WorldWideScience

Sample records for ground surface reflection

  1. Exploration of a Polarized Surface Bidirectional Reflectance Model Using the Ground-Based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Diner

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate characterization of surface reflection is essential for retrieval of aerosols using downward-looking remote sensors. In this paper, observations from the Ground-based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (GroundMSPI are used to evaluate a surface polarized bidirectional reflectance distribution function (PBRDF model. GroundMSPI is an eight-band spectropolarimetric camera mounted on a rotating gimbal to acquire pushbroom imagery of outdoor landscapes. The camera uses a very accurate photoelastic-modulator-based polarimetric imaging technique to acquire Stokes vector measurements in three of the instrument’s bands (470, 660, and 865 nm. A description of the instrument is presented, and observations of selected targets within a scene acquired on 6 January 2010 are analyzed. Data collected during the course of the day as the Sun moved across the sky provided a range of illumination geometries that facilitated evaluation of the surface model, which is comprised of a volumetric reflection term represented by the modified Rahman-Pinty-Verstraete function plus a specular reflection term generated by a randomly oriented array of Fresnel-reflecting microfacets. While the model is fairly successful in predicting the polarized reflection from two grass targets in the scene, it does a poorer job for two manmade targets (a parking lot and a truck roof, possibly due to their greater degree of geometric organization. Several empirical adjustments to the model are explored and lead to improved fits to the data. For all targets, the data support the notion of spectral invariance in the angular shape of the unpolarized and polarized surface reflection. As noted by others, this behavior provides valuable constraints on the aerosol retrieval problem, and highlights the importance of multiangle observations.

  2. Use of reflective surfaces on roadway embankment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders Stuhr; Doré, Guy

    2007-01-01

    adherence characteristics for roadway use. In Kangerlussuaq Airport, western Greenland, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) has been used to compare the variation of the frost table underneath a normal black asphalt surface and a more reflective surface (white paint). The GPR results have shown a clear...

  3. Preliminary results of ground reflectivity measurements using noise radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maślikowski, Łukasz; Krysik, Piotr; Dąbrowska-Zielińska, Katarzyna; Kowalik, Wanda; Bartold, Maciej

    2011-10-01

    The paper describes experimental L-band ground reflectivity measurement using noise radar demonstrator working as a scatterometer. The radar ground return is usually described with a scattering coefficient, a quantity that is independent from the scatterometer system. To calculate the coefficient in a function of incidence angle, range profile values obtained after range compression were used. In order to improve dynamic range of the measurement, antenna cross-path interference was removed using lattice filter. The ground return was measured at L band both for HH and VV polarizations of radar wave as well as for HV and VH crosspolarizations using log-periodic antennas placed at a 10 m high mast directed towards a meadow surface. In the paper the theoretical considerations, noise radar setup, measurement campaign and the results are described.

  4. MODIS/TERRA MOD09GQ Surface Reflectance Daily L2G Global 250m

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODIS Surface Reflectance products provide an estimate of the surface spectral reflectance as it would be measured at ground level in the absence of atmospheric...

  5. MODIS/AQUA MYD09GQ Surface Reflectance Daily L2G Global 250m

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODIS Surface Reflectance products provide an estimate of the surface spectral reflectance as it would be measured at ground level in the absence of atmospheric...

  6. MODIS/AQUA MYD09A1 Surface Reflectance 8-Day L3 Global 500m

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODIS Surface Reflectance products provide an estimate of the surface spectral reflectance as it would be measured at ground level in the absence of atmospheric...

  7. MODIS/AQUA MYD09Q1 Surface Reflectance 8-Day L3 Global 250m

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODIS Surface Reflectance products provide an estimate of the surface spectral reflectance as it would be measured at ground level in the absence of atmospheric...

  8. MODIS/TERRA MOD09A1 Surface Reflectance 8-Day L3 Global 500m

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODIS Surface Reflectance products provide an estimate of the surface spectral reflectance as it would be measured at ground level in the absence of atmospheric...

  9. MODIS/TERRA MOD09Q1 Surface Reflectance 8-Day L3 Global 250m

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODIS Surface Reflectance products provide an estimate of the surface spectral reflectance as it would be measured at ground level in the absence of atmospheric...

  10. [The ground reflectance spectrum retrieval from ETM images].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun; Wu, Yu-Hang; Liu, Zhi-Ming; He, Hai-Jian

    2007-04-01

    Retrieval of ground reflectance spectrum from satellite sensor digital count requires knowledge of the atmospheric conditions. Images of spectral radiance from ground-atmosphere system recorded by the multi-spectral imager ETM which boarded Landsat-7 sensor can retrieve the ground reflectivity spectrum. The uncertainty of reflectance spectrum retrieval is no more than 17% at the band 1 of ETM, and less than 10% at the band 2 and 3 of ETM. It is superior to those arithmetics widely used at present. Retrieval of ground radiance spectrum from ground-atmosphere system can be used to synthesize the sRGB true color image, but the definition is not excellent. And it was proved that the color of the images can not reflect the actual nature of earth objects before being adjusted. And the accuracy of interpretation based on true color synthesized images is superior to those based on the source images. So the precision of such reflectance spectrum retrieval is not as good as expected if applied to the true color photography on the ground.

  11. Spectral invariance hypothesis study of polarized reflectance with Ground-based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (GroundMSPI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Christine L.; Kupinski, Meredith; Diner, David J.; Xu, Feng; Chipman, Russell A.

    2015-09-01

    Many models used to represent the boundary condition for the separation of atmospheric scattering from the surface reflectance in polarized remote sensing measurements assume that the polarized surface reflectance is spectrally neutral. The Spectral Invariance Hypothesis asserts that the magnitude and shape of the polarized bidirectional reflectance factor (pBRF) is equal for all wavelengths. In order to test this hypothesis, JPL's Ground-based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (GroundMSPI) is used to measure polarization information of different outdoor surface types. GroundMSPI measures the linear polarization Stokes parameters (I, Q, U), at three wavelengths, 470 nm, 660 nm, and 865 nm. The camera is mounted on a two-axis gimbal to accurately select the view azimuth and elevation directions. On clear sky days we acquired day-long scans of scenes that contain various surface types such as grass, dirt, cement, brick, and asphalt and placed a Spectralon panel in the camera field of view to provide a reflectance reference. Over the course of each day, changing solar position in the sky provides a large range of scattering angles for this study. The polarized bidirectional reflectance factor (pBRF) is measured for the three wavelengths and the best fit slope of the spectral correlation is reported. This work reports the range of best fit slopes measured for five region types.

  12. GPS Multipath Fade Measurements to Determine L-Band Ground Reflectivity Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavak, Adnan; Xu, Guang-Han; Vogel, Wolfhard J.

