WorldWideScience

Sample records for ground-based atomic oxygen

  1. Ground-based Investigations of Atomic Oxygen Erosion Behaviors of Silver and Ion-implanted Silver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUO Shu-wang; LI Mei-shuan; YIN Xiao-hui; LI Wen-kui; LI Ming-sheng

    2006-01-01

    Silver foils and ion-implanted silver foils exposed to atomic oxygen (AO) generated in a ground simulation facility were investigated by the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The experimental results show the presence of Ag2O and AgO in an oxidation process of the silver foil having exposure to AO. As soon as silver comes under the bombardment of atomic oxygen, the oxidation process starts with a thick film forming on the silver surface. Because of the development of stresses, the oxide layer gets cracked and spalled, which leads to appearance of a new silver surface intensifying further oxidation. At last, AgO begins to form on the outer surface of the oxide film. The analytical results of the XPS and the AES attest to formation of a continuous high-quality protective oxide-based layer on the surface of ion-implanted silver films after exposure to AO. This layer can well protect materials in question from erosion.

  2. A ground-based radio frequency inductively coupled plasma apparatus for atomic oxygen simulation in low Earth orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yongxian; Tian, Xiubo; Yang, Shiqin; Chu, Paul K

    2007-10-01

    A radio frequency (rf) inductively coupled plasma apparatus has been developed to simulate the atomic oxygen environment encountered in low Earth orbit (LEO). Basing on the novel design, the apparatus can achieve stable, long lasting operation, pure and high density oxygen plasma beam. Furthermore, the effective atomic oxygen flux can be regulated. The equivalent effective atomic oxygen flux may reach (2.289-2.984) x 10(16) at.cm(2) s at an oxygen pressure of 1.5 Pa and rf power of 400 W. The equivalent atomic oxygen flux is about 100 times than that in the LEO environment. The mass loss measured from the polyimide sample changes linearly with the exposure time, while the density of the eroded holes becomes smaller. The erosion mechanism of the polymeric materials by atomic oxygen is complex and involves initial reactions at the gas-surface interface as well as steady-state material removal.

  3. A method for the retrieval of atomic oxygen density and temperature profiles from ground-based measurements of the O(+)(2D-2P) 7320 A twilight airglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennelly, J. A.; Torr, D. G.; Richards, P. G.; Torr, M. R.; Sharp, W. E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for extracting thermospheric profiles of the atomic-oxygen density and temperature, using ground-based measurements of the O(+)(2D-2P) doublet at 7320 and 7330 A in the twilight airglow. In this method, a local photochemical model is used to calculate the 7320-A intensity; the method also utilizes an iterative inversion procedure based on the Levenberg-Marquardt method described by Press et al. (1986). The results demonstrate that, if the measurements are only limited by errors due to Poisson noise, the altitude profiles of neutral temperature and atomic oxygen concentration can be determined accurately using currently available spectrometers.

  4. Ground-based investigation of atomic oxygen effects on naked Ag and Ag with protective organic coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张蕾; 严川伟; 屈庆; 孙刚; 童靖宇; 曹楚南

    2002-01-01

    Protective behavior of organic coatings of alkyd, epoxy, urethane and siloxane applied to silver solar cell interconnects and erosion of Ag were investigated by exposure experiments to ground simulation atomic oxygen (AO). Evaluations of their protective properties were made through assessing their mass change characteristics, chemical and physical changes to AO attack. The specimens after exposure were analyzed with SEM/EDAX and XPS. The results indicated that the silver is heavily etched, some coatings such as epoxy, alkyd, urethane are seriously degraded or removed as volatile oxides and the morphology of coatings changed. It is evident that siloxane coatings have excellent properties for anti-AO attack. The erosion product consists of silicon dioxide layer of compact texture and is left on the surface to provide adequate protection from further attack by the energetic AO.

  5. Ground-Based Tests of Spacecraft Polymeric Materials under OXY-GEN Plasma-Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernik, Vladimir; Novikov, Lev; Gaidar, Anna

    2016-07-01

    Spacecraft LEO mission is accompanied by destruction of polymeric material surface under influence of atomic oxygen flow. Sources of molecular, plasma and ion beams are used for the accelerated ground-based tests of spacecraft materials. In the work application of oxygen plasma accelerator of a duoplasmatron type is described. Plasma particles have been accelerated up to average speed of 13-16 km/s. Influence of such beam on materials leads to more intensive destruction of polymers than in LEO. This fact allows to execute tests in the accelerated time scale by a method of an effective fluence. Special measures were given to decrease a concentration of both gaseous and electrode material impurities in the oxygen beam. In the work the results of simulative tests of spacecraft materials and experiments on LEO are considered. Comparison of plasma beam simulation with LEO data has shown conformity for structures of a number of polymeric materials. The relative erosion yields (normalized with respect to polyimide) of the tested materials are shown practically equal to those in LEO. The obtained results give grounds for using the plasma-generation mode with ion energies of 20-30 eV to accelerated testing of spacecraft materials for long -term LEO missions.

  6. Low Frequency Gravitational Wave Detection With Ground Based Atom Interferometer Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Chaibi, W; Canuel, B; Bertoldi, A; Landragin, A; Bouyer, P

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new detection strategy for gravitational waves (GWs) below few Hertz based on a correlated array of atom interferometers (AIs). Our proposal allows to reduce the Newtonian Noise (NN) which limits all ground based GW detectors below few Hertz, including previous atom interferometry-based concepts. Using an array of long baseline AI gradiometers yields several estimations of the NN, whose effect can thus be reduced via statistical averaging. Considering the km baseline of current optical detectors, a NN rejection of factor 2 could be achieved, and tested with existing AI array geometries. Exploiting the correlation properties of the gravity acceleration noise, we show that a 10-fold or more NN rejection is possible with a dedicated configuration. Considering a conservative NN model and the current developments in cold atom technology, we show that strain sensitivities below $1\\times 10^{-19}/ \\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}$ in the $ 0.3-3 \\ \\text{Hz}$ frequency band can be within reach, with a peak sensitivity o...

  7. Ground-based simulation of the Earth's upper atmosphere oxygen impact on polymer composites with nanosized fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, Lev; Chernik, Vladimir; Voronina, Ekaterina; Chechenin, Nikolay; Samokhina, Maria S.; Bondarenko, Gennady G.; Gaidar, Anna I.; Vorobyeva, Ekaterina A.; Petrov, Dmitrii V.; Chirskaya, Natalia P.

    The improvement of durability of polymer composites to the space environment impact is a very important task because these materials are considered currently as very promising type of materials for aerospace engineering. By embedding various nanosized fillers into a polymer matrix it is possible to obtain composites with required mechanical, thermal, electrical and optic properties. However, while developing such materials for operation in low Earth orbits (LEO), it is necessary to study thoroughly their durability to the impact of atomic oxygen (AO) of the Earth’s upper atmosphere, because AO is the main factor that causes erosion and damage of spacecraft surface materials in LEO. Ground-based simulation of AO impact on polymer composites was performed on a magnetoplasmadynamic accelerator developed at Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University. Polymer composite samples which were prepared as films of 30-50 mum thickness with different amount (3-20 wt%) of various inorganic and organic nanofillers including nanoparticles of metal oxides and carbides as well as polyethoxysiloxanes and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), were exposed to hyperthermal AO flow, and mass losses of samples were estimated. Changes in the structure of composite surface and in material optical properties were studied. The experiments demonstrated that embedding nanosized fillers into a polymer matrix can significantly reduced mass losses, and the good dispersion of fillers improves AO durability in comparison with initial polymers [1]. The computer simulation within the developed 2D Monte-Carlo model demonstrated a good agreement with the experimental data [2]. Special attention was given to the study of AO impact on aligned multiwalled CNTs and CNT-based composites [3]. Some results of computer simulation of hyperthermal oxygen atom interaction with CNT and graphene as well as with polymers are presented to discuss elementary processes which occur in nanostructures

  8. Double Photoionization of Atomic Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramarathna, Madhushani; Gorczyca, Thomas; Ballance, Connor; Stolte, Wayne

    2016-05-01

    Double photoionization of atomic oxygen was first measured at Aladdin, a second-generation synchrotron source, at lower resolution (Angel and Samson, PRA, 38, 5573, 1988). Here we present new experimental and theoretical results for the direct double photoionization of atomic oxygen. The experiment was performed at the Advanced Light Source for photon energies near the double-ionization threshold, revealing rich resonance structures converging to multiple single-ionization thresholds. State-of-the-art calculations were performed using the R-matrix with pseudostates (RMPS) method (P. G. Burke, R-matrix Theory of Atomic Collisions, Springer 2011) as implemented by Gorczya and Badnell (JPB, 30, 3897, 1997), and recently applied, in a converged representation, to the double photoionization of helium (T. W. Gorczyca et al., JPB, 46, 195201, 2013). The much-larger calculation required for oxygen, due to the many target state symmetries compared to helium, necessitated a parallel RMPS approach. Comparison between theoretical and experimental results shows overall qualitative agreement but also some puzzling discrepancies: experimental features that are not reproduced by the RMPS calculations.

  9. Intelsat solar array coupon atomic oxygen flight experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, S.; King, G.; Dunnet, A.; Kirkendahl, T.; Linton, R.; Vaughn, J.

    1994-05-01

    A Hughes communications satellite (INTELSAT series) belonging to the INTELSAT Organization was marooned in low-Earth orbit (LEO) on March 14, 1990, following failure of the Titan launch vehicle third stage to separate properly. The satellite, INTELSAT 6, was designed for service in geosynchronous orbit and contains several materials that are potentially susceptible to attack by atomic oxygen. Analysis showed that direct exposure of the silver interconnects in the satellite photovoltaic array to atomic oxygen in LEO was the key materials issue. Available data on atomic oxygen degradation of silver are limited and show high variance, so solar array configurations of the INTELSAT 6 type and individual interconnects were tested in ground-based facilities and during STS-41 (Space Shuttle Discovery, October 1990) as part of the ISAC flight experiment. Several materials for which little or no flight data exist were also tested for atomic oxygen reactivity. Dry lubricants, elastomers, and polymeric and inorganic materials were exposed to an oxygen atom fluence of 1.1 x 10(exp 20) atoms cm(exp 2). Many of the samples were selected to support Space Station Freedom design and decision making. This paper provides an overview of the ISAC flight experiment and a brief summary of results. In addition to new data on materials not before flown, ISAC provided data supporting the decision to rescue INTELSAT 6, which was successfully undertaken in May 1992.

  10. Can Ground-based Telescopes Detect The Oxygen 1.27 Micron Absorption Feature as a Biomarker in Exoplanets ?

    CERN Document Server

    Kawahara, Hajime; Takami, Michihiro; Fujii, Yuka; Kotani, Takayuki; Murakami, Naoshi; Tamura, Motohide; Guyon, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    The oxygen absorption line imprinted in the scattered light from the Earth-like planets has been considered as the most promising metabolic biomarker of the exo-life. We examine the feasibility of the detection of the oxygen 1.27 micron band from habitable exoplanets, in particular, around late-type stars with a 30 m class ground-based telescope with a future instrument. We analyzed the night airglow around 1.27 micron with IRCS/echelle spectrometer on Subaru and found that the strong telluric emission from atmospheric oxygen molecules declines by an order of magnitude by the midnight. With compilation of nearby star catalogues combined with the sky background model, we estimate the detectability of the oxygen absorption band from an Earth twin, if exists, around nearby stars. We find that the most dominant photon noise of the oxygen 1.27 micron detection comes from the night airglow if the leakage is suppressed enough to detect the planet. We conclude that the future detectors for which the detection contras...

  11. Ground Based Observation of Isotopic Oxygen in the Martian Atmosphere Using Infrared Heterodyne Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. L.; Kostiuk, T.; Livengood, T. A.; Fast, K. E.; Hewagama, T.; Delgado, J. D.; Sonnabend, G.

    2010-01-01

    Infrared heterodyne spectra of isotopic CO2 in the Martian atmosphere were obtained using the Goddard Heterodyne Instrument for Planetary Wind and Composition, HIPWAC, which was interfaced with the 3-meter telescope at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility- Spectra were colle cted at a resolution of lambda/delta lambda=10(exp 7). Absorption fea tures of the CO2 isotopologues have been identified from which isotop ic ratios of oxygen have been determined. The isotopic ratios O-17/O -16 and O-18/O-16 in the Martian atmosphere can be related to Martian atmospheric evolution and can be compared to isotopic ratios of oxyg en in the Earth's atmosphere. Isotopic carbon and oxygen are importa nt constraints on any theory for the erosion of the Martian primordia l atmosphere and the interaction between the atmosphere and surface o r subsurface chemical reservoirs. This investigation explored the pr esent abundance of the stable isotopes of oxygen in Mars' atmospheric carbon dioxide by measuring rovibrational line absorption in isotop ic species of CO2 using groundbased infrared heterodyne spectroscopy in the vicinity of the 9.6 micron and 10.6 micron CO2 lasing bands. T he target transitions during this observation were O-18 C-12 O-16 as well as O-178 C-12 O-16 and O-16 C-113 O-16 at higher resolving power of lambda/delta lambda=10(exp 7) and with high signal-to-noise ratio (longer integration time) in order to fully characterize the absorpt ion line profiles. The fully-resolved lineshape of both the strong n ormal-isotope and the weak isotopic CO2 lines were measured simultane ously in a single spectrum.

  12. Energetic oxygen atom material degradation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caledonia, George E.; Krech, Robert H.

    1987-01-01

    As part of a study designed to test potential Shuttle surface materials for the extents of degradation and mass loss expected to be suffered in space from the velocity impacts of ambient oxygen atoms, a novel technique was developed for generation of a high flux of energetic oxygen atoms. The generation technique involves laser-induced breakdown of molecular oxygen followed by a rapid expansion of energetic oxygen atoms. The high-velocity streams developed in an evacuated hypersonic nozzle have average O-atom velocities of about 5 to 13 km/s, with an estimated total production of 10 to the 18th atoms per pulse over pulse durations of several microseconds. Results on preliminary material degradation tests conducted with this test facility have been reported by Caledonia et al. (1987). Diagrams of the experimental setup are included.

  13. Atomic Oxygen Cleaning of Unpainted Plaster Sculptures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2017-01-01

    Atomic oxygen erosion of polymers has been found to be a threat to spacecraft in low Earth orbit. As a result ground facilities have been developed to identify coatings to protect polymers such as used for solar array blankets. As a result of extensive laboratory testing, it was discovered that soot and other organic contamination on paintings could be readily removed by atomic oxygen interactions with minimal damage to the artwork. No method, other than dusting, has been found to be effective in the cleaning of unpainted plaster sculptures This presentation discusses the atomic oxygen interaction processes and how effective they are for cleaning soot damaged unpainted plaster sculptures.

  14. Formulation of geopotential difference determination using optical-atomic clocks onboard satellites and on ground based on Doppler cancellation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ziyu; Shen, Wen-Bin; Zhang, Shuangxi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we propose an approach for determining the geopotential difference using high-frequency-stability microwave links between satellite and ground station based on Doppler cancellation system. Suppose a satellite and a ground station are equipped with precise optical-atomic clocks (OACs) and oscillators. The ground oscillator emits a signal with frequency fa towards the satellite and the satellite receiver (connected with the satellite oscillator) receives this signal with frequency fb which contains the gravitational frequency shift effect and other signals and noises. After receiving this signal, the satellite oscillator transmits and emits, respectively, two signals with frequencies fb and fc towards the ground station. Via Doppler cancellation technique, the geopotential difference between the satellite and the ground station can be determined based on gravitational frequency shift equation by a combination of these three frequencies. For arbitrary two stations on ground, based on similar procedures as described above, we may determine the geopotential difference between these two stations via a satellite. Our analysis shows that the accuracy can reach 1 m2 s- 2 based on the clocks' inaccuracy of about 10-17 (s s-1) level. Since OACs with instability around 10-18 in several hours and inaccuracy around 10-18 level have been generated in laboratory, the proposed approach may have prospective applications in geoscience, and especially, based on this approach a unified world height system could be realized with one-centimetre level accuracy in the near future.

  15. Investigation of Surface Reaction and Degradation Mechanism of Kapton during Atomic Oxygen Exposure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuwang DUO; Meishuan LI; Yanchun ZHOU; Jingyu TONG; Gang SUN

    2003-01-01

    The erosion behavior of Kapton when exposed to atomic oxygen (AO) environment in the ground-based simulation facility was studied. The chemical and physical changes of sample surfaces after exposed to AO fluxes were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results indicated that Kapton underwent dramatically degradation, including much mass loss and change of surface morphologies; vacuum outgassing effect of Kapton was the key factor for initial mass loss in the course of atomic oxygen beam exposures. XPS analysis showed that the carbonyl group in Kapton reacted with oxygen atoms to generate CO2, then CO2 desorbed from Kapton surface. In addition, PMDA in the polyimide structure degraded due to the reaction with atomic oxygen of 5 eV.

  16. Tutorial on Atomic Oxygen Effects and Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sharon K.

    2017-01-01

    Atomic oxygen is the most predominant specie in low Earth orbit (LEO) and is contained in the upper atmosphere of many other planetary bodies. Formed by photo-dissociation of molecular oxygen, it is highly reactive and energetic enough to break chemical bonds on the surface of many materials and react with them to form either stable or volatile oxides. The extent of the damage for spacecraft depends a lot on how much atomic oxygen arrives at the surface, the energy of the atoms, and the reactivity of the material that is exposed to it. Oxide formation can result in shrinkage, cracking, or erosion which can also result in changes in optical, thermal, or mechanical properties of the materials exposed. The extent of the reaction can be affected by mechanical loading, temperature, and other environmental components such as ultraviolet radiation or charged particles. Atomic oxygen generally causes a surface reaction, but it can scatter under coatings and into crevices causing oxidation much farther into a spacecraft surface or structure than would be expected. Contamination can also affect system performance. Contamination is generally caused by arrival of volatile species that condense on spacecraft surfaces. The volatiles are typically a result of outgassing of materials that are on the spacecraft. Once the volatiles are condensed on a surface, they can then be fixed on the surface by ultraviolet radiation andor atomic oxygen reaction to form stable surface contaminants that can change optical and thermal properties of materials in power systems, thermal systems, and sensors. This tutorial discusses atomic oxygen erosion and contaminate formation, and the effect they have on typical spacecraft materials. Scattering of atomic oxygen, some effects of combined environments and examples of effects of atomic oxygen and contamination on spacecraft systems and components will also be presented.

  17. Atomic Structure Calculations for Neutral Oxygen

    OpenAIRE

    Norah Alonizan; Rabia Qindeel; Nabil Ben Nessib

    2016-01-01

    Energy levels and oscillator strengths for neutral oxygen have been calculated using the Cowan (CW), SUPERSTRUCTURE (SS), and AUTOSTRUCTURE (AS) atomic structure codes. The results obtained with these atomic codes have been compared with MCHF calculations and experimental values from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) database.

  18. Atomic Oxygen Treatment and Its Effect on a Variety of Artist's Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sharon K. R.; Banks, Bruce A.; Waters, Deborah L.

    2005-01-01

    Atomic oxygen treatment has been investigated as an unconventional option for art restoration where conventional methods have not been effective. Exposure of surfaces to atomic oxygen was first performed to investigate the durability of materials in the low Earth orbit environment of space. The use of the ground based environmental simulation chambers, developed for atomic oxygen exposure testing, has been investigated in collaboration with conservators at a variety of institutions, as a method to clean the surfaces of works of art. The atomic oxygen treatment technique has been evaluated as a method to remove soot and char from the surface of oil paint (both varnished and unvarnished), watercolors, acrylic paint, and fabric as well as the removal of graffiti and other marks from surfaces which are too porous to lend themselves to conventional solvent removal techniques. This paper will discuss the treatment of these surfaces giving an example of each and a discussion of the treatment results.

  19. Embedded-atom Potential for Oxygen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The analytic embedded-atom potential for oxygen is developed from the experimental data and the results of the first-principle. The potential is used to predict the geometries and energies of O3, fcc, bcc, sc and diamond. The predictions are in good agreement with experimental data available and other theoretical results.

  20. Oxygen Atom Recombination in Carbon Dioxide Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Corey; Garcia, R. M.; Pejakovic, D. A.; Kalogerakis, K. S.

    2009-09-01

    Understanding processes involving atomic oxygen is crucial for the study and modeling of composition, energy transfer, airglow, and transport dynamics in planetary atmospheres. Significant gaps and uncertainties exist in our understanding of the above processes, and often the relevant input from laboratory measurements is missing or outdated. We are conducting experiments to measure the rate coefficients for O + O + CO2 and O + O2 + CO2 recombination and investigate the O2 excited states produced following O-atom recombination. These laboratory measurements are key input for a quantitative understanding and reliable modeling of the atmospheres of the CO2 planets and their airglow. An ArF excimer laser with 193-nm pulsed output radiation is employed to partially photodissociate carbon dioxide. In an ambient-pressure (760 Torr) background of CO2, the O atoms produced recombine in a time scale of a few milliseconds. Detection of laser-induced fluorescence at 845 nm following two-photon excitation near 226 nm monitors the decay of the oxygen atom population. From the temporal evolution of the signal we can extract the rate coefficients for recombination of O + O and O + O2 in the presence of CO2. We also use fluorescence and resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization techniques to detect the products of the O-atom recombination and subsequent relaxation in CO2. This work is supported by the US National Science Foundation's (NSF) Planetary Astronomy Program. Rosanne Garcia's participation was funded by the NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program.

  1. Atomic oxygen in the Martian thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, A. I. F.; Alexander, M. J.; Meier, R. R.; Paxton, L. J.; Bougher, S. W.; Fesen, C. G.

    1992-01-01

    Modern models of thermospheric composition and temperature and of excitation and radiative transfer processes are used to simulate the O I 130-nm emission from Mars measured by the Mariner 9 ultraviolet spectrometer. This paper uses the Mars thermospheric general circulation model calculations (MTGCM) of Bougher et al. (1988) and the Monte Carlo partial frequency redistribution multiple scattering code of Meier and Lee (1982). It is found that the decline in atomic oxygen through the daylight hours predicted by the MTGCM cannot be reconciled with the excess afternoon brightness seen in the data. Oxygen concentrations inferred from the data show a positive gradient through the day, in agreement with the original analysis by Strickland et al. (1973). In addition, the data suggest that the oxygen abundance increases toward high southerly latitudes, in contrast with the MTGCM prediction of high values in the Northern Hemisphere. It appears that solar forcing alone cannot account for the observed characteristics of the Martian thermosphere and that wave and tidal effects may profoundly affect the structure, winds, and composition.

  2. Formation and properties of metal-oxygen atomic chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thijssen, W.H.A.; Strange, Mikkel; de Brugh, J.M.J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Suspended chains consisting of single noble metal and oxygen atoms have been formed. We provide evidence that oxygen can react with and be incorporated into metallic one-dimensional atomic chains. Oxygen incorporation reinforces the linear bonds in the chain, which facilitates the creation of lon...

  3. Effect of energetic oxygen atoms on neutral density models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbaugh, R. P.; Nisbet, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    The dissociative recombination of O2(+) and NO(+) in the F region results in the production of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen with substantially greater kinetic energy than the ambient atoms. In the exosphere these energetic atoms have long free paths. They can ascend to altitudes of several thousand kilometers and can travel horizontally to distances of the order of the earth's radius. The distribution of energetic oxygen atoms is derived by means of models of the ion and neutral densities for quiet and disturbed solar conditions. A distribution technique is used to study the motion of the atoms in the collision-dominated region. Ballistic trajectories are calculated in the spherical gravitational field of the earth. The present calculations show that the number densities of energetic oxygen atoms predominate over the ambient atomic oxygen densities above 1000 km under quiet solar conditions and above 1600 km under disturbed solar conditions.

  4. Operation of the computer model for microenvironment atomic oxygen exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, R. J.; Gillis, J. R.; Gruenbaum, P. E.

    1995-01-01

    A computer model for microenvironment atomic oxygen exposure has been developed to extend atomic oxygen modeling capability to include shadowing and reflections. The model uses average exposure conditions established by the direct exposure model and extends the application of these conditions to treat surfaces of arbitrary shape and orientation.

  5. A technique for synergistic atomic oxygen and vacuum ultraviolet radiation durability evaluation of materials for use in LEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Banks, Bruce A.

    1996-01-01

    Material erosion data collected during flight experiments such as the Environmental Oxygen Interaction with Materials (EOIM)-3 and the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) have raised questions as to the sensitivity of material erosion to levels of atomic oxygen exposure and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation. The erosion sensitivity of some materials such as FEP Teflon used as a thermal control material on satellites in low Earth orbit (LEO), is particularly important but difficult to determine. This is in large part due to the inability to hold all but one exposure parameter constant during a flight experiment. This is also difficult to perform in a ground based facility, because often the variation of the level of atomic oxygen or VUV radiation also results in a change in the level of the other parameter. A facility has been developed which allows each parameter to be changed almost independently and offer broad area exposure. The resulting samples can be made large enough for mechanical testing. The facility uses an electron cyclotron resonance plasma source to provide the atomic oxygen. A series of glass plates is used to focus the atomic oxygen while filtering the VUV radiation from the plasma source. After filtering, atomic oxygen effective flux levels can still be measured which are as high as 7 x 10(exp 15) atoms/cm(exp 2)-sec which is adequate for accelerated testing. VUV radiation levels after filtering can be as low as 0.3 suns. Additional VUV suns can be added with the use of deuterium lamps which allow the VUV level to be changed while keeping the flux of atomic oxygen constant. This paper discusses the facility, and results from exposure of Kapton and FEP at pre-determined atomic oxygen flux and VUV sun levels.

  6. Atomic oxygen effects on POSS polyimides in low earth orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, Timothy K; Wright, Michael E; Tomczak, Sandra J; Marquez, Sara A; Shen, Linhan; Brunsvold, Amy L; Cooper, Russell; Zhang, Jianming; Vij, Vandana; Guenthner, Andrew J; Petteys, Brian J

    2012-02-01

    Kapton polyimde is extensively used in solar arrays, spacecraft thermal blankets, and space inflatable structures. Upon exposure to atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit (LEO), Kapton is severely eroded. An effective approach to prevent this erosion is to incorporate polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) into the polyimide matrix by copolymerizing POSS monomers with the polyimide precursor. The copolymerization of POSS provides Si and O in the polymer matrix on the nano level. During exposure of POSS polyimide to atomic oxygen, organic material is degraded, and a silica passivation layer is formed. This silica layer protects the underlying polymer from further degradation. Laboratory and space-flight experiments have shown that POSS polyimides are highly resistant to atomic-oxygen attack, with erosion yields that may be as little as 1% those of Kapton. The results of all the studies indicate that POSS polyimide would be a space-survivable replacement for Kapton on spacecraft that operate in the LEO environment.

  7. Atomic Oxygen Erosion Yield Dependence Upon Texture Development in Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Loftus, Ryan J.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2016-01-01

    The atomic oxygen erosion yield (volume of a polymer that is lost due to oxidation per incident atom) of polymers is typically assumed to be reasonably constant with increasing fluence. However polymers containing ash or inorganic pigments, tend to have erosion yields that decrease with fluence due to an increasing presence of protective particles on the polymer surface. This paper investigates two additional possible causes for erosion yields of polymers that are dependent upon atomic oxygen. These are the development of surface texture which can cause the erosion yield to change with fluence due to changes in the aspect ratio of the surface texture that develops and polymer specific atomic oxygen interaction parameters. The surface texture development under directed hyperthermal attack produces higher aspect ratio surface texture than isotropic thermal energy atomic oxygen attack. The fluence dependence of erosion yields is documented for low Kapton H (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) effective fluences for a variety of polymers under directed hyperthermal and isotropic thermal energy attack.

  8. Microwave discharge as a remote source of neutral oxygen atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Primc

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The late flowing afterglow of an oxygen plasma was used as a remote source of neutral oxygen atoms. Plasma was created via a microwave discharge in a narrow quartz glass tube with an inner diameter of 6 mm at powers between 50 W and 300 W. The tube was connected to a wider perpendicular tube with an inner diameter of 36 mm. The density of neutral oxygen atoms was measured in the wide tube about 70 cm from the discharge using a classical nickel catalytic probe. The oxygen atom density as a function of gas pressure had a well-defined maximum. The oxygen atom density can be as large as 11 × 1020 m-3. At the lowest power tested (50 W, the maximum was obtained at a pressure of about 30 Pa. However, at higher powers, the maximum shifted to higher pressures. As a result, at 300 W the maximum appeared at 60 Pa. The results can be explained through collision phenomena in gas phase and surfaces in both discharge and flowing afterglow regions, and strong pressure gradients along the narrow tube.

  9. Ground-Laboratory to In-Space Atomic Oxygen Correlation for the Polymer Erosion and Contamination Experiment (PEACE) Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambler, Arielle H.; Inoshita, Karen E.; Roberts, Lily M.; Barbagallo, Claire E.; deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    The Materials International Space Station Experiment 2 (MISSE 2) Polymer Erosion and Contamination Experiment (PEACE) polymers were exposed to the environment of low Earth orbit (LEO) for 3.95 years from 2001 to 2005. There were 41 different PEACE polymers, which were flown on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS) in order to determine their atomic oxygen erosion yields. In LEO, atomic oxygen is an environmental durability threat, particularly for long duration mission exposures. Although spaceflight experiments, such as the MISSE 2 PEACE experiment, are ideal for determining LEO environmental durability of spacecraft materials, ground-laboratory testing is often relied upon for durability evaluation and prediction. Unfortunately, significant differences exist between LEO atomic oxygen exposure and atomic oxygen exposure in ground-laboratory facilities. These differences include variations in species, energies, thermal exposures and radiation exposures, all of which may result in different reactions and erosion rates. In an effort to improve the accuracy of ground-based durability testing, ground-laboratory to in-space atomic oxygen correlation experiments have been conducted. In these tests, the atomic oxygen erosion yields of the PEACE polymers were determined relative to Kapton H using a radio-frequency (RF) plasma asher (operated on air). The asher erosion yields were compared to the MISSE 2 PEACE erosion yields to determine the correlation between erosion rates in the two environments. This paper provides a summary of the MISSE 2 PEACE experiment; it reviews the specific polymers tested as well as the techniques used to determine erosion yield in the asher, and it provides a correlation between the space and ground laboratory erosion yield values. Using the PEACE polymers asher to in-space erosion yield ratios will allow more accurate in-space materials performance predictions to be made based on plasma asher durability evaluation.

  10. Trapping of molecular Oxygen together with Lithium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Akerman, Nitzan; Segev, Yair; Bibelnik, Natan; Narevicius, Julia; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate simultaneous deceleration and trapping of a cold atomic and molecular mixture. This is the first step towards studies of cold atom-molecule collisions at low temperatures as well as application of sympathetic cooling. Both atoms and molecules are cooled in a supersonic expansion and are loaded into a moving magnetic trap which brings them to rest via the Zeeman interaction from an initial velocity of 375 m/s. We use a beam seeded with molecular Oxygen, and entrain it with Lithium atoms by laser ablation prior to deceleration. The deceleration ends with loading of the mixture into a static quadrupole trap, which is generated by two permanent magnets. We estimate $10^9$ trapped O$_2$ molecules and $10^5$ Li atoms with background pressure limited lifetime on the order of 1 second. With further improvements to Lithium entrainment we expect that sympathetic cooling of molecules is within reach.

  11. Trapping of Molecular Oxygen together with Lithium Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerman, Nitzan; Karpov, Michael; Segev, Yair; Bibelnik, Natan; Narevicius, Julia; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate simultaneous deceleration and trapping of a cold atomic and molecular mixture. This is the first step towards studies of cold atom-molecule collisions at low temperatures as well as application of sympathetic cooling. Both atoms and molecules are cooled in a supersonic expansion and are loaded into a moving magnetic trap that brings them to rest via the Zeeman interaction from an initial velocity of 375 m /s . We use a beam seeded with molecular oxygen, and entrain it with lithium atoms by laser ablation prior to deceleration. The deceleration ends with loading of the mixture into a static quadrupole trap, which is generated by two permanent magnets. We estimate 1 09 trapped O2 molecules and 1 05 Li atoms with background pressure limited lifetime on the order of 1 sec. With further improvements to lithium entrainment we expect that sympathetic cooling of molecules is within reach.

  12. Atom-atom excitation in shock waves in argon-oxygen mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezumi, Hiromichi; Kawamura, Masahiko

    1987-05-01

    The slope constants of the excitational cross-section for atom-atom and atom-electron collisions were generally considered and that for the oxygen atom-atom collision S/sub 0-0/ was determined to be 3.14 x 10/sup -19/ cm/sup 2//eV. Using the newly determined value of S/sub 0-0/, the calculation of the ionizing shock structure of argon-oxygen mixture was made at shock Mach number M/sub S/ = 17.1 and the initial pressure P/sub 1/ = 2.85 Torr. From the comparison of the calculated value of relaxation length with the experimental one, it was proved that the experimental result can be explained well by the present determined value of S/sub 0-0/.

  13. Interaction of atomic oxygen with a graphite surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateljevic, Natasa

    This project was a part of the Multi University Research Initiative (MURI) Center for Materials Chemistry in the Space Environment which seeks to develop a quantitative and predictive understanding of how materials degrade or become passivated in the space environment. This is a critical research area for the Department of Defense (DoD) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) given the large and increasing dependence on satellites and manned spacecrafts that reside in, or pass through, the low-Earth orbit (LEO) space environment. In this work, we completed three separate projects. First, we carried out ab initio electronic structure studies of the interaction of oxygen atoms with graphite surfaces. The (O3 P) ground state of oxygen interacts weakly with the graphite surface while the excited (O1D) state interacts more strongly with a binding energy sufficient for a high coverage of oxygen to be maintained on the surface. Thus, it requires a transition from O(3P) to O(1D) in order for oxygen to strongly bind. Since graphite is a semi-metal, it requires a vanishingly small energy to remove an electron of up spin from just below the Fermi level, and replace it with a down spin electron just above the Fermi level; spin-orbit interaction is not required to switch the state of the oxygen atom. We have examined this complexity for the first time and developed guidelines for properly describing chemical reactivity on graphite surfaces. The second project is a kinetic Monte Carlo study of the erosion of graphite by energetic oxygen atoms in LEO and in the laboratory. These simulations, in conjunction with experiments by our MURI collaborators, reveal new insights about reaction pathways. Finally, we have developed a new model for accommodation of energy and momentum in collisions of gases with highly corrugated surfaces. This model promises to be valuable in simulating frictional heating and drag of objects moving through the atmosphere.

  14. Heterogeneous recombination of neutral oxygen atoms on niobium surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozetic, Miran; Zalar, Anton; Cvelbar, Uros; Poberaj, Igor

    2003-04-30

    The recombination coefficient for the reaction O+O{yields}O{sub 2} on a polycrystalline niobium surface was measured at various experimental conditions. The source of O atoms was a low pressure weakly ionized highly dissociated oxygen plasma created in a RF discharge. The electron temperature in plasma was about 5 eV and the density of positive ions between 5 and 10x10{sup 15} m{sup -3}. The density of neutral oxygen atoms was measured in the afterglow with a nickel catalytic probe and was between 2.5 and 7x10{sup 21} m{sup -3}. The recombination coefficient was measured at different temperature between 420 and 620 K, and was found to be a constant within the limits of the experimental error at the value of 0.09{+-}0.018.

  15. Monte Carlo modeling of atomic oxygen attack of polymers with protective coatings on LDEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Degroh, Kim K.; Auer, Bruce M.; Gebauer, Linda; Edwards, Jonathan L.

    1993-01-01

    Characterization of the behavior of atomic oxygen interaction with materials on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) assists in understanding of the mechanisms involved. Thus the reliability of predicting in-space durability of materials based on ground laboratory testing should be improved. A computational model which simulates atomic oxygen interaction with protected polymers was developed using Monte Carlo techniques. Through the use of an assumed mechanistic behavior of atomic oxygen interaction based on in-space atomic oxygen erosion of unprotected polymers and ground laboratory atomic oxygen interaction with protected polymers, prediction of atomic oxygen interaction with protected polymers on LDEF was accomplished. However, the results of these predictions are not consistent with the observed LDEF results at defect sites in protected polymers. Improved agreement between observed LDEF results and predicted Monte Carlo modeling can be achieved by modifying of the atomic oxygen interactive assumptions used in the model. LDEF atomic oxygen undercutting results, modeling assumptions, and implications are presented.

  16. Effects of Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation on Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Polysiloxane/SiO2 Hybrid Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Longfei Hu; Meishuan Li; Yanchun Zhou

    2009-01-01

    Polysiloxane/SiO2 hybrid coatings have been prepared on Kapton films by a sol-gel process. The erosion resistance of polysiloxane/SiO2 (20 wt pct) coating was evaluated by exposure tests of vacuum ultraviolet radiation (VUV) and atomic oxygen beam (AO) in a ground-based simulation facility. The experimental results indicate that this coating exhibits better AO resistance than pure polysiloxane coating. The erosion yield (Ey) of the polysiloxane/SiO2 (20 wt pct) hybrid coating is about 10-27 cm3/atom, being one or two orders of magnitude lower than that of polysiloxane. VUV radiation can affect the erosion process greatly. Under simultaneous AO and VUV exposure, the value of Ey of the polysiloxane/SiO2 (20 wt pct) hybrid coating increases by 39% compared with that under single AO exposure.

  17. A Comprehensive X-Ray Absorption Model for Atomic Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczyca, T. W.; Bautista, M. A.; Hasoglu, M. F.; Garcia, J.; Gatuzz, E.; Kaastra, J. S.; Kallman, T. R.; Manson, S. T.; Mendoza, C.; Raassen, A. J. J.; de Vries, C. P.; Zatsarinny, O.

    2013-01-01

    An analytical formula is developed to accurately represent the photoabsorption cross section of atomic Oxygen for all energies of interest in X-ray spectral modeling. In the vicinity of the K edge, a Rydberg series expression is used to fit R-matrix results, including important orbital relaxation effects, that accurately predict the absorption oscillator strengths below threshold and merge consistently and continuously to the above-threshold cross section. Further, minor adjustments are made to the threshold energies in order to reliably align the atomic Rydberg resonances after consideration of both experimental and observed line positions. At energies far below or above the K-edge region, the formulation is based on both outer- and inner-shell direct photoionization, including significant shake-up and shake-off processes that result in photoionization-excitation and double-photoionization contributions to the total cross section. The ultimate purpose for developing a definitive model for oxygen absorption is to resolve standing discrepancies between the astronomically observed and laboratory-measured line positions, and between the inferred atomic and molecular oxygen abundances in the interstellar medium from XSTAR and SPEX spectral models.

  18. Photochemistry of molecular and atomic oxygen in the terrestrial nightglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednyts'kyy, Olexandr; Von Savigny, Christian; Sinnhuber, Miriam

    2016-07-01

    The electronic states of molecular oxygen ({O}_2) are in constant communication through collisions in high vibrational levels of {O}_2 in the MLT (Mesosphere/Lower Thermosphere) region. We assume that the Herzberg {O}_2 electronic states transfer energy to O-atoms to generate the green line. Our Multiple Nightglow Chemistry model is based on more than 80 (odd oxygen and odd hydrogen) aeronomical reactions to implement this concept. We retrieved atomic oxygen concentration ([O]) profiles in the MLT region with help of SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) and SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry) infrared radiometer observations of the nightglow. Particularly, we obtained volume emission rate (VER) profiles (due to the infrared atmospheric {O}_2(a^1Δ_g) nightglow at 1.27 μm) from SABER to retrieve [O] profiles. We discussed quenching profiles that correspond to retrieved [O] profiles to reflect complex molecularity of infrared atmospheric and green line nightglow emissions.

  19. K-shell auger decay of atomic oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolte, W.C.; Lu, Y.; Samson, J.A.R. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The aim of the present research is to understand the interaction between the ejected photoelectron and Auger electron produced by the Auger decay of a 1s hole in atomic oxygen, and to understand the influence this interaction has on the shape of the ionization cross sections. To accomplish this the authors have measured the relative ion yields (ion/photon) in the vicinity of the oxygen K-shell (525 - 533 eV) for O{sup +} and O{sup 2+}. The measurements were performed at the ALS on beamline, 6.3.2. The atomic oxygen was produced by passing molecular oxygen through a microwave-driven discharge. A Rydberg analysis of the two series leading to the [1s]2s{sup 2}2p{sup 4}({sup 4}P) and [1s]2s{sup 2}2p{sup 4}({sup 2}P) limits were obtained. This analysis shows some differences to the recently published results by Menzel et al. The energy position of the main 1s{sup 1}2s{sup 2}2p{sup 5}({sup 3}P) resonance differs by approximately 1 eV from the authors value, all members of the ({sup 2}P)np series differ by 0.3 eV, but the members of the ({sup 4}P)np series agree. The molecular resonance at 530.5 eV and those between 539 eV and 543 eV, measured with the microwave discharge off show identical results in both experiments.

  20. Effects of Atomic Oxygen and Grease on Outgassing and Adhesion of Silicone Elastomers for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Henry C., III; Puleo, Bernadette J.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2012-01-01

    An investigation of silicone elastomers for seals used in docking and habitat systems for future space exploration vehicles is being conducted at NASA. For certain missions, NASA is considering androgynous docking systems where two vehicles each having a seal would be required to: dock for a period of time, seal effectively, and then separate with minimum push-off forces for undocking. Silicone materials are generally chosen for their wide operating temperatures and low leakage rates. However silicone materials are often sticky and usually exhibit considerable adhesion when mated against metals and silicone surfaces. This paper investigates the adhesion unit pressure for a space rated silicone material (S0383-70) for either seal-on-seal (SoS) or seal-on-aluminum (SoAl) operation modes in the following conditions: as-received, after ground-based atomic-oxygen (AO) pre-treatment, after application of a thin coating of a space-qualified grease (Braycote 601EF), and after a combination of AO pre-treatment and grease coating. In order of descending adhesion reduction, the AO treatment reduced seal adhesion the most, followed by the AO plus grease pre-treatment, followed by the grease treatment. The effects of various treatments on silicone (S0383-70 and ELA-SA-401) outgassing properties were also investigated. The leading adhesion AO pretreatment reduction led to a slight decrease in outgassing for the S0383-70 material and virtually no change in ELA-SA-401 outgassing.

  1. MISSE 6 Stressed Polymers Experiment Atomic Oxygen Erosion Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Mitchell, Gianna G.; Yi, Grace T.; Guo, Aobo; Ashmeade, Claire C.; Roberts, Lily M.; McCarthy, Catherine E.; Sechkar, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    Polymers and other oxidizable materials used on the exterior of spacecraft in the low Earth orbit (LEO) space environment can be eroded away by reaction with atomic oxygen (AO). For spacecraft design, it is important to know the LEO AO erosion yield, Ey (volume loss per incident oxygen atom), of materials susceptible to AO erosion. The Stressed Polymers Experiment was developed and flown as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment 6 (MISSE 6) to compare the AO erosion yields of stressed and non-stressed polymers to determine if erosion is dependent upon stress while in LEO. The experiment contained 36 thin film polymer samples that were exposed to ram AO for 1.45 years. This paper provides an overview of the Stressed Polymers Experiment with details on the polymers flown, the characterization techniques used, the AO fluence, and the erosion yield results. The MISSE 6 data are compared to data for similar samples flown on previous MISSE missions to determine fluence or solar radiation effects on erosion yield.

  2. Atom interaction propensities of oxygenated chemical functions in crystal packings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Jelsch

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The crystal contacts of several families of hydrocarbon compounds substituted with one or several types of oxygenated chemical groups were analyzed statistically using the Hirshfeld surface methodology. The propensity of contacts to occur between two chemical types is described with the contact enrichment descriptor. The systematic large enrichment ratios of some interactions like the O—H...O hydrogen bonds suggests that these contacts are a driving force in the crystal packing formation. The same statement holds for the weaker C—H...O hydrogen bonds in ethers, esters and ketones, in the absence of polar H atoms. The over-represented contacts in crystals of oxygenated hydrocarbons are generally of two types: electrostatic attractions (hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. While Cl...O interactions are generally avoided, in a minority of chloro-oxygenated hydrocarbons, significant halogen bonding does occur. General tendencies can often be derived for many contact types, but outlier compounds are instructive as they display peculiar or rare features. The methodology also allows the detection of outliers which can be structures with errors. For instance, a significant number of hydroxylated molecules displaying over-represented non-favorable oxygen–oxygen contacts turned out to have wrongly oriented hydroxyl groups. Beyond crystal packings with a single molecule in the asymmetric unit, the behavior of water in monohydrate compounds and of crystals with Z′ = 2 (dimers are also investigated. It was found in several cases that, in the presence of several oxygenated chemical groups, cross-interactions between different chemical groups (e.g. water/alcohols; alcohols/phenols are often favored in the crystal packings. While some trends in accordance with common chemical principles are retrieved, some unexpected results can however appear. For example, in crystals of alcohol–phenol compounds, the strong O—H...O hydrogen bonds between

  3. Operation of the computer model for direct atomic oxygen exposure of Earth satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, R. J.; Gruenbaum, P. E.; Gillis, J. R.; Hargraves, C. R.

    1995-01-01

    One of the primary causes of material degradation in low Earth orbit (LEO) is exposure to atomic oxygen. When atomic oxygen molecules collide with an orbiting spacecraft, the relative velocity is 7 to 8 km/sec and the collision energy is 4 to 5 eV per atom. Under these conditions, atomic oxygen may initiate a number of chemical and physical reactions with exposed materials. These reactions contribute to material degradation, surface erosion, and contamination. Interpretation of these effects on materials and the design of space hardware to withstand on-orbit conditions requires quantitative knowledge of the atomic oxygen exposure environment. Atomic oxygen flux is a function of orbit altitude, the orientation of the orbit plan to the Sun, solar and geomagnetic activity, and the angle between exposed surfaces and the spacecraft heading. We have developed a computer model to predict the atomic oxygen exposure of spacecraft in low Earth orbit. The application of this computer model is discussed.

  4. Materials International Space Station Experiment-6 (MISSE-6) Atomic Oxygen Fluence Monitor Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K.; Waters, Deborah L.

    2010-01-01

    An atomic oxygen fluence monitor was flown as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment-6 (MISSE-6). The monitor was designed to measure the accumulation of atomic oxygen fluence with time as it impinged upon the ram surface of the MISSE 6B Passive Experiment Container (PEC). This was an active experiment for which data was to be stored on a battery-powered data logger for post-flight retrieval and analysis. The atomic oxygen fluence measurement was accomplished by allowing atomic oxygen to erode two opposing wedges of pyrolytic graphite that partially covered a photodiode. As the wedges of pyrolytic graphite erode, the area of the photodiode that is illuminated by the Sun increases. The short circuit current, which is proportional to the area of illumination, was to be measured and recorded as a function of time. The short circuit current from a different photodiode, which was oriented in the same direction and had an unobstructed view of the Sun, was also to be recorded as a reference current. The ratio of the two separate recorded currents should bear a linear relationship with the accumulated atomic oxygen fluence and be independent of the intensity of solar illumination. Ground hyperthermal atomic oxygen exposure facilities were used to evaluate the linearity of the ratio of short circuit current to the atomic oxygen fluence. In flight, the current measurement circuitry failed to operate properly, thus the overall atomic oxygen mission fluence could only be estimated based on the physical erosion of the pyrolytic graphite wedges. The atomic oxygen fluence was calculated based on the knowledge of the space atomic oxygen erosion yield of pyrolytic graphite measured from samples on the MISSE 2. The atomic oxygen fluence monitor, the expected result and comparison of mission atomic oxygen fluence based on the erosion of the pyrolytic graphite and Kapton H atomic oxygen fluence witness samples are presented in this paper.

  5. Erosion of Carbon-based spacecraft structures in LEO by Atomic Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif

    1998-01-01

    Atomic oxygen is constantly generated on the topside of the atmosphere by ionizing radiation. The ionizing solar radiation, UV and particles, will on impact dissociate molecular oxygen to atomic oxygen. However, due to the ratio between the UV and the particle flux from the sun, and due to compar...

  6. Spatial and temporal behavior of atomic oxygen determined by Ogo 6 airglow observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, T. M.; Guenther, B.; Thomas, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Maps are produced of the atomic oxygen density near 97 km showing a strong variation in latitude, longitude, universal time, and time of year. These densities are deduced from atomic oxygen green nightglow observations carried out from Ogo 6. Meridional wind patterns needed to support the asymmetries observed in local oxygen production and loss rates are deduced.

  7. Erosion of Carbon-based spacecraft structures in LEO by Atomic Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif

    1998-01-01

    Atomic oxygen is constantly generated on the topside of the atmosphere by ionizing radiation. The ionizing solar radiation, UV and particles, will on impact dissociate molecular oxygen to atomic oxygen. However, due to the ratio between the UV and the particle flux from the sun, and due to compar...

  8. BARK-MIMETIC LAYER-BY-LAYER ASSEMBLED MONTMORILLONITE/POLY(p-AMINOSTYRENE) FLEXIBLE NANOCOMPOSITES SHIELDING ATOMIC OXYGEN EROSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Gao; Bing-jun Liu; Long-cheng Gao; Peng-gang Yin; Lei Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by the birch bark,which has multilayered structures,we fabricated layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled montmorillonite (MMT) and poly(p-aminostyrene) (PPAS) nanocomposites on cotton fiber curved surfaces to provide protection from atomic oxygen (AO) erosion.The multilayer coated fibers had high flexibility,uniformity,defect free,ease of preparation and low cost.The AO erosion durability has been dramatically enhanced which was evidenced by testing in the ground-based AO effects simulation facility.And the dimension and surface morphologies of the fibers observed by SEM had few changes,indicating excellent AO erosion resistant ability of the coatings.These results provide us a new method to design fibrous materials exposed directly in low earth orbit environment.

  9. Flight Validation of Atomic Oxygen Resistant Resistant Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Richard L.; Orwoll, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Because of its high reactivity, atomic oxygen causes surface erosion on polymeric materials. although the reaction efficiency depends on the chemical structure of the polymer. We have found an organotin compound, bis(triphenyltin) oxide (BTO), which has an unusually high solubility in solutions of a number of commercial high performance polymers. Films of these polymers containing BTO showed a substantial reduction in erosion by atomic oxygen when compared with films of the pure material. Analysis has shown that in the presence of atomic oxygen, erosion of the exposed surfaces of the BTO-containing films leaves a residual protective tin oxide coating . Since the additive is uniformly distributed throughout the polymeric material, any break or puncture in the protective coating is "healed" by the material below. Samples were exposed to the environment of the low earth orbit (LEO) on two Space Shuttle flights, STS-46, in June of 1992, and STS-51 in September of 1993. The analysis of these samples has been reported previously. For both flights, the samples were small (1.3 cm and 1.9 cm respectively) thus limiting the scope of analysis. In the research under this cooperative agreement, films of a polyetherimide, were exposed to the LEO environment on Space Shuttle flight STS-85 in August of 1997 as part of the Evaluation of Space Environment and Effects on Materials (ESEM) experiment. The polyetherimide chosen is available commercially as Ultem, registered to the General Electric Company. Films of pure Ultem, Ultem with 10% BTO by mass, and Ultem with 20% BTO by mass were exposed in the ram direction for 40 hours during STS-85. Ultem has a Tg of 215 deg C and is soluble in common chlorinated solvents. Granules of the polymer were dried at 120 deg C, but otherwise were used as received. Films were cast on a glass plate from a solution of the polymer in a 60/40 (w/w) mixture of chloroform and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane. The plate was placed in a dust-free box for at least

  10. Hydroxylation Reaction Mechanism for Nitrosodimethylamine by Oxygen Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lan; LIN Xiao-yan; LI Zong-he

    2011-01-01

    The hydroxylation reaction mechanism of nitrosodimethylamine(NDMA)by oxygen atom was theoretically investigated at the B3LYP/6-31G** level.It has been found that the path of the oxydation of the C-H bond is easier than the path involving a Singlet/Triplet crossing.The study of the potential surface shows that both solvent effect at B3LYP/6-31G** level and different method at more credible MP2/6-311G** level in the gas phase have no effect on the hydroxylation reaction mechanism.The oxidation hydroxylation process of NDMA by O is exothermic reaction and easy to occur.

  11. Oxygen-free atomic layer deposition of indium sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Robert F; Weimer, Matthew S; Emery, Jonathan D; Hock, Adam S; Martinson, Alex B F

    2014-08-13

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of indium sulfide (In2S3) films was achieved using a newly synthesized indium precursor and hydrogen sulfide. We obtain dense and adherent thin films free from halide and oxygen impurities. Self-limiting half-reactions are demonstrated at temperatures up to 225 °C, where oriented crystalline thin films are obtained without further annealing. Low-temperature growth of 0.89 Å/cycle is observed at 150 °C, while higher growth temperatures gradually reduce the per-cycle growth rate. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) together with depth-profiling Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) reveal a S/In ratio of 1.5 with no detectable carbon, nitrogen, halogen, or oxygen impurities. The resistivity of thin films prior to air exposure decreases with increasing deposition temperature, reaching In2S3 via ALD at temperatures up to 225 °C may allow high quality thin films to be leveraged in optoelectronic devices including photovoltaic absorbers, buffer layers, and intermediate band materials.

  12. Enhancement of burning velocity by dissociated oxygen atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Haruaki; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Sasaki, Koichi

    2015-09-01

    Green technology, such as preventing global warming, has been developed for years. Researches on plasma assisted combustion is one of the technologies and have been done for investigating more efficient combustion, more efficient use of fossil fuel with plasmas or applying electric fields. In the ignition time delay analyses with the dissociated oxygen atoms which is generated by non-equilibrium plasma had significant effect on the ignition time. In this paper, dissociated oxygen could effect on burning velocity or not has been examined using CHEMKIN. As a result, no effect can be seen with dissociation degree of lower than 10-3. But there is an effect on the enhancement of burning velocity with higher degree of 10-3. At the dissociation degree of 5×10-2, the burning velocity is enhanced at a factor of 1.24. And it is found that the distributions of each species in front of preheat zone are completely different. The combustion process is proceeded several steps in advance, and generation of H2O, CO and CO2 can be seen before combustion in higher dissociation case. This work was supported by KAKENHI (22340170).

  13. Thermal relaxation of molecular oxygen in collisions with nitrogen atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrienko, Daniil A.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2016-07-01

    Investigation of O2-N collisions is performed by means of the quasi-classical trajectory method on the two lowest ab initio potential energy surfaces at temperatures relevant to hypersonic flows. A complete set of bound-bound and bound-free transition rates is obtained for each precollisional rovibrational state. Special attention is paid to the vibrational and rotational relaxations of oxygen as a result of chemically non-reactive interaction with nitrogen atoms. The vibrational relaxation of oxygen partially occurs via the formation of an intermediate NO2 complex. The efficient energy randomization results in rapid vibrational relaxation at low temperatures, compared to other molecular systems with a purely repulsive potential. The vibrational relaxation time, computed by means of master equation studies, is nearly an order of magnitude lower than the relaxation time in N2-O collisions. The rotational nonequilibrium starts to play a significant effect at translational temperatures above 8000 K. The present work provides convenient relations for the vibrational and rotational relaxation times as well as for the quasi-steady dissociation rate coefficient and thus fills a gap in data due to a lack of experimental measurements for this system.

  14. Photothermal imaging of damage and undercutting to gold-coated Kapton samples exposed to atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, A. W.; Wood, N. J.

    1996-09-01

    In this paper we describe the design and construction of a laser-based photothermal imaging system, which we have used to evaluate damage to gold-coated Kapton samples that have been exposed to atomic oxygen in a laboratory atomic oxygen source. This exposure simulates the erosive effects of atomic oxygen on spacecraft materials in low Earth orbits. In particular, thermal wave imaging studies have been carried out for materials that are susceptible to atomic oxygen erosion. The photothermal imaging method is sensitive to invisible subsurface features such as the delamination of barrier coatings used to protect vulnerable substrates.

  15. Adsorption of oxygen atom on MoSi2 (110) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, S. P.; Li, X. P.; Wang, H. J.; Jiang, Y.; Yi, D. Q.

    2016-09-01

    The adsorption energy, structural relaxation and electronic properties of oxygen atom on MoSi2 (110) surface have been investigated by first-principles calculations. The energetic stability of MoSi2 low-index surfaces was analyzed, and the results suggested that MoSi2 (110) surface had energetically stability. The site of oxygen atom adsorbed on MoSi2 (110) surface were discussed, and the results indicated that the preference adsorption site of MoSi2 (110) surface for oxygen atom was H site (hollow position). Our calculated work should help to understand further the interaction between oxygen atoms and MoSi2 surfaces.

  16. Density functional theory study the effects of oxygen-containing functional groups on oxygen molecules and oxygen atoms adsorbed on carbonaceous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xuejun; Song, Wenwu; Shi, Jianwei

    2017-01-01

    Density functional theory was used to study the effects of different types of oxygen-containing functional groups on the adsorption of oxygen molecules and single active oxygen atoms on carbonaceous materials. During gasification or combustion reactions of carbonaceous materials, oxygen-containing functional groups such as hydroxyl(-OH), carbonyl(-CO), quinone(-O), and carboxyl(-COOH) are often present on the edge of graphite and can affect graphite's chemical properties. When oxygen-containing functional groups appear on a graphite surface, the oxygen molecules are strongly adsorbed onto the surface to form a four-member ring structure. At the same time, the O-O bond is greatly weakened and easily broken. The adsorption energy value indicates that the adsorption of oxygen molecules changes from physisorption to chemisorption for oxygen-containing functional groups on the edge of a graphite surface. In addition, our results indicate that the adsorption energy depends on the type of oxygen-containing functional group. When a single active oxygen atom is adsorbed on the bridge site of graphite, it gives rise to a stable epoxy structure. Epoxy can cause deformation of the graphite lattice due to the transition of graphite from sp2 to sp3 after the addition of an oxygen atom. For quinone group on the edge of graphite, oxygen atoms react with carbon atoms to form the precursor of CO2. Similarly, the single active oxygen atoms of carbonyl groups can interact with edge carbon atoms to form the precursor of CO2. The results show that oxygen-containing functional groups on graphite surfaces enhance the activity of graphite, which promotes adsorption on the graphite surface.

  17. Dioxygen molecule adsorption and oxygen atom diffusion on clean and defective aluminum(111) surface using first principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiltat, Mathilde; Brut, Marie; Vizzini, Sébastien; Hémeryck, Anne

    2017-03-01

    First principles calculations are conducted to investigate kinetic behavior of oxygen species at the surface of clean and defective Al(111) substrate. Oxygen island, aluminum vacancy, aluminum sub-vacancy, aluminum ad-atom and aluminum terraces defects are addressed. Adsorption of oxygen molecule is first performed on all these systems resulting in dissociated oxygen atoms in main cases. The obtained adsorbed configurations are then picked to study the behavior of atomic oxygen specie and get a detailed understanding on the effect of the local environment on the ability of the oxygen atom to diffuse on the surface. We pointed out that local environment impacts energetics of oxygen atom diffusion. Close packed oxygen island, sub-vacancy and ad-atoms favor oxygen atom stability and decrease mobility of oxygen atom on the surface, to be seen as surface area for further nucleation of oxygen island.

  18. Atomic Oxygen (AO) and Nitrogen (AN) In-situ Flux Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-10

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0126 DURIP 09) AN ATOMIC OXYGEN FLUX MONITOR FOR USE IN THE SEARCH FOR NEW AND BETT Malcolm Beasley LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIV ...Grant # FA9550-01-1-0433 M. R. Beasley, PI Stanford University Project Title: Atomic Oxygen (AO) and Nitrogen (AN) In-situ Flux Sensor

  19. Use of Atomic Oxygen for Increased Water Contact Angles of Various Polymers for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beger, Lauren; Roberts, Lily; deGroh, Kim; Banks, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    In the low Earth orbit (LEO) space environment, spacecraft surfaces can be altered during atomic oxygen exposure through oxidation and erosion. There can be terrestrial benefits of such interactions, such as the modification of hydrophobic or hydrophilic properties of polymers due to chemical modification and texturing. Such modification of the surface may be useful for biomedical applications. For example, atomic oxygen texturing may increase the hydrophilicity of polymers, such as chlorotrifluoroethylene (Aclar), thus allowing increased adhesion and spreading of cells on textured Petri dishes. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of atomic oxygen exposure on the hydrophilicity of nine different polymers. To determine whether hydrophilicity remains static after atomic oxygen exposure or changes with exposure, the contact angles between the polymer and a water droplet placed on the polymer s surface were measured. The polymers were exposed to atomic oxygen in a radio frequency (RF) plasma asher. Atomic oxygen plasma treatment was found to significantly alter the hydrophilicity of non-fluorinated polymers. Significant decreases in the water contact angle occurred with atomic oxygen exposure. Fluorinated polymers were found to be less sensitive to changes in hydrophilicity for equivalent atomic oxygen exposures, and two of the fluorinated polymers became more hydrophobic. The majority of change in water contact angle of the non-fluorinated polymers was found to occur with very low fluence exposures, indicating potential cell culturing benefit with short treatment time.

  20. In situ chemical and structural investigations of the oxidation of Ge(001) substrates by atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molle, Alessandro; Bhuiyan, Md. Nurul Kabir; Tallarida, Grazia; Fanciulli, Marco

    2006-08-01

    The exposure of Ge(001) substrates to atomic oxygen was studied in situ to establish the stability of the germanium oxide. After preparing chemically clean and atomically flat Ge(001) surfaces, the Ge samples were exposed to atomic oxygen in a wide temperature range from room temperature to 400°C. The chemical composition of the so-formed oxides was studied by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, while the structure was observed by reflection high energy electron diffraction. At low substrate temperatures the atomic oxygen is efficiently chemisorbed and suboxides coexist with the dioxide, which in turn is remarkably promoted in the high temperature range.

  1. Model of spacecraft atomic oxygen and solar exposure microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, R. J.; Pippin, H. G.

    1993-01-01

    Computer models of environmental conditions in Earth orbit are needed for the following reasons: (1) derivation of material performance parameters from orbital test data, (2) evaluation of spacecraft hardware designs, (3) prediction of material service life, and (4) scheduling spacecraft maintenance. To meet these needs, Boeing has developed programs for modeling atomic oxygen (AO) and solar radiation exposures. The model allows determination of AO and solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposures for spacecraft surfaces (1) in arbitrary orientations with respect to the direction of spacecraft motion, (2) overall ranges of solar conditions, and (3) for any mission duration. The models have been successfully applied to prediction of experiment environments on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and for analysis of selected hardware designs for deployment on other spacecraft. The work on these models has been reported at previous LDEF conferences. Since publication of these reports, a revision has been made to the AO calculation for LDEF, and further work has been done on the microenvironments model for solar exposure.

  2. Oxidation of silicon surface with atomic oxygen radical anions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lian; Song Chong-Fu; Sun Jian-Qiu; Hou Ying; Li Xiao-Guang; Li Quan-Xin

    2008-01-01

    The surface oxidation of silicon (Si) wafers by atomic oxygen radical anions (O- anions) and the preparation of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors on the O--oxidized Si substrates have been examined for the first time. The O- anions are generated from a recently developed O- storage-emission material of [Ca24Al28O64]4+.4O- (C12A7-O- for short). After it has been irradiated by an O- anion beam (0.5 μA/cm2) at 300℃ for 1-10 hours, the Si wafer achieves an oxide layer with a thickness ranging from 8 to 32 nm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results reveal that the oxide layer is of a mixture of SiO2, Si2O3, and Si2O distributed in different oxidation depths. The features of the MOS capacitor of are investigated by measuring capacitance-voltage (C - V) and current-voltage (Ⅰ - Ⅴ) curves. The oxide charge density is about 6.0×1011 cm-2 derived from the C - V curves. The leakage current density is in the order of 10-6 A/cm2 below 4 MV/cm, obtained from the Ⅰ - Ⅴ curves. The Oanions formed by present method would have potential applications to the oxidation and the surface-modification of materials together with the preparation of semiconductor devices.

  3. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3 x 10(exp 17) and 9 x 10(exp 17) cm(exp -3). The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  4. A Simulator for Producing of High Flux Atomic Oxygen Beam by Using ECR Plasma Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuwang DUO; Meishuan LI; Yaming ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    In order to study the atomic oxygen corrosion of spacecraft materials in low earth orbit environment, an atomic oxygen simulator was established. In the simulator, a 2.45 GHz microwave source with maximum power of 600 W was launched into the circular cavity to generate ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) plasma. The oxygen ion beam moved onto a negatively biased Mo plate under the condition of symmetry magnetic mirror field confine, then was neutralized and reflected to form oxygen atom beam. The properties of plasma density, electron temperature, plasma space potential and ion incident energy were characterized. The atomic oxygen beam flux was calibrated by measuring the mass loss rate of Kapton during the atomic 5~30 eV and a cross section of φ80 mm could be obtained under the operating pressure of 10-1~10-3 Pa. Such a high flux source can provide accelerated simulation tests of materials and coatings for space applications.

  5. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3 x 10(exp 17) and 9 x 10(exp 17)/cu cm. The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  6. First-principles calculations of the diffusion of atomic oxygen in nickel: thermal expansion contribution

    OpenAIRE

    Megchiche, El Hocine; Amarouche, Mohand; Mijoule, Claude

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Within the framework of density functional theory using the projector augmented-wave (PAW) method, we present some energetic properties of atomic oxygen interstitials in crystalline Ni, i.e. the insertion and activation energies of the O diffusion. Concerning the activation energy, two pathways for the migration process are studied. The charge transfer process between atomic oxygen and nickel atoms is analysed in the interstitial sites. We find that the interstitial oc...

  7. Anti-Adhesion Elastomer Seal Coatings for Ultraviolet and Atomic Oxygen Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groh, Henry C., III; Puleo, Bernadette J.; Waters, Deborah L.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation blocking sunscreen coatings have been developed for the protection of elastomer seals used in low-Earth-orbit (LEO). The coatings protect the seals from ultraviolet (UV) radiation and atomic oxygen (AO) damage. The coatings were developed for use on NASA docking seals. Docking seal damage from the UV and AO present in LEO can constrain mission time-line, flight mode options, and increases risk. A low level of adhesion is also required for docking seals so undocking push-off forces can be low. The coatings presented also mitigate this unwanted adhesion. Greases with low collected volatile condensable materials (CVCM) and low total mass loss (TML) were mixed with slippery and/or UV blocking powders to create the protective coatings. Coatings were applied at rates up to 2 milligrams per square centimeter. Coated seals were exposed to AO and UV in the NUV (near-UV) and UV-C wavelength ranges (300 to 400 nanometers and 254 nanometers, respectively). Ground based ashers were used to simulate the AO of space. The Sun's UV energy was mimicked assuming a nose forward flight mode, resulting in an exposure rate of 2.5 megajoules per square meter per day. Exposures between 0 and 147 megajoules per square meter (UV-C) and 245 megajoules per square meter (NUV) were accomplished. The protective coatings were durable, providing protection from UV after a simulated docking and undocking cycle. The level of protection begins to decline at coverage rates less than 0.9 milligrams per square centimeter. The leakage of seals coated with Braycote plus 20 percent Z-cote ZnO sunscreen increased by a factor of 40 after moderate AO exposure; indicating that this coating might not be suitable due to AO intolerance. Seals coated with DC-7-16.4 percent Z-cote ZnO sunscreen were not significantly affected by combined doses of 2 x 10 (sup 21) atoms per square AO with 73 megajoules per square meter UV-C. Unprotected seals were significantly damaged at UV-C exposures of 0.3 megajoules per

  8. Oxygen Atom Adsorption on and Diffusion into Nb(110) and Nb(100) from First Principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tafen, De Nyago; Gao, Michael C

    2013-11-01

    In order to understand the dynamics of oxidation of Nb, we examine the adsorption, absorption, and diffusion of an oxygen atom on, in, and into Nb(110) and Nb(100) surfaces, respectively, using density functional theory. Our calculations predict that the oxygen atom adsorbs on the threefold site on Nb(110) and the fourfold hollow site on Nb(100), and the adsorption energy is -5.08 and -5.18 eV respectively. We find the long and short bridge sites to be transition states for O diffusion on Nb(110), while the on top site is a rank-2 saddle point. In the subsurface region, the oxygen atom prefers the octahedral site, as in bulk niobium. Our results also show that the O atom is more stable on Nb(110) subsurface than on Nb(100) subsurface. The diffusion of oxygen atoms into niobium surfaces passes through transition states where the oxygen atom is coordinated to four niobium atoms. The diffusion barriers of the oxygen atom into Nb(110) and Nb(100) are 1.81 and 2.05 eV, respectively. Analysis of the electronic density of states reveals the emergence of well localized electronic states below the lowest states of clean Nb surfaces due to d-p orbital hybridization.

