WorldWideScience

Sample records for ground validation program

  1. Climatological Processing and Product Development for the TRMM Ground Validation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, D. A.; Kulie, M. S.; Robinson, M.; Silberstein, D. S.; Wolff, D. B.; Ferrier, B. S.; Amitai, E.; Fisher, B.; Wang, J.; Augustine, D.; Thiele, O.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite was successfully launched in November 1997.The main purpose of TRMM is to sample tropical rainfall using the first active spaceborne precipitation radar. To validate TRMM satellite observations, a comprehensive Ground Validation (GV) Program has been implemented. The primary goal of TRMM GV is to provide basic validation of satellite-derived precipitation measurements over monthly climatologies for the following primary sites: Melbourne, FL; Houston, TX; Darwin, Australia- and Kwajalein Atoll, RMI As part of the TRMM GV effort, research analysts at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) generate standardized rainfall products using quality-controlled ground-based radar data from the four primary GV sites. This presentation will provide an overview of TRMM GV climatological processing and product generation. A description of the data flow between the primary GV sites, NASA GSFC, and the TRMM Science and Data Information System (TSDIS) will be presented. The radar quality control algorithm, which features eight adjustable height and reflectivity parameters, and its effect on monthly rainfall maps, will be described. The methodology used to create monthly, gauge-adjusted rainfall products for each primary site will also be summarized. The standardized monthly rainfall products are developed in discrete, modular steps with distinct intermediate products. A summary of recently reprocessed official GV rainfall products available for TRMM science users will be presented. Updated basic standardized product results involving monthly accumulation, Z-R relationship, and gauge statistics for each primary GV site will also be displayed.

  2. LLNL Calibration Program: Data Collection, Ground Truth Validation, and Regional Coda Magnitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, S C; Mayeda, K; Walter, C; Schultz, C; O' Boyle, J; Hofstetter, A; Rodgers, A; Ruppert, S

    2001-08-28

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) integrates and collects data for use in calibration of seismic detection, location, and identification. Calibration data is collected by (1) numerous seismic field efforts, many conducted under NNSA (ROA) and DTRA (PRDA) contracts, and (2) permanent seismic stations that are operated by national and international organizations. Local-network operators and international organizations (e.g. International Seismic Center) provide location and other source characterization (collectively referred to as source parameters) to LLNL, or LLNL determines these parameters from raw data. For each seismic event, LLNL rigorously characterizes the uncertainty of source parameters. This validation process is used to identify events whose source parameters are accurate enough for use in calibration. LLNL has developed criteria for determining the accuracy of seismic locations and methods to characterize the covariance of calibration datasets. Although the most desirable calibration events are chemical and nuclear explosions with highly accurate locations and origin times, catalogues of naturally occurring earthquakes offer needed geographic coverage that is not provided by man made sources. The issue in using seismically determined locations for calibration is validating the location accuracy. Sweeney (1998) presented a 50/90 teleseismic, network-coverage criterion (50 defining phases and 90{sup o} maximum azimuthal gap) that generally results in 15-km maximum epicenter error. We have also conducted tests of recently proposed local/regional criteria and found that 10-km accuracy can be achieved by applying a 20/90 criteria. We continue to conduct tests that may validate less stringent criteria (which will produce more calibration events) while maintaining desirable location accuracy. Lastly, we examine methods of characterizing the covariance structure of calibration datasets. Each dataset is likely to be effected by distinct error

  3. LLNL Calibration Program: Data Collection, Ground Truth Validation, and Regional Coda Magnitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, S C; Mayeda, K; Walter, C; Schultz, C; O' Boyle, J; Hofstetter, A; Rodgers, A; Ruppert, S

    2001-08-28

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) integrates and collects data for use in calibration of seismic detection, location, and identification. Calibration data is collected by (1) numerous seismic field efforts, many conducted under NNSA (ROA) and DTRA (PRDA) contracts, and (2) permanent seismic stations that are operated by national and international organizations. Local-network operators and international organizations (e.g. International Seismic Center) provide location and other source characterization (collectively referred to as source parameters) to LLNL, or LLNL determines these parameters from raw data. For each seismic event, LLNL rigorously characterizes the uncertainty of source parameters. This validation process is used to identify events whose source parameters are accurate enough for use in calibration. LLNL has developed criteria for determining the accuracy of seismic locations and methods to characterize the covariance of calibration datasets. Although the most desirable calibration events are chemical and nuclear explosions with highly accurate locations and origin times, catalogues of naturally occurring earthquakes offer needed geographic coverage that is not provided by man made sources. The issue in using seismically determined locations for calibration is validating the location accuracy. Sweeney (1998) presented a 50/90 teleseismic, network-coverage criterion (50 defining phases and 90{sup o} maximum azimuthal gap) that generally results in 15-km maximum epicenter error. We have also conducted tests of recently proposed local/regional criteria and found that 10-km accuracy can be achieved by applying a 20/90 criteria. We continue to conduct tests that may validate less stringent criteria (which will produce more calibration events) while maintaining desirable location accuracy. Lastly, we examine methods of characterizing the covariance structure of calibration datasets. Each dataset is likely to be effected by distinct error

  4. The Validity of Divergent Grounded Theory Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Nils Amsteus PhD

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to assess whether divergence of grounded theory method may be considered valid. A review of literature provides a basis for understanding and evaluating grounded theory. The principles and nature of grounded theory are synthesized along with theoretical and practical implications. It is deduced that for a theory to be truly grounded in empirical data, the method resulting in the theory should be the equivalent of pure induction. Therefore, detailed, specified, stepwise a priori procedures may be seen as unbidden or arbitrary. It is concluded that divergent grounded theory can be considered valid. The author argues that securing methodological transparency through the description of the actual principles and procedures employed, as well as tailoring them to the particular circumstances, is more important than adhering to predetermined stepwise procedures. A theoretical foundation is provided from which diverse theoretical developments and methodological procedures may be developed, judged, and refined based on their own merits.

  5. Ground-water models: Validate or invalidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredehoeft, J.D.; Konikow, L.F.

    1993-01-01

    The word validation has a clear meaning to both the scientific community and the general public. Within the scientific community the validation of scientific theory has been the subject of philosophical debate. The philosopher of science, Karl Popper, argued that scientific theory cannot be validated, only invalidated. Popper’s view is not the only opinion in this debate; however, many scientists today agree with Popper (including the authors). To the general public, proclaiming that a ground-water model is validated carries with it an aura of correctness that we do not believe many of us who model would claim. We can place all the caveats we wish, but the public has its own understanding of what the word implies. Using the word valid with respect to models misleads the public; verification carries with it similar connotations as far as the public is concerned. Our point is this: using the terms validation and verification are misleading, at best. These terms should be abandoned by the ground-water community.

  6. Precipitation Ground Validation over the Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepp, C.; Bakan, S.

    2012-04-01

    State-of-the-art satellite derived and reanalysis based precipitation climatologies show remarkably large differences in detection, amount, variability and temporal behavior of precipitation over the oceans. The uncertainties are largest for light precipitation within the ITCZ and for cold season high-latitude precipitation including snowfall. Our HOAPS (Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite data, www.hoaps.org) precipitation retrieval exhibits fairly high accuracy in such regions compared to our ground validation data. However, the statistical basis for a conclusive validation has to be significantly improved with comprehensive ground validation efforts. However, existing in-situ instruments are not designed for precipitation measurements under high wind speeds on moving ships. To largely improve the ground validation data basis of precipitation over the oceans, especially for snow, the systematic data collection effort of the Initiative Pro Klima funded project at the KlimaCampus Hamburg uses automated shipboard optical disdrometers, called ODM470 that are capable of measuring liquid and solid precipitation on moving ships with high accuracy. The main goal of this project is to constrain the precipitation retrievals for HOAPS and the new Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) satellite constellation. Currently, three instruments are long-term mounted on the German research icebreaker R/V Polarstern (Alfred Wegner Institut) since June 2010, on R/V Akademik Ioffe (P.P.Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, RAS, Moscow, Russia) since September 2010 and on R/V Maria S. Merian (Brise Research, University of Hamburg) since December 2011. Three more instruments will follow shortly on further ships. The core regions for these long-term precipitation measurements comprise the Arctic Ocean, the Nordic Seas, the Labrador Sea, the subtropical Atlantic trade wind regions, the Caribbean, the ITCZ, and the Southern Oceans as far south to Antarctica. This

  7. Nordic Seas Precipitation Ground Validation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepp, Christian; Bumke, Karl; Bakan, Stephan; Andersson, Axel

    2010-05-01

    A thorough knowledge of global ocean precipitation is an indispensable prerequisite for the understanding of the water cycle in the global climate system. However, reliable detection of precipitation over the global oceans, especially of solid precipitation, remains a challenging task. This is true for both, passive microwave remote sensing and reanalysis based model estimates. The satellite based HOAPS (Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data) climatology contains fields of precipitation, evaporation and the resulting freshwater flux along with 12 additional atmospheric parameters over the global ice-free ocean between 1987 and 2005. Except for the NOAA Pathfinder SST, all basic state variables are calculated from SSM/I passive microwave radiometer measurements. HOAPS contains three main data subsets that originate from one common pixel-level data source. Gridded 0.5 degree monthly, pentad and twice daily data products are freely available from www.hoaps.org. The optical disdrometer ODM 470 is a ground validation instrument capable of measuring rain and snowfall on ships even under high wind speeds. It was used for the first time over the Nordic Seas during the LOFZY 2005 campaign. A dichotomous verification for these snowfall events resulted in a perfect score between the disdrometer, a precipitation detector and a shipboard observer's log. The disdrometer data is further point-to-area collocated against precipitation from three satellite derived climatologies, HOAPS-3, the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) one degree daily (1DD) data set, and the Goddard Profiling algorithm, version 2004 (GPROF 2004). Only the HOAPS precipitation turns out to be overall consistent with the disdrometer data resulting in an accuracy of 0.96. The collocated data comprises light precipitation events below 1 mm/h. Therefore two LOFZY case studies with high precipitation rates are presented that still indicate plausible results. Overall, this

  8. Ground-Water Protection and Monitoring Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dresel, P.E.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the ground-water protection and monitoring program strategy for the Hanford Site in 1994. Two of the key elements of this strategy are to (1) protect the unconfined aquifer from further contamination, and (2) conduct a monitoring program to provide early warning when contamination of ground water does occur. The monitoring program at Hanford is designed to document the distribution and movement of existing ground-water contamination and provides a historical baseline for evaluating current and future risk from exposure to the contamination and for deciding on remedial action options.

  9. Evolution of the JPSS Ground Project Calibration and Validation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, G.; Jain, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) is the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) next-generation operational Earth observation Program that acquires and distributes global environmental data from multiple polar-orbiting satellites. The JPSS Program plays a critical role to NOAA's mission to understand and predict changes in weather, climate, oceans, and coasts environments, which supports the nation's economy and protects lives and property. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is acquiring and implementing the JPSS, comprised of flight and ground systems on behalf of NOAA. The JPSS satellites are planned to fly in afternoon orbit and will provide operational continuity of satellite-based observations and products for NOAA Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) and the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite. Government Resource for Algorithm Verification, Independent Test, and Evaluation (GRAVITE) system is a NOAA system developed and deployed by JPSS Ground Project to support Calibration and Validation (Cal/Val), Algorithm Integration, Investigation, and Tuning, and Data Quality Monitoring. It is a mature, deployed system that supports SNPP mission and has been in operations since SNPP launch. This paper discusses the major re-architecture for Block 2.0 that incorporates SNPP lessons learned, architecture of the system, and demonstrates how GRAVITE has evolved as a system with increased performance. It is a robust, reliable, maintainable, scalable, and secure system that supports development, test, and production strings, replaces proprietary and custom software, uses open source software, and is compliant with NASA and NOAA standards. "[Pending NASA Goddard Applied Engineering & Technology Directorate (AETD) Approval]"

  10. Subscale Validation of the Subsurface Active Filtration of Exhaust (SAFE) Approach to the NTP Ground Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, William M.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Bulman, Mel; Joyner, Russell; Martin, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) has been recognized as an enabling technology for missions to Mars and beyond. However, one of the key challenges of developing a nuclear thermal rocket is conducting verification and development tests on the ground. A number of ground test options are presented, with the Sub-surface Active Filtration of Exhaust (SAFE) method identified as a preferred path forward for the NTP program. The SAFE concept utilizes the natural soil characteristics present at the Nevada National Security Site to provide a natural filter for nuclear rocket exhaust during ground testing. A validation method of the SAFE concept is presented, utilizing a non-nuclear sub-scale hydrogen/oxygen rocket seeded with detectible radioisotopes. Additionally, some alternative ground test concepts, based upon the SAFE concept, are presented. Finally, an overview of the ongoing discussions of developing a ground test campaign are presented.

  11. Cross Validation of Spaceborne and Ground Polarimetric Radar Snowfall Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Y.; Hong, Y.; Cao, Q.; Kirstetter, P.; Gourley, J. J.; Zhang, J.

    2013-12-01

    Snow, as a primary contribution to regional or even global water budgets is of critical importance to our society. For large-scale weather monitoring and global climate studies, satellite-based snowfall observations with ground validations have become highly desirable. Ground-based polarimetric weather radar is the powerful validation tool that provides physical insight into the development and interpretation of spaceborne snowfall retrievals. This study aims to compare and resolve discrepancies in snowfall detection and estimation between Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) on board NASA's Cloudsat satellite and new polarimetric National Mosaic and Multi-sensor QPE (NMQ) system (Q3) developed by OU and NOAA/NSSL scientists. The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission with its core satellite scheduled for launch in 2014 will carry active and passive microwave instrumentation anticipated to detect and estimate snowfall or snowpack. This study will potentially serve as the basis for global validation of space-based snowfall products and also invite synergistic development of coordinated space-ground multisensor snowfall products.

  12. The potential of ground gravity measurements to validate GRACE data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Crossley

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available New satellite missions are returning high precision, time-varying, satellite measurements of the Earth’s gravity field. The GRACE mission is now in its calibration/- validation phase and first results of the gravity field solutions are imminent. We consider here the possibility of external validation using data from the superconducting gravimeters in the European sub-array of the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP as ‘ground truth’ for comparison with GRACE. This is a pilot study in which we use 14 months of 1-hour data from the beginning of GGP (1 July 1997 to 30 August 1998, when the Potsdam instrument was relocated to South Africa. There are 7 stations clustered in west central Europe, and one station, Metsahovi in Finland. We remove local tides, polar motion, local and global air pressure, and instrument drift and then decimate to 6-hour samples. We see large variations in the time series of 5–10µgal between even some neighboring stations, but there are also common features that correlate well over the 427-day period. The 8 stations are used to interpolate a minimum curvature (gridded surface that extends over the geographical region. This surface shows time and spatial coherency at the level of 2– 4µgal over the first half of the data and 1–2µgal over the latter half. The mean value of the surface clearly shows a rise in European gravity of about 3µgal over the first 150 days and a fairly constant value for the rest of the data. The accuracy of this mean is estimated at 1µgal, which compares favorably with GRACE predictions for wavelengths of 500 km or less. Preliminary studies of hydrology loading over Western Europe shows the difficulty of correlating the local hydrology, which can be highly variable, with large-scale gravity variations.Key words. GRACE, satellite gravity, superconducting gravimeter, GGP, ground truth

  13. GPM ground validation via commercial cellular networks: an exploratory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios Gaona, Manuel Felipe; Overeem, Aart; Leijnse, Hidde; Brasjen, Noud; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2016-04-01

    The suitability of commercial microwave link networks for ground validation of GPM (Global Precipitation Measurement) data is evaluated here. Two state-of-the-art rainfall products are compared over the land surface of the Netherlands for a period of 7 months, i.e., rainfall maps from commercial cellular communication networks and Integrated Multi-satellite Retrievals for GPM (IMERG). Commercial microwave link networks are nowadays the core component in telecommunications worldwide. Rainfall rates can be retrieved from measurements of attenuation between transmitting and receiving antennas. If adequately set up, these networks enable rainfall monitoring tens of meters above the ground at high spatiotemporal resolutions (temporal sampling of seconds to tens of minutes, and spatial sampling of hundreds of meters to tens of kilometers). The GPM mission is the successor of TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission). For two years now, IMERG offers rainfall estimates across the globe (180°W - 180°E and 60°N - 60°S) at spatiotemporal resolutions of 0.1° x 0.1° every 30 min. These two data sets are compared against a Dutch gauge-adjusted radar data set, considered to be the ground truth given its accuracy, spatiotemporal resolution and availability. The suitability of microwave link networks in satellite rainfall evaluation is of special interest, given the independent character of this technique, its high spatiotemporal resolutions and availability. These are valuable assets for water management and modeling of floods, landslides, and weather extremes; especially in places where rain gauge networks are scarce or poorly maintained, or where weather radar networks are too expensive to acquire and/or maintain.

  14. Numerical simulation and experimental validation of aircraft ground deicing model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Chen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft ground deicing plays an important role of guaranteeing the aircraft safety. In practice, most airports generally use as many deicing fluids as possible to remove the ice, which causes the waste of the deicing fluids and the pollution of the environment. Therefore, the model of aircraft ground deicing should be built to establish the foundation for the subsequent research, such as the optimization of the deicing fluid consumption. In this article, the heat balance of the deicing process is depicted, and the dynamic model of the deicing process is provided based on the analysis of the deicing mechanism. In the dynamic model, the surface temperature of the deicing fluids and the ice thickness are regarded as the state parameters, while the fluid flow rate, the initial temperature, and the injection time of the deicing fluids are treated as control parameters. Ignoring the heat exchange between the deicing fluids and the environment, the simplified model is obtained. The rationality of the simplified model is verified by the numerical simulation and the impacts of the flow rate, the initial temperature and the injection time on the deicing process are investigated. To verify the model, the semi-physical experiment system is established, consisting of the low-constant temperature test chamber, the ice simulation system, the deicing fluid heating and spraying system, the simulated wing, the test sensors, and the computer measure and control system. The actual test data verify the validity of the dynamic model and the accuracy of the simulation analysis.

  15. A refined computer program for the transient simulation of ground coupled heat pump systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, J. W.; Metz, P. D.; Saunders, J. H.

    1983-04-01

    The use of the earth as a heat source/sink or storage medium for various heat pump based space conditioning systems were investigated. A computer program ground coupled system (GROCS) was developed to model the behavior of ground coupling devices. The GROCS was integrated with TRNSYS, the solar system simulation program, to permit the simulation of complete ground coupled heat pump systems. Experimental results were compared to GROCS simulation results for model validation. It is found that the model has considerable validity. A refined version of the GROCS-TRNSYS program developed to model vertical or horizontal earth coil systems, which considers system cycling is described. The design of the program and its interaction with TRNSYS are discussed.

  16. Ground validation of DPR precipitation rate over Italy using H-SAF validation methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puca, Silvia; Petracca, Marco; Sebastianelli, Stefano; Vulpiani, Gianfranco

    2017-04-01

    The H-SAF project (Satellite Application Facility on support to Operational Hydrology and Water Management, funded by EUMETSAT) is aimed at retrieving key hydrological parameters such as precipitation, soil moisture and snow cover. Within the H-SAF consortium, the Product Precipitation Validation Group (PPVG) evaluate the accuracy of instantaneous and accumulated precipitation products with respect to ground radar and rain gauge data adopting the same methodology (using a Unique Common Code) throughout Europe. The adopted validation methodology can be summarized by the following few steps: (1) ground data (radar and rain gauge) quality control; (2) spatial interpolation of rain gauge measurements; (3) up-scaling of radar data to satellite native grid; (4) temporal comparison of satellite and ground-based precipitation products; and (5) production and evaluation of continuous and multi-categorical statistical scores for long time series and case studies. The statistical scores are evaluated taking into account the satellite product native grid. With the recent advent of the GPM era starting in march 2014, more new global precipitation products are available. The validation methodology developed in H-SAF can be easily applicable to different precipitation products. In this work, we have validated instantaneous precipitation data estimated from DPR (Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar) instrument onboard of the GPM-CO (Global Precipitation Measurement Core Observatory) satellite. In particular, we have analyzed the near surface and estimated precipitation fields collected in the 2A-Level for 3 different scans (NS, MS and HS). The Italian radar mosaic managed by the National Department of Civil Protection available operationally every 10 minutes is used as ground reference data. The results obtained highlight the capability of the DPR to identify properly the precipitation areas with higher accuracy in estimating the stratiform precipitation (especially for the HS). An

  17. Theoretical validation of ground-based microwave ozone observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ricaud

    Full Text Available Ground-based microwave measurements of the diurnal and seasonal variations of ozoneat 42±4.5 and 55±8 km are validated by comparing with results from a zero-dimensional photochemical model and a two-dimensional (2D chemical/radiative/dynamical model, respectively. O3 diurnal amplitudes measured in Bordeaux are shown to be in agreement with theory to within 5%. For the seasonal analysis of O3 variation, at 42±4.5 km, the 2D model underestimates the yearly averaged ozone concentration compared with the measurements. A double maximum oscillation (~3.5% is measured in Bordeaux with an extended maximum in September and a maximum in February, whilst the 2D model predicts only a single large maximum (17% in August and a pronounced minimum in January. Evidence suggests that dynamical transport causes the winter O3 maximum by propagation of planetary waves, phenomena which are not explicitly reproduced by the 2D model. At 55±8 km, the modeled yearly averaged O3 concentration is in very good agreement with the measured yearly average. A strong annual oscillation is both measured and modeled with differences in the amplitude shown to be exclusively linked to temperature fields.

  18. Validating global hydrological models by ground and space gravimetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU JiangCun; SUN HePing; XU JianQiao

    2009-01-01

    The long-term continuous gravity observations obtained by the superconducting gravimeters (SG) at seven globally-distributed stations are comprehensively analyzed. After removing the signals related to the Earth's tides and variations in the Earth's rotation, the gravity residuals are used to describe the seasonal fluctuations in gravity field. Meanwhile, the gravity changes due to the air pressure loading are theoretically modeled from the measurements of the local air pressure, and those due to land water and nontidal ocean loading are also calculated according to the corresponding numerical models. The numerical results show that the gravity changes due to both the air pressure and land water loading are as large as 100×10-9 m s-2 in magnitude, and about 10×10-9 m s-2 for those due to the nontidal ocean loading in the coastal area. On the other hand, the monthly-averaged gravity variations over the area surrounding the stations are derived from the spherical harmonic coefficients of the GRACE-recovered gravity fields, by using Gaussian smoothing technique in which the radius is set to be 600 km. Compared the land water induced gravity variations, the SG observations after removal of tides, polar motion effects, air pressure and nontidal ocean loading effects and the GRACE-derived gravity variations with each other, it is inferred that both the ground- and space-based gravity observations can effectively detect the seasonal gravity variations with a magnitude of 100×10-9 m s-2 induced by the land water loading. This implies that high precision gravimetry is an effective technique to validate the reliabilities of the hydrological models.

  19. Ground Radar and Guided Munitions: Increased Oversight and Cooperation Can Help Avoid Duplication among the Services’ Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    mandatory . GAO believes the recommendation remains valid as discussed in its report. DOD agreed with the second recommendation. What GAO Found...designation mandatory for all new ground radar programs. Hence, we still believe without this designation for all new ground radar programs, the JROC and...Obtaining Copies of GAO Reports and Testimony Order by Phone Connect with GAO To Report Fraud, Waste, and Abuse in Federal Programs Congressional Relations Public Affairs Please Print on Recycled Paper.

  20. Permanent-File-Validation Utility Computer Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Stephen D.

    1988-01-01

    Errors in files detected and corrected during operation. Permanent File Validation (PFVAL) utility computer program provides CDC CYBER NOS sites with mechanism to verify integrity of permanent file base. Locates and identifies permanent file errors in Mass Storage Table (MST) and Track Reservation Table (TRT), in permanent file catalog entries (PFC's) in permit sectors, and in disk sector linkage. All detected errors written to listing file and system and job day files. Program operates by reading system tables , catalog track, permit sectors, and disk linkage bytes to vaidate expected and actual file linkages. Used extensively to identify and locate errors in permanent files and enable online correction, reducing computer-system downtime.

  1. Multicultural Ground Teams in Space Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, M.

    2012-01-01

    In the early years of space flight only two countries had access to space. In the last twenty years, there have been major changes in how we conduct space business. With the fall of the iron curtain and the growing of the European Union, more and more players were able to join the space business and space science. By end of the last century, numerous countries, agencies and companies earned the right to be equal partners in space projects. This paper investigates the impact of multicultural teams in the space arena. Fortunately, in manned spaceflight, especially for long duration missions, there are several studies and simulations reporting on multicultural team impact. These data have not been as well explored on the team interactions within the ground crews. The focus of this paper are the teams working on the ISS project. Hypotheses will be drawn from the results of space crew research to determine parallels and differences for this vital segment of success in space missions. The key source of the data will be drawn from structured interviews with managers and other ground crews on the ISS project.

  2. Numerical simulation and experimental validation of aircraft ground deicing model

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Aircraft ground deicing plays an important role of guaranteeing the aircraft safety. In practice, most airports generally use as many deicing fluids as possible to remove the ice, which causes the waste of the deicing fluids and the pollution of the environment. Therefore, the model of aircraft ground deicing should be built to establish the foundation for the subsequent research, such as the optimization of the deicing fluid consumption. In this article, the heat balance of the deicing proce...

  3. Ship Grounding on Rock - II. Validation and Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    1997-01-01

    with errors less than 10%. The rock penetration to fracture is predictedwith errors of 10-15%. The sensitivity to uncertain input parameters is discussed. Analysis of an accidental grounding that was recorded in 1975, also shows that the theoretical model canreproduce the observed damage. Finally...

  4. Flight validation of ground-based assessment for control power requirements at high angles of attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Ross, Holly M.; Foster, John V.; Pahle, Joseph W.; Sternberg, Charles A.; Traven, Ricardo; Lackey, James B.; Abbott, Troy D.

    1994-01-01

    A review is presented in viewgraph format of an ongoing NASA/U.S. Navy study to determine control power requirements at high angles of attack for the next generation high-performance aircraft. This paper focuses on recent flight test activities using the NASA High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV), which are intended to validate results of previous ground-based simulation studies. The purpose of this study is discussed, and the overall program structure, approach, and objectives are described. Results from two areas of investigation are presented: (1) nose-down control power requirements and (2) lateral-directional control power requirements. Selected results which illustrate issues and challenges that are being addressed in the study are discussed including test methodology, comparisons between simulation and flight, and general lessons learned.

  5. Validating Microwave-Based Satellite Rain Rate Retrievals Over TRMM Ground Validation Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, B. L.; Wolff, D. B.

    2008-12-01

    Multi-channel, passive microwave instruments are commonly used today to probe the structure of rain systems and to estimate surface rainfall from space. Until the advent of meteorological satellites and the development of remote sensing techniques for measuring precipitation from space, there was no observational system capable of providing accurate estimates of surface precipitation on global scales. Since the early 1970s, microwave measurements from satellites have provided quantitative estimates of surface rainfall by observing the emission and scattering processes due to the existence of clouds and precipitation in the atmosphere. This study assesses the relative performance of microwave precipitation estimates from seven polar-orbiting satellites and the TRMM TMI using four years (2003-2006) of instantaneous radar rain estimates obtained from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Ground Validation (GV) sites at Kwajalein, Republic of the Marshall Islands (KWAJ) and Melbourne, Florida (MELB). The seven polar orbiters include three different sensor types: SSM/I (F13, F14 and F15), AMSU-B (N15, N16 and N17), and AMSR-E. The TMI aboard the TRMM satellite flies in a sun asynchronous orbit between 35 S and 35 N latitudes. The rain information from these satellites are combined and used to generate several multi-satellite rain products, namely the Goddard TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA), NOAA's CPC Morphing Technique (CMORPH) and Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks (PERSIANN). Instantaneous rain rates derived from each sensor were matched to the GV estimates in time and space at a resolution of 0.25 degrees. The study evaluates the measurement and error characteristics of the various satellite estimates through inter-comparisons with GV radar estimates. The GV rain observations provided an empirical ground-based reference for assessing the relative performance of each sensor and sensor

  6. Constellation Program Electrical Ground Support Equipment Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Keegan S.

    2010-01-01

    At the Kennedy Space Center, I engaged in the research and development of electrical ground support equipment for NASA's Constellation Program. Timing characteristics playa crucial role in ground support communications. Latency and jitter are two problems that must be understood so that communications are timely and consistent within the Kennedy Ground Control System (KGCS). I conducted latency and jitter tests using Alien-Bradley programmable logic controllers (PLCs) so that these two intrinsic network properties can be reduced. Time stamping and clock synchronization also play significant roles in launch processing and operations. Using RSLogix 5000 project files and Wireshark network protocol analyzing software, I verified master/slave PLC Ethernet module clock synchronization, master/slave IEEE 1588 communications, and time stamping capabilities. All of the timing and synchronization test results are useful in assessing the current KGCS operational level and determining improvements for the future.

  7. Overview of the solar dynamic ground test demonstration program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Boyle, Robert V.

    1993-01-01

    The Solar Dynamic (SD) Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) program demonstrates the availability of SD technologies in a simulated space environment at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) vacuum facility. An aerospace industry/ government team is working together to design, fabricate, build, and test a complete SD system. This paper reviews the goals and status of the SD GTD program. A description of the SD system includes key design features of the system, subsystems, and components as reported at the Critical Design Review (CDR).

  8. Validation of Aura OMI by Aircraft and Ground-Based Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPeters, R. D.; Petropavlovskikh, I.; Kroon, M.

    2006-12-01

    Both aircraft-based and ground-based measurements have been used to validate ozone measurements by the OMI instrument on Aura. Three Aura Validation Experiment (AVE) flights have been conducted, in November 2004 and June 2005 with the NASA WB57, and in January/February 2005 with the NASA DC-8. On these flights, validation of OMI was primarily done using data from the CAFS (CCD Actinic Flux Spectroradiometer) instrument, which is used to measure total column ozone above the aircraft. These measurements are used to differentiate changes in stratospheric ozone from changes in total column ozone. Also, changes in ozone over high clouds measured by OMI were checked in a flight over tropical storm Arlene on a flight on June 11th. Ground-based measurements were made during the SAUNA campaign in Sodankyla, Finland, in March and April 2006. Both total column ozone and the ozone vertical distribution were validated.

  9. Contrast validation test for retrieval method of high frequency ground wave radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hailong; GUO Peifang; HAN Shuzong; XIE Qiang; ZHOU Liangming

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, on the basis of the working principles of high frequency ground wave radar for retrieval of ocean wave and sea wind elements were used to systematically study the data obtained from contrast validation test in Zhoushan sea area of Zhejiang Province on Oct. 2000, to validate the accuracy of OSMAR2000for wave and wind parameters, and to analyze the possible error caused when using OSMAR2000 to retrieve ocean parameters.

  10. A Ground-Based Validation System of Teleoperation for a Space Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Xueqian Wang; Houde Liu; Wenfu Xu; Bin Liang; Yingchun Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Teleoperation of space robots is very important for future on‐orbit service. In order to assure the task is accomplished successfully, ground experiments are required to verify the function and validity of the teleoperation system before a space robot is launched. In this paper, a ground‐based validation subsystem is developed as a part of a teleoperation system. The subsystem is mainly composed of four parts: the input verification module, the onboard verification module, the dynamic and ima...

  11. NASA's mobile satellite communications program; ground and space segment technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, F.; Weber, W. J.; Knouse, G. H.

    1984-10-01

    This paper describes the Mobile Satellite Communications Program of the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The program's objectives are to facilitate the deployment of the first generation commercial mobile satellite by the private sector, and to technologically enable future generations by developing advanced and high risk ground and space segment technologies. These technologies are aimed at mitigating severe shortages of spectrum, orbital slot, and spacecraft EIRP which are expected to plague the high capacity mobile satellite systems of the future. After a brief introduction of the concept of mobile satellite systems and their expected evolution, this paper outlines the critical ground and space segment technologies. Next, the Mobile Satellite Experiment (MSAT-X) is described. MSAT-X is the framework through which NASA will develop advanced ground segment technologies. An approach is outlined for the development of conformal vehicle antennas, spectrum and power-efficient speech codecs, and modulation techniques for use in the non-linear faded channels and efficient multiple access schemes. Finally, the paper concludes with a description of the current and planned NASA activities aimed at developing complex large multibeam spacecraft antennas needed for future generation mobile satellite systems.

  12. NASA's mobile satellite communications program; ground and space segment technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, F.; Weber, W. J.; Knouse, G. H.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the Mobile Satellite Communications Program of the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The program's objectives are to facilitate the deployment of the first generation commercial mobile satellite by the private sector, and to technologically enable future generations by developing advanced and high risk ground and space segment technologies. These technologies are aimed at mitigating severe shortages of spectrum, orbital slot, and spacecraft EIRP which are expected to plague the high capacity mobile satellite systems of the future. After a brief introduction of the concept of mobile satellite systems and their expected evolution, this paper outlines the critical ground and space segment technologies. Next, the Mobile Satellite Experiment (MSAT-X) is described. MSAT-X is the framework through which NASA will develop advanced ground segment technologies. An approach is outlined for the development of conformal vehicle antennas, spectrum and power-efficient speech codecs, and modulation techniques for use in the non-linear faded channels and efficient multiple access schemes. Finally, the paper concludes with a description of the current and planned NASA activities aimed at developing complex large multibeam spacecraft antennas needed for future generation mobile satellite systems.

  13. Ground-source heat pump case studies and utility programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienau, P.J.; Boyd, T.L.; Rogers, R.L.

    1995-04-01

    Ground-source heat pump systems are one of the promising new energy technologies that has shown rapid increase in usage over the past ten years in the United States. These systems offer substantial benefits to consumers and utilities in energy (kWh) and demand (kW) savings. The purpose of this study was to determine what existing monitored data was available mainly from electric utilities on heat pump performance, energy savings and demand reduction for residential, school and commercial building applications. In order to verify the performance, information was collected for 253 case studies from mainly utilities throughout the United States. The case studies were compiled into a database. The database was organized into general information, system information, ground system information, system performance, and additional information. Information was developed on the status of demand-side management of ground-source heat pump programs for about 60 electric utility and rural electric cooperatives on marketing, incentive programs, barriers to market penetration, number units installed in service area, and benefits.

  14. Seismic Safety Program: Ground motion and structural response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    In 1964, John A. Blume & Associates Research Division (Blume) began a broad-range structural response program to assist the Nevada Operations Office of the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in ensuring the continued safe conduct of underground nuclear detonation testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and elsewhere. Blume`s long experience in earthquake engineering provided a general basis for the program, but much more specialized knowledge was required for the AEC`s purposes. Over the next 24 years Blume conducted a major research program to provide essential understanding of the detailed nature of the response of structures to dynamic loads such as those imposed by seismic wave propagation. The program`s results have been embodied in a prediction technology which has served to provide reliable advanced knowledge of the probable effects of seismic ground motion on all kinds of structures, for use in earthquake engineering and in building codes as well as for the continuing needs of the US Department of Energy`s Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV). This report is primarily an accounting of the Blume work, beginning with the setting in 1964 and the perception of the program needs as envisioned by Dr. John A. Blume. Subsequent chapters describe the structural response program in detail and the structural prediction procedures which resulted; the intensive data acquisition program which, as is discussed at some length, relied heavily on the contributions of other consultant-contractors in the DOE/NV Seismic Safety Support Program; laboratory and field studies to provide data on building elements and structures subjected to dynamic loads from sources ranging from testing machines to earthquakes; structural response activities undertaken for testing at the NTS and for off-NTS underground nuclear detonations; and concluding with an account of corollary studies including effects of natural forces and of related studies on building response.

  15. Specifications and programs for computer software validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, J. C.; Kleir, R.; Davis, T.; Henneman, M.; Haller, A.; Lasseter, G. L.

    1973-01-01

    Three software products developed during the study are reported and include: (1) FORTRAN Automatic Code Evaluation System, (2) the Specification Language System, and (3) the Array Index Validation System.

  16. Validation of Broadband Ground Motion Simulations for Japanese Crustal Earthquakes by the Recipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, A.; Maeda, T.; Morikawa, N.; Miyake, H.; Fujiwara, H.

    2015-12-01

    The Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion (HERP) of Japan has organized the broadband ground motion simulation method into a standard procedure called the "recipe" (HERP, 2009). In the recipe, the source rupture is represented by the characterized source model (Irikura and Miyake, 2011). The broadband ground motion time histories are computed by a hybrid approach: the 3-D finite-difference method (Aoi et al. 2004) and the stochastic Green's function method (Dan and Sato, 1998; Dan et al. 2000) for the long- (> 1 s) and short-period (structure model. As the engineering significance of scenario earthquake ground motion prediction is increasing, thorough verification and validation are required for the simulation methods. This study presents the self-validation of the recipe for two MW6.6 crustal events in Japan, the 2000 Tottori and 2004 Chuetsu (Niigata) earthquakes. We first compare the simulated velocity time series with the observation. Main features of the velocity waveforms, such as the near-fault pulses and the large later phases on deep sediment sites are well reproduced by the simulations. Then we evaluate 5% damped pseudo acceleration spectra (PSA) in the framework of the SCEC Broadband Platform (BBP) validation (Dreger et al. 2015). The validation results are generally acceptable in the period range 0.1 - 10 s, whereas those in the shortest period range (0.01-0.1 s) are less satisfactory. We also evaluate the simulations with the 1-D velocity structure models used in the SCEC BBP validation exercise. Although the goodness-of-fit parameters for PSA do not significantly differ from those for the 3-D velocity structure model, noticeable differences in velocity waveforms are observed. Our results suggest the importance of 1) well-constrained 3-D velocity structure model for broadband ground motion simulations and 2) evaluation of time series of ground motion as well as response spectra.

  17. Validation of a Poison Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Noel C.; Braden, Barbara T.

    Two way analyses of variance and cross-group descriptive comparisons assessed the effectiveness of the Siop Poison Prevention Program, which included an educational program and the use of warning labels, on improving verbal and visual discrimination of poisonous and nonpoisonous products for preschool children. The study sample consisted of 156…

  18. Isotope Brayton ground demonstration testing and flight qualification program. Volume 1. Technical program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-12-09

    A proposal for the demonstration, development and production of the Isotope Brayton Flight System for space vehicles is presented with details on the technical requirements for designing and testing a ground demonstration system and on the program organization and personnel. (LCL)

  19. Ground Truth Observations of the Interior of a Rockglacier as Validation for Geophysical Monitoring Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbich, C.; Roer, I.; Hauck, C.

    2007-12-01

    Monitoring the permafrost evolution in mountain regions is currently one of the important tasks in cryospheric studies as little data on past and present changes of the ground thermal regime and its material properties are available. In addition to recently established borehole temperature monitoring networks, techniques to determine and monitor the ground ice content have to be developed. A reliable quantification of ground ice is especially important for modelling the thermal evolution of frozen ground and for assessing the hazard potential due to thawing permafrost induced slope instability. Near surface geophysical methods are increasingly applied to detect and monitor ground ice occurrences in permafrost areas. Commonly, characteristic values of electrical resistivity and seismic velocity are used as indicators for the presence of frozen material. However, validation of the correct interpretation of the geophysical parameters can only be obtained through boreholes, and only regarding vertical temperature profiles. Ground truth of the internal structure and the ice content is usually not available. In this contribution we will present a unique data set from a recently excavated rockglacier near Zermatt/Valais in the Swiss Alps, where an approximately 5 m deep trench was cut across the rockglacier body for the construction of a ski track. Longitudinal electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and refraction seismic tomography profiles were conducted prior to the excavation, yielding data sets for cross validation of commonly applied geophysical interpretation approaches in the context of ground ice detection. A recently developed 4-phase model was applied to calculate ice-, air- and unfrozen water contents from the geophysical data sets, which were compared to the ground truth data from the excavated trench. The obtained data sets will be discussed in the context of currently established geophysical monitoring networks in permafrost areas. In addition to the

  20. Demonstration/Validation of the Snap Sampler Passive Ground Water Sampling Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    direction, although the direction of groundwater movement locally is influenced by water -supply wells and by groundwater extraction and treatment systems...Validation of the Snap Sampler Passive Ground Water Sampling Device June 2011 i COST & PERFORMANCE REPORT Project: ER-200630 TABLE OF CONTENTS...range of analyte types. These included dissolved and total inorganics (including non-metal anions, metalloids , and metals) and four volatile organic

  1. Comparison of vertical ground reaction forces during overground and treadmill running. A validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kluitenberg Bas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One major drawback in measuring ground-reaction forces during running is that it is time consuming to get representative ground-reaction force (GRF values with a traditional force platform. An instrumented force measuring treadmill can overcome the shortcomings inherent to overground testing. The purpose of the current study was to determine the validity of an instrumented force measuring treadmill for measuring vertical ground-reaction force parameters during running. Methods Vertical ground-reaction forces of experienced runners (12 male, 12 female were obtained during overground and treadmill running at slow, preferred and fast self-selected running speeds. For each runner, 7 mean vertical ground-reaction force parameters of the right leg were calculated based on five successful overground steps and 30 seconds of treadmill running data. Intraclass correlations (ICC(3,1 and ratio limits of agreement (RLOA were used for further analysis. Results Qualitatively, the overground and treadmill ground-reaction force curves for heelstrike runners and non-heelstrike runners were very similar. Quantitatively, the time-related parameters and active peak showed excellent agreement (ICCs between 0.76 and 0.95, RLOA between 5.7% and 15.5%. Impact peak showed modest agreement (ICCs between 0.71 and 0.76, RLOA between 19.9% and 28.8%. The maximal and average loading-rate showed modest to excellent ICCs (between 0.70 and 0.89, but RLOA were higher (between 34.3% and 45.4%. Conclusions The results of this study demonstrated that the treadmill is a moderate to highly valid tool for the assessment of vertical ground-reaction forces during running for runners who showed a consistent landing strategy during overground and treadmill running. The high stride-to-stride variance during both overground and treadmill running demonstrates the importance of measuring sufficient steps for representative ground-reaction force values. Therefore, an

  2. 22 CFR 62.45 - Reinstatement to valid program status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... appropriate activity. Example, a lecture, consultation, or other activity appropriate to the category which is... following criteria: (1) Regardless of the reason, has the exchange visitor failed to maintain valid program... suspended or terminated from his or her program? (6) Has an exchange visitor in the student category failed...

  3. Assessment model validity document. NAMMU: A program for calculating groundwater flow and transport through porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cliffe, K.A.; Morris, S.T.; Porter, J.D. [AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1998-05-01

    NAMMU is a computer program for modelling groundwater flow and transport through porous media. This document provides an overview of the use of the program for geosphere modelling in performance assessment calculations and gives a detailed description of the program itself. The aim of the document is to give an indication of the grounds for having confidence in NAMMU as a performance assessment tool. In order to achieve this the following topics are discussed. The basic premises of the assessment approach and the purpose of and nature of the calculations that can be undertaken using NAMMU are outlined. The concepts of the validation of models and the considerations that can lead to increased confidence in models are described. The physical processes that can be modelled using NAMMU and the mathematical models and numerical techniques that are used to represent them are discussed in some detail. Finally, the grounds that would lead one to have confidence that NAMMU is fit for purpose are summarised.

  4. Using Focus Groups to Validate a Pharmacy Vaccination Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Bushell

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Focus group methodology is commonly used to quickly collate, integrated views from a variety of different stakeholders. This paper provides an example of how focus groups can be employed to collate expert opinion informing amendments on a newly developed training program for integration into undergraduate pharmacy curricula. Materials and methods: Four focus groups were conducted, across three continents, to determine the appropriateness and reliability of a developed vaccination training program with nested injection skills training. All focus groups were comprised of legitimate experts in the field of vaccination, medicine and/or pharmacy. Results: Themes that emerged across focus groups informed amendments giving rise to a validated version of a training program. Discussion: The rigorous validation of the vaccination training program offers generalizable lessons to inform the design and validation of future training programs intended for the health sector and or pharmacy curricula. Using the knowledge and experience of focus group participants fostered collaborative problem solving and validation of material and concept development. The group dynamics of a focus group allowed synthesis of feedback in an inter-professional manner. Conclusions: This paper provides a demonstration of how focus groups can be structured and used by health researchers to validate a newly developed training program.

  5. Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan Technology Validation and Market Introduction 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2008-01-01

    Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan 2008 for technology validation and market introduction, including ENERGY STAR, building energy codes, technology transfer application centers, commercial lighting initiative, EnergySmart Schools, EnergySmar

  6. Validation of space/ground antenna control algorithms using a computer-aided design tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantenbein, Rex E.

    1995-01-01

    The validation of the algorithms for controlling the space-to-ground antenna subsystem for Space Station Alpha is an important step in assuring reliable communications. These algorithms have been developed and tested using a simulation environment based on a computer-aided design tool that can provide a time-based execution framework with variable environmental parameters. Our work this summer has involved the exploration of this environment and the documentation of the procedures used to validate these algorithms. We have installed a variety of tools in a laboratory of the Tracking and Communications division for reproducing the simulation experiments carried out on these algorithms to verify that they do meet their requirements for controlling the antenna systems. In this report, we describe the processes used in these simulations and our work in validating the tests used.

  7. CING: an integrated residue-based structure validation program suite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doreleijers, Jurgen F. [Radboud University Medical Centre, CMBI (Netherlands); Sousa da Silva, Alan W. [European Bioinformatics Institute, UniProt (United Kingdom); Krieger, Elmar [YASARA Biosciences GmbH (Austria); Nabuurs, Sander B. [Radboud University Medical Centre, CMBI (Netherlands); Spronk, Christian A. E. M. [Spronk NMR Consultancy UAB (Lithuania); Stevens, Tim J. [University of Cambridge, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom); Vranken, Wim F. [VIB, Department of Structural Biology (Belgium); Vriend, Gert [Radboud University Medical Centre, CMBI (Netherlands); Vuister, Geerten W., E-mail: gv29@le.ac.uk [University of Leicester, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-15

    We present a suite of programs, named CING for Common Interface for NMR Structure Generation that provides for a residue-based, integrated validation of the structural NMR ensemble in conjunction with the experimental restraints and other input data. External validation programs and new internal validation routines compare the NMR-derived models with empirical data, measured chemical shifts, distance- and dihedral restraints and the results are visualized in a dynamic Web 2.0 report. A red-orange-green score is used for residues and restraints to direct the user to those critiques that warrant further investigation. Overall green scores below {approx}20 % accompanied by red scores over {approx}50 % are strongly indicative of poorly modelled structures. The publically accessible, secure iCing webserver (https://nmr.le.ac.ukhttps://nmr.le.ac.uk) allows individual users to upload the NMR data and run a CING validation analysis.

  8. The SCEC Broadband Platform: Open-Source Software for Strong Ground Motion Simulation and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulet, C.; Silva, F.; Maechling, P. J.; Callaghan, S.; Jordan, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) Broadband Platform (BBP) is a carefully integrated collection of open-source scientific software programs that can simulate broadband (0-100Hz) ground motions for earthquakes at regional scales. The BBP scientific software modules implement kinematic rupture generation, low and high-frequency seismogram synthesis using wave propagation through 1D layered velocity structures, seismogram ground motion amplitude calculations, and goodness of fit measurements. These modules are integrated into a software system that provides user-defined, repeatable, calculation of ground motion seismograms, using multiple alternative ground motion simulation methods, and software utilities that can generate plots, charts, and maps. The BBP has been developed over the last five years in a collaborative scientific, engineering, and software development project involving geoscientists, earthquake engineers, graduate students, and SCEC scientific software developers. The BBP can run earthquake rupture and wave propagation modeling software to simulate ground motions for well-observed historical earthquakes and to quantify how well the simulated broadband seismograms match the observed seismograms. The BBP can also run simulations for hypothetical earthquakes. In this case, users input an earthquake location and magnitude description, a list of station locations, and a 1D velocity model for the region of interest, and the BBP software then calculates ground motions for the specified stations. The SCEC BBP software released in 2015 can be compiled and run on recent Linux systems with GNU compilers. It includes 5 simulation methods, 7 simulation regions covering California, Japan, and Eastern North America, the ability to compare simulation results against GMPEs, updated ground motion simulation methods, and a simplified command line user interface.

  9. Comparisons of aerosol backscatter using satellite and ground lidars: implications for calibrating and validating spaceborne lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmestad, Gary; Forrister, Haviland; Grigas, Tomas; O’Dowd, Colin

    2017-01-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the polar orbiter Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) is an elastic backscatter lidar that produces a global uniformly-calibrated aerosol data set. Several Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) studies for CALIOP conducted with ground-based lidars and CALIOP data showed large aerosol profile disagreements, both random and systematic. In an attempt to better understand these problems, we undertook a series of ground-based lidar measurements in Atlanta, Georgia, which did not provide better agreement with CALIOP data than the earlier efforts, but rather prompted us to investigate the statistical limitations of such comparisons. Meaningful Cal/Val requires intercomparison data sets with small enough uncertainties to provide a check on the maximum expected calibration error. For CALIOP total attenuated backscatter, reducing the noise to the required level requires averaging profiles along the ground track for distances of at least 1,500 km. Representative comparison profiles often cannot be acquired with ground-based lidars because spatial aerosol inhomogeneities introduce systematic error into the averages. These conclusions have implications for future satellite lidar Cal/Val efforts, because planned satellite lidars measuring aerosol backscatter, wind vector, and CO2 concentration profiles may all produce data requiring considerable along-track averaging for meaningful Cal/Val. PMID:28198389

  10. Comparisons of aerosol backscatter using satellite and ground lidars: implications for calibrating and validating spaceborne lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmestad, Gary; Forrister, Haviland; Grigas, Tomas; O’Dowd, Colin

    2017-02-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the polar orbiter Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) is an elastic backscatter lidar that produces a global uniformly-calibrated aerosol data set. Several Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) studies for CALIOP conducted with ground-based lidars and CALIOP data showed large aerosol profile disagreements, both random and systematic. In an attempt to better understand these problems, we undertook a series of ground-based lidar measurements in Atlanta, Georgia, which did not provide better agreement with CALIOP data than the earlier efforts, but rather prompted us to investigate the statistical limitations of such comparisons. Meaningful Cal/Val requires intercomparison data sets with small enough uncertainties to provide a check on the maximum expected calibration error. For CALIOP total attenuated backscatter, reducing the noise to the required level requires averaging profiles along the ground track for distances of at least 1,500 km. Representative comparison profiles often cannot be acquired with ground-based lidars because spatial aerosol inhomogeneities introduce systematic error into the averages. These conclusions have implications for future satellite lidar Cal/Val efforts, because planned satellite lidars measuring aerosol backscatter, wind vector, and CO2 concentration profiles may all produce data requiring considerable along-track averaging for meaningful Cal/Val.

  11. Comparisons of aerosol backscatter using satellite and ground lidars: implications for calibrating and validating spaceborne lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmestad, Gary; Forrister, Haviland; Grigas, Tomas; O'Dowd, Colin

    2017-02-15

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the polar orbiter Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) is an elastic backscatter lidar that produces a global uniformly-calibrated aerosol data set. Several Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) studies for CALIOP conducted with ground-based lidars and CALIOP data showed large aerosol profile disagreements, both random and systematic. In an attempt to better understand these problems, we undertook a series of ground-based lidar measurements in Atlanta, Georgia, which did not provide better agreement with CALIOP data than the earlier efforts, but rather prompted us to investigate the statistical limitations of such comparisons. Meaningful Cal/Val requires intercomparison data sets with small enough uncertainties to provide a check on the maximum expected calibration error. For CALIOP total attenuated backscatter, reducing the noise to the required level requires averaging profiles along the ground track for distances of at least 1,500 km. Representative comparison profiles often cannot be acquired with ground-based lidars because spatial aerosol inhomogeneities introduce systematic error into the averages. These conclusions have implications for future satellite lidar Cal/Val efforts, because planned satellite lidars measuring aerosol backscatter, wind vector, and CO2 concentration profiles may all produce data requiring considerable along-track averaging for meaningful Cal/Val.

  12. Satellite Cloud Data Validation through MAGIC Ground Observation and the S'COOL Project: Scientific Benefits grounded in Citizen Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crecelius, S.; Chambers, L. H.; Lewis, P. M.; Rogerson, T.

    2013-12-01

    The Students' Cloud Observation On-Line (S'COOL) Project was launched in 1997 as the Formal Education and Public Outreach arm of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Mission. ROVER, the Citizen Scientist area of S'COOL, started in 2007 and allows participants to make 'roving' observations from any location as opposed to a fixed, registered classroom. The S'COOL Project aids the CERES Mission in trying to answer the research question: 'What is the Effect of Clouds on the Earth's Climate'. Participants from all 50 states, most U.S. Territories, and 63 countries have reported more than 100,500 observations to the S'COOL Project over the past 16 years. The Project is supported by an intuitive website that provides curriculum support and guidance through the observation steps; 1) Request satellite overpass schedule, 2) Observe clouds, and 3) Report cloud observations. The S'COOL Website also hosts a robust database housing all participants' observations as well as the matching satellite data. While the S'COOL observation parameters are based on the data collected by 5 satellite missions, ground observations provide a unique perspective to data validation. Specifically, low to mid level clouds can be obscured by overcast high-level clouds, or difficult to observe from a satellite's perspective due to surface cover or albedo. In these cases, ground observations play an important role in filling the data gaps and providing a better, global picture of our atmosphere and clouds. S'COOL participants, operating within the boundary layer, have an advantage when observing low-level clouds that affect the area we live in, regional weather patterns, and climate change. S'COOL's long-term data set provides a valuable resource to the scientific community in improving the "poorly characterized and poorly represented [clouds] in climate and weather prediction models'. The MAGIC Team contacted S'COOL in early 2012 about making cloud observations as part of the MAGIC

  13. An individual and dynamic Body Segment Inertial Parameter validation method using ground reaction forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Clint; Venture, Gentiane; Rezzoug, Nasser; Gorce, Philippe; Isableu, Brice

    2014-05-01

    Over the last decades a variety of research has been conducted with the goal to improve the Body Segment Inertial Parameters (BSIP) estimations but to our knowledge a real validation has never been completely successful, because no ground truth is available. The aim of this paper is to propose a validation method for a BSIP identification method (IM) and to confirm the results by comparing them with recalculated contact forces using inverse dynamics to those obtained by a force plate. Furthermore, the results are compared with the recently proposed estimation method by Dumas et al. (2007). Additionally, the results are cross validated with a high velocity overarm throwing movement. Throughout conditions higher correlations, smaller metrics and smaller RMSE can be found for the proposed BSIP estimation (IM) which shows its advantage compared to recently proposed methods as of Dumas et al. (2007). The purpose of the paper is to validate an already proposed method and to show that this method can be of significant advantage compared to conventional methods.

  14. Pattern Matching, Validity, and Conceptualization in Program Evaluation,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trochim, Wilham M. K.

    1985-01-01

    Two quasiexperimental designs--nonequivalent dependent variable and reversed treatment designs--illustrate pattern matching logic as a basis for evaluation, examining college health services. Three pattern matches are significant: (1) program pattern match indicates implementation; (2) measurement match assesses test validity; and (3) effect…

  15. A Ground-Based Validation System of Teleoperation for a Space Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueqian Wang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Teleoperation of space robots is very important for future on‐orbit service. In order to assure the task is accomplished successfully, ground experiments are required to verify the function and validity of the teleoperation system before a space robot is launched. In this paper, a ground‐based validation subsystem is developed as a part of a teleoperation system. The subsystem is mainly composed of four parts: the input verification module, the onboard verification module, the dynamic and image workstation, and the communication simulator. The input verification module, consisting of hardware and software of the master, is used to verify the input ability. The onboard verification module, consisting of the same hardware and software as the onboard processor, is used to verify the processor’s computing ability and execution schedule. In addition, the dynamic and image workstation calculates the dynamic response of the space robot and target, and generates emulated camera images, including the hand‐eye cameras, global‐ vision camera and rendezvous camera. The communication simulator provides fidelity communication conditions, i.e., time delays and communication bandwidth. Lastly, we integrated a teleoperation system and conducted many experiments on the system. Experiment results show that the ground system is very useful for verified teleoperation technology.

  16. VERIFICATION & VALIDATION OF A SEMANTIC IMAGE TAGGING FRAMEWORK VIA GENERATION OF GEOSPATIAL IMAGERY GROUND TRUTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleason, Shaun Scott [ORNL; Ferrell, Regina Kay [ORNL; Cheriyadat, Anil M [ORNL; Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed [ORNL; Dema, Mesfin A [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    As a result of increasing geospatial image libraries, many algorithms are being developed to automatically extract and classify regions of interest from these images. However, limited work has been done to compare, validate and verify these algorithms due to the lack of datasets with high accuracy ground truth annotations. In this paper, we present an approach to generate a large number of synthetic images accompanied by perfect ground truth annotation via learning scene statistics from few training images through Maximum Entropy (ME) modeling. The ME model [1,2] embeds a Stochastic Context Free Grammar (SCFG) to model object attribute variations with Markov Random Fields (MRF) with the final goal of modeling contextual relations between objects. Using this model, 3D scenes are generated by configuring a 3D object model to obey the learned scene statistics. Finally, these plausible 3D scenes are captured by ray tracing software to produce synthetic images with the corresponding ground truth annotations that are useful for evaluating the performance of a variety of image analysis algorithms.

  17. Testing alternative ground water models using cross-validation and other methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglia, L.; Mehl, S.W.; Hill, M.C.; Perona, P.; Burlando, P.

    2007-01-01

    Many methods can be used to test alternative ground water models. Of concern in this work are methods able to (1) rank alternative models (also called model discrimination) and (2) identify observations important to parameter estimates and predictions (equivalent to the purpose served by some types of sensitivity analysis). Some of the measures investigated are computationally efficient; others are computationally demanding. The latter are generally needed to account for model nonlinearity. The efficient model discrimination methods investigated include the information criteria: the corrected Akaike information criterion, Bayesian information criterion, and generalized cross-validation. The efficient sensitivity analysis measures used are dimensionless scaled sensitivity (DSS), composite scaled sensitivity, and parameter correlation coefficient (PCC); the other statistics are DFBETAS, Cook's D, and observation-prediction statistic. Acronyms are explained in the introduction. Cross-validation (CV) is a computationally intensive nonlinear method that is used for both model discrimination and sensitivity analysis. The methods are tested using up to five alternative parsimoniously constructed models of the ground water system of the Maggia Valley in southern Switzerland. The alternative models differ in their representation of hydraulic conductivity. A new method for graphically representing CV and sensitivity analysis results for complex models is presented and used to evaluate the utility of the efficient statistics. The results indicate that for model selection, the information criteria produce similar results at much smaller computational cost than CV. For identifying important observations, the only obviously inferior linear measure is DSS; the poor performance was expected because DSS does not include the effects of parameter correlation and PCC reveals large parameter correlations. ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  18. Modeling short wave radiation and ground surface temperature: a validation experiment in the Western Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogliotti, P.; Cremonese, E.; Dallamico, M.; Gruber, S.; Migliavacca, M.; Morra di Cella, U.

    2009-12-01

    Permafrost distribution in high-mountain areas is influenced by topography (micro-climate) and high variability of ground covers conditions. Its monitoring is very difficult due to logistical problems like accessibility, costs, weather conditions and reliability of instrumentation. For these reasons physically-based modeling of surface rock/ground temperatures (GST) is fundamental for the study of mountain permafrost dynamics. With this awareness a 1D version of GEOtop model (www.geotop.org) is tested in several high-mountain sites and its accuracy to reproduce GST and incoming short wave radiation (SWin) is evaluated using independent field measurements. In order to describe the influence of topography, both flat and near-vertical sites with different aspects are considered. Since the validation of SWin is difficult on steep rock faces (due to the lack of direct measures) and validation of GST is difficult on flat sites (due to the presence of snow) the two parameters are validated as independent experiments: SWin only on flat morphologies, GST only on the steep ones. The main purpose is to investigate the effect of: (i) distance between driving meteo station location and simulation point location, (ii) cloudiness, (iii) simulation point aspect, (iv) winter/summer period. The temporal duration of model runs is variable from 3 years for the SWin experiment to 8 years for the validation of GST. The model parameterization is constant and tuned for a common massive bedrock of crystalline rock like granite. Ground temperature profile is not initialized because rock temperature is measured at only 10cm depth. A set of 9 performance measures is used for comparing model predictions and observations (including: fractional mean bias (FB), coefficient of residual mass (CMR), mean absolute error (MAE), modelling efficiency (ME), coefficient of determination (R2)). Results are very encouraging. For both experiments the distance (Km) between location of the driving meteo

  19. Satellite Based Soil Moisture Product Validation Using NOAA-CREST Ground and L-Band Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi, H.; Campo, C.; Temimi, M.; Lakhankar, T.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture content is among most important physical parameters in hydrology, climate, and environmental studies. Many microwave-based satellite observations have been utilized to estimate this parameter. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) is one of many remotely sensors that collects daily information of land surface soil moisture. However, many factors such as ancillary data and vegetation scattering can affect the signal and the estimation. Therefore, this information needs to be validated against some "ground-truth" observations. NOAA - Cooperative Remote Sensing and Technology (CREST) center at the City University of New York has a site located at Millbrook, NY with several insitu soil moisture probes and an L-Band radiometer similar to Soil Moisture Passive and Active (SMAP) one. This site is among SMAP Cal/Val sites. Soil moisture information was measured at seven different locations from 2012 to 2015. Hydra probes are used to measure six of these locations. This study utilizes the observations from insitu data and the L-Band radiometer close to ground (at 3 meters height) to validate and to compare soil moisture estimates from AMSR2. Analysis of the measurements and AMSR2 indicated a weak correlation with the hydra probes and a moderate correlation with Cosmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System (COSMOS probes). Several differences including the differences between pixel size and point measurements can cause these discrepancies. Some interpolation techniques are used to expand point measurements from 6 locations to AMSR2 footprint. Finally, the effect of penetration depth in microwave signal and inconsistencies with other ancillary data such as skin temperature is investigated to provide a better understanding in the analysis. The results show that the retrieval algorithm of AMSR2 is appropriate under certain circumstances. This validation algorithm and similar study will be conducted for SMAP mission. Keywords: Remote Sensing, Soil

  20. Validation and modeling of earthquake strong ground motion using a composite source model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Y.

    2001-12-01

    Zeng et al. (1994) have proposed a composite source model for synthetic strong ground motion prediction. In that model, the source is taken as a superposition of circular subevents with a constant stress drop. The number of subevents and their radius follows a power law distribution equivalent to the Gutenberg and Richter's magnitude-frequency relation for seismicity. The heterogeneous nature of the composite source model is characterized by its maximum subevent size and subevent stress drop. As rupture propagates through each subevent, it radiates a Brune's pulse or a Sato and Hirasawa's circular crack pulse. The method has been proved to be successful in generating realistic strong motion seismograms in comparison with observations from earthquakes in California, eastern US, Guerrero of Mexico, Turkey and India. The model has since been improved by including scattering waves from small scale heterogeneity structure of the earth, site specific ground motion prediction using weak motion site amplification, and nonlinear soil response using geotechnical engineering models. Last year, I have introduced an asymmetric circular rupture to improve the subevent source radiation and to provide a consistent rupture model between overall fault rupture process and its subevents. In this study, I revisit the Landers, Loma Prieta, Northridge, Imperial Valley and Kobe earthquakes using the improved source model. The results show that the improved subevent ruptures provide an improved effect of rupture directivity compared to our previous studies. Additional validation includes comparison of synthetic strong ground motions to the observed ground accelerations from the Chi-Chi, Taiwan and Izmit, Turkey earthquakes. Since the method has evolved considerably when it was first proposed, I will also compare results between each major modification of the model and demonstrate its backward compatibility to any of its early simulation procedures.

