge spurious-free dynamic range of 85.8 dB/Hz2/3. This operation suppresses the noise floor of the DMLD carried QPSK-OFDM spectrum by 5 dB. The optical receiving power is optimized to restrict the power fading effect for improving the bit error rate to 1.9 × 10−3 and the receiving power penalty to 1.1 dB. Such DMLD based hybrid architecture for 60-GHz MMW fiber-wireless access can directly cover the current optical and wireless networks for next-generation indoor and short-reach mobile communications. PMID:27297267

  17. High-power millimeter-wave mode converters in overmoded circular waveguides using periodic wall perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thumm, M.

    1984-07-01

    This work reports on measurements and calculations (coupled mode equations) on the conversion of circular elecric TEsub(0n) gyrotron mode compositions (TE 01 to TE 04 ) at 28 and 70 GHz to the linearly polarized TE 11 mode by means of a mode converter system using periodic waveguide wall perturbations. Mode transducers with axisymmetric radius perturbations transform the TEsub(0n) gyrotron mode mixture to the more convenient TE 01 mode for long-distance transmission through overmoded waveguides. Proper matching of the phase differences between the TEsub(0n) modes and of lengths and perturbation amplitudes of the several converter sections is required. A mode converter with constant diameter and periodically perturbed curvature transfers the unpolarized TE 01 mode into the TE 11 mode which produces an almost linearly polarized millimeter-wave beam needed for efficient electron cyclotron heating (ECRH) of plasmas in thermonuclear fusion devices. The experimentally determined TEsub(0n)-to-TE 01 conversion efficiency is (98+-1)% at 28 and 70 GHz (99% predicted) while the TE 01 -to-TE 11 converter has a (96+-2)% conversion efficiency at 28 GHz (95% predicted) and (94+-2)% at 70 GHz (93% predicted); ohmic losses are included. (orig./AH)

  18. Proof-of-Concept of a Millimeter-Wave Integrated Heterogeneous Network for 5G Cellular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shozo Okasaka

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The fifth-generation mobile networks (5G will not only enhance mobile broadband services, but also enable connectivity for a massive number of Internet-of-Things devices, such as wireless sensors, meters or actuators. Thus, 5G is expected to achieve a 1000-fold or more increase in capacity over 4G. The use of the millimeter-wave (mmWave spectrum is a key enabler to allowing 5G to achieve such enhancement in capacity. To fully utilize the mmWave spectrum, 5G is expected to adopt a heterogeneous network (HetNet architecture, wherein mmWave small cells are overlaid onto a conventional macro-cellular network. In the mmWave-integrated HetNet, splitting of the control plane (CP and user plane (UP will allow continuous connectivity and increase the capacity of the mmWave small cells. mmWave communication can be used not only for access linking, but also for wireless backhaul linking, which will facilitate the installation of mmWave small cells. In this study, a proof-of-concept (PoC was conducted to demonstrate the practicality of a prototype mmWave-integrated HetNet, using mmWave technologies for both backhaul and access.

  19. A blind green bank telescope millimeter-wave survey for redshifted molecular absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanekar, N.; Gupta, A. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, TIFR, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Carilli, C. L. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Stocke, J. T. [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Willett, K. W., E-mail: nkanekar@ncra.tifr.res.in [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2014-02-10

    We present the methodology for 'blind' millimeter-wave surveys for redshifted molecular absorption in the CO/HCO{sup +} rotational lines. The frequency range 30-50 GHz appears optimal for such surveys, providing sensitivity to absorbers at z ≳ 0.85. It is critical that the survey is 'blind', i.e., based on a radio-selected sample, including sources without known redshifts. We also report results from the first large survey of this kind, using the Q-band receiver on the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to search for molecular absorption toward 36 sources, 3 without known redshifts, over the frequency range 39.6-49.5 GHz. The GBT survey has a total redshift path of Δz ≈ 24, mostly at 0.81 < z < 1.91, and a sensitivity sufficient to detect equivalent H{sub 2} column densities ≳ 3 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2} in absorption at 5σ significance (using CO-to-H{sub 2} and HCO{sup +}-to-H{sub 2} conversion factors of the Milky Way). The survey yielded no confirmed detections of molecular absorption, yielding the 2σ upper limit n(z = 1.2) < 0.15 on the redshift number density of molecular gas at column densities N(H{sub 2}) ≳ 3 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2}.

  20. Simplified human model and pedestrian simulation in the millimeter-wave region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Junghwan; Kim, Seok; Lee, Tae-Yun; Ka, Min-Ho

    2016-02-01

    The 24 GHz and 77 GHz radar sensors have been studied as a strong candidate for advanced driver assistance systems(ADAS) because of their all-weather capability and accurate range and radial velocity measuring scheme. However, developing a reliable pedestrian recognition system hasmany obstacles due to the inaccurate and non-trivial radar responses at these high frequencies and the many combinations of clothes and accessories. To overcome these obstacles, many researchers used electromagnetic (EM) simulation to characterize the radar scattering response of a human. However, human simulation takes so long time because of the electrically huge size of a human in the millimeter-wave region. To reduce simulation time, some researchers assumed the skin of a human is the perfect electric conductor (PEC) and have simulated the PEC human model using physical optics (PO) algorithm without a specific explanation about how the human body could be modeled with PEC. In this study, the validity of the assumption that the surface of the human body is considered PEC in the EM simulation is verified, and the simulation result of the dry skin human model is compared with that of the PEC human model.

  1. A 0.1-μm MHEMT millimeter-wave IC technology designed for manufacturability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohdin, Hans; Wakita, Arlene; Nagy, Avelina; Robbins, Virginia; Moll, Nick; Su, Chung-yi

    1999-08-01

    We describe and discuss our approach to improved manufacturability of millimeter-wave InP-type HEMT IC technology. The main ingredients are the use of (1) GaAs (rather than InP) as substrate, with a buffer that grades the lattice constant to that of the high-mobility Ga 0.47In 0.53As channel; (2) low-resistance non-alloyed ohmic contacts with good reliability and reproducibility; (3) an e-beam process that produces 0.1-μm T-gate fingers with one exposure and (4) two-step selective etching of the gate trough for good uniformity. The process is compatible with standard GaAs FET IC front and back end unit processes, including backside vias. The yield, uniformity and performance of devices and circuits made on this metamorphic (MHEMT) material are consistently as good as those we get using InP substrates. The reliability of our devices, whether made on GaAs or InP substrates, is limited by impact ionization in the channel, which has also been linked to Rd-degradation and burnout. At low-noise drain bias ( Vd=1 V), where the impact ionization is small, we have demonstrated reliability, i.e. extrapolated MTTF at 125°C channel temperature is >10 6 h. This is as good as FETs made on InP substrates.

  2. Numerical Analysis of the Performance of Millimeter-Wave RoF-Based Cellular Backhaul Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thu A.; Pham, Hien T. T.; Le, Hai-Chau; Dang, Ngoc T.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we study the performance of a next-generation cellular backhaul network that is based on a hybrid architecture using radio-over-fiber (RoF) and millimeter-wave (MMW) techniques. We develop a mathematic model and comprehensively analyze the performance of a MMW/RoF-based backhaul downlink under the impacts of various physical layer impairments originated from both optical fiber and wireless links. More specifically, the effects of nonlinear distortion, chromatic dispersion, fading, and many types of noises including shot noise, thermal noise, amplifier noise, and relative intensity noise are investigated. The numerical results show that the nonlinear distortion, fiber dispersion, and wireless fading are key factors that limit the system performance. Setting the modulation index properly helps minimize the effect of nonlinear distortion while implementing dispersion shifted optical fibers could be used to reduce the impact of dispersion and as a result, they can improve the bit-error rate. Moreover, it is also verified that, to mitigate the effect of multipath fading, remote radio heads should be located as near the remote antenna units as possible.

  3. A Tutorial on Optical Feeding of Millimeter-Wave Phased Array Antennas for Communication Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Aldaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the interference avoidance capacity, high gain, and dynamical reconfigurability, phased array antennas (PAAs have emerged as a key enabling technology for future broadband mobile applications. This is especially important at millimeter-wave (mm-wave frequencies, where the high power consumption and significant path loss impose serious range constraints. However, at mm-wave frequencies the phase and amplitude control of the feeding currents of the PAA elements is not a trivial issue because electrical beamforming requires bulky devices and exhibits relatively narrow bandwidth. In order to overcome these limitations, different optical beamforming architectures have been presented. In this paper we review the basic principles of phased arrays and identify the main challenges, that is, integration of high-speed photodetectors with antenna elements and the efficient optical control of both amplitude and phase of the feeding current. After presenting the most important solutions found in the literature, we analyze the impact of the different noise sources on the PAA performance, giving some guidelines for the design of optically fed PAAs.

  4. THE CHROMOSPHERIC SOLAR MILLIMETER-WAVE CAVITY ORIGINATES IN THE TEMPERATURE MINIMUM REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De la Luz, Victor [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Tonantzintla, Puebla, Mexico, Apdo. Postal 51 y 216, 72000 (Mexico); Raulin, Jean-Pierre [CRAAM, Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Sao Paulo, SP 01302-907 (Brazil); Lara, Alejandro [Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico 04510 (Mexico)

    2013-01-10

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of the local radio emission at the lower part of the solar atmosphere. To accomplish this, we have used a numerical code to simulate the emission and transport of high-frequency electromagnetic waves from 2 GHz up to 10 THz. As initial conditions, we used VALC, SEL05, and C7 solar chromospheric models. In this way, the generated synthetic spectra allow us to study the local emission and absorption processes with high resolution in both altitude and frequency. Associated with the temperature minimum predicted by these models, we found that the local optical depth at millimeter wavelengths remains constant, producing an optically thin layer that is surrounded by two layers of high local emission. We call this structure the Chromospheric Solar Millimeter-wave Cavity (CSMC). The temperature profile, which features temperature minimum layers and a subsequent temperature rise, produces the CSMC phenomenon. The CSMC shows the complexity of the relation between the theoretical temperature profile and the observed brightness temperature and may help us to understand the dispersion of the observed brightness temperature in the millimeter wavelength range.

  5. First lasing of the KAERI millimeter-wave free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B.C.; Jeong, Y.U.; Cho, S.O. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Democratic People`s Republic of)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The millimeter-wave FEL program at KAERI aims at the generation of high-power CW laser beam with high efficiency at the wavelength of 3{approximately}10 mm for the application in plasma heating and in power beaming. In the first oscillation experiment, the FEL has lased at the wavelength of 10 mm with the pulsewidth of 10{approximately}30 {mu}s. The peak power is about 1 kW The FEL is driven by a recirculating electrostatic accelerator having tandem geometry. The energy and the current of the electron beam are 400 keV and 2 A, respectively. The FEL resonator is located in the high-voltage terminal and is composed of a helical undulator, two mesh mirrors, and a cylindrical waveguide. The parameters of the permanent-magnet helical undulator are : period = 32 mm, number of periods = 20, magnetic field = 1.3 kG. At present, with no axial guiding magnetic field only 15 % of the injected beam pass through the undulator. Transport ratio of the electron beam through the undulator is very sensitive to the injection parameters such as the diameter and the divergence of the electron beam Simulations show that, with unproved injection condition, the FEL can generate more than 50 kW of average power in CW operation. Details of the experiments, including the spectrum measurement and the recirculation of electron beam, are presented.

  6. Analysis on Human Blockage Path Loss and Shadow Fading in Millimeter-Wave Band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Millimeter-wave (Mm-w is the trend of communication development in the future; users who carry mobile communication equipment could be blocked by others in a crowded population environment. Based on Shooting and Bouncing Ray (SBR method and setting up different orientation receivers (RX, population density, and people fabric property at 28 GHz and 38 GHz, simulating experimental scene similar to station square by Wireless Insite software, we use least square method to do linear-regression analysis for path loss and build path loss model. The result shows that the path loss index has a certain change in the different frequency, orientation receivers, population density, and people fabric. The path loss index of RouteC1 and RouteA2 has an obvious change in the central transmitter (TX. Each route shadow fading obeys Gaussian distribution whose mean is 0. This paper’s result has a theoretical guiding for designing the communication system in a crowded population environment.

  7. Millimeter-Wave Measurements of High Level and Low Level Activity Glass Melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woskov, Paul

    2005-01-01

    EMSP supported research of millimeter-wave technology for nuclear waste glass melter monitoring has been very productive in establishing this field and showing great progress. This work has garnered significant recognition, winning an R and D 100 Award for viscosity monitoring, a Best Paper Award by the American Ceramic Society for nuclear waste glass monitoring, investment by the Glass Plus industry consortium to test this technology for glass fiber manufacture, investment by Savannah River Technology Center in purchasing key hardware components for additional tests, and Japanese initiated exchange visits between MIT and the vitrification facilities at Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in Tokai to review this technology. There are also potentially important spin offs to other areas including nuclear and fossil fuel power production, and National Institute of Health sponsored research as indicated below. Consequently, this work has the potential of becoming a major inter nationally recognized EMSP success story. A summary of the main accomplishments follows. The readers are referred to the cited reference publications for more details, many of which were EMSP supported by this work

  8. Enhanced Next Generation Millimeter-Wave Multicarrier System with Generalized Frequency Division Multiplexing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidekazu Shimodaira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM is a popular multicarrier technique used to attain high spectral efficiencies. It also has other advantages such as multipath tolerance and ease of implementation. However, OFDM based systems suffer from high Peak-to-Average Power Ratio (PAPR problem. Because of the nonlinearity of the power amplifiers, the high PAPR causes significant distortion in the transmitted signal for millimeter-wave (mmWave systems. To alleviate the high PAPR problem, this paper utilizes Generalized Frequency Division Multiplexing (GFDM which can achieve high spectral efficiency as well as low PAPR. In this paper, we show the performance of GFDM using the IEEE 802.11ad multicarrier frame structures. IEEE 802.11ad is considered one of the most successful industry standards utilizing unlicensed mmWave frequency band. In addition, this paper indicates the feasibility of using GFDM for the future standards such as IEEE 802.11ay. This paper studies the performance improvements in terms of PAPR reduction for GFDM. Based on the performance results, the optimal numbers of subcarriers and subsymbols are calculated for PAPR reduction while minimizing the Bit Error Rate (BER performance degradation. Moreover, transmitter side ICI (Intercarrier Interference reduction is introduced to reduce the receiver load.

  9. A study of a millimeter-wave quarter-wave patch antenna on a benzocyclobutene polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seok, Seonho; Rolland, Nathalie; Rolland, Paul-Alain

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and characterization of a millimeter-wave λ/4-patch antenna on a benzocyclobutene (BCB) polymer. This antenna is compatible with wafer-level packaging for a miniaturized wireless communication system. All components of this antenna are manufactured by using a gold electroplated and a BCB polymer patterned by photolithography. The implemented antenna size was 3.5 × 3.5 × 0.05 mm 3 . The manufactured patch antenna mounted on a V-connector was characterized using an Agilent network analyzer E8361A for a return loss and a range-calibration setup for a radiation pattern. The fabricated antenna showed a minimum return loss of 30 dB at 51.75 GHz and −10 dB impedance bandwidth of 5 GHz from 49.5 to 54.5 GHz. The measured gain is −1.7 dBi and the −3 dB beamwidth is nearly 50°. In addition, the effect of various critical parameters of the proposed antenna, such as the separation between an RF-feed and a shorting-pin, a ground plane size and the height of a BCB polymer, was investigated

  10. Precise equilibrium structure determination of hydrazoic acid (HN3) by millimeter-wave spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amberger, Brent K.; Esselman, Brian J.; Woods, R. Claude; McMahon, Robert J.; Stanton, John F.

    2015-01-01

    The millimeter-wave spectrum of hydrazoic acid (HN 3 ) was analyzed in the frequency region of 235-450 GHz. Transitions from a total of 14 isotopologues were observed and fit using the A-reduced or S-reduced Hamiltonian. Coupled-cluster calculations were performed to obtain a theoretical geometry, as well as rotation-vibration interaction corrections. These calculated vibration-rotation correction terms were applied to the experimental rotational constants to obtain mixed theoretical/experimental equilibrium rotational constants (A e , B e , and C e ). These equilibrium rotational constants were then used to obtain an equilibrium (R e ) structure using a least-squares fitting routine. The R e structural parameters are consistent with a previously published R s structure, largely falling within the uncertainty limits of that R s structure. The present R e geometric parameters of HN 3 are determined with exceptionally high accuracy, as a consequence of the large number of isotopologues measured experimentally and the sophisticated (coupled-cluster theoretical treatment (CCSD(T))/ANO2) of the vibration-rotation interactions. The R e structure exhibits remarkable agreement with the CCSD(T)/cc-pCV5Z predicted structure, validating both the accuracy of the ab initio method and the claimed uncertainties of the theoretical/experimental structure determination

  11. Efficient Preamble Design Technique for Millimeter-Wave Cellular Systems with Beamforming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Geun Han

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The processing time for beam training in millimeter-wave (mmWave cellular systems can be significantly reduced by a code division multiplexing (CDM-based technique, where multiple beams are transmitted simultaneously with their corresponding Tx beam IDs (BIDs in the preamble. However, mmWave cellular systems with CDM-based preambles require a large number of cell IDs (CIDs and BIDs, and a high computational complexity for CID and BID (CBID searches. In this paper, a new preamble design technique that can increase the number of CBIDs significantly is proposed, using a preamble sequence constructed by a combination of two Zadoff-Chu (ZC sequences. An efficient technique for the CBID detection is also described for the proposed preamble. It is shown by simulations using a simple model of an mmWave cellular system that the proposed technique can obtain a significant reduction in the complexity of the CBID detection without a noticeable performance degradation, compared to the previous technique.

  12. Comparisons of global ozone trends inferred from the BUV experiment on Nimbus 4 and the ground-based network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, D. F.

    1981-01-01

    Preliminary comparisons between global ozone burdens derived from the backscattered ultraviolet (BUV) experiment on Nimbus 4 and those inferred from an analysis of ground-based network data seem to indicate significant differences in the inter-annual variability of ozone. Some of the observed differences may be due to improper weighting of the ground-based network data, slowly changing planetary wave structure over the fixed station, of small inter-annual changes in meridional transport parameters. There is also some evidence which indicates that the polar stratosphere at high latitudes may represent an important ozone storage resevoir which tends to compensate for large scale changes observed in the regions outside of the polar stratosphere. Possible consequences of this are that the global trends derived from ground based ozone measurements may not be valid and furthermore that the current satellite techniques by themselves may be sufficient. An ozone monitoring system which includes observations from satellites, ground-based stations, balloons and rockets may be necessary.

  13. Predicted buffer zones to protect temporary pond invertebrates from ground-based insecticide applications against desert locusts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lahr, J.; Gadji, B.; Dia, D.