    1996-01-01

    In personal satellite communications, especially when the line-of-sight is clear, ground specular reflected signals along with direct signals are received by low gain, almost omni-directional subscriber antennas. A six-channel, C/A code processing, GPS receiver with an almost omni-directional patch antenna was used to take measurements over three types of ground to characterize 1.575 GHz specular ground reflections and ground dielectric properties. Fade measurements were taken over grass, asphalt, and lake water surfaces by placing the antenna in a vertical position at a fixed height from the ground. Electrical characteristics (conductivity and dielectric constant) of these surfaces (grass, asphalt, lake water) were obtained by matching computer simulations to the experimental results.

  13. A climatology of visible surface reflectance spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoogman, Peter; Liu, Xiong; Chance, Kelly; Sun, Qingsong; Schaaf, Crystal; Mahr, Tobias; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    We present a high spectral resolution climatology of visible surface reflectance as a function of wavelength for use in satellite measurements of ozone and other atmospheric species. The Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) instrument is planned to measure backscattered solar radiation in the 290-740 nm range, including the ultraviolet and visible Chappuis ozone bands. Observation in the weak Chappuis band takes advantage of the relative transparency of the atmosphere in the visible to achieve sensitivity to near-surface ozone. However, due to the weakness of the ozone absorption features this measurement is more sensitive to errors in visible surface reflectance, which is highly variable. We utilize reflectance measurements of individual plant, man-made, and other surface types to calculate the primary modes of variability of visible surface reflectance at a high spectral resolution, comparable to that of TEMPO (0.6 nm). Using the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Bidirection Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF)/albedo product and our derived primary modes we construct a high spatial resolution climatology of wavelength-dependent surface reflectance over all viewing scenes and geometries. The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) Lambertian Equivalent Reflectance (LER) product provides complementary information over water and snow scenes. Preliminary results using this approach in multispectral ultraviolet+visible ozone retrievals from the GOME-2 instrument show significant improvement to the fitting residuals over vegetated scenes.

  14. A Bayesian Reflection on Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Wolf

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The topic of this paper is a novel Bayesian continuous-basis field representation and inference framework. Within this paper several problems are solved: The maximally informative inference of continuous-basis fields, that is where the basis for the field is itself a continuous object and not representable in a finite manner; the tradeoff between accuracy of representation in terms of information learned, and memory or storage capacity in bits; the approximation of probability distributions so that a maximal amount of information about the object being inferred is preserved; an information theoretic justification for multigrid methodology. The maximally informative field inference framework is described in full generality and denoted the Generalized Kalman Filter. The Generalized Kalman Filter allows the update of field knowledge from previous knowledge at any scale, and new data, to new knowledge at any other scale. An application example instance, the inference of continuous surfaces from measurements (for example, camera image data, is presented.

  15. The reflectance characteristics of snow covered surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batten, E. S.

    1979-01-01

    Data analysis techniques were developed to most efficiently use available satellite measurements to determine and understand components of the surface energy budget for ice and snow-covered areas. The emphasis is placed on identifying the important components of the heat budget related to snow surfaces, specifically the albedo and the energy consumed in the melting process. Ice and snow charts are prepared by NOAA from satellite observations which map areas into three relative reflectivity zones. Field measurements are analyzed of the reflectivity of an open snow field to assist in the interpretation of the NOAA reflectivity zones.

  16. MODIS/TERRA MOD09A1 Surface Reflectance 8-Day L3 Global 500m Version 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODIS Surface Reflectance products provide an estimate of the surface spectral reflectance as it would be measured at ground level in the absence of atmospheric...

  17. MODIS/TERRA MOD09GA Surface Reflectance Daily L2G Global 1km and 500m

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODIS Surface Reflectance products provide an estimate of the surface spectral reflectance as it would be measured at ground level in the absence of atmospheric...

  18. MODIS/AQUA MYD09GA Surface Reflectance Daily L2G Global 1km and 500m

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODIS Surface Reflectance products provide an estimate of the surface spectral reflectance as it would be measured at ground level in the absence of atmospheric...

  19. MODIS/AQUA MYD09A1 Surface Reflectance 8-Day L3 Global 500m Version 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODIS Surface Reflectance products provide an estimate of the surface spectral reflectance as it would be measured at ground level in the absence of atmospheric...

  20. MODIS/AQUA MYD09Q1 Surface Reflectance 8-Day L3 Global 250m Version 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODIS Surface Reflectance products provide an estimate of the surface spectral reflectance as it would be measured at ground level in the absence of atmospheric...

  1. MODIS/AQUA MYD09CMG Surface Reflectance Daily L3 Global 0.05Deg CMG Version 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODIS Surface Reflectance products provide an estimate of the surface spectral reflectance as it would be measured at ground level in the absence of atmospheric...

  2. MODIS/AQUA MYD09GA Surface Reflectance Daily L2G Global 1km and 500m Version 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODIS Surface Reflectance products provide an estimate of the surface spectral reflectance as it would be measured at ground level in the absence of atmospheric...

  3. MODIS/TERRA MOD09GA Surface Reflectance Daily L2G Global 1km and 500m Version 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODIS Surface Reflectance products provide an estimate of the surface spectral reflectance as it would be measured at ground level in the absence of atmospheric...

  4. MODIS/TERRA MOD09CMG Surface Reflectance Daily L3 Global 0.05Deg CMG

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODIS Surface Reflectance products provide an estimate of the surface spectral reflectance as it would be measured at ground level in the absence of atmospheric...

  5. MODIS/AQUA MYD09CMG Surface Reflectance Daily L3 Global 0.05Deg CMG

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODIS Surface Reflectance products provide an estimate of the surface spectral reflectance as it would be measured at ground level in the absence of atmospheric...

  6. MODIS/AQUA MYD09GQ Surface Reflectance Daily L2G Global 250m Version 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODIS Surface Reflectance products provide an estimate of the surface spectral reflectance as it would be measured at ground level in the absence of atmospheric...

  7. MODIS/TERRA MOD09GQ Surface Reflectance Daily L2G Global 250m Version 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODIS Surface Reflectance products provide an estimate of the surface spectral reflectance as it would be measured at ground level in the absence of atmospheric...

  8. MODIS/TERRA MOD09CMG Surface Reflectance Daily L3 Global 0.05Deg CMG Version 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODIS Surface Reflectance products provide an estimate of the surface spectral reflectance as it would be measured at ground level in the absence of atmospheric...

  9. MODIS/TERRA MOD09Q1 Surface Reflectance 8-Day L3 Global 250m Version 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODIS Surface Reflectance products provide an estimate of the surface spectral reflectance as it would be measured at ground level in the absence of atmospheric...