  1. Content Validity and Satisfaction With a Stroke Caregiver Intervention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakas, Tamilyn; Farran, Carol J.; Austin, Joan K.; Given, Barbara A.; Johnson, Elizabeth A.; Williams, Linda S.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose Establishing evidence of content validity and satisfaction is an integral part of intervention research. The purpose of this article is to describe content validity and satisfaction relative to the Telephone Assessment and Skill-Building Kit (TASK), an 8-week follow-up program based on individualized assessment of stroke caregiver needs. Design and Methods The TASK intervention enables caregivers to develop skills based on assessment of their own needs. During the development of the TASK program, 10 experts rated the validity of the TASK intervention components for accuracy, feasibility, acceptability, and problem relevance. After incorporating feedback from the experts, a randomized controlled clinical trial was instituted using a convenience sample of 40 stroke caregivers to determine satisfaction (usefulness, case of use, and acceptability) with the TASK intervention (n=21) compared with an attention control group (n=19). Data collection occurred between March 2005 and June 2006. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, independent sample t tests, and content analysis. Findings Expert ratings on a 1 to 5 scale, with 5 being strongly agree, provided evidence of content validity (accuracy 4.71, feasibility 4.46, acceptability 4.40, problem relevance 4.67). Caregivers in the TASK group scored significantly higher than the attention control group on all satisfaction measures (usefulness p=.02; ease of use p=.02; acceptability p=.05). Qualitative comments from caregivers provided further evidence of satisfaction. Conclusions Evidence of content validity and user satisfaction for the TASK intervention relative to an attention control group was found. Clinical Relevance The TASK program may be a viable telephone-based program that can be implemented by nurses to support family caregivers during the first few months after stroke survivors are discharged home. PMID:19941582

  2. Validation of MOPITT carbon monoxide using ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectrometer data from NDACC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Rebecca R.; Deeter, Merritt N.; Worden, Helen M.; Gille, John; Edwards, David P.; Hannigan, James W.; Jones, Nicholas B.; Paton-Walsh, Clare; Griffith, David W. T.; Smale, Dan; Robinson, John; Strong, Kimberly; Conway, Stephanie; Sussmann, Ralf; Hase, Frank; Blumenstock, Thomas; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Langerock, Bavo

    2017-06-01

    The Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) satellite instrument provides the longest continuous dataset of carbon monoxide (CO) from space. We perform the first validation of MOPITT version 6 retrievals using total column CO measurements from ground-based remote-sensing Fourier transform infrared spectrometers (FTSs). Validation uses data recorded at 14 stations, that span a wide range of latitudes (80° N to 78° S), in the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). MOPITT measurements are spatially co-located with each station, and different vertical sensitivities between instruments are accounted for by using MOPITT averaging kernels (AKs). All three MOPITT retrieval types are analyzed: thermal infrared (TIR-only), joint thermal and near infrared (TIR-NIR), and near infrared (NIR-only). Generally, MOPITT measurements overestimate CO relative to FTS measurements, but the bias is typically less than 10 %. Mean bias is 2.4 % for TIR-only, 5.1 % for TIR-NIR, and 6.5 % for NIR-only. The TIR-NIR and NIR-only products consistently produce a larger bias and lower correlation than the TIR-only. Validation performance of MOPITT for TIR-only and TIR-NIR retrievals over land or water scenes is equivalent. The four MOPITT detector element pixels are validated separately to account for their different uncertainty characteristics. Pixel 1 produces the highest standard deviation and lowest correlation for all three MOPITT products. However, for TIR-only and TIR-NIR, the error-weighted average that includes all four pixels often provides the best correlation, indicating compensating pixel biases and well-captured error characteristics. We find that MOPITT bias does not depend on latitude but rather is influenced by the proximity to rapidly changing atmospheric CO. MOPITT bias drift has been bound geographically to within ±0.5 % yr-1 or lower at almost all locations.

  3. Monitoring Ground Subsidence in Hong Kong via Spaceborne Radar: Experiments and Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxiao Qin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The persistent scatterers interferometry (PSI technique is gradually becoming known for its capability of providing up to millimeter accuracy of measurement on ground displacement. Nevertheless, there is still quite a good amount of doubt regarding its correctness or accuracy. In this paper, we carried out an experiment corroborating the capability of the PSI technique with the help of a traditional survey method in the urban area of Hong Kong, China. Seventy three TerraSAR-X (TSX and TanDEM-X (TDX images spanning over four years are used for the data process. There are three aims of this study. The first is to generate a displacement map of urban Hong Kong and to check for spots with possible ground movements. This information will be provided to the local surveyors so that they can check these specific locations. The second is to validate if the accuracy of the PSI technique can indeed reach the millimeter level in this real application scenario. For validating the accuracy of PSI, four corner reflectors (CR were installed at a construction site on reclaimed land in Hong Kong. They were manually moved up or down by a few to tens of millimeters, and the value derived from the PSI analysis was compared to the true value. The experiment, carried out in unideal conditions, nevertheless proved undoubtedly that millimeter accuracy can be achieved by the PSI technique. The last is to evaluate the advantages and limitations of the PSI technique. Overall, the PSI technique can be extremely useful if used in collaboration with other techniques, so that the advantages can be highlighted and the drawbacks avoided.

  4. Modelling floor heating systems using a validated two-dimensional ground coupled numerical model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitzmann, Peter; Kragh, Jesper; Roots, Peter

    2005-01-01

    the floor. This model can be used to design energy efficient houses with floor heating focusing on the heat loss through the floor construction and foundation. It is found that it is impor-tant to model the dynamics of the floor heating system to find the correct heat loss to the ground, and further......This paper presents a two-dimensional simulation model of the heat losses and tempera-tures in a slab on grade floor with floor heating which is able to dynamically model the floor heating system. The aim of this work is to be able to model, in detail, the influence from the floor construction...... and foundation on the performance of the floor heating sys-tem. The ground coupled floor heating model is validated against measurements from a single-family house. The simulation model is coupled to a whole-building energy simu-lation model with inclusion of heat losses and heat supply to the room above...

  5. ASC Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program Verification and Validation Whitepaper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, R; Graziani, F; Trucano, T

    2006-03-31

    The purpose of this whitepaper is to provide a framework for understanding the role that verification and validation (V&V) are expected to play in successful ASC Predictive Science Academic Alliance (PSAA) Centers and projects. V&V have been emphasized in the recent specification of the PSAA (NNSA, 2006): (1) The resulting simulation models lend themselves to practical verification and validation methodologies and strategies that should include the integrated use of experimental and/or observational data as a key part of model and sub-model validation, as well as demonstrations of numerical convergence and accuracy for code verification. (2) Verification, validation and prediction methodologies and results must be much more strongly emphasized as research topics and demonstrated via the proposed simulations. (3) It is mandatory that proposals address the following two topics: (a) Predictability in science & engineering; and (b) Verification & validation strategies for large-scale simulations, including quantification of uncertainty and numerical convergence. We especially call attention to the explicit coupling of computational predictability and V&V in the third bullet above. In this whitepaper we emphasize this coupling, and provide concentrated guidance for addressing item 2. The whitepaper has two main components. First, we provide a brief and high-level tutorial on V&V that emphasizes critical elements of the program. Second, we state a set of V&V-related requirements that successful PSAA proposals must address.

  6. Validation of five years (2003–2007 of SCIAMACHY CO total column measurements using ground-based spectrometer observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Poberovskii

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a validation study of SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY carbon monoxide (CO total column measurements from the Iterative Maximum Likelihood Method (IMLM algorithm using ground-based spectrometer observations from twenty surface stations for the five year time period of 2003–2007. Overall we find a good agreement between SCIAMACHY and ground-based observations for both mean values as well as seasonal variations. For high-latitude Northern Hemisphere stations absolute differences between SCIAMACHY and ground-based measurements are close to or fall within the SCIAMACHY CO 2σ precision of 0.2 × 1018 molecules/cm2 (∼10% indicating that SCIAMACHY can observe CO accurately at high Northern Hemisphere latitudes. For Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude stations the validation is complicated due to the vicinity of emission sources for almost all stations, leading to higher ground-based measurements compared to SCIAMACHY CO within its typical sampling area of 8° × 8°. Comparisons with Northern Hemisphere mountain stations are hampered by elevation effects. After accounting for these effects, the validation provides satisfactory results. At Southern Hemisphere mid- to high latitudes SCIAMACHY is systematically lower than the ground-based measurements for 2003 and 2004, but for 2005 and later years the differences between SCIAMACHY and ground-based measurements fall within the SCIAMACHY precision. The 2003–2004 bias is consistent with previously reported results although its origin remains under investigation. No other systematic spatial or temporal biases could be identified based on the validation presented in this paper. Validation results are robust with regard to the choices of the instrument-noise error filter, sampling area, and time averaging required for the validation of SCIAMACHY CO total column measurements. Finally, our results show that the spatial coverage of the ground

  7. Validation of NH3 satellite observations by ground-based FTIR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammers, Enrico; Palm, Mathias; Van Damme, Martin; Shephard, Mark; Cady-Pereira, Karen; Capps, Shannon; Clarisse, Lieven; Coheur, Pierre; Erisman, Jan Willem

    2016-04-01

    Global emissions of reactive nitrogen have been increasing to an unprecedented level due to human activities and are estimated to be a factor four larger than pre-industrial levels. Concentration levels of NOx are declining, but ammonia (NH3) levels are increasing around the globe. While NH3 at its current concentrations poses significant threats to the environment and human health, relatively little is known about the total budget and global distribution. Surface observations are sparse and mainly available for north-western Europe, the United States and China and are limited by the high costs and poor temporal and spatial resolution. Since the lifetime of atmospheric NH3 is short, on the order of hours to a few days, due to efficient deposition and fast conversion to particulate matter, the existing surface measurements are not sufficient to estimate global concentrations. Advanced space-based IR-sounders such as the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) enable global observations of atmospheric NH3 that help overcome some of the limitations of surface observations. However, the satellite NH3 retrievals are complex requiring extensive validation. Presently there have only been a few dedicated satellite NH3 validation campaigns performed with limited spatial, vertical or temporal coverage. Recently a retrieval methodology was developed for ground-based Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) instruments to obtain vertical concentration profiles of NH3. Here we show the applicability of retrieved columns from nine globally distributed stations with a range of NH3 pollution levels to validate satellite NH3 products.

  8. Inversion model validation of ground emissivity. Contribution to the development of SMOS algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Demontoux, François; Ruffié, Gilles; Wigneron, Jean Pierre; Grant, Jennifer; Hernandez, Daniel Medina

    2007-01-01

    SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity), is the second mission of 'Earth Explorer' to be developed within the program 'Living Planet' of the European Space Agency (ESA). This satellite, containing the very first 1.4GHz interferometric radiometer 2D, will carry out the first cartography on a planetary scale of the moisture of the grounds and the salinity of the oceans. The forests are relatively opaque, and the knowledge of moisture remains problematic. The effect of the vegetation can be corrected thanks a simple radiative model. Nevertheless simulations show that the effect of the litter on the emissivity of a system litter + ground is not negligible. Our objective is to highlight the effects of this layer on the total multi layer system. This will make it possible to lead to a simple analytical formulation of a model of litter which can be integrated into the calculation algorithm of SMOS. Radiometer measurements, coupled to dielectric characterizations of samples in laboratory can enable us to characterize...

  9. INL Experimental Program Roadmap for Thermal Hydraulic Code Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn McCreery; Hugh McIlroy

    2007-09-01

    Advanced computer modeling and simulation tools and protocols will be heavily relied on for a wide variety of system studies, engineering design activities, and other aspects of the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), the DOE Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), and light-water reactors. The goal is for all modeling and simulation tools to be demonstrated accurate and reliable through a formal Verification and Validation (V&V) process, especially where such tools are to be used to establish safety margins and support regulatory compliance, or to design a system in a manner that reduces the role of expensive mockups and prototypes. Recent literature identifies specific experimental principles that must be followed in order to insure that experimental data meet the standards required for a “benchmark” database. Even for well conducted experiments, missing experimental details, such as geometrical definition, data reduction procedures, and manufacturing tolerances have led to poor Benchmark calculations. The INL has a long and deep history of research in thermal hydraulics, especially in the 1960s through 1980s when many programs such as LOFT and Semiscle were devoted to light-water reactor safety research, the EBRII fast reactor was in operation, and a strong geothermal energy program was established. The past can serve as a partial guide for reinvigorating thermal hydraulic research at the laboratory. However, new research programs need to fully incorporate modern experimental methods such as measurement techniques using the latest instrumentation, computerized data reduction, and scaling methodology. The path forward for establishing experimental research for code model validation will require benchmark experiments conducted in suitable facilities located at the INL. This document describes thermal hydraulic facility requirements and candidate buildings and presents examples of suitable validation experiments related

  10. Method for validating cloud mask obtained from satellite measurements using ground-based sky camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letu, Husi; Nagao, Takashi M; Nakajima, Takashi Y; Matsumae, Yoshiaki

    2014-11-01

    Error propagation in Earth's atmospheric, oceanic, and land surface parameters of the satellite products caused by misclassification of the cloud mask is a critical issue for improving the accuracy of satellite products. Thus, characterizing the accuracy of the cloud mask is important for investigating the influence of the cloud mask on satellite products. In this study, we proposed a method for validating multiwavelength satellite data derived cloud masks using ground-based sky camera (GSC) data. First, a cloud cover algorithm for GSC data has been developed using sky index and bright index. Then, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite data derived cloud masks by two cloud-screening algorithms (i.e., MOD35 and CLAUDIA) were validated using the GSC cloud mask. The results indicate that MOD35 is likely to classify ambiguous pixels as "cloudy," whereas CLAUDIA is likely to classify them as "clear." Furthermore, the influence of error propagations caused by misclassification of the MOD35 and CLAUDIA cloud masks on MODIS derived reflectance, brightness temperature, and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) in clear and cloudy pixels was investigated using sky camera data. It shows that the influence of the error propagation by the MOD35 cloud mask on the MODIS derived monthly mean reflectance, brightness temperature, and NDVI for clear pixels is significantly smaller than for the CLAUDIA cloud mask; the influence of the error propagation by the CLAUDIA cloud mask on MODIS derived monthly mean cloud products for cloudy pixels is significantly smaller than that by the MOD35 cloud mask.

  11. Validation and downscaling of Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) soil moisture using ground measurements in the Western Cape, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moller, J

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available of Plant and Soil: DOI: 10.1080/02571862.2017.1318962 Validation and downscaling of Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) soil moisture using ground measurements in the Western Cape, South Africa Moller J Jovanovic N Garcia CL Bugan RDH Mazvimavi D...

  12. Ground validation of oceanic snowfall detection in satellite climatologies during LOFZY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepp, Christian; Bumke, Karl; Bakan, Stephan; Bauer, Peter

    2010-08-01

    A thorough knowledge of global ocean precipitation is an indispensable prerequisite for the understanding of the water cycle in the global climate system. However, reliable detection of precipitation over the global oceans, especially of solid precipitation, remains a challenging task. This is true for both, passive microwave remote sensing and reanalysis based model estimates. The optical disdrometer ODM 470 is a ground validation instrument capable of measuring rain and snowfall on ships even under high wind speeds. It was used for the first time over the Nordic Seas during the LOFZY 2005 campaign. A dichotomous verification of precipitation occurrence resulted in a perfect correspondence between the disdrometer, a precipitation detector and a shipboard observer's log. The disdrometer data is further point-to-area collocated against precipitation from the satellite based Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and fluxes from Satellite data (HOAPS) climatology. HOAPS precipitation turns out to be overall consistent with the disdrometer data resulting in a detection accuracy of 0.96. The collocated data comprises light precipitation events below 1 mm h-1. Therefore two LOFZY case studies with high precipitation rates are presented that indicate plausible HOAPS satellite precipitation rates. Overall, this encourages longer term measurements of ship-to-satellite collocated precipitation in the near future.

  13. New Sentinel-2 radiometric validation approaches (SEOM program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruniquel, Véronique; Lamquin, Nicolas; Ferron, Stéphane; Govaerts, Yves; Woolliams, Emma; Dilo, Arta; Gascon, Ferran

    2016-04-01

    SEOM is an ESA program element whose one of the objectives aims at launching state-of-the-art studies for the scientific exploitation of operational missions. In the frame of this program, ESA awarded ACRI-ST and its partners Rayference and National Physical Laboratory (NPL) early 2016 for a R&D study on the development and intercomparison of algorithms for validating the Sentinel-2 radiometric L1 data products beyond the baseline algorithms used operationally in the frame of the S2 Mission Performance Centre. In this context, several algorithms have been proposed and are currently in development: The first one is based on the exploitation of Deep Convective Cloud (DCC) observations over ocean. This method allows an inter-band radiometry validation from the blue to the NIR (typically from B1 to B8a) from a reference band already validated for example with the well-known Rayleigh method. Due to their physical properties, DCCs appear from the remote sensing point of view to have bright and cold tops and they can be used as invariant targets to monitor the radiometric response degradation of reflective solar bands. The DCC approach is statistical i.e. the method shall be applied on a large number of measurements to derive reliable statistics and decrease the impact of the perturbing contributors. The second radiometric validation method is based on the exploitation of matchups combining both concomitant in-situ measurements and Sentinel-2 observations. The in-situ measurements which are used here correspond to measurements acquired in the frame of the RadCalNet networks. The validation is performed for the Sentinel-2 bands similar to the bands of the instruments equipping the validation site. The measurements from the Cimel CE 318 12-filters BRDF Sun Photometer installed recently in the Gobabeb site near the Namib desert are used for this method. A comprehensive verification of the calibration requires an analysis of MSI radiances over the full dynamic range

  14. TEMIS UV product validation using NILU-UV ground-based measurements in Thessaloniki, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zempila, Melina-Maria; van Geffen, Jos H. G. M.; Taylor, Michael; Fountoulakis, Ilias; Koukouli, Maria-Elissavet; van Weele, Michiel; van der A, Ronald J.; Bais, Alkiviadis; Meleti, Charikleia; Balis, Dimitrios

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to cross-validate ground-based and satellite-based models of three photobiological UV effective dose products: the Commission Internationale de l'Éclairage (CIE) erythemal UV, the production of vitamin D in the skin, and DNA damage, using high-temporal-resolution surface-based measurements of solar UV spectral irradiances from a synergy of instruments and models. The satellite-based Tropospheric Emission Monitoring Internet Service (TEMIS; version 1.4) UV daily dose data products were evaluated over the period 2009 to 2014 with ground-based data from a Norsk Institutt for Luftforskning (NILU)-UV multifilter radiometer located at the northern midlatitude super-site of the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (LAP/AUTh), in Greece. For the NILU-UV effective dose rates retrieval algorithm, a neural network (NN) was trained to learn the nonlinear functional relation between NILU-UV irradiances and collocated Brewer-based photobiological effective dose products. Then the algorithm was subjected to sensitivity analysis and validation. The correlation of the NN estimates with target outputs was high (r = 0. 988 to 0.990) and with a very low bias (0.000 to 0.011 in absolute units) proving the robustness of the NN algorithm. For further evaluation of the NILU NN-derived products, retrievals of the vitamin D and DNA-damage effective doses from a collocated Yankee Environmental Systems (YES) UVB-1 pyranometer were used. For cloud-free days, differences in the derived UV doses are better than 2 % for all UV dose products, revealing the reference quality of the ground-based UV doses at Thessaloniki from the NILU-UV NN retrievals. The TEMIS UV doses used in this study are derived from ozone measurements by the SCIAMACHY/Envisat and GOME2/MetOp-A satellite instruments, over the European domain in combination with SEVIRI/Meteosat-based diurnal cycle of the cloud cover fraction per 0. 5° × 0. 5° (lat × long) grid cells. TEMIS

  15. A FORTRAN program for calculating nonlinear seismic ground response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, William B.

    1977-01-01

    The program described here was designed for calculating the nonlinear seismic response of a system of horizontal soil layers underlain by a semi-infinite elastic medium representing bedrock. Excitation is a vertically incident shear wave in the underlying medium. The nonlinear hysteretic behavior of the soil is represented by a model consisting of simple linear springs and Coulomb friction elements arranged as shown. A boundary condition is used which takes account of finite rigidity in the elastic substratum. The computations are performed by an explicit finite-difference scheme that proceeds step by step in space and time. A brief program description is provided here with instructions for preparing the input and a source listing. A more detailed discussion of the method is presented elsewhere as is the description of a different program employing implicit integration.

  16. A Grounded Theory of Connectivity and Persistence in a Limited Residency Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, Steven R.; Snyder, Martha M.; Dringus, Laurie P.; Maddrey, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Limited-residency and online doctoral programs have an attrition rate significantly higher than traditional programs. This grounded-theory study focused on issues pertaining to communication between students, their peers and faculty and how interpersonal communication may affect persistence. Data were collected from 17 students actively working on…

  17. Construction Management Program Builds Financial Development from the Ground up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobe, Michael D.; Shuler, Scott; Grosse, Larry

    2007-01-01

    Recent economic and legislative changes have hit higher education hard and threaten the financial viability of many educational programs nationwide. With state support dwindling to less than 10 percent in some cases, institutions across the nation face a financial crisis. Many strategies have been explored and implemented, from campaigns to…

  18. Middle Level Advisory Programs: From the Ground Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzog, C. Jay

    1992-01-01

    Because of changes in the family and other institutions, schools must fill the void created by students' lack of affective development before genuine learning can occur. This article provides guidelines for developing and implementing an advisory program for middle school students that successfully combines the elementary school's child-centered…

  19. HBCUs Break New Ground with Hospitality and Tourism Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Leland L.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The perceptions of representatives of 16 historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) concerning the future of hospitality and tourism education in those institutions are summarized. Comments address leadership, instruction, research, perceptions by other disciplines, ingredients for program success, industry-academe relationship, and…

  20. Construct validity of RT3 accelerometer: A comparison of level-ground and treadmill walking at self-selected speeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Hendrick, MPhty

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examined differences in accelerometer output when subjects walked on level ground and on a treadmill. We asked 25 nondisabled participants to wear an RT3 triaxial accelerometer (StayHealthy, Inc; Monrovia, California and walk at their "normal" and "brisk" walking speeds for 10 minutes. These activities were repeated on a treadmill using the individual speeds from level-ground walking on two occasions 1 week apart. Paired t-tests found a difference in RT3 accelerometer vector magnitude (VM counts/min between the two walking speeds on both surfaces on days 1 and 2 (p 0.05, we found wide limits of agreement between level ground and treadmill walking at both speeds. Measurement and discrimination of walking intensity employing RT3 accelerometer VM counts/min on the treadmill demonstrated reasonable validity and stability over two time points compared with level-ground walking.

  1. Determination of pedestrian displacement velocity for ground exploration programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Hernán Ochoa Gutierrez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In Engineering and Geophysics field exploration, uncertainty for determination of the velocity of ground data acquisition due to extreme topographic conditions has been underestimated in the calculation of the displacement time between stations or sampling points. This lack of reliable models, negatively affects the determination of costs and planning of fieldwork activities. Known models of times and routes of displacement determination such as the “Smaller Cost Routes” are based on the effect of the type of land and the slope. However, these models consider the effect of the slope by means of subjective impedance values which has no a clear physical meaning. Furthermore, the upslope or downslope displacement is not considered to affect the reliability of velocity estimation. In this paper, a model of displacement velocity is proposed taking into account the upslope/downslope factor. The model was determined using real data from a topographical survey along a pipeline of 880 Km extended along terrains with changing climatic and topographic conditions. As a result, the proposed model improves the selection of optimal routes for a reliable time and cost estimation.

  2. X-51A Scramjet Demonstrator Program: Waverider Ground and Flight Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    USAF) WaveRider program. The overall test objective of the X-51A program was to demonstrate a scramjet engine using endothermic hydrocarbon fuel...Hypersonic Technology (HyTech) scramjet engine , integrated into the vehicle, used endothermic hydrocarbon fuel (JP-7). The X-51A was designed to be...unlimited, 412TW-PA-13417 X-51A SCRAMJET DEMONSTRATOR PROGRAM: WAVERIDER GROUND AND FLIGHT TEST Maj Christopher M. Rondeau Chief Flight Test Engineer

  3. Validation of the CrIS fast physical NH3 retrieval with ground-based FTIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Dammers

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Presented here is the validation of the CrIS (Cross-track Infrared Sounder fast physical NH3 retrieval (CFPR column and profile measurements using ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR observations. We use the total columns and profiles from seven FTIR sites in the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC to validate the satellite data products. The overall FTIR and CrIS total columns have a positive correlation of r  =  0.77 (N  =  218 with very little bias (a slope of 1.02. Binning the comparisons by total column amounts, for concentrations larger than 1.0  ×  1016 molecules cm−2, i.e. ranging from moderate to polluted conditions, the relative difference is on average ∼ 0–5 % with a standard deviation of 25–50 %, which is comparable to the estimated retrieval uncertainties in both CrIS and the FTIR. For the smallest total column range (< 1.0  × 1016 molecules cm−2 where there are a large number of observations at or near the CrIS noise level (detection limit the absolute differences between CrIS and the FTIR total columns show a slight positive column bias. The CrIS and FTIR profile comparison differences are mostly within the range of the single-level retrieved profile values from estimated retrieval uncertainties, showing average differences in the range of  ∼ 20 to 40 %. The CrIS retrievals typically show good vertical sensitivity down into the boundary layer which typically peaks at  ∼ 850 hPa (∼ 1.5 km. At this level the median absolute difference is 0.87 (std  =  ±0.08 ppb, corresponding to a median relative difference of 39 % (std  =  ±2 %. Most of the absolute and relative profile comparison differences are in the range of the estimated retrieval uncertainties. At the surface, where CrIS typically has lower sensitivity, it tends to overestimate in low-concentration conditions and underestimate

  4. The Fast Scattering Code (FSC): Validation Studies and Program Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinetti, Ana F.; Dunn, Mark H.

    2011-01-01

    The Fast Scattering Code (FSC) is a frequency domain noise prediction program developed at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to simulate the acoustic field produced by the interaction of known, time harmonic incident sound with bodies of arbitrary shape and surface impedance immersed in a potential flow. The code uses the equivalent source method (ESM) to solve an exterior 3-D Helmholtz boundary value problem (BVP) by expanding the scattered acoustic pressure field into a series of point sources distributed on a fictitious surface placed inside the actual scatterer. This work provides additional code validation studies and illustrates the range of code parameters that produce accurate results with minimal computational costs. Systematic noise prediction studies are presented in which monopole generated incident sound is scattered by simple geometric shapes - spheres (acoustically hard and soft surfaces), oblate spheroids, flat disk, and flat plates with various edge topologies. Comparisons between FSC simulations and analytical results and experimental data are presented.

  5. Ground-Water Recharge in Humid Areas of the United States--A Summary of Ground-Water Resources Program Studies, 2003-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delin, Geoffrey N.; Risser, Dennis W.

    2007-01-01

    Increased demands on water resources by a growing population and recent droughts have raised awareness about the adequacy of ground-water resources in humid areas of the United States. The spatial and temporal variability of ground-water recharge are key factors that need to be quantified to determine the sustainability of ground-water resources. Ground-water recharge is defined herein as the entry into the saturated zone of water made available at the water-table surface, together with the associated flow away from the water table within the saturated zone (Freeze and Cherry, 1979). In response to the need for better estimates of ground-water recharge, the Ground-Water Resources Program (GWRP) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began an initiative in 2003 to estimate ground-water recharge rates in the relatively humid areas of the United States.

  6. Comparison of vertical ground reaction forces during overground and treadmill running. A validation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluitenberg, Bas; Bredeweg, Steef W.; Zijlstra, Sjouke; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Buist, Ida

    2012-01-01

    Background: One major drawback in measuring ground-reaction forces during running is that it is time consuming to get representative ground-reaction force (GRF) values with a traditional force platform. An instrumented force measuring treadmill can overcome the shortcomings inherent to overground te

  7. Comparison of vertical ground reaction forces during overground and treadmill running. A validation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluitenberg, Bas; Bredeweg, Steef W.; Zijlstra, Sjouke; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Buist, Ida

    2012-01-01

    Background: One major drawback in measuring ground-reaction forces during running is that it is time consuming to get representative ground-reaction force (GRF) values with a traditional force platform. An instrumented force measuring treadmill can overcome the shortcomings inherent to overground te

  8. Ground Truth Studies - A hands-on environmental science program for students, grades K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzenberger, John; Chappell, Charles R.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses the background and the objectives of the Ground Truth Studies (GTSs), an activity-based teaching program which integrates local environmental studies with global change topics, utilizing remotely sensed earth imagery. Special attention is given to the five key concepts around which the GTS programs are organized, the pilot program, the initial pilot study evaluation, and the GTS Handbook. The GTS Handbook contains a primer on global change and remote sensing, aerial and satellite images, student activities, glossary, and an appendix of reference material. Also described is a K-12 teacher training model. International participation in the program is to be initiated during the 1992-1993 school year.

  9. A validation of ground ambulance pre-hospital times modeled using geographic information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Alka B

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evaluating geographic access to health services often requires determining the patient travel time to a specified service. For urgent care, many research studies have modeled patient pre-hospital time by ground emergency medical services (EMS using geographic information systems (GIS. The purpose of this study was to determine if the modeling assumptions proposed through prior United States (US studies are valid in a non-US context, and to use the resulting information to provide revised recommendations for modeling travel time using GIS in the absence of actual EMS trip data. Methods The study sample contained all emergency adult patient trips within the Calgary area for 2006. Each record included four components of pre-hospital time (activation, response, on-scene and transport interval. The actual activation and on-scene intervals were compared with those used in published models. The transport interval was calculated within GIS using the Network Analyst extension of Esri ArcGIS 10.0 and the response interval was derived using previously established methods. These GIS derived transport and response intervals were compared with the actual times using descriptive methods. We used the information acquired through the analysis of the EMS trip data to create an updated model that could be used to estimate travel time in the absence of actual EMS trip records. Results There were 29,765 complete EMS records for scene locations inside the city and 529 outside. The actual median on-scene intervals were longer than the average previously reported by 7–8 minutes. Actual EMS pre-hospital times across our study area were significantly higher than the estimated times modeled using GIS and the original travel time assumptions. Our updated model, although still underestimating the total pre-hospital time, more accurately represents the true pre-hospital time in our study area. Conclusions The widespread use of generalized EMS pre

  10. A validation of ground ambulance pre-hospital times modeled using geographic information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Alka B; Waters, Nigel M; Blanchard, Ian E; Doig, Christopher J; Ghali, William A

    2012-10-03

    Evaluating geographic access to health services often requires determining the patient travel time to a specified service. For urgent care, many research studies have modeled patient pre-hospital time by ground emergency medical services (EMS) using geographic information systems (GIS). The purpose of this study was to determine if the modeling assumptions proposed through prior United States (US) studies are valid in a non-US context, and to use the resulting information to provide revised recommendations for modeling travel time using GIS in the absence of actual EMS trip data. The study sample contained all emergency adult patient trips within the Calgary area for 2006. Each record included four components of pre-hospital time (activation, response, on-scene and transport interval). The actual activation and on-scene intervals were compared with those used in published models. The transport interval was calculated within GIS using the Network Analyst extension of Esri ArcGIS 10.0 and the response interval was derived using previously established methods. These GIS derived transport and response intervals were compared with the actual times using descriptive methods. We used the information acquired through the analysis of the EMS trip data to create an updated model that could be used to estimate travel time in the absence of actual EMS trip records. There were 29,765 complete EMS records for scene locations inside the city and 529 outside. The actual median on-scene intervals were longer than the average previously reported by 7-8 minutes. Actual EMS pre-hospital times across our study area were significantly higher than the estimated times modeled using GIS and the original travel time assumptions. Our updated model, although still underestimating the total pre-hospital time, more accurately represents the true pre-hospital time in our study area. The widespread use of generalized EMS pre-hospital time assumptions based on US data may not be appropriate in a

  11. Validation of Satellite AOD Data with the Ground PM10 Data over Islamabad Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulbul, Gufran; Shahid, Imran

    2016-07-01

    health. In this study, concentrations of PM10 will be monitored at different sites in H-12 sector and Kashmir Highway Islamabad using High volume air sampler and its chemical characterization will be done using Energy Dispersive XRF. The first application of satellite remote sensing for aerosol monitoring began in the mid-1970s to detect the desert particles above the ocean using data from Landsat, GOES, and AVHRR remote sensing satellites. Maps of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) over the ocean were produced using the 0.63 µm channel of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) . Aerosols properties were retrieved using AVHRR. The useable range of wavelengths of spectrum (shorter wavelengths and the longer wavelengths) for the remote sensing of the aerosols particles is mostly restricted due to ozone and gaseous absorptions. The purpose of the study is to validate the satellite Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) data for the regional and local scale for Pakistan Objectives • To quantify the concentration of PM10 • To investigate their elemental composition • To find out their possible sources • Validation with MODIS satellite AOD Methodology: PM10 concentration will be measured at different sites of NUST Islamabad, Pakistan using High volume air sampler an Air sampling equipment capable of sampling high volumes of air (typically 57,000 ft3 or 1,600 m3) at high flow rates (typically 1.13 m3/min or 40 ft3/min) over an extended sampling duration (typically 24 hrs). The sampling period will be of 24 hours. Particles in the PM10 size range are then collected on the filter(s) during the specified 24-h sampling period. Each sample filter will be weighed before and after sampling to determine the net weight (mass) gain of the collected PM10 sample (40 CFR Part 50, Appendix M, US EPA). Next step will be the chemical characterization. Element concentrations will be determined by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF) technique. The ED-XRF system uses an X-ray tube to

  12. How Robotics Programs Influence Young Women's Career Choices: A Grounded Theory Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Cecilia Dosh-Bluhm

    2014-01-01

    The fields of engineering, computer science, and physics have a paucity of women despite decades of intervention by universities and organizations. Women's graduation rates in these fields continue to stagnate, posing a critical problem for society. This qualitative grounded theory (GT) study sought to understand how robotics programs influenced…

  13. How Robotics Programs Influence Young Women's Career Choices: A Grounded Theory Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Cecilia Dosh-Bluhm

    2014-01-01

    The fields of engineering, computer science, and physics have a paucity of women despite decades of intervention by universities and organizations. Women's graduation rates in these fields continue to stagnate, posing a critical problem for society. This qualitative grounded theory (GT) study sought to understand how robotics programs influenced…

  14. Identifying Barriers in Implementing Outcomes-Based Assessment Program Review: A Grounded Theory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresciani, Marilee J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this grounded theory study was to identify the typical barriers encountered by faculty and administrators when implementing outcomes-based assessment program review. An analysis of interviews with faculty and administrators at nine institutions revealed a theory that faculty and administrators' promotion, tenure (if applicable),…

  15. Structured Programming Series. Volume 15. Validation and Verification Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-05-22

    concept* b. Top down programming c . Structured programming In FORTRAN with a preprocessor d. Variation of HIPO* Including: *A1 though these are not...Structured programming technology components used In this project Include: a. Top down programming b. Structured programming c . Program design

  16. The Effects of Highlighting, Validity, and Feature Type on Air-to-Ground Target Acquisition Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    cultura I taget Target type Validity X target X leadin interaction on initial response time (highlighted trials) WRONG HIGHLIGHTING ÖU - M ea...natural - leadin cultural ndurd cultura taget I taget Target type Figure 3.10: Validity X lead-in X Target interaction Confirmation time A

  17. Validation of CALIPSO space-borne-derived attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles using a ground-based lidar in Athens, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Mamouri

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We present initial aerosol validation results of the space-borne lidar CALIOP -onboard the CALIPSO satellite- Level 1 attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles, using coincident observations performed with a ground-based lidar in Athens, Greece (37.9° N, 23.6° E. A multi-wavelength ground-based backscatter/Raman lidar system is operating since 2000 at the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA in the framework of the European Aerosol Research LIdar NETwork (EARLINET, the first lidar network for tropospheric aerosol studies on a continental scale. Since July 2006, a total of 40 coincidental aerosol ground-based lidar measurements were performed over Athens during CALIPSO overpasses. The ground-based measurements were performed each time CALIPSO overpasses the station location within a maximum distance of 100 km. The duration of the ground–based lidar measurements was approximately two hours, centred on the satellite overpass time. From the analysis of the ground-based/satellite correlative lidar measurements, a mean bias of the order of 22% for daytime measurements and of 8% for nighttime measurements with respect to the CALIPSO profiles was found for altitudes between 3 and 10 km. The mean bias becomes much larger for altitudes lower that 3 km (of the order of 60% which is attributed to the increase of aerosol horizontal inhomogeneity within the Planetary Boundary Layer, resulting to the observation of possibly different air masses by the two instruments. In cases of aerosol layers underlying Cirrus clouds, comparison results for aerosol tropospheric profiles become worse. This is attributed to the significant multiple scattering effects in Cirrus clouds experienced by CALIPSO which result in an attenuation which is less than that measured by the ground-based lidar.

  18. Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menart, James A. [Wright State University

    2013-02-22

    This report is a compilation of the work that has been done on the grant DE-EE0002805 entitled ?Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump Systems.? The goal of this project was to develop a detailed computer simulation tool for GSHP (ground source heat pump) heating and cooling systems. Two such tools were developed as part of this DOE (Department of Energy) grant; the first is a two-dimensional computer program called GEO2D and the second is a three-dimensional computer program called GEO3D. Both of these simulation tools provide an extensive array of results to the user. A unique aspect of both these simulation tools is the complete temperature profile information calculated and presented. Complete temperature profiles throughout the ground, casing, tube wall, and fluid are provided as a function of time. The fluid temperatures from and to the heat pump, as a function of time, are also provided. In addition to temperature information, detailed heat rate information at several locations as a function of time is determined. Heat rates between the heat pump and the building indoor environment, between the working fluid and the heat pump, and between the working fluid and the ground are computed. The heat rates between the ground and the working fluid are calculated as a function time and position along the ground loop. The heating and cooling loads of the building being fitted with a GSHP are determined with the computer program developed by DOE called ENERGYPLUS. Lastly COP (coefficient of performance) results as a function of time are provided. Both the two-dimensional and three-dimensional computer programs developed as part of this work are based upon a detailed finite volume solution of the energy equation for the ground and ground loop. Real heat pump characteristics are entered into the program and used to model the heat pump performance. Thus these computer tools simulate the coupled performance of the ground loop and the heat pump

  19. Recovery Act: Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James A Menart, Professor

    2013-02-22

    This report is a compilation of the work that has been done on the grant DE-EE0002805 entitled Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump Systems. The goal of this project was to develop a detailed computer simulation tool for GSHP (ground source heat pump) heating and cooling systems. Two such tools were developed as part of this DOE (Department of Energy) grant; the first is a two-dimensional computer program called GEO2D and the second is a three-dimensional computer program called GEO3D. Both of these simulation tools provide an extensive array of results to the user. A unique aspect of both these simulation tools is the complete temperature profile information calculated and presented. Complete temperature profiles throughout the ground, casing, tube wall, and fluid are provided as a function of time. The fluid temperatures from and to the heat pump, as a function of time, are also provided. In addition to temperature information, detailed heat rate information at several locations as a function of time is determined. Heat rates between the heat pump and the building indoor environment, between the working fluid and the heat pump, and between the working fluid and the ground are computed. The heat rates between the ground and the working fluid are calculated as a function time and position along the ground loop. The heating and cooling loads of the building being fitted with a GSHP are determined with the computer program developed by DOE called ENERGYPLUS. Lastly COP (coefficient of performance) results as a function of time are provided. Both the two-dimensional and three-dimensional computer programs developed as part of this work are based upon a detailed finite volume solution of the energy equation for the ground and ground loop. Real heat pump characteristics are entered into the program and used to model the heat pump performance. Thus these computer tools simulate the coupled performance of the ground loop and the heat pump. The

  20. Validation of a Torso-Mounted Accelerometer for Measures of Vertical Oscillation and Ground Contact Time During Treadmill Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Ricky; Hettinga, Blayne; Osis, Sean; Ferber, Reed

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate measures of vertical oscillation (VO) and ground contact time (GCT) derived from a commercially-available, torso-mounted accelerometer compared with single marker kinematics and kinetic ground reaction force (GRF) data. Twenty-two semi-elite runners ran on an instrumented treadmill while GRF data (1000 Hz) and three-dimensional kinematics (200 Hz) were collected for 60 s across 5 different running speeds ranging from 2.7 to 3.9 m/s. Measurement agreement was assessed by Bland-Altman plots with 95% limits of agreement and by concordance correlation coefficient (CCC). The accelerometer had excellent CCC agreement (> 0.97) with marker kinematics, but only moderate agreement, and overestimated measures between 16.27 mm to 17.56 mm compared with GRF VO measures. The GCT measures from the accelerometer had very good CCC agreement with GRF data, with less than 6 ms of mean bias at higher speeds. These results indicate a torso-mounted accelerometer provides valid and accurate measures of torso-segment VO, but both a marker placed on the torso and the accelerometer yield systematic overestimations of center of mass VO. Measures of GCT from the accelerometer are valid when compared with GRF data, particularly at faster running speeds.

  1. Self-organizing strategy design and validation for integrated air-ground detection swarm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meiyan An; Zhaokui Wang; Yulin Zhang

    2016-01-01

    A self-organized integrated air-ground detection swarm is tentatively applied to achieve reentry vehicle landing detection, such as searching and rescuing a manned spaceship. The detec-tion swarm consists of multiple unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs). The UAVs can access a detected object quickly for high mobility, while the UGVs can comprehensively investigate the object due to the variety of car-ried equipment. In addition, the integrated air-ground detection swarm is capable of detecting from the ground and the air si-multaneously. To accomplish the coordination of the UGVs and UAVs, they are al regarded as individuals of the artificial swarm. Those individuals make control decisions independently of others based on the self-organizing strategy. The overal requirements for the detection swarm are analyzed, and the theoretical model of the self-organizing strategy based on a combined individual and environmental virtual function is established. The numerical in-vestigation proves that the self-organizing strategy is suitable and scalable to control the detection swarm. To further inspect the en-gineering reliability, an experiment set is established in laboratory, and the experimental demonstration shows that the self-organizing strategy drives the detection swarm forming a close range and mul-tiangular surveil ance configuration of a landing spot.

  2. Validity and reliability of pressure-measurement insoles for vertical ground reaction force assessment in field situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Markus; Lunde, Lars-Kristian; Ernst, Michael; Knardahl, Stein; Veiersted, Kaj Bo

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to test the validity and reliability of pressure-measurement insoles (medilogic® insoles) when measuring vertical ground reaction forces in field situations. Various weights were applied to and removed from the insoles in static mechanical tests. The force values measured simultaneously by the insoles and force plates were compared for 15 subjects simulating work activities. Reliability testing during the static mechanical tests yielded an average interclass correlation coefficient of 0.998. Static loads led to a creeping pattern of the output force signal. An individual load response could be observed for each insole. The average root mean square error between the insoles and force plates ranged from 6.6% to 17.7% in standing, walking, lifting and catching trials and was 142.3% in kneeling trials. The results show that the use of insoles may be an acceptable method for measuring vertical ground reaction forces in field studies, except for kneeling positions.

  3. Generalizability of GMAT[R] Validity to Programs outside the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talento-Miller, Eileen

    2008-01-01

    This study explores the predictive validity of GMAT[R] scores for predicting performance in graduate management programs outside the United States. Results suggest that the validity estimates based on the combination of GMAT[R] scores were about a third of a standard deviation higher for non-U.S. programs compared with existing data on U.S.…

  4. Generalizability of GMAT[R] Validity to Programs outside the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talento-Miller, Eileen

    2008-01-01

    This study explores the predictive validity of GMAT[R] scores for predicting performance in graduate management programs outside the United States. Results suggest that the validity estimates based on the combination of GMAT[R] scores were about a third of a standard deviation higher for non-U.S. programs compared with existing data on U.S.…

  5. Ground-based water vapor Raman lidar measurements up to the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere – Part 1: Instrument development, optimization, and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. McDermid

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Recognizing the importance of water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS and the scarcity of high-quality, long-term measurements, JPL began the development of a powerful Raman lidar in 2005 to try to meet these needs. This development was endorsed by the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC and the validation program for the EOS-Aura satellite. In this paper we review the stages in the instrumental development of the lidar and the conclusions from three validation campaigns: MOHAVE, MOHAVE-II, and MOHAVE 2009 (Measurements of Humidity in the Atmosphere and Validation Experiments. The data analysis, profile retrieval and calibration procedures, as well as additional results from MOHAVE-2009 are presented in detail in a companion paper (Leblanc et al., 2011a. Ultimately the lidar has demonstrated capability to measure water vapor profiles from ~1 km above the ground to the lower stratosphere, reaching 14 km for 1-h integrated profiles and 21 km for 6-h integrated profiles, with a precision of 10 % or better near 13 km and below, and an estimated accuracy of 5 %.

  6. Geographic Information System technology applications to Ground-Water Management Program, EPA Region 3. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clibanoff, A.

    1989-01-01

    The report is part of the National Network for Environmental Management Studies under the auspices of the Office of Cooperative Environmental Management of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. GIS technology is a computer informational system that stores, analyzes, and manipulates both spatial and non-spatial data. Base map information for the GIS has come primarily from the USGS. Data for the entire Region at the 1:2,000,000 scale and for some of the Region at the 1:100,000 scale is currently being used. Data from GIRAS, a land use Database, at the 1:250,000 also exists for much of the Region. Information is contributed to the GIS from various sources including but not limited to RCRA, CERCLA, UIC, and UST programs. The WHP program is also being tapped to identify locations of public water supply wells. Region III is interested in any data that accurately describes the ground water condition in a given area. In Regional pilot studies being conducted, GIS is being employed at both the regional and county level. The goals of the pilot studies include the identification of areas of ground water susceptibility and major sources of ground water contamination, and prioritizing the Region's ground water supplies in terms of vulnerability to pollution and risk to the population.

  7. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Guidelines for determining design basis ground motions. Volume 2, Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-18

    This report develops and applies a methodology for estimating strong earthquake ground motion. The motivation was to develop a much needed tool for use in developing the seismic requirements for structural designs. An earthquake`s ground motion is a function of the earthquake`s magnitude, and the physical properties of the earth through which the seismic waves travel from the earthquake fault to the site of interest. The emphasis of this study is on ground motion estimation in Eastern North America (east of the Rocky Mountains), with particular emphasis on the Eastern United States and southeastern Canada. Eastern North America is a stable continental region, having sparse earthquake activity with rare occurrences of large earthquakes. While large earthquakes are of interest for assessing seismic hazard, little data exists from the region to empirically quantify their effects. The focus of the report is on the attributes of ground motion in Eastern North America that are of interest for the design of facilities such as nuclear power plants. This document, Volume II, contains Appendices 2, 3, 5, 6, and 7 covering the following topics: Eastern North American Empirical Ground Motion Data; Examination of Variance of Seismographic Network Data; Soil Amplification and Vertical-to-Horizontal Ratios from Analysis of Strong Motion Data From Active Tectonic Regions; Revision and Calibration of Ou and Herrmann Method; Generalized Ray Procedure for Modeling Ground Motion Attenuation; Crustal Models for Velocity Regionalization; Depth Distribution Models; Development of Generic Site Effects Model; Validation and Comparison of One-Dimensional Site Response Methodologies; Plots of Amplification Factors; Assessment of Coupling Between Vertical & Horizontal Motions in Nonlinear Site Response Analysis; and Modeling of Dynamic Soil Properties.

  8. Validation and understanding of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aerosol products (C5) using ground-based measurements from the handheld Sun photometer network in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhanqing Li; Feng Niu; Kwon-Ho Lee; Jinyuan Xin; Wei Min Hao; Bryce L. Nordgren; Yuesi Wang; Pucai Wang

    2007-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) currently provides the most extensive aerosol retrievals on a global basis, but validation is limited to a small number of ground stations. This study presents a comprehensive evaluation of Collection 4 and 5 MODIS aerosol products using ground measurements from the Chinese Sun Hazemeter Network (CSHNET). The...

  9. Dimensionless Maps for the Validity of Analytical Ground Heat Transfer Models for GSHP Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Conti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article provides plain and handy expressions to decide the most suitable analytical model for the thermal analysis of the ground source in vertical ground-coupled heat pump applications. We perform a comprehensive dimensionless analysis of the reciprocal deviation among the classical infinite, finite, linear and cylindrical heat source models in purely conductive media. Besides, we complete the framework of possible boreholes model with the “hollow” finite cylindrical heat source solution, still lacking in the literature. Analytical expressions are effective tools for both design and performance assessment: they are able to provide practical and general indications on the thermal behavior of the ground with an advantageous tradeoff between calculation efforts and solution accuracy. This notwithstanding, their applicability to any specific case is always subjected to the coherence of the model assumptions, also in terms of length and time scales, with the specific case of interest. We propose several dimensionless criteria to evaluate when one model is practically equivalent to another one and handy maps that can be used for both design and performance analysis. Finally, we found that the finite line source represents the most suitable model for borehole heat exchangers (BHEs, as it is applicable to a wide range of space and time scales, practically providing the same results of more complex models.

  10. Development and Ground-Test Validation of Fiber Optic Sensor Attachment Techniques for Hot Structures Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Anthony; Hudson, Larry D.; Richards, W. Lance

    2005-01-01

    Fiber Optic Strain Measurements: a) Successfully attached silica fiber optic sensors to both metallics and composites; b) Accomplished valid EFPI strain measurements to 1850 F; c) Successfully attached EFPI sensors to large scale hot-structures; and d) Attached and thermally validated FBG bond and epsilon(sub app). Future Development a) Improve characterization of sensors on C-C and C-SiC substrates; b) Apply application to other composites such as SiC-SiC; c) Assist development of interferometer based Sapphire sensor currently being conducted under a Phase II SBIR; and d) Complete combined thermal/mechanical testing of FBG on composite substrates in controlled laboratory environment.

  11. Update of the 2 Kw Solar Dynamic Ground Test Demonstration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Boyle, Robert V.

    1994-01-01

    The Solar Dynamic (SD) Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) program demonstrates the operation of a complete 2 kW, SD system in a simulated space environment at a NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) thermal-vacuum facility. This paper reviews the goals and status of the SD GTD program. A brief description of the SD system identifying key design features of the system, subsystems, and components is included. An aerospace industry/government team is working together to design, fabricate, assemble, and test a complete SD system.

  12. Shuttle Ground Support Equipment (GSE) T-0 Umbilical to Space Shuttle Program (SSP) Flight Elements Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Timmy R.; Kichak, Robert A.; McManamen, John P.; Kramer-White, Julie; Raju, Ivatury S.; Beil, Robert J.; Weeks, John F.; Elliott, Kenny B.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was tasked with assessing the validity of an alternate opinion that surfaced during the investigation of recurrent failures at the Space Shuttle T-0 umbilical interface. The most visible problem occurred during the Space Transportation System (STS)-112 launch when pyrotechnics used to separate Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Hold-Down Post (HDP) frangible nuts failed to fire. Subsequent investigations recommended several improvements to the Ground Support Equipment (GSE) and processing changes were implemented, including replacement of ground-half cables and connectors between flights, along with wiring modifications to make critical circuits quad-redundant across the interface. The alternate opinions maintained that insufficient data existed to exonerate the design, that additional data needed to be gathered under launch conditions, and that the interface should be further modified to ensure additional margin existed to preclude failure. The results of the assessment are contained in this report.

  13. Validation of GOME-2/Metop total column water vapour with ground-based and in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalakoski, Niilo; Kujanpää, Jukka; Sofieva, Viktoria; Tamminen, Johanna; Grossi, Margherita; Valks, Pieter

    2016-04-01

    The total column water vapour product from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 on board Metop-A and Metop-B satellites (GOME-2/Metop-A and GOME-2/Metop-B) produced by the Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M SAF) is compared with co-located radiosonde observations and global positioning system (GPS) retrievals. The validation is performed using recently reprocessed data by the GOME Data Processor (GDP) version 4.7. The time periods for the validation are January 2007-July 2013 (GOME-2A) and December 2012-July 2013 (GOME-2B). The radiosonde data are from the Integrated Global Radiosonde Archive (IGRA) maintained by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). The ground-based GPS observations from the COSMIC/SuomiNet network are used as the second independent data source. We find a good general agreement between the GOME-2 and the radiosonde/GPS data. The median relative difference of GOME-2 to the radiosonde observations is -2.7 % for GOME-2A and -0.3 % for GOME-2B. Against the GPS, the median relative differences are 4.9 % and 3.2 % for GOME-2A and B, respectively. For water vapour total columns below 10 kg m-2, large wet biases are observed, especially against the GPS retrievals. Conversely, at values above 50 kg m-2, GOME-2 generally underestimates both ground-based observations.

  14. Data Mining for Understanding and Impriving Decision-Making Affecting Ground Delay Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Deepak; Wang, Yao Xun; Sridhar, Banavar

    2013-01-01

    The continuous growth in the demand for air transportation results in an imbalance between airspace capacity and traffic demand. The airspace capacity of a region depends on the ability of the system to maintain safe separation between aircraft in the region. In addition to growing demand, the airspace capacity is severely limited by convective weather. During such conditions, traffic managers at the FAA's Air Traffic Control System Command Center (ATCSCC) and dispatchers at various Airlines' Operations Center (AOC) collaborate to mitigate the demand-capacity imbalance caused by weather. The end result is the implementation of a set of Traffic Flow Management (TFM) initiatives such as ground delay programs, reroute advisories, flow metering, and ground stops. Data Mining is the automated process of analyzing large sets of data and then extracting patterns in the data. Data mining tools are capable of predicting behaviors and future trends, allowing an organization to benefit from past experience in making knowledge-driven decisions. The work reported in this paper is focused on ground delay programs. Data mining algorithms have the potential to develop associations between weather patterns and the corresponding ground delay program responses. If successful, they can be used to improve and standardize TFM decision resulting in better predictability of traffic flows on days with reliable weather forecasts. The approach here seeks to develop a set of data mining and machine learning models and apply them to historical archives of weather observations and forecasts and TFM initiatives to determine the extent to which the theory can predict and explain the observed traffic flow behaviors.

  15. Space-borne detection of volcanic carbon dioxide anomalies: The importance of ground-based validation networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandner, F. M.; Carn, S. A.; Corradini, S.; Merucci, L.; Salerno, G.; La Spina, A.

    2012-04-01

    2011 activity we compare GOSAT custom re-processed target mode observation CO2 data to SO2 data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and ground-based SO2 measurements obtained by the FLAME ultraviolet scanning DOAS network, as well as ground-based multi-species measurements obtained by FTIR technique. GOSAT CO2 data show an expected seasonal pattern, because the signal is dominated by ambient atmospheric CO2. However, some possible significant variations do appear to exist before and during eruptive events. Besides cloud and aerosol effects and volcanic emission pulses, two further factors seem to also strongly affect the signal beyond seasonal variability: different altitudes ranges of sensitivity for OMI and GOSAT appear to cause inverse signal correlations when the presence of clouds allows for multiple scattering effects. The second effect is wintertime high-altitude snow cover, which enhances the reflected light yield in the suspected high-concentration column portions near the ground. The latter two effects may dominate between emission pulses and their inverse correlations stand in contrast to magmatic events, which we suspect to give rise to positive correlations. (2) Integration of space-borne and ground-based observations of volcanic CO2 emissions. Monitoring of remote terrestrial volcanic point sources of CO2 from space and using ground-based observations have advantages and disadvantages. Advantages of satellite methods include homogenous coverage potential, a single data format, and a largely unbiased, mostly global coverage potential. Advantages of ground-based observations include easier calibration and targeting, validation and spatial resolution capacity. While cost plays a strong role in either approach, ground-based methods are often hampered by available personnel to expand observations to global coverage, by a patchwork of instrumentation types, coverage, availability, quality, and

  16. An Experimental Facility to Validate Ground Source Heat Pump Optimisation Models for the Australian Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanshen Lu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ground source heat pumps (GSHPs are one of the most widespread forms of geothermal energy technology. They utilise the near-constant temperature of the ground below the frost line to achieve energy-efficiencies two or three times that of conventional air-conditioners, consequently allowing a significant offset in electricity demand for space heating and cooling. Relatively mature GSHP markets are established in Europe and North America. GSHP implementation in Australia, however, is limited, due to high capital price, uncertainties regarding optimum designs for the Australian climate, and limited consumer confidence in the technology. Existing GSHP design standards developed in the Northern Hemisphere are likely to lead to suboptimal performance in Australia where demand might be much more cooling-dominated. There is an urgent need to develop Australia’s own GSHP system optimisation principles on top of the industry standards to provide confidence to bring the GSHP market out of its infancy. To assist in this, the Queensland Geothermal Energy Centre of Excellence (QGECE has commissioned a fully instrumented GSHP experimental facility in Gatton, Australia, as a publically-accessible demonstration of the technology and a platform for systematic studies of GSHPs, including optimisation of design and operations. This paper presents a brief review on current GSHP use in Australia, the technical details of the Gatton GSHP facility, and an analysis on the observed cooling performance of this facility to date.

  17. Anger & Aggression Management in Young Adolescents: An Experimental Validation of the SCARE Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, D. Scott; McWhirter, J. Jeffries

    2003-01-01

    A study examined the validity of the SCARE program; an anger management program developed with high school students. Adolescents (n=207) exposed to the SCARE program had significantly lower levels of anger and aggression, slightly higher anger control, and lower scores on aggressive and violent attitudes a year after exposure. (Contains…

  18. Groningen orthopaedic exit strategy : Validation of a support program after total hip or knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Groothoff, Johan W.; van Horn, Jim R.; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.; Stevens, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Validation of the program theory of the Groningen orthopaedic exit strategy (GOES), a theory-driven program aiming to improve the rehabilitation of total hip and knee arthroplasty patients after shortened hospital stay. First part of the program theory is the action theory, hypothesising

  19. Validation of vertical ground reaction forces on individual limbs calculated from kinematics of horse locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, Maarten F; Gómez Alvarez, Constanza B; van Weeren, P René; Roepstorff, Lars; Weishaupt, Michael A

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether individual limb forces could be calculated accurately from kinematics of trotting and walking horses. We collected kinematic data and measured vertical ground reaction forces on the individual limbs of seven Warmblood dressage horses, trotting at 3.4 m s(-1) and walking at 1.6 m s(-1) on a treadmill. First, using a segmental model, we calculated from kinematics the total ground reaction force vector and its moment arm relative to each of the hoofs. Second, for phases in which the body was supported by only two limbs, we calculated the individual reaction forces on these limbs. Third, we assumed that the distal limbs operated as linear springs, and determined their force-length relationships using calculated individual limb forces at trot. Finally, we calculated individual limb force-time histories from distal limb lengths. A good correspondence was obtained between calculated and measured individual limb forces. At trot, the average peak vertical reaction force on the forelimb was calculated to be 11.5+/-0.9 N kg(-1) and measured to be 11.7+/-0.9 N kg(-1), and for the hindlimb these values were 9.8+/-0.7 N kg(-1) and 10.0+/-0.6 N kg(-1), respectively. At walk, the average peak vertical reaction force on the forelimb was calculated to be 6.9+/-0.5 N kg(-1) and measured to be 7.1+/-0.3 N kg(-1), and for the hindlimb these values were 4.8+/-0.5 N kg(-1) and 4.7+/-0.3 N kg(-1), respectively. It was concluded that the proposed method of calculating individual limb reaction forces is sufficiently accurate to detect changes in loading reported in the literature for mild to moderate lameness at trot.

  20. NASA solar dynamic ground test demonstration (GTD) program and its application to space nuclear power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, William B.; Shaltens, Richard K.

    1993-01-01

    Closed Brayton cycle power conversion systems are readily adaptable to any heat source contemplated for space application. The inert gas working fluid can be used directly in gas-cooled reactors and coupled to a variety of heat sources (reactor, isotope or solar) by a heat exchanger. This point is demonstrated by the incorporation in the NASA 2 kWe Solar Dynamic (SD) Space Power Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) Program of the turboalternator-compressor and recuperator from the Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) program. This paper will review the goals and status of the SD GTD Program, initiated in April 1992. The performance of the BIPS isotope-heated system will be compared to the solar-heated GTD system incorporating the BIPS components and the applicability of the GTD test bed to dynamics space nuclear power R&D will be discussed.

  1. A Coding Scheme Development Methodology Using Grounded Theory For Qualitative Analysis Of Pair Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Salinger

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of quantitative studies of pair programming (the practice of two programmers working together using just one computer have partially conflicting results. Qualitative studies are needed to explain what is really going on. We support such studies by taking a grounded theory (GT approach for deriving a coding scheme for the objective conceptual description of specific pair programming sessions independent of a particular research goal. The present article explains why our initial attempts at using GT failed and describes how to avoid these difficulties by a predetermined perspective on the data, concept naming rules, an analysis results metamodel, and pair coding. These practices may be helpful in all GT situations, particularly those involving very rich data such as video data. We illustrate the operation and usefulness of these practices by real examples derived from our coding work and present a few preliminary hypotheses regarding pair programming that have surfaced.

  2. AATSR Land Surface Temperature Product Validation Using Ground Measurements in China and Implications for SLSTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji; Zmuda, Andy; Desnos, Yves-Louis; Ma, Jin

    2016-08-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is one of the most important parameters at the interface between the earth's surface and the atmosphere. It acts as a sensitive indicator of climate change and is an essential input parameter for land surface models. Because of the intense variability at different spatial and temporal scales, satellite remote sensing provides the sole opportunity to acquire LSTs over large regions. Validation of the LST products is an necessary step before their applications conducted by scientific community and it is essential for the developers to improve the LST products.

  3. Data Mining for Understanding and Improving Decision-making Affecting Ground Delay Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Deepak; Wang, Yao; Sridhar, Banavar

    2013-01-01

    The continuous growth in the demand for air transportation results in an imbalance between airspace capacity and traffic demand. The airspace capacity of a region depends on the ability of the system to maintain safe separation between aircraft in the region. In addition to growing demand, the airspace capacity is severely limited by convective weather. During such conditions, traffic managers at the FAA's Air Traffic Control System Command Center (ATCSCC) and dispatchers at various Airlines' Operations Center (AOC) collaborate to mitigate the demand-capacity imbalance caused by weather. The end result is the implementation of a set of Traffic Flow Management (TFM) initiatives such as ground delay programs, reroute advisories, flow metering, and ground stops. Data Mining is the automated process of analyzing large sets of data and then extracting patterns in the data. Data mining tools are capable of predicting behaviors and future trends, allowing an organization to benefit from past experience in making knowledge-driven decisions.

  4. Validation of VIIRS Cloud Base Heights at Night Using Ground and Satellite Measurements over Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    NOH, Y. J.; Miller, S. D.; Seaman, C.; Forsythe, J. M.; Brummer, R.; Lindsey, D. T.; Walther, A.; Heidinger, A. K.; Li, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of Cloud Base Height (CBH) is critical to describing cloud radiative feedbacks in numerical models and is of practical significance to aviation communities. We have developed a new CBH algorithm constrained by Cloud Top Height (CTH) and Cloud Water Path (CWP) by performing a statistical analysis of A-Train satellite data. It includes an extinction-based method for thin cirrus. In the algorithm, cloud geometric thickness is derived with upstream CTH and CWP input and subtracted from CTH to generate the topmost layer CBH. The CBH information is a key parameter for an improved Cloud Cover/Layers product. The algorithm has been applied to the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard the Suomi NPP spacecraft. Nighttime cloud optical properties for CWP are retrieved from the nighttime lunar cloud optical and microphysical properties (NLCOMP) algorithm based on a lunar reflectance model for the VIIRS Day/Night Band (DNB) measuring nighttime visible light such as moonlight. The DNB has innovative capabilities to fill the polar winter and nighttime gap of cloud observations which has been an important shortfall from conventional radiometers. The CBH products have been intensively evaluated against CloudSat data. The results showed the new algorithm yields significantly improved performance over the original VIIRS CBH algorithm. However, since CloudSat is now operational during daytime only due to a battery anomaly, the nighttime performance has not been fully assessed. This presentation will show our approach to assess the performance of the CBH algorithm at night. VIIRS CBHs are retrieved over the Alaska region from October 2015 to April 2016 using the Clouds from AVHRR Extended (CLAVR-x) processing system. Ground-based measurements from ceilometer and micropulse lidar at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site on the North Slope of Alaska are used for the analysis. Local weather conditions are checked using temperature and precipitation

  5. From the ground up: building a minimally invasive aortic valve surgery program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tom C; Lamelas, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) is associated with numerous advantages including improved patient satisfaction, cosmesis, decreased transfusion requirements, and cost-effectiveness. Despite these advantages, little information exists on how to build a MIAVR program from the ground up. The steps to build a MIAVR program include compiling a multi-disciplinary team composed of surgeons, cardiologists, anesthesiologists, perfusionists, operating room (OR) technicians, and nurses. Once assembled, this team can then approach hospital administrators to present a cost-benefit analysis of MIAVR, emphasizing the importance of reduced resource utilization in the long-term to offset the initial financial investment that will be required. With hospital approval, training can commence to provide surgeons and other staff with the necessary knowledge and skills in MIAVR procedures and outcomes. Marketing and advertising of the program through the use of social media, educational conferences, grand rounds, and printed media will attract the initial patients. A dedicated website for the program can function as a "virtual lobby" for patients wanting to learn more. Initially, conservative selection criteria of cases that qualify for MIAVR will set the program up for success by avoiding complex co-morbidities and surgical techniques. During the learning curve phase of the program, patient safety should be a priority.

  6. Distributed Disdrometer and Rain Gauge Measurement Infrastructure Developed for GPM Ground Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, W. A.; Bringi, V.; Carey, L. D.; Gatlin, P. N.; Phillips, D.; Schwaller, M.; Tokay, A.; Wingo, M.; Wolff, D. B.

    2010-12-01

    Global Precipitation Mission (GPM)retrieval algorithm validation requires datasets characterizing the 4-D structure, variability, and correlation properties of hydrometeor particle size distributions (PSD) and accumulations over satellite fields of view (FOV;tropospheric sounding data to refine GPM snowfall retrievals. The gauge and disdrometer instruments are being developed to operate autonomously when necessary using solar power and wireless communications. These systems will be deployed in numerous field campaigns through 2016. Planned deployment of these systems include field campaigns in Finland (2010), Oklahoma (2011), Canada (2012) and North Carolina (2013). GPM will also deploy 20 pairs of TBRGs within a 25 km2 region along the Virginia coast under NASA NPOL radar coverage in order to quantify errors in point-area rainfall measurements.

  7. Validation of ground-motion simulations for historical events using SDoF systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galasso, C.; Zareian, F.; Iervolino, I.; Graves, R.W.