    2000-01-01

    To estimate safe downwind distances (i.e. buffer zone widths) for temporary ponds from ULV-treatments with current locust insecticides, experimental trials with two ground-based sprayers, the hand-held Micro-Ulva® and the vehicle-mounted Ulva-Mast® X15 Mark I, were conducted with fenitrothion

  14. Ground-Based Observations and Modeling of the Visibility and Radar Reflectivity in a Radiation Fog Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boers, R.; Baltink, K.H.; Hemink, H.J.; Bosveld, F.C.; Moerman, M.

    2013-01-01

    The development of a radiation fog layer at the Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research(51.97°N, 4.93°E) on 23 March 2011 was observed with ground-based in situ and remote sensing observationsto investigate the relationship between visibility and radar reflectivity. The fog layer thickness

  15. Comparison of co-located independent ground-based middle atmospheric wind and temperature measurements with numerical weather prediction models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Pichon, A.; Assink, J.D.; Heinrich, P.; Blanc, E.; Charlton-Perez, A.; Lee, C.F.; Keckhut, P.; Hauchecorne, A.; Rufenacht, R.; Kampfer, N.; Drob, D.P.; Smets, P.S.M.; Evers, L.G.; Ceranna, L.; Pilger, C.; Ross, O.; Claud, C.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution, ground-based and independent observations including co-located wind radiometer, lidar stations, and infrasound instruments are used to evaluate the accuracy of general circulation models and data-constrained assimilation systems in the middle atmosphere at northern hemisphere

  16. Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astronomy: Parameter Estimation and Tests of General Relativity with Space- and Ground-Based Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Salvatore

    2016-07-29

    With the discovery of the binary-black-hole (BBH) coalescence GW150914 the era of gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy has started. It has recently been shown that BBH with masses comparable to or higher than GW150914 would be visible in the Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA) band a few years before they finally merge in the band of ground-based detectors. This would allow for premerger electromagnetic alerts, dramatically increasing the chances of a joint detection, if BBHs are indeed luminous in the electromagnetic band. In this Letter we explore a quite different aspect of multiband GW astronomy, and verify if, and to what extent, measurement of masses and sky position with eLISA could improve parameter estimation and tests of general relativity with ground-based detectors. We generate a catalog of 200 BBHs and find that having prior information from eLISA can reduce the uncertainty in the measurement of source distance and primary black hole spin by up to factor of 2 in ground-based GW detectors. The component masses estimate from eLISA will not be refined by the ground based detectors, whereas joint analysis will yield precise characterization of the newly formed black hole and improve consistency tests of general relativity.

  17. Ground-Based Facilities for Simulation of Microgravity: Organism-Specific Recommendations for Their Use, and Recommended Terminology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herranz, R.; Anken, R.; Boonstra, J.; Braun, M.; Christianen, P.C.M.; van der Geest, M.; Hauslage, J.; Hilbig, R.; Hill, R.J.A.; Lebert, M.; Medina, F.J.; Vagt, N.; Ullrich, O.; van Loon, J.J.W.A.; Hemmersbach, R.

    2013-01-01

    Research in microgravity is indispensable to disclose the impact of gravity on biological processes and organisms. However, research in the near-Earth orbit is severely constrained by the limited number of flight opportunities. Ground-based simulators of microgravity are valuable tools for preparing

  18. Validation of GOME (ERS-2) NO2 vertical column data with ground-based measurements at Issyk-Kul (Kyrgyzstan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionov, D.; Sinyakov, V.; Semenov, V.

    Starting from 1995 the global monitoring of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide is carried out by the measurements of nadir-viewing GOME spectrometer aboard ERS-2 satellite. Continuous validation of that data by means of comparisons with well-controlled ground-based measurements is important to ensure the quality of GOME data products and improve related retrieval algorithms. At the station of Issyk-Kul (Kyrgyzstan) the ground-based spectroscopic observations of NO2 vertical column have been started since 1983. The station is located on the northern shore of Issyk-Kul lake, 1650 meters above the sea level (42.6 N, 77.0 E). The site is equipped with grating spectrometer for the twilight measurements of zenith-scattered solar radiation in the visible range, and applies the DOAS technique to retrieve NO2 vertical column. It is included in the list of NDSC stations as a complementary one. The present study is focused on validation of GOME NO2 vertical column data, based on 8-year comparison with correlative ground-based measurements at Issyk-Kul station in 1996-2003. Within the investigation, an agreement of both individual and monthly averaged GOME measurements with corresponding twilight ground-based observations is examined. Such agreement is analyzed with respect to different conditions (season, sun elevation), temporal/spatial criteria choice (actual overpass location, correction for diurnal variation) and data processing (GDP version 2.7, 3.0). In addition, NO2 vertical columns were integrated from simultaneous stratospheric profile measurements by NASA HALOE and SAGE-II/III satellite instruments and introduced to explain the differences with ground-based observations. In particular cases, NO2 vertical profiles retrieved from the twilight ground-based measurements at Issuk-Kul were also included into comparison. Overall, summertime GOME NO2 vertical columns were found to be systematicaly lower than ground-based data. This work was supported by International Association

  19. Ultraviolet radiation modelling from ground-based and satellite measurements on Reunion Island, southern tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Lamy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface ultraviolet radiation (SUR is not an increasing concern after the implementation of the Montreal Protocol and the recovery of the ozone layer Morgenstern et al.(2008. However, large uncertainties remain in the prediction of future changes of SUR Bais et al.(2015. Several studies pointed out that UV-B impacts the biosphere Erickson et al.(2015, especially the aquatic system, which plays a central part in the biogeochemical cycle Hader et al.(2007. It can affect phytoplankton productivity Smith and Cullen(1995. This influence can result in either positive or negative feedback on climate (Zepp et al., 2007. Global circulation model simulations predict an acceleration of the Brewer-Dobson circulation over the next century (Butchart, 2014, which would lead to a decrease in ozone levels in the tropics and an enhancement at higher latitudes (Hegglin and Shepherd, 2009. Reunion Island is located in the tropics (21° S, 55° E, in a part of the world where the amount of ozone in the ozone column is naturally low. In addition, this island is mountainous and the marine atmosphere is often clean with low aerosol concentrations. Thus, measurements show much higher SUR than at other sites at the same latitude or at midlatitudes. Ground-based measurements of SUR have been taken on Reunion Island by a Bentham DTMc300 spectroradiometer since 2009. This instrument is affiliated with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC. In order to quantify the future evolution of SUR in the tropics, it is necessary to validate a model against present observations. This study is designed to be a preliminary parametric and sensitivity study of SUR modelling in the tropics. We developed a local parameterisation using the Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible Model (TUV; Madronich, 1993 and compared the output of TUV to multiple years of Bentham spectral measurements. This comparison started in early 2009 and continued until 2016

  20. The Irregular Shape of (21) Lutetia as Determined from Ground-based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, A.; Carry, B.; Merline, W. J.; Drummond, J. D.; Chapman, C. R.; Tamblyn, P. M.; Christou, J. C.; Dumas, C.; Weaver, H. A.; Rosetta OSIRIS Instument Team

    2010-12-01

    We report the results of our campaign to improve our understanding of the physical characteristics of asteroid (21) Lutetia ahead of the Rosetta flyby in 2010 July. This included measurements of shape, size, pole, density, and a search for satellites. We utilized primarily adaptive optics (AO) on large ground-based telescopes (Keck, Gemini, and VLT). We coordinated these efforts with HST observations (Weaver et al. 2010, A&A 518, A4), made in support of Rosetta’s ALICE UV spectrometer. Preliminary results were supplied to Rosetta mission teams in fall of 2009 to assist in planning for the mission. Observations and analyses were complete and submitted for publication before the flyby (Drummond et al. 2010, A&A, in press; Carry et al. 2010, A&A, in press). Using more than 300 AO images of Lutetia, which subtended only slightly more than two resolution-elements (0.10”) for these large telescopes, we were able to derive accurate size and shape information, as well as a pole and spin period. We modeled the size and shape using both a triaxial-ellipsoid model and a 3D radius-vector model. The radius-vector model used our new technique of multi-dataset inversion, called KOALA (for Knitted Occultation, Adaptive optics, and Lightcurve Analysis), in which we utilized not only our AO imaging, but also 50 lightcurves spanning 48 years. We combined the best aspects of each model to produce our best-estimate 3D shape model, a hybrid having ellipsoid-equivalent dimensions of 124 x 101 x 93 km (± 5 x 4 x 13 km) and effective diameter 105 ± 7 km. We found the spin axis of Lutetia to lie within 5 deg of [long, lat (52,-6)] or [RA DEC (52,+12)] and determined an improved sidereal period of 8.168270 ± 0.000001 h. We predicted the geometry of Lutetia during the flyby and showed that the southern hemisphere would be in seasonal shadow at that time. The model suggested the presence of several concavities and irregularities that may be associated with large impacts. The model

  1. Supporting a Diverse Community of Undergraduate Researchers in Satellite and Ground-Based Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, R.; Liou-Mark, J.

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. remains in grave danger of losing its global competitive edge in STEM. To find solutions to this problem, the Obama Administration proposed two new national initiatives: the Educate to Innovate Initiative and the $100 million government/private industry initiative to train 100,000 STEM teachers and graduate 1 million additional STEM students over the next decade. To assist in ameliorating the national STEM plight, the New York City College of Technology has designed its NSF Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) program in satellite and ground-based remote sensing to target underrepresented minority students. Since the inception of the program in 2008, a total of 45 undergraduate students of which 38 (84%) are considered underrepresented minorities in STEM have finished or are continuing with their research or are pursuing their STEM endeavors. The program is comprised of the three primary components. The first component, Structured Learning Environments: Preparation and Mentorship, provides the REU Scholars with the skill sets necessary for proficiency in satellite and ground-based remote sensing research. The students are offered mini-courses in Geographic Information Systems, MATLAB, and Remote Sensing. They also participate in workshops on the Ethics of Research. Each REU student is a member of a team that consists of faculty mentors, post doctorate/graduate students, and high school students. The second component, Student Support and Safety Nets, provides undergraduates a learning environment that supports them in becoming successful researchers. Special networking and Brown Bag sessions, and an annual picnic with research scientists are organized so that REU Scholars are provided with opportunities to expand their professional community. Graduate school support is provided by offering free Graduate Record Examination preparation courses and workshops on the graduate school application process. Additionally, students are supported by college

  2. Ultraviolet radiation modelling from ground-based and satellite measurements on Reunion Island, southern tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Kévin; Portafaix, Thierry; Brogniez, Colette; Godin-Beekmann, Sophie; Bencherif, Hassan; Morel, Béatrice; Pazmino, Andrea; Metzger, Jean Marc; Auriol, Frédérique; Deroo, Christine; Duflot, Valentin; Goloub, Philippe; Long, Charles N.

    2018-01-01

    Surface ultraviolet radiation (SUR) is not an increasing concern after the implementation of the Montreal Protocol and the recovery of the ozone layer (Morgenstern et al., 2008). However, large uncertainties remain in the prediction of future changes of SUR (Bais et al., 2015). Several studies pointed out that UV-B impacts the biosphere (Erickson et al., 2015), especially the aquatic system, which plays a central part in the biogeochemical cycle (Hader et al., 2007). It can affect phytoplankton productivity (Smith and Cullen, 1995). This influence can result in either positive or negative feedback on climate (Zepp et al., 2007). Global circulation model simulations predict an acceleration of the Brewer-Dobson circulation over the next century (Butchart, 2014), which would lead to a decrease in ozone levels in the tropics and an enhancement at higher latitudes (Hegglin and Shepherd, 2009). Reunion Island is located in the tropics (21° S, 55° E), in a part of the world where the amount of ozone in the ozone column is naturally low. In addition, this island is mountainous and the marine atmosphere is often clean with low aerosol concentrations. Thus, measurements show much higher SUR than at other sites at the same latitude or at midlatitudes. Ground-based measurements of SUR have been taken on Reunion Island by a Bentham DTMc300 spectroradiometer since 2009. This instrument is affiliated with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). In order to quantify the future evolution of SUR in the tropics, it is necessary to validate a model against present observations. This study is designed to be a preliminary parametric and sensitivity study of SUR modelling in the tropics. We developed a local parameterisation using the Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible Model (TUV; Madronich, 1993) and compared the output of TUV to multiple years of Bentham spectral measurements. This comparison started in early 2009 and continued until 2016. Only

  3. An innovative method for on-power radiometry of end-shields of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Gaurav; Gupta, Pankaj; Nawal, Shriram; Gautam, Mahesh; Kakkar, Aman Deep; Yadav, Umed

    2012-01-01

    Every lndian PHWR reactor calandria is sandwiched within a pair of shield on either side. These shields are perpendicular to the coaxial axis of calandria and are called end-shields. These provide shielding from leakage radiation from reactor core in escaping out to Fuelling Machine vault, thereby significantly reducing the dose rates in the vaults. This has got a direct impact on radiation field in accessible areas. By maintaining low dose rates in accessible areas, the individual and collective doses of radiation workers can be effectively controlled well within the stipulated limits. Thus, it is of utmost importance to ensure adequacy of shielding provided by end-shields. In this context, a limited radiometry exercise is executed after filling of end-shields with steel balls and prior to their installation at designated place. This exercise provides limited inputs along the periphery of end-shield due to limited strength of radiation source, its handling provisions and dose constraints to the individual. In order to ascertain an in-depth analysis of shielding adequacy on-power, different methodologies have been adopted and have certain limitation in precisely pinpointing the affected area/location besides limitation on number of locations that can be monitored at a single stretch. To overcome these important anomalies, a computer based setup has been indigenously designed. The setup essentially comprises of a radiation monitor with wide energy, measuring, temperature and humidity range; a custom designed 25 m long compatible cable with suitable connectors; a laptop with additional cooling arrangement; a configurable interfacing software; thermal shielding for the detector and tying/fixing provisions. The radiation monitor after being properly shielded for thermal impacts is installed on the head of Fuelling Machine. It is connected through long cable to a laptop kept at Fuelling Machine service area with due cooling provisions (as temperature in the area will

  4. Ground-Based Polarimetric Remote Sensing of Dust Aerosol Properties in Chinese Deserts near Hexi Corridor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One-year observation of dust aerosol properties near Hexi Corridor was obtained from polarimetric measurements by ground-based sunphotometer in the county of Minqin in northwestern China from March 2012 to February 2013. We observed an annual mean AOD of 0.22±0.22 at 0.50 μm and Ångström exponents of 0.1–1.0 fitting a bimode normal distribution centered at 0.18 and 0.50, respectively. The effective radii of fine (0.13–0.17 μm and coarse (2.49–3.49 μm modes were found stable at all seasons together with the appearance of a third mode of particle radius at 0.4–1.0 μm when AOD was larger than 0.6. It is noticeable that the real (1.5–1.7 and imaginary (0.0005 to 0.09 parts of complex refractive indices were higher than other studies performed in other desert regions of China, while single scattering albedo was relatively lower (~0.84–0.89 at wavelengths of 0.44, 0.67, 0.87, and 1.02 μm. This is partially due to calcite or hematite in the soil in Minqin or the influence of anthropogenic aerosols containing carbon. Moreover, from our novel polarimetric measurement, the scattering phase function (F11 and degree of linear polarization for incident unpolarized light (-F12/F11 of dust aerosols were also obtained within this deserted area.

  5. Simultaneous and synergistic profiling of cloud and drizzle properties using ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusli, Stephanie P.; Donovan, David P.; Russchenberg, Herman W. J.

    2017-12-01

    Despite the importance of radar reflectivity (Z) measurements in the retrieval of liquid water cloud properties, it remains nontrivial to interpret Z due to the possible presence of drizzle droplets within the clouds. So far, there has been no published work that utilizes Z to identify the presence of drizzle above the cloud base in an optimized and a physically consistent manner. In this work, we develop a retrieval technique that exploits the synergy of different remote sensing systems to carry out this task and to subsequently profile the microphysical properties of the cloud and drizzle in a unified framework. This is accomplished by using ground-based measurements of Z, lidar attenuated backscatter below as well as above the cloud base, and microwave brightness temperatures. Fast physical forward models coupled to cloud and drizzle structure parameterization are used in an optimal-estimation-type framework in order to retrieve the best estimate for the cloud and drizzle property profiles. The cloud retrieval is first evaluated using synthetic signals generated from large-eddy simulation (LES) output to verify the forward models used in the retrieval procedure and the vertical parameterization of the liquid water content (LWC). From this exercise it is found that, on average, the cloud properties can be retrieved within 5 % of the mean truth. The full cloud-drizzle retrieval method is then applied to a selected ACCEPT (Analysis of the Composition of Clouds with Extended Polarization Techniques) campaign dataset collected in Cabauw, the Netherlands. An assessment of the retrieval products is performed using three independent methods from the literature; each was specifically developed to retrieve only the cloud properties, the drizzle properties below the cloud base, or the drizzle fraction within the cloud. One-to-one comparisons, taking into account the uncertainties or limitations of each retrieval, show that our results are consistent with what is derived

  6. Simulation of submillimetre atmospheric spectra for characterising potential ground-based remote sensing observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Turner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The submillimetre is an understudied region of the Earth's atmospheric electromagnetic spectrum. Prior technological gaps and relatively high opacity due to the prevalence of rotational water vapour lines at these wavelengths have slowed progress from a ground-based remote sensing perspective; however, emerging superconducting detector technologies in the fields of astronomy offer the potential to address key atmospheric science challenges with new instrumental methods. A site study, with a focus on the polar regions, is performed to assess theoretical feasibility by simulating the downwelling (zenith angle = 0° clear-sky submillimetre spectrum from 30 mm (10 GHz to 150 µm (2000 GHz at six locations under annual mean, summer, winter, daytime, night-time and low-humidity conditions. Vertical profiles of temperature, pressure and 28 atmospheric gases are constructed by combining radiosonde, meteorological reanalysis and atmospheric chemistry model data. The sensitivity of the simulated spectra to the choice of water vapour continuum model and spectroscopic line database is explored. For the atmospheric trace species hypobromous acid (HOBr, hydrogen bromide (HBr, perhydroxyl radical (HO2 and nitrous oxide (N2O the emission lines producing the largest change in brightness temperature are identified. Signal strengths, centre frequencies, bandwidths, estimated minimum integration times and maximum receiver noise temperatures are determined for all cases. HOBr, HBr and HO2 produce brightness temperature peaks in the mK to µK range, whereas the N2O peaks are in the K range. The optimal submillimetre remote sensing lines for the four species are shown to vary significantly between location and scenario, strengthening the case for future hyperspectral instruments that measure over a broad wavelength range. The techniques presented here provide a framework that can be applied to additional species of interest and taken forward to simulate

  7. Quantifying the effect of riming on snowfall using ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisseev, Dmitri; von Lerber, Annakaisa; Tiira, Jussi

    2017-04-01

    Ground-based observations of ice particle size distribution and ensemble mean density are used to quantify the effect of riming on snowfall. The rime mass fraction is derived from these measurements by following the approach that is used in a single ice-phase category microphysical scheme proposed for the use in numerical weather prediction models. One of the characteristics of the proposed scheme is that the prefactor of a power law relation that links mass and size of ice particles is determined by the rime mass fraction, while the exponent does not change. To derive the rime mass fraction, a mass-dimensional relation representative of unrimed snow is also determined. To check the validity of the proposed retrieval method, the derived rime mass fraction is converted to the effective liquid water path that is compared to microwave radiometer observations. Since dual-polarization radar observations are often used to detect riming, the impact of riming on dual-polarization radar variables is studied for differential reflectivity measurements. It is shown that the relation between rime mass fraction and differential reflectivity is ambiguous, other factors such as change in median volume diameter need also be considered. Given the current interest on sensitivity of precipitation to aerosol pollution, which could inhibit riming, the importance of riming for surface snow accumulation is investigated. It is found that riming is responsible for 5% to 40% of snowfall mass. The study is based on data collected at the University of Helsinki field station in Hyytiälä during U.S. Department of Energy Biogenic Aerosols Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC) field campaign and the winter 2014/2015. In total 22 winter storms were analyzed, and detailed analysis of two events is presented to illustrate the study.