  10. Simulation Tool for GNSS Ocean Surface Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høeg, Per; von Benzon, Hans-Henrik; Durgonics, Tibor

    2015-04-01

    GNSS coherent and incoherent reflected signals have the potential of deriving large scale parameters of ocean surfaces, as barotropic variability, eddy currents and fronts, Rossby waves, coastal upwelling, mean ocean surface heights, and patterns of the general ocean circulation. In the reflection zone the measurements may derive parameters as sea surface roughness, winds, waves, heights and tilts from the spectral measurements. Previous measurements from the top of mountains and airplanes have shown such results leading. The coming satellite missions, CYGNSS, COSMIC-2, and GEROS on the International Space Station, are focusing on GNSS ocean reflection measurements. Thus, simulation studies highlighting the assumptions for the data retrievals and the precision and the accuracy of such measurements are of interest for assessing the observational method. The theory of propagation of microwaves in the atmosphere is well established, and methods for propagation modeling range from ray tracing to numerical solutions to the wave equation. Besides ray tracing there are propagation methods that use mode theory and a finite difference solution to the parabolic equation. The presented propagator is based on the solution of the parabolic equation. The parabolic equation in our simulator is solved using the split-step sine transformation. The Earth's surface is modeled with the use of an impedance model. The value of the Earth impedance is given as a function of the range along the surface of the Earth. This impedance concept gives an accurate lower boundary condition in the determination of the electromagnetic field, and makes it possible to simulate reflections and the effects of transitions between different mediums. A semi-isotropic Philips spectrum is used to represent the air-sea interaction. Simulated GPS ocean surface reflections will be presented and discussed based on different ocean characteristics. The spectra of the simulated surface reflections will be analyzed

  11. Reflection and Refraction on Implicit Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Hu; Kai-Huai Qin; Hua-Wei Wang; Ya-Feng Li

    2006-01-01

    Implicit surfaces are often used in computer graphics. They can be easily modeled and rendered, and many objects are composed of them in our daily life. In this paper, based on the concept of virtual objects, a novel method of real-time rendering is presented for reflection and refraction on implicit surface. The method is used to construct virtual objects from real objects quickly, and then render the virtual objects as if they were real objects except for one more step of merging their images with the real objects' images. Characteristics of implicit surfaces are used to compute virtual objects effectively and quickly. GPUs (Graphics Processing Units) are used to compute virtual vertices quickly and further accelerate the computing and rendering processes. As a result, realistic effects of reflections and refractions on implicit surfaces are rendered in real time.

  12. Surface composition of Mercury from reflectance spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas, Faith

    1988-01-01

    The controversies surrounding the existing spectra of Mercury are discussed together with the various implications for interpretations of Mercury's surface composition. Special attention is given to the basic procedure used for reducing reflectance spectrophotometry data, the factors that must be accounted for in the reduction of these data, and the methodology for defining the portion of the surface contributing the greatest amount of light to an individual spectrum. The application of these methodologies to Mercury's spectra is presented.

  13. Reflectance Spectral Characteristics of Lunar Surface Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Liao Zou; Jian-Zhong Liu; Jian-Jun Liu; Tao Xu

    2004-01-01

    Based on a comprehensive analysis of the mineral composition of major lunar rocks (highland anorthosite, lunar mare basalt and KREEP rock), we investigate the reflectance spectral characteristics of the lunar rock-forming minerals, including feldspar, pyroxene and olivine. The affecting factors, the variation of the intensity of solar radiation with wavelength and the reflectance spectra of the lunar rocks are studied. We also calculate the reflectivity of lunar mare basalt and highland anorthosite at 300 nm, 415 nm, 750 nm, 900 nm, 950 nm and 1000 nm.It is considered that the difference in composition between lunar mare basalt and highland anorthosite is so large that separate analyses are needed in the study of the reflectivity of lunar surface materials in the two regions covered by mare basalt and highland anorthosite, and especially in the region with high Th contents, which may be the KREEP-distributed region.

  14. Reflection characteristics of a composite planar AMC surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruey-Bing Hwang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the reflection characteristics of a composite Artificial Magnetic Conductor (AMC surface consisting of multiple orthogonal gradient AMC surfaces arranged in a two-dimensional periodic pattern. The gradient AMC surface in this study consists of square metal patches of variable size printed on a grounded dielectric substrate. Due to the orthogonal placement of the gradient AMC surface, the incident energy of a plane wave normally incident on the composite AMC surface will be reflected into four major lobes away from the impinging direction. To achieve a systematical design, a simple formula based on array antenna theory was developed to determine the reflection pattern of the gradient AMC surface illuminated by a normal incident plane wave. A time-domain full-wave simulation was also carried out to calculate the electromagnetic fields in the structure and the far-field patterns. The scattering patterns of the structure were measured in an electromagnetic anechoic chamber. Results confirm the design principle and procedures in this research. Since such a composite AMC surface can be easily fabricated using the standard printed circuit board technique without via-hole process, it may have potential applications in beam-steering and radar cross section reduction.

  15. Conversion from surface wave to surface wave on reflection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the reflection and transmission of an incident surface wave to a pure surface wave state at another interface. This is allowed only for special media parameters: at least one of the media must be magnetic. We found such material characteristics that the obliquely incident surface wave...... can be transmitted without changing its direction (nevertheless the amplitude varies). For other media parameters, only normally incident surface waves can be converted to surface waves. We propose applications of the predicted conversion as a beam splitter and polarization filter for surface waves....

  16. Field theoretic description of partially reflective surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Barone, F E

    2014-01-01

    The issue of electric charges in interaction with partially reflective surfaces is addressed by means of field theoretic methods. It is proposed an enlarged Maxwell lagrangian, describing the electromagnetic field in the presence of a semitransparent surface, and its corresponding photon propagator is computed exactly. The amended Green function reduces to the one for a perfect conductor in the appropriate limit, and leads to the interaction between charges and surfaces with varying degrees of transparency, featured by a phenomenological parameter. The interaction found via image method is recovered, in the limiting case of perfect mirrors, as a testimony to the validity of the model.

  17. Artificial Ground Water Recharge with Surface Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heviánková, Silvie; Marschalko, Marian; Chromíková, Jitka; Kyncl, Miroslav; Korabík, Michal

    2016-10-01

    With regard to the adverse manifestations of the recent climatic conditions, Europe as well as the world have been facing the problem of dry periods that reduce the possibility of drawing drinking water from the underground sources. The paper aims to describe artificial ground water recharge (infiltration) that may be used to restock underground sources with surface water from natural streams. Among many conditions, it aims to specify the boundary and operational conditions of the individual aspects of the artificial ground water recharge technology. The principle of artificial infiltration lies in the design of a technical system, by means of which it is possible to conduct surplus water from one place (in this case a natural stream) into another place (an infiltration basin in this case). This way, the water begins to infiltrate into the underground resources of drinking water, while the mixed water composition corresponds to the water parameters required for drinking water.