  9. Oxygen Atom Adsorption on and Diffusion into Nb(110) and Nb(100) from First Principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tafen, De Nyago; Gao, Michael C

    2013-11-01

    In order to understand the dynamics of oxidation of Nb, we examine the adsorption, absorption, and diffusion of an oxygen atom on, in, and into Nb(110) and Nb(100) surfaces, respectively, using density functional theory. Our calculations predict that the oxygen atom adsorbs on the threefold site on Nb(110) and the fourfold hollow site on Nb(100), and the adsorption energy is -5.08 and -5.18 eV respectively. We find the long and short bridge sites to be transition states for O diffusion on Nb(110), while the on top site is a rank-2 saddle point. In the subsurface region, the oxygen atom prefers the octahedral site, as in bulk niobium. Our results also show that the O atom is more stable on Nb(110) subsurface than on Nb(100) subsurface. The diffusion of oxygen atoms into niobium surfaces passes through transition states where the oxygen atom is coordinated to four niobium atoms. The diffusion barriers of the oxygen atom into Nb(110) and Nb(100) are 1.81 and 2.05 eV, respectively. Analysis of the electronic density of states reveals the emergence of well localized electronic states below the lowest states of clean Nb surfaces due to d-p orbital hybridization.

  10. Oxygen dayglow emissions as proxies for atomic oxygen and ozone in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankovsky, Valentine A.; Martyshenko, Kseniia V.; Manuilova, Rada O.; Feofilov, Artem G.

    2016-09-01

    The main goal of this study is to propose and then to justify a set of methods for retrieving the [O] and [O3] altitude distributions from the observation of emissions of the excited oxygen molecules and O(1D) atom at daytime in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region. In other words, we propose retrieving the [O] and [O3] using the proxies. One of the main requirements for the proxy is that the measured value should be directly related to a variable of our interest while, at the same time, the influence of the proxies on [O3] and [O(3P)] should be minimal. For a comprehensive analysis of different O3 and O(3P) proxies, we use a full model of electronic vibrational kinetics of excited products of O3 and O2 photolysis in the MLT of the Earth. Based on this model, we have tested five excited components; namely, O2(b1Σg+, v = 0, 1, 2), O2(a1Δg , v = 0) and O(1D) as the [O3] and [O(3P)] proxies in the MLT region. Using an analytical approach to sensitivity studies and uncertainty analysis, we have therefore developed the following methods of [O(3P)] and [O3] retrieval, which utilise electronic-vibrational transitions from the oxygen molecule second singlet level (O2(b1 Σg+, v = 0, 1, 2). We conclude that O2(b1 Σg+, v = 2) and O2(b1 Σg+, v = 0) are preferable proxies for [O(3P)] retrieval in the altitude range of 90-140 km, while O2(b1 Σg+, v = 1) is the best proxy for [O3] retrieval in the altitude range of 50-98 km.

  11. The Interstellar Oxygen Crisis, or Where Have All the Oxygen Atoms Gone?

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shu; Jiang, B W

    2015-01-01

    The interstellar medium (ISM) seems to have a significant surplus of oxygen which was dubbed as the "O crisis": independent of the adopted interstellar reference abundance, the total number of O atoms depleted from the gas phase far exceeds that tied up in solids by as much as ~160ppm of O/H. Recently, it has been hypothesized that the missing O could be hidden in micrometer-sized H2O ice grains. We examine this hypothesis by comparing the infrared (IR) extinction and far-IR emission arising from these grains with that observed in the Galactic diffuse ISM. We find that it is possible for the diffuse ISM to accommodate ~160ppm of O/H in micron-sized H2O ice grains without violating the observational constraints including the absence of the 3.1micron O-H absorption feature. More specifically, H2O ice grains of radii ~4micron and O/H = 160 ppm are capable of accounting for the observed flat extinction at ~ 3-8 micron and produce no excessive emission in the far-IR. These grains could be present in the diffuse IS...

  12. Atom-Scale Reaction Pathways and Free-Energy Landscapes in Oxygen Plasma Etching of Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Kenichi; Boero, Mauro; Shigeta, Yasuteru; Oshiyama, Atsushi

    2013-05-16

    We report first-principles molecular dynamics calculations combined with rare events sampling techniques that clarify atom-scale mechanisms of oxygen plasma etching of graphene. The obtained reaction pathways and associated free-energy landscapes show that the etching proceeds near vacancies via a two-step mechanism, formation of precursor lactone structures and the subsequent exclusive CO2 desorption. We find that atomic oxygen among the plasma components is most efficient for etching, providing a guidline in tuning the plasma conditions.

  13. Oxygen Atom Exchange Mechanism in Reaction of OH Radical with AsO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Oxygen atom exchange reaction mechanism in the reaction of OH radicals with AsO was investigated by means of the density functional theory (DFT) with 6-311++G(3df,3pd) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. The calculated results suggest that the reaction between OH and AsO should make the oxygen atoms exchange rapidly because the barrier to isomerization is significantly less than the HO-AsO bond dissociation energy.

  14. Atomic oxygen fine-structure splittings with tunable far-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Lyndon R.; Evenson, Kenneth M.; Matsushima, Fusakazu; Nelis, Thomas; Robinson, Ruth L.

    1991-01-01

    Fine-structure splittings of atomic oxygen (O-16) in the ground state have been accurately measured using a tunable far-infrared spectrometer. The 3P0-3pl splitting is 2,060,069.09 (10) MHz, and the 3Pl-3P2 splitting is 4,744,777.49 (16) MHz. These frequencies are important for measuring atomic oxygen concentration in earth's atmosphere and the interstellar medium.

  15. Atomic oxygen distributions in the Venus thermosphere: Comparisons between Venus Express observations and global model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecht, A. S.; Bougher, S. W.; Gérard, J.-C.; Soret, L.

    2012-02-01

    Nightglow emissions provide insight into the global thermospheric circulation, specifically in the transition region (˜70-120 km). The O 2 IR nightglow statistical map created from Venus Express (VEx) Visible and InfraRed Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS) observations has been used to deduce a three-dimensional atomic oxygen density map. In this study, the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Venus Thermospheric General Circulation Model (VTGCM) is utilized to provide a self-consistent global view of the atomic oxygen density distribution. More specifically, the VTGCM reproduces a 2D nightside atomic oxygen density map and vertical profiles across the nightside, which are compared to the VEx atomic oxygen density map. Both the simulated map and vertical profiles are in close agreement with VEx observations within a ˜30° contour of the anti-solar point. The quality of agreement decreases past ˜30°. This discrepancy implies the employment of Rayleigh friction within the VTGCM may be an over-simplification for representing wave drag effects on the local time variation of global winds. Nevertheless, the simulated atomic oxygen vertical profiles are comparable with the VEx profiles above 90 km, which is consistent with similar O 2 ( 1Δ) IR nightglow intensities. The VTGCM simulations demonstrate the importance of low altitude trace species as a loss for atomic oxygen below 95 km. The agreement between simulations and observations provides confidence in the validity of the simulated mean global thermospheric circulation pattern in the lower thermosphere.

  16. Adsorption of oxygen atom on MoSi{sub 2} (110) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, S.P., E-mail: sunshunping@jsut.edu.cn [School of Materials Engineering, Jiangsu University of Technology, Changzhou 213001 (China); Li, X.P.; Wang, H.J. [School of Materials Engineering, Jiangsu University of Technology, Changzhou 213001 (China); Jiang, Y., E-mail: yjiang@csu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, and Key Laboratory for Non-ferrous Materials of Ministry of Education, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Yi, D.Q. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, and Key Laboratory for Non-ferrous Materials of Ministry of Education, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2016-09-30

    Highlights: • The adsorption of oxygen atom on MoSi{sub 2} (110) surface was studied systematically. • The stability of MoSi{sub 2} low-index surfaces was also investigated. • The preference adsorption site of MoSi{sub 2} (110) surface for oxygen atom was H site. - Abstract: The adsorption energy, structural relaxation and electronic properties of oxygen atom on MoSi{sub 2} (110) surface have been investigated by first-principles calculations. The energetic stability of MoSi{sub 2} low-index surfaces was analyzed, and the results suggested that MoSi{sub 2} (110) surface had energetically stability. The site of oxygen atom adsorbed on MoSi{sub 2} (110) surface were discussed, and the results indicated that the preference adsorption site of MoSi{sub 2} (110) surface for oxygen atom was H site (hollow position). Our calculated work should help to understand further the interaction between oxygen atoms and MoSi{sub 2} surfaces.

  17. Adsorption of atomic nitrogen and oxygen on [Formula: see text] surface: a density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breedon, M; Spencer, M J S; Yarovsky, I

    2009-04-08

    The adsorption of atomic nitrogen and oxygen on the ([Formula: see text]) crystal face of zinc oxide (ZnO) was studied. Binding energies, workfunction changes, vibrational frequencies, charge density differences and electron localization functions were calculated. It was elucidated that atomic oxygen binds more strongly than nitrogen, with the most stable [Formula: see text] structure exhibiting a binding energy of -2.47 eV, indicating chemisorption onto the surface. Surface reconstructions were observed for the most stable minima of both atomic species. Positive workfunction changes were calculated for both adsorbed oxygen and nitrogen if the adsorbate interacted with zinc atoms. Negative workfunction changes were calculated when the adsorbate interacted with both surface oxygen and zinc atoms. Interactions between the adsorbate and the surface zinc atoms resulted in ionic-type bonding, whereas interactions with oxygen atoms were more likely to result in the formation of covalent-type bonding. The positive workfunction changes correlate with an experimentally observed increase in resistance of ZnO conductometric sensor devices.

  18. Kinetic modeling of primary and secondary oxygen atom fluxes at 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balyukin, Igor; Katushkina, Olga; Alexashov, Dmitry; Izmodenov, Vladislav

    2016-07-01

    The first quantitative measurements of the interstellar heavy (oxygen and neon) neutral atoms obtained on the IBEX spacecraft were presented in Park et al. (ApJS, 2015). Qualitative analysis of these data shows that the secondary component of the interstellar oxygen atoms was also measured along with the primary interstellar atoms. This component is formed near the heliopause due to process of charge exchange of interstellar oxygen ions with hydrogen atoms and its existence in the heliosphere was previously predicted theoretically (Izmodenov et al, 1997, 1999, 2001). Quantitative analysis of fluxes of interstellar heavy neutral atoms is only possible with the help of a model which takes into account both filtration of the primary and origin of the secondary interstellar oxygen in the region of interaction of the solar wind with the local interstellar medium as well as a detailed simulation of the motion of interstellar atoms inside the heliosphere. This simulation must take into account the temporal and heliolatitudinal dependences of ionization, the process of charge exchange with the protons of the solar wind and the effect of the solar gravitational attraction. This paper presents the results of modeling interstellar oxygen and neon atoms in the heliospheric shock layer and inside the heliosphere based on a new three-dimensional kinetic-MHD model of the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium (Izmodenov and Alexashov, ApJS, 2015) and the comparison of this results with the data obtained on the IBEX spacecraft.

  19. Epicubenol synthase. Origin of the oxygen atom of a bacterial sesquiterpene alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cane, D E; Ke, N

    2000-01-17

    Incubation of epicubenol synthase with farnesyl pyrophosphate in the presence of 11.1 atom% H2(18)O gave epicubenol (2) in which the hydroxyl oxygen atom was shown to be derived exclusively from water, as established by GC-selected ion monitoring MS of the derived TMS-epicubenol derivative (15).

  20. Enhanced atomic oxygen adsorption on defective nickel surfaces: An ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherbal, N.; Megchiche, E. H.; Zenia, H.; Lounis, K.; Amarouche, M.

    2017-09-01

    In this work we have examined the influence of the presence of a monovacancy on the atomic oxygen adsorption process at nickel surfaces of orientation (111), (100), and (110). The presence of such a defect was neglected in earlier studies. And for the first time, we have studied oxygen segregation on a defective (111) surface. The results reveal a varying sensitivity of the oxygen adsorption energy to the state of the surfaces. When compared to the perfect surface, we have registered an energy gain of 0.22 eV in the process of oxygen adsorption on the (111) surface when a vacancy is present on it. However, the energetic gains for the other two surfaces, (100) and (110), are much less than that of the (111) surface: they are of the order of 0.1 eV. Comparing to the perfect surfaces, we have found that charge reconstruction in the neighborhood of the vacancy plays a major role in giving rise to the aforementioned energetic gains. Indeed, we find an increase in the charge density on the nickel atoms surrounding the vacancy, which leads to strengthening of the ionic Ni-O bond if the oxygen is adsorbed in its vicinity. As a means of studying the effect of the presence of the vacancy on the first stages of the growth of an oxide layer, we have looked at the segregation process of oxygen atoms at the three surfaces. Our results show that up to four oxygen atoms can aggregate favorably at the adsorption sites inside and in the vicinity of the monovacancy at the (111) surface. This number is reduced to two oxygen atoms at the (110) surface, and to only one oxygen atom at the (100) surface.

  1. Reaction Mechanism of Oxygen Atoms with Unsaturated Hydrocarbons by the Crossed-Molecular-Beams Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, R. J.; Baseman, R. J.; Guozhong, H.; Lee, Y. T.

    1982-04-01

    From a series of studies of the reaction of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons using the crossed molecular beam method, the dominant reaction mechanisms were found to be the simple substitution reactions with oxygen atoms replacing H, Cl, Br atom or alkyl groups. Complication due to secondary reaction was avoided by carrying out experiments under single collisions and observing primary products directly. Primary products were identified by measuring the angular and velocity distributions of products at all the mass numbers which could be detected by the mass spectrometer, and from comparison of these distributions, applying the requirement of energy and momentum conservation.

  2. Atomic oxygen adsorption and absorption on Rh(111) and Ag(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derouin, Jonathan D.

    A central question in the field of heterogeneous catalysis is how surface structure and subsurface species influence catalytic behavior. One key to answering that question is determining which surface structures and subsurface species are present under catalytically relevant conditions. This dissertation presents results of Auger electron spectroscopy, low energy electron diffraction, temperature programmed desorption, and scanning tunneling microscopy experiments on oxidized Rh(111) and Ag(111) crystals. Exposing Rh(111) to O2 produced a predominately (2 x 1) adlayer, but even after extended dosing, (2 x 2) domains were also present. Exposing Rh(111) to atomic oxygen yielded O coverages greater than 0.5 ML and (1 x 1) domains were observed to form along terrace step edges. However, (2 x 1) and (2 x 2) domains were still present. Atomic oxygen was used to oxidize Ag(111) in order to study the effect of sample temperature as well as oxygen flux and energy. When atomic oxygen was generated using a lower temperature thermal cracker, a variety of previously reported surface structures were observed. When O was generated using a higher filament temperature, the surface became highly corrugated, layers of Ag 2O appeared to form, and little subsurface oxygen was observed. To investigate the role of sample temperature, the Ag(111) sample was held at various temperatures while being exposed to atomic oxygen. For short doses, sample temperature had minimal effect on surface reconstruction. For longer doses, changes in sample temperature in the range of 490 K to 525 K had a substantial impact on surface reconstruction and subsurface oxygen absorption. Higher temperature dosing yielded the same surface structures which were observed after short doses. Lower temperature dosing with atomic oxygen resulted in subsurface oxygen formation and new structures which covered the surface. The results indicate the rich complexity of oxygen/transition metal interactions and illustrate how

  3. Ground based materials science experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. B.; Johnston, J. C.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    The facilities at the Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory (MMSL) at the Lewis Research Center, created to offer immediate and low-cost access to ground-based testing facilities for industrial, academic, and government researchers, are described. The equipment in the MMSL falls into three categories: (1) devices which emulate some aspect of low gravitational forces, (2) specialized capabilities for 1-g development and refinement of microgravity experiments, and (3) functional duplicates of flight hardware. Equipment diagrams are included.

  4. Ground based materials science experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. B.; Johnston, J. C.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    The facilities at the Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory (MMSL) at the Lewis Research Center, created to offer immediate and low-cost access to ground-based testing facilities for industrial, academic, and government researchers, are described. The equipment in the MMSL falls into three categories: (1) devices which emulate some aspect of low gravitational forces, (2) specialized capabilities for 1-g development and refinement of microgravity experiments, and (3) functional duplicates of flight hardware. Equipment diagrams are included.

  5. Growth control of Saccharomyces cerevisiae through dose of oxygen atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, Hiroshi; Ohta, Takayuki; Hori, Masaru; Ito, Masafumi

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the dose-dependent effects of neutral oxygen radicals on the proliferation as well as the inactivation of microorganisms, we treated suspensions of budding yeast cells with oxygen radicals using an atmospheric-pressure oxygen radical source, varying the fluxes of O(3Pj) from 1.3 × 1016 to 2.3 × 1017 cm-2 s-1. Proliferation was promoted at doses of O(3Pj) ranging from 6 × 1016 to 2 × 1017 cm-3, and suppressed at doses ranging from 3 × 1017 to 1 × 1018 cm-3; cells were inactivated by O(3Pj) doses exceeding 1 × 1018 cm-3, even when the flux was varied over the above flux range. These results showed that the growth of cells was regulated primarily in response to the total dose of O(3Pj).

  6. Erosion effects of atomic oxygen on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane-polyimide hybrid films in low earth orbit space environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duo, Shuwang; Song, Mimi; Liu, Tingzhi; Hu, Changyuan; Li, Meishuan

    2013-02-01

    A novel polyimide (PI) hybrid nanocomposite containing polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) had been prepared by copolymerization of trisilanolphenyl-POSS, 4,4'-oxydianiline (ODA), and pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA). The AO resistance of these PI/POSS hybrid films was tested in the ground-based AO simulation facility. Exposed and unexposed surfaces were characterized by SEM and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. SEM images showed that the surface of the 20 wt% PI/POSS became much less rough than that of the pristine polyimide. Mass measurements of the samples showed that the erosion yield of the PI/POSS (20 wt.%) hybrid film was 1.2 x 10(-25) cm3/atom, and reduced to 4% of the polyimide film. The XPS data indicated that the carbon content of the near-surface region was decreased from 60.1 to 13.2 at% after AO exposure. The oxygen and silicon concentrations in the near-surface region increased to 1.96 after AO exposure. The nanometer-sized structure of POSS, with its large surface area, had led AO-irradiated samples to form a SiO2 passivation layer, which protected the underlying polymer from further AO attack. The incorporation of POSS into the polyimide could dramatically improve the AO resistance of polyimide films in low earth orbit environment.

  7. Atomic Oxygen Interactions With Silicone Contamination on Spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit Studied

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.

    2001-01-01

    Silicones have been widely used on spacecraft as potting compounds, adhesives, seals, gaskets, hydrophobic surfaces, and atomic oxygen protective coatings. Contamination of optical and thermal control surfaces on spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) has been an ever-present problem as a result of the interaction of atomic oxygen with volatile species from silicones and hydrocarbons onboard spacecraft. These interactions can deposit a contaminant that is a risk to spacecraft performance because it can form an optically absorbing film on the surfaces of Sun sensors, star trackers, or optical components or can increase the solar absorptance of thermal control surfaces. The transmittance, absorptance, and reflectance of such contaminant films seem to vary widely from very transparent SiOx films to much more absorbing SiOx-based films that contain hydrocarbons. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, silicone contamination that was oxidized by atomic oxygen has been examined from LEO spacecraft (including the Long Duration Exposure Facility and the Mir space station solar arrays) and from ground laboratory LEO simulations. The findings resulted in the development of predictive models that may help explain the underlying issues and effects. Atomic oxygen interactions with silicone volatiles and mixtures of silicone and hydrocarbon volatiles produce glassy SiOx-based contaminant coatings. The addition of hydrocarbon volatiles in the presence of silicone volatiles appears to cause much more absorbing (and consequently less transmitting) contaminant films than when no hydrocarbon volatiles are present. On the basis of the LDEF and Mir results, conditions of high atomic oxygen flux relative to low contaminant flux appear to result in more transparent contaminant films than do conditions of low atomic oxygen flux with high contaminant flux. Modeling predictions indicate that the deposition of contaminant films early in a LEO flight should depend much more on atomic oxygen flux than

  8. Atomic scale behavior of oxygen-based radicals in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlackt, C. C. W.; Neyts, E. C.; Bogaerts, A.

    2017-03-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasmas in and in contact with liquids represent a growing field of research for various applications. Understanding the interactions between the plasma generated species and the liquid is crucial. In this work we perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations based on a quantum mechanical method, i.e. density-functional based tight-binding (DFTB), to examine the interactions of OH radicals and O atoms in bulk water. Our calculations reveal that the transport of OH radicals through water is not only governed by diffusion, but also by an equilibrium reaction of H-abstraction with water molecules. Furthermore, when two OH radicals encounter each other, they either form a stable cluster, or react, resulting in the formation of a new water molecule and an O atom. In addition, the O atoms form either oxywater (when in singlet configuration) or they remain stable in solution (when in triplet configuration), stressing the important role that O atoms can play in aqueous solution, and in contact with biomolecules. Our observations are in line with both experimental and ab initio results from the literature.

  9. Monte Carlo Technique Used to Model the Degradation of Internal Spacecraft Surfaces by Atomic Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2004-01-01

    Atomic oxygen is one of the predominant constituents of Earth's upper atmosphere. It is created by the photodissociation of molecular oxygen (O2) into single O atoms by ultraviolet radiation. It is chemically very reactive because a single O atom readily combines with another O atom or with other atoms or molecules that can form a stable oxide. The effects of atomic oxygen on the external surfaces of spacecraft in low Earth orbit can have dire consequences for spacecraft life, and this is a well-known and much studied problem. Much less information is known about the effects of atomic oxygen on the internal surfaces of spacecraft. This degradation can occur when openings in components of the spacecraft exterior exist that allow the entry of atomic oxygen into regions that may not have direct atomic oxygen attack but rather scattered attack. Openings can exist because of spacecraft venting, microwave cavities, and apertures for Earth viewing, Sun sensors, or star trackers. The effects of atomic oxygen erosion of polymers interior to an aperture on a spacecraft were simulated at the NASA Glenn Research Center by using Monte Carlo computational techniques. A two-dimensional model was used to provide quantitative indications of the attenuation of atomic oxygen flux as a function of the distance into a parallel-walled cavity. The model allows the atomic oxygen arrival direction, the Maxwell Boltzman temperature, and the ram energy to be varied along with the interaction parameters of the degree of recombination upon impact with polymer or nonreactive surfaces, the initial reaction probability, the reaction probability dependence upon energy and angle of attack, degree of specularity of scattering of reactive and nonreactive surfaces, and the degree of thermal accommodation upon impact with reactive and non-reactive surfaces to be varied to allow the model to produce atomic oxygen erosion geometries that replicate actual experimental results from space. The degree of

  10. Atmospheric Pressure Method and Apparatus for Removal of Organic Matter with Atomic and Ionic Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor); Rutledge, Sharon K. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A gas stream containing ionic and atomic oxygen in inert gas is used to remove organic matter from a substrate. The gas stream is formed by flowing a mixture of gaseous oxygen in an inert gas such as helium at atmospheric pressure past a high voltage, current limited, direct current arc which contacts the gas mixture and forms the ionic and atomic oxygen. The arc is curved at the cathode end and the ionic oxygen formed by the arc nearer to the anode end of the arc is accelerated in a direction towards the cathode by virtue of its charge. The relatively high mass to charge ratio of the ionic oxygen enables at least some of it to escape the arc before contacting the cathode and it is directed onto the substrate. This is useful for cleaning delicate substrates such as fine and historically important paintings and delicate equipment and the like.

  11. New oxygen radical source using selective sputtering of oxygen atoms for high rate deposition of TiO{sub 2} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Yoji; Lei, Hao; Hoshi, Yoichi [Department of Electronics and Information Technology, Tokyo Polytechnic University, Kanagawa 243-0297 (Japan); State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Surface Engineering of Materials Division, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Department of Electronics and Information Technology, Tokyo Polytechnic University, Kanagawa 243-0297 (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    We have developed a new oxygen radical source based on the reactive sputtering phenomena of a titanium target for high rate deposition of TiO{sub 2} films. In this oxygen radical source, oxygen radicals are mainly produced by two mechanisms: selective sputter-emission of oxygen atoms from the target surface covered with a titanium oxide layer, and production of high-density oxygen plasma in the space near the magnetron-sputtering cathode. Compared with molecular oxygen ions, the amount of atomic oxygen radicals increased significantly with an increase in discharge current so that atomic oxygen radicals were mainly produced by this radical source. It should be noted that oxygen atoms were selectively sputtered from the target surface, and titanium atoms sputter-emitted from the target cathode were negligibly small. The amount of oxygen radicals supplied from this radical source increased linearly with increasing discharge current, and oxygen radicals of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} atoms/s/cm{sup 2} were supplied to the substrate surface at a discharge current of 1.2 A. We conclude that our newly developed oxygen radical source can be a good tool to achieve high rate deposition and to control the structure of TiO{sub 2} films for many industrial design applications.

  12. Growth control of Saccharomyces cerevisiae through dose of oxygen atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashizume, Hiroshi, E-mail: hashizume@plasma.engg.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Plasma Medical Science Global Innovation Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Meijo University, 1-501 Shiogamaguchi, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya 468-8502 (Japan); Ohta, Takayuki; Ito, Masafumi [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Meijo University, 1-501 Shiogamaguchi, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya 468-8502 (Japan); Hori, Masaru [Plasma Medical Science Global Innovation Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2015-08-31

    To investigate the dose-dependent effects of neutral oxygen radicals on the proliferation as well as the inactivation of microorganisms, we treated suspensions of budding yeast cells with oxygen radicals using an atmospheric-pressure oxygen radical source, varying the fluxes of O({sup 3}P{sub j}) from 1.3 × 10{sup 16} to 2.3 × 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. Proliferation was promoted at doses of O({sup 3}P{sub j}) ranging from 6 × 10{sup 16} to 2 × 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3}, and suppressed at doses ranging from 3 × 10{sup 17} to 1 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}; cells were inactivated by O({sup 3}P{sub j}) doses exceeding 1 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}, even when the flux was varied over the above flux range. These results showed that the growth of cells was regulated primarily in response to the total dose of O({sup 3}P{sub j})

  13. Rapid hydrogen and oxygen atom transfer by a high-valent nickel-oxygen species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corona, Teresa; Draksharapu, Apparao; Padamati, Sandeep K; Gamba, Ilaria; Martin-Diaconescu, Vlad; Acuña-Parés, Ferran; Browne, Wesley R; Company, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Terminal high-valent metal-oxygen species are key reaction intermediates in the catalytic cycle of both enzymes (e.g., oxygenases) and synthetic oxidation catalysts. While tremendous efforts have been directed towards the characterization of the biologically relevant terminal manganese-oxygen and

  14. Rapid hydrogen and oxygen atom transfer by a high-valent nickel-oxygen species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corona, Teresa; Draksharapu, Apparao; Padamati, Sandeep K; Gamba, Ilaria; Martin-Diaconescu, Vlad; Acuña-Parés, Ferran; Browne, Wesley R; Company, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Terminal high-valent metal-oxygen species are key reaction intermediates in the catalytic cycle of both enzymes (e.g., oxygenases) and synthetic oxidation catalysts. While tremendous efforts have been directed towards the characterization of the biologically relevant terminal manganese-oxygen and ir

  15. Atomic oxygen and ultraviolet radiation mission total exposures for LDEF experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, R. J.; Gillis, J. R.; Rousslang, Ken W.

    1992-01-01

    Atomic oxygen and solar radiation exposures were determined analytically for rows, longerons, and end bays of the LDEF. Calculated atomic oxygen exposures are based on an analytical model that accounts for the effects of thermal molecular velocity, atmospheric temperature, number density, spacecraft velocity, incidence angle, and atmospheric rotation. Results also incorporate variations in solar activity, geomagnetic index, and orbital parameters occurring over the six year flight of the spacecraft. Solar radiation exposure calculations are based on the form factors reported in the Solar Illumination Data Package prepared by NASA Langley. The earth albedo value for these calculations was based on the Nimbus 7 earth radiation data set. Summary charts for both atomic oxygen and solar radiation exposure are presented to facilitate the use of the data generated by LDEF experimenters.

  16. Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Growth on Graphene via Chemical Activation with Atomic Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, James E.; Alaboson, Justice M. P.; Patwardhan, Sameer; Ryder, Christopher R.; Schatz, George C.

    2013-01-01

    Chemically interfacing the inert basal plane of graphene with other materials has limited the development of graphene-based catalysts, composite materials, and devices. Here, we overcome this limitation by chemically activating epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001) using atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen produces epoxide groups on graphene, which act as reactive nucleation sites for zinc oxide nanoparticle growth using the atomic layer deposition precursor diethyl zinc. In particular, exposure of epoxidized graphene to diethyl zinc abstracts oxygen, creating mobile species which diffuse on the surface to form metal oxide clusters. This mechanism is corroborated with a combination of scanning probe microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and density functional theory, and can likely be generalized to a wide variety of related surface reactions on graphene. PMID:24206242

  17. A high flux pulsed source of energetic atomic oxygen. [for spacecraft materials ground testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krech, Robert H.; Caledonia, George E.

    1986-01-01

    The design and demonstration of a pulsed high flux source of nearly monoenergetic atomic oxygen are reported. In the present test setup, molecular oxygen under several atmospheres of pressure is introduced into an evacuated supersonic expansion nozzle through a pulsed molecular beam valve. A 10J CO2 TEA laser is focused to intensities greater than 10 to the 9th W/sq cm in the nozzle throat, generating a laser-induced breakdown with a resulting 20,000-K plasma. Plasma expansion is confined by the nozzle geometry to promote rapid electron-ion recombination. Average O-atom beam velocities from 5-13 km/s at fluxes up to 10 to the 18th atoms/pulse are measured, and a similar surface oxygen enrichment in polyethylene samples to that obtained on the STS-8 mission is found.

  18. Longitudinal structure in atomic oxygen concentrations observed with WINDII on UARS. [Wind Imaging Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, G. G.; Thuillier, G.; Solheim, B. H.; Chandra, S.; Cogger, L. L.; Duboin, M. L.; Evans, W. F. J.; Gattinger, R. L.; Gault, W. A.; Herse, M.

    1993-01-01

    WINDII, the Wind Imaging Interferometer on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, began atmospheric observations on September 28, 1991 and since then has been collecting data on winds, temperatures and emissions rates from atomic, molecular and ionized oxygen species, as well as hydroxyl. The validation of winds and temperatures is not yet complete, and scientific interpretation has barely begun, but the dominant characteristic of these data so far is the remarkable structure in the emission rate from the excited species produced by the recombination of atomic oxygen. The latitudinal and temporal variability has been noted before by many others. In this preliminary report on WINDII results we draw attention to the dramatic longitudinal variations of planetary wave character in atomic oxygen concentration, as reflected in the OI 557.7 nm emission, and to similar variations seen in the Meine1 hydroxyl band emission.

  19. Metal oxide nanoparticle growth on graphene via chemical activation with atomic oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, James E; Alaboson, Justice M P; Patwardhan, Sameer; Ryder, Christopher R; Schatz, George C; Hersam, Mark C

    2013-12-04

    Chemically interfacing the inert basal plane of graphene with other materials has limited the development of graphene-based catalysts, composite materials, and devices. Here, we overcome this limitation by chemically activating epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001) using atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen produces epoxide groups on graphene, which act as reactive nucleation sites for zinc oxide nanoparticle growth using the atomic layer deposition precursor diethyl zinc. In particular, exposure of epoxidized graphene to diethyl zinc abstracts oxygen, creating mobile species that diffuse on the surface to form metal oxide clusters. This mechanism is corroborated with a combination of scanning probe microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and density functional theory and can likely be generalized to a wide variety of related surface reactions on graphene.

  20. Inactivation of Bacillus Subtilis by Atomic Oxygen Radical Anion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Longchun; WANG Lian; YU Zhou; LV Xuanzhong; LI Quanxin

    2007-01-01

    UAtomic oxygen radical anion (O- ) is one of the most active oxygen species, and has extremely high oxidation ability toward small-molecules of hydrocarbons. However, to our knowledge, little is known about the effects of O- on cells of micro-organisms. This work showed that O- could quickly react with the Bacillus subtilis cells and seriously damage the cell walls a s well as their other contents, leading to a fast and irreversible inactivation. SEM micrographs revealed that the cell structures were dramatically destroyed by their exposure to O-. The inactivation efficiencies of B. subtilis depend on the O-- intensity, the initial population of cells and the treatment temperature, but not on the pH in the range of our investigation. For a cell concentration of 106 cfu/ml, the number of survived cells dropped from 106 cfu/ml to 103 cfu/ml after about five-minute irradiation by an O- flux in an intensity of 233 nA/cm2 under a dry argon environment (30 ℃, 1 atm, exposed size: 1.8 cm2). The inactivation mechanism of micro-organisms induced by O- is also discussed.

  1. Use of O2 airglow for calibrating direct atomic oxygen measurements from sounding rockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Witt

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate knowledge about the distribution of atomic oxygen is crucial for many studies of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Direct measurements of atomic oxygen by the resonance fluorescence technique at 130 nm have been made from many sounding rocket payloads in the past. This measurement technique yields atomic oxygen profiles with good sensitivity and altitude resolution. However, accuracy is a problem as calibration and aerodynamics make the quantitative analysis challenging. Most often, accuracies better than a factor 2 are not to be expected from direct atomic oxygen measurements. As an example, we present results from the NLTE (Non Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium sounding rocket campaign at Esrange, Sweden, in 1998, with simultaneous O2 airglow and O resonance fluorescence measurements. O number densities are found to be consistent with the nightglow analysis, but only within the uncertainty limits of the resonance fluorescence technique. Based on these results, we here describe how better atomic oxygen number densities can be obtained by calibrating direct techniques with complementary airglow photometer measurements and detailed aerodynamic analysis. Night-time direct O measurements can be complemented by photometric detection of the O2 (b1∑g+−X3∑g- Atmospheric Band at 762 nm, while during daytime the O2 (a1Δg−X3∑g- Infrared Atmospheric Band at 1.27 μm can be used. The combination of a photometer and a rather simple resonance fluorescence probe can provide atomic oxygen profiles with both good accuracy and good height resolution.

  2. A Fiber Optic Catalytic Sensor for Neutral Atom Measurements in Oxygen Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Vesel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The presented sensor for neutral oxygen atom measurement in oxygen plasma is a catalytic probe which uses fiber optics and infrared detection system to measure the gray body radiation of the catalyst. The density of neutral atoms can be determined from the temperature curve of the probe, because the catalyst is heated predominantly by the dissipation of energy caused by the heterogeneous surface recombination of neutral atoms. The advantages of this sensor are that it is simple, reliable, easy to use, noninvasive, quantitative and can be used in plasma discharge regions. By using different catalyst materials the sensor can also be applied for detection of neutral atoms in other plasmas. Sensor design, operation, example measurements and new measurement procedure for systematic characterization are presented.

  3. Use of Atomic Oxygen for Increased Water Contact Angles of Various Polymers for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim; Berger, Lauren; Roberts, Lily

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of atomic oxygen (AO) exposure on the hydrophilicity of nine different polymers for biomedical applications. Atomic oxygen treatment can alter the chemistry and morphology of polymer surfaces, which may increase the adhesion and spreading of cells on Petri dishes and enhance implant growth. Therefore, nine different polymers were exposed to atomic oxygen and water-contact angle, or hydrophilicity, was measured after exposure. To determine whether hydrophilicity remains static after initial atomic oxygen exposure, or changes with higher fluence exposures, the contact angles between the polymer and water droplet placed on the polymer s surface were measured versus AO fluence. The polymers were exposed to atomic oxygen in a 100-W, 13.56-MHz radio frequency (RF) plasma asher, and the treatment was found to significantly alter the hydrophilicity of non-fluorinated polymers. Pristine samples were compared with samples that had been exposed to AO at various fluence levels. Minimum and maximum fluences for the ashing trials were set based on the effective AO erosion of a Kapton witness coupon in the asher. The time intervals for ashing were determined by finding the logarithmic values of the minimum and maximum fluences. The difference of these two values was divided by the desired number of intervals (ideally 10). The initial desired fluence was then multiplied by this result (2.37), as was each subsequent desired fluence. The flux in the asher was determined to be approximately 3.0 x 10(exp 15) atoms/sq cm/sec, and each polymer was exposed to a maximum fluence of 5.16 x 10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm.

  4. Atomic Oxygen and Space Environment Effects on Aerospace Materials Flown with EOIM-3 Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scialdone, John J.; Clatterbuck, Carroll H.; Ayres-Treusdell, Mary; Park, Gloria; Kolos, Diane

    1996-01-01

    Polymer materials samples mounted on a passive carrier tray were flown aboard the STS-46 Atlantis shuttle as complement to the EOIM-3 (Evaluation of Oxygen Interaction with Materials) experiment to evaluate the effects of atomic oxygen on the materials and to measure the gaseous shuttle bay environment. The morphological changes of the samples produced by the atomic oxygen fluence of 2.07 x 10(exp 20) atoms/cm(exp 2) are being reported. The changes have been verified using Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA), gravimetric measurement, microscopic observations and thermo-optical measurements. The samples, including Kapton, Delrin, epoxies, Beta Cloth, Chemglaze Z306, silver Teflon, silicone coatings, 3M tape and Uralane and Ultem, PEEK, Victrex (PES), Polyethersulfone and Polymethylpentene thermoplastic, have been characterized by their oxygen reaction efficiency on the basis of their erosion losses and the oxygen fluence. Those efficiencies have been compared to results from other experiments, when available. The efficiencies of the samples are all in the range of E-24 g/atom. The results indicate that the reaction efficiencies of the reported materials can be grouped in about three ranges of values. The least affected materials which have efficiencies varying from 1 to 10(exp 25) g/atom, include silicones, epoxies, Uralane and Teflon. A second group with efficiency from 10 to 45(exp 25) g/atom includes additional silicone coatings, the Chemglaze Z306 paint and Kapton. The third range from 50 to 75(exp 25) includes organic compound such as Pentene, Peek, Ultem, Sulfone and a 3M tape. A Delrin sample had the highest reaction efficiency of 179(exp 25) g/atom. Two samples, the aluminum Beta cloth X389-7 and the epoxy fiberglass G-11 nonflame retardant, showed a slight mass increase.

  5. First-principles calculations of the diffusion of atomic oxygen in nickel: thermal expansion contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megchiche, E H; Amarouche, M; Mijoule, C

    2007-07-25

    Within the framework of density functional theory using the projector augmented-wave (PAW) method, we present some energetic properties of atomic oxygen interstitials in crystalline Ni, i.e. the insertion and activation energies of the O diffusion. Concerning the activation energy, two pathways for the migration process are studied. The charge transfer process between atomic oxygen and nickel atoms is analysed in the interstitial sites. We find that the interstitial octahedral site (O site) is lower in energy than the tetrahedral site (T site). The most favourable pathway for the migration between two octahedral sites corresponds to an intermediate metastable state located in a tetrahedral site. Concerning the charge transfers we find that the atomic oxygen ionizes as O(-) and that the electron migrates essentially from the Ni nearest neighbours of atomic oxygen. In addition, the thermal expansion contribution through the dilatation of the solid is studied. When the thermal expansion is introduced, we show that the insertion process is stabilized and that the tetrahedral insertion energy becomes nearly equal to the octahedral ones. However, the activation energy decreases with the dilatation. Taking into account the thermal expansion effects, our results are consistent with the more reliable experimental data.

  6. Silicon solar cell performance deposited by diamond like carbon thin film ;Atomic oxygen effects;

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, Abbas Ail; Eshaghi, Akbar; Karami, Esmaeil

    2017-09-01

    In this research, a diamond-like carbon thin film was deposited on p-type polycrystalline silicon solar cell via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method by using methane and hydrogen gases. The effect of atomic oxygen on the functioning of silicon coated DLC thin film and silicon was investigated. Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the structure and morphology of the DLC thin film. Photocurrent-voltage characteristics of the silicon solar cell were carried out using a solar simulator. The results showed that atomic oxygen exposure induced the including oxidation, structural changes, cross-linking reactions and bond breaking of the DLC film; thus reducing the optical properties. The photocurrent-voltage characteristics showed that although the properties of the fabricated thin film were decreased after being exposed to destructive rays, when compared with solar cell without any coating, it could protect it in atomic oxygen condition enhancing solar cell efficiency up to 12%. Thus, it can be said that diamond-like carbon thin layer protect the solar cell against atomic oxygen exposure.

  7. The role of thermal energy accommodation and atomic recombination probabilities in low pressure oxygen plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Andrew Robert; Foucher, Mickaël; Marinov, Daniil; Chabert, Pascal; Gans, Timo; Kushner, Mark J.; Booth, Jean-Paul

    2017-02-01

    Surface interaction probabilities are critical parameters that determine the behaviour of low pressure plasmas and so are crucial input parameters for plasma simulations that play a key role in determining their accuracy. However, these parameters are difficult to estimate without in situ measurements. In this work, the role of two prominent surface interaction probabilities, the atomic oxygen recombination coefficient γ O and the thermal energy accommodation coefficient α E in determining the plasma properties of low pressure inductively coupled oxygen plasmas are investigated using two-dimensional fluid-kinetic simulations. These plasmas are the type used for semiconductor processing. It was found that α E plays a crucial role in determining the neutral gas temperature and neutral gas density. Through this dependency, the value of α E also determines a range of other plasma properties such as the atomic oxygen density, the plasma potential, the electron temperature, and ion bombardment energy and neutral-to-ion flux ratio at the wafer holder. The main role of γ O is in determining the atomic oxygen density and flux to the wafer holder along with the neutral-to-ion flux ratio. It was found that the plasma properties are most sensitive to each coefficient when the value of the coefficient is small causing the losses of atomic oxygen and thermal energy to be surface interaction limited rather than transport limited.

  8. Oxygen-free atomic layer deposition of indium sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinson, Alex B.; Hock, Adam S.; McCarthy, Robert; Weimer, Matthew S.

    2016-07-05

    A method for synthesizing an In(III) N,N'-diisopropylacetamidinate precursor including cooling a mixture comprised of diisopropylcarbodiimide and diethyl ether to approximately -30.degree. C., adding methyllithium drop-wise into the mixture, allowing the mixture to warm to room temperature, adding indium(III) chloride as a solid to the mixture to produce a white solid, dissolving the white solid in pentane to form a clear and colorless solution, filtering the mixture over a celite plug, and evaporating the solution under reduced pressure to obtain a solid In(III) N,N'-diisopropylacetamidinate precursor. This precursor has been further used to develop a novel atomic layer deposition technique for indium sulfide by dosing a reactor with the precursor, purging with nitrogen, dosing with dilute hydrogen sulfide, purging again with nitrogen, and repeating these steps to increase growth.

  9. Atomic Oxygen Cleaning Shown to Remove Organic Contaminants at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has developed and filed for a patent on a method to produce atomic oxygen at atmospheric pressure by using a direct current arc in a gas flow mixture of oxygen and helium. A prototype device has been tested for its ability to remove various soot residues from surfaces exposed to fire, and various varnishes such as acrylic and egg white.

  10. Mesospheric minor species determinations from rocket and ground-based i.r. measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulwick, J. C.; Baker, K. D.; Baker, D. J.; Steed, A. J.; Pendleton, W. R.; Grossmann, K.; Brückelmann, H. G.

    As part of the MAP/WINE campaign the infrared hydroxyl airglow layer was investigated at Kiruna, Sweden, by simultaneous measurements with rocket probes of OH ≠ and O2( a1Δg) infrared emissions and concentrations of odd oxygen species (O and O 3). Coordinated measurements of OH ≠ and O2( a1Δg) zenith radiance and emission spectra and their time histories were made from the ground. The rocket-borne Λ = 1.55 μm radiometer ( ΔΛ ≊ 0.23 μm) provided volume emission rates for OH for both rocket ascent and descent, showing a peak near 87 km with a maximum of nearly 10 6 photons sec -1 cm -3. The atomic oxygen distribution showed a concentration of about 10 11 cm -3 between 88 and 100 km, dropping off sharply below 85 km. The ground-based radiometer at Λ = 1.56 μm, which had a similar filter bandpass to the rocket-borne instrument, yielded an equivalent of 130 kR for the total OH Δv = 2 sequence, which is consistent with the zenith-corrected rocket-based sequence radiance value of ≌ 110 kR. The rotational temperature of the OH night airglow obtained from the rotational structure of the OH M (3,1) band observed by the ground-based interferometer was about 195K at the time of the rocket measurement. Atomic oxygen concentrations were calculated from the OH profile and show agreement with the directly measured values. Atomic hydrogen concentrations of a few times 10 7 cm -3 near 85 km were inferred from the data set.

  11. Measurement of atomic oxygen in the middle atmosphere using solid electrolyte sensors and catalytic probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart, M.; Löhle, S.; Steinbeck, A.; Binder, T.; Fasoulas, S.

    2015-09-01

    The middle- and upper-atmospheric energy budget is largely dominated by reactions involving atomic oxygen (O). Modeling of these processes requires detailed knowledge about the distribution of this oxygen species. Understanding the mutual contributions of atomic oxygen and wave motions to the atmospheric heating is the main goal of the rocket project WADIS (WAve propagation and DISsipation in the middle atmosphere). It includes, amongst others, our instruments for the measurement of atomic oxygen that have both been developed with the aim of resolving density variations on small vertical scales along the trajectory. In this paper the instrument based on catalytic effects (PHLUX: Pyrometric Heat Flux Experiment) is introduced briefly. The experiment employing solid electrolyte sensors (FIPEX: Flux φ(Phi) Probe Experiment) is presented in detail. These sensors were laboratory calibrated using a microwave plasma as a source of atomic oxygen in combination with mass spectrometer reference measurements. The spectrometer was in turn calibrated for O with a method based on methane. In order to get insight into the horizontal variability, the rocket payload had instrument decks at both ends. Each housed several sensor heads measuring during both the up- and downleg of the trajectory. The WADIS project comprises two rocket flights during different geophysical conditions. Results from WADIS-1 are presented, which was successfully launched in June 2013 from the Andøya Space Center, Norway. FIPEX data were sampled at 100 Hz and yield atomic oxygen density profiles with a vertical resolution better than 9 m. This allows density variations to be studied on very small spatial scales. Numerical simulations of the flow field around the rocket were done at several points of the trajectory to assess the influence of aerodynamic effects on the measurement results. Density profiles peak at 3 × 1010 cm-3 at altitudes of 93.6 and 96 km for the up- and downleg, respectively.

  12. Pressure broadening of atomic oxygen two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, Daniil; Drag, Cyril; Blondel, Christophe; Guaitella, Olivier; Golda, Judith; Klarenaar, Bart; Engeln, Richard; Schulz-von der Gathen, Volker; Booth, Jean-Paul

    2016-12-01

    Atomic oxygen, considered to be a determining reactant in plasma applications at ambient pressure, is routinely detected by two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). Here, pressure broadening of the (2p 4 3 P 2  →  3p 3 P J=0,1,2) two-photon transition in oxygen atoms was investigated using a high-resolution TALIF technique in normal and Doppler-free configurations. The pressure broadening coefficients determined were {γ{{\\text{O}2}}}   =  0.40  ±  0.08  cm-1/bar for oxygen molecules and {γ\\text{He}}   =  0.46  ±  0.03 cm-1/bar for helium atoms. These correspond to pressure broadening rate constants k\\text{PB}{{\\text{O}2}}   =  9 · 10-9 cm3 s-1 and k\\text{PB}\\text{He}   =  4 · 10-9 cm3 s-1, respectively. The well-known quenching rate constants of O(3p 3 P J ) by O2 and He are at least one order of magnitude smaller, which signifies that non-quenching collisions constitute the main line-broadening mechanism. In addition to providing new insights into collisional processes of oxygen atoms in electronically excited 3p 3 P J state, reported pressure broadening parameters are important for quantification of oxygen TALIF line profiles when both collisional and Doppler broadening mechanisms are important. Thus, the Doppler component (and hence the temperature of oxygen atoms) can be accurately determined from high resolution TALIF measurements in a broad range of conditions.

  13. Characterization of carbon nanotube yarn after exposure to hyperthermal atomic oxygen and thermal fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misak, H. E.; Mall, S.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-yarn was evaluated for the survivability under hazardous space environmental conditions which were thermal fatigue, atomic oxygen and additive effect of these two exposures. Its tensile strength, tenacity, stiffness, strain to failure and electrical conductivity were characterized at the two extreme space temperatures of -150 and 120 °C before and after exposure to these environmental conditions. Tensile strength, stiffness and electrical conductivity of unexposed CNT yarn increased at the cryogenic temperature relative to at the elevated temperature. There was no change in the tensile properties after exposure to the space environmental conditions when measured at the elevated and cryogenic temperatures. Electrical conductivity decreased after exposure to three hazardous environments involving thermal fatigue, but it had no or small decrease when exposed to atomic oxygen only. No additive effect of thermal fatigue followed by atomic oxygen or by atomic oxygen followed by thermal fatigue environments on the CNTs' tensile properties and electrical conductivity was observed. Considering the low density 0.59 g/cc and good resistant to the extreme hazardous space environment, CNT-yarns have potential for applications in spacecraft and satellites.

  14. Atomic Oxygen Treatment for Non-Contact Removal of Organic Protective Coatings from Painting Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Cales, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Current techniques for removal of varnish (lacquer) and other organic protective coatings from paintings involve contact with the surface. This contact can remove pigment, or alter the shape and location of paint on the canvas surface. A thermal energy atomic oxygen plasma, developed to simulate the space environment in low Earth orbit, easily removes these organic materials. Uniform removal of organic protective coatings from the surfaces of paintings is accomplished through chemical reaction. Atomic oxygen will not react with oxides so that most paint pigments will not be affected by the reaction. For paintings containing organic pigments, the exposure can be carefully timed so that the removal stops just short of the pigment. Color samples of Alizarin Crimson, Sap Green, and Zinc White coated with Damar lacquer were exposed to atomic oxygen. The lacquer was easily removed from all of the samples. Additionally, no noticeable change in appearance was observed after the lacquer was reapplied. The same observations were made on a painted canvas test sample obtained from the Cleveland Museum of Art. Scanning electron microscope photographs showed a slight microscopic texturing of the vehicle after exposure. However, there was no removal or disturbance of the paint pigment on the surface. It appears that noncontact cleaning using atomic oxygen may provide a viable alternative to other cleaning techniques. It is especially attractive in cases where the organic protective surface cannot be acceptably or safely removed by conventional techniques.

  15. Efficacy of oxygen-driven atomizing inhalation of budesonide in the treatment of acute laryngitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To explore the clinical efficacy of oxygen-driven atomizing inhalation of budesonide in the treatment of acute laryngitis.Methods:Based on the routine treatment, the patients in the observation group were given oxygen-driven atomizing inhalation of budesonide, while the patients in the control group were given oxygen-driven atomizing inhalation of dexamethasone. The change of SpO2 before treatment and 30 min after treatment, the changes of serum IL-4 and IL-8 before treatment and 3 d after treatment, the clinical symptom disappearing time, hospitalization time, and clinical therapeutic effect after drug administration in the two groups were observed.Results: The improved degree of SpO2 30 min after treatment in the observation group was significantly superior to that in the control group. The decreased degree of IL-4 and IL-8 levels 3 d after treatment in the observation group was significantly superior to that in the control group. The clinical symptom disappearing time and hospitalization time in the observation group were significantly shorter than those in the control group. The total effective rate in the observation group (94.3%) was significantly superior to that in the control group (74.3%).Conclusions:Oxygen-driven atomizing inhalation of budesonide in the treatment of acute laryngitis can rapidly alleviate the local inflammatory reaction, improve the clinical symptoms, and enhance the safety of drug administration; therefore, it deserves to be widely recommended in the clinic.

  16. Theoretical study of atomic oxygen on gold surface by Hückel theory and DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Keju; Kohyama, Masanori; Tanaka, Shingo; Takeda, Seiji

    2012-09-27

    It is fundamental to understand the behavior of atomic oxygen on gold surfaces so as to elucidate the mechanism of nano gold catalysts for low-temperature CO oxidation reactions since the atomic oxygen on gold system is an important intermediate involved in both the processes of O(2) dissociation and CO oxidation. We performed theoretical analysis of atomic oxygen adsorption on gold by using Hückel theory. It is found that formation of linear O-Au-O structure on Au surfaces greatly stabilizes the atomic oxygen adsorption due to stronger bond energy and bond order, which is confirmed subsequently by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The linear O-Au-O structure may explain the surprising first order kinetics behavior of O(2) desorption from gold surfaces. This view of the linear O-Au-O structure as the natural adsorption status is quite different from the conventional view, which may lead to new understanding toward the reaction mechanism of low-temperature CO oxidation reaction on nano gold catalysts.

  17. Rate of reaction of dimethylmercury with oxygen atoms in the gas phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Helge

    1986-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen (O(3P)) with dimethylmercury has been measured at room temperature at a pressure of about 1 Torr using a fast flow system with electron paramagnetic resonance and mass spectrometric detection. Some reaction products were identified. The rate...

  18. Atomic oxygen dynamics in an air dielectric barrier discharge: a combined diagnostic and modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldus, Sabrina; Schröder, Daniel; Bibinov, Nikita; Schulz-von der Gathen, Volker; Awakowicz, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasmas are a promising alternative therapy for treatment of chronic wounds, as they have already shown in clinical trials. In this study an air dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) developed for therapeutic use in dermatology is characterized with respect to the plasma produced reactive oxygen species, namely atomic oxygen and ozone, which are known to be of great importance to wound healing. To understand the plasma chemistry of the applied DBD, xenon-calibrated two-photon laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and optical absorption spectroscopy are applied. The measured spatial distributions are shown and compared to each other. A model of the afterglow chemistry based on optical emission spectroscopy is developed to cross-check the measurement results and obtain insight into the dynamics of the considered reactive oxygen species. The atomic oxygen density is found to be located mostly between the electrodes with a maximum density of {{n}\\text{O}}=6× {{10}16} cm-3 . Time resolved measurements reveal a constant atomic oxygen density between two high voltage pulses. The ozone is measured up to 3 mm outside the active plasma volume, reaching a maximum value of {{n}{{\\text{O}3}}}=3× {{10}16} cm-3 between the electrodes.

  19. Rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen with phosphine at 298 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, L. J.; Payne, W. A.; Nava, D. F.

    1987-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen with phosphine has been measured at 298 K using flash photolysis combined with time-resolved detection of O(3P) via resonance fluorescence. Atomic oxygen was produced by flash photolysis of N2O or NO highly diluted in argon. The results were shown to be independent of (PH3), (O), total pressure and the source of O(3P). The mean value of all the experiments is k1 = (3.6 + or -0.8) x 10 to the -11th cu cm/s (1 sigma). Two previous measurements of k1 differed by more than an order of magnitude, and the results support the higher value obtained in a discharge flow-mass spectrometry study. A comparison with rate data for other atomic and free radical reactions with phosphine is presented, and the role of these reactions in the aeronomy or photochemistry of Jupiter and Saturn is briefly considered.

  20. Oxygen atom transfer to a half-sandwich iridium complex: clean oxidation yielding a molecular product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlington, Christopher R; White, Peter S; Brookhart, Maurice; Templeton, Joseph L

    2014-03-12

    The oxidation of [Ir(Cp*)(phpy)(NCAr(F))][B(Ar(F))4] (1; Cp* = η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl, phpy = 2-phenylene-κC(1')-pyridine-κN, NCAr(F) = 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)benzonitrile, B(Ar(F))4 = tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate) with the oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reagent 2-tert-butylsulfonyliodosobenzene (sPhIO) yielded a single, molecular product at -40 °C. New Ir(Cp*) complexes with bidentate ligands derived by oxidation of phpy were synthesized to model possible products resulting from oxygen atom insertion into the iridium-carbon and/or iridium-nitrogen bonds of phpy. These new ligands were either cleaved from iridium by water or formed unreactive, phenoxide-bridged iridium dimers. The reactivity of these molecules suggested possible decomposition pathways of Ir(Cp*)-based water oxidation catalysts with bidentate ligands that are susceptible to oxidation. Monitoring the [Ir(Cp*)(phpy)(NCAr(F))](+) oxidation reaction by low-temperature NMR techniques revealed that the reaction involved two separate OAT events. An intermediate was detected, synthesized independently with trapping ligands, and characterized. The first oxidation step involves direct attack of the sPhIO oxidant on the carbon of the coordinated nitrile ligand. Oxygen atom transfer to carbon, followed by insertion into the iridium-carbon bond of phpy, formed a coordinated organic amide. A second oxygen atom transfer generated an unidentified iridium species (the "oxidized complex"). In the presence of triphenylphosphine, the "oxidized complex" proved capable of transferring one oxygen atom to phosphine, generating phosphine oxide and forming an Ir-PPh3 adduct in 92% yield. The final Ir-PPh3 product was fully characterized.

  1. Measuring atomic oxygen densities and electron properties in an Inductively Coupled Plasma for thin film deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, David; Gibson, Andrew; Booth, Jean-Paul; Wagenaars, Erik

    2016-09-01

    Plasma Enhanced Pulsed Laser Deposition (PE-PLD) is an advanced way of depositing thin films of oxide materials by using a laser to ablate a target, and passing the resulting plasma plume through a background Inductively-Coupled Plasma (ICP), instead of a background gas as is done in traditional PLD. The main advantage of PE-PLD is the control of film stoichiometry via the direct control of the reactive oxygen species in the ICP instead of relying on a neutral gas background. The aim is to deposit zinc oxide films from a zinc metal target and an oxygen ICP. In this work, we characterise the range of compositions of the reactive oxygen species achievable in ICPs; in particular the atomic oxygen density. The density of atomic oxygen has been determined within two ICPs of two different geometries over a range of plasma powers and pressures with the use of Energy Resolved Actinometry (ERA). ERA is a robust diagnostic technique with determines both the dissociation degree and average electron energy by comparing the excitation ratios of two oxygen and one argon transition. Alongside this the electron densities have been determined with the use of a hairpin probe. This work received financial support from the EPSRC, and York-Paris CIRC.

  2. Effects of combined irradiation of 500 keV protons and atomic oxygen on polyimide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, Lev; Chernik, Vladimir; Zhilyakov, Lev; Voronina, Ekaterina; Chirskaia, Natalia

    2016-07-01

    Polyimide films are widely used on the spacecraft surface as thermal control coating, films in different constuctions, etc. However, the space ionizing radiation of different types can alter the mechanical, optical and electrical properties of polyimide films. For example, it is well known that 20-100 keV proton irradiation causes breaking of chemical bonds and destruction of the surface layer in polyimide, deterioration of its optical properties, etc. In low-Earth orbits serious danger for polymeric materials is atomic oxygen of the upper atmosphere of the Earth, which is the main component in the range of heights of 200-800 km. Due to the orbital spacecraft velocity, the collision energy of oxygen atoms with the surface ( 5 eV) enhances their reactivity and opens additional pathways of their reaction with near-surface layers of materials. Hyperthermal oxygen atom flow causes erosion of the polyimide surface by breaking chemical bonds and forming of volatiles products (primarily, CO and CO _{2}), which leads to mass losses and degradation of material properties. Combined effect of protons and oxygen plasma is expected to give rise to synergistic effects enhancing the destruction of polyimide surface layers. This paper describes experimental investigation of polyimide films sequential irradiation with protons and oxygen plasma. The samples were irradiated by 500 keV protons at fluences of 10 ^{14}-10 ^{16} cm ^{-2} produced with SINP cascade generator KG-500 and 5-20 eV neutral oxygen atoms at fluence of 10 ^{20} cm ^{-2} generated by SINP magnetoplasmodynamics accelerator. The proton bombardment causes the decrease in optical transmission coefficient of samples, but their transmittance recovers partially after the exposure to oxygen plasma. The results of the comparative analysis of polyimide optical transmission spectra, Raman and XPS spectra obtained at different stages of the irradiation of samples, data on mass loss of samples due to erosion of the surface are

  3. Atomic and molecular oxygen adsorbed on (111) transition metal surfaces: Cu and Ni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Moreno, S., E-mail: sinlopez@uacam.mx [Centro de Investigación en Corrosión, Universidad Autónoma de Campeche, Av. Héroe de Nacozari 480, Campeche, Campeche 24029 (Mexico); Romero, A. H. [Physics Department, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States)

    2015-04-21

    Density functional theory is used to investigate the reaction of oxygen with clean copper and nickel [111]-surfaces. We study several alternative adsorption sites for atomic and molecular oxygen on both surfaces. The minimal energy geometries and adsorption energies are in good agreement with previous theoretical studies and experimental data. From all considered adsorption sites, we found a new O{sub 2} molecular precursor with two possible dissociation paths on the Cu(111) surface. Cross barrier energies for the molecular oxygen dissociation have been calculated by using the climbing image nudge elastic band method, and direct comparison with experimental results is performed. Finally, the structural changes and adsorption energies of oxygen adsorbed on surface when there is a vacancy nearby the adsorption site are also considered.

  4. Oxygen Atom Adsorption and Diffusion on Pd Low-index Surfaces and (311) Stepped Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG, Ze-Xin(王泽新); JIA, Xiang-Feng(贾祥凤); TIAN, Feng-Hui(田凤惠); CHEN, Shou-Gang(陈守刚)

    2004-01-01

    The 5-parameter Morse potential (5-MP for short) of the interaction system between an oxygen atom and palladium surface clusters was constructed. The adsorption and diffusion of an oxygen atom on low index surfaces Pd (100), Pd (111), Pd (110) and Pd (311) stepped surface were investigated in detail with 5-MP. It is found that fcc and hcp sites on the (111) surface and (111) microfacets are equivalent. The calculation results show that O atom adsorbs in the three-fold hollow site, and the long-bridge site is a stable site both in regular Pd (110) surface and in the (1×2) missing-row reconstruction structure. Moreover, in the study of O-Pd (311) surface system, We conclude that there are two stable adsorption states (four-fold site: H4, three-fold site: Hh) on O-Pd (311) surface and the three-fold site (Hf) is the metastable adsorption. At low coverage oxygen atom favors the four-fold hollow site (H4).

  5. Atomic oxygen characteristics in a dielectric barrier discharge developed for wound treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldus, Sabrina; Schroeder, Daniel; Schulz-von der Gathen, Volker; Bibinov, Nikita; Awakowicz, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Nowadays, infected chronic wounds are a major problem of society. Atmospheric pressure plasmas like dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) have already shown their ability of improving the wound healing process of chronic wounds in clinical trials. Yet, the mechanism of action is poorly understood. A DBD comprising a single driven electrode is a beneficial configuration for wound treatment. The patient itself functions as the counter electrode. Hence, reactive oxygen species (ROS) like ozone or atomic oxygen produced in the plasma reach the wound directly. Some ROS, including superoxide or nitric oxide, are produced by skin cells to repulse invading bacteria. Nevertheless, a very high amount of ROS leads to oxidative stress and can cause cell damage or even cell death. Therefore it is crucial to have a well characterized plasma for effective wound treatment. Plasma parameters are determined using absolutely calibrated optical emission spectroscopy. Density of atomic oxygen is measured applying xenon-calibrated two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. A simulation of the afterglow chemistry, developed to gain insight in the characteristics of the atomic oxygen and its flux towards the treated surface, is cross-checked with measurement results. Work supported by the German Research Foundation within PAK816.

  6. Rapid Hydrogen and Oxygen Atom Transfer by a High-Valent Nickel-Oxygen Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, Teresa; Draksharapu, Apparao; Padamati, Sandeep K; Gamba, Ilaria; Martin-Diaconescu, Vlad; Acuña-Parés, Ferran; Browne, Wesley R; Company, Anna

    2016-10-05

    Terminal high-valent metal-oxygen species are key reaction intermediates in the catalytic cycle of both enzymes (e.g., oxygenases) and synthetic oxidation catalysts. While tremendous efforts have been directed toward the characterization of the biologically relevant terminal manganese-oxygen and iron-oxygen species, the corresponding analogues based on late-transition metals such as cobalt, nickel or copper are relatively scarce. This scarcity is in part related to the "Oxo Wall" concept, which predicts that late transition metals cannot support a terminal oxido ligand in a tetragonal environment. Here, the nickel(II) complex (1) of the tetradentate macrocyclic ligand bearing a 2,6-pyridinedicarboxamidate unit is shown to be an effective catalyst in the chlorination and oxidation of C-H bonds with sodium hypochlorite as terminal oxidant in the presence of acetic acid (AcOH). Insight into the active species responsible for the observed reactivity was gained through the study of the reaction of 1 with ClO(-) at low temperature by UV-vis absorption, resonance Raman, EPR, ESI-MS, and XAS analyses. DFT calculations aided the assignment of the trapped chromophoric species (3) as a nickel-hypochlorite species. Despite the fact that the formal oxidation state of the nickel in 3 is +4, experimental and computational analysis indicate that 3 is best formulated as a Ni(III) complex with one unpaired electron delocalized in the ligands surrounding the metal center. Most remarkably, 3 reacts rapidly with a range of substrates including those with strong aliphatic C-H bonds, indicating the direct involvement of 3 in the oxidation/chlorination reactions observed in the 1/ClO(-)/AcOH catalytic system.

  7. Mathematical modeling of chemical composition modification and etching of polymers under the atomic oxygen influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirskaia, Natalia; Novikov, Lev; Voronina, Ekaterina

    2016-07-01

    Atomic oxygen (AO) of the upper atmosphere is one of the most important space factors that can cause degradation of spacecraft surface. In our previous mathematical model the Monte Carlo method and the "large particles" approximation were used for simulating processes of polymer etching under the influence of AO [1]. The interaction of enlarged AO particles with the polymer was described in terms of probabilities of reactions such as etching of polymer and specular and diffuse scattering of the AO particles on polymer. The effects of atomic oxygen on protected polymers and microfiller containing composites were simulated. The simulation results were in quite good agreement with the results of laboratory experiments on magnetoplasmadynamic accelerator of the oxygen plasma of SINP MSU [2]. In this paper we present a new model that describes the reactions of AO interactions with polymeric materials in more detail. Reactions of formation and further emission of chemical compounds such as CO, CO _{2}, H _{2}O, etc. cause the modification of the chemical composition of the polymer and change the probabilities of its consequent interaction with the AO. The simulation results are compared with the results of previous simulation and with the results of laboratory experiments. The reasons for the differences between the results of natural experiments on spacecraft, laboratory experiments and simulations are discussed. N. Chirskaya, M. Samokhina, Computer modeling of polymer structures degradation under the atomic oxygen exposure, WDS'12 Proceedings of Contributed Papers: Part III - Physics, Matfyzpress Prague, 2012, pp. 30-35. E. Voronina, L. Novikov, V. Chernik, N. Chirskaya, K. Vernigorov, G. Bondarenko, and A. Gaidar, Mathematical and experimental simulation of impact of atomic oxygen of the earth's upper atmosphere on nanostructures and polymer composites, Inorganic Materials: Applied Research, 2012, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 95-101.

  8. Ground state atomic oxygen in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering: a quantitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britun, Nikolay; Belosludtsev, Alexandr; Silva, Tiago; Snyders, Rony

    2017-02-01

    The ground state density of oxygen atoms in reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges has been studied quantitatively. Both time-resolved and space-resolved measurements were conducted. The measurements were performed using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF), and calibrated by optical emission actinometry with multiple Ar emission lines. The results clarify the dynamics of the O ground state atoms in the discharge afterglow significantly, including their propagation and fast decay after the plasma pulse, as well as the influence of gas pressure, O2 admixture, etc.