  8. Exploring the Diversity of Exoplanet Atmospheres Using Ground-Based Transit Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Jacob

    This is a proposal to fund an observational study of the atmospheres of exoplanets in order to improve our understanding of the nature and origins of these mysterious worlds. The observations will be performed using our new approach for ground-based transit spectroscopy measurements that yields space-telescope quality data. We will also carry out supporting theoretical calculations with new abundance retrieval codes to interpret the measurements. Our project includes a survey of giant exoplanets, and intensive study of especially compelling exoplanets. For the survey, optical and near-infrared transmission spectra, and near-infrared emission spectra will be measured for giant exoplanets with a wide range of estimated temperatures, heavy element abundance, and mass. This comprehensive characterization of a large sample of these planets is now crucial to investigate such issues for their atmospheres as the carbon-to-oxygen ratios and overall metallicities, cause of thermal inversions, and prevalence and nature of high-altitude hazes. The intensive study of compelling individual planets will focus on low-mass (M spectroscopy, and leveraging its particular sensitivity to the atmospheric scale height. Observations for the project will be carried out with Magellan, Keck, Gemini, and VLT. The team has institutional access to Magellan and Keck, and a demonstrated record of obtaining time on Gemini and VLT for these observations through public channels. This proposal is highly relevant for current and future NASA projects. We are seeking to understand the diversity of exoplanets revealed by planet searches like Kepler and the Eta-Earth survey. Our observations will complement, extend, and provide context for similar observations with HST and Spitzer. We will investigate the fundamental nature of the closest kin to Earth-size exoplanets, and this is an important foundation that must be laid down before studying habitable planets with JWST and a future TPF-like mission.

  9. SIRTA, a ground-based atmospheric observatory for cloud and aerosol research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Haeffelin

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Ground-based remote sensing observatories have a crucial role to play in providing data to improve our understanding of atmospheric processes, to test the performance of atmospheric models, and to develop new methods for future space-borne observations. Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, a French research institute in environmental sciences, created the Site Instrumental de Recherche par Télédétection Atmosphérique (SIRTA, an atmospheric observatory with these goals in mind. Today SIRTA, located 20km south of Paris, operates a suite a state-of-the-art active and passive remote sensing instruments dedicated to routine monitoring of cloud and aerosol properties, and key atmospheric parameters. Detailed description of the state of the atmospheric column is progressively archived and made accessible to the scientific community. This paper describes the SIRTA infrastructure and database, and provides an overview of the scientific research associated with the observatory. Researchers using SIRTA data conduct research on atmospheric processes involving complex interactions between clouds, aerosols and radiative and dynamic processes in the atmospheric column. Atmospheric modellers working with SIRTA observations develop new methods to test their models and innovative analyses to improve parametric representations of sub-grid processes that must be accounted for in the model. SIRTA provides the means to develop data interpretation tools for future active remote sensing missions in space (e.g. CloudSat and CALIPSO. SIRTA observation and research activities take place in networks of atmospheric observatories that allow scientists to access consistent data sets from diverse regions on the globe.

  10. Ground-based solar radio observations of the August 1972 events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhonsle, R.V.; Degaonkar, S.S.; Alurkar, S.K.

    1976-01-01

    Ground-based observations of the variable solar radio emission ranging from few millimetres to decametres have been used here as a diagnostic tool to gain coherent phenomenological understanding of the great 2, 4 and 7 August, 1972 solar events in terms of dominant physical processes like generation and propagation of shock waves in the solar atmosphere, particle acceleration and trapping. Four major flares are selected for detailed analysis on the basis of their ability to produce energetic protons, shock waves, polar cap absorptions (PCA) and sudden commencement (SC) geomagnetic storms. A comparative study of their radio characteristics is made. Evidence is seen for the pulsations during microwave bursts by the mechanism similar to that proposed by McLean et al. (1971), to explain the pulsations in the metre wavelength continuum radiation. It is suggested that the multiple peaks observed in some microwave bursts may be attributable to individual flares occurring sequentially due to a single initiating flare. Attempts have been made to establish identification of Type II bursts with the interplanetary shock waves and SC geomagnetic storms. Furthermore, it is suggested that it is the mass behind the shock front which is the deciding factor for the detection of shock waves in the interplantary space. It appears that more work is necessary in order to identify which of the three moving Type IV bursts (Wild and Smerd, 1972), namely, advancing shock front, expanding magnetic arch and ejected plasma blob serves as the piston-driver behind the interplanetary shocks. The existing criteria for proton flare prediction have been summarized and two new criteria have been proposed. (Auth.)

  11. The high-resolution extraterrestrial solar spectrum (QASUMEFTS determined from ground-based solar irradiance measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gröbner

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A high-resolution extraterrestrial solar spectrum has been determined from ground-based measurements of direct solar spectral irradiance (SSI over the wavelength range from 300 to 500 nm using the Langley-plot technique. The measurements were obtained at the Izaña Atmospheric Research Centre from the Agencia Estatal de Meteorología, Tenerife, Spain, during the period 12 to 24 September 2016. This solar spectrum (QASUMEFTS was combined from medium-resolution (bandpass of 0.86 nm measurements of the QASUME (Quality Assurance of Spectral Ultraviolet Measurements in Europe spectroradiometer in the wavelength range from 300 to 500 nm and high-resolution measurements (0.025 nm from a Fourier transform spectroradiometer (FTS over the wavelength range from 305 to 380 nm. The Kitt Peak solar flux atlas was used to extend this high-resolution solar spectrum to 500 nm. The expanded uncertainties of this solar spectrum are 2 % between 310 and 500 nm and 4 % at 300 nm. The comparison of this solar spectrum with solar spectra measured in space (top of the atmosphere gave very good agreements in some cases, while in some other cases discrepancies of up to 5 % were observed. The QASUMEFTS solar spectrum represents a benchmark dataset with uncertainties lower than anything previously published. The metrological traceability of the measurements to the International System of Units (SI is assured by an unbroken chain of calibrations leading to the primary spectral irradiance standard of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt in Germany.

  12. Satellite- and ground-based observations of atmospheric water vapor absorption in the 940 nm region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, P.; Smith, K.M.; Bennartz, R.; Newnham, D.A.; Fischer, J.

    2004-01-01

    Ground-based measurements of direct absorption of solar radiation between 9000 and 13,000 cm -1 (770-1100 nm) with a spectral resolution of 0.05 cm -1 are compared with line-by-line simulations of atmospheric absorption based on different molecular databases (HITRAN 2000, HITRAN 99, HITRAN 96 and ESA-WVR). Differences between measurements and simulations can be reduced to a great amount by scaling the individual line intensities with spectral and database dependent scaling factors. Scaling factors are calculated for the selected databases using a Marquardt non-linear least-squares fit together with a forward model for 100 cm -1 wide intervals between 10,150 and 11,250 cm -1 as well as for the water vapor absorption channels of the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) onboard the European Space Agency's (ESA) ENVISAT platform and the Modular Optoelectronic Scanner (MOS) on the Indian IRSP-3 platform, developed by the German Aerospace Centre (DLR). For the latter, the scaling coefficients are converted into correction factors for retrieved total columnar water vapor content and used for a comparison of MOS-based retrievals of total columnar atmospheric water vapor above cloud-free land surfaces with radio soundings. The scaling factors determined for 100 cm -1 wide intervals range from 0.85 for the ESA-WVR molecular database to 1.15 for HITRAN 96. The best agreement between measurements and simulations is achieved with HITRAN 99 and HITRAN 2000, respectively, using scaling factors between 0.9 and 1. The effects on the satellite-based retrievals of columnar atmospheric water vapor range from 2% (HITRAN 2000) to 12% (ESA-WVR)

  13. Subtropical and Polar Cirrus Clouds Characterized by Ground-Based Lidars and CALIPSO/CALIOP Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Córdoba-Jabonero Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cirrus clouds are product of weather processes, and then their occurrence and macrophysical/optical properties can vary significantly over different regions of the world. Lidars can provide height-resolved measurements with a relatively good both vertical and temporal resolutions, making them the most suitable instrumentation for high-cloud observations. The aim of this work is to show the potential of lidar observations on Cirrus clouds detection in combination with a recently proposed methodology to retrieve the Cirrus clouds macrophysical and optical features. In this sense, a few case studies of cirrus clouds observed at both subtropical and polar latitudes are examined and compared to CALIPSO/CALIOP observations. Lidar measurements are carried out in two stations: the Metropolitan city of Sao Paulo (MSP, Brazil, 23.3°S 46.4°W, located at subtropical latitudes, and the Belgrano II base (BEL, Argentina, 78ºS 35ºW in the Antarctic continent. Optical (COD-cloud optical depth and LR-Lidar Ratio and macrophysical (top/base heights and thickness properties of both the subtropical and polar cirrus clouds are reported. In general, subtropical Cirrus clouds present lower LR values and are found at higher altitudes than those detected at polar latitudes. In general, Cirrus clouds are detected at similar altitudes by CALIOP. However, a poor agreement is achieved in the LR retrieved between ground-based lidars and space-borne CALIOP measurements, likely due to the use of a fixed (or low-variable LR value in CALIOP inversion procedures.

  14. Research on Ground-Based LWIR Hyperspectral Imaging Remote Gas Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei-jian; Lei, Zheng-gang; Yu, Chun-chao; Yang, Zhi-xiong; Wang, Hai-yangi; Fu, Yan-peng; Li, Xun-niu; Liao, Ning-fang; Su, Jun-hong

    2016-02-01

    The new progress of ground-based long-wave infrared remote sensing is presented, which describes the windowing spatial and temporal modulation Fourier spectroscopy imaging in details. The prototype forms the interference fringes based on the corner-cube of spatial modulation of Michelson interferometer, using cooled long-wave infrared photovoltaic staring FPA (focal plane array) detector. The LWIR hyperspectral imaging is achieved by the process of collection, reorganization, correction, apodization, FFT etc. from data cube. Noise equivalent spectral radiance (NESR), which is the sensitivity index of CHIPED-1 LWIR hyperspectral imaging prototype, can reach 5.6 x 10⁻⁸ W · (cm⁻¹ · sr · cm²)⁻¹ at single sampling. The data is the same as commercial temporal modulation hyperspectral imaging spectrometer. It can prove the advantage of this technique. This technique still has space to be improved. For instance, spectral response range of CHIPED-1 LWIR hyperspectral imaging prototype can reach 11. 5 µm by testing the transmission curve of polypropylene film. In this article, choosing the results of outdoor high-rise and diethyl ether gas experiment as an example, the authors research on the detecting method of 2D distribution chemical gas VOC by infrared hyperspectral imaging. There is no observed diethyl ether gas from the infrared spectral slice of the same wave number in complicated background and low concentration. By doing the difference spectrum, the authors can see the space distribution of diethyl ether gas clearly. Hyperspectral imaging is used in the field of organic gas VOC infrared detection. Relative to wide band infrared imaging, it has some advantages. Such as, it has high sensitivity, the strong anti-interference ability, identify the variety, and so on.

  15. Characterization of Oribtal Debris via Hyper-Velocity Ground-Based Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowardin, H.

    2015-01-01

    Existing DoD and NASA satellite breakup models are based on a key laboratory-based test, Satellite Orbital debris Characterization Impact Test (SOCIT), which has supported many applications and matched on-orbit events involving older satellite designs reasonably well over the years. In order to update and improve the break-up models and the NASA Size Estimation Model (SEM) for events involving more modern satellite designs, the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has worked in collaboration with the University of Florida to replicate a hypervelocity impact using a satellite built with modern-day spacecraft materials and construction techniques. The spacecraft, called DebriSat, was intended to be a representative of modern LEO satellites and all major designs decisions were reviewed and approved by subject matter experts at Aerospace Corporation. DebriSat is composed of 7 major subsystems including attitude determination and control system (ADCS), command and data handling (C&DH), electrical power system (EPS), payload, propulsion, telemetry tracking and command (TT&C), and thermal management. To reduce cost, most components are emulated based on existing design of flight hardware and fabricated with the same materials. All fragments down to 2 mm is size will be characterized via material, size, shape, bulk density, and the associated data will be stored in a database for multiple users to access. Laboratory radar and optical measurements will be performed on a subset of fragments to provide a better understanding of the data products from orbital debris acquired from ground-based radars and telescopes. The resulting data analysis from DebriSat will be used to update break-up models and develop the first optical SEM in conjunction with updates into the current NASA SEM. The characterization of the fragmentation will be discussed in the subsequent presentation.

  16. Microwave complex for ground based ozone and thermal sounding of middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvetsov, Alexander; Krasil'nikov, Alexander; Kulikov, Mihail; Ryskin, Vitaly; Bolshakov, Oleg; Belikovich, Mihail; Mukhin, Dmitry; Karashtin, Dmitry; Fedoseev, Lev; Feigin, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Description of the novel ground-based microwave complex for ozone and thermal sounding of middle atmosphere is presented. The instrument include two spectroradiometers operating in the frequency range 110.3-111.3 GHz (ozone line), and in the in the frequency range 52.5 - 54.5 GHz (edge of 5-mm molecular oxygen band), accordingly. The latter includes band slope and four resolved from the earth's surface relatively weak oxygen lines. Both spectroradiometers employ feed cone as antenna with half-power beam width approximately equal 4 degree. Two digital fast Fourier transform spectrometers developed by "Acqiris" are used for signal analysis in the intermediate frequency range 0.05 - 1 GHz with the effective resolution 61 KHz. Both spectroradiometers operate in total power mod with fast internal calibration that realize by electrically controlled noise generator on basis of Shottky barrier diodes. Noise temperature is approximately 3000 K for ozone spectroradiometer and 1400 K for thermometer. Novel method for retrieval vertical profiles of ozone and temperature from radiometric data is applied. The procedure is based on Bayesian approach to inverse problems which assumes a construction of probability distribution of the characteristics of retrieved profiles with taking into account measurement noise and available a priori information about possible distributions of ozone and temperature in the middle atmosphere. At the present time we carry out the experimental campaign aimed to simultaneous measurements temperature and ozone profile above Nizhny Novgorod, Russia. The work was done under support of the RFBR (projects 11-05-97050 and 12-05-00999)

  17. Ground-based photometry of the 21-day Neptune HD 106315c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendl, M.; Ehrenreich, D.; Turner, O. D.; Bayliss, D.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Giles, H.; Bouchy, F.; Marmier, M.; Udry, S.

    2017-07-01

    Space-based transit surveys such as K2 and the Transiting Exoplanets Survey Satellite (TESS) allow the detection of small transiting planets with orbital periods greater than 10 days. Few of these warm Neptunes are currently known around stars bright enough to allow for detailed follow-up observations dedicated to their atmospheric characterization. The 21-day period and 3.95 R⊕ planet HD 106315c has been discovered by K2 based on the observation of two of its transits. We observed HD 106315 using the 1.2 m Euler telescope equipped with the EulerCam camera on two occasions to confirm the transit using broadband photometry and refine the planetary period. Based on two observed transits of HD 106315c, we detect its 1 mmag transit and obtain a precise measurement of the planetary ephemerides, which are critical for planning further follow-up observations. We used the attained precision together with the predicted yield from the TESS mission to evaluate the potential for ground-based confirmation of Neptune-sized planets found by TESS. We find that one-meter class telescopes on the ground equipped with precise photometers could substantially contribute to the follow-up of 162 TESS candidates orbiting stars with magnitudes of V ≤ 14. Of these candidates, 74 planets orbit stars with V ≤ 12 and 12 planets orbit V ≤ 10, which makes them high-priority objects for atmospheric characterization with high-end instrumentation. The photometric time series data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/603/L5

  18. Validation of smoke plume rise models using ground-based Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, V.; Urbanski, S.; Petkov, A.; Scalise, A.; Wold, C.; Hao, W. M.

    2014-10-01

    Biomass fires can significantly degrade regional air quality through the emission of primary aerosols and the photochemical production of ozone and secondary aerosols. The injection height of smoke from biomass burning into the atmosphere (`plume rise height') is one of the critical factors in determining the impact of fire emissions on air quality. Plume rise models are used to simulate plume rise height and prescribe the vertical distribution of fire emissions for input to smoke dispersion and air quality models. While several plume rise models exist, their uncertainties, biases, and application limits when applied to biomass fires are not well characterized. The poor state of model evaluation is due in large part to a lack of appropriate observational datasets. We have initiated a research project to address this critical observation gap. In August of 2013 we performed a multi-agency field experiment designed to obtain the data necessary to improve the air quality models used by agricultural smoke managers in the northwestern United States. In the experiment, the ground-based mobile lidar, developed at the US Forest Service Missoula Fire Science Laboratory, was used to monitor plume rise heights for nine agricultural fires in the northwestern United States. The lidar measurements were compared with plume rise heights calculated with the Briggs equations, which are used in several smoke management tools. Here we present the preliminary evaluation results and provide recommendations regarding the application of the models to agricultural burning based on lidar measurements made in the vicinity of Walla Walla, Washington, on August 24, 2013.