    2012-01-01

    The study presented in this paper is among the first in a series of studies toward the engineering validation of the hybrid broadband ground‐motion simulation methodology by Graves and Pitarka (2010). This paper provides a statistical comparison between seismic demands of single degree of freedom (SDoF) systems subjected to past events using simulations and actual recordings. A number of SDoF systems are selected considering the following: (1) 16 oscillation periods between 0.1 and 6 s; (2) elastic case and four nonlinearity levels, from mildly inelastic to severely inelastic systems; and (3) two hysteretic behaviors, in particular, nondegrading–nonevolutionary and degrading–evolutionary. Demand spectra are derived in terms of peak and cyclic response, as well as their statistics for four historical earthquakes: 1979 Mw 6.5 Imperial Valley, 1989 Mw 6.8 Loma Prieta, 1992 Mw 7.2 Landers, and 1994 Mw 6.7 Northridge.

  8. User Guide and Documentation for Five MODFLOW Ground-Water Modeling Utility Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, Edward R.; Paschke, Suzanne S.; Litke, David W.

    2008-01-01

    This report documents five utility programs designed for use in conjunction with ground-water flow models developed with the U.S. Geological Survey's MODFLOW ground-water modeling program. One program extracts calculated flow values from one model for use as input to another model. The other four programs extract model input or output arrays from one model and make them available in a form that can be used to generate an ArcGIS raster data set. The resulting raster data sets may be useful for visual display of the data or for further geographic data processing. The utility program GRID2GRIDFLOW reads a MODFLOW binary output file of cell-by-cell flow terms for one (source) model grid and converts the flow values to input flow values for a different (target) model grid. The spatial and temporal discretization of the two models may differ. The four other utilities extract selected 2-dimensional data arrays in MODFLOW input and output files and write them to text files that can be imported into an ArcGIS geographic information system raster format. These four utilities require that the model cells be square and aligned with the projected coordinate system in which the model grid is defined. The four raster-conversion utilities are * CBC2RASTER, which extracts selected stress-package flow data from a MODFLOW binary output file of cell-by-cell flows; * DIS2RASTER, which extracts cell-elevation data from a MODFLOW Discretization file; * MFBIN2RASTER, which extracts array data from a MODFLOW binary output file of head or drawdown; and * MULT2RASTER, which extracts array data from a MODFLOW Multiplier file.

  9. Ozone columns obtained by ground-based remote sensing in Kiev for Aura Ozone Measuring Instrument validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavrina, A. V.; Pavlenko, Y. V.; Veles, A.; Syniavskyi, I.; Kroon, M.

    2007-12-01

    Ground-based observations with a Fourier transform spectrometer in the infrared region (FTIR) were performed in Kiev (Ukraine) during the time frames August-October 2005 and June-October 2006 within the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) validation project 2907 entitled "OMI validation by ground based remote sensing: ozone columns and profiles" in the frame of the international European Space Agency/Netherlands Agency for Aerospace Programmes/Royal Dutch Meteorological Institute OMI Announcement of Opportunity effort. Ozone column data for 2005 were obtained by modeling the ozone spectral band at 9.6 μm with the radiative transfer code MODTRAN3.5. Our total ozone column values were found to be lower than OMI Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) total ozone column data by 8-10 Dobson units (DU, 1 DU = 0.001 atm cm) on average, while our observations have a relatively small standard error of about 2 DU. Improved modeling of the ozone spectral band, now based on HITRAN-2004 spectral data as calculated by us, moves our results toward better agreement with the OMI DOAS total ozone column data. The observations made during 2006 with a modernized FTIR spectrometer and higher signal-to-noise ratio were simulated by the MODTRAN4 model computations. For ozone column estimates the Aqua Atmospheric Infrared Sounder satellite water vapor and temperature profiles were combined with the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder stratospheric ozone profiles and Tropospheric Emission Monitoring Internet Service-Koninklijk Nederlands Meteorologisch Instituut climatological profiles to create a priori input files for spectral modeling. The MODTRAN4 estimates of ozone columns from the 2006 observations compare rather well with the OMI total ozone column data: standard errors are of 1.11 DU and 0.68 DU, standard deviation are of 8.77 DU and 5.37 DU for OMI DOAS and OMI Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, respectively.

  10. Development and Validation of a Needs Assessment Model Using Stakeholders Involved in a University Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrecque, Monique

    1999-01-01

    Developed a needs-assessment model and validated the model with five groups of stakeholders connected with an undergraduate university nursing program in Canada. Used focus groups, questionnaires, a hermeneutic approach, and the magnitude-estimation scaling model to validate the model. Results show that respondents must define need to clarify the…

  11. Validation of stratospheric temperature profiles from a ground-based microwave radiometer with other techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Haefele, Alexander; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature trends has become recognized as an important indicator of climate change, because different climate forcing mechanisms exhibit distinct vertical warming and cooling patterns. For example, the cooling of the stratosphere is an indicator for climate change as it provides evidence of natural and anthropogenic climate forcing just like surface warming. Despite its importance, our understanding of the observed stratospheric temperature trend and our ability to test simulations of the stratospheric response to emissions of greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances remains limited. One of the main reason is because stratospheric long-term datasets are sparse and obtained trends differ from one another. Different techniques allow to measure stratospheric temperature profiles as radiosonde, lidar or satellite. The main advantage of microwave radiometers against these other instruments is a high temporal resolution with a reasonable good spatial resolution. Moreover, the measurement at a fixed location allows to observe local atmospheric dynamics over a long time period, which is crucial for climate research. This study presents an evaluation of the stratospheric temperature profiles from a newly ground-based microwave temperature radiometer (TEMPERA) which has been built and designed at the University of Bern. The measurements from TEMPERA are compared with the ones from other different techniques such as in-situ (radiosondes), active remote sensing (lidar) and passive remote sensing on board of Aura satellite (MLS) measurements. In addition a statistical analysis of the stratospheric temperature obtained from TEMPERA measurements during four years of data has been performed. This analysis evidenced the capability of TEMPERA radiometer to monitor the temperature in the stratosphere for a long-term. The detection of some singular sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) during the analyzed period shows the necessity of these

  12. Subscale Validation of the Subsurface Active Filtration of Exhaust (SAFE) Approach to NTP Ground Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, William M.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Bulman, Mel; Joyner, Russell; Martin, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    Brief History of NTP: Project Rover Began in 1950s by Los Alamos Scientific Labs (now Los Alamos National Labs) and ran until 1970s Tested a series of nuclear reactor engines of varying size at Nevada Test Site (now Nevada National Security Site) Ranged in scale from 111 kN (25 klbf) to 1.1 MN (250 klbf) Included Nuclear Furnace-1 tests Demonstrated the viability and capability of a nuclear rocket engine test program One of Kennedys 4 goals during famous moon speech to Congress Nuclear Engines for Rocket Vehicle Applications (NERVA) Atomic Energy Commission and NASA joint venture started in 1964 Parallel effort to Project Rover was focused on technology demonstration Tested XE engine, a 245-kN (55-klbf) engine to demonstrate startup shutdown sequencing. Hot-hydrogen stream is passed directly through fuel elements potential for radioactive material to be eroded into gaseous fuel flow as identified in previous programs NERVA and Project Rover (1950s-70s) were able to test in open atmosphere similar to conventional rocket engine test stands today Nuclear Furance-1 tests employed a full scrubber system Increased government and environmental regulations prohibit the modern testing in open atmosphere. Since the 1960s, there has been an increasing cessation on open air testing of nuclear material Political and national security concerns further compound the regulatory environment

  13. Problems and possibilities of astronauts—Ground communication content analysis validity check

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanas, Nick; Gushin, Vadim; Yusupova, Anna

    The analysis of space crew's communication with mission control (MC) is the standard operational procedure of the psychological support group in the Institute for Biomedical problems, Russia. For more than 20 years it is used for the monitoring of the behavioral health of Russian crewmembers in space. We apply quantitative speech content analysis to reveal relationship dynamics within the group and between the crew and MC. We suggest that the features of individual communicative style reflect psychological emotional status and individuality of communicator, his coping strategy, fixed by POMS. Moreover, the appearance of certain psychological complexities would become apparent both in POMS profile change and in communicative style change. As a result of the validity check we arrived to a new objective method of crews' dynamic psychological monitoring. This method would not take any of astronauts' time, would not need any on-board equipment, and at the same time it is based on real performance in space, i.e. astronauts communication with MC.

  14. Qualitative data analysis using the n Vivo programe and the application of the methodology of grounded theory procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niedbalski Jakub

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the article is to identify the capabilities and constraints of using CAQDAS (Computer-Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis Software programs in qualitative data analysis. Our considerations are based on the personal experiences gained while conducting the research projects using the methodology of grounded theory (GT and the NVivo 8 program. In presented article we focusedon relations between the methodological principles of grounded theory and the technical possibilities of NVivo 8. The paper presents our opinion about the most important options available in NVivo 8 and their application in the studies based on the methodology of grounded theory.

  15. The 183-WSL Fast Rain Rate Retrieval Algorithm. Part II: Validation Using Ground Radar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laviola, Sante; Levizzani, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The Water vapour Strong Lines at 183 GHz (183-WSL) algorithm is a method for the retrieval of rain rates and precipitation type classification (convectivestratiform), that makes use of the water vapor absorption lines centered at 183.31 GHz of the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit module B (AMSU-B) and of the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) flying on NOAA-15-18 and NOAA-19Metop-A satellite series, respectively. The characteristics of this algorithm were described in Part I of this paper together with comparisons against analogous precipitation products. The focus of Part II is the analysis of the performance of the 183-WSL technique based on surface radar measurements. The ground truth dataset consists of 2.5 years of rainfall intensity fields from the NIMROD European radar network which covers North-Western Europe. The investigation of the 183-WSL retrieval performance is based on a twofold approach: 1) the dichotomous statistic is used to evaluate the capabilities of the method to identify rain and no-rain clouds; 2) the accuracy statistic is applied to quantify the errors in the estimation of rain rates.The results reveal that the 183-WSL technique shows good skills in the detection of rainno-rain areas and in the quantification of rain rate intensities. The categorical analysis shows annual values of the POD, FAR and HK indices varying in the range 0.80-0.82, 0.330.36 and 0.39-0.46, respectively. The RMSE value is 2.8 millimeters per hour for the whole period despite an overestimation in the retrieved rain rates. Of note is the distribution of the 183-WSL monthly mean rain rate with respect to radar: the seasonal fluctuations of the average rainfalls measured by radar are reproduced by the 183-WSL. However, the retrieval method appears to suffer for the winter seasonal conditions especially when the soil is partially frozen and the surface emissivity drastically changes. This fact is verified observing the discrepancy distribution diagrams where2the 183-WSL

  16. Isotope Brayton ground demonstration testing and flight qualification. Volume 1. Technical program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-12-09

    A program is proposed for the ground demonstration, development, and flight qualification of a radioisotope nuclear heated dynamic power system for use on space missions beginning in the 1980's. This type of electrical power system is based upon and combines two aerospace technologies currently under intense development; namely, the MHW isotope heat source and the closed Brayton cycle gas turbine. This power system represents the next generation of reliable, efficient economic electrical power equipment for space, and will be capable of providing 0.5 to 2.0 kW of electric power to a wide variety of spacecraft for earth orbital and interplanetary missions. The immediate design will be based upon the requirements for the Air Force SURVSATCOM mission. The proposal is presented in three volumes plus an Executive Summary. This volume describes the tasks in the technical program.

  17. Sagittal Plane Knee Biomechanics and Vertical Ground Reaction Forces Are Modified Following ACL Injury Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padua, Darin A.; DiStefano, Lindsay J.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) occur because of excessive loading on the knee. ACL injury prevention programs can influence sagittal plane ACL loading factors and vertical ground reaction force (VGRF). Objective: To determine the influence of ACL injury prevention programs on sagittal plane knee biomechanics (anterior tibial shear force, knee flexion angle/moments) and VGRF. Data Sources: The PubMed database was searched for studies published between January 1988 and June 2008. Reference lists of selected articles were also reviewed. Study Selection: Studies were included that evaluated healthy participants for knee flexion angle, sagittal plane knee kinetics, or VGRF after performing a multisession training program. Two individuals reviewed all articles and determined which articles met the selection criteria. Approximately 4% of the articles fulfilled the selection criteria. Data Extraction: Data were extracted regarding each program’s duration, frequency, exercise type, population, supervision, and testing procedures. Means and variability measures were recorded to calculate effect sizes. One reviewer extracted all data and assessed study quality using PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database). A second reviewer (blinded) verified all information. Results: There is moderate evidence to indicate that knee flexion angle, external knee flexion moment, and VGRF can be successfully modified by an ACL injury prevention program. Programs utilizing multiple exercises (ie, integrated training) appear to produce the most improvement, in comparison to that of single-exercise programs. Knee flexion angle was improved following integrated training (combined balance and strength exercises or combined plyometric and strength exercises). Similarly, external knee flexion moment was improved following integrated training consisting of balance, plyometric, and strength exercises. VGRF was improved when incorporating supervision with instruction and

  18. Interim site characterization report and ground-water monitoring program for the Hanford site solid waste landfill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruland, R.M.; Hagan, R.A.; Cline, C.S.; Bates, D.J.; Evans, J.C.; Aaberg, R.L.

    1989-07-01

    Federal and state regulations governing the operation of landfills require utilization of ground-water monitoring systems to determine whether or not landfill operations impact ground water at the point of compliance (ground water beneath the perimeter of the facility). A detection-level ground-water monitoring system was designed, installed, and initiated at the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill (SWL). Chlorinated hydrocarbons were detected at the beginning of the ground-water monitoring program and continue to be detected more than 1 year later. The most probable source of the chlorinated hydrocarbons is washwater discharged to the SWL between 1985 and 1987. This is an interim report and includes data from the characterization work that was performed during well installation in 1987, such as field observations, sediment studies, and geophysical logging results, and data from analyses of ground-water samples collected in 1987 and 1988, such as field parameter measurements and chemical analyses. 38 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. The SCEC Broadband Platform: A Collaborative Open-Source Software Package for Strong Ground Motion Simulation and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, F.; Maechling, P. J.; Goulet, C. A.; Somerville, P.; Jordan, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) Broadband Platform is a collaborative software development project involving geoscientists, earthquake engineers, graduate students, and the SCEC Community Modeling Environment. The SCEC Broadband Platform (BBP) is open-source scientific software that can generate broadband (0-100Hz) ground motions for earthquakes, integrating complex scientific modules that implement rupture generation, low and high-frequency seismogram synthesis, non-linear site effects calculation, and visualization into a software system that supports easy on-demand computation of seismograms. The Broadband Platform operates in two primary modes: validation simulations and scenario simulations. In validation mode, the Platform runs earthquake rupture and wave propagation modeling software to calculate seismograms for a well-observed historical earthquake. Then, the BBP calculates a number of goodness of fit measurements that quantify how well the model-based broadband seismograms match the observed seismograms for a certain event. Based on these results, the Platform can be used to tune and validate different numerical modeling techniques. In scenario mode, the Broadband Platform can run simulations for hypothetical (scenario) earthquakes. In this mode, users input an earthquake description, a list of station names and locations, and a 1D velocity model for their region of interest, and the Broadband Platform software then calculates ground motions for the specified stations. Working in close collaboration with scientists and research engineers, the SCEC software development group continues to add new capabilities to the Broadband Platform and to release new versions as open-source scientific software distributions that can be compiled and run on many Linux computer systems. Our latest release includes 5 simulation methods, 7 simulation regions covering California, Japan, and Eastern North America, the ability to compare simulation results

  20. Assessing the capability of numerical methods to predict earthquake ground motion: the Euroseistest verification and validation project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaljub, E. O.; Bard, P.; Tsuno, S.; Kristek, J.; Moczo, P.; Franek, P.; Hollender, F.; Manakou, M.; Raptakis, D.; Pitilakis, K.

    2009-12-01

    During the last decades, an important effort has been dedicated to develop accurate and computationally efficient numerical methods to predict earthquake ground motion in heterogeneous 3D media. The progress in methods and increasing capability of computers have made it technically feasible to calculate realistic seismograms for frequencies of interest in seismic design applications. In order to foster the use of numerical simulation in practical prediction, it is important to (1) evaluate the accuracy of current numerical methods when applied to realistic 3D applications where no reference solution exists (verification) and (2) quantify the agreement between recorded and numerically simulated earthquake ground motion (validation). Here we report the results of the Euroseistest verification and validation project - an ongoing international collaborative work organized jointly by the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, the Cashima research project (supported by the French nuclear agency, CEA, and the Laue-Langevin institute, ILL, Grenoble), and the Joseph Fourier University, Grenoble, France. The project involves more than 10 international teams from Europe, Japan and USA. The teams employ the Finite Difference Method (FDM), the Finite Element Method (FEM), the Global Pseudospectral Method (GPSM), the Spectral Element Method (SEM) and the Discrete Element Method (DEM). The project makes use of a new detailed 3D model of the Mygdonian basin (about 5 km wide, 15 km long, sediments reach about 400 m depth, surface S-wave velocity is 200 m/s). The prime target is to simulate 8 local earthquakes with magnitude from 3 to 5. In the verification, numerical predictions for frequencies up to 4 Hz for a series of models with increasing structural and rheological complexity are analyzed and compared using quantitative time-frequency goodness-of-fit criteria. Predictions obtained by one FDM team and the SEM team are close and different from other predictions

  1. Ground test program for a full-size solar dynamic heat receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgwick, L. M.; Kaufmann, K. J.; McLallin, K. L.; Kerslake, T. W.

    Test hardware, facilities, and procedures were developed to conduct ground testing of a full-size, solar dynamic heat receiver in a partially simulated, low earth orbit environment. The heat receiver was designed to supply 102 kW of thermal energy to a helium and xenon gas mixture continuously over a 94 minute orbit, including up to 36 minutes of eclipse. The purpose of the test program was to quantify the receiver thermodynamic performance, its operating temperatures, and thermal response to changes in environmental and power module interface boundary conditions. The heat receiver was tested in a vacuum chamber using liquid nitrogen cold shrouds and an aperture cold plate. Special test equipment was designed to provide the required ranges in interface boundary conditions that typify those expected or required for operation as part of the solar dynamic power module on the Space Station Freedom. The support hardware includes an infrared quartz lamp heater with 30 independently controllable zones and a closed-Brayton cycle engine simulator to circulate and condition the helium-xenon gas mixture. The test article, test support hardware, facilities, and instrumentation developed to conduct the ground test program are all described.

  2. Validation of ACE-FTS measurements of CFC-11, CFC-12, and HCFC-22 using ground-based FTIR spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolonjari, F.; Walker, K. A.; Mahieu, E.; Batchelor, R. L.; Bernath, P. F.; Boone, C.; Conway, S. A.; Dan, L.; Griffin, D.; Harrett, A.; Kasai, Y.; Kagawa, A.; Lindenmaier, R.; Strong, K.; Whaley, C.

    2013-12-01

    Satellite datasets can be an effective global monitoring tool for long-lived compounds in the atmosphere. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) is a mission on-board the Canadian satellite SCISAT-1. The primary instrument on SCISAT-1 is a high-resolution infrared Fourier transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS) which is capable of measuring a range of gases including key chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) species. These families of species are of interest because of their significant contribution to anthropogenic ozone depletion and to global warming. To assess the quality of data derived from satellite measurements, validation using other data sources is essential. Ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers are particularly useful for this purpose. In this study, five FTIR spectrometers located at four sites around the world are used to validate the CFC-11 (CCl3F), CFC-12 (CCl2F2), and HCFC-22 (CHClF2) retrieved profiles from ACE-FTS measurements. These species are related because HCFC-22 was the primary replacement for CFC-11 and CFC-12 in refrigerant and propellant applications. The FTIR spectrometers used in this study record solar absorption spectra at Eureka (Canada), Jungfraujoch (Switzerland), Poker Flat (USA), and Toronto (Canada). The retrieval of CFC-11, CFC-12, and HCFC-22 are not standard products for many of these instruments, and as such, a harmonization of retrieval parameters between the sites has been conducted. The retrievals of these species from the FTIR spectra are sensitive from the surface to approximately 20 km, while the ACE-FTS profiles extend from approximately 6 to 30 km. For each site, partial column comparisons between coincident measurements of the three species and a validation of the observed trends will be discussed.

  3. Real-Time On-Board Processing Validation of MSPI Ground Camera Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingree, Paula J.; Werne, Thomas A.; Bekker, Dmitriy L.

    2010-01-01

    The Earth Sciences Decadal Survey identifies a multiangle, multispectral, high-accuracy polarization imager as one requirement for the Aerosol-Cloud-Ecosystem (ACE) mission. JPL has been developing a Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (MSPI) as a candidate to fill this need. A key technology development needed for MSPI is on-board signal processing to calculate polarimetry data as imaged by each of the 9 cameras forming the instrument. With funding from NASA's Advanced Information Systems Technology (AIST) Program, JPL is solving the real-time data processing requirements to demonstrate, for the first time, how signal data at 95 Mbytes/sec over 16-channels for each of the 9 multiangle cameras in the spaceborne instrument can be reduced on-board to 0.45 Mbytes/sec. This will produce the intensity and polarization data needed to characterize aerosol and cloud microphysical properties. Using the Xilinx Virtex-5 FPGA including PowerPC440 processors we have implemented a least squares fitting algorithm that extracts intensity and polarimetric parameters in real-time, thereby substantially reducing the image data volume for spacecraft downlink without loss of science information.

  4. Validation studies of the DOE-2 Building Energy Simulation Program. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, R.; Winkelmann, F.

    1998-06-01

    This report documents many of the validation studies (Table 1) of the DOE-2 building energy analysis simulation program that have taken place since 1981. Results for several versions of the program are presented with the most recent study conducted in 1996 on version DOE-2.1E and the most distant study conducted in 1981 on version DOE-1.3. This work is part of an effort related to continued development of DOE-2, particularly in its use as a simulation engine for new specialized versions of the program such as the recently released RESFEN 3.1. RESFEN 3.1 is a program specifically dealing with analyzing the energy performance of windows in residential buildings. The intent in providing the results of these validation studies is to give potential users of the program a high degree of confidence in the calculated results. Validation studies in which calculated simulation data is compared to measured data have been conducted throughout the development of the DOE-2 program. Discrepancies discovered during the course of such work has resulted in improvements in the simulation algorithms. Table 2 provides a listing of additions and modifications that have been made to various versions of the program since version DOE-2.1A. One of the most significant recent changes in the program occurred with version DOE-2.1E. An improved algorithm for calculating the outside surface film coefficient was implemented. In addition, integration of the WINDOW 4 program was accomplished resulting in improved ability in analyzing window energy performance. Validation and verification of a program as sophisticated as DOE-2 must necessarily be limited because of the approximations inherent in the program. For example, the most accurate model of the heat transfer processes in a building would include a three-dimensional analysis. To justify such detailed algorithmic procedures would correspondingly require detailed information describing the building and/or HVAC system and energy plant parameters

  5. Development and Validation of the Cultural Competence of Program Evaluators (CCPE) Self-Report Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunaway, Krystall E.; Morrow, Jennifer A.; Porter, Bryan E.

    2012-01-01

    No self-report measure of cultural competence currently exists in program evaluation. Adapting items from cultural competence measures in fields such as counseling and nursing, the researchers developed the Cultural Competence of Program Evaluators (CCPE) self-report scale. The goals of this study were to validate the CCPE and to assess…

  6. Social Validity Evaluation of the FRIENDS for Life Program with Mexican Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos-Guajardo, Julia; Ruvalcaba-Romero, Norma Alicia; Garza-Tamez, Martha; Villegas-Guinea, Diana

    2013-01-01

    This study is the first social validity evaluation of the Spanish version of the "FRIENDS for Life" program with Mexican children. "FRIENDS for Life" is a cognitive-behavioral intervention aimed at increasing social and emotional competence and decreasing anxiety and depressive symptoms in children. The program is designed to…

  7. Evaluation of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education: Application of Behavioral Theory and Survey Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyker, Brett A.; Jordan, Patricia; Quigley, Danielle L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Application of the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) to Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) evaluation and development and validation of an evaluation tool used to measure TTM constructs is described. Methods: Surveys were collected from parents of children receiving food at Summer Food Service Program sites prior…

  8. Validation of ACE and OSIRIS ozone and NO2 measurements using ground-based instruments at 80° N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pazmino

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Optical Spectrograph and Infra-Red Imager System (OSIRIS and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE have been taking measurements from space since 2001 and 2003, respectively. This paper presents intercomparisons between ozone and NO2 measured by the ACE and OSIRIS satellite instruments and by ground-based instruments at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL, which is located at Eureka, Canada (80° N, 86° W and is operated by the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC. The ground-based instruments included in this study are four zenith-sky differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS instruments, one Bruker Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR and four Brewer spectrophotometers. Ozone total columns measured by the DOAS instruments were retrieved using new Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC guidelines and agree to within 3.2%. The DOAS ozone columns agree with the Brewer spectrophotometers with mean relative differences that are smaller than 1.5%. This suggests that for these instruments the new NDACC data guidelines were successful in producing a homogenous and accurate ozone dataset at 80° N. Satellite 14–52 km ozone and 17–40 km NO2 partial columns within 500 km of PEARL were calculated for ACE-FTS Version 2.2 (v2.2 plus updates, ACE-FTS v3.0, ACE-MAESTRO (Measurements of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation v1.2 and OSIRIS SaskMART v5.0x ozone and Optimal Estimation v3.0 NO2 data products. The new ACE-FTS v3.0 and the validated ACE-FTS v2.2 partial columns are nearly identical, with mean relative differences of 0.0 ± 0.2% and −0.2 ± 0.1% for v2.2 minus v3.0 ozone and NO2, respectively. Ozone columns were constructed from 14–52 km satellite and 0–14 km ozonesonde partial columns and compared with the ground-based total column measurements. The satellite-plus-sonde measurements agree

  9. [Intrauterine programming of reproductive function--a valid concept?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleussner, Ekkehard

    2009-01-01

    Early intrauterine fetal (mis)programming determines not only cardiovascular and metabolic regulation in later life, but also reproductive function. Intrauterine growth restriction may be associated with precocious maturation of gonadal function and an earlier onset of puberty and menarche. Especially prenatal androgen excess has negative effects on the development of the ovaries and female genital phenotype itself as well as on the neuroendocrine feedback regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis followed by a polycystic ovary syndrome with hyperandrogenism and anovulation in later life. These associations, which can be clearly demonstrated in animal experiments, need further confirmation by epidemiological and clinical trials in humans.

  10. Validation of TRMM Precipitation Radar Through Comparison of its Multi-Year Measurements to Ground-Based Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Liang; Meneghini, Robert

    2010-01-01

    A procedure to accurately resample spaceborne and ground-based radar data is described, and then applied to the measurements taken from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) and the ground-based Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D or WSR) for the validation of the PR measurements and estimates. Through comparisons with the well-calibrated, non-attenuated WSR at Melbourne, Florida for the period 1998-2007, the calibration of the Precipitation Radar (PR) aboard the TRMM satellite is checked using measurements near the storm top. Analysis of the results indicates that the PR, after taking into account differences in radar reflectivity factors between the PR and WSR, has a small positive bias of 0.8 dB relative to the WSR, implying a soundness of the PR calibration in view of the uncertainties involved in the comparisons. Comparisons between the PR and WSR reflectivities are also made near the surface for evaluation of the attenuation-correction procedures used in the PR algorithms. It is found that the PR attenuation is accurately corrected in stratiform rain but is underestimated in convective rain, particularly in heavy rain. Tests of the PR estimates of rainfall rate are conducted through comparisons in the overlap area between the TRMM overpass and WSR scan. Analyses of the data are made both on a conditional basis, in which the instantaneous rain rates are compared only at those pixels where both the PR and WSR detect rain, and an unconditional basis, in which the area-averaged rain rates are estimated independently for the PR and WSR. Results of the conditional rain comparisons show that the PR-derived rain is about 9% greater and 19% less than the WSR estimates for stratiform and convective storms, respectively. Overall, the PR tends to underestimate the conditional mean rain rate by 8% for all rain categories, a finding that conforms to the results of the area-averaged rain (unconditional) comparisons.

  11. Concurrent and predictive validity of an early language screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, T; Carson, D K; Gavin, W J; Hall, L; Kent, A; Reece, S

    1998-06-01

    The efficacy of screening 2-year-old children for language delay using a parent-report questionnaire was investigated in three studies. The Language Development Survey (Rescorla, 1989) was mailed to 650 families at the time of their child's second birthday. Fifty-three percent of the surveys received by parents were completed and returned. Screening outcomes were then compared, in double-blind fashion, with the results of comprehensive clinical evaluations at ages 2 (N = 64) and 3 (N = 36). Parents' report of the size of their children's expressive vocabularies was highly correlated with clinical language measures at age 2. Children who screened positive performed significantly poorer than children who screened negative on standardized language tests and on measures taken from spontaneous conversation. The screening program demonstrated excellent sensitivity and specificity for identifying language delay at age 2 but somewhat lower levels for predicting developmental status one year later.

  12. Assessing the Relative Performance of Microwave-Based Satellite Rain Rate Retrievals Using TRMM Ground Validation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, David B.; Fisher, Brad L.

    2011-01-01

    Space-borne microwave sensors provide critical rain information used in several global multi-satellite rain products, which in turn are used for a variety of important studies, including landslide forecasting, flash flood warning, data assimilation, climate studies, and validation of model forecasts of precipitation. This study employs four years (2003-2006) of satellite data to assess the relative performance and skill of SSM/I (F13, F14 and F15), AMSU-B (N15, N16 and N17), AMSR-E (Aqua) and the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) in estimating surface rainfall based on direct instantaneous comparisons with ground-based rain estimates from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Ground Validation (GV) sites at Kwajalein, Republic of the Marshall Islands (KWAJ) and Melbourne, Florida (MELB). The relative performance of each of these satellite estimates is examined via comparisons with space- and time-coincident GV radar-based rain rate estimates. Because underlying surface terrain is known to affect the relative performance of the satellite algorithms, the data for MELB was further stratified into ocean, land and coast categories using a 0.25deg terrain mask. Of all the satellite estimates compared in this study, TMI and AMSR-E exhibited considerably higher correlations and skills in estimating/observing surface precipitation. While SSM/I and AMSU-B exhibited lower correlations and skills for each of the different terrain categories, the SSM/I absolute biases trended slightly lower than AMSR-E over ocean, where the observations from both emission and scattering channels were used in the retrievals. AMSU-B exhibited the least skill relative to GV in all of the relevant statistical categories, and an anomalous spike was observed in the probability distribution functions near 1.0 mm/hr. This statistical artifact appears to be related to attempts by algorithm developers to include some lighter rain rates, not easily detectable by its scatter-only frequencies. AMSU

  13. Metrology of ground-based satellite validation: co-location mismatch and smoothing issues of total ozone comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Verhoelst

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Comparisons with ground-based correlative measurements constitute a key component in the validation of satellite data on atmospheric composition. The error budget of these comparisons contains not only the measurement errors but also several terms related to differences in sampling and smoothing of the inhomogeneous and variable atmospheric field. A versatile system for Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs, named OSSSMOSE, is used here to quantify these terms. Based on the application of pragmatic observation operators onto high-resolution atmospheric fields, it allows a simulation of each individual measurement, and consequently, also of the differences to be expected from spatial and temporal field variations between both measurements making up a comparison pair. As a topical case study, the system is used to evaluate the error budget of total ozone column (TOC comparisons between GOME-type direct fitting (GODFITv3 satellite retrievals from GOME/ERS2, SCIAMACHY/Envisat, and GOME-2/MetOp-A, and ground-based direct-sun and zenith–sky reference measurements such as those from Dobsons, Brewers, and zenith-scattered light (ZSL-DOAS instruments, respectively. In particular, the focus is placed on the GODFITv3 reprocessed GOME-2A data record vs. the ground-based instruments contributing to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC. The simulations are found to reproduce the actual measurements almost to within the measurement uncertainties, confirming that the OSSE approach and its technical implementation are appropriate. This work reveals that many features of the comparison spread and median difference can be understood as due to metrological differences, even when using strict co-location criteria. In particular, sampling difference errors exceed measurement uncertainties regularly at most mid- and high-latitude stations, with values up to 10 % and more in extreme cases. Smoothing difference errors only

  14. Ground based measurements on reflectance towards validating atmospheric correction algorithms on IRS-P6 AWiFS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani Sharma, Anu; Kharol, Shailesh Kumar; Kvs, Badarinath; Roy, P. S.

    In Earth observation, the atmosphere has a non-negligible influence on the visible and infrared radiation which is strong enough to modify the reflected electromagnetic signal and at-target reflectance. Scattering of solar irradiance by atmospheric molecules and aerosol generates path radiance, which increases the apparent surface reflectance over dark surfaces while absorption by aerosols and other molecules in the atmosphere causes loss of brightness to the scene, as recorded by the satellite sensor. In order to derive precise surface reflectance from satellite image data, it is indispensable to apply the atmospheric correction which serves to remove the effects of molecular and aerosol scattering. In the present study, we have implemented a fast atmospheric correction algorithm to IRS-P6 AWiFS satellite data which can effectively retrieve surface reflectance under different atmospheric and surface conditions. The algorithm is based on MODIS climatology products and simplified use of Second Simulation of Satellite Signal in Solar Spectrum (6S) radiative transfer code, which is used to generate look-up-tables (LUTs). The algorithm requires information on aerosol optical depth for correcting the satellite dataset. The proposed method is simple and easy to implement for estimating surface reflectance from the at sensor recorded signal, on a per pixel basis. The atmospheric correction algorithm has been tested for different IRS-P6 AWiFS False color composites (FCC) covering the ICRISAT Farm, Patancheru, Hyderabad, India under varying atmospheric conditions. Ground measurements of surface reflectance representing different land use/land cover, i.e., Red soil, Chick Pea crop, Groundnut crop and Pigeon Pea crop were conducted to validate the algorithm and found a very good match between surface reflectance and atmospherically corrected reflectance for all spectral bands. Further, we aggregated all datasets together and compared the retrieved AWiFS reflectance with

  15. Metrology of ground-based satellite validation: co-location mismatch and smoothing issues of total ozone comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoelst, T.; Granville, J.; Hendrick, F.; Köhler, U.; Lerot, C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Redondas, A.; Van Roozendael, M.; Lambert, J.-C.

    2015-12-01

    Comparisons with ground-based correlative measurements constitute a key component in the validation of satellite data on atmospheric composition. The error budget of these comparisons contains not only the measurement errors but also several terms related to differences in sampling and smoothing of the inhomogeneous and variable atmospheric field. A versatile system for Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs), named OSSSMOSE, is used here to quantify these terms. Based on the application of pragmatic observation operators onto high-resolution atmospheric fields, it allows a simulation of each individual measurement, and consequently, also of the differences to be expected from spatial and temporal field variations between both measurements making up a comparison pair. As a topical case study, the system is used to evaluate the error budget of total ozone column (TOC) comparisons between GOME-type direct fitting (GODFITv3) satellite retrievals from GOME/ERS2, SCIAMACHY/Envisat, and GOME-2/MetOp-A, and ground-based direct-sun and zenith-sky reference measurements such as those from Dobsons, Brewers, and zenith-scattered light (ZSL-)DOAS instruments, respectively. In particular, the focus is placed on the GODFITv3 reprocessed GOME-2A data record vs. the ground-based instruments contributing to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). The simulations are found to reproduce the actual measurements almost to within the measurement uncertainties, confirming that the OSSE approach and its technical implementation are appropriate. This work reveals that many features of the comparison spread and median difference can be understood as due to metrological differences, even when using strict co-location criteria. In particular, sampling difference errors exceed measurement uncertainties regularly at most mid- and high-latitude stations, with values up to 10 % and more in extreme cases. Smoothing difference errors only play a role in the

  16. LiDAR-Assisted Multi-Source Program (LAMP for Measuring Above Ground Biomass and Forest Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuomo Kauranne

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Forest measurement for purposes like harvesting planning, biomass estimation and mitigating climate change through carbon capture by forests call for increasingly frequent forest measurement campaigns that need to balance cost with accuracy and precision. Often this implies the use of remote sensing based measurement methods. For any remote-sensing based methods to be accurate, they must be validated against field data. We present a method that combines field measurements with two layers of remote sensing data: sampling of forests by airborne laser scanning (LiDAR and Landsat imagery. The Bayesian model-based framework presented here is called Lidar-Assisted Multi-source Programme—or LAMP—for Above Ground Biomass estimation. The method has two variants: LAMP2 which splits the biomass estimation task into two separate stages: forest type stratification from Landsat imagery and mean biomass density estimation of each forest type by LiDAR models calibrated on field plots. LAMP3, on the other hand, estimates first the biomass on a LiDAR sample using models calibrated with field plots and then uses these LiDAR-based models to generate biomass density estimates on thousands of surrogate plots, with which a satellite image based model is calibrated and subsequently used to estimate biomass density on the entire forest area. Both LAMP methods have been applied to a 2 million hectare area in Southern Nepal, the Terai Arc Landscape or TAL to calculate the emission Reference Levels (RLs that are required for the UN REDD+ program that was accepted as part of the Paris Climate Agreement. The uncertainty of these estimates is studied with error variance estimation, cross-validation and Monte Carlo simulation. The relative accuracy of activity data at pixel level was found to be 14 per cent at 95 per cent confidence level and the root mean squared error of biomass estimates to be between 35 and 39 per cent at 1 ha resolution.

  17. Rainfall measurements from cellular networks microwave links : an alternative ground reference for satellite validation and hydrology in Africa .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosset, Marielle; cazenave, frederic; Zougmore, françois; Doumounia, Ali; kacou, Modeste

    2015-04-01

    In many part of the Tropics the ground based gauge networks are sparse, often degrading and accessing this data for monitoring rainfall or for validating satellite products is sometime difficult. Here, an alternative rainfall measuring technique is proposed and tested in West Africa. It is based on using commercial microwave links from cellular telephone networks to detect and quantify rainfall. Rainfall monitoring based on commercial terrestrial microwave links has been tested for the first time in Burkina Faso, in Sahel. The rainfall regime is characterized by intense rainfall intensities brought by mesoscale Convective systems (MCS), generated by deep organized convection. The region is subjected to drought as well as dramatic floods associated with the intense rainfall provided by a few MCSs. The hydrometeorological risk is increasing and need to be monitored. In collaboration with the national cellular phone operator, Telecel Faso, the attenuation on 29 km long microwave links operating at 7 GHz was monitored at 1s time rate for the monsoon season 2012. The time series of attenuation is transformed into rain rates and compared with rain gauge data. The method is successful in quantifying rainfall: 95% of the rainy days are detected. The correlation with the daily raingauge series is 0.8 and the season bias is 5%. The correlation at the 5 min time step within each event is also high. We will present the quantitative results, discuss the uncertainties and compare the time series and the 2D maps with those derived from a polarimetric radar. The results demonstrate the potential interest of exploiting national and regional wireless telecommunication networks to provide rainfall maps for various applications : urban hydrology, agro-hydrological risk monitoring, satellite validation and development of combined rainfall products. We will also present the outcome of the first international Rain Cell Africa workshop held in Ouagadougou early 2015.

  18. [Validity of a social skills training program for schizophrenic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirici Amell, R; Obiols Llandrich, J

    2008-01-01

    In the 1980's, Robert P. Liberman and his team from UCLA designed the Social Independent Living Skills Modules. Since then, their methods have spread throughout the world and their effectiveness has been demonstrated. It seems that the application of these methods is beginning to disappear and there are practically no publications that support the continuity of these treatments. In this article, the results of the Social Skills Training Program (SSTP) are presented in a sample of 57 schizophrenic patients. The results are evaluated with the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS) and the Social behavior Assessment Schedule (SBAS) scale and with the Social Interaction Self-Statements Test (SISST) and AI-F questionnaires. The negative symptoms of the patients improved after the therapeutic intervention. The patients acquired new social roles and their frequency of assertive behavior increased. Their relatives also improved their emotional burden and stress level. In any event, these improvements decreased at 6 months of follow-up without therapeutic intervention.

  19. Validation of the Cooray‐Rubinstein (C‐R) formula for a rough ground surface by using three‐dimensional (3‐D) FDTD

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Dongshuai; Zhang, Qilin; Liu, Tao; Wang, Zhenhui

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we have extended the Cooray‐Rubinstein (C‐R) approximate formula into the fractal rough ground surface and then validate its accuracy by using three‐dimensional (3‐D) finite‐difference time‐domain (FDTD...

  20. Validation of Atmosphere/Ionosphere Signals Associated with Major Earthquakes by Multi-Instrument Space-Borne and Ground Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounov, Dimitar; Pulinets, Sergey; Hattori, Katsumi; Parrot, Michel; Liu, J. Y.; Yang, T. F.; Arellano-Baeza, Alonso; Kafatos, M.; Taylor, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    regions of the atmosphere and the modifications, by dc electric fields, in the ionosphere-atmosphere electric circuit. We retrospectively analyzed temporal and spatial variations of four different physical parameters (gas/radon counting rate, lineaments change, long-wave radiation transitions and ionospheric electron density/plasma variations) characterizing the state of the lithosphere/atmosphere coupling several days before the onset of the earthquakes. Validation processes consist in two phases: A. Case studies for seven recent major earthquakes: Japan (M9.0, 2011), China (M7.9, 2008), Italy (M6.3, 2009), Samoa (M7, 2009), Haiti (M7.0, 2010) and, Chile (M8.8, 2010) and B. A continuous retrospective analysis was preformed over two different regions with high seismicity- Taiwan and Japan for 2003-2009. Satellite, ground surface, and troposphere data were obtained from Terra/ASTER, Aqua/AIRS, POES and ionospheric variations from DEMETER and COSMIC-I data. Radon and GPS/TEC were obtaining from monitoring sites in Taiwan, Japan and Italy and from global ionosphere maps (GIM) respectively. Our analysis of ground and satellite data during the occurrence of 7 global earthquakes has shown the presence of anomalies in the atmosphere. Our results for Tohoku M9.0 earthquake show that on March 7th, 2011 (4 days before the main shock and 1 day before the M7.2 foreshock of March 8, 2011) a rapid increase of emitted infrared radiation was observed by the satellite data and an anomaly was developed near the epicenter. The GPS/TEC data indicate an increase and variation in electron density reaching a maximum value on March 8. From March 3 to 11 a large increase in electron concentration was recorded at all four Japanese ground-based ionosondes, which returned to normal after the main earthquake. Similar approach for analyzing atmospheric and ionospheric parameters has been applied for China (M7.9, 2008), Italy (M6.3, 2009), Samoa (M7, 2009), Haiti (M7.0, 2010) and Chile (M8.8, 2010

  1. Development and Experimental Validation of a TRNSYS Dynamic Tool for Design and Energy Optimization of Ground Source Heat Pump Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix Ruiz-Calvo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ground source heat pump (GSHP systems stand for an efficient technology for renewable heating and cooling in buildings. To optimize not only the design but also the operation of the system, a complete dynamic model becomes a highly useful tool, since it allows testing any design modifications and different optimization strategies without actually implementing them at the experimental facility. Usually, this type of systems presents strong dynamic operating conditions. Therefore, the model should be able to predict not only the steady-state behavior of the system but also the short-term response. This paper presents a complete GSHP system model based on an experimental facility, located at Universitat Politècnica de València. The installation was constructed in the framework of a European collaborative project with title GeoCool. The model, developed in TRNSYS, has been validated against experimental data, and it accurately predicts both the short- and long-term behavior of the system.

  2. Validating MODIS and Sentinel-2 NDVI Products at a Temperate Deciduous Forest Site Using Two Independent Ground-Based Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Maximilian; Dechant, Benjamin; Rebmann, Corinna; Vohland, Michael; Cuntz, Matthias; Doktor, Daniel

    2017-08-11

    Quantifying the accuracy of remote sensing products is a timely endeavor given the rapid increase in Earth observation missions. A validation site for Sentinel-2 products was hence established in central Germany. Automatic multispectral and hyperspectral sensor systems were installed in parallel with an existing eddy covariance flux tower, providing spectral information of the vegetation present at high temporal resolution. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) values from ground-based hyperspectral and multispectral sensors were compared with NDVI products derived from Sentinel-2A and Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The influence of different spatial and temporal resolutions was assessed. High correlations and similar phenological patterns between in situ and satellite-based NDVI time series demonstrated the reliability of satellite-based phenological metrics. Sentinel-2-derived metrics showed better agreement with in situ measurements than MODIS-derived metrics. Dynamic filtering with the best index slope extraction algorithm was nevertheless beneficial for Sentinel-2 NDVI time series despite the availability of quality information from the atmospheric correction procedure.

  3. Predictive validity of the MMPI-2 among female offenders in a residential treatment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAnulty, Richard D; McAnulty, David P; Sipp, Jennifer E; Demakis, George J; Heggestad, Eric D

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) validity, clinical, restructured clinical, supplementary, and content scales in a female correctional population. The study used archival data for a final sample of 116 women who had been evaluated for acceptance into a residential rehabilitative treatment program for nonviolent female offenders in North Carolina. MMPI-2 scale elevations are reported and assessed for predictive validity in relation to treatment success, as measured by treatment attendance and graduation status. In relation to predictive validity, logistic regression analyses revealed that elevations on Scales FRS (Fears) and R (Repression) differentiated women who attended the program from women who did not. Elevations on Scales 4, DEP (Depression), Re (Responsibility), and AAS (Addiction Admission Scale) differentiated women who graduated the program from women who did not. Implications for the rehabilitation of female offenders, as well as limitations of this exploratory study, are discussed.

  4. PHAST--a program for simulating ground-water flow, solute transport, and multicomponent geochemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhurst, David L.; Kipp, Kenneth L.; Engesgaard, Peter; Charlton, Scott R.

    2004-01-01

    The computer program PHAST simulates multi-component, reactive solute transport in three-dimensional saturated ground-water flow systems. PHAST is a versatile ground-water flow and solute-transport simulator with capabilities to model a wide range of equilibrium and kinetic geochemical reactions. The flow and transport calculations are based on a modified version of HST3D that is restricted to constant fluid density and constant temperature. The geochemical reactions are simulated with the geochemical model PHREEQC, which is embedded in PHAST. PHAST is applicable to the study of natural and contaminated ground-water systems at a variety of scales ranging from laboratory experiments to local and regional field scales. PHAST can be used in studies of migration of nutrients, inorganic and organic contaminants, and radionuclides; in projects such as aquifer storage and recovery or engineered remediation; and in investigations of the natural rock-water interactions in aquifers. PHAST is not appropriate for unsaturated-zone flow, multiphase flow, density-dependent flow, or waters with high ionic strengths. A variety of boundary conditions are available in PHAST to simulate flow and transport, including specified-head, flux, and leaky conditions, as well as the special cases of rivers and wells. Chemical reactions in PHAST include (1) homogeneous equilibria using an ion-association thermodynamic model; (2) heterogeneous equilibria between the aqueous solution and minerals, gases, surface complexation sites, ion exchange sites, and solid solutions; and (3) kinetic reactions with rates that are a function of solution composition. The aqueous model (elements, chemical reactions, and equilibrium constants), minerals, gases, exchangers, surfaces, and rate expressions may be defined or modified by the user. A number of options are available to save results of simulations to output files. The data may be saved in three formats: a format suitable for viewing with a text editor; a

  5. Factorial validity of a subjective outcome evaluation tool for implementers of a positive youth development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Yu, Lu

    2014-06-01

    This study examined the dimensionality of the subjective outcome evaluation tool assessing the views of program implementers in the context of the Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong. For illustration purpose, both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were performed to examine the factor structure of the instrument. Subjective outcome evaluation findings were collected from 1,170 program implementers who implemented the Grade 7 level program. A validated subjective outcome evaluation scale was used to assess the views of the program implementers. Conceptually, the scale was designed to assess program implementers' perceptions about program content, implementer qualities, and program effectiveness after completion of the program. Exploratory factor analyses showed that 3 factors were abstracted from the scale and they were stable across 2 random subsamples. Confirmatory factor analyses showed that there was support for a higher-order factor model containing 3 primary factors and 1 second-order factor, and that evidence supporting factorial invariance was found. The 3 subscales were also shown to be reliable with acceptable internal consistency. Both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses provided support for the factorial validity of the subjective outcome evaluation tool designed for program implementers in the Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong. Copyright © 2014 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Validation of ENVISAT/SCIAMACHY columnar methane by solar FTIR spectrometry at the Ground-Truthing Station Zugspitze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sussmann

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Methane total-vertical column retrievals from ground-based solar FTIR measurements at the Permanent Ground-Truthing Station Zugspitze (47.42° N, 10.98° E, 2964 m a.s.l., Germany are used to validate column averaged methane retrieved from ENVISAT/SCIAMACHY spectra by WFM-DOAS (WFMD version 0.4 and 0.41 for 153 days in 2003. Smoothing errors are estimated to be below 0.10% for FTIR and 0.14% for SCIAMACHY-WFMD retrievals and can be neglected for the assessment of observed bias and day-to-day-scatter. In order to minimize the altitude-difference effect, dry-air column averaged mixing ratios (XCH4 have been utilized. From the FTIR-time series of XCH4 an atmospheric day-to-day variability of 1% was found, and a sinusoidal annual cycle with a ≈1.6% amplitude. To obtain the WFMD bias, a polynomial fitted to the FTIR series was used as a reference. The result is WFMD v0.4/FTIR=1.008±0.019 and WFMD v0.41/FTIR=1.058±0.008. WFMD v0.41 was significantly improved by a time-dependent bias correction. It can still not capture the natural day-to-day variability, i.e., the standard deviation calculated from the daily-mean values is 2.4% using averages within a 2000-km radius, and 2.7% for a 1000-km radius. These numbers are dominated by a residual time-dependent bias in the order of 3%/month. The latter can be reduced, e.g., from 2.4% to 1.6% as shown by an empirical time-dependent bias correction. Standard deviations of the daily means, calculated from the individual measurements of each day, are excluding time-dependent biases, thus showing the potential precision of WFMD daily means, i.e., 0.3% for a 2000-km selection radius, and 0.6% for a 1000-km selection radius. Therefore, the natural variability could be captured under the prerequisite of further advanced time-dependent bias corrections, or the use of other channels, where the icing issue is less prominent.

  7. Metrology of ground-based satellite validation: co-location mismatch and smoothing issues of total ozone comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Verhoelst

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Comparisons with ground-based correlative measurements constitute a key component in the validation of satellite data on atmospheric composition. The error budget of these comparisons contains not only the measurement uncertainties but also several terms related to differences in sampling and smoothing of the inhomogeneous and variable atmospheric field. A versatile system for Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs, named OSSSMOSE, is used here to quantify these terms. Based on the application of pragmatic observation operators onto high-resolution atmospheric fields, it allows a simulation of each individual measurement, and consequently also of the differences to be expected from spatial and temporal field variations between both measurements making up a comparison pair. As a topical case study, the system is used to evaluate the error budget of total ozone column (TOC comparisons between on the one hand GOME-type direct fitting (GODFITv3 satellite retrievals from GOME/ERS2, SCIAMACHY/Envisat, and GOME-2/MetOp-A, and on the other hand direct-sun and zenith-sky reference measurements such as from Dobsons, Brewers, and zenith scattered light (ZSL-DOAS instruments respectively. In particular, the focus is placed on the GODFITv3 reprocessed GOME-2A data record vs. the ground-based instruments contributing to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC. The simulations are found to reproduce the actual measurements almost to within the measurement uncertainties, confirming that the OSSE approach and its technical implementation are appropriate. This work reveals that many features of the comparison spread and median difference can be understood as due to metrological differences, even when using strict co-location criteria. In particular, sampling difference errors exceed measurement uncertainties regularly at most mid- and high-latitude stations, with values up to 10 % and more in extreme cases. Smoothing

  8. Reliability, Validity, and Usability of Data Extraction Programs for Single-Case Research Designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeyaert, Mariola; Maggin, Daniel; Verkuilen, Jay

    2016-11-01

    Single-case experimental designs (SCEDs) have been increasingly used in recent years to inform the development and validation of effective interventions in the behavioral sciences. An important aspect of this work has been the extension of meta-analytic and other statistical innovations to SCED data. Standard practice within SCED methods is to display data graphically, which requires subsequent users to extract the data, either manually or using data extraction programs. Previous research has examined issues of reliability and validity of data extraction programs in the past, but typically at an aggregate level. Little is known, however, about the coding of individual data points. We focused on four different software programs that can be used for this purpose (i.e., Ungraph, DataThief, WebPlotDigitizer, and XYit), and examined the reliability of numeric coding, the validity compared with real data, and overall program usability. This study indicates that the reliability and validity of the retrieved data are independent of the specific software program, but are dependent on the individual single-case study graphs. Differences were found in program usability in terms of user friendliness, data retrieval time, and license costs. Ungraph and WebPlotDigitizer received the highest usability scores. DataThief was perceived as unacceptable and the time needed to retrieve the data was double that of the other three programs. WebPlotDigitizer was the only program free to use. As a consequence, WebPlotDigitizer turned out to be the best option in terms of usability, time to retrieve the data, and costs, although the usability scores of Ungraph were also strong.

  9. Validation of the Rotorcraft Flight Simulation Program (C81) Using Operational Loads Survey Flight Test Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    could be improved by the use of one of the sensitive, accurate, cup - anemometer type of airspeed sensors that have recently been developed. 8.1.4...programs of this nature to enhance their use for the validation of simulation programs: - Remove the airspeed sensor from the boom and use a cup - anemometer ...transducers to allow access to the instrumentation. Hot-wire anemometers were then applied to the leading edge at the same five blade stations. 24 The

  10. OMI/Aura UV product validation using NILU-UV ground-based measurements in Thessaloniki, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zempila, Melina-Maria; Koukouli, Maria-Elissavet; Bais, Alkiviadis; Fountoulakis, Ilias; Arola, Antti; Kouremeti, Natalia; Balis, Dimitris

    2016-09-01

    The main aim of this work is to evaluate the NASA EOS AURA Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) UV irradiance estimates through ground-based measurements performed by a NILU-UV multichannel radiometer (NILU-UV) operating in Thessaloniki, Greece, for the time period between January 2005 and December 2014. NILU-UV multi-filter radiometers can provide measurements at 5 UV wavelength bands with full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 10 nm approximately and a time analysis of 1 min. An additional channel measuring the Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) is also incorporated to the instrument and is used for the stringent characterization of the cloud free instances. The OMI instrument estimates solar UV irradiances at four wavelengths close to those of the NILU-UV in Thessaloniki. Clear and all-sky overpass-time, as well as solar local-noon time, UV estimates are provided by the NASA Aura Data Validation Center. Spectra measured from a collocated MKIII Brewer spectrophotometer with serial number 086 (Brewer #086) were utilized for the whole period (2005-2014) in order to estimate the NILU-UV irradiances at the OMI wavelength irradiances and therefore provide a direct comparison and validation to the NILU UV measurements provided by OMI. For the nominal comparisons, using un-flagged OMI data within a 50 km radius from Thessaloniki, the linear determination coefficient, R2, ranges between 0.91 and 0.97 for the 305 nm and between 0.75 and 0.92 for 380 nm depending on the choice of overpass or local-noon time data and the cloudiness flags. The best agreement is found for the clear-sky overpass-time comparisons as well as the both PAR- and satellite algorithm-deduced clear-sky overpass and local-noon comparisons for all wavelengths. The OMI irradiances were found to overestimate the NILU-UV observations in Thessaloniki between ∼4.5% and 13.5% for the 305 nm and between ∼1.5% and ∼10.0% for the 310 nm wavelength depending on the choice of time [overpass vs local noon

  11. Value-Added Models for Teacher Preparation Programs: Validity and Reliability Threats, and a Manageable Alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P.; Heiser, Lawrence A.; McCormick, Jazarae K.; Forgan, James

    2016-01-01

    High-stakes standardized student assessments are increasingly used in value-added evaluation models to connect teacher performance to P-12 student learning. These assessments are also being used to evaluate teacher preparation programs, despite validity and reliability threats. A more rational model linking student performance to candidates who…

  12. Experimental validation of the twins prediction program for rolling noise. Pt.2: results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, D.J.; Fodiman, P.; Mahé, H.

    1996-01-01

    Two extensive measurement campaigns have been carried out to validate the TWINS prediction program for rolling noise, as described in part 1 of this paper. This second part presents the experimental results of vibration and noise during train pass-bys and compares them with predictions from the TWIN

  13. Towards valid score reports in the Computer Program LOVS: A redesign study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleij, van der Fabienne M.; Eggen, Theo J.H.M.; Engelen, Ronald J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Supporting users in interpreting assessment results is an important but underexposed aspect of validity. This study investigated how the score reports from the pupil-monitoring Computer Program LOVS can be redesigned in a way that supports users in interpreting pupils’ test results. In several round

  14. Experimental validation of the twins prediction program for rolling noise. Pt.2: results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, D.J.; Fodiman, P.; Mahé, H.

    1996-01-01

    Two extensive measurement campaigns have been carried out to validate the TWINS prediction program for rolling noise, as described in part 1 of this paper. This second part presents the experimental results of vibration and noise during train pass-bys and compares them with predictions from the

  15. Cope and Grow: A Grounded Theory Approach to Early College Entrants' Lived Experiences and Changes in a STEM Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, David Yun; Steenbergen-Hu, Saiying; Zhou, Yehan

    2015-01-01

    In this grounded theory qualitative study, we interviewed 34 graduates from one cohort of 51 students from a prestigious early college entrance program in China. Based on the interview data, we identified distinct convergent and divergent patterns of lived experiences and changes. We found several dominant themes, including peers' mutual…

  16. Intelligent Testing of Traffic Light Programs: Validation in Smart Mobility Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Ferrer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In smart cities, the use of intelligent automatic techniques to find efficient cycle programs of traffic lights is becoming an innovative front for traffic flow management. However, this automatic programming of traffic lights requires a validation process of the generated solutions, since they can affect the mobility (and security of millions of citizens. In this paper, we propose a validation strategy based on genetic algorithms and feature models for the automatic generation of different traffic scenarios checking the robustness of traffic light cycle programs. We have concentrated on an extensive urban area in the city of Malaga (in Spain, in which we validate a set of candidate cycle programs generated by means of four optimization algorithms: Particle Swarm Optimization for Traffic Lights, Differential Evolution for Traffic Lights, random search, and Sumo Cycle Program Generator. We can test the cycles of traffic lights considering the different states of the city, weather, congestion, driver expertise, vehicle’s features, and so forth, but prioritizing the most relevant scenarios among a large and varied set of them. The improvement achieved in solution quality is remarkable, especially for CO2 emissions, in which we have obtained a reduction of 126.99% compared with the experts’ solutions.

  17. Reflectance conversion methods for the VIS/NIR imaging spectrometer aboard the Chang'E-3 lunar rover: based on ground validation experiment data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Liu; Jian-Zhong Liu; Guang-Liang Zhang; Zong-Cheng Ling; Jiang Zhang; Zhi-Ping He; Ben-Yong Yang

    2013-01-01

    The second phase of the Chang'E Program (also named Chang'E-3) has the goal to land and perform in-situ detection on the lunar surface.A VIS/NIR imaging spectrometer (VNIS) will be carried on the Chang'E-3 lunar rover to detect the distribution of lunar minerals and resources.VNIS is the first mission in history to perform in-situ spectral measurement on the surface of the Moon,the reflectance data of which are fundamental for interpretation of lunar composition,whose quality would greatly affect the accuracy of lunar element and mineral determination.Until now,in-situ detection by imaging spectrometers was only performed by rovers on Mars.We firstly review reflectance conversion methods for rovers on Mars (Viking landers,Pathfinder and Mars Exploration rovers,etc).Secondly,we discuss whether these conversion methods used on Mars can be applied to lunar in-situ detection.We also applied data from a laboratory bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) using simulated lunar soil to test the availability of this method.Finally,we modify reflectance conversion methods used on Mars by considering differences between environments on the Moon and Mars and apply the methods to experimental data obtained from the ground validation of VNIS.These results were obtained by comparing reflectance data from the VNIS measured in the laboratory with those from a standard spectrometer obtained at the same time and under the same observing conditions.The shape and amplitude of the spectrum fits well,and the spectral uncertainty parameters for most samples are within 8%,except for the ilmenite sample which has a low albedo.In conclusion,our reflectance conversion method is suitable for lunar in-situ detection.

  18. Validation of mathematical models for Salmonella growth in raw ground beef under dynamic temperature conditions representing loss of refrigeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Jennifer A; Schaffner, Donald W

    2014-07-01

    Temperature is a primary factor in controlling the growth of microorganisms in food. The current U. S. Food and Drug Administration Model Food Code guidelines state that food can be kept out of temperature control for up to 4 h without qualifiers, or up to 6 h, if the food product starts at an initial 41 °F (5 °C) temperature and does not exceed 70 °F (21 °C) at 6 h. This project validates existing ComBase computer models for Salmonella growth under changing temperature conditions modeling scenarios using raw ground beef as a model system. A cocktail of Salmonella serovars isolated from different meat products ( Salmonella Copenhagen, Salmonella Montevideo, Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Saintpaul, and Salmonella Heidelberg) was made rifampin resistant and used for all experiments. Inoculated samples were held in a programmable water bath at 4.4 °C (40 °F) and subjected to linear temperature changes to different final temperatures over various lengths of time and then returned to 4.4 °C (40 °F). Maximum temperatures reached were 15.6, 26.7, or 37.8 °C (60, 80, or 100 °F), and the temperature increases took place over 4, 6, and 8 h, with varying cooling times. Our experiments show that when maximum temperatures were lower (15.6 or 26.7 °C), there was generally good agreement between the ComBase models and experiments: when temperature increases of 15.6 or 26.7 °C occurred over 8 h, experimental data were within 0.13 log CFU of the model predictions. When maximum temperatures were 37 °C, predictive models were fail-safe. Overall bias of the models was 1.11. and accuracy was 2.11. Our experiments show the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Model Food Code guidelines for holding food out of temperature control are quite conservative. Our research also shows that the ComBase models for Salmonella growth are accurate or fail-safe for dynamic temperature conditions as might be observed due to power loss from natural disasters or during transport out of

  19. Bridging Ground Validation and Algorithms: Using Scattering and Integral Tables to Incorporate Observed DSD Correlations into Satellite Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) raindrop size distribution (DSD) Working Group is composed of NASA PMM Science Team Members and is charged to "investigate the correlations between DSD parameters using Ground Validation (GV) data sets that support, or guide, the assumptions used in satellite retrieval algorithms." Correlations between DSD parameters can be used to constrain the unknowns and reduce the degrees-of-freedom in under-constrained satellite algorithms. Over the past two years, the GPM DSD Working Group has analyzed GV data and has found correlations between the mass-weighted mean raindrop diameter (Dm) and the mass distribution standard deviation (Sm) that follows a power-law relationship. This Dm-Sm power-law relationship appears to be robust and has been observed in surface disdrometer and vertically pointing radar observations. One benefit of a Dm-Sm power-law relationship is that a three parameter DSD can be modeled with just two parameters: Dm and Nw that determines the DSD amplitude. In order to incorporate observed DSD correlations into satellite algorithms, the GPM DSD Working Group is developing scattering and integral tables that can be used by satellite algorithms. Scattering tables describe the interaction of electromagnetic waves on individual particles to generate cross sections of backscattering, extinction, and scattering. Scattering tables are independent of the distribution of particles. Integral tables combine scattering table outputs with DSD parameters and DSD correlations to generate integrated normalized reflectivity, attenuation, scattering, emission, and asymmetry coefficients. Integral tables contain both frequency dependent scattering properties and cloud microphysics. The GPM DSD Working Group has developed scattering tables for raindrops at both Dual Precipitation Radar (DPR) frequencies and at all GMI radiometer frequencies less than 100 GHz. Scattering tables include Mie and T-matrix scattering with H- and V

  20. Validation of Multibody Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II Parachute Simulation with Interacting Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiszadeh, Behzad; Queen, Eric M.; Hotchko, Nathaniel J.

    2009-01-01

    A capability to simulate trajectories of multiple interacting rigid bodies has been developed, tested and validated. This capability uses the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST 2). The standard version of POST 2 allows trajectory simulation of multiple bodies without force interaction. In the current implementation, the force interaction between the parachute and the suspended bodies has been modeled using flexible lines, allowing accurate trajectory simulation of the individual bodies in flight. The POST 2 multibody capability is intended to be general purpose and applicable to any parachute entry trajectory simulation. This research paper explains the motivation for multibody parachute simulation, discusses implementation methods, and presents validation of this capability.

  1. The First Development of Human Factors Engineering Requirements for Application to Ground Task Design for a NASA Flight Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dischinger, H. Charles, Jr.; Stambolian, Damon B.; Miller, Darcy H.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has long applied standards-derived human engineering requirements to the development of hardware and software for use by astronauts while in flight. The most important source of these requirements has been NASA-STD-3000. While there have been several ground systems human engineering requirements documents, none has been applicable to the flight system as handled at NASA's launch facility at Kennedy Space Center. At the time of the development of previous human launch systems, there were other considerations that were deemed more important than developing worksites for ground crews; e.g., hardware development schedule and vehicle performance. However, experience with these systems has shown that failure to design for ground tasks has resulted in launch schedule delays, ground operations that are more costly than they might be, and threats to flight safety. As the Agency begins the development of new systems to return humans to the moon, the new Constellation Program is addressing this issue with a new set of human engineering requirements. Among these requirements is a subset that will apply to the design of the flight components and that is intended to assure ground crew success in vehicle assembly and maintenance tasks. These requirements address worksite design for usability and for ground crew safety.