  18. On automatic visual inspection of reflective surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulmann, Lionel

    1995-01-01

    . The first is the inspection of highly reflective aluminum sheets, used by the Danish company Bang & Olufsen, as a part of the exterior design and general appearance of their audio and video products. The second is the inspection of IBM hard disk read/write heads for defects during manufacturing. We have......, and inspection of hard disk sliders is presented....... in algorithms for detecting 3-dimensional surface damages based on images from a novel structured lighting setup enhancing the appearance of these defects in specular surfaces. A hardware implementable polynomial classifier structure has been described and compared to better known techniques based...

  19. Bacteriophages as surface and ground water tracers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Rossi

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages are increasingly used as tracers for quantitative analysis in both hydrology and hydrogeology. The biological particles are neither toxic nor pathogenic for other living organisms as they penetrate only a specific bacterial host. They have many advantages over classical fluorescent tracers and offer the additional possibility of multi-point injection for tracer tests. Several years of research make them suitable for quantitative transport analysis and flow boundary delineation in both surface and ground waters, including karst, fractured and porous media aquifers. This article presents the effective application of bacteriophages based on their use in differing Swiss hydrological environments and compares their behaviour to conventional coloured dye or salt-type tracers. In surface water and karst aquifers, bacteriophages travel at about the same speed as the typically referenced fluorescent tracers (uranine, sulphurhodamine G extra. In aquifers of interstitial porosity, however, they appear to migrate more rapidly than fluorescent tracers, albeit with a significant reduction in their numbers within the porous media. This faster travel time implies that a modified rationale is needed for defining some ground water protection area boundaries. Further developments of other bacteriophages and their documentation as tracer methods should result in an accurate and efficient tracer tool that will be a proven alternative to conventional fluorescent dyes.

  20. Bacteriophages as surface and ground water tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, P.; Dörfliger, N.; Kennedy, K.; Müller, I.; Aragno, M.

    Bacteriophages are increasingly used as tracers for quantitative analysis in both hydrology and hydrogeology. The biological particles are neither toxic nor pathogenic for other living organisms as they penetrate only a specific bacterial host. They have many advantages over classical fluorescent tracers and offer the additional possibility of multi-point injection for tracer tests. Several years of research make them suitable for quantitative transport analysis and flow boundary delineation in both surface and ground waters, including karst, fractured and porous media aquifers. This article presents the effective application of bacteriophages based on their use in differing Swiss hydrological environments and compares their behaviour to conventional coloured dye or salt-type tracers. In surface water and karst aquifers, bacteriophages travel at about the same speed as the typically referenced fluorescent tracers (uranine, sulphurhodamine G extra). In aquifers of interstitial porosity, however, they appear to migrate more rapidly than fluorescent tracers, albeit with a significant reduction in their numbers within the porous media. This faster travel time implies that a modified rationale is needed for defining some ground water protection area boundaries. Further developments of other bacteriophages and their documentation as tracer methods should result in an accurate and efficient tracer tool that will be a proven alternative to conventional fluorescent dyes.

  1. Reduction of Glass Surface Reflectance by Ion Beam Surface Modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Spitzer

    2011-03-11

    This is the final report for DOE contract DE-EE0000590. The purpose of this work was to determine the feasibility of the reduction of the reflection from the front of solar photovoltaic modules. Reflection accounts for a power loss of approximately 4%. A solar module having an area of one square meter with an energy conversion efficiency of 18% generates approximately 180 watts. If reflection loss can be eliminated, the power output can be increased to 187 watts. Since conventional thin-film anti-reflection coatings do not have sufficient environmental stability, we investigated the feasibility of ion beam modification of the glass surface to obtain reduction of reflectance. Our findings are generally applicable to all solar modules that use glass encapsulation, as well as commercial float glass used in windows and other applications. Ion implantation of argon, fluorine, and xenon into commercial low-iron soda lime float glass, standard float glass, and borosilicate glass was studied by implantation, annealing, and measurement of reflectance. The three ions all affected reflectance. The most significant change was obtained by argon implantation into both low-iron and standard soda-lime glass. In this way samples were formed with reflectance lower than can be obtained with a single-layer coatings of magnesium fluoride. Integrated reflectance was reduced from 4% to 1% in low-iron soda lime glass typical of the glass used in solar modules. The reduction of reflectance of borosilicate glass was not as large; however borosilicate glass is not typically used in flat plate solar modules. Unlike conventional semiconductor ion implantation doping, glass reflectance reduction was found to be tolerant to large variations in implant dose, meaning that the process does not require high dopant uniformity. Additionally, glass implantation does not require mass analysis. Simple, high current ion implantation equipment can be developed for this process; however, before the process

  2. Optical profiler for low reflectance ultrasmooth surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wingerden, Johannes; Frankena, Hans J.; van der Zwan, Bertram A.

    1992-11-01

    Design considerations are discussed for an optical profiler consisting of an interference microscope adapted for phase shifting interferometry. The influence of several errors on the accuracy of the profiler are estimated. Specific attention is paid to the case of low-reflectance surfaces, which have to be measured with extremely high precision (e.g., uncoated bowl-feed polished glass surfaces). The accuracy-limiting factor for the measurement of these low- reflectance ultrasmooth surfaces is shown to be the inaccuracy of the measured intensity. A significant increase in accuracy is obtained by using a mercury arc lamp, which has a very high brightness, yielding a larger intensity signal and thus reducing the signal-to-noise ratio. Extensive tests results of such an optical profiler using a Linnik interference microscope are presented, including the determination of the estimated reference profile accuracy. A measurement accuracy of 0.015 nm rms was obtained for uncoated glass surfaces by averaging 64 profiles. The accuracy of the estimated reference profile using 32 measurements was determined as being about 0.03 nm rms.

  3. Passive heating of the ground surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyburczyk, Anna

    2016-03-01

    The phenomenon of phase change is one of the most important contemporary issues of thermal engineering. In particular, this applies to all kinds of heat exchanger systems, which should achieve the highest possible efficiency while reducing investment and operating costs. Some of these systems are heat pipes or thermosyphons, which, among others, are used for the heat transfer, temperature stabilization and the regulation of heat flux density. Additionally, they are passive systems, and therefore do not require an external power supply. Heat pipes can be used to stabilize the surface temperature of roads and driveways. Large heat tubes can be applied for heating the surface of bridges and overpasses, which become icy in unfavorable climatic conditions. The paper presents research on the test facility, whose main component is a long vertical copper fin. The temperature at the base of the fin was kept constant for a given series of measurements. Heat receiving fluid was ethanol at atmospheric pressure. The measurement methodology and the results of investigations were discussed. The surface temperature distribution was measured with the infrared camera, and on this basis the local values of heat flow and the heat transfer coefficient were determined. The results were presented as boiling curves for both the fin with the smooth surface and the one covered with a metal capillary-porous structure. The results obtained are useful in the design of heat exchangers, including passive heating of the ground.