  19. Geocenter variations derived from a combined processing of LEO- and ground-based GPS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Männel, Benjamin; Rothacher, Markus

    2017-08-01

    GNSS observations provided by the global tracking network of the International GNSS Service (IGS, Dow et al. in J Geod 83(3):191-198, 2009) play an important role in the realization of a unique terrestrial reference frame that is accurate enough to allow a detailed monitoring of the Earth's system. Combining these ground-based data with GPS observations tracked by high-quality dual-frequency receivers on-board low earth orbiters (LEOs) is a promising way to further improve the realization of the terrestrial reference frame and the estimation of geocenter coordinates, GPS satellite orbits and Earth rotation parameters. To assess the scope of the improvement on the geocenter coordinates, we processed a network of 53 globally distributed and stable IGS stations together with four LEOs (GRACE-A, GRACE-B, OSTM/Jason-2 and GOCE) over a time interval of 3 years (2010-2012). To ensure fully consistent solutions, the zero-difference phase observations of the ground stations and LEOs were processed in a common least-squares adjustment, estimating all the relevant parameters such as GPS and LEO orbits, station coordinates, Earth rotation parameters and geocenter motion. We present the significant impact of the individual LEO and a combination of all four LEOs on the geocenter coordinates. The formal errors are reduced by around 20% due to the inclusion of one LEO into the ground-only solution, while in a solution with four LEOs LEO-specific characteristics are significantly reduced. We compare the derived geocenter coordinates w.r.t. LAGEOS results and external solutions based on GPS and SLR data. We found good agreement in the amplitudes of all components; however, the phases in x- and z-direction do not agree well.

  20. Characterizing GEO Titan IIIC Transtage Fragmentations using Ground-Based and Telescopic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowardin, Heather; Anz-Meador, Phillip; Reyes, Jacqueline A.

    2017-01-01

    In a continued effort to better characterize the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) environment, NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) utilizes various ground-based optical assets to acquire photometric and spectral data of known debris associated with fragmentations in or near GEO. The Titan IIIC Transtage upper stage is known to have fragmented four times. Two of the four fragmentations were in GEO while the Transtage fragmented a third time in GEO transfer orbit. The forth fragmentation occurred in low Earth orbit. To better assess and characterize these fragmentations, the NASA ODPO acquired a Titan Transtage test and display article previously in the custody of the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG) in Tucson, Arizona. After initial inspections at AMARG demonstrated that it was of sufficient fidelity to be of interest, the test article was brought to NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) to continue material analysis and historical documentation. The Transtage has undergone two separate spectral measurement campaigns to characterize the reflectance spectroscopy of historical aerospace materials. These data have been incorporated into the NASA Spectral Database, with the goal of using telescopic data comparisons for potential material identification. A Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) system scan also has been completed and a scale model has been created for use in the Optical Measurement Center (OMC) for photometric analysis of an intact Transtage, including bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) measurements. An historical overview of the Titan IIIC Transtage, the current analysis that has been done to date, and the future work to be completed in support of characterizing the GEO and near GEO orbital debris environment will be discussed in the subsequent presentation.

  1. Development and verification of ground-based tele-robotics operations concept for Dextre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Sarmad

    2013-05-01

    The Special Purpose Dextreous Manipulator (Dextre) is the latest addition to the on-orbit segment of the Mobile Servicing System (MSS); Canada's contribution to the International Space Station (ISS). Launched in March 2008, the advanced two-armed robot is designed to perform various ISS maintenance tasks on robotically compatible elements and on-orbit replaceable units using a wide variety of tools and interfaces. The addition of Dextre has increased the capabilities of the MSS, and has introduced significant complexity to ISS robotics operations. While the initial operations concept for Dextre was based on human-in-the-loop control by the on-orbit astronauts, the complexities of robotic maintenance and the associated costs of training and maintaining the operator skills required for Dextre operations demanded a reexamination of the old concepts. A new approach to ISS robotic maintenance was developed in order to utilize the capabilities of Dextre safely and efficiently, while at the same time reducing the costs of on-orbit operations. This paper will describe the development, validation, and on-orbit demonstration of the operations concept for ground-based tele-robotics control of Dextre. It will describe the evolution of the new concepts from the experience gained from the development and implementation of the ground control capability for the Space Station Remote Manipulator System; Canadarm 2. It will discuss the various technical challenges faced during the development effort, such as requirements for high positioning accuracy, force/moment sensing and accommodation, failure tolerance, complex tool operations, and the novel operational tools and techniques developed to overcome them. The paper will also describe the work performed to validate the new concepts on orbit and will discuss the results and lessons learned from the on-orbit checkout and commissioning of Dextre using the newly developed tele-robotics techniques and capabilities.

  2. OGLE-2015-BLG-0196: GROUND-BASED GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENS PARALLAX CONFIRMED BY SPACE-BASED OBSERVATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, C. [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Poleski, R.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pawlak, M. [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Gould, A.; Zhu, Wei; Fausnaugh, M.; Gaudi, B. S. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Yee, J. C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Beichman, C. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, MS 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Novati, S. Calchi [Dipartimento di Fisica “E. R. Caianiello,” Uńiversitá di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy); Carey, S. [Spitzer Science Center, MS 220-6, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Bryden, C. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Collaboration: OGLE Collaboration; Spitzer Microlensing Team; and others

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis of the binary gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0196. The event lasted for almost a year, and the light curve exhibited significant deviations from the lensing model based on the rectilinear lens-source relative motion, enabling us to measure the microlens parallax. The ground-based microlens parallax is confirmed by the data obtained from space-based microlens observations using the Spitzer telescope. By additionally measuring the angular Einstein radius from the analysis of the resolved caustic crossing, the physical parameters of the lens are determined up to the twofold degeneracy, u {sub 0} < 0 and u {sub 0} > 0, solutions caused by the well-known “ecliptic” degeneracy. It is found that the binary lens is composed of two M dwarf stars with similar masses, M {sub 1} = 0.38 ± 0.04 M {sub ⊙} (0.50 ± 0.05 M {sub ⊙}) and M {sub 2} = 0.38 ± 0.04 M {sub ⊙} (0.55 ± 0.06 M {sub ⊙}), and the distance to the lens is D {sub L} = 2.77 ± 0.23 kpc (3.30 ± 0.29 kpc). Here the physical parameters outside and inside the parentheses are for the u {sub 0} < 0 and u {sub 0} > 0 solutions, respectively.

  3. Ground-Based Measurements of the 2014–2015 Holuhraun Volcanic Cloud (Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A. Pfeffer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The 2014–2015 Bárðarbunga fissure eruption at Holuhraun in central Iceland was distinguished by the high emission of gases, in total 9.6 Mt SO2, with almost no tephra. This work collates all ground-based measurements of this extraordinary eruption cloud made under particularly challenging conditions: remote location, optically dense cloud with high SO2 column amounts, low UV intensity, frequent clouds and precipitation, an extensive and hot lava field, developing ramparts, and high-latitude winter conditions. Semi-continuous measurements of SO2 flux with three scanning DOAS instruments were augmented by car traverses along the ring-road and along the lava. The ratios of other gases/SO2 were measured by OP-FTIR, MultiGAS, and filter packs. Ratios of SO2/HCl = 30–110 and SO2/HF = 30–130 show a halogen-poor eruption cloud. Scientists on-site reported extremely minor tephra production during the eruption. OPC and filter packs showed low particle concentrations similar to non-eruption cloud conditions. Three weather radars detected a droplet-rich eruption cloud. Top of eruption cloud heights of 0.3–5.5 km agl were measured with ground- and aircraft-based visual observations, web camera and NicAIR II infrared images, triangulation of scanning DOAS instruments, and the location of SO2 peaks measured by DOAS traverses. Cloud height and emission rate measurements were critical for initializing gas dispersal simulations for hazard forecasting.

  4. Blowing snow detection from ground-based ceilometers: application to East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossart, Alexandra; Souverijns, Niels; Gorodetskaya, Irina V.; Lhermitte, Stef; Lenaerts, Jan T. M.; Schween, Jan H.; Mangold, Alexander; Laffineur, Quentin; van Lipzig, Nicole P. M.

    2017-12-01

    Blowing snow impacts Antarctic ice sheet surface mass balance by snow redistribution and sublimation. However, numerical models poorly represent blowing snow processes, while direct observations are limited in space and time. Satellite retrieval of blowing snow is hindered by clouds and only the strongest events are considered. Here, we develop a blowing snow detection (BSD) algorithm for ground-based remote-sensing ceilometers in polar regions and apply it to ceilometers at Neumayer III and Princess Elisabeth (PE) stations, East Antarctica. The algorithm is able to detect (heavy) blowing snow layers reaching 30 m height. Results show that 78 % of the detected events are in agreement with visual observations at Neumayer III station. The BSD algorithm detects heavy blowing snow 36 % of the time at Neumayer (2011-2015) and 13 % at PE station (2010-2016). Blowing snow occurrence peaks during the austral winter and shows around 5 % interannual variability. The BSD algorithm is capable of detecting blowing snow both lifted from the ground and occurring during precipitation, which is an added value since results indicate that 92 % of the blowing snow is during synoptic events, often combined with precipitation. Analysis of atmospheric meteorological variables shows that blowing snow occurrence strongly depends on fresh snow availability in addition to wind speed. This finding challenges the commonly used parametrizations, where the threshold for snow particles to be lifted is a function of wind speed only. Blowing snow occurs predominantly during storms and overcast conditions, shortly after precipitation events, and can reach up to 1300 m a. g. l. in the case of heavy mixed events (precipitation and blowing snow together). These results suggest that synoptic conditions play an important role in generating blowing snow events and that fresh snow availability should be considered in determining the blowing snow onset.

  5. Geocenter Coordinates from a Combined Processing of LEO and Ground-based GPS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Männel, Benjamin; Rothacher, Markus

    2017-04-01

    The GPS observations provided by the global IGS (International GNSS Service) tracking network play an important role for the realization of a unique terrestrial reference frame that is accurate enough to allow the monitoring of the Earth's system. Combining these ground-based data with GPS observations tracked by high-quality dual-frequency receivers on-board Low Earth Orbiters (LEO) might help to further improve the realization of the terrestrial reference frame and the estimation of the geocenter coordinates, GPS satellite orbits and Earth rotation parameters (ERP). To assess the scope of improvement, we processed a network of 50 globally distributed and stable IGS-stations together with four LEOs (GRACE-A, GRACE-B, OSTM/Jason-2 and GOCE) over a time interval of three years (2010-2012). To ensure fully consistent solutions the zero-difference phase observations of the ground stations and LEOs were processed in a common least-square adjustment, estimating GPS orbits, LEO orbits, station coordinates, ERPs, site-specific tropospheric delays, satellite and receiver clocks and ambiguities. We present the significant impact of the individual LEOs and a combination of all four LEOs on geocenter coordinates derived by using a translational approach (also called network shift approach). In addition, we present geocenter coordinates derived from the same set of GPS observations by using a unified approach. This approach combines the translational and the degree-one approach by estimating translations and surface deformations simultaneously. Based on comparisons against each other and against geocenter time series derived by other techniques the effect of the selected approach is assessed.

  6. Blowing snow detection from ground-based ceilometers: application to East Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gossart

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Blowing snow impacts Antarctic ice sheet surface mass balance by snow redistribution and sublimation. However, numerical models poorly represent blowing snow processes, while direct observations are limited in space and time. Satellite retrieval of blowing snow is hindered by clouds and only the strongest events are considered. Here, we develop a blowing snow detection (BSD algorithm for ground-based remote-sensing ceilometers in polar regions and apply it to ceilometers at Neumayer III and Princess Elisabeth (PE stations, East Antarctica. The algorithm is able to detect (heavy blowing snow layers reaching 30 m height. Results show that 78 % of the detected events are in agreement with visual observations at Neumayer III station. The BSD algorithm detects heavy blowing snow 36 % of the time at Neumayer (2011–2015 and 13 % at PE station (2010–2016. Blowing snow occurrence peaks during the austral winter and shows around 5 % interannual variability. The BSD algorithm is capable of detecting blowing snow both lifted from the ground and occurring during precipitation, which is an added value since results indicate that 92 % of the blowing snow is during synoptic events, often combined with precipitation. Analysis of atmospheric meteorological variables shows that blowing snow occurrence strongly depends on fresh snow availability in addition to wind speed. This finding challenges the commonly used parametrizations, where the threshold for snow particles to be lifted is a function of wind speed only. Blowing snow occurs predominantly during storms and overcast conditions, shortly after precipitation events, and can reach up to 1300 m a. g. l.  in the case of heavy mixed events (precipitation and blowing snow together. These results suggest that synoptic conditions play an important role in generating blowing snow events and that fresh snow availability should be considered in determining the blowing snow onset.

  7. Person re-identification across aerial and ground-based cameras by deep feature fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Arne; Metzler, Jürgen

    2017-05-01

    Person re-identification is the task of correctly matching visual appearances of the same person in image or video data while distinguishing appearances of different persons. The traditional setup for re-identification is a network of fixed cameras. However, in recent years mobile aerial cameras mounted on unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) have become increasingly useful for security and surveillance tasks. Aerial data has many characteristics different from typical camera network data. Thus, re-identification approaches designed for a camera network scenario can be expected to suffer a drop in accuracy when applied to aerial data. In this work, we investigate the suitability of features, which were shown to give robust results for re- identification in camera networks, for the task of re-identifying persons between a camera network and a mobile aerial camera. Specifically, we apply hand-crafted region covariance features and features extracted by convolu- tional neural networks which were learned on separate data. We evaluate their suitability for this new and as yet unexplored scenario. We investigate common fusion methods to combine the hand-crafted and learned features and propose our own deep fusion approach which is already applied during training of the deep network. We evaluate features and fusion methods on our own dataset. The dataset consists of fourteen people moving through a scene recorded by four fixed ground-based cameras and one mobile camera mounted on a small UAV. We discuss strengths and weaknesses of the features in the new scenario and show that our fusion approach successfully leverages the strengths of each feature and outperforms all single features significantly.

  8. Sounding rocket/ground-based observation campaign to study Medium-Scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (MSTID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, M.; Yokoyama, T.; Saito, A.; Otsuka, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Abe, T.; Watanabe, S.; Ishisaka, K.; Saito, S.; Larsen, M.; Pfaff, R. F.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    An observation campaign is under preparation. It is to launch sounding rockets S-520-27 and S-310-42 from Uchinoura Space Center of JAXA while ground-based instruments measure waves in the ionosphere. It is scheduled in July/August 2013. The main purpose of the experiment is to reveal generation mechanism of Medium-Scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbance (MSTID). The MSTID is the ionospheric wave with 1-2 hour periodicity, 100-200 km horizontal wavelength, and southwestward propagation. It is enhanced in the summer nighttime of the mid-latitude ionosphere. The MSTID is not only a simple atmospheric-wave modulation of the ionosphere, but shows similarity to characteristics of the Perkins instability. A problem is that growth rate of the Perkins instability is too small to explain the phenomena. We now hypothesize a generation mechanism that electromagnetic coupling of the F- and E-regions help rapid growth of the MSTID especially at its initial stage. In the observation campaign, we will use the sounding rocket S-520-27 for in-situ measurement of ionospheric parameters, i.e., electron density and electric fields. Wind velocity measurements in both F- and E-regions are very important as well. For the F-region winds, we will conduct Lithium-release experiment under the full-moon condition. This is a big technical challenge. Another rocket S-310-42 will be used for the E-region wind measurement with the TMA release. On the ground, we will use GEONET (Japanese vast GPS receiver network) to monitor horizontal distribution of GPS-TEC on the realtime bases. In the presentation we will show MSTID characteristics and the proposed generation mechanism, and discuss plan and current status of the project.

  9. Confronting remote sensing product with ground base measurements across time and scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmokhtarian, A.; Dietze, M.

    2015-12-01

    Ecosystem models are essential tools in forecasting ecosystem responses to global climate change. One of the most challenging issues in ecosystem modeling is scaling while preserving landscape characteristics and minimizing loss of information, when moving from point observation to regional scale. There is a keen interest in providing accurate inputs for ecosystem models which represent ecosystem initial state conditions. Remote sensing land cover products, such as Landsat NLCD and MODIS MCD12Q1, provide extensive spatio-temporal coverage but do not capture forest composition and structure. Lidar and hyperspectral have the potential to meet this need but lack sufficient spatial and historical coverage. Forest inventory measurements provide detailed information on the landscape but in a very small footprint. Combining inventory and land cover could improve estimates of ecosystem state and characteristic across time and space. This study focuses on the challenges associated with fusing and scaling the US Forest Service FIA database and NLCD across regional scales to quantify ecosystem characteristics and reduce associated uncertainties. Across Southeast of U.S. 400 stratified random samples of 10x10 km2 landscapes were selected. Data on plant density, species, age, and DBH of trees in FIA plots within each site were extracted. Using allometry equations, the canopy cover of different plant functional types (PFTs) was estimated using a PPA-style canopy model and used to assign each inventory plot to a land cover class. Inventory and land cover were fused in a Bayesian model that adjusts the fractional coverage of inventory plots while accounting for multiple sources of uncertainty. Results were compared to estimates derived from inventory alone, land cover alone, and model spin-up alone. Our findings create a framework of data assimilation to better interpret remote sensing data using ground-based measurements.

  10. Ground-based remote sensing of tropospheric water vapour isotopologues within the project MUSICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M.; Barthlott, S.; Hase, F.; González, Y.; Yoshimura, K.; García, O. E.; Sepúlveda, E.; Gomez-Pelaez, A.; Gisi, M.; Kohlhepp, R.; Dohe, S.; Blumenstock, T.; Wiegele, A.; Christner, E.; Strong, K.; Weaver, D.; Palm, M.; Deutscher, N. M.; Warneke, T.; Notholt, J.; Lejeune, B.; Demoulin, P.; Jones, N.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Smale, D.; Robinson, J.

    2012-12-01

    Within the project MUSICA (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water), long-term tropospheric water vapour isotopologue data records are provided for ten globally distributed ground-based mid-infrared remote sensing stations of the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change). We present a new method allowing for an extensive and straightforward characterisation of the complex nature of such isotopologue remote sensing datasets. We demonstrate that the MUSICA humidity profiles are representative for most of the troposphere with a vertical resolution ranging from about 2 km (in the lower troposphere) to 8 km (in the upper troposphere) and with an estimated precision of better than 10%. We find that the sensitivity with respect to the isotopologue composition is limited to the lower and middle troposphere, whereby we estimate a precision of about 30‰ for the ratio between the two isotopologues HD16O and H216O. The measurement noise, the applied atmospheric temperature profiles, the uncertainty in the spectral baseline, and the cross-dependence on humidity are the leading error sources. We introduce an a posteriori correction method of the cross-dependence on humidity, and we recommend applying it to isotopologue ratio remote sensing datasets in general. In addition, we present mid-infrared CO2 retrievals and use them for demonstrating the MUSICA network-wide data consistency. In order to indicate the potential of long-term isotopologue remote sensing data if provided with a well-documented quality, we present a climatology and compare it to simulations of an isotope incorporated AGCM (Atmospheric General Circulation Model). We identify differences in the multi-year mean and seasonal cycles that significantly exceed the estimated errors, thereby indicating deficits in the modeled atmospheric water cycle.