  2. Provider attitudes toward pay-for-performance programs: development and validation of a measurement instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meterko, Mark; Young, Gary J; White, Bert; Bokhour, Barbara G; Burgess, James F; Berlowitz, Dan; Guldin, Matthew R; Nealon Seibert, Marjorie

    2006-10-01

    To develop an instrument for assessing physician attitudes toward quality incentive programs, and to assess its reliability and validity. Study involved primary data collection. A 40-item paper and pencil survey of primary care physicians in Rochester, New York, and Massachusetts was conducted between May 2004 and December 2004. Seven-hundred and ninety-eight completed questionnaires were received, representing a response rate of 32 percent (798/2,497). Based on an extensive review of the literature and discussions with experts in the field, we developed a conceptual framework representing the features of pay-for-performance (P4P) programs hypothesized to affect physician behavior in that context. A draft questionnaire was developed based on that conceptual model and pilot tested in three groups of physicians. The questionnaire was modified based on the physician feedback, and the revised version was distributed to 2,497 primary care physicians affiliated with two of the seven sites participating in Rewarding Results, a national evaluation of quality target and financial incentive programs. Respondents were randomly divided into a derivation and a validation sample. Exploratory factor analysis was applied to the responses of the derivation sample. Those results were used to create scales in the validation sample, and these were then subjected to multitrait analysis (MTA). One scale representing physicians' perception of the impact of P4P on their clinical practice was regressed on the other scales as a test of construct validity. Seven constructs were identified and demonstrated substantial convergent and discriminant validity in the MTA: awareness and understanding, clinical relevance, cooperation, unintended consequences, control, financial salience, and impact. Internal consistency reliabilities (Cronbach's alpha coefficients) ranged from 0.50 to 0.80. A statistically significant 25 percent of the variation in perceived impact was accounted for by physician

  3. Calculation of broadband time histories of ground motion: Comparison of methods and validation using strong-ground motion from the 1994 Northridge earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, S.; Harmsen, S.; Frankel, A.; Larsen, S.

    1999-01-01

    This article compares techniques for calculating broadband time histories of ground motion in the near field of a finite fault by comparing synthetics with the strong-motion data set for the 1994 Northridge earthquake. Based on this comparison, a preferred methodology is presented. Ground-motion-simulation techniques are divided into two general methods: kinematic- and composite-fault models. Green's functions of three types are evaluated: stochastic, empirical, and theoretical. A hybrid scheme is found to give the best fit to the Northridge data. Low frequencies ( 1 Hz) are calculated using a composite-fault model with a fractal subevent size distribution and stochastic, bandlimited, white-noise Green's functions. At frequencies below 1 Hz, theoretical elastic-wave-propagation synthetics introduce proper seismic-phase arrivals of body waves and surface waves. The 3D velocity structure more accurately reproduces record durations for the deep sedimentary basin structures found in the Los Angeles region. At frequencies above 1 Hz, scattering effects become important and wave propagation is more accurately represented by stochastic Green's functions. A fractal subevent size distribution for the composite fault model ensures an ??-2 spectral shape over the entire frequency band considered (0.1-20 Hz).

  4. Validation of the Cooray-Rubinstein (C-R) formula for a rough ground surface by using three-dimensional (3-D) FDTD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongshuai; Zhang, Qilin; Liu, Tao; Wang, Zhenhui

    2013-11-01

    this paper, we have extended the Cooray-Rubinstein (C-R) approximate formula into the fractal rough ground surface and then validate its accuracy by using three-dimensional (3-D) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method at distances of 50 m and 100 m from the lightning channel. The results show that the extended C-R formula has an accepted accuracy for predicting the lightning-radiated horizontal electric field above the fractal rough and conducting ground, and its accuracy increases a little better with the higher of the earth conductivity. For instance, when the conductivity of the rough ground is 0.1 S/m, the error of the peak value predicted by the extended C-R formula is less than about 2.3%, while its error is less than about 6.7% for the conductivity of 0.01 S/m. The rough ground has much effect on the lightning horizontal field, and the initial peak value of the horizontal field obviously decreases with the increase of the root-mean-square height of the rough ground at early times (within several microseconds of the beginning of return stroke).

  5. The Development and Validation of a Transformational Leadership Survey for Substance Use Treatment Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jennifer R.; Knight, Danica K.; Broome, Kirk M.; Flynn, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Directors in substance use treatment programs are increasingly required to respond to external economic and socio-political pressures. Leadership practices that promote innovation can help offset these challenges. Using focus groups, factor analysis, and validation instruments, the current study developed and established psychometrics for the Survey of Transformational Leadership. In 2008, clinical directors were evaluated on leadership practices by 214 counselors within 57 programs in four U.S. regions. Nine themes emerged: integrity, sensible risk, demonstrates innovation, encourages innovation, inspirational motivation, supports others, develops others, delegates tasks, and expects excellence. Study implications, limitations and suggested future directions are discussed. Funding from NIDA. PMID:20509734

  6. ROTC Validation Study of LEADER MATCH IV, Programmed Instruction in Leadership for the US Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-05-01

    00/ SARI TECHNICAL REPORT TR-78-TH2 utm ROTC Validation Study of LEADER MATCH IV, Programmed Instruction in Leadership for the US Army by ,EVEL Fred ...E. Fiedler and Linda Mahar University of Washington S Seattle, Washington 98105 and -I. Robert M. Carroll . Army Research Institute •,et q•\\•’~e009ŕ...Sciences as ARI Technical Report TR-77-TH3, "LEADER MATCH IV, Programmed Instruction in Leadership for the U.S. Army," by F. E. Fiedler , L. Mahar, and M

  7. Density and fledging success of ground-nesting passerines in Conservation Reserve Program fields in the northeastern Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koford, Rolf R.

    1999-01-01

    The Conservation Reserve Program, initiated in 1985, was designed primarily to reduce soil erosion and crop surpluses. A secondary benefit was the provision of habitat for wildlife. Grassland bird populations, many of which declined in the decades prior to the Conservation Reserve Program, may have benefited from the Conservation Reserve Program if reproduction in this newly available habitat has been at least as high as it would have been in the absence of the Conservation Reserve Program. On study areas in North Dakota and Minnesota, I examined breeding densities and fledging success of grassland birds in Conservation Reserve Program fields and in an alternative habitat of similar structure, idle grassland fields on federal Waterfowl Production Areas. Fields were 10 to 25 hectares in size. The avifaunas of these two habitats were similar, although brush-dependent species were more abundant on Waterfowl Protection Areas. The common species in these habitats included ones whose continental populations have declined, such as Grasshopper Sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum), Savannah Sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis), and Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus). These ground-nesting species were pooled with other ground nesters in an analysis of fledging success, which revealed no significant differences between habitats, between states, or among years (1991-1993). Predation was the primary cause of nest failure. I concluded that Conservation Reserve Program fields in this region were suitable breeding habitat for several species whose populations had declined prior to the Conservation Reserve Program era. This habitat appeared to be as secure for nests of ground-nesting birds as another suitable habitat in North Dakota and Minnesota.

  8. Certainty in Stockpile Computing: Recommending a Verification and Validation Program for Scientific Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.R.

    1998-11-01

    As computing assumes a more central role in managing the nuclear stockpile, the consequences of an erroneous computer simulation could be severe. Computational failures are common in other endeavors and have caused project failures, significant economic loss, and loss of life. This report examines the causes of software failure and proposes steps to mitigate them. A formal verification and validation program for scientific software is recommended and described.

  9. Secure Programming Cookbook for C and C++ Recipes for Cryptography, Authentication, Input Validation & More

    CERN Document Server

    Viega, John

    2009-01-01

    Secure Programming Cookbook for C and C++ is an important new resource for developers serious about writing secure code for Unix® (including Linux®) and Windows® environments. This essential code companion covers a wide range of topics, including safe initialization, access control, input validation, symmetric and public key cryptography, cryptographic hashes and MACs, authentication and key exchange, PKI, random numbers, and anti-tampering.

  10. Research in support of the EODAP validation program and solid earth geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaposchkin, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    A validation program to verify that geodetic space techniques can measure intersite distances of several hundred to several thousand kilometers and polar motion, both with a precision of about 5 cm is described. Laser data were analyzed using a new analytical approach "scalar translocation." It was found that this approach can give geodynamic information and that the method is promising and can be used on a variety of satellites with data of different accuracy.

  11. Initial feasibility and validity of a prospective memory training program in a substance use treatment population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Mary M; Rass, Olga; Johnson, Patrick S; Strain, Eric C; Berry, Meredith S; Vo, Hoa T; Fishman, Marc J; Munro, Cynthia A; Rebok, George W; Mintzer, Miriam Z; Johnson, Matthew W

    2016-10-01

    Individuals with substance use disorders have shown deficits in the ability to implement future intentions, called prospective memory. Deficits in prospective memory and working memory, a critical underlying component of prospective memory, likely contribute to substance use treatment failures. Thus, improvement of prospective memory and working memory in substance use patients is an innovative target for intervention. We sought to develop a feasible and valid prospective memory training program that incorporates working memory training and may serve as a useful adjunct to substance use disorder treatment. We administered a single session of the novel prospective memory and working memory training program to participants (n = 22; 13 men, 9 women) enrolled in outpatient substance use disorder treatment and correlated performance to existing measures of prospective memory and working memory. Generally accurate prospective memory performance in a single session suggests feasibility in a substance use treatment population. However, training difficulty should be increased to avoid ceiling effects across repeated sessions. Consistent with existing literature, we observed superior performance on event-based relative to time-based prospective memory tasks. Performance on the prospective memory and working memory training components correlated with validated assessments of prospective memory and working memory, respectively. Correlations between novel memory training program performance and established measures suggest that our training engages appropriate cognitive processes. Further, differential event- and time-based prospective memory task performance suggests internal validity of our training. These data support the development of this intervention as an adjunctive therapy for substance use disorders. (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. An experimental evaluation of error seeding as a program validation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, J. C.; Ammann, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    A previously reported experiment in error seeding as a program validation technique is summarized. The experiment was designed to test the validity of three assumptions on which the alleged effectiveness of error seeding is based. Errors were seeded into 17 functionally identical but independently programmed Pascal programs in such a way as to produce 408 programs, each with one seeded error. Using mean time to failure as a metric, results indicated that it is possible to generate seeded errors that are arbitrarily but not equally difficult to locate. Examination of indigenous errors demonstrated that these are also arbitrarily difficult to locate. These two results support the assumption that seeded and indigenous errors are approximately equally difficult to locate. However, the assumption that, for each type of error, all errors are equally difficult to locate was not borne out. Finally, since a seeded error occasionally corrected an indigenous error, the assumption that errors do not interfere with each other was proven wrong. Error seeding can be made useful by taking these results into account in modifying the underlying model.

  13. Validation of an age-modified caries risk assessment program (Cariogram) in preschool children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holgerson, Pernilla Lif; Twetman, Svante; Stecksèn-Blicks, Christina

    2009-01-01

    to children with a lower risk in the control group (pchildren remained in the same risk category at both ages, despite a largely unchanged consumption pattern...... of sugar. The majority of the children who changed category displayed a lowered risk at 7 years. The intervention program seemed to impair the predictive abilities of Cariogram. CONCLUSION: A modified Cariogram applied on preschool children was not particularly useful in identifying high caries risk......OBJECTIVES: (i) To validate caries risk profiles assessed with a computer program against actual caries development in preschool children, (ii) to study the possible impact of a preventive program on the risk profiles, and (iii) to compare the individual risk profiles longitudinally. MATERIAL...

  14. Validation of satellite data through the remote sensing techniques and the inclusion of them into agricultural education pilot programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadavid, Georgios; Kountios, Georgios; Bournaris, T.; Michailidis, Anastasios; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, the remote sensing techniques have a significant role in all the fields of agricultural extensions as well as agricultural economics and education but they are used more specifically in hydrology. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the use of field spectroscopy for validation of the satellite data and how combination of remote sensing techniques and field spectroscopy can have more accurate results for irrigation purposes. For this reason vegetation indices are used which are mostly empirical equations describing vegetation parameters during the lifecycle of the crops. These numbers are generated by some combination of remote sensing bands and may have some relationship to the amount of vegetation in a given image pixel. Due to the fact that most of the commonly used vegetation indices are only concerned with red-near-infrared spectrum and can be divided to perpendicular and ratio based indices the specific goal of the research is to illustrate the effect of the atmosphere to those indices, in both categories. In this frame field spectroscopy is employed in order to derive the spectral signatures of different crops in red and infrared spectrum after a campaign of ground measurements. The main indices have been calculated using satellite images taken at interval dates during the whole lifecycle of the crops by using a GER 1500 spectro-radiomete. These indices was compared to those extracted from satellite images after applying an atmospheric correction algorithm -darkest pixel- to the satellite images at a pre-processing level so as the indices would be in comparable form to those of the ground measurements. Furthermore, there has been a research made concerning the perspectives of the inclusion of the above mentioned remote satellite techniques to agricultural education pilot programs.

  15. Validation of a ground motion synthesis and prediction methodology for the 1988, M=6.0, Saguenay Earthquake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchings, L.; Jarpe, S.; Kasameyer, P.; Foxall, W.

    1998-01-01

    We model the 1988, M=6.0, Saguenay earthquake. We utilize an approach that has been developed to predict strong ground motion. this approach involves developing a set of rupture scenarios based upon bounds on rupture parameters. rupture parameters include rupture geometry, hypocenter, rupture roughness, rupture velocity, healing velocity (rise times), slip distribution, asperity size and location, and slip vector. Scenario here refers to specific values of these parameters for an hypothesized earthquake. Synthetic strong ground motion are then generated for each rupture scenario. A sufficient number of scenarios are run to span the variability in strong ground motion due to the source uncertainties. By having a suite of rupture scenarios of hazardous earthquakes for a fixed magnitude and identifying the hazard to the site from the one standard deviation value of engineering parameters we have introduced a probabilistic component to the deterministic hazard calculation, For this study we developed bounds on rupture scenarios from previous research on this earthquake. The time history closest to the observed ground motion was selected as a model for the Saguenay earthquake.

  16. Validation of the AGDISP model for predicting airborne atrazine spray drift: a South African ground application case study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nsibande, SA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available monitoring data in order for them to be employed with confidence, especially when they are used to implement regulatory measures or to evaluate potential human exposure levels. In this case study, off-target pesticide drift was monitored during ground...

  17. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Guidelines for determining design basis ground motions. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-18

    This report develops and applies a methodology for estimating strong earthquake ground motion. The motivation was to develop a much needed tool for use in developing the seismic requirements for structural designs. An earthquake`s ground motion is a function of the earthquake`s magnitude, and the physical properties of the earth through which the seismic waves travel from the earthquake fault to the site of interest. The emphasis of this study is on ground motion estimation in Eastern North America (east of the Rocky Mountains), with particular emphasis on the Eastern United States and southeastern Canada. Eastern North America is a stable continental region, having sparse earthquake activity with rare occurrences of large earthquakes. While large earthquakes are of interest for assessing seismic hazard, little data exists from the region to empirically quantify their effects. Therefore, empirically based approaches that are used for other regions, such as Western North America, are not appropriate for Eastern North America. Moreover, recent advances in science and technology have now made it possible to combine theoretical and empirical methods to develop new procedures and models for estimating ground motion. The focus of the report is on the attributes of ground motion in Eastern North America that are of interest for the design of facilities such as nuclear power plants. Specifically considered are magnitudes M from 5 to 8, distances from 0 to 500 km, and frequencies from 1 to 35 Hz.

  18. Development and Validation of Pathogen Environmental Monitoring Programs for Small Cheese Processing Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beno, Sarah M; Stasiewicz, Matthew J; Andrus, Alexis D; Ralyea, Robert D; Kent, David J; Martin, Nicole H; Wiedmann, Martin; Boor, Kathryn J

    2016-12-01

    Pathogen environmental monitoring programs (EMPs) are essential for food processing facilities of all sizes that produce ready-to-eat food products exposed to the processing environment. We developed, implemented, and evaluated EMPs targeting Listeria spp. and Salmonella in nine small cheese processing facilities, including seven farmstead facilities. Individual EMPs with monthly sample collection protocols were designed specifically for each facility. Salmonella was detected in only one facility, with likely introduction from the adjacent farm indicated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis data. Listeria spp. were isolated from all nine facilities during routine sampling. The overall Listeria spp. (other than Listeria monocytogenes ) and L. monocytogenes prevalences in the 4,430 environmental samples collected were 6.03 and 1.35%, respectively. Molecular characterization and subtyping data suggested persistence of a given Listeria spp. strain in seven facilities and persistence of L. monocytogenes in four facilities. To assess routine sampling plans, validation sampling for Listeria spp. was performed in seven facilities after at least 6 months of routine sampling. This validation sampling was performed by independent individuals and included collection of 50 to 150 samples per facility, based on statistical sample size calculations. Two of the facilities had a significantly higher frequency of detection of Listeria spp. during the validation sampling than during routine sampling, whereas two other facilities had significantly lower frequencies of detection. This study provides a model for a science- and statistics-based approach to developing and validating pathogen EMPs.

  19. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Coastal Los Angeles Basin Study Unit, 2006: Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Land, Michael; Belitz, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 860 square-mile Coastal Los Angeles Basin study unit (CLAB) was investigated from June to November of 2006 as part of the Statewide Basin Assessment Project of the Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Statewide Basin Assessment was developed in response to the Ground-Water Quality Monitoring Act of 2001, and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The Coastal Los Angeles Basin study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality within CLAB, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 69 wells in Los Angeles and Orange Counties. Fifty-five of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area (?grid wells?). Fourteen additional wells were selected to evaluate changes in ground-water chemistry or to gain a greater understanding of the ground-water quality within a specific portion of the Coastal Los Angeles Basin study unit ('understanding wells'). Ground-water samples were analyzed for: a large number of synthetic organic constituents [volatile organic compounds (VOCs), gasoline oxygenates and their degradates, pesticides, polar pesticides, and pesticide degradates, pharmaceutical compounds, and potential wastewater-indicators]; constituents of special interest [perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), 1,4-dioxane, and 1,2,3-trichloropropane (1,2,3-TCP)]; inorganic constituents that can occur naturally [nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements]; radioactive constituents [gross-alpha and gross-beta radiation, radium isotopes, and radon-222]; and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes [stable isotopic ratios of hydrogen and oxygen, and activities of tritium and carbon-14

  20. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Santa Clara River Valley Study Unit, 2007: Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montrella, Joseph; Belitz, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 460-square-mile Santa Clara River Valley study unit (SCRV) was investigated from April to June 2007 as part of the statewide Priority Basin project of the Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of raw ground water used for public water supplies within SCRV, and to facilitate a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Fifty-seven ground-water samples were collected from 53 wells in Ventura and Los Angeles Counties. Forty-two wells were selected using a randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area (grid wells). Eleven wells (understanding wells) were selected to further evaluate water chemistry in particular parts of the study area, and four depth-dependent ground-water samples were collected from one of the eleven understanding wells to help understand the relation between water chemistry and depth. The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of synthetic organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOC], pesticides and pesticide degradates, potential wastewater-indicator compounds, and pharmaceutical compounds), a constituent of special interest (perchlorate), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial constituents. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, carbon-13, carbon-14 [abundance], stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in water, stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate, chlorine-37, and bromine-81), and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the source

  1. In-Situ Load System for Calibrating and Validating Aerodynamic Properties of Scaled Aircraft in Ground-Based Aerospace Testing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commo, Sean A. (Inventor); Lynn, Keith C. (Inventor); Landman, Drew (Inventor); Acheson, Michael J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An In-Situ Load System for calibrating and validating aerodynamic properties of scaled aircraft in ground-based aerospace testing applications includes an assembly having upper and lower components that are pivotably interconnected. A test weight can be connected to the lower component to apply a known force to a force balance. The orientation of the force balance can be varied, and the measured forces from the force balance can be compared to applied loads at various orientations to thereby develop calibration factors.

  2. The Validation Activities of the APhoRISM EC 7FP Project, Aimed at Post Seismic Damage Mapping, Through a Combined Use of EOS and Ground Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devanthery, N.; Luzi, G.; Stramondo, S.; Bignami, C.; Pierdicca, N.; Wegmuller, U.; Romaniello, V.; Anniballe, R.; Piscini, A.; Albano, M.; Moro, M.; Crosetto, M.

    2016-08-01

    The estimate of damage after an earthquake using spaceborne remote sensing data is one of the main application of the change detection methodologies widely discussed in literature. APhoRISM - Advanced PRocedures for volcanIc and Seismic Monitoring is a collaborative European Commission project (FP7-SP ACE- 2013-1) addressing the development of innovative methods, using space and ground sensors to support the management and mitigation of the seismic and the volcanic risk. In this paper a novel approach aimed at damage assessment based on the use of a priori information derived by different sources in a preparedness phase is described and a preliminary validation is shown.

  3. Special diabetes program for Indians: reliability and validity of brief measures of print literacy and numeracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brega, Angela G; Jiang, Luohua; Beals, Janette; Manson, Spero M; Acton, Kelly J; Roubideaux, Yvette

    2012-01-01

    Health literacy is associated with health knowledge, behavior, and outcomes. Availability of valid measures of health literacy that require minimal time and resources to administer may provide a valuable resource for researchers and healthcare providers. We investigated the psychometric properties of brief, written tests of two components of health literacy--print literacy and numeracy--among American Indians and Alaska Natives. Secondary analysis of baseline data from the Special Diabetes Program for Indians Healthy Heart Project. Thirty health care programs participate in the project. They span 13 states and include Indian Health Service hospitals/clinics/service units as well as tribal and urban Indian health care programs. 3,033 American Indian and Alaska Native adults with diabetes. Internal consistency was investigated for the print literacy items. Construct validity analyses examined the expected association of print literacy and numeracy with demographic characteristics and four measures of disease knowledge. The print literacy items demonstrated acceptable internal consistency. Print literacy and numeracy were more limited among older people and those with lower income and education. Both measures were strong predictors of disease knowledge. Results support the value of the brief tests of print literacy and numeracy, and represent the first examination of the performance of health literacy measures in the American Indian and Alaska Native population.

  4. A Dynamic Programming-Based Heuristic for the Shift Design Problem in Airport Ground Handling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Tommy

    We consider the heterogeneous shift design problem for a workforce with multiple skills, where work shifts are created to cover a given demand as well as possible while minimizing cost and satisfying a flexible set of constraints. We focus mainly on applications within airport ground handling where...... the demand can be highly irregular and specified on time intervals as short as five minutes. Ground handling operations are subject to a high degree of cooperation and specialization that require workers with different qualifications to be planned together. Different labor regulations or organizational rules...... can apply to different ground handling operations, so the rules and restrictions can be numerous and vary significantly. This is modeled using flexible volume constraints that limit the creation of certain shifts. We present a fast heuristic for the heterogeneous shift design problem based on dynamic...

  5. A social skills training program for preschoolers with developmental delays. Generalization and social validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, L A; Matson, J L

    1995-04-01

    This investigation was designed to assess a social skills training program with 32 developmentally delayed preschoolers. Subjects were evaluated in an unstructured play session, matched for levels of appropriate and inappropriate social behaviors, and assigned to either a treatment or control condition. The treatment group (N = 16) was presented with a 6-week protocol involving positive reinforcement, modeling, rehearsal, feedback, and time out. Controls (N = 16) received no instruction beyond regular classroom activities during the 6 weeks. The two groups were reevaluated in a posttest session and again in a generalization setting where two peers with developmental delays (not included in either experimental condition) were included. Prosocial behaviors were successfully taught and maintained in generalization settings. Efforts to reduce inappropriate behaviors were less successful. A test of social validity via teachers' ratings of videotapes of pretest and posttest assessments was also conducted. Implications for generalization and social validity research are discussed.

  6. How Nasa's Independent Verification and Validation (IVandV) Program Builds Reliability into a Space Mission Software System (SMSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Marcus S.; Northey, Jeffrey; Stanton, William

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to outline how the NASA Independent Verification and Validation (IVV) Program helps to build reliability into the Space Mission Software Systems (SMSSs) that its customers develop.

  7. Getting Clean in a Drug Rehabilitation Program in Prison: A Grounded Theory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sharon; Ferguson, Neil

    2005-01-01

    High-risk drug use is prevalent among UK prison populations (Lipton, 1995) while recovery in prison is both complex and variable. Grounded theory methodology was employed to gain a greater understanding of the perceptions and conceptualisations of "risk," "need" and "motivation" in relation to prisoner drug abusing practices, criminal practices,…

  8. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Southern Sacramento Valley, California, 2005 - Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milby Dawson, Barbara J.; Bennett, George L.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 2,100 square-mile Southern Sacramento Valley study unit (SSACV) was investigated from March to June 2005 as part of the Statewide Basin Assessment Project of Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. This study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality within SSACV, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 83 wells in Placer, Sacramento, Solano, Sutter, and Yolo Counties. Sixty-seven of the wells were selected using a randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area. Sixteen of the wells were sampled to evaluate changes in water chemistry along ground-water flow paths. Four additional samples were collected at one of the wells to evaluate water-quality changes with depth. The GAMA Statewide Basin Assessment project was developed in response to the Ground-Water Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of man-made organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], pesticides and pesticide degradates, pharmaceutical compounds, and wastewater-indicator constituents), constituents of special interest (perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA], and 1,2,3-trichloropropane [1,2,3-TCP]), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, and carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon), and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the source and age of the sampled ground water. Quality-control samples (blanks, replicates, matrix spikes

  9. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Southeast San Joaquin Valley, 2005-2006 - Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Carmen A.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 3,800 square-mile Southeast San Joaquin Valley study unit (SESJ) was investigated from October 2005 through February 2006 as part of the Priority Basin Assessment Project of Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Statewide Basin Assessment project was developed in response to the Ground-Water Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The SESJ study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality within SESJ, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 99 wells in Fresno, Tulare, and Kings Counties, 83 of which were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area (grid wells), and 16 of which were sampled to evaluate changes in water chemistry along ground-water flow paths or across alluvial fans (understanding wells). The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of synthetic organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], pesticides and pesticide degradates, and pharmaceutical compounds), constituents of special interest (perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine, and 1,2,3-trichloropropane), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, and carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon), and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the source and age of the sampled ground water. Quality-control samples (blanks, replicates, samples for matrix spikes) were collected at approximately 10 percent of the wells, and the results

  10. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Coachella Valley Study Unit, 2007: Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldrath, Dara A.; Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 820 square-mile Coachella Valley Study Unit (COA) was investigated during February and March 2007 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001, and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground water used for public-water supplies within the Coachella Valley, and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of ground-water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 35 wells in Riverside County. Nineteen of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells). Sixteen additional wells were sampled to evaluate changes in water chemistry along selected ground-water flow paths, examine land use effects on ground-water quality, and to collect water-quality data in areas where little exists. These wells were referred to as 'understanding wells'. The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOC], pesticides and pesticide degradates, pharmaceutical compounds, and potential wastewater-indicator compounds), constituents of special interest (perchlorate and 1,2,3-trichloropropane [1,2,3-TCP]), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes (uranium, tritium, carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and boron), and dissolved noble gases (the last in collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) also were measured to help identify the source and age of the sampled

  11. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Middle Sacramento Valley Study Unit, 2006 - Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Stephen J.; Fram, Miranda S.; Milby Dawson, Barbara J.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 3,340 square mile Middle Sacramento Valley study unit (MSACV) was investigated from June through September, 2006, as part of the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) program. The GAMA Priority Basin Assessment project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The Middle Sacramento Valley study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality within MSACV, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 108 wells in Butte, Colusa, Glenn, Sutter, Tehama, Yolo, and Yuba Counties. Seventy-one wells were selected using a randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells), 15 wells were selected to evaluate changes in water chemistry along ground-water flow paths (flow-path wells), and 22 were shallow monitoring wells selected to assess the effects of rice agriculture, a major land use in the study unit, on ground-water chemistry (RICE wells). The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of synthetic organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], gasoline oxygenates and degradates, pesticides and pesticide degradates, and pharmaceutical compounds), constituents of special interest (perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA], and 1,2,3-trichloropropane [1,2,3-TCP]), inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, and carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon), and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the sources and ages of the sampled ground water. Quality-control samples (blanks

  12. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Central Sierra Study Unit, 2006 - Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Matthew J.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 950 square kilometer (370 square mile) Central Sierra study unit (CENSIE) was investigated in May 2006 as part of the Priority Basin Assessment project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Assessment project was developed in response to the Ground-Water Quality Monitoring Act of 2001, and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). This study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of raw ground water used for drinking-water supplies within CENSIE, and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of ground-water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from thirty wells in Madera County. Twenty-seven of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area (grid wells), and three were selected to aid in evaluation of specific water-quality issues (understanding wells). Ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of synthetic organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], gasoline oxygenates and degradates, pesticides and pesticide degradates), constituents of special interest (N-nitrosodimethylamine, perchlorate, and 1,2,3-trichloropropane), naturally occurring inorganic constituents [nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements], radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes [tritium, and carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon], and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the sources and ages of the sampled ground water. In total, over 250 constituents and water-quality indicators were investigated. Quality-control samples (blanks, replicates, and samples for matrix spikes) were collected at approximately one-sixth of the wells, and

  13. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Kern County Subbasin Study Unit, 2006 - Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Jennifer L.; Pimentel, Isabel; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 3,000 square-mile Kern County Subbasin study unit (KERN) was investigated from January to March, 2006, as part of the Priority Basin Assessment Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Assessment project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001, and is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Kern County Subbasin study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw (untreated) ground-water quality within KERN, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 50 wells within the San Joaquin Valley portion of Kern County. Forty-seven of the wells were selected using a randomized grid-based method to provide a statistical representation of the ground-water resources within the study unit. Three additional wells were sampled to aid in the evaluation of changes in water chemistry along regional ground-water flow paths. The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of man-made organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], pesticides, and pesticide degradates), constituents of special interest (perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA], and 1,2,3-trichloropropane [1,2,3-TCP]), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon) and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the source and age of the sampled ground water. Quality-control samples (blanks, replicates, and laboratory matrix spikes) were collected and analyzed at approximately 10 percent of

  14. Microbiological Testing Results of Boneless and Ground Beef Purchased for the National School Lunch Program, 2011 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerscher, Darin R; Lutz, Terry L; Whisenant, Stephen J; Smith, Kerry R; Morris, Craig A; Schroeder, Carl M

    2015-09-01

    The Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) purchases boneless and ground beef for distribution to recipients through federal nutrition assistance programs, including the National School Lunch Program, which represents 93% of the overall volume. Approximately every 2,000 lb (ca. 907 kg) of boneless beef and 10,000 lb (ca. 4,535 kg) of ground beef are designated a "lot" and tested for Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, standard plate count organisms (SPCs), E. coli, and coliforms. Any lot of beef positive for E. coli O157:H7 or for Salmonella, or any beef with concentrations of organisms exceeding critical limits for SPCs (100,000 CFU g(-1)), E. coli (500 CFU g(-1)), or coliforms (1,000 CFU g(-1)) is rejected for purchase by AMS and must be diverted from federal nutrition assistance programs. From July 2011 through June 2014, 537,478,212 lb (ca. 243,795,996 kg) of boneless beef and 428,130,984 lb (ca. 194,196,932 kg) of ground beef were produced for federal nutrition assistance programs. Of the 230,359 boneless beef samples collected over this period, 82 (0.04%) were positive for E. coli O157:H7, 924 (0.40%) were positive for Salmonella, 222 (0.10%) exceeded the critical limit for SPCs, 69 (0.03%) exceeded the critical limit for E. coli, and 123 (0.05%) exceeded the critical limit for coliforms. Of the 46,527 ground beef samples collected over this period, 30 (0.06%) were positive for E. coli O157:H7, 360 (0.77%) were positive for Salmonella, 20 (0.04%) exceeded the critical limit for SPCs, 22 (0.05%) exceeded the critical limit for E. coli, and 17 (0.04%) exceeded the critical limit for coliforms. Cumulatively, these data suggest beef produced for the AMS National School Lunch Program is done so under an adequate food safety system, as indicated by the low percentage of lots that were pathogen positive or exceeded critical limits for indicator organisms.

  15. A presentation of ATR processing chain validation procedure of IR terminal guidance version of the AASM modular air-to-ground weapon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclos, D.; Quinquis, N.; Broda, G.; Galmiche, F.; Oudyi, F.; Coulon, N.; Cordier, D.; Sonier, C.

    2009-05-01

    Developed by Sagem (SAFRAN Group), the AASM is a modular Air-To-Ground "Fire and Forget" weapon designed to be able to neutralise a large range of targets under all conditions. The AASM is composed of guidance and range enhancement kits that give bombs, already in service, new operational capabilities. AASM Guidance kit exists in two different versions. The IMU/GPS guidance version is able to achieve "ten-meter class" accuracy on target in all weather conditions. The IMU/GPS/IR guidance version is able to achieve "meter class" accuracy on target with poor precision geographic designation or in GPS-denied flight context, thanks to a IR sensor and a complex image processing chain. In this night/day IMU/GPS/IR version, the terminal guidance phase adjusts the missile navigation to the true target by matching the image viewed through the infrared sensor with a target model stored in the missile memory. This model will already have been drawn up on the ground using a mission planning system and, for example, a satellite image. This paper will present the main steps of the procedure applied to qualify the complete image processing chain of the AASM IMU/GPS/IR version, including open-loop validation of ATR algorithms on real and synthetic images, and closed-loop validation using AASM simulation reference model.

  16. Multi-body simulation of a canine hind limb: model development, experimental validation and calculation of ground reaction forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wefstaedt Patrick

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among other causes the long-term result of hip prostheses in dogs is determined by aseptic loosening. A prevention of prosthesis complications can be achieved by an optimization of the tribological system which finally results in improved implant duration. In this context a computerized model for the calculation of hip joint loadings during different motions would be of benefit. In a first step in the development of such an inverse dynamic multi-body simulation (MBS- model we here present the setup of a canine hind limb model applicable for the calculation of ground reaction forces. Methods The anatomical geometries of the MBS-model have been established using computer tomography- (CT- and magnetic resonance imaging- (MRI- data. The CT-data were collected from the pelvis, femora, tibiae and pads of a mixed-breed adult dog. Geometric information about 22 muscles of the pelvic extremity of 4 mixed-breed adult dogs was determined using MRI. Kinematic and kinetic data obtained by motion analysis of a clinically healthy dog during a gait cycle (1 m/s on an instrumented treadmill were used to drive the model in the multi-body simulation. Results and Discussion As a result the vertical ground reaction forces (z-direction calculated by the MBS-system show a maximum deviation of 1.75%BW for the left and 4.65%BW for the right hind limb from the treadmill measurements. The calculated peak ground reaction forces in z- and y-direction were found to be comparable to the treadmill measurements, whereas the curve characteristics of the forces in y-direction were not in complete alignment. Conclusion In conclusion, it could be demonstrated that the developed MBS-model is suitable for simulating ground reaction forces of dogs during walking. In forthcoming investigations the model will be developed further for the calculation of forces and moments acting on the hip joint during different movements, which can be of help in context with the in

  17. Validation of middle atmospheric campaign-based water vapour measured by the ground-based microwave radiometer MIAWARA-C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Tschanz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Middle atmospheric water vapour can be used as a tracer for dynamical processes. It is mainly measured by satellite instruments and ground-based microwave radiometers. Ground-based instruments capable of measuring middle atmospheric water vapour are sparse but valuable as they complement satellite measurements, are relatively easy to maintain and have a long lifetime. MIAWARA-C is a ground-based microwave radiometer for middle atmospheric water vapour designed for use on measurement campaigns for both atmospheric case studies and instrument intercomparisons. MIAWARA-C's retrieval version 1.1 (v1.1 is set up in a way to provide a consistent data set even if the instrument is operated from different locations on a campaign basis. The sensitive altitude range for v1.1 extends from 4 hPa (37 km to 0.017 hPa (75 km. MIAWARA-C measures two polarisations of the incident radiation in separate receiver channels and can therefore provide two independent measurements of the same air mass. The standard deviation of the difference between the profiles obtained from the two polarisations is in excellent agreement with the estimated random error of v1.1. In this paper, the quality of v1.1 data is assessed during two measurement campaigns: (1 five months of measurements in the Arctic (Sodankylä, 67.37° N/26.63° E and (2 nine months of measurements at mid-latitudes (Zimmerwald, 46.88° N/7.46° E. For both campaigns MIAWARA-C's profiles are compared to measurements from the satellite experiments Aura MLS and MIPAS. In addition, comparisons to ACE-FTS and SOFIE are presented for the Arctic and to the ground-based radiometer MIAWARA for the mid-latitudinal campaign. In general all intercomparisons show high correlation coefficients, above 0.5 at altitudes above 45 km, confirming the ability of MIAWARA-C to monitor temporal variations on the order of days. The biases are generally below 10% and within the estimated systematic uncertainty of MIAWARA-C. No

  18. Direct imaging of extrasolar planets: overview of ground and space programs

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony, Boccaletti

    2009-01-01

    With the ever-growing number of exoplanets detected, the issue of characterization is becoming more and more relevant. Direct imaging is certainly the most efficient but the most challenging tool to probe the atmosphere of exoplanets and hence in turns determine the physical properties and refine models of exoplanets. A number of instruments optimized for exoplanets imaging are now operating or planned for the short and long term both on the ground and in space. This paper reviews these instr...

  19. Considerations for Use of the Rora Program to Estimate Ground-Water Recharge From Streamflow Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    inch per year (in/yr) 25.4 millimeter per year foot (ft) 0.3048 meter square mile (mi2) 2.590 square kilometer cubic foot per second (ft3...designates those parts of the record that represent ground-water discharge. In extremely flat areas, the time period of surface runoff may not be...by several hydrologists (Gerhart, 1986; Hall and Risser , 1993; Meinzer and Stearns, 1929; Rasmussen and Andreasen, 1959). To isolate the rise caused

  20. Development of methodology and computer programs for the ground response spectrum and the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joon Kyoung [Semyung Univ., Research Institute of Industrial Science and Technol , Jecheon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-15

    Objective of this study is to investigate and develop the methodologies and corresponding computer codes, compatible to the domestic seismological and geological environments, for estimating ground response spectrum and probabilistic seismic hazard. Using the PSHA computer program, the Cumulative Probability Functions(CPDF) and Probability Functions (PDF) of the annual exceedence have been investigated for the analysis of the uncertainty space of the annual probability at ten interested seismic hazard levels (0.1 g to 0.99 g). The cumulative provability functions and provability functions of the annual exceedence have been also compared to those results from the different input parameter spaces.

  1. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Southern Sierra Study Unit, 2006 - Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 1,800 square-mile Southern Sierra study unit (SOSA) was investigated in June 2006 as part of the Statewide Basin Assessment Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Statewide Basin Assessment Project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The Southern Sierra study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality within SOSA, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from fifty wells in Kern and Tulare Counties. Thirty-five of the wells were selected using a randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area, and fifteen were selected to evaluate changes in water chemistry along ground-water flow paths. The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of synthetic organic constituents [volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides and pesticide degradates, pharmaceutical compounds, and wastewater-indicator compounds], constituents of special interest [perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), and 1,2,3-trichloropropane (1,2,3-TCP)], naturally occurring inorganic constituents [nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements], radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes [tritium, and carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in water], and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the source and age of the sampled ground water. Quality-control samples (blanks, replicates, and samples for matrix spikes) were collected for approximately one-eighth of the wells, and the results for these samples were used to evaluate the quality of the data for the ground-water samples. Assessment of the

  2. Ground-Water Quality Data in the San Francisco Bay Study Unit, 2007: Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Mary C.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 620-square-mile San Francisco Bay study unit (SFBAY) was investigated from April through June 2007 as part of the Priority Basin project of the Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001, and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples in SFBAY were collected from 79 wells in San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Alameda, and Contra Costa Counties. Forty-three of the wells sampled were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells). Thirty-six wells were sampled to aid in evaluation of specific water-quality issues (understanding wells). The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of synthetic organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOC], pesticides and pesticide degradates, pharmaceutical compounds, and potential wastewater-indicator compounds), constituents of special interest (perchlorate and N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA]), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, trace elements, chloride and bromide isotopes, and uranium and strontium isotopes), radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, carbon-14 isotopes, and stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, boron, and carbon), and dissolved noble gases (noble gases were analyzed in collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) also were measured to help identify the source and age of the sampled ground water. Quality-control samples (blank samples

  3. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Central Eastside San Joaquin Basin 2006: Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landon, Matthew K.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 1,695-square-mile Central Eastside study unit (CESJO) was investigated from March through June 2006 as part of the Statewide Basin Assessment Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Statewide Basin Assessment project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality within CESJO, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 78 wells in Merced and Stanislaus Counties. Fifty-eight of the 78 wells were selected using a randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells). Twenty of the wells were selected to evaluate changes in water chemistry along selected lateral or vertical ground-water flow paths in the aquifer (flow-path wells). The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of synthetic organic constituents [volatile organic compounds (VOCs), gasoline oxygenates and their degradates, pesticides and pesticide degradates], constituents of special interest [perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), and 1,2,3-trichloropropane (1,2,3-TCP)], inorganic constituents that can occur naturally [nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements], radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes [tritium, carbon-14, and uranium isotopes and stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and carbon], and dissolved noble and other gases also were measured to help identify the source and age of the sampled ground water. Quality-control samples (blanks, replicates, samples for matrix spikes) were collected

  4. Measurement of Health Program Equity Made Easier: Validation of a Simplified Asset Index Using Program Data From Honduras and Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergo, Alex; Ritter, Julie; Gwatkin, Davidson R; Binkin, Nancy

    2016-03-01

    the 8 simplified asset index iterations did this proportion exceed 50%. We conclude that substantially reducing the number of variables and questions used to assess equity is feasible, producing valid results and providing a less burdensome way for program implementers or researchers to evaluate whether their interventions are pro-poor. Developing a standardized, simplified asset questionnaire that could be used across countries may prove difficult, however, given that the variables that contribute the most to the asset index are largely country-specific.

  5. Development and validation of ultrasound-assisted solid-liquid extraction of phenolic compounds from waste spent coffee grounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Ponmurugan, Karuppiah; Maran Jeganathan, Prakash

    2017-01-01

    In this current work, Box-Behnken statistical experimental design (BBD) was adopted to evaluate and optimize USLE (ultrasound-assisted solid-liquid extraction) of phytochemicals from spent coffee grounds. Factors employed in this study are ultrasonic power, temperature, time and solid-liquid (SL) ratio. Individual and interactive effect of independent variables over the extraction yield was depicted through mathematical models, which are generated from the experimental data. Determined optimum process conditions are 244W of ultrasonic power, 40°C of temperature, 34min of time and 1:17g/ml of SL ratio. The predicted values were in correlation with experimental values with 95% confidence level, under the determined optimal conditions. This indicates the significance of selected method for USLE of phytochemicals from SCG. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Hypergravity Facilities in the ESA Ground-Based Facility Program - Current Research Activities and Future Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frett, Timo; Petrat, Guido; W. A. van Loon, Jack J.; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Anken, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Research on Artificial Gravity (AG) created by linear acceleration or centrifugation has a long history and could significantly contribute to realize long-term human spaceflight in the future. Employing centrifuges plays a prominent role in human physiology and gravitational biology. This article gives a short review about the background of Artificial Gravity with respect to hypergravity (including partial gravity) and provides information about actual ESA ground-based facilities for research on a variety of biosystems such as cells, plants, animals or, particularly, humans.

  7. Ground Plane and Near-Surface Thermal Analysis for NASA's Constellation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasbarre, Joseph F.; Amundsen, Ruth M.; Scola, Salvatore; Leahy, Frank F.; Sharp, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Most spacecraft thermal analysis tools assume that the spacecraft is in orbit around a planet and are designed to calculate solar and planetary fluxes, as well as radiation to space. On NASA Constellation projects, thermal analysts are also building models of vehicles in their pre-launch condition on the surface of a planet. This process entails making some modifications in the building and execution of a thermal model such that the radiation from the planet, both reflected albedo and infrared, is calculated correctly. Also important in the calculation of pre-launch vehicle temperatures are the natural environments at the vehicle site, including air and ground temperatures, sky radiative background temperature, solar flux, and optical properties of the ground around the vehicle. A group of Constellation projects have collaborated on developing a cohesive, integrated set of natural environments that accurately capture worst-case thermal scenarios for the pre-launch and launch phases of these vehicles. The paper will discuss the standardization of methods for local planet modeling across Constellation projects, as well as the collection and consolidation of natural environments for launch sites. Methods for Earth as well as lunar sites will be discussed.

  8. The CU Airborne MAX-DOAS instrument: ground based validation, and vertical profiling of aerosol extinction and trace gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Baidar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The University of Colorado Airborne Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS instrument uses solar stray light remote sensing to detect and quantify multiple trace gases, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2, glyoxal (CHOCHO, formaldehyde (HCHO, water vapor (H2O, nitrous acid (HONO, iodine monoxide (IO, bromine monoxide (BrO, and oxygen dimers (O4 at multiple wavelengths (360 nm, 477 nm, 577 nm and 632 nm simultaneously, and sensitively in the open atmosphere. The instrument is unique, in that it presents the first systematic implementation of MAX-DOAS on research aircraft, i.e. (1 includes measurements of solar stray light photons from nadir, zenith, and multiple elevation angles forward and below the plane by the same spectrometer/detector system, and (2 features a motion compensation system that decouples the telescope field of view (FOV from aircraft movements in real-time (< 0.35° accuracy. Sets of solar stray light spectra collected from nadir to zenith scans provide some vertical profile information within 2 km above and below the aircraft altitude, and the vertical column density (VCD below the aircraft is measured in nadir view. Maximum information about vertical profiles is derived simultaneously for trace gas concentrations and aerosol extinction coefficients over similar spatial scales and with a vertical resolution of typically 250 m during aircraft ascent/descent.

    The instrument is described, and data from flights over California during the CalNex and CARES air quality field campaigns is presented. Horizontal distributions of NO2 VCDs (below the aircraft maps are sampled with typically 1 km resolution, and show good agreement with two ground based CU MAX-DOAS instruments (slope 0.95 ± 0.09, R2 = 0.86. As a case study vertical profiles of NO2, CHOCHO, HCHO, and H2O mixing ratios and aerosol extinction coefficients

  9. Retrieval and validation of O3 measurements from ground-based FTIR spectrometer at equatorial station: Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takele Kenea, S.; Mengistu Tsidu, G.; Blumenstock, T.; Hase, F.; von Clarmann, T.; Stiller, G. P.

    2012-09-01

    Since May 2009 high-resolution Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) solar absorption spectra are recorded at Addis Ababa (9.01° N latitude, 38.76° E longitude, 2443 m altitude a.s.l.), Ethiopia. The vertical profiles and total column amounts of ozone (O3) are deduced from the spectra by using the retrieval code PROFFIT (V9.5) and regularly determined instrumental line shape (ILS). A detailed error analysis of the O3 retrieval is performed. Averaging kernels analysis of the target gas shows that the major contribution to the retrieved information always comes from the measurement. We obtained 2.1 degrees of freedom on average for signals in the retrieval of O3 from the observed FTIR spectra. We have compared the FTIR retrieval of ozone Volume Mixing Ratio (VMR) profiles and column amounts with the coincident satellite observations of Microwave Limb Sounding (MLS), Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) and Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), Atmospheric Infrared Sounding (AIRS) and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2) instrument. The mean relative differences are generally found below +15% in the altitude range of 27 to 36 km for comparison of VMR profiles made between MLS and MIPAS, whereas comparison with TES has shown below 9.4% relative difference. Furthermore, the mean relative difference is positive above 31 km, suggesting positive bias in the FTIR measurement of O3 VMR with respect to MLS, MIPAS and TES. The overall comparisons of column amounts of satellite measurements with the ground-based FTIR instruments show better agreement exhibiting mean relative differences of ground-based FTIR with respect to MLS and GOME-2 within +0.4% to +4.0% and corresponding standard deviations of 2.2 to 4.3% whereas, in the case of OMI, TES, AIRS, the mean relative differences are from -0.38 to -6.8%. Thus, the retrieved O3 VMR and column amounts from a tropical site, Addis Ababa, is found to exhibit

  10. The CU Airborne MAX-DOAS instrument: ground based validation, and vertical profiling of aerosol extinction and trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baidar, S.; Oetjen, H.; Coburn, S.; Dix, B.; Ortega, I.; Sinreich, R.; Volkamer, R.

    2012-09-01

    The University of Colorado Airborne Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument uses solar stray light remote sensing to detect and quantify multiple trace gases, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2), glyoxal (CHOCHO), formaldehyde (HCHO), water vapor (H2O), nitrous acid (HONO), iodine monoxide (IO), bromine monoxide (BrO), and oxygen dimers (O4) at multiple wavelengths (360 nm, 477 nm, 577 nm and 632 nm) simultaneously, and sensitively in the open atmosphere. The instrument is unique, in that it presents the first systematic implementation of MAX-DOAS on research aircraft, i.e. (1) includes measurements of solar stray light photons from nadir, zenith, and multiple elevation angles forward and below the plane by the same spectrometer/detector system, and (2) features a motion compensation system that decouples the telescope field of view (FOV) from aircraft movements in real-time (CHOCHO, HCHO, and H2O mixing ratios and aerosol extinction coefficients, ɛ, at 477nm calculated from O4 measurements from a low approach at Brackett airfield inside the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB) are presented. These profiles contain ~ 12 degrees of freedom (DOF) over a 3.5 km altitude range, independent of signal-to-noise at which the trace gas is detected. The boundary layer NO2 concentration, and the integral aerosol extinction over height (aerosol optical depth, AOD) agrees well with nearby ground-based in-situ NO2 measurement, and AERONET station. The detection limits of NO2, CHOCHO, HCHO, ɛ360, ɛ477 from 30 s integration time spectra recorded forward of the plane are 5 ppt, 3 ppt, 100 ppt, 0.004 km-1, 0.002 km-1 in the free troposphere (FT), and 30 ppt, 16 ppt, 540 ppt, 0.012 km-1, 0.006 km-1 inside the boundary layer (BL), respectively. Mobile column observations of trace gases and aerosols are complimentary to in-situ observations, and help bridge the spatial scales probed by ground-based observations, satellites, and predicted by atmospheric

  11. M3 version 3.0: Verification and validation; Hydrochemical model of ground water at repository site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Javier B. (Dept. of Earth Sciences, Univ. of Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain)); Laaksoharju, Marcus (Geopoint AB, Sollentuna (Sweden)); Skaarman, Erik (Abscondo, Bromma (Sweden)); Gurban, Ioana (3D-Terra (Canada))

    2009-01-15

    Hydrochemical evaluation is a complex type of work that is carried out by specialists. The outcome of this work is generally presented as qualitative models and process descriptions of a site. To support and help to quantify the processes in an objective way, a multivariate mathematical tool entitled M3 (Multivariate Mixing and Mass balance calculations) has been constructed. The computer code can be used to trace the origin of the groundwater, and to calculate the mixing proportions and mass balances from groundwater data. The M3 code is a groundwater response model, which means that changes in the groundwater chemistry in terms of sources and sinks are traced in relation to an ideal mixing model. The complexity of the measured groundwater data determines the configuration of the ideal mixing model. Deviations from the ideal mixing model are interpreted as being due to reactions. Assumptions concerning important mineral phases altering the groundwater or uncertainties associated with thermodynamic constants do not affect the modelling because the calculations are solely based on the measured groundwater composition. M3 uses the opposite approach to that of many standard hydrochemical models. In M3, mixing is evaluated and calculated first. The constituents that cannot be described by mixing are described by reactions. The M3 model consists of three steps: the first is a standard principal component analysis, followed by mixing and finally mass balance calculations. The measured groundwater composition can be described in terms of mixing proportions (%), while the sinks and sources of an element associated with reactions are reported in mg/L. This report contains a set of verification and validation exercises with the intention of building confidence in the use of the M3 methodology. At the same time, clear answers are given to questions related to the accuracy and the precision of the results, including the inherent uncertainties and the errors that can be made

  12. M3 version 3.0: Verification and validation; Hydrochemical model of ground water at repository site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Javier B. (Dept. of Earth Sciences, Univ. of Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain)); Laaksoharju, Marcus (Geopoint AB, Sollentuna (Sweden)); Skaarman, Erik (Abscondo, Bromma (Sweden)); Gurban, Ioana (3D-Terra (Canada))

    2009-01-15

    Hydrochemical evaluation is a complex type of work that is carried out by specialists. The outcome of this work is generally presented as qualitative models and process descriptions of a site. To support and help to quantify the processes in an objective way, a multivariate mathematical tool entitled M3 (Multivariate Mixing and Mass balance calculations) has been constructed. The computer code can be used to trace the origin of the groundwater, and to calculate the mixing proportions and mass balances from groundwater data. The M3 code is a groundwater response model, which means that changes in the groundwater chemistry in terms of sources and sinks are traced in relation to an ideal mixing model. The complexity of the measured groundwater data determines the configuration of the ideal mixing model. Deviations from the ideal mixing model are interpreted as being due to reactions. Assumptions concerning important mineral phases altering the groundwater or uncertainties associated with thermodynamic constants do not affect the modelling because the calculations are solely based on the measured groundwater composition. M3 uses the opposite approach to that of many standard hydrochemical models. In M3, mixing is evaluated and calculated first. The constituents that cannot be described by mixing are described by reactions. The M3 model consists of three steps: the first is a standard principal component analysis, followed by mixing and finally mass balance calculations. The measured groundwater composition can be described in terms of mixing proportions (%), while the sinks and sources of an element associated with reactions are reported in mg/L. This report contains a set of verification and validation exercises with the intention of building confidence in the use of the M3 methodology. At the same time, clear answers are given to questions related to the accuracy and the precision of the results, including the inherent uncertainties and the errors that can be made

  13. Overview and Initial Results from the DEEPWAVE Airborne and Ground-Based Measurement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    The deep-propagating gravity wave experiment (DEEPWAVE) was performed on and over New Zealand, the Tasman Sea, and the Southern Ocean with core airborne measurements extending from 5 June to 21 July 2014 and supporting ground-based measurements spanning a longer interval. The NSF/NCAR GV employed standard flight-level measurements and new airborne lidar and imaging measurements of gravity waves (GWs) from sources at lower altitudes throughout the stratosphere and into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). The new GV lidars included a Rayleigh lidar measuring atmospheric density and temperature from ~20-60 km and a sodium resonance lidar measuring sodium density and temperature at ~75-105 km. An airborne Advanced Mesosphere Temperature Mapper (AMTM) and two IR "wing" cameras imaged the OH airglow temperature and/or intensity fields extending ~900 km across the GV flight track. The DLR Falcon was equipped with its standard flight-level instruments and an aerosol Doppler lidar measuring radial winds below the Falcon. DEEPWAVE also included extensive ground-based measurements in New Zealand, Tasmania, and Southern Ocean Islands. DEEPWAVE performed 26 GV flights and 13 Falcon flights, and ground-based measurements occurred whether or not the aircraft were flying. Collectively, many diverse cases of GW forcing, propagation, refraction, and dissipation spanning altitudes of 0-100 km were observed. Examples include strong mountain wave (MW) forcing and breaking in the lower and middle stratosphere, weak MW forcing yielding MW penetration into the MLT having very large amplitudes and momentum fluxes, MW scales at higher altitudes ranging from ~10-250 km, large-scale trailing waves from orography refracting into the polar vortex and extending to high altitudes, GW generation by deep convection, large-scale GWs arising from jet stream sources, and strong MWs in the MLT arising from strong surface flow over a small island. DEEPWAVE yielded a number of surprises, among

  14. Validation of the facial assessment by computer evaluation (FACE) program for software-aided eyelid measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Catherine J; Lefebvre, Daniel R; Yoon, Michael K

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this article is to validate the accuracy of Facial Assessment by Computer Evaluation (FACE) program in eyelid measurements. Sixteen subjects between the ages of 27 and 65 were included with IRB approval. Clinical measurements of upper eyelid margin reflex distance (MRD1) and inter-palpebral fissure (IPF) were obtained. Photographs were then taken with a digital single lens reflex camera with built-in pop-up flash (dSLR-pop) and a dSLR with lens-mounted ring flash (dSLR-ring) with the cameras upright, rotated 90, 180, and 270 degrees. The images were analyzed using both the FACE and ImageJ software to measure MRD1 and IPF.Thirty-two eyes of sixteen subjects were included. Comparison of clinical measurement of MRD1 and IPF with FACE measurements of photos in upright position showed no statistically significant differences for dSLR-pop (MRD1: p = 0.0912, IPF: p = 0.334) and for dSLR-ring (MRD1: p = 0.105, IPF: p = 0.538). One-to-one comparison of MRD1 and IPF measurements in four positions obtained with FACE versus ImageJ for dSLR-pop showed moderate to substantial agreement for MRD1 (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.534 upright, 0.731 in 90 degree rotation, 0.627 in 180 degree rotation, 0.477 in 270 degree rotation) and substantial to excellent agreement in IPF (ICC = 0.740, 0.859, 0.849, 0.805). In photos taken with dSLR-ring, there was excellent agreement of all MRD1 (ICC = 0.916, 0.932, 0.845, 0.812) and IPF (ICC = 0.937, 0.938, 0.917, 0.888) values. The FACE program is a valid method for measuring margin reflex distance and inter-palpebral fissure.

  15. Validation of SCIAMACHY NO2 Vertical Column Densities with Mt.Cimone and Stara Zagora Ground-Based Zenith Sky DOAS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostadinov, I.; Petritoli, A.; Werner, R.; Valev, D.; Atanasov, At.; Bortoli, D.; Markova, T.; Ravegnani, F.; Palazzi, E.; Giovanelli, G.

    2004-08-01

    Ground-based zenith sky Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements performed by means of GASCOD instruments at Mt. Cimone (44N 11E), Italy and Stara Zagora (42N, 25E), Bulgaria are used for validation of SCIAMACHY NO2 vertical column density (vcd) of ESA SCI_NL product retrieved with 5.01 processor version. The results presented in this work regard satellite data for the JulyDecember 2002 period. On this base it is concluded that during summer-autumn period the overall NO2 vcd above both stations is fairly well reproduced by the SCIAMACHY data, while towards the winter period they deviate from the seasonal behaviour of NO2 vcd derived at both stations

  16. In Pursuit of Improving Airburst and Ground Damage Predictions: Recent Advances in Multi-Body Aerodynamic Testing and Computational Tools Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Gulhan, Ali; Aftosmis, Michael; Brock, Joseph; Mathias, Donovan; Need, Dominic; Rodriguez, David; Seltner, Patrick; Stern, Eric; Wiles, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    An airburst from a large asteroid during entry can cause significant ground damage. The damage depends on the energy and the altitude of airburst. Breakup of asteroids into fragments and their lateral spread have been observed. Modeling the underlying physics of fragmented bodies interacting at hypersonic speeds and the spread of fragments is needed for a true predictive capability. Current models use heuristic arguments and assumptions such as pancaking or point source explosive energy release at pre-determined altitude or an assumed fragmentation spread rate to predict airburst damage. A multi-year collaboration between German Aerospace Center (DLR) and NASA has been established to develop validated computational tools to address the above challenge.

  17. ARMA models for earthquake ground motions. Seismic safety margins research program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, M. K.; Kwiatkowski, J. W.; Nau, R. F.; Oliver, R. M.; Pister, K. S.

    1981-02-01

    Four major California earthquake records were analyzed by use of a class of discrete linear time-domain processes commonly referred to as ARMA (Autoregressive/Moving-Average) models. It was possible to analyze these different earthquakes, identify the order of the appropriate ARMA model(s), estimate parameters, and test the residuals generated by these models. It was also possible to show the connections, similarities, and differences between the traditional continuous models (with parameter estimates based on spectral analyses) and the discrete models with parameters estimated by various maximum-likelihood techniques applied to digitized acceleration data in the time domain. The methodology proposed is suitable for simulating earthquake ground motions in the time domain, and appears to be easily adapted to serve as inputs for nonlinear discrete time models of structural motions. 60 references, 19 figures, 9 tables.

  18. Recovery Act: Tennessee Energy Efficient Schools Initiative Ground Source Heat Pump Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townsend, Terry [Townsend Engineering, Inc., Davenport, IA (United States); Slusher, Scott [Townsend Engineering, Inc., Davenport, IA (United States)

    2017-04-24

    The Tennessee Energy Efficient Schools Initiative (EESI) Hybrid-Water Source Heat Pump (HY-GSHP) Program sought to provide installation costs and operation costs for different Hybrid water source heat pump systems’ configurations so that other State of Tennessee School Districts will have a resource for comparison purposes if considering a geothermal system.

  19. Gaining Ground: The Labor Market Progress of Sectoral Employment Development Programs. SEDLP Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandniapour, Lily; Conway, Maureen

    The Sectoral Employment Development Learning Project conducted a longitudinal survey of participants of industry-based workforce development programs about two years after completing training. Outcomes for unemployed and underemployed workers--77 percent of the sample--indicated increased hours worked and increased earnings per hour produced…

  20. Safeguarding Self-Governance: A Grounded Theory of Older Patients’ Pattern of Behavior in Relation to their Relatives in Fast-track Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Connie B.; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Lindhardt Damsgaard, Tove

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to generate a grounded theory of older patients’ pattern of behavior in relation to their relatives’ involvement in fast-track programs during total joint replacement. Sixteen patients were recruited in orthopedic wards. Data collection included 11 interviews......-governance emerged in the analysis as the core category of our theory and pattern of behavior of the older patients in relation to their relatives. The older patients’ main concern was to complete the fast-track program while maintaining autonomy, which they resolved through four strategies of actions: embracing......, shielding, distancing, and masking. Keywords: Fast-track program, grounded theory, older patients, relatives, total joint replacement....

  1. Forward Modeling and validation of a new formulation to compute self-potential signals associated with ground water flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bolève

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The classical formulation of the coupled hydroelectrical flow in porous media is based on a linear formulation of two coupled constitutive equations for the electrical current density and the seepage velocity of the water phase and obeying Onsager's reciprocity. This formulation shows that the streaming current density is controlled by the gradient of the fluid pressure of the water phase and a streaming current coupling coefficient that depends on the so-called zeta potential. Recently a new formulation has been introduced in which the streaming current density is directly connected to the seepage velocity of the water phase and to the excess of electrical charge per unit pore volume in the porous material. The advantages of this formulation are numerous. First this new formulation is more intuitive not only in terms of establishing a constitutive equation for the generalized Ohm's law but also in specifying boundary conditions for the influence of the flow field upon the streaming potential. With the new formulation, the streaming potential coupling coefficient shows a decrease of its magnitude with permeability in agreement with published results. The new formulation has been extended in the inertial laminar flow regime and to unsaturated conditions with applications to the vadose zone. This formulation is suitable to model self-potential signals in the field. We investigate infiltration of water from an agricultural ditch, vertical infiltration of water into a sinkhole, and preferential horizontal flow of ground water in a paleochannel. For the three cases reported in the present study, a good match is obtained between finite element simulations performed and field observations. Thus, this formulation could be useful for the inverse mapping of the geometry of groundwater flow from self-potential field measurements.

  2. The OECD validation program of the H295R steroidogenesis assay: Phase 3. Final inter-laboratory validation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecker, Markus; Hollert, Henner; Cooper, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) test guideline.A previously optimized and pre-validated protocol was used to assess the potential of 28 chemicals of diverse structures and properties to validate the H295R steroidogenesis assay. These chemicals are comprised of known endocrine-active chemicals...... on hormone production, confounding factors, such as cell viability and possible direct interference of test substances with antibody-based hormone detection assays, were assessed. Prior to and during the conduct of exposure experiments, each laboratory had to demonstrate that they were able to conduct...... associated with only one laboratory after a personnel change occurred. Significant interference of test chemicals with some of the antibody-based hormone detection systems occurred for four chemicals. Only one of these chemicals, however, significantly affected the ability of the detection system...

  3. Towards a first ground-based validation of aerosol optical depths from Sentinel-2 over the complex topography of the Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Valerio; Cremonese, Edoardo; Diémoz, Henri; Siani, Anna Maria

    2017-04-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) is spending notable effort to put in operation a new generation of advanced Earth-observation satellites, the Sentinel constellation. In particular, the Sentinel-2 host an instrumental payload mainly consisting in a MultiSpectral Instrument (MSI) imaging sensor, capable of acquiring high-resolution imagery of the Earth surface and atmospheric reflectance at selected spectral bands, hence providing complementary measurements to ground-based radiometric stations. The latter can provide reference data for validating the estimates from spaceborne instruments such as Sentinel-2A (operating since October 2015), whose aerosol optical thickness (AOT) values, can be obtained from correcting SWIR (2190 nm) reflectance with an improved dense dark vegetation (DDV) algorithm. In the Northwestern European Alps (Saint-Christophe, 45.74°N, 7.36°E) a Prede POM-02 sun/sky aerosol photometer has been operating for several years within the EuroSkyRad network by the Environmental Protection Agency of Aosta Valley (ARPA Valle d'Aosta), gathering direct sun and diffuse sky radiance for retrieving columnar aerosol optical properties. This aerosol optical depth (AOD) dataset represents an optimal ground-truth for the corresponding Sentinel-2 estimates obtained with the Sen2cor processor in the challenging environment of the Alps (complex topography, snow-covered surfaces). We show the deviations between the two measurement series and propose some corrections to enhance the overall accuracy of satellite estimates.