  9. Ab initio atomic thermodynamics investigation on oxygen defects in the anatase TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Zhijun [College of Science, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai 200093 (China); Liu, Tingyu, E-mail: liutyyxj@163.com [College of Science, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai 200093 (China); Yang, Chenxing; Gan, Haixiu [College of Science, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai 200093 (China); Chen, Jianyu [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zhang, Feiwu [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)

    2013-01-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three typical oxygen defects under the different annealing conditions have been studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The oxygen vacancy is easier to form at the surface than in the bulk. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adsorption of O{sub 2} whose orientation is parallel to the surface should be more favorable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reduction reaction may firstly undertake at the surface during the annealing treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interstitial oxygen has important contribution to lead to the reduction of the band gap. - Abstract: In the framework of the ab initio atomic thermodynamics, the preliminary analysis of the oxygen defects in anatase TiO{sub 2} has been done by investigating the influence of the annealing treatment under representative conditions on three typical oxygen defects, that is, oxygen vacancy, oxygen adsorption and oxygen interstitial. Our results in this study agree well with the related experimental results. The molecular species of the adsorbed O{sub 2} is subject to the ratio of the number of the O{sub 2} to that of the vacancy, as well as to the initial orientation of O{sub 2} relative to the surface (101). Whatever the annealing condition is, the oxygen vacancy is easier to form at the surface than in the bulk indicating that the reduction reaction may firstly undertake at the surface during the annealing treatment, which is consistent with the phase transformation experiments. The molecular ion, peroxide species, caused by the interstitial oxygen has important contribution to the top of the valence band and lead to the reduction of the band gap.

  10. Neutral oxygen atom density in the MESOX air plasma solar furnace facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balat-Pichelin, Marianne; Vesel, Alenka

    2006-08-01

    The density of neutral oxygen atoms in the MESOX set-up, one device of the PROMES-CNRS solar facilities, was determined by a fiber-optics catalytic probe (FOCP). Plasma was created in a flowing air within a quartz tube with the outer diameter of 5 cm by a 2.45 GHz microwave generator with the output power up to 1000 W. The flow of air was varied between 4 and 20 l/h. The O-atom density was found to increase monotonously with the increasing discharge power, and it decreased with the increasing flow rate. The degree of dissociation of oxygen molecules in the plasma column depended largely on the flow rate. At the air flow of 4 l/h it was about 80% but it decreased to about 20% at the flow of 20 l/h.

  11. Neutral oxygen atom density in the MESOX air plasma solar furnace facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balat-Pichelin, Marianne [CNRS-PROMES, Laboratoire Procedes, Materiaux et Energie Solaire, UPR 8521, 7 rue du four solaire, F-66120 Font Romeu, Odeillo (France)], E-mail: balat@promes.cnrs.fr; Vesel, Alenka [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2006-08-21

    The density of neutral oxygen atoms in the MESOX set-up, one device of the PROMES-CNRS solar facilities, was determined by a fiber-optics catalytic probe (FOCP). Plasma was created in a flowing air within a quartz tube with the outer diameter of 5 cm by a 2.45 GHz microwave generator with the output power up to 1000 W. The flow of air was varied between 4 and 20 l/h. The O-atom density was found to increase monotonously with the increasing discharge power, and it decreased with the increasing flow rate. The degree of dissociation of oxygen molecules in the plasma column depended largely on the flow rate. At the air flow of 4 l/h it was about 80% but it decreased to about 20% at the flow of 20 l/h.

  12. Velocity distribution of carbon and oxygen atoms in front of a tokamak limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogen, P.; Rusbüldt, D.

    1992-12-01

    From the Doppler-broadened emission profiles of a CI line ( 3P 2→ 3P 20, λ=909.5 nm) and of an OI line ( 3P 2,1,0→ 3S 10, λ=844.6 nm), the velocity distribution of carbon and oxygen atoms in front of a graphite limiter has been deduced. For the π-component of the CI line, the Zeeman splitting is negligible, but for the π-components of the OI line, the Paschen-Back effect has to be taken into account. The contribution of chemical and physical sputtering to the release of impurities under various experimental conditions has been investigated at the tip of the limiter. For C atoms, chemical sputtering dominates at low boundary temperatures, and physical sputtering at high temperature. For oxygen, chemical sputtering is always indicated to be the more efficient process.

  13. The Effect of Ash and Inorganic Pigment Fill on the Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Polymers and Paints (ISMSE-12)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Simmons, Julie C.; de Groh, Kim K.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2012-01-01

    Low atomic oxygen fluence (below 1x10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm) exposure of polymers and paints that have a small ash content and/or inorganic pigment fill does not cause a significant difference in erosion yield compared to unfilled (neat) polymers or paints. However, if the ash and/or inorganic pigment content is increased, the surface population of the inorganic content will begin to occupy a significant fraction of the surface area as the atomic oxygen exposure increases because the ash is not volatile and remains as a loosely attached surface layer. This results in a reduction of the flux of atomic oxygen reacting with the polymer and a reduction in the rate of erosion of the polymer remaining. This paper presents the results of ground laboratory and low Earth orbital (LEO) investigations to evaluate the fluence dependence of atomic oxygen erosion yields of polymers and paints having inorganic fill content.

  14. The mystery of gold's chemical activity: local bonding, morphology and reactivity of atomic oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Thomas A; Liu, Xiaoying; Friend, Cynthia M

    2011-01-07

    Recently, gold has been intensely studied as a catalyst for key synthetic reactions. Gold is an attractive catalyst because, surprisingly, it is highly active and very selective for partial oxidation processes suggesting promise for energy-efficient "green" chemistry. The underlying origin of the high activity of Au is a controversial subject since metallic gold is commonly thought to be inert. Herein, we establish that one origin of the high activity for gold catalysis is the extremely reactive nature of atomic oxygen bound in 3-fold coordination sites on metallic gold. This is the predominant form of O at low concentrations on the surface, which is a strong indication that it is most relevant to catalytic conditions. Atomic oxygen bound to metallic Au in 3-fold sites has high activity for CO oxidation, oxidation of olefins, and oxidative transformations of alcohols and amines. Among the factors identified as important in Au-O interaction are the morphology of the surface, the local binding site of oxygen, and the degree of order of the oxygen overlayer. In this Perspective, we present an overview of both theory and experiments that identify the reactive forms of O and their associated charge density distributions and bond strengths. We also analyze and model the release of Au atoms induced by O binding to the surface. This rough surface also has the potential for O(2) dissociation, which is a critical step if Au is to be activated catalytically. We further show the strong parallels between product distributions and reactivity for O-covered Au at low pressure (ultrahigh vacuum) and for nanoporous Au catalysts operating at atmospheric pressure as evidence that atomic O is the active species under working catalytic conditions when metallic Au is present. We briefly discuss the possible contributions of oxidants that may contain intact O-O bonds and of the Au-metal oxide support interface in Au catalysis. Finally, the challenges and future directions for fully

  15. Recommended practices for in-space and ground laboratory. Atomic oxygen exposure and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce; Koontz, Steve; Mccargo, Matt; Pippin, Gary; Rutledge, Sharon

    1992-01-01

    A detailed guide to testing materials for atomic oxygen durability in earth orbit environments is presented. The steps covered include sample preparation, including masking of the sample, dehydration, weighing, and handling; effective fluence prediction, including the use of witness samples (notably Kapton); plasma facility and operational considerations, involving such matters as avoidance of silicone contamination, the use of continuous versus incremental ashing, and temperature of operation; and erosion yield measurement, with calculation methods and protective coating performance indices provided.

  16. Ground-based observations of exoplanet atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ernst Johan Walter de

    2011-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the properties of exoplanet atmospheres. The results for ground-based near-infrared secondary eclipse observations of three different exoplanets, TrES-3b, HAT-P-1b and WASP-33b, are presented which have been obtained with ground-based telescopes as part of the GROUSE project.

  17. Ground-based observations of exoplanet atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ernst Johan Walter de

    2011-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the properties of exoplanet atmospheres. The results for ground-based near-infrared secondary eclipse observations of three different exoplanets, TrES-3b, HAT-P-1b and WASP-33b, are presented which have been obtained with ground-based telescopes as part of the GROUSE project.

  18. Atomic Oxygen Erosion Yield Prediction for Spacecraft Polymers in Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Backus, Jane A.; Manno, Michael V.; Waters, Deborah L.; Cameron, Kevin C.; deGroh, Kim K.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to predict the atomic oxygen erosion yield of polymers based on their chemistry and physical properties has been only partially successful because of a lack of reliable low Earth orbit (LEO) erosion yield data. Unfortunately, many of the early experiments did not utilize dehydrated mass loss measurements for erosion yield determination, and the resulting mass loss due to atomic oxygen exposure may have been compromised because samples were often not in consistent states of dehydration during the pre-flight and post-flight mass measurements. This is a particular problem for short duration mission exposures or low erosion yield materials. However, as a result of the retrieval of the Polymer Erosion and Contamination Experiment (PEACE) flown as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment 2 (MISSE 2), the erosion yields of 38 polymers and pyrolytic graphite were accurately measured. The experiment was exposed to the LEO environment for 3.95 years from August 16, 2001 to July 30, 2005 and was successfully retrieved during a space walk on July 30, 2005 during Discovery s STS-114 Return to Flight mission. The 40 different materials tested (including Kapton H fluence witness samples) were selected specifically to represent a variety of polymers used in space as well as a wide variety of polymer chemical structures. The MISSE 2 PEACE Polymers experiment used carefully dehydrated mass measurements, as well as accurate density measurements to obtain accurate erosion yield data for high-fluence (8.43 1021 atoms/sq cm). The resulting data was used to develop an erosion yield predictive tool with a correlation coefficient of 0.895 and uncertainty of +/-6.3 10(exp -25)cu cm/atom. The predictive tool utilizes the chemical structures and physical properties of polymers to predict in-space atomic oxygen erosion yields. A predictive tool concept (September 2009 version) is presented which represents an improvement over an earlier (December 2008) version.

  19. Additives to reduce susceptibility of thermosets and thermoplastics to erosion from atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orwoll, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    Polymeric materials have many attractive features such as light weight, high strength, and broad applicability in the form of films, fibers, and molded objects. In low earth orbit (LEO), these materials, when exposed on the exterior of the spacecraft, have the serious disadvantage of being susceptible to erosion by atomic oxygen (AO). AO is the most common chemical species at LEO altitudes. AO can be an extremely efficient oxidizing agent as was apparent from the extensive erosion of organic films exposed in STS missions. The mechanism for erosion involves the reaction of oxygen atoms at the surface of the substrate to form small molecular species. The susceptibility of polymeric materials varies with their chemical composition. Films with silicon atoms incorporated in the molecular structures have large coefficients of thermal expansion. This limits their utility. In an alternative approach additives were sought that mix physically and form a protective oxide layer when the film is exposed to AO. A large number of organic compounds containing silicon, germanium, or tin atoms were screened. Most were found to have very limited solubility in the polyetherimide (Ultem) films that were being protected from AO. However, one, bis(triphenyl tin) oxide, (BTO), is miscible in Ultem up to about 25 percent. Films of Ultem polyimide containing up to 25 wt percent BTO were prepared by evaporation of solvent from a solution of Ultem and BTO. The effects of AO on these films were simulated in the oxygen atmosphere of a radio frequency glow-discharge chamber. In the second part of this study, atoms were incorporated in epoxy resins. Experiments are in progress to measure the resistance of films of the cured epoxy to AO in the discharge chamber.

  20. A comparison of carbon depletion on STS-8 with atmospheric atomic oxygen flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triolo, J. [Swales and Associates Inc., 5050 Powder Mill Road, Beltsville, Maryland 20705 (United States); Kruger, R. [Technical Services, 4740 Connecticut Ave. N. W., Washington, District of Columbia 20008 (United States); Chen, P.; Straka, S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

    1996-03-01

    In the early and mid 1980s, there were a number of experiments flown aboard the Space Transportation System (STS) Shuttle to measure contamination accumulation and atomic oxygen erosion effects on various materials. One of these experiments was the Contamination Monitoring Package (CMP), designed and built at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The CMP was a small, easily integrated instrument which basically consisted of a box with four Temperature Controlled Quartz Crystal Microbalances (TQCMs), a tape recorder, and electronics. The CMP flew on several of the early Shuttle missions including STS-3, 8, and 11. The focus of this paper is to present the results of the CMP experiment flown on the STS-8 mission. This CMP mission was designed to measure atomic oxygen erosion of several different materials, including erosion of carbon from a TQCM. This paper presents the data and discusses the results from the STS-8 CMP experiment and seeks to establish a correlation model between predicted atomic oxygen densities and the carbon erosion rates observed during the STS-8 mission. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Atomic Oxygen Erosion Yield Predictive Tool for Spacecraft Polymers in Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, Bruce A.; de Groh, Kim K.; Backus, Jane A.

    2008-01-01

    A predictive tool was developed to estimate the low Earth orbit (LEO) atomic oxygen erosion yield of polymers based on the results of the Polymer Erosion and Contamination Experiment (PEACE) Polymers experiment flown as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment 2 (MISSE 2). The MISSE 2 PEACE experiment accurately measured the erosion yield of a wide variety of polymers and pyrolytic graphite. The 40 different materials tested were selected specifically to represent a variety of polymers used in space as well as a wide variety of polymer chemical structures. The resulting erosion yield data was used to develop a predictive tool which utilizes chemical structure and physical properties of polymers that can be measured in ground laboratory testing to predict the in-space atomic oxygen erosion yield of a polymer. The properties include chemical structure, bonding information, density and ash content. The resulting predictive tool has a correlation coefficient of 0.914 when compared with actual MISSE 2 space data for 38 polymers and pyrolytic graphite. The intent of the predictive tool is to be able to make estimates of atomic oxygen erosion yields for new polymers without requiring expensive and time consumptive in-space testing.

  2. Surface reactions of molecular and atomic oxygen with carbon phosphide films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorham, Justin; Torres, Jessica; Wolfe, Glenn; d'Agostino, Alfred; Fairbrother, D Howard

    2005-11-01

    The surface reactions of atomic and molecular oxygen with carbon phosphide films have been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Carbon phosphide films were produced by ion implantation of trimethylphosphine into polyethylene. Atmospheric oxidation of carbon phosphide films was dominated by phosphorus oxidation and generated a carbon-containing phosphate surface film. This oxidized surface layer acted as an effective diffusion barrier, limiting the depth of phosphorus oxidation within the carbon phosphide film to phosphorus atoms as well as the degree of phosphorus oxidation. For more prolonged AO exposures, a highly oxidized phosphate surface layer formed that appeared to be inert toward further AO-mediated erosion. By utilizing phosphorus-containing hydrocarbon thin films, the phosphorus oxides produced during exposure to AO were found to desorb at temperatures >500 K under vacuum conditions. Results from this study suggest that carbon phosphide films can be used as AO-resistant surface coatings on polymers.

  3. Determination of the neutral oxygen atom density in a plasma reactor loaded with metal samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozetic, Miran; Cvelbar, Uros [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)], E-mail: miran.mozetic@ijs.si

    2009-08-15

    The density of neutral oxygen atoms was determined during processing of metal samples in a plasma reactor. The reactor was a Pyrex tube with an inner diameter of 11 cm and a length of 30 cm. Plasma was created by an inductively coupled radiofrequency generator operating at a frequency of 27.12 MHz and output power up to 500 W. The O density was measured at the edge of the glass tube with a copper fiber optics catalytic probe. The O atom density in the empty tube depended on pressure and was between 4 and 7 x 10{sup 21} m{sup -3}. The maximum O density was at a pressure of about 150 Pa, while the dissociation fraction of O{sub 2} molecules was maximal at the lowest pressure and decreased with increasing pressure. At about 300 Pa it dropped below 10%. The measurements were repeated in the chamber loaded with different metallic samples. In these cases, the density of oxygen atoms was lower than that in the empty chamber. The results were explained by a drain of O atoms caused by heterogeneous recombination on the samples.

  4. Formation of oxides and segregation of mobile atoms during SIMS profiling of Si with oxygen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petravic, M.; Williams, J.S.; Svensson, B.G.; Conway, M. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Research School of Physical Sciences

    1993-12-31

    An oxygen beam is commonly used in secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis to enhance the ionization probability for positive secondary ions. It has been observed, however, that this technique produces in some cases a great degradation of depth resolution. The most pronounced effects have been found for impurities in silicon under oxygen bombardment at angles of incidence smaller than {approx} 30 deg from the surface normal. A new approach is described which involved broadening of SIMS profiles for some mobile atoms, such as Cu, Ni and Au, implanted into silicon. The anomalously large broadening is explained in terms of segregation at a SiO{sub 2}/Si interface formed during bombardment with oxygen at impact angles less than 30 deg. 2 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  5. Study of high coverages of atomic oxygen on the Pt(111) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, D.H.; Bartram, M.E.; Koel, B.E. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (United States))

    1989-01-01

    Atomic oxygen coverages of up to 0.75 monolayer (ML) may be adsorbed cleanly on Pt(111) surfaces under UHV conditions by exposure to NO{sub 2} at 400 K. The authors have studied this adsorbed oxygen layer by using AES, LEED, UPS, HREELS, TPD, and work function ({Delta}{phi}) measurements. The (2{times}2)-O structure formed at {theta}{sub o} = 0.25 ML is still apparent at {theta}{sub o} = 0.60 ML and a faint (2{times}2) pattern persists even up to {theta}{sub o} = 0.75 ML.AES and {Delta}{phi} measurements show no evidence for chemically distinct species in the adlayer as a function of oxygen coverage. HREELS spectra clearly rule out the presence of molecular oxygen and oxide species over the range of oxygen coverage studied. UPS also shows no shift in binding energy of the oxygen-derived peak as the coverage is increased. These spectroscopic probes indicate that all oxygen is present as atomic oxygen with no indication of oxide formation or molecular oxygen at any coverage. Multiple O{sub 2} desorption peaks observed in TPD are interpreted as arising largely from kinetic effects rather than a result of multiple, distinctly different chemical species, even though large changes in the Pt-O bond energy are determined from the TPD data. The activation energy for O{sub 2} desorption reflects the sum of the heat of dissociative adsorption of O{sub 2} and the activation energy for O{sub 2} desorption reflects the sum of the heat of dissociative adsorption of O{sub 2} and the activation energy for O{sub 2} dissociation. The structure in the O{sub 2} TPD spectrum is due to large changes in the activation energy for O{sub 2} desorption resulting from increases in the barrier to dissociative O{sub 2} chemisorption and decreases in the Pt-O bond energy.

  6. Laboratory installation for the study of atomic-oxygen and ozone detectors and certain methodological aspects concerning the determination of oxygen-atom concentration by the methods of NO and NO2 titration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberg, D. V.; Perov, S. P.

    A laboratory installation is described which can be used to study various characteristics of atomic oxygen and ozone in the pressure range from 0.01 to 50 Pa. The installation can be used to calibrate rocketborne sensors intended for measurements in the middle atmosphere. Systematic and random errors connected with the determination of oxygen-atom concentration by the NO2 and NO titration methods are examined.

  7. Chemical reaction of atomic oxygen with evaporated films of copper, part 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromhold, A. T.; Williams, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    Evaporated copper films were exposed to an atomic oxygen flux of 1.4 x 10(exp 17) atoms/sq cm per sec at temperatures in the range 285 to 375 F (140 to 191 C) for time intervals between 2 and 50 minutes. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) was used to determine the thickness of the oxide layers formed and the ratio of the number of copper to oxygen atoms in the layers. Oxide film thicknesses ranged from 50 to 3000 A (0.005 to 0.3 microns, or equivalently, 5 x 10(exp -9) to 3 x 10(exp -7); it was determined that the primary oxide phase was Cu2O. The growth law was found to be parabolic (L(t) varies as t(exp 1/2)), in which the oxide thickness L(t) increases as the square root of the exposure time t. The analysis of the data is consistent with either of the two parabolic growth laws. (The thin-film parabolic growth law is based on the assumption that the process is diffusion controlled, with the space charge within the growing oxide layer being negligible. The thick-film parabolic growth law is also based on a diffusion controlled process, but space-charge neutrality prevails locally within very thick oxides.) In the absence of a voltage measurement across the growing oxide, a distinction between the two mechanisms cannot be made, nor can growth by the diffusion of neutral atomic oxygen be entirely ruled out. The activation energy for the reaction is on the order of 1.1 eV (1.76 x 10(exp -19) joule, or equivalently, 25.3 kcal/mole).

  8. Adsorption of atomic oxygen on PdAg/Pd(111) surface alloys and coadsorption of CO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, Arnold P. [Institute of Surface Chemistry and Catalysis, Ulm University, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Reaction Kinetics Research Group, University of Szeged, Chemical Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Bansmann, Joachim; Diemant, Thomas; Behm, R. Juergen [Institute of Surface Chemistry and Catalysis, Ulm University, D-89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The interaction of dissociated oxygen with structurally well-defined PdAg/Pd(111) surface alloys and the coadsorption of CO was studied by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). After oxygen saturation of the non-modified Pd(111) surface at RT, we observed the formation of a prominent peak in the HREEL spectra at 60 meV corresponding to the perpendicular vibration of oxygen atoms adsorbed in threefold hollow sites. Deposition of small Ag amounts does not change the signal intensity of this peak; it decreases only above 20% Ag. Beyond this Ag content, the peak intensity steeply declines and disappears at around 55-60% Ag. CO coadsorption on the oxygen pre-covered surfaces at 120 K leads to the formation of additional features in HREELS. For a surface alloy with 29% Ag, three loss features due to CO adsorption in on-top, bridge, and threefold-hollow sites can be discriminated already after the lowest CO exposure. Annealing of the co-adsorbed layer to 200 K triggers a decrease of the oxygen concentration due to CO{sub 2} formation. These findings are corroborated by TPD spectra of the CO desorption and CO{sub 2} production.

  9. XPS study of the effect of hydrocarbon contamination on polytetrafluoroethylene (teflon) exposed to atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Morton A.; Wydeven, Theodore; Cormia, Robert D.

    1991-01-01

    The presence of hydrocarbon contamination on the surface of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) markedly affects the oxygen uptake, and hence the wettability, of this polymer when exposed to an oxygen plasma. As revealed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, the oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O/C) for such a polymer can increase sharply, and correspondingly the fluorine-to-carbon ratio (F/C) can decrease sharply, at very short exposure times; at longer times, however, such changes in the O/C and F/C ratios reverse direction, and these ratios then assume values similar to those of the unexposed PTFE. The greater the extent of hydrocarbon contamination in the PTFE, the larger are the amplitudes of the 'spikes' in the O/C- and F/C-exposure time plots. In contrast, a pristine PTFE experiences a very small, monotonic increase of surface oxidation or O/C ratio with time of exposure to oxygen atoms, while the F/C ratio is virtually unchanged from that of the unexposed polymer (2.0). Unless the presence of adventitious hydrocarbon is taken into account, anomalous surface properties relating to polymer adhesion may be improperly ascribed to PTFE exposed to an oxygen plasma.

  10. Active MnO{sub x} electrocatalysts prepared by atomic layer deposition for oxygen evolution and oxygen reduction reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickrahn, Katie L.; Park, Sang Wook; Gorlin, Yelena; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram; Jaramillo, Thomas F.; Bent, Stacey F. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5025 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    The ability to deposit conformal catalytic thin films enables opportunities to achieve complex nanostructured designs for catalysis. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is capable of creating conformal thin films over complex substrates. Here, ALD-MnO{sub x} on glassy carbon is investigated as a catalyst for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), two reactions that are of growing interest due to their many applications in alternative energy technologies. The films are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, ellipsometry, and cyclic voltammetry. The as-deposited films consist of Mn(II)O, which is shown to be a poor catalyst for the ORR, but highly active for the OER. By controllably annealing the samples, Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts with good activity for both the ORR and OER are synthesized. Hypotheses are presented to explain the large difference in the activity between the MnO and Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts for the ORR, but similar activity for the OER, including the effects of surface oxidation under experimental conditions. These catalysts synthesized though ALD compare favorably to the best MnO{sub x} catalysts in the literature, demonstrating a viable way to produce highly active, conformal thin films from earth-abundant materials for the ORR and the OER. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Crossed beam reactive scattering of oxygen atoms and surface scattering studies of gaseous condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibener, S.J.

    1979-09-01

    A high pressure, radio frequency discharge nozzle beam source was developed for the production of very intense (greater than or equal to 10/sup 18/ atoms sr/sup -1/ sec/sup -1/) supersonic beams of oxygen atoms. This source is capable of producing seeded beams of ground state O(/sup 3/P/sub J/) atoms when dilute oxygen-argon mixtures are used, with molecular dissociation levels exceeding 80% being realized for operation at pressures up to 350 torr. When dilute oxygen-helium mixtures are employed both ground state O(/sup 3/P/sub J/) and excited state O(/sup 1/D/sub 2/) atoms are present in the terminal beam, with molecular dissociation levels typically exceeding 60% being achieved for operation at pressures up to 200 torr. Atomic oxygen mean translational energies from 0.14 to 0.50 eV were obtained using the seeded beams technique, with Mach numbers as high as 10 (FWHM ..delta.. v/v approx. = 20%) being realized. The IC1, CF/sub 3/I, C/sub 6/H/sub 6/, and C/sub 6/D/sub 6/ reactions are discussed in detail. The IC1 and CF/sub 3/I studies have enabled us to determine an improved value for the bond energy of the IO radical: D/sub o/(IO) = 55 +- 2 kcal/mole. The IO product angular and velocity distributions have been used to generate center-of-mass flux contour maps, which indicate that these two reactions proceed via relatively long-lived collision complexes whose mean lifetimes are slightly shorter than their respective rotational periods. The O(/sup 3/P/sub J/) + C/sub 6/H/sub 6/ and C/sub 6/D/sub 6/ reactions were studied in order to elucidate the reaction mechanism, and, in particular, to identify the primary reaction products produced in these reactions. Finally, a series of beam-surface scattering experiments are described which examined the internal and translational energy dependence of molecular condensation probabilities for collisions involving either CC1/sub 4/ or SF/sub 6/ and their respective condensed phases. 117 references. (JFP)

  12. Atomic Oxygen Abundance in Molecular Clouds: Absorption Toward Sagittarius B2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis, D. C.; Keene, Jocelyn; Phillips, T. G.; Schilke, P.; Werner, M. W.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2001-01-01

    We have obtained high-resolution (approximately 35 km/s) spectra toward the molecular cloud Sgr B2 at 63 micrometers, the wavelength of the ground-state fine-structure line of atomic oxygen (O(I)), using the ISO-LWS instrument. Four separate velocity components are seen in the deconvolved spectrum, in absorption against the dust continuum emission of Sgr B2. Three of these components, corresponding to foreground clouds, are used to study the O(I) content of the cool molecular gas along the line of sight. In principle, the atomic oxygen that produces a particular velocity component could exist in any, or all, of three physically distinct regions: inside a dense molecular cloud, in the UV illuminated surface layer (PDR) of a cloud, and in an atomic (H(I)) gas halo. For each of the three foreground clouds, we estimate, and subtract from the observed O(I) column density, the oxygen content of the H(I) halo gas, by scaling from a published high-resolution 21 cm spectrum. We find that the remaining O(I) column density is correlated with the observed (13)CO column density. From the slope of this correlation, an average [O(I)]/[(13)CO] ratio of 270 +/- 120 (3-sigma) is derived, which corresponds to [O(I)]/[(13)CO] = 9 for a CO to (13)CO abundance ratio of 30. Assuming a (13)CO abundance of 1x10(exp -6) with respect to H nuclei, we derive an atomic oxygen abundance of 2.7x10(exp -4) in the dense gas phase, corresponding to a 15% oxygen depletion compared to the diffuse ISM in our Galactic neighborhood. The presence of multiple, spectrally resolved velocity components in the Sgr B2 absorption spectrum allows, for the first time, a direct determination of the PDR contribution to the O(I) column density. The PDR regions should contain O(I) but not (13)CO, and would thus be expected to produce an offset in the O(I)-(13)CO correlation. Our data do not show such an offset, suggesting that within our beam O(I) is spatially coexistent with the molecular gas, as traced by (13)CO

  13. Low-Lying Resonance States of Slow Electron Collisions With Atomic Oxygen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴建华; 袁建民

    2003-01-01

    A 39-target state close-coupling calculation of low-energy electron scattering from atomic oxygen is carried out with core-valence electron correlation by using R-matrix method. It is shown that the elastic cross section has a huge and sharp increase with the electron energy going down below 1eV. This remarkable structure is attributed to a few very low-lying potential resonances and the features of these resonances are given with partial cross sections. It is also shown that after considering excitations of two electrons from 2s shell, the three lowest atomic energy levels are in agreement with experimental results better than that just considering excitations of two electrons from the 2p shell as well as only one electron from the 2s shell. Elastic and two excitation (3P → 1 D and 3p → 1S) cross sections are given and compared with the other theoretical and experimental results.

  14. Plasma-photocatalyst interaction: Production of oxygen atoms in a low pressure discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaitella, O.; Gatilova, L.; Rousseau, A.

    2005-04-01

    A pulsed dc low pressure discharge in air (210 Pa) is used to study the mechanisms of activation of a photocatalytic material (TiO2) under plasma exposure. It is first shown that the presence of TiO2 inside the plasma region leads to a strong increase of the reduced electric field. Time resolved measurement of the atomic oxygen density is performed by actinometry during a 10 ms pulse at a low repetition rate (1 Hz) with and without TiO2 pellets inside the plasma region. The presence of TiO2 pellets strongly increases the O atom density during the first millisecond, but this effect saturates for longer exposure times.

  15. A comparative study of atomic oxygen adsorption at Pd surfaces from Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukas, Vanessa J.; Reuter, Karsten

    2017-04-01

    Based on density functional theory, we present a detailed investigation into the on-surface adsorption of atomic oxygen at all three low-index Pd facets in the low-coverage regime. Relying on one consistent computational framework allows for a systematic comparison with respect to surface symmetry, while discerning trends in the adsorption geometries, energies, work functions, and electron densities. We overall find a persisting degree of O-Pd hybridization that is accompanied by minimal charge transfer from the substrate to the adsorbate, thereby resulting in comparable binding energies and diffusion barriers at the three surfaces. Small differences in reactivity are nevertheless reflected in subtle variations of the underlying electronic structure which do not, however, follow the expected order according to atom packing density.

  16. Atomic layer deposition by reaction of molecular oxygen with tetrakisdimethylamido-metal precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provine, J, E-mail: jprovine@stanford.edu; Schindler, Peter; Torgersen, Jan; Kim, Hyo Jin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Karnthaler, Hans-Peter [Physics of Nanostructured Materials, University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Prinz, Fritz B. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Tetrakisdimethylamido (TDMA) based precursors are commonly used to deposit metal oxides such as TiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and HfO{sub 2} by means of chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition (ALD). Both thermal and plasma enhanced ALD (PEALD) have been demonstrated with TDMA-metal precursors. While the reactions of TDMA-type precursors with water and oxygen plasma have been studied in the past, their reactivity with pure O{sub 2} has been overlooked. This paper reports on experimental evaluation of the reaction of molecular oxygen (O{sub 2}) and several metal organic precursors based on TDMA ligands. The effect of O{sub 2} exposure duration and substrate temperature on deposition and film morphology is evaluated and compared to thermal reactions with H{sub 2}O and PEALD with O{sub 2} plasma.

  17. Use of an Atmospheric Atomic Oxygen Beam for Restoration of Defaced Paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Karla, Margaret; Norris, Mary Jo; Real, William A.; Haytas, Christy A.

    1999-01-01

    An atmospheric atomic oxygen beam has been found to be effective in removing organic materials through oxidation that are typical of graffiti or other contaminant defacements which may occur to the surfaces of paintings. The technique, developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, is portable and was successfully used at the Carnegie Museum of Art to remove a lipstick smudge from the surface of porous paint on the Andy Warhol painting "Bathtub." This process was also evaluated for suitability to remove felt tip and ball point ink graffiti from paper, gesso on canvas and cotton canvas.

  18. The photospheric solar oxygen project: I. Abundance analysis of atomic lines and influence of atmospheric models

    CERN Document Server

    Caffau, Elisabetta; Steffen, Matthias; Ayres, Thomas R; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Cayrel, Roger; Freytag, Bernd; Plez, Bertrand

    2008-01-01

    The solar oxygen abundance has undergone a major downward revision in the last decade, the most noticeable one being the update including 3D hydrodynamical simulations to model the solar photosphere. Up to now, such an analysis has been carried out only by one group using one radiation-hydrodynamics code. We investigate the photospheric oxygen abundance considering lines from atomic transitions. We also consider the relationship between the solar model used and the resulting solar oxygen abundance, to understand whether the downward abundance revision is specifically related to 3D hydrodynamical effects. We perform a new determination of the solar photospheric oxygen abundance by analysing different high-resolution high signal-to-noise ratio atlases of the solar flux and disc-centre intensity making use of the latest generation of CO5BOLD 3D solar model atmospheres. We find 8.73 < logNoxygen/Nhydrogen +12 < 8.79. The lower and upper value represent extreme assumptions on the role of collisional excitati...

  19. Accelerated Oxygen Atom Transfer and C-H Bond Oxygenation by Remote Redox Changes in Fe3 Mn-Iodosobenzene Adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, Graham; Carsch, Kurtis M; Gul, Sheraz; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Thompson, Niklas B; Takase, Michael K; Yano, Junko; Agapie, Theodor

    2017-03-24

    We report the synthesis, characterization, and reactivity of [LFe3 (PhPz)3 OMn((s) PhIO)][OTf]x (3: x=2; 4: x=3), where 4 is one of very few examples of iodosobenzene-metal adducts characterized by X-ray crystallography. Access to these rare heterometallic clusters enabled differentiation of the metal centers involved in oxygen atom transfer (Mn) or redox modulation (Fe). Specifically, (57) Fe Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy provided unique insights into how changes in oxidation state (Fe(III)2 Fe(II) Mn(II) vs. Fe(III)3 Mn(II) ) influence oxygen atom transfer in tetranuclear Fe3 Mn clusters. In particular, a one-electron redox change at a distal metal site leads to a change in oxygen atom transfer reactivity by ca. two orders of magnitude.

  20. Exposure of Pt(5 5 3) and Rh(1 1 1) to atomic and molecular oxygen: do defects enhance subsurface oxygen formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Rachael G; Turano, Marie E; Oskorep, Eleanor C N; Wands, Noelle T; Juurlink, Ludo B F; Killelea, Daniel R

    2017-04-26

    Subsurface oxygen is known to form in transition metals, and is thought to be an important aspect of their ability to catalyze chemical reactions. The formation of subsurface oxygen is not, however, equivalent across all catalytically relevant metals. As a result, it is difficult to predict the stability and ease of the formation of subsurface oxygen in metals, as well as how the absorbed oxygen affects the chemical and physical properties of the metal. In comparing how a stepped platinum surface, Pt(5 5 3), responds to exposure to gas-phase oxygen atoms under ultra-high vacuum conditions to planar Rh(1 1 1), we are able to determine what role, if any, steps have on the capacity of a metal for subsurface oxygen formation. Despite the presence of regular defects, we found that only surface-bound oxygen formed on Pt(5 5 3). Alternatively, on the Rh(1 1 1) surface, oxygen readily absorbed into the selvedge of the metal. These results suggest that defects alone are insufficient for the formation of subsurface oxygen, and the ability of the metal to absorb oxygen is the primary factor in the formation and stabilization of subsurface oxygen.

  1. Exposure of Pt(5 5 3) and Rh(1 1 1) to atomic and molecular oxygen: do defects enhance subsurface oxygen formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Rachael G.; Turano, Marie E.; Oskorep, Eleanor C. N.; Wands, Noelle T.; Juurlink, Ludo B. F.; Killelea, Daniel R.

    2017-04-01

    Subsurface oxygen is known to form in transition metals, and is thought to be an important aspect of their ability to catalyze chemical reactions. The formation of subsurface oxygen is not, however, equivalent across all catalytically relevant metals. As a result, it is difficult to predict the stability and ease of the formation of subsurface oxygen in metals, as well as how the absorbed oxygen affects the chemical and physical properties of the metal. In comparing how a stepped platinum surface, Pt(5 5 3), responds to exposure to gas-phase oxygen atoms under ultra-high vacuum conditions to planar Rh(1 1 1), we are able to determine what role, if any, steps have on the capacity of a metal for subsurface oxygen formation. Despite the presence of regular defects, we found that only surface-bound oxygen formed on Pt(5 5 3). Alternatively, on the Rh(1 1 1) surface, oxygen readily absorbed into the selvedge of the metal. These results suggest that defects alone are insufficient for the formation of subsurface oxygen, and the ability of the metal to absorb oxygen is the primary factor in the formation and stabilization of subsurface oxygen.

  2. Electron ionization of metastable nitrogen and oxygen atoms in relation to the auroral emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Siddharth; Joshipura, K. N.

    Atomic and molecular excited metastable states (EMS) are exotic systems due to their special properties like long radiative life-time, large size (average radius) and large polarizability along with relatively smaller first ionization energy compared to their respective ground states (GS). The present work includes our theoretical calculations on electron impact ionization of metastable atomic states N( (2) P), N( (2) D) of nitrogen and O( (1) S), O( (1) D) of oxygen. The targets of our present interest, are found to be present in our Earth's ionosphere and they play an important role in auroral emissions observed in Earth’s auroral regions [1] as also in the emissions observed from cometary coma [2, 3] and airglow emissions. In particular, atomic oxygen in EMS can radiate, the visible O( (1) D -> (3) P) doublet 6300 - 6364 Å red doublet, the O( (1) S -> (1) D) 5577 Å green line, and the ultraviolet O( (1) S -> (3) P) 2972 Å line. For metastable atomic nitrogen one observes the similar emissions, in different wavelengths, from (2) D and (2) P states. At the Earth's auroral altitudes, from where these emissions take place in the ionosphere, energetic electrons are also present. In particular, if the metastable N as well as O atoms are ionized by the impact of electrons then these species are no longer available for emissions. This is a possible loss mechanism, and hence it is necessary to analyze the importance of electron ionization of the EMS of atomic O and N, by calculating the relevant cross sections. In the present paper we investigate electron ionization of the said metastable species by calculating relevant total cross sections. Our quantum mechanical calculations are based on projected approximate ionization contribution in the total inelastic cross sections [4]. Detailed results and discussion along with the significance of these calculations will be presented during the COSPAR-2014. References [1] A.Bhardwaj, and G. R. Gladstone, Rev. Geophys., 38

  3. Prediction of CO Cameron band and atomic oxygen visible emissions in comets C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) and 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuram, S.; Bhardwaj, A.

    2014-04-01

    The forbidden emissions of cometary species have special importance in the cometary spectra. The excited species which produce these forbidden emissions can not be populated by direct solar radiation excitation. These metastable species are produced mainly from dissociative excitation and ion-electron recombination reactions. Thus the observed emissions have been used as tracers of parent cometary species. The CO (a3 -X1) is a forbidden transition which produces Cameron band emission in the ultraviolet region during dissociative excitation of CObearing neutrals and the dissociative recombination of CO-ionic species in the cometary coma. Similarly, the forbidden transitions of metastable atomic oxygen 1S-3P (green, 5577 Å), and 1D-3P (red-doublet, 6300 and 6364 Å) produce line emissions in the visible region. These emissions have been used to probe H2O and CO2 abundances in the comets. We have developed a coupled chemistry-emission model to study various production and loss mechanisms of these excited metastable states. The model is applied to comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) which will have a close fly-by of Mars during mid October, 2014, when Indian Mars orbiter Mission and NASA's Maven, would be orbiting the planet. The model is also applied on ESA's Rosetta mission target comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko which will be useful for different observations over various heliocentric distances. The predicted intensities and quantitative analysis of these emissions can be a theoretical support for various space and ground-based observations.

  4. MISSE 2 PEACE Polymers Experiment Atomic Oxygen Erosion Yield Error Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Catherine E.; Banks, Bruce A.; deGroh, Kim, K.

    2010-01-01

    Atomic oxygen erosion of polymers in low Earth orbit (LEO) poses a serious threat to spacecraft performance and durability. To address this, 40 different polymer samples and a sample of pyrolytic graphite, collectively called the PEACE (Polymer Erosion and Contamination Experiment) Polymers, were exposed to the LEO space environment on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS) for nearly 4 years as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment 1 & 2 (MISSE 1 & 2). The purpose of the PEACE Polymers experiment was to obtain accurate mass loss measurements in space to combine with ground measurements in order to accurately calculate the atomic oxygen erosion yields of a wide variety of polymeric materials exposed to the LEO space environment for a long period of time. Error calculations were performed in order to determine the accuracy of the mass measurements and therefore of the erosion yield values. The standard deviation, or error, of each factor was incorporated into the fractional uncertainty of the erosion yield for each of three different situations, depending on the post-flight weighing procedure. The resulting error calculations showed the erosion yield values to be very accurate, with an average error of 3.30 percent.

  5. Shock-tube measurements of excited oxygen atoms using cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nations, Marcel; Wang, Shengkai; Goldenstein, Christopher S; Sun, Kai; Davidson, David F; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K

    2015-10-10

    We report the use of cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) using two distributed feedback diode lasers near 777.2 and 844.6 nm for sensitive, time-resolved, in situ measurements of excited-state populations of atomic oxygen in a shock tube. Here, a 1% O2/Ar mixture was shock-heated to 5400-8000 K behind reflected shock waves. The combined use of a low-finesse cavity, fast wavelength scanning of the lasers, and an off-axis alignment enabled measurements with 10 μs time response and low cavity noise. The CEAS absorption gain factors of 104 and 142 for the P35←S520 (777.2 nm) and P0,1,23←S310 (844.6 nm) atomic oxygen transitions, respectively, significantly improved the detection sensitivity over conventional single-pass measurements. This work demonstrates the potential of using CEAS to improve shock-tube studies of nonequilibrium electronic-excitation processes at high temperatures.

  6. Photochemistry of atomic oxygen green and red-doublet emissions in comets at larger heliocentric distances

    CERN Document Server

    Raghuram, Susarla

    2014-01-01

    In comets the atomic oxygen green to red-doublet emission intensity ratio (G/R ratio) of 0.1 has been used to confirm H$_2$O as the parent species producing oxygen emission lines. The larger ($>$0.1) value of G/R ratio observed in a few comets is ascribed to the presence of higher CO$_2$ and CO relative abundances in the cometary coma. We aim to study the effect of CO$_2$ and CO relative abundances on the observed G/R ratio in comets observed at large ($>$2 au) heliocentric distances by accounting for important production and loss processes of O($^1$S) and O($^1$D) in the cometary coma. Recently we have developed a coupled chemistry-emission model to study photochemistry of O($^1$S) and O($^1$D) atoms and the production of green and red-doublet emissions in comets Hyakutake and Hale-Bopp. In the present work we applied the model to six comets where green and red-doublet emissions are observed when they are beyond 2 au from the Sun. In a water-dominated cometary coma and with significant ($>$10%) CO$_2$ relati...

  7. Leveling coatings for reducing the atomic oxygen defect density in protected graphite fiber epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Degroh, K. K.; Podojil, G.; Mccollum, T.; Anzic, J.

    1992-01-01

    Pinholes or other defect sites in a protective oxide coating provide pathways for atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit to reach underlying material. One concept for enhancing the lifetime of materials in low Earth orbits is to apply a leveling coating to the material prior to applying any reflective and protective coatings. Using a surface tension leveling coating concept, a low viscosity epoxy was applied to the surface of several composite coupons. A protective layer of 1000 A of SiO2 was deposited on top of the leveling coating, and the coupons were exposed to an atomic oxygen environment in a plasma asher. Pinhole populations per unit area were estimated by counting the number of undercut sites observed by scanning electron microscopy. Defect density values of 180,000 defects/sq cm were reduced to about 1000 defects/sq cm as a result of the applied leveling coating. These improvements occur at a mass penalty of about 2.5 mg/sq cm.

  8. Model for Atomic Oxygen Visible Line Emissions in Comet C/1995 O1 Hale-Bopp

    CERN Document Server

    Raghuram, Susarla

    2012-01-01

    We have recently developed a coupled chemistry-emission model for the green and red-doublet emissions of atomic oxygen on comet Hyakutake. In the present work we applied our model to comet Hale-Bopp, which had an order of magnitude higher H2O production rate than comet Hyakutake, to evaluate the photochemistry associated with the production and loss of O(1S) and O(1D) atoms and emission processes of green and red-doublet lines. We present the wavelength-dependent photo-attenuation rates for different photodissociation processes forming O(1S) and O(1D). The calculated radiative efficiency profiles of O(1S) and O(1D) atoms show that in comet Hale-Bopp the green and red-doublet emissions are emitted mostly above radial distances of 10^3 and 10^4 km, respectively. The model calculated [OI] 6300 A emission surface brightness and average intensity over the Fabry-P{\\'e}rot spectrometer field of view are consistent with the observation of Morgenthaler et al. (2001), while the intensity ratio of green to red-doublet e...

  9. Fresnel zones for ground-based antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J. Bach

    1964-01-01

    The ordinary Fresnel zone concept is modified to include the influence of finite ground conductivity. This is important for ground-based antennas because the influence on the radiation pattern of irregularities near the antenna is determined by the amplitude and phase of the groundwave. A new...

  10. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement unce...

  11. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Yordanova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement unce...

  12. Downward diffusive transport velocity of atomic oxygen 80-110 km, and inferences of wave effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, G. R.

    2016-12-01

    The distribution of atomic oxygen in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere (80-120 km) is characterized by molecular diffusion transport above 100 km, and mixing processes including turbulence below. Considering O is produced by photo-dissociation in the 140 km altitude region and lost in the upper mesosphere by chemical recombination, the total transport of O between the production and loss regimes must be consistent. Recombination O loss chemistry using densities from SABER drives a downward transport velocity of 1.0 cm s-1, at 95 km, peaking 4.5 cm s -1 near 83 km. The shape of the altitude profile of O transport velocity suggests mechanisms for the transport processes including damped AGWs and tides.

  13. Modified polymeric materials for durability in the atomic oxygen space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, R. L.; Anderson, R. A.; Kim, M.-H. Y.; Thibeault, S. A.

    2003-08-01

    Organometallic compounds have been incorporated into organic polymers to improve their durability to the environment of the low earth orbit (LEO), particularly their resistance to erosion by atomic oxygen (AO). Bis(triphenyltin) oxide (BTO) was added to a thermoplastic polyetherimide, Ultem, and exposed on the Mir space station. The addition of the BTO to Ultem significantly reduced the mass loss in LEO. Aluminum acetylacetonate was added to a thermoset, PMDA-ODA polyimide. that is currently deployed on the International Space Station. Two films are placed in the ram direction exposed to AO and space radiation. Three films are placed in the wake direction and are exposed to space radiation but not AO. The doped films show superior resistance to AO.

  14. Chemical reactivity of hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen atoms at temperatures below 100 k

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgee, H. A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The synthesis of unusual compounds by techniques employing cryogenic cooling to retard their very extreme reactivity was investigated. Examples of such species that were studied are diimide (N2H2), cyclobutadiene (C4H4), cyclopropanone (C3H4O), oxirene (C2H2O), and many others. Special purpose cryogenically cooled inlet arrangements were designed such that the analyses incurred no warm-up of the cold, and frequently explosively unstable, compounds. Controlled energy electron impact techniques were used to measure critical potentials and to develop the molecular energetics and thermodynamics of these molecules and to gain some insight into their kinetic characteristics as well. Three and four carbon strained ring molecules were studied. Several reactions of oxygen and hydrogen atoms with simple molecules of H, N, C, and O in hard quench configurations were studied. And the quench stabilization of BH3 was explored as a model system in cryochemistry.

  15. Protective coating and hyperthermal atomic oxygen texturing of optical fibers used for blood glucose monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of producing cones and pillars on polymethylmethacralate (PMMA) optical fibers for glucose monitoring. The method, in one embodiment, consists of using electron beam evaporation to deposit a non-contiguous thin film of aluminum on the distal ends of the PMMA fibers. The partial coverage of aluminum on the fibers is randomly, but rather uniformly distributed across the end of the optical fibers. After the aluminum deposition, the ends of the fibers are then exposed to hyperthermal atomic oxygen, which oxidizes the areas that are not protected by aluminum. The resulting PMMA fibers have a greatly increased surface area and the cones or pillars are sufficiently close together that the cellular components in blood are excluded from passing into the valleys between the cones and pillars. The optical fibers are then coated with appropriated surface chemistry so that they can optically sense the glucose level in the blood sample than that with conventional glucose monitoring.

  16. Behavior of pure and modified carbon/carbon composites in atomic oxygen environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-chong Liu; Lai-fei Cheng; Li-tong Zhang; Xin-gang Luan; Hui Mei

    2014-01-01

    Atomic oxygen (AO) is considered the most erosive particle to spacecraft materials in low earth orbit (LEO). Carbon fiber, car-bon/carbon (C/C), and some modified C/C composites were exposed to a simulated AO environment to investigate their behaviors in LEO. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), AO erosion rate calculation, and mechanical property testing were used to characterize the material properties. Results show that the carbon fiber and C/C specimens undergo significant degradation under the AO bombing. According to the effects of AO on C/C-SiC and CVD-SiC-coated C/C, a condensed CVD-SiC coat is a feasible approach to protect C/C composites from AO degradation.

  17. Atomic structure and oxygen deficiency of the ultrathin aluminium oxide barrier in Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lunjie; Tran, Dung Trung; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Svensson, Gunnar; Olsson, Eva

    2016-07-01

    Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions are the building blocks of a wide range of superconducting quantum devices that are key elements for quantum computers, extremely sensitive magnetometers and radiation detectors. The properties of the junctions and the superconducting quantum devices are determined by the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. The nanoscale dimension and disordered nature of the barrier oxide have been challenges for the direct experimental investigation of the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. Here we show that the miniaturized dimension of the barrier and the interfacial interaction between crystalline Al and amorphous AlOx give rise to oxygen deficiency at the metal/oxide interfaces. In the interior of the barrier, the oxide resembles the atomic structure of bulk aluminium oxide. Atomic defects such as oxygen vacancies at the interfaces can be the origin of the two-level systems and contribute to decoherence and noise in superconducting quantum circuits.

  18. Atomic structure and oxygen deficiency of the ultrathin aluminium oxide barrier in Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lunjie; Tran, Dung Trung; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Svensson, Gunnar; Olsson, Eva

    2016-07-12

    Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions are the building blocks of a wide range of superconducting quantum devices that are key elements for quantum computers, extremely sensitive magnetometers and radiation detectors. The properties of the junctions and the superconducting quantum devices are determined by the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. The nanoscale dimension and disordered nature of the barrier oxide have been challenges for the direct experimental investigation of the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. Here we show that the miniaturized dimension of the barrier and the interfacial interaction between crystalline Al and amorphous AlOx give rise to oxygen deficiency at the metal/oxide interfaces. In the interior of the barrier, the oxide resembles the atomic structure of bulk aluminium oxide. Atomic defects such as oxygen vacancies at the interfaces can be the origin of the two-level systems and contribute to decoherence and noise in superconducting quantum circuits.

  19. Faster oxygen atom transfer catalysis with a tungsten dioxo complex than with its molybdenum analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumuganathan, T; Mayilmurugan, Ramasamy; Volpe, Manuel; Mösch-Zanetti, Nadia C

    2011-08-21

    The synthesis and characterization of a series of molybdenum ([MoO(2)Cl(L(n))]; L(1) (1), L(2) (3)) and tungsten ([WO(2)Cl(L(n))]; L(1) (2), L(2) (4)) dioxo complexes (L(1) = 1-methyl-4-(2-hydroxybenzyl)-1,4-diazepane and L(2) = 1-methyl-4-(2-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butylbenzyl)-1,4-diazepane) of tridentate aminomonophenolate ligands HL(1) and HL(2) are reported. The ligands were obtained by reductive amination of 1-methyl-1,4-diazepane with the corresponding aldehyde. Complexes 3 and 4 were obtained by the reaction of [MO(2)Cl(2)(dme)(n)] (M = Mo, n = 0; W, n = 1) with the corresponding ligand in presence of a base, whereas for the preparation of 1 and 2 the ligands were deprotonated by KH prior to the addition to the metal. They were characterized by NMR and IR spectroscopy, by cyclic voltammetry, mass spectrometry, elemental analysis and by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Solid-state structures of the molybdenum and tungsten cis-dioxo complexes reveal hexa-coordinate metal centers surrounded by two oxo groups, a chloride ligand and by the tridentate monophenolate ligand which coordinates meridionally through its [ONN] donor set. In the series of compounds 1-4, complexes 3 and 4 have been used as catalysts for the oxygen atom transfer reaction between dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and trimethyl phosphine (PMe(3)). Surprisingly, faster oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reactivity has been observed for the tungsten complex [WO(2)Cl(L(2))] (4) in comparison to its molybdenum analog [MoO(2)Cl(L(2))] (3) at room temperature. The kinetic results are discussed and compared in terms of their reactivity. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  20. The effect of atomic oxygen for the hollow-cathode in a 20 mN class ion thruster

    OpenAIRE

    長野, 寛; 早川, 幸男; 稲永, 康隆; 尾崎, 敏之; 首藤, 和雄; NAGANO, Hiroshi; Hayakawa, Yukio; Inanaga, Yasutaka; Ozaki, Toshiyuki; Shuto, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    The super-low earth orbits under the altitude of 250 km are very attractive for earth and atmospheric observation. JAXA plans to launch the first test satellite in super-low altitude called SLATS. Such satellites use ion thrusters to compensate for air drag and keep their altitude. However, there are a lot of atomic oxygen in super-low earth orbit. The dispenser cathodes generally show degradation by oxidation. Therefore, the effect of atomic oxygen for the hollow-cathode was evaluated here. ...

  1. Oxygen atom transfer reactions from Mimoun complexes to sulfides and sulfoxides. A bonding evolution theory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Navarrete, Patricio; Sensato, Fabricio R; Andrés, Juan; Longo, Elson

    2014-08-07

    In this research, a comprehensive theoretical investigation has been conducted on oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reactions from Mimoun complexes to sulfides and sulfoxides. The joint use of the electron localization function (ELF) and Thom's catastrophe theory (CT) provides a powerful tool to analyze the evolution of chemical events along a reaction pathway. The progress of the reaction has been monitored by structural stability domains from ELF topology while the changes between them are controlled by turning points derived from CT which reveal that the reaction mechanism can be separated in several steps: first, a rupture of the peroxo O1-O2 bond, then a rearrangement of lone pairs of the sulfur atom occurs and subsequently the formation of S-O1 bond. The OAT process involving the oxidation of sulfides and sulfoxides is found to be an asynchronous process where O1-O2 bond breaking and S-O1 bond formation processes do not occur simultaneously. Nucleophilic/electrophilic characters of both dimethyl sulfide and dimethyl sulfoxide, respectively, are sufficiently described by our results, which hold the key to unprecedented insight into the mapping of electrons that compose the bonds while the bonds change.

  2. Three-dimensional evaluation of gettering ability for oxygen atoms at small-angle tilt boundaries in Czochralski-grown silicon crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Yutaka, E-mail: yutakaohno@imr.tohoku.ac.jp; Inoue, Kaihei; Fujiwara, Kozo; Deura, Momoko; Kutsukake, Kentaro; Yonenaga, Ichiro [Institute for Materials Research (IMR), Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Shimizu, Yasuo; Inoue, Koji; Ebisawa, Naoki; Nagai, Yasuyoshi [The Oarai Center, IMR, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan)

    2015-06-22

    Three-dimensional distribution of oxygen atoms at small-angle tilt boundaries (SATBs) in Czochralski-grown p-type silicon ingots was investigated by atom probe tomography combined with transmission electron microscopy. Oxygen gettering along edge dislocations composing SATBs, post crystal growth, was observed. The gettering ability of SATBs would depend both on the dislocation strain and on the dislocation density. Oxygen atoms would agglomerate in the atomic sites under the tensile hydrostatic stress larger than about 2.0 GPa induced by the dislocations. It was suggested that the density of the atomic sites, depending on the tilt angle of SATBs, determined the gettering ability of SATBs.

  3. Adsorption and diffusion of atomic oxygen and sulfur at pristine and doped Ni surfaces with implications for stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrov, Vitaly; Sushko, Maria L.; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2016-12-01

    A density-functional-theory modeling study of atomic oxygen/sulfur adsorption and diffusion at pristine and doped Ni(111) and (110) surfaces is presented. We find that oxygen and sulfur feature comparable adsorption energies over the same surface sites, however, the surface diffusion of sulfur is characterized by an activation barrier about one half that of oxygen. Calculations with different alloying elements at Ni surfaces show that Cr strongly enhances surface binding of both species in comparison to Al. These results in combination with previous modeling studies help explain the observed differences in selective grain boundary oxidation mechanisms of Ni-Cr and Ni-Al alloys.

  4. Effect of oxygen atoms dissociated by non-equilibrium plasma on flame of methane oxygen and argon pre-mixture gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Haruaki; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Sasaki, Koichi

    2014-10-01

    For more efficient way of combustion, plasma-assisted combustion has been investigated by many researchers. But it is very difficult to clarify the effect of plasma even on the flame of methane. Because there are many complex chemical reactions in combustion system. Sasaki et al. has reported that the flame length of methane and air premixed burner shortened by irradiating microwave power. They also measured emission from Second Positive Band System of nitrogen during the irradiation. The emission indicates existence of high energy electrons which are accelerated by the microwave. The high energy electrons also dissociate oxygen molecules easily and oxygen atom would have some effects on the flame. But the dissociation ratio of oxygen molecules by the non-equilibrium plasma is significantly low, compared to that in the combustion reaction. To clarify the effect of dissociated oxygen atoms on the flame, dependence of dissociation ratio of oxygen on the flame has been examined using CHEMKIN. It is found that in the case of low dissociation ratio of 10-6, the ignition of the flame becomes slightly earlier. It is also found that in the case of high dissociation ratio of 10-3, the ignition time becomes significantly earlier by almost half. This work was supported by KAKENHI (22340170).

  5. Space and Ground-Based Infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weems, Jon; Zell, Martin

    This chapter deals first with the main characteristics of the space environment, outside and inside a spacecraft. Then the space and space-related (ground-based) infrastructures are described. The most important infrastructure is the International Space Station, which holds many European facilities (for instance the European Columbus Laboratory). Some of them, such as the Columbus External Payload Facility, are located outside the ISS to benefit from external space conditions. There is only one other example of orbital platforms, the Russian Foton/Bion Recoverable Orbital Capsule. In contrast, non-orbital weightless research platforms, although limited in experimental time, are more numerous: sounding rockets, parabolic flight aircraft, drop towers and high-altitude balloons. In addition to these facilities, there are a number of ground-based facilities and space simulators, for both life sciences (for instance: bed rest, clinostats) and physical sciences (for instance: magnetic compensation of gravity). Hypergravity can also be provided by human and non-human centrifuges.

  6. Development of Ground-Based Plant Sentinels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    plants in response to different strains of Pseudomonas syringae. Planta . 217:767-775. De Moraes CM, Schultz JC, Mescher MC, Tumlinson JH. (2004...09-30-2004 Final Technical _ April 2001 - April 2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Developing Plants as Ground-based Sentinels 5b. GRANT...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 9 "Z Plants emit volatile mixes characteristic of exposure to both plant and animal (insect) pathogens (bacteria and fungi). The

  7. Illumination compensation in ground based hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Alexander; Underwood, James

    2017-07-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has emerged as an important tool for analysing vegetation data in agricultural applications. Recently, low altitude and ground based hyperspectral imaging solutions have come to the fore, providing very high resolution data for mapping and studying large areas of crops in detail. However, these platforms introduce a unique set of challenges that need to be overcome to ensure consistent, accurate and timely acquisition of data. One particular problem is dealing with changes in environmental illumination while operating with natural light under cloud cover, which can have considerable effects on spectral shape. In the past this has been commonly achieved by imaging known reference targets at the time of data acquisition, direct measurement of irradiance, or atmospheric modelling. While capturing a reference panel continuously or very frequently allows accurate compensation for illumination changes, this is often not practical with ground based platforms, and impossible in aerial applications. This paper examines the use of an autonomous unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) to gather high resolution hyperspectral imaging data of crops under natural illumination. A process of illumination compensation is performed to extract the inherent reflectance properties of the crops, despite variable illumination. This work adapts a previously developed subspace model approach to reflectance and illumination recovery. Though tested on a ground vehicle in this paper, it is applicable to low altitude unmanned aerial hyperspectral imagery also. The method uses occasional observations of reference panel training data from within the same or other datasets, which enables a practical field protocol that minimises in-field manual labour. This paper tests the new approach, comparing it against traditional methods. Several illumination compensation protocols for high volume ground based data collection are presented based on the results. The findings in this paper are

  8. Ground based spectroscopy of hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Ingo

    2010-05-01

    It has been shown in recent years with great success that spectroscopy of exoplanetary atmospheres is feasible using space based observatories such as the HST and Spitzer. However, with the end of the Spitzer cold-phase, space based observations in the near to mid infra-red are limited, which will remain true until the the onset of the JWST. The importance of developing methods of ground based spectroscopic analysis of known hot Jupiters is therefore apparent. In the past, various groups have attempted exoplanetary spectroscopy using ground based facilities and various techniques. Here I will present results using a novel spectral retrieval method for near to mid infra-red emission and transmission spectra of exoplanetary atmospheres taken from the ground and discuss the feasibility of future ground-based spectroscopy in a broader context. My recently commenced PhD project is under the supervision of Giovanna Tinetti (University College London) and in collaboration with J. P. Beaulieu (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris), Mark Swain and Pieter Deroo (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech).

  9. A reaction-diffusion model for atomic oxygen interacting with spacecraft surface protective materials in low earth orbit environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN LaiWen; WANG JingHua; LEE Chun-Hian

    2009-01-01

    When hyperthermal atomic oxygen collides with a silicon surface, an ultrathin oxidation regime characterized by fractional atomic-oxygen anions having low diffusive and reactive barriers, along with their enhanced diffusion due to both the electric field and image potential, will form on the surface. In accordance with these properties, an attempt was made in the present study to modify the AlmeidaGoncalves-Baumvol (AGB) model by setting the diffusivity and reaction rate constant to be diffusion-length dependence. According to the modified model, numerical parametric studies for oxidation thin growth were performed. The dependencies of the diffusion coefficient, the reaction rate constant,the attenuation length, and the adjustable parameter upon the translational kinetic energy, flux, temperature, and tangential flux of atomic oxygen were analyzed briefly via the fitting of the experimental data given by Tagawa et al. The numerical results confirmed the rationality of the modified diffusion-reaction model. The model together with the computer code developed in this study would be a useful tool for thickness evaluation of the protective film against the oxidation of atomic oxygen toward spacecraft surface materials in LEO environment.

  10. A reaction-diffusion model for atomic oxygen interacting with spacecraft surface protective materials in low earth orbit environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEE; Chun-Hian

    2009-01-01

    When hyperthermal atomic oxygen collides with a silicon surface, an ultrathin oxidation regime characterized by fractional atomic-oxygen anions having low diffusive and reactive barriers, along with their enhanced diffusion due to both the electric field and image potential, will form on the surface. In ac- cordance with these properties, an attempt was made in the present study to modify the Almeida- Goncalves-Baumvol (AGB) model by setting the diffusivity and reaction rate constant to be diffu- sion-length dependence. According to the modified model, numerical parametric studies for oxidation thin growth were performed. The dependencies of the diffusion coefficient, the reaction rate constant, the attenuation length, and the adjustable parameter upon the translational kinetic energy, flux, tem- perature, and tangential flux of atomic oxygen were analyzed briefly via the fitting of the experimental data given by Tagawa et al. The numerical results confirmed the rationality of the modified diffu- sion-reaction model. The model together with the computer code developed in this study would be a useful tool for thickness evaluation of the protective film against the oxidation of atomic oxygen toward spacecraft surface materials in LEO environment.

  11. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Atomic Oxygen Measurements in Short Pulse Discharges by Two Photon Laser Induced Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempert, Walter; Uddi, Mruthunjaya; Mintusov, Eugene; Jiang, Naibo; Adamovich, Igor

    2007-10-01

    Two Photon Laser Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) is used to measure time-dependent absolute oxygen atom concentrations in O2/He, O2/N2, and CH4/air plasmas produced with a 20 nanosecond duration, 20 kV pulsed discharge at 10 Hz repetition rate. Xenon calibrated spectra show that a single discharge pulse creates initial oxygen dissociation fraction of ˜0.0005 for air like mixtures at 40-60 torr total pressure. Peak O atom concentration is a factor of approximately two lower in fuel lean (φ=0.5) methane/air mixtures. In helium buffer, the initially formed atomic oxygen decays monotonically, with decay time consistent with formation of ozone. In all nitrogen containing mixtures, atomic oxygen concentrations are found to initially increase, for time scales on the order of 10-100 microseconds, due presumably to additional O2 dissociation caused by collisions with electronically excited nitrogen. Further evidence of the role of metastable N2 is demonstrated from time-dependent N2 2^nd Positive and NO Gamma band emission spectroscopy. Comparisons with modeling predictions show qualitative, but not quantitative, agreement with the experimental data.

  12. ESCA study of the effect of hydrocarbon contamination on poly(tetrafluoroethylene) exposed to atomic oxygen plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Morton A.; Wydeven, Theodore; Cormia, Robert D.

    1991-01-01

    The ESCA spectra and data obtained by Morra et al. (1989) on poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) exposed to atomic oxygen plasma are closely reexamined. It is shown that the spikes observed in Morra et al. plots of O/C or F/C versus time of the exposure of PTFE to atomic oxygen plasma were not characteristic of PTFE per se but were instead a result of a contamination by hydrocarbon present in their PTFE samples. This was demonstrated experimentally by comparing data derived for a very clean PTFE sample exposed for 10, 20, and 30 min to oxygen plasma with data obtained on PTFE samples with very small amounts of hydrocarbon contamination.

  13. Inference of atomic oxygen concentration from remote sensing of optical aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, M. G.; McConnell, J. C.; Tobiska, W. K.; Gladstone, G. R.; Chakrabarti, S.; Schmidtke, G.

    1995-09-01

    A remote sensing method has been developed for the determination of the [O]/[O-MSIS] ratio in aurora, using ratios of the O I (557.7 nm) and N+2 (391.4 nm) emissions. It is shown that the method can be used for the analysis of measurements integrated along the line of sight, provided data only above the emission rate peak are used. The method is applied to the case of horizontal viewing from a vertically oriented rocket so that a large volume of space was sampled around the rocket. The method can potentially be applied to satellite limb images, provided some independent information about the location of the aurora is available, as it was for the rocket observations. Photometric measurements of the N+2 (391.4 nm) and O I (557.7 nm) emissions obtained during the Energy Budget Campaign 1980 on flight E-2 with the instrument EF11 and its reflight in 1981 were used in the analysis presented. During the first flight the rocket horizontally viewed two distinct aurorae, a nearby diffuse patch, and a more distant pulsating aurora. Results obtained by the same EF11 instrument on a second flight through an auroral arc in 1981 are also presented. Two types of atomic oxygen variability were found in both of the flights. In the first type, [O] is increased above [O-MSIS] by a factor of 1.5 at 180 km, is equal to the MSIS model at 160 km, and is less than MSIS below that; that is, the scale height of [O] was increased. The experimental I(557.7)/I(391.4) ratio was constant with altitude. In the second type, the [O] was depleted by about a factor of 2 over the altitude range of 120-180 km, while the I(557.7)/I(391.4) ratio decreased with altitude. The inferred atomic oxygen concentrations of 0.5 to 2 with respect to MSIS suggested different vertical flows on the two cases. Independent evidence is provided by atmospheric composition measurements made during the same campaign.

  14. Enhancement of oxygen reduction activity of nanoshell carbons by introducing nitrogen atoms from metal phthalocyanines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaki, Jun-ichi, E-mail: jozaki@cee.gunma-u.ac.j [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1, Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Tanifuji, Shin-ichi; Furuichi, Atsuya; Yabutsuka, Katsutoshi [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1, Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    Nanoshell carbon is a type of catalytically grown nanocarbon with a hollow, round, shell-like structure, with a diameter in the range of approximately 20-50 nm. It has been shown to possess the electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and is also expected to be a non-Pt catalyst for polymer electrolyte fuel cells. This paper reports the synergetic enhancement of the ORR activity of nanoshell carbons caused by the coexistence of nitrogen atoms. The nanoshell carbons were prepared by the carbonization of furan resin in the presence of acetylacetonates (AAs) and of phthalocyanines (Pcs), which contained Fe, Co, and Ni. The Pc-derived nanoshells (MP-T series; M = Co or Fe, T = carbonization temperature) showed higher ORR activities than the AA-derived nanoshells (MA-T series; M = Co or Fe, T = carbonization temperature) when the same metal elements were employed. An XPS study revealed that nitrogen species were introduced to the surface of the nanoshells when Pcs were used as the nanoshell-forming catalysts, and that no metal species remained on the nanoshells. Principally, the ORR activity of the carbons was governed by the presence of the nanoshells and further enhancement could be achieved by the introduction of nitrogen atoms. 0.78 V of OCV and 0.21 W cm{sup -2} of the maximum power density were observed for a fuel cell whose MEA consisted of 3CoP1000 cathode and a commercial Pt/C anode, when it was operated at 80 deg. C under a pressurized condition of 0.35 MPa.