  11. Ground-based remote sensing of tropospheric water vapour isotopologues within the project MUSICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schneider

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the project MUSICA (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water, long-term tropospheric water vapour isotopologue data records are provided for ten globally distributed ground-based mid-infrared remote sensing stations of the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change. We present a new method allowing for an extensive and straightforward characterisation of the complex nature of such isotopologue remote sensing datasets. We demonstrate that the MUSICA humidity profiles are representative for most of the troposphere with a vertical resolution ranging from about 2 km (in the lower troposphere to 8 km (in the upper troposphere and with an estimated precision of better than 10%. We find that the sensitivity with respect to the isotopologue composition is limited to the lower and middle troposphere, whereby we estimate a precision of about 30‰ for the ratio between the two isotopologues HD16O and H216O. The measurement noise, the applied atmospheric temperature profiles, the uncertainty in the spectral baseline, and the cross-dependence on humidity are the leading error sources. We introduce an a posteriori correction method of the cross-dependence on humidity, and we recommend applying it to isotopologue ratio remote sensing datasets in general. In addition, we present mid-infrared CO2 retrievals and use them for demonstrating the MUSICA network-wide data consistency. In order to indicate the potential of long-term isotopologue remote sensing data if provided with a well-documented quality, we present a climatology and compare it to simulations of an isotope incorporated AGCM (Atmospheric General Circulation Model. We identify differences in the multi-year mean and seasonal cycles that significantly exceed the estimated errors, thereby indicating deficits in the modeled atmospheric water cycle.

  12. PhotoSpec - Ground-based Remote Sensing of Solar-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence: First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, K.; Magney, T. S.; Frankenberg, C.; Seibt, U.; Pivovaroff, A. L.; Hurlock, S. C.; Stutz, J.

    2016-12-01

    Solar-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence (SIF) emitted from vegetation can be used as a proxy for photosynthetic activity and is observable on a global scale from space. However, many issues on a leaf-to-canopy scale remain poorly understood, such as influences on the SIF signal from environmental conditions, water stress, or radiation. We have developed a novel ground-based spectrometer system for measuring SIF from natural ecosystems. The instrumental set-up, requirements, and measurement technique are based on decades of experience using Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS), an established method to measure atmospheric trace gases. The instrument consists of three thermally stabilized commercial spectrometers that are linked to a 2D scanning telescope unit via optical fiber bundles, and also includes a commercial photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) sensor. The spectrometers cover a SIF retrieval wavelength range at high spectral resolution (670 - 780 nm, 0.1 nm FWHM), and also provide moderate resolution spectra (400 - 800 nm, 1.5 nm FWHM) to retrieve vegetation indices and the photochemical reflectance index (PRI). We report on results of the first continuous field measurements of this novel system at Stunt Ranch Santa Monica Mountains UC Reserve, where the PhotoSpec instrument was monitoring SIF of four native Californian shrubland species with different adaptations to seasonal summer drought. We report on the correlation with CO2 fluxes over both the growing season and the hot summer period in 2016. We also show detailed measurements of the diurnal cycle of the SIF signal of single broad leaves, as well as dark-light transitions, under controlled experimental conditions. In addition to demonstrating the instrumental set-up, retrieval algorithm, and instrument performance, our results illustrate that SIF measurements at the leaf to ecosystem scale are needed to understand and interpret the SIF signals retrieved at larger scales.

  13. The thin border between cloud and aerosol: Sensitivity of several ground based observation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calbó, Josep; Long, Charles N.; González, Josep-Abel; Augustine, John; McComiskey, Allison

    2017-11-01

    Cloud and aerosol are two manifestations of what it is essentially the same physical phenomenon: a suspension of particles in the air. The differences between the two come from the different composition (e.g., much higher amount of condensed water in particles constituting a cloud) and/or particle size, and also from the different number of such particles (10-10,000 particles per cubic centimeter depending on conditions). However, there exist situations in which the distinction is far from obvious, and even when broken or scattered clouds are present in the sky, the borders between cloud/not cloud are not always well defined, a transition area that has been coined as the ;twilight zone;. The current paper presents a discussion on the definition of cloud and aerosol, the need for distinguishing or for considering the continuum between the two, and suggests a quantification of the importance and frequency of such ambiguous situations, founded on several ground-based observing techniques. Specifically, sensitivity analyses are applied on sky camera images and broadband and spectral radiometric measurements taken at Girona (Spain) and Boulder (Co, USA). Results indicate that, at these sites, in more than 5% of the daytime hours the sky may be considered cloudless (but containing aerosols) or cloudy (with some kind of optically thin clouds) depending on the observing system and the thresholds applied. Similarly, at least 10% of the time the extension of scattered or broken clouds into clear areas is problematic to establish, and depends on where the limit is put between cloud and aerosol. These findings are relevant to both technical approaches for cloud screening and sky cover categorization algorithms and radiative transfer studies, given the different effect of clouds and aerosols (and the different treatment in models) on the Earth's radiation balance.

  14. Deformation vector measurement by means of ground based interferometric radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelini, Alberto; Coppi, Francesco

    2017-10-01

    Ground Based Interferometric Radar (GBInRad) is a class of terrestrial remote sensing imaging system, based on microwave interferometric techniques. The principal application of GBInRad system is deformation monitoring, since respect to other techniques they can provide remote sensing, high sensitivity to small deformations, long range of measurements, imaging capability and fast scan time. The main limitation of standard GBInRad system is their capability of detecting movements only along the Line of Sight (LoS) of the sensor, although actual targets may show deformations in any direction of space; this represents an important limitation with respect to other techniques able to estimate the full 3D deformation vector. If the displacement direction is not known a priori, combining together LoS displacement measured from different spatial positions, it is possible to reconstruct the actual 3D displacement vector of monitored targets. In this paper are introduced and analysed the various aspect of the displacement vector measurement with multiple GBInRad system that work both in a monostatic and in a bistatic configuration. In the monostatic configuration every system transmits and receives the signal independently from the others; this approach requires multiple GBInRad system deployed to monitoring the same scenario and therefore its main limitations lie in the costs, power consumption and maintenance. A possible cost-effective evolution of the monostatic configuration is to exploit GBInRad system in a multiple bistatic configuration; a multiple bistatic Radar is a system in which a transmitter operates together with multiple receivers located in different positions in space. In this paper, the deformation vector measurement by means of bistatic GBInRad is proposed.

  15. Eight-component retrievals from ground-based MAX-DOAS observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Irie

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We attempt for the first time to retrieve lower-tropospheric vertical profile information for 8 quantities from ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS observations. The components retrieved are the aerosol extinction coefficients at two wavelengths, 357 and 476 nm, and NO2, HCHO, CHOCHO, H2O, SO2, and O3 volume mixing ratios. A Japanese MAX-DOAS profile retrieval algorithm, version 1 (JM1, is applied to observations performed at Cabauw, the Netherlands (51.97° N, 4.93° E, in June–July 2009 during the Cabauw Intercomparison campaign of Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI. Of the retrieved profiles, we focus here on the lowest-layer data (mean values at altitudes 0–1 km, where the sensitivity is usually highest owing to the longest light path. In support of the capability of the multi-component retrievals, we find reasonable overall agreement with independent data sets, including a regional chemical transport model (CHIMERE and in situ observations performed near the surface (2–3 m and at the 200-m height level of the tall tower in Cabauw. Plumes of enhanced HCHO and SO2 were likely affected by biogenic and ship emissions, respectively, and an improvement in their emission strengths is suggested for better agreement between CHIMERE simulations and MAX-DOAS observations. Analysis of air mass factors indicates that the horizontal spatial representativeness of MAX-DOAS observations is about 3–15 km (depending mainly on aerosol extinction, comparable to or better than the spatial resolution of current UV-visible satellite observations and model calculations. These demonstrate that MAX-DOAS provides multi-component data useful for the evaluation of satellite observations and model calculations and can play an important role in bridging different data sets having different spatial resolutions.

  16. Validation of stratospheric temperature profiles from a ground-based microwave radiometer with other techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Haefele, Alexander; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature trends has become recognized as an important indicator of climate change, because different climate forcing mechanisms exhibit distinct vertical warming and cooling patterns. For example, the cooling of the stratosphere is an indicator for climate change as it provides evidence of natural and anthropogenic climate forcing just like surface warming. Despite its importance, our understanding of the observed stratospheric temperature trend and our ability to test simulations of the stratospheric response to emissions of greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances remains limited. One of the main reason is because stratospheric long-term datasets are sparse and obtained trends differ from one another. Different techniques allow to measure stratospheric temperature profiles as radiosonde, lidar or satellite. The main advantage of microwave radiometers against these other instruments is a high temporal resolution with a reasonable good spatial resolution. Moreover, the measurement at a fixed location allows to observe local atmospheric dynamics over a long time period, which is crucial for climate research. This study presents an evaluation of the stratospheric temperature profiles from a newly ground-based microwave temperature radiometer (TEMPERA) which has been built and designed at the University of Bern. The measurements from TEMPERA are compared with the ones from other different techniques such as in-situ (radiosondes), active remote sensing (lidar) and passive remote sensing on board of Aura satellite (MLS) measurements. In addition a statistical analysis of the stratospheric temperature obtained from TEMPERA measurements during four years of data has been performed. This analysis evidenced the capability of TEMPERA radiometer to monitor the temperature in the stratosphere for a long-term. The detection of some singular sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) during the analyzed period shows the necessity of these

  17. HST and ground-based spectroscopy of quasar outflows: from mini-BALs to BALs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravec, E. A.; Hamann, F.; Capellupo, D. M.; McGraw, S. M.; Shields, J. C.; Rodríguez Hidalgo, P.

    2017-07-01

    Quasar outflows have been posited as a mechanism to couple supermassive black holes to evolution in their host galaxies. We use multi-epoch spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based observatories to study the outflows in seven quasars that have C IV outflow lines ranging from a classic broad absorption line (BAL) to weaker/narrower 'mini-BALs' across rest wavelengths of at least 850-1650 Å. The C IV outflow lines all varied within a time frame of ≤1.9 yr (rest). This includes equal occurrences of strengthening and weakening plus the emergence of a new BAL system at -38 800 km s-1 accompanied by dramatic strengthening in a mini-BAL at -22 800 km s-1. We infer from ˜1:1 doublet ratios in P v and other lines that the BAL system is highly saturated with line-of-sight covering fractions ranging from 0.27 to 0.80 in the highest to lowest column density regions, respectively. Three of the mini-BALs also provide evidence for saturation and partial covering based on ˜1:1 doublet ratios. We speculate that the BALs and mini-BALs form in similar clumpy/filamentary outflows, with mini-BALs identifying smaller or fewer clumps along our lines of sight. If we attribute the line variabilities to clumps crossing our lines of sight at roughly Keplerian speeds, then a typical variability time in our study, ˜1.1 yr, corresponds to a distance ˜2 pc from the central black hole. Combining this with the speed and minimum total column density inferred from the P v BAL, NH ≳ 2.5 × 1022 cm-2, suggests that the BAL outflow kinetic energy is in the range believed to be sufficient for feedback to galaxy evolution.

  18. Satellite and Ground Based Observations on Air Quality Over Major Cities in the Indo- Gangetic Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R. P.; Prasad, A. K.; Singh, S.

    2006-05-01

    The Indo-Gangetic (IG) basin is one of the largest basins in the world. The basin is densely populated; about 600 million live in the basin. Due to growing urbanization and industrialization, the air quality of cities lying in the basin is degrading. Further, increase in energy demand have led to growth of a number of coal based thermal power plants (TPP) which are mostly located close to cities are also contributing significantly in the air quality of the major cities in particular and in general of the IG basin. We have carried out analysis of satellite (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer - MODIS, Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer - MISR) data that have been corroborated by several ground observations (Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB), and other ground based measurements). In the last decade (1990- 2000), percent share of biomass as energy source has declined by 9.9% with rise in the coal (4.2%) and petroleum (4.2%) share. In the present paper, we have carried analysis of aerosol parameters retrieved from satellite remote sensing data and the air quality data measured in the major cities. The qualitative behavior of the aerosol parameters are found to show one to one relation with the air quality parameters measured from ground network. We have further used the Industrial Source Complex Short Term (ISCST-3) dispersion model to study the concentration of air pollutants emitted from these major cities and found that the point source lying in the cities contribute significantly up to a radius of 25km. The spatial concentration is found to be highly dependent on the wind direction and speed besides stability of the boundary layer. The model shows decrease in the concentration of pollutants with season (winter to summer).

  19. Ground-based and airborne measurements of volcanic gas emissions at White Island in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirpitz, Jan-Lukas; Poehler, Denis; Bobrowski, Nicole; Christenson, Bruce; Platt, Ulrich

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative understanding of volcanic gas emissions has twofold relevance for nature and society: 1) Variation in gas emission and/or in emitted gas ratios are tracers of the dynamic processes in the volcano interior indicating its activity. 2) Volcanic degassing plays an important role for the Earth's climate, for local sometimes even regional air quality and atmospheric chemistry. In autumn 2015, a campaign to White Island Volcano in New Zealand was organized to perform ground-based as well as airborne in-situ and remote sensing gas measurements of sulfur dioxide (SO2), carbon dioxide (CO2) and bromine monoxide (BrO). For all three gases the ratios and total emission rates were determined in different plume types and ages. An overview over the data will be presented with focus on the two most notable outcomes: 1) The first determination of the BrO/SO2 ratio in the White Island plume and a minimum estimate of the volcano's bromine emission rate; two of many parameters, which are important to assess the impact of volcanic degassing on the atmospheric halogen chemistry. 2) In-situ SO2 data was very successfully recorded with the PITSA, a prototype of a portable and cost-effective optical instrument. It is based on the principle of non-dispersive UV absorption spectroscopy and features different advantages over the customary electrochemical sensors, including a sub second response time, negligible cross sensitivities to other gases, and inherent calibration. The campaign data demonstrates the capabilities and limitations of the PITSA and shows, that it can be well applied as substitute for conventional electrochemical systems.

  20. An absolute calibration method of an ethyl alcohol biosensor based on wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi Jun; Mandelis, Andreas; Guo, Xinxin

    2015-11-01

    In this work, laser-based wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry (WM-DPTR) is applied to develop a non-invasive in-vehicle alcohol biosensor. WM-DPTR features unprecedented ethanol-specificity and sensitivity by suppressing baseline variations through a differential measurement near the peak and baseline of the mid-infrared ethanol absorption spectrum. Biosensor signal calibration curves are obtained from WM-DPTR theory and from measurements in human blood serum and ethanol solutions diffused from skin. The results demonstrate that the WM-DPTR-based calibrated alcohol biosensor can achieve high precision and accuracy for the ethanol concentration range of 0-100 mg/dl. The high-performance alcohol biosensor can be incorporated into ignition interlocks that could be fitted as a universal accessory in vehicles in an effort to reduce incidents of drinking and driving.

  1. Ground-based aerosol characterization during the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA field experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brito

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the physical and chemical characteristics of aerosols at ground level at a site heavily impacted by biomass burning. The site is located near Porto Velho, Rondônia, in the southwestern part of the Brazilian Amazon rainforest, and was selected for the deployment of a large suite of instruments, among them an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor. Our measurements were made during the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA field experiment, which consisted of a combination of aircraft and ground-based measurements over Brazil, aimed to investigate the impacts of biomass burning emissions on climate, air quality, and numerical weather prediction over South America. The campaign took place during the dry season and the transition to the wet season in September/October 2012. During most of the campaign, the site was impacted by regional biomass burning pollution (average CO mixing ratio of 0.6 ppm, occasionally superimposed by intense (up to 2 ppm of CO, freshly emitted biomass burning plumes. Aerosol number concentrations ranged from ~1000 cm−3 to peaks of up to 35 000 cm−3 (during biomass burning (BB events, corresponding to an average submicron mass mean concentrations of 13.7 μg m−3 and peak concentrations close to 100 μg m−3. Organic aerosol strongly dominated the submicron non-refractory composition, with an average concentration of 11.4 μg m−3. The inorganic species, NH4, SO4, NO3, and Cl, were observed, on average, at concentrations of 0.44, 0.34, 0.19, and 0.01 μg m−3, respectively. Equivalent black carbon (BCe ranged from 0.2 to 5.5 μg m−3, with an average concentration of 1.3 μg m−3. During BB peaks, organics accounted for over 90% of total mass (submicron non-refractory plus BCe, among the highest values described in the literature. We examined the ageing of biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA using the changes in the H : C and O : C ratios, and found that throughout most of the

  2. Multi-frequency force-detected electron spin resonance in the millimeter-wave region up to 150 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohmichi, E., E-mail: ohmichi@harbor.kobe-u.ac.jp; Tokuda, Y.; Tabuse, R.; Tsubokura, D.; Okamoto, T. [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Ohta, H. [Molecular Photoscience Research Center, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2016-07-15

    In this article, a novel technique is developed for multi-frequency force-detected electron spin resonance (ESR) in the millimeter-wave region. We constructed a compact ESR probehead, in which the cantilever bending is sensitively detected by a fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometer. With this setup, ESR absorption of diphenyl-picrylhydrazyl radical (<1 μg) was clearly observed at multiple frequencies of up to 150 GHz. We also observed the hyperfine splitting of low-concentration Mn{sup 2+} impurities(∼0.2%) in MgO.

  3. Toward compact millimeter-wave diode in thin stacked-hole array assisted by a dielectric grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beruete, M.; Serebryannikov, A. E.; Torres, V.; Navarro-Cía, M.; Sorolla, M.

    2011-10-01

    Unidirectional transmission in thin stacked hole arrays (SHAs), whose spatial inversion symmetry is broken by adding a dielectric grating at one of the interfaces, is theoretically predicted and experimentally validated in the millimeter-wave regime. It appears at a fixed nonzero angle of incidence due to hybridization of SHA resonances with diffraction effects. In contrast to the earlier suggested structures with the diffraction relevant unidirectional transmission mechanism, the nonsymmetric diode-like structure founded on the intrinsically subwavelength SHA, which supports left-handed propagation, is less than one wavelength thick.

  4. IUE spectroscopy, visible-band polarimetry, and radiometry of V641 Mon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, R. H.; Hrivnak, B. J.; Bradstreet, D. H.; Blitzstein, W.; Pfeiffer, R. J.; Perry, P. M.

    1982-01-01

    This hot, double line, ellipsoidal variable member of NGC 2264 has been shown previously to be either a semi-detached or contact close binary. Low-resolution IUE spectra are best fitted to a Kurucz model atmosphere for very small (approximately 0.08 mag) E(B-V). The familiar interstellar absorption dip near lambda 2200 is apparently absent. A suitable model atmosphere can be fitted to the IUE fluxes, but flux excesses (compared to the model) appear for all the published U through L magnitudes. The spectrum of the B through L excess appears to follow a .0001 lambda dependence. It is shown that this cannot be interpreted as arising from another star fortuitously observed in the visible band or IR. Ground based polarization measures indicate V641 Mon to be a polarization variable. Previous and new V light curves show the amplitude of light variability itself to be variable by about a factor of 2. It is suggested that all these observed characteristics are best explained by postulating "third light" and identifying part of it with Rayleigh scattered starlight very near to the stars. From this same region there arise circumstellar absorptions which give rise to nontheoretical strengths for Si II and Si III lines.