  4. Long-term ground-water monitoring program and performance-evaluation plan for the extraction system at the former Nike Missile Battery Site, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senus, Michael P.; Tenbus, Frederick J.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents lithologic and ground-water-quality data collected during April and May 2000 in the remote areas of the tidal wetland of West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Contamination of the Canal Creek aquifer with volatile organic compounds has been documented in previous investigations of the area. This study was conducted to investigate areas that were previously inaccessible because of deep mud and shallow water, and to support ongoing investigations of the fate and transport of volatile organic compounds in the Canal Creek aquifer. A unique vibracore drill rig mounted on a hovercraft was used for drilling and ground-water sampling. Continuous cores of the wetland sediment and of the Canal Creek aquifer were collected at five sites. Attempts to sample ground water were made by use of a continuous profiler at 12 sites, without well installation, at a total of 81 depths within the aquifer. Of those 81 attempts, only 34 sampling depths produced enough water to collect samples. Ground-water samples from two sites had the highest concentrations of volatile organic compounds?with total volatile organic compound concentrations in the upper part of the aquifer ranging from about 15,000 to 50,000 micrograms per liter. Ground-water samples from five sites had much lower total volatile organic compound concentrations (95 to 2,100 micrograms per liter), whereas two sites were essentially not contaminated, with total volatile organic compound concentrations less than or equal to 5 micrograms per liter.

  5. FORTRAN programs for calculating nonlinear seismic ground response in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, W.B.

    1978-01-01

    The programs described here were designed for calculating the nonlinear seismic response of a two-dimensional configuration of soil underlain by a semi-infinite elastic medium representing bedrock. There are two programs. One is for plane strain motions, that is, motions in the plane perpendicular to the long axis of the structure, and the other is for antiplane strain motions, that is motions parallel to the axis. The seismic input is provided by specifying what the motion of the rock-soil boundary would be if the soil were absent and the boundary were a free surface. This may be done by supplying a magnetic tape containing the values of particle velocity for every boundary point at every instant of time. Alternatively, a punch card deck may be supplied giving acceleration values at every instant of time. In the plane strain program it is assumed that the acceleration values apply simultaneously to every point on the boundary; in the antiplane strain program it is assumed that the acceleration values characterize a plane shear wave propagating upward in the underlying elastic medium at a specified angle with the vertical. The nonlinear hysteretic behavior of the soil is represented by a three-dimensional rheological model. A boundary condition is used which takes account of finite rigidity in the elastic substratum. The computations are performed by an explicit finite-difference scheme that proceeds step by step in space and time. Computations are done in terms of stress departures from an unspecified initial state. Source listings are provided here along with instructions for preparing the input. A more detailed discussion of the method is presented elsewhere.

  6. Studying the learning of programming using grounded theory to support activity theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Alsop

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Teaching programming to first year undergraduates in large numbers is challenging. Currently, online supported learning is becoming more dominant, even on face-to-face courses, and this trend will increase in the future. This paper uses activity theory (AT to analyse the use of tools to support learning. Data collection took place during 2008-2010 at Kingston University and involves over one hundred responses. This has been analysed into activity systems offering a detailed analysis of the use of a number of tools being used (in AT these include physical tools, such as technologies including books, and non-physical tools, such as conversation. When teaching programming to large numbers of students it is difficult to offer one-to-one attention and the reliance on such tools becomes more important. For example, in student responses a good integrated development environment (IDE is shown to make learning easier and more enjoyable, whereas a bad IDE makes the learning experience poor. Teaching materials, and access to these, were often mentioned positively. These included online communication, discussion boards and video lectures. Using AT offers sufficiently rich detail to identify key interventions and aids the redesign of the learning process. For example, the choice of an IDE for a specific language can have a larger impact than is initially apparent. This paper will report on the data collected to show where simple improvements to the use of tools may have a large impact on students' abilities to learn programming.

  7. California GAMA Program: Ground-Water Quality Data in the Northern San Joaquin Basin Study Unit, 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, George L.; Belitz, Kenneth; Milby Dawson, Barbara J.

    2006-01-01

    Growing concern over the closure of public-supply wells because of ground-water contamination has led the State Water Board to establish the Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. With the aid of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the program goals are to enhance understanding and provide a current assessment of ground-water quality in areas where ground water is an important source of drinking water. The Northern San Joaquin Basin GAMA study unit covers an area of approximately 2,079 square miles (mi2) across four hydrologic study areas in the San Joaquin Valley. The four study areas are the California Department of Water Resources (CADWR) defined Tracy subbasin, the CADWR-defined Eastern San Joaquin subbasin, the CADWR-defined Cosumnes subbasin, and the sedimentologically distinct USGS-defined Uplands study area, which includes portions of both the Cosumnes and Eastern San Joaquin subbasins. Seventy ground-water samples were collected from 64 public-supply, irrigation, domestic, and monitoring wells within the Northern San Joaquin Basin GAMA study unit. Thirty-two of these samples were collected in the Eastern San Joaquin Basin study area, 17 in the Tracy Basin study area, 10 in the Cosumnes Basin study area, and 11 in the Uplands Basin study area. Of the 32 samples collected in the Eastern San Joaquin Basin, 6 were collected using a depth-dependent sampling pump. This pump allows for the collection of samples from discrete depths within the pumping well. Two wells were chosen for depth-dependent sampling and three samples were collected at varying depths within each well. Over 350 water-quality field parameters, chemical constituents, and microbial constituents were analyzed and are reported as concentrations and as detection frequencies, by compound classification as well as for individual constituents, for the Northern San Joaquin Basin study unit as a whole and for each individual study area

  8. Proof-of-Concept of a Networked Validation Environment for Distributed Air/Ground NextGen Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisham, James; Larson, Natalie; Nelson, Justin; Reed, Joshua; Suggs, Marvin; Underwood, Matthew; Papelis, Yiannis; Ballin, Mark G.

    2013-01-01

    The National Airspace System (NAS) must be improved to increase capacity, reduce flight delays, and minimize environmental impacts of air travel. NASA has been tasked with aiding the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in NAS modernization. Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) is an enabling technology that is fundamental to realization of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). Despite the 2020 FAA mandate requiring ADS-B Out equipage, airspace users are lacking incentives to equip with the requisite ADS-B avionics. A need exists to validate in flight tests advanced concepts of operation (ConOps) that rely on ADS-B and other data links without requiring costly equipage. A potential solution is presented in this paper. It is possible to emulate future data link capabilities using the existing in-flight Internet and reduced-cost test equipment. To establish proof-of-concept, a high-fidelity traffic operations simulation was modified to include a module that simulated Internet transmission of ADS-B messages. An advanced NASA ConOp, Flight Deck Interval Management (FIM), was used to evaluate technical feasibility. A preliminary assessment of the effects of latency and dropout rate on FIM was performed. Flight hardware that would be used by proposed test environment was connected to the simulation so that data transfer from aircraft systems to test equipment could be verified. The results indicate that the FIM ConOp, and therefore, many other advanced ConOps with equal or lesser response characteristics and data requirements, can be evaluated in flight using the proposed concept.

  9. Validation and Application of Skeletochronology for Age Determination of the Ryukyu Ground Gecko, Goniurosaurus kuroiwae (Squamata:Eublepharidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takaki KURITA; Mamoru TODA

    2013-01-01

    Skeletochronology is a method commonly used for estimating the age of amphibians and reptiles in the wild. However, the number of lines of arrested growth (LAGs) does not necessarily relfect age in some species. We validated the applicability of this method to an endangered eublepharid gecko, Goniurosaurus kuroiwae, then inferred its longevity and age structures in wild populations. We classiifed young geckos into three groups using previously published data for early growth:Group 1 contained hatchlings before the ifrst winter, Group 2 contained hatchlings after the ifrst win-ter, and Group 3 included yearlings after the second winter. LAG numbers in these groups were then compared. All individuals in Group 1 possessed a single LAG, which was considered as a hatching line. Most individuals in Groups 2 and 3 possessed one and two additional LAGs, respectively (LAG1 and LAG2), corroborating the notion that LAGs are formed annually. A few geckos exhibited fewer LAGs than expected. Analysis of variations in LAG and marrow cavity diameter demonstrated that in animals with fewer LAGs, endosteal resorption or fusion of hatching line and LAG1 had occurred. LAG2 was never lost by endosteal resorption and was identiifable by its diameter. Thus, the age of adult geckos could be determined by counting LAGs outward from LAG2. Application of this method to wild populations re-vealed that the longevity of this species is not less than 83 months, but that almost all individuals in fragmented habitats die before 50 months, suggesting lower population sustainability in such habitats.

  10. Validation of the Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Variability: Can Manual Segmentations Be Trusted as Ground Truth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiburger, Kristen M; Molinari, Filippo; Wong, Justin; Aguilar, Luis; Gallo, Diego; Steinman, David A; Morbiducci, Umberto

    2016-07-01

    The common carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) is widely accepted and used as an indicator of atherosclerosis. Recent studies, however, have found that the irregularity of the IMT along the carotid artery wall has a stronger correlation with atherosclerosis than the IMT itself. We set out to validate IMT variability (IMTV), a parameter defined to assess IMT irregularities along the wall. In particular, we analyzed whether or not manual segmentations of the lumen-intima and media-adventitia can be considered reliable in calculation of the IMTV parameter. To do this, we used a total of 60 simulated ultrasound images with a priori IMT and IMTV values. The images, simulated using the Fast And Mechanistic Ultrasound Simulation software, presented five different morphologies, four nominal IMT values and three different levels of variability along the carotid artery wall (no variability, small variability and large variability). Three experts traced the lumen-intima (LI) and media-adventitia (MA) profiles, and two automated algorithms were employed to obtain the LI and MA profiles. One expert also re-traced the LI and MA profiles to test intra-reader variability. The average IMTV measurements of the profiles used to simulate the longitudinal B-mode images were 0.002 ± 0.002, 0.149 ± 0.035 and 0.286 ± 0.068 mm for the cases of no variability, small variability and large variability, respectively. The IMTV measurements of one of the automated algorithms were statistically similar (p > 0.05, Wilcoxon signed rank) when considering small and large variability, but non-significant when considering no variability (p truth. On the other hand, our automated algorithm was found to be more reliable, indicating how automated techniques could therefore foster analysis of the carotid artery intima-media thickness irregularity.

  11. Aviation System Capacity Program Terminal Area Productivity Project: Ground and Airborne Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulianetti, Demo J.

    2001-01-01

    Ground and airborne technologies were developed in the Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) project for increasing throughput at major airports by safely maintaining good-weather operating capacity during bad weather. Methods were demonstrated for accurately predicting vortices to prevent wake-turbulence encounters and to reduce in-trail separation requirements for aircraft approaching the same runway for landing. Technology was demonstrated that safely enabled independent simultaneous approaches in poor weather conditions to parallel runways spaced less than 3,400 ft apart. Guidance, control, and situation-awareness systems were developed to reduce congestion in airport surface operations resulting from the increased throughput, particularly during night and instrument meteorological conditions (IMC). These systems decreased runway occupancy time by safely and smoothly decelerating the aircraft, increasing taxi speed, and safely steering the aircraft off the runway. Simulations were performed in which optimal trajectories were determined by air traffic control (ATC) and communicated to flight crews by means of Center TRACON Automation System/Flight Management System (CTASFMS) automation to reduce flight delays, increase throughput, and ensure flight safety.

  12. A Hypervelocity Experimental Research Database (HERD): Support for the Wright Laboratory Armament Directorate Code Validation Program (COVAL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Scott A.; Anderson, Charles E., Jr.; Hertel, Eugene S., Jr.; Hunt, Ronald D.

    The Hypervelocity Experimental Research Database (HERD) described in this paper was developed to aid researchers with code validation for impacts that occur at velocities faster than the testable regime. Codes of concern include both hydrocodes and fast-running analytical or semi-empirical models used to predict the impact phenomenology and damage that results to projectiles and targets. There are several well documented experimental programs that can serve as benchmarks for code validation; these are identified and described. Recommendations for further experimentation (a canonical problem) to provide validation data are also discussed.

  13. Retrieval of nitrogen dioxide stratospheric profiles from ground-based zenith-sky UV-visible observations: validation of the technique through correlative comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hendrick

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A retrieval algorithm based on the Optimal Estimation Method (OEM has been developed in order to provide vertical distributions of NO2 in the stratosphere from ground-based (GB zenith-sky UV-visible observations. It has been applied to observational data sets from the NDSC (Network for Detection of Stratospheric Change stations of Harestua (60° N, 10° E and Andøya (69° N, 16° E in Norway. The information content and retrieval errors have been analyzed following a formalism used for characterizing ozone profiles retrieved from solar infrared absorption spectra. In order to validate the technique, the retrieved NO2 vertical profiles and columns have been compared to correlative balloon and satellite observations. Such extensive validation of the profile and column retrievals was not reported in previously published work on the profiling from GB UV-visible measurements. A good agreement - generally better than 25% - has been found with the SAOZ (Système d'Analyse par Observations Zénithales and DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy balloons. A similar agreement has been reached with correlative satellite data from the HALogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE and Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM III instruments above 25km of altitude. Below 25km, a systematic underestimation - by up to 40% in some cases - of both HALOE and POAM III profiles by our GB profile retrievals has been observed, pointing out more likely a limitation of both satellite instruments at these altitudes. We have concluded that our study strengthens our confidence in the reliability of the retrieval of vertical distribution information from GB UV-visible observations and offers new perspectives in the use of GB UV-visible network data for validation purposes.

  14. Retrieval of nitrogen dioxide stratospheric profiles from ground-based zenith-sky UV-visible observations: validation of the technique through correlative comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hendrick

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available A retrieval algorithm based on the Optimal Estimation Method (OEM has been developed in order to provide vertical distributions of NO2 in the stratosphere from ground-based (GB zenith-sky UV-visible observations. It has been applied to observational data sets from the NDSC (Network for Detection of Stratospheric Change stations of Harestua (60° N, 10° E and Andøya (69.3° N, 16.1° E in Norway. The information content and retrieval errors have been analyzed following a formalism used for characterizing ozone profiles retrieved from solar infrared absorption spectra. In order to validate the technique, the retrieved NO2 vertical profiles and columns have been compared to correlative balloon and satellite observations. Such extensive validation of the profile and column retrievals was not reported in previously published work on the profiling from GB UV-visible measurements. A good agreement – generally better than 25% – has been found with the SAOZ (Système d'Analyse par Observations Zénithales and DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy balloon data. A similar agreement has been reached with correlative satellite data from HALogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE and Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM III instruments above 25 km of altitude. Below 25 km, a systematic overestimation of our retrieved profiles – by up to 50% in some cases – has been observed by both HALOE and POAM III, pointing out the limitation of the satellite solar occultation technique at these altitudes. We have concluded that our study strengthens our confidence in the reliability of the retrieval of vertical distribution information from GB UV-visible observations and offers new perspectives in the use of GB UV-visible network data for validation purposes.

  15. Recommendations for Technology Development and Validation Activities in Support of the Origins Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capps, Richard W. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The Office of Space Science (OSS) has initiated mission concept studies and associated technology roadmapping activities for future large space optical systems. The scientific motivation for these systems is the study of the origins of galaxies, stars, planetary systems and, ultimately, life. Collectively, these studies are part of the 'Astronomical Search for Origins and Planetary Systems Program' or 'Origins Program'. A series of at least three science missions and associated technology validation flights is currently envisioned in the time frame between the year 1999 and approximately 2020. These would be the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM), a 10-meter baseline Michelson stellar interferometer; the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), a space-based infrared optimized telescope with aperture diameter larger than four meters; and the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF), an 80-meter baseline-nulling Michelson interferometer described in the Exploration of Neighboring Planetary Systems (ExNPS) Study. While all of these missions include significant technological challenges, preliminary studies indicate that the technological requirements are achievable. However, immediate and aggressive technology development is needed. The Office of Space Access and Technology (OSAT) is the primary sponsor of NASA-unique technology for missions such as the Origins series. For some time, the OSAT Space Technology Program has been developing technologies for large space optical systems, including both interferometers and large-aperture telescopes. In addition, technology investments have been made by other NASA programs, including OSS; other government agencies, particularly the Department of Defense; and by the aerospace industrial community. This basis of prior technology investment provides much of the rationale for confidence in the feasibility of the advanced Origins missions. In response to the enhanced interest of both the user community and senior NASA management in large

  16. Variable thickness transient ground-water flow model. Volume 3. Program listings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisenauer, A.E.

    1979-12-01

    The Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program is developing and applying the methodology for assessing the far-field, long-term post-closure safety of deep geologic nuclear waste repositories. AEGIS is being performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract with the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (OWNI) for the Department of Energy (DOE). One task within AEGIS is the development of methodology for analysis of the consequences (water pathway) from loss of repository containment as defined by various release scenarios. Analysis of the long-term, far-field consequences of release scenarios requires the application of numerical codes which simulate the hydrologic systems, model the transport of released radionuclides through the hydrologic systems to the biosphere, and, where applicable, assess the radiological dose to humans. Hydrologic and transport models are available at several levels of complexity or sophistication. Model selection and use are determined by the quantity and quality of input data. Model development under AEGIS and related programs provides three levels of hydrologic models, two levels of transport models, and one level of dose models (with several separate models). This is the third of 3 volumes of the description of the VTT (Variable Thickness Transient) Groundwater Hydrologic Model - second level (intermediate complexity) two-dimensional saturated groundwater flow.

  17. Systems for heat and cold from the ground. Proposal for a development program; System foer vaerme och kyla ur mark - Foerslag till utvecklingsprogram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, Bengt; Gabrielsson, Anna; Fallsvik, Jan; Nilsson, Gunnel [Swedish Geotechnical Inst., Linkoeping (Sweden); Hellstroem, Goeran [Lund Inst. of Technology (Sweden). Dept. of Mathematical Physics

    2002-02-01

    Ground heat systems usually consist of a heat pump, with an evaporator connected to a heat carrier circuit of heat exchangers in the ground, and a condenser connected to the heat distribution system inside the building (radiators, fan convectors, floor heating etc). The heat pump's compressor is connected to the electricity grid. Similar systems without heat pumps are also used, where the excess heat from the building or process is exchanged with the cooler ground solely by circulation of the heat carrier fluid in the ground heat exchangers, so called 'Tree cooling'. The performance of ground heat systems depends on several factors. There is a continuous development of components and their interaction in heating/cooling systems, both in Sweden and abroad. Based on the current state of the art of ground heat systems and the national energy market it is possible to identify the development potential within many areas. In this report the development potentials for ground heat systems are presented in the following program areas: Combined heating/cooling systems with or without heat pumps and improvements of existing systems. Horizontal, compact and vertical ground heat exchangers, installation methods. Geological prerequisites and geotechnical impact of heating and/or cooling. Thermal capacity of all types of ground heat exchangers including moisture transport effects. Design specifications for different types of ground heat exchangers and ground conditions. Operation and maintenance. Environmental impact, e.g. of heat carrier fluids and local government environmental protection requirements. Economic optimization based on verified technical performance and cost figures.

  18. Derivation from the Landsat 7 NDVI and ground truth validation of LAI and interception storage capacity for wetland ecosystems in Biebrza Valley, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suliga, Joanna; Chormański, Jarosław; Szporak-Wasilewska, Sylwia; Kleniewska, Małgorzata; Berezowski, Tomasz; van Griensven, Ann; Verbeiren, Boud

    2015-10-01

    Wetlands are very valuable areas because they provide a wide range of ecosystems services therefore modeling of wetland areas is very relevant, however, the most widely used hydrological models were developed in the 90s and usually are not adjusted to simulate wetland conditions. In case of wetlands including interception storage into the model's calculation is even more challenging, because literature data hardly exists. This study includes the computation of interception storage capacity based on Landsat 7 image and ground truthing measurements conducted in the Biebrza Valley, Poland. The method was based on collecting and weighing dry, wet and fully saturated samples of sedges. During the experiments measurements of fresh/dry biomass and leaf area index (LAI) were performed. The research was repeated three times during the same season (May, June and July 2013) to observe temporal variability of parameters. Ground truthing measurements were used for the validating estimation of parameters derived from images acquired in a similar period as the measurements campaigns. The use of remote sensing has as major advantage of being able to obtain an area covering spatially and temporally distributed estimate of the interception storage capacity. Results from this study proved that interception capacity of wetlands vegetation is changing considerably during the vegetation season (temporal variability) and reaches its maximum value when plants are fully developed. Different areas depending on existing plants species are characterized with different values of interception capacity (spatial variability). This research frames within the INTREV and HiWET projects, funded respectively by National Science Centre (NCN) in Poland and BELSPO STEREO III.

  19. Assessment of the stress response in Columbian ground squirrels: laboratory and field validation of an enzyme immunoassay for fecal cortisol metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosson, Curtis O; Palme, Rupert; Boonstra, Rudy

    2009-01-01

    Stress responses play a critical role in the ecology and demography of wild animals, and the analysis of fecal hormone metabolites is a powerful noninvasive method to assess the role of stress. We characterized the metabolites of injected radiolabeled cortisol in the urine and feces of Columbian ground squirrels and validated an enzyme immunoassay for measuring fecal cortisol metabolites (FCM) with a 5 alpha-3beta,11 beta-diol structure by stimulation and suppression of adrenocortical activity and by evaluation of the circadian pattern of FCM excretion. In addition, we also evaluated the impact of capture, handling, and acclimation to the laboratory on FCM. Cortisol is highly metabolized, with virtually none being excreted, and of the radiolabeled cortisol injected, 31% was recovered in urine and 6.5% in feces. The lag time between cortisol injection and its appearance in urine and feces was 4.5 +/- 0.82 (SE) h and 7.0 +/- 0.53 (SE) h, respectively. FCM levels varied over the day, reflecting circadian variation in endogenous cortisol. Dexamethasone decreased FCM levels by 33%, and ACTH increased them by 255%. Trapping and housing initially increased FCM levels and decreased body mass, but these reversed within 3-7 d, indicating acclimation. Finally, FCM levels were modestly repeatable over time (r=0.57) in wild, live trapped, nonbreeding animals, indicating that FCMs provide a measure of the squirrel's stress-axis state. This assay provides a robust noninvasive assessment of the stress response of the Columbian ground squirrel and will facilitate an integration of its life history and physiology.

  20. Cross-validation of IASI/MetOp derived tropospheric δD with TES and ground-based FTIR observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-L. Lacour

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI flying on-board MetOpA and MetOpB is able to capture fine isotopic variations of the HDO to H2O ratio (δD in the troposphere. Such observations at the high spatio temporal resolution of the sounder are of great interest to improve our understanding of the mechanisms controlling humidity in the troposphere. In this study we aim to empirically assess the validity of our error estimation previously evaluated theoretically. To achieve this, we compare IASI δD retrieved profiles with other available profiles of δD, from the TES infrared sounder onboard AURA and from three ground-based FTIR stations produced within the MUSICA project: the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change sites Kiruna and Izana, and the TCCON site Karlsruhe, which in addition to near-infrared TCCON spectra also records mid-infrared spectra. We describe the achievable level of agreement between the different retrievals and show that these theoretical errors are in good agreement with empirical differences. The comparisons are made at different locations from tropical to Arctic latitudes, above sea and above land. Generally IASI and TES are similarly sensitive to δD in the free troposphere which allows to compare their measurements directly. At tropical latitudes where IASI's sensitivity is lower than that of TES, we show that the agreement improves when taking into account the sensitivity of IASI in the TES retrieval. For the comparison IASI-FTIR only direct comparisons are performed because of similar sensitivities. We identify a quasi negligible bias in the free troposphere (−3‰ between IASI retrieved δD with the TES one, which are bias corrected, but an important with the ground-based FTIR reaching −47‰. We also suggest that model-satellite observations comparisons could be optimized with IASI thanks to its high spatial and temporal sampling.

  1. Correcting for systematic effects in ground-based photographic proper motions: The Southern Proper Motion Program as a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Altena, William F.; Girard, T. M.; Platais, I.; Kozhurina-Platais, V.; López, C. E.

    The derivation of accurate positions and proper motions from ground-based photographic materials requires the minimization of systematic errors due to inaccurate modeling of the telescopes' field-of-view and the magnitude equation. We describe the procedures that have been developed for the Southern Proper Motions Program (SPM) to deal with these important problems. The SPM is based on photographic plates taken at our Carlos Cesco Observatory at El Leoncito, Argentina and will yield absolute proper motions and positions to magnitude B approximately 19 for approximately 1 million stars south of declination -20 degrees. The SPM is a joint program between the Yale Southern Observatory and the Universidad Nacional de San Juan, Argentina. The SPM Catalog 2.0, which is the current version covering the -25 to -40 degree declination zones, provides positions, absolute proper motions, and photographic BV photometry for over 320,000 stars and galaxies. Stars cover the magnitude range 5 astrom/. Our web-side contains several useful plots showing the sky coverage, error distribution, a quick comparison with the Hipparcos proper motions, etc. We would appreciate your comments on the SPM 2.0 and our Web page.

  2. Ionospheric Disturbances Originating From Tropospheric and Ground Activities: A new Strategic Research Program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, X. M.

    2015-12-01

    It has been increasingly recognized and observed that activities within the troposphere, either natural (e.g., thunderstorm, earthquake, volcano) or anthropogenic (e.g., explosion above or below ground), can substantially disturb the ionosphere in the forms of atmosphere gravity wave, infrasonic acoustic wave, and electric-field-induced ionospheric chemical reaction. These disturbances introduce plasma density variations in the ionosphere that adversely distort the transionospheric radio signals for communication, navigation, surveillance, and other national security missions. A new three-year strategic research program has been initiated at LANL in FY16 to investigate, understand, and characterize the interwoven dynamic and electrodynamic coupling processes from the source in the troposphere to the disturbances in the ionosphere via comprehensive observation and model simulation. The planned study area is chosen to be over the US Great Plains where severe thunderstorms occur frequently and where the necessary atmospheric and ionospheric observations are conducted routinely. In this presentation, we will outline our program plan, technical approaches, and scientific goals, and will discuss opportunities of possible inter-institute collaborations.

  3. The Undergraduate Research Student Self-Assessment (URSSA): Validation for Use in Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Timothy J; Laursen, Sandra L

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the validity of the Undergraduate Research Student Self-Assessment (URSSA), a survey used to evaluate undergraduate research (UR) programs. The underlying structure of the survey was assessed with confirmatory factor analysis; also examined were correlations between different average scores, score reliability, and matches between numerical and textual item responses. The study found that four components of the survey represent separate but related constructs for cognitive skills and affective learning gains derived from the UR experience. Average scores from item blocks formed reliable but moderate to highly correlated composite measures. Additionally, some questions about student learning gains (meant to assess individual learning) correlated to ratings of satisfaction with external aspects of the research experience. The pattern of correlation among individual items suggests that items asking students to rate external aspects of their environment were more like satisfaction ratings than items that directly ask about student skills attainment. Finally, survey items asking about student aspirations to attend graduate school in science reflected inflated estimates of the proportions of students who had actually decided on graduate education after their UR experiences. Recommendations for revisions to the survey include clarified item wording and increasing discrimination between item blocks through reorganization.

  4. Ground measurements of the hemispherical-directional reflectance of Arctic snow covered tundra for the validation of satellite remote sensing products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, C. P.; Marks, A. A.; Green, P.; Mac Arthur, A.; Fox, N.; King, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Surface albedo is the hemispherical and wavelength integrated reflectance over the visible, near infrared and shortwave infrared regions of the solar spectrum. The albedo of Arctic snow can be in excess of 0.8 and it is a critical component in the global radiation budget because it determines the proportion of solar radiation absorbed, and reflected, over a large part of the Earth's surface. We present here our first results of the angularly resolved surface reflectance of Arctic snow at high solar zenith angles (~80°) suitable for the validation of satellite remote sensing products. The hemispherical directional reflectance factor (HDRF) of Arctic snow covered tundra was measured using the GonioRAdiometric Spectrometer System (GRASS) during a three-week field campaign in Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, in March/April 2013. The measurements provide one of few existing HDRF datasets at high solar zenith angles for wind-blown Arctic snow covered tundra (conditions typical of the Arctic region), and the first ground-based measure of HDRF at Ny-Ålesund. The HDRF was recorded under clear sky conditions with 10° intervals in view zenith, and 30° intervals in view azimuth, for several typical sites over a wavelength range of 400-1500 nm at 1 nm resolution. Satellite sensors such as MODIS, AVHRR and VIIRS offer a method to monitor the surface albedo with high spatial and temporal resolution. However, snow reflectance is anisotropic and is dependent on view and illumination angle and the wavelength of the incident light. Spaceborne sensors subtend a discrete angle to the target surface and measure radiance over a limited number of narrow spectral bands. Therefore, the derivation of the surface albedo requires accurate knowledge of the surfaces bidirectional reflectance as a function of wavelength. The ultimate accuracy to which satellite sensors are able to measure snow surface properties such as albedo is dependant on the accuracy of the BRDF model, which can only be assessed

  5. Estimates of evapotranspiration for riparian sites (Eucalyptus) in the Lower Murray -Darling Basin using ground validated sap flow and vegetation index scaling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doody, T.; Nagler, P. L.; Glenn, E. P.

    2014-12-01

    Water accounting is becoming critical globally, and balancing consumptive water demands with environmental water requirements is especially difficult in in arid and semi-arid regions. Within the Murray-Darling Basin (MDB) in Australia, riparian water use has not been assessed across broad scales. This study therefore aimed to apply and validate an existing U.S. riparian ecosystem evapotranspiration (ET) algorithm for the MDB river systems to assist water resource managers to quantify environmental water needs over wide ranges of niche conditions. Ground-based sap flow ET was correlated with remotely sensed predictions of ET, to provide a method to scale annual rates of water consumption by riparian vegetation over entire irrigation districts. Sap flux was measured at nine locations on the Murrumbidgee River between July 2011 and June 2012. Remotely sensed ET was calculated using a combination of local meteorological estimates of potential ET (ETo) and rainfall and MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) from selected 250 m resolution pixels. The sap flow data correlated well with MODIS EVI. Sap flow ranged from 0.81 mm/day to 3.60 mm/day and corresponded to a MODIS-based ET range of 1.43 mm/day to 2.42 mm/day. We found that mean ET across sites could be predicted by EVI-ETo methods with a standard error of about 20% across sites, but that ET at any given site could vary much more due to differences in aquifer and soil properties among sites. Water use was within range of that expected. We conclude that our algorithm developed for US arid land crops and riparian plants is applicable to this region of Australia. Future work includes the development of an adjusted algorithm using these sap flow validated results.

  6. CO measurements from the ACE-FTS satellite instrument: data analysis and validation using ground-based, airborne and spaceborne observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Clerbaux

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE mission was launched in August 2003 to sound the atmosphere by solar occultation. Carbon monoxide (CO, a good tracer of pollution plumes and atmospheric dynamics, is one of the key species provided by the primary instrument, the ACE-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS. This instrument performs measurements in both the CO 1-0 and 2-0 ro-vibrational bands, from which vertically resolved CO concentration profiles are retrieved, from the mid-troposphere to the thermosphere. This paper presents an updated description of the ACE-FTS version 2.2 CO data product, along with a comprehensive validation of these profiles using available observations (February 2004 to December 2006. We have compared the CO partial columns with ground-based measurements using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and millimeter wave radiometry, and the volume mixing ratio profiles with airborne (both high-altitude balloon flight and airplane observations. CO satellite observations provided by nadir-looking instruments (MOPITT and TES as well as limb-viewing remote sensors (MIPAS, SMR and MLS were also compared with the ACE-FTS CO products. We show that the ACE-FTS measurements provide CO profiles with small retrieval errors (better than 5% from the upper troposphere to 40 km, and better than 10% above. These observations agree well with the correlative measurements, considering the rather loose coincidence criteria in some cases. Based on the validation exercise we assess the following uncertainties to the ACE-FTS measurement data: better than 15% in the upper troposphere (8–12 km, than 30% in the lower stratosphere (12–30 km, and than 25% from 30 to 100 km.

  7. CO measurements from the ACE-FTS satellite instrument: data analysis and validation using ground-based, airborne and spaceborne observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Clerbaux

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE mission was launched in August 2003 to sound the atmosphere by solar occultation. Carbon monoxide (CO, a good tracer of pollution plumes and atmospheric dynamics, is one of the key species provided by the primary instrument, the ACE-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS. This instrument performs measurements in both the CO 1-0 and 2-0 ro-vibrational bands, from which vertically resolved CO concentration profiles are retrieved, from the mid-troposphere to the thermosphere. This paper presents an updated description of the ACE-FTS version 2.2 CO data product, along with a comprehensive validation of these profiles using available observations (February 2004 to December 2006. We have compared the CO partial columns with ground-based measurements using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and millimeter wave radiometry, and the volume mixing ratio profiles with airborne (both high-altitude balloon flight and airplane observations. CO satellite observations provided by nadir-looking instruments (MOPITT and TES as well as limb-viewing remote sensors (MIPAS, SMR and MLS were also compared with the ACE-FTS CO products. We show that the ACE-FTS measurements provide CO profiles with small retrieval errors (better than 5% from the upper troposphere to 40 km, and better than 10% above. These observations agree well with the correlative measurements, considering the rather loose coincidence criteria in some cases. Based on the validation exercise we assess the following uncertainties to the ACE-FTS measurement data: better than 15% in the upper troposphere (8–12 km, than 30% in the lower stratosphere (12–30 km, and than 25% from 30 to 100 km.

  8. Concurrent validity and reliability of using ground reaction force and center of pressure parameters in the determination of leg movement initiation during single leg lift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldabe, Daniela; de Castro, Marcelo Peduzzi; Milosavljevic, Stephan; Bussey, Melanie Dawn

    2016-09-01

    Postural adjustment evaluations during single leg lift requires the initiation of heel lift (T1) identification. T1 measured by means of motion analyses system is the most reliable approach. However, this method involves considerable workspace, expensive cameras, and time processing data and setting up laboratory. The use of ground reaction forces (GRF) and centre of pressure (COP) data is an alternative method as its data processing and setting up is less time consuming. Further, kinetic data is normally collected using frequency samples higher than 1000Hz whereas kinematic data are commonly captured using 50-200Hz. This study describes the concurrent-validity and reliability of GRF and COP measurements in determining T1, using a motion analysis system as reference standard. Kinematic and kinetic data during single leg lift were collected from ten participants. GRF and COP data were collected using one and two force plates. Displacement of a single heel marker was captured by means of ten Vicon(©) cameras. Kinetic and kinematic data were collected using a sample frequency of 1000Hz. Data were analysed in two stages: identification of key events in the kinetic data, and assessing concurrent validity of T1 based on the chosen key events with T1 provided by the kinematic data. The key event presenting the least systematic bias, along with a narrow 95% CI and limits of agreement against the reference standard T1, was the Baseline COPy event. Baseline COPy event was obtained using one force plate and presented excellent between-tester reliability.

  9. LIF LiDAR high resolution ground truth data, suitable to validate medium-resolution bands of MODIS/Terra radiometer in case of inner waterbody ecological monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelevin, Vadim; Zavialov, Peter; Zlinszky, Andras; Khimchenko, Elizaveta; Toth, Viktor; Kremenetskiy, Vyacheslav

    2017-04-01

    The report is based on field measurements on the lake Balaton (Hungary) in September 2008 as obtained by Light Induced Fluorescence (LIF) portable LiDAR UFL-8. It was tested in natural lake waters and validated by contact conventional measurements. We had opportunity to compare our results with the MODIS/Terra spectroradiometer satellite images received at the satellite monitoring station of the Eötvös Loránd University (Budapest, Hungary) to make an attempt of lidar calibration of satellite medium-resolution bands data. Water quality parameters were surveyed with the help of UFL-8 in a time interval very close to the satellite overpass. High resolution maps of the chlorophyll-a, chromophoric dissolved organic matter and total suspended sediments spatial distributions were obtained. Our results show that the resolution provided by laboratory measurements on a few water samples does not resemble actual conditions in the lake, and it would be more efficient to measure these parameters less accurately but in a better spatial distribution with the LiDAR. The UFL instrument has a great potential for being used for collecting ground truth data for satellite remote sensing of these parameters. Its measurement accuracy is comparable to classic water sample measurements, the measurement speed is high and large areas can be surveyed in a time interval very close to the satellite overpass.

  10. NEPR Ground Validation Points 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This shapefile denotes the location of underwater photos and videos taken in shallow water (0-35m) benthic habitats surrounding Northeast Puerto Rico and Culebra...

  11. Validation of satellite-based noontime UVI with NDACC ground-based instruments: influence of topography, environment and satellite overpass time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogniez, Colette; Auriol, Frédérique; Deroo, Christine; Arola, Antti; Kujanpää, Jukka; Sauvage, Béatrice; Kalakoski, Niilo; Riku Aleksi Pitkänen, Mikko; Catalfamo, Maxime; Metzger, Jean-Marc; Tournois, Guy; Da Conceicao, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    Spectral solar UV radiation measurements are performed in France using three spectroradiometers located at very different sites. One is installed in Villeneuve d'Ascq, in the north of France (VDA). It is an urban site in a topographically flat region. Another instrument is installed in Observatoire de Haute-Provence, located in the southern French Alps (OHP). It is a rural mountainous site. The third instrument is installed in Saint-Denis, Réunion Island (SDR). It is a coastal urban site on a small mountainous island in the southern tropics. The three instruments are affiliated with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) and carry out routine measurements to monitor the spectral solar UV radiation and enable derivation of UV index (UVI). The ground-based UVI values observed at solar noon are compared to similar quantities derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI, onboard the Aura satellite) and the second Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2, onboard the Metop-A satellite) measurements for validation of these satellite-based products. The present study concerns the period 2009-September 2012, date of the implementation of a new OMI processing tool. The new version (v1.3) introduces a correction for absorbing aerosols that were not considered in the old version (v1.2). Both versions of the OMI UVI products were available before September 2012 and are used to assess the improvement of the new processing tool. On average, estimates from satellite instruments always overestimate surface UVI at solar noon. Under cloudless conditions, the satellite-derived estimates of UVI compare satisfactorily with ground-based data: the median relative bias is less than 8 % at VDA and 4 % at SDR for both OMI v1.3 and GOME-2, and about 6 % for OMI v1.3 and 2 % for GOME-2 at OHP. The correlation between satellite-based and ground-based data is better at VDA and OHP (about 0.99) than at SDR (0.96) for both space-borne instruments. For all

  12. Technology-Based Programs to Promote Walking Fluency or Improve Foot-Ground Contact during Walking: Two Case Studies of Adults with Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; La Martire, Maria L.; Oliva, Doretta; Groeneweg, Jop

    2012-01-01

    These two case studies assessed technology-based programs for promoting walking fluency and improving foot-ground contact during walking with a man and a woman with multiple disabilities, respectively. The man showed breaks during walking and the woman presented with toe walking. The technology used in the studies included a microprocessor with…

  13. TCV software test and validation tools and technique. [Terminal Configured Vehicle program for commercial transport aircraft operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straeter, T. A.; Williams, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes techniques for testing and validating software for the TCV (Terminal Configured Vehicle) program which is intended to solve problems associated with operating a commercial transport aircraft in the terminal area. The TCV research test bed is a Boeing 737 specially configured with digital computer systems to carry out automatic navigation, guidance, flight controls, and electronic displays research. The techniques developed for time and cost reduction include automatic documentation aids, an automatic software configuration, and an all software generation and validation system.

  14. Strategic Defense Initiative Demonstration/Validation Program Environmental Assessment. Ground-Based Surveillance and Tracking System (GSTS),

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-01

    to Ebeye Island in response to reported availabilty of relatively high- paying jobs. The consequences of increased migration could be significant. No...components, various metallic and nonmetallic structural materials, fuel , and labor. This commitment of resources is not different from those necessary for...I aquifers, end at current usage rates the aquifers could be depleted (44). The ’Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Mineral Resource Nanagement

  15. User's guide to Model Viewer, a program for three-dimensional visualization of ground-water model results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Paul A.; Winston, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    Model Viewer is a computer program that displays the results of three-dimensional groundwater models. Scalar data (such as hydraulic head or solute concentration) may be displayed as a solid or a set of isosurfaces, using a red-to-blue color spectrum to represent a range of scalar values. Vector data (such as velocity or specific discharge) are represented by lines oriented to the vector direction and scaled to the vector magnitude. Model Viewer can also display pathlines, cells or nodes that represent model features such as streams and wells, and auxiliary graphic objects such as grid lines and coordinate axes. Users may crop the model grid in different orientations to examine the interior structure of the data. For transient simulations, Model Viewer can animate the time evolution of the simulated quantities. The current version (1.0) of Model Viewer runs on Microsoft Windows 95, 98, NT and 2000 operating systems, and supports the following models: MODFLOW-2000, MODFLOW-2000 with the Ground-Water Transport Process, MODFLOW-96, MOC3D (Version 3.5), MODPATH, MT3DMS, and SUTRA (Version 2D3D.1). Model Viewer is designed to directly read input and output files from these models, thus minimizing the need for additional postprocessing. This report provides an overview of Model Viewer. Complete instructions on how to use the software are provided in the on-line help pages.

  16. Cross-validation of IASI/MetOp derived tropospheric δD with TES and ground-based FTIR observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacour, J.-L.; Clarisse, L.; Worden, J.; Schneider, M.; Barthlott, S.; Hase, F.; Risi, C.; Clerbaux, C.; Hurtmans, D.; Coheur, P.-F.

    2015-03-01

    The Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) flying onboard MetOpA and MetOpB is able to capture fine isotopic variations of the HDO to H2O ratio (δD) in the troposphere. Such observations at the high spatio-temporal resolution of the sounder are of great interest to improve our understanding of the mechanisms controlling humidity in the troposphere. In this study we aim to empirically assess the validity of our error estimation previously evaluated theoretically. To achieve this, we compare IASI δD retrieved profiles with other available profiles of δD, from the TES infrared sounder onboard AURA and from three ground-based FTIR stations produced within the MUSICA project: the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change) sites Kiruna and Izaña, and the TCCON site Karlsruhe, which in addition to near-infrared TCCON spectra also records mid-infrared spectra. We describe the achievable level of agreement between the different retrievals and show that these theoretical errors are in good agreement with empirical differences. The comparisons are made at different locations from tropical to Arctic latitudes, above sea and above land. Generally IASI and TES are similarly sensitive to δD in the free troposphere which allows one to compare their measurements directly. At tropical latitudes where IASI's sensitivity is lower than that of TES, we show that the agreement improves when taking into account the sensitivity of IASI in the TES retrieval. For the comparison IASI-FTIR only direct comparisons are performed because the sensitivity profiles of the two observing systems do not allow to take into account their differences of sensitivity. We identify a quasi negligible bias in the free troposphere (-3‰) between IASI retrieved δD with the TES, which are bias corrected, but important with the ground-based FTIR reaching -47‰. We also suggest that model-satellite observation comparisons could be optimized with IASI thanks to its high

  17. Assessment of home-based behavior modification programs for autistic children: reliability and validity of the behavioral summarized evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oneal, Brent J; Reeb, Roger N; Korte, John R; Butter, Eliot J

    2006-01-01

    Since the publication of Lovaas' (1987) impressive findings, there has been a proliferation of home-based behavior modification programs for autistic children. Parents and other paraprofessionals often play key roles in the implementation and monitoring of these programs. The Behavioral Summarized Evaluation (BSE) was developed for professionals and paraprofessionals to use in assessing the severity of autistic symptoms over the course of treatment. This paper examined the psychometric properties of the BSE (inter-item consistency, factorial composition, convergent validity, and sensitivity to parents' perceptions of symptom change over time) when used by parents of autistic youngsters undergoing home-based intervention. Recommendations for future research are presented.

  18. [Validation of the structure and resources of nosocomial infection control team in hospitals ascribed to VINCat program in Catalonia, Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limón, Enrique; Pujol, Miquel; Gudiol, Francesc

    2014-07-01

    The main objective of this study was to validate the structure of the infection control team (ICT) in the hospitals adhered to VINCat program and secondary objective was to establish the consistency of resources of each center with the requirements established by the program. Qualitative research consisting of an ethnographic study using participant observation during the years 2008-2010. The centers were stratified in three groups by complexity and beds. The instrument was a semistructured interview to members of the ICT. The transcription of the interview was sent to informants for validation. In November 2010 a questionnaire regarding human resources and number hours dedicated to the ICT was sent. During 2008-2010, 65 centers had been adhered to VINCat program. In 2010, the ICT of Group I hospitals had a mean of two physician, one in full-time and one nurse for every 230 beds. In Group II, one physician part-time and one nurse per 180 beds and in Group III a physician and a nurse for every 98 beds, both part-time. In 2010, all hospitals had a structured ICT, an operative infection committee, and a hospital member representing the center at the program as well as enough electronic resources. The hospitals participating in the program have now VINCat an adequate surveillance structure and meet the minimum technical and human resources required to provide high-quality data. However human resources are not guaranteed.

  19. Analysis of global and regional CO burdens measured from space between 2000 and 2009 and validated by ground-based solar tracking spectrometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yurganov

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Interannual variations in AIRS and MOPITT retrieved CO burdens are validated, corrected, and compared with CO emissions from wild fires from the Global Fire Emission Dataset (GFED2 inventory. Validation of daily mean CO total column (TC retrievals from MOPITT version 3 and AIRS version 5 is performed through comparisons with archived TC data from the Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC ground-based Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS between March 2000 and December 2007. MOPITT V3 retrievals exhibit an increasing temporal bias with a rate of 1.4–1.8% per year; thus far, AIRS retrievals appear to be more stable. For the lowest CO values in the Southern Hemisphere (SH, AIRS TC retrievals overestimate FTS TC by 20%. MOPITT's bias and standard deviation do not depend on CO TC absolute values. Empirical corrections are derived for AIRS and MOPITT retrievals based on the observed annually averaged bias versus the FTS TC. Recently published MOPITT V4 is found to be in a good agreement with MOPITT V3 corrected by us (with exception of 2000–2001 period. With these corrections, CO burdens from AIRS V5 and MOPITT V3 (as well as MOPITT V4 come into good agreement in the mid-latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere (NH and in the tropical belt. In the SH, agreement between AIRS and MOPITT CO burdens is better for the larger CO TC in austral winter and worse in austral summer when CO TC are smaller. Before July 2008, all variations in retrieved CO burden can be explained by changes in fire emissions. After July 2008, global and tropical CO burdens decreased until October before recovering by the beginning of 2009. The NH CO burden also decreased but reached a minimum in January 2009 before starting to recover. The decrease in tropical CO burdens is explained by lower than usual fire emissions in South America and Indonesia. This decrease in tropical emissions also accounts for most of the change in the global CO burden. However, no

  20. Methane cross-validation between three Fourier transform spectrometers: SCISAT ACE-FTS, GOSAT TANSO-FTS, and ground-based FTS measurements in the Canadian high Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl, Gerrit; Walker, Kaley A.; Conway, Stephanie; Saitoh, Naoko; Boone, Chris D.; Strong, Kimberly; Drummond, James R.

    2016-05-01

    We present cross-validation of remote sensing measurements of methane profiles in the Canadian high Arctic. Accurate and precise measurements of methane are essential to understand quantitatively its role in the climate system and in global change. Here, we show a cross-validation between three data sets: two from spaceborne instruments and one from a ground-based instrument. All are Fourier transform spectrometers (FTSs). We consider the Canadian SCISAT Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE)-FTS, a solar occultation infrared spectrometer operating since 2004, and the thermal infrared band of the Japanese Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation (TANSO)-FTS, a nadir/off-nadir scanning FTS instrument operating at solar and terrestrial infrared wavelengths, since 2009. The ground-based instrument is a Bruker 125HR Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, measuring mid-infrared solar absorption spectra at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) Ridge Laboratory at Eureka, Nunavut (80° N, 86° W) since 2006. For each pair of instruments, measurements are collocated within 500 km and 24 h. An additional collocation criterion based on potential vorticity values was found not to significantly affect differences between measurements. Profiles are regridded to a common vertical grid for each comparison set. To account for differing vertical resolutions, ACE-FTS measurements are smoothed to the resolution of either PEARL-FTS or TANSO-FTS, and PEARL-FTS measurements are smoothed to the TANSO-FTS resolution. Differences for each pair are examined in terms of profile and partial columns. During the period considered, the number of collocations for each pair is large enough to obtain a good sample size (from several hundred to tens of thousands depending on pair and configuration). Considering full profiles, the degrees of freedom for signal (DOFS) are between 0.2 and 0.7 for TANSO-FTS and

  1. The Development and Validation of a Human Systems Integration (HSI) Program for the Canadian Department of National Defence (DND)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    The Development and Validation of a Human Systems Integration (HSI) Program for the Canadian Department of National Defence (DND) Mike Greenley ... Greenley , Andrea Scipione, Jeremy Brooks and Alice Salway CAE Professional Services (Canada) Limited (Formerly Greenley & Associates Incorporated...IHS et à appuyer la mise en œuvre d’un programme officiel et amélioré d’IHS au MDN du Canada. Greenley & Associates Incorporated ix Table of

  2. Control of groundwater pH during bioremediation: Improvement and validation of a geochemical model to assess the buffering potential of ground silicate minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, Elsa; Brovelli, Alessandro; Holliger, Christof; Barry, D. A.

    2014-05-01

    Accurate control of groundwater pH is of critical importance for in situ biological treatment of chlorinated solvents. The use of ground silicate minerals mixed with groundwater is an appealing buffering strategy as silicate minerals may act as long-term sources of alkalinity. In a previous study, we developed a geochemical model for evaluation of the pH buffering capacity of such minerals. The model included the main microbial processes driving groundwater acidification as well as mineral dissolution. In the present study, abiotic mineral dissolution experiments were conducted with five silicate minerals (andradite, diopside, fayalite, forsterite, nepheline). The goal of the study was to validate the model and to test the buffering capacity of the candidate minerals identified previously. These five minerals increased the pH from acidic to neutral and slightly basic values. The model was revised and improved to represent better the experimental observations. In particular, the experiments revealed the importance of secondary mineral precipitation on the buffering potential of silicates, a process not included in the original formulation. The main secondary phases likely to precipitate were identified through model calibration, as well as the degree of saturation at which they formed. The predictions of the revised geochemical model were in good agreement with the observations, with a correlation coefficient higher than 0.9 in most cases. This study confirmed the potential of silicates to act as pH control agents and showed the reliability of the geochemical model, which can be used as a design tool for field applications.

  3. Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Ground-Based Radiation and Aerosol Validation Using the NOAA Mobile SURFRAD Station Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalsky, Joseph [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States); Lantz, Kathy [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is preparing for the launch of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-Series (GOES-R) satellite in 2015. This satellite will feature higher time (5-minute versus 30-minute sampling) and spatial resolution (0.5 km vs 1 km in the visible channel) than current GOES instruments provide. NOAA’s National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service has funded the Global Monitoring Division at the Earth System Research Laboratory to provide ground-based validation data for many of the new and old products the new GOES instruments will retrieve specifically related to radiation at the surface and aerosol and its extensive and intensive properties in the column. The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) had an emphasis on aerosol; therefore, we asked to be involved in this campaign to de-bug our new instrumentation and to provide a new capability that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s Mobile Facilities (AMF) did not possess, namely surface albedo measurement out to 1625 nm. This gave us a chance to test remote operation of our new multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer/multi-filter radiometer (MFRSR/MFR) combination. We did not deploy standard broadband shortwave and longwave radiation instrumentation because ARM does this as part of every AMF deployment. As it turned out, the ARM standard MFRSR had issues, and we were able to provide the aerosol column data for the first 2 months of the campaign covering the summer flight phase of the deployment. Using these data, we were able to work with personnel at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to retrieve not only aerosol optical depth (AOD), but single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter, as well.

  4. Control of groundwater pH during bioremediation: improvement and validation of a geochemical model to assess the buffering potential of ground silicate minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, Elsa; Brovelli, Alessandro; Holliger, Christof; Barry, D A

    2014-05-01

    Accurate control of groundwater pH is of critical importance for in situ biological treatment of chlorinated solvents. The use of ground silicate minerals mixed with groundwater is an appealing buffering strategy as silicate minerals may act as long-term sources of alkalinity. In a previous study, we developed a geochemical model for evaluation of the pH buffering capacity of such minerals. The model included the main microbial processes driving groundwater acidification as well as mineral dissolution. In the present study, abiotic mineral dissolution experiments were conducted with five silicate minerals (andradite, diopside, fayalite, forsterite, nepheline). The goal of the study was to validate the model and to test the buffering capacity of the candidate minerals identified previously. These five minerals increased the pH from acidic to neutral and slightly basic values. The model was revised and improved to represent better the experimental observations. In particular, the experiments revealed the importance of secondary mineral precipitation on the buffering potential of silicates, a process not included in the original formulation. The main secondary phases likely to precipitate were identified through model calibration, as well as the degree of saturation at which they formed. The predictions of the revised geochemical model were in good agreement with the observations, with a correlation coefficient higher than 0.9 in most cases. This study confirmed the potential of silicates to act as pH control agents and showed the reliability of the geochemical model, which can be used as a design tool for field applications.

  5. Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) Universe of Chemicals and General Validation Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document was developed by the EPA to provide guidance to staff and managers regarding the EDSP universe of chemicals and general validation principles for consideration of computational toxicology tools for chemical prioritization.

  6. Logistics Civil Augmentation Program Task Order 130: Requirements Validation, Government Oversight, and Contractor Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-22

    Food Service • Office Automation/Supplies & Operational Requirements • Communications • Force Protection/Security • Transportation Motor Pool ...room, aerobic/cardiovascular workout facility, and Internet café.” According to the KBR customer surveys, KBR did a good job of performing this...Conditioning Equipment Maintenance Non-Tactical Vehicles Transportation Motor Pool Morale, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) Billeting & Grounds

  7. Modeling earthquake ground motion with an earthquake simulation program (EMPSYN) that utilizes empirical Green's functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchings, L.

    1992-01-01

    This report outlines a method of using empirical Green's functions in an earthquake simulation program EMPSYN that provides realistic seismograms from potential earthquakes. The theory for using empirical Green's functions is developed, implementation of the theory in EMPSYN is outlined, and an example is presented where EMPSYN is used to synthesize observed records from the 1971 San Fernando earthquake. To provide useful synthetic ground motion data from potential earthquakes, synthetic seismograms should model frequencies from 0.5 to 15.0 Hz, the full wave-train energy distribution, and absolute amplitudes. However, high-frequency arrivals are stochastically dependent upon the inhomogeneous geologic structure and irregular fault rupture. The fault rupture can be modeled, but the stochastic nature of faulting is largely an unknown factor in the earthquake process. The effect of inhomogeneous geology can readily be incorporated into synthetic seismograms by using small earthquakes to obtain empirical Green's functions. Small earthquakes with source corner frequencies higher than the site recording limit f{sub max}, or much higher than the frequency of interest, effectively have impulsive point-fault dislocation sources, and their recordings are used as empirical Green's functions. Since empirical Green's functions are actual recordings at a site, they include the effects on seismic waves from all geologic inhomogeneities and include all recordable frequencies, absolute amplitudes, and all phases. They scale only in amplitude with differences in seismic moment. They can provide nearly the exact integrand to the representation relation. Furthermore, since their source events have spatial extent, they can be summed to simulate fault rupture without loss of information, thereby potentially computing the exact representation relation for an extended source earthquake.

  8. Regulatory perspectives on model validation in high-level radioactive waste management programs: A joint NRC/SKI white paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wingefors, S.; Andersson, J.; Norrby, S. [Swedish Nuclear Power lnspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden). Office of Nuclear Waste Safety; Eisenberg, N.A.; Lee, M.P.; Federline, M.V. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards; Sagar, B.; Wittmeyer, G.W. [Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1999-03-01

    Validation (or confidence building) should be an important aspect of the regulatory uses of mathematical models in the safety assessments of geologic repositories for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high-level radioactive wastes (HLW). A substantial body of literature exists indicating the manner in which scientific validation of models is usually pursued. Because models for a geologic repository performance assessment cannot be tested over the spatial scales of interest and long time periods for which the models will make estimates of performance, the usual avenue for model validation- that is, comparison of model estimates with actual data at the space-time scales of interest- is precluded. Further complicating the model validation process in HLW programs are the uncertainties inherent in describing the geologic complexities of potential disposal sites, and their interactions with the engineered system, with a limited set of generally imprecise data, making it difficult to discriminate between model discrepancy and inadequacy of input data. A successful strategy for model validation, therefore, should attempt to recognize these difficulties, address their resolution, and document the resolution in a careful manner. The end result of validation efforts should be a documented enhancement of confidence in the model to an extent that the model's results can aid in regulatory decision-making. The level of validation needed should be determined by the intended uses of these models, rather than by the ideal of validation of a scientific theory. This white Paper presents a model validation strategy that can be implemented in a regulatory environment. It was prepared jointly by staff members of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate-SKI. This document should not be viewed as, and is not intended to be formal guidance or as a staff position on this matter. Rather, based on a review of the literature and previous

  9. Validation of the IASI operational CH4 and N2O products using ground-based Fourier Transform Spectrometer: preliminary results at the Izaña Observatory (28ºN, 17ºW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omaira García

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the project VALIASI (VALidation of IASI level 2 products the validation of the IASI operational atmospheric trace gas products (total column amounts of H2O, O3, CH4, N2O, CO2 and CO as well H2O and O3 profiles will be carried out. Ground-based FTS (Fourier Transform Spectrometer trace gas measurements made in the framework of NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change serve as the validation reference. In this work, we will present the validation methodology developed for this project and show the first intercomparison results obtained for the Izaña Atmospheric Observatory between 2008 and 2012. As example, we will focus on two of the most important greenhouse gases, CH4 and N2O.

  10. Introduction to the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) of ground-water quality trends and comparison to other national programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Michael R.; Lapham, W.W.

    2008-01-01

    Assessment of temporal trends in national ground-water quality networks are rarely published in scientific journals. This is partly due to the fact that long-term data from these types of networks are uncommon and because many national monitoring networks are not driven by hypotheses that can be easily incorporated into scientific research. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) since 1991 has to date (2006) concentrated on occurrence of contaminants because sufficient data for trend analysis is only just becoming available. This paper introduces the first set of trend assessments from NAWQA and provides an assessment of the success of the program. On a national scale, nitrate concentrations in ground water have generally increased from 1988 to 2004, but trends in pesticide concentrations are less apparent. Regionally, the studies showed high nitrate concentrations and frequent pesticide detections are linked to agricultural use of fertilizers and pesticides. Most of these areas showed increases in nitrate concentration within the last decade, and these increases are associated with oxic-geochemical conditions and well-drained soils. The current NAWQA plan for collecting data to define trends needs to be constantly reevaluated to determine if the approach fulfills the expected outcome. To assist this evaluation, a comparison of NAWQA to other national ground-water quality programs was undertaken. The design and spatial extent of each national program depend on many factors, including current and long-term budgets, purpose of the program, size of the country, and diversity of aquifer types. Comparison of NAWQA to nine other national programs shows a great diversity in program designs, but indicates that different approaches can achieve similar and equally important goals. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  11. Quality assurance and quality control data validation procedures used for the Love Canal and Dallas lead soil monitoring programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K W; Black, S C

    1983-06-01

    Public awareness of soils contamination has increased in recent years due in part to the notoriety associated with the indiscriminate release, packaging, transporting and disposal of hazardous materials. In 1980, and again in 1982, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was responsible for designing, implementing and conducting environmental monitoring programs at Love Canal in Niagara Falls, New York, and in Dallas, Texas, that dealt with suspected contaminated soils. Both of these monitoring programs were conducted over a relatively short time with the collection and analysis of over 4000 soil samples. The methods employed by the Environmental Protection Agency for providing soil data that was scientifically valid and of defensible quality for each of these monitoring programs are presented. Also, methods for identifying data bias, its precision and its uncertainty are identified.

  12. Assessing the construct validity of five nutrient profiling systems using diet modeling with linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerfeuille, E; Vieux, F; Lluch, A; Darmon, N; Rolf-Pedersen, N

    2013-09-01

    Nutrient profiling classifies individual food products according to their nutrient content. According to the WHO (World Health Organization), validation is a key step in the development of a nutrient profiling system. The aim was to assess the construct validity of five European nutrient profiling systems (Choices, Keyhole, (AFSSA), European Commission (EC) system and FoodProfiler). Construct validity was assessed for each of the five-selected nutrient profiling systems by testing whether healthy foods (that is, identified as eligible by the system) make healthy diets, and unhealthy foods (that is, non-eligible) make unhealthy diets, using diet modeling. The AFSSA, EC and FoodProfiler systems were identified as valid, but differences in their levels of permissiveness suggested some misclassified food products. The two other systems failed the construct validity assessment. Among these three systems, the EC system is the less demanding in terms of nutritional information, it would, therefore, be the easiest to implement for regulating nutrition and health claims in Europe.

  13. VALIDATION OF COOKING TIMES AND TEMPERATURES FOR THERMAL INACTIVATION OF YERSINIA PESTIS STRAINS KIM5 AND CDC-A1112 IN GROUND BEEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    The thermal stability of Yersinia pestis inoculated into retail ground beef (25 per cent fat) and heated in a temperature-controlled water bath or cooked on commercial grills was evaluated. Irradiated ground beef (3-g portions) was inoculated with ca. 6.7 log10 CFU/g of Y. pestis strain KIM5 and hea...

  14. Reliability and validity of the Treatment Outcome Profile among patients attending methadone maintenance treatment programs in Kunming, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei; Shen, Jiucheng; Liu, Xianling; Deng, Yuan; Li, Jiahua; Finch, Emily; Wolff, Kim

    2017-06-01

    Substance misuse has been a major health and social issue worldwide and has become an important public health issue in China over the past two decades. Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) has been proved worldwide by large bodies of research to be one of the most effective practices for illicit drug users. The Treatment Outcome Profile (TOP) was developed in 2007 by the UK National Treatment Agency (NTA). It has been proved to be a reliable instrument for outcome measure. This study aim to develop the Chinese version of the Treatment Outcome Profile (TOP), and to assess whether TOP is a reliable outcome measure that can be recommended for use in Chinese MMT program. The Chinese version of TOP was translated and revised based on the English version of TOP. Psychometric properties of TOP were evaluated through face-to-face interviews in 197 patients who had been attending methadone maintenance treatment clinics in Kunming city, Yunnan Institute for Drug Abuse, for less than three months. Patients were interviewed by 3 trained interviewers. Reliability and validity of the instrument were analyzed by measures including test-retest and inter-rater reliability, concurrent validity and change sensitivity. Concurrent validity was assessed by comparing the scores from TOP with scores obtained from validated clinometric instruments. Self-reported opiate use was compared with results of urine analysis. Change sensitivity was judged by t-tests and chi-square tests. About 67% of the 197 interviewers were male and 33% were female. Test-retest reliability of TOP scores (after 10 days interval) were good (K=0.65 to 0.95), inter-rater correlations (ICC) ranged from 0.7 to 0.9, and the criterion validity ranged from 0.72 to 0.88. TOP covers a large scope of problems encountered by drug users needed for treatment. The Chinese version of TOP is a reliable and valid assessment tool. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Nature and Predictive Validity of a Benchmark Assessment Program in an American Indian School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Beverly J. R.

    2013-01-01

    This mixed methods study explored the nature of a benchmark assessment program and how well the benchmark assessments predicted End-of-Grade (EOG) and End-of-Course (EOC) test scores in an American Indian school district. Five major themes were identified and used to develop a Dimensions of Benchmark Assessment Program Effectiveness model:…

  16. A Quality Control Design for Validating Hierarchical Sequencing of Programed Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, Robert D.; Boutwell, Richard C.

    A quality control model is proposed to facilitate development of effective instructional programs. The theories of R. M. Gagne and of M. D. Merrill provide the foundations for a theory of sequencing behavior into a hierarchical order in order to improve the learning potential of an instructional program. The initial step in the procedural model is…

  17. Validating a set of tools designed to assess the perceived quality of training of pediatric residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Dalt, Liviana; Anselmi, Pasquale; Furlan, Sara; Carraro, Silvia; Baraldi, Eugenio; Robusto, Egidio; Perilongo, Giorgio

    2015-01-20

    The Paediatric Residency Program (PRP) of Padua, Italy, developed a set of questionnaires to assess the quality of the training provided by each faculty member, the quality of the professional experience the residents experienced during the various rotations and the functioning of the Resident Affair Committee (RAC), named respectively: "Tutor Assessment Questionnaire" (TAQ), "Rotation Assessment Questionnaire" (RAQ), and RAC Assessment Questionnaire". The process that brought to their validation are herein presented. Between July 2012 and July 2013, 51 residents evaluated 26 tutors through the TAQ, and 25 rotations through the RAQ. Forty-eight residents filled the RAC Assessment Questionnaire. The three questionnaires were validated through a many-facet Rasch measurement analysis. In their final form, the questionnaires produced measures that were valid, reliable, unidimensional, and free from gender biases. TAQ and RAQ distinguished tutors and rotations into 5-6 levels of different quality and effectiveness. The three questionnaires allowed the identification of strengths and weaknesses of tutors, rotations, and RAC. The agreement observed among judges was coherent to the predicted values, suggesting that no particular training is required for developing a shared interpretation of the items. The work herein presented serves to enrich the armamentarium of tools that resident medical programs can use to monitor their functioning. A larger application of these tools will serve to consolidate and refine further the results presented.