  15. First detection of the 63 μm atomic oxygen line in the thermosphere of Mars with GREAT/SOFIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezac, L.; Hartogh, P.; Güsten, R.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Hübers, H.-W.; Jarchow, C.; Richter, H.; Klein, B.; Honingh, N.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) with its 2.5 m telescope provides new science opportunities for spectroscopic observations of planetary atmospheres in the far-infrared wavelength range. Aims: This paper presents first results from the 14 May, 2014 observing campaign of the Martian atmosphere at 4.7 THz using the German REceiver for Astronomy at Terahertz frequencies (GREAT) instrument. Methods: The atomic oxygen 63 μm transition, OI, was detected in absorption against the Mars continuum, with a high signal-to-noise ratio (~35). A beam-averaged atomic oxygen from a global circulation model was used as input to the radiative transfer simulations of the observed line area and to obtain a new estimate on the column density using a grid-search method. Results: Minimizing differences between the calculated and observed line intensities in the least-square sense yields an atomic oxygen column density of (1.1 ± 0.2) × 1017 cm-2. This value is about twice as low as predicted by a modern photochemical model of Mars. The radiative transfer simulations indicate that the line forms in the upper atmospheric region over a rather extended altitude region of 70-120 km. Conclusions: For the first time, a far-infrared transition of the atomic oxygen line was detected in the atmosphere of Mars. The absorption depth provides an estimate on the column density, and this measurement provides additional means to constrain the photochemical models in global circulation models and airglow studies. The lack of other means for monitoring the atomic oxygen in the Martian upper atmosphere makes future observations with the SOFIA observatory highly desirable. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  17. Atomic oxygen behavior at downstream of AC excited atmospheric pressure He plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2016-09-01

    Applications of atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJ) have been investigated in the plasma medical fields such as cancer therapy, blood coagulation, etc. Reactive species generated by the plasma jet interacts with the biological surface. Therefore, the issue attracts much attentions to investigate the plasma effects on targets. In our group, a spot-size AC excited He APPJ have been used for the plasma medicine. From diagnostics of the APPJ using optical emission spectroscopy, the gas temperature and the electron density was estimated to be 299 K and 3.4 ×1015 cm-3. The AC excited He APPJ which affords high density plasma at room temperature is considered to be a powerful tool for the medical applications. In this study, by using vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy, the density of atomic oxygen on a floating copper as a target irradiated by the He APPJ was measured as a function of the distance between the plasma source and the copper wire. The measured density became a maximum value around 8 ×1013 cm-3 at 12 mm distance, and then decreased over the distance. It is considered that the behavior was due to the changes in the plasma density on the copper wire and influence of ambient air.

  18. International Test Program for Synergistic Atomic Oxygen and Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure of Spacecraft Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sharon K.

    2001-01-01

    The components and materials of spacecraft in low Earth orbit can degrade in thermal and optical performance through interaction with atomic oxygen and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation, which are predominant in low Earth orbit. Because of the importance of low Earth orbit durability and performance to manufacturers and users, an international test program for assessing the durability of spacecraft materials and components was initiated. Initial tests at the NASA Glenn Research Center consisted of exposure of samples representing a variety of thermal control paints, multilayer insulation materials, and Sun sensors that have been used in space. Materials donated from various international sources were tested alongside materials whose performance is well known, such as Teflon FEP, Kapton H, or Z-93-P white paint. The optical, thermal, or mass loss data generated during the tests were then provided to the participating material suppliers. Data were not published unless the participant donating the material consented to publication. The test program is intended to give spacecraft builders and users a better understanding of degradation processes and effects so that they can improve their predictions of spacecraft performance.

  19. Simple-Cubic Carbon Frameworks with Atomically Dispersed Iron Dopants toward High-Efficiency Oxygen Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Biwei; Wang, Xinxia; Zou, Jinxiang; Yan, Yancui; Xie, Songhai; Hu, Guangzhi; Li, Yanguang; Dong, Angang

    2017-03-08

    Iron and nitrogen codoped carbons (Fe-N-C) have attracted increasingly greater attention as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Although challenging, the synthesis of Fe-N-C catalysts with highly dispersed and fully exposed active sites is of critical importance for improving the ORR activity. Here, we report a new type of graphitic Fe-N-C catalysts featuring numerous Fe single atoms anchored on a three-dimensional simple-cubic carbon framework. The Fe-N-C catalyst, derived from self-assembled Fe3O4 nanocube superlattices, was prepared by in situ ligand carbonization followed by acid etching and ammonia activation. Benefiting from its homogeneously dispersed and fully accessible active sites, highly graphitic nature, and enhanced mass transport, our Fe-N-C catalyst outperformed Pt/C and many previously reported Fe-N-C catalysts for ORR. Furthermore, when used for constructing the cathode for zinc-air batteries, our Fe-N-C catalyst exhibited current and power densities comparable to those of the state-of-the-art Pt/C catalyst.

  20. Study of atomic oxygen greenline dayglow emission in thermosphere during geomagnetic storm conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, T.; Singh, Vir; Sunil Krishna, M. V.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of geomagnetic storms on the atomic oxygen greenline (557.7 nm) dayglow emission in thermosphere is studied during solar active and solar quiet conditions. This study is primarily based on the photochemical model with inputs obtained from experimental observations and empirical models. The updated rate coefficients, quantum yields and related cross-sections have been used from experimental results and theoretical studies. This study is presented for a low latitude station Tirunelveli (8.7°N, 77.8°E), India. The volume emission rate (VER) has been calculated using densities and temperatures from the empirical models. The modeled VER shows a positive correlation with the Dst index. The VER also shows a negative correlation with the number densities of O, O2, and N2. The VER, calculated at peak emission altitude, exhibits depletion during the main phase of the storm. The altitude of peak emission rate is unaffected by the geomagnetic storm activity. The study also reveals that the peak emission altitude depends on the F10.7 solar index. The peak emission altitude moves upward as the value of F10.7 solar index increases.

  1. Far-IR detection of neutral atomic oxygen toward the Horsehead Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Goicoechea, Javier R; Habart, Emilie

    2009-01-01

    We present the first detection of neutral atomic oxygen (3P_1-3P_2 fine structure line at ~63um) toward the Horsehead photodissociation region (PDR). The cloud has been mapped with the Spitzer Space Telescope at far-IR (FIR) wavelengths using MIPS in the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) mode. The [OI]63um line peaks at the illuminated edge of the cloud at AV~0.1-0.5 (inwards the gas becomes too cold and outwards the gas density drops). The luminosity carried by the [OI]63um line represents a significant fraction of the total FIR dust luminosity (I_63/I_FIR~4x10^-3). We analyze the dust continuum emission and the nonlocal OI excitation and radiative transfer in detail. The observations are reproduced with a gas density of n_H~10^4 cm^-3 and gas and dust temperatures of T_k~100 K and T_d~30 K. We conclude that the determination of the OI 3P_J level populations and emergent line intensities at such ``low'' densities is a complex non-LTE problem. FIR radiative pumping, [OI]63um subthermal emission, [OI]145um su...

  2. Carbon fiber CVD coating by carbon nanostructured for space materials protection against atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Roberto; Bueno Morles, Ramon; Micheli, Davide

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, the emphasis in space research has been shifting from space exploration to commercialization of space. In order to utilize space for commercial purposes it is necessary to understand the low earth orbit (LEO) space environment where most of the activities will be carried out. The studies on the LEO environment are mainly focused towards understanding the effect of atomic oxygen (AO) on spacecraft materials. In the first few shuttle flights, materials looked frosty because they were actually being eroded and textured: AO reacts with organic materials on spacecraft exteriors, gradually damaging them. When a spacecraft travel in LEO (where crewed vehicles and the International Space Station fly), the AO formed from the residual atmosphere can react with the spacecraft surfaces, causing damage to the vehicle. Polymers are widely used in space vehicles and systems as structural materials, thermal blankets, thermal control coatings, conformal coatings, adhesives, lubricants, etc. Exposure of polymers and composites to the space environment may result in different detrimental effects via modification of their chemical, electrical, thermal, optical and mechanical properties as well as surface erosion. The major degradation effects in polymers are due to their exposure to atomic oxygen, vacuum ultraviolet and synergistic effects, which result in different damaging effects by modification of the polymer's chemical properties. In hydrocarbon containing polymers the main AO effect is the surface erosion via chemical reactions and the release of volatile reaction products associated with the mass loss. The application of a thin protective coating to the base materials is one of the most commonly used methods of preventing AO degradation. The purpose is to provide a barrier between base material and AO environment or, in some cases, to alter AO reactions to inhibit its diffusion. The effectiveness of a coating depends on its continuity, porosity, degree of

  3. Formation of cysteine sulfenic acid by oxygen atom transfer from nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinecke, Julie; Ford, Peter C

    2010-07-14

    Cysteine sulfenic acid CysS(O)H is shown to be formed for the reaction of cysteine (CysSH) with aqueous nitrite and the water-soluble ferriheme models Fe(III)(TPPS) (TPPS = meso-tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrinato) or Fe(III)(TMPS) (TMPS = meso-tetra(sulfonatomesityl)porphyrinato) at pH 5.8 and 7.4. The other product is the respective ferrous nitrosyl complex Fe(II)(Por)(NO) (Por = TPPS or TMPS). Analogous oxygen atom transfers (OAT) were seen when glutathione (GSH) was used as the substrate. The sulfenic acids, CysS(O)H and GS(O)H, are transient species since they react rapidly with excess thiol to give the respective disulfides, so their presence as reactive intermediates was demonstrated by trapping with dimedone and detecting the resulting adduct using LC/MS. Preliminary kinetics studies are consistent with rate-limiting OAT from a ferric nitro complex Fe(III)(Por)(NO(2)(-)) to CysSH, although this reaction is complicated by a competing dead-end equilibrium to form the thiolate complex (Fe(III)(TPPS)(CysS(-)).

  4. Photochemistry of atomic oxygen green and red-doublet emissions in comets at larger heliocentric distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuram, Susarla; Bhardwaj, Anil

    2014-06-01

    Context. In comets, the atomic oxygen green (5577 Å) to red-doublet (6300, 6364 Å) emission intensity ratio (G/R ratio) of 0.1 has been used to confirm H2O as the parent species producing forbidden oxygen emission lines. The larger (>0.1) value of G/R ratio observed in a few comets is ascribed to the presence of higher CO2 and CO relative abundances in the cometary coma. Aims: We aim to study the effect of CO2 and CO relative abundances on the observed G/R ratio in comets observed at large (>2 au) heliocentric distances by accounting for important production and loss processes of O(1S) and O(1D) atoms in the cometary coma. Methods: Recently we have developed a coupled chemistry-emission model to study photochemistry of O(1S) and O(1D) atoms and the production of green and red-doublet emissions in comets Hyakutake and Hale-Bopp. In the present work we applied the model to six comets where green and red-doublet emissions are observed when they are beyond 2 au from the Sun. Results: The collisional quenching of O(1S) and O(1D) can alter the G/R ratio more significantly than that due to change in the relative abundances of CO2 and CO. In a water-dominated cometary coma and with significant (>10%) CO2 relative abundance, photodissociation of H2O mainly governs the red-doublet emission, whereas CO2 controls the green line emission. If a comet has equal composition of CO2 and H2O, then ~50% of red-doublet emission intensity is controlled by the photodissociation of CO2. The role of CO photodissociation is insignificant in producing both green and red-doublet emission lines and consequently in determining the G/R ratio. Involvement of multiple production sources in the O(1S) formation may be the reason for the observed higher green line width than that of red lines. The G/R ratio values and green and red-doublet line widths calculated by the model are consistent with the observation. Conclusions: Our model calculations suggest that in low gas production rate comets the G

  5. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  6. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of a test of a ground-based lidar of other type. The test was performed at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. The result as an establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided...... by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from the wind vanes is also given....

  7. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Yordanova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  8. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  9. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Georgieva Yankova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  10. Recombination of atomic oxygen on α-Al 2O 3 at high temperature under air microwave-induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balat-Pichelin, M.; Bedra, L.; Gerasimova, O.; Boubert, P.

    2007-11-01

    New ceramic materials are necessary for the design of primary heat shields for future reusable space vehicles re-entering atmospheric planet. During the re-entry phase on earth, one of the most important phenomena occurring on the heat shield is the recombination of atomic species and among them atomic oxygen. The recombination of atomic oxygen is catalyzed by the material of the heat shield. This paper presents some experimental results for the recombination coefficient γ and the thermal flux of recombination transferred to the material in the surface-catalyzed recombination of oxygen atoms based on experiments performed on the MESOX set-up using optical emission spectroscopy, actinometry and calorimetry techniques. Experimental results on the recombination coefficient are presented for three types of α-Al 2O 3 in the temperature range 900-2400 K for 300 Pa total air pressure. The thermal flux of recombination is given for only two representative samples. These three alumina differ essentially by their content of sintering additives. Different behaviors of the recombination coefficient versus temperature are observed according to the impurity level of the α-alumina.

  11. Unique cell culture systems for ground based research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Marian L.

    1990-01-01

    The horizontally rotating fluid-filled, membrane oxygenated bioreactors developed at NASA Johnson for spacecraft applications provide a powerful tool for ground-based research. Three-dimensional aggregates formed by cells cultured on microcarrier beads are useful for study of cell-cell interactions and tissue development. By comparing electron micrographs of plant seedlings germinated during Shuttle flight 61-C and in an earth-based rotating bioreactor it is shown that some effects of microgravity are mimicked. Bioreactors used in the UAH Bioreactor Laboratory will make it possible to determine some of the effects of altered gravity at the cellular level. Bioreactors can be valuable for performing critical, preliminary-to-spaceflight experiments as well as medical investigations such as in vitro tumor cell growth and chemotherapeutic drug response; the enrichment of stem cells from bone marrow; and the effect of altered gravity on bone and muscle cell growth and function and immune response depression.

  12. Adsorption sites of single noble metal atoms on the rutile TiO2 (1 1 0) surface influenced by different surface oxygen vacancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Katsuyuki; Chang, Teng-Yuan; Ishikawa, Ryo; Dong, Qian; Toyoura, Kazuaki; Nakamura, Atsutomo; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Shibata, Naoya

    2016-05-05

    Atomic adsorption of Au and Pt on the rutile (1 1 0) surface was investigated by atomic-resolution aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) measurements combined with density functional theory calculations. Au single atoms were deposited on the surface in a vacuum condition, and the observed results were compared with Pt single atoms on the same surface prepared by the same experimental manner. It was found that Au single atoms are stably adsorbed only at the bridging oxygen vacancy sites, which is quite different from Pt single atoms exhibiting the most frequently observed adsorption at the basal oxygen vacancy sites. Such a difference in oxygen-vacancy effect between Au and Pt can be explained by electronic structures of the surface vacancies as well as characters of outermost atomic orbitals of Au and Pt.

  13. Adsorption of atomic oxygen, electron structure and elastic moduli of TiC(0 0 1) surface during its laser reconstruction: Ab initio study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilyasov, V.V., E-mail: viily@mail.ru; Pham, Khang D., E-mail: dinhkhang307@gmail.com; Holodova, O.M.; Ershov, I.V., E-mail: thijd@mail.ru

    2015-10-01

    We have performed ab initio simulation of oxygen atom adsorption on TiC(0 0 1) laser-reconstructed surface. Relaxed atomic structures of the O/Ti{sub x}C{sub y}(0 0 1) surface observed upon thermal impact have been studied. DFT calculations of their thermodynamic, electronic, and elastic properties have been carried out. For the first time we have established the bond length and adsorption energy for various reconstructions of the O/Ti{sub x}C{sub y}(0 0 1) surface atomic structure. We have examined the effects of the oxygen adatom upon the band and electron spectra of the O/TiC(0 0 1) surface in its various reconstructions. For the first time we have established a correlation between the energy level of flat bands (−5.4 eV and −5.8 eV) responsible for the doublet of singular peaks of partial densities of oxygen 2p electrons, and the adsorption energy of oxygen atom in non-stoichiometric O/TiC{sub y}(0 0 1) systems. Effective charges of titanium and carbon atoms surrounding the oxygen adatom in various reconstructions have been identified. We have established charge transfer from titanium atom to oxygen and carbon atoms determined by the reconstruction of local atomic and electron structures which correlate with atomic electronegativity values and chemisorption processes. Potential mechanisms for laser nanostructuring of titanium carbide surface have been suggested.

  14. A New Determination of the Binding Energy of Atomic Oxygen on Dust Grain Surfaces: Experimental Results and Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    He, Jiao; Hopkins, Tyler; Vidali, Gianfranco; Kaufman, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    The energy to desorb atomic oxygen from an interstellar dust grain surface, $E_{\\rm des}$, is an important controlling parameter in gas-grain models; its value impacts the temperature range over which oxygen resides on a dust grain. However, no prior measurement has been done of the desorption energy. We report the first direct measurement of $E_{\\rm des}$ for atomic oxygen from dust grain analogs. The values of $E_{\\rm des}$ are $1660\\pm 60$~K and $1850\\pm 90$~K for porous amorphous water ice and for a bare amorphous silicate film, respectively, or about twice the value previously adopted in simulations of the chemical evolution of a cloud. We use the new values to study oxygen chemistry as a function of depth in a molecular cloud. For $n=10^4$ cm$^{-3}$ and $G_0$=10$^2$ ($G_0$=1 is the average local interstellar radiation field), the main result of the adoption of the higher oxygen binding energy is that H$_2$O can form on grains at lower visual extinction $A_{\\rm V}$, closer to the cloud surface. A higher ...

  15. The formation of diethyl ether via the reaction of iodoethane with atomic oxygen on the Ag(110) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G. Scott; Barteau, Mark A.; Vohs, John M.

    1999-01-01

    The reactions of iodoethane (ICH 2CH 3) on clean and oxygen-covered Ag(110) surfaces were investigated using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS). Iodoethane adsorbs dissociatively at 150 K to produce surface ethyl groups on both clean and oxygen-covered Ag(110) surfaces. The ethyl species couple to form butane on both surfaces, with the desorption peak maximum located between 218 and 238 K, depending on the ethyl coverage. In addition to butane, a number of oxidation products including diethyl ether, ethanol, acetaldehyde, surface acetate, ethylene, carbon dioxide and water were formed on the oxygen-dosed Ag(110) surface. Diethyl ether was the major oxygenate produced at all ethyl:oxygen ratios, and the peak temperature for ether evolution varied from 220 to 266 K depending on the relative coverages of these reactants. The total combustion products, CO 2 and H 2O, were primarily formed at low ethyl coverages in the presence of excess oxygen. The formation of ethylene near 240 K probably involves an oxygen-assisted dehydrogenation pathway since ethylene is not formed from ethyl groups on the clean surface. Acetaldehyde and ethanol evolve coincidentally with a peak centered at 270-280 K, and are attributed to the reactions of surface ethoxide species. The surface acetate which decomposes near 620 K is formed from subsequent reactions of acetaldehyde with oxygen atoms. The addition of ethyl to oxygen to form surface ethoxides was verified by HREELS results. The yields of all products exhibited a strong dependence on the relative coverages of ethyl and oxygen.

  16. Combined ground-based optical support for the aurora (DELTA) sounding rocket campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Eoghan; Kosch, Mike; Aruliah, Anasuya; Kavanagh, Andrew; McWhirter, Ian; Senior, Andrew; Ford, Elaina; Davis, Chris; Abe, Takumi; Kurihara, Junichi; Kauristie, Kirsti; Ogawa, Yasunobu

    2006-09-01

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) DELTA rocket experiment, successfully launched from Andøya at 0033 UT on December 13, 2004, supported by ground based optical instruments, primarily 2 Fabry- Perot Interferometers (FPIs) located at Skibotn, Norway (69.3°N, 20.4°E) and the KEOPS Site, Esrange, Kiruna, Sweden (67.8°N, 20.4°E). Both these instruments sampled the 557.7 nm lower thermosphere atomic oxygen emission and provided neutral temperatures and line-of-sight wind velocities, with deduced vector wind patterns over each site. All sky cameras allow contextual auroral information to be acquired. The proximity of the sites provided overlapping fields of view, adjacent to the trajectory of the DELTA rocket. This allowed independent verification of the absolute temperatures in the relatively quiet conditions early in the night, especially important given the context provided by co-located EISCAT ion temperature measurements which allow investigation of the likely emission altitude of the passive FPI measurements. The results demonstrate that this altitude changes from 120 km pre-midnight to 115 km post-midnight. Within this large scale context the results from the FPIs also demonstrate smaller scale structure in neutral temperatures, winds and intensities consistent with localised heating. These results present a challenge to the representation of thermospheric variability for the existing models of the region.

  17. Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation and Atomic Oxygen Durability Evaluation of HST Bi-Stem Thermal Shield Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dever, Joyce; deGroh, Kim K.

    2002-01-01

    Bellows-type thermal shields were used on the bi-stems of replacement solar arrays installed on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) during the first HST servicing mission (SMI) in December 1993. These thermal shields helped reduce the problem of thermal gradient- induced jitter observed with the original HST solar arrays during orbital thermal cycling and have been in use on HST for eight years. This paper describes ground testing of the candidate solar array bi-stem thermal shield materials including backside aluminized Teflon(R)FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene) with and without atomic oxygen (AO) and ultraviolet radiation protective surface coatings for durability to AO and combined AO and vacuum ultraviolet (VOV) radiation. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) conducted VUV and AO exposures of samples of candidate thermal shield materials at HST operational temperatures and pre- and post-exposure analyses as part of an overall program coordinated by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to determine the on-orbit durability of these materials. Coating adhesion problems were observed for samples having the AO- and combined AO/UV-protective coatings. Coating lamination occurred with rapid thermal cycling testing which simulated orbital thermal cycling. This lack of adhesion caused production of coating flakes from the material that would have posed a serious risk to HST optics if the coated materials were used for the bi-stem thermal shields. No serious degradation was observed for the uncoated aluminized Teflon(R) as evaluated by optical microscopy, although atomic force microscopy (AFM) microhardness testing revealed that an embrittled surface layer formed on the uncoated Teflon(R) surface due to vacuum ultraviolet radiation exposure. This embrittled layer was not completely removed by AO erosion, No cracks or particle flakes were produced for the embrittled uncoated material upon exposure to VUV and AO at operational temperatures to an equivalent exposure of

  18. Trimethylaluminum and Oxygen Atomic Layer Deposition on Hydroxyl-Free Cu(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharachorlou, Amir; Detwiler, Michael D; Gu, Xiang-Kui; Mayr, Lukas; Klötzer, Bernhard; Greeley, Jeffrey; Reifenberger, Ronald G; Delgass, W Nicholas; Ribeiro, Fabio H; Zemlyanov, Dmitry Y

    2015-08-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of alumina using trimethylaluminum (TMA) has technological importance in microelectronics. This process has demonstrated a high potential in applications of protective coatings on Cu surfaces for control of diffusion of Cu in Cu2S films in photovoltaic devices and sintering of Cu-based nanoparticles in liquid phase hydrogenation reactions. With this motivation in mind, the reaction between TMA and oxygen was investigated on Cu(111) and Cu2O/Cu(111) surfaces. TMA did not adsorb on the Cu(111) surface, a result consistent with density functional theory (DFT) calculations predicting that TMA adsorption and decomposition are thermodynamically unfavorable on pure Cu(111). On the other hand, TMA readily adsorbed on the Cu2O/Cu(111) surface at 473 K resulting in the reduction of some surface Cu(1+) to metallic copper (Cu(0)) and the formation of a copper aluminate, most likely CuAlO2. The reaction is limited by the amount of surface oxygen. After the first TMA half-cycle on Cu2O/Cu(111), two-dimensional (2D) islands of the aluminate were observed on the surface by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). According to DFT calculations, TMA decomposed completely on Cu2O/Cu(111). High-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) was used to distinguish between tetrahedrally (Altet) and octahedrally (Aloct) coordinated Al(3+) in surface adlayers. TMA dosing produced an aluminum oxide film, which contained more octahedrally coordinated Al(3+) (Altet/Aloct HREELS peak area ratio ≈ 0.3) than did dosing O2 (Altet/Aloct HREELS peak area ratio ≈ 0.5). After the first ALD cycle, TMA reacted with both Cu2O and aluminum oxide surfaces in the absence of hydroxyl groups until film closure by the fourth ALD cycle. Then, TMA continued to react with surface Al-O, forming stoichiometric Al2O3. O2 half-cycles at 623 K were more effective for carbon removal than O2 half-cycles at 473 K or water half-cycles at 623 K. The growth rate was approximately 3

  19. Development of a high flow source of energetic oxygen atoms for material degradation studies. [of Space Shuttles in low earth orbit environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caledonia, G. E.; Krech, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    A technique for the generation, in the laboratory, of thermally 'cold', high flux of energetic oxygen atoms is presented. The flux of nearly mono-energetic oxygen atoms is obtained after a laser-induced breakdown of oxygen molecules followed by a rapid expansion of the recombining plasma. The experimental apparatus, the optical and spectral measurements, the O-atom source characterization, and the material degradation studies are discussed. Average oxygen atom velocities of about 5 to 13 km/s are measured with an estimated flux of 10 to the 18th per pulse, over pulse durations of several microseconds. The flow of the O2 gas for about 200 microseconds before applying the laser pulse is found to give best results. It is also found that the energetic O-atom irradiation of sample targets such as Al, Fe, and polyethylene, induces mass removal. In addition, spectral scans of the radiation reveals the existence of two main spectral subsets.

  20. Sensitivity of equatorial atomic oxygen in the MLT region to the 11-year and 27-day solar cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednyts'kyy, Olexandr; von Savigny, Christian; Weber, Mark

    2017-09-01

    We report on 27-day and 11-year solar cycle signatures in atomic oxygen (O) concentrations ([O]) in the MLT (Mesosphere/Lower Thermosphere) region of the terrestrial atmosphere. MLT [O] profiles were retrieved on the base of green line (557.7 nm) nightglow data sets provided by the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) onboard Envisat from 2002 to 2012. A statistically significant solar 27-day signature was identified (and then quantified with respect to the sensitivity and phase relationship to solar forcing) in time series of MLT [O] profiles with use of cross-correlation and superposed epoch analysis techniques. It was the first identification of the solar 27-day signature in MLT atomic oxygen on the base of such experimental data sets. The sensitivity of [O] to solar cycle variability at the 11-year time scale was quantified with use of cross-correlation and multiple-linear regression analysis techniques, which yield results consistent with known studies and, particularly, indicate that the sensitivity of [O] to solar forcing increases with increasing altitude. A comparison of obtained values of atomic oxygen sensitivity in response to solar forcing at the 27-day and 11-year time scales reveals the fact that the sensitivities agree well to each other within their uncertainties during the descending phase of the last (23rd) 11-year cycle of solar activity, whereas the [O] sensitivity values at the 27-day time scale during the last solar minimum phase were lower than those ones during the descending phase. It was also determined that atomic oxygen is in-phase with the solar forcing (in agreement with model results) at the 11-year time scale, whereas the time lag of the 27-day signature in response to solar forcing was about 12 - 14 days.

  1. Evaluation of Thermal Control Coatings and Polymeric Materials Exposed to Ground Simulated Atomic Oxygen and Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenetzky, R. R.; Vaughn, J. A.; Finckenor, M. M.; Linton, R. C.

    1995-01-01

    Numerous thermal control and polymeric samples with potential International Space Station applications were evaluated for atomic oxygen and vacuum ultraviolet radiation effects in the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory 5 eV Neutral Atomic Oxygen Facility and in the MSFC Atomic Oxygen Drift Tube System. Included in this study were samples of various anodized aluminum samples, ceramic paints, polymeric materials, and beta cloth, a Teflon-impregnated fiberglass cloth. Aluminum anodizations tested were black duranodic, chromic acid anodize, and sulfuric acid anodize. Paint samples consisted of an inorganic glassy black paint and Z-93 white paint made with the original PS7 binder and the new K2130 binder. Polymeric samples evaluated included bulk Halar, bulk PEEK, and silverized FEP Teflon. Aluminized and nonaluminized Chemfab 250 beta cloth were also exposed. Samples were evaluated for changes in mass, thickness, solar absorptance, and infrared emittance. In addition to material effects, an investigation was made comparing diffuse reflectance/solar absorptance measurements made using a Beckman DK2 spectroreflectometer and like measurements made using an AZ Technology-developed laboratory portable spectroreflectometer.

  2. First-Principles Study of Mo Segregation in MoNi(111: Effects of Chemisorbed Atomic Oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanlin Yu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Segregation at metal alloy surfaces is an important issue because many electrochemical and catalytic properties are directly correlated to the surface composition. We have performed density functional theory calculations for Mo segregation in MoNi(111 in the presence of chemisorbed atomic oxygen. In particular, the coverage dependence and possible adsorption-induced segregation phenomena are addressed by investigating segregation energies of the Mo atom in MoNi(111. The theoretical calculated results show that the Mo atom prefers to be embedded in the bulk for the clean MoNi(111, while it segregates to the top-most layer when the oxygen coverage is thicker than 1/9 monolayer (ML. Furthermore, we analyze the densities of states for the clean and oxygen-chemisorbed MoNi(111, and see a strong covalent bonding between Mo d-band states and O p-states. The present study provides valuable insight for exploring practical applications of Ni-based alloys as hydrogen evolution electrodes.

  3. Oxygen-atom transfer chemistry and thermolytic properties of a di-tert-butylphosphate-ligated Mn4O4 cubane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Allsburg, Kurt M; Anzenberg, Eitan; Drisdell, Walter S; Yano, Junko; Tilley, T Don

    2015-03-16

    [Mn4O4{O2P(OtBu)2}6] (1), an Mn4O4 cubane complex combining the structural inspiration of the photosystem II oxygen-evolving complex with thermolytic precursor ligands, was synthesized and fully characterized. Core oxygen atoms within complex 1 are transferred upon reaction with an oxygen-atom acceptor (PEt3), to give the butterfly complex [Mn4O2{O2P(OtBu)2}6(OPEt3)2]. The cubane structure is restored by reaction of the latter complex with the O-atom donor PhIO. Complex 1 was investigated as a precursor to inorganic Mn metaphosphate/pyrophosphate materials, which were studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy to determine the fate of the Mn4O4 unit. Under the conditions employed, thermolyses of 1 result in reduction of the manganese to Mn(II) species. Finally, the related butterfly complex [Mn4O2{O2P(pin)}6(bpy)2] (pin = pinacolate) is described.

  4. The Unique Gas-Phase Chemistry of the [AuO](+) /CH4 Couple: Selective Oxygen-Atom Transfer to, Rather than Hydrogen-Atom Abstraction from, Methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shaodong; Li, Jilai; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2016-08-26

    The thermal reaction of [AuO](+) with methane has been explored using FT-ICR mass spectrometry complemented by high-level quantum chemical calculations. In contrast to the previously studied congener [CuO](+) , and to [AgO](+) , [AuO](+) reacts with CH4 exclusively via oxygen-atom transfer to form CH3 OH, and a novel mechanistic scenario for this selective oxidation process has been revealed. Also, the origin of the inertness of the [AgO](+) /CH4 couple has been addressed computationally.

  5. (10, 10) Single walled carbon nanotube consisted of chemisorbed oxygen atoms as a promising supercapacitor electrode material: A first principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targholi, Ehsan; Molaei, Masoumeh; Mousavi-Khoshdel, S. Morteza

    2016-11-01

    The effects of atomic oxygen chemisorption on the electronic structures and quantum capacitance of (10, 10) CNT have been studied in this article. The results indicated that the chemisorption on bonds aligned with nanotube axis is more favorable than other position. The most efficient configuration for enhancing quantum capacitance is the nanotube with oxygen atoms chemisorbed on axial bonds. Specifically, in water stability range, the quantum capacitance of (10, 10) CNT before and after chemisorption of six oxygen atoms (aligned with nanotube axis) were found to be 222.6 (anode) -117.6 (cathode) and 306.9 (anode) -217.2 (cathode) F/g, respectively.

  6. Effect of Solar Exposure on the Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Hubble Space Telescope Aluminized-Teflon Thermal Shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Aobo; Ashmead, Claire C.; deGroh, Kim K.

    2012-01-01

    When exposed to low Earth orbital (LEO) environment, external spacecraft materials degrade due to radiation, thermal cycling, micrometeoroid and debris impacts, and atomic oxygen (AO) interaction. Collisions between AO and spacecraft can result in oxidation of external spacecraft surface materials, which can lead to erosion and severe structural and/or optical property deterioration. It is therefore essential to understand the AO erosion yield (Ey), the volume loss per incident oxygen atom (cu cm/atom), of polymers to assure durability of spacecraft materials. The objective of this study was to determine whether solar radiation exposure can increase the rate of AO erosion of polymers in LEO. The material studied was a section of aluminized-Teflon (DuPont) fluorinated ethylene propylene (Al-FEP) thermal shield exposed to space on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) for 8.25 years. Retrieved samples were sectioned from the circular thermal shield and exposed to ground laboratory thermal energy AO. The results indicate that the average Ey of the solar facing HST Al-FEP was 1.9 10(exp -24)cu cm/atom, while the average Ey of the anti-solar HST Al-FEP was 1.5 10(exp -24)cu cm/atom. The Ey of the pristine samples was 1.6- 1.7 10(exp -24)cu cm/atom. These results indicate that solar exposure affects the post-flight erosion rate of FEP in a plasma asher. Therefore, it likely affects the erosion rate while in LEO.

  7. Statistical analysis of thermospheric gravity waves from Fabry-Perot Interferometer measurements of atomic oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. K. Ford

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Data from the Fabry-Perot Interferometers at KEOPS (Sweden, Sodankylä (Finland, and Svalbard (Norway, have been analysed for gravity wave activity on all the clear nights from 2000 to 2006. A total of 249 nights were available from KEOPS, 133 from Sodankylä and 185 from the Svalbard FPI. A Lomb-Scargle analysis was performed on each of these nights to identify the periods of any wave activity during the night. Comparisons between many nights of data allow the general characteristics of the waves that are present in the high latitude upper thermosphere to be determined. Comparisons were made between the different parameters: the atomic oxygen intensities, the thermospheric winds and temperatures, and for each parameter the distribution of frequencies of the waves was determined. No dependence on the number of waves on geomagnetic activity levels, or position in the solar cycle, was found. All the FPIs have had different detectors at various times, producing different time resolutions of the data, so comparisons between the different years, and between data from different sites, showed how the time resolution determines which waves are observed. In addition to the cutoff due to the Nyquist frequency, poor resolution observations significantly reduce the number of short-period waves (<1 h period that may be detected with confidence. The length of the dataset, which is usually determined by the length of the night, was the main factor influencing the number of long period waves (>5 h detected. Comparisons between the number of gravity waves detected at KEOPS and Sodankylä over all the seasons showed a similar proportion of waves to the number of nights used for both sites, as expected since the two sites are at similar latitudes and therefore locations with respect to the auroral oval, confirming this as a likely source region. Svalbard showed fewer waves with short periods than KEOPS data for a season when both had the same time resolution data

  8. Numerical simulation of physicochemical interactions between oxygen atom and phosphatidylcholine due to direct irradiation of atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasma to biological membrane with quantum mechanical molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Satoshi; Yoshida, Taketo; Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi

    2017-10-01

    Plasma medicine is one of the most attractive applications using atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasma. With respect to direct contact of the discharge plasma with a biological membrane, reactive oxygen species play an important role in induction of medical effects. However, complicated interactions between the plasma radicals and membrane have not been understood well. In the present work, we simulated elemental processes at the first stage of physicochemical interactions between oxygen atom and phosphatidylcholine using the quantum mechanical molecular dynamics code in a general software AMBER. The change in the above processes was classified according to the incident energy of oxygen atom. At an energy of 1 eV, the abstraction of a hydrogen atom and recombination to phosphatidylcholine were simultaneously occurred in chemical attachment of incident oxygen atom. The exothermal energy of the reaction was about 80% of estimated one based on the bond energies of ethane. An oxygen atom over 10 eV separated phosphatidylcholine partially. The behaviour became increasingly similar to physical sputtering. The reaction probability of oxygen atom was remarkably high in comparison with that of hydrogen peroxide. These results suggest that we can uniformly estimate various physicochemical dynamics of reactive oxygen species against membrane lipids.

  9. Study of double bond equivalents and the numbers of carbon and oxygen atom distribution of dissolved organic matter with negative-mode FT-ICR MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, EunJung; Yeo, In Joon; Jeong, Byungkwan; Shin, Yongsik; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Kim, Sunghwan

    2011-06-01

    A strong linear relationship was observed between the average double bond equivalence (DBE) and the ratio of carbon to oxygen atoms in oxygenated compounds of dissolved organic matter (DOM). Data were acquired by a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS), equipped with a negative-mode electrospray ionization source. The slope and y-intercepts extracted from the linear relationship can be used to compare DOM samples originating from different locations. Significant differences in these parameters were observed between inland riverine and offshore coastal DOM samples. Offshore coastal DOM molecules underwent a change of one DBE for each removal or addition of two oxygen atoms. This suggested the existence of multiple carboxyl groups, each of which contains a double bond and two oxygen atoms. Inland riverine samples exhibited a change of ~1.5 DBE following the addition or removal of two oxygen atoms. This extra change in DBE was attributed to cyclic structures or unsaturated chemical bonds. The DBE value with maximum relative abundance and the minimum DBE value for each class of oxygenated compounds showed that approximately two oxygen atoms contributed to a unity change in DBE. The qualitative analyses given here are in a good agreement with results obtained from analyses using orthogonal analytical techniques. This study demonstrates that DBE and the carbon number distribution, observed by high resolution mass spectrometry, can be valuable in elucidating and comparing structural features of oxygenated molecules of DOM.

  10. 纳米ZnO-有机硅复合涂层的抗原子氧剥蚀性能%Anti-atomic oxygen properties of silicone coating modified by nano-ZnO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王静; 李卫平; 陈贻炽; 朱立群

    2009-01-01

    To improve the anti-atomic oxygen properties of silicone coating, nano-ZnO modified by silane coupling reagent was filled in the silicone resin and nano-ZnO/silicone composite coating on polyimide film was obtained. Polyimide with and without nano-ZnO/silicone coating was exposed to atomic oxygen(AO) in a ground-based AO effect simulation facility. The modified nano-ZnO particles were uniformly distributed within the silicone coating so that micro-cracks occurred during film-forming of the silicone were eliminated effectively. The AO experiment results indicate that polyimide is significantly eroded which is characterized by substantial weight loss and change of surface morphologies; nano-ZnO/silicone coatings exhibit excellent properties for anti-atomic oxygen effects with little variation in weight or morphology. The anti-oxygen properties of the coatings were improved along with the increase of nano-ZnO content.%为了进一步提高有机硅涂层的抗原子氧剥蚀能力,采用经硅烷偶联剂处理的纳米ZnO微粒,在聚酰亚胺薄膜基材表面制备出纳米ZnO-有机硅复合涂层.通过原子氧地面模拟试验,研究了纳米ZnO-有机硅复合涂层的质量损失、表面形貌及化学成分的变化规律.结果表明:经表面处理的纳米ZnO微粒可以均匀分布在有机硅涂层中,有效消除有机硅树脂成膜过程中产生的微裂纹.经过原子氧辐照试验,没有保护涂层的聚酰亚胺基材的质量损失较大,而涂覆纳米ZnO-有机硅复合涂层具有良好的抗原子氧剥蚀性能,其质量损失和微观表面形貌变化很小,并且随着涂层中纳米ZnO含量的增加,其抗原子氧剥蚀的能力进一步增强.

  11. The interface between Gd2O3 films and Ge(001): A comparative study between molecular and atomic oxygen mediated growths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molle, Alessandro; Perego, Michele; Bhuiyan, Md. Nurul Kabir; Wiemer, Claudia; Tallarida, Grazia; Fanciulli, Marco

    2007-08-01

    The interface properties of thin Gd2O3 films grown on Ge(001) are studied as a function of the oxidizing species used during the deposition. The mediation of molecular oxygen during growth produces a crystalline oxide with an atomically sharp and contamination-free interface on the Ge substrate. Conversely, an interface layer of substoichiometric germanium oxide occurs whenever atomic oxygen radicals are used. The two different Gd2O3/Ge interfacial configurations are discussed basing on thermodynamic arguments.

  12. Computational insights into the effect of carbon structures at the atomic level for non-aqueous sodium-oxygen batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H. R.; Wu, M. C.; Zhou, X. L.; Yan, X. H.; Zhao, T. S.

    2016-09-01

    Carbon materials have been widely used to form air cathodes for non-aqueous sodium-oxygen (Nasbnd O2) batteries due to their large specific surface area, high conductivity and low cost. However, the effect of carbon structures at the atomic level remains poorly understood. In this work, a first-principles study is conducted to investigate how representative carbon structures, including graphite (0001) surface, point defects and fractured edge, influence the discharge and charge processes of non-aqueous Nasbnd O2 batteries. It is found that the single vacancy (SV) defect has the largest adsorption energy (5.81 eV) to NaO2 molecule among the structures studied, even larger than that of the NaO2 molecule on NaO2 crystal (2.81 eV). Such high adsorption energy is attributed to two factors: the dangling atoms in SV defects decrease the distance from NaO2 molecules, and the attachment through oxygen atoms increases the electrons transfer. The findings suggest that SV defects can act as the nucleation sites for NaO2 in the discharge process, and increasing the number of SV defects can facilitate the uniform formation of small-sized particles. The uniformly distributed discharge products lower the possibility for pore clogging, leading to an increased discharge capacity and improved cyclability for non-aqueous Nasbnd O2 batteries.

  13. Surface recombination of oxygen atoms in O2 plasma at increased pressure: II. Vibrational temperature and surface production of ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopaev, D. V.; Malykhin, E. M.; Zyryanov, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    Ozone production in an oxygen glow discharge in a quartz tube was studied in the pressure range of 10-50 Torr. The O3 density distribution along the tube diameter was measured by UV absorption spectroscopy, and ozone vibrational temperature TV was found comparing the calculated ab initio absorption spectra with the experimental ones. It has been shown that the O3 production mainly occurs on a tube surface whereas ozone is lost in the tube centre where in contrast the electron and oxygen atom densities are maximal. Two models were used to analyse the obtained results. The first one is a kinetic 1D model for the processes occurring near the tube walls with the participation of the main particles: O(3P), O2, O2(1Δg) and O3 molecules in different vibrational states. The agreement of O3 and O(3P) density profiles and TV calculated in the model with observed ones was reached by varying the single model parameter—ozone production probability (\\gamma_{O_{3}}) on the quartz tube surface on the assumption that O3 production occurs mainly in the surface recombination of physisorbed O(3P) and O2. The phenomenological model of the surface processes with the participation of oxygen atoms and molecules including singlet oxygen molecules was also considered to analyse \\gamma_{O_{3}} data obtained in the kinetic model. A good agreement between the experimental data and the data of both models—the kinetic 1D model and the phenomenological surface model—was obtained in the full range of the studied conditions that allowed consideration of the ozone surface production mechanism in more detail. The important role of singlet oxygen in ozone surface production was shown. The O3 surface production rate directly depends on the density of physisorbed oxygen atoms and molecules and can be high with increasing pressure and energy inputted into plasma while simultaneously keeping the surface temperature low enough. Using the special discharge cell design, such an approach opens up the

  14. The Materials Chemistry of Atomic Oxygen with Applications to Anisotropic Etching of Submicron Structures in Microelectronics and the Surface Chemistry Engineering of Porous Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Steve L.; Leger, Lubert J.; Wu, Corina; Cross, Jon B.; Jurgensen, Charles W.

    1994-01-01

    Neutral atomic oxygen is the most abundant component of the ionospheric plasma in the low Earth orbit environment (LEO; 200 to 700 kilometers altitude) and can produce significant degradation of some spacecraft materials. In order to produce a more complete understanding of the materials chemistry of atomic oxygen, the chemistry and physics of O-atom interactions with materials were determined in three radically different environments: (1) The Space Shuttle cargo bay in low Earth orbit (the EOIM-3 space flight experiment), (2) a high-velocity neutral atom beam system (HVAB) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and (3) a microwave-plasma flowing-discharge system at JSC. The Space Shuttle and the high velocity atom beam systems produce atom-surface collision energies ranging from 0.1 to 7 eV (hyperthermal atoms) under high-vacuum conditions, while the flowing discharge system produces a 0.065 eV surface collision energy at a total pressure of 2 Torr. Data obtained in the three different O-atom environments referred to above show that the rate of O-atom reaction with polymeric materials is strongly dependent on atom kinetic energy, obeying a reactive scattering law which suggests that atom kinetic energy is directly available for overcoming activation barriers in the reaction. General relationships between polymer reactivity with O atoms and polymer composition and molecular structure have been determined. In addition, vacuum ultraviolet photochemical effects have been shown to dominate the reaction of O atoms with fluorocarbon polymers. Finally, studies of the materials chemistry of O atoms have produced results which may be of interest to technologists outside the aerospace industry. Atomic oxygen 'spin-off' or 'dual use' technologies in the areas of anisotropic etching in microelectronic materials and device processing, as well as surface chemistry engineering of porous solid materials are described.

  15. The Materials Chemistry of Atomic Oxygen with Applications to Anisotropic Etching of Submicron Structures in Microelectronics and the Surface Chemistry Engineering of Porous Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Steve L.; Leger, Lubert J.; Wu, Corina; Cross, Jon B.; Jurgensen, Charles W.

    1994-01-01

    Neutral atomic oxygen is the most abundant component of the ionospheric plasma in the low Earth orbit environment (LEO; 200 to 700 kilometers altitude) and can produce significant degradation of some spacecraft materials. In order to produce a more complete understanding of the materials chemistry of atomic oxygen, the chemistry and physics of O-atom interactions with materials were determined in three radically different environments: (1) The Space Shuttle cargo bay in low Earth orbit (the EOIM-3 space flight experiment), (2) a high-velocity neutral atom beam system (HVAB) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and (3) a microwave-plasma flowing-discharge system at JSC. The Space Shuttle and the high velocity atom beam systems produce atom-surface collision energies ranging from 0.1 to 7 eV (hyperthermal atoms) under high-vacuum conditions, while the flowing discharge system produces a 0.065 eV surface collision energy at a total pressure of 2 Torr. Data obtained in the three different O-atom environments referred to above show that the rate of O-atom reaction with polymeric materials is strongly dependent on atom kinetic energy, obeying a reactive scattering law which suggests that atom kinetic energy is directly available for overcoming activation barriers in the reaction. General relationships between polymer reactivity with O atoms and polymer composition and molecular structure have been determined. In addition, vacuum ultraviolet photochemical effects have been shown to dominate the reaction of O atoms with fluorocarbon polymers. Finally, studies of the materials chemistry of O atoms have produced results which may be of interest to technologists outside the aerospace industry. Atomic oxygen 'spin-off' or 'dual use' technologies in the areas of anisotropic etching in microelectronic materials and device processing, as well as surface chemistry engineering of porous solid materials are described.

  16. Detection of the Zeeman effect in atmospheric O2 using a ground-based microwave radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Murk, Axel; Larsson, Richard; Buehler, Stefan A.; Eriksson, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    In this work we study the Zeeman effect on stratospheric O2 using ground-based microwave radiometer measurements. The Zeeman effect is a phenomenon which occurs when an external magnetic field interacts with a molecule or an atom of total electron spin different from zero. Such an interaction will split an original energy level into several sub-levels [1]. In the atmosphere, oxygen is an abundant molecule which in its ground electronic state has a permanent magnetic dipole moment coming from two parallel electron spins. The interaction of the magnetic dipole moment with the Earth magnetic field leads to a Zeeman splitting of the O2 rotational transitions which polarizes the emission spectra. A special campaign was carried out in order to measure this effect in the oxygen emission line centered at 53.07 GHz in Bern (Switzerland). The measurements were possible using a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) spectrometer with 1 GHz of band width to measure the whole oxygen emission line centered at 53.07 GHz and a narrow spectrometer (4 MHz) to measure the center of the line with a very high resolution (1 kHz). Both a fixed and a rotating mirror were incorporated to the TEMPERA (TEMPERature RAdiometer) radiometer in order to be able to measure under different observational angles. This new configuration allowed us to change the angle between the observational path and the Earth magnetic field direction. The measured spectra showed a clear polarized signature when the observational angles were changed evidencing the Zeeman effect in the oxygen molecule. In addition, simulations carried out with the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS) [2] allowed us to verify the microwave measurements showing a very good agreement between model and measurements. The incorporation of this effect to the forward model will allow to extend the temperature retrievals beyond 50 km. This improvement in the forward model will be very useful for the assimilation of brightness temperatures in

  17. Single Cobalt Atoms with Precise N-Coordination as Superior Oxygen Reduction Reaction Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Peiqun; Yao, Tao; Wu, Yuen; Zheng, Lirong; Lin, Yue; Liu, Wei; Ju, Huanxin; Zhu, Junfa; Hong, Xun; Deng, Zhaoxiang; Zhou, Gang; Wei, Shiqiang; Li, Yadong

    2016-08-26

    A new strategy for achieving stable Co single atoms (SAs) on nitrogen-doped porous carbon with high metal loading over 4 wt % is reported. The strategy is based on a pyrolysis process of predesigned bimetallic Zn/Co metal-organic frameworks, during which Co can be reduced by carbonization of the organic linker and Zn is selectively evaporated away at high temperatures above 800 °C. The spherical aberration correction electron microscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements both confirm the atomic dispersion of Co atoms stabilized by as-generated N-doped porous carbon. Surprisingly, the obtained Co-Nx single sites exhibit superior ORR performance with a half-wave potential (0.881 V) that is more positive than commercial Pt/C (0.811 V) and most reported non-precious metal catalysts. Durability tests revealed that the Co single atoms exhibit outstanding chemical stability during electrocatalysis and thermal stability that resists sintering at 900 °C. Our findings open up a new routine for general and practical synthesis of a variety of materials bearing single atoms, which could facilitate new discoveries at the atomic scale in condensed materials. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Rocket observation of atomic oxygen and night airglow: Measurement of concentration with an improved resonance fluorescence technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kita

    Full Text Available An improved resonant fluorescence instrument for measuring atomic oxygen concentration was developed to avoid the Doppler effect and the aerodynamic shock effect due to the supersonic motion of a rocket. The shock effect is reduced by adopting a sharp wedge-shaped housing and by scanning of the detector field of view to change the distance between the scattering volume and the surface of the housing. The scanning enables us to determine absolute values of atomic oxygen concentration from relative variation of the scattered light signal due to the self-absorption. The instrument was calibrated in the laboratory, and the numerical simulation reproduced the calibration result. Using the instrument, the altitude profile of atomic oxygen concentration was observed by a rocket experiment at Uchinoura (31°N on 28 January 1992. The data obtained from the rocket experiment were not perfectly free from the shock effect, but errors due to the effect were reduced by the data analysis procedure. The observed maximum concentration was 3.8× 1011 cm–3 at altitudes around 94 km. The systematic error is estimated to be less than ±0.7×1011 cm–3 and the relative random error is less than±0.07× 1011 cm–3at the same altitudes. The altitude profile of the OI 557.7-nm airglow was also observed in the same rocket experiment. The maximum volume emission rate was found to be 150 photons cm–3 s–1 at 94 km. The observed altitude profiles are compared with the MSIS model and other in situ observations.

  19. Optical and electron spin resonance studies of xenon-nitrogen-helium condensates containing nitrogen and oxygen atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltnev, Roman E; Bykhalo, Igor B; Krushinskaya, Irina N; Pelmenev, Alexander A; Khmelenko, Vladimir V; Mao, Shun; Meraki, Adil; Wilde, Scott C; McColgan, Patrick T; Lee, David M

    2015-03-19

    We present the first observations of excimer XeO* molecules in molecular nitrogen films surrounding xenon cores of nanoclusters. Multishell nanoclusters form upon the fast cooling of a helium jet containing small admixtures of nitrogen and xenon by cold helium vapor (T = 1.5 K). Such nanoclusters injected into superfluid helium aggregate into porous impurity-helium condensates. Passage of helium gas with admixtures through a radio frequency discharge allows the storage of high densities of radicals stabilized in impurity-helium condensates. Intense recombination of the radicals occurs during destruction of such condensates and generates excited species observable because of optical emission. Rich spectra of xenon-oxygen complexes have been detected upon destruction of xenon-nitrogen-helium condensates. A xenon environment quenches metastable N((2)D) atoms but has a much weaker effect on the luminescence of N((2)P) atoms. Electron spin resonance spectra of N((4)S) atoms trapped in xenon-nitrogen-helium condensates have been studied. High local concentrations of nitrogen atoms (up to 10(21) cm(-3)) stabilized in xenon-nitrogen nanoclusters have been revealed.

  20. High-resolution X-ray study of the multiple ionization of Pd atoms by fast oxygen ions

    OpenAIRE

    Czarnota, M.; Banaś, D; Berset, Michel; Chmielewska, D; Dousse, Jean-Claude; Hoszowska, Joanna; Maillard, Yves-Patrick; Mauron, Olivier; Pajek, M.; Polasik, M.; Raboud, Pierre-Alexandre; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Słabkowska, K.; Sujkowski, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The multiple ionization of the L- and M-shells of Pd by fast oxygen ions has been studied by measuring with high-resolution the satellite structures of the Lα1,2 X-ray transitions. Relativistic multi-configuration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) calculations were used to interpret the complex X-ray spectrum, allowing to derive the number of L- and M-shell spectator vacancies at the moment of the X-ray emission. After correcting these numbers for the atomic vacancy rearrangement processes that take place pr...

  1. Ground-based observations of Kepler asteroseismic targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uyttterhoeven , K.; Karoff, Christoffer

    2010-01-01

    We present the ground-based activities within the different working groups of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium (KASC). The activities aim at the systematic characterization of the 5000+ KASC targets, and at the collection of ground-based follow-up time-series data of selected promising...

  2. Movable Ground Based Recovery System for Reuseable Space Flight Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver, George L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A reusable space flight launch system is configured to eliminate complex descent and landing systems from the space flight hardware and move them to maneuverable ground based systems. Precision landing of the reusable space flight hardware is enabled using a simple, light weight aerodynamic device on board the flight hardware such as a parachute, and one or more translating ground based vehicles such as a hovercraft that include active speed, orientation and directional control. The ground based vehicle maneuvers itself into position beneath the descending flight hardware, matching its speed and direction and captures the flight hardware. The ground based vehicle will contain propulsion, command and GN&C functionality as well as space flight hardware landing cushioning and retaining hardware. The ground based vehicle propulsion system enables longitudinal and transverse maneuverability independent of its physical heading.

  3. A Comparison of Space and Ground Based Facility Environmental Effects for FEP Teflon. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Kitral, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) Teflon is widely used as a thermal control material for spacecraft, however, it is susceptible to erosion, cracking, and subsequent mechanical failure in low Earth orbit. One of the difficulties in determining whether FEP Teflon will survive during a mission is the wide disparity of erosion rates observed for this material in space and in ground based facilities. Each environment contains different levels of atomic oxygen, ions, and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation in addition to parameters such as the energy of the arriving species and temperature. These variations make it difficult to determine what is causing the observed differences in erosion rates. This paper attempts to narrow down which factors affect the erosion rate of FEP Teflon through attempting to change only one environmental constituent at a time. This was attempted through the use of a single simulation facility (plasma asher) environment with a variety of Faraday cages and VUV transparent windows. Isolating one factor inside of a radio frequency (RF) plasma proved to be very difficult. Two observations could be made. First, it appears that the erosion yield of FEP Teflon with respect to that of polyimide Kapton is not greatly affected by the presence or lack of VUV radiation present in the RF plasma and the relative erosion yield for the FEP Teflon may decrease with increasing fluence. Second, shielding from charged particles appears to lower the relative erosion yield of the FEP to approximately that observed in space, however it is difficult to determine for sure whether ions, electrons, or some other components are causing the enhanced erosion.

  4. Atomic-Scale Modeling of Particle Size Effects for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction of Pt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tritsaris, Georgios; Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Rossmeisl, Jan;

    2011-01-01

    in both the specific and mass activities for particle sizes in the range between 2 and 30 nm. The mass activity is calculated to be maximized for particles of a diameter between 2 and 4 nm. Our study demonstrates how an atomic-scale description of the surface microstructure is a key component...

  5. Single Molecule Atomic Force Microscopy Studies of Photosensitized Singlet Oxygen Behavior on a DNA Origami Template

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helmig, Sarah Wendelboe; Rotaru, Alexandru; Arian, Dumitru

    2010-01-01

    photosensitizer molecule conjugated to a selected DNA origami staple strand on an origami structure. We demonstrate a distance-dependent oxidation of organic moieties incorporated in specific positions on DNA origami by singlet oxygen produced from a single photosensitizer located at the center of each origami....

  6. Synthesis, characterisation, and oxygen atom transfer reactions involving the first gold(I)-alkylperoxo complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Alba; Gómez-Suárez, Adrián; Oonishi, Yoshihiro; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Nolan, Steven P

    2013-11-25

    The synthesis of a new class of organogold species containing a peroxo moiety is reported. Complexes [Au(IPr)(OO(t)Bu)] and [Au(SIPr)(OO(t)Bu)] have been synthesised via a straightforward methodology using the parent gold(I) hydroxide complexes as synthons. These complexes have been successfully used in oxygen-transfer reactions to triphenylphosphine.

  7. Modelling of the heat transfer during oxygen atoms recombination on metallic surfaces in a plasma reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavadias, S; Cauquot, P; Amouroux, J

    1997-01-01

    Space shuttle overheating during the re-entry phase, due to catalytic oxygen recombination on the thermal protection system, is a problem of practical and theoretical interest. The energy transfer is characterised by the product of the accommodation and the recombination coefficients. Previous measu

  8. Photolytic-interference-free, femtosecond, two-photon laser-induced fluorescence imaging of atomic oxygen in flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Roy, Sukesh; Jiang, Naibo; Gord, James R.

    2016-02-01

    Ultrashort-pulse lasers are well suited for nonlinear diagnostic techniques such as two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (TPLIF) because the signals generated scale as the laser intensity squared. Furthermore, the broad spectral bandwidths associated with nearly Fourier-transform-limited ultrashort pulses effectively contribute to efficient nonlinear excitation by coupling through a large number of in-phase photon pairs, thereby producing strong fluorescence signals. Additionally, femtosecond (fs)-duration amplified laser systems typically operate at 1-10 kHz repetition rates, enabling high-repetition-rate imaging in dynamic environments. In previous experiments, we have demonstrated utilization of fs pulses for kilohertz (kHz)-rate, interference-free imaging of atomic hydrogen (H) in flames. In the present study, we investigate the utilization of fs-duration pulses to photolytic-interference-free TPLIF imaging of atomic oxygen (O). In TPLIF of O, photodissociation of vibrationally excited carbon dioxide (CO2) is known to be the prominent interference that produces additional O atoms in the medium. We have found that through the use of fs excitation, such interferences can be virtually eliminated in premixed laminar methane flames, which paves the way for two-dimensional imaging of O at kHz data rates. Such measurements can provide critical data for validating complex, multidimensional turbulent-combustion models as well as for investigating flame dynamics in practical combustion devices.

  9. Ionic properties of ultrathin yttria-stabilized zirconia thin films fabricated by atomic layer deposition with water, oxygen, and ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ho Keun; Jang, Dong Young; Kim, Jun Woo [School of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Anam-Dong, Seongbuk-Gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Kiho [School of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Anam-Dong, Seongbuk-Gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); High-Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Joon Hyung, E-mail: shimm@korea.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Anam-Dong, Seongbuk-Gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-31

    We compared the ionic properties of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin films prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using various oxidants including water, oxygen, and ozone. Cross-plane conductivity measurements were performed at low temperature (50 °C) and high temperature (450 °C) using AC impedance spectroscopy. As a result, we have confirmed that the conductivity of ALD YSZ films below 300 °C is greater by several orders of magnitude compared to the nano-scale YSZ thin films synthesized by other conventional techniques. Among the ALD YSZ samples, ALD YSZ fabricated using water showed the highest conductivity while ALD YSZ fabricated using ozone showed the lowest. We have analyzed this result in relation with grain morphology characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the chemical binding states measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). - Highlights: • YSZ is prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, and O{sub 3} as oxidants. • Grain size of ALD YSZ membranes deposited using H{sub 2}O is the smallest. • Conductivity of ALD YSZ made with H{sub 2}O shows the highest value below 300 °C. • Conductivity trends coincide with the hydroxyl group content measured by XPS.

  10. Reactive and Inelastic Scattering Dynamics of Hyperthermal Oxygen Atoms on a Liquid Hydrocarbon Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, Timothy K.

    2004-03-01

    The saturated hydrocarbon liquid, squalane (2,6,10,15,19,23-hexamethyltetracosane), was used as a target surface for model studies of hyperthermal O-atom reactions with a hydrocarbon surface. Beams containing hyperthermal O(^3P) atoms at average translational energies of 3.0 or 5.2 eV were directed at a continuously refreshed squalane surface, and products that scattered from the surface were monitored with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. Inelastically scattered O and reactively scattered OH and H_2O have been detected, and the dynamical behavior of these products has been characterized. Both the reactive and nonreactive channels were found to occur through thermal and nonthermal processes, with the nonthermal processes dominating. The initial step leading to formation of OH and H_2O products is believed to be H-atom abstraction to form OH. The direct inelastic scattering of O and the direct H-atom abstraction to form OH occur through gas-phase-like collisions, which may be described by a kinematic picture similar to that used to describe scattering in crossed-beams experiments. This kinematic picture allows the determination of the effective surface mass encountered by the incident O atom, the atom-surface collision energy in the center-of-mass (c.m.) frame, and the fraction of the c.m. collision energy that goes into translation of the scattered gaseous product and the recoiling surface fragment. Center-of-mass velocity-flux maps for scattered OH indicate either single-collision events through a largely collinear O-H-C transition state or multiple-collision events in which OH, likely formed by a stripping mechanism, scatters inelastically from the surface. Further studies are underway to investigate experimentally the dynamics of a possible carbon-containing product (OCH_3) that is predicted by theory to be formed (in addition to OH and H_2O) in the hyperthermal reaction of O(^3P) with a hydrocarbon surface.

  11. Erosion of POSS-polyimide films under hypervelocity impact and atomic oxygen: The role of mechanical properties at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verker, R. [Space Environment Group, Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel); School of Mechanical Engineering, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel)], E-mail: rverker@soreq.gov.il; Grossman, E. [Space Environment Group, Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Eliaz, N. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2009-02-15

    Low Earth orbital debris impacts on the external surfaces of satellites have increased dramatically in recent years. Polyimides are used as the outer layer of thermal control insulation blankets, covering most of the external spacecraft surfaces that are exposed to the space environment. A recently developed material, named polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)-polyimide, shows significant enhancement in withstanding the space environment. In this work, the combined effect of ground-simulated hypervelocity space debris impacts and atomic oxygen (AO) on the erosion of POSS-containing polyimide films was investigated. During such hypervelocity impacts, elevated temperatures, on the order of hundreds degrees, are formed. A laser-driven flyer system was used to accelerate aluminum flyers to impact velocities of up to 3 km s{sup -1}. The impacted films were exposed to an oxygen RF plasma environment, simulating the effect of AO in the low Earth orbit. Impacted polyimide films exposed to AO revealed synergistic erosion effect, while impacted POSS-containing samples showed improved erosion resistance. The increased erosion rate of the impacted polyimide film is explained by formation of residual stresses that affect the oxidation mainly by increasing the diffusivity of oxygen into the subsurface layers. Mechanical properties of the POSS-containing samples performed at 450 deg. C and fractographic examination supports the above hypothesis.

  12. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS OF ATOMIC OXYGEN, TEMPERATURE, ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION EFFECTS ON A SPACECRAFT MATERIAL-POLYTETRAFLUOROETHYLENE%空间用聚四氟乙烯材料的原子氧、温度、紫外辐射效应的试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵小虎; 沈志刚; 王忠涛; 邢玉山; 麻树林

    2001-01-01

    在IFM原子氧剥蚀效应地面模拟设备中对空间常用材料聚四氟乙烯进行了原子氧剥蚀效应试验,试样温度升高对原子氧效应的影响以及原子氧与紫外辐射复合效应试验,对试验前后试样的质量及表面形貌进行了比较,得出了材料在设备中的反应特点以及温度升高、紫外辐射对材料的原子氧效应的影响规律。对原子氧与材料的反应机理也做了相应的分析。同时还测量比较了原子氧暴露试验前后、原子氧与紫外辐射复合作用前后试样的反射率、透射率等光学性质。%Spacecraft, running in Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO), will react with environmental conditions, such as atomic oxygen, thermal cycling and ultraviolet radiation, which may severely affect the longevity of spacecraft. Fluorination has lower erosion rate than other materials in space flight exposure tests. So the interactions between this kind of material and environment are of great interest to the aerospace engineering community. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE Teflon) is a commonly used spacecraft material, on which experiment are constructed in this paper to investigate the atomic oxygen erosion effects, the impact of the temperature change on the atomic oxygen effects and the ultraviolet radiation effects with atomic oxygen effects ground-based simulation facility. The sample material before and after the experiments is compared in mass and surface morphology. The reaction characteristics of the material in the facility and the impact of temperature change and ultraviolet radiation on atomic oxygen effects were acquired. Through analyzing the reaction mechanism between atomic oxygen and PTFE Teflon, it was concluded that the collision of energetic particles may be an important factor of PTFE Teflon mass loss. Optic properties, such as reflectivity and transmissivity, before and after experiments were measured and compared.

  13. Hypervelocity Oxygen Source for the Study of Atom-Surface Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    conclusions. Based on two space shuttle flights (STS-5 and STS-8), they have established that carbon based composites, polymers and organic films have...under single collision conditions. The most popular technique for studying "hot atom chemistry" today involves photodissociating precursor molecules to...ultraviolet solar flux. Recent results indicate for instance, that silicon dioxide , normally quite inert to further reaction, can be made unstable by 4 4-5

  14. Water-Soluble Iron(IV)-Oxo Complexes Supported by Pentapyridine Ligands: Axial Ligand Effects on Hydrogen Atom and Oxygen Atom Transfer Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantarojsiri, Teera; Sun, Yujie; Long, Jeffrey R; Chang, Christopher J

    2015-06-15

    We report the photochemical generation and study of a family of water-soluble iron(IV)-oxo complexes supported by pentapyridine PY5Me2-X ligands (PY5Me2 = 2,6-bis(1,1-bis(2-pyridyl)ethyl)pyridine; X = CF3, H, Me, or NMe2), in which the oxidative reactivity of these ferryl species correlates with the electronic properties of the axial pyridine ligand. Synthesis of a systematic series of [Fe(II)(L)(PY5Me2-X)](2+) complexes, where L = CH3CN or H2O, and characterizations by several methods, including X-ray crystallography, cyclic voltammetry, and Mössbauer spectroscopy, show that increasing the electron-donating ability of the axial pyridine ligand tracks with less positive Fe(III)/Fe(II) reduction potentials and quadrupole splitting parameters. The Fe(II) precursors are readily oxidized to their Fe(IV)-oxo counterparts using either chemical outer-sphere oxidants such as CAN (ceric ammonium nitrate) or flash-quench photochemical oxidation with [Ru(bpy)3](2+) as a photosensitizer and K2S2O8 as a quencher. The Fe(IV)-oxo complexes are capable of oxidizing the C-H bonds of alkane (4-ethylbenzenesulfonate) and alcohol (benzyl alcohol) substrates via hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and an olefin (4-styrenesulfonate) substrate by oxygen atom transfer (OAT). The [Fe(IV)(O)(PY5Me2-X)](2+) derivatives with electron-poor axial ligands show faster rates of HAT and OAT compared to their counterparts supported by electron-rich axial donors, but the magnitudes of these differences are relatively modest.