  4. Passive heating of the ground surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyburczyk Anna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of phase change is one of the most important contemporary issues of thermal engineering. In particular, this applies to all kinds of heat exchanger systems, which should achieve the highest possible efficiency while reducing investment and operating costs. Some of these systems are heat pipes or thermosyphons, which, among others, are used for the heat transfer, temperature stabilization and the regulation of heat flux density. Additionally, they are passive systems, and therefore do not require an external power supply. Heat pipes can be used to stabilize the surface temperature of roads and driveways. Large heat tubes can be applied for heating the surface of bridges and overpasses, which become icy in unfavorable climatic conditions. The paper presents research on the test facility, whose main component is a long vertical copper fin. The temperature at the base of the fin was kept constant for a given series of measurements. Heat receiving fluid was ethanol at atmospheric pressure. The measurement methodology and the results of investigations were discussed. The surface temperature distribution was measured with the infrared camera, and on this basis the local values of heat flow and the heat transfer coefficient were determined. The results were presented as boiling curves for both the fin with the smooth surface and the one covered with a metal capillary-porous structure. The results obtained are useful in the design of heat exchangers, including passive heating of the ground.

  5. On automatic visual inspection of reflective surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulmann, Lionel

    1995-01-01

    surveyed visual inspection system design methods and presented available image processing hardware to perform high resolution image capture. We present general usable practical visual inspection system solutions, when performing high resolution visual inspection of surfaces. We have presented known and new......This thesis descrbes different methods to perform automatic visual inspection of reflective manufactured products, with the aim of increasing productivity, reduce cost and improve the quality level of the production. We investigate two different systems performing automatic visual inspection...... in algorithms for detecting 3-dimensional surface damages based on images from a novel structured lighting setup enhancing the appearance of these defects in specular surfaces. A hardware implementable polynomial classifier structure has been described and compared to better known techniques based...

  6. Reflection of ground-source heat pump systems' application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGSuyun; LINZhenguo; WUXiangsheng; WUTian

    2003-01-01

    Ground-source heat pump system is an air-conditioning form of energy efficient and environment protection. This article introduced the forms of ground-source heat pump systems, analyzed the problems of ground-source heat pump systems in application in China, and put forward the solutions to these problems.

  7. Ground based measurements on reflectance towards validating atmospheric correction algorithms on IRS-P6 AWiFS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani Sharma, Anu; Kharol, Shailesh Kumar; Kvs, Badarinath; Roy, P. S.

    In Earth observation, the atmosphere has a non-negligible influence on the visible and infrared radiation which is strong enough to modify the reflected electromagnetic signal and at-target reflectance. Scattering of solar irradiance by atmospheric molecules and aerosol generates path radiance, which increases the apparent surface reflectance over dark surfaces while absorption by aerosols and other molecules in the atmosphere causes loss of brightness to the scene, as recorded by the satellite sensor. In order to derive precise surface reflectance from satellite image data, it is indispensable to apply the atmospheric correction which serves to remove the effects of molecular and aerosol scattering. In the present study, we have implemented a fast atmospheric correction algorithm to IRS-P6 AWiFS satellite data which can effectively retrieve surface reflectance under different atmospheric and surface conditions. The algorithm is based on MODIS climatology products and simplified use of Second Simulation of Satellite Signal in Solar Spectrum (6S) radiative transfer code, which is used to generate look-up-tables (LUTs). The algorithm requires information on aerosol optical depth for correcting the satellite dataset. The proposed method is simple and easy to implement for estimating surface reflectance from the at sensor recorded signal, on a per pixel basis. The atmospheric correction algorithm has been tested for different IRS-P6 AWiFS False color composites (FCC) covering the ICRISAT Farm, Patancheru, Hyderabad, India under varying atmospheric conditions. Ground measurements of surface reflectance representing different land use/land cover, i.e., Red soil, Chick Pea crop, Groundnut crop and Pigeon Pea crop were conducted to validate the algorithm and found a very good match between surface reflectance and atmospherically corrected reflectance for all spectral bands. Further, we aggregated all datasets together and compared the retrieved AWiFS reflectance with

  8. Prediction of ground surface displacement caused by grouting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭风琪; 刘晓潭; 童无期; 单智

    2015-01-01

    Ground surface displacement caused by grouting was calculated with stochastic medium theory. Ground surface displacement was assumed to be caused by the cavity expansion of grouting, slurry seepage, and slurry contraction. A prediction method of ground surface displacement was developed. The reliability of the presented method was validated through a comparison between theoretical results and results from engineering practice. Results show that the present method is effective. The effect of parameters on uplift displacement was illustrated under different grouting conditions. Through analysis, it can be known that the ground surface uplift is mainly caused by osmosis of slurry and the primary influence angle of stratum βdetermines the influence range of surface uplift. Besides, the results show that ground surface uplift displacement decreases notably with increasing depth of the grouting cavity but it increases with increasing diffusion radius of grout and increasing grouting pressure.

  9. Non-Lambertian effects on remote sensing of surface reflectance and vegetation index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T. Y.; Kaufman, Y. J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of non-Lambertian reflection from a homogeneous surface on remote sensing of the surface reflectance and vegetation index from a satellite. Remote measurement of the surface characteristics is perturbed by atmospheric scattering of sun light. This scattering tends to smooth the angular dependence of non-Lambertian surface reflectances, an effect that is not present in the case of Lambertian surfaces. This effect is calculated to test the validity of a Lambertian assumption used in remote sensing. For the three types of vegetations considered in this study, the assumption of Lambertian surface can be used satisfactorily in the derivation of surface reflectance from remotely measured radiance for a view angle outside the backscattering region. Within the backscattering region, however, the use of the assumption can result in a considerable error in the derived surface reflectance. Accuracy also deteriorates with increasing solar zenith angle. The angular distribution of the surface reflectance derived from remote measurements is smoother than that at the surface. The effect of surface non-Lambertianity on remote sensing of vegetation index is very weak. Since the effect is similiar in the visible and near infrared part of the solar spectrum for the vegetations treated in this study, it is canceled in deriving the vegetation index. The effect of the diffuse skylight on surface reflectance measurements at ground level is also discussed.