  18. Estimation of Carbon Budgets for Croplands by Combining High Resolution Remote Sensing Data with a Crop Model and Validation Ground Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, S.; Veloso, A.; Ceschia, E.; Tallec, T.; Dejoux, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Croplands occupy large areas of Earth's land surface playing a key role in the terrestrial carbon cycle. Hence, it is essential to quantify and analyze the carbon fluxes from those agro-ecosystems, since they contribute to climate change and are impacted by the environmental conditions. In this study we propose a regional modeling approach that combines high spatial and temporal resolutions (HSTR) optical remote sensing data with a crop model and a large set of in-situ measurements for model calibration and validation. The study area is located in southwest France and the model that we evaluate, called SAFY-CO2, is a semi-empirical one based on the Monteith's light-use efficiency theory and adapted for simulating the components of the net ecosystem CO2 fluxes (NEE) and of the annual net ecosystem carbon budgets (NECB) at a daily time step. The approach is based on the assimilation of satellite-derived green area index (GAI) maps for calibrating a number of the SAFY-CO2 parameters linked to crop phenology. HSTR data from the Formosat-2 and SPOT satellites were used to produce the GAI maps. The experimental data set includes eddy covariance measurements of net CO2 fluxes from two experimental sites and partitioned into gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Reco). It also includes measurements of GAI, biomass and yield between 2005 and 2011, focusing on the winter wheat crop. The results showed that the SAFY-CO2 model correctly reproduced the biomass production, its dynamic and the yield (relative errors about 24%) in contrasted climatic, environmental and management conditions. The net CO2 flux components estimated with the model were overall in agreement with the ground data, presenting good correlations (R² about 0.93 for GPP, 0.77 for Reco and 0.86 for NEE). The evaluation of the modelled NECB for the different site-years highlighted the importance of having accurate estimates of each component of the NECB. Future works aim at considering

  19. Technical Note: Validation of Odin/SMR limb observations of ozone, comparisons with OSIRIS, POAM III, ground-based and balloon-borne instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Jégou

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Odin satellite carries two instruments capable of determining stratospheric ozone profiles by limb sounding: the Sub-Millimetre Radiometer (SMR and the UV-visible spectrograph of the OSIRIS (Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imager System instrument. A large number of ozone profiles measurements were performed during six years from November 2001 to present. This ozone dataset is here used to make quantitative comparisons with satellite measurements in order to assess the quality of the Odin/SMR ozone measurements. In a first step, we compare Swedish SMR retrievals version 2.1, French SMR ozone retrievals version 222 (both from the 501.8 GHz band, and the OSIRIS retrievals version 3.0, with the operational version 4.0 ozone product from POAM III (Polar Ozone Atmospheric Measurement. In a second step, we refine the Odin/SMR validation by comparisons with ground-based instruments and balloon-borne observations. We use observations carried out within the framework of the Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC and balloon flight missions conducted by the Canadian Space Agency (CSA, the Laboratoire de Physique et de Chimie de l'Environnement (LPCE, Orléans, France, and the Service d'Aéronomie (SA, Paris, France. Coincidence criteria were 5° in latitude x in 10° longitude, and 5 h in time in Odin/POAM III comparisons, 12 h in Odin/NDACC comparisons, and 72 h in Odin/balloons comparisons. An agreement is found with the POAM III experiment (10–60 km within −0.3±0.2 ppmv (bias±standard deviation for SMR (v222, v2.1 and within −0.5±0.2 ppmv for OSIRIS (v3.0. Odin ozone mixing ratio products are systematically slightly lower than the POAM III data and show an ozone maximum lower by 1–5 km in altitude. The comparisons with the NDACC data (10–34 km for ozonesonde, 10–50 km for lidar, 10–60 for microwave instruments yield a good agreement within −0.15±0.3 ppmv for the SMR data and −0.3±0.3 ppmv

  20. Examining Student Feedback in Writing Assessment: Validation Inquiry in a Writing Placement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getchell, Kristen M.

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated the use of student feedback as support in a validation study of university writing placement practices. Using interviews with seventeen incoming first year students, this study examined student experiences constructing and submitting writing portfolios as opposed to taking a timed essay test. Also, this study…

  1. Implicit structural inversion of gravity data using linear programming, a validation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zon, A.T. van; Roy Chowdhury, K.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a regional scale gravity data set has been inverted to infer the structure (topography) of the top of the basement underlying sub-horizontal strata. We apply our method to this real data set for further proof of concept, validation and benchmarking against results from an earlier forw

  2. Implicit structural inversion of gravity data using linear programming, a validation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zon, A.T. van; Roy Chowdhury, K.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a regional scale gravity data set has been inverted to infer the structure (topography) of the top of the basement underlying sub-horizontal strata. We apply our method to this real data set for further proof of concept, validation and benchmarking against results from an earlier forw

  3. Validity and reliability of portfolio assessment of competency in a baccalaureate dental hygiene program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C.

    This study examined validity and reliability of portfolio assessment using Messick's (1996, 1995) unified framework of construct validity. Theoretical and empirical evidence was sought for six aspects of construct validity. The sample included twenty student portfolios. Each portfolio were evaluated by seven faculty raters using a primary trait analysis scoring rubric. There was a significant relationship (r = .81--.95; p portfolio and rubric (1.15%) indicating that while the seven subscales varied in difficulty level, the relative standing of individual portfolios was maintained across subscales. Faculty rater variance accounted for only 1.28% of total variance. A phi coefficient of .86, analogous to a reliability coefficient in classical test theory, was obtained in the Decision study by increasing the subscales to fourteen and decreasing faculty raters to three. There was a significant relationship between portfolios and grade point average (r = .70; p portfolios and the Central Regional Dental Testing Service examination was both weak and nonsignificant (r = .19; p > .05). An open-ended survey was used to elicit student feedback on portfolio development. A majority of the students (76%) perceived value in the development of programmatic portfolios. In conclusion, the pattern of findings from this study suggest that portfolios can serve as a valid and reliable measure for assessing student competency.

  4. Development and Validation of an Online Program for Promoting Self-Management among Korean Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhyang Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The hepatitis B virus is second only to tobacco as a known human carcinogen. However, chronic hepatitis B usually does not produce symptoms and people feel healthy even in the early stages of live cancer. Therefore, chronically infected people should perceive it as a serious health problem and move on to appropriate health behaviour. The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate an online program for promoting self-management among Korean patients with chronic hepatitis B. The online program was developed using a prototyping approach and system developing life cycle method, evaluated by users for their satisfaction with the website and experts for the quality of the site. To evaluate the application of the online program, knowledge and self-management compliance of the subjects were measured and compared before and after the application of the online program. There were statistically significant increases in knowledge and self-management compliance in the user group. An online program with high accessibility and applicability including information, motivation, and behavior skill factors can promote self-management of the patient with chronic hepatitis B. Findings from this study allow Korean patients with chronic hepatitis B to engage in proactive and effective health management in the community or clinical practice.

  5. Assessment model validity document - HYDRASTAR. A stochastic continuum program for groundwater flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gylling, B. [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Eriksson, Lars [Equa Simulation AB, Sundbyberg (Sweden)

    2001-12-01

    The prevailing document addresses validation of the stochastic continuum model HYDRASTAR designed for Monte Carlo simulations of groundwater flow in fractured rocks. Here, validation is defined as a process to demonstrate that a model concept is fit for its purpose. Preferably, the validation is carried out by comparison of model predictions with independent field observations and experimental measurements. In addition, other sources can also be used to confirm that the model concept gives acceptable results. One method is to compare results with the ones achieved using other model concepts for the same set of input data. Another method is to compare model results with analytical solutions. The model concept HYDRASTAR has been used in several studies including performance assessments of hypothetical repositories for spent nuclear fuel. In the performance assessments, the main tasks for HYDRASTAR have been to calculate groundwater travel time distributions, repository flux distributions, path lines and their exit locations. The results have then been used by other model concepts to calculate the near field release and far field transport. The aim and framework for the validation process includes describing the applicability of the model concept for its purpose in order to build confidence in the concept. Preferably, this is made by comparisons of simulation results with the corresponding field experiments or field measurements. Here, two comparisons with experimental results are reported. In both cases the agreement was reasonably fair. In the broader and more general context of the validation process, HYDRASTAR results have been compared with other models and analytical solutions. Commonly, the approximation calculations agree well with the medians of model ensemble results. Additional indications that HYDRASTAR is suitable for its purpose were obtained from the comparisons with results from other model concepts. Several verification studies have been made for

  6. EOS Aqua AMSR-E Arctic Sea Ice Validation Program: Intercomparison Between Modeled and Measured Sea Ice Brightness Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroeve, J.; Markus, T.; Cavalieri, D. J.; Maslanik, J.; Sturm, M.; Henrichs, J.; Gasiewski, A.; Klein, M.

    2004-01-01

    During March 2003, an extensive field campaign was conducted near Barrow, Alaska to validate AQUA Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) sea ice products. Field, airborne and satellite data were collected over three different types of sea ice: 1) first year ice with little deformation, 2) first year ice with various amounts of deformation and 3) mixed first year ice and multi-year ice with various degrees of deformation. The validation plan relies primarily on comparisons between satellite, aircraft flights and ground-based measurements. Although these efforts are important, key aspects such as the effects of atmospheric conditions, snow properties, surface roughness, melt processes, etc on the sea ice algorithms are not sufficiently well understood or documented. To improve our understanding of these effects, we combined the detailed, in-situ data collection from the 2003 field campaign with radiance modeling using a radiative transfer model to simulate the top of the atmosphere AMSR brightness temperatures. This study reports on the results of the simulations for a variety of snow and ice types and compares the results with the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (NOAA) (ETL) (PSR) microwave radiometer that was flown on the NASA P-3.

  7. The United States Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Program Validation Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litynski, John T; Plasynski, Sean; McIlvried, Howard G; Mahoney, Christopher; Srivastava, Rameshwar D

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews the Validation Phase (Phase II) of the Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships initiative. In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy created a nationwide network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) to help determine and implement the technology, infrastructure, and regulations most appropriate to promote carbon sequestration in different regions of the nation. The objectives of the Characterization Phase (Phase I) were to characterize the geologic and terrestrial opportunities for carbon sequestration; to identify CO(2) point sources within the territories of the individual partnerships; to assess the transportation infrastructure needed for future deployment; to evaluate CO(2) capture technologies for existing and future power plants; and to identify the most promising sequestration opportunities that would need to be validated through a series of field projects. The Characterization Phase was highly successful, with the following achievements: established a national network of companies and professionals working to support sequestration deployment; created regional and national carbon sequestration atlases for the United States and portions of Canada; evaluated available and developing technologies for the capture of CO(2) from point sources; developed an improved understanding of the permitting requirements that future sequestration activities will need to address as well as defined the gap in permitting requirements for large scale deployment of these technologies; created a raised awareness of, and support for, carbon sequestration as a greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation option, both within industry and among the general public; identified the most promising carbon sequestration opportunities for future field tests; and established protocols for project implementation, accounting, and management. Economic evaluation was started and is continuing and will be a factor in project selection. During the

  8. Validation and Development of a Certification Program for Using K9s to Survey Desert Tortoises

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Esque, and K. Nussear. Humans vs. K9s: Is fear warranted in the race to save the desert tortoise? 91st Annual Ecological Society of America , August 6-11...desert tortoises, other reptiles (Schwartz et al., 1984; Engeman et al., 1998), or even to 10 distinguish cancer in human subjects (McCulloch et...has yet to be validated in mammals. Therefore, it is not possible to explain precisely how dogs use scent to find desert tortoises, other reptiles

  9. Stochastic ground motion simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaeian, Sanaz; Xiaodan, Sun; Beer, Michael; Kougioumtzoglou, Ioannis A.; Patelli, Edoardo; Siu-Kui Au, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Strong earthquake ground motion records are fundamental in engineering applications. Ground motion time series are used in response-history dynamic analysis of structural or geotechnical systems. In such analysis, the validity of predicted responses depends on the validity of the input excitations. Ground motion records are also used to develop ground motion prediction equations(GMPEs) for intensity measures such as spectral accelerations that are used in response-spectrum dynamic analysis. Despite the thousands of available strong ground motion records, there remains a shortage of records for large-magnitude earthquakes at short distances or in specific regions, as well as records that sample specific combinations of source, path, and site characteristics.

  10. Development and validation of the water hammer program DYVRO Mod.3; Entwicklung und Validierung des Druckstossprogramms DYVRO Mod. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuhaus, Thorsten; Schaffrath, Andreas; Ronneberger, Rolf [TUeV NORD SysTec GmbH und Co. KG, Hamburg (Germany); Altstadt, Eberhard [Forschungszentrum Dresden (DE). Inst. fuer Sicherheitsforschung (IFS)

    2008-07-01

    Water hammer events in piping systems develop in case of a sudden opening or closure of armatures, changes or pump rotation speeds or as consequence of pipe breaks. The propagation speed of pressure waves depend on the properties of the fluid (compressibility, density) and the mechanical properties (Young modulus, Poisson ratio) and geometry of the piping system. Water hammer effects induce very often damage of the piping and the pipe mountings. The TUeV Nord Sys Tec GmBH and Co KG has developed and qualified the water hammer program DYVRO for two-phase fluids. The contribution covers the improved version of the program DYVRO Mod3. The validation of the calculation procedure includes the Simpson experiment and experiments at the cold water hammer test facility CWHTF in Rossendorf with and without vapor lock.

  11. The RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management Program: A Follow-Up Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetsch, Robert J.; Yang, Raymond K.; Pettit, Matthew J.

    2008-01-01

    This study is the first follow-up assessment of the RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management Program. Parent participants (N = 168) reduced their anger, violence, and family conflict levels from posttest to follow-up, on average, at 2.5 months on 13 of 15 dependent variables. Current findings are consistent with a small, albeit growing body of…

  12. The RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management Program: A Follow-Up Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetsch, Robert J.; Yang, Raymond K.; Pettit, Matthew J.

    2008-01-01

    This study is the first follow-up assessment of the RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management Program. Parent participants (N = 168) reduced their anger, violence, and family conflict levels from posttest to follow-up, on average, at 2.5 months on 13 of 15 dependent variables. Current findings are consistent with a small, albeit growing body of…

  13. Establishing the Validity of a Talents Unlimited Program at the School Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, James E.; Chissom, Brad S.

    Procedures are described to conduct summative evaluations of Talents Unlimited programs. It is assumed that school counselors, administrators, or personnel minimally trained in measurement and statistics are capable of conducting the evaluation, except for doing the statistical analysis. The procedures are composed of: establishing measurable…

  14. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a Drug Counselling Training Program: Suggestions for a Validation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Michael; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The study measured the effectiveness of a drug counselling program to achieve behavioral, attitudinal and informational change of the participants. Significant changes were found in responses to knowledge inventories on medical and legal aspects of drug abuse and on behavioral dimensions of increased listening skills and ability to analyse…

  15. The jmzQuantML programming interface and validator for the mzQuantML data standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Da; Krishna, Ritesh; Jones, Andrew R

    2014-03-01

    The mzQuantML standard from the HUPO Proteomics Standards Initiative has recently been released, capturing quantitative data about peptides and proteins, following analysis of MS data. We present a Java application programming interface (API) for mzQuantML called jmzQuantML. The API provides robust bridges between Java classes and elements in mzQuantML files and allows random access to any part of the file. The API provides read and write capabilities, and is designed to be embedded in other software packages, enabling mzQuantML support to be added to proteomics software tools (http://code.google.com/p/jmzquantml/). The mzQuantML standard is designed around a multilevel validation system to ensure that files are structurally and semantically correct for different proteomics quantitative techniques. In this article, we also describe a Java software tool (http://code.google.com/p/mzquantml-validator/) for validating mzQuantML files, which is a formal part of the data standard. © 2014 The Authors. Proteomics published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Reliability and validity of birth certificate prepregnancy weight and height among women enrolled in prenatal WIC program: Florida, 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sohyun; Sappenfield, William M; Bish, Connie; Bensyl, Diana M; Goodman, David; Menges, Jane

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the reliability and validity of weight, height, and body mass index (BMI) from birth certificates with directly measured values from the Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Program. Florida birth certificate data were linked and compared with first trimester WIC data for women with a live birth during the last quarter of calendar year 2005 (n = 23,314 women). Mean differences for weight, height, and BMI were calculated by subtracting birth certificate values from WIC values. Reliability was estimated by Pearson's correlation. Validity was measured by sensitivity and specificity using WIC data as the reference. Overall mean differences plus or minus standard error (SE) were 1.93 ± 0.04 kg for weight, -1.03 ± 0.03 cm for height, and 1.07 ± 0.02 kg/m(2) for BMI. Pearson's correlation ranged from 0.83 to 0.95, which indicates a strong positive association. Compared with other categories, women in the second weight group (56.7-65.8 kg), the highest height group (≥167.6 cm), or BMI reliability and validity for population-based surveillance and research purposes related to recall or reporting bias.

  17. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Monterey Bay and Salinas Valley Basins, California, 2005 - Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 1,000-square-mile Monterey Bay and Salinas Valley study unit was investigated from July through October 2005 as part of the California Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) program. The study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 94 public-supply wells and 3 monitoring wells in Monterey, Santa Cruz, and San Luis Obispo Counties. Ninety-one of the public-supply wells sampled were selected to provide a spatially distributed, randomized monitoring network for statistical representation of the study area. Six wells were sampled to evaluate changes in water chemistry: three wells along a ground-water flow path were sampled to evaluate lateral changes, and three wells at discrete depths from land surface were sampled to evaluate changes in water chemistry with depth from land surface. The ground-water samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides, pesticide degradates, nutrients, major and minor ions, trace elements, radioactivity, microbial indicators, and dissolved noble gases (the last in collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory). Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, carbon-14, helium-4, and the isotopic composition of oxygen and hydrogen) also were measured to help identify the source and age of the sampled ground water. In total, 270 constituents and water-quality indicators were investigated for this study. This study did not attempt to evaluate the quality of water delivered to consumers; after withdrawal from the ground, water typically is treated, disinfected, and (or) blended with other waters to maintain water quality. In addition, regulatory thresholds apply to treated water that is served to the consumer, not to raw ground water. In this study, only six constituents, alpha radioactivity, N

  18. Development, validation and operating room-transfer of a six-step laparoscopic training program for the vesicourethral anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Jan; Teber, Dogu; Frede, Tom; Stock, Christian; Hruza, Marcel; Gözen, Ali; Seemann, Othmar; Schulze, Michael; Rassweiler, Jens

    2013-03-01

    Development and full validation of a laparoscopic training program for stepwise learning of a reproducible application of a standardized laparoscopic anastomosis technique and integration into the clinical course. The training of vesicourethral anastomosis (VUA) was divided into six simple standardized steps. To fix the objective criteria, four experienced surgeons performed the stepwise training protocol. Thirty-eight participants with no previous laparoscopic experience were investigated in their training performance. The times needed to manage each training step and the total training time were recorded. The integration into the clinical course was investigated. The training results and the corresponding steps during laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) were analyzed. Data analysis of corresponding operating room (OR) sections of 793 LRP was performed. Based on the validity, criteria were determined. In the laboratory section, a significant reduction of OR time for every step was seen in all participants. Coordination: 62%; longitudinal incision: 52%; inverted U-shape incision: 43%; plexus: 47%. Anastomosis catheter model: 38%. VUA: 38%. The laboratory section required a total time of 29 hours (minimum: 16 hours; maximum: 42 hours). All participants had shorter execution times in the laboratory than under real conditions. The best match was found within the VUA model. To perform an anastomosis under real conditions, 25% more time was needed. By using the training protocol, the performance of the VUA is comparable to that of an surgeon with experience of about 50 laparoscopic VUA. Data analysis proved content, construct, and prognostic validity. The use of stepwise training approaches enables a surgeon to learn and reproduce complex reconstructive surgical tasks: eg, the VUA in a safe environment. The validity of the designed system is given at all levels and should be used as a standard in the clinical surgical training in laparoscopic reconstructive urology.

  19. Development and validation of a computer program to design and calculate ROPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangado, J; Arana, I; Jarén, C; Arnal, P; Arazuri, S; Ponce de León, J L

    2007-01-01

    In Spain, there are more than 250,000 tractors built before 1980, when it became mandatory for all new tractors to be equipped with a rollover protective structure (ROPS). A similar situation is found in the European Union, but the situation is worse in the U.S. and in developing countries. Directive 2003/37/EEC establishes that tractors over 800 kg weight can be homologated by using the OECD standard code for the official testing of protective structures on agricultural and forestry tractors (static test), called Code 4. A ROPS attachable to the rear axle of different tractor models has been designed, and a computer program for the calculation of the ROPS design has been developed. The program, named ESTREMA, is available at: www.cfnavarra.es/insl. Using this program, it has been possible to design a ROPS for the Massey Ferguson model 178 tractor, one of the most common tractor models without a ROPS in Spain. After the tractor was equipped with the designed ROPS, it was tested at the Spanish Authorized Station for testing ROPS and passed the homologation test (OECD Code 4), the main results being a maximum distortion of 21.3 cm when the absorbed energy was 5437 N and the maximum force applied was 34 kN during loading from the side. The ROPS was improved, redesigned, and remounted on the tractor, the tractor was tested in a real overturn, and no part of the structure intruded on the driver's clearance zone during the test. In conclusion, the ESTREMA program worked correctly, and the designed ROPS was able to pass the authorized test and provide adequate protection to the operator during a real overturn.

  20. Strategic Defense Initiative Demonstration/Validation Program Environmental Assessment. Exoatmospheric Reentry Vehicle Interception System (ERIS),

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-01

    2; - 4; C i O Ga. ; . ft* .4 .4 ~I A la 4. a d .4 . - aa .3 r U. AM 0SP0 o~~0 0.ei. ’U4 Is .~ -4 -- I r ’M .0. ~ aDa id .40 *l - 3~.4 144 0.U .4z- z... Lovelace , Norm, Environmental Protection Agency, Permit Programs, Micronesia, Region IX, San Francisco, California. 27 May 1987. Tele- phone

  1. Demonstration and Validation of a Regenerated Cellulose Dialysis Membrane Diffusion Sampler for Monitoring Ground Water Quality and Remediation Progress at DoD Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-30

    with biodegradation was probably because of their longer deployment times, warmer ground-water temperatures, and proximity to high bacteria ...NFESC Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center NJDEP New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection NTU Nephelometric turbidity units PAH ...high ionic strength waters and due to biodegradation were not significant when equilibration times in wells were one to two weeks. Water samples

  2. AQMAN; linear and quadratic programming matrix generator using two-dimensional ground-water flow simulation for aquifer management modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkoff, L.J.; Gorelick, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    A FORTRAN-77 computer program code that helps solve a variety of aquifer management problems involving the control of groundwater hydraulics. It is intended for use with any standard mathematical programming package that uses Mathematical Programming System input format. The computer program creates the input files to be used by the optimization program. These files contain all the hydrologic information and management objectives needed to solve the management problem. Used in conjunction with a mathematical programming code, the computer program identifies the pumping or recharge strategy that achieves a user 's management objective while maintaining groundwater hydraulic conditions within desired limits. The objective may be linear or quadratic, and may involve the minimization of pumping and recharge rates or of variable pumping costs. The problem may contain constraints on groundwater heads, gradients, and velocities for a complex, transient hydrologic system. Linear superposition of solutions to the transient, two-dimensional groundwater flow equation is used by the computer program in conjunction with the response matrix optimization method. A unit stress is applied at each decision well and transient responses at all control locations are computed using a modified version of the U.S. Geological Survey two dimensional aquifer simulation model. The program also computes discounted cost coefficients for the objective function and accounts for transient aquifer conditions. (Author 's abstract)

  3. Prevention validation and accounting platform: a framework for establishing accountability and performance measures of substance abuse prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S; McLeod, J H; Williams, C; Hepler, N

    2000-01-01

    The field of substance abuse prevention has neither an overarching conceptual framework nor a set of shared terminologies for establishing the accountability and performance outcome measures of substance abuse prevention services rendered. Hence, there is a wide gap between what we currently have as data on one hand and information that are required to meet the performance goals and accountability measures set by the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 on the other. The task before us is: How can we establish the accountability and performance measures of substance abuse prevention programs and transform the field of prevention into prevention science? The intent of this volume is to serve that purpose and accelerate the processes of this transformation by identifying the requisite components of the transformation (i.e., theory, methodology, convention on terms, and data) and by introducing an open forum called, Prevention Validation and Accounting (PREVA) Platform. The entire PREVA Platform (for short, the Platform) is designed as an analytic framework, which is formulated by a collectivity of common concepts, terminologies, accounting units, protocols for counting the units, data elements, and operationalizations of various constructs, and other summary measures intended to bring about an efficient and effective measurement of process input, program capacity, process output, performance outcome, and societal impact of substance abuse prevention programs. The measurement units and summary data elements are designed to be measured across time and across jurisdictions, i.e., from local to regional to state to national levels. In the Platform, the process input is captured by two dimensions of time and capital. Time is conceptualized in terms of service delivery time and time spent for research and development. Capital is measured by the monies expended for the delivery of program activities during a fiscal or reporting period. Program capacity is captured

  4. Implementing RapidArc into clinical routine: A comprehensive program from machine QA to TPS validation and patient QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Esch, Ann; Huyskens, Dominique P.; Behrens, Claus F.; Samsoee, Eva; Sjoelin, Maria; Bjelkengren, Ulf; Sjoestroem, David; Clermont, Christian; Hambach, Lionel; Sergent, Francois [7Sigma, QA-team in Radiotherapy Physics, 3150 Tildonk, Belgium and Department of Radiotherapy, Clinique Ste. Elisabeth, 5000 Namur (Belgium); Department of Oncology, Division of Radiophysics, Copenhagen University Hospital, 2730 Herlev (Denmark); Department of Radiotherapy, Clinique Ste. Elisabeth, 5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: With the increased commercial availability of intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) comes the need for comprehensive QA programs, covering the different aspects of this newly available technology. This manuscript proposes such a program for the RapidArc (RA) (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto) IMAT solution. Methods: The program was developed and tested out for a Millennium120 MLC on iX Clinacs and a HighDefinition MLC on a Novalis TX, using a variety of measurement equipment including Gafchromic film, 2D ion chamber arrays (Seven29 and StarCheck, PTW, Freiburg, Germany) with inclinometer and Octavius phantom, the Delta4 systam (ScandiDos, Uppsala, Sweden) and the portal imager (EPID). First, a number of complementary machine QA tests were developed to monitor the correct interplay between the accelerating/decelerating gantry, the variable dose rate and the MLC position, straining the delivery to the maximum allowed limits. Second, a systematic approach to the validation of the dose calculation for RA was adopted, starting with static gantry and RA specific static MLC shapes and gradually moving to dynamic gantry, dynamic MLC shapes. RA plans were then optimized on a series of artificial structures created within the homogeneous Octavius phantom and within a heterogeneous lung phantom. These served the double purpose of testing the behavior of the optimization algorithm (PRO) as well as the precision of the forward dose calculation. Finally, patient QA on a series of clinical cases was performed with different methods. In addition to the well established in-phantom QA, we evaluated the portal dosimetry solution within the Varian approach. Results: For routine machine QA, the ''Snooker Cue'' test on the EPID proved to be the most sensitive to overall problem detection. It is also the most practical one. The ''Twinkle'' and ''Sunrise'' tests were useful to obtain well differentiated information on

  5. Implementing RapidArc into clinical routine: a comprehensive program from machine QA to TPS validation and patient QA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Esch, Ann; Huyskens, Dominique P; Behrens, Claus F; Samsoe, Eva; Sjolin, Maria; Bjelkengren, Ulf; Sjostrom, David; Clermont, Christian; Hambach, Lionel; Sergent, Francois

    2011-09-01

    With the increased commercial availability of intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) comes the need for comprehensive QA programs, covering the different aspects of this newly available technology. This manuscript proposes such a program for the RapidArc (RA) (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto) IMAT solution. The program was developed and tested out for a Millennium120 MLC on iX Clinacs and a HighDefinition MLC on a Novalis TX, using a variety of measurement equipment including Gafchromic film, 2D ion chamber arrays (Seven29 and StarCheck, PTW, Freiburg, Germany) with inclinometer and Octavius phantom, the Delta4 systam (ScandiDos, Uppsala, Sweden) and the portal imager (EPID). First, a number of complementary machine QA tests were developed to monitor the correct interplay between the accelerating/decelerating gantry, the variable dose rate and the MLC position, straining the delivery to the maximum allowed limits. Second, a systematic approach to the validation of the dose calculation for RA was adopted, starting with static gantry and RA specific static MLC shapes and gradually moving to dynamic gantry, dynamic MLC shapes. RA plans were then optimized on a series of artificial structures created within the homogeneous Octavius phantom and within a heterogeneous lung phantom. These served the double purpose of testing the behavior of the optimization algorithm (PRO) as well as the precision of the forward dose calculation. Finally, patient QA on a series of clinical cases was performed with different methods. In addition to the well established in-phantom QA, we evaluated the portal dosimetry solution within the Varian approach. For routine machine QA, the "Snooker Cue" test on the EPID proved to be the most sensitive to overall problem detection. It is also the most practical one. The "Twinkle" and "Sunrise" tests were useful to obtain well differentiated information on the individual treatment delivery components. The AAA8.9 dose calculations showed excellent

  6. Validity and consistency analysis of a social transformation scale for the impact evaluation of the ViraVida program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Campos Crivelaro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available According to estimates by the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF, about one million children worldwide are directly affected by sexual violence and nearly a third of all cases occur in Brazil. The Program ViraVida acts to reduce the problem in the country, rescuing teenagers and youngsters in this situation, providing psychological, educational, and vocational assistance, including support for monitoring the placement and labor market. In this context, the main goal of the study is to analyze the validity and consistency of the Social Transformation Scale of the ViraVida Program. The study represents the second stage of the impact evaluation of the Program to measure possible impacts to strengthen employability, autonomy, self-esteem, community and family ties of young people from 16 to 24 years in situation of sexual exploitation. The methodology is based on the Factor Analysis procedures, including a verification of internal consistency of the full scale and their specific domains. Both proved to be consistent with Cronbach’s Alpha greater than 0.7. The results provide security for the performance of the later stage due to the ViraVida evaluation: evaluative research on adolescents and youngsters in the 11 states and 14 cities where ViraVida is ongoing.

  7. Nutrient profiling can help identify foods of good nutritional quality for their price: a validation study with linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillot, Matthieu; Ferguson, Elaine L; Drewnowski, Adam; Darmon, Nicole

    2008-06-01

    Nutrient profiling ranks foods based on their nutrient content. They may help identify foods with a good nutritional quality for their price. This hypothesis was tested using diet modeling with linear programming. Analyses were undertaken using food intake data from the nationally representative French INCA (enquête Individuelle et Nationale sur les Consommations Alimentaires) survey and its associated food composition and price database. For each food, a nutrient profile score was defined as the ratio between the previously published nutrient density score (NDS) and the limited nutrient score (LIM); a nutritional quality for price indicator was developed and calculated from the relationship between its NDS:LIM and energy cost (in euro/100 kcal). We developed linear programming models to design diets that fulfilled increasing levels of nutritional constraints at a minimal cost. The median NDS:LIM values of foods selected in modeled diets increased as the levels of nutritional constraints increased (P = 0.005). In addition, the proportion of foods with a good nutritional quality for price indicator was higher (P quality for their price. Linear programming is a useful tool for testing nutrient profiling systems and validating the concept of nutrient profiling.

  8. A comparison of two commercial volumetry software programs in the analysis of pulmonary ground-glass nodules: Segmentation capability and measurement accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyung Jin; Park, Chang Min; Lee, Sang Min; Lee, Hyun Joo; Goo, Jin Mo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    To compare the segmentation capability of the 2 currently available commercial volumetry software programs with specific segmentation algorithms for pulmonary ground-glass nodules (GGNs) and to assess their measurement accuracy. In this study, 55 patients with 66 GGNs underwent unenhanced low-dose CT. GGN segmentation was performed by using 2 volumetry software programs (LungCARE, Siemens Healthcare; LungVCAR, GE Healthcare). Successful nodule segmentation was assessed visually and morphologic features of GGNs were evaluated to determine factors affecting segmentation by both types of software. In addition, the measurement accuracy of the software programs was investigated by using an anthropomorphic chest phantom containing simulated GGNs. The successful nodule segmentation rate was significantly higher in LungCARE (90.9%) than in LungVCAR (72.7%) (p = 0.012). Vascular attachment was a negatively influencing morphologic feature of nodule segmentation for both software programs. As for measurement accuracy, mean relative volume measurement errors in nodules ≥ 10 mm were 14.89% with LungCARE and 19.96% with LungVCAR. The mean relative attenuation measurement errors in nodules ≥ 10 mm were 3.03% with LungCARE and 5.12% with LungVCAR. LungCARE shows significantly higher segmentation success rates than LungVCAR. Measurement accuracy of volume and attenuation of GGNs is acceptable in GGNs ≥ 10 mm by both software programs.

  9. Structure and application of an interface program between a geographic-information system and a ground-water flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Metre, P.C.

    1990-01-01

    A computer-program interface between a geographic-information system and a groundwater flow model links two unrelated software systems for use in developing the flow models. The interface program allows the modeler to compile and manage geographic components of a groundwater model within the geographic information system. A significant savings of time and effort is realized in developing, calibrating, and displaying the groundwater flow model. Four major guidelines were followed in developing the interface program: (1) no changes to the groundwater flow model code were to be made; (2) a data structure was to be designed within the geographic information system that follows the same basic data structure as the groundwater flow model; (3) the interface program was to be flexible enough to support all basic data options available within the model; and (4) the interface program was to be as efficient as possible in terms of computer time used and online-storage space needed. Because some programs in the interface are written in control-program language, the interface will run only on a computer with the PRIMOS operating system. (USGS)

  10. Demonstration/Validation of the Snap Sampler Passive Ground Water Sampling Device for Sampling Inorganic Analytes at the Former Pease Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    it starts to undergo biodegradation . Also, because diffusion samplers typically require at least several days for equilibration to occur, they... PAHs ), and metals have been found in soils on the base. The ground wa- ter has been found to be contaminated with volatile organic compounds ERDC...CRREL TR-09-12 14 (VOCs) including trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE). PAHs , pesticides, and heavy metals have been found in the

  11. The OECD program to validate the rat uterotrophic bioassay to screen compounds for in vivo estrogenic responses: phase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, J; Onyon, L; Haseman, J; Fenner-Crisp, P; Ashby, J; Owens, W

    2001-01-01

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development has completed the first phase of an international validation program for the rodent uterotrophic bioassay. This uterotrophic bioassay is intended to identify the in vivo activity of compounds that are suspected agonists or antagonists of estrogen. This information could, for example, be used to help prioritize positive compounds for further testing. Using draft protocols, we tested and compared two model systems, the immature female rat and the adult ovariectomized rat. Data from 19 participating laboratories using a high-potency reference agonist, ethinyl estradiol (EE), and an antagonist, ZM 189,154, indicate no substantive performance differences between models. All laboratories and all protocols successfully detected increases in uterine weights using EE in phase 1. These significant uterine weight increases were achieved under a variety of experimental conditions (e.g., strain, diet, housing protocol, bedding, vehicle). For each protocol, there was generally good agreement among laboratories with regard to the actual EE doses both in producing the first significant increase in uterine weights and achieving the maximum uterine response. Furthermore, the Hill equation appears to model the dose response satisfactorily and indicates general agreement based on calculated effective dose (ED)(10) and ED(50) within and among laboratories. The feasibility of an antagonist assay was also successfully demonstrated. Therefore, both models appear robust, reproducible, and transferable across laboratories for high-potency estrogen agonists such as EE. For the next phase of the OECD validation program, both models will be tested against a battery of weak, partial estrogen agonists. PMID:11564613

  12. Construction and validation of two parent-report scales for the evaluation of early intervention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, William P; Elbaum, Batya; Coulter, W Alan

    2012-01-01

    The State Performance Plan (SPP) developed under the 2004 reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA 2004, Public Law 108-446) requires states to collect data and report on the impact of early intervention services on three key outcomes for participating families. The NCSEAM Impact on Family Scale (NIFS) and the NCSEAM Family Centered Services Scale (NFCSS) were developed to provide states with a means to address this new reporting requirement and to collect additional data that would inform program improvement efforts. Items suggested by stakeholder groups were piloted with a nationally representative sample of parents of children with developmental delays or disabilities ages birth to three participating in early intervention services in eight states. The 28-item NIFS had measurement reliabilities ranging from .93-.96 in a sample of 1,750; measurement reliabilities for the 135-item NFCSS ranged from .94 to .97 in a sample of 1,755 respondents. A 29-item version of the NFCSS had measurement reliabilities ranging from .87 to .92. Using data from the pilot study, stakeholders established a recommended performance standard, set at a meaningful point in the NIFS item hierarchy, for each of the three established outcome areas.

  13. Validation protocol for multiple blood gas analyzers in accordance with laboratory accreditation programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérsio A. R. Ebner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIntroduction:The results of blood gas analysis using different instrumentation can vary widely due to the methodological differences, the calibration procedures and the use of different configurations for each type of instrument.Objective:The objective of this study was to evaluate multiple analytical systems for measurement of blood gases, electrolytes and metabolites in accordance with the accreditation program (PALC of Sociedade Brasileira de Patologia Clínica/Medicina Laboratorial (SBPC/ML.Materials and methods:20 samples were evaluated in three ABL800 Flex (Radiometer Medical ApS, Denmark blood gas analyzers, and the results were compared with those of the device in use, which was considered the reference. The analysis of variance (Anova was applied for statistical purposes, as well as the calculation of mean, standard deviation and coefficient of variation.Results:The p values obtained in the statistical analysis were: pH = 0.983, pO2 = 0.991, pCO2 = 0.353, lactate = 0.584, glucose = 0.995, ionized calcium = 0.983, sodium = 0.991, potassium = 0.926, chlorine = 0.029.Conclusion:The evaluation of multiple analytical systems is an essential procedure in the clinical laboratory for quality assurance and accuracy of the results.

  14. Damage Theory Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    1998-01-01

    This report contains a series of validation examples for the theoretical model implemented in the computer program DAMAGE. note that the validation examples are for assembled structures.......This report contains a series of validation examples for the theoretical model implemented in the computer program DAMAGE. note that the validation examples are for assembled structures....

  15. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Owens and Indian Wells Valleys Study Unit, 2006: Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, Jill N.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 1,630 square-mile Owens and Indian Wells Valleys study unit (OWENS) was investigated in September-December 2006 as part of the Priority Basin Project of Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in collaboration with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The Owens and Indian Wells Valleys study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality within OWENS study unit, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 74 wells in Inyo, Kern, Mono, and San Bernardino Counties. Fifty-three of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area (grid wells), and 21 wells were selected to evaluate changes in water chemistry in areas of interest (understanding wells). The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of synthetic organic constituents [volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides and pesticide degradates, pharmaceutical compounds, and potential wastewater- indicator compounds], constituents of special interest [perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), and 1,2,3- trichloropropane (1,2,3-TCP)], naturally occurring inorganic constituents [nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements], radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes [tritium, and carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in water], and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the source and age of the sampled ground water. This study evaluated the quality of raw ground water in the aquifer in the OWENS study unit and did not attempt to evaluate the quality of treated water

  16. Initial validation of a training program focused on laparoscopic radical nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enciso, S; Díaz-Güemes, I; Serrano, Á; Bachiller, J; Rioja, J; Usón, J; Sánchez-Margallo, F M

    2016-05-01

    To assess a training model focused on laparoscopic nephrectomy. 16 residents participated in the study, who attended a training program with a theoretical session (1hour) and a dry (7hours) and a wet lab (13hours). During animal training, the first and last nephrectomies were assessed through the completion time and the global rating scale "Objective and Structured Assessment of Technical Skills" (OSATS). Before and after the course, they performed 3 tasks on the virtual reality simulator LAPMentor (1) eye-hand coordination; 2) hand-hand coordination; and 3) transference of objects), registering time and movement metrics. All participants completed a questionnaire related to the training components on a 5-point rating scale. The participants performed the last nephrectomy faster (P<.001) and with higher OSATS scores (P<.001). After the course, they completed the LAPMentor tasks faster (P<.05). The number of movements decreased in all tasks (1) P<.001, 2) P<.05, and 3) P<.05), and the path length in tasks 1 (P<.05) and 2 (P<.05). The movement speeds increased in tasks 2 (P<.001) and 3 (P<.001). With regards to the questionnaire, the usefulness of the animal training and the necessity of training on them prior to their laparoscopic clinical practice were the questions with the highest score (4.92±.28). The combination of physical simulation and animal training constitute an effective training model for improving basic and advanced skills for laparoscopic nephrectomy. The component preferred by the urology residents was the animal training. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Initial Results from the DEEPWAVE Airborne and Ground-Based Measurement Program in New Zealand in 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, Dave; Smith, Ron; Taylor, Mike; Doyle, Jim; Eckermann, Steve; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Rapp, Markus; Williams, Biff; Bossert, Katrina; Pautet, Dominique

    2015-04-01

    The deep-propagating gravity wave experiment (DEEPWAVE) was performed on and over New Zealand, Tasmania, the Tasman Sea, and the Southern Ocean with core airborne measurements extending from 5 June to 21 July 2014 and supporting ground-based measurements beginning in late May and extending beyond the airborne component. DEEPWAVE employed two aircraft, the NSF/NCAR GV and the German DLR Falcon. The GV carried the standard flight-level instruments, dropsondes, and the Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP). It also hosted new airborne lidar and imaging instruments built specifically to allow quantification of gravity waves (GWs) from sources at lower altitudes (e.g., orography, convection, jet streams, fronts, and secondary GW generation) throughout the stratosphere and into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). The new GV lidars included a Rayleigh lidar measuring atmospheric density and temperature from ~20-60 km and a sodium resonance lidar measuring sodium density and temperature at ~75-100 km. An airborne Advanced Mesosphere Temperature Mapper (AMTM) was also developed for the GV, and together with additional IR "wing" cameras, imaged the OH airglow temperature and/or intensity fields extending ~900 km across the GV flight track. The DLR Falcon was equipped with its standard flight-level instruments and an aerosol Doppler lidar able to measure radial winds below the Falcon where aerosol backscatter was sufficient. Additional ground-based instruments included a 449 MHz boundary layer radar, balloons at multiple sites, two ground-based Rayleigh lidars, a second ground-based AMTM, a Fabry Perot interferometer measuring winds and temperatures at ~87 and 95 km, and a meteor radar measuring winds from ~80-100 km. DEEPWAVE performed 26 GV flights, 13 Falcon flights, and an extensive series of ground-based measurements whether or not the aircraft were flying. Together, these observed many diverse cases of GW forcing, propagation, refraction, and dissipation

  18. Validation of Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Programs for Adults with Intellectual and/or Developmental Disorders (FallPAIDD: A Modified Otago Exercise Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindy Renfro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Evidence-based fall prevention (EBFP programs significantly decrease fall risk, falls, and fall-related injuries in community-dwelling older adults. To date, EBFP programs are only validated for use among people with normal cognition and, therefore, are not evidence-based for adults with intellectual and/or developmental disorders (IDD such as Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD, cerebral vascular accident (CVA, or traumatic brain injury (TBI. BACKGROUND: Adults with IDD experience not only a higher rate of falls than their community-dwelling, cognitively intact peers, but also higher rates and earlier onset of chronic diseases, also known to increase fall risk. Adults with IDD experience many barriers to healthcare and health promotion programs. As the lifespan for people with IDD continues to increase, issues of aging (including falls with associated injury are on the rise and require effective and efficient prevention. METHODS: A modified group-based version of the Otago Exercise Program (OEP was developed and implemented at a worksite employing adults with IDD in Montana. Participants were tested pre and post-intervention using the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC STopping Elderly Accidents Deaths and Injuries (STEADI tool kit. Participants participated in progressive once weekly, one-hour group exercise classes and home programs over a 7-week period. Discharge planning with consumers and caregivers included home exercise, walking, and an optional home assessment. RESULTS: Despite the limited number of participants (n=15 and short length of participation, improvements were observed in the 30-Second Chair Stand Test, 4-Stage Balance Test, and 2-Minute Walk Test. Additionally, three individuals experienced an improvement in ambulation independence. Participants reported no falls during the study period. DISCUSSION: Promising results of this preliminary project underline the need for further study

  19. Growth and inactivation of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes in broth and validation in ground pork meat during simulated home storage abusive temperature and home pan-frying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang eWang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ground pork meat with natural microbiota and inoculated with low initial densities (1-10 or 10-100 CFU/g of Salmonella enterica or Listeria monocytogenes was stored under abusive temperature at 10°C and thermally treated by a simulated home pan-frying procedure. The growth and inactivation characteristics were also evaluated in broth. In ground pork meat, the population of S. enterica increased by less than one log after 12-days of storage at 10°C, whereas L. monocytogenes increased by 2.3 to 2.8 log units. No unusual intrinsic heat resistance of the pathogens was noted when tested in broth at 60°C although shoulders were observed on the inactivation curves of L. monocytogenes. After growth of S. enterica and L. monocytogenes at 10°C for 5 days to levels of 1.95 log CFU/g and 3.10 log CFU/g, respectively, in ground pork meat, their inactivation in the burger subjected to a simulated home pan-frying was studied. After thermal treatment S. enterica was undetectable but L. monocytogenes was recovered in three out of six of the 25 g burger samples. Overall, the present study shows that data on growth and inactivation of broths are indicative but may underestimate as well as overestimate behavior of pathogens and thus need confirmation in food matrix conditions to assess food safety in reasonably foreseen abusive conditions of storage and usual home pan-frying of of meat burgers in Belgium.

  20. The potential surface in the ground electronic state of HCP with the isomerization process: the validity of calculating potential surface with DFT methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The density functional theory (DFT) provides us an effective way to calculate large cluster systems with moderate computational demands. We calculate potential energy surfaces (PES) with several different approaches of DFT. The PES in the ground electronic state are related to HCP's isomerization process. The calculated PES are compared with the “experimental” PES obtained by fitting from the experimental vibrational spectra and that given by the “accurate” quantum chemistry calculation with more expensive computations. The comparisons show that the potential surfaces calculated with DFT methods can reach the accuracy of less than 0.1 eV.

  1. Research program to develop and validate conceptual models for flow and transport through unsaturated, fractured rock; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, R.J.; Tidwell, V.C.

    1991-09-01

    As part of the Yucca Mountain Project, our research program to develop and validate conceptual models for flow and transport through unsaturated fractured rock integrates fundamental physical experimentation with conceptual model formulation and mathematical modeling. Our research is directed toward developing and validating macroscopic, continuum-based models and supporting effective property models because of their widespread utility within the context of this project. Success relative to the development and validation of effective property models is predicted on a firm understanding of the basic physics governing flow through fractured media, specifically in the areas of unsaturated flow and transport in a single fracture and fracture-matrix interaction.

  2. Grounded action: Achieving optimal and sustainable change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odis E. Simmons, Ph.D.

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Grounded action is the application and extension of grounded theory for the purpose of designing and implementing practical actions such as interventions, program designs, action models, social and organizational policies, and change initiatives. Grounded action is grounded theory with an added action component in which actions are systematically derived from a systematically derived explanatory grounded theory. Actions are grounded in the grounded theory in the same way that grounded theories are grounded in data. Grounded actionwas designed by the authors to address complex, multi-dimensionalorganizational and social problems and issues.

  3. Consistencies between New Teachers' Beliefs and Practices and Those Grounding Their Initial Teacher Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towers, Jo

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the experiences of beginning teachers as they navigated their first seven years in the profession. Drawing on data from a research study that charted these teachers' experiences during and after their initial teacher education program, I reveal that although the participants' teaching contexts varied considerably,…

  4. Cross-validation Methodology between Ground and GPM Satellite-based Radar Rainfall Product over Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) Metroplex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.; Chandrasekar, V.; Biswas, S.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past two decades, a large number of rainfall products have been developed based on satellite, radar, and/or rain gauge observations. However, to produce optimal rainfall estimation for a given region is still challenging due to the space time variability of rainfall at many scales and the spatial and temporal sampling difference of different rainfall instruments. In order to produce high-resolution rainfall products for urban flash flood applications and improve the weather sensing capability in urban environment, the center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA), in collaboration with National Weather Service (NWS) and North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG), has developed an urban radar remote sensing network in DFW Metroplex. DFW is the largest inland metropolitan area in the U.S., that experiences a wide range of natural weather hazards such as flash flood and hailstorms. The DFW urban remote sensing network, centered by the deployment of eight dual-polarization X-band radars and a NWS WSR-88DP radar, is expected to provide impacts-based warning and forecasts for benefit of the public safety and economy. High-resolution quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) is one of the major goals of the development of this urban test bed. In addition to ground radar-based rainfall estimation, satellite-based rainfall products for this area are also of interest for this study. Typical example is the rainfall rate product produced by the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) onboard Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory satellite. Therefore, cross-comparison between ground and space-based rainfall estimation is critical to building an optimal regional rainfall system, which can take advantages of the sampling differences of different sensors. This paper presents the real-time high-resolution QPE system developed for DFW urban radar network, which is based upon the combination of S-band WSR-88DP and X

  5. MAX-DOAS measurements in southern China: retrieval of aerosol extinctions and validation using ground-based in-situ data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Li

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We performed MAX-DOAS measurements during the PRiDe-PRD2006 campaign in the Pearl River Delta region 50 km north of Guangzhou, China, for 4 weeks in June 2006. We used an instrument sampling at 7 different elevation angles between 3° and 90°. During 9 cloud-free days, differential slant column densities (DSCDs of O4 (O2 dimer absorptions between 351 nm and 389 nm were evaluated for 6 elevation angles. Here, we show that radiative transfer modeling of the DSCDS can be used to retrieve the aerosol extinction and the height of the boundary layer. A comparison of the aerosol extinction with simultaneously recorded, ground based nephelometer data shows excellent agreement.

  6. Validation of middle-atmospheric campaign-based water vapour measured by the ground-based microwave radiometer MIAWARA-C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Tschanz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Middle atmospheric water vapour can be used as a tracer for dynamical processes. It is mainly measured by satellite instruments and ground-based microwave radiometers. Ground-based instruments capable of measuring middle-atmospheric water vapour are sparse but valuable as they complement satellite measurements, are relatively easy to maintain and have a long lifetime. MIAWARA-C is a ground-based microwave radiometer for middle-atmospheric water vapour designed for use on measurement campaigns for both atmospheric case studies and instrument intercomparisons. MIAWARA-C's retrieval version 1.1 (v1.1 is set up in a such way as to provide a consistent data set even if the instrument is operated from different locations on a campaign basis. The sensitive altitude range for v1.1 extends from 4 hPa (37 km to 0.017 hPa (75 km. For v1.1 the estimated systematic error is approximately 10% for all altitudes. At lower altitudes it is dominated by uncertainties in the calibration, with altitude the influence of spectroscopic and temperature uncertainties increases. The estimated random error increases with altitude from 5 to 25%. MIAWARA-C measures two polarisations of the incident radiation in separate receiver channels, and can therefore provide two measurements of the same air mass with independent instrumental noise. The standard deviation of the difference between the profiles obtained from the two polarisations is in excellent agreement with the estimated random measurement error of v1.1. In this paper, the quality of v1.1 data is assessed for measurements obtained at two different locations: (1 a total of 25 months of measurements in the Arctic (Sodankylä, 67.37° N, 26.63° E and (2 nine months of measurements at mid-latitudes (Zimmerwald, 46.88° N, 7.46° E. For both locations MIAWARA-C's profiles are compared to measurements from the satellite experiments Aura MLS and MIPAS. In addition, comparisons to ACE-FTS and SOFIE are presented for the

  7. The Effects of Management Initiatives on the Costs and Schedules of Defense Acquisition Programs. Volume 2. Analyses of Ground Combat and Ship Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    negotiate a sales agreement with Turkey, the missiles were ___ 1~2.~~____ _____ __ I handed over to a unit of the New Mexico National Guard, The unit was...87 End Date Sep-89 Sep-06 Sep-06 Qnanthy, N/A N/AN/ Program Status Development-Completed Prduction - -3 yas of data Note: N/A moans not applicable. d...Quantity 12 18 12 Cost $146.5 $337.2 $239.1 3 Total Program Cost $205.9 $443.0 $344.9 Average Unit Cost Prduction $12.2 $18,7 $13,3 Total Pmgrn $17.2 $24.6

  8. UCLA's Institute for Planets and Exoplanets: Structuring an Education and Public Outreach Program from the Ground Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curren, I. S.; Jewitt, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Geoscience education and public outreach efforts (EPO), both formal and informal, are critical to increasing science literacy amongst members of the public and securing the next generation of geoscientists. At UCLA, the Institute for Planets and Exoplanets (iPLEX) has developed a multifaceted program to administer meaningful and original hands-on education and outreach to the public, teachers/professors, and students. To build the program, we first developed a virtual "home base" using Wordpress. With the needs of our community in mind, we structured the website to serve three categories of individuals: the public, teachers/professors, and volunteers. To serve the public, we have developed a series of informal education events (e.g., Exploring Your Universe) that bring thousands of science enthusiasts to campus. For those unable to participate in hands-on demonstrations or for those who would like to see them again, informational videos were developed and made available on our online Physical Demonstrations Digital Library (PDDL). The PDDL contains a second set of videos that are tutorial in nature and specifically designed with teachers, TAs and professors in mind. In addition, we have produced a publicly available annual newsletter written at the level of the informed public that details exciting and current planetary research at UCLA. Another facet of the program, designed with teachers in mind is our application-based private outreach event system in which teachers may choose to have volunteers come to their school with interactive demos or to come to UCLA to speak with scientists and tour laboratories. The final branch of the iPLEX EPO and education program caters to volunteers and includes an online "hub" where volunteers can register for events, download demonstration information packets, and discuss tips with other volunteers. We have recently developed a "Science Education, Outreach, and Communication" course to be integrated into UCLA's undergraduate

  9. Houston, We Have A Problem: A History of Air-to-Ground Voice Transmissions from the U.S. Manned Space Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Glen E.

    2002-01-01

    America's manned civil space program unfolded before the public through a vast array of sights and sounds. Beginning with Alan Shepard's first flight into space and continuing through the early Space Shuttle Program, nearly every word spoken between Earth and astronaut was recorded, transcribed and published for the world to see. Engineers installed onboard tape recorders which, as part of their data-saving function, recorded astronaut intercom communications. Some of these recordings were made during critical phases of each flight when the preservation of all data was essential. These tapes along with hundreds of others that gathered on the ground from each mission became the focused attention of legions of typists whose single job was converting voice to paper. Armed with reel-to-reel tape players, electric typewriters and reams of paper, these folks hammered out thousands of pages of transcripts. The results are a permanent written record that reveal a different side to America's manned space program; one in which its astronauts are both professional and profane, calm and excited, confident and unsure, healthy and sick - in a word, "human."

  10. Grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Tina

    2015-04-29

    Grounded theory is a popular research approach in health care and the social sciences. This article provides a description of grounded theory methodology and its key components, using examples from published studies to demonstrate practical application. It aims to demystify grounded theory for novice nurse researchers, by explaining what it is, when to use it, why they would want to use it and how to use it. It should enable nurse researchers to decide if grounded theory is an appropriate approach for their research, and to determine the quality of any grounded theory research they read.

  11. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Upper Santa Ana Watershed Study Unit, November 2006-March 2007: Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Robert; Belitz, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 1,000-square-mile Upper Santa Ana Watershed study unit (USAW) was investigated from November 2006 through March 2007 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001, and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The Upper Santa Ana Watershed study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality within USAW, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 99 wells in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. Ninety of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells). Nine wells were selected to provide additional understanding of specific water-quality issues identified within the basin (understanding wells). The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], pesticides and pesticide degradates, pharmaceutical compounds, and potential wastewater-indicator compounds), constituents of special interest (perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA], 1,4-dioxane, and 1,2,3-trichloropropane [1,2,3-TCP]), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in water) and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify sources and ages of the sampled ground water. Dissolved gases, and isotopes of nitrogen gas and of dissolved nitrate also were measured in order to investigate the sources and occurrence of

  12. Predictive Validity of Grade Point Averages and of the Miller Analogies Test for Admission to a Doctoral Program in Educational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, I. Phillip

    2007-01-01

    This manuscript evaluates the predictive validity of several predictors used to delimit an initial applicant pool of doctoral candidates at the department/program level. Particular predictors addressed in this manuscript are measures of past academic performance and of future academic potential. Past academic performance is assessed by grade point…

  13. Is the Television Rating System Valid? Indirect, Verbal, and Physical Aggression in Programs Viewed by Fifth Grade Girls and Associations with Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Jennifer Ruh; Gentile, Douglas A.

    2009-01-01

    This study had two goals: first, to examine the validity of the television rating system for assessing aggression in programs popular among girls; second, to evaluate the importance of inclusion of non-physical forms of aggression in the ratings system by examining associations between television aggression exposure and behavior. Ninety-nine fifth…

  14. ¿Exito en California? A Validity Critique of Language Program Evaluations and Analysis of English Learner Test Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn S. Thompson

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Several states have recently faced ballot initiatives that propose to functionally eliminate bilingual education in favor of English-only approaches. Proponents of these initiatives have argued an overall rise in standardized achievement scores of California's limited English proficient (LEP students is largely due to the implementation of English immersion programs mandated by Proposition 227 in 1998, hence, they claim Exito en California (Success in California. However, many such arguments presented in the media were based on flawed summaries of these data. We first discuss the background, media coverage, and previous research associated with California's Proposition 227. We then present a series of validity concerns regarding use of Stanford-9 achievement data to address policy for educating LEP students; these concerns include the language of the test, alternative explanations, sample selection, and data analysis decisions. Finally, we present a comprehensive summary of scaled-score achievement means and trajectories for California's LEP and non-LEP students for 1998-2000. Our analyses indicate that although scores have risen overall, the achievement gap between LEP and EP students does not appear to be narrowing.

  15. Ground energy coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, P. D.

    The feasibility of ground coupling for various heat pump systems was investigated. Analytical heat flow models were developed to approximate design ground coupling devices for use in solar heat pump space conditioning systems. A digital computer program called GROCS (GRound Coupled Systems) was written to model 3-dimensional underground heat flow in order to simulate the behavior of ground coupling experiments and to provide performance predictions which have been compared to experimental results. GROCS also has been integrated with TRNSYS. Soil thermal property and ground coupling device experiments are described. Buried tanks, serpentine earth coils in various configurations, lengths and depths, and sealed vertical wells are being investigated. An earth coil used to heat a house without use of resistance heating is described.

  16. The Verification and Validation of the Ray-tracing of Bag of Triangles (BoTs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The Verification and Validation of the Ray-tracing of Bag of Triangles ( BoTs ) by Charith Ranawake ARL-CR-0761 February 2015...Ground, MD 22105 ARL-CR-0761 February 2015 The Verification and Validation of the Ray-tracing of Bag of Triangles ( BoTs ) Charith...and Validation of the Ray-tracing of Bag of Triangles ( BoTs ) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  17. Correlative 3D-imaging of Pipistrellus penis micromorphology: Validating quantitative microCT images with undecalcified serial ground section histomorphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdina, Anna Nele; Plenk, Hanns; Benda, Petr; Lina, Peter H C; Herzig-Straschil, Barbara; Hilgers, Helge; Metscher, Brian D

    2015-06-01

    Detailed knowledge of histomorphology is a prerequisite for the understanding of function, variation, and development. In bats, as in other mammals, penis and baculum morphology are important in species discrimination and phylogenetic studies. In this study, nondestructive 3D-microtomographic (microCT, µCT) images of bacula and iodine-stained penes of Pipistrellus pipistrellus were correlated with light microscopic images from undecalcified surface-stained ground sections of three of these penes of P. pipistrellus (1 juvenile). The results were then compared with µCT-images of bacula of P. pygmaeus, P. hanaki, and P. nathusii. The Y-shaped baculum in all studied Pipistrellus species has a proximal base with two club-shaped branches, a long slender shaft, and a forked distal tip. The branches contain a medullary cavity of variable size, which tapers into a central canal of variable length in the proximal baculum shaft. Both are surrounded by a lamellar and a woven bone layer and contain fatty marrow and blood vessels. The distal shaft consists of woven bone only, without a vascular canal. The proximal ends of the branches are connected with the tunica albuginea of the corpora cavernosa via entheses. In the penis shaft, the corpus spongiosum-surrounded urethra lies in a ventral grove of the corpora cavernosa, and continues in the glans under the baculum. The glans penis predominantly comprises an enlarged corpus spongiosum, which surrounds urethra and baculum. In the 12 studied juvenile and subadult P. pipistrellus specimens the proximal branches of the baculum were shorter and without marrow cavity, while shaft and distal tip appeared already fully developed. The present combination with light microscopic images from one species enabled a more reliable interpretation of histomorphological structures in the µCT-images from all four Pipistrellus species.

  18. Ground-Water Quality Data in the San Fernando-San Gabriel Study Unit, 2005 - Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Michael; Belitz, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 460 square mile San Fernando-San Gabriel study unit (SFSG) was investigated between May and July 2005 as part of the Priority Basin Assessment Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Assessment Project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The San Fernando-San Gabriel study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality within SFSG, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 52 wells in Los Angeles County. Thirty-five of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area (grid wells), and seventeen wells were selected to aid in the evaluation of specific water-quality issues or changes in water chemistry along a historic ground-water flow path (understanding wells). The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of synthetic organic constituents [volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides and pesticide degradates], constituents of special interest [perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), 1,2,3-trichloropropane (1,2,3-TCP), and 1,4-dioxane], naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, and carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon), and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the source and age of the sampled ground water. Quality-control samples (blanks, replicates, samples for matrix spikes) were collected at approximately one-fifth (11 of 52) of the wells, and the results for these

  19. Grounded cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsalou, Lawrence W

    2008-01-01

    Grounded cognition rejects traditional views that cognition is computation on amodal symbols in a modular system, independent of the brain's modal systems for perception, action, and introspection. Instead, grounded cognition proposes that modal simulations, bodily states, and situated action underlie cognition. Accumulating behavioral and neural evidence supporting this view is reviewed from research on perception, memory, knowledge, language, thought, social cognition, and development. Theories of grounded cognition are also reviewed, as are origins of the area and common misperceptions of it. Theoretical, empirical, and methodological issues are raised whose future treatment is likely to affect the growth and impact of grounded cognition.

  20. Human Factors Throughout the Life Cycle: Lessons Learned from the Shuttle Program. [Human Factors in Ground Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanki, Barbara G.

    2011-01-01

    With the ending of the Space Shuttle Program, it is critical that we not forget the Human Factors lessons we have learned over the years. At every phase of the life cycle, from manufacturing, processing and integrating vehicle and payload, to launch, flight operations, mission control and landing, hundreds of teams have worked together to achieve mission success in one of the most complex, high-risk socio-technical enterprises ever designed. Just as there was great diversity in the types of operations performed at every stage, there was a myriad of human factors that could further complicate these human systems. A single mishap or close call could point to issues at the individual level (perceptual or workload limitations, training, fatigue, human error susceptibilities), the task level (design of tools, procedures and aspects of the workplace), as well as the organizational level (appropriate resources, safety policies, information access and communication channels). While we have often had to learn through human mistakes and technological failures, we have also begun to understand how to design human systems in which individuals can excel, where tasks and procedures are not only safe but efficient, and how organizations can foster a proactive approach to managing risk and supporting human enterprises. Panelists will talk about their experiences as they relate human factors to a particular phase of the shuttle life cycle. They will conclude with a framework for tying together human factors lessons-learned into system-level risk management strategies.

  1. Development of an assessment tool to measure students′ perceptions of respiratory care education programs: Item generation, item reduction, and preliminary validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazi Alotaibi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Students who perceived their learning environment positively are more likely to develop effective learning strategies, and adopt a deep learning approach. Currently, there is no validated instrument for measuring the educational environment of educational programs on respiratory care (RC. The aim of this study was to develop an instrument to measure students′ perception of the RC educational environment. Materials and Methods: Based on the literature review and an assessment of content validity by multiple focus groups of RC educationalists, potential items of the instrument relevant to RC educational environment construct were generated by the research group. The initial 71 item questionnaire was then field-tested on all students from the 3 RC programs in Saudi Arabia and was subjected to multi-trait scaling analysis. Cronbach′s alpha was used to assess internal consistency reliabilities. Results: Two hundred and twelve students (100% completed the survey. The initial instrument of 71 items was reduced to 65 across 5 scales. Convergent and discriminant validity assessment demonstrated that the majority of items correlated more highly with their intended scale than a competing one. Cronbach′s alpha exceeded the standard criterion of >0.70 in all scales except one. There was no floor or ceiling effect for scale or overall score. Conclusions: This instrument is the first assessment tool developed to measure the RC educational environment. There was evidence of its good feasibility, validity, and reliability. This first validation of the instrument supports its use by RC students to evaluate educational environment.