  15. Atmospheric plasma generates oxygen atoms as oxidizing species in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtar Hefny, Mohamed; Pattyn, Cedric; Lukes, Petr; Benedikt, Jan

    2016-10-01

    A remote microscale atmospheric pressure plasma jet (µAPPJ) with He, He/H2O, He/O2, and He/O2/H2O gas mixtures was used to study the transport of reactive species from the gas phase into the liquid and the following aqueous phase chemistry. The effects induced by the µAPPJ in water were quantitatively studied using phenol as a chemical probe and by measuring H2O2 concentration and pH values. These results were combined with the analysis of the absolute densities of the reactive species and the modeling of convective/diffusion transport and recombination reactions in the effluent of the plasma jet. Additionally, modified plasma jets were used to show that the role of emitted photons in aqueous chemistry is negligible for these plasma sources. The fastest phenol degradation was measured for the He/O2 plasma, followed by He/H2O, He/O2/H2O, and He plasmas. The modeled quantitative flux of O atoms into the liquid in the He/O2 plasma case was highly comparable with the phenol degradation rate and showed a very high transfer efficiency of reactive species from the plasma into the liquid, where more than half of the O atoms leaving the jet nozzle entered the liquid. The results indicate that the high oxidative effect of He/O2 plasma was primarily due to solvated O atoms, whereas OH radicals dominated the oxidative effects induced in water by plasmas with other gas mixtures. These findings help to understand, in a quantitative way, the complex interaction of cold atmospheric plasmas with aqueous solutions and will allow a better understanding of the interaction of these plasmas with water or buffered solutions containing biological macromolecules, microorganisms, or even eukaryotic cells. Additionally, the µAPPJ He/O2 plasma source seems to be an ideal tool for the generation of O atoms in aqueous solutions for any future studies of their reactivity.

  16. Hetero-atom doped carbon nanotubes for dye degradation and oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandan, Ravi, E-mail: aerawat27@gmail.com; Nanda, Karuna Kar [Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore-560012 (India)

    2015-06-24

    We report the synthesis of nitrogen doped vertically aligned multi-walled (MWNCNTs) carbon nanotubes by pyrolysis and its catalytic performance for degradation of methylene blue (MB) dye & oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The degradation of MB was monitored spectrophotometrically with time. Kinetic studies show the degradation of MB follows a first order kinetic with rate constant k=0.0178 min{sup −1}. The present rate constant is better than that reported for various supported/non-supported semiconducting nanomaterials. Further ORR performance in alkaline media makes MWNCNTs a promising cost-effective, fuel crossover tolerance, metal-free, eco-friendly cathode catalyst for direct alcohol fuel cell.

  17. Hetero-atom doped carbon nanotubes for dye degradation and oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandan, Ravi; Nanda, Karuna Kar

    2015-06-01

    We report the synthesis of nitrogen doped vertically aligned multi-walled (MWNCNTs) carbon nanotubes by pyrolysis and its catalytic performance for degradation of methylene blue (MB) dye & oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The degradation of MB was monitored spectrophotometrically with time. Kinetic studies show the degradation of MB follows a first order kinetic with rate constant k=0.0178 min-1. The present rate constant is better than that reported for various supported/non-supported semiconducting nanomaterials. Further ORR performance in alkaline media makes MWNCNTs a promising cost-effective, fuel crossover tolerance, metal-free, eco-friendly cathode catalyst for direct alcohol fuel cell.

  18. Low-energy quantum dynamics of atoms at defects; interstitial oxygen in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Rafael; Herrero, Carlos P.; Artacho, Emilio; Ynduráin, Félix

    1997-04-01

    The problem of the low-energy highly anharmonic quantum dynamics of isolated impurities in solids is addressed by using path-integral Monte Carlo simulations. Interstitial oxygen in silicon is studied as a prototypical example showing such a behaviour. The assignment of a `geometry' to the defect is discussed. Depending on the potential (or on the impurity mass), there is a `classical' regime, where the maximum probability density for the oxygen nucleus is at the potential minimum. There is another regime, associated with highly anharmonic potentials, where this is not the case. The two regimes are separated by a sharp transition. Also, the decoupling of the many-nuclei problem into a one-body Hamiltonian to describe the low-energy dynamics is studied. The adiabatic potential obtained from the relaxation of all of the other degrees of freedom at each value of the coordinate associated with the low-energy motion gives the best approximation to the full many-nuclei problem.

  19. Modelling the impact of noctilucent cloud formation on atomic oxygen and other minor constituents of the summer mesosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Murray

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation, evolution and eventual sublimation of noctilucent clouds (NLC may have a significant effect on the odd oxygen and hydrogen chemistry of the high latitude summer mesosphere. Three mechanisms are considered here: the direct uptake of atomic oxygen on the surface of the ice particles; the redistribution of water vapour, which changes the photochemical source of odd hydrogen species; and the direct photolysis of the ice particles themselves to produce odd hydrogen species in the gas phase. A 1-D photochemical model is employed to investigate the potential importance of these mechanisms. This shows, using the recently measured uptake coefficients of O on ice, that the heterogeneous removal of O on the surface of the cloud particles is too slow by at least a factor of 5x103 to compete with gas-phase O chemistry. The second and third mechanisms involve the solar Lyman-α photolysis of H2O in the gas and solid phase, respectively. During twilight, Lyman-α radiation is severely attenuated and these mechanisms are insignificant. In contrast, when the upper mesosphere is fully illuminated there is a dramatic impact on the O profile, with depletion of O at the base of the cloud layer of close to an order of magnitude. A correspondingly large depletion in O3 is also predicted, while H, OH, HO2 and H2O2 are found to be enhanced by factors of 3-5. In fact, rocket-borne mass spectrometer measurements during summer have revealed local H2O2 enhancements in the region of the clouds. Rocket-borne measurements of atomic O and O3 profiles in the presence of mesospheric clouds in the daytime are highly desirable to test the predictions of this model and our understanding of the genesis of mesospheric clouds.

  20. First-principle study of atomic oxygen and nitrogen adsorption on (1 1 1) β-cristobalite as a model of thermal protection coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchachenko, A. A.; Kroupnov, A. A.; Kovalev, V. L.

    2014-07-01

    Atomic oxygen and nitrogen adsorption on the Si site of the (1 1 1) face of ideal β-cristobalite is studied within the cluster model using the density functional approach. The M06 and B3LYP functionals are found to be the most appropriate for studying atomic adsorption on silica. The calculations show significant difference in adsorption properties with respect to previously studied (1 0 0) β-cristobalite face, but do not reveal remarkable effect of the surface relaxation.

  1. Studies of Ultra High Temperature Ceramic Composite Components: Synthesis and Characterization of HfOxCy and Si Oxidation in Atomic Oxygen Containing Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    protective coatings since either HfC was produced with either carbon vacancies or oxygen inclusion or the films had non-uniform properties. The preparation ...thin films prepared by laser ablation: material distribution and droplet problem, Mater. Sci. Eng., 1992, B13, 67-74. 13. Gyorgy E., Mihailescu...Adsorption of atomic oxygen and nitrogen at β- Cristobalite (100): a density functonal theory study, J. Phys. Chem. B, 2005, 109, 14954-14964. 8

  2. Preparation of high-content hexagonal boron nitride composite film and characterization of atomic oxygen erosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Min; Gu, Yizhuo; Wang, Shaokai; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2017-04-01

    Space aircrafts circling in low earth orbit are suffered from highly reactive atomic oxygen (AO). To shield AO, a flexible thin film with 80 wt.% hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and h-BN/epoxy film were fabricated through vacuum filtration and adding nanofibrillated cellulose fibers. H-BN nanosheets were hydroxylated for enhancing interaction in the films. Mass loss and erosion yield at accumulated AO fluence about 3.04 × 1020 atoms/cm2 were adopted to evaluate the AO resistance properties of the films. A carpet-like rough surface, chemical oxidations and change in crystal structure of h-BN were found after AO treatment, and the degrading mechanism was proposed. The mass loss and erosion yield under AO attack were compared between h-BN film and h-BN/epoxy film, and the comparison was also done for various types of shielding AO materials. Excellent AO resistance property of h-BN film is shown, and the reasons are analyzed.

  3. Atomic structure of unligated laccase from Cerrena maxima at 1.76 A with molecular oxygen and hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukova, Yu. N., E-mail: amm@ns.crys.ras.ru; Lyashenko, A. V.; Lashkov, A. A.; Gur' yanov, V. A.; Kobyl' skaya, Yu. V.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Mikhailov, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2010-05-15

    The three-dimensional structure of unligated laccase from Cerrena maxima was established by X-ray diffraction at 1.76-A resolution; R{sub work} = 18.07%, R{sub free} = 21.71%, rmsd of bond lengths, bond angles, and chiral angles are 0.008 A, 1.19{sup o}, and 0.077{sup o}, respectively. The coordinate error for the refined structure estimated from the Luzzati plot is 0.195 A. The maximum average error in the atomic coordinates is 0.047 A. A total of 99.4% of amino-acid residues of the polypeptide chain are in the most favorable, allowable, and accessible regions of the Ramachandran plot. The three-dimensional structures of the complexes of laccase from C. maxima with molecular oxygen and hydrogen peroxide were determined by the molecular simulation. These data provide insight into the structural aspect of the mechanism of the enzymatic cycle. The structure factors and the refined atomic coordinates were deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB-ID code is 3DIV).

  4. Surface reaction mechanisms during ozone and oxygen plasma assisted atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Vikrant R; Vandalon, Vincent; Agarwal, Sumit

    2010-09-07

    We have elucidated the reaction mechanism and the role of the reactive intermediates in the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide from trimethyl aluminum in conjunction with O(3) and an O(2) plasma. In situ attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy data show that both -OH groups and carbonates are formed on the surface during the oxidation cycle. These carbonates, once formed on the surface, are stable to prolonged O(3) exposure in the same cycle. However, in the case of plasma-assisted ALD, the carbonates decompose upon prolonged O(2) plasma exposure via a series reaction kinetics of the type, A (CH(3)) --> B (carbonates) --> C (Al(2)O(3)). The ratio of -OH groups to carbonates on the surface strongly depends on the oxidizing agent, and also the duration of the oxidation cycle in plasma-assisted ALD. However, in both O(3) and O(2) plasma cycles, carbonates are a small fraction of the total number of reactive sites compared to the hydroxyl groups.

  5. Hyperspherical elliptic coordinates treatment of muon transfer from muonic hydrogen to atomic oxygen

    CERN Document Server

    Dupays, A; Beswick, J A; Rizzo, C; Bakalov, D; Dupays, Arnaud; Lepetit, Bruno; Rizzo, Carlo; Bakalov, Dimitar

    2003-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical calculations of muon transfer between muonic hydrogen and an oxygen nuclei for $s$ waves and collision energies in the range $10^{-3} - 10^3$ eV, are presented. Close-coupling time-independent Schr\\"odinger equations, written in terms of hyperspherical elliptic coordinates were integrated along the hyper-radius to obtain the partial and total muon-transfer probabilities. The results show the expected Wigner-Bethe threshold behavior up to collision energies of the order of $10^{-2}$ eV and pronounced maxima at $10^2$ eV which can be interpreted in terms of crossings between potential energy curves corresponding to the entrance channel state $(\\mu p)_{1s} + \\mO$ and two product channels which asymptotically correlate to $p + (\\mO\\mu)_{n=5,6}$. The population of the final states with different orbital angular momenta is found to be essentially independent of energy in the range considered in this work. This can be attributed to a strong selection rule for the conservation of the quantum number...

  6. Atomic oxygen in a cold argon plasma jet: TALIF spectroscopy in ambient air with modelling and measurements of ambient species diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, S.; Winter, J.; Schmidt-Bleker, A.; Schroeder, D.; Lange, H.; Knake, N.; Schulz-von der Gathen, V.; Weltmann, K.-D.

    2012-04-01

    By investigating the atomic oxygen density in its effluent, two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) spectroscopy measurements are for the first time performed in a cold argon/oxygen atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The measurements are carried out in ambient air and quenching by inflowing air species is considered. We propose a novel absorption technique in the VUV spectral range, where emission originating from within the discharge is used as light source to determine the inflow of atmospheric oxygen into the effluent. Furthermore, we propose a modelling solution for the on-axis density of inflowing ambient air based on the stationary convection-diffusion equation.

  7. Biosensors for EVA: Improved Instrumentation for Ground-based Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, B.; Ellerby, G.; Zou, F.; Scott, P.; Jin, C.; Lee, S. M. C.; Coates, J.

    2010-01-01

    During lunar excursions in the EVA suit, real-time measurement of metabolic rate is required to manage consumables and guide activities to ensure safe return to the base. Metabolic rate, or oxygen consumption (VO2), is normally measured from pulmonary parameters but cannot be determined with standard techniques in the oxygen-rich environment of a spacesuit. Our group has developed novel near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) methods to calculate muscle oxygen saturation (SmO 2), hematocrit, and pH, and we recently demonstrated that we can use our NIRS sensor to measure VO 2 on the leg during cycling. Our NSBRI project has 4 objectives: (1) increase the accuracy of the metabolic rate calculation through improved prediction of stroke volume; (2) investigate the relative contributions of calf and thigh oxygen consumption to metabolic rate calculation for walking and running; (3) demonstrate that the NIRS-based noninvasive metabolic rate methodology is sensitive enough to detect decrement in VO 2 in a space analog; and (4) improve instrumentation to allow testing within a spacesuit. Over the past year we have made progress on all four objectives, but the most significant progress was made in improving the instrumentation. The NIRS system currently in use at JSC is based on fiber optics technology. Optical fiber bundles are used to deliver light from a light source in the monitor to the patient, and light reflected back from the patient s muscle to the monitor for spectroscopic analysis. The fiber optic cables are large and fragile, and there is no way to get them in and out of the test spacesuit used for ground-based studies. With complimentary funding from the US Army, we undertook a complete redesign of the sensor and control electronics to build a novel system small enough to be used within the spacesuit and portable enough to be used by a combat medic. In the new system the filament lamp used in the fiber optic system was replaced with a novel broadband near infrared

  8. Biosensors for EVA: Improved Instrumentation for Ground-based Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, B.; Ellerby, G.; Zou, F.; Scott, P.; Jin, C.; Lee, S. M. C.; Coates, J.

    2010-01-01

    During lunar excursions in the EVA suit, real-time measurement of metabolic rate is required to manage consumables and guide activities to ensure safe return to the base. Metabolic rate, or oxygen consumption (VO2), is normally measured from pulmonary parameters but cannot be determined with standard techniques in the oxygen-rich environment of a spacesuit. Our group has developed novel near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) methods to calculate muscle oxygen saturation (SmO 2), hematocrit, and pH, and we recently demonstrated that we can use our NIRS sensor to measure VO 2 on the leg during cycling. Our NSBRI project has 4 objectives: (1) increase the accuracy of the metabolic rate calculation through improved prediction of stroke volume; (2) investigate the relative contributions of calf and thigh oxygen consumption to metabolic rate calculation for walking and running; (3) demonstrate that the NIRS-based noninvasive metabolic rate methodology is sensitive enough to detect decrement in VO 2 in a space analog; and (4) improve instrumentation to allow testing within a spacesuit. Over the past year we have made progress on all four objectives, but the most significant progress was made in improving the instrumentation. The NIRS system currently in use at JSC is based on fiber optics technology. Optical fiber bundles are used to deliver light from a light source in the monitor to the patient, and light reflected back from the patient s muscle to the monitor for spectroscopic analysis. The fiber optic cables are large and fragile, and there is no way to get them in and out of the test spacesuit used for ground-based studies. With complimentary funding from the US Army, we undertook a complete redesign of the sensor and control electronics to build a novel system small enough to be used within the spacesuit and portable enough to be used by a combat medic. In the new system the filament lamp used in the fiber optic system was replaced with a novel broadband near infrared

  9. High time resolution measurements of the thermosphere from Fabry-Perot Interferometer measurements of atomic oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. K. Ford

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the performance of CCD detectors have enabled a high time resolution study of the high latitude upper thermosphere with Fabry-Perot Interferometers (FPIs to be performed. 10-s integration times were used during a campaign in April 2004 on an FPI located in northern Sweden in the auroral oval. The FPI is used to study the thermosphere by measuring the oxygen red line emission at 630.0 nm, which emits at an altitude of approximately 240 km. Previous time resolutions have been 4 min at best, due to the cycle of look directions normally observed. By using 10 s rather than 40 s integration times, and by limiting the number of full cycles in a night, high resolution measurements down to 15 s were achievable. This has allowed the maximum variability of the thermospheric winds and temperatures, and 630.0 nm emission intensities, at approximately 240 km, to be determined as a few minutes. This is a significantly greater variability than the often assumed value of 1 h or more. A Lomb-Scargle analysis of this data has shown evidence of gravity wave activity with waves with short periods. Gravity waves are an important feature of mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT dynamics, observed using many techniques and providing an important mechanism for energy transfer between atmospheric regions. At high latitudes gravity waves may be generated in-situ by localised auroral activity. Short period waves were detected in all four clear nights when this experiment was performed, in 630.0 nm intensities and thermospheric winds and temperatures. Waves with many periodicities were observed, from periods of several hours, down to 14 min. These waves were seen in all parameters over several nights, implying that this variability is a typical property of the thermosphere.

  10. Extremely stable platinum nanoparticles encapsulated in a zirconia nanocage by area-selective atomic layer deposition for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Niancai; Banis, Mohammad Norouzi; Liu, Jian; Riese, Adam; Li, Xia; Li, Ruying; Ye, Siyu; Knights, Shanna; Sun, Xueliang

    2015-01-14

    Encapsulation of Pt nanoparticles (NPs) in a zirconia nanocage by area-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) can significantly enhance both the Pt stability and activity. Such encapsulated Pt NPs show 10 times more stability than commercial Pt/C catalysts and an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity 6.4 times greater than that of Pt/C.

  11. Validity of actinometry to monitor oxygen atom concentration in microwave discharges created by surface wave in O2-N2 mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granier, A.; Chéreau, D.; Henda, K.; Safari, R.; Leprince, P.

    1994-01-01

    The validity of actinometry to monitor oxygen atom concentration in O2-N2 microwave discharges created by surface wave is investigated. The plasma is created with a gas flow in a quartz tube of inner diameter 16 mm at pressures in the Torr range. First, it is shown that the reliability of actinometry can be deduced from the longitudinal profile of the actinometry signal. Second, absolute concentrations of oxygen atoms are estimated from the experimental actinometry signal and agree satisfactorily with concentrations simultaneously measured by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) absorption downstream from the plasma. Moreover, upon varying the nitrogen percentage (0%-100%), it is evidenced that the actinometry signal is proportional to the concentration measured by VUV absorption. Furthermore, it is evidenced that the oxygen dissociation rate is only 2% in pure oxygen plasmas, while it reaches 15% (433 MHz) or 30% (2450 MHz) for mixtures containing more than 20% of nitrogen. This drastic increase in [O] upon the addition of N2 is extensively discussed and, finally, attributed to a decrease in the recombination frequency of oxygen atoms on the quartz wall, in the presence of nitrogen.

  12. Modelling the impact of noctilucent cloud formation on atomic oxygen and other minor constituents of the summer mesosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Murray

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The formation, evolution and eventual sublimation of noctilucent clouds (NLC could have a significant effect on the odd oxygen and hydrogen chemistry of the high latitude summer mesosphere. Three mechanisms are considered here: the direct uptake of atomic oxygen on the surface of the ice particles; the redistribution of water vapour, which changes the photochemical source of odd hydrogen species; and the direct photolysis of the ice particles themselves to produce odd hydrogen species in the gas phase. A 1-D photochemical model is employed to investigate the potential importance of these mechanisms. This shows, using the recently measured uptake coefficients of O on ice, that the heterogeneous removal of O on the surface of the cloud particles is too slow by at least a factor of 5×103 to compete with gas-phase O chemistry. The second and third mechanisms involve the solar Lyman-α photolysis of H2O in the gas and solid phase, respectively. During twilight, Lyman-α radiation is severely attenuated and these mechanisms are insignificant. In contrast, when the upper mesosphere is fully illuminated there is a dramatic impact on the O profile, with depletion of O at the base of the cloud layer of close to an order of magnitude. A correspondingly large depletion in O3 is also predicted, while H, OH, HO2 and H2O2 are found to be enhanced by factors of 3–5. In fact, rocket-borne mass spectrometer measurements during summer have revealed local H2O2 enhancements in the region of the clouds. Rocket-borne measurements of atomic O and O3 profiles in the presence of mesospheric clouds in the daytime are highly desirable to test the predictions of this model and our understanding of the genesis of mesospheric clouds.

  13. Atomic ensemble and electronic effects in Ag-rich AgPd nanoalloy catalysts for oxygen reduction in alkaline media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slanac, Daniel A; Hardin, William G; Johnston, Keith P; Stevenson, Keith J

    2012-06-13

    The ability to design and characterize uniform, bimetallic alloy nanoparticles, where the less active metal enhances the activity of the more active metal, would be of broad interest in catalysis. Herein, we demonstrate that simultaneous reduction of Ag and Pd precursors provides uniform, Ag-rich AgPd alloy nanoparticles (~5 nm) with high activities for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. The particles are crystalline and uniformly alloyed, as shown by X-ray diffraction and probe corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. The ORR mass activity per total metal was 60% higher for the AgPd(2) alloy relative to pure Pd. The mass activities were 2.7 and 3.2 times higher for Ag(9)Pd (340 mA/mg(metal)) and Ag(4)Pd (598 mA/mg(metal)), respectively, than those expected for a linear combination of mass activities of Ag (60 mA/mg(Ag)) and Pd (799 mA/mg(Pd)) particles, based on rotating disk voltammetry. Moreover, these synergy factors reached 5-fold on a Pd mass basis. For silver-rich alloys (Ag(≥4)Pd), the particle surface is shown to contain single Pd atoms surrounded by Ag from cyclic voltammetry and CO stripping measurements. This morphology is favorable for the high activity through a combination of modified electronic structure, as shown by XPS, and ensemble effects, which facilitate the steps of oxygen bond breaking and desorption for the ORR. This concept of tuning the heteroatomic interactions on the surface of small nanoparticles with low concentrations of precious metals for high synergy in catalytic activity may be expected to be applicable to a wide variety of nanoalloys.

  14. Replacement of an oxo by an imido group in oxotransferase model compounds: influence on the oxygen atom transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mösch-Zanetti, Nadia C; Wurm, Dietmar; Volpe, Manuel; Lyashenko, Ganna; Harum, Bastian; Belaj, Ferdinand; Baumgartner, Judith

    2010-10-04

    Treatment of [MoO(N-t-Bu)Cl(2)(dme)] (dme = dimethoxyethane) with 2 equiv of the potassium salts of Schiff base ligands of the type KArNC(CH(3))CHC(CH(3))O afforded oxo imido molybdenum(VI) compounds [MoO(N-t-Bu)L(2)] {1, with Ar = phenyl (L(Ph)), 2 with Ar = 2-tolyl (L(MePh)), 3 with Ar = 2,6-dimethylphenyl (L(Me2Ph)) and 4 with Ar = 2,6-diisopropylphenyl (L(iPr2Ph))}. We have also prepared related bisimido complexes [Mo(N-t-Bu)(2)L(2) (5 with L = L(Ph), 6 with L = L(MePh), and 7 with L = L(Me2Ph)) by treatment of [Mo(N-t-Bu)(2)Cl(2)(dme)] with 2 equiv of the potassium salt of the respective ligand. 1, 3, 5, and 6 were characterized via single crystal X-ray diffraction. The oxo imido complexes exhibit oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reactivity toward trimethyl phosphine. Kinetic data were obtained for 1 and 3 by UV/vis spectroscopy revealing decreased OAT reactivity in comparison to related dioxo complexes with the same Schiff base ligands and decreased reactivity of 1 versus 3. Cyclic voltammetry was used to probe the electronic situation at the molybdenum center showing reversible reduction waves for 3 and [MoO(2)(L(Me2Ph))(2)] at comparable potentials while 1 exhibits a significant lower potential. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations showed a higher electron density on oxygen in the oxo imido complexes.

  15. Synergic effect of atomic oxygen and outgassing phenomena on Carbon/SiC composites for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, Marta

    The space environment is one of the most critical for space structures. The low earth orbit (LEO) space environment includes hazards such as atomic oxygen, UV radiation, ionizing radiation (electrons, protons), high vacuum, plasma, micrometeoroids and debris, as well as severe temperature cycles. Exposure of composites to the space environment may result in different detrimental effects via modification of their chemical, electrical, thermal, optical and mechanical properties as well as surface erosion. The high vacuum induces material outgassing (e.g. low-molecular weight residues, plasticizers and additives) and consequent contamination of nearby surfaces. At LEO altitudes the neutral atmosphere consists primarily of ATOX (˜80%) and nitrogen molecules (˜20%). ATOX, which is formed by photo-dissociation of molecular oxygen in the upper atmosphere, is a severe hazard for composites. The number density of ATOX at about 300 km altitude is ˜2 × 109 to 8 × 109 atoms/cm3, for minimum and maximum solar activity, respectively. Front surfaces (ram direction) of space vehicles orbiting at a velocity of about 8 km/s collide with the ATOX species with impingement kinetic energy of approximately 5 eV. The ATOX flux is determined by such parameters as altitude, orbital inclination, solar activity and time of day. A nominal range of values for LEO is 1014-1015 atoms/cm2 s. The Low Earth Orbit is a complex and dynamic environment where constituents vary with position, local time, season and solar activity. Effects of different constituents of the space environment on spacecraft materials play an important role in determining the system function, reliability and lifetime. This is more crucial if the structure has to be used for the re-entry as thermal protection systems for example. In this case the integrity of the surface and its coating is crucial for the success of the entire mission. During the re-entry, resistance of materials is hard tested by fast chemical reactions

  16. Determination of total arsenic in coal and wood using oxygen flask combustion method followed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Wenhua; Furuzono, Takuya; Nakajima, Tsunenori; Takanashi, Hirokazu; Ohki, Akira

    2010-04-15

    A simple and sensitive procedure for the determination of total arsenic in coal and wood was conducted by use of oxygen flask combustion (OFC) followed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS). The effect of various items (composition of absorbent, standing time between the combustion and filtration, particle size and mass of sample) was investigated. Under the optimized conditions of the OFC method, nine certified reference materials were analyzed, and the values of arsenic concentration obtained by this method were in good accordance with the certified values. The limit of detection (LOD) and relative standard deviation (RSD) of the method were 0.29 microg g(-1) and less than 8%, respectively. In addition, eight kinds of coals and four chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood wastes were analyzed by the present method, and the data were compared to those from the microwave-acid digestion (MW-AD) method. The determination of arsenic in solid samples was discussed in terms of applicable scope and concentration range of arsenic.

  17. Two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurement of atomic oxygen density in an air atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Jim; Gogna, Gurusharan; Daniels, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    Two-photon Absorption Laser Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) is used to measure atomic oxygen number density [O] in an air Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet (APPJ). A novel technique based on photolysis of O2 is used to calibrate the TALIF system ensuring the same species (O) is probed during calibration and measurement. As a result, laser intensity can be increased outside the TALIF quadratic laser power region without affecting calibration reliability as any high intensity saturation effects will be identical for calibration and experiment. Higher laser intensity gives stronger TALIF signals helping overcome weak TALIF signals often experienced at atmospheric pressure due to collisional quenching. O2 photo-dissociation and two-photon excitation of the resulting [O] are both achieved within the same laser pulse. The photolysis [O] is spatially non-uniform and time varying. To allow valid comparison with [O] in a plasma, spatial and temporal correction factors are required. Knowledge of the laser pulse intensity I0(t), and wavelength allows correction factors to be found using a rate equation model. The air flow into the jet was fixed and the RF power coupled into the system varied. The resulting [O] was found to increase with RF power.

  18. Simultaneous Laser-induced Fluorescence of Nitric Oxide and Atomic Oxygen in the Hypersonic Materials Environment Test System Arcjet Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Craig; Lincoln, Daniel; Bathel, Brett; Inman, Jennifer; Danehy, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous nitric oxide (NO) and atomic oxygen (O) laser induced fluorescence (LIF) experiments were performed in the Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System (HYMETS) facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. The data serves as an experimental database for validation for chemical and thermal nonequilibrium models used in hypersonic flows. Measurements were taken over a wide range of stagnation enthalpies (6.7 - 18.5 MJ/kg) using an Earth atmosphere simulant with a composition of 75% N2, 20% O2, and 5% Ar (by volume). These are the first simultaneous measurements of NO and O LIF to be reported in literature for the HYMETS facility. The maximum O LIF mean signal intensity was observed at a stagnation enthalpy of approximately 12 MJ/kg while the maximum NO LIF mean signal intensity was observed at a stagnation enthalpy of 6.7 MJ/kg. Experimental results were compared to simple fluorescence model that assumes equilibrium conditions in the plenum and frozen chemistry in the isentropic nozzle expansion (Mach 5). The equilibrium calculations were performed using CANTERA v2.1.1 with 16 species. The fluorescence model captured the correlation in mean O and NO LIF signal intensities over the entire range of stagnation enthalpies tested. Very weak correlations between single-shot O and NO LIF intensities were observed in the experiments at all of the stagnation enthalpy conditions.

  19. The effects of sulfur substitution for the nucleophile and bridging oxygen atoms in reactions of hydroxyalkyl phosphate esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Subashree; Hengge, Alvan C

    2008-07-04

    The effects of sulfur substitution on the reactions of hydroxyalkyl phosphate esters are examined. These compounds are models for the intramolecular phosphoryl transfer reaction involved in the cleavage of the internucleotide bond in RNA. The models studied here lack the ribose ring and their conformational flexibility results in greater stability and the availability of different reaction pathways. Sulfur in the nucleophilic position shows no nucleophilic reaction at phosphorus, instead rapidly attacking at the beta carbon atom, forming thiirane with departure of a phosphomonoester. Sulfur substitution at either of the two bridging positions leads to cleavage of the diester via formation of a cyclic intermediate, but with significant rate acceleration when compared to the oxygen analogues. The bridge-substituted models react substantially slower than the analogous ribose compounds with sulfur substitution at comparable positions. Kinetic isotope effects reveal significant differences in the transition state depending on which bridging position sulfur occupies. When sulfur is in the scissile bridging position, a highly associative transition state is indicated, with a largely formed bond to the nucleophile and the scissile P-S bond is little changed. When sulfur occupies the other bridging position, the isotope effects imply a very early transition state in a concerted reaction.

  20. High-resolution X-ray study of the multiple ionization of Pd atoms by fast oxygen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarnota, M.; Banas, D.; Pajek, M. [Jan Kochanowski Univ., Institute of Physics, Kielce (Poland); Berset, M.; Dousse, J.C.; Hoszowska, J.; Maillard, Y.P.; Mauron, O.; Raboud, P.A. [Fribourg Univ., Dept. of Physics (Switzerland); Chmielewska, D.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Sujkowski, Z. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Polasik, M.; Slabkowska, K. [Nicholas Copernicus Univ., Faculty of Chemistry, Torun (Poland)

    2010-04-15

    The multiple ionization of the L- and M-shells of Pd by fast oxygen ions has been studied by measuring with high-resolution the satellite structures of the Lalpha{sub 1,2} X-ray transitions. Relativistic multi-configuration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) calculations were used to interpret the complex X-ray spectrum, allowing to derive the number of L- and M-shell spectator vacancies at the moment of the X-ray emission. After correcting these numbers for the atomic vacancy rearrangement processes that take place prior to the X-ray emission, the ionization probabilities corresponding to the collision time were obtained. The latter were compared to predictions of the semiclassical approximation (SCA) and the geometrical model. The SCA calculations were performed using relativistic hydrogenic and self-consistent Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) electronic wave functions. It was found that the use of the more realistic DHF wave functions in the SCA calculations leads to a much better description of the measured ionization probabilities for both the L- and M-shells. (authors)

  1. Study of apical oxygen atoms in a spin-ladder cuprate compound by X-ray absorption spectroscopy near the Cu K edge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatterer, C.J.; Eustache, B.; Collin, L.; Beuran, C.F.; Partiot, C.; Germain, P.; Xu, X.Z.; Lagues, M. [CNRS, Paris (France). Surfaces et Supraconducteurs; Michalowicz, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Desordonnes, Universite Paris XII Val-de-Marne, 61 avenue du general de Gaulle, 94010, Creteil Cedex (France)]|[LURE, Universite Paris Sud, 91405, Orsay Cedex (France); Moscovici, J. [Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Desordonnes, Universite Paris XII Val-de-Marne, 61 avenue du general de Gaulle, 94010, Creteil Cedex (France); Deville Cavellin, C. [CNRS, Paris (France). Surfaces et Supraconducteurs]|[Laboratoire d`Electronique, Universite Paris XII Val-de-Marne, 61 av. du general de Gaulle, 94010, Creteil Cedex (France); Traverse, A. [LURE, Universite Paris Sud, 91405, Orsay Cedex (France)

    1997-04-01

    The structure of high-T{sub c} superconducting cuprate compounds is based on CuO{sub 2} planes alternating with blocks that behave as charge reservoirs. The apical oxygen atoms which belong to these reservoirs are suspected to play a role in the mechanism of superconductivity. It thus seems necessary to measure the amount of apical oxygen atoms in various compounds, as a function of the superconducting properties. Polarisation dependent X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements were performed near the Cu K-edge on three types of phases. We collected information about the neighbourhood of the copper atom in the cuprate planes and in the direction perpendicular to these planes. Two of these phases have well known structures: Bi2212 in which copper atoms are on a pyramidal site and infinite layer phase, a square planar cuprate without apical oxygen. We used the obtained results as reference data to study a new copper-rich phase related to the spin-ladder series. (orig.)

  2. GLAST and Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The launch of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope together with the advent of a new generation of ground-based gamma-ray detectors such as VERITAS, HESS, MAGIC and CANGAROO, will usher in a new era of high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics. GLAST and the ground based gamma-ray observatories will provide highly complementary capabilities for spectral, temporal and spatial studies of high energy gamma-ray sources. Joint observations will cover a huge energy range, from 20 MeV to over 20 TeV. The LAT will survey the entire sky every three hours, allowing it both to perform uniform, long-term monitoring of variable sources and to detect flaring sources promptly. Both functions complement the high-sensitivity pointed observations provided by ground-based detectors. Finally, the large field of view of GLAST will allow a study of gamma-ray emission on large angular scales and identify interesting regions of the sky for deeper studies at higher energies. In this poster, we will discuss the science returns that might result from joint GLAST/ground-based gamma-ray observations and illustrate them with detailed source simulations.

  3. GLAST and Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The launch of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope together with the advent of a new generation of ground-based gamma-ray detectors such as VERITAS, HESS, MAGIC and CANGAROO, will usher in a new era of high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics. GLAST and the ground based gamma-ray observatories will provide highly complementary capabilities for spectral, temporal and spatial studies of high energy gamma-ray sources. Joint observations will cover a huge energy range, from 20 MeV to over 20 TeV. The LAT will survey the entire sky every three hours, allowing it both to perform uniform, long-term monitoring of variable sources and to detect flaring sources promptly. Both functions complement the high-sensitivity pointed observations provided by ground-based detectors. Finally, the large field of view of GLAST will allow a study of gamma-ray emission on large angular scales and identify interesting regions of the sky for deeper studies at higher energies. In this poster, we will discuss the science returns that might result from joint GLAST/ground-based gamma-ray observations and illustrate them with detailed source simulations.

  4. Stability of V2O5 Supported on Titania in the Presence of Water, Bulk Oxygen Vacancies, and Adsorbed Oxygen Atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Henrik Høgh; Neilson, Hunter L.; Buratto, Steven K.

    2017-01-01

    A catalyst consisting of vanadium oxide submonolayers supported on rutile titanium dioxide is used for a variety of reactions. One important question is the difference between the activity of monomeric clusters (having one vanadium atom) and polymeric clusters (having more than one vanadium atom)...

  5. XPS of oxygen atoms on Ag(111) and Ag(110) surfaces: accurate study with SAC/SAC-CI combined with dipped adcluster model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Atsushi; Nakatsuji, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    O1s core-electron binding energies (CEBE) of the atomic oxygens on different Ag surfaces were investigated by the symmetry adapted cluster-configuration interaction (SAC-CI) method combined with the dipped adcluster model, in which the electron exchange between bulk metal and adsorbate is taken into account properly. Electrophilic and nucleophilic oxygens (O(elec) and O(nuc)) that might be important for olefin epoxidation in a low-oxygen coverage condition were focused here. We consider the O1s CEBE as a key property to distinguish the surface oxygen states, and series of calculation was carried out by the Hartree-Fock, Density functional theory, and SAC/SAC-CI methods. The experimental information and our SAC/SAC-CI results indicate that O(elec) is the atomic oxygen adsorbed on the fcc site of Ag(111) and that O(nuc) is the one on the reconstructed added-row site of Ag(110) and that one- and two-electron transfers occur, respectively, to the O(elec) and O(nuc) adclusters from the silver surface.

  6. Catalytic role of TiO(2) terminal oxygen atoms in liquid-phase photocatalytic reactions: oxidation of aromatic compounds in anhydrous acetonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Juan F; Bahnemann, Detlef W; Peral, José; Salvador, Pedro

    2014-08-04

    On the basis of experiments carried out with controlled amounts of residual oxygen and water, or by using oxygen-isotope-labeled Ti(18) O2 as the photocatalyst, we demonstrate that (18) Os atoms behave as real catalytic species in the photo-oxidation of acetonitrile-dissolved aromatic compounds such as benzene, phenol, and benzaldehyde with TiO2 . The experimental evidence allows a terminal-oxygen indirect electron-transfer (TOIET) mechanism to be proposed, which is a new pathway that involves the trapping of free photogenerated valence-band holes at Os species and their incorporation into the reaction products, with simultaneous generation of oxygen vacancies at the TiO2 surface and their subsequent healing with oxygen atoms from either O2 or H2 O molecules that are dissolved in the liquid phase. According to the TOIET mechanism, the TiO2 surface is not considered to remain stable, but is continuously changing in the course of the photocatalytic reaction, challenging earlier interpretations of TiO2 photocatalytic phenomena.

  7. Inflight resistance measurement on high-T(sub c) superconducting thin films exposed to orbital atomic oxygen on CONCAP-2 (STS-46)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, J. C.; Raiker, G. N.; Bijvoet, J. A.; Nerren, P. D.; Sutherland, W. T.; Mogro-Camperso, A.; Turner, L. G.; Kwok, Hoi; Raistrick, I. D.; Cross, J. B.

    1995-01-01

    In 1992, UAH (University of Alabama in Huntsville) conducted a unique experiment on STS-46 in which YBa2Cu3O7 (commonly known as '1-2-3' superconductor) high-T(c) superconducting thin film samples prepared at three different laboratories were exposed to 5 eV atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit on the ambient and 320 C hot plate during the first flight of the CONCAP-2 (Complex Autonomous Payload) experiment carrier. The resistance of the thin films was measured in flight during the atomic oxygen exposure and heating cycle. Superconducting properties were measured in the laboratory before and after the flight by the individual experimenters. Films with good superconducting properties, and which were exposed to the oxygen flux, survived the flight including those heated to 320 C (600 K) with properties essentially unchanged, while other samples which were heated but not exposed to oxygen were degraded. The properties of other flight controls held at ambient temperature appear unchanged and indistinguishable from those of ground controls, whether exposed to oxygen or not.

  8. Oxygen-assisted enhancement of H atom UV-photogeneration from hydrocarbons in van der Waals complexes RH-O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baklanov, Alexey V.; Bogomolov, Alexandr S.; Chikishev, Leonid M.; Bogdanchikov, Georgii A.; Kochubei, Sergei A.

    2013-02-01

    The strong enhancement of H-atom UV-photogeneration is revealed in van der Waals complexes of unsaturated hydrocarbons RH (RHdbnd ethylene C2H4, propylene C3H6, butadiene C4H6, butene-2 C4H8) with oxygen RH-O2 as compared with the ‘free' RH molecules. The results obtained indicate enhancement of H atom yield to be due to one-quantum photoprocess 1RH-3O2 + hν → 3RH∗ + 3O2(1O2) providing triplet RH molecules with excitation level sufficient for dissociation.

  9. Theoretical study on the degradation reaction of octachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin with atomic oxygen O((3)P) in dielectric barrier discharge reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chen; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Chenxi; Hu, Jingtian; Qi, Chuansong

    2014-11-01

    Dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) have been used in the degradation of dioxins due to the large number of excimers and free radicals produced in discharge process. In this article, the density functional theory (DFT) is used to study the degradation mechanism of octachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (OCDD) with the atomic oxygen O((3)P) in DBD reactor. The reactants, intermediates, transition states and products are optimized at the MPWB1K/6-31+G(d,p) level. The vibrational frequencies have been calculated at the same level. The reaction pathways and mechanisms are analyzed in detail. The effect of removing the chlorine atom on environment also has been discussed.

  10. How does the exchange of one oxygen atom with sulfur affect the catalytic cycle of carbonic anhydrase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Stephan; Kesselmeier, Jürgen; Anders, Ernst

    2004-06-21

    We have extended our investigations of the carbonic anhydrase (CA) cycle with the model system [(H(3)N)(3)ZnOH](+) and CO(2) by studying further heterocumulenes and catalysts. We investigated the hydration of COS, an atmospheric trace gas. This reaction plays an important role in the global COS cycle since biological consumption, that is, uptake by higher plants, algae, lichens, and soil, represents the dominant terrestrial sink for this gas. In this context, CA has been identified by a member of our group as the key enzyme for the consumption of COS by conversion into CO(2) and H(2)S. We investigated the hydration mechanism of COS by using density functional theory to elucidate the details of the catalytic cycle. Calculations were first performed for the uncatalyzed gas phase reaction. The rate-determining step for direct reaction of COS with H(2)O has an energy barrier of deltaG=53.2 kcal mol(-1). We then employed the CA model system [(H(3)N)(3)ZnOH](+) (1) and studied the effect on the catalytic hydration mechanism of replacing an oxygen atom with sulfur. When COS enters the carbonic anhydrase cycle, the sulfur atom is incorporated into the catalyst to yield [(H(3)N)(3)ZnSH](+) (27) and CO(2). The activation energy of the nucleophilic attack on COS, which is the rate-determining step, is somewhat higher (20.1 kcal mol(-1) in the gas phase) than that previously reported for CO(2). The sulfur-containing model 27 is also capable of catalyzing the reaction of CO(2) to produce thiocarbonic acid. A larger barrier has to be overcome for the reaction of 27 with CO(2) compared to that for the reaction of 1 with CO(2). At a well-defined stage of this cycle, a different reaction path can emerge: a water molecule helps to regenerate the original catalyst 1 from 27, a process accompanied by the formation of thiocarbonic acid. We finally demonstrate that nature selected a surprisingly elegant and efficient group of reactants, the [L(3)ZnOH](+)/CO(2)/H(2)O system, that helps

  11. Finding extraterrestrial life using ground-based high-resolution spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Snellen, Ignas; Poole, Rudolf Le; Brogi, Matteo; Birkby, Jayne

    2013-01-01

    Exoplanet observations promise one day to unveil the presence of extraterrestrial life. Atmospheric compounds in strong chemical disequilibrium would point to large-scale biological activity just as oxygen and methane do in the Earth's atmosphere. The cancellation of both the Terrestrial Planet Finder and Darwin missions means that it is unlikely that a dedicated space telescope to search for biomarker gases in exoplanet atmospheres will be launched within the next 25 years. Here we show that ground-based telescopes provide a strong alternative for finding biomarkers in exoplanet atmospheres through transit observations. Recent results on hot Jupiters show the enormous potential of high-dispersion spectroscopy to separate the extraterrestrial and telluric signals making use of the Doppler shift of the planet. The transmission signal of oxygen from an Earth-twin orbiting a small red dwarf star is only a factor 3 smaller than that of carbon monoxide recently detected in the hot Jupiter tau Bootis b, albeit such...

  12. Treatment surfaces with atomic oxygen excited in dielectric barrier discharge plasma of O2 admixed to N2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Shun'ko

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the increase in surface energy of substrates by their treatment with gas composition generated in plasmas of DBD (Dielectric Barrier Discharge in O2 admixed with N2. Operating gas dissociation and excitation was occurred in plasmas developed in two types of reactors of capacitively-coupled dielectric barrier configurations: coaxial cylindrical, and flat rectangular. The coaxial cylindrical type comprised an inner cylindrical electrode encapsulated in a ceramic sheath installed coaxially inside a cylindrical ceramic (quartz tube passing through an annular outer electrode. Components of the flat rectangular type were a flat ceramic tube of a narrow rectangular cross section supplied with two flat electrodes mounted against one another outside of the long parallel walls of this tube. The operating gas, mixture of N2 and O2, was flowing in a completely insulated discharge gap formed between insulated electrodes of the devices with an average velocity of gas inlet of about 7 to 9 m/s. Dielectric barrier discharge plasma was excited in the operating gaps with a bipolar pulse voltage of about 6 kV for 2 ms at 50 kHz repetition rate applied to the electrodes of the coaxial device, and of about 14 kV for 7 ms at 30 kHz repetition rate for the flat linear device. A lifetime of excited to the 2s22p4(1S0 state in DBD plasma and streaming to the surfaces with a gas flow atomic oxygen, responsible presumably for treating surfaces, exceeded 10 ms in certain cases, that simplified its separation from DBD plasma and delivery to substrates. As it was found in particular, surfaces of glass and some of polymers revealed significant enhancement in wettability after treatment.

  13. Linear free energy relationships for metal-ligand complexation: Bidentate binding to negatively-charged oxygen donor atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonaro, Richard F.; Atalay, Yasemin B.; Di Toro, Dominic M.

    2011-05-01

    Stability constants for metal complexation to bidentate ligands containing negatively-charged oxygen donor atoms can be estimated from the following linear free energy relationship (LFER): log KML = χOO( αO log KHL,1 + αO log KHL,2) where KML is the metal-ligand stability constant for a 1:1 complex, KHL,1 and KHL,2 are the proton-ligand stability constants (the ligand p Ka values), and αO is the Irving-Rossotti slope. The parameter χOO is metal specific and has slightly different values for five and six membered chelate rings. LFERs are presented for 21 different metal ions and are accurate to within approximately 0.30 log units in predictions of log KML values. Ligands selected for use in LFER development include dicarboxylic acids, carboxyphenols, and ortho-diphenols. For ortho-hydroxybenzaldehydes, α-hydroxycarboxylic acids, and α-ketocarboxylic acids, a modification of the LFER where log KHL,2 is set equal to zero is required. The chemical interpretation of χOO is that it accounts for the extra stability afforded to metal complexes by the chelate effect. Cu-NOM binding constants calculated from the bidentate LFERs are similar in magnitude to those used in WHAM 6. This LFER can be used to make log KML predictions for small organic molecules. Since natural organic matter (NOM) contains many of the same functional groups (i.e. carboxylic acids, phenols, alcohols), the LFER log KML predictions shed light on the range of appropriate values for use in modeling metal partitioning in natural systems.

  14. Redox-inactive metal ions promoted the catalytic reactivity of non-heme manganese complexes towards oxygen atom transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Cholho; Yang, Ling; Lv, Zhanao; Mo, Wanling; Chen, Zhuqi; Li, Guangxin; Yin, Guochuan

    2015-05-21

    Redox-inactive metal ions can modulate the reactivity of redox-active metal ions in a variety of biological and chemical oxidations. Many synthetic models have been developed to help address the elusive roles of these redox-inactive metal ions. Using a non-heme manganese(II) complex as the model, the influence of redox-inactive metal ions as a Lewis acid on its catalytic efficiency in oxygen atom transfer was investigated. In the absence of redox-inactive metal ions, the manganese(II) catalyst is very sluggish, for example, in cyclooctene epoxidation, providing only 9.9% conversion with 4.1% yield of epoxide. However, addition of 2 equiv. of Al(3+) to the manganese(II) catalyst sharply improves the epoxidation, providing up to 97.8% conversion with 91.4% yield of epoxide. EPR studies of the manganese(II) catalyst in the presence of an oxidant reveal a 16-line hyperfine structure centered at g = 2.0, clearly indicating the formation of a mixed valent di-μ-oxo-bridged diamond core, Mn(III)-(μ-O)2-Mn(IV). The presence of a Lewis acid like Al(3+) causes the dissociation of this diamond Mn(III)-(μ-O)2-Mn(IV) core to form monomeric manganese(iv) species which is responsible for improved epoxidation efficiency. This promotional effect has also been observed in other manganese complexes bearing various non-heme ligands. The findings presented here have provided a promising strategy to explore the catalytic reactivity of some di-μ-oxo-bridged complexes by adding non-redox metal ions to in situ dissociate those dimeric cores and may also provide clues to understand the mechanism of methane monooxygenase which has a similar diiron diamond core as the intermediate.

  15. Comparison of the Results of MISSE 6 Atomic Oxygen Erosion Yields of Layered Kapton H Films with Monte Carlo Computational Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Groh, Kim De; Kneubel, Christian A.

    2014-01-01

    A space experiment flown as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment 6B (MISSE 6B) was designed to compare the atomic oxygen erosion yield (Ey) of layers of Kapton H polyimide with no spacers between layers with that of layers of Kapton H with spacers between layers. The results were compared to a solid Kapton H (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) sample. Monte Carlo computational modeling was performed to optimize atomic oxygen interaction parameter values to match the results of both the MISSE 6B multilayer experiment and the undercut erosion profile from a crack defect in an aluminized Kapton H sample flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The Monte Carlo modeling produced credible agreement with space results of increased Ey for all samples with spacers as well as predicting the space-observed enhancement in erosion near the edges of samples due to scattering from the beveled edges of the sample holders.

  16. Theoretical Study of Isotopic Effect of Oxygen Atom on the Stereodynamics for the O(3P)+D2→ OD+D Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shi-Li; SHI Ying

    2010-01-01

    @@ Quasi-classical trajectory theory is used to study the isotope effect of oxygen atoms on the vector correlations in the O(3p)+D2 reaction at a collision energy of 25kcal/mol using accurate potential energy surface of the 3 A' triplet state.The distributions of p(θr)and the distribution of dihedral angel p(ψr)as well as p(θr,ψr)are calculated.Moreover,four polarization-dependent generalized differential cross sections(PDDCSs)of product are presented in the center-of-mass frame.The results indicate that the polarization of the product presents different characters for the isotope effect of oxygen atoms.Isotopic substitute can cause obviously different effects on the four PDDCSs.

  17. The Influence of Oxygen Atoms on Conformation and π-π Stacking of Ladder-Type Donor-Based Polymers and Their Photovoltaic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Tong; Zang, Yue; Bai, Wei-Yun; Yao, Kai; Xu, Yun-Xiang

    2017-08-01

    A novel ladder-type donor pyran-bridged indacenodithiophene (IDTP) is developed by introducing two oxygen atoms into indacenodithiophene unit. IDTP possesses a twisted backbone and leads to facially asymmetric arrangement of side chains, resulting in enhanced local π-π stacking of according polymer poly[(5,5,11,11-tetrakis(4-octylphenyl)-5,11-dihydrothieno[2',3':5,6]pyrano[3,4-g]thieno[3,2-c]isochromene)-alt-4,7-(5-fluoro-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole)] (PIDTP)-FBT, which shows extended absorption range. Moreover, oxygen atoms render deeper highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) levels of poly[indacenodithiophene-alt-4,7-(5-fluoro-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole)] (PIDTP)-FBT compared with PIDT-FBT, therefore bringing a higher open-circuit voltage (Voc ). © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Insights into thermal diffusion of germanium and oxygen atoms in HfO{sub 2}/GeO{sub 2}/Ge gate stacks and their suppressed reaction with atomically thin AlO{sub x} interlayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Shingo, E-mail: Shingo-Ogawa@trc.toray.co.jp [Toray Research Center, Inc., 3-3-7 Sonoyama, Otsu, Shiga 520-8567 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Asahara, Ryohei; Minoura, Yuya; Hosoi, Takuji, E-mail: hosoi@mls.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sako, Hideki; Kawasaki, Naohiko; Yamada, Ichiko; Miyamoto, Takashi [Toray Research Center, Inc., 3-3-7 Sonoyama, Otsu, Shiga 520-8567 (Japan)

    2015-12-21

    The thermal diffusion of germanium and oxygen atoms in HfO{sub 2}/GeO{sub 2}/Ge gate stacks was comprehensively evaluated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry combined with an isotopic labeling technique. It was found that {sup 18}O-tracers composing the GeO{sub 2} underlayers diffuse within the HfO{sub 2} overlayers based on Fick's law with the low activation energy of about 0.5 eV. Although out-diffusion of the germanium atoms through HfO{sub 2} also proceeded at the low temperatures of around 200 °C, the diffusing germanium atoms preferentially segregated on the HfO{sub 2} surfaces, and the reaction was further enhanced at high temperatures with the assistance of GeO desorption. A technique to insert atomically thin AlO{sub x} interlayers between the HfO{sub 2} and GeO{sub 2} layers was proven to effectively suppress both of these independent germanium and oxygen intermixing reactions in the gate stacks.

  19. Magnetism, Spin Texture, and In-Gap States: Atomic Specialization at the Surface of Oxygen-Deficient SrTiO_{3}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmeyer, Michaela; Jeschke, Harald O; Hijano-Cubelos, Oliver; Martins, Cyril; Lechermann, Frank; Koepernik, Klaus; Santander-Syro, Andrés F; Rozenberg, Marcelo J; Valentí, Roser; Gabay, Marc

    2016-04-15

    Motivated by recent spin- and angular-resolved photoemission (SARPES) measurements of the two-dimensional electronic states confined near the (001) surface of oxygen-deficient SrTiO_{3}, we explore their spin structure by means of ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations of slabs. Relativistic nonmagnetic DFT calculations display Rashba-like spin winding with a splitting of a few meV and when surface magnetism on the Ti ions is included, bands become spin-split with an energy difference ∼100  meV at the Γ point, consistent with SARPES findings. While magnetism tends to suppress the effects of the relativistic Rashba interaction, signatures of it are still clearly visible in terms of complex spin textures. Furthermore, we observe an atomic specialization phenomenon, namely, two types of electronic contributions: one is from Ti atoms neighboring the oxygen vacancies that acquire rather large magnetic moments and mostly create in-gap states; another comes from the partly polarized t_{2g} itinerant electrons of Ti atoms lying further away from the oxygen vacancy, which form the two-dimensional electron system and are responsible for the Rashba spin winding and the spin splitting at the Fermi surface.

  20. Ground-based observations of Kepler asteroseismic targets

    CERN Document Server

    Uytterhoeven, K; Southworth, J; Randall, S; Ostensen, R; Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Marconi, M; Kurtz, D W; Kiss, L; Gutierrez-Soto, J; Frandsen, S; De Cat, P; Bruntt, H; Briquet, M; Zhang, X B; Telting, J H; Steslicki, M; Ripepi, V; Pigulski, A; Paparo, M; Oreiro, R; Choong, Ngeow Chow; Niemczura, E; Nemec, J; Narwid, A; Mathias, P; Martin-Ruiz, S; Lehman, H; Kopacki, G; Karoff, C; Jackiewicz, J; Henden, A A; Handler, G; Grigachene, A; Green, E M; Garrido, R; Machado, L Fox; Debosscher, J; Creevey, O L; Catanzaro, G; Bognar, Z; Biazzo, K; Bernabei, S

    2010-01-01

    We present the ground-based activities within the different working groups of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium (KASC). The activities aim at the systematic characterization of the 5000+ KASC targets, and at the collection of ground-based follow-up time-series data of selected promising Kepler pulsators. So far, 35 different instruments at 30 telescopes on 22 different observatories in 12 countries are in use, and a total of more than 530 observing nights has been awarded. (Based on observations made with the Isaac Newton Telescope, William Herschel Telescope, Nordic Optical Telescope, Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, Mercator Telescope (La Palma, Spain), and IAC-80 (Tenerife, Spain). Also based on observations taken at the observatories of Sierra Nevada, San Pedro Martir, Vienna, Xinglong, Apache Point, Lulin, Tautenburg, Loiano, Serra la Nave, Asiago, McDonald, Skinakas, Pic du Midi, Mauna Kea, Steward Observatory, Bialkow Observatory of the Wroclaw University, Piszkesteto Mountain Station, Observato...

  1. Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Technology Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Leslie A.

    2014-01-13

    This GNDD Technology Roadmap is intended to provide guidance to potential researchers and help management define research priorities to achieve technology advancements for ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring science being pursued by the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team within the Office of Nuclear Detonation Detection in the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Four science-based elements were selected to encompass the entire scope of nuclear monitoring research and development (R&D) necessary to facilitate breakthrough scientific results, as well as deliver impactful products. Promising future R&D is delineated including dual use associated with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Important research themes as well as associated metrics are identified along with a progression of accomplishments, represented by a selected bibliography, that are precursors to major improvements to nuclear explosion monitoring.

  2. Ground-Based Calibration Of A Microwave Landing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriazes, John J.; Scott, Marshall M., Jr.; Willis, Alfred D.; Erdogan, Temel; Reyes, Rolando

    1996-01-01

    System of microwave instrumentation and data-processing equipment developed to enable ground-based calibration of microwave scanning-beam landing system (MSBLS) at distances of about 500 to 1,000 ft from MSBLS transmitting antenna. Ensures accuracy of MSBLS near touchdown point, without having to resort to expense and complex logistics of aircraft-based testing. Modified versions prove useful in calibrating aircraft instrument landing systems.

  3. Atomic layer deposition of amorphous oxygen-deficient TiO2-x on carbon nanotubes as cathode materials for lithium-air batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingbo; Ma, Dingtao; Li, Yongliang; Zhang, Peixin; Mi, Hongwei; Deng, Libo; Sun, Lingna; Ren, Xiangzhong

    2017-08-01

    The amorphous oxygen-deficient TiO2-x thin layer coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are synthesized by atomic layer deposition and employed as cathode materials for lithium-air battery. The cathode demonstrates high electrocatalytic activity toward electrode reactions, resulting from the introduction of oxygen-deficient TiO2-x into the nanocomposites. It is found that the intrinsically isotropic nature of amorphous TiO2 which a certain amount of Ti3.5+ and Ti3+ can improve the catalytic activity. Consequently, the battery with the corresponded CNT@TiO2-x cathode shows high discharge/charge capacities and good cycling performance, which the cyclic retention of more than 90 cycles are achieved, while with the pristine CNTs only 50 cycles are obtained. This study provides an approach to fabricate cathode materials for lithium-air battery and moreover clarifies the influence of oxygen vacancies of TiO2 on the electrochemical performance.

  4. Inactivation of Penicillium digitatum Spores by a High-Density Ground-State Atomic Oxygen-Radical Source Employing an Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseki, Sachiko; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Jia, Fengdong; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Ohta, Takayuki; Ito, Masafumi; Hori, Masaru

    2011-11-01

    Penicillium digitatum spores were inactivated using an oxygen-radical source that supplies only neutral oxygen radicals. Vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy was used to measure the ground-state atomic oxygen [O (3Pj)] densities and they were estimated to be in the range of 1014-1015 cm-3. The inactivation rate of P. digitatum spores was correlated with the O (3Pj) density. The result indicates that O (3Pj) is the dominant species in the inactivation. The inactivation rate constant of P. digitatum spores by O (3Pj) was estimated to be on the order of 10-17 cm3 s-1 from the measured O (3Pj) densities and inactivation rates.

  5. Ground-Based Lidar for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Ozone Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J.; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than 10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures.

  6. Ground-based lidar for atmospheric boundary layer ozone measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-05-20

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than ±10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures.

  7. 含氧生物燃料的雾化性能测试及分析%Measurement and analysis of atomization characteristics of oxygenated bio-fuel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张弛; 傅奇慧; 荣龙; 林宇震; 许全宏

    2012-01-01

    A pressure-swirl atomizer was adopted to measure the atomization characteristics of oxygenated bio-fuel and its different blends with conventional kerosene RP-3.The study was conducted to analyze the effect of the chemical composition and physical-chemical properties on the atomization characteristics of the oxygenated bio-fuel.For the blends with 50% or less oxygenated bio-fuel,a Sauter mean diameter(SMD) prediction model was developed.The experimental results show that decrease the oxygenated bio-fuel in the blends,the atomization would be improved.In addition,increase the supply pressure drop,the difference of atomization among the fuel blends would be reduced.When the supply pressure drop is larger than 1.0 MPa,SMD of the fuel blends can achieve less than 40 μm.By analysis,currently the oxygenated bio-fuel can not be directly used for aero-engine,and the fuel-hydroprocessing or aircraft modification is necessary for meeting the demands of the long-term future aviation.%采用离心喷嘴对含氧生物燃料及其与传统航空煤油RP-3不同比例混合燃料的雾化性能进行测试,并分析了该燃料的组分和理化性质对雾化性能的影响.同时,对含氧生物燃料体积分数在50%以下的混合燃料,发展了具有较高精度的雾化颗粒索太尔平均直径(SMD)预估模型.试验结果表明:随着含氧生物燃料比例的减少,混合燃料的雾化性能得到改善,并且随着供油压差的增大,不同比例混合燃料间的雾化性能差距缩小;供油压差高于1.0MPa后混合燃料的SMD均可达到小于40μm的水平.经分析,目前该含氧生物燃料还不能直接应用于航空发动机,需要通过燃料氢化处理或者飞行器硬件改造,才可用于长远期的未来航空.

  8. Ground-based microwave measuring of middle atmosphere ozone and temperature profiles during sudden stratospheric warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigin, A. M.; Shvetsov, A. A.; Krasilnikov, A. A.; Kulikov, M. Y.; Karashtin, D. A.; Mukhin, D.; Bolshakov, O. S.; Fedoseev, L. I.; Ryskin, V. G.; Belikovich, M. V.; Kukin, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    We carried out the experimental campaign aimed to study the response of middle atmosphere on a sudden stratospheric warming in winter 2011-2012 above Nizhny Novgorod, Russia (56N, 44E). We employed the ground-based microwave complex for remote sensing of middle atmosphere developed in the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Science. The complex combines two room-temperature radiometers, i.e. microwave ozonometer and the stratospheric thermometer. Ozonometer is a heterodyne spectroradiometer, operating in a range of frequencies that include the rotation transition of ozone molecules with resonance frequency 110.8 GHz. Operating frequency range of the stratospheric thermometer is 52.5-5.4 GHz and includes lower frequency edge of 5 mm molecular oxygen absorption bands and among them two relatively weak lines of O2 emission. Digital fast Fourier transform spectrometers developed by "Acqiris" are employed for signal spectral analysis. The spectrometers have frequency range 0.05-1 GHz and realizes the effective resolution about 61 KHz. For retrieval vertical profiles of ozone and temperature from radiometric data we applied novel method based on Bayesian approach to inverse problem solution, which assumed a construction of probability distribution of the characteristics of retrieved profiles with taking into account measurement noise and available a priori information about possible distributions of ozone and temperature in the middle atmosphere. Here we introduce the results of the campaign in comparison with Aura MLS data. Presented data includes one sudden stratospheric warming event which took place in January 13-14 and was accompanied by temperature increasing up to 310 K at 45 km height. During measurement period, ozone and temperature variations were (almost) anti-correlated, and total ozone abundance achieved a local maxima during the stratosphere cooling phase. In general, results of ground-based measurements are in good agreement with

  9. Matrix-isolation studies on the radiation-induced chemistry in H₂O/CO₂ systems: reactions of oxygen atoms and formation of HOCO radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryazantsev, Sergey V; Feldman, Vladimir I

    2015-03-19

    The radiation-induced transformations occurring upon X-ray irradiation of solid CO2/H2O/Ng systems (Ng = Ar, Kr, Xe) at 8-10 K and subsequent annealing up to 45 K were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The infrared (IR) spectra of deposited matrices revealed the presence of isolated monomers, dimers, and intermolecular H2O···CO2 complexes. Irradiation resulted in effective decomposition of matrix-isolated carbon dioxide and water yielding CO molecules and OH radicals, respectively. Annealing of the irradiated samples led to formation of O3, HO2, and a number of xenon hydrides of HXeY type (in the case of xenon matrices). The formation of these species was used for monitoring of the postirradiation thermally induced chemical reactions involving O and H atoms generated by radiolysis. It was shown that the radiolysis of CO2 in noble-gas matrices produced high yields of stabilized oxygen atoms. In all cases, the temperatures at which O atoms become mobile and react are lower than those of H atoms. Dynamics and reactivity of oxygen atoms was found to be independent of the precursor nature. In addition, the formation of HOCO radicals was observed in all the noble-gas matrices at remarkably low temperatures. The IR spectra of HOCO and DOCO were first characterized in krypton and xenon matrices. It was concluded that the formation of HOCO was mainly due to the radiation-induced evolution of the weakly bound H2O···CO2 complexes. This result indicates the significance of weak intermolecular interactions in the radiation-induced chemical processes in inert low-temperature media.

  10. Quaternary ammonium room-temperature ionic liquid including an oxygen atom in side chain/lithium salt binary electrolytes: ab initio molecular orbital calculations of interactions between ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, Seiji; Hayamizu, Kikuko; Seki, Shiro; Ohno, Yasutaka; Kobayashi, Yo; Miyashiro, Hajime

    2008-08-14

    Interactions of the lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide (LiTFSA) complex with N, N-diethyl-N-methyl-N-(2-methoxyethyl) ammonium (DEME), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium (EMIM) cations, neutral diethylether (DEE), and the DEMETFSA complex were studied by ab initio molecular orbital calculations. An interaction energy potential calculated for the DEME cation with the LiTFSA complex has a minimum when the Li atom has contact with the oxygen atom of DEME cation, while potentials for the EMIM cation with the LiTFSA complex are always repulsive. The MP2/6-311G**//HF/6-311G** level interaction energy calculated for the DEME cation with the LiTFSA complex was -18.4 kcal/mol. The interaction energy for the neutral DEE with the LiTFSA complex was larger (-21.1 kcal/mol). The interaction energy for the DEMETFSA complex with LiTFSA complex is greater (-23.2 kcal/mol). The electrostatic and induction interactions are the major source of the attraction in the two systems. The substantial attraction between the DEME cation and the LiTFSA complex suggests that the interaction between the Li cation and the oxygen atom of DEME cation plays important roles in determining the mobility of the Li cation in DEME-based room temperature ionic liquids.

  11. Oxidation of phenyl and hydride ligands of bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)hafnium derivatives by nitrous oxide via selective oxygen atom transfer reactions: insights from quantum chemistry calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hujun; Liu, Chengcheng; Yuan, Ying; Zhou, Tao; Fan, Ting; Lei, Qunfang; Fang, Wenjun

    2016-01-21

    The mechanisms for the oxidation of phenyl and hydride ligands of bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)hafnium derivatives (Cp* = η(5)-C5Me5) by nitrous oxide via selective oxygen atom transfer reactions have been systematically studied by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. On the basis of the calculations, we investigated the original mechanism proposed by Hillhouse and co-workers for the activation of N2O. The calculations showed that the complex with an initial O-coordination of N2O to the coordinatively unsaturated Hf center is not a local minimum. Then we proposed a new reaction mechanism to investigate how N2O is activated and why N2O selectively oxidize phenyl and hydride ligands of . Frontier molecular orbital theory analysis indicates that N2O is activated by nucleophilic attack by the phenyl or hydride ligand. Present calculations provide new insights into the activation of N2O involving the direct oxygen atom transfer from nitrous oxide to metal-ligand bonds instead of the generally observed oxygen abstraction reaction to generate metal-oxo species.