  5. Supervised Classification of Natural Targets Using Millimeter-Wave Multifrequency Polarimetric Radar Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmeier, Stephen Paul

    This dissertation classifies trees, snow, and clouds using multiparameter millimeter-wave radar data at 35, 95, and 225 GHz. Classification techniques explored include feedforward multilayer perceptron neural networks trained with standard backpropagation, Gaussian and minimum distance statistical classifiers, and rule-based classifiers. Radar data products, serving as features for classification, are defined, radar and in situ data are presented, scattering phenomenology is discussed, and the effect of data biases are analyzed. A neural network was able to discriminate between white pine trees and other broader-leaved trees with an accuracy of 97% using normalized Mueller matrix data at 225 GHz; wet, dry, melting, and freezing snow could be discriminated 89% of the time using 35, 95, and 225 GHz Mueller matrix data; and metamorphic and fresh snow could be differentiated 98% of the time using either the copolarized complex correlation coefficient or normalized radar cross section at three frequencies. A neural network was also able to discriminate ice clouds from water clouds using vertical and horizontal 95 GHz airborne reflectivity measurements with a success rate of 82% and 86% when viewing the clouds from the side and below respectively. Using 33 and 95 GHz data collected from the ground, a neural net was able to discriminate between ice clouds, liquid clouds, mixed phase clouds, rain, and insects 95% of the time using linear depolarization ratio, velocity, and range. As a precursor to this classification, a rule-based classifier was developed to label training pixels, since in situ data was not available for this particular data set. Attenuation biases in reflectivity were also removed with the aid of the rule-based classifier. A neural network using reflectivity in addition to other features was able to classify pixels correctly 96% of the time.

  6. An assessment of the performance of global rainfall estimates without ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Christian; Crow, Wade; Brocca, Luca

    2017-09-01

    Satellite-based rainfall estimates over land have great potential for a wide range of applications, but their validation is challenging due to the scarcity of ground-based observations of rainfall in many areas of the planet. Recent studies have suggested the use of triple collocation (TC) to characterize uncertainties associated with rainfall estimates by using three collocated rainfall products. However, TC requires the simultaneous availability of three products with mutually uncorrelated errors, a requirement which is difficult to satisfy with current global precipitation data sets. In this study, a recently developed method for rainfall estimation from soil moisture observations, SM2RAIN, is demonstrated to facilitate the accurate application of TC within triplets containing two state-of-the-art satellite rainfall estimates and a reanalysis product. The validity of different TC assumptions are indirectly tested via a high-quality ground rainfall product over the contiguous United States (CONUS), showing that SM2RAIN can provide a truly independent source of rainfall accumulation information which uniquely satisfies the assumptions underlying TC. On this basis, TC is applied with SM2RAIN on a global scale in an optimal configuration to calculate, for the first time, reliable global correlations (vs. an unknown truth) of the aforementioned products without using a ground benchmark data set. The analysis is carried out during the period 2007-2012 using daily rainfall accumulation products obtained at 1° × 1° spatial resolution. Results convey the relatively high performance of the satellite rainfall estimates in eastern North and South America, southern Africa, southern and eastern Asia, eastern Australia, and southern Europe, as well as complementary performances between the reanalysis product and SM2RAIN, with the first performing reasonably well in the Northern Hemisphere and the second providing very good performance in the Southern Hemisphere. The

  7. Radiative Energetics of Mineral Dust Aerosols from Ground-Based Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Hansell, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Airborne dust aerosols worldwide contribute a significant part to air quality problems and, to some extent, regional climatic issues (e.g., radiative forcing, hydrological cycle, and primary biological productivity in oceans). Evaluating the direct solar radiative effect of dust aerosols is relatively straightforward due in part to the relatively large SIN ratio in broadband irradiance measurements. The longwave (LW) impact, on the other hand, is rather difficult to ascertain since the measured dust signal level (approx.10 W/sq m) is on the same order as the instrumental uncertainties. Although the magnitude of the LW impact is much smaller than that of the shortwave (SW), it can still have a noticeable influence on the energy distribution of Earth-atmosphere system, particularly due to the strong light-absorptive properties commonly found in many terrestrial minerals. The current effort is part of an ongoing research study to perform a global assessment of dust direct aerosol radiative effects (DARE) during major field deployments of key dust source regions worldwide. In this work we present results stemming from two previous field deployments: the 2006 NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Activities and the 2008 Asian Monsoon Years, both utilizing NASA Goddard's mobile ground-based facility. The former study focused on transported Saharan dust at Sal (16.73degN, 22.93degW), Cape Verde along the west coast of Africa while the latter focused on Asian dust at Zhangye (39.082degN, 100.276degE), China near the source between the Taklimakan and Gobi deserts. Due to the compelling variability in spatial and temporal scale of dust properties during field experiments, a deterministic I-D radiative transfer model constrained by local measurements (i.e., spectral photometry/interferometry and lidar for physical/microphysical, mineralogy, and single-scattering properties) is employed to evaluate dust's local instantaneous SW/LW DARE both at the surface and at the top of

  8. Observing wind, aerosol particles, cloud and precipitation: Finland's new ground-based remote-sensing network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsikko, A.; O'Connor, E. J.; Komppula, M.; Korhonen, K.; Pfüller, A.; Giannakaki, E.; Wood, C. R.; Bauer-Pfundstein, M.; Poikonen, A.; Karppinen, T.; Lonka, H.; Kurri, M.; Heinonen, J.; Moisseev, D.; Asmi, E.; Aaltonen, V.; Nordbo, A.; Rodriguez, E.; Lihavainen, H.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Laurila, T.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Viisanen, Y.

    2014-05-01

    The Finnish Meteorological Institute, in collaboration with the University of Helsinki, has established a new ground-based remote-sensing network in Finland. The network consists of five topographically, ecologically and climatically different sites distributed from southern to northern Finland. The main goal of the network is to monitor air pollution and boundary layer properties in near real time, with a Doppler lidar and ceilometer at each site. In addition to these operational tasks, two sites are members of the Aerosols, Clouds and Trace gases Research InfraStructure Network (ACTRIS); a Ka band cloud radar at Sodankylä will provide cloud retrievals within CloudNet, and a multi-wavelength Raman lidar, PollyXT (POrtabLe Lidar sYstem eXTended), in Kuopio provides optical and microphysical aerosol properties through EARLINET (the European Aerosol Research Lidar Network). Three C-band weather radars are located in the Helsinki metropolitan area and are deployed for operational and research applications. We performed two inter-comparison campaigns to investigate the Doppler lidar performance, compare the backscatter signal and wind profiles, and to optimize the lidar sensitivity through adjusting the telescope focus length and data-integration time to ensure sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in low-aerosol-content environments. In terms of statistical characterization, the wind-profile comparison showed good agreement between different lidars. Initially, there was a discrepancy in the SNR and attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles which arose from an incorrectly reported telescope focus setting from one instrument, together with the need to calibrate. After diagnosing the true telescope focus length, calculating a new attenuated backscatter coefficient profile with the new telescope function and taking into account calibration, the resulting attenuated backscatter profiles all showed good agreement with each other. It was thought that harsh Finnish

  9. Integrated interpretation of helicopter and ground-based geophysical data recorded within the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorski, Joel E.; Green, Alan G.; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang K. H.; Horstmeyer, Heinrich; Maurer, Hansruedi; Rabenstein, Lasse; Doetsch, Joseph; Auken, Esben; Ngwisanyi, Tiyapo; Tshoso, Gomotsang; Jaba, Bashali Charles; Ntibinyane, Onkgopotse; Laletsang, Kebabonye

    2015-03-01

    Integration of information from the following sources has been used to produce a much better constrained and more complete four-unit geological/hydrological model of the Okavango Delta than previously available: (i) a 3D resistivity model determined from helicopter time-domain electromagnetic (HTEM) data recorded across most of the delta, (ii) 2D models and images derived from ground-based electrical resistance tomographic, transient electromagnetic, and high resolution seismic reflection/refraction tomographic data acquired at four selected sites in western and north-central regions of the delta, and (iii) geological details extracted from boreholes in northeastern and southeastern parts of the delta. The upper heterogeneous unit is the modern delta, which comprises extensive dry and freshwater-saturated sand and lesser amounts of clay and salt. It is characterized by moderate to high electrical resistivities and very low to low P-wave velocities. Except for images of several buried abandoned river channels, it is non-reflective. The laterally extensive underlying unit of low resistivities, low P-wave velocity, and subhorizontal reflectors very likely contains saline-water-saturated sands and clays deposited in the huge Paleo Lake Makgadikgadi (PLM), which once covered a 90,000 km2 area that encompassed the delta, Lake Ngami, the Mababe Depression, and the Makgadikgadi Basin. Examples of PLM sediments are intersected in many boreholes. Low permeability clay within the PLM unit seems to be a barrier to the downward flow of the saline water. Below the PLM unit, freshwater-saturated sand of the Paleo Okavango Megafan (POM) unit is distinguished by moderate to high resistivities, low P-wave velocity, and numerous subhorizontal reflectors. The POM unit is interpreted to be the remnants of a megafan based on the arcuate nature of its front and the semi-conical shape of its upper surface in the HTEM resistivity model. Moderate to high resistivity subhorizontal layers are

  10. Blowing snow detection in Antarctica, from space borne and ground-based remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossart, A.; Souverijns, N.; Lhermitte, S.; Lenaerts, J.; Gorodetskaya, I.; Schween, J. H.; Van Lipzig, N. P. M.

    2017-12-01

    Surface mass balance (SMB) strongly controls spatial and temporal variations in the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) mass balance and its contribution to sea level rise. Currently, the scarcity of observational data and the challenges of climate modelling over the ice sheet limit our understanding of the processes controlling AIS SMB. Particularly, the impact of blowing snow on local SMB is not yet constrained and is subject to large uncertainties. To assess the impact of blowing snow on local SMB, we investigate the attenuated backscatter profiles from ceilometers at two East Antarctic locations in Dronning Maud Land. Ceilometers are robust ground-based remote sensing instruments that yield information on cloud base height and vertical structure, but also provide information on the particles present in the boundary layer. We developed a new algorithm to detect blowing snow (snow particles lifted by the wind from the surface to substantial height) from the ceilometer attenuated backscatter. The algorithm successfully allows to detect strong blowing snow signal from layers thicker than 15 m at the Princess Elisabeth (PE, (72°S, 23°E)) and Neumayer (70°S, 8° W) stations. Applying the algorithm to PE, we retrieve the frequency and annual cycle of blowing snow as well as discriminate between clear sky and overcast conditions during blowing snow. We further apply the blowing snow algorithm at PE to evaluate the blowing snow events detection by satellite imagery (Palm et al., 2011): the near-surface blowing snow layers are apparent in lidar backscatter profiles and enable snowdrift events detection (spatial and temporal frequency, height and optical depth). These data are processed from CALIPSO, at a high resolution (1x1 km digital elevation model). However, the remote sensing detection of blowing snow events by satellite is limited to layers of a minimal thickness of 20-30 m. In addition, thick clouds, mostly occurring during winter storms, can impede drifting snow

  11. Ground-Based Observations of Terrestrial Gamma Ray Flashes Associated with Downward-Directed Lightning Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belz, J.; Abbasi, R.; Krehbiel, P. R.; LeVon, R.; Remington, J.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    Terrestrial Gamma Flashes (TGFs) have been observed in satellite-borne gamma ray detectors for several decades, starting with the BATSE instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray observatory in 1994. TGFs consist of bursts of upwards of 1018 primary gamma rays, with a duration of up to a few milliseconds, originating in the Earth's atmosphere. More recent observations have shown that satellite-observed TGFs are generated in upward-propagating negative leaders of intracloud lightning, suggesting that they may be sensitive to the processes responsible for the initial lightning breakdown. Here, we present the first evidence that TGFs are also produced at the beginning of negative cloud-to-ground flashes, and that they may provide a new window through which ground-based observatories may contribute to understanding the breakdown process. The Telescope Array Surface Detector (TASD) is a 700 square kilometer cosmic ray observatory, an array of 507 3m2 scintillators on a 1.2 km grid. The array is triggered and read out when at least three adjacent detectors observe activity within an 8 μs window. Following the observation of bursts of anomalous TASD triggers, lasting a few hundred microseconds and correlated with local lightning activity, a Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and slow electric field antenna were installed at the TASD site in order to study the effect. From data obtained between 2014 and 2016, correlated observations were obtained for ten -CG flashes. In 9 out of 10 cases, bursts of up to five anomalous triggers were detected during the first ms of the flash, as negative breakdown was descending into lower positive storm charge. The triggers occurred when the LMA-detected VHF radiation sources were at altitudes between 1.5 to 4.5 km AGL. The tenth flash was initiated by an unusually energetic leader that reached the ground in 2.5 ms and produced increasingly powerful triggers down to about 500 m AGL. While the TASD is not optimized for individual gamma ray detection

  12. Using ground-based geophysics to rapidly and accurately map sub-surface acidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Vanessa; Triantafilis, John; Johnston, Scott; Nhan, Terence; Page, Donald; Wege, Richard; Hirst, Phillip; Slavich, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Globally, large areas of coastal and estuarine floodplains are underlain by sulfidic sediments and acid sulfate soils (ASS). These soils can be environmentally hazardous due to their high acidity and large pool of potentially mobile metals. The floodplains are characterised by high spatial and temporal heterogeneity. On coastal floodplains, ASS are of moderate to high salinity, with salts derived mainly from either connate marine sources or oxidation of biogenic sulfides and the subsequent increases in soluble ions (e.g. SO42-) and acidity that follow oxidation. Enhanced acidity also increases the mobilisation of pH-sensitive trace metals such as Fe, Al, Mn, Zn and Ni and contributes to increasing apparent salinity. Ground-based geophysics using electromagnetic (EM) induction techniques have been used successfully and extensively to rapidly map soils for salinity management and precision agriculture. EM induction techniques measure apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa), which is a function of salinity, clay content, water content, soil mineralogy and temperature to determine the spatial distribution of sub-surface conductivity. In this study, we used ECa as a proxy to map the surface and sub-surface spatial distribution of ASS and associated acidic groundwater. Three EM instruments were used, EM38, DUALEM-421 and EM34, which focus on different depth layers, in a survey of a coastal floodplain in eastern Australia. The EM surveys were calibrated with limited soil sampling and analysis (pH, EC, soluble and exchangeable salts and metals, particle size and titratable actual acidity (TAA)). Using fuzzy k-means clustering analysis, the EM38 and elevation data, from a digital elevation model, clearly identified three classes in the near-surface (0-2m) layers: i) levee soils, ii) fluvial sediment capping and iii) ASS (Fig. 4). Increasing the number of classes did not alter the classes identified. Joint inversion of the DUALEM-421 and EM34 data also identified

  13. Historical Trends in Ground-Based Optical Space Surveillance System Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, M.; Shroyer, L.

    In the spirit of the 50th anniversary of the launch of the first man-made satellite, an historical overview of ground-based optical space surveillance systems is provided. Specific emphasis is given on gathering metrics to analyze design trends. The subject of space surveillance spans the history of spaceflight: from the early tracking cameras at missile ranges, the first observations of Sputnik, to the evolution towards highly capable commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) systems, and much in between. Whereas previous reviews in the literature have been limited in scope to specific time periods, operational programs, countries, etc., a broad overview of a wide range of sources is presented. This review is focused on systems whose primary design purpose can be classified as Space Object Identification (SOI) or Orbit Determination (OD). SOI systems are those that capture images or data to determine information about the satellite itself, such as attitude, features, and material composition. OD systems are those that produce estimates of the satellite position, usually in the form of orbital elements or a time history of tracking angles. Systems are also categorized based on the orbital regime in which their targets reside, which has been simplified in this study to either Low Earth Orbit (LEO) or Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). The systems are further classified depending on the industry segment (government/commercial or academic), and whether the program is foreign or domestic. In addition to gathering metrics on systems designed solely for man-made satellite observations, it is interesting to find examples of other systems being similarly used. Examples include large astronomical telescopes being used for GEO debris surveys and anomaly resolution for deep-space probes. Another interesting development is the increase in number and capability of COTS systems, some of which are specifically marketed to consumers as satellite trackers. After describing the results of the

  14. Timing and location of substorm onsets from THEMIS satellite and ground based observations

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    S. Mende

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The unprecedented coverage of the THEMIS GBO station network coupled with high temporal and spatial resolution allowed us to determine the various stages of the global scale developments of the optical aurora at substorm onsets. We identified several steps of the substorm onset auroral phenomena and we suggest that the most rapid development is the starting of the Substorm Poleward Expansion (SPE and it is most useful for accurate timing of the substorm onset. The physical significance of this step is the start of the large scale substorm energy dissipation in the atmosphere due to particle precipitation and auroral electrojet currents. We also recognized several pre-cursor features. We also measured the time of arrival of magnetic impulses associated with the same substorms at the THEMIS satellites. We used these times and a simple model with assumed iono-acoustic speeds in the range of 300–800 km/s to calculate the location and time of the origin of the magnetic impulses propagating from substorm onset. The assumption was made that the substorm occurred between two THEMIS satellites and the impulses propagated away from a singular starting point in and out along the magneto tail GSM-x axis. This technique is only useful in cases where the ground based signature of the substorm is very close in local time (or longitude to the foot of the field lines of the THEMIS satellites. The x distance of the calculated origins were naturally highly dependent on the assumed propagation velocity model and the associated magneto-sonic speed. The resulting x distances of the starting point for the three events ranged between 11 and 17.6 RE. denoting a starting region that requires highly stretched field lines to map to the auroral onset latitude but which is generally considered to be too close for neutral line formation. The corresponding start times were in the range of 0 to 170 s prior SPE depending strongly on the assumed propagation speed.