  10. Photodetachment of H- near a Partially Reflecting Surface-Ⅰ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Afaq

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical and interpretative study on the subject of photodetachment of H- near a partially reflecting surface is presented,and the absorption effect of the surface is investigated on the total and differential cross sections using a theoretical imaging method.To understand the absorption effect,a reflection parameter K is introduced as a multiplicative factor to the outgoing detached-electron wave of H- propagating towards the wall.The reflection parameter measures.how much electron wave would reflect from the surface;K=0 corresponds to no reflection and K=1 corresponds to the total reflection.

  11. Modeling visible and near-infrared snow surface reflectance-simulation and validation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyi Wu; Ling Tong

    2011-01-01

    Retrieving snow surface reflectance is difficult in optical remote sensing.Hence,this letter evaluates five surface reflectance models,including the Ross-Li,Roujean,Walthall,modified Rahman and Staylor models,in terms of their capacities to capture snow reflectance signatures using ground measurements in Antarctica.The biases of all the models are less than 0.0003 in both visible and near-infrared regions.Moreover,with the exception of the Staylor model,all models have root-mean-square errors of around 0.02,indicating that they can simulate the reflectance magnitude well.The R2 performances of the Ross-Li and Roujean models are higher than those of the others,indicating that these two models can capture the angle distribution of snow surface reflectance better.The bidirectional reflectance distribution flmction (BRDF) characterizes the angular distribution of surface reflection[1,2].It plays an important role in performing atmospheric correction,detecting land cover types,and calculating other biophysical parameters[3].Howcver,the retrieval of snow BRDF/albedo is always a difficult issue in the application of remotely sensed information.%Retrieving snow surface reflectance is difficult in optical remote sensing. Hence, this letter evaluates five surface reflectance models, including the Ross-Li, Roujean, Walthall, modified Rahman and Staylor models, in terms of their capacities to capture snow reflectance signatures using ground measurements in Antarctica. The biases of all the models are less than 0.0003 in both visible and near-infrared regions. Moreover, with the exception of the Staylor model, all models have root-mean-square errors of around 0.02, indicating that they can simulate the reflectance magnitude well. The R2 performances of the Ross-Li and Roujean models are higher than those of the others, indicating that these two models can capture the angle distribution of snow surface reflectance better.

  12. Reflecting on E-Recruiting Research Using Grounded Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolfswinkel, Joost; Furtmüller, Elfi; Wilderom, Celeste

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic review of the e-Recruiting literature through a grounded theory lens. The large number of publications and the increasing diversity of publications on e-Recruiting research, as the most studied area within e-HRM (Electronic Human Resource Management), calls for a syn

  13. Retrieval of background surface reflectance with BRD components from pre-running BRDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungwon; Lee, Kyeong-Sang; Jin, Donghyun; Lee, Darae; Han, Kyung-Soo

    2016-10-01

    Many countries try to launch satellite to observe the Earth surface. As important of surface remote sensing is increased, the reflectance of surface is a core parameter of the ground climate. But observing the reflectance of surface by satellite have weakness such as temporal resolution and being affected by view or solar angles. The bidirectional effects of the surface reflectance may make many noises to the time series. These noises can lead to make errors when determining surface reflectance. To correct bidirectional error of surface reflectance, using correction model for normalized the sensor data is necessary. A Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) is making accuracy higher method to correct scattering (Isotropic scattering, Geometric scattering, Volumetric scattering). To correct bidirectional error of surface reflectance, BRDF was used in this study. To correct bidirectional error of surface reflectance, we apply Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) to retrieve surface reflectance. And we apply 2 steps for retrieving Background Surface Reflectance (BSR). The first step is retrieving Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution (BRD) coefficients. Before retrieving BSR, we did pre-running BRDF to retrieve BRD coefficients to correct scatterings (Isotropic scattering, Geometric scattering, Volumetric scattering). In pre-running BRDF, we apply BRDF with observed surface reflectance of SPOT/VEGETATION (VGT-S1) and angular data to get BRD coefficients for calculating scattering. After that, we apply BRDF again in the opposite direction with BRD coefficients and angular data to retrieve BSR as a second step. As a result, BSR has very similar reflectance to one of VGT-S1. And reflectance in BSR is shown adequate. The highest reflectance of BSR is not over 0.4μm in blue channel, 0.45μm in red channel, 0.55μm in NIR channel. And for validation we compare reflectance of clear sky pixel from SPOT/VGT status map data. As a result of

  14. Near-ground cooling efficacies of trees and high-albedo surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinson, R M [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-05-01

    Daytime summer urban heat islands arise when the prevalence of dark-colored surfaces and lack of vegetation make a city warmer than neighboring countryside. Two frequently-proposed summer heat island mitigation measures are to plant trees and to increase the albedo (solar reflectivity) of ground surfaces. This dissertation examines the effects of these measures on the surface temperature of an object near the ground, and on solar heating of air near the ground. Near-ground objects include people, vehicles, and buildings. The variation of the surface temperature of a near-ground object with ground albedo indicates that a rise in ground albedo will cool a near-ground object only if the object`s albedo exceeds a critical value. This critical value of object albedo depends on wind speed, object geometry, and the height of the atmospheric thermal boundary layer. It ranges from 0.15 to 0.37 for a person. If an object has typical albedo of 0.3, increasing the ground albedo by.

  15. Classic Grounded Theory to Analyse Secondary Data: Reality and Reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine Andrews

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper draws on the experiences of two researchers and discusses how they conducted a secondary data analysis using classic grounded theory. The aim of the primary study was to explore first-time parents’ postnatal educational needs. A subset of the data from the primary study (eight transcripts from interviews with fathers was used for the secondary data analysis. The objectives of the secondary data analysis were to identify the challenges of using classic grounded theory with secondary data and to explore whether the re-analysis of primary data using a different methodology would yield a different outcome. Through the process of re-analysis a tentative theory emerged on ‘developing competency as a father’. Challenges encountered during this re-analysis included the small dataset, the pre-framed data, and limited ability for theoretical sampling. This re-analysis proved to be a very useful learning tool for author 1(LA, who was a novice with classic grounded theory.

  16. Clarifying Analysis and Interpretation in Grounded Theory: Using a Conditional Relationship Guide and Reflective Coding Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Wilson Scott PhD

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Although qualitative methods, grounded theory included, cannot be reduced to formulaic procedures, research tools can clarify the process. The authors discuss two instruments supporting grounded theory analysis and interpretation using two examples from doctoral students. The conditional relationship guide contextualizes the central phenomenon and relates categories linking structure with process. The reflective coding matrix serves as a bridge to the final phase of grounded theory analysis, selective coding and interpretation, and, ultimately, to substantive theory generation.

  17. Simulations of direct and reflected wave trajectories for ground-based GNSS-R experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, N.; Frappart, F.; Ramillien, G.; Darrozes, J.; Desjardins, C.; Gegout, P.; Pérosanz, F.; Biancale, R.