  2. Development of a microbial model for the combined effect of temperature and pH on spoilage of ground meat, and validation of the model under dynamic temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsoumanis, K; Stamatiou, A; Skandamis, P; Nychas, G-J E

    2006-01-01

    The changes in microbial flora and sensory characteristics of fresh ground meat (beef and pork) with pH values ranging from 5.34 to 6.13 were monitored at different isothermal storage temperatures (0 to 20 degrees C) under aerobic conditions. At all conditions tested, pseudomonads were the predominant bacteria, followed by Brochothrix thermosphacta, while the other members of the microbial association (e.g., lactic acid bacteria and Enterobacteriaceae) remained at lower levels. The results from microbiological and sensory analysis showed that changes in pseudomonad populations followed closely sensory changes during storage and could be used as a good index for spoilage of aerobically stored ground meat. The kinetic parameters (maximum specific growth rate [mu(max)] and the duration of lag phase [lambda]) of the spoilage bacteria were modeled by using a modified Arrhenius equation for the combined effect of temperature and pH. Meat pH affected growth of all spoilage bacteria except that of lactic acid bacteria. The "adaptation work," characterized by the product of mu(max) and lambda(mu(max) x lambda) was found to be unaffected by temperature for all tested bacteria but was affected by pH for pseudomonads and B. thermosphacta. For the latter bacteria, a negative linear correlation between ln(mu(max) x lambda) and meat pH was observed. The developed models were further validated under dynamic temperature conditions using different fluctuating temperatures. Graphical comparison between predicted and observed growth and the examination of the relative errors of predictions showed that the model predicted satisfactorily growth under dynamic conditions. Predicted shelf life based on pseudomonads growth was slightly shorter than shelf life observed by sensory analysis with a mean difference of 13.1%. The present study provides a "ready-to-use," well-validated model for predicting spoilage of aerobically stored ground meat. The use of the model by the meat industry can

  3. DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics: Recommendations on the validation of software programs performing biostatistical calculations for forensic genetics applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coble, M D; Buckleton, J; Butler, J M; Egeland, T; Fimmers, R; Gill, P; Gusmão, L; Guttman, B; Krawczak, M; Morling, N; Parson, W; Pinto, N; Schneider, P M; Sherry, S T; Willuweit, S; Prinz, M

    2016-11-01

    The use of biostatistical software programs to assist in data interpretation and calculate likelihood ratios is essential to forensic geneticists and part of the daily case work flow for both kinship and DNA identification laboratories. Previous recommendations issued by the DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG) covered the application of bio-statistical evaluations for STR typing results in identification and kinship cases, and this is now being expanded to provide best practices regarding validation and verification of the software required for these calculations. With larger multiplexes, more complex mixtures, and increasing requests for extended family testing, laboratories are relying more than ever on specific software solutions and sufficient validation, training and extensive documentation are of upmost importance. Here, we present recommendations for the minimum requirements to validate bio-statistical software to be used in forensic genetics. We distinguish between developmental validation and the responsibilities of the software developer or provider, and the internal validation studies to be performed by the end user. Recommendations for the software provider address, for example, the documentation of the underlying models used by the software, validation data expectations, version control, implementation and training support, as well as continuity and user notifications. For the internal validations the recommendations include: creating a validation plan, requirements for the range of samples to be tested, Standard Operating Procedure development, and internal laboratory training and education. To ensure that all laboratories have access to a wide range of samples for validation and training purposes the ISFG DNA commission encourages collaborative studies and public repositories of STR typing results. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  4. Validation of S-NPP VIIRS Day-Night band and M bands performance using ground reference targets of Libya 4 and Dome C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuexia; Wu, Aisheng; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Lei, Ning; Wang, Zhipeng; Chiang, Kwofu

    2015-09-01

    This paper provides methodologies developed and implemented by the NASA VIIRS Calibration Support Team (VCST) to validate the S-NPP VIIRS Day-Night band (DNB) and M bands calibration performance. The Sensor Data Records produced by the Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS) and NASA Land Product Evaluation and Algorithm Testing Element (PEATE) are acquired nearly nadir overpass for Libya 4 desert and Dome C snow surfaces. In the past 3.5 years, the modulated relative spectral responses (RSR) change with time and lead to 3.8% increase on the DNB sensed solar irradiance and 0.1% or less increases on the M4-M7 bands. After excluding data before April 5th, 2013, IDPS DNB radiance and reflectance data are consistent with Land PEATE data with 0.6% or less difference for Libya 4 site and 2% or less difference for Dome C site. These difference are caused by inconsistent LUTs and algorithms used in calibration. In Libya 4 site, the SCIAMACHY spectral and modulated RSR derived top of atmosphere (TOA) reflectance are compared with Land PEATE TOA reflectance and they indicate a decrease of 1.2% and 1.3%, respectively. The radiance of Land PEATE DNB are compared with the simulated radiance from aggregated M bands (M4, M5, and M7). These data trends match well with 2% or less difference for Libya 4 site and 4% or less difference for Dome C. This study demonstrate the consistent quality of DNB and M bands calibration for Land PEATE products during operational period and for IDPS products after April 5th, 2013.

  5. Validation of S-NPP VIIRS Day-Night Band and M Bands Performance Using Ground Reference Targets of Libya 4 and Dome C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuexia; Wu, Aisheng; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Lei, Ning; Wang, Zhipeng; Chiang, Kwofu

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides methodologies developed and implemented by the NASA VIIRS Calibration Support Team (VCST) to validate the S-NPP VIIRS Day-Night band (DNB) and M bands calibration performance. The Sensor Data Records produced by the Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS) and NASA Land Product Evaluation and Algorithm Testing Element (PEATE) are acquired nearly nadir overpass for Libya 4 desert and Dome C snow surfaces. In the past 3.5 years, the modulated relative spectral responses (RSR) change with time and lead to 3.8% increase on the DNB sensed solar irradiance and 0.1% or less increases on the M4-M7 bands. After excluding data before April 5th, 2013, IDPS DNB radiance and reflectance data are consistent with Land PEATE data with 0.6% or less difference for Libya 4 site and 2% or less difference for Dome C site. These difference are caused by inconsistent LUTs and algorithms used in calibration. In Libya 4 site, the SCIAMACHY spectral and modulated RSR derived top of atmosphere (TOA) reflectance are compared with Land PEATE TOA reflectance and they indicate a decrease of 1.2% and 1.3%, respectively. The radiance of Land PEATE DNB are compared with the simulated radiance from aggregated M bands (M4, M5, and M7). These data trends match well with 2% or less difference for Libya 4 site and 4% or less difference for Dome C. This study demonstrate the consistent quality of DNB and M bands calibration for Land PEATE products during operational period and for IDPS products after April 5th, 2013.

  6. Technology-Based Orientation Programs to Support Indoor Travel by Persons with Moderate Alzheimer's Disease: Impact Assessment and Social Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Perilli, Viviana; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Bosco, Andrea; Caffo, Alessandro O.; Picucci, Luciana; Cassano, Germana; Groeneweg, Jop

    2013-01-01

    The present study (a) extended the assessment of an orientation program involving auditory cues (i.e., verbal messages automatically presented from the destinations) with five patients with Alzheimer's disease, (b) compared the effects of this program with those of a program with light cues (i.e., a program in which strobe lights were used instead…

  7. Technology-Based Orientation Programs to Support Indoor Travel by Persons with Moderate Alzheimer's Disease: Impact Assessment and Social Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Perilli, Viviana; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Bosco, Andrea; Caffo, Alessandro O.; Picucci, Luciana; Cassano, Germana; Groeneweg, Jop

    2013-01-01

    The present study (a) extended the assessment of an orientation program involving auditory cues (i.e., verbal messages automatically presented from the destinations) with five patients with Alzheimer's disease, (b) compared the effects of this program with those of a program with light cues (i.e., a program in which strobe lights were used instead…

  8. NASA's Orbital Debris Optical and IR Ground-based Observing Program: Utilizing the MCAT, UKIRT, and Magellan Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, S.; Cowardin, H.; Buckalew, B.; Frith, J.; Hickson, P.; Pace, L.; Matney, M.; Anz-Meador, P.; Seitzer, P.; Stansbery, E.; Glesne, T.

    2016-09-01

    Characterizing debris in Earth-orbit has become increasingly important as the growing population of debris poses greater threats to active satellites each year. Currently, the Joint Space Operations is tracking > 23,000 objects ranging in size from 1-meter and larger in Geosychronous orbits (GEO) to 10-cm and larger at low-Earth orbits (LEO). Model estimates suggest that there are hundreds of thousands of pieces of spacecraft debris larger than 10 cm currently in orbit around the Earth. With such a small fraction of the total population being tracked, and new break-ups occurring from LEO to GEO, new assets, techniques, and approaches for characterizing this debris are needed. With this in mind, NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office has actively tasked a suite of telescopes around the world. In 2015, the newly-built 1.3m optical Meter Class Autonomous Telescope (MCAT) came on-line on Ascension Island and is now being commissioned. MCAT is designed to track Earth-orbiting objects above 200km, conduct surveys at GEO, and work with a co-located Raven-class commercial-off-the-shelf system, a 0.4m telescope with a field-of-view similar to MCAT's and research-grade instrumentation designed to complement MCAT. The 3.8m infrared UKIRT telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii has been heavily tasked to collect data on individual targets and in survey modes to study both the general GEO population and a break-up event. Data collected include photometry and spectroscopy in the near-Infrared (0.85 - 2.5μm) and the mid-infrared (8-16μm). Finally, the 6.5-m Baade Magellan telescope at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile was used to collect optical photometric survey data in October 2015 of two GEO Titan transtage breakups, focusing on locations of possible debris concentrations as indicated by the NASA standard break-up model.

  9. Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs: Announcement of the Implementation and Extension of Temporary Moratoria on Enrollment of Part B Non-Emergency Ground Ambulance Suppliers and Home Health Agencies in Designated Geographic Locations and Lifting of the Temporary Moratoria on Enrollment of Part B Emergency Ground Ambulance Suppliers in All Geographic Locations. Extension, implementation, and lifting of temporary moratoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-03

    This document announces the extension of temporary moratoria on the enrollment of new Medicare Part B non-emergency ground ambulance suppliers and Medicare home health agencies (HHAs), subunits, and branch locations in specific locations within designated metropolitan areas in Florida, Illinois, Michigan, Texas, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey to prevent and combat fraud, waste, and abuse. It also announces the implementation of temporary moratoria on the enrollment of new Medicare Part B non-emergency ground ambulance suppliers and Medicare HHAs, subunits, and branch locations in Florida, Illinois, Michigan, Texas, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey on a statewide basis. In addition, it announces the lifting of the moratoria on all Part B emergency ground ambulance suppliers. These moratoria, and the changes described in this document, also apply to the enrollment of HHAs and non-emergency ground ambulance suppliers in Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program.

  10. Multidisciplinary Studies of the Fate and Transport of Contaminants in Ground Water at the U.S. Geological Survey Cape Cod Toxic Substances Hydrology Program Research Site, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, D. R.; Smith, R. L.; Kent, D. B.; Barber, L. B.; Harvey, R. W.

    2008-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducts multidisciplinary research on the physical, chemical, and microbiological processes affecting ground-water contaminants of global concern at its Cape Cod Toxic Substances Hydrology Program site in Massachusetts, USA. The work centers on a 6-kilometer-long plume of treated wastewater in a glacial sand and gravel aquifer. The plume is characterized by distinct geochemical zones caused by the biodegradation of organic materials in treated wastewater that was disposed to the aquifer by rapid infiltration during the period 1936-95. A core group of hydrogeologists, geochemists, microbiologists, and geophysicists has been involved in the research effort for more than two decades. The effort has been enhanced by stable funding, a readily accessible site, a relatively simple hydrologic setting, and logistical support from an adjacent military base. The research team uses a three-part approach to plan and conduct research at the site. First, detailed spatial and temporal monitoring of the plume since the late 1970s provides field evidence of important contaminant-transport processes and provides the basis for multidisciplinary, process-oriented studies. Second, ground-water tracer experiments are conducted in various geochemical zones in the plume to study factors that control the rate and extent of contaminant transport. Several arrays of multilevel sampling devices, including an array with more than 15,000 individual sampling points, are used to conduct these experiments. Plume-scale (kilometers) and tracer-test-scale (1- 100 meters) studies are complemented by laboratory experiments and mathematical modeling of flow and reactive transport. Third, results are applied to the treated-wastewater plume, other contaminant plumes at the military base, and other sites nationally to evaluate the applicability of the findings and to point toward further research. Examples of findings to date include that (1) macrodispersivity can be related to

  11. The OECD validation program of the H295R steroidogenesis assay for the identification of in vitro inhibitors and inducers of testosterone and estradiol production. Phase 2: Inter-laboratory pre-validation studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecker, Markus; Hollert, Henner; Cooper, Ralph

    2007-01-01

    related to one laboratory there were unexplained minor uncertainties related to the inter-laboratory hormone production variation. Based on the findings from this Phase 2 prevalidation study, the H295R Steroidogenesis Assay protocol is currently being refined. The next phase of the OECD validation program...... their potential to interact with the endocrine system of vertebrates. Study Design. Six laboratories from five countries participated in the pre-validation studies. Each laboratory tested the effects of three model chemicals on the production of testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2) using the H295R Steroidogenesis...... Assay. Chemicals tested were well described inducers or inhibitors of steroidogenic pathways (forskolin, prochloraz and fadrozole). All experiments were conducted in 24 well plates following standard protocols. Six different doses per compound were analyzed in triplicate per plate. A quality control (QQ...

  12. Grounding Anger Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odis E. Simmons, PhD

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the things that drew me to grounded theory from the beginning was Glaser and Strauss’ assertion in The Discovery of Grounded Theory that it was useful as a “theoretical foothold” for practical applications (p. 268. From this, when I was a Ph.D student studying under Glaser and Strauss in the early 1970s, I devised a GT based approach to action I later came to call “grounded action.” In this short paper I’ll present a very brief sketch of an anger management program I developed in 1992, using grounded action. I began my research by attending a two-day anger management training workshop designed for training professionals in the most commonly used anger management model. Like other intervention programs I had seen, this model took a psychologizing and pathologizing approach to the issue. Following this, I sat through the full course of an anger management program that used this model, observing the reactions of the participants and the approach of the facilitator. Following each session I conducted open-ended interviews with most of the participants, either individually or in groups of two or three. I had also done previous research in counseling and social work contexts that turned out to be very relevant to an anger management program design.

  13. The Integrated Oncology Program of the Italian Ministry of Health. Analytical and clinical validation of new biomarkers for early diagnosis: network, resources, methodology, quality control, and data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, Angelo; Mangia, Anita; Orlando, Claudio; Verderio, Paolo; Belfiglio, Maurizio; Marchetti, Antonio; Bertario, Lucio; Chiappetta, Gennaro; Gion, Massimo; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Podo, Franca; Vocaturo, Amina; Silvestrini, Rosella; Romani, Massimo; Belloni, Elena; Cavallo, Delia; Ulivi, Paola; Tommasi, Stefania; Steffan, Agostino; Russo, Antonio; Alessio, Massimo; Calistri, Daniele; Zancan, Matelda; Parrela, Paola; Broggini, Massimo; Giuseppe, Antonio; Buttitta, Fiamma; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Mazzocco, Katia; Veronesi, Giulia; Landuzzi, Lorena; Benevolo, Maria; Mariani, Luciano; De Marco, Federico; Venuti, Aldo; Giannelli, Gianluigi; Quaranta, Michele; Trojano, Vito

    2009-01-01

    In 2007, an Italian cancer research group proposed a specific concerted action aimed at the "analytical and clinica validation of new biomarkers for early diagnosis: Network, resources, methodology, quality control, and data analysis." The proposal united 37 national operative units involved in different biomarker studies and it created a strong coordinative body with the necessary expertise in methodologies, statistical analysis, quality control, and biological resources to perform ad hoc validation studies for new biomarkers of early cancer diagnosis. The action, financed by the Italian Ministry of Health within the Integrated Oncology Program (PIO) coordinated by NCI-Istituto Tumori Bari, started in 2007 and activated 7 projects, each of which focused on disease-specific biomarker studies. Overall, the 37 participating units proposed studies on 50 biomarkers, including analytical and clinical validation procedures. Clusters of units were specifically involved in research of early-detection biomarkers for cancers of the lung, digestive tract, prostate/bladder, and nervous system, as well as female cancers. Furthermore, a cluster involved in biomarkers for bioimaging and infection-related cancers was created. The first investigators' meeting, "Analytical and clinical validation of new biomarkers for early diagnosis," was held on 9 September 2008 in Bari. During this meeting, methodological aspects, scientific programs and preliminary results were presented and discussed.

  14. Ground-based Magnetometer Array Science for IHY: Opportunities for an Array in Africa within the UNBSS Developing Nations Small Instrument Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, I. R.; Milling, D. K.; Moldwin, M.; Yizengaw, E.

    2005-12-01

    Arrays of ground-based magnetometers provide the capability for the meso- and global-scale monitoring of current systems and waves in the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere system. Recent advances in the processing of multiple time series magnetometer array data allows the inversion of standing Alfven eigenfrequencies for the purposes of monitoring density depletion and refilling dynamics in the plasmasphere, plasmapause and plasmatrough regions. In addition, mid-latitude magnetometer arrays can also allow the monitoring of the ULF waves which are implicated in the transport and acceleration of MeV energy electrons in the radiation belts, as well as monitoring the penetration of asymmetric ring current and substorm current systems to mid- and low-latitudes during storms. Fluxgate magnetometer technology is relatively inexpensive, and the data sets are small allowing relatively easy collection of data through the low-band-width internet connections. However, the accumulation of magnetometer data into nation-, continental- and global-scale array coverage provides a powerful tool for pursuing IHY science objectives. We present examples of how these concepts might be exploited through the UN Developing Nations Small Instrument program with the creation, coordination and operation of an IHY Magnetometer Array (IHYMag). The IHY science focus on storms also ensures that mid-latitude and even equatorial developing nations coverage would ensure IHYMag data is a valuable resource for IHY scientists. African locations offer a prime opportunity to expand the global magnetometer coverage into this region during IHY. Technology being developed for instrument development and data collection for the CARISMA formerly CANOPUS) magnetometer array expansion, including planned use of solar and/or wind turbine power at the remote BACK magnetometer site in the CARISMA array, might also form a basis for the hardware development which could be used to support a Developing Nations Small

  15. Ground Wars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Kleis

    Political campaigns today are won or lost in the so-called ground war--the strategic deployment of teams of staffers, volunteers, and paid part-timers who work the phones and canvass block by block, house by house, voter by voter. Ground Wars provides an in-depth ethnographic portrait of two...... infrastructures that utilize large databases with detailed individual-level information for targeting voters, and armies of dedicated volunteers and paid part-timers. Nielsen challenges the notion that political communication in America must be tightly scripted, controlled, and conducted by a select coterie...... of professionals. Yet he also quashes the romantic idea that canvassing is a purer form of grassroots politics. In today's political ground wars, Nielsen demonstrates, even the most ordinary-seeming volunteer knocking at your door is backed up by high-tech targeting technologies and party expertise. Ground Wars...

  16. Development, validation, and utility of an instrument to assess core competencies in the Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND) program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, Stephen S; Baum, Katherine T; Bevans, Katherine B; Blum, Nathan J

    2015-02-01

    To describe the development and psychometric evaluation of the Core Competency Measure (CCM), an instrument designed to assess professional competencies as defined by the Maternal Child Health Bureau (MCHB) and targeted by Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND) programs. The CCM is a 44-item self-report measure comprised of six subscales to assess clinical, interdisciplinary, family-centered/cultural, community, research, and advocacy/policy competencies. The CCM was developed in an iterative fashion through participatory action research, and then nine cohorts of LEND trainees (N = 144) from 14 different disciplines completed the CCM during the first week of the training program. A 6-factor confirmatory factor analysis model was fit to data from the 44 original items. After three items were removed, the model adequately fit the data (comparative fit indices = .93, root mean error of approximation = .06) with all factor loadings exceeding .55. The measure was determined to be quite reliable as adequate internal consistency and test-retest reliability were found for each subscale. The instrument's construct validity was supported by expected differences in self-rated competencies among fellows representing various disciplines, and the convergent validity was supported by the pattern of inter-correlations between subscale scores. The CCM appears to be a reliable and valid measure of MCHB core competencies for our sample of LEND trainees. It provides an assessment of key training areas addressed by the LEND program. Although the measure was developed within only one LEND Program, with additional research it has the potential to serve as a standardized tool to evaluate the strengths and limitations of MCHB training, both within and between programs.

  17. Hydrogeologic setting, ground-water flow, and ground-water quality at the Lake Wheeler Road research station, 2001-03 : North Carolina Piedmont and Mountains Resource Evaluation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Melinda J.; Bolich, Richard E.; Huffman, Brad A.

    2005-01-01

    Results of a 2-year field study of the regolith-fractured bedrock ground-water system at the Lake Wheeler Road research station in Wake County, North Carolina, indicate both disconnection and interaction among components of the ground-water system. The three components of the ground-water system include (1) shallow, porous regolith; (2) a transition zone, including partially weathered rock, having both secondary (fractures) and primary porosity; and (3) deeper, fractured bedrock that has little, if any, primary porosity and is dominated by secondary fractures. The research station includes 15 wells (including a well transect from topographic high to low settings) completed in the three major components of the ground-water-flow system and a surface-water gaging station on an unnamed tributary. The Lake Wheeler Road research station is considered representative of a felsic gneiss hydrogeologic unit having steeply dipping foliation and a relatively thick overlying regolith. Bedrock foliation generally strikes N. 10? E. to N. 30? E. and N. 20? W. to N. 40? W. to a depth of about 400 feet and dips between 70? and 80? SE. and NE., respectively. From 400 to 600 feet, the foliation generally strikes N. 70? E. to N. 80? E., dipping 70? to 80? SE. Depth to bedrock locally ranges from about 67 to 77 feet below land surface. Fractures in the bedrock generally occur in two primary sets: low dip angle, stress relief fractures that cross cut foliation, and steeply dipping fractures parallel to foliation. Findings of this study generally support the conceptual models of ground-water flow from high to low topographic settings developed for the Piedmont and Blue Ridge Provinces in previous investigations, but are considered a refinement of the generalized conceptual model based on a detailed local-scale investigation. Ground water flows toward a surface-water boundary, and hydraulic gradients generally are downward in recharge areas and upward in discharge areas; however, local

  18. Development, validation, and application of a novel LC-MS/MS trace analysis method for the simultaneous quantification of seven iodinated X-ray contrast media and three artificial sweeteners in surface, ground, and drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ens, Waldemar; Senner, Frank; Gygax, Benjamin; Schlotterbeck, Götz

    2014-05-01

    A new method for the simultaneous determination of iodated X-ray contrast media (ICM) and artificial sweeteners (AS) by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) operated in positive and negative ionization switching mode was developed. The method was validated for surface, ground, and drinking water samples. In order to gain higher sensitivities, a 10-fold sample enrichment step using a Genevac EZ-2 plus centrifugal vacuum evaporator that provided excellent recoveries (90 ± 6 %) was selected for sample preparation. Limits of quantification below 10 ng/L were obtained for all compounds. Furthermore, sample preparation recoveries and matrix effects were investigated thoroughly for all matrix types. Considerable matrix effects were observed in surface water and could be compensated by the use of four stable isotope-labeled internal standards. Due to their persistence, fractions of diatrizoic acid, iopamidol, and acesulfame could pass the whole drinking water production process and were observed also in drinking water. To monitor the fate and occurrence of these compounds, the validated method was applied to samples from different stages of the drinking water production process of the Industrial Works of Basel (IWB). Diatrizoic acid was found as the most persistent compound which was eliminated by just 40 % during the whole drinking water treatment process, followed by iopamidol (80 % elimination) and acesulfame (85 % elimination). All other compounds were completely restrained and/or degraded by the soil and thus were not detected in groundwater. Additionally, a direct injection method without sample preparation achieving 3-20 ng/L limits of quantification was compared to the developed method.

  19. Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs: Announcement of the Extension of Temporary Moratoria on Enrollment of Part B Non-Emergency Ground Ambulance Suppliers and Home Health Agencies in Designated Geographic Locations. Extension of temporary moratoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-28

    This document announces the extension of statewide temporary moratoria on the enrollment of new Medicare Part B non-emergency ground ambulance providers and suppliers and Medicare home health agencies, subunits, and branch locations in Florida, Illinois, Michigan, Texas, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey, as applicable, to prevent and combat fraud, waste, and abuse. This extension also applies to the enrollment of new non-emergency ground ambulance suppliers and home health agencies, subunits, and branch locations in Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program in those states.

  20. Ground Validation GPS for American Samoa

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project is a cooperative effort among the National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment; the...

  1. Cross-cultural adaptation of an adolescent HIV prevention program: social validation of social contexts and behavior among Botswana adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Lawrence, Janet S; Seloilwe, Esther; Magowe, Mabel; Dithole, Kefalotse; Kgosikwena, Billy; Kokoro, Elija; Lesaane, Dipuo

    2013-08-01

    An evidence-based HIV prevention intervention was adapted for Botswana youth with qualitative interviews, input from an adolescent panel, and social validation. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 40 boys and girls ages 13-19. An adolescent panel then drafted scenarios reflecting social situations described in the interviews that posed risk for HIV. A social validation sample (N = 65) then indicated the prevalence and difficulty of each situation. Youth described informational needs, pressures to use alcohol and drugs, peer pressure for unprotected sex, and intergenerational sex initiations as risk-priming situations. From 17% to 57% of the social validation sample had personally experienced the situations drafted by the adolescent panel. There were no differences in the ratings of boys versus girls, but youth over age 16 more often reported that they had experienced these risky situations. The results were embedded into the intervention. Major changes to the intervention resulted from this three-phase process.

  2. Wind-induced ground motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderyan, Vahid; Hickey, Craig J.; Raspet, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Wind noise is a problem in seismic surveys and can mask the seismic signals at low frequency. This research investigates ground motions caused by wind pressure and shear stress perturbations on the ground surface. A prediction of the ground displacement spectra using the measured ground properties and predicted pressure and shear stress at the ground surface is developed. Field measurements are conducted at a site having a flat terrain and low ambient seismic noise. Triaxial geophones are deployed at different depths to study the wind-induced ground vibrations as a function of depth and wind velocity. Comparison of the predicted to the measured wind-induced ground displacement spectra shows good agreement for the vertical component but significant underprediction for the horizontal components. To validate the theoretical model, a test experiment is designed to exert controlled normal pressure and shear stress on the ground using a vertical and a horizontal mass-spring apparatus. This experiment verifies the linear elastic rheology and the quasi-static displacements assumptions of the model. The results indicate that the existing surface shear stress models significantly underestimate the wind shear stress at the ground surface and the amplitude of the fluctuation shear stress must be of the same order of magnitude as the normal pressure. Measurement results show that mounting the geophones flush with the ground provides a significant reduction in wind noise on all three components of the geophone. Further reduction in wind noise with depth of burial is small for depths up to 40 cm.

  3. An Assessment of the Social Validity of Cooperative Learning and Conflict Resolution Programs in an Alternative Inner City High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattri, Nidhi

    A study was done to evaluate the social validity of the interventions of conflict resolution and cooperative learning at three campuses of an alternative inner-city high school in New York City. The evaluation explored students' and teachers' perceptions of the effectiveness and applicability of the interventions in their lives. Extensive…

  4. Using business plan development as a capstone project for MPH programs in Canada: validation through the student perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Andrew; Britten, Nicole; Hatcher, Meghan; Rainville, Keira

    2013-10-01

    Master of Public Health (MPH) programs have been developed across Canada as a response to the need for adequately trained individuals to work in the public health sector. Educational institutions that deliver MPH programs have a responsibility to ensure that graduates of their program have the essential knowledge, skills and attitudes to begin a successful career in public health. The Public Health Agency of Canada has created the core competencies for public health to guide the development, delivery and evaluation of MPH programs. In Canada, a capstone project is the recommended method of evaluating the MPH graduate's ability to demonstrate proficiency in the public health core competencies. A business plan that develops the framework for a public health program is an ideal capstone project currently used in practice within the University of Guelph MPH program. This group assignment incorporates all 36 of the public health core competencies while providing students with a real-world public health experience, and should be considered for inclusion within MPH programs across Canada. Business planning provides students the opportunity to engage in practice-based learning, applying theoretical knowledge to practice. Further, the ability to develop realistic but financially feasible public health problems is an invaluable skill for MPH graduates. As the development of programs becomes more restricted and the continuation of other programs are under constant threat, the ability to develop a sound business plan is a required skill for individuals entering the public health sector, and will ensure students are able to maximize outcomes given tight fiscal budgets and limited resources.

  5. Application of A Global-To-Beam Irradiance Model to the Satellite-Based NASA GEWEX SRB Data and Validation of the Results against the Ground-Based BSRN Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T.; Stackhouse, P. W., Jr.; Chandler, W.; Hoell, J. M.; Westberg, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA/GEWEX SRB (Surface Radiation Budget) project has produced a 24.5-year continuous global record of shortwave and longwave radiation flux dataset at TOA and the Earth's surface from satellite measurements. The time span of the data is from July 1983 to December 2007, and the spatial resolution is 1 degree latitude by 1 degree longitude. SRB products are available on 3-hourly, 3-hourly-monthly, daily and monthly time scales. The inputs to the models include: 1.) Cloud parameters derived from pixel-level DX product of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP); 2.) Temperature and moisture profiles of the atmosphere generated with the Goddard Earth Observing System model Version 4.0.3 (GEOS-4.0.3) from a 4-D data assimilation product of the Data Assimilation Office at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; 3.) Atmospheric column ozone record constructed from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) aboard Nimbus-7 (July 1983 - November 1994), from the Operational Vertical Sounder aboard the Television Infrared Observation Satellite (TIROS, TOVS) (December 1994 - October 1995), from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), and from Stratospheric Monitoring Ozone Blended Analysis (SMOBA) products; 4.) Surface albedos based on monthly climatological clear-sky albedos at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) which in turn were derived from the NASA Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) data during 2000-2005; 5.) Surface emissivities from a map developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The SRB global irradiances have been extensively validated against the ground-based BSRN (Baseline Surface Radiation Network), GEBA (Global Energy Balance Archive), and WRDC (World Radiation Data Centre) data, and generally good agreement is achieved. In this paper, we apply the DirIndex model, a modified version of the DirInt model, to the SRB 3-hourly global irradiances and derive the 3-hourly beam, or direct normal, irradiances. Daily and monthly mean direct

  6. Development and Validation of Written Exam Items for the Agricultural Hazardous Occupations Orders (AgHOs) Certification Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, A J; Field, W E; Tormoehlen, R; French, B F

    2016-04-01

    Research was conducted to develop and validate a pool of exam items that can be used to test the readiness of youth, ages 14-15 years, to be certified under the current federally mandated Agricultural Hazardous Occupations Orders (AgHOs). The AgHOs require training prior to employment in agricultural workplaces that the Secretary of Labor has determined are especially hazardous for youth within the prescribed age range. Under the current provisions of the AgHOs certification process, non-exempt youth seeking employment in agriculture are required to pass a written exam concentrating on safe work practices as partial satisfaction to receive certification of eligibility for employment to perform certain tasks. However, the regulations provide little guidance concerning the format of the exam, subject matter to be covered, degree of difficulty, or minimum passing score. As part of the USDA-sponsored Hazardous Occupations Safety Training in Agriculture (HOSTA) initiative, efforts have been made to develop consistent and evidence-based testing methods for disseminating the test protocols to instructors. The goal was to expand, enhance, and maintain the reliability of the exam item pool for the AgHOs certification process. Item development was based on the HOSTA-supported Gearing Up for Safety: Production Agriculture Safety Training for Youth curriculum. To ensure adequate item availability, the current item pool was expanded to include a minimum of two test items for each of the 157 cognitive-based core competencies developed as part of the Gearing Up curriculum design process. Administering 70-item exams that were generated from the item pool to 568 youth, ages 13-18 years, provided evidence of item validity. The result was a pool of 367 validated exam items.

  7. Systems analysis programs for Hands-on integrated reliability evaluations (SAPHIRE) Version 5.0: Verification and validation (V&V) manual. Volume 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.L.; Calley, M.B.; Capps, E.L.; Zeigler, S.L.; Galyean, W.J.; Novack, S.D.; Smith, C.L.; Wolfram, L.M. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-03-01

    A verification and validation (V&V) process has been performed for the System Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluation (SAPHIRE) Version 5.0. SAPHIRE is a set of four computer programs that NRC developed for performing probabilistic risk assessments. They allow an analyst to perform many of the functions necessary to create, quantify, and evaluate the risk associated with a facility or process being analyzed. The programs are Integrated Reliability and Risk Analysis System (IRRAS) System Analysis and Risk Assessment (SARA), Models And Results Database (MAR-D), and Fault tree, Event tree, and Piping and instrumentation diagram (FEP) graphical editor. Intent of this program is to perform a V&V of successive versions of SAPHIRE. Previous efforts have been the V&V of SAPHIRE Version 4.0. The SAPHIRE 5.0 V&V plan is based on the SAPHIRE 4.0 V&V plan with revisions to incorporate lessons learned from the previous effort. Also, the SAPHIRE 5.0 vital and nonvital test procedures are based on the test procedures from SAPHIRE 4.0 with revisions to include the new SAPHIRE 5.0 features as well as to incorporate lessons learned from the previous effort. Most results from the testing were acceptable; however, some discrepancies between expected code operation and actual code operation were identified. Modifications made to SAPHIRE are identified.

  8. EURISOL-DS Multi-MW Target: Experimental program associated to validation of CFD simulations of the mercury loop

    CERN Document Server

    Blumenfeld, Laure; Kadi, Yacine; Samec, Karel; Lindroos, Mats

    At the core of the Eurisol project facility, the neutron source produces spallation neutrons from a proton beam impacting dense liquid. The liquid circulates at high speed inside the source, a closed vessel with beam windows.This technical note summarises the needed of the hydraulic METEX 1 and METEX 2 data tests to contribute to validate CFD turbulent simulation of liquid metal with the LES model and FEM structural model as well as a-dimensional analysis of Laser Dopplet Velocimetry for cavitation measurements.

  9. Process evaluation to explore internal and external validity of the "Act in Case of Depression" care program in nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leontjevas, R.; Gerritsen, D.L.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Smalbrugge, M.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A multidisciplinary, evidence-based care program to improve the management of depression in nursing home residents was implemented and tested using a stepped-wedge design in 23 nursing homes (NHs): "Act in case of Depression" (AiD). OBJECTIVE: Before effect analyses, to evaluate AiD proc

  10. Validity of a practitioner-administered observational tool to measure physical activity, nutrition, and screen time in school-age programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Rebekka M; Emmons, Karen M; Okechukwu, Cassandra A; Barrett, Jessica L; Kenney, Erica L; Cradock, Angie L; Giles, Catherine M; deBlois, Madeleine E; Gortmaker, Steven L

    2014-11-28

    Nutrition and physical activity interventions have been effective in creating environmental changes in afterschool programs. However, accurate assessment can be time-consuming and expensive as initiatives are scaled up for optimal population impact. This study aims to determine the criterion validity of a simple, low-cost, practitioner-administered observational measure of afterschool physical activity, nutrition, and screen time practices and child behaviors. Directors from 35 programs in three cities completed the Out-of-School Nutrition and Physical Activity Observational Practice Assessment Tool (OSNAP-OPAT) on five days. Trained observers recorded snacks served and obtained accelerometer data each day during the same week. Observations of physical activity participation and snack consumption were conducted on two days. Correlations were calculated to validate weekly average estimates from OSNAP-OPAT compared to criterion measures. Weekly criterion averages are based on 175 meals served, snack consumption of 528 children, and physical activity levels of 356 children. OSNAP-OPAT validly assessed serving water (r = 0.73), fruits and vegetables (r = 0.84), juice >4oz (r = 0.56), and grains (r = 0.60) at snack; sugary drinks (r = 0.70) and foods (r = 0.68) from outside the program; and children's water consumption (r = 0.56) (all p activity time offered were correlated with accelerometer estimates (minutes of moderate and vigorous physical activity r = 0.59, p = 0.02; vigorous physical activity r = 0.63, p = 0.01). The reported proportion of children participating in moderate and vigorous physical activity was correlated with observations (r = 0.48, p = 0.03), as were reports of computer (r = 0.85) and TV/movie (r = 0.68) time compared to direct observations (both p activity environments and behaviors in afterschool settings. Phase 1 of this measure validation was conducted during a study registered at

  11. Ground water in Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, A.R.

    1960-01-01

    One of the first requisites for the intelligent planning of utilization and control of water and for the administration of laws relating to its use is data on the quantity, quality, and mode of occurrence of the available supplies. The collection, evaluation and interpretation, and publication of such data are among the primary functions of the U.S. Geological Survey. Since 1895 the Congress has made appropriations to the Survey for investigation of the water resources of the Nation. In 1929 the Congress adopted the policy of dollar-for-dollar cooperation with the States and local governmental agencies in water-resources investigations of the U.S. Geological Survey. In 1937 a program of ground-water investigations was started in cooperation with the Oklahoma Geological Survey, and in 1949 this program was expanded to include cooperation with the Oklahoma Planning and Resources Board. In 1957 the State Legislature created the Oklahoma Water Resources Board as the principal State water agency and it became the principal local cooperator. The Ground Water Branch of the U.S. Geological Survey collects, analyzes, and evaluates basic information on ground-water resources and prepares interpretive reports based on those data. Cooperative ground-water work was first concentrated in the Panhandle counties. During World War II most work was related to problems of water supply for defense requirements. Since 1945 detailed investigations of ground-water availability have been made in 11 areas, chiefly in the western and central parts of the State. In addition, water levels in more than 300 wells are measured periodically, principally in the western half of the State. In Oklahoma current studies are directed toward determining the source, occurrence, and availability of ground water and toward estimating the quantity of water and rate of replenishment to specific areas and water-bearing formations. Ground water plays an important role in the economy of the State. It is

  12. 'Grounded' Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Garbi

    2012-01-01

    play within one particular neighbourhood: Nørrebro in the Danish capital, Copenhagen. The article introduces the concept of grounded politics to analyse how groups of Muslim immigrants in Nørrebro use the space, relationships and history of the neighbourhood for identity political statements....... The article further describes how national political debates over the Muslim presence in Denmark affect identity political manifestations within Nørrebro. By using Duncan Bell’s concept of mythscape (Bell, 2003), the article shows how some political actors idealize Nørrebro’s past to contest the present...

  13. A Validity Study on the Air Force Institute of Technology Student Selection Criteria for Resident Master’s Degree Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    these findings, the ETS stresses that it is still important to, "establish the relationship between GMAT scores and performance in your graduate...Multiple regression models developed for graduate degree programs differ in actual nredictor sets. 3. GRE scores, GMAT scores, and undergraduate GPA...Service, 1982b). GMTV. This variable is a subject’s scaled score on the verbal portion of the GMAT . It’s range is from 0 to 60 with scores below 10 and

  14. A program to generate simulated radioxenon beta–gamma data for concentration verification and validation and training exercises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntyre, Justin I.; Schrom, Brian T.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Prinke, Amanda M.; Suckow, Thomas J.; Ringbom, Anders; Warren, Glen A.

    2016-03-08

    Abstract Several hundred simulated radioxenon beta-gamma data files were developed to assist in evaluating the performance and results from radioxenon concentration calculation analysis at the International Data Center (IDC) and other National Data Centers (NDC). PNNL developed a Beta-Gamma Simulator (BGSim) that incorporated GEANT-modeled data sets from radioxenon decay chains, as well as functionality to use nuclear detector-acquired data sets to create new beta-gamma spectra with varying amounts of background, 133Xe, 131mXe, 133mXe, 135Xe, and 222Rn and its decay products. The program has been implemented on a web-based applications platform and allows the user to create very specific data sets that incorporate most of the operational parameters for the current beta-gamma systems deployed in the International Monitoring System (IMS) and the On-site Inspection (OSI) equipment. After an initial beta-gamma simulations program was developed, additional uses began to be identified for the program output: training sets of two-dimensional spectra for data analysts at the IDC and other NDC, spectra for exercises such as the Integrated Field Exercise 2014 (IFE14) held in Jordan at the Dead Sea, and testing new analysis methods and algorithms

  15. Validation of ACE-FTS v2.2 measurements of HCl, HF, CCl3F and CCl2F2 using space-, balloon- and ground-based instrument observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Servais

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen chloride (HCl and hydrogen fluoride (HF are respectively the main chlorine and fluorine reservoirs in the Earth's stratosphere. Their buildup resulted from the intensive use of man-made halogenated source gases, in particular CFC-11 (CCl3F and CFC-12 (CCl2F2, during the second half of the 20th century. It is important to continue monitoring the evolution of these source gases and reservoirs, in support of the Montreal Protocol and also indirectly of the Kyoto Protocol. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS is a space-based instrument that has been performing regular solar occultation measurements of over 30 atmospheric gases since early 2004. In this validation paper, the HCl, HF, CFC-11 and CFC-12 version 2.2 profile data products retrieved from ACE-FTS measurements are evaluated. Volume mixing ratio profiles have been compared to observations made from space by MLS and HALOE, and from stratospheric balloons by SPIRALE, FIRS-2 and Mark-IV. Partial columns derived from the ACE-FTS data were also compared to column measurements from ground-based Fourier transform instruments operated at 12 sites. ACE-FTS data recorded from March 2004 to August 2007 have been used for the comparisons. These data are representative of a variety of atmospheric and chemical situations, with sounded air masses extending from the winter vortex to summer sub-tropical conditions. Typically, the ACE-FTS products are available in the 10–50 km altitude range for HCl and HF, and in the 7–20 and 7–25 km ranges for CFC-11 and -12, respectively. For both reservoirs, comparison results indicate an agreement generally better than 5–10% above 20 km altitude, when accounting for the known offset affecting HALOE measurements of HCl and HF. Larger positive differences are however found for comparisons with single profiles from FIRS-2 and SPIRALE. For CFCs, the few coincident measurements available suggest that the differences

  16. Validation of ACE-FTS v2.2 measurements of HCl, HF, CCl3F and CCl2F2 using space-, balloon- and ground-based instrument observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Tétard

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen chloride (HCl and hydrogen fluoride (HF are respectively the main chlorine and fluorine reservoirs in the Earth's stratosphere. Their buildup resulted from the intensive use of man-made halogenated source gases, in particular CFC-11 (CCl3F and CFC-12 (CCl2F2, during the second half of the 20th century. It is important to continue monitoring the evolution of these source gases and reservoirs, in support of the Montreal Protocol and also indirectly of the Kyoto Protocol. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS is a space-based instrument that has been performing regular solar occultation measurements of over 30 atmospheric gases since early 2004. In this validation paper, the HCl, HF, CFC-11 and CFC-12 version 2.2 profile data products retrieved from ACE-FTS measurements are evaluated. Volume mixing ratio profiles have been compared to observations made from space by MLS and HALOE, and from stratospheric balloons by SPIRALE, FIRS-2 and Mark-IV. Partial columns derived from the ACE-FTS data were also compared to column measurements from ground-based Fourier transform instruments operated at 12 sites. ACE-FTS data recorded from March 2004 to August 2007 have been used for the comparisons. These data are representative of a variety of atmospheric and chemical situations, with sounded air masses extending from the winter vortex to summer sub-tropical conditions. Typically, the ACE-FTS products are available in the 10–50 km altitude range for HCl and HF, and in the 7–20 and 7–25 km ranges for CFC-11 and CFC-12, respectively. For both reservoirs, comparison results indicate an agreement generally better than 5–10%, when accounting for the known offset affecting HALOE measurements of HCl and HF. Larger positive differences are however found for comparisons with single profiles from FIRS-2 and SPIRALE. For CFCs, the few coincident measurements available suggest that the differences probably remain

  17. From reactive to proactive: developing a valid clinical ethics needs assessment survey to support ethics program strategic planning (part 1 of 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolic, Andrea; Jennings, Barb; Seidlitz, Wendy; Andreychuk, Sandy; Djuric-Paulin, Angela; Flaherty, Barb; Peace, Donna

    2013-03-01

    As ethics committees and programs become integrated into the "usual business" of healthcare organizations, they are likely to face the predicament of responding to greater demands for service and higher expectations, without an influx of additional resources. This situation demands that ethics committees and programs allocate their scarce resources (including their time, skills and funds) strategically, rather than lurching from one ad hoc request to another; finding ways to maximize the effectiveness, efficiency, impact and quality of ethics services is essential in today's competitive environment. How can Hospital Ethics Committees (HECs) begin the process of strategic priority-setting to ensure they are delivering services where and how they are most needed? This paper describes the creation of the Clinical Ethics Needs Assessment Survey (CENAS) as a tool to understand interprofessional staff perceptions of the organization's ethical climate, challenging ethical issues and educational priorities. The CENAS was designed to support informed resource allocation and advocacy by HECs. By sharing our process of developing and validating this ethics needs assessment survey we hope to enable strategic priority-setting in other resource-strapped ethics programs, and to empower HECs to shift their focus to more proactive, quality-focused initiatives.

  18. Validation of the use of organic acids and acidified sodium chlorite to reduce Escherichia coli O157 and Salmonella typhimurium in beef trim and ground beef in a simulated processing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, K; Miller, M F; Loneragan, G H; Brashears, M M

    2006-08-01

    A study was conducted to determine if acidified sodium chlorite (1,200 ppm) and acetic and lactic acids (2 and 4%) were effective in reducing foodborne pathogens in beef trim prior to grinding in a simulated processing environment. The reduction of Salmonella Typhimurium and Escherichia coli O157:H7 at high (4.0 log CFU/g) and low (1.0 log CFU/g) inoculation doses was evaluated at various processing steps, including the following: (i) in trim just after treatment application, (ii) in ground beef just after grinding, (iii) in ground beef 24 h after refrigerated storage, (iv) in ground beef 5 days after refrigerated storage, and (v) in ground beef 30 days after frozen storage. All antimicrobial treatments reduced the pathogens on the trim inoculated with the lower inoculation dose to nondetectable numbers in the trim and in the ground beef. There were significant reductions of both pathogens in the trim and in the ground beef inoculated with the high inoculation doses. On the trim itself, E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium were reduced by 1.5 to 2.0 log cycles, with no differences among all treatments. In the ground beef, the organic acids were more effective in reducing both pathogens than the acidified sodium chlorite immediately after grinding, but after 1 day of storage, there were no differences among treatments. Overall, in the ground beef, there was a 2.5-log reduction of E. coli O157:H7 and a 1.5-log reduction of Salmonella Typhimurium that was sustained over time in refrigerated and frozen storage. Very few sensory differences between the control samples and the treated samples were detected by a consumer panel. Thus, antimicrobial treatments did not cause serious adverse sensory changes. Use of these antimicrobial treatments can be a promising intervention available to ground beef processors who currently have few interventions in their process.

  19. A software program designed to educate patients on age-related skin changes of facial and exposed extrafacial regions: the results of a validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodman GJ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Greg J Goodman1, Michael B Halstead2, John D Rogers2, Daniela Borzillo1, Elizabeth Ryan1, Nick Riley3, John Wlodarczyk31Dermatology Institute of Victoria, South Yarra, Victoria, Australia; 2Allergan Australia, Gordon, NSW, Australia; 3John Wlodarczyk Consulting Services, New Lambton, NSW, AustraliaBackground: A software program called "HOYS" has been developed to depict various aspects and degrees of aging at 35 constituent subregions of seven distinct facial or exposed extrafacial regions. This program is underpinned by five-point photonumeric Likert scales characterizing skin surface and volume changes across five decades for each of the 35 subregions, and features an interactive skin-age assessment with a treatment-prioritization tool. In this study, the reliability and reproducibility of these scales was evaluated.Methods: Eleven physicians and 19 non-physicians participated in this study. The five images from each of the 35 Likert scales in the HOYS program were shown on a total of 43 display boards, with selected subregions presented at rest or with movement, consistent with this program. Each image was randomly labeled between "A–E," corresponding to a range of skin ages by decade from 20–69 years. Each rater was asked to rank these images from youngest to oldest (or least to most severe deficit for each scale and to repeat this exercise 2 hours later, with the intra- and inter-rater reliability evaluated. The raters were also asked to estimate the age of a single randomly allocated image on each scale for the purposes of internal validation.Results: The overall inter-rater reliability of the raters was high at the first ranking session (weighted kappa: 0.78; 95% confidence intervals [95% CI]: 0.77–0.79 and this was confirmed when repeated 2 hours later (0.82; 95% CI: 0.81–0.83, with an intra-rater reliability of 0.76 (95% CI: 0.75–0.77. There was no significant difference in the physicians' and non-physicians' rankings. The

  20. Program for catenary-pantograph analysis, PrOSA statement of methods and validation according EN 50318

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finner, Lars; Poetsch, Gero; Sarnes, Bernhard; Kolbe, Michael

    2015-03-01

    DB Systemtechnik is a high-performing, customer-driven service provider that, as well as authoritatively serving the Deutsche Bahn Group by dint of its specialist knowledge is also increasingly active on the global railway market. Development and testing of pantograph models and catenary systems have been part of the company's essential activity fields from the beginning. Therefore, an efficient and high-performing simulation tool is indispensable. That is why DB Systemtechnik spent high efforts to develop the program PrOSA in cooperation with the Heinz-Nixdorf-Institut (HNI) of the university Paderborn to simulate the interaction of pantograph and catenary. This article gives an overview of the most relevant properties of PrOSA. Furthermore, it is described how the benchmark requirements were implemented and processed.

  1. Numerical simulation and validation on heat exchange performance of pile spiral coil ground heat exchanger%桩基螺旋型地埋管换热器换热性能的数值模拟与验证

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨卫波; 杨晶晶; 孔磊

    2016-01-01

    The new trends in energy savings and greenhouse gas reductions are expecting to explore the utilization of shallow geothermal energy. The most popular way to exploit shallow geothermal energy resources is the ground coupled heat pump (GCHP) system with using ground as a heat source. Because underground temperature is rather constant compared with ambient air temperature, the GCHP could achieve higher efficiency as well as more stable performance compared with traditional air source heat pumps. Thus the GCHP system becomes increasingly popular in commercial and institutional buildings. In general, a vertical borehole with ground heat exchanger (GHE) is used as the mainstream of GCHP system. However, the wide application of this type of GCHP technology has been limited by its higher initial cost and substantial land areas required to install the GHE. For this reason, the foundation piles of buildings have been used as part of GHE in recent years to reduce the cost of drilling borehole and save the required land area. This innovative idea of utilizing what are usually called “energy piles”, has led to notable progress in the field of GCHP systems. It has become particularly attractive because it lowers total cost and spatial requirements, and offers the higher renewable contribution. In this paper, a novel configuration of an energy pile with a spiral coil was proposed. In order to investigate the effects of various factors on heat exchange performance of the pile spiral coil GHE, a numerical model of the pile with a spiral coil was developed. Based on the numerical solution of the model, the effects of pile diameter, pile depth, spiral coil group number and soil type on the heat exchange rate and soil temperature distribution of the spiral pile GHE were analyzed. The results indicated that increasing foundation pile diameter can improve the thermal storage capacity and thus enhance heat exchange rate of pile. But increase in foundation pile diameter can also

  2. Validación de un programa de vigilancia de infecciones nosocomiales Validation of a nosocomial infections surveillance program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sigfrido Rangel-Frausto

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO. Validar el programa de vigilancia de infecciones nosocomiales y conocer la morbilidad y la mortalidad. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS. Un médico especialmente capacitado, realizó vigilancia intensiva de todos los pacientes admitidos en el hospital. Los casos de infección fueron discutidos con otros dos médicos y el resultado se comparó con la vigilancia rutinaria. Se incluyó a todos los pacientes hospitalizados del 11 de julio al 12 de agosto de 1995, que no tenían un proceso infeccioso activo o que no manifestaban un periodo de incubación a su ingreso. Se siguieron diariamente y se registraron datos de: edad, sexo y padecimiento de ingreso. Se recabó información sobre tratamiento antimicrobiano, microrganismo aislado y susceptibilidad. Se evaluó el estado clínico final y se estimó el tiempo de estancia hospitalaria. RESULTADOS. De 429 pacientes, 45 desarrollaron infección nosocomial (casos y 384 no lo hicieron (controles. La incidencia de infecciones nosocomiales fue de 10.48/100. La sensibilidad y la especificidad del programa fueron de 93.3 y 98.7%, respectivamente. La mortalidad en los infectados fue de 11.11%, y en el grupo de los no infectados, de 2.4%. El promedio de estancia hospitalaria fue de 20 y 11 días, para infectados y no infectados, respectivamente (pOBJECTIVES. To validate the nosocomial infections surveillance system, establish its impact in morbi-mortality. MATERIAL AND METHODS. Surveillance of every single patient admited during a one month period was done by one of us (DMG. Each posibile case was discussed with two other hospital epidemiologists (SPLR, MSRF. This intensive surveillance was compared against the routinely surveillance performed by the nurses. We included all hospitalized patients between 11th July and 12th of August according to CDC (Atlanta, GA nosocomial infections definitions. Patients were followed everyday and information about age, gender, underlying diagnosis, microorganisms responsible

  3. Culture-sensitive adaptation and validation of the community-oriented program for the control of rheumatic diseases methodology for rheumatic disease in Latin American indigenous populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris; Granados, Ysabel; Silvestre, Adriana; Alvarez-Nemegyei, José; Valls, Evart; Quintana, Rosana; Figuera, Yemina; Santiago, Flor Julian; Goñi, Mario; González, Rosa; Santana, Natalia; Nieto, Romina; Brito, Irais; García, Imelda; Barrios, Maria Cecilia; Marcano, Manuel; Loyola-Sánchez, Adalberto; Stekman, Ivan; Jorfen, Marisa; Goycochea-Robles, Maria Victoria; Midauar, Fadua; Chacón, Rosa; Martin, Maria Celeste; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the study is to validate a culturally sensitive adaptation of the community-oriented program for the control of rheumatic diseases (COPCORD) methodology in several Latin American indigenous populations. The COPCORD Spanish questionnaire was translated and back-translated into seven indigenous languages: Warao, Kariña and Chaima (Venezuela), Mixteco, Maya-Yucateco and Raramuri (Mexico) and Qom (Argentina). The questionnaire was administered to almost 100 subjects in each community with the assistance of bilingual translators. Individuals with pain, stiffness or swelling in any part of the body in the previous 7 days and/or at any point in life were evaluated by physicians to confirm a diagnosis according to criteria for rheumatic diseases. Overall, individuals did not understand the use of a 0-10 visual analog scale for pain intensity and severity grading and preferred a Likert scale comprising four items for pain intensity (no pain, minimal pain, strong pain, and intense pain). They were unable to discriminate between pain intensity and pain severity, so only pain intensity was included. For validation, 702 subjects (286 male, 416 female, mean age 42.7 ± 18.3 years) were interviewed in their own language. In the last 7 days, 198 (28.2 %) subjects reported having musculoskeletal pain, and 90 (45.4 %) of these had intense pain. Compared with the physician-confirmed diagnosis, the COPCORD questionnaire had 73.8 % sensitivity, 72.9 % specificity, a positive likelihood ratio of 2.7 and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.73. The COPCORD questionnaire is a valid screening tool for rheumatic diseases in indigenous Latin American populations.

  4. Internal validity of a household food security scale is consistent among diverse populations participating in a food supplement program in Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Michelle; Melgar-Quinonez, Hugo; Uribe, Martha C Alvarez

    2008-01-01

    Objective We assessed the validity of a locally adapted Colombian Household Food Security Scale (CHFSS) used as a part of the 2006 evaluation of the food supplement component of the Plan for Improving Food and Nutrition in Antioquia, Colombia (MANA – Plan Departamental de Seguridad Alimentaria y Nutricional de Antioquia). Methods Subjects included low-income families with pre-school age children in MANA that responded affirmatively to at least one CHFSS item (n = 1,319). Rasch Modeling was used to evaluate the psychometric characteristics of the items through measure and INFIT values. Differences in CHFSS performance were assessed by area of residency, socioeconomic status and number of children enrolled in MANA. Unidimensionality of a scale by group was further assessed using Differential Item Functioning (DIF). Results Most CHFSS items presented good fitness with most INFIT values within the adequate range of 0.8 to 1.2. Consistency in item measure values between groups was found for all but two items in the comparison by area of residency. Only two adult items exhibited DIF between urban and rural households. Conclusion The results indicate that the adapted CHFSS is a valid tool to assess the household food security of participants in food assistance programs like MANA. PMID:18500988

  5. Empirical validation of building simulation programs - Swiss contribution to IEA Task 34, Annex 43; Empirische Validierung von Gebaeudesimulationsprogrammen. Schweizer Beitrag zu IEA Task 34 / Annex 43. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loutzenhiser, P.; Manz, H. (eds.)

    2006-11-15

    This comprehensive, illustrated final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) reports on work carried out on the validation of building simulation programs. the purpose of this project was to create a data set for use when evaluating the accuracy of models for glazing units and windows with and without shading devices. A series of eight experiments that subsequently increased in complexity were performed in an outdoor test cell located on the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Testing and Research (EMPA) campus in Duebendorf, Switzerland. Particular emphasis was placed on accurately determining the test cell characteristics. The report presents information on experimental set-ups, their validation and the methodology used. Further chapters describe particular experiments made, including transient characterisation, evaluation of irradiation models on tiled facades, as well as those made on glazing units with various types of shading and blinds. The thermal properties of windows are looked at. The results of experiments made with four different models, HELIOS, EnergyPlus, DOE-2.1E and IDA-ICE, are discussed.

  6. Internal validity of a household food security scale is consistent among diverse populations participating in a food supplement program in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Michelle; Melgar-Quinonez, Hugo; Uribe, Martha C Alvarez

    2008-05-23

    We assessed the validity of a locally adapted Colombian Household Food Security Scale (CHFSS) used as a part of the 2006 evaluation of the food supplement component of the Plan for Improving Food and Nutrition in Antioquia, Colombia (MANA - Plan Departamental de Seguridad Alimentaria y Nutricional de Antioquia). Subjects included low-income families with pre-school age children in MANA that responded affirmatively to at least one CHFSS item (n = 1,319). Rasch Modeling was used to evaluate the psychometric characteristics of the items through measure and INFIT values. Differences in CHFSS performance were assessed by area of residency, socioeconomic status and number of children enrolled in MANA. Unidimensionality of a scale by group was further assessed using Differential Item Functioning (DIF). Most CHFSS items presented good fitness with most INFIT values within the adequate range of 0.8 to 1.2. Consistency in item measure values between groups was found for all but two items in the comparison by area of residency. Only two adult items exhibited DIF between urban and rural households. The results indicate that the adapted CHFSS is a valid tool to assess the household food security of participants in food assistance programs like MANA.

  7. Internal validity of a household food security scale is consistent among diverse populations participating in a food supplement program in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melgar-Quinonez Hugo

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective We assessed the validity of a locally adapted Colombian Household Food Security Scale (CHFSS used as a part of the 2006 evaluation of the food supplement component of the Plan for Improving Food and Nutrition in Antioquia, Colombia (MANA – Plan Departamental de Seguridad Alimentaria y Nutricional de Antioquia. Methods Subjects included low-income families with pre-school age children in MANA that responded affirmatively to at least one CHFSS item (n = 1,319. Rasch Modeling was used to evaluate the psychometric characteristics of the items through measure and INFIT values. Differences in CHFSS performance were assessed by area of residency, socioeconomic status and number of children enrolled in MANA. Unidimensionality of a scale by group was further assessed using Differential Item Functioning (DIF. Results Most CHFSS items presented good fitness with most INFIT values within the adequate range of 0.8 to 1.2. Consistency in item measure values between groups was found for all but two items in the comparison by area of residency. Only two adult items exhibited DIF between urban and rural households. Conclusion The results indicate that the adapted CHFSS is a valid tool to assess the household food security of participants in food assistance programs like MANA.

  8. Empirical validation of building simulation programs - Swiss contribution to IEA Task 34, Annex 43; Empirische Validierung von Gebaeudesimulationsprogrammen. Schweizer Beitrag zu IEA Task 34 / Annex 43. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loutzenhiser, P.; Manz, H. (eds.)

    2006-11-15

    This comprehensive, illustrated final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) reports on work carried out on the validation of building simulation programs. the purpose of this project was to create a data set for use when evaluating the accuracy of models for glazing units and windows with and without shading devices. A series of eight experiments that subsequently increased in complexity were performed in an outdoor test cell located on the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Testing and Research (EMPA) campus in Duebendorf, Switzerland. Particular emphasis was placed on accurately determining the test cell characteristics. The report presents information on experimental set-ups, their validation and the methodology used. Further chapters describe particular experiments made, including transient characterisation, evaluation of irradiation models on tiled facades, as well as those made on glazing units with various types of shading and blinds. The thermal properties of windows are looked at. The results of experiments made with four different models, HELIOS, EnergyPlus, DOE-2.1E and IDA-ICE, are discussed.

  9. Validity of air-displacement plethysmography in the assessment of body composition changes in a 16-month weight loss program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hull Holly R

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To compare the accuracy of air displacement plethysmography (ADP and dual energy x-ray absorptionmetry (DXA in tracking changes in body composition after a 16 month weight loss intervention in overweight and obese females. Methods 93 healthy female subjects (38.9 ± 5.7 yr, 159.8 ± 5.6 cm, 76.7 ± 9.9 kg, 30.0 ± 3.4 kg/m2 completed a 16 month weight loss intervention. Eligible subjects attended 15 treatment sessions occurring over the course of 4 months with educational content including topics relating to physical activity and exercise, diet and eating behavior, and behavior modification. In the remaining 12 months, subjects underwent a lifestyle program designed to increase physical activity and improve eating habits. Before and after the intervention, subjects had their percent body fat (%fat, fat mass (FM, and fat-free mass (FFM assessed by DXA and ADP. Results Significant differences (p ≤ 0.001 were found between DXA and ADP at baseline %fat (46.0 % fat vs. 42.0 % fat, FM (35.3 kg vs. 32.5 kg and FFM (40.8 kg vs. 44.2 kg as well as at post intervention for %fat (42.1% fat vs. 38.3 % fat, FM (30.9 kg vs. 28.4 kg and FFM (41.7 kg vs. 44.7 kg. At each time point, ADP %fat and total FM was significantly lower (p ≤ 0.001 than DXA while FFM was significantly higher (p ≤ 0.001. However, both techniques tracked %fat changes similarly considering that there were no differences between the two means. Furthermore, a Bland-Altman analysis was performed and no significant bias was observed, thus demonstrating the ability of ADP to measure body fat across a wide range of fatness. Conclusion At baseline and post weight loss, a significant difference was found between ADP and DXA. However, the results indicate both methods are highly related and track changes in %fat similarly after a weight loss program in overweight and obese females. Additionally, the mean changes in %fat were similar between the two techniques, suggesting

  10. Validity of the international physical activity questionnaire and the Singapore prospective study program physical activity questionnaire in a multiethnic urban Asian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai E Shyong

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical activity patterns of a population remain mostly assessed by the questionnaires. However, few physical activity questionnaires have been validated in Asian populations. We previously utilized a combination of different questionnaires to assess leisure time, transportation, occupational and household physical activity in the Singapore Prospective Study Program (SP2. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ has been developed for a similar purpose. In this study, we compared estimates from these two questionnaires with an objective measure of physical activity in a multi-ethnic Asian population. Methods Physical activity was measured in 152 Chinese, Malay and Asian Indian adults using an accelerometer over five consecutive days, including a weekend. Participants completed both the physical activity questionnaire in SP2 (SP2PAQ and IPAQ long form. 43subjects underwent a second set of measurements on average 6 months later to assess reproducibility of the questionnaires and the accelerometer measurements. Spearman correlations were used to evaluate validity and reproducibility and correlations for validity were corrected for within-person variation of accelerometer measurements. Agreement between the questionnaires and the accelerometer measurements was also evaluated using Bland Altman plots. Results The corrected correlation with accelerometer estimates of energy expenditure from physical activity was better for the SP2PAQ (vigorous activity: r = 0.73; moderate activity: r = 0.27 than for the IPAQ (vigorous activity: r = 0.31; moderate activity: r = 0.15. For moderate activity, the corrected correlation between SP2PAQ and the accelerometer was higher for Chinese (r = 0.38 and Malays (r = 0.57 than for Indians (r = -0.09. Both questionnaires overestimated energy expenditure from physical activity to a greater extent at higher levels of physical activity than at lower levels of physical activity. The

  11. Preliminary validation of an exercise program suitable for pregnant women with abnormal glucose metabolism: inhibitory effects of Tai Chi Yuttari-exercise on plasma glucose elevation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Sachina; Kagawa, Kyoko; Hori, Naohi; Akezaki, Yoshiteru; Mori, Kohei; Nomura, Takuo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] There is insufficient evidence related to exercise programs that are safe and efficacious for pregnant women with abnormal glucose metabolism. Tai Chi Yuttari-exercise is an exercise program with validated safety and efficacy in improving physical function in the elderly. In this study, we investigated this program’s inhibitory effects on plasma glucose elevation when it was adapted to a pregnancy model. [Subjects and Methods] Twelve 18- to 19-year-old females without a history of pregnancy were randomly assorted into two groups: an intervention group, for which six subjects were outfitted with mock-pregnancy suits and asked to perform Tai Chi Yuttari-exercise, and a control group who did not perform exercise. The intervention group had a mean Borg Scale score of 11.1 ± 0.9 during the exercise. [Results] No significant intragroup differences were observed in fasting, baseline, or post-intervention/observation plasma glucose levels. On the other hand, the intergroup change in plasma glucose levels after intervention/observation was significant when comparing the intervention and control groups: −1.66 ± 7.0 and 9.42 ± 6.57 mg/dl, respectively. [Conclusion] Tai Chi Yuttari-exercise appears to effectively inhibit plasma glucose elevation at intensity and movement levels that can be safely applied to pregnant women with abnormal glucose metabolism. PMID:28174463

  12. Development and Validation of a Training Program Using a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Approach with the Purpose of Enabling Community Pharmacists to Provide Empathic Patient Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanuma, Kazunori; Watanabe, Fumiyuki; Maeda, Hatsuyo; Shiina, Miki; Hara, Kazuo; Kamei, Miwako

    2017-01-01

     To enable community pharmacists to provide empathic patient counseling, we developed and validated a training program based on cognitive reframing, which is one of the cognitive behavioral therapies. We divided 24 community pharmacists into two groups, providing training to the intervention group. The duration of the training program was two hours per session, with a total of eight hours. We conducted a survey of the intervention group to evaluate their training experience. In addition, we performed two role-play scenarios on patient counseling using simulated patients, evaluating the patient counseling alliance scores and the degrees of the psychological distance between the patients and pharmacists. The degree of satisfaction correlated with four training items, including "explanation by comics". When pharmacists felt that the cognitive behavioral therapy approach was successful, no significant differences were found in the patient counseling alliance grades. However, the psychological distance between the patients and pharmacists was smaller. We were able to infer that a cognitive behavioral therapy approach could decrease the psychological distance between patients and pharmacists, thereby enabling empathic patient counseling.