  12. Augmenting WFIRST Microlensing with a Ground-Based Telescope Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Gould, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Augmenting the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) microlensing campaigns with intensive observations from a ground-based network of wide-field survey telescopes would have several major advantages. First, it would enable full two-dimensional (2-D) vector microlens parallax measurements for a substantial fraction of low-mass lenses as well as planetary and binary events that show caustic crossing features. For a significant fraction of the free-floating planet (FFP) events and all caustic-crossing planetary/binary events, these 2-D parallax measurements directly lead to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) of the lens object (or lens system). For even more events, the complementary ground-based observations will yield 1-D parallax measurements. Together with the 1-D parallaxes from WFIRST alone, they can probe the entire mass range M > M_Earth. For luminous lenses, such 1-D parallax measurements can be promoted to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) by high-resolution imaging. This would provide crucial information not only about the hosts of planets and other lenses, but also enable a much more precise Galactic model. Other benefits of such a survey include improved understanding of binaries (particularly with low mass primaries), and sensitivity to distant ice-giant and gas-giant companions of WFIRST lenses that cannot be detected by WFIRST itself due to its restricted observing windows. Existing ground-based microlensing surveys can be employed if WFIRST is pointed at lower-extinction fields than is currently envisaged. This would come at some cost to the event rate. Therefore the benefits of improved characterization of lenses must be weighed against these costs.

  13. The STACEE-32 Ground Based Gamma-ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hanna, D S; Boone, L M; Chantell, M C; Conner, Z; Covault, C E; Dragovan, M; Fortin, P; Gregorich, D T; Hinton, J A; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Oser, S; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Schütte, D R; Theoret, C G; Tümer, T O; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J A

    2002-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment detector in its initial configuration (STACEE-32). STACEE is a new ground-based gamma ray detector using the atmospheric Cherenkov technique. In STACEE, the heliostats of a solar energy research array are used to collect and focus the Cherenkov photons produced in gamma-ray induced air showers. The large Cherenkov photon collection area of STACEE results in a gamma-ray energy threshold below that of previous detectors.

  14. The STACEE Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gingrich, D M; Bramel, D; Carson, J; Covault, C E; Fortin, P; Hanna, D S; Hinton, J A; Jarvis, A; Kildea, J; Lindner, T; Müller, C; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Theoret, C G; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J A

    2005-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) in its complete configuration. STACEE uses the heliostats of a solar energy research facility to collect and focus the Cherenkov photons produced in gamma-ray induced air showers. The light is concentrated onto an array of photomultiplier tubes located near the top of a tower. The large Cherenkov photon collection area of STACEE results in a gamma-ray energy threshold below that of previous ground-based detectors. STACEE is being used to observe pulsars, supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei, and gamma-ray bursts.

  15. Research on target accuracy for ground-based lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ling; Shi, Ruoming

    2009-05-01

    In ground based Lidar system, the targets are used in the process of registration, georeferencing for point cloud, and also can be used as check points. Generally, the accuracy of capturing the flat target center is influenced by scanning range and scanning angle. In this research, the experiments are designed to extract accuracy index of the target center with 0-90°scan angles and 100-195 meter scan ranges using a Leica HDS3000 laser scanner. The data of the experiments are listed in detail and the related results are analyzed.

  16. Magnetic ordering of Fe atoms in oxygen-saturated and oxygen-reduced YBa sub 2 (Cu sub 1-x Fe sub x ) sub 3 O sub y

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyubutin, I.S.; Terziev, V.G.; Dmitrieva, T.V. (Inst. of Crystallography, Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russia)); Balagurov, A.M. (Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russia)); Nasu, S. (Dept. of Material Physics, Osaka Univ. (Japan))

    1992-06-01

    The magnetic ordering of Fe atoms in the YBa{sub 2}(Cu{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}){sub 3}O{sub y} system is studied in the superconducting (SC) and non-SC states by Moessbauer spectroscopy. In the SC samples a single magnetic ordering point T{sub m1} is observed for all Fe atoms: T{sub m1}=10 K and 16 K for x=0.05 and 0.10, respectively. In the non-SC state for x=0.05 the Cu(1) and Cu(2) sublattices are magnetically independent and two magnetic ordering points are found: T{sub m1}=20 K and T{sub m2}=405 K. For x=0.10 a strong magnetic coupling between the Cu(1) and Cu(2) sublattices leads to a single magnetic ordering temperature T{sub m2}=435 K. (orig.).

  17. Chlorine oxide in the stratospheric ozone layer Ground-based detection and measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, A.; De Zafra, R. L.; Solomon, P. M.; Barrett, J. W.; Carlson, E. R.

    1981-01-01

    Stratospheric chlorine oxide, a significant intermediate product in the catalytic destruction of ozone by atomic chlorine, has been detected and measured by a ground-based 204 GHz, millimeter-wave receiver. Data taken at latitude 42 deg N on 17 days between January 10 and February 18, 1980 yield an average chlorine oxide column density of approximately 1.05 x 10 to the 14th/sq cm or approximately 2/3 that of the average of eight in situ balloon flight measurements (excluding the anomalously high data of July 14, 1977) made over the past four years at 32 deg N. Less chlorine oxide below 35 km and a larger vertical gradient than predicted by theoretical models of the stratospheric ozone layer are found.

  18. Airborne and ground based lidar measurements of the atmospheric pressure profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, C. Laurence; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Dombrowski, Mark; Weng, Chi Y.

    1989-01-01

    The first high accuracy remote measurements of the atmospheric pressure profile have been made. The measurements were made with a differential absorption lidar system that utilizes tunable alexandrite lasers. The absorption in the trough between two lines in the oxygen A-band near 760 nm was used for probing the atmosphere. Measurements of the two-dimensional structure of the pressure field were made in the troposphere from an aircraft looking down. Also, measurements of the one-dimensional structure were made from the ground looking up. Typical pressure accuracies for the aircraft measurements were 1.5-2 mbar with a 30-m vertical resolution and a 100-shot average (20 s), which corresponds to a 2-km horizontal resolution. Typical accuracies for the upward viewing ground based measurements were 2.0 mbar for a 30-m resolution and a 100-shot average.

  19. Ground-Based Global Positioning System (GPS) Meteorology Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor (IPW)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ground-Based Global Positioning System (GPS) Meteorology Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor (IPW) data set measures atmospheric water vapor using ground-based...

  20. Statistical Studies of Ground-Based Optical Lightning Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, C. R.; Nemzek, R. J.; Suszcynsky, D. M.

    2005-12-01

    Most extensive optical studies of lightning have been conducted from orbit, and the statistics of events collected from earth are relatively poorly documented. The time signatures of optical power measured in the presence of clouds are inevitably affected by scattering,which can distort the signatures by extending and delaying the amplitude profile in time. We have deployed two all-sky photodiode detectors, one in New Mexico and one in Oklahoma, which are gathering data alongside electric field change monitors as part of the LANL EDOTX Great Plains Array. Preliminary results show that the photodiode is sensitive to approximately 50% or more of RF events detected at ranges of up to 30 km, and still has some sensitivity at ranges in excess of 60 km (distances determined by the EDOTX field-change array). The shapes of events within this range were assessed, with focus on rise time, width, peak power, and their correlation to corresponding electric field signatures, and these are being compared with published on-orbit and ground-based data. Initial findings suggest a mean characteristic width (ratio of total detected optical energy to peak power) of 291 +/- 12 microseconds and a mean delay between the RF signal peak and optical peak of 121 +/- 17 microseconds. These values fall between prior ground-based measurements of direct return stroke emissions, and scattering-dominated on-orbit measurements. This work will promote better understanding of the correspondence between radio and optical measurements of lightning.

  1. Satellite and hypersatellite structures of Lα1,2 and Lβ1 x-ray transitions in mid-Z atoms multiply ionized by fast oxygen ions

    OpenAIRE

    Czarnota, M.; Banaś, D; Berset, Michel; Chmielewska, D; Dousse, Jean-Claude; Hoszowska, Joanna; Maillard, Yves-Patrick; Mauron, Olivier; Pajek, M.; Polasik, M.; Raboud, Pierre-Alexandre; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Słabkowska, K.; Sujkowski, Z.

    2014-01-01

    A detailed investigation of the Lα1,2 (L3→M4,5) and Lβ1 (L2→M4) x-ray satellite and hypersatellite structures in zirconium, molybdenum, and palladium atoms multiply ionized by impact with 278.6-MeV oxygen ions is reported. The x-ray spectra were measured with a high-resolution von Hamos bent crystal spectrometer. For the interpretation of the complex spectral features, relativistic multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations were performed for all multivacancy configurations expected to contri...

  2. STM/STS studies on YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} thin films treated with an atomic oxygen beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Shigehiro; Kashiwaya, Satoshi; Terada, Norio; Tanaka, Yukio; Tanuma, Yasunari; Koyanagi, Masao; Obara, Kozo

    2003-05-15

    The surface electronic states of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO) films are studied by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy at 10 K. In order to improve the sample surface quality, we have developed a vacuum transfer system combined with an atomic oxygen beam. The conductance spectra of the YBCO films showed the gap structure in most area of the surface, which indicates the successful surface treatment in the present system. The spatial variation of electronic states observed near a step structure suggests the presence of interference effect of the d-wave pair potential induced by surface roughness.

  3. Ionosphere-magnetosphere studies using ground based VLF radio propagation technique: an Indian example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Subhas

    sferics at least in some seasons providing a noise free environment for observing rare and new phenomena requiring better SNR to detect such changes, The VLF signals from the active seismic zones or other electro-geological sources would require high sensitivities of the system and suitable network of transmitting and receiv-ing stations designed for targeted data and applications. Some new results over Indian and other regions show evidences of earthquake related seismo-geological VLF emissions with the potential of being used as a prognostic tool, change in ozone and ion production in the night time middle atmosphere due to transit of stellar x-ray/γ ray sources. Results obtained on whistlers and related studies from a number of Indian stations covering geomagnetic latitude range between 13-24 N will be mentioned and reviewed in the background of theoretical understanding of the lightning return stroke signal elements, VLF propagation through cold plasma, ionospheric wave guide mode, electron precipitation due to cyclotron resonance and production of atomic oxygen O (3 P) and ionisation in the mesosphere due to solar/stellar UV/X/γrays. Use of future VLF techniques in terms of improving ground based observations, critical analysis of available satellite data in the context and real time moni-toring/modelling of earth's geosphere and space weather conditions will be considered for a possible programme of a developing country.

  4. Surface preparation of gold nanostructures on glass by ultraviolet ozone and oxygen plasma for thermal atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lancaster, Cady A., E-mail: lancaster@chem.utah.edu; Shumaker-Parry, Jennifer S., E-mail: shumaker-parry@chem.utah.edu

    2016-08-01

    Thin film deposition to create robust plasmonic nanomaterials is a growing area of research. Plasmonic nanomaterials have tunable optical properties and can be used as substrates for surface-enhanced spectroscopies. Due to the surface sensitivity and the dependence of the near-field behavior on structural details, degradation from cleaning or spectroscopic interrogation causes plasmonic nanostructures to lose distinctive localized surface plasmon resonances or exhibit diminished optical near-field enhancements over time. To decrease degradation, conformal thin films of alumina are deposited on nanostructured substrates using atomic layer deposition. While film growth on homogenous surfaces has been studied extensively, atomic layer deposition-based film growth on heterogeneous nanostructured surfaces is not well characterized. In this report, we have evaluated the impact of oxygen plasma and ultraviolet ozone pre-treatments on Au nanoparticle substrates for thin film growth by monitoring changes in plasmonic response and nanostructure morphology. We have found that ultraviolet ozone is more effective than oxygen plasma for cleaning gold nanostructured surfaces, which is in contrast to bulk films of the same material. Our results show that oxygen plasma treatment negatively impacts the nanostructure and alumina coating based on both scanning electron microscopy analysis of morphology and changes in the plasmonic response. - Highlights: • Plasmonic response indicates oxygen plasma damages Au structures and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films. • Ultraviolet ozone (UVO) re-activates aged Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-coated Au nanostructures. • UVO treatments do not damage Au or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-coated nanostructures.

  5. Femtosecond, two-photon-absorption, laser-induced-fluorescence (fs-TALIF) imaging of atomic hydrogen and oxygen in non-equilibrium plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jacob B.; Roy, Sukesh; Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Shkurenkov, Ivan; Adamovich, Igor V.; Lempert, Walter R.; Gord, James R.

    2017-01-01

    Femtosecond, two-photon-absorption laser-induced fluorescence (fs-TALIF) is employed to measure space- and time-resolved distributions of atomic hydrogen and oxygen in moderate-pressure, non-equilibrium, nanosecond-duration pulsed-discharge plasmas. Temporally and spatially resolved hydrogen and oxygen TALIF images are obtained over a range of low-temperature plasmas in mixtures of helium and argon at 100 Torr total pressure. The high-peak-intensity, low-average-energy fs pulses combined with the increased spectral bandwidth compared to traditional ns-duration laser pulses provide a large number of photon pairs that are responsible for the two-photon excitation, which results in an enhanced TALIF signal. Krypton and xenon TALIF are used for quantitative calibration of the hydrogen and oxygen concentrations, respectively, with similar excitation schemes being employed. This enables 2D collection of atomic-hydrogen and -oxygen TALIF signals with absolute number densities ranging from 2  ×  1012 cm-3 to 6  ×  1015 cm-3 and 1  ×  1013 cm-3 to 3  ×  1016 cm-3, respectively. These 2D images are the first application of TALIF imaging in moderate-pressure plasma discharges. 1D self-consistent modeling predictions show agreement with experimental results within the estimated experimental error of 25%. The present results can be used to further the development of higher fidelity kinetic models while quantifying plasma-source characteristics.

  6. FINDING EXTRATERRESTRIAL LIFE USING GROUND-BASED HIGH-DISPERSION SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snellen, I. A. G.; Le Poole, R.; Brogi, M.; Birkby, J. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Postbus 9513, 2300-RA Leiden (Netherlands); De Kok, R. J. [SRON, Sorbonnelaan 2, 3584-CA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-02-20

    Exoplanet observations promise one day to unveil the presence of extraterrestrial life. Atmospheric compounds in strong chemical disequilibrium would point to large-scale biological activity just as oxygen and methane do in the Earth's atmosphere. The cancellation of both the Terrestrial Planet Finder and Darwin missions means that it is unlikely that a dedicated space telescope to search for biomarker gases in exoplanet atmospheres will be launched within the next 25 years. Here we show that ground-based telescopes provide a strong alternative for finding biomarkers in exoplanet atmospheres through transit observations. Recent results on hot Jupiters show the enormous potential of high-dispersion spectroscopy to separate the extraterrestrial and telluric signals, making use of the Doppler shift of the planet. The transmission signal of oxygen from an Earth-twin orbiting a small red dwarf star is only a factor of three smaller than that of carbon monoxide recently detected in the hot Jupiter {tau} Booetis b, albeit such a star will be orders of magnitude fainter. We show that if Earth-like planets are common, the planned extremely large telescopes can detect oxygen within a few dozen transits. Ultimately, large arrays of dedicated flux-collector telescopes equipped with high-dispersion spectrographs can provide the large collecting area needed to perform a statistical study of life-bearing planets in the solar neighborhood.

  7. The STACEE Ground-Based Gamma-ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragan, Ken

    2002-04-01

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a ground-based instrument designed to study astrophysical sources of gamma rays in the energy range from 50 to 500 GeV using an array of heliostat mirrors at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in New Mexico. The mirrors collect Cherenkov light generated by gamma-ray air showers and concentrate it onto cameras composed of photomultiplier tubes. The STACEE instrument is now complete, and uses a total of 64 heliostats. Prototype instruments, using smaller numbers of heliostats, have previously detected gamma emission from both the Crab Nebula and the Active Galactic Nucleus Mrk421. The complete instrument has a lower threshold -- approximately 50 GeV -- than those prototypes due to superior triggering and electronics, including flash ADCs for every channel.We will discuss the performance of the complete instrument in its first full season of operation, and present preliminary results of selected observations.

  8. Atmospheric contamination for CMB ground-based observations

    CERN Document Server

    Errard, J; Akiba, Y; Arnold, K; Atlas, M; Baccigalupi, C; Barron, D; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Cukierman, A; Delabrouille, J; Dobbs, M; Ducout, A; Elleflot, T; Fabbian, G; Feng, C; Feeney, S; Gilbert, A; Goeckner-Wald, N; Halverson, N W; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Hill, C; Holzapfel, W L; Hori, Y; Inoue, Y; Jaehnig, G C; Jaffe, A H; Jeong, O; Katayama, N; Kaufman, J; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T; Jeune, M Le; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Leon, D; Linder, E; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Miller, N J; Myers, M J; Navaroli, M; Nishino, H; Okamura, T; Paar, H; Peloton, J; Poletti, D; Puglisi, G; Rebeiz, G; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Rotermund, K M; Schenck, D E; Sherwin, B D; Siritanasak, P; Smecher, G; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Tajima, O; Takakura, S; Tikhomirov, A; Tomaru, T; Whitehorn, N; Wilson, B; Yadav, A; Zahn, O

    2015-01-01

    Atmosphere is one of the most important noise sources for ground-based Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments. By increasing optical loading on the detectors, it amplifies their effective noise, while its fluctuations introduce spatial and temporal correlations between detected signals. We present a physically motivated 3d-model of the atmosphere total intensity emission in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. We derive an analytical estimate for the correlation between detectors time-ordered data as a function of the instrument and survey design, as well as several atmospheric parameters such as wind, relative humidity, temperature and turbulence characteristics. Using numerical computation, we examine the effect of each physical parameter on the correlations in the time series of a given experiment. We then use a parametric-likelihood approach to validate the modeling and estimate atmosphere parameters from the POLARBEAR-I project first season data set. We compare our results to previous st...

  9. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel E; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfectly all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean and, as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources' right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO's observations and electromagnetic follow-up. Beyond galactic foregrounds associated with seasonal variations, we find that equatorial observatories can access over $80\\%$ of the localization probability, while mid-latitudes will access closer to $70\\%$. Facilities located near the two LIGO sites can obser...

  10. Progress in the ULTRA 1-m ground-based telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Robert C.; Martin, Robert N.; Twarog, Bruce; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara; Taghavi, Ray; Hale, Rick; Etzel, Paul; Fesen, Rob; Shawl, Steve

    2006-06-01

    We present the technical status of the Ultra Lightweight Telescope for Research in Astronomy (ULTRA) program. The program is a 3-year Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) program funded by NSF. The MRI is a collaborative effort involving Composite Mirror Applications, Inc. (CMA), University of Kansas, San Diego State University and Dartmouth College. Objectives are to demonstrate the feasibility of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite mirror technology for ground-based optical telescopes. CMA is spearheading the development of surface replication techniques to produce the optics, fabricating the 1m glass mandrel, and constructing the optical tube assembly (OTA). Presented will be an overview and status of the 1-m mandrel fabrication, optics development, telescope design and CFRP telescope fabrication by CMA for the ULTRA Telescope.

  11. Ground-based optical observation system for LEO objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, T.; Kurosaki, H.; Oda, H.; Tagawa, M.

    2015-08-01

    We propose a ground-based optical observation system for monitoring LEO objects, which uses numerous optical sensors to cover a vast region of the sky. Its potential in terms of detection and orbital determination were examined. About 30 cm LEO objects at 1000 km altitude are detectable using an 18 cm telescope, a CCD camera and the analysis software developed. Simulations and a test observation showed that two longitudinally separate observation sites with arrays of optical sensors can identify the same objects from numerous data sets and determine their orbits precisely. The proposed system may complement or replace the current radar observation system for monitoring LEO objects, like space-situation awareness, in the near future.

  12. Identification of rainy periods from ground based microwave radiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada Vittoria Bosisio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors present the results of a study aiming at detecting rainy data in measurements collected by a dual band ground-based radiometer. The proposed criterion is based on the ratio of the brightness temperatures observed in the 20-30 GHz band without need of any ancillary information. A major result obtained from the probability density of the ratio computed over one month of data is the identification of threshold values between clear sky, cloudy sky and rainy sky, respectively. A linear fit performed by using radiometric data and concurrent rain gauge measurements shows a correlation coefficient equal to 0.56 between the temperature ratio and the observed precipitation.

  13. Optical vortex coronagraphs on ground-based telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, Charles

    2007-01-01

    The optical vortex coronagraph is potentially a remarkably effective device, at least for an ideal unobstructed telescope. Most ground-based telescopes however suffer from central obscuration and also have to operate through the aberrations of the turbulent atmosphere. This note analyzes the performance of the optical vortex in these circumstances and compares to some other designs, showing that it performs similarly in this situation. There is a large class of coronagraphs of this general type, and choosing between them in particular applications depends on details of performance at small off-axis distances and uniformity of response in the focal plane. Issues of manufacturability to the necessary tolerances are also likely to be important.

  14. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfectly all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean and, as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources' right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO's observations and electromagnetic follow-up. These effects can inform electromagnetic follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  15. Spatial-angular modeling of ground-based biaxial lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agishev, Ravil R.

    1997-10-01

    Results of spatial-angular LIDAR modeling based on an efficiency criterion introduced are represented. Their analysis shows that a low spatial-angular efficiency of traditional VIS and NIR systems is a main cause of a low S/BR ratio at the photodetector input. It determines the considerable measurements errors and the following low accuracy of atmospheric optical parameters retrieval. As we have shown, the most effective protection against intensive sky background radiation for ground-based biaxial LIDAR's consist in forming of their angular field according to spatial-angular efficiency criterion G. Some effective approaches to high G-parameter value achievement to achieve the receiving system optimization are discussed.

  16. Synthesis of Mixed Tail Triphenylene Discotic Liquid Crystals:Molecular Symmetry and Oxygen-Atom Effect on the Stabilization of Columnar Mesophases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ke-Qing; HU Ping; WANG Bi-Qin; YU Wen-Hao; CHEN Hong-Mei; WANG Xin-Ling; SHIMIZU Yo

    2007-01-01

    Small change in chemical structure of discotic liquid crystals can cause big difference in their mesomorphism.Replacing of the alkoxy peripheral chains of triphenylene by oxygen-atom containing ester chains would result in novel mesomorphism. A series of mixed tail triphenylenes containing propoxyacetyloxy and alkoxy, abbreviated as C18H6(OCnH2n+1)3(OCOCH2OC3H7)3, n=4-8, and hexa(propyloxyacetyloxy)triphenylene, C18H6(OCOCH2OC3H7)6 were synthesized. Thermal gravimetry analysis (TGA) of three discogens showed that they had good thermal stability till 350℃. The mesomorphism was investigated through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)and polarized optical microscopy (POM). The preliminary X-ray diffraction (XRD) results of one compound showed that it exhibited ordered hexagonal columnar (Colho) mesophase. These mixed tail triphenylene derivatives possessed much stable Colho mesophase and wider mesophase ranges than their hexaalkoxytriphenylene C18H6(OR)6 and hexaalkanoyloxytriphenylene C18H6(OCOR')6 analogues. The asymmetrical compounds 2,6,11-trialkoxy-3,7,10-tri(2-propyloxyacetyloxy)triphenylenes with n=5-8 displayed higher clearing points and wider temperature ranges than their symmetrical isomers 2,6,10-trialkoxy-3,7,11-tri(2-propyloxyacetyloxy)triphenylenes, while C18H6(OCOCH2OC3H7)6 had the highest clearing point due to the β-oxygen-atom effect.

  17. Thermospheric atomic oxygen concentrations from WINDII O+(2P→2D) 732 nm emission: Comparisons with the NRLMSISE-00 and C-IAM models and with GUVI observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Gordon G.; Cho, Young-Min; Fomichev, Victor I.; Martynenko, Oleg V.

    2016-09-01

    Thermospheric atomic oxygen concentrations have been retrieved from observations by the Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) O+(2P→2D) 732 and 733 nm emissions and are compared with results obtained by the Global Ultraviolet Imager (GUVI). Although the observations compared were taken ten years apart, the periods were selected on the basis of solar activity, using the Canadian Ionosphere and Atmosphere Model (C-IAM) to bridge the time gap. Results from all of these were compared with those from the Naval Research Laboratory Mass Spectrometer and Incoherent Scatter (NRLMSISE-00) model. Comparisons were made on the basis of F10.7 solar flux, day of year, local time, season, latitude and longitude. The WINDII local time variations showed enhanced values for the Northern spring season. Latitude and longitude plots showed smooth variations for NRLMSISE-00 and large variations for both WINDII and GUVI observations; in particular a depression in atomic oxygen concentration around 40 °S latitude and 100 °E longitude that is tentatively identified with a longitudinal wave 1 that does not propagate in local time but has an annual variation. The averaged values showed the WINDII values to be 0.75 that of NRLMSISE-00 compared with 0.80 for GUVI. Thus the WINDII values agreed with those of GUVI to within 6%, although taken 10 years apart.

  18. A Coupled Chemistry-emission Model for Atomic Oxygen Green and Red-doublet Emissions in the Comet C/1996 B2 Hyakutake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Raghuram, Susarla

    2012-03-01

    The green (5577 Å) and red-doublet (6300, 6364 Å) lines are prompt emissions of metastable oxygen atoms in the 1 S and 1 D states, respectively, that have been observed in several comets. The value of the intensity ratio of green to red-doublet (G/R ratio) of 0.1 has been used as a benchmark to identify the parent molecule of oxygen lines as H2O. A coupled chemistry-emission model is developed to study the production and loss mechanisms of the O(1 S) and O(1 D) atoms and the generation of red and green lines in the coma of C/1996 B2 Hyakutake. The G/R ratio depends not only on photochemistry, but also on the projected area observed for cometary coma, which is a function of the dimension of the slit used and the geocentric distance of the comet. Calculations show that the contribution of photodissociation of H2O to the green (red) line emission is 30%-70% (60%-90%), while CO2 and CO are the next potential sources contributing 25%-50% (green lines and G/R ratios are in good agreement with the observations made on the comet Hyakutake in 1996 March.

  19. Coupled Chemistry-Emission Model for Atomic Oxygen Green and Red-doublet Emissions in Comet C/1996 B2 Hyakutake

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, Anil

    2012-01-01

    The green (5577 \\AA) and red-doublet (6300, 6364 \\AA) lines are prompt emissions of metastable oxygen atoms in the $^1$S and $^1$D states, respectively, that have been observed in several comets. The value of intensity ratio of green to red-doublet (G/R ratio) of 0.1 has been used as a benchmark to identify the parent molecule of oxygen lines as H$_2$O. A coupled chemistry-emission model is developed to study the production and loss mechanisms of O($^1$S) and O($^1$D) atoms and the generation of red and green lines in the coma of C/1996 B2 Hyakutake. The G/R ratio depends not only on photochemistry, but also on the projected area observed for cometary coma, which is a function of the dimension of the slit used and geocentric distance of the comet. Calculations show that the contribution of photodissociation of H$_2$O to the green (red) line emission is 30 to 70% (60 to 90%), while CO$_2$ and CO are the next potential sources contributing 25 to 50% ($<$5%). The ratio of the photo-production rate of O($^1$S)...

  20. Atomic Data for Fusion. Volume 5: Collisions of Carbon and Oxygen Ions with Electrons, H, H2 and He

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-01

    814 ( 1940 ). E.24 M. Lennon, R. W. McCullough, and H. B. Gilbody, J. Phys. B 16, 2191 (1983). 6-7 E.25 I. S. Dmitriev, V. S. Nikolaev, Y. A. Tashaev...Dept. of Physics, Tel-Aviv Univ., Tel-Aviv, Israel 383. Dr. I. N. Golovin , I. V. Kurchatov Inst., Atomic Energy, Ulitsa Kurchatova 46, Moscow 123182

  1. Model polymer etching and surface modification by a time modulated RF plasma jet: role of atomic oxygen and water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, P.; Knoll, A. J.; Wang, H.; Kondeti, V. S. S. K.; Bruggeman, P. J.; Oehrlein, G. S.

    2017-01-01

    The surface interaction of a well-characterized time modulated radio frequency (RF) plasma jet with polystyrene, poly(methyl methacrylate) and poly(vinyl alcohol) as model polymers is investigated. The RF plasma jet shows fast polymer etching but mild chemical modification with a characteristic carbonate ester and NO formation on the etched surface. By varying the plasma treatment conditions including feed gas composition, environment gaseous composition, and treatment distance, we find that short lived species, especially atomic O for Ar/1% O2 and 1% air plasma and OH for Ar/1% H2O plasma, play an essential role for polymer etching. For O2 containing plasma, we find that atomic O initiates polymer etching and the etching depth mirrors the measured decay of O atoms in the gas phase as the nozzle-surface distance increases. The etching reaction probability of an O atom ranging from 10-4 to 10-3 is consistent with low pressure plasma research. We also find that adding O2 and H2O simultaneously into Ar feed gas quenches polymer etching compared to adding them separately which suggests the reduction of O and OH density in Ar/O2/H2O plasma.

  2. A COUPLED CHEMISTRY-EMISSION MODEL FOR ATOMIC OXYGEN GREEN AND RED-DOUBLET EMISSIONS IN THE COMET C/1996 B2 HYAKUTAKE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Raghuram, Susarla, E-mail: bhardwaj_spl@yahoo.com, E-mail: anil_bhardwaj@vssc.gov.in, E-mail: raghuramsusarla@gmail.com [Space Physics Laboratory, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Trivandrum 695022 (India)

    2012-03-20

    The green (5577 Angstrom-Sign ) and red-doublet (6300, 6364 Angstrom-Sign ) lines are prompt emissions of metastable oxygen atoms in the {sup 1}S and {sup 1}D states, respectively, that have been observed in several comets. The value of the intensity ratio of green to red-doublet (G/R ratio) of 0.1 has been used as a benchmark to identify the parent molecule of oxygen lines as H{sub 2}O. A coupled chemistry-emission model is developed to study the production and loss mechanisms of the O({sup 1}S) and O({sup 1}D) atoms and the generation of red and green lines in the coma of C/1996 B2 Hyakutake. The G/R ratio depends not only on photochemistry, but also on the projected area observed for cometary coma, which is a function of the dimension of the slit used and the geocentric distance of the comet. Calculations show that the contribution of photodissociation of H{sub 2}O to the green (red) line emission is 30%-70% (60%-90%), while CO{sub 2} and CO are the next potential sources contributing 25%-50% (<5%). The ratio of the photoproduction rate of O({sup 1} S) to O({sup 1} D) would be around 0.03 ({+-}0.01) if H{sub 2}O is the main source of oxygen lines, whereas it is {approx}0.6 if the parent is CO{sub 2}. Our calculations suggest that the yield of O({sup 1} S) production in the photodissociation of H{sub 2}O cannot be larger than 1%. The model-calculated radial brightness profiles of the red and green lines and G/R ratios are in good agreement with the observations made on the comet Hyakutake in 1996 March.

  3. Study on performances of colorless and transparent shape memory polyimide film in space thermal cycling, atomic oxygen and ultraviolet irradiation environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui; Lan, Xin; Liu, Liwu; Xiao, Xinli; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2017-09-01

    Shape memory polymers with high glass transition temperature (HSMPs) and HSMP-based deployable structures and devices, which can bear harsh operation conditions for durable applications, have attracted more and more interest in recent years. In this article, colorless and transparent shape memory polyimide (SMCTPI) films were subjected to simulated vacuum thermal cycling, atomic oxygen (AO) and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation environments up to 600 h, 556 h and 600 h for accelerated irradiation. The glass transition temperature (T g) determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) had no obvious changes after being irradiated by varying amounts of thermal cycling, AO and UV irradiation dose. After being irradiated by 50 thermal cycles, 10 × 1021 atoms cm-2 AO irradiation and 3000 ESH UV irradiation, shape recovery behaviors of SMCTPI films also had no obvious damage even if they experienced 30 shape memory cycles, while the surface morphologies and optical properties were seriously destroyed by AO irradiation, as compared with thermal cycling and UV irradiation. The tensile strength could separately maintain 122 MPa, 120 MPa and 70 MPa after 50 thermal cycles, 10 × 1021 atoms cm-2 AO irradiation and 3000 ESH UV irradiation, which shows great potential for use in aerospace structures and devices.

  4. Oxygen Partial Pressure during Pulsed Laser Deposition: Deterministic Role on Thermodynamic Stability of Atomic Termination Sequence at SrRuO3/BaTiO3 Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yeong Jae; Wang, Lingfei; Kim, Yoonkoo; Nahm, Ho-Hyun; Lee, Daesu; Kim, Jeong Rae; Yang, Sang Mo; Yoon, Jong-Gul; Chung, Jin-Seok; Kim, Miyoung; Chang, Seo Hyoung; Noh, Tae Won

    2017-08-16

    With recent trends on miniaturizing oxide-based devices, the need for atomic-scale control of surface/interface structures by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has increased. In particular, realizing uniform atomic termination at the surface/interface is highly desirable. However, a lack of understanding on the surface formation mechanism in PLD has limited a deliberate control of surface/interface atomic stacking sequences. Here, taking the prototypical SrRuO3/BaTiO3/SrRuO3 (SRO/BTO/SRO) heterostructure as a model system, we investigated the formation of different interfacial termination sequences (BaO-RuO2 or TiO2-SrO) with oxygen partial pressure (PO2) during PLD. We found that a uniform SrO-TiO2 termination sequence at the SRO/BTO interface can be achieved by lowering the PO2 to 5 mTorr, regardless of the total background gas pressure (Ptotal), growth mode, or growth rate. Our results indicate that the thermodynamic stability of the BTO surface at the low-energy kinetics stage of PLD can play an important role in surface/interface termination formation. This work paves the way for realizing termination engineering in functional oxide heterostructures.

  5. The double-well oscillating potential of oxygen atoms in perovskite system Ba(K)BiO sub 3 : EXAFS - analysis results

    CERN Document Server

    Menushenkov, A P; Konarev, P V; Meshkov, A A; Benazeth, S; Purans, J

    2000-01-01

    Temperature-dependent X-ray absorption investigations were made on the Bi L sub 3 -edge in Ba sub 1 sub - sub x K sub x BiO sub 3 with x=0.0, 0.4 and 0.5. For the superconducting samples (x=0.4 and 0.5) it has been found that the local structure differs from the ideal cubic in contrast to the neutron and X-ray diffraction data. The provided analysis of the EXAFS spectra indicates that the oxygen atoms move in double-well potential produced by the existence of two non-equivalent octahedral types of the oxygen environment of bismuth. The vibrations in such a potential lead to modulations of the Bi-O lengths with low frequency which is determined by the soft oxygen octahedron rotation mode frequency. This induces strong electron-phonon interaction and may be the reason for relatively high-temperature transition (T sub c approx 30 K) to the superconducting state.

  6. Absolute atomic oxygen density measurements for nanosecond-pulsed atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, C.; Carter, C.

    2014-12-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed plasma jets that are generated under ambient air conditions and free from confinement of electrodes have become of great interest in recent years due to their promising applications in medicine and dentistry. Reactive oxygen species that are generated by nanosecond-pulsed, room-temperature non-equilibrium He-O2 plasma jets among others are believed to play an important role during the bactericidal or sterilization processes. We report here absolute measurements of atomic oxygen density in a 1 mm-diameter He/(1%)O2 plasma jet at atmospheric pressure using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Oxygen number density on the order of 1013 cm-3 was obtained in a 150 ns, 6 kV single-pulsed plasma jet for an axial distance up to 5 mm above the device nozzle. Temporally resolved O density measurements showed that there are two maxima, separated in time by 60-70 µs, and a total pulse duration of 260-300 µs. Electrostatic modeling indicated that there are high-electric-field regions near the nozzle exit that may be responsible for the observed temporal behavior of the O production. Both the field-distribution-based estimation of the time interval for the O number density profile and a pulse-energy-dependence study confirmed that electric-field-dependent, direct and indirect electron-induced processes play important roles for O production.

  7. Probing Pluto's Atmosphere Using Ground-Based Stellar Occultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicardy, Bruno; Rio de Janeiro Occultation Team, Granada Team, International Occultation and Timing Association, Royal Astronomical Society New Zealand Occultation Section, Lucky Star associated Teams

    2016-10-01

    Over the last three decades, some twenty stellar occultations by Pluto have been monitored from Earth. They occur when the dwarf planet blocks the light from a star for a few minutes as it moves on the sky. Such events led to the hint of a Pluto's atmosphere in 1985, that was fully confirmed during another occultation in 1988, but it was only in 2002 that a new occultation could be recorded. From then on, the dwarf planet started to move in front of the galactic center, which amplified by a large factor the number of events observable per year.Pluto occultations are essentially refractive events during which the stellar rays are bent by the tenuous atmosphere, causing a gradual dimming of the star. This provides the density, pressure and temperature profiles of the atmosphere from a few kilometers above the surface up to about 250 km altitude, corresponding respectively to pressure levels of about 10 and 0.1 μbar. Moreover, the extremely fine spatial resolution (a few km) obtained through this technique allows the detection of atmospheric gravity waves, and permits in principle the detection of hazes, if present.Several aspects make Pluto stellar occultations quite special: first, they are the only way to probe Pluto's atmosphere in detail, as the dwarf planet is far too small on the sky and the atmosphere is far too tenuous to be directly imaged from Earth. Second, they are an excellent example of participative science, as many amateurs have been able to record those events worldwide with valuable scientific returns, in collaboration with professional astronomers. Third, they reveal Pluto's climatic changes on decade-scales and constrain the various seasonal models currently explored.Finally, those observations are fully complementary to space exploration, in particular with the New Horizons (NH) mission. I will show how ground-based occultations helped to better calibrate some NH profiles, and conversely, how NH results provide some key boundary conditions

  8. Independet Component Analyses of Ground-based Exoplanetary Transits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Martins-Filho, Walter; Griffith, Caitlin Ann; Pearson, Kyle; Waldmann, Ingo; Biddle, Lauren; Zellem, Robert Thomas; Alvarez-Candal, Alvaro

    2016-10-01

    Most observations of exoplanetary atmospheres are conducted when a "Hot Jupiter" exoplanet transits in front of its host star. These Jovian-sized planets have small orbital periods, on the order of days, and therefore a short transit time, making them more ameanable to observations. Measurements of Hot Jupiter transits must achieve a 10-4 level of accuracy in the flux to determine the spectral modulations of the exoplanetary atmosphere. In order to accomplish this level of precision, we need to extract systematic errors, and, for ground-based measurements, the effects of Earth's atmosphere, from the signal due to the exoplanet, which is several orders of magnitudes smaller. Currently, the effects of the terrestrial atmosphere and the some of the time-dependent systematic errors are treated by dividing the host star by a reference star at each wavelength and time step of the transit. More recently, Independent Component Analyses (ICA) have been used to remove systematic effects from the raw data of space-based observations (Waldmann 2014,2012; Morello et al.,2015,2016). ICA is a statistical method born from the ideas of the blind-source separation studies, which can be used to de-trend several independent source signals of a data set (Hyvarinen and Oja, 2000). One strength of this method is that it requires no additional prior knowledge of the system. Here, we present a study of the application of ICA to ground-based transit observations of extrasolar planets, which are affected by Earth's atmosphere. We analyze photometric data of two extrasolar planets, WASP-1b and GJ3470b, recorded by the 61" Kuiper Telescope at Stewart Observatory using the Harris B and U filters. The presentation will compare the light curve depths and their dispersions as derived from the ICA analysis to those derived by analyses that ratio of the host star to nearby reference stars.References: Waldmann, I.P. 2012 ApJ, 747, 12, Waldamann, I. P. 2014 ApJ, 780, 23; Morello G. 2015 ApJ, 806

  9. Oxygen-Induced Restructuring of Rutile TiO(2)(110): Formation Mechanism, Atomic Models, and Influence on Surface Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Min; Hebenstreit, Wilhelm; Diebold, Ulrike; Henderson, Michael A.; Jennison, Dwight R.

    1999-07-07

    The rutile TiO{sub 2} (110) (1x1) surface is considered the prototypical ''well-defined'' system in the surface science of metal oxides. Its popularity results partly from two experimental advantages: bulk-reduced single crystals do not exhibit charging, and stoichiometric surfaces--as judged by electron spectroscopes--can be prepared reproducibly by sputtering and annealing in oxygen. We present results that show that this commonly-applied preparation procedure may result in a surface structure that is by far more complex than generally anticipated. Flat, (1x1) terminated surfaces are obtained by sputtering and annealing in ultrahigh vacuum. When re-annealed in oxygen at moderate temperatures (470 K to 660 K), irregular networks of partially-connected, pseudohexagonal rosettes (6.5 x 6 {angstrom} wide), one-unit cell wide strands, and small ({approximately} tens of {angstrom}) (1x1) islands appear. This new surface phase is formed through reaction of oxygen gas with interstitial Ti from the reduced bulk. Because it consists of an incomplete, kinetically-limited (1x1) layer, this phenomenon has been termed restructuring. We report a combined experimental and theoretical study that systematically explores this restructuring process. The influence of several parameters (annealing time, temperature, pressure, sample history, gas) on the surface morphology is investigated using STM. The surface coverage of the added phase as well as the kinetics of the restructuring process are quantified by LEIS and SSIMS measurements in combination with annealing in {sup 18}O-enriched gas. Atomic models of the essential structural elements are presented and are shown to be stable with first-principles density functional calculations. The effect of oxygen-induced restructuring on surface chemistry and its importance for TiO{sub 2} and other bulk-reduced oxide materials is briefly discussed.

  10. Formation of hydrogen peroxide and water from the reaction of cold hydrogen atoms with solid oxygen at 10K

    CERN Document Server

    Miyauchi, N; Chigai, T; Nagaoka, A; Watanabe, N; Kouchi, A

    2008-01-01

    The reactions of cold H atoms with solid O2 molecules were investigated at 10 K. The formation of H2O2 and H2O has been confirmed by in-situ infrared spectroscopy. We found that the reaction proceeds very efficiently and obtained the effective reaction rates. This is the first clear experimental evidence of the formation of water molecules under conditions mimicking those found in cold interstellar molecular clouds. Based on the experimental results, we discuss the reaction mechanism and astrophysical implications.

  11. Observing Tsunamis in the Ionosphere Using Ground Based GPS Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, D. A.; Komjathy, A.; Song, Y. Tony; Stephens, P.; Hickey, M. P.; Foster, J.

    2011-01-01

    Ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements of ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) show variations consistent with atmospheric internal gravity waves caused by ocean tsunamis following recent seismic events, including the Tohoku tsunami of March 11, 2011. We observe fluctuations correlated in time, space, and wave properties with this tsunami in TEC estimates processed using JPL's Global Ionospheric Mapping Software. These TEC estimates were band-pass filtered to remove ionospheric TEC variations with periods outside the typical range of internal gravity waves caused by tsunamis. Observable variations in TEC appear correlated with the Tohoku tsunami near the epicenter, at Hawaii, and near the west coast of North America. Disturbance magnitudes are 1-10% of the background TEC value. Observations near the epicenter are compared to estimates of expected tsunami-driven TEC variations produced by Embry Riddle Aeronautical University's Spectral Full Wave Model, an atmosphere-ionosphere coupling model, and found to be in good agreement. The potential exists to apply these detection techniques to real-time GPS TEC data, providing estimates of tsunami speed and amplitude that may be useful for future early warning systems.

  12. Tissue Engineering of Cartilage on Ground-Based Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleshcheva, Ganna; Bauer, Johann; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Egli, Marcel; Wehland, Markus; Grimm, Daniela

    2016-06-01

    Investigations under simulated microgravity offer the opportunity for a better understanding of the influence of altered gravity on cells and the scaffold-free three-dimensional (3D) tissue formation. To investigate the short-term influence, human chondrocytes were cultivated for 2 h, 4 h, 16 h, and 24 h on a 2D Fast-Rotating Clinostat (FRC) in DMEM/F-12 medium supplemented with 10 % FCS. We detected holes in the vimentin network, perinuclear accumulations of vimentin after 2 h, and changes in the chondrocytes shape visualised by F-actin staining after 4 h of FRC-exposure. Scaffold-free cultivation of chondrocytes for 7 d on the Random Positioning Machine (RPM), the FRC and the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) resulted in spheroid formation, a phenomenon already known from spaceflight experiments with chondrocytes (MIR Space Station) and thyroid cancer cells (SimBox/Shenzhou-8 space mission). The experiments enabled by the ESA-CORA-GBF programme gave us an optimal opportunity to study gravity-related cellular processes, validate ground-based facilities for our chosen cell system, and prepare long-term experiments under real microgravity conditions in space

  13. Theoretical validation of ground-based microwave ozone observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ricaud

    Full Text Available Ground-based microwave measurements of the diurnal and seasonal variations of ozoneat 42±4.5 and 55±8 km are validated by comparing with results from a zero-dimensional photochemical model and a two-dimensional (2D chemical/radiative/dynamical model, respectively. O3 diurnal amplitudes measured in Bordeaux are shown to be in agreement with theory to within 5%. For the seasonal analysis of O3 variation, at 42±4.5 km, the 2D model underestimates the yearly averaged ozone concentration compared with the measurements. A double maximum oscillation (~3.5% is measured in Bordeaux with an extended maximum in September and a maximum in February, whilst the 2D model predicts only a single large maximum (17% in August and a pronounced minimum in January. Evidence suggests that dynamical transport causes the winter O3 maximum by propagation of planetary waves, phenomena which are not explicitly reproduced by the 2D model. At 55±8 km, the modeled yearly averaged O3 concentration is in very good agreement with the measured yearly average. A strong annual oscillation is both measured and modeled with differences in the amplitude shown to be exclusively linked to temperature fields.

  14. Models of ionospheric VLF absorption of powerful ground based transmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M. B.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Inan, U. S.

    2012-12-01

    Ground based Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) radio transmitters play a role in precipitation of energetic Van Allen electrons. Initial analyses of the contribution of VLF transmitters to radiation belt losses were based on early models of trans-ionospheric propagation known as the Helliwell absorption curves, but some recent studies have found that the model overestimates (by 20-100 dB) the VLF energy reaching the magnetosphere. It was subsequently suggested that conversion of wave energy into electrostatic modes may be responsible for the error. We utilize a newly available extensive record of VLF transmitter energy reaching the magnetosphere, taken from the DEMETER satellite, and perform a direct comparison with a sophisticated full wave model of trans-ionospheric propagation. Although the model does not include the effect of ionospheric irregularities, it correctly predicts the average total power injected into the magnetosphere within several dB. The results, particularly at nighttime, appear to be robust against the variability of the ionospheric electron density. We conclude that the global effect of irregularity scattering on whistler mode conversion to quasi-electrostatic may be no larger than 6 dB.

  15. Atmospheric Refraction Path Integrals in Ground-Based Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Mathar, R J

    2004-01-01

    The basic effect of the earth's atmospheric refraction on telescope operation is the reduction of the true zenith angle to the apparent zenith angle, associated with prismatic aberrations due to the dispersion in air. If one attempts coherent superposition of star images in ground-based interferometry, one is in addition interested in the optical path length associated with the refracted rays. In a model of a flat earth, the optical path difference between these is not concerned as the translational symmetry of the setup means no net effect remains. Here, I evaluate these interferometric integrals in the more realistic arrangement of two telescopes located on the surface of a common earth sphere and point to a star through an atmosphere which also possesses spherical symmetry. Some focus is put on working out series expansions in terms of the small ratio of the baseline over the earth radius, which allows to bypass some numerics which otherwise is challenged by strong cancellation effects in building the opti...

  16. Experiments on a Ground-Based Tomographic Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoonyol Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development and experiment of three-dimensional image formation by using a ground-based tomographic synthetic aperture radar (GB-TomoSAR system. GB-TomoSAR formulates two-dimensional synthetic aperture by the motion of antennae, both in azimuth and vertical directions. After range compression, three-dimensional image focusing is performed by applying Deramp-FFT (Fast Fourier Transform algorithms, both in azimuth and vertical directions. Geometric and radiometric calibrations were applied to make an image cube, which is then projected into range-azimuth and range-vertical cross-sections for visualization. An experiment with a C-band GB-TomoSAR system with a scan length of 2.49 m and 1.86 m in azimuth and vertical-direction, respectively, shows distinctive three-dimensional radar backscattering of stable buildings and roads with resolutions similar to the theoretical values. Unstable objects such as trees and moving cars generate severe noise due to decorrelation during the eight-hour image-acquisition time.

  17. A comparative study of satellite and ground-based phenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, S; Stöckli, R; Appenzeller, C; Vidale, P L

    2007-05-01

    Long time series of ground-based plant phenology, as well as more than two decades of satellite-derived phenological metrics, are currently available to assess the impacts of climate variability and trends on terrestrial vegetation. Traditional plant phenology provides very accurate information on individual plant species, but with limited spatial coverage. Satellite phenology allows monitoring of terrestrial vegetation on a global scale and provides an integrative view at the landscape level. Linking the strengths of both methodologies has high potential value for climate impact studies. We compared a multispecies index from ground-observed spring phases with two types (maximum slope and threshold approach) of satellite-derived start-of-season (SOS) metrics. We focus on Switzerland from 1982 to 2001 and show that temporal and spatial variability of the multispecies index correspond well with the satellite-derived metrics. All phenological metrics correlate with temperature anomalies as expected. The slope approach proved to deviate strongly from the temporal development of the ground observations as well as from the threshold-defined SOS satellite measure. The slope spring indicator is considered to indicate a different stage in vegetation development and is therefore less suited as a SOS parameter for comparative studies in relation to ground-observed phenology. Satellite-derived metrics are, however, very susceptible to snow cover, and it is suggested that this snow cover should be better accounted for by the use of newer satellite sensors.

  18. Satellite Type Estination from Ground-based Photometric Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, T.; Ono, H.; Suzuki, J.; Ando, T.; Takanezawa, T.

    2016-09-01

    The optical photometric observation is potentially a powerful tool for understanding of the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) objects. At first, we measured in laboratory the surface reflectance of common satellite materials, for example, Multi-layer Insulation (MLI), mono-crystalline silicon cells, and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP). Next, we calculated visual magnitude of a satellite by simplified shape and albedo. In this calculation model, solar panels have dimensions of 2 by 8 meters, and the bus area is 2 meters squared with measured optical properties described above. Under these conditions, it clarified the brightness can change the range between 3 and 4 magnitudes in one night, but color index changes only from 1 to 2 magnitudes. Finally, we observed the color photometric data of several GEO satellites visible from Japan multiple times in August and September 2014. We obtained that light curves of GEO satellites recorded in the B and V bands (using Johnson filters) by a ground-base optical telescope. As a result, color index changed approximately from 0.5 to 1 magnitude in one night, and the order of magnitude was not changed in all cases. In this paper, we briefly discuss about satellite type estimation using the relation between brightness and color index obtained from the photometric observation.

  19. Ground-based measurements of UV Index (UVI at Helwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Farouk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available On October 2010 UV Index (UVI ground-based measurements were carried out by weather station at solar laboratory in NRIAG. The daily variation has maximum values in spring and summer days, while minimum values in autumn and winter days. The low level of UVI between 2.55 and 2.825 was found in December, January and February. The moderate level of UVI between 3.075 and 5.6 was found in March, October and November. The high level of UVI between 6.7 and 7.65 was found in April, May and September. The very high level of UVI between 8 and 8.6 was found in June, July and August. High level of radiation over 6 months per year including 3 months with a very high level UVI. According to the equation {UVI=a[SZA]b} the UVI increases with decreasing SZA by 82% on a daily scale and 88% on a monthly scale. Helwan exposure to a high level of radiation over 6 months per year including 3 months with a very high level UVI, so it is advisable not to direct exposure to the sun from 11 am to 2:00 pm.

  20. A Method of Inversing the Peak Density of Atomic Oxygen Vertical Distribution in the MLT Region From the OI (557.7nm) Night Airglow Intensity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. Gao; J.Y. Xu; W. Yuan

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, using the MSISE-90 model as the reference atmosphere, we discuss the feasibility and method of deducing the peak densities of the undisturbed atomic oxygen profiles in the MLT region (the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region) from OI (557.7 nm) night airglow intersities. The peak densities for different seasons, latitudes and longitudes are deduced from OI (557.7nm) airglow intensities through this expression. We analyze the features of inversion relative errors and discuss the influence of the variations in temperature on inversion errors. The results indicate that all inversion errors are less than 5% except for those at high altitudes in the summer hemisphere. And the impact of the variations in temperature on errors is not significant.

  1. Design and demonstration of a system for the deposition of atomic-oxygen durable coatings for reflective solar dynamic power system concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcclure, Donald J.

    1988-01-01

    A system for the vacuum deposition of atomic-oxygen durable coatings for reflective solar dynamic power systems (SDPS) concentrators was designed and demonstrated. The design issues pertinent to SDPS were developed by the Government Aerospace Systems Division of the Harris Corporation and are described in NASA-CR-179489. Both design and demonstration phases have been completed. At the time of this report the deposition system was ready for coating of facets for SDPS concentrators. The materials issue relevant to the coating work were not entirely resolved. These issues can only be resolved when substrates which are comparable to those which will be used in flight hardware are available. The substrates available during the contract period were deficient in the areas of surface roughness and contamination. These issues are discussed more thoroughly in the body of the report.

  2. A manganese(V)-oxo π-cation radical complex: influence of one-electron oxidation on oxygen-atom transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Katharine A; Neu, Heather M; de Visser, Sam P; Goldberg, David P

    2011-10-12

    One-electron oxidation of Mn(V)-oxo corrolazine 2 affords 2(+), the first example of a Mn(V)(O) π-cation radical porphyrinoid complex, which was characterized by UV-vis, EPR, LDI-MS, and DFT methods. Access to 2 and 2(+) allowed for a direct comparison of their reactivities in oxygen-atom transfer (OAT) reactions. Both complexes are capable of OAT to PPh(3) and RSR substrates, and 2(+) was found to be a more potent oxidant than 2. Analysis of rate constants and activation parameters, together with DFT calculations, points to a concerted OAT mechanism for 2(+) and 2 and indicates that the greater electrophilicity of 2(+) likely plays a dominant role in enhancing its reactivity. These results are relevant to comparisons between Compound I and Compound II in heme enzymes.

  3. Enumeration of non-labile oxygen atoms in dissolved organic matter by use of ¹⁶O/ ¹⁸O exchange and Fourier transform ion-cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyukevich, Yury; Kononikhin, Alexey; Zherebker, Alexander; Popov, Igor; Perminova, Irina; Nikolaev, Eugene

    2014-10-01

    We report a simple approach for enumeration of non-labile oxygen atoms in individual molecules of dissolved organic matter (DOM), using acid-catalyzed (16)O/(18)O exchange and ultrahigh-resolution Fourier-transform ion-cyclotron-resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). We found that by dissolving DOM in H2 (18)O at 95 °C for 20 days it is possible to replace all oxygen atoms of DOM molecules (excluding oxygen from ether groups) with (18)O. The number of exchanges in each molecule can be determined using high-resolution FTICR. Using the proposed method we identified the number of non-labile oxygen atoms in 231 molecules composing DOM. Also, using a previously developed hydrogen-deuterium (H/D)-exchange approach we identified the number of labile hydrogen atoms in 450 individual molecular formulas. In addition, we observed that several backbone hydrogen atoms can be exchanged for deuterium under acidic conditions. The method can be used for structural and chemical characterization of individual DOM molecules, comparing different DOM samples, and investigation of biological pathways of DOM in the environment.

  4. Formation Mechanism and Emission Spectrum of AlO Radicals in Reaction of Laser-ablated Al Atom and Oxygen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shu-dong; LI Hai-Yang

    2003-01-01

    The emission spectrum of AlO radicals was analyzed in 440-540 nm in the reaction of laser ablated Al beam and O2. The carrier of spectrum was assigned to Δν=0, ±1, ±2 vibrational sequences of B2Σ+-X2Σ+ transition of AlO radicals, the observed maximum vibrational quantum number was ν′=6. The rotational and vibrational temperatures of B state were estimated at 3000 and 7500 K by spectrally simulating the rovibronic population distribution. There is a strong evidence that the production of excited Al(2S) atoms is essential to the formation of excited AlO radicals.

  5. Absolute quantum yield measurements for the formation of oxygen atoms after UV laser excitation of SO2 at 222.4 nm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mohammed Abu-Bajeh; Melanie Cameron; Kyung-Hoon Jung; Christoph Kappel; Almuth Läuter; Kyoung-Seok Lee; Hari P Upadhyaya; Rajesh K Vatsa; Hans-Robert Volpp

    2002-12-01

    The dynamics of formation of oxygen atoms after UV photoexcitation of SO2 in the gas-phase was studied by pulsed laser photolysis-laser-induced fluorescence `pump-and-probe' technique in a flow reactor. SO2 at room-temperature was excited at the KrCl excimer laser wavelength (222.4 nm) and O(3P) photofragments were detected under collision-free conditions by vacuum ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence. The use of narrow-band probe laser radiation, generated via resonant third-order sum-difference frequency conversion of dye laser radiation in Krypton, allowed the measurement of the nascent O(3P=2,1,0) fine-structure state distribution: =2/=1/=0 = (0.88 ± 0.02)/(0.10 ± 0.01)/(0.02 ± 0.01). Employing NO2 photolysis as a reference, a value of O(3P) = 0.13 ± 0.05 for the absolute O(3P) atom quantum yield was determined. The measured O(3P) quantum yield is compared with the results of earlier fluorescence quantum yield measurements. A suitable mechanism is suggested in which the dissociation proceeds via internal conversion from high rotational states of the initially excited SO2(∼ 1 B2) (1, 2, 2) vibronic level to nearby continuum states of the electronic ground state.

  6. Remote sensing of atomic oxygen - Some observational difficulties in the use of the forbidden O I 1173-A and O I 1641-A transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdman, P. W.; Zipf, E. C.

    1987-01-01

    Recent sounding rocket and satellite studies suggest that simultaneous measurements of the O I 989-A and 1304-A resonance lines and of the forbidden 1172.6-A and 1641.3-A transitions would form the basis of a useful remote sensing technique for measuring the O I density and optical opacity of a planetary or stellar atmosphere. Because the 1172.6-A and 1641.3-A emissions are weak lines and are emitted in a wavelength region rich in spectral features, it is important to determine whether typical flight instruments can make measurements with sufficient spectral purity so that the remote sensing observations will yield accurate results. A detailed, high-resolution study of the far UV emission features in the regions surrounding the atomic oxygen transitions at 1172.6 and 1641.3 A was made. These spectra, which were excited by electron impact on O2 and N2, are presented in an attempt to display some potential sources of interference in aeronomical measurements of these O I lines. Both atomic and molecular emissions are found, and the spectral resolution necessary to make unambiguous measurements is discussed.

  7. Effects of the oxygen precursor on the electrical and structural properties of HfO2 films grown by atomic layer deposition on Ge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, S.; Wiemer, C.; Tallarida, G.; Scarel, G.; Ferrari, S.; Seguini, G.; Fanciulli, M.

    2005-09-01

    We report on the growth by atomic layer deposition of HfO2 films on HF-last treated Ge(001) substrates using HfCl4 as a Hf source and either O3 or H2O as oxygen sources. The choice of the oxygen precursor strongly influences the structural, chemical, and electrical properties of the HfO2 films: Those grown using H2O exhibit local epitaxial growth, a large amount of contaminants such as chlorine and carbon, and a large frequency dispersion of the capacitance-voltage (C -V) characteristics. Films grown using O3 are good insulators and exhibit well-shaped C -V curves with a minimum frequency dispersion of the accumulation capacitance. Moreover, they are smoother, less crystallized, and with a lower contaminant content than those grown using H2O. However, the use of O3 leads to the formation of a 2nm thick layer, possibly GeOx, at the HfO2/Ge interface.

  8. O2 insertion into group 9 metal-hydride bonds: evidence for oxygen activation through the hydrogen-atom-abstraction mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Jason M; Teets, Thomas S; Nocera, Daniel G

    2012-09-03

    A detailed density functional study was performed to examine the reaction of mixed-valence dirhodium and diiridium species [M(2)(0,II)(tfepma)(2)(CN(t)Bu)(2)(Cl)(2) (1, tfepma = MeN[P(OCH(2)CF(3))(2)](2), CN(t)Bu = tert-butyl isocyaninde)] with HCl and oxygen with an interest in examining the pathways for oxygen insertion into the intermediate metal hydride to form hydroperoxo species. The O(2) hydrogen atom abstraction mechanism for both the Rh and Ir was found to be feasible. This is the first time this mechanism has been applied to a Rh system and only the second time it has been examined for a system other than Pd. The competing trans HCl reductive elimination pathway was also examined and found to be greatly dependent on the stereochemistry of the starting hydride primarily due to the intermediate formed upon the loss of Cl(-). As a result, the reductive elimination pathway was more favorable by 11.5 kcal/mol for the experimentally observed Ir stereoisomer, while the two pathways were isoenergetic for the other stereoisomer of the Rh complex. All findings are consistent with the kinetics study previously performed.

  9. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel E.; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfect all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean, and as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources’ right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO’s observations and electromagnetic (EM) follow-up. Beyond galactic foregrounds associated with seasonal variations, we find that equatorial observatories can access over 80% of the localization probability, while mid-latitudes will access closer to 70%. Facilities located near the two LIGO sites can observe sources closer to their zenith than their analogs in the south, but the average observation will still be no closer than 44° from zenith. We also find that observatories in Africa or the South Atlantic will wait systematically longer before they can begin observing compared to the rest of the world though, there is a preference for longitudes near the LIGOs. These effects, along with knowledge of the LIGO antenna pattern, can inform EM follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  10. Ground-based Measurements of Next Generation Spectroradiometric Standard Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate, radiometric standards are essential to the future of ground- and space-based astronomy and astrophysics. While astronomers tend to think of “standard stars” as available calibration sources, progress at NIST to accurately calibrate inexpensive, easy to use photodiode detectors as spectroradiometric standards from 200 nm to 1800 nm allows referencing astronomical measurements to these devices. Direction-, time-, and wavelength-dependent transmission of Earth’s atmosphere is the single largest source of error for ground-based radiometric measurement of astronomical objects. Measurements and impacts of atmospheric extinction - scattering and absorption - on imaging radiometric and spectroradiometric measurements are described. The conclusion is that accurate real-time measurement of extinction in the column of atmosphere through which standard star observations are made, over the spectral region being observed and over the field of view of the telescope are required. New techniques to directly and simultaneously measure extinction in the column of atmosphere through which observations are made are required. Our direct extinction measurement solution employs three small facility-class instruments working in parallel: a lidar to measure rapidly time variable transmission at three wavelengths with uncertainty of 0.25% per airmass, a spectrophotometer to measure rapidly wavelength variable extinction with sub-1% precision per nanometer resolution element from 350 to 1050nm, and a wide-field camera to measure angularly variable extinction over the field of view. These instruments and their operation will be described. We assert that application of atmospheric metadata provided by this instrument suite corrects for a significant fraction of systematic errors currently limiting radiometric precision, and provides a major step towards measurements that are provably dominated by random noise.

  11. Ozone profiles above Kiruna from two ground-based radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Niall J.; Walker, Kaley A.; Raffalski, Uwe; Kivi, Rigel; Gross, Jochen; Manney, Gloria L.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents new atmospheric ozone concentration profiles retrieved from measurements made with two ground-based millimetre-wave radiometers in Kiruna, Sweden. The instruments are the Kiruna Microwave Radiometer (KIMRA) and the Millimeter wave Radiometer 2 (MIRA 2). The ozone concentration profiles are retrieved using an optimal estimation inversion technique, and they cover an altitude range of ˜ 16-54 km, with an altitude resolution of, at best, 8 km. The KIMRA and MIRA 2 measurements are compared to each other, to measurements from balloon-borne ozonesonde measurements at Sodankylä, Finland, and to measurements made by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the Aura satellite. KIMRA has a correlation of 0.82, but shows a low bias, with respect to the ozonesonde data, and MIRA 2 shows a smaller magnitude low bias and a 0.98 correlation coefficient. Both radiometers are in general agreement with each other and with MLS data, showing high correlation coefficients, but there are differences between measurements that are not explained by random errors. An oscillatory bias with a peak of approximately ±1 ppmv is identified in the KIMRA ozone profiles over an altitude range of ˜ 18-35 km, and is believed to be due to baseline wave features that are present in the spectra. A time series analysis of KIMRA ozone for winters 2008-2013 shows the existence of a local wintertime minimum in the ozone profile above Kiruna. The measurements have been ongoing at Kiruna since 2002 and late 2012 for KIMRA and MIRA 2, respectively.

  12. Project management for complex ground-based instruments: MEGARA plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Vargas, María. Luisa; Pérez-Calpena, Ana; Gil de Paz, Armando; Gallego, Jesús; Carrasco, Esperanza; Cedazo, Raquel; Iglesias, Jorge

    2014-08-01

    The project management of complex instruments for ground-based large telescopes is a challenge itself. A good management is a clue for project success in terms of performance, schedule and budget. Being on time has become a strict requirement for two reasons: to assure the arrival at the telescope due to the pressure on demanding new instrumentation for this first world-class telescopes and to not fall in over-costs. The budget and cash-flow is not always the expected one and has to be properly handled from different administrative departments at the funding centers worldwide distributed. The complexity of the organizations, the technological and scientific return to the Consortium partners and the participation in the project of all kind of professional centers working in astronomical instrumentation: universities, research centers, small and large private companies, workshops and providers, etc. make the project management strategy, and the tools and procedures tuned to the project needs, crucial for success. MEGARA (Multi-Espectrógrafo en GTC de Alta Resolución para Astronomía) is a facility instrument of the 10.4m GTC (La Palma, Spain) working at optical wavelengths that provides both Integral-Field Unit (IFU) and Multi-Object Spectrograph (MOS) capabilities at resolutions in the range R=6,000-20,000. The project is an initiative led by Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain) in collaboration with INAOE (Mexico), IAA-CSIC (Spain) and Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain). MEGARA is being developed under contract with GRANTECAN.

  13. Promising monolayer membranes for CO2/N2/CH4 separation: Graphdiynes modified respectively with hydrogen, fluorine, and oxygen atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lianming; Sang, Pengpeng; Guo, Sheng; Liu, Xiuping; Li, Jing; Zhu, Houyu; Guo, Wenyue

    2017-05-01

    Three graphdiyne-like monolayers were designed by substituting one-third diacetylenic linkages with heteroatoms hydrogen, fluorine, and oxygen (GDY_X, X = H, F, and O), respectively. The CO2/N2/CH4 separation performance of the designed graphdiyne-like monolayers was investigated by using both first-principle density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. The stabilities of GDY_X monolayers were confirmed by the calculated cohesive energies and phonon dispersion spectra. Both the DFT and MD calculations demonstrated that although the GDY_H membrane has poor selectivity for CO2/N2/CH4 gases, the GDY_F and GDY_O membranes can excellently separate CO2 and N2 from CH4 in a wide temperature range. Moreover, the CO2/N2 mixture can be effectively separated by GDY_O at temperatures lower than 300 K. Based on the kinetic theory, extremely high permeances were found for CO2 and N2 passing through the GDY_X membranes (10-4-10-2 mol/m2 s Pa at 298 K). In addition, the influence of relative concentration on selectivity was also investigated for gases in the binary mixtures. This work provides an effective way to modify graphdiyne for the separation of large molecular gases, which is quite crucial in the gas separation industry.

  14. Ground Based Investigation of Electrostatic Accelerometer in HUST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y.; Zhou, Z.

    2013-12-01

    High-precision electrostatic accelerometers with six degrees of freedom (DOF) acceleration measurement were successfully used in CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions which to measure the Earth's gravity field. In our group, space inertial sensor based on the capacitance transducer and electrostatic control technique has been investigated for test of equivalence principle (TEPO), searching non-Newtonian force in micrometer range, and satellite Earth's field recovery. The significant techniques of capacitive position sensor with the noise level at 2×10-7pF/Hz1/2 and the μV/Hz1/2 level electrostatic actuator are carried out and all the six servo loop controls by using a discrete PID algorithm are realized in a FPGA device. For testing on ground, in order to compensate one g earth's gravity, the fiber torsion pendulum facility is adopt to measure the parameters of the electrostatic controlled inertial sensor such as the resolution, and the electrostatic stiffness, the cross couple between different DOFs. A short distance and a simple double capsule equipment the valid duration about 0.5 second is set up in our lab for the free fall tests of the engineering model which can directly verify the function of six DOF control. Meanwhile, high voltage suspension method is also realized and preliminary results show that the horizontal axis of acceleration noise is about 10-8m/s2/Hz1/2 level which limited mainly by the seismic noise. Reference: [1] Fen Gao, Ze-Bing Zhou, Jun Luo, Feasibility for Testing the Equivalence Principle with Optical Readout in Space, Chin. Phys. Lett. 28(8) (2011) 080401. [2] Z. Zhu, Z. B. Zhou, L. Cai, Y. Z. Bai, J. Luo, Electrostatic gravity gradiometer design for the advanced GOCE mission, Adv. Sp. Res. 51 (2013) 2269-2276. [3] Z B Zhou, L Liu, H B Tu, Y Z Bai, J Luo, Seismic noise limit for ground-based performance measurements of an inertial sensor using a torsion balance, Class. Quantum Grav. 27 (2010) 175012. [4] H B Tu, Y Z Bai, Z B Zhou, L Liu, L

  15. Ground-Based Observing Campaign of Briz-M Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, S. M.; Buckalew, B.; Frith, J.; Cowardin, H. M.; Hickson, P.; Matney, M.; Anz-Meador, P.