  15. An assessment of the performance of global rainfall estimates without ground-based observations

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    C. Massari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Satellite-based rainfall estimates over land have great potential for a wide range of applications, but their validation is challenging due to the scarcity of ground-based observations of rainfall in many areas of the planet. Recent studies have suggested the use of triple collocation (TC to characterize uncertainties associated with rainfall estimates by using three collocated rainfall products. However, TC requires the simultaneous availability of three products with mutually uncorrelated errors, a requirement which is difficult to satisfy with current global precipitation data sets. In this study, a recently developed method for rainfall estimation from soil moisture observations, SM2RAIN, is demonstrated to facilitate the accurate application of TC within triplets containing two state-of-the-art satellite rainfall estimates and a reanalysis product. The validity of different TC assumptions are indirectly tested via a high-quality ground rainfall product over the contiguous United States (CONUS, showing that SM2RAIN can provide a truly independent source of rainfall accumulation information which uniquely satisfies the assumptions underlying TC. On this basis, TC is applied with SM2RAIN on a global scale in an optimal configuration to calculate, for the first time, reliable global correlations (vs. an unknown truth of the aforementioned products without using a ground benchmark data set. The analysis is carried out during the period 2007–2012 using daily rainfall accumulation products obtained at 1° × 1° spatial resolution. Results convey the relatively high performance of the satellite rainfall estimates in eastern North and South America, southern Africa, southern and eastern Asia, eastern Australia, and southern Europe, as well as complementary performances between the reanalysis product and SM2RAIN, with the first performing reasonably well in the Northern Hemisphere and the second providing very good performance in the Southern

  16. Advancing Translational Space Research Through Biospecimen Sharing: Amplifying the Impact of Ground-Based Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronca, A.; Lewis, L.; Staten, B.; Moyer, E.; Vizir, V.; Gompf, H.; Hoban-Higgins, T.; Fuller, C. A.

    2017-01-01

    Biospecimen Sharing Programs (BSPs) have been organized by NASA Ames Research Center since the 1960s with the goal of maximizing utilization and scientific return from rare, complex and costly spaceflight experiments. BSPs involve acquiring otherwise unused biological specimens from primary space research experiments for distribution to secondary experiments. Here we describe a collaboration leveraging Ames expertise in biospecimen sharing to magnify the scientific impact of research informing astronaut health funded by the NASA Human Research Program (HRP) Human Health Countermeasures (HHC) Element. The concept expands biospecimen sharing to one-off ground-based studies utilizing analogue space platforms (e.g., Hind limb Unloading (HLU), Artificial Gravity) for rodent experiments, thereby significantly broadening the range of research opportunities with translational relevance for protecting human health in space and on Earth. In this presentation, we will report on biospecimens currently being acquired from HHC Award Head-Down Tilt as a Model for Intracranial and Intraocular Pressures, and Retinal Changes during Spaceflight, and their availability. The BSP add-on to the project described herein has already yielded for HHC-funded investigators more than 4,700 additional tissues that would otherwise have been discarded as waste, with additional tissues available for analysis. Young (3-mo old) male and female rats and Older (9-mo old) male rats are being exposed to HLU for either 7, 14, 28, or 90 days. Additional groups are exposed to 90 days of unloading followed by either 7, 14, 28 days or 90 days of recovery (normal loading). Comparisons are made with non-suspended controls. Unused tissues are: Skin, Lungs, Thymus, Adrenals, Kidneys, Spleen, Hindlimb Muscles (Soleus, Extensor Digitorum Longus, Tibialis Anterior, Plantaris Gastrocnemius), Fat Pads, Reproductive Organs, and Intestines. Tissues are harvested, weighed, preserved then archived (with metadata) using a

  17. Evaluation of Six High-Resolution Satellite and Ground-Based Precipitation Products over Malaysia

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    Mou Leong Tan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Satellite precipitation products (SPPs potentially constitute an alternative to sparse rain gauge networks for assessing the spatial distribution of precipitation. However, applications of these products are still limited due to the lack of robust quality assessment. This study compares daily, monthly, seasonal, and annual rainfall amount at 342 rain gauges over Malaysia to estimations using five SPPs (3B42RT, 3B42V7, GPCP-1DD, PERSIANN-CDR, and CMORPH and a ground-based precipitation product (APHRODITE. The performance of the precipitation products was evaluated from 2003 to 2007 using continuous (RMSE, R2, ME, MAE, and RB and categorical (ACC, POD, FAR, CSI, and HSS statistical approaches. Overall, 3B42V7 and APHRODITE performed the best, while the worst performance was shown by GPCP-1DD. 3B42RT, 3B42V7, and PERSIANN-CDR slightly overestimated observed precipitation by 2%, 4.7%, and 2.1%, respectively. By contrast, APHRODITE and CMORPH significantly underestimated precipitations by 19.7% and 13.2%, respectively, whereas GPCP-1DD only slightly underestimated by 2.8%. All six precipitation products performed better in the northeast monsoon than in the southwest monsoon. The better performances occurred in eastern and southern Peninsular Malaysia and in the north of East Malaysia, which receives higher rainfall during the northeast monsoon, whereas poor performances occurred in the western and dryer Peninsular Malaysia. All precipitation products underestimated the no/tiny (<1 mm/day and extreme (≥20 mm/day rainfall events, while they overestimated low (1–20 mm/day rainfall events. 3B42RT and 3B42V7 showed the best ability to detect precipitation amounts with the highest HSS value (0.36. Precipitations during flood events such as those which occurred in late 2006 and early 2007 were estimated the best by 3B42RT and 3B42V7, as shown by an R2 value ranging from 0.49 to 0.88 and 0.52 to 0.86, respectively. These results on SPPs’ uncertainties

  18. Ground-based hyperspectral imaging and analysis of Jupiter’s atmosphere during the Juno era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Emma; Chanover, Nancy J.; Voelz, David; Kuehn, David M.; Wijerathna, Erandi; Hull, Robert; Strycker, Paul D.; Baines, Kevin H.

    2017-10-01

    The Juno mission to Jupiter has presented ground-based observers with a unique opportunity to collect data while the spacecraft is simultaneously measuring the planet and its atmosphere. Data collected in conjunction with Juno measurements have the capability to complement and enhance wavelength regimes already covered by Juno instruments.In order to enrich Juno’s scientific returns in the visible regime, we use the New Mexico State University Acousto-optic Imaging Camera (NAIC) to obtain hyperspectral image cubes of Jupiter from 470-950 nm with an average spectral resolution (λ/dλ) of 242. We use NAIC with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5-m telescope to image Jupiter’s atmosphere during Juno’s perijove flybys. With these timely, high spectral resolution measurements, we can derive the properties of cloud and haze particulates and estimate cloud heights. We present geometrically and photometrically calibrated spectra of representative regions of Jupiter’s atmosphere to be compared with previous work and laboratory measurements of candidate chromophore materials. The data we present are from the night of March 26th, 2017, captured during Juno’s 5th perijove flyby. We discuss preliminary analyses of these spectra, including implications for future work regarding atmospheric modeling.For the aforementioned observations, NAIC was equipped with a thinned, back-illuminated CCD. Because of the narrow bandwidths NAIC’s spectral tuning element produces, this chip design resulted in etaloning, or “fringing,” in images at wavelengths longer than ~720 nm. We discuss our methodology for correcting the fringing and the progress of a general-use model for correcting fringing in CCDs. Such a model requires the extraction of chip characteristics from monochromatic flats, which can be then be used to model exactly how the interference of light inside the chip results in the fringing pattern. This artificial fringing image can then be removed from images, thereby

  19. Mesoscale ionospheric electrodynamics of omega bands determined from ground-based electromagnetic and satellite optical observations

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    O. Amm

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available We present ground-based electromagnetic data from the MIRACLE and BEAR networks and satellite optical observations from the UVI and PIXIE instruments on the Polar satellite of an omega band event over Northern Scandinavia on 26 June 1998, which occured close to the morning side edge of a substorm auroral bulge. Our analysis of the data concentrates on one omega band period from 03:18-03:27 UT, for which we use the method of characteristics combined with an analysis of the UVI and PIXIE data to derive a time series of instantaneous, solely data-based distributions of the mesoscale ionospheric electrodynamic parameters with a 1-min time resolution. In addition, the AMIE method is used to derive global Hall conductance patterns. Our results show that zonally alternating regions of enhanced ionospheric conductances ("tongues" up to ~60S and low conductance regions are associated with the omega bands. The tongues have a poleward extension of ~400km from their base and a zonal extension of ~380km. While they are moving coherently eastward with a velocity of ~770ms-1, the structures are not strictly stationary. The current system of the omega band can be described as a superposition of two parts: one consists of anticlockwise rotating Hall currents around the tongues, along with Pedersen currents, with a negative divergence in their centers. The sign of this system is reversing in the low conductance areas. It causes the characteristic ground magnetic signature. The second part consists of zonally aligned current wedges of westward flowing Hall currents and is mostly magnetically invisible below the ionosphere. This system dominates the field-aligned current (FAC pattern and causes alternating upward and downward FAC at the flanks of the tongues with maximum upward FAC of ~25µA m-2. The total FAC of ~2MA are comparable to the ones diverted inside a westward traveling surge. Throughout the event, the overwhelming part of the FAC are associated with

  20. Mesoscale ionospheric electrodynamics of omega bands determined from ground-based electromagnetic and satellite optical observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Amm

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available We present ground-based electromagnetic data from the MIRACLE and BEAR networks and satellite optical observations from the UVI and PIXIE instruments on the Polar satellite of an omega band event over Northern Scandinavia on 26 June 1998, which occured close to the morning side edge of a substorm auroral bulge. Our analysis of the data concentrates on one omega band period from 03:18-03:27 UT, for which we use the method of characteristics combined with an analysis of the UVI and PIXIE data to derive a time series of instantaneous, solely data-based distributions of the mesoscale ionospheric electrodynamic parameters with a 1-min time resolution. In addition, the AMIE method is used to derive global Hall conductance patterns. Our results show that zonally alternating regions of enhanced ionospheric conductances ("tongues" up to ~60S and low conductance regions are associated with the omega bands. The tongues have a poleward extension of ~400km from their base and a zonal extension of ~380km. While they are moving coherently eastward with a velocity of ~770ms-1, the structures are not strictly stationary. The current system of the omega band can be described as a superposition of two parts: one consists of anticlockwise rotating Hall currents around the tongues, along with Pedersen currents, with a negative divergence in their centers. The sign of this system is reversing in the low conductance areas. It causes the characteristic ground magnetic signature. The second part consists of zonally aligned current wedges of westward flowing Hall currents and is mostly magnetically invisible below the ionosphere. This system dominates the field-aligned current (FAC pattern and causes alternating upward and downward FAC at the flanks of the tongues with maximum upward FAC of ~25µA m-2. The total FAC of ~2MA are comparable to the ones diverted inside a westward traveling surge. Throughout the event, the overwhelming part of the FAC

  1. Validation of the CrIS fast physical NH3 retrieval with ground-based FTIR

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    E. Dammers

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Presented here is the validation of the CrIS (Cross-track Infrared Sounder fast physical NH3 retrieval (CFPR column and profile measurements using ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR observations. We use the total columns and profiles from seven FTIR sites in the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC to validate the satellite data products. The overall FTIR and CrIS total columns have a positive correlation of r  =  0.77 (N  =  218 with very little bias (a slope of 1.02. Binning the comparisons by total column amounts, for concentrations larger than 1.0  ×  1016 molecules cm−2, i.e. ranging from moderate to polluted conditions, the relative difference is on average ∼ 0–5 % with a standard deviation of 25–50 %, which is comparable to the estimated retrieval uncertainties in both CrIS and the FTIR. For the smallest total column range (< 1.0  × 1016 molecules cm−2 where there are a large number of observations at or near the CrIS noise level (detection limit the absolute differences between CrIS and the FTIR total columns show a slight positive column bias. The CrIS and FTIR profile comparison differences are mostly within the range of the single-level retrieved profile values from estimated retrieval uncertainties, showing average differences in the range of  ∼ 20 to 40 %. The CrIS retrievals typically show good vertical sensitivity down into the boundary layer which typically peaks at  ∼ 850 hPa (∼ 1.5 km. At this level the median absolute difference is 0.87 (std  =  ±0.08 ppb, corresponding to a median relative difference of 39 % (std  =  ±2 %. Most of the absolute and relative profile comparison differences are in the range of the estimated retrieval uncertainties. At the surface, where CrIS typically has lower sensitivity, it tends to overestimate in low-concentration conditions and underestimate

  2. Characteristics of greenhouse gas concentrations derived from ground-based FTS spectra at Anmyeondo, South Korea

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    Y.-S. Oh

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the late 1990s, the meteorological observatory established in Anmyeondo (36.5382° N, 126.3311° E, and 30 m above mean sea level has been monitoring several greenhouse gases such as CO2, CH4, N2O, CFCs, and SF6 as a part of the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW Program. A high resolution ground-based (g-b Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS was installed at this observation site in 2013 and has been operated within the frame work of the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON since August 2014. The solar spectra recorded by the g-b FTS cover the spectral range 3800 to 16 000 cm−1 at a resolution of 0.02 cm−1. In this work, the GGG2014 version of the TCCON standard retrieval algorithm was used to retrieve total column average CO2 and CH4 dry mole fractions (XCO2, XCH4 and from the FTS spectra. Spectral bands of CO2 (at 6220.0 and 6339.5 cm−1 center wavenumbers, CH4 at 6002 cm−1 wavenumber, and O2 near 7880 cm−1 were used to derive the XCO2 and XCH4. In this paper, we provide comparisons of XCO2 and XCH4 between the aircraft observations and g-b FTS over Anmyeondo station. A comparison of 13 coincident observations of XCO2 between g-b FTS and OCO-2 (Orbiting Carbon Observatory satellite measurements are also presented for the measurement period between February 2014 and November 2017. OCO-2 observations are highly correlated with the g-b FTS measurements (r2 = 0.884 and exhibited a small positive bias (0.189 ppm. Both data set capture seasonal variations of the target species with maximum and minimum values in spring and late summer, respectively. In the future, it is planned to further utilize the FTS measurements for the evaluation of satellite observations such as Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT, GOSAT-2. This is the first report of the g-b FTS observations of XCO2 species over the Anmyeondo station.

  3. Ground-based and satellite remote sensing of paroxysmal eruptions at Etna volcano, 2011-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonny, Estelle

    Mt Etna's activity has increased during the last decade with a tendency towards more explosive eruptions that produce paroxysmal lava fountains. From January 2011 to April 2012, 25 lava fountaining episodes took place at Etna's New South-East Crater (NSEC). Improved understanding of the mechanism driving these explosive basaltic eruptions is needed to reduce volcanic hazards. This type of activity produces high sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions, associated with lava flows and ash fall-out, but to date the SO2 emissions associated with Etna's lava fountains have been poorly constrained. The Ultraviolet (UV) Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on NASA's Aura satellite and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on Aqua were used to measure the SO2 loadings. Ground-based data from the Observatoire de Physique du Globe de Clermont-Ferrand (OPGC) L-band Doppler radar, VOLDORAD 2B, used in collaboration with the Italian National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology in Catania (INGV-CT), also detected the associated ash plumes, giving precise timing and duration for the lava fountains. This study resulted in the first detailed analysis of the OMI and AIRS SO2 data for Etna's lava fountains during the 2011-2012 eruptive cycle. The HYSPLIT trajectory model is used to constrain the altitude of the observed SO2 clouds, and results show that the SO2 emission usually coincided with the lava fountain peak intensity as detected by VOLDORAD. The UV OMI and IR AIRS SO2 retrievals permit quantification of the SO2 loss rate in the volcanic SO2 clouds, many of which were tracked for several days after emission. A first attempt to quantitatively validate AIRS SO2 retrievals with OMI data revealed a good correlation for high altitude SO2 clouds. Using estimates of the emitted SO2 at the time each paroxysm, we observe a correlation with the inter-paroxysm repose time. We therefore suggest that our data set supports the collapsing foam (CF) model [1] as driving mechanism for the paroxysmal

  4. Reliability-centered maintenance for ground-based large optical telescopes and radio antenna arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchiori, G.; Formentin, F.; Rampini, F.

    2014-07-01

    In the last years, EIE GROUP has been more and more involved in large optical telescopes and radio antennas array projects. In this frame, the paper describes a fundamental aspect of the Logistic Support Analysis (LSA) process, that is the application of the Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) methodology for the generation of maintenance plans for ground-based large optical telescopes and radio antennas arrays. This helps maintenance engineers to make sure that the telescopes continue to work properly, doing what their users require them to do in their present operating conditions. The main objective of the RCM process is to establish the complete maintenance regime, with the safe minimum required maintenance, carried out without any risk to personnel, telescope and subsystems. At the same time, a correct application of the RCM allows to increase the cost effectiveness, telescope uptime and items availability, and to provide greater understanding of the level of risk that the organization is managing. At the same time, engineers shall make a great effort since the initial phase of the project to obtain a telescope requiring easy maintenance activities and simple replacement of the major assemblies, taking special care on the accesses design and items location, implementation and design of special lifting equipment and handling devices for the heavy items. This maintenance engineering framework is based on seven points, which lead to the main steps of the RCM program. The initial steps of the RCM process consist of: system selection and data collection (MTBF, MTTR, etc.), definition of system boundaries and operating context, telescope description with the use of functional block diagrams, and the running of a FMECA to address the dominant causes of equipment failure and to lay down the Critical Items List. In the second part of the process the RCM logic is applied, which helps to determine the appropriate maintenance tasks for each identified failure mode. Once

  5. Imaging Ionospheric Disturbances with a Global Array of the Ground-Based GPS TEC Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J. C.; Coster, A.; Rideout, B.; Immel, T.; Rich, F. J.

    2004-05-01

    A prime example of distributed arrays of small instruments for space science research is found in the use of the existing global array of GPS receivers to provide high spatial/temporal resolution mapping of the total electron electron content (TEC) at equatorial, mid, auroral, and polar latitudes. Particularly dramatic effects are observed during major disturbances when magnetospheric electric fields perturb and redistribute the thermal plasmas of inner magnetosphere (plasmasphere/ionosphere). Enhancement and poleward displacement of the equatorial anomalies (EA), the formation of plasmaspheric drainage plumes which erode the outer plasmasphere and produce significant storm enhanced density and space weather effects at mid latitudes, and tongues of ionization which span the polar caps are all a part of the systematic redistribution of the low-latitude thermal plasma during strong events. The present distribution of GPS receivers permits mapping such features primarily over the land masses of North America and Europe, where 1x1 deg spatial and 30-sec temporal observations of vertical TEC can be achieved. Few receivers currently exist in developing countries and large gaps in coverage exist over the oceans. However, the large and meso-scale characteristics and evolution of these thermal plasma storm effects can be identified in the global maps. We address the cross-calibration of ground-based and space-based techniques to image and sample such features by comparing simultaneous observations of the major features observed during the strong storm on May 30, 2003. GPS TEC mapping observed the rapid enhancement of the EA and the formation of a concentration of enhanced plasma in the Carribean sector. This co-rotating enhancement provided a continuing a source for the dusk-sector plasmaspheric drainage plume. The down-looking IMAGE FUV instrument can map enhancements in the equatorial emissions associated with the EA and observed the spatial extent and evolution of the co

  6. Unattended instruments for ground-based hyperspectral measurements: development and application for plant photosynthesis monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogliati, S.; Rossini, M.; Meroni, M.; Barducci, A.; Julitta, T.; Colombo, R.