  13. PV Systems Reliability Final Technical Report: Ground Fault Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrova, Olga [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flicker, Jack David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johnson, Jay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We have examined ground faults in PhotoVoltaic (PV) arrays and the efficacy of fuse, current detection (RCD), current sense monitoring/relays (CSM), isolation/insulation (Riso) monitoring, and Ground Fault Detection and Isolation (GFID) using simulations based on a Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis SPICE ground fault circuit model, experimental ground faults installed on real arrays, and theoretical equations.

  14. SU-E-J-92: Validating Dose Uncertainty Estimates Produced by AUTODIRECT, An Automated Program to Evaluate Deformable Image Registration Accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H; Chen, J; Pouliot, J [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Pukala, J [UF Health Cancer Center at Orlando Health, Orlando, FL (United States); Kirby, N [University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Deformable image registration (DIR) is a powerful tool with the potential to deformably map dose from one computed-tomography (CT) image to another. Errors in the DIR, however, will produce errors in the transferred dose distribution. We have proposed a software tool, called AUTODIRECT (automated DIR evaluation of confidence tool), which predicts voxel-specific dose mapping errors on a patient-by-patient basis. This work validates the effectiveness of AUTODIRECT to predict dose mapping errors with virtual and physical phantom datasets. Methods: AUTODIRECT requires 4 inputs: moving and fixed CT images and two noise scans of a water phantom (for noise characterization). Then, AUTODIRECT uses algorithms to generate test deformations and applies them to the moving and fixed images (along with processing) to digitally create sets of test images, with known ground-truth deformations that are similar to the actual one. The clinical DIR algorithm is then applied to these test image sets (currently 4) . From these tests, AUTODIRECT generates spatial and dose uncertainty estimates for each image voxel based on a Student’s t distribution. This work compares these uncertainty estimates to the actual errors made by the Velocity Deformable Multi Pass algorithm on 11 virtual and 1 physical phantom datasets. Results: For 11 of the 12 tests, the predicted dose error distributions from AUTODIRECT are well matched to the actual error distributions within 1–6% for 10 virtual phantoms, and 9% for the physical phantom. For one of the cases though, the predictions underestimated the errors in the tail of the distribution. Conclusion: Overall, the AUTODIRECT algorithm performed well on the 12 phantom cases for Velocity and was shown to generate accurate estimates of dose warping uncertainty. AUTODIRECT is able to automatically generate patient-, organ- , and voxel-specific DIR uncertainty estimates. This ability would be useful for patient-specific DIR quality assurance.

  15. 地面煤流201G 皮带机改造方案%Ground coal flow 201G belt rehabilitation programs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范美侠

    2013-01-01

      Articles on the ground coal flow system has been modified and made a belt conveyor transformation solutions and measures to improve the reliability of belt conveyor systems, to ensure mine safety, economy and stable operation has important reference value.%  文章对地面煤流系统进行了改造,并提出了皮带机改造的方案及对策,对提高皮带机系统的可靠性,保证矿井安全、经济、稳定运行有重要的参考价值。

  16. Development of an Electromechanical Ground Support System for NASA's Payload Transfer Operations: A Case Study of Multidisciplinary Work in the Space Shuttle Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix A. Soto Toro

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Space shuttle Atlantis was launched from Kennedy Space Center on July 8, 2011 and landed on July 21, 2011, the final flight of the 30-year Shuttle Program. The development and support of the Space Transportation System (STS had required intensive coordination by scientists and engineers from multiple program disciplines. This paper presents a case study of a typical multidisciplinary effort that was proposed in the late 1990

  17. Unsteady propulsion in ground effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Goon; Kim, Boyoung; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-11-01

    Many animals in nature experience hydrodynamic benefits by swimming or flying near the ground, and this phenomenon is commonly called 'ground effect'. A flexible fin flapping near the ground was modelled, inspired by animals swimming. A transverse heaving motion was prescribed at the leading edge, and the posterior parts of the fin were passively fluttering by the fin-fluid interaction. The fin moved freely horizontally in a quiescent flow, by which the swimming speed was dynamically determined. The fin-fluid interaction was considered by using the penalty immersed boundary method. The kinematics of the flexible fin was altered by flapping near the ground, and the vortex structures generated in the wake were deflected upward, which was qualitatively analyzed by using the vortex dipole model. The swimming speed and the thrust force of the fin increased by the ground effects. The hydrodynamic changes from flapping near the ground affected the required power input in two opposite ways; the increased and decreased hydrodynamic pressures beneath the fin hindered the flapping motion, increasing the power input, while the transversely reduced flapping motion induced the decreased power input. The Froude propulsive efficiency was increased by swimming in the ground effects Creative Research Initiatives (No. 2016-004749) program of the National Research Foundation of Korea (MSIP).

  18. The OECD Program to Validate the Rat Hershberger Bioassay to Screen Compounds for in Vivo Androgen and Antiandrogen Responses: Phase 2 Dose–Response Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, William; Gray, L. Earl; Zeiger, Errol; Walker, Michael; Yamasaki, Kanji; Ashby, John; Jacob, Elard

    2007-01-01

    Objective The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has completed phase 2 of an international program to validate the rodent Hershberger bioassay. Design The Hershberger bioassay is designed to identify suspected androgens and antiandrogens based on changes in the weights of five androgen-responsive tissues (ventral prostate, paired seminal vesicles and coagulating glands, the levator ani and bulbocavernosus muscles, the glans penis, and paired Cowper’s or bulbourethral glands). Protocol sensitivity and reproducibility were tested using two androgen agonists (17α-methyl testosterone and 17β-trenbolone), four antagonists [procymi-done, vinclozolin, linuron, and 1,1-dichoro-2,2-bis-(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (p,p’-DDE)], and a 5α-reductase inhibitor (finasteride). Sixteen laboratories from seven countries participated in phase 2. Results In 40 of 41 studies, the laboratories successfully detected substance-related weight changes in one or more tissues. The one exception was with the weakest antiandrogen, linuron, in a laboratory with reduced sensitivity because of high coefficients of variation in all tissue weights. The protocols performed well under different experimental conditions (e.g., strain, diet, housing protocol, bedding, vehicle). There was good agreement and reproducibility among laboratories with regard to the lowest dose inducing significant effects on tissue weights. Conclusions The results show that the OECD Hershberger bioassay protocol is reproducible and transferable across laboratories with androgen agonists, weak androgen antagonists, and a 5α-reductase inhibitor. The next validation phase will employ coded test substances, including positive substances and negative substances having no androgenic or antiandrogenic activity. PMID:17520051

  19. Validation of the MCNP-ORIGEN Coupled Utility Program (MOCUP)%MCNP-ORIGEN耦合通用程序(MOCUP)的基准验证与实用化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王侃; T P Lou; E Greenspan; J Vujic

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to validate the MOCUP program for bum-up analysis. Twowell-documented benchmarking problems were used to validate MOCUP itself and the application way. Onebenchmark consists of three PWR pin-cell bum-up cases. The other benchmark is a fast reactor (burner) burn-upproblem. From the comparisons of our MOCUP results by using appropriate program parameters with those ob-tained from measurement and/or other computer codes, it has been concluded that: (a) with few exceptions, theMOCUP results of isotopic compositions fall within the range of those calculated by different codes; (b) MOCUPresults for the actinide concentration are in agreement with the measurement values to within 11% (for most of theactinides, the deviations are less than 5%) and for all fission products studied, the deviations are less than 10%, ex-cept for 149Sm; and (c) the MOCUP predictions of reactivity change with bum-up are in good agreement with thereported values.%本文的目的是将MOCUP程序实用化,以用于燃耗分析.选取了2个资料完整的基准问题以验证MOCUP程序本身和应用方法.一个基准题是压水堆的栅元燃耗问题(含3种状况);另一个是快堆的燃耗问题.适当选取程序的有关参数后,将MOCUP的计算结果同实验结果和/或其它程序计算结果相比较,可得如下结论:①除极个别特例外,MOCUP程序计算得到的同位素成分结果处于其它程序计算结果的范围之内;②与实验测量数据相比,MOCUP程序计算得到的锕系元素浓度的误差均小于¨%,绝大多数小于5%;裂变产物浓度的误差小于10%,除149Sm之外;③MOCUP程序计算得到的反应性随燃耗变化的结果与所报告的其它结果吻合很好.

  20. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program, Phase I. Project II: seismic input. Compilation, assessment and expansion of the strong earthquake ground motion data base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouse, C B; Hileman, J A; Turner, B E; Martin, G R

    1980-04-01

    A catalog has been prepared which contains information for: (1) world-wide, ground-motion accelerograms, (2) the accelerograph sites where these records were obtained, and (3) the seismological parameters of the causative earthquakes. The catalog is limited to data for those accelerograms which have been digitized and published. In addition, the quality and completeness of these data are assessed. This catalog is unique because it is the only publication which contains comprehensive information on the recording conditions of all known digitized accelerograms. However, information for many accelerograms is missing. Although some literature may have been overlooked, most of the missing data has not been published. Nevertheless, the catalog provides a convenient reference and useful tool for earthquake engineering research and applications.

  1. Grounding Adult Education Research in Rural Areas: Reflections on the Development of a Research Program at the University of Limpopo in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeelen, Jacques; Rampedi, Makgwana; van der Linden, Josje

    2014-01-01

    Mission statements of universities in developing countries usually include serving the surrounding communities. Often this service does not reach beyond lip service. This article puts into context the experience of developing an adult education research program responding to the needs of the surrounding community in a historically disadvantaged…

  2. Grounding Adult Education Research in Rural Areas : Reflections on the Development of a Research Program at the University of Limpopo in South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeelen, Jacques; Rampedi, Makgwana; van der Linden, Josje

    2014-01-01

    Mission statements of universities in developing countries usually include serving the surrounding communities. Often this service does not reach beyond lip service. This article puts into context the experience of developing an adult education research program responding to the needs of the surroun

  3. Phenomenon of dual- and single-retention behaviors of solutes and its validation by computational simulation in linear programmed temperature gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liejun; Duan, Xiaojuan; Liu, Chuanyu; Zhang, Guangxiang; Li, Qing X

    2016-07-01

    The current theory of programmed temperature gas chromatography considers that solutes are focused by the stationary phase at the column head completely and does not explicitly recognize the different effects of initial temperature (To ) and heating rate (rT ) on the retention time or temperature of a homologue series. In the present study, n-alkanes, 1-alkenes, 1-alkyl alcohols, alkyl benzenes, and fatty acid methyl esters standards were used as model chemicals and were separated on two nonpolar columns, one moderately polar column and one polar column. Effects of To and rT on the retention of nonstationary phase focusing solutes can be explicitly described with isothermal and cubic equation models, respectively. When the solutes were in the stationary phase focusing status, the single-retention behavior of solutes was observed. It is simple, dependent upon rT only and can be well described by the cubic equation model that was visualized through four sequential slope analyses. These observed dual- and single-retention behaviors of solutes were validated by various experimental data, physical properties, and computational simulation.

  4. Ground Truth Annotation in T Analyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    This video shows how to annotate the ground truth tracks in the thermal videos. The ground truth tracks are produced to be able to compare them to tracks obtained from a Computer Vision tracking approach. The program used for annotation is T-Analyst, which is developed by Aliaksei Laureshyn, Ph...

  5. Ground Truth Annotation in T Analyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    This video shows how to annotate the ground truth tracks in the thermal videos. The ground truth tracks are produced to be able to compare them to tracks obtained from a Computer Vision tracking approach. The program used for annotation is T-Analyst, which is developed by Aliaksei Laureshyn, Ph...

  6. Procedures for ground-water investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    This manual was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to document the procedures used to carry out and control the technical aspects of ground-water investigations at the PNL. Ground-water monitoring procedures are developed and used in accordance with the PNL Quality Assurance Program.

  7. Installation-Restoration Program Stage 3. McClellan AFB, California. Remedial investigation/feasibility study ground-water sampling and analysis program, January through March 1989 data summary. Final report, January-March 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-06-19

    This Data Summary presents the results of ground-water sampling activities conducted on and in the vicinity of McClellan Air Force Base from the sampling period of January through March, 1989. Concentrations of purgeable halocarbons and aromatic compounds detected in 336 wells 26 monitoring wells are located on base in Area A, B, C, D, and adjacent on-base areas and off-base in the Northwest and Southwest areas. There was no detected increase in the areal extent of contaminated ground-water, nor was there any increase in the depth that contaminated ground-water was detected. The Area D extraction system is effectively operating to change hydraulic gradients, so groundwater in Area D flows toward the extraction wells. Contaminant concentrations have decreased in Area D deep zone monitoring wells. Samples from three middle-zone monitoring wells located in Area D also show decreases in contaminant concentration during this sampling period. Decreasing contaminant concentrations have stabilized in shallow zone monitoring wells located off-base, west of Area D.

  8. Compiler validates units and dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, F. E.

    1980-01-01

    Software added to compiler for automated test system for Space Shuttle decreases computer run errors by providing offline validation of engineering units used system command programs. Validation procedures are general, though originally written for GOAL, a free-form language that accepts "English-like" statements, and may be adapted to other programming languages.

  9. PAST: Programa para el proyecto y análisis de sistemas de puesta a tierra. (Primera parte; SistPTEx: Program for the project and analysis of grounding system. (First part.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Cecilio Valcárcel Rojas

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available resistencia de contacto a tierra de diferentes configuraciones de electrodos, desde métodos aproximados, métodos semiexactos, hasta métodos que garantizan muy buenos niveles de exactitud. El desarrollo alcanzado por la computación ha permitido el rescate de algoritmos relativamente antiguos como los basados en la teoría de las imágenes de Maxwell, hasta el desarrollo de métodos basados en la teoría de los elementos finitos. En este trabajo se exponen las características y bondades de un programa para el proyecto y análisis de sistemas de puesta a tierra para cualquier instalación eléctrica, aplicando la teoría de las imágenes de Maxwell.  During the historical development of electrical engineering, have developed many methods for calculating the contact resistance grounding electrodes of different configurations, from approximate methods, semi exact methods up methods which guarantee good levels of exactness. The development achieved by the computer has enabled the rescue of relatively old algorithms, such as those based on the theory of Maxwell’s images, until the development of methods based on the theory of finite elements. In this paper we describe the features and benefits of a program for the design and analysis of grounding systems for any electrical installation, using the theory of Maxwell’s images.

  10. Hanford site ground water protection management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    Ground water protection at the Hanford Site consists of preventative and remedial measures that are implemented in compliance with a variety of environmental regulations at local, state, and federal levels. These measures seek to ensure that the resource can sustain a broad range of beneficial uses. To effectively coordinate and ensure compliance with applicable regulations, the U.S. Department of Energy has issued DOE Order 5400.1 (DOE 1988a). This order requires all U.S. Department of Energy facilities to prepare separate ground water protection program descriptions and plans. This document describes the Ground Water Protection Management Plan (GPMP) for the Hanford Site located in the state of Washington. DOE Order 5400.1 specifies that the GPMP covers the following general topical areas: (1) documentation of the ground water regime; (2) design and implementation of a ground water monitoring program to support resource management and comply with applicable laws and regulations; (3) a management program for ground water protection and remediation; (4) a summary and identification of areas that may be contaminated with hazardous waste; (5) strategies for controlling hazardous waste sources; (6) a remedial action program; and (7) decontamination, decommissioning, and related remedial action requirements. Many of the above elements are currently covered by existing programs at the Hanford Site; thus, one of the primary purposes of this document is to provide a framework for coordination of existing ground water protection activities. The GPMP provides the ground water protection policy and strategies for ground water protection/management at the Hanford Site, as well as an implementation plan to improve coordination of site ground water activities.

  11. Finite-element three-dimensional ground-water (FE3DGW) flow model - formulation, program listings and users' manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, S.K.; Cole, C.R.; Bond, F.W.

    1979-12-01

    The Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program is developing and applying the methodology for assessing the far-field, long-term post-closure safety of deep geologic nuclear waste repositories. AEGIS is being performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract with the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (OWNI) for the Department of Energy (DOE). One task within AEGIS is the development of methodology for analysis of the consequences (water pathway) from loss of repository containment as defined by various release scenarios. Analysis of the long-term, far-field consequences of release scenarios requires the application of numerical codes which simulate the hydrologic systems, model the transport of released radionuclides through the hydrologic systems to the biosphere, and, where applicable, assess the radiological dose to humans. Hydrologic and transport models are available at several levels of complexity or sophistication. Model selection and use are determined by the quantity and quality of input data. Model development under AEGIS and related programs provides three levels of hydrologic models, two levels of transport models, and one level of dose models (with several separate models). This document consists of the description of the FE3DGW (Finite Element, Three-Dimensional Groundwater) Hydrologic model third level (high complexity) three-dimensional, finite element approach (Galerkin formulation) for saturated groundwater flow.

  12. Suomi NPP Ground System Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, K. D.; Bergeron, C.

    2013-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation civilian weather and environmental satellite system: the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). JPSS will replace the afternoon orbit component and ground processing system of the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA. The JPSS satellites will carry a suite of sensors designed to collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological and geophysical observations of the Earth. The first satellite in the JPSS constellation, known as the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) satellite, was launched on 28 October 2011, and is currently undergoing product calibration and validation activities. As products reach a beta level of maturity, they are made available to the community through NOAA's Comprehensive Large Array-data Stewardship System (CLASS). CGS's data processing capability processes the satellite data from the Joint Polar Satellite System satellites to provide environmental data products (including Sensor Data Records (SDRs) and Environmental Data Records (EDRs)) to NOAA and Department of Defense (DoD) processing centers operated by the United States government. CGS is currently processing and delivering SDRs and EDRs for Suomi NPP and will continue through the lifetime of the Joint Polar Satellite System programs. Following the launch and sensor activation phase of the Suomi NPP mission, full volume data traffic is now flowing from the satellite through CGS's C3, data processing, and data delivery systems. Ground system performance is critical for this operational system. As part of early system checkout, Raytheon measured all aspects of data acquisition, routing, processing, and delivery to ensure operational performance requirements are met, and will continue to be met throughout the mission. Raytheon developed a tool to measure, categorize, and

  13. Measurement of ground motion in various sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bialowons, W.; Amirikas, R.; Bertolini, A.; Kruecker, D.

    2007-04-15

    Ground vibrations may affect low emittance beam transport in linear colliders, Free Electron Lasers (FEL) and synchrotron radiation facilities. This paper is an overview of a study program to measure ground vibrations in various sites which can be used for site characterization in relation to accelerator design. Commercial broadband seismometers have been used to measure ground vibrations and the resultant database is available to the scientific community. The methodology employed is to use the same equipment and data analysis tools for ease of comparison. This database of ground vibrations taken in 19 sites around the world is first of its kind. (orig.)

  14. Ground water and energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-11-01

    This national workshop on ground water and energy was conceived by the US Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Assessments. Generally, OEA needed to know what data are available on ground water, what information is still needed, and how DOE can best utilize what has already been learned. The workshop focussed on three areas: (1) ground water supply; (2) conflicts and barriers to ground water use; and (3) alternatives or solutions to the various issues relating to ground water. (ACR)

  15. Validation of the Benefit Forecasting Method: Organization Development Program to Increase Health Organization Membership. Training and Development Research Center, Project Number Eleven.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleezer, Catherine M.; And Others

    This project is the sixth in a series of studies designed to validate the Training and Development Benefit Forecasting Method (BFM) sponsored by the Training and Development Research Center (TDRC) at the University of Minnesota. The purpose of this study was to validate the BFM's ability to forecast the benefits of an organization development…

  16. Documentation of a computer program to simulate lake-aquifer interaction using the MODFLOW ground water flow model and the MOC3D solute-transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Michael L.; Konikow, Leonard F.

    2000-01-01

    Heads and flow patterns in surficial aquifers can be strongly influenced by the presence of stationary surface-water bodies (lakes) that are in direct contact, vertically and laterally, with the aquifer. Conversely, lake stages can be significantly affected by the volume of water that seeps through the lakebed that separates the lake from the aquifer. For these reasons, a set of computer subroutines called the Lake Package (LAK3) was developed to represent lake/aquifer interaction in numerical simulations using the U.S. Geological Survey three-dimensional, finite-difference, modular ground-water flow model MODFLOW and the U.S. Geological Survey three-dimensional method-of-characteristics solute-transport model MOC3D. In the Lake Package described in this report, a lake is represented as a volume of space within the model grid which consists of inactive cells extending downward from the upper surface of the grid. Active model grid cells bordering this space, representing the adjacent aquifer, exchange water with the lake at a rate determined by the relative heads and by conductances that are based on grid cell dimensions, hydraulic conductivities of the aquifer material, and user-specified leakance distributions that represent the resistance to flow through the material of the lakebed. Parts of the lake may become ?dry? as upper layers of the model are dewatered, with a concomitant reduction in lake surface area, and may subsequently rewet when aquifer heads rise. An empirical approximation has been encoded to simulate the rewetting of a lake that becomes completely dry. The variations of lake stages are determined by independent water budgets computed for each lake in the model grid. This lake budget process makes the package a simulator of the response of lake stage to hydraulic stresses applied to the aquifer. Implementation of a lake water budget requires input of parameters including those representing the rate of lake atmospheric recharge and evaporation

  17. Tree canopy light interception estimates in almond and a walnut orchards using ground, low flying aircraft, and satellite based methods to improve irrigation scheduling programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosecrance, R. C.; Johnson, L.; Soderstrom, D.

    2016-12-01

    Canopy light interception is a main driver of water use and crop yield in almond and walnut production. Fractional green canopy cover (Fc) is a good indicator of light interception and can be estimated remotely from satellite using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data. Satellite-based Fc estimates could be used to inform crop evapotranspiration models, and hence support improvements in irrigation evaluation and management capabilities. Satellite estimates of Fc in almond and walnut orchards, however, need to be verified before incorporating them into irrigation scheduling or other crop water management programs. In this study, Landsat-based NDVI and Fc from NASA's Satellite Irrigation Management Support (SIMS) were compared with four estimates of canopy cover: 1. light bar measurement, 2. in-situ and image-based dimensional tree-crown analyses, 3. high-resolution NDVI data from low flying aircraft, and 4. orchard photos obtained via Google Earth and processed by an Image J thresholding routine. Correlations between the various estimates are discussed.

  18. Tree Canopy Light Interception Estimates in Almond and a Walnut Orchards Using Ground, Low Flying Aircraft, and Satellite Based Methods to Improve Irrigation Scheduling Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosecrance, Richard C.; Johnson, Lee; Soderstrom, Dominic

    2016-01-01

    Canopy light interception is a main driver of water use and crop yield in almond and walnut production. Fractional green canopy cover (Fc) is a good indicator of light interception and can be estimated remotely from satellite using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data. Satellite-based Fc estimates could be used to inform crop evapotranspiration models, and hence support improvements in irrigation evaluation and management capabilities. Satellite estimates of Fc in almond and walnut orchards, however, need to be verified before incorporating them into irrigation scheduling or other crop water management programs. In this study, Landsat-based NDVI and Fc from NASA's Satellite Irrigation Management Support (SIMS) were compared with four estimates of canopy cover: 1. light bar measurement, 2. in-situ and image-based dimensional tree-crown analyses, 3. high-resolution NDVI data from low flying aircraft, and 4. orchard photos obtained via Google Earth and processed by an Image J thresholding routine. Correlations between the various estimates are discussed.

  19. NASA Boeing 757 HIRF test series low power on-the-ground tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poggio, A.J.; Pennock, S.T.; Zacharias, R.A.; Avalle, C.A.; Carney, H.L. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Langley AFB, VA (United States). Langley Research Center

    1996-08-01

    The data acquisition phase of a program intended to provide data for the validation of computational, analytical, and experimental techniques for the assessment of electromagnetic effects in commercial transports; for the checkout of instrumentation for following test programs; and for the support of protection engineering of airborne systems has been completed. Funded by the NASA Fly-By-Light/ Power-By-Wire Program, the initial phase involved on-the-ground electromagnetic measurements using the NASA Boeing 757 and was executed in the LESLI Facility at the USAF Phillips Laboratory. The major participants in this project were LLNL, NASA Langley Research Center, Phillips Laboratory, and UIE, Inc. The tests were performed over a five week period during September through November, 1994. Measurements were made of the fields coupled into the aircraft interior and signals induced in select structures and equipment under controlled illumination by RF fields. A characterization of the ground was also performed to permit ground effects to be included in forthcoming validation exercises. This report and the associated test plan that is included as an appendix represent a definition of the overall on-the-ground test program. They include descriptions of the test rationale, test layout, and samples of the data. In this report, a detailed description of each executed test is provided, as is the data identification (data id) relating the specific test with its relevant data files. Samples of some inferences from the data that will be useful in protection engineering and EM effects mitigation are also presented. The test plan which guided the execution of the tests, a test report by UIE Inc., and the report describing the concrete pad characterization are included as appendices.

  20. DynaMax+ ground-tracking algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smock, Brandon; Gader, Paul; Wilson, Joseph

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method for performing ground-tracking using ground-penetrating radar (GPR). Ground-tracking involves identifying the air-ground interface, which is usually the dominant feature in a radar image but frequently is obscured or mimicked by other nearby elements. It is an important problem in landmine detection using vehicle-mounted systems because antenna motion, caused by bumpy ground, can introduce distortions in downtrack radar images, which ground-tracking makes it possible to correct. Because landmine detection is performed in real-time, any algorithm for ground-tracking must be able to run quickly, prior to other, more computationally expensive algorithms for detection. In this investigation, we first describe an efficient algorithm, based on dynamic programming, that can be used in real-time for tracking the ground. We then demonstrate its accuracy through a quantitative comparison with other proposed ground-tracking methods, and a qualitative comparison showing that its ground-tracking is consistent with human observations in challenging terrain.

  1. Analysis and Prediction of Weather Impacted Ground Stop Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao Xun

    2014-01-01

    When the air traffic demand is expected to exceed the available airport's capacity for a short period of time, Ground Stop (GS) operations are implemented by Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Traffic Flow Management (TFM). The GS requires departing aircraft meeting specific criteria to remain on the ground to achieve reduced demands at the constrained destination airport until the end of the GS. This paper provides a high-level overview of the statistical distributions as well as causal factors for the GSs at the major airports in the United States. The GS's character, the weather impact on GSs, GS variations with delays, and the interaction between GSs and Ground Delay Programs (GDPs) at Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR) are investigated. The machine learning methods are used to generate classification models that map the historical airport weather forecast, schedule traffic, and other airport conditions to implemented GS/GDP operations and the models are evaluated using the cross-validations. This modeling approach produced promising results as it yielded an 85% overall classification accuracy to distinguish the implemented GS days from the normal days without GS and GDP operations and a 71% accuracy to differentiate the GS and GDP implemented days from the GDP only days.

  2. Cross Calibration of TOMS, SBUV/2 and SCIAMACHY Radiances from Ground Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilsenrath, Ernest; Bhartia, P. K.; Bojkov, B.; Kowaleski, M.; Labow, G.; Ahmad, Z.

    2002-01-01

    We have shown that validation of radiances is a very effective means for correcting absolute accuracy and long term drifts of backscatter type satellite measurements. This method by-passes the algorithms used for both satellite and ground based measurements which are normally used to validate and correct the satellite data. A new method for satellite validation is planned which will compliment measurements from the existing ground-based networks. This method will employ very accurate comparisons between ground based zenith sky radiances and satellite nadir radiances. These comparisons will rely heavily on the experience derived from the Shuttle SBUV (SSBUV) program which provided a reference standard of radiance measurements for SBUV/2, TOMS, and GOME. This new measurement program, called 'Skyrad', employs two well established capabilities at the Goddard Space Flight Center, 1) the SSBUV calibration facilities and 2) the radiative transfer codes used for the TOMS and SBUV/2 algorithms and their subsequent refinements. Radiative transfer calculations show that ground based zenith sky and satellite nadir backscatter ultraviolet comparisons can be made very accurately under certain viewing conditions. The Skyrad instruments (SSBUV, Brewer spectrophotometers, and possibly others) will be calibrated and maintained to a precision of a few tenths of a percent. Skyrad data will then enable long term calibration of upcoming satellite instruments such as QuickTOMS, SBUV/2s and SCIAMACHY with a high degree of precision. This technique can be further employed to monitor the performance of future instruments such as GOMEZ, OMI, and OMPS. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  3. Validation Measures in CMMI

    CERN Document Server

    Khraiwesh, Mahmoud

    2011-01-01

    Validation is one of the software engineering disciplines that help build quality into software. The major objective of software validation process is to determine that the software performs its intended functions correctly and provide information about its quality and reliability. This paper identifies general measures for the specific goals and its specific practices of Validation Process Area (PA) in Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI). CMMI is developed by Software Engineering Institute (SEI). CMMI is a framework for improvement and assessment of a software development process. CMMI needs a measurement program that is practical. The method we used to define the measures is to apply the Goal Question Metrics (GQM) paradigm to the specific goals and its specific practices of Validation Process Area in CMMI.

  4. The Envisat-1 ground segment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ray; Ashton, Martin

    1995-03-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) Earth Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-1 and ERS-2) missions will be followed by the Polar Orbit Earth Mission (POEM) program. The first of the POEM missions will be Envisat-1. ESA has completed the design phase of the ground segment. This paper presents the main elements of that design. The main part of this paper is an overview of the Payload Data Segment (PDS) which is the core of the Envisat-1 ground segment, followed by two further sections which describe in more detail the facilities to be offered by the PDS for archiving and for user servcies. A further section describes some future issues for ground segment development. Logica was the prime contractor of a team of 18 companies which undertook the ESA financed architectural design study of the Envisat-1 ground segment. The outputs of the study included detailed specifications of the components that will acquire, process, archive and disseminate the payload data, together with the functional designs of the flight operations and user data segments.

  5. Optimization of a ground coupled heat pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, V.D.; Catan, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    A cooperative analytical project has optimized a horizontal ground coil heat pump system for the Pittsburgh climate. This is the first step in the exploration of several advanced designs including various ground coil devices and advanced heat pump components. The project made use of new and existing design tools to simulate system performance and determine first cost. The system life cycle cost was minimized while constraining the system to meet the design day cooling load using a function minimizing program. Among the system parameters considered were: air-to-refrigerant frontal area, air-to-refrigerant fin pitch, air-to-refrigerant air flowrate, compressor displacement, liquid-to-refrigerant coil length, liquid-to-refrigerant coil diameter, ground coil fluid flowrate, ground coil length, and ground coil depth.

  6. Ground Truth Collections at the MTI Core Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, A.J.

    2001-01-25

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) selected 13 sites across the continental US and one site in the western Pacific to serve as the primary or core site for collection of ground truth data for validation of MTI science algorithms. Imagery and ground truth data from several of these sites are presented in this paper. These sites are the Comanche Peak, Pilgrim and Turkey Point power plants, Ivanpah playas, Crater Lake, Stennis Space Center and the Tropical Western Pacific ARM site on the island of Nauru. Ground truth data includes water temperatures (bulk and skin), radiometric data, meteorological data and plant operating data. The organizations that manage these sites assist SRTC with its ground truth data collections and also give the MTI project a variety of ground truth measurements that they make for their own purposes. Collectively, the ground truth data from the 14 core sites constitute a comprehensive database for science algorithm validation.

  7. Mercury and Cyanide Data Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Document designed to offer data reviewers guidance in determining the validity ofanalytical data generated through the USEPA Contract Laboratory Program (CLP) Statement ofWork (SOW) ISM01.X Inorganic Superfund Methods (Multi-Media, Multi-Concentration)

  8. ICP-MS Data Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Document designed to offer data reviewers guidance in determining the validity ofanalytical data generated through the USEPA Contract Laboratory Program Statement ofWork (SOW) ISM01.X Inorganic Superfund Methods (Multi-Media, Multi-Concentration)

  9. Validating an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) as a Method for Selecting Foreign Medical Graduates for a Pre-Internship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Robert; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A study supported use of the objective structured clinical examination for screening foreign medical graduates (n=67) wishing to enter a preinternship program in at the University of Toronto. However, it also showed that appropriate training for the candidates was the internship, not preinternship, program. (MSE)

  10. Program Evaluation Using the Project Dakota Parent Satisfaction Survey. A Manual for Administration and Interpretation of Findings Using a Validated Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, JoAnne; Jacks, Robert

    This manual presents an instrument (the Dakota Parent Satisfaction Survey) and procedures for evaluating parent satisfaction with early intervention programs. The survey procedures have been used to evaluate seven early intervention programs each year since 1985. Development of the Survey is discussed, including the identification of program…

  11. Systematic Model for Validating Equipment Uses in Selected Marketing and Distribution Education Programs. Final Report, February 1, 1980-June 30, 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildan, Kate; Buckner, Leroy

    Research was conducted to provide a model for selecting equipment for marketing and distributive education programs that was required for the development of the skills or competencies needed to perform in marketing and distribution occupation. A research of the literature identified both competency statements for three program areas--Fashion…

  12. Systematic Model for Validating Equipment Uses in Selected Marketing and Distribution Education Programs. Final Report, February 1, 1980-June 30, 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildan, Kate; Buckner, Leroy

    Research was conducted to provide a model for selecting equipment for marketing and distributive education programs that was required for the development of the skills or competencies needed to perform in marketing and distribution occupation. A research of the literature identified both competency statements for three program areas--Fashion…

  13. A Microswitch-Cluster Program to Foster Adaptive Responses and Head Control in Students with Multiple Disabilities: Replication and Validation Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Oliva, Doretta; Gatti, Michela; Manfredi, Francesco; Megna, Gianfranco; La Martire, Maria L.; Tota, Alessia; Smaldone, Angela; Groeneweg, Jop

    2008-01-01

    A program relying on microswitch clusters (i.e., combinations of microswitches) and preferred stimuli was recently developed to foster adaptive responses and head control in persons with multiple disabilities. In the last version of this program, preferred stimuli (a) are scheduled for adaptive responses occurring in combination with head control…

  14. Grounded theory and leadership research: A critical realist perspective

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The methodology of grounded theory has great potential to contribute to our understanding of leadership within particular substantive contexts. However, our notions of good science might constrain these contributions. We argue that for grounded theorists a tension might exist between a desire to create a contextualised theory of leadership and a desire for scientifically justified issues of validity and generalizable theory. We also explore how the outcome of grounded theory research can crea...

  15. Construct Validation of a Program to Increase Use of Self-Regulation for Physical Activity among Overweight and Obese Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petosa, R. Lingyak; Silfee, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies have revealed that overweight adults with type 2 diabetes have low rates of physical activity and are resistant to change. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to use construct validation of intervention methods to examine the impact of a 4-week behavioral intervention on the use of self-regulation skills for physical…

  16. A Validity Study on Predictors of Success in Resident Master’s Degree Programs at the Air Force Institute of Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    1. 0% DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE *AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio I Dzsnm ION SATE A I A edfor ... k 6 or more examinees is a useful and valid measurement i.e., within reliability limits (10:3). The GRE and the GMAT are divided into various

  17. Microbiological Validation of the IVGEN System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The principal purpose of this report is to describe a validation process that can be performed in part on the ground prior to launch, and in space for the IVGEN system. The general approach taken is derived from standard pharmaceutical industry validation schemes modified to fit the special requirements of in-space usage.

  18. Airport Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Tommy

    travels safely and efficiently through the airport. When an aircraft lands, a significant number of tasks must be performed by different groups of ground crew, such as fueling, baggage handling and cleaning. These tasks must be complete before the aircraft is able to depart, as well as check......-in and security services. These tasks are collectively known as ground handling, and are the major source of activity with airports. The business environments of modern airports are becoming increasingly competitive, as both airports themselves and their ground handling operations are changing to private...... ownership. As airports are in competition to attract airline routes, efficient and reliable ground handling operations are imperative for the viability and continued growth of both airports and airlines. The increasing liberalization of the ground handling market prompts ground handling operators...

  19. [Introduction to grounded theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shou-Yu; Windsor, Carol; Yates, Patsy

    2012-02-01

    Grounded theory, first developed by Glaser and Strauss in the 1960s, was introduced into nursing education as a distinct research methodology in the 1970s. The theory is grounded in a critique of the dominant contemporary approach to social inquiry, which imposed "enduring" theoretical propositions onto study data. Rather than starting from a set theoretical framework, grounded theory relies on researchers distinguishing meaningful constructs from generated data and then identifying an appropriate theory. Grounded theory is thus particularly useful in investigating complex issues and behaviours not previously addressed and concepts and relationships in particular populations or places that are still undeveloped or weakly connected. Grounded theory data analysis processes include open, axial and selective coding levels. The purpose of this article was to explore the grounded theory research process and provide an initial understanding of this methodology.

  20. Ground Vehicle Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    Ground Vehicle Robotics Jim Parker Associate Director, Ground Vehicle Robotics UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution Statement A. Approved for public...DATE 20 AUG 2013 2. REPORT TYPE Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED 09-05-2013 to 15-08-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ground Vehicle Robotics 5a...Willing to take Risk on technology -User Evaluated -Contested Environments -Operational Data Applied Robotics for Installation & Base Ops -Low Risk

  1. The Grounded Theory Bookshelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian B. Martin, Ph.D.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Bookshelf will provide critical reviews and perspectives on books on theory and methodology of interest to grounded theory. This issue includes a review of Heaton’s Reworking Qualitative Data, of special interest for some of its references to grounded theory as a secondary analysis tool; and Goulding’s Grounded Theory: A practical guide for management, business, and market researchers, a book that attempts to explicate the method and presents a grounded theory study that falls a little short of the mark of a fully elaborated theory.Reworking Qualitative Data, Janet Heaton (Sage, 2004. Paperback, 176 pages, $29.95. Hardcover also available.

  2. Common Ground Between Three Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehuda Peled

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The Triwizard program with Israel brought together students from three different communities: an Israeli Arab school, an Israeli Jewish school, and an American public school with few Jews and even fewer Muslims. The two Israeli groups met in Israel to find common ground and overcome their differences through dialogue and understanding. They communicated with the American school via technology such as video-conferencing, Skype, and emails. The program culminated with a visit to the U.S. The goal of the program was to embark upon a process that would bring about intercultural awareness and acceptance at the subjective level, guiding all involved to develop empathy and an insider's view of the other's culture. It was an attempt to have a group of Israeli high school students and a group of Arab Israeli students who had a fearful, distrustful perception of each other find common ground and become friends. TriWizard was designed to have participants begin a dialogue about issues, beliefs, and emotions based on the premise that cross-cultural training strategies that are effective in changing knowledge are those that engage the emotions, and actively develop empathy and an insider's views of another culture focused on what they have in common. Participants learned that they could become friends despite their cultural differences.

  3. ISS Logistics Hardware Disposition and Metrics Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Toneka R.

    2010-01-01

    I was assigned to the Logistics Division of the International Space Station (ISS)/Spacecraft Processing Directorate. The Division consists of eight NASA engineers and specialists that oversee the logistics portion of the Checkout, Assembly, and Payload Processing Services (CAPPS) contract. Boeing, their sub-contractors and the Boeing Prime contract out of Johnson Space Center, provide the Integrated Logistics Support for the ISS activities at Kennedy Space Center. Essentially they ensure that spares are available to support flight hardware processing and the associated ground support equipment (GSE). Boeing maintains a Depot for electrical, mechanical and structural modifications and/or repair capability as required. My assigned task was to learn project management techniques utilized by NASA and its' contractors to provide an efficient and effective logistics support infrastructure to the ISS program. Within the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) I was exposed to Logistics support components, such as, the NASA Spacecraft Services Depot (NSSD) capabilities, Mission Processing tools, techniques and Warehouse support issues, required for integrating Space Station elements at the Kennedy Space Center. I also supported the identification of near-term ISS Hardware and Ground Support Equipment (GSE) candidates for excessing/disposition prior to October 2010; and the validation of several Logistics Metrics used by the contractor to measure logistics support effectiveness.

  4. Methodology for Validating Building Energy Analysis Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkoff, R.; Wortman, D.; O' Doherty, B.; Burch, J.

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this report was to develop a validation methodology for building energy analysis simulations, collect high-quality, unambiguous empirical data for validation, and apply the validation methodology to the DOE-2.1, BLAST-2MRT, BLAST-3.0, DEROB-3, DEROB-4, and SUNCAT 2.4 computer programs. This report covers background information, literature survey, validation methodology, comparative studies, analytical verification, empirical validation, comparative evaluation of codes, and conclusions.

  5. Comparison of a Validated LC/MS/MS Method with a Validated GC/MS Method for the Analysis of Zeranol and its Related Mycotoxin Residues in Bovine Urine Samples Collected During Argentina's Residue Monitoring Control Program (2005-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echarte, Juan M; Fernández, Damián C; Chiacchio, Carlos A; Torres Leedham, Verónica M

    2014-01-01

    The use of zeranol (ZRL), a resorcylic acid lactone, in food animal production has been banned in Argentina since 2004. To enforce this regulation, a GC/MS method developed by the official laboratory was used to confirm ZRL, taleranol, and α- and β-zearalenol from suspect samples. A few years later, a more sensitive LC/MS/MS method was also developed for testing these four analytes plus zearalenone. Both methods were validated according to local standards that are equivalent to 657/2002/EC, and the GC/MS method was accredited under ISO/International Electrotechnical Commission 17025. This paper describes the analytical methods, compares their performances, and presents conclusions derived from their results. When these methods were used on national control plans in which about 1262 samples were analyzed annually over the 2005-2011 sampling period, the incidence rate for noncompliant samples analyzed by GC/MS ranged from 0.3 to 4%. Of the 1500 samples analyzed in 2012 by both methods, the noncompliance incidence rate was only 0.3%.

  6. Pesticides in Ground Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    1996-01-01

    Review af: Jack E. Barbash & Elizabeth A. Resek (1996). Pesticides in Ground Water. Distribution trends and governing factors. Ann Arbor Press, Inc. Chelsea, Michigan. pp 588.......Review af: Jack E. Barbash & Elizabeth A. Resek (1996). Pesticides in Ground Water. Distribution trends and governing factors. Ann Arbor Press, Inc. Chelsea, Michigan. pp 588....

  7. Pesticides in Ground Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    1996-01-01

    Review af: Jack E. Barbash & Elizabeth A. Resek (1996). Pesticides in Ground Water. Distribution trends and governing factors. Ann Arbor Press, Inc. Chelsea, Michigan. pp 588.......Review af: Jack E. Barbash & Elizabeth A. Resek (1996). Pesticides in Ground Water. Distribution trends and governing factors. Ann Arbor Press, Inc. Chelsea, Michigan. pp 588....

  8. Space Shuttle navigation validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragsdale, A.

    The validation of the guidance, navigation, and control system of the Space Shuttle is explained. The functions of the ascent, on-board, and entry mission phases software of the navigation system are described. The common facility testing, which evaluates the simulations to be used in the navigation validation, is examined. The standard preflight analysis of the operational modes of the navigation software and the post-flight navigation analysis are explained. The conversion of the data into a useful reference frame and the use of orbit parameters in the analysis of the data are discussed. Upon entry the data received are converted to flags, ratios, and residuals in order to evaluate performance and detect errors. Various programs developed to support navigation validation are explained. A number of events that occurred with the Space Shuttle's navigation system are described.

  9. Communication, concepts and grounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velde, Frank

    2015-02-01

    This article discusses the relation between communication and conceptual grounding. In the brain, neurons, circuits and brain areas are involved in the representation of a concept, grounding it in perception and action. In terms of grounding we can distinguish between communication within the brain and communication between humans or between humans and machines. In the first form of communication, a concept is activated by sensory input. Due to grounding, the information provided by this communication is not just determined by the sensory input but also by the outgoing connection structure of the conceptual representation, which is based on previous experiences and actions. The second form of communication, that between humans or between humans and machines, is influenced by the first form. In particular, a more successful interpersonal communication might require forms of situated cognition and interaction in which the entire representations of grounded concepts are involved.

  10. Application of modified vector fitting to grounding system modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, D.; Camargo, M.; Herrera, J.; Torres, H. [National University of Colombia (Colombia). Research Program on Acquisition and Analysis of Signals - PAAS], Emails: dyjimeneza@unal.edu.co, mpcamargom@unal.edu.co; Vargas, M. [Siemens S.A. - Power Transmission and Distribution - Energy Services (Colombia)

    2007-07-01

    The transient behavior of grounding systems (GS) influences greatly the performance of electrical networks under fault conditions. This fact has led the authors to present an application of the Modified Vector Fitting (MVF)1 methodology based upon the frequency response of the system, in order to find a rational function approximation and an equivalent electrical network whose transient behavior is similar to the original one of the GS. The obtained network can be introduced into the EMTP/ATP program for simulating the transient behavior of the GS. The MVF technique, which is a modification of the Vector Fitting (VF) technique, allows identifying state space models from the Frequency Domain Response for both single and multiple input-output systems. In this work, the methodology is used to fit the frequency response of a grounding grid, which is computed by means of the Hybrid Electromagnetic Model (HEM), finding the relation between voltages and input currents in two points of the grid in frequency domain. The model obtained with the MVF shows a good agreement with the frequency response of the GS. Besides, the model is tested in EMTP/ATP finding a good fitting with the calculated data, which demonstrates the validity and usefulness of the MVF. (author)

  11. Face validity of VIS-Ed: a visualization program for teaching medical students and residents the biomechanics of cervical spine trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courteille, Olivier; Ho, Johnson; Fahlstedt, Madelen; Fors, Uno; Felländer-Tsai, Li; Hedman, Leif; Möller, Hans

    2013-01-01

    This RCT study aimed to investigate if VIS-Ed (Visualization through Imaging and Simulation - Education) had the potential to improve medical student education and specialist training in clinical diagnosis and treatment of trauma patients. The participants' general opinion was reported as high in both groups (lecture vs. virtual patient (VP)). Face validity of the VIS-Ed for cervical spine trauma was demonstrated and the VP group reported higher stimulation and engagement compared to the lecture group. No significant difference in the knowledge test between both groups could be observed, confirming our null hypothesis that VIS-Ed was on par with a lecture.

  12. Relational grounding facilitates development of scientifically useful multiscale models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam Tai

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We review grounding issues that influence the scientific usefulness of any biomedical multiscale model (MSM. Groundings are the collection of units, dimensions, and/or objects to which a variable or model constituent refers. To date, models that primarily use continuous mathematics rely heavily on absolute grounding, whereas those that primarily use discrete software paradigms (e.g., object-oriented, agent-based, actor typically employ relational grounding. We review grounding issues and identify strategies to address them. We maintain that grounding issues should be addressed at the start of any MSM project and should be reevaluated throughout the model development process. We make the following points. Grounding decisions influence model flexibility, adaptability, and thus reusability. Grounding choices should be influenced by measures, uncertainty, system information, and the nature of available validation data. Absolute grounding complicates the process of combining models to form larger models unless all are grounded absolutely. Relational grounding facilitates referent knowledge embodiment within computational mechanisms but requires separate model-to-referent mappings. Absolute grounding can simplify integration by forcing common units and, hence, a common integration target, but context change may require model reengineering. Relational grounding enables synthesis of large, composite (multi-module models that can be robust to context changes. Because biological components have varying degrees of autonomy, corresponding components in MSMs need to do the same. Relational grounding facilitates achieving such autonomy. Biomimetic analogues designed to facilitate translational research and development must have long lifecycles. Exploring mechanisms of normal-to-disease transition requires model components that are grounded relationally. Multi-paradigm modeling requires both hyperspatial and relational grounding.

  13. Duke University's Quality Appearance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Joe

    2008-01-01

    The Grounds Services Unit at Duke University has implemented a new program that involves a process of self evaluation, which embraces the concept of perpetual and continuous improvement. The Quality Appearance Program (QAP) embellishes and expands upon the Quality Assurance Program concept, but with a twist to grounds management improvement…

  14. Development and Validation of an Interactive Efficient Dose Rates Distribution Calculation Program Arshield for Visualization of Radiation Field in Nuclear Power Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shuxiang; Zang, Qiyong; Zhang, Jingyu; Zhang, Han; Wang, Mengqi; Chen, Yixue

    2016-05-31

    Point kernel integration (PKI) method is widely used in the visualization of radiation field in engineering applications because of the features of quickly dealing with large-scale complicated geometry space problems. But the traditional PKI programs have a lot of restrictions, such as complicated modeling, complicated source setting, 3D fine mesh results statistics and large-scale computing efficiency. To break the traditional restrictions for visualization of radiation field, ARShield was developed successfully. The results show that ARShield can deal with complicated plant radiation shielding problems for visualization of radiation field. Compared with SuperMC and QAD, it can be seen that the program is reliable and efficient. Also, ARShield can meet the demands of calculation speediness and interactive operations of modeling and displaying 3D geometries on a graphical user interface, avoiding error modeling in calculation and visualization.

  15. Alignment validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALICE; ATLAS; CMS; LHCb; Golling, Tobias

    2008-09-06

    The four experiments, ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb are currently under constructionat CERN. They will study the products of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. All experiments are equipped with sophisticated tracking systems, unprecedented in size and complexity. Full exploitation of both the inner detector andthe muon system requires an accurate alignment of all detector elements. Alignmentinformation is deduced from dedicated hardware alignment systems and the reconstruction of charged particles. However, the system is degenerate which means the data is insufficient to constrain all alignment degrees of freedom, so the techniques are prone to converging on wrong geometries. This deficiency necessitates validation and monitoring of the alignment. An exhaustive discussion of means to validate is subject to this document, including examples and plans from all four LHC experiments, as well as other high energy experiments.

  16. Ground State Spin Logic

    CERN Document Server

    Whitfield, J D; Biamonte, J D

    2012-01-01

    Designing and optimizing cost functions and energy landscapes is a problem encountered in many fields of science and engineering. These landscapes and cost functions can be embedded and annealed in experimentally controllable spin Hamiltonians. Using an approach based on group theory and symmetries, we examine the embedding of Boolean logic gates into the ground state subspace of such spin systems. We describe parameterized families of diagonal Hamiltonians and symmetry operations which preserve the ground state subspace encoding the truth tables of Boolean formulas. The ground state embeddings of adder circuits are used to illustrate how gates are combined and simplified using symmetry. Our work is relevant for experimental demonstrations of ground state embeddings found in both classical optimization as well as adiabatic quantum optimization.

  17. Strong ground motion prediction using virtual earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denolle, M A; Dunham, E M; Prieto, G A; Beroza, G C

    2014-01-24

    Sedimentary basins increase the damaging effects of earthquakes by trapping and amplifying seismic waves. Simulations of seismic wave propagation in sedimentary basins capture this effect; however, there exists no method to validate these results for earthquakes that have not yet occurred. We present a new approach for ground motion prediction that uses the ambient seismic field. We apply our method to a suite of magnitude 7 scenario earthquakes on the southern San Andreas fault and compare our ground motion predictions with simulations. Both methods find strong amplification and coupling of source and structure effects, but they predict substantially different shaking patterns across the Los Angeles Basin. The virtual earthquake approach provides a new approach for predicting long-period strong ground motion.

  18. SANSMIC Validation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Paula D.; Rudeen, David Keith; Lord, David L.

    2014-08-01

    SANSMIC is solution mining software that was developed and utilized by SNL in its role as geotechnical advisor to the US DOE SPR for planning purposes. Three SANSMIC leach modes - withdrawal, direct, and reverse leach - have been revalidated with multiple test cases for each mode. The withdrawal mode was validated using high quality data from recent leach activity while the direct and reverse modes utilized data from historical cavern completion reports. Withdrawal results compared very well with observed data, including the location and size of shelves due to string breaks with relative leached volume differences ranging from 6 - 10% and relative radius differences from 1.5 - 3%. Profile comparisons for the direct mode were very good with relative leached volume differences ranging from 6 - 12% and relative radius differences from 5 - 7%. First, second, and third reverse configurations were simulated in order to validate SANSMIC over a range of relative hanging string and OBI locations. The first-reverse was simulated reasonably well with relative leached volume differences ranging from 1 - 9% and relative radius differences from 5 - 12%. The second-reverse mode showed the largest discrepancies in leach profile. Leached volume differences ranged from 8 - 12% and relative radius differences from 1 - 10%. In the third-reverse, relative leached volume differences ranged from 10 - 13% and relative radius differences were %7E4 %. Comparisons to historical reports were quite good, indicating that SANSMIC is essentially the same as documented and validated in the early 1980's.

  19. Computerized assessment of pedophilic sexual interest through self-report and viewing time: reliability, validity, and classification accuracy of the affinity program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokros, Andreas; Gebhard, Michael; Heinz, Volker; Marschall, Roland W; Nitschke, Joachim; Glasgow, David V; Gress, Carmen L Z; Laws, D Richard

    2013-06-01

    Affinity is a computerized assessment tool that combines viewing time and self-report measures of sexual interest. The present study was designed to assess the diagnostic properties of Affinity with respect to sexual interest in prepubescent children. Reliability of both self-report and viewing time components was estimated to be high. The group profile of a sample of pedophilic adult male child molesters (n = 42, all of whom admitted their offenses) differed from the group profiles of male community controls (n = 95) and male nonsexual offenders (n = 27), respectively. More specifically, both ratings and viewing times for images showing small children or prejuvenile children were significantly higher within the child molester sample than in either of the other two groups, attesting to the validity of the measures. Overall classification accuracy, however, was mediocre: A multivariate classification routine yielded 50% sensitivity for child molester status at the cost of 13% false positives. The implications for forensic use of Affinity are discussed.

  20. Theory and Validation for the Collision Module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    1999-01-01

    This report describes basic modelling principles, the theoretical background and validation examples for the Collision Module for the computer program DAMAGE.......This report describes basic modelling principles, the theoretical background and validation examples for the Collision Module for the computer program DAMAGE....

  1. Ground Vehicle Robotics Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    Mr. Jim Parker Associate Director Ground Vehicle Robotics Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release Report Documentation Page...Briefing 3. DATES COVERED 01-07-2012 to 01-08-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ground Vehicle Robotics Presentation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...ABSTRACT Provide Transition-Ready, Cost-Effective, and Innovative Robotics and Control System Solutions for Manned, Optionally-Manned, and Unmanned

  2. St. John Shallow-water Ground Validation Transects

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic habitat maps of the nearshore marine environment of St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of remotely sensed imagery. The...

  3. St. John Benthic Habitat Mapping - Moderate Depth Ground Validation Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic habitats of the moderate-depth marine environment in and around the Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument were mapped using a combination of...

  4. Ship Grounding on Rock - II. Validation and Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    1997-01-01

    , it is demonstrated that the proposed methodology issufficiently fast to be used in a probabilistic framework. Based on a set of stochastic inputparameters, the probability density functions for the damage extents of a single hull VLCC werederived from simulations. Possible future applications of the methodology...

  5. Northeast Puerto Rico and Culebra Island Ground Validation Points 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This shapefile denotes the location of underwater photos and videos taken in shallow water (0-35m) benthic habitats surrounding Northeast Puerto Rico and Culebra...

  6. Mixed-mode data validation program research%混合方式数据验证方案的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘成; 张凯; 陈建勋

    2013-01-01

    Traditional data verification plan have the problem of user experience deficiency, system efficiency and high coupling degree of validation code with other system module, brought by simplicity and work division indeterminacy. This paper poses a definite division strategy based on complexity verification to validate places, designing a plan using event listener on the client side to reduce coupling degree of UI and verification code and utilizing Aop and Valang to separate data verification and business logic module on the server. This plan is very practical in projects as it can realize data verification function with short code and low coupling.%针对传统数据验证方案在验证场所的单一性或验证场所分工不明确而导致的用户体验差、系统效率低,以及验证代码与系统其它模块耦合度较大的问题,提出了一种以验证复杂度为依据来进行验证场所在数据验证方面的明确分工策略.设计了一个在客户端采用事件监听减少客户端UI和验证代码的耦合度,在服务器端运用Aop和Valang分离数据验证模块和业务逻辑模块的方案.该方案能以少代码、低耦合的方式实现数据验证功能,并在实际项目中有较好的实用性.

  7. Ground Enterprise Management System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Emergent Space Technologies Inc. proposes to develop the Ground Enterprise Management System (GEMS) for spacecraft ground systems. GEMS will provide situational...

  8. Ground-water conditions in Whisky Flat, Mineral County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakin, T.E.; Robinson, T.W.

    1950-01-01

    As a part of the State-wide cooperative program between the Office of the State Engineer of Nevada and the U.S. Geological Survey, the Ground Water Branch of the Geological Survey made a reconnaissance study of ground-water conditions in Whisky Flat, Mineral County, Nevada.

  9. Procedures for ground-water investigations. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    This manual was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to document the procedures used to carry out and control the technical aspects of ground-water investigations at the PNL. Ground-water monitoring procedures are developed and used in accordance with the PNL Quality Assurance Program.

  10. A Theory-Grounded Measure of Adolescents’ Response to a Media Literacy Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Kathryn; Yanovitzky, Itzhak; Carpenter, Amanda; Banerjee, Smita C.; Magsamen-Conrad, Kate; Hecht, Michael L.; Elek, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Media literacy interventions offer promising avenues for the prevention of risky health behaviors among children and adolescents, but current literature remains largely equivocal about their efficacy. The primary objective of this study was to develop and test theoretically-grounded measures of audiences’ degree of engagement with the content of media literacy programs based on the recognition that engagement (and not participation per se) can better explain and predict individual variations in the effects of these programs. We tested the validity and reliability of a measure of engagement with two different samples of 10th grade high school students who participated in a pilot and actual test of a brief media literacy curriculum. Four message evaluation factors (involvement, perceived novelty, critical thinking, personal reflection) emerged and demonstrate acceptable reliability. PMID:28042522

  11. Reinventing Grounded Theory: Some Questions about Theory, Ground and Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gary; James, David

    2006-01-01

    Grounded theory's popularity persists after three decades of broad-ranging critique. In this article three problematic notions are discussed--"theory," "ground" and "discovery"--which linger in the continuing use and development of grounded theory procedures. It is argued that far from providing the epistemic security promised by grounded theory,…

  12. Achieving integrated convoys: cargo unmanned ground vehicle development and experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zych, Noah; Silver, David; Stager, David; Green, Colin; Pilarski, Thomas; Fischer, Jacob

    2013-05-01

    The Cargo UGV project was initiated in 2010 with the aim of developing and experimenting with advanced autonomous vehicles capable of being integrated unobtrusively into manned logistics convoys. The intent was to validate two hypotheses in complex, operationally representative environments: first, that unmanned tactical wheeled vehicles provide a force protection advantage by creating standoff distance to warfighters during ambushes or improvised explosive device attacks; and second, that these UGVs serve as force multipliers by enabling a single operator to control multiple unmanned assets. To assess whether current state-of-the-art autonomous vehicle technology was sufficiently capable to permit resupply missions to be executed with decreased risk and reduced manpower, and to assess the effect of UGVs on customary convoy tactics, the Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory and the Joint Ground Robotics Enterprise sponsored Oshkosh Defense and the National Robotics Engineering Center to equip two standard Marine Corps cargo trucks for autonomous operation. This paper details the system architecture, hardware implementation, and software modules developed to meet the vehicle control, perception, and planner requirements compelled by this application. Additionally, the design of a custom human machine interface and an accompanying training program are described, as is the creation of a realistic convoy simulation environment for rapid system development. Finally, results are conveyed from a warfighter experiment in which the effectiveness of the training program for novice operators was assessed, and the impact of the UGVs on convoy operations was observed in a variety of scenarios via direct comparison to a fully manned convoy.

  13. Validation according to OIE criteria of a monoclonal, recombinant p26-based, serologic competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as screening method in surveillance programs for the detection of Equine infectious anemia virus antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, Roberto; Autorino, Gian Luca; Ricci, Ida; Frontoso, Raffaele; Rosone, Francesca; Simula, Massimiliano; Scicluna, Maria Teresa

    2016-03-01

    The Italian National Reference Center for equine infectious anemia (CRAIE; Rome, Italy) developed and validated a monoclonal, recombinant p26-based competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) for the detection of EIA virus antibodies employing the 2010 criteria of the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). The following parameters were evaluated: cutoff values, repeatability, reproducibility, concordance, analytical sensitivity (Se), absolute analytical specificity (Sp), and diagnostic Se and Sp. Positive and negative predictive values were also defined in relation to the estimated prevalence. When the cELISA was used as a screening test for 96,468 samples in the Italian EIA surveillance program, 17% more EIA cases were detected than by the agar gel immunodiffusion test, and the apparent diagnostic Sp estimated from these samples was 99.8%, which was more than the diagnostic Sp (80.2%) estimated from validation. The high Se and Sp of the cELISA confirm its fit for purpose as a screening test. © 2015 The Author(s).

  14. Computer simulation of ground coupled storage in a series solar assisted heat pump system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, John W.; Metz, Philip D.

    1979-01-01

    A quantitative study of the effect of thermal coupling between the ground and the heat storage element of a series solar assisted heat pump system is presented. The transient simulation computer program TRNSYS is used to simulate the solar portion of this system. A program to simulate the thermal interaction of the storage element with the ground is incorporated into TRNSYS as a sub-routine. This program calculates heat flow through the ground in discrete steps over space and time. Boundary conditions are established. The ground coupled storage is driven by thermal inputs from the solar portion of the system and from the changing ambient and ground temperatures.

  15. Detection of ground ice using ground penetrating radar method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gennady M. Stoyanovich; Viktor V. Pupatenko; Yury A. Sukhobok

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a ground penetrating radar (GPR) application for the detection of ground ice. We com-bined a reflection traveltime curves analysis with a frequency spectrogram analysis. We found special anomalies at specific traces in the traveltime curves and ground boundaries analysis, and obtained a ground model for subsurface structure which allows the ground ice layer to be identified and delineated.

  16. Collison and Grounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, G.; Ji, C.; Kuhala, P.;

    2006-01-01

    COMMITTEE MANDATE Concern for structural arrangements on ships and floating structures with regard to their integrity and adequacy in the events of collision and grounding, with the view towards risk assessment and management. Consideration shall be given to the frequency of occurrence, the proba......COMMITTEE MANDATE Concern for structural arrangements on ships and floating structures with regard to their integrity and adequacy in the events of collision and grounding, with the view towards risk assessment and management. Consideration shall be given to the frequency of occurrence...

  17. Engineering uses of physics-based ground motion simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Jack W.; Luco, Nicolas; Abrahamson, Norman A.; Graves, Robert W.; Maechling, Phillip J.; Olsen, Kim B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes validation methodologies focused on enabling ground motion simulations to be used with confidence in engineering applications such as seismic hazard analysis and dynmaic analysis of structural and geotechnical systems. Numberical simullation of ground motion from large erthquakes, utilizing physics-based models of earthquake rupture and wave propagation, is an area of active research in the earth science community. Refinement and validatoin of these models require collaboration between earthquake scientists and engineering users, and testing/rating methodolgies for simulated ground motions to be used with confidence in engineering applications. This paper provides an introduction to this field and an overview of current research activities being coordinated by the Souther California Earthquake Center (SCEC). These activities are related both to advancing the science and computational infrastructure needed to produce ground motion simulations, as well as to engineering validation procedures. Current research areas and anticipated future achievements are also discussed.

  18. Coding Issues in Grounded Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Alireza

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses grounded theory as one of the qualitative r