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) completed the installation of the Meter Class Autonomous Telescope (MCAT) on Ascension Island. MCAT is a 1.3m optical telescope designed with a fast tracking capability for observing orbital debris at all orbital regimes (Low-Erath orbits to Geosyncronous (GEO) orbits) from a low latitude site. This new asset is dedicated year-round for debris observations, and its location fills a geographical gap in the Ground-based Electro Optical Space Surveillance (GEODSS) network. A commercial off the shelf (COTS) research grade 0.4m telescope (named the Benbrook telescope) will also be installed on Ascension at the end of 2016. This smaller version is controlled by the same master software, designed by Euclid Research, and can be tasked to work independently or in concert with MCAT. Like MCAT, it has a the same suite of filters, a similar field of view, and a fast-tracking Astelco mount, and is also capable of tracking debris at all orbital regimes. These assets are well suited for targeted campagins or surveys of debris. Since 2013, NASA's ODPO has also had extensive access to the 3.8m infrared UKIRT telescope, located on Mauna Kea. At nearly 14,000-ft, this site affords excellent conditions for collecting both photometery and spectroscopy at near-IR (0.9 - 2.5 micrometers SWIR) and thermal-IR (8 - 25 micrometers; LWIR) regimes, ideal for investigating material properties as well as thermal characteristics and sizes of debris. For the purposes of understanding orbital debris, taking data in both survey mode as well as targeting individual objects for more in-depth characterizations are desired. With the recent break-ups of Briz-M rocket bodies, we have collected a suite of data in the optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared of in-tact objects as well as those classified as debris. A break-up at GEO of a Briz-M rocket occurred in January, 2016, well timed for the first remote observing survey-campaign with MCAT. Access to

  16. Nursing Intervention in Elderly Patients with COPD Oxygen Atomizing Inhalation%老年COPD患者氧气雾化吸入的护理干预

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯海霞

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the nursing intervention for elderly patients with COPD and application ef ect of oxygen atomization. Methods Selected from February 2012 to February 2013, 2013 patients as the research object, were randomly divided into experimental group and control group, Control group 40 cases with atomization inhalation treatment method in clinical nursing, the experimental group 40 cases using atomizing inhalation therapy nursing treatment, based on the detection indicators of patients during treatment and discharge time, were analyzed. Results The experimental group total ef ective rate and discharge time was bet er than control group, and P<0.05, the more similar between the two groups have statistical significance. Conclusion Nursing intervention can improve the elderly patients with COPD understanding of atomizing inhalation of knowledge, improve the curative ef ect of treatment and shortening the time of discharge, is worthy of popularization and application.%目的探讨护理干预对老年COPD患者氧气雾化的应用效果。方法选取我院2012年2月~2013年2月80例患者作为研究对象,随机分为实验组与对照组,对照组40例使用雾化吸入治疗方法进行临床护理治疗,实验组40例使用雾化吸入法治疗基础上进行护理干预治疗,治疗期间观察患者的各项检测指标以及出院时间,进行对比分析。结果实验组的总有效率以及出院时间明显优于对照组,且约0.05,两组比较差异有统计学意义。结论护理干预可提高老年COPD患者对雾化吸入知识的了解,提高治疗的疗效以及缩短出院时间,值得推广应用。

  17. Contamination Reasons and Preventing Measures Caused by Oxygen-driving Atomizer%氧驱动雾化器污染的原因及预防措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建伟; 马学英; 宋淑霞; 袁桂敏; 王青青; 宋立霞

    2011-01-01

    目的 探索医院普通病房连续使用中的氧驱动雾化器污染的原因,并制定预防措施.方法 随机检测连续使用中的氧驱动雾化器的面罩、储药杯和通气管,并追查污染的原因.结果 在检测的50副雾化器中,面罩污染最严重,污染率为48.0%,其中14只检测出致病菌,主要有表皮葡萄球菌、肺炎克雷伯菌、大肠埃希菌;储药杯的污染率为30.2%,其中7只检出白色念珠菌、甲型溶血性链球菌;通气管污染率为18.0%,其中2只检测出肺炎克雷伯菌、白色念珠菌.雾化器各部件用洗洁精刷洗干净后,经1 000 mg/L的含氯消毒剂浸泡30 min,清水冲洗15 min,晾干后,随机抽取30副雾化器各部件检测,其结果 全部符合医院Ⅱ类环境物品卫生标准要求.结论 清洁、消毒观念错误以及用后存放不当是引起雾化器污染的主要原因;严格消毒,正确存放,定期进行细菌检测,在规定的期限内使用是避免细菌污染的可靠措施.%Objective To explore contamination reasons of oxygen-driving atomizers used continuously in ordinary sickrooms of hospital, and formulate preventing measures. Methods Veils, medicine cups and air pipes of atomizers that used continuously were detected randomly, contamination reasons were further tracked down. Results Among 50 atomizers detected, veils were contaminated most severely with a rate of 48.0%, 14 of them showed pathogenic bacteria, mainly Staphylococcus epidermidis, K.pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. The contamination rate of medicine cups was 30.2%, 7 cups infected with Candida albicans and α-hemolytic streptococcus. Air pipes' contamination accounted for 18.0% ,2 pipes existed K. pneumoniae and Candida albicans. All parts of atomizers were scrubed with cleanser essence ,then were soaked in 1 000 mg/L chlorine-releasing disinfectant 30 minutes, and then were washed with water for 15 minutes. After dry,30 atomizers' parts were drawn at random, and their detect

  18. Inelastic and Reactive Scattering Dynamics of Hyperthermal Oxygen Atoms on Ionic Liquid Surfaces: [emim][NTf2] and [C12mim][NTf2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bohan; Zhang, Jianming; Minton, Timothy K.; McKendrick, Kenneth G.; Slattery, John M.; Yockel, Scott; Schatz, George C.

    2011-05-01

    Collisions of hyperthermal oxygen atoms, with an average translational energy of 520 kJ mol-1, on continuously refreshed ionic liquids, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide ([emim][NTf2]) and 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide ([C12mim][NTf2]), were studied with the use of a beam-surface scattering technique. Time-of-flight and angular distributions of inelastically scattered O and reactively scattered OH and H2O were collected for various angles of incidence with the use of a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. For both O and OH, two distinct scattering processes were identified, which can be empirically categorized as thermal and non-thermal. Non-thermal scattering is more probable for both O and OH products. The observation of OH confirms that at least some reactive sites, presumably alkyl groups, must be exposed at the surface. The ionic liquid with the longer alkyl chain, [C12mim][NTf2], is substantially more reactive than the liquid with the shorter alkyl chain, [emim][NTf2], and proportionately much more so than would be predicted simply from stoichiometry based on the number of abstractable hydrogen atoms. Molecular dynamics models of these surfaces shed light on this change in reactivity. The scattering behavior of O is distinctly different from that of OH. However, no such differences between inelastic and reactive scattering dynamics have been seen in previous work on pure hydrocarbon liquids, in particular the benchmark, partially branched hydrocarbon, squalane (C30H62). The comparison between inelastic and reactive scattering dynamics indicates that inelastic scattering from the ionic liquid surfaces takes place predominantly at non-reactive sites that are effectively stiffer than the reactive alkyl chains, with a higher proportion of collisions sampling such sites for [emim][NTf2] than for [C12mim][NTf2].

  19. Atomic Oxygen (ATOX) simulation of Teflon FEP and Kapton H surfaces using a high intensity, low energy, mass selected, ion beam facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vered, R.; Grossman, E.; Lempert, G. D.; Lifshitz, Y.

    1994-01-01

    A high intensity (greater than 10(exp 15) ions/sq cm) low energy (down to 5 eV) mass selected ion beam (MSIB) facility was used to study the effects of ATOX on two polymers commonly used for space applications (Kapton H and Teflon FEP). The polymers were exposed to O(+) and Ne(+) fluences on 10(exp 15) - 10(exp 19) ions/sq cm, using 30eV ions. A variety of analytical methods were used to analyze the eroded surfaces including: (1) atomic force microscopy (AFM) for morphology measurements; (2) total mass loss measurements using a microbalance; (3) surface chemical composition using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and (4) residual gas analysis (RGA) of the released gases during bombardment. The relative significance of the collisional and chemical degradation processes was evaluated by comparing the effects of Ne(+) and O(+) bombardment. For 30 eV ions it was found that the Kapton is eroded via chemical mechanisms while Teflon FEP is eroded via collisional mechanisms. AFM analysis was found very powerful in revealing the evolution of the damage from its initial atomic scale (roughness of approx. 1 nm) to its final microscopic scale (roughness greater than 1 micron). Both the surface morphology and the average roughness of the bombarded surfaces (averaged over 1 micron x 1 micron images by the system's computer) were determined for each sample. For 30 eV a non linear increase of the Kapton roughness with the O(+) fluence was discovered (a slow increase rate for fluences phi less than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm, and a rapid increase rate for phi greater than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm). Comparative studies on the same materials exposed to RF and DC oxygen plasmas indicate that the specific details of the erosion depend on the simulation facility emphasizing the advantages of the ion beam facility.

  20. Ground-based monitoring of solar radiation in Moldova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aculinin, Alexandr; Smicov, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    Integrated measurements of solar radiation in Kishinev, Moldova have been started by Atmospheric Research Group (ARG) at the Institute of Applied Physics from 2003. Direct, diffuse and total components of solar and atmospheric long-wave radiation are measured by using of the radiometric complex at the ground-based solar radiation monitoring station. Measurements are fulfilled at the stationary and moving platforms equipped with the set of 9 broadband solar radiation sensors overlapping wavelength range from UV-B to IR. Detailed description of the station can be found at the site http://arg.phys.asm.md. Ground station is placed in an urban environment of Kishinev city (47.00N; 28.56E). Summary of observation data acquired at the station in the course of short-term period from 2004 to 2009 are presented below. Solar radiation measurements were fulfilled by using CM11(280-3000 nm) and CH1 sensors (Kipp&Zonen). In the course of a year maximum and minimum of monthly sums of total radiation was ~706.4 MJm-2 in June and ~82.1MJm-2 in December, respectively. Monthly sums of direct solar radiation (on horizontal plane) show the maximum and minimum values of the order ~456.9 MJm-2 in July and ~25.5MJm-2 in December, respectively. In an average, within a year should be marked the predominance of direct radiation over the scattered radiation, 51% and 49%, respectively. In the course of a year, the percentage contribution of the direct radiation into the total radiation is ~55-65% from May to September. In the remaining months, the percentage contribution decreases and takes the minimum value of ~ 28% in December. In an average, annual sum of total solar radiation is ~4679.9 MJm-2. For the period from April to September accounts for ~76% of the annual amount of total radiation. Annual sum of sunshine duration accounts for ~2149 hours, which is of ~ 48% from the possible sunshine duration. In an average, within a year maximum and minimum of sunshine duration is ~ 304 hours in

  1. Ground-based Space Weather Monitoring with LOFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Michael; van Haarlem, Michiel; Lawrence, Gareth; Reid, Simon; Bos, Andre; Rawlings, Steve; Salvini, Stef; Mitchell, Cathryn; Soleimani, Manuch; Amado, Sergio; Teresa, Vital

    As one of the first of a new generation of radio instruments, the International LOFAR Telescope (ILT) will provide a number of unique and novel capabilities for the astronomical community. These include remote configuration and operation, dynamic real-time processing and system response, and the ability to provide multiple simultaneous streams of data to a community whose scientific interests run the gamut from lighting in the atmospheres of distant planets to the origins of the universe itself. The LOFAR (LOw Frequency ARray) system is optimized for a frequency range from 30-240 MHz and consists of multiple antenna fields spread across Europe. In the Netherlands, a total 36 LOFAR stations are nearing completion with an initial 8 international stations currently being deployed in Germany, France, Sweden, and the UK. Digital beam-forming techniques make the LOFAR system agile and allow for rapid repointing of the telescope as well as the potential for multiple simultaneous observations. With its dense core array and long interferometric baselines, LOFAR has the potential to achieve unparalleled sensitivity and spatial resolution in the low frequency radio regime. LOFAR will also be one of the first radio observatories to feature automated processing pipelines to deliver fully calibrated science products to its user community. As we discuss in this presentation, the same capabilities that make LOFAR a powerful tool for radio astronomy also provide an excellent platform upon which to build a ground-based monitoring system for space weather events. For example, the ability to monitor Solar activity in near real-time is one of the key scientific capabilities being developed for LOFAR. With only a fraction of its total observing capacity, LOFAR will be able to provide continuous monitoring of the Solar spectrum over the entire 10-240 MHz band down to microsecond timescales. Autonomous routines will scan these incoming spectral data for evidence of Solar flares and be

  2. Tropospheric BrO column densities in the Arctic derived from satellite: retrieval and comparison to ground-based measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sihler

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available During polar spring, halogen radicals like bromine monoxide (BrO play an important role in the chemistry of tropospheric ozone destruction. Satellite measurements of the BrO distribution have become a particularly useful tool to investigate this probably natural phenomenon, but the separation of stratospheric and tropospheric partial columns of BrO is challenging. In this study, an algorithm was developed to retrieve tropospheric vertical column densities of BrO from data of high-resolution spectroscopic satellite instruments such as the second Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2. Unlike recently published approaches, the presented algorithm is capable of separating the fraction of BrO in the activated troposphere from the total BrO column solely based on remotely measured properties. The presented algorithm furthermore allows to estimate a realistic measurement error of the tropospheric BrO column. The sensitivity of each satellite pixel to BrO in the boundary layer is quantified using the measured UV radiance and the column density of the oxygen collision complex O4. A comparison of the sensitivities with CALIPSO LIDAR observations demonstrates that clouds shielding near-surface trace-gas columns can be reliably detected even over ice and snow. Retrieved tropospheric BrO columns are then compared to ground-based BrO measurements from two Arctic field campaigns in the Amundsen Gulf and at Barrow in 2008 and 2009, respectively. Our algorithm was found to be capable of retrieving enhanced near-surface BrO during both campaigns in good agreement with ground-based data. Some differences between ground-based and satellite measurements observed at Barrow can be explained by both elevated and shallow surface layers of BrO. The observations strongly suggest that surface release processes are the dominating source of BrO and that boundary layer meteorology influences the vertical distribution.

  3. Tropospheric BrO column densities in the Arctic from satellite: retrieval and comparison to ground-based measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sihler

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available During polar spring, halogen radicals like bromine monoxide (BrO play an important role in the chemistry of tropospheric ozone destruction. Satellite measurements of the BrO-distribution have become a particularly useful tool to investigate this probably natural phenomenon, but the separation of stratospheric and tropospheric partial columns of BrO is challenging. In this study, an algorithm was developed to retrieve tropospheric vertical column densities of BrO from data of high-resolution spectroscopic satellite instruments such as the second Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2. Unlike recently published approaches, the presented algorithm is capable of separating the fraction of BrO in the activated troposphere from the total BrO column solely based on remotely measured properties. The sensitivity of each satellite pixel to BrO in the boundary-layer is quantified using the measured UV-radiance and the column density of the oxygen collision complex O4. A comparison of the sensitivities with CALIPSO LIDAR observations demonstrates that clouds shielding near-surface trace-gas columns can be reliably detected even over ice and snow. Retrieved tropospheric BrO columns are then compared to ground-based BrO measurements from two Arctic field campaigns in the Amundsen Gulf and at Barrow in 2008 and 2009, respectively. Our algorithm was found to be capable of retrieving enhanced near-surface BrO during both campaigns in good agreement to ground-based data. Some differences between ground-based and satellite measurements observed at Barrow can be explained by both, elevated and shallow surface layers of BrO. The observations strongly suggest that surface release processes are the dominating source of BrO and that boundary-layer meteorology influences the vertical distribution.

  4. Ground-based aerosol characterization during the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, J.; Rizzo, L. V.; Morgan, W. T.; Coe, H.; Johnson, B.; Haywood, J.; Longo, K.; Freitas, S.; Andreae, M. O.; Artaxo, P.

    2014-11-01

    .25 to O : C ≅ 0.6), no remarkable change is observed in the H : C ratio (~1.35). Such a result contrasts strongly with previous observations of chemical ageing of both urban and Amazonian biogenic aerosols. At higher levels of processing (O : C > 0.6), the H : C ratio changes with a H : C / O : C slope of -0.5, possibly due to the development of a combination of BB (H : C / O : C slope = 0) and biogenic (H : C /O :C slope =-1) organic aerosol (OA). An analysis of the ΔOA /ΔCO mass ratios yields very little enhancement in the OA loading with atmospheric processing, consistent with previous observations. These results indicate that negligible secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation occurs throughout the observed BB plume processing, or that SOA formation is almost entirely balanced by OA volatilization. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the organic aerosol spectra resulted in three factors: fresh BBOA, aged BBOA, and low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA). Analysis of the diurnal patterns and correlation with external markers indicates that during the first part of the campaign, OA concentrations are impacted by local fire plumes with some chemical processing occurring in the near-surface layer. During the second part of the campaign, long-range transport of BB plumes above the surface layer, as well as potential SOAs formed aloft, dominates OA concentrations at our ground-based sampling site. This manuscript describes the first ground-based deployment of the aerosol mass spectrometry at a site heavily impacted by biomass burning in the Amazon region, allowing a deeper understanding of aerosol life cycle in this important ecosystem.

  5. Ground based aerosol characterization during the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA field experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brito

    2014-05-01

    processing (O : C ≅ 0.25 to O : C ≅ 0.6, no remarkable change is observed in the H : C ratio (∼1.35. Such a result contrasts strongly with previous observations of chemical ageing of both urban and Amazonian biogenic aerosols. At higher levels of processing (O : C>0.6, the H : C ratio changes with a H : C / O : C slope of −0.5, possibly due to the development of a combination of BB (H : C / O : C slope = 0 and biogenic (H : C / O : C slope = −1 OA. An analysis of the ΔOA / ΔCO mass ratios yields very little enhancement in the OA loading with atmospheric processing, consistent with previous observations. These results indicate that negligible Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA formation occurs throughout the observed BB plume processing, or that SOA formation is almost entirely balanced by OA volatilization. Positive Matrix Factorization of the organic aerosol spectra resulted in three factors: Fresh BBOA, Aged BBOA and Low-Volatility Oxygenated Organic Aerosol (LV-OOA. Analysis of the diurnal patterns and correlation with external markers indicates that during the first part of the campaign OA concentrations are impacted by local fire plumes with some chemical processing occurring in the near-surface layer. During the second part of the campaign, long-range transport of BB plumes above the surface layer, as well as potential SOAs formed aloft, dominates OA concentrations at our ground-based sampling site. This manuscript describes the first ground-based deployment of aerosol mass spectrometry at a site heavily impacted by biomass burning in the Amazon region, allowing a deeper understanding of aerosol life cycle in this important ecosystem.

  6. Atomic layer deposition of Al-doped ZnO films using ozone as the oxygen source: A comparison of two methods to deliver aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan Hai; Luo Bing; Yu Dan; Cheng, An-jen; Campbell, Stephen A.; Gladfelter, Wayne L. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, Shaan' xi 710025 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Aluminum-doped ZnO films were prepared by atomic layer deposition at 250 deg. C using diethylzinc (DEZ), trimethylaluminum (TMA), and ozone as the precursors. Two deposition methods were compared to assess their impact on the composition, structural, electrical, and optical properties as a function of Al concentration. The first method controlled the Al concentration by changing the relative number of Al to Zn deposition cycles; a process reported in the literature where water was used as the oxygen source. The second method involved coinjection of the DEZ and TMA during each cycle where the partial pressures of the precursors control the aluminum concentration. Depth profiles of the film composition using Auger electron spectroscopy confirmed a layered microstructure for the films prepared by the first method, whereas the second method led to a homogeneous distribution of the aluminum throughout the ZnO film. Beneath the surface layer the carbon concentrations for all of the films were below the detection limit. Comparison of their electrical and optical properties established that films deposited by coinjection of the precursors were superior.

  7. Photoionisation of Be-like and Li-like atomic oxygen{\\it K}-shell photoionisation of O$^{4+}$ and O$^{5+}$ ions : experiment and theory

    CERN Document Server

    McLaughlin, B M; Cubaynes, D; Guilbaud, S; Douix, S; Shorman, M M Al; Ghazaly, M O A El; Sakho, I; Gharaibeh, M F

    2016-01-01

    Absolute cross sections for the {\\it K}-shell photoionisation of Be-like (O$^{4+}$) and Li-like (O$^{5+}$) atomic oxygen ions were measured for the first time (in their respective {\\it K}-shell regions) by employing the ion-photon merged-beam technique at the SOLEIL synchrotron-radiation facility in Saint-Aubin, France. High-resolution spectroscopy with E/$\\Delta$E $\\approx$ 3200 ($\\approx$ 170 meV, FWHM)was achieved with photon energy from 550 eV up to 670 eV. Rich resonance structure observed in the experimental spectra is analysed using the R-matrix with pseudo-states (RMPS) method. Results are also compared with the screening constant by unit nuclear charge (SCUNC) calculations. We characterise and identify the strong $\\rm 1s \\rightarrow 2p$ resonances for both ions and the weaker $\\rm 1s \\rightarrow np$ resonances ($ n \\ge 3$) observed in the {\\it K}-shell spectra of O$^{4+}$.

  8. Ozone treatment of coal- and coffee grounds-based active carbons: Water vapor adsorption and surface fractal micropores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsunoda, Ryoichi; Ozawa, Takayoshi; Ando, Junichi [Kanagawa Industrial Technology Research Inst., Ebina, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1998-09-15

    Characteristics of the adsorption iostherms of water vapor on active carbons from coal and coffee grounds and those ozonized ones from the surface fractal dimension analysis are discussed. The upswing of the adsorption isotherms in the low relative pressure of coffee grounds-based active carbon, of which isotherms were not scarcely affected on ozonization, was attributed to the adsorption of water molecules on the metallic oxides playing the role of oxygen-surface complexes, which formed the corrugated surfaces on the basal planes of micropore walls with the surface fractal dimension D{sub s} > 2. On the other hand, coal-based active carbon with D{sub s} < 2, which indicated the flat surfaces of micropore walls, showed little effect on the upswing even on ozonization, even though the adsorption amounts of water vapor were increased in the low relative pressure.

  9. Ground-based Infrared Observations of Water Vapor and Hydrogen Peroxide in the Atmosphere of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encrenaz, T.; Greathouse, T. K.; Bitner, M.; Kruger, A.; Richter, M. J.; Lacy, J. H.; Bézard, B.; Fouchet, T.; Lefevre, F.; Forget, F.; Atreya, S. K.

    2008-11-01

    Ground-based observations of water vapor and hydrogen peroxide have been obtained in the thermal infrared range, using the TEXES instrument at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, for different times of the seasonal cycle.

  10. Informing hydrological models with ground-based time-lapse relative gravimetry: potential and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Christiansen, Lars; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Coupled hydrogeophysical inversion emerges as an attractive option to improve the calibration and predictive capability of hydrological models. Recently, ground-based time-lapse relative gravity (TLRG) measurements have attracted increasing interest because there is a direct relationship between ...

  11. Changes in ground-based solar ultraviolet radiation during fire episodes: a case study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wright, CY

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available about the relationship between fires and solar UVR without local high-quality column or ground-based ambient air pollution (particulate matter in particular) data; however, the threat to public health from fires was acknowledged....

  12. System Identification and Automatic Mass Balancing of Ground-Based Three-Axis Spacecraft Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    System Identification and Automatic Mass Balancing of Ground-Based Three-Axis Spacecraft Simulator Jae-Jun Kim∗ and Brij N. Agrawal † Department of...TITLE AND SUBTITLE System Identification and Automatic Mass Balancing of Ground-Based Three-Axis Spacecraft Simulator 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...and Dynamics, Vol. 20, No. 4, July-August 1997, pp. 625-632. 6Schwartz, J. L. and Hall, C. D., “ System Identification of a Spherical Air-Bearing

  13. Altitude dependent sensitivity of equatorial atomic oxygen in the MLT region to the quasi-11-year and quasi-27-day solar cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednyts'kyy, Olexandr; Von Savigny, Christian

    2016-07-01

    We retrieved atomic oxygen concentration ([O]) profiles with help of volume emission rate (VER) profiles calculated from the measured by SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) emissions of green line nightglow in the MLT (Mesosphere/Lower Thermosphere) region. We quantified the sensitivity of equatorial [O] to the 11-year and 27-day solar cycle forcing represented by such proxy indicators of solar activity as MgII index and Lyman-α with help of the wavelet, cross-correlation, superposed epoch, regression and harmonical analysis methods. We applied ordinary least squares bisector fitting on MgII index and F10.7 radio flux, which is measured in solar flux units (sfu), to convert the [O] sensitivity values in sfu and finally in percent changes. The same procedure was performed in the case of Lyman-α. Our results of the sensitivity analysis correspond well to the 11-year solar cycle response of O volume mixing ratios found in simulations performed with the WACCM3 (Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model, v. 3) and the HAMMONIA (3D Hamburg Model of the Neutral and Ionized Atmosphere) model. We identified an 11-year solar cycle variation, quasi-biennial and annual/semi-annual oscillations as well as signatures of the 27-day cycle of solar activity as presented in the MLT O layer. The most remarkable result is that the found sensitivities agree within their uncertainties and do not depend on averaging method (annual, monthly and daily) of the [O] time series. We report on 11-year and 27-day solar cycle signatures in dependence on altitude intervals used to average the [O] time series.

  14. Understanding the ε and ζ High-Pressure Solid Phases of Oxygen. Systematic Periodic Density Functional Theory Studies Using Localized Atomic Basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Calle, A J; Zicovich-Wilson, C M; Hernández-Lamoneda, R; Ramírez-Solís, A

    2015-03-10

    The experimentally characterized ε and ζ phases of solid oxygen are studied by periodic Hartree-Fock (HF) and Density Functional Theory calculations at pressures from 10 to 160 GPa using different types of exchange-correlation functionals with Gaussian atomic basis sets. Full geometry optimizations of the monoclinic C2/m (O2)4 unit cell were done to study the evolution of the structural and electronic properties with pressure. Vibrational calculations were performed at each pressure. While periodic HF does not predict the ε-ζ phase transition in the considered range, Local Density approximation and Generalized Gradient approximation methods predict too low transition pressures. The performance of hybrid functional methods is dependent on the amount of non-local HF exchange. PBE0, M06, B3PW91, and B3LYP approaches correctly predict the structural and electronic changes associated with the phase transition. GGA and hybrid functionals predict a pressure range where both phases coexist, but only the latter type of methods yield results in agreement with experiment. Using the optimized (O2)4 unit cell at each pressure we show, through CASSCF(8,8) calculations, that the greater accuracy of the optimized geometrical parameters with increasing pressure is due to a decreasing multireference character of the unit cell wave function. The mechanism of the transition from the non-conducting to the conducting ζ phase is explained through the Electron Pair Localization Function, which clearly reveals chemical bonding between O2 molecules in the ab crystal planes belonging to different unit cells due to much shorter intercell O2-O2 distances.

  15. Antiferromagnetic vs. non-magnetic ε phase of solid oxygen. Periodic density functional theory studies using a localized atomic basis set and the role of exact exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Solís, A; Zicovich-Wilson, C M; Hernández-Lamoneda, R; Ochoa-Calle, A J

    2017-01-25

    The question of the non-magnetic (NM) vs. antiferromagnetic (AF) nature of the ε phase of solid oxygen is a matter of great interest and continuing debate. In particular, it has been proposed that the ε phase is actually composed of two phases, a low-pressure AF ε1 phase and a higher pressure NM ε0 phase [Crespo et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2014, 111, 10427]. We address this problem through periodic spin-restricted and spin-polarized Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations at pressures from 10 to 50 GPa using calibrated GGA and hybrid exchange-correlation functionals with Gaussian atomic basis sets. The two possible configurations for the antiferromagnetic (AF1 and AF2) coupling of the 0 ≤ S ≤ 1 O2 molecules in the (O2)4 unit cell were studied. Full enthalpy-driven geometry optimizations of the (O2)4 unit cells were done to study the pressure evolution of the enthalpy difference between the non-magnetic and both antiferromagnetic structures. We also address the evolution of structural parameters and the spin-per-molecule vs. pressure. We find that the spin-less solution becomes more stable than both AF structures above 50 GPa and, crucially, the spin-less solution yields lattice parameters in much better agreement with experimental data at all pressures than the AF structures. The optimized AF2 broken-symmetry structures lead to large errors of the a and b lattice parameters when compared with experiments. The results for the NM model are in much better agreement with the experimental data than those found for both AF models and are consistent with a completely non-magnetic (O2)4 unit cell for the low-pressure regime of the ε phase.

  16. Estimates of eddy turbulence consistent with seasonal variations of atomic oxygen and its possible role in the seasonal cycle of mesopause temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Vlasov

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available According to current understanding, adiabatic cooling and heating induced by the meridional circulation driven by gravity waves is the major process for the cold summer and warm winter polar upper mesosphere. However, our calculations show that the upward/downward motion needed for adiabatic cooling/heating of the summer/winter polar mesopause simultaneously induces a seasonal variation in both the O maximum density and the altitude of the [O] peak that is opposite to the observed variables generalized by the MSISE-90 model. It is usually accepted that eddy turbulence can produce the [O] seasonal variations. Using this approach, we can infer the eddy diffusion coefficient for the different seasons. Taking these results and experimental data on the eddy diffusion coefficient, we consider in detail and estimate the heating and cooling caused by eddy turbulence in the summer and winter polar upper mesosphere. The seasonal variations of these processes are similar to the seasonal variations of the temperature and mesopause. These results lead to the conclusion that heating/cooling by eddy turbulence is an important component in the energy budget and that adiabatic cooling/heating induced by upward/downward motion cannot dominate in the mesopause region. Our study shows that the impact of the dynamic process, induced by gravity waves, on [O] distributions must be included in models of thermal balance in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT for a consistent description because (a the [O] distribution is very sensitive to dynamic processes, and (b atomic oxygen plays a very important role in chemical heating and infrared cooling in the MLT. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to consider this aspect of the problem.

  17. Investigation of Thermospheric and Ionospheric Changes during Ionospheric Storms with Satellite and Ground-Based Data and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Philip G.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this proposed research is to improve our basic understanding of the causes of ionospheric storm behavior in the midlatitude F region ionosphere. This objective will be achieved by detailed comparisons between ground based measurements of the peak electron density (N(sub m)F(sub 2)), Atmosphere Explorer satellite measurements of ion and neutral composition, and output from the Field Line Interhemispheric Plasma (FLIP) model. The primary result will be a better understanding of changes in the neutral densities and ion chemistry during magnetic storms that will improve our capability to model the weather of the ionosphere which will be needed as a basis for ionospheric prediction. Specifically, this study seeks to answer the following questions: (1) To what extent are negative ionospheric storm phases caused by changes in the atomic to molecular ratio? (2) Are the changes in neutral density ratio due to increased N2, or decreased O, or both? (3) Are there other chemical processes (e.g., excited N2) that increase O+ loss rates during negative storms? (4) Do neutral density altitude distributions differed from hydrostatic equilibrium? (5) Why do near normal nighttime densities often follow daytime depletions of electron density; and (6) Can changes in h(sub m)F2 fully account for positive storm phases? To answer these questions, we plan to combine ground-based and space-based measurements with the aid of our ionospheric model which is ideally suited to this purpose. These proposed studies will lead to a better capability to predict long term ionospheric variability, leading to better predictions of ionospheric weather.

  18. Ground-based follow-up in relation to Kepler Asteroseismic Investigation

    CERN Document Server

    Uytterhoeven, K; Bruntt, H; De Cat, P; Frandsen, S; Gutierrez-Soto, J; Kiss, L; Kurtz, D W; Marconi, M; Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Ostensen, R; Randall, S; Southworth, J; Szabo, R

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler space mission, successfully launched in March 2009, is providing continuous, high-precision photometry of thousands of stars simultaneously. The uninterrupted time-series of stars of all known pulsation types are a precious source for asteroseismic studies. The Kepler data do not provide information on the physical parameters, such as effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and vsini, which are crucial for successful asteroseismic modelling. Additional ground-based time-series data are needed to characterize mode parameters in several types of pulsating stars. Therefore, ground-based multi-colour photometry and mid/high-resolution spectroscopy are needed to complement the space data. We present ground-based activities within KASC on selected asteroseismic Kepler targets of several pulsation types. (Based on observations made with the Isaac Newton Telescope, William Herschel Telescope, Nordic Optical Telescope, Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, Mercator Telescope (La Palma, Spain), and IAC-...

  19. BigBOSS: The Ground-Based Stage IV BAO Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlegel, David; Bebek, Chris; Heetderks, Henry; Ho, Shirley; Lampton, Michael; Levi, Michael; Mostek, Nick; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Perlmutter, Saul; Roe, Natalie; Sholl, Michael; Smoot, George; White, Martin; Dey, Arjun; Abraham, Tony; Jannuzi, Buell; Joyce, Dick; Liang, Ming; Merrill, Mike; Olsen, Knut; Salim, Samir

    2009-04-01

    The BigBOSS experiment is a proposed DOE-NSF Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment to study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure with an all-sky galaxy redshift survey. The project is designed to unlock the mystery of dark energy using existing ground-based facilities operated by NOAO. A new 4000-fiber R=5000 spectrograph covering a 3-degree diameter field will measure BAO and redshift space distortions in the distribution of galaxies and hydrogen gas spanning redshifts from 0.2< z< 3.5. The Dark Energy Task Force figure of merit (DETF FoM) for this experiment is expected to be equal to that of a JDEM mission for BAO with the lower risk and cost typical of a ground-based experiment.

  20. Comparing Dawn, Hubble Space Telescope, and Ground-Based Interpretations of (4) Vesta

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, Vishnu; Corre, Lucille Le; Scully, Jennifer E C; Gaskell, Robert; Russell, Christopher T; Park, Ryan S; Nathues, Andreas; Raymond, Carol; Gaffey, Michael J; Sierks, Holger; Becker, Kris J; McFadden, Lucy A

    2013-01-01

    Observations of asteroid 4 Vesta by NASA's Dawn spacecraft are interesting because its surface has the largest range of albedo, color and composition of any other asteroid visited by spacecraft to date. These hemispherical and rotational variations in surface brightness and composition have been attributed to impact processes since Vesta's formation. Prior to Dawn's arrival at Vesta, its surface properties were the focus of intense telescopic investigations for nearly a hundred years. Ground-based photometric and spectroscopic observations first revealed these variations followed later by those using Hubble Space Telescope. Here we compare interpretations of Vesta's rotation period, pole, albedo, topographic, color, and compositional properties from ground-based telescopes and HST with those from Dawn. Rotational spectral variations observed from ground-based studies are also consistent with those observed by Dawn. While the interpretation of some of these features was tenuous from past data, the interpretati...

  1. Ka-band bistatic ground-based SAR using noise signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, K.; Mogyla, A.; Vyplavin, P.; Palamarchuk, V.; Zemlyaniy, O.; Tarasenko, V.; Zaets, N.; Skretsanov, V.; Shubniy, A.; Glamazdin, V.; Natarov, M.; Nechayev, O.

    2008-01-01

    Currently, one of the actual problems is remote monitoring of technical state of large objects. Different methods can be used for that purpose. The most promising of them relies on application of ground based synthetic aperture radars (SAR) and differential interferometry. We have designed and tested Ground Based Noise Waveform SAR based on noise radar technology [1] and synthetic aperture antennas [2]. It enabled to build an instrument for precise all-weather monitoring of large objects in real-time. We describe main performance of ground-based interferometric SAR which uses continuous Ka-band noise waveform as a probe signal. Besides, results of laboratory trials and evaluation of its main performance are presented as well.

  2. Ground-based aerosol characterization during the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA field experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brito

    2014-11-01

    aerosol processing (O : C ≅ 0.25 to O : C ≅ 0.6, no remarkable change is observed in the H : C ratio (~1.35. Such a result contrasts strongly with previous observations of chemical ageing of both urban and Amazonian biogenic aerosols. At higher levels of processing (O : C > 0.6, the H : C ratio changes with a H : C / O : C slope of −0.5, possibly due to the development of a combination of BB (H : C / O : C slope = 0 and biogenic (H : C /O :C slope =−1 organic aerosol (OA. An analysis of the ΔOA /ΔCO mass ratios yields very little enhancement in the OA loading with atmospheric processing, consistent with previous observations. These results indicate that negligible secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation occurs throughout the observed BB plume processing, or that SOA formation is almost entirely balanced by OA volatilization. Positive matrix factorization (PMF of the organic aerosol spectra resulted in three factors: fresh BBOA, aged BBOA, and low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA. Analysis of the diurnal patterns and correlation with external markers indicates that during the first part of the campaign, OA concentrations are impacted by local fire plumes with some chemical processing occurring in the near-surface layer. During the second part of the campaign, long-range transport of BB plumes above the surface layer, as well as potential SOAs formed aloft, dominates OA concentrations at our ground-based sampling site. This manuscript describes the first ground-based deployment of the aerosol mass spectrometry at a site heavily impacted by biomass burning in the Amazon region, allowing a deeper understanding of aerosol life cycle in this important ecosystem.

  3. Observation in effect of early oxygen atomizing inhalation with oxygen mask on correction of hy-poxemia of patients with severe head injury%早期氧气面罩雾化给氧对纠正重型颅脑损伤患者低氧血症的影响效果观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    提文萍

    2009-01-01

    Objective To explore the feasibility and safety of early oxygen atomizing inhalation with oxygen mask on correction of hypoxemia of patients with severe head injury in order to promote the early recov-ery of patients. Methods 98 cases of patients with severe head injury were randomly divided into the obser-vation group(48 cases) and the control group(50 cases), the observation group received conventional treatment as well as oxygen atomizing inhalation with oxygen mask, the control group used nasal catheter with wet gauze covering mouth and nose for oxygen supply. Results The arterial oxygen saturation rate, partial pressure of oxygen markedly improved in the observation group. Significant difference existed in mortality rate between the two groups, while no significant difference was seen in heart rate, blood pressure, pH and PaCO2 between the two groups. Conclusions Oxygen atomizing inhalation with oxygen mask can quickly and effectively correct the hypoxic state and correct hypoxemia of patients with severe head injury.%目的 探讨氧气面罩雾化给氧方式对重型颅脑损伤患者低氧血症的可行性及安全性,以促进患者早日康复.方法 将收治98例重型颅脑损伤患者随机分为观察组48例和对照组50例,在常规治疗的同时,观察组采用氧气面罩接雾化器给氧方式进行给氧;对照组采用鼻塞导管湿纱布覆盖口鼻进行给氧.结果 观察组其动脉血氧饱和度、氧分压明显提高.2组病死率比较差异明显,而2组患者的心率、血压、pH、PaCO2比较差异不明显.结论 氧气面罩雾化器给氧能快速、有效纠正重型颅脑损伤患者缺氧状态,纠正低氧血症.

  4. First ground-based FTIR-observations of methane in the tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Petersen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Total column concentrations and volume mixing ratio profiles of methane have been retrieved from ground-based solar absorption FTIR spectra in the near-infrared recorded in Paramaribo (Suriname. The methane FTIR observations are compared with TM5 model simulations and satellite observations from SCIAMACHY, and represent the first validation of SCIAMACHY retrievals in the tropics using ground-based remote sensing techniques. Apart from local biomass burning features, our methane FTIR observations agree well with the SCIAMACHY retrievals and TM5 model simulations.

  5. Extended lateral heating of the nighttime ionosphere by ground-based VLF transmitters

    OpenAIRE

    İnan, Umran Savaş; Graf, K. L.; Spasojevic, M.; Marshall, R. A.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Foust, F. R.

    2013-01-01

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: SPACE PHYSICS, VOL. 118, 7783–7797, doi:10.1002/2013JA019337, 2013 Extended lateral heating of the nighttime ionosphere by ground-based VLF transmitters K. L. Graf,1 M. Spasojevic,1 R. A. Marshall,2 N. G. Lehtinen,1 F. R. Foust,1 and U. S. Inan1,3 Received 16 August 2013; revised 9 October 2013; accepted 11 November 2013; published 3 December 2013. [1] The effects of ground-based very low frequency (VLF) transmitters on the lower ionospher...

  6. Status of advanced ground-based laser interferometers for gravitational-wave detection

    CERN Document Server

    Dooley, Katherine L; Dwyer, Sheila; Puppo, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Ground-based laser interferometers for gravitational-wave (GW) detection were first constructed starting 20 years ago and as of 2010 collection of several years' worth of science data at initial design sensitivities was completed. Upgrades to the initial detectors together with construction of brand new detectors are ongoing and feature advanced technologies to improve the sensitivity to GWs. This conference proceeding provides an overview of the common design features of ground-based laser interferometric GW detectors and establishes the context for the status updates of each of the four gravitational-wave detectors around the world: Advanced LIGO, Advanced Virgo, GEO600 and KAGRA.

  7. Asteroseismology of solar-type stars with Kepler: III. Ground-based data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Molenda-Żakowicz , J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the ground-based follow-up program of spectroscopic and photometric observations of solar-like asteroseismic targets for the Kepler space mission. These stars constitute a large group of more than a thousand objects which are the subject of an intensive study by the Kepler Asteroseis......We report on the ground-based follow-up program of spectroscopic and photometric observations of solar-like asteroseismic targets for the Kepler space mission. These stars constitute a large group of more than a thousand objects which are the subject of an intensive study by the Kepler...

  8. Estimation of solar irradiance using ground-based whole sky imagers

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, Soumyabrata; Lee, Yee Hui; Winkler, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Ground-based whole sky imagers (WSIs) can provide localized images of the sky of high temporal and spatial resolution, which permits fine-grained cloud observation. In this paper, we show how images taken by WSIs can be used to estimate solar radiation. Sky cameras are useful here because they provide additional information about cloud movement and coverage, which are otherwise not available from weather station data. Our setup includes ground-based weather stations at the same location as the imagers. We use their measurements to validate our methods.

  9. 氧驱动雾化吸入与空气压缩泵雾化吸入治疗小儿哮喘的比较%Comparison of oxygen-driven atomizing inhalation and air pressure pump atomizing inhalation in the treatment of children with asthma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王正强

    2016-01-01

    目的:比较氧驱动雾化与空气压缩泵雾化吸入法治疗哮喘患儿的临床效果.方法:收治哮喘患儿112例,随机分为两组.治疗组采用氧驱动雾化吸入法,对照组采用空气压缩泵雾化吸入法,比较两组疗效.结果:治疗组总有效率96.43%,明显高于对照组的85.71%(P<0.05).结论:氧驱动雾化吸入法治疗哮喘患儿能大幅度缓解患者的病情.%Objective:To compare the clinical effect of oxygen-driven atomizing inhalation and air pressure pump atomizing inhalation in the treatment of children with asthma.Methods:112 cases of children with asthma were divided into two groups randomly.The treatment group was treated with oxygen-driven atomizing inhalation,the control group was treated with air pressure pump atomizing inhalation,and the curative effect of the two groups were compared.Results:The total effective rate of the treatment group 96.43% was significantly higher than that of the control group 85.71% (P<0.05).Conclusion:Oxygen-driven atomizing inhalation in the treatment of children with asthma could ease the patient''s condition greatly.

  10. 加温加氧超声雾化对存在脓痰肺炎患者的预后影响%Influence of ultrasonic atomization with heat and oxygenation on prognosis of phlegm pneumonia patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊家义; 赵启凤; 张婷

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveTo investigate the influence of ultrasonic atomization with heat and oxygenation on prognosis of phlegm pneumonia patients.MethodsA total of 100 phlegm pneumonia patients were randomly divided into control group and observation group, with 50 cases in each group. The control group received traditional oxygen atomization, and the observation group received ultrasonic atomization with heat and oxygenation. Curative effects of the two groups were compared.ResultsThe observation group had clinically total effective rate as 98% and symptom improvement rate as 86%. Those in the control group were 80% and 62%. The differences between the two groups had statistical significance (P<0.05). The observation group had much shorter fever subsidence time than the control group (P<0.05). The observation group had much higher sputum excretion rate after atomization as 94% than 72% of the control group (P<0.05). All cases in the observation group had successful atomization, while there were 8 cases with compelled termination of atomization. Their difference had statistical significance (P<0.05).ConclusionImplement of ultrasonic atomization with heat and oxygenation for phlegm pneumonia patients can increase clinically total effective rate and symptom improvement rate, shorten disease course, and improve sputum excretion effect after atomization. This method can guarantee successful atomization process, and it provides precise significant for improving prognosis and patients' quality of life.%目的探讨脓痰肺炎采用加温加氧超声雾化治疗对预后的影响.方法100例脓痰肺炎患者, 随机分为对照组和观察组, 各50例.对照组患者采用传统氧气雾化, 观察组患者采用加温加氧超声雾化, 比较两组患者治疗效果.结果观察组临床总有效率为98%, 症状改善率为86%, 对照组临床总有效率为80%, 症状改善率为62%, 两组比较, 差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05);观察组退热

  11. Ground-Based VIS/NIR Reflectance Spectra of 25143 Itokawa: What Hayabusa will See and How Ground-Based Data can Augment Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas, Faith; Abell, P. A.; Jarvis, K. S.

    2004-01-01

    Planning for the arrival of the Hayabusa spacecraft at asteroid 25143 Itokawa includes consideration of the expected spectral information to be obtained using the AMICA and NIRS instruments. The rotationally-resolved spatial coverage the asteroid we have obtained with ground-based telescopic spectrophotometry in the visible and near-infrared can be utilized here to address expected spacecraft data. We use spectrophotometry to simulate the types of data that Hayabusa will receive with the NIRS and AMICA instruments, and will demonstrate them here. The NIRS will cover a wavelength range from 0.85 m, and have a dispersion per element of 250 Angstroms. Thus, we are limited in coverage of the 1.0 micrometer and 2.0 micrometer mafic silicate absorption features. The ground-based reflectance spectra of Itokawa show a large component of olivine in its surface material, and the 2.0 micrometer feature is shallow. Determining the olivine to pyroxene abundance ratio is critically dependent on the attributes of the 1.0- and 2.0 micrometer features. With a cut-off near 2,1 micrometer the longer edge of the 2.0- feature will not be obtained by NIRS. Reflectance spectra obtained using ground-based telescopes can be used to determine the regional composition around space-based spectral observations, and possibly augment the longer wavelength spectral attributes. Similarly, the shorter wavelength end of the 1.0 micrometer absorption feature will be partially lost to the NIRS. The AMICA filters mimic the ECAS filters, and have wavelength coverage overlapping with the NIRS spectral range. We demonstrate how merging photometry from AMICA will extend the spectral coverage of the NIRS. Lessons learned from earlier spacecraft to asteroids should be considered.

  12. Imaging the impact of single oxygen atoms on superconducting Bi(2+y)Sr(2-y)CaCu2O(8+x).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeljkovic, Ilija; Xu, Zhijun; Wen, Jinsheng; Gu, Genda; Markiewicz, Robert S; Hoffman, Jennifer E

    2012-07-20

    High-temperature cuprate superconductors display unexpected nanoscale inhomogeneity in essential properties such as pseudogap energy, Fermi surface, and even superconducting critical temperature. Theoretical explanations for this inhomogeneity have ranged from chemical disorder to spontaneous electronic phase separation. We extend the energy range of scanning tunneling spectroscopy on Bi(2+y)Sr(2-y)CaCu(2)O(8+x), allowing a complete mapping of two types of interstitial oxygen dopants and vacancies at the apical oxygen site. We show that the nanoscale spatial variations in the pseudogap states are correlated with disorder in these dopant concentrations, particularly that of apical oxygen vacancies.

  13. On reconciling ground-based with spaceborne normalized radar cross section measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumgartner, Francois; Munk, Jens; Jezek, K C

    2002-01-01

    This study examines differences in the normalized radar cross section, derived from ground-based versus spaceborne radar data. A simple homogeneous half-space model, indicates that agreement between the two improves as 1) the distance from the scatterer is increased; and/or 2) the extinction...

  14. Precision simulation of ground-based lensing data using observations from space

    CERN Document Server

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Leauthaud, Alexie; Massey, Richard J; Rhodes, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Current and upcoming wide-field, ground-based, broad-band imaging surveys promise to address a wide range of outstanding problems in galaxy formation and cosmology. Several such uses of ground-based data, especially weak gravitational lensing, require highly precise measurements of galaxy image statistics with careful correction for the effects of the point-spread function (PSF). In this paper, we introduce the SHERA (SHEar Reconvolution Analysis) software to simulate ground-based imaging data with realistic galaxy morphologies and observing conditions, starting from space-based data (from COSMOS, the Cosmological Evolution Survey) and accounting for the effects of the space-based PSF. This code simulates ground-based data, optionally with a weak lensing shear applied, in a model-independent way using a general Fourier space formalism. The utility of this pipeline is that it allows for a precise, realistic assessment of systematic errors due to the method of data processing, for example in extracting weak len...

  15. Analysis of the substorm trigger phase using multiple ground-based instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauristie, K.; Pulkkinen, T.I.; Pellinen, R.J. [Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    The authors discuss in detail the observation of an event of auroral activity fading during the trigger, or growth phase of a magnetic storm. This event was observed by all-sky cameras, EISCAT radar and magnetometers, riometers, and pulsation magnetometers, from ground based stations in Finland and Scandanavia. Based on their detailed analysis, they present a possible cause for the observed fading.

  16. Simulation of the imaging quality of ground-based telescopes affected by atmospheric disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yubin; Kou, Songfeng; Gu, Bozhong

    2014-08-01

    Ground-based telescope imaging model is developed in this paper, the relationship between the atmospheric disturbances and the ground-based telescope image quality is studied. Simulation of the wave-front distortions caused by atmospheric turbulences has long been an important method in the study of the propagation of light through the atmosphere. The phase of the starlight wave-front is changed over time, but in an appropriate short exposure time, the atmospheric disturbances can be considered as "frozen". In accordance with Kolmogorov turbulence theory, simulating atmospheric disturbances of image model based on the phase screen distorted by atmospheric turbulences is achieved by the fast Fourier transform (FFT). Geiger mode avalanche photodiode array (APD arrays) model is used for atmospheric wave-front detection, the image is achieved by inversion method of photon counting after the target starlight goes through phase screens and ground-based telescopes. Ground-based telescope imaging model is established in this paper can accurately achieve the relationship between the quality of telescope imaging and monolayer or multilayer atmosphere disturbances, and it is great significance for the wave-front detection and optical correction in a Multi-conjugate Adaptive Optics system (MCAO).

  17. Ground-based LIDAR: a novel approach to quantify fine-scale fuelbed characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.L. Loudermilk; J.K. Hiers; J.J. O’Brien; R.J. Mitchell; A. Singhania; J.C. Fernandez; W.P. Cropper; K.C. Slatton

    2009-01-01

    Ground-based LIDAR (also known as laser ranging) is a novel technique that may precisely quantify fuelbed characteristics important in determining fire behavior. We measured fuel properties within a south-eastern US longleaf pine woodland at the individual plant and fuelbed scale. Data were collected using a mobile terrestrial LIDAR unit at sub-cm scale for individual...

  18. Use of neural networks in ground-based aerosol retrievals from multi-angle spectropolarimetric observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Noia, A.; Hasekamp, O.P.; Harten, G. van; Rietjens, J.H.H.; Smit, J.M.; Snik, F.; Henzing, J.S.; Boer, J. de; Keller, C.U.; Volten, H.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the use of a neural network algorithm for the retrieval of the aerosol properties from ground-based spectropolarimetric measurements is discussed. The neural network is able to retrieve the aerosol properties with an accuracy that is almost comparable to that of an iterative retrieval

  19. Retrieval of liquid water cloud properties from ground-based remote sensing observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knist, C.L.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate ground-based remotely sensed microphysical and optical properties of liquid water clouds are essential references to validate satellite-observed cloud properties and to improve cloud parameterizations in weather and climate models. This requires the evaluation of algorithms for retrieval of

  20. Ground-based remote sensing scheme for monitoring aerosol–cloud interactions (discussion)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarna, K.; Russchenberg, H.W.J.

    2015-01-01

    A method for continuous observation of aerosol–cloud interactions with ground-based remote sensing instruments is presented. The main goal of this method is to enable the monitoring of cloud microphysical changes due to the changing aerosol concentration. We use high resolution measurements from lid

  1. Ground-based remote sensing scheme for monitoring aerosol-cloud interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarna, K.; Russchenberg, H.W.J.

    2016-01-01

    A new method for continuous observation of aerosol–cloud interactions with ground-based remote sensing instruments is presented. The main goal of this method is to enable the monitoring of the change of the cloud droplet size due to the change in the aerosol concentration. We use high-resolution mea

  2. Low Power Ground-Based Laser Illumination for Electric Propulsion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, Michael R.; Oleson, Steven R.

    1994-01-01

    A preliminary evaluation of low power, ground-based laser powered electric propulsion systems is presented. A review of available and near-term laser, photovoltaic, and adaptive optic systems indicates that approximately 5-kW of ground-based laser power can be delivered at an equivalent one-sun intensity to an orbit of approximately 2000 km. Laser illumination at the proper wavelength can double photovoltaic array conversion efficiencies compared to efficiencies obtained with solar illumination at the same intensity, allowing a reduction in array mass. The reduced array mass allows extra propellant to be carried with no penalty in total spacecraft mass. The extra propellant mass can extend the satellite life in orbit, allowing additional revenue to be generated. A trade study using realistic cost estimates and conservative ground station viewing capability was performed to estimate the number of communication satellites which must be illuminated to make a proliferated system of laser ground stations economically attractive. The required number of satellites is typically below that of proposed communication satellite constellations, indicating that low power ground-based laser beaming may be commercially viable. However, near-term advances in low specific mass solar arrays and high energy density batteries for LEO applications would render the ground-based laser system impracticable.

  3. Asteroseismology of solar-type stars with Kepler: III. Ground-based data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Molenda-Żakowicz , J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the ground-based follow-up program of spectroscopic and photometric observations of solar-like asteroseismic targets for the Kepler space mission. These stars constitute a large group of more than a thousand objects which are the subject of an intensive study by the Kepler Asteroseis...

  4. A Fast Method for Embattling Optimization of Ground-Based Radar Surveillance Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H.; Cheng, H.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, J.

    A growing number of space activities have created an orbital debris environment that poses increasing impact risks to existing space systems and human space flight. For the safety of in-orbit spacecraft, a lot of observation facilities are needed to catalog space objects, especially in low earth orbit. Surveillance of Low earth orbit objects are mainly rely on ground-based radar, due to the ability limitation of exist radar facilities, a large number of ground-based radar need to build in the next few years in order to meet the current space surveillance demands. How to optimize the embattling of ground-based radar surveillance network is a problem to need to be solved. The traditional method for embattling optimization of ground-based radar surveillance network is mainly through to the detection simulation of all possible stations with cataloged data, and makes a comprehensive comparative analysis of various simulation results with the combinational method, and then selects an optimal result as station layout scheme. This method is time consuming for single simulation and high computational complexity for the combinational analysis, when the number of stations increases, the complexity of optimization problem will be increased exponentially, and cannot be solved with traditional method. There is no better way to solve this problem till now. In this paper, target detection procedure was simplified. Firstly, the space coverage of ground-based radar was simplified, a space coverage projection model of radar facilities in different orbit altitudes was built; then a simplified objects cross the radar coverage model was established according to the characteristics of space objects orbit motion; after two steps simplification, the computational complexity of the target detection was greatly simplified, and simulation results shown the correctness of the simplified results. In addition, the detection areas of ground-based radar network can be easily computed with the

  5. Ground-Based Lidar Measurements During the CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ) Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkoff, Timothy; Qian, Li; Kleidman, Richard; Stewart, Sebastian; Welton, Ellsworth; Li, Zhu; Holbem, Brent

    2008-01-01

    The CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ) field campaign was carried out between June 26th and August 29th of 2007 in the multi-state Maryland-Virginia-Pennsylvania region of the U.S. to study aerosol properties and cloud-aerosol interactions during overpasses of the CALIPSO satellite. Field work was conducted on selected days when CALIPSO ground tracks occurred in the region. Ground-based measurements included data from multiple Cimel sunphotometers that were placed at intervals along a segment of the CALIPSO ground-track. These measurements provided sky radiance and AOD measurements to enable joints inversions and comparisons with CALIPSO retrievals. As part of this activity, four ground-based lidars provided backscatter measurements (at 523 nm) in the region. Lidars at University of Maryland Baltimore County (Catonsville, MD) and Goddard Space Flight Center (Greenbelt, MD) provided continuous data during the campaign, while two micro-pulse lidar (MPL) systems were temporarily stationed at various field locations directly on CALIPSO ground-tracks. As a result, thirteen on-track ground-based lidar observations were obtained from eight different locations in the region. In some cases, nighttime CALIPSO coincident measurements were also obtained. In most studies reported to date, ground-based lidar validation efforts for CALIPSO rely on systems that are at fixed locations some distance away from the satellite ground-track. The CATZ ground-based lidar data provide an opportunity to examine vertical structure properties of aerosols and clouds both on and off-track simultaneously during a CALIPSO overpass. A table of available ground-based lidar measurements during this campaign will be presented, along with example backscatter imagery for a number of coincident cases with CALIPSO. Results indicate that even for a ground-based measurements directly on-track, comparisons can still pose a challenge due to the differing spatio-temporal properties of the ground and satellite

  6. Effects of co-implanted oxygen or aluminum atoms on hydrogen migration and damage structure in multiple-beam irradiated Al sub 2 O sub 3

    CERN Document Server

    Katano, Y; Yamamoto, S; Nakazawa, T; Yamaki, D; Noda, K

    2000-01-01

    Depth profiles of implanted H atoms were measured for single crystalline Al sub 2 O sub 3 samples irradiated at 923 K with dual or triple beams of 0.25 MeV H-, 0.6 MeV He-, 2.4 MeV O-ions or 2.6 MeV Al-ions. The peaks occur at 1.55 and 1.45 mu m in the depth profiles measured for the H + Al dual beam irradiation and H + O dual beam case, respectively. The ratio of the peak areas is over 4, which is much larger than the implanted H atom ratio of 1.1, indicating that implanted Al atoms suppress the mobility of H atoms. However, the ratio becomes almost 1 between the triple beam samples with H + He + O-ions and with H + He + Al-ions at comparable doses. The fact demonstrates that implanted He atoms overwhelm the effects of the implanted self-cation/anion excess atoms on the migration behaviors of implanted hydrogen and radiation produced point defects, with the resulting sluggish cavity growth observed.

  7. Characterization of surface modification in atomic force microscope-induced nanolithography of oxygen deficient La0.67Ba0.33MnO3−δ thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kevin Tanyi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We report our studies of the nanolithographic surface modifications induced by an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM in epitaxial thin films of oxygen deficient Lanthanum Barium Manganese Oxide (La0.67Ba0.33MnO3−δ. The pattern characteristics depend on the tip voltage, tip polarity, voltage duration, tip force, and humidity. We have used Electron Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS to analyze the chemical changes associated with the surface modifications produced with a negatively biased AFM tip. A significant increase in the oxygen stoichiometry for the patterned regions relative to the pristine film surface is observed. The results also indicate changes in the cation stoichiometry, specifically a decrease in the Lanthanum and Manganese concentrations and an increase in the Barium concentration in the patterned regions.

  8. Study of the photodynamic effect on the A549 cell line by atomic force microscopy and the influence of green tea extract on the production of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomankova, Katerina; Kolarova, Hana; Bajgar, Robert; Jirova, Dagmar; Kejlova, Kristina; Mosinger, Jiri

    2009-08-01

    We studied the morphology of the A549 cell line (human lung carcinoma cells) before and after photodynamic therapy (PDT) by atomic force microscopy. PDT was induced by an efficient light-emitting diode source with total light dose of 15 J cm(-2) in the presence of the sensitizer zinc-5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrine. In the presence of molecular oxygen, light activation of the photosensitizer, which accumulates in cancer cells, leads to the local production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This is one of several reasons leading to cell death, and in some cases we could observe signs of apoptosis. We detected the kinetics of ROS production to be dependent on the presence of green tea extract.

  9. A Study of the Elements Copper through Uranium in Sirius A: Contributions from STIS and Ground-Based Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, C. R.; Ayres, T. R.; Castelli, F.; Gulliver, A. F.; Monier, R.; Wahlgren, G. M.

    2016-08-01

    We determine abundances or upper limits for all of the 55 stable elements from copper to uranium for the A1 Vm star Sirius. The purpose of the study is to assemble the most complete picture of elemental abundances with the hope of revealing the chemical history of the brightest star in the sky, apart from the Sun. We also explore the relationship of this hot metallic-line (Am) star to its cooler congeners, as well as the hotter, weakly- or non-magnetic Mercury-manganese (HgMn) stars. Our primary observational material consists of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spectra taken with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph in the ASTRAL project. We have also used archival material from the COPERNICUS satellite, and from the HST Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph, as well as ground-based spectra from Furenlid, Westin, Kurucz, Wahlgren, and their coworkers, ESO spectra from the UVESPOP project, and NARVAL spectra retrieved from PolarBase. Our analysis has been primarily by spectral synthesis, and in this work we have had the great advantage of extensive atomic data unavailable to earlier workers. We find most abundances as well as upper limits range from 10 to 100 times above solar values. We see no indication of the huge abundance excesses of 1000 or more that occur among many chemically peculiar stars of the upper main sequence. The picture of Sirius as a hot Am star is reinforced.

  10. 空间原子氧环境对常用热控涂层的影响%The effects of atomic oxygen on the thermal control coatings in common use

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李涛; 姜海富; 刘向鹏; 赵雪; 翟睿琼

    2012-01-01

    空间原子氧(AO)是影响低地球轨道( LEO)航天器在轨性能的主要空间环境因素之一,其强氧化性能够对热控涂层和组件造成危害.文章分析了空间AO及相关综合环境对白漆、黑漆、有色有机漆、薄膜、织物、二次表面镜等各类常用热控涂层在LEO长期使用时可能引起的环境效应和危害,提出了相关使用建议,以期为今后我国以空间站为代表的LEO长寿命航天器论证及研制提供技术参考.%The atomic oxygen is one of the most important space environments in the LEO space, which could damage the thermal control materials and the components of the spacecraft due to its huge erosion effect. This paper studies the atomic oxygen and its effect on the LEO thermal control coatings including white paint, black paint, organic colored paint, polymer film, coated fabric, and second surface mirror, and advances some reasonable proposals for the long term LEO mission design such as for the space station of China.

  11. Understanding the mechanisms of interfacial reactions during TiO2 layer growth on RuO2 by atomic layer deposition with O2 plasma or H2O as oxygen source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaker, A.; Szkutnik, P. D.; Pointet, J.; Gonon, P.; Vallée, C.; Bsiesy, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, TiO2 layers grown on RuO2 by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using tetrakis (dimethyla-mino) titanium (TDMAT) and either oxygen plasma or H2O as oxygen source were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and depth-resolved X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The main objective is to investigate the surface chemical reactions mechanisms and their influence on the TiO2 film properties. The experimental results using XRD show that ALD deposition using H2O leads to anatase TiO2 whereas a rutile TiO2 is obtained when oxygen-plasma is used as oxygen source. Depth-resolved XPS analysis allows to determine the reaction mechanisms at the RuO2 substrate surface after growth of thin TiO2 layers. Indeed, the XPS analysis shows that when H2O assisted ALD process is used, intermediate Ti2O3 layer is obtained and RuO2 is reduced into Ru as evidenced by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. In this case, there is no possibility to re-oxidize the Ru surface into RuO2 due to the weak oxidation character of H2O and an anatase TiO2 layer is therefore grown on Ti2O3. In contrast, when oxygen plasma is used in the ALD process, its strong oxidation character leads to the re-oxidation of the partially reduced RuO2 following the first Ti deposition step. Consequently, the RuO2 surface is regenerated, allowing the growth of rutile TiO2. A surface chemical reaction scheme is proposed that well accounts for the observed experimental results.

  12. Entry Dispersion Analysis for the Hayabusa Spacecraft using Ground Based Optical Observation

    CERN Document Server

    Yamaguchi, T; Yagi, M; Tholen, D J

    2011-01-01

    Hayabusa asteroid explorer successfully released the sample capsule to Australia on June 13, 2010. Since the Earth reentry phase of sample return was critical, many backup plans for predicting the landing location were prepared. This paper investigates the reentry dispersion using ground based optical observation as a backup observation for radiometric observation. Several scenarios are calculated and compared for the reentry phase of the Hayabusa to evaluate the navigation accuracy of the ground-based observation. The optical observation doesn't require any active reaction from a spacecraft, thus these results show that optical observations could be a steady backup strategy even if a spacecraft had some trouble. We also evaluate the landing dispersion of the Hayabusa only with the optical observation.

  13. Ground-based walking training improves quality of life and exercise capacity in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, Sally L; Ng, L W Cindy; McKeough, Zoe J; Jenkins, Sue; Hill, Kylie; Eastwood, Peter R; Hillman, David R; Cecins, Nola; Spencer, Lissa M; Jenkins, Christine; Alison, Jennifer A

    2014-10-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of ground-based walking training on health-related quality of life and exercise capacity in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). People with COPD were randomised to either a walking group that received supervised, ground-based walking training two to three times a week for 8-10 weeks, or a control group that received usual medical care and did not participate in exercise training. 130 out of 143 participants (mean±sd age 69±8 years, forced expiratory volume in 1 s 43±15% predicted) completed the study. Compared to the control group, the walking group demonstrated greater improvements in the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire total score (mean difference -6 points (95% CI -10- -2), pimproves quality of life and endurance exercise capacity in people with COPD.

  14. Nulling interferometry: performance comparison between space and ground-based sites for exozodiacal disc detection

    CERN Document Server

    Defrère, D; Foresto, V Coudé du; Danchi, W C; Hartog, R den

    2008-01-01

    Characterising the circumstellar dust around nearby main sequence stars is a necessary step in understanding the planetary formation process and is crucial for future life-finding space missions such as ESA's Darwin or NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF). Besides paving the technological way to Darwin/TPF, the space-based infrared interferometers Pegase and FKSI (Fourier-Kelvin Stellar Interferometer) will be valuable scientific precursors in that respect. In this paper, we investigate the performance of Pegase and FKSI for exozodiacal disc detection and compare the results with ground-based nulling interferometers. Besides their main scientific goal (characterising hot giant extrasolar planets), Pegase and FKSI are very efficient in assessing within a few minutes the level of circumstellar dust in the habitable zone around nearby main sequence stars. They are capable of detecting exozodiacal discs respectively 5 and 1 time as dense as the solar zodiacal cloud and they outperform any ground-based instrumen...

  15. Techniques to extend the reach of ground based gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Sheila

    2016-03-01

    While the current generation of advanced ground based detectors will open the gravitational wave universe to observation, ground based interferometry has the potential to extend the reach of these observatories to high redshifts. Several techniques have the potential to improve the advanced detectors beyond design sensitivity, including the use of squeezed light, upgraded suspensions, and possibly new optical coatings, new test mass materials, and cryogenic suspensions. To improve the sensitivity by more than a factor of 10 compared to advanced detectors new, longer facilities will be needed. Future observatories capable of hosting interferometers 10s of kilometers long have the potential to extend the reach of gravitational wave astronomy to cosmological distances, enabling detection of binary inspirals from throughout the history of star formation.

  16. Ground-based near-infrared imaging of the HD141569 circumstellar disk

    CERN Document Server

    Boccaletti, A; Marchis, F; Hanh, J

    2003-01-01

    We present the first ground-based near-infrared image of the circumstellar disk around the post-Herbig Ae/Be star HD141569A initially detected with the HST. Observations were carried out in the near-IR (2.2 $\\mu$m) at the Palomar 200-inch telescope using the adaptive optics system PALAO. The main large scale asymmetric features of the disk are detected on our ground-based data. In addition, we measured that the surface brightness of the disk is slightly different than that derived by HST observations (at 1.1 $\\mu$m and 1.6 $\\mu$m). We interpret this possible color-effect in terms of dust properties and derive a minimal

  17. Validation of Aura OMI by Aircraft and Ground-Based Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPeters, R. D.; Petropavlovskikh, I.; Kroon, M.