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the present work is the development of ground-based hyperspectral systems capable of collecting continuous and long-term hyperspectral measurements of the Earth-surface. The development of such instruments includes the optical design, the development of the data acquisition (Auto3S) and processing software as well as the definition of the calibration procedures. In particular an in-field calibration methodologie based on the comparison between field spectra and data modeled using Radiative Transfer (RT) approach has been proposed to regularly upgrade instrument calibration coefficients. Two different automatic spectrometric systems have been developed: the HyperSpectral Irradiometer (HSI) [Meroni et al., 2011] and the Multiplexer Radiometer Irradiometer (MRI) [Cogliati, 2011]. Both instruments are able to continuously measure: sun incoming irradiance (ETOT) and irradiance (ES, HSI)/radiance (LS, MRI) upwelling from the investigated surface. Both instruments employ two Ocean Optics HR4000 spectrometers sharing the same optical signal that allow to simultaneously collect "fine" (1 nm Full Width at Half Maximum, FWHM) spectra in the 400-1000 nm rangeand "ultra-fine" (0.1 nm FWHM) spectra within the 700-800 nm. The collected optical data allow to estimate biochemical/structural properties of vegetation (e.g. NDVI) as well as its photosynthetic efficiency through the Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) and the analysis of sun-induced chlorophyll Fluorescence in the O2-A Fraunhofer line (F@760). The automatic instruments were operated in coordination with eddy covariance flux tower measurements of carbon exchange in the framework of several field campaigns: HSI was employed in a subalpine pasture (2009-ongoing) (www.phenoalp.eu) while MRI was employed in 2009 in the Sen3Exp field survey promoted by the European Space Agency as consolidation study to the future mission Sentinel-3. Results show that the proposed instruments succeeded in collecting continuous

  7. Investigating the long-term evolution of subtropical ozone profiles applying ground-based FTIR spectrometry

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    O. E. García

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the long-term evolution of subtropical ozone profile time series (1999–2010 obtained from ground-based FTIR (Fourier Transform InfraRed spectrometry at the Izaña Observatory ozone super-site. Different ozone retrieval strategies are examined, analysing the influence of an additional temperature retrieval and different constraints. The theoretical assessment reveals that the FTIR system is able to resolve four independent ozone layers with a precision of better than 6% in the troposphere and of better than 3% in the lower, middle and upper stratosphere. This total error includes the smoothing error, which dominates the random error budget. Furthermore, we estimate that the measurement noise as well as uncertainties in the applied atmospheric temperature profiles and instrumental line shape are leading error sources. We show that a simultaneous temperature retrieval can significantly reduce the total random errors and that a regular determination of the instrumental line shape is important for producing a consistent long-term dataset. These theoretical precision estimates are empirically confirmed by daily intercomparisons with Electro Chemical Cell (ECC sonde profiles. In order to empirically document the long-term stability of the FTIR ozone profile data we compare the linear trends and seasonal cycles as obtained from the FTIR and ECC time series. Concerning seasonality, in winter both techniques observe stratospheric ozone profiles that are typical middle latitude profiles (low tropopause, low ozone maximum concentrations and in summer/autumn profiles that are typical tropical profiles (high tropopause, high maximum concentrations. The linear trends estimated from the FTIR and the ECC datasets agree within their error bars. For the FTIR time series, we observe a significant negative trend in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere of about −0.2% yr−1 and a significant positive trend in the middle and

  8. First retrievals of methane isotopologues from FTIR ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Whitney; Strong, Kimberly; Walker, Kaley; Buzan, Eric

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric methane concentrations have reached a new high at 1845 ± 2 ppb, accounting for an increase of 256 % since pre-industrial times (WMO, 2016). In the last ten years, methane has been on the rise again at rates of ˜0.3%/year (e.g., Bader et al., 2016), after a period of stabilization of about 5 years. This recent increase is not fully understood due to remaining uncertainties in the methane budget, influenced by numerous anthropogenic and natural emission sources. In order to examine the cause(s) of this increase, we focus on the two main methane isotopologues, i.e. CH3D and 13CH4. Both CH3D and 13CH4 are emitted in the atmosphere with different ratio depending on the emission processes involved. As heavier isotopologues will react more slowly than 12CH4, each isotopologue will be depleted from the atmosphere at a specific rate depending on the removal process. Methane isotopologues are therefore good tracers of the methane budget. In this contribution, the first development and optimization of the retrieval strategy of CH3D as well as the preliminary tests for 13CH4 will be presented and discussed , using FTIR (Fourier Transform infrared) solar spectra collected at the Eureka (80.05 ˚ N, -86.42 ˚ E, 610 m a.s.l.) and Toronto (43.66˚ N, -79.4˚ E, 174 m a.s.l.) ground-based sites. Mixing ratio vertical profiles from a Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM v.4, Marsh et al., 2013) simulation developed by Buzan et al. (2016) are used as a priori inputs. A discussion on the type of regularization constraints used for the retrievals will be presented as well as an evaluation of available spectroscopy (primarily the different editions of the HITRAN database, see Rothman et al., 2013 and references therein). The uncertainties affecting the retrieved columns as well as information content evaluation will be discussed in order to assess the best strategy to be employed based on its altitude sensitivity range and complete error budget. Acknowledgments

  9. Development and Short-Range Testing of a 100 kW Side-Illuminated Millimeter-Wave Thermal Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruccoleri, Alexander; Eilers, James A.; Lambot, Thomas; Parkin, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the phase described here of the Millimeter-Wave Thermal Launch System (MTLS) Project was to launch a small thermal rocket into the air using millimeter waves. The preliminary results of the first MTLS flight vehicle launches are presented in this work. The design and construction of a small thermal rocket with a planar ceramic heat exchanger mounted along the axis of the rocket is described. The heat exchanger was illuminated from the side by a millimeter-wave beam and fed propellant from above via a small tank containing high pressure argon or nitrogen. Short-range tests where the rocket was launched, tracked, and heated with the beam are described. The rockets were approximately 1.5 meters in length and 65 millimeters in diameter, with a liftoff mass of 1.8 kilograms. The rocket airframes were coated in aluminum and had a parachute recovery system activated via a timer and Pyrodex. At the rocket heat exchanger, the beam distance was 40 meters with a peak power intensity of 77 watts per square centimeter. and a total power of 32 kilowatts in a 30 centimeter diameter circle. An altitude of approximately 10 meters was achieved. Recommendations for improvements are discussed.

  10. A comprehensive study of cryogenic cooled millimeter-wave frequency multipliers based on GaAs Schottky-barrier varactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Rybalko, Oleksandr; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2018-01-01

    The benefit of cryogenic cooling on the performance of millimeter-wave GaAs Schottky-barrier varactor-based frequency multipliers has been studied. For this purpose, a dedicated compact model of a GaAs Schottky-barrier varactor using a triple-anode diode stack has been developed for use with a co......The benefit of cryogenic cooling on the performance of millimeter-wave GaAs Schottky-barrier varactor-based frequency multipliers has been studied. For this purpose, a dedicated compact model of a GaAs Schottky-barrier varactor using a triple-anode diode stack has been developed for use...... with a commercial RF and microwave CAD tool. The model implements critical physical phenomena such as thermionic-field emission current transport at cryogenic temperatures, temperature dependent mobility, reverse breakdown, self-heating, and high-field velocity saturation effects. A parallel conduction model...... is employed in order to include the effect of barrier inhomogeneities which is known to cause deviation from the expected I--V characteristics at cryogenic temperatures. The developed model is shown to accurately fit the I--V --T dataset from 25 to 295 K measured on the varactor diode stack. Harmonic balance...

  11. Satellite and ground-based sensors for the Urban Heat Island analysis in the city of Rome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabrizi, Roberto; Bonafoni, Stefania; Biondi, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the trend of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) of Rome is analyzed by both ground-based weather stations and a satellite-based infrared sensor. First, we have developed a suitable algorithm employing satellite brightness temperatures for the estimation of the air temperature belonging...... and nighttime scenes taken between 2003 and 2006 have been processed. Analysis of the Canopy Layer Heat Island (CLHI) during summer months reveals a mean growth in magnitude of 3-4 K during nighttime and a negative or almost zero CLHI intensity during daytime, confirmed by the weather stations. © 2010...... by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Keyword: Thermal pollution,Summer months,Advanced-along track scanning radiometers,Urban heat island,Remote sensing,Canopy layer,Atmospheric temperature,Ground based sensors,Weather information services,Satellite remote sensing,Infra-red sensor,Weather stations...

  12. Spectroscopic analysis of stellar mass black-hole mergers in our local universe with ground-based gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagwat, Swetha; Brown, Duncan; Ballmer, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by the recent discoveries of binary black-hole mergers by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (Advanced LIGO), we investigate the prospects of ground based detectors to perform a spectroscopic analysis of signals emitted during the ringdown of the Kerr black-hole formed by a stellar mass binary black-hole merger. We investigate the detectability and resolvability of the sub-dominant modes l = m = 3, l = m = 4 and l = 2;m = 1. We find that new ground-based facilities such as Einstein Telescope or Cosmic Explorer could measure multiple ringdown modes in over 300 events per year. We also investigate detector tuning for ringdown oriented searches.

  13. Trends in gravity changes from 2009 to 2013 derived from ground-based gravimetry and GRACE data in North China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongyang Shen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available North China is a key region for studying geophysical progress. In this study, ground-based and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE gravity data from 2009 to 2013 are used to calculate the gravity change rate (GCR using the polynomial fitting method. In general, the study area was divided into the Shanxi rift, Jing-Jin-Ji (Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Province, and Bohai Bay Basin (BBB regions. Results of the distribution of the GCR determined from ground-based gravimetry show that the GCR appears to be “negative-positive-negative” from west to east, which indicates that different geophysical mechanisms are involved in the tectonic activities of these regions. However, GRACE solutions are conducted over a larger spatial scale and are able to show a difference between southern and northern areas and a mass redistribution of land water storage.

  14. Preliminary Assessment of Detection Efficiency for the Geostationary Lightning Mapper Using Intercomparisons with Ground-Based Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Monte; Mach, Douglas; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Koshak, William

    2018-01-01

    As part of the calibration/validation (cal/val) effort for the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) on GOES-16, we need to assess instrument performance (detection efficiency and accuracy). One major effort is to calculate the detection efficiency of GLM by comparing to multiple ground-based systems. These comparisons will be done pair-wise between GLM and each other source. A complication in this process is that the ground-based systems sense different properties of the lightning signal than does GLM (e.g., RF vs. optical). Also, each system has a different time and space resolution and accuracy. Preliminary results indicate that GLM is performing at or above its specification.

  15. Radiation in fog: Quantification of the impact on fog liquid water based on ground-based remote sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Wærsted , Eivind G.; Haeffelin , Martial; Dupont , Jean-Charles; Delanoë , Julien; Dubuisson , Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Radiative cooling and heating impact the liquid water balance of fog and therefore play an important role in determining their persistence or dissipation. We demonstrate that a quantitative analysis of the radiation-driven condensation and evaporation is possible in real time using ground-based remote sensing observations (cloud radar, ceilometer, microwave radiometer). Seven continental fog events in midlatitude winter are studied, and the radiative processes are further ex...

  16. Spatio-temporal monitoring of cotton cultivation using ground-based and airborne multispectral sensors in GIS environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Antonis; Kalivas, Dionissios; Theocharopoulos, Sid

    2017-07-01

    Multispectral sensor capability of capturing reflectance data at several spectral channels, together with the inherent reflectance responses of various soils and especially plant surfaces, has gained major interest in crop production. In present study, two multispectral sensing systems, a ground-based and an aerial-based, were applied for the multispatial and temporal monitoring of two cotton fields in central Greece. The ground-based system was Crop Circle ACS-430, while the aerial consisted of a consumer-level quadcopter (Phantom 2) and a modified Hero3+ Black digital camera. The purpose of the research was to monitor crop growth with the two systems and investigate possible interrelations between the derived well-known normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Five data collection campaigns were conducted during the cultivation period and concerned scanning soil and plants with the ground-based sensor and taking aerial photographs of the fields with the unmanned aerial system. According to the results, both systems successfully monitored cotton growth stages in terms of space and time. The mean values of NDVI changes through time as retrieved by the ground-based system were satisfactorily modelled by a second-order polynomial equation (R 2 0.96 in Field 1 and 0.99 in Field 2). Further, they were highly correlated (r 0.90 in Field 1 and 0.74 in Field 2) with the according values calculated via the aerial-based system. The unmanned aerial system (UAS) can potentially substitute crop scouting as it concerns a time-effective, non-destructive and reliable way of soil and plant monitoring.

  17. Aerial Prefeeding Followed by Ground Based Toxic Baiting for More Efficient and Acceptable Poisoning of Invasive Small Mammalian Pests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Morgan

    Full Text Available Introduced brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula and rat species (Rattus spp. are major vertebrate pests in New Zealand, with impacts on conservation and agriculture being managed largely through poisoning operations. Aerial distribution of baits containing sodium fluoroacetate (1080 has been refined to maximise cost effectiveness and minimise environmental impact, but this method is strongly opposed by some as it is perceived as being indiscriminate. Although ground based control enables precise placement of baits, operations are often more than twice as costly as aerial control, mainly due to the high labour costs. We investigated a new approach to ground based control that combined aerial distribution of non-toxic 'prefeed' baits followed by sparse distribution of toxic baits at regular intervals along the GPS tracked prefeeding flight paths. This approach was tested in two field trials in which both 1080 baits and cholecalciferol baits were used in separate areas. Effectiveness of the approach, assessed primarily using 'chewcards', was compared with that of scheduled aerial 1080 operations that were conducted in outlying areas of both trials. Contractors carrying out ground based control were able to follow the GPS tracks of aerial prefeeding flight lines very accurately, and with 1080 baits achieved very high levels of kill of possums and rats similar to those achieved by aerial 1080 baiting. Cholecalciferol was less effective in the first trial, but by doubling the amount of cholecalciferol bait used in the second trial, few possums or rats survived. By measuring the time taken to complete ground baiting from GPS tracks, we predicted that the method (using 1080 baits would be similarly cost effective to aerial 1080 operations for controlling possums and rats, and considerably less expensive than typical current costs of ground based control. The main limitations to the use of the method will be access to, and size of, the operational

  18. Monitoring Strategies of Earth Dams by Ground-Based Radar Interferometry: How to Extract Useful Information for Seismic Risk Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pasquale, Andrea; Nico, Giovanni; Pitullo, Alfredo; Prezioso, Giuseppina

    2018-01-16

    The aim of this paper is to describe how ground-based radar interferometry can provide displacement measurements of earth dam surfaces and of vibration frequencies of its main concrete infrastructures. In many cases, dams were built many decades ago and, at that time, were not equipped with in situ sensors embedded in the structure when they were built. Earth dams have scattering properties similar to landslides for which the Ground-Based Synthetic Aperture Radar (GBSAR) technique has been so far extensively applied to study ground displacements. In this work, SAR and Real Aperture Radar (RAR) configurations are used for the measurement of earth dam surface displacements and vibration frequencies of concrete structures, respectively. A methodology for the acquisition of SAR data and the rendering of results is described. The geometrical correction factor, needed to transform the Line-of-Sight (LoS) displacement measurements of GBSAR into an estimate of the horizontal displacement vector of the dam surface, is derived. Furthermore, a methodology for the acquisition of RAR data and the representation of displacement temporal profiles and vibration frequency spectra of dam concrete structures is presented. For this study a Ku-band ground-based radar, equipped with horn antennas having different radiation patterns, has been used. Four case studies, using different radar acquisition strategies specifically developed for the monitoring of earth dams, are examined. The results of this work show the information that a Ku-band ground-based radar can provide to structural engineers for a non-destructive seismic assessment of earth dams.

  19. Monitoring Strategies of Earth Dams by Ground-Based Radar Interferometry: How to Extract Useful Information for Seismic Risk Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Di Pasquale

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to describe how ground-based radar interferometry can provide displacement measurements of earth dam surfaces and of vibration frequencies of its main concrete infrastructures. In many cases, dams were built many decades ago and, at that time, were not equipped with in situ sensors embedded in the structure when they were built. Earth dams have scattering properties similar to landslides for which the Ground-Based Synthetic Aperture Radar (GBSAR technique has been so far extensively applied to study ground displacements. In this work, SAR and Real Aperture Radar (RAR configurations are used for the measurement of earth dam surface displacements and vibration frequencies of concrete structures, respectively. A methodology for the acquisition of SAR data and the rendering of results is described. The geometrical correction factor, needed to transform the Line-of-Sight (LoS displacement measurements of GBSAR into an estimate of the horizontal displacement vector of the dam surface, is derived. Furthermore, a methodology for the acquisition of RAR data and the representation of displacement temporal profiles and vibration frequency spectra of dam concrete structures is presented. For this study a Ku-band ground-based radar, equipped with horn antennas having different radiation patterns, has been used. Four case studies, using different radar acquisition strategies specifically developed for the monitoring of earth dams, are examined. The results of this work show the information that a Ku-band ground-based radar can provide to structural engineers for a non-destructive seismic assessment of earth dams.

  20. A comparison of ground-based hydroxyl airglow temperatures with SABER/TIMED measurements over 23° N, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, Navin; Singh, Dupinder; Gurubaran, Subramanian

    2017-03-01

    Ground-based observations of OH (6, 2) Meinel band nightglow were carried out at Ranchi (23.3° N, 85.3° E), India, during January-March 2011, December 2011-May 2012 and December 2012-March 2013 using an all-sky imaging system. Near the mesopause, OH temperatures were derived from the OH (6, 2) Meinel band intensity information. A limited comparison of OH temperatures (TOH) with SABER/TIMED measurements in 30 cases was performed by defining almost coincident criterion of ±1.5° latitude-longitude and ±3 min of the ground-based observations. Using SABER OH 1.6 and 2.0 µm volume emission rate profiles as the weighing function, two sets of OH-equivalent temperature (T1. 6 and T2. 0 respectively) were estimated from its kinetic temperature profile for comparison with OH nightglow measurements. Overall, fair agreement existed between ground-based and SABER measurements in the majority of events within the limits of experimental errors. Overall, the mean value of OH-derived temperatures and SABER OH-equivalent temperatures were 197.3 ± 4.6, 192.0 ± 10.8 and 192.7 ± 10.3 K, and the ground-based temperatures were 4-5 K warmer than SABER values. A difference of 8 K or more is noted between two measurements when the peak of the OH emission layer lies in the vicinity of large temperature inversions. A comparison of OH temperatures derived using different sets of Einstein transition probabilities and SABER measurements was also performed; however, OH temperatures derived using Langhoff et al. (1986) transition probabilities were found to compare well.