    2014-10-01

    The detection of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals that are reflected off the surface, along with the reception of direct GNSS signals, offers a unique opportunity to monitor water level variations over land and ocean. The time delay between the reception of the direct and reflected signals gives access to the altitude of the receiver over the reflecting surface. The field of view of the receiver is highly dependent on both the orbits of the GNSS satellites and the configuration of the study site geometries. A simulator has been developed to determine the location of the reflection points on the surface accurately by modeling the trajectories of GNSS electromagnetic waves that are reflected by the surface of the Earth. Only the geometric problem was considered using a specular reflection assumption. The orbit of the GNSS constellation satellites (mainly GPS, GLONASS and Galileo), and the position of a fixed receiver, are used as inputs. Four different simulation modes are proposed, depending on the choice of the Earth surface model (local plane, osculating sphere or ellipsoid) and the consideration of topography likely to cause masking effects. Angular refraction effects derived from adaptive mapping functions are also taken into account. This simulator was developed to determine where the GNSS-R receivers should be located to monitor a given study area efficiently. In this study, two test sites were considered: the first one at the top of the 65 m Cordouan lighthouse in the Gironde estuary, France, and the second one on the shore of Lake Geneva (50 m above the reflecting surface), at the border between France and Switzerland. This site is hidden by mountains in the south (orthometric altitude up to 2000 m), and overlooking the lake in the north (orthometric altitude of 370 m). For this second test site configuration, reflections occur until 560 m from the receiver. The planimetric (arc length) differences (or altimetric difference as WGS84

  18. Impedance of Surface Footings on Layered Ground

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Clausen, Johan Christian

    2005-01-01

    Traditionally only the static bearing capacity and stiffness of the ground is considered in the design of wind turbine foundations. However, modern wind turbines are flexible structures with resonance frequencies as low as 0.2 Hz. Unfortunately, environmental loads and the passage of blades past...... the tower may lead to excitation with frequencies of the same order of magnitude. Therefore, dynamic soil-structure interaction has to be accounted for in order to get an accurate prediction of the structural response. In this paper the particular problem of a rigid foundation on a layered subsoil...

  19. Impedance of Surface Footings on Layered Ground

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Clausen, Johan

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally only the static bearing capacity and stiffness of the ground is considered in the design of wind turbine foundations. However, modern wind turbines are flexible structures with resonance frequencies as low as 0.2 Hz. Unfortunately, environmental loads and the passage of blades past...... the tower may lead to excitation with frequencies of the same order of magnitude. Therefore, dynamic soilstructure interaction has to be accounted for in order to get an accurate prediction of the structural response. In this paper the particular problem of a rigid foundation on a layered subsoil...

  20. Polyfluorinated chemicals in European surface waters, ground- and drinking waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eschauzier, C.; de Voogt, P.; Brauch, H.-J.; Lange, F.T.; Knepper, T.P.; Lange, F.T.

    2012-01-01

    Polyfluorinated chemicals (PFCs), especially short chain fluorinated alkyl sulfonates and carboxylates, are ubiquitously found in the environment. This chapter aims at giving an overview of PFC concentrations found in European surface, ground- and drinking waters and their behavior during convention

  1. Polyfluorinated chemicals in European surface waters, ground- and drinking waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eschauzier, C.; de Voogt, P.; Brauch, H.-J.; Lange, F.T.; Knepper, T.P.; Lange, F.T.

    2012-01-01

    Polyfluorinated chemicals (PFCs), especially short chain fluorinated alkyl sulfonates and carboxylates, are ubiquitously found in the environment. This chapter aims at giving an overview of PFC concentrations found in European surface, ground- and drinking waters and their behavior during

  2. Simulation Tool for GNSS Ocean Surface Reflections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Per; von Benzon, Hans-Henrik; Durgonics, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    on the International Space Station, are focusing on GNSS ocean reflection measurements. Thus, simulation studies highlighting the assumptions for the data retrievals and the precision and the accuracy of such measurements are of interest for assessing the observational method.The theory of propagation of microwaves...

  3. Shallow Alluvial Aquifer Ground Water System and Surface Water/Ground Water Interaction, Boulder Creek, Boulder, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, K. P.; Ge, S.; Crifasi, R. R.

    2006-12-01

    Water chemistry in Boulder Creek, Colorado, shows significant variation as the Creek flows through the City of Boulder [Barber et al., 2006]. This variation is partially due to ground water inputs, which are not quantitatively understood. The purpose of this study is (1) to understand ground water movement in a shallow alluvial aquifer system and (2) to assess surface water/ground water interaction. The study area, encompassing an area of 1 mi2, is located at the Sawhill and Walden Ponds area in Boulder. This area was reclaimed by the City of Boulder and Boulder County after gravel mining operations ceased in the 1970's. Consequently, ground water has filled in the numerous gravel pits allowing riparian vegetation regrowth and replanting. An integrated approach is used to examine the shallow ground water and surface water of the study area through field measurements, water table mapping, graphical data analysis, and numerical modeling. Collected field data suggest that lateral heterogeneity exists throughout the unconsolidated sediment. Alluvial hydraulic conductivities range from 1 to 24 ft/day and flow rates range from 0.01 to 2 ft/day. Preliminary data analysis suggests that ground water movement parallels surface topography and does not noticeably vary with season. Recharge via infiltrating precipitation is dependent on evapotranspiration (ET) demands and is influenced by preferential flow paths. During the growing season when ET demand exceeds precipitation rates, there is little recharge; however recharge occurs during cooler months when ET demand is insignificant. Preliminary data suggest that the Boulder Creek is gaining ground water as it traverses the study area. Stream flow influences the water table for distances up to 400 feet. The influence of stream flow is reflected in the zones relatively low total dissolved solids concentration. A modeling study is being conducted to synthesize aquifer test data, ground water levels, and stream flow data. The

  4. Photodetachment of H$^{-}$ near a partial reflecting surface

    OpenAIRE

    Afaq, A.

    2007-01-01

    Theoretical and interpretative study on the subject of photodetachment of H$^{-}$ near a partial reflecting surface is presented, and the absorption effect of the surface is investigated on the total and differential cross sections using a theoretical imaging method. To understand the absorption effect, a reflection parameter $K$ is introduced as a multiplicative factor to the outgoing detached-electron wave of H$^-$ propagating toward the wall. The reflection parameter measures, how much ele...