    2006-12-01

    Both aircraft-based and ground-based measurements have been used to validate ozone measurements by the OMI instrument on Aura. Three Aura Validation Experiment (AVE) flights have been conducted, in November 2004 and June 2005 with the NASA WB57, and in January/February 2005 with the NASA DC-8. On these flights, validation of OMI was primarily done using data from the CAFS (CCD Actinic Flux Spectroradiometer) instrument, which is used to measure total column ozone above the aircraft. These measurements are used to differentiate changes in stratospheric ozone from changes in total column ozone. Also, changes in ozone over high clouds measured by OMI were checked in a flight over tropical storm Arlene on a flight on June 11th. Ground-based measurements were made during the SAUNA campaign in Sodankyla, Finland, in March and April 2006. Both total column ozone and the ozone vertical distribution were validated.

  18. REMOTE SENSING OF WATER VAPOR CONTENT USING GROUND-BASED GPS DATA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Spatial and temporal resolution of water vapor content is useful in improving the accuracy of short-term weather prediction.Dense and continuously tracking regional GPS arrays will play an important role in remote sensing atmospheric water vapor content.In this study,a piecewise linear solution method was proposed to estimate the precipitable water vapor (PWV) content from ground-based GPS observations in Hong Kong.To evaluate the solution accuracy of the water vapor content sensed by GPS,the upper air sounding data (radiosonde) that are collected locally was used to calculate the precipitable water vapor during the same period.One-month results of PWV from both ground-based GPS sensing technique and radiosonde method are in agreement within 1~2 mm.This encouraging result will motivate the GPS meteorology application based on the establishment of a dense GPS array in Hong Kong.

  19. DEM extraction and its accuracy analysis with ground-based SAR interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, J.; Yue, J. P.; Li, L. H.

    2014-03-01

    Two altimetry models extracting DEM (Digital Elevation Model) with the GBSAR (Ground-Based Synthetic Aperture Radar) technology are studied and their accuracies are analyzed in detail. The approximate and improved altimetry models of GBSAR were derived from the spaceborne radar altimetry based on the principles of the GBSAR technology. The error caused by the parallel ray approximation in the approximate model was analyzed quantitatively, and the results show that the errors cannot be ignored for the ground-based radar system. For the improved altimetry model, the elevation error expression can be acquired by simulating and analyzing the error propagation coefficients of baseline length, wavelength, differential phase and range distance in the mathematical model. By analyzing the elevation error with the baseline and range distance, the results show that the improved altimetry model is suitable for high-precision DEM and the accuracy can be improved by adjusting baseline and shortening slant distance.

  20. Reactivity of Chemisorbed Oxygen Atoms and Their Catalytic Consequences during CH 4 –O 2 Catalysis on Supported Pt Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Ya-Huei(Cathy); Buda, Corneliu; Neurock, Matthew; Iglesia, Enrique

    2011-10-12

    Kinetic and isotopic data and density functional theory treatments provide evidence for the elementary steps and the active site requirements involved in the four distinct kinetic regimes observed during CH4 oxidation reactions using O2, H2O, or CO2 as oxidants on Pt clusters. These four regimes exhibit distinct rate equations because of the involvement of different kinetically relevant steps, predominant adsorbed species, and rate and equilibrium constants for different elementary steps. Transitions among regimes occur as chemisorbed oxygen (O*) coverages change on Pt clusters. O* coverages are given, in turn, by a virtual O2 pressure, which represents the pressure that would give the prevalent steady-state O* coverages if their adsorption–desorption equilibrium was maintained. The virtual O2 pressure acts as a surrogate for oxygen chemical potentials at catalytic surfaces and reflects the kinetic coupling between C–H and O=O activation steps. O* coverages and virtual pressures depend on O2 pressure when O2 activation is equilibrated and on O2/CH4 ratios when this step becomes irreversible as a result of fast scavenging of O* by CH4-derived intermediates. In three of these kinetic regimes, C–H bond activation is the sole kinetically relevant step, but occurs on different active sites, which evolve from oxygen–oxygen (O*–O*), to oxygen–oxygen vacancy (O*–*), and to vacancy–vacancy (*–*) site pairs as O* coverages decrease.

  1. A spectroscopic experimental and computer-assisted empirical model for the production and energetics of excited oxygen molecules formed by atom recombination on shuttle tile surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owan, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    A visible emission spectroscopic method was developed. The amounts of excited singlet and triplet oxygen molecules produced by recombination on the Space Shuttle Orbiter thermal protective tiles at elevated temperatures are determined. Rate constants and energetics of the extremely exothermic reaction are evaluated in terms of a chemical and mathematical model. Implications for potential contribution to Shuttle surface reentry heating fluxes are outlined.

  2. Investigating the long-term evolution of subtropical ozone profiles applying ground-based FTIR spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    García, O.E.; Schneider, M; A. Redondas; Y. González; Hase, F.; Blumenstock, T.; Sepúlveda, E.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the long-term evolution of subtropical ozone profile time series (1999–2010) obtained from ground-based FTIR (Fourier Transform InfraRed) spectrometry at the Izaña Observatory ozone super-site. Different ozone retrieval strategies are examined, analysing the influence of an additional temperature retrieval and different constraints. The theoretical assessment reveals that the FTIR system is able to resolve four independent ozone layers with a precision of better than 6...

  3. Space Fence Ground-Based Radar System Increment 1 (Space Fence Inc 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-438 Space Fence Ground-Based Radar System Increment 1 (Space Fence Inc 1) As of FY 2017...11 Track to Budget 17 Cost and Funding 18 Low Rate Initial Production 23 Foreign Military Sales 24 Nuclear Costs 24 Unit Cost...Document CLIN - Contract Line Item Number CPD - Capability Production Document CY - Calendar Year DAB - Defense Acquisition Board DAE - Defense Acquisition

  4. Particle production during inflation and gravitational waves detectable by ground-based interferometers

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Jessica L.; Sorbo, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    Inflation typically predicts a quasi scale-invariant spectrum of gravitational waves. In models of slow-roll inflation, the amplitude of such a background is too small to allow direct detection without a dedicated space-based experiment such as the proposed BBO or DECIGO. In this paper we note that particle production during inflation can generate a feature in the spectrum of primordial gravitational waves. We discuss the possibility that such a feature might be detected by ground-based laser...

  5. NASA Requirements for Ground-Based Pressure Vessels and Pressurized Systems (PVS). Revision C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greulich, Owen Rudolf

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to ensure the structural integrity of PVS through implementation of a minimum set of requirements for ground-based PVS in accordance with this document, NASA Policy Directive (NPD) 8710.5, NASA Safety Policy for Pressure Vessels and Pressurized Systems, NASA Procedural Requirements (NPR) 8715.3, NASA General Safety Program Requirements, applicable Federal Regulations, and national consensus codes and standards (NCS).

  6. Comparison of NO2 vertical profiles from satellite and ground based measurements over Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni, Pavan; Bortoli, Daniele; Costa, Maria João; Silva, Ana Maria; Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Giovanelli, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    The Intercomparison of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) vertical profiles, derived from the satellite based HALogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) measurements and from the ground based UV-VIS spectrometer GASCOD (Gas Analyzer Spectrometer Correlating Optical Differences) observations at the Mario Zucchelli Station (MZS), in Antarctica, are done for the first time. It is shown here that both datasets are in good agreement showing the same features in terms of magnitude, profile structure, a...

  7. The Gaia Era: synergy between space missions and ground based surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Vallenari, A

    2008-01-01

    The Gaia mission is expected to provide highly accurate astrometric, photometric, and spectroscopic measurements for about $10^9$ objects. Automated classification of detected sources is a key part of the data processing. Here a few aspects of the Gaia classification process are presented. Information from other surveys at longer wavelengths, and from follow-up ground based observations will be complementary to Gaia data especially at faint magnitudes, and will offer a great opportunity to understand our Galaxy.

  8. Instrumentation for Ground-Based Testing in Simulated Space and Planetary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiman, Jacob; Horodetsky, Sergey; Issoupov, Vitali

    This paper is an overview of instrumentation developed and created by ITL Inc. for simulated testing and performance evaluation of spacecraft materials, structures, mechanisms, assemblies and components in different space and planetary environments. The LEO Space Environment Simulator allows simulation of the synergistic effect of ultra-high vacuum conditions, 5 eV neutral atomic oxygen beams, Vacuum-Ultraviolet (VUV) and Near-Ultraviolet (NUV) radiation, and temperature conditions. The simulated space environmental conditions can be controlled in-situ using a quadruple mass-spectrometer, Time-of-Flight technique, as well as Quartz Crystal Microbalance sensors. The new NUV System is capable of delivering an NUV power intensity of up to 10 Equivalent Suns. The design of the system uses horizontal orientation of the 5 kW Mercury lamp, focusing of NUV radiation is achieved due to a parabolic reflector. To address the Lunar/Martian surface environments, the Planetary Environmental Simulator/Test Facility has been developed and built to allow for physical evaluation of the effects of the Lunar/Martian dust environments in conjunction with other factors (ultra-high vacuum or planetary atmospheric conditions, VUV/NUV radiation, thermal cycling, and darkness). The ASTM E 595/ASTM E 1559 Outgassing Test Facility provides the means for the outgassing test of materials with the objective to select materials with low outgassing properties for spacecraft use and allows to determine the following outgassing parameters: Total Mass Loss, Collected Volatile Condensable Materials, and Water Vapor Regained.

  9. First-generation Science Cases for Ground-based Terahertz Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Satoki; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Nakamura, Masanori; Asada, Keiichi; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Urata, Yuji; Wang, Ming-Jye; Wang, Wei-Hao; Takahashi, Satoko; Tang, Ya-Wen; Chang, Hsian-Hong; Huang, Kuiyun; Morata, Oscar; Otsuka, Masaaki; Lin, Kai-Yang; Tsai, An-Li; Lin, Yen-Ting; Srinivasan, Sundar; Martin-Cocher, Pierre; Pu, Hung-Yi; Kemper, Francisca; Patel, Nimesh; Grimes, Paul; Huang, Yau-De; Han, Chih-Chiang; Huang, Yen-Ru; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Lin, Lupin Chun-Che; Zhang, Qizhou; Keto, Eric; Burgos, Roberto; Chen, Ming-Tang; Inoue, Makoto; Ho, Paul T P

    2015-01-01

    Ground-based observations at terahertz (THz) frequencies are a newly explorable area of astronomy for the next ten years. We discuss science cases for a first-generation 10-m class THz telescope, focusing on the Greenland Telescope as an example of such a facility. We propose science cases and provide quantitative estimates for each case. The largest advantage of ground-based THz telescopes is their higher angular resolution (~ 4 arcsec for a 10-m dish), as compared to space or airborne THz telescopes. Thus, high-resolution mapping is an important scientific argument. In particular, we can isolate zones of interest for Galactic and extragalactic star-forming regions. The THz windows are suitable for observations of high-excitation CO lines and [N II] 205 um lines, which are scientifically relevant tracers of star formation and stellar feedback. Those lines are the brightest lines in the THz windows, so that they are suitable for the initiation of ground-based THz observations. THz polarization of star-forming...

  10. Interactive dynamic three-dimensional scene for the ground-based three-dimensional display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Peining; Sang, Xinzhu; Guo, Nan; Chen, Duo; Yan, Binbin; Wang, Kuiru; Dou, Wenhua; Xiao, Liquan

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) displays provides valuable tools for many fields, such as scientific experiment, education, information transmission, medical imaging and physical simulation. Ground based 360° 3D display with dynamic and controllable scene can find some special applications, such as design and construction of buildings, aeronautics, military sand table and so on. It can be utilized to evaluate and visualize the dynamic scene of the battlefield, surgical operation and the 3D canvas of art. In order to achieve the ground based 3D display, the public focus plane should be parallel to the camera's imaging planes, and optical axes should be offset to the center of public focus plane in both vertical and horizontal directions. Virtual cameras are used to display 3D dynamic scene with Unity 3D engine. Parameters of virtual cameras for capturing scene are designed and analyzed, and locations of virtual cameras are determined by the observer's eye positions in the observing space world. An interactive dynamic 3D scene for ground based 360° 3D display is demonstrated, which provides high-immersion 3D visualization.

  11. Intercomparison of ground-based ozone and NO2 measurements during the MANTRA 2004 campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Strong

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The MANTRA (Middle Atmosphere Nitrogen TRend Assessment 2004 campaign took place in Vanscoy, Saskatchewan, Canada (52° N, 107° W from 3 August to 15 September, 2004. In support of the main balloon launch, a suite of five zenith-sky and direct-Sun-viewing UV-visible ground-based spectrometers was deployed, primarily measuring ozone and NO2 total columns. Three Fourier transform spectrometers (FTSs that were part of the balloon payload also performed ground-based measurements of several species, including ozone. Ground-based measurements of ozone and NO2 differential slant column densities from the zenith-viewing UV-visible instruments are presented herein. They are found to partially agree within NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change standards for instruments certified for process studies and satellite validation. Vertical column densities of ozone from the zenith-sky UV-visible instruments, the FTSs, a Brewer spectrophotometer, and ozonesondes are compared, and found to agree within the combined error estimates of the instruments (15%. NO2 vertical column densities from two of the UV-visible instruments are compared, and are also found to agree within combined error (15%.

  12. Limitation of Ground-based Estimates of Solar Irradiance Due to Atmospheric Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Guoyong; Cahalan, Robert F.; Holben, Brent N.

    2003-01-01

    The uncertainty in ground-based estimates of solar irradiance is quantitatively related to the temporal variability of the atmosphere's optical thickness. The upper and lower bounds of the accuracy of estimates using the Langley Plot technique are proportional to the standard deviation of aerosol optical thickness (approx. +/- 13 sigma(delta tau)). The estimates of spectral solar irradiance (SSI) in two Cimel sun photometer channels from the Mauna Loa site of AERONET are compared with satellite observations from SOLSTICE (Solar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment) on UARS (Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite) for almost two years of data. The true solar variations related to the 27-day solar rotation cycle observed from SOLSTICE are about 0.15% at the two sun photometer channels. The variability in ground-based estimates is statistically one order of magnitude larger. Even though about 30% of these estimates from all Level 2.0 Cimel data fall within the 0.4 to approx. 0.5% variation level, ground-based estimates are not able to capture the 27-day solar variation observed from SOLSTICE.

  13. Kepler and Ground-based Transits of the Exo-Neptune HAT-P-11b

    CERN Document Server

    Deming, Drake; Jackson, Brian; Peterson, Steven W; Agol, Eric; Knutson, Heather A; Jennings, Donald E; Haase, Flynn; Bays, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    We analyze 26 archival Kepler transits of the exo-Neptune HAT-P-11b, supplemented by ground-based transits observed in the blue (B-band) and near-IR (J-band). Both the planet and host star are smaller than previously believed; our analysis yields Rp=4.31 +/-0.06 Earth-radii, and Rs = 0.683 +/-0.009 solar radii, both about 3-sigma smaller than the discovery values. Our ground-based transit data at wavelengths bracketing the Kepler bandpass serve to check the wavelength dependence of stellar limb darkening, and the J-band transit provides a precise and independent constraint on the transit duration. Both the limb darkening and transit duration from our ground-based data are consistent with the new Kepler values for the system parameters. Our smaller radius for the planet implies that its gaseous envelope can be less extensive than previously believed, being very similar to the H-He envelope of GJ436b and Kepler-4b. HAT-P-11 is an active star, and signatures of star spot crossings are ubiquitous in the Kepler tr...

  14. Structure and evolution of Pluto's Atmosphere from ground-based stellar occultations between 2002 and 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, Erick; Sicardy, Bruno; Rio de Janeiro occultation team, Granada occultation team, International Occultation and Timing Association

    2016-10-01

    Ground-Based stellar occultations probe Pluto's atmosphere from about 3 km altitude (~ 10 μbar pressure level) up to 260 km altitude (~0.1 μbar). Our main goal is to derive Pluto's atmosphere evolution using thirteen ground-based occultations observed between 2002 and 2015 (plus 2016, if available). We consistently analyze the light curves using the Dias et al. (ApJ 811, 53, 2015) model, and confirm the general pressure increase by a factor of about 1.5 between 2002 and 2015 and a factor of almost three between 1988 and 2015. Implications for Pluto's seasonal evolution will be briefly discussed in the context of the New Horizons (NH) findings.Ground-based-derived temperature profiles will be compared with NH's results, where we use new temperature boundary conditions in our inversion procedures, as given by NH near 260 km altitude. Although the profiles reasonably agree, significant discrepancies are observed both in the deeper stratospheric zone (altitude topographic features revealed by NH.Finally, possible correlations between spike activity in the occultation light-curves and local underlying presence of free nitrogen ice terrains will be investigated.Part of the research leading to these results has received funding from the European Research Council under the European Community's H2020 (2014-2020/ ERC Grant Agreement n 669416 "LUCKY STAR").

  15. Flow Characteristics of Tidewater Glaciers in Greenland and Alaska using Ground-Based LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnegan, D. C.; Stearns, L. A.; Hamilton, G. S.; O'Neel, S.

    2010-12-01

    LiDAR scanning systems have been employed to characterize and quantify multi-temporal glacier and ice sheet changes for nearly three decades. Until recently, LiDAR scanning systems were limited to airborne and space-based platforms which come at a significant cost to deploy and are limited in spatial and temporal sampling capabilities necessary to compare with in-situ field measurements. Portable ground-based LiDAR scanning systems are now being used as a glaciological tool. We discuss research efforts to employ ground-based near-infrared LiDAR systems at two differing tidewater glacier systems in the spring of 2009; Helheim Glacier in southeast Greenland and Columbia Glacier in southeast Alaska. Preliminary results allow us to characterize short term displacement rates and detailed observations of calving processes. These results highlight the operational limitations and capabilities of commercially available LiDAR systems, and allow us to identify optimal operating characteristics for monitoring small to large-scale tidewater glaciers in near real-time. Furthermore, by identifying the operational limitations of these sensors it allows for optimal design characteristics of new sensors necessary to meet ground-based calibration and validation requirements of ongoing scientific missions.

  16. Phase-coherent mapping of gravitational-wave backgrounds using ground-based laser interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Joseph D; Cornish, Neil J; Gair, Jonathan; Mingarelli, Chiara M F; van Haasteren, Rutger

    2015-01-01

    We extend the formalisms developed in Gair et al. and Cornish and van Haasteren to create maps of gravitational-wave backgrounds using a network of ground-based laser interferometers. We show that in contrast to pulsar timing arrays, which are insensitive to half of the gravitational-wave sky (the curl modes), a network of ground-based interferometers is sensitive to both the gradient and curl components of the background. The spatial separation of a network of interferometers, or of a single interferometer at different times during its rotational and orbital motion around the Sun, allows for recovery of both components. We derive expressions for the response functions of a laser interferometer in the small-antenna limit, and use these expressions to calculate the overlap reduction function for a pair of interferometers. We also construct maximum-likelihood estimates of the + and x-polarization modes of the gravitational-wave sky in terms of the response matrix for a network of ground-based interferometers, e...

  17. A Ground-Based Array to Observe Geospace Electrodynamics During Adverse Space Weather Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, J. J.; Eccles, J. V.; Rice, D.

    2004-05-01

    Geomagnetic Storms occur with surprising frequency and create adverse space weather conditions. During these periods, our knowledge and ability to specify or forecast in adequate detail for user needs is negligible. Neither experimental observations nor theoretical developments have made a significant new impact on the problem for over two decades. Although we can now map Total Electron Content (TEC) in the ionosphere over a continent with sufficient resolution to see coherent long-lived structures, these do not provide constraints on the geospace electrodynamics that is at the heart of our lack of understanding. We present arguments for the need of a continental deployment of ground-based sensors to stepwise advance our understanding of the geospace electrodynamics when it is most adverse from a space weather perspective and also most frustrating from an understanding of Magnetosphere-Ionosphere coupling. That a continental-scale deployment is more productive at addressing the problem than a realizable global distribution is shown. Each measurement is discussed from the point-of-view of either providing new knowledge or becoming a key for future real-time specification and forecasting for user applications. An example of a storm database from one mid-latitude station for the 31 March 2002 is used as a conceptual point in a ground-based array. The presentation focuses on scientific questions that have eluded a quantitative solution for over three decades and view a ground-based array as an "IGY" type of catalyst for answering these questions.

  18. Oxygen atom transfer from {mu}-Oxo-bis[1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octakis(trifluoromethyl)ph-thalocya ninato]diiron(III) : evidence for an Fe(IV)=O intermediate.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, M. J.; Rathke, J. W.; Chemical Engineering

    1998-01-01

    The dimeric [(FPc)Fe]2({mu}-O) (1) (FPc is the dianion of 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octakis(trifluoromethyl)phthalocyanine) has been shown to transfer its -oxo atom quantitatively to trimethylphosphine and triphenylphosphine. In the case of triphenylphosphine a base such as 1-methylimidazole (MeIm) or pyridine (py) is needed to induce the oxygen atom transfer. The reaction of 1 with MeIm at -40 C and below gives [(MeIm)(FPc)Fe]2({mu}-O) (4), which disproportionates to give (MeIm)2(FPc)Fe (5) and (FPc)Fe=O (6) at higher temperatures. The oxo atom of 6 has been shown to transfer to triphenylphosphine. Similarly, 6 is generated by the disproportionation of 1 with py. It has also been generated by the oxidation of 1 with t-butyl hydroperoxide. [(FPc)Fe]2({mu}-O) catalyzes the oxidation of hydrocarbons by iodosylbenzene. With stilbenes, styrenes, cyclohexenes and butenes as substrates, both epoxidations and alkyl C-H bond oxidations have been observed. The epoxidation of cis-stilbene leads to a mixture of cis- and trans-stilbene oxides, indicating that epoxidation of cis-stilbene, and possibly other olefins as well, proceeds through a non-concerted mechanism.

  19. The CU Airborne MAX-DOAS instrument: ground based validation, and vertical profiling of aerosol extinction and trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baidar, S.; Oetjen, H.; Coburn, S.; Dix, B.; Ortega, I.; Sinreich, R.; Volkamer, R.

    2012-09-01

    The University of Colorado Airborne Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument uses solar stray light remote sensing to detect and quantify multiple trace gases, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2), glyoxal (CHOCHO), formaldehyde (HCHO), water vapor (H2O), nitrous acid (HONO), iodine monoxide (IO), bromine monoxide (BrO), and oxygen dimers (O4) at multiple wavelengths (360 nm, 477 nm, 577 nm and 632 nm) simultaneously, and sensitively in the open atmosphere. The instrument is unique, in that it presents the first systematic implementation of MAX-DOAS on research aircraft, i.e. (1) includes measurements of solar stray light photons from nadir, zenith, and multiple elevation angles forward and below the plane by the same spectrometer/detector system, and (2) features a motion compensation system that decouples the telescope field of view (FOV) from aircraft movements in real-time (CHOCHO, HCHO, and H2O mixing ratios and aerosol extinction coefficients, ɛ, at 477nm calculated from O4 measurements from a low approach at Brackett airfield inside the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB) are presented. These profiles contain ~ 12 degrees of freedom (DOF) over a 3.5 km altitude range, independent of signal-to-noise at which the trace gas is detected. The boundary layer NO2 concentration, and the integral aerosol extinction over height (aerosol optical depth, AOD) agrees well with nearby ground-based in-situ NO2 measurement, and AERONET station. The detection limits of NO2, CHOCHO, HCHO, ɛ360, ɛ477 from 30 s integration time spectra recorded forward of the plane are 5 ppt, 3 ppt, 100 ppt, 0.004 km-1, 0.002 km-1 in the free troposphere (FT), and 30 ppt, 16 ppt, 540 ppt, 0.012 km-1, 0.006 km-1 inside the boundary layer (BL), respectively. Mobile column observations of trace gases and aerosols are complimentary to in-situ observations, and help bridge the spatial scales probed by ground-based observations, satellites, and predicted by atmospheric

  20. The direct ionization processes in the collisions of partially stripped carbon and oxygen ions with helium atoms at low-to-intermediate energies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Chun-Lin; Shao Jian-Xiong; Chen Xi-Meng; Sun Guang-Zhi; Zou Xian-Rong

    2008-01-01

    The values of direct double- to-single ionization ratio R of helium atoms induced by Cq+,Oq+ (q=1-4) ions at incident energies from 0.2 to 8.5MeV are measured.Based on the existing model (Shao J X,Chen X M and Ding B W 2007 Phys.Rev.A 75 012701) the effective charge of the projectile is introduced to theoretically estimate the value of R for the partially stripped ions impacting on helium atoms.The results calculated from our "effective charge" model are in good agreement with the experimental data,and the dependence of the effective charge on the ionization energy of the projectile is also discussed qualitatively.

  1. Comparison of Thermal Structure Results from Venus Express and Ground Based Observations since Vira

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Sanjay

    2016-07-01

    An international team was formed in 2013 through the International Space Studies Institute (Bern, Switzerland) to compare recent results of the Venus atmospheric thermal structure from spacecraft and ground based observations made since the Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA) was developed (Kliore et al., 1985, Keating et al., 1985). Five experiments on European Space Agency's Venus Express orbiter mission have yielded results on the atmospheric structure during is operational life (April 2006 - November 2014). Three of these were from occultation methods: at near infrared wavelengths from solar occultations, (SOIR, 70 - 170 km), at ultraviolet wavelengths from stellar occultations (SPICAV, 90-140 km), and occultation of the VEx-Earth radio signal (VeRa, 40-90 km). In-situ drag measurements from three different techniques (accelerometry, torque, and radio tracking, 130 - 200 km) were also obtained using the spacecraft itself while passive infrared remote sensing was used by the VIRTIS experiment (70 - 120 km). The only new data in the -40-70 km altitude range are from radio occultation, as no new profiles of the deep atmosphere have been obtained since the VeGa 2 lander measurements in 1985 (not included in VIRA). Some selected ground based results available to the team were also considered by team in the inter comparisons. The temperature structure in the lower thermosphere from disk resolved ground based observations (except for one ground based investigation), is generally consistent with the Venus Express results. These experiments sampled at different periods, at different locations and at different local times and have different vertical and horizontal resolution and coverage. The data were therefore binned in latitude and local time bins and compared, ignoring temporal variations over the life time of the Venus Express mission and assumed north-south symmetry. Alternating warm and cooler layers are present in the 120-160 altitude range in results

  2. The CU Airborne MAX-DOAS instrument: ground based validation, and vertical profiling of aerosol extinction and trace gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Baidar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The University of Colorado Airborne Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS instrument uses solar stray light remote sensing to detect and quantify multiple trace gases, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2, glyoxal (CHOCHO, formaldehyde (HCHO, water vapor (H2O, nitrous acid (HONO, iodine monoxide (IO, bromine monoxide (BrO, and oxygen dimers (O4 at multiple wavelengths (360 nm, 477 nm, 577 nm and 632 nm simultaneously, and sensitively in the open atmosphere. The instrument is unique, in that it presents the first systematic implementation of MAX-DOAS on research aircraft, i.e. (1 includes measurements of solar stray light photons from nadir, zenith, and multiple elevation angles forward and below the plane by the same spectrometer/detector system, and (2 features a motion compensation system that decouples the telescope field of view (FOV from aircraft movements in real-time (< 0.35° accuracy. Sets of solar stray light spectra collected from nadir to zenith scans provide some vertical profile information within 2 km above and below the aircraft altitude, and the vertical column density (VCD below the aircraft is measured in nadir view. Maximum information about vertical profiles is derived simultaneously for trace gas concentrations and aerosol extinction coefficients over similar spatial scales and with a vertical resolution of typically 250 m during aircraft ascent/descent.

    The instrument is described, and data from flights over California during the CalNex and CARES air quality field campaigns is presented. Horizontal distributions of NO2 VCDs (below the aircraft maps are sampled with typically 1 km resolution, and show good agreement with two ground based CU MAX-DOAS instruments (slope 0.95 ± 0.09, R2 = 0.86. As a case study vertical profiles of NO2, CHOCHO, HCHO, and H2O mixing ratios and aerosol extinction coefficients

  3. 超声与氧驱动雾化吸入治疗小儿哮喘的效果比较%Effectiveness comparison of Ultrasonic and oxygen-driven atomizing inhalation on the treatment of asthma in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯叶维

    2013-01-01

    目的 比较超声与氧驱动雾化吸入治疗小儿哮喘的疗效.方法 选择2010年6月~2012年6月重庆市渝北区人民医院收治的哮喘患儿90例,按随机数字表法分为观察组和对照组,每组45例.所有患儿均给予基础治疗,并在此基础上加用布地奈德混悬液、硫酸沙丁胺醇雾化吸入治疗.观察组采用氧气驱动雾化吸入,对照组采用超声雾化吸入.比较两组疗效、症状消失时间和住院时间.结果 观察组总有效率为93.33%(42/45),对照组为73.33%(33/45),差异有统计学意义(P < 0.05);观察组症状消失时间(咳嗽、喘憋及肺部哮鸣音)及住院时间均明显短于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P < 0.05).结论 相比超声雾化吸入,氧驱动雾化吸入治疗小儿哮喘起效更快,疗效更高,并能缩短住院时间,无不良反应,可作为临床治疗小儿哮喘的首选.%Objective To compare the efficacy of ultrasonic and oxygen-driven atomizing inhalation on treatment of asthma in children. Methods 90 cases of children with asthma in our hospital from June 2010 to June 2012 were se-lected, according to the random number table were divided into observation group and control group with 45 cases in each group. All children were given basic treatment, and on this basis plus budesonide and salbutamol sulfate by at-omizing inhalation. The observation group was treated with oxygen-driven atomizing inhalation, the control group used ultrasonic atomizing inhalation. The efficacy, symptoms disappear time and length of hospital stay of two groups were compared. Results The total effective rate of observation group was 93.33% (42/45), which in the control group was 73.33% (33/45), the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05); the symptoms disappeared time (cough, asthmat-ic, lung wheezing sound), and length of hospital stay in observation group were significantly shorter than that of control group, the difference were statistically significant

  4. Blue Skies through a Blue Sky: an attempt to detect Rayleigh scattering in an exoplanet atmosphere from a ground-based telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchsinger, Kristen; Redfield, Seth; Cauley, Paul W.; Barman, Travis S.; Jensen, Adam G.

    2017-01-01

    When studying planetary atmospheres, scattering signatures, such as Rayleigh scattering, can often be the most easily characterized signal. This is especially true in terrestrial atmospheres, where Rayleigh scattering is the dominant spectral feature in optical wavelengths. These scattering signatures, unlike molecular or atomic line absorption, are broad and continuous, and are char- acterized by a single slope. Rayleigh scattering provides an imporant glimpse into the atmospheric composition of an exoplanet's atmosphere, and a Rayleigh scattering detection on a smaller, ground-based telescope can be a useful method to identify interesting science targets for larger, space-based telescopes.We will present observations of three exoplanets using the HYDRA multi- object spectrometer on the WIYN telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory. We obtained two transits each for WASP 12b and GJ 3470b, and one transit for HD 189733b, for a range of wavelengths between 4500 Å and 9201 Å. A successful Rayleigh scattering detection in the atmospheres of these planets using this in- strument would represent a step forward in our current detection capabilities and open up the study of planetary atmospheres to smaller, ground-based telescopes.Data presented herein were obtained at the WIYN Observatory from telescope time allocated to NN-EXPLORE through the scientific partnership of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory. This work was supported by a NASA WIYN PI Data Award, administered by the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute.

  5. The effect of oxygen source on atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as blocking oxide in metal/aluminum oxide/nitride/oxide/silicon memory capacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaou, Nikolaos, E-mail: n.nikolaou@imel.demokritos.gr [Department of Microelectronics, NCSR “Demokritos”, 153 10 Athens (Greece); Department of Physics, University of Patras, 265 04 Patras (Greece); Ioannou-Sougleridis, Vassilios; Dimitrakis, Panagiotis; Normand, Pascal [Department of Microelectronics, NCSR “Demokritos”, 153 10 Athens (Greece); Skarlatos, Dimitrios [Department of Physics, University of Patras, 265 04 Patras (Greece); Giannakopoulos, Konstantinos [Department of Microelectronics, NCSR “Demokritos”, 153 10 Athens (Greece); Kukli, Kaupo [Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, EE-51014 Tartu (Estonia); Niinistö, Jaakko; Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku [Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-04-30

    This work explores the electrical properties of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using different oxygen sources (water and ozone) and trimethylaluminium (TMA). The as-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers were used as blocking oxides in metal (Pt)–alumina–nitride–oxide–silicon memory capacitors. The capacitance–voltage characteristics of the devices with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposited with the ozone–TMA and water–TMA processes showed almost identical capacitance equivalent thicknesses in accordance with transmission electron microscopy imaging which revealed similar dielectric layer thicknesses between the two gate stacks. At high negative gate voltages the water-TMA devices exhibited higher leakage currents than the ozone-TMA devices. This effect had a direct impact on the attainable memory window, due to the limited erase performance of the capacitors and the extended erase-saturation effect. These findings indicate that the ALD chemistry and in particular the oxygen source is a crucial factor which determines the electrical behavior of the as-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films, and therefore the performance of the memory stacks. These differences are attributed to the different trap distributions either in space or energy within the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers. - Highlights: ► Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were formed by atomic layer deposition using H{sub 2}O and O{sub 3} as oxygen sources. ► Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers were used as blocking oxides in charge trapping memory capacitors. ► At high negative voltages, H{sub 2}O-based samples exhibit higher leakage current density. ► The H{sub 2}O-based samples have a limited ability to remove trapped electrons. ► Oxygen source differentiates the electrical behavior of as-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers.

  6. Observation of internal structure of the L-shell x-ray hypersatellites for palladium atoms multiply ionized by fast oxygen ions

    OpenAIRE

    Czarnota, M.; Banaś, D; Berset, Michel; Chmielewska, D; Dousse, Jean-Claude; Hoszowska, Joanna; Maillard, Yves-Patrick; Mauron, Olivier; Pajek, M.; Polasik, M.; Raboud, Pierre-Alexandre; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Słabkowska, K.; Sujkowski, Z.

    2010-01-01

    An observation of the internal structure of the L-shell hypersatellite x rays resulting from the one-photon decay of L⁻² double-vacancy states in palladium multiply ionized by oxygen ions is reported. The Pd L₃→M4,5 x-ray spectrum was measured with a von Hamos high-resolution crystal spectrometer. The complex shape of the observed spectrum could be interpreted in detail using relativistic multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations. The relative intensities of the measured x rays were found to...

  7. Kepler and Ground-Based Transits of the exo-Neptune HAT-P-11b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, Drake; Sada, Pedro V.; Jackson, Brian; Peterson, Steven W.; Agol, Eric; Knutson, Heather A.; Jennings, Donald E.; Haase, Plynn; Bays, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    We analyze 26 archival Kepler transits of the exo-Neptune HAT-P-11b, supplemented by ground-based transits observed in the blue (B band) and near-IR (J band). Both the planet and host star are smaller than previously believed; our analysis yields Rp = 4.31 R xor 0.06 R xor and Rs = 0.683 R solar mass 0.009 R solar mass, both about 3 sigma smaller than the discovery values. Our ground-based transit data at wavelengths bracketing the Kepler bandpass serve to check the wavelength dependence of stellar limb darkening, and the J-band transit provides a precise and independent constraint on the transit duration. Both the limb darkening and transit duration from our ground-based data are consistent with the new Kepler values for the system parameters. Our smaller radius for the planet implies that its gaseous envelope can be less extensive than previously believed, being very similar to the H-He envelope of GJ 436b and Kepler-4b. HAT-P-11 is an active star, and signatures of star spot crossings are ubiquitous in the Kepler transit data. We develop and apply a methodology to correct the planetary radius for the presence of both crossed and uncrossed star spots. Star spot crossings are concentrated at phases 0.002 and +0.006. This is consistent with inferences from Rossiter-McLaughlin measurements that the planet transits nearly perpendicular to the stellar equator. We identify the dominant phases of star spot crossings with active latitudes on the star, and infer that the stellar rotational pole is inclined at about 12 deg 5 deg to the plane of the sky. We point out that precise transit measurements over long durations could in principle allow us to construct a stellar Butterfly diagram to probe the cyclic evolution of magnetic activity on this active K-dwarf star.

  8. Toward High Altitude Airship Ground-Based Boresight Calibration of Hyperspectral Pushbroom Imaging Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiwu Zhang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the single linear hyperspectral pushbroom imaging based on a high altitude airship (HAA without a three-axis stabilized platform is much more than that based on the spaceborne and airborne. Due to the effects of air pressure, temperature and airflow, the large pitch and roll angles tend to appear frequently that create pushbroom images highly characterized with severe geometric distortions. Thus, the in-flight calibration procedure is not appropriate to apply to the single linear pushbroom sensors on HAA having no three-axis stabilized platform. In order to address this problem, a new ground-based boresight calibration method is proposed. Firstly, a coordinate’s transformation model is developed for direct georeferencing (DG of the linear imaging sensor, and then the linear error equation is derived from it by using the Taylor expansion formula. Secondly, the boresight misalignments are worked out by using iterative least squares method with few ground control points (GCPs and ground-based side-scanning experiments. The proposed method is demonstrated by three sets of experiments: (i the stability and reliability of the method is verified through simulation-based experiments; (ii the boresight calibration is performed using ground-based experiments; and (iii the validation is done by applying on the orthorectification of the real hyperspectral pushbroom images from a HAA Earth observation payload system developed by our research team—“LanTianHao”. The test results show that the proposed boresight calibration approach significantly improves the quality of georeferencing by reducing the geometric distortions caused by boresight misalignments to the minimum level.

  9. Estimation of Antarctic ozone loss from Ground-based total column measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kuttippurath

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The passive ozone method is used to estimate ozone loss from ground-based measurements in the Antarctic. A sensitivity study shows that the O3 loss can be estimated within an accuracy of ~4%. The method is then applied to the observations from Amundsen-Scott/South Pole, Arrival Heights, Belgrano, Concordia, Dumont d'Urville, Faraday, Halley, Marambio, Neumayer, Rothera, Syowa and Zhongshan for the diagnosis of ozone loss in the Antarctic. On average, the five-day running mean of the vortex averaged ozone column loss deduced from the ground-based stations shows about 53% in 2009, 59% in 2008, 55% in 2007, 56% in 2006 and 61% in 2005. The observed O3 loss and loss rates are in very good agreement with the satellite observations (Ozone Monitoring Instrument and Sciamachy and are well reproduced by the model (Reprobus and SLIMCAT calculations.

    The historical ground-based total ozone measurements show that the depletion started in the late 1970s, reached a maximum in the early 1990s, stabilising afterwards at this level until present, with the exception of 2002, the year of an early vortex break-up. There is no indication of significant recovery yet.

    At southern mid-latitudes, a total ozone reduction of 40–50% is observed at the newly installed station Rio Gallegos and 25–35% at Kerguelen in October–November of 2008–2009 and 2005–2009 (except 2008 respectively, and of 10–20% at Macquarie Island in July–August of 2006–2009. This illustrates the significance of measurements at the edges of Antarctica.

  10. Comparison of OMI UV observations with ground-based measurements at high northern latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bernhard

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Dutch-Finnish Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI on board NASA's Aura spacecraft provides estimates of erythemal (sunburning ultraviolet (UV dose rates and erythemal daily doses. These data were compared with ground-based measurements at 13 stations located throughout the Arctic and Scandinavia from 60 to 83° N. The study corroborates results from earlier work, but is based on a longer time series (eight vs. two years and considers additional data products, such as the erythemal dose rate at the time of the satellite overpass. Furthermore, systematic errors in satellite UV data resulting from inaccuracies in the surface albedo climatology used in the OMI UV algorithm are systematically assessed. At times when the surface albedo is correctly known, OMI data typically exceed ground-based measurements by 0–11%. When the OMI albedo climatology exceeds the actual albedo, OMI data may be biased high by as much as 55%. In turn, when the OMI albedo climatology is too low, OMI data can be biased low by up to 59%. Such large negative biases may occur when reflections from snow and ice, which increase downwelling UV irradiance, are misinterpreted as reflections from clouds, which decrease the UV flux at the surface. Results suggest that a better OMI albedo climatology would greatly improve the accuracy of OMI UV data products even if year-to-year differences of the actual albedo cannot be accounted for. A pathway for improving the OMI albedo climatology is discussed. Results also demonstrate that ground-based measurements from the center of Greenland, where high, homogenous surface albedo is observed year round, are ideally suited to detect systematic problems or temporal drifts in estimates of surface UV irradiance from space.

  11. Ground-Based Network and Supersite Observations to Complement and Enrich EOS Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Holben, Brent N.; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2011-01-01

    Since 1997 NASA has been successfully launching a series of satellites - the Earth Observing System (EOS) - to intensively study, and gain a better understanding of, the Earth as an integrated system. Space-borne remote sensing observations, however, are often plagued by contamination of surface signatures. Thus, ground-based in-situ and remote-sensing measurements, where signals come directly from atmospheric constituents, the sun, and/or the Earth-atmosphere interactions, provide additional information content for comparisons that confirm quantitatively the usefulness of the integrated surface, aircraft, and satellite datasets. Through numerous participations, particularly but not limited to the EOS remote-sensing/retrieval and validation projects over the years, NASA/GSFC has developed and continuously refined ground-based networks and mobile observatories that proved to be vital in providing high temporal measurements, which complement and enrich the satellite observations. These are: the AERO NET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) a federation of ground-based globally distributed network of spectral sun-sky photometers; the MPLNET (Micro-Pulse Lidar NETwork, a similarly organized network of micro-pulse lidar systems measuring aerosol and cloud vertical structure continuously; and the SMART-COMMIT (Surface-sensing Measurements for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer - Chemical, Optical & Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere, mobile observatories, a suite of spectral radiometers and in-situ probes acquiring supersite measurements. Most MPLNET sites are collocated with those of AERONET, and both networks always support the deployment of SMART-COMMIT worldwide. These data products follow the data structure of EOS conventions: Level-0, instrument archived raw data; Level-1 (or 1.5), real-time data with no (or limited) quality assurance; Level-2, not real high temporal and spectral resolutions. In this talk, we will present NASA/GSFC groundbased facilities, serving

  12. Ground-based SMART-COMMIT Measurements for Studying Aerosol and Cloud Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Si-Chee

    2008-01-01

    From radiometric principles, it is expected that the retrieved properties of extensive aerosols and clouds from reflected/emitted measurements by satellite (and/or aircraft) should be consistent with those retrieved from transmitted/emitted radiance observed at the surface. Although space-borne remote sensing observations cover large spatial domain, they are often plagued by contamination of surface signatures. Thus, ground-based in-situ and remote-sensing measurements, where signals come directly from atmospheric constituents, the sun, and/or the Earth-atmosphere interactions, provide additional information content for comparisons that confirm quantitatively the usefulness of the integrated surface, aircraft, and satellite data sets. The development and deployment of SMARTCOMMIT (Surface-sensing Measurements for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer - Chemical, Optical & Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere) mobile facilities are aimed for the optimal utilization of collocated ground-based observations as constraints to yield higher fidelity satellite retrievals and to determine any sampling bias due to target conditions. To quantify the energetics of the surface-atmosphere system and the atmospheric processes, SMART-COMMIT instruments fall into three categories: flux radiometer, radiance sensor and in-situ probe. In this paper, we will demonstrate the capability of SMART-COMMIT in recent field campaigns (e.g., CRYSTAL-FACE, UAE 2, BASEASIA, NAMMA) that were designed and executed to study the compelling variability in temporal scale of both anthropogenic and natural aerosols (e.g., biomass-burning smoke, airborne dust) and cirrus clouds. We envision robust approaches in which well-collocated ground-based measurements and space-borne observations will greatly advance our knowledge of extensive aerosols and clouds.

  13. 慢性阻塞性肺疾病患者雾化吸入中吸氧方法效果探讨%Oxygen inhalation methods during atomization inhalation for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解志惠; 李红

    2012-01-01

    Objective The study was aimed to explore a better oxygen-providing therapy when implementing atomization inhalation for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods 62 patients of COPD were randomly divided into comparison group (31 patients) and experimental group (31 patients). Patients of the comparison group were provided with oxygen by a nasal tube during electric-atomization inhalation, whereas patients of the experiment group were provided with oxygen by a tube beside the buccal apparatus during electric-atomization inhalation. Variations of oxy-hemoglobin saturations (SpO2) and heart rate before and after inhalation were dynamically recorded. Results The statistic discrepancy of the SpO2 indexes for both groups did not appear before inhalation (P>0. 05). but it appeared after implementing inhalation for 5, 10, 15. 20. 30 miniatures (P0. 05), but it appeared after implementing inhalation for 5, 10, 15, 20. 30 miniatures(P<0. 05). Conclusion The oxygen-providing therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by adding a tube beside the buccal apparatus during atomization inhalation can effectively promote the oxyhemoglobin saturation and improve hypoxia and heart rate.%目的 探讨慢性阻塞性肺疾病(COPD)在雾化吸入过程中最佳给氧途径.方法 将62例COPD患者随机分组为对照组31例,观察组31例.对照组电动雾化吸入同时采用经鼻导管吸氧;观察组电动雾化吸入同时在口含器旁加氧气管吸氧,动态观察两组吸入前、后的血氧饱和度(SpO2)及心率的变化.结果 两组SpO2在吸入前差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)而开始吸入后的5、10、15、20、30min时,两组SpO2差异有显著性(P<0.05).吸入前两组心率无统计学意义(P>0.05),而吸入后5、10、15、20、30min时,两组心率具有统计学差异(P<0.05).结论 慢性阻塞性肺疾病在雾化吸入过程中在口含器旁加一氧气管进行吸氧,可有效提高患者的血氧饱和度,改

  14. The effect of collisional quenching of the O 3p 3PJ state on the determination of the spatial distribution of the atomic oxygen density in an APPJ operating in ambient air by TALIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; van Gessel, A. F. H.; van Grootel, S. C.; Bruggeman, P. J.

    2014-04-01

    The spatial profile of the absolute atomic oxygen density is obtained by two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) in an Ar+2% air cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) operating in ambient air. The varying air concentration in the jet effluent which contributes to the collisional quenching of the O 3p 3PJ state, pumped by the laser, strongly influences the recorded TALIF signal under the present experimental conditions. The spatially resolved air densities obtained from Raman scattering measurements have been reported in our previous work (van Gessel et al 2013 Appl. Phys. Lett. 103 064103). These densities allow us to calculate the spatially dependent collisional quenching rate for the O 3p 3PJ state and reconstruct the spatial O density profile from the recorded TALIF signal. Significant differences between the TALIF intensity profile and the actual O density profile for the investigated experimental conditions are found.

  15. Self-Assembled Fe-N-Doped Carbon Nanotube Aerogels with Single-Atom Catalyst Feature as High-Efficiency Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Chengzhou [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Fu, Shaofang [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Song, Junhua [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Shi, Qiurong [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Su, Dong [Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA; Engelhard, Mark H. [Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Li, Xiaolin [Energy and Environmental Directory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Xiao, Dongdong [Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Li, Dongsheng [Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Estevez, Luis [Energy and Environmental Directory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Du, Dan [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Lin, Yuehe [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA

    2017-02-06

    Finely controlled synthesis of high active and robust non-precious metal catalysts with excellent electrocatalytic efficiency towards oxygen reduction reaction is extremely vital for successful implementation of fuel cells and metal batteries. Unprecedented oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalytic performances and the diversified synthetic procedure in term of favorable structure/morphology characteristics make transition metals-derived M–N–C (M=Fe, Co) structures the most promising nanocatalysts. Herein, using the nitrogen-containing small molecular and inorganic salt as precursors and ultrathin tellurium nanowires as templates, we successfully synthesized a series of well-defined M-N-doped hollow carbon nanowire aerogels through one step hydrothermal route and subsequent facile annealing treatment. Taking advantage of the porous nanostructures, one-dimensional building block as well as homogeneity of active sites, the resultant Fe-N-doped carbon hollow nanowire aerogels exhibited excellent ORR electrocatalytic performance even better than commercial Pt/C in alkaline solution, holding great potential in fuel cell applications.

  16. Ground-based measurements of aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing in North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongbin Chen; Xiangao Xia; Pucai Wang; Wenxing Zhang

    2007-01-01

    In order to gain an insight into the aerosol properties and their climatic effect over the continental source regions of China, it is of significance to carry out long-term ground-based measurements of aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing. A couple of temporary and permanent Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites and three comprehensive radiative sites were established in China as a result of international cooperation in recent years. Heavy aerosol loading and significant temporal and spatial variation over North China are revealed by the AERONET data.Aerosol-induced reductions in surface radiation budget are examined on the basis of collocated observations by sun photometers and pyranometers.

  17. Estimation of above ground biomass in boreal forest using ground-based Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheriazad, L.; Moghadas, H.; Sanchez-Azofeifa, A.

    2017-05-01

    Assessing above ground biomass of forest is important for carbon storage monitoring in boreal forest. In this study, a new model is developed to estimate the above ground biomass using ground based Lidar data. 21 trees were measured and scanned across the plot area study in boreal forests of Alberta, Canada. The study area was scanned in the summer season 2014 to quantify the green biomass. The average of total crown biomass and green biomass in this study was 377 kg (standard deviation, S.D. = 243 kg) and 6.42 kg (S.D. = 2.69 m), respectively.

  18. Synergetic ground-based methods for remote measurements of ozone vertical profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeyev, Yuriy; Kostsov, Vladimir; Virolainen, Yana

    2013-05-01

    The technique of combining ground-based measurements in infrared and microwave spectral regions in order to achieve higher accuracy of ozone profile retrieval in extensive altitude ranges is described and analyzed. The information content, errors, altitude ranges and vertical resolution of ozone profile retrieval have been studied on the basis of numerical simulation of synergetic experiments. Optimal conditions of measurements are defined and requirements to additional information are formulated. The first results on ozone vertical profile retrieval using groundbased measurements of FTIR-spectrometer and microwave radiometer are given.

  19. Solar diameter, eclipses and transits: the importance of ground-based observations

    CERN Document Server

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2012-01-01

    According to satellite measurements the difference between polar and equatorial radius does not exceed 10 milliarcsec. These measurements are differential, and the absolute value of the solar diameter is not precisely known to a level of accuracy needed for finding variations during years or decades. Moreover the lifetime of a satellite is limited, and its calibration is not stable. This shows the need to continue ground-based observations of the Sun exploiting in particular the methods less affected by atmospheric turbulence, as the planetary transits and the total and annular eclipses. The state of art, the advantages and the limits of these two methods are here considered.

  20. Asteroseismology of Solar-type stars with Kepler III. Ground-based Data

    CERN Document Server

    Molenda-Zakowicz, Joanna; Sousa, Sergio; Frasca, Antonio; Biazzo, Katia; Huber, Daniel; Ireland, Mike; Bedding, Tim; Stello, Dennis; Uytterhoeven, Katrien; Dreizler, Stefan; De Cat, Peter; Briquet, Maryline; Catanzaro, Giovanni; Karoff, Chistoffer; Frandsen, Soeren; Spezzi, Loredana; Catala, Claude

    2010-01-01

    We report on the ground-based follow-up program of spectroscopic and photometric observations of solar-like asteroseismic targets for the Kepler space mission. These stars constitute a large group of more than thousand objects which are the subject of an intensive study of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium Working Group 1 (KASC WG-1). The main goal of this coordinated research is the determination of the fundamental stellar atmospheric parameters, which are used for the computing of their asteroseismic models, as well as for the verification of the Kepler Input Catalogue (KIC).

  1. Boost-Phase ballistic missile trajectory estimation with ground based radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Yuyan; Huang Peikang

    2006-01-01

    A conditional boost-phase trajectory estimation method based on ballistic missile (BM) information database and classification is developed to estimate and predict boos-phase BM trajectory. The main uncertain factors to describe BM dynamics equation are reduced to the control law of trajectory pitch angle in boost-phase. After the BM mass at the beginning of estimation, the BM attack angle and the modification of engine thrust denoting BM acceleration are modeled reasonably, the boost-phase BM trajectory estimation with ground based radar is well realized. The validity of this estimation method is testified by computer simulation with a typical example.

  2. Integrated interpretation of helicopter and ground-based geophysical data recorded within the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podgorski, Joel E.; Green, Alan G.; Kalscheuer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    ) data recorded across most of the delta, (ii) 2D models and images derived from ground-based electrical resistance tomographic, transient electromagnetic, and high resolution seismic reflection/refraction tomographic data acquired at four selected sites in western and north-central regions of the delta...... resistivities and very low to low P-wave velocities. Except for images of several buried abandoned river channels, it is non-reflective. The laterally extensive underlying unit of low resistivities, low P-wave velocity, and subhorizontal reflectors very likely contains saline-water-saturated sands and clays...... reflectivity. The interface between the POM unit and basement is a prominent seismic reflector....

  3. Hypergravity Facilities in the ESA Ground-Based Facility Program - Current Research Activities and Future Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frett, Timo; Petrat, Guido; W. A. van Loon, Jack J.; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Anken, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Research on Artificial Gravity (AG) created by linear acceleration or centrifugation has a long history and could significantly contribute to realize long-term human spaceflight in the future. Employing centrifuges plays a prominent role in human physiology and gravitational biology. This article gives a short review about the background of Artificial Gravity with respect to hypergravity (including partial gravity) and provides information about actual ESA ground-based facilities for research on a variety of biosystems such as cells, plants, animals or, particularly, humans.

  4. Images of Neptune's ring arcs obtained by a ground-based telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicardy, B.; Roddier, F.; Roddier, C.; Perozzi, E.; Graves, J. E.; Guyon, O.; Northcott, M. J.

    1999-08-01

    Neptune has a collection of incomplete narrow rings, known as ring arcs, which should in isolation be destroyed by differential motion in a matter of months. Yet since first discovered by stellar occultations in 1984, they appear to have persisted, perhaps through a gravitational resonance effect involving the satellite Galatea. Here we report ground-based observations of the ring arcs, obtained using an adaptive optics system. Our data, and those obtained using the Hubble Space Telescope (reported in a companion paper), indicate that the ring arcs are near, but not within the resonance with Galatea, in contrast to what is predicted by some models.

  5. SCENARIO AND TARGET SIMULATION FOR A GROUND BASED MULTIFUNCTION PHASED ARRAY RADAR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a scenario and target simulation which operates in non real-time to provide full closed-loop operation of the ground based multifunction phased array radar simulation system in support of ballistic missile defence experiments against countermeasure.By simulating the target scattering signature and dynamical signature,this scenario and target simulation provide re- alistic scenario source to evaluate the system performance of multifunction phased array radar,and the key algorithms verification and validation such as target tracking,multi-target imaging and target recognition.

  6. Improved ground-based FTS measurement for column abundance CO2 retrievals(Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Tae-Young

    2016-10-01

    The National Institute of Meteorological Sciences has operated a ground-based Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) at Anmyeondo, Korea since December 2012. Anmyeondo FTS site is a designated operational station of Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) and belongs to regional Global Atmosphere Watch observatory. A Bruker IFS-125HR model, which has a significantly high spectral resolution by 0.02 cm-1, is employed and instrument specification is almost same as the TCCON configuration. such as a spectrum range of 3,800 16,000 cm-1, a resolution of 1 cm-1, InGaAs and Si-Diode detectors and CaF2 beam splitter. It is found that measured spectra have a good agreement with simulated spectra. In order to improve the spectral accuracy and stability, The Operational Automatic System for Intensity of Sunray (OASIS) has been developed. The OASIS can provide consistent photon energy optimized to detector range by controlling the diameter of solar beam reflected from the mirror of suntracker. As a result, monthly modulation efficiency (ME), which indicates the spectral accuracy of FTS measurement, has been recorded the vicinity of 99.9% since Feb 2015. The ME of 98% is regarded as the error of 0.1% in the ground-based in-situ CO2 measurement. Total column abundances of CO2 and CH4 during 2015 are estimated by using GGG v14 and compared with ground-based in-situ CO2 and CH4 measurements at the height of 86 m above sea level. The seasonality of CO2 is well captured by both FTS and in-situ measurements while there is considerable difference on the amplitude of CO2 seasonal variation due to the insensitivity of column CO2 to the surface carbon cycle dynamics in nature as well as anthropogenic sources. Total column CO2 and CH4 approximately vary from 395 ppm to 405 ppm and from 1.82 ppm to 1.88 ppm, respectively. It should be noted that few measurements obtained in July to August because of a lot of cloud and fog. It is found that enhancement of CH4 from the FTS at Anmyeondo

  7. The laser calibration system for the STACEE ground-based gamma ray detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hanna, D

    2002-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the laser system used for calibration monitoring of components of the STACEE detector. STACEE is a ground based gamma ray detector which uses the heliostats of a solar power facility to collect and focus Cherenkov light onto a system of secondary optics and photomultiplier tubes. To monitor the gain and check the linearity and timing properties of the phototubes and associated electronics, a system based on a dye laser, neutral density filters and optical fibres has been developed. In this paper we describe the system and present some results from initial tests made with it.

  8. Ground-Based Gas-Liquid Flow Research in Microgravity Conditions: State of Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillen, J.; Colin, C.; Fabre, J.

    1999-01-01

    During the last decade, ground-based microgravity facilities have been utilized in order to obtain predictions for spacecraft system designers and further the fundamental understanding of two-phase flow. Although flow regime, pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient data has been obtained for straight tubes and a limited number of fittings, measurements of the void fraction, film thickness, wall shear stress, local velocity and void information are also required in order to develop general mechanistic models that can be utilized to ascertain the effects of fluid properties, tube geometry and acceleration levels. A review of this research is presented and includes both empirical data and mechanistic models of the flow behavior.

  9. Ground-based and spaceborn observations of the type II burst with developed fine structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorovskyy, V.; Melnik, V.; Konovalenko, A.; Brazhenko, A.; Rucker, H.; Stanislavskyy, A.; Panchenko, M.

    2012-09-01

    The combination of two huge ground-based radio telescopes (UTR-2 and URAN-2) operated in decameter wavelengths with three spatially separated spacecrafts (SOHO, STEREO-A and STEREO-B) equipped with white light coronagraphs, UV telescopes and decameter-hectometer band radio telescopes created a unique opportunity to investigate the high energy solar transients, such as CMEs and their manifestations in radio bands - type II bursts. In this paper we made detailed analysis of the powerful and complex event occurred on 7 June 2011 consisted of Halo-CME and type II burst with rich fine structure.

  10. Advanced ground-based gravitational-wave detectors' potential to detect generic deviations from general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Narikawa, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the potential of the advanced ground-based gravitational-wave detectors, such as LIGO, Virgo, and KAGRA, to detect generic deviations of gravitational waveforms from the prediction of General Relativity. We use the parameterized post-Einsteinian formalism to characterize the deviations, and assess how much magnitude of the deviations are detectable by using an approximate decision scheme based on Bayesian statistics. We find that there exist detectable regions of the parameterized post-Einsteinian parameters by using a single gravitational wave event. The regions are not excluded by currently existing binary pulsar observations for the parameterized post-Einsteinian parameters at higher post-Newtonian order.

  11. Oxygen Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxygen therapy is a treatment that provides you with extra oxygen. Oxygen is a gas that your body needs to function. Normally, your lungs absorb oxygen from the air you breathe. But some conditions ...

  12. Elevated aerosol layers modify the O2–O2 absorption measured by ground-based MAX-DOAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Ivan; Berg, Larry K.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Volkamer, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    The oxygen collisional complex (O2-O2, or O4) is a greenhouse gas, and a calibration trace gas used to infer aerosol and cloud properties by Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). Recent reports suggest the need for an O4 correction factor (CFO4) when comparing simulated and measured O4 differential slant column densities (dSCD) by passive DOAS. We investigate the sensitivity of O4 dSCD simulations at ultraviolet (360 nm) and visible (477 nm) wavelengths towards separately measured aerosol extinction profiles. Measurements were conducted by the University of Colorado 2D-MAX-DOAS instrument and NASA’s multispectral High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2) during the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) at Cape Cod, MA in July 2012. During two case study days with (1) high aerosol load (17 July, AOD ~ 0.35 at 477 nm), and (2) near molecular scattering conditions (22 July, AOD < 0.10 at 477 nm) the measured and calculated O4 dSCDs agreed within 6.4±0.4% (360 nm) and 4.7±0.6% (477 nm) if the HSRL-2 profiles were used as input to the calculations. However, if in the calculations the aerosol is confined to the surface layer (while keeping AOD constant) we find 0.53ground-based MAX-DOAS. Opportunities to identify and better characterize these layers are also discussed.

  13. Elevated aerosol layers modify the O2–O2 absorption measured by ground-based MAX-DOAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Ivan; Berg, Larry K.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Volkamer, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    The oxygen collisional complex (O2-O2, or O4) is a greenhouse gas, and a calibration trace gas used to infer aerosol and cloud properties by Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). Recent reports suggest the need for an O4 correction factor (CFO4) when comparing simulated and measured O4 differential slant column densities (dSCD) by passive DOAS. We investigate the sensitivity of O4 dSCD simulations at ultraviolet (360 nm) and visible (477 nm) wavelengths towards separately measured aerosol extinction profiles. Measurements were conducted by the University of Colorado 2D-MAX-DOAS instrument and NASA’s multispectral High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2) during the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) at Cape Cod, MA in July 2012. During two case study days with (1) high aerosol load (17 July, AOD ~ 0.35 at 477 nm), and (2) near molecular scattering conditions (22 July, AOD < 0.10 at 477 nm) the measured and calculated O4 dSCDs agreed within 6.4±0.4% (360 nm) and 4.7±0.6% (477 nm) if the HSRL-2 profiles were used as input to the calculations. However, if in the calculations the aerosol is confined to the surface layer (while keeping AOD constant) we find 0.53ground-based MAX-DOAS. Opportunities to identify and better characterize these layers are also discussed.

  14. Exploring the relationship between monitored ground-based and satellite aerosol measurements over the City of Johannesburg

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Garland, Rebecca M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This project studied the relationship between aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on the Terra satellite, and ground-based monitored particulate matter (PM) mass concentrations measured...

  15. Binding to Redox-Inactive Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metal Ions Strongly Deactivates the C-H Bonds of Tertiary Amides toward Hydrogen Atom Transfer to Reactive Oxygen Centered Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Michela; Carboni, Giulia; Mangiacapra, Livia; Bietti, Massimo

    2015-09-18

    The effect of alkali and alkaline earth metal ions on the reactions of the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) with N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA) was studied by laser flash photolysis. In acetonitrile, a >2 order of magnitude decrease in the rate constant for hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) from the C-H bonds of these substrates (kH) was measured after addition of Li(+). This behavior was explained in terms of a strong interaction between Li(+) and the oxygen atom of both DMF and DMA that increases the extent of positive charge on the amide, leading to C-H bond deactivation toward HAT to the electrophilic radical CumO(•). Similar effects were observed after addition of Ca(2+), which was shown to strongly bind up to four equivalents of the amide substrates. With Mg(2+), weak C-H deactivation was observed for the first two substrate equivalents followed by stronger deactivation for two additional equivalents. No C-H deactivation was observed in DMSO after addition of Li(+) and Mg(2+). These results point toward the important role played by metal ion Lewis acidity and solvent Lewis basicity, indicating that C-H deactivation can be modulated by varying the nature of the metal cation and solvent and allowing for careful control over the HAT reactivity of amide substrates.

  16. Magnetism, spin texture and in-gap states. Atomic specialization at the surface of oxygen-deficient SrTiO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeschke, Harald O.; Altmeyer, Michaela; Valenti, Roser [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Rozenberg, Marcelo; Gabay, Marc [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Bat 510, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the electronic structure and spin texture at the (001) surface of SrTiO{sub 3} in the presence of oxygen vacancies by means of ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations of slabs. Relativistic non-magnetic DFT calculations exhibit Rashba-like spin winding with a characteristic energy scale ∝ 10 meV. However, when surface magnetism on the Ti ions is included, bands become spin-split with an energy difference ∝ 100 meV at the Γ point. This energy scale is comparable to the observations in SARPES experiments performed on the two-dimensional electronic states confined near the (001) surface of SrTiO{sub 3}. We find the spin polarized state to be the ground state of the system, and while magnetism tends to suppress the effects of the relativistic Rashba interaction, signatures of it are still clearly visible in terms of complex spin textures.

  17. A Process Model for Deployment Planning of Ground-based Air Defense System Against Asymmetric Homeland Threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    A Process Model for Deployment Planning of Ground-based Air Defense System Against Asymmetric Homeland Threat Ronald L. Cypert Scientific...units, along with coordination at the state and federal agency level, a dynamic process modeling capability was chosen to chart the myriad...COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Process Model for Deployment Planning of Ground-based Air Defense System Against

  18. Development of a Ground-Based Atmospheric Monitoring Network for the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sprovieri F.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Consistent, high-quality measurements of atmospheric mercury (Hg are necessary in order to better understand Hg emissions, transport, and deposition on a global scale. Although the number of atmospheric Hg monitoring stations has increased in recent years, the available measurement database is limited and there are many regions of the world where measurements have not been extensively performed. Long-term atmospheric Hg monitoring and additional ground-based monitoring sites are needed in order to generate datasets that will offer new insight and information about the global scale trends of atmospheric Hg emissions and deposition. In the framework of the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS project, a coordinated global observational network for atmospheric Hg is being established. The overall research strategy of GMOS is to develop a state-of-the-art observation system able to provide information on the concentration of Hg species in ambient air and precipitation on the global scale. This network is being developed by integrating previously established ground-based atmospheric Hg monitoring stations with newly established GMOS sites that are located both at high altitude and sea level locations, as well as in climatically diverse regions. Through the collection of consistent, high-quality atmospheric Hg measurement data, we seek to create a comprehensive assessment of atmospheric Hg concentrations and their dependence on meteorology, long-range atmospheric transport and atmospheric emissions.

  19. Potential use of ground-based sensor technologies for weed detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteinatos, Gerassimos G; Weis, Martin; Andújar, Dionisio; Rueda Ayala, Victor; Gerhards, Roland

    2014-02-01

    Site-specific weed management is the part of precision agriculture (PA) that tries to effectively control weed infestations with the least economical and environmental burdens. This can be achieved with the aid of ground-based or near-range sensors in combination with decision rules and precise application technologies. Near-range sensor technologies, developed for mounting on a vehicle, have been emerging for PA applications during the last three decades. These technologies focus on identifying plants and measuring their physiological status with the aid of their spectral and morphological characteristics. Cameras, spectrometers, fluorometers and distance sensors are the most prominent sensors for PA applications. The objective of this article is to describe-ground based sensors that have the potential to be used for weed detection and measurement of weed infestation level. An overview of current sensor systems is presented, describing their concepts, results that have been achieved, already utilized commercial systems and problems that persist. A perspective for the development of these sensors is given. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Ground-based observation of emission lines from the corona of a red-dwarf star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, J H; Wichmann, R

    2001-08-02

    All 'solar-like' stars are surrounded by coronae, which contain magnetically confined plasma at temperatures above 106 K. (Until now, only the Sun's corona could be observed in the optical-as a shimmering envelope during a total solar eclipse.) As the underlying stellar 'surfaces'-the photospheres-are much cooler, some non-radiative process must be responsible for heating the coronae. The heating mechanism is generally thought to be magnetic in origin, but is not yet understood even for the case of the Sun. Ultraviolet emission lines first led to the discovery of the enormous temperature of the Sun's corona, but thermal emission from the coronae of other stars has hitherto been detectable only from space, at X-ray wavelengths. Here we report the detection of emission from highly ionized iron (Fe XIII at 3,388.1 A) in the corona of the red-dwarf star CN Leonis, using a ground-based telescope. The X-ray flux inferred from our data is consistent with previously measured X-ray fluxes, and the non-thermal line width of 18.4 km s-1 indicates great similarities between solar and stellar coronal heating mechanisms. The accessibility and spectral resolution (45,000) of the ground-based instrument are much better than those of X-ray satellites, so a new window to the study of stellar coronae has been opened.