  5. Digital Modeling Phenomenon Of Surface Ground Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Voina

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available With the development of specialized software applications it was possible to approach and resolve complex problems concerning automating and process optimization for which are being used field data. Computerized representation of the shape and dimensions of the Earth requires a detailed mathematical modeling, known as "digital terrain model". The paper aims to present the digital terrain model of Vulcan mining, Hunedoara County, Romania. Modeling consists of a set of mathematical equations that define in detail the surface of Earth and has an approximate surface rigorously and mathematical, that calculated the land area. Therefore, the digital terrain model means a digital representation of the earth's surface through a mathematical model that approximates the land surface modeling, which can be used in various civil and industrial applications in. To achieve the digital terrain model of data recorded using linear and nonlinear interpolation method based on point survey which highlights the natural surface studied. Given the complexity of this work it is absolutely necessary to know in detail of all topographic elements of work area, without the actions to be undertaken to project and manipulate would not be possible. To achieve digital terrain model, within a specialized software were set appropriate parameters required to achieve this case study. After performing all steps we obtained digital terrain model of Vulcan Mine. Digital terrain model is the complex product, which has characteristics that are equivalent to the specialists that use satellite images and information stored in a digital model, this is easier to use.

  6. Simulation of laser beam reflection at the sea surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenger, Frédéric; Repasi, Endre

    2011-05-01

    A 3D simulation of the reflection of a Gaussian shaped laser beam on the dynamic sea surface is presented. The simulation is suitable for both the calculation of images of SWIR (short wave infrared) imaging sensor and for determination of total detected power of reflected laser light for a bistatic configuration of laser source and receiver at different atmospheric conditions. Our computer simulation comprises the 3D simulation of a maritime scene (open sea/clear sky) and the simulation of laser light reflected at the sea surface. The basic sea surface geometry is modeled by a composition of smooth wind driven gravity waves. The propagation model for water waves is applied for sea surface animation. To predict the view of a camera in the spectral band SWIR the sea surface radiance must be calculated. This is done by considering the emitted sea surface radiance and the reflected sky radiance, calculated by MODTRAN. Additionally, the radiances of laser light specularly reflected at the wind-roughened sea surface are modeled in the SWIR band considering an analytical statistical sea surface BRDF (bidirectional reflectance distribution function). This BRDF model considers the statistical slope statistics of waves and accounts for slope-shadowing of waves that especially occurs at flat incident angles of the laser beam and near horizontal detection angles of reflected irradiance at rough seas. Simulation results are presented showing the variation of the detected laser power dependent on the geometric configuration of laser, sensor and wind characteristics.

  7. Evaluation of ground stiffness parameters using continuous surface wave geophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Anne; Foged, Niels

    2000-01-01

    -small-strain stiffness of the ground Gmax. Continuous surface wave geophysics offers a quick, non-intrusive and economical way of making such measurements. This paper reviews the continuous surface wave techniques and evaluates, in engineering terms, the applicability of the method to the site investigation industry....

  8. Evaluation of ground stiffness parameters using continuous surface wave geophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Anne; Foged, Niels

    2000-01-01

    -small-strain stiffness of the ground Gmax. Continuous surface wave geophysics offers a quick, non-intrusive and economical way of making such measurements. This paper reviews the continuous surface wave techniques and evaluates, in engineering terms, the applicability of the method to the site investigation industry....

  9. Power productivity of the ground surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutu A.I.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Here there is presented an attempt to estimate the efficiency degree when working with soil surface through the different methods of valorization incident solar radiation. Such technical methods are being analyzed as (solar collectors, photovoltaic cells, solar thermal power plants, power cultures field (bushes, wheat, sunflower, maize, rape, sorghum as well as microalgae crops. Here is the description of advantages and disadvantages for each group in part out of these three. The technical methods are up to date from the efficiency utilization view-point of industrial area. Microalgae crops are similar to technical methods from this point of view.

  10. Measuring and modeling the effect of surface moisture on the spectral reflectance of coastal beach sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolet, Corjan; Poortinga, Ate; Roosjen, Peter; Bartholomeus, Harm; Ruessink, Gerben

    2014-01-01

    Surface moisture is an important supply limiting factor for aeolian sand transport, which is the primary driver of coastal dune development. As such, it is critical to account for the control of surface moisture on available sand for dune building. Optical remote sensing has the potential to measure surface moisture at a high spatio-temporal resolution. It is based on the principle that wet sand appears darker than dry sand: it is less reflective. The goals of this study are (1) to measure and model reflectance under controlled laboratory conditions as function of wavelength (λ) and surface moisture (θ) over the optical domain of 350-2500 nm, and (2) to explore the implications of our laboratory findings for accurately mapping the distribution of surface moisture under natural conditions. A laboratory spectroscopy experiment was conducted to measure spectral reflectance (1 nm interval) under different surface moisture conditions using beach sand. A non-linear increase of reflectance upon drying was observed over the full range of wavelengths. Two models were developed and tested. The first model is grounded in optics and describes the proportional contribution of scattering and absorption of light by pore water in an unsaturated sand matrix. The second model is grounded in soil physics and links the hydraulic behaviour of pore water in an unsaturated sand matrix to its optical properties. The optical model performed well for volumetric moisture content θ 0.97), but underestimated reflectance for θ between 24-30% (R2 > 0.92), most notable around the 1940 nm water absorption peak. The soil-physical model performed very well (R2 > 0.99) but is limited to 4% > θ < 24%. Results from a field experiment show that a short-wave infrared terrestrial laser scanner (λ = 1550 nm) can accurately relate surface moisture to reflectance (standard error 2.6%), demonstrating its potential to derive spatially extensive surface moisture maps of a natural coastal beach.

  11. Measuring and modeling the effect of surface moisture on the spectral reflectance of coastal beach sand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corjan Nolet

    Full Text Available Surface moisture is an important supply limiting factor for aeolian sand transport, which is the primary driver of coastal dune development. As such, it is critical to account for the control of surface moisture on available sand for dune building. Optical remote sensing has the potential to measure surface moisture at a high spatio-temporal resolution. It is based on the principle that wet sand appears darker than dry sand: it is less reflective. The goals of this study are (1 to measure and model reflectance under controlled laboratory conditions as function of wavelength (λ and surface moisture (θ over the optical domain of 350-2500 nm, and (2 to explore the implications of our laboratory findings for accurately mapping the distribution of surface moisture under natural conditions. A laboratory spectroscopy experiment was conducted to measure spectral reflectance (1 nm interval under different surface moisture conditions using beach sand. A non-linear increase of reflectance upon drying was observed over the full range of wavelengths. Two models were developed and tested. The first model is grounded in optics and describes the proportional contribution of scattering and absorption of light by pore water in an unsaturated sand matrix. The second model is grounded in soil physics and links the hydraulic behaviour of pore water in an unsaturated sand matrix to its optical properties. The optical model performed well for volumetric moisture content θ 0.97, but underestimated reflectance for θ between 24-30% (R2 > 0.92, most notable around the 1940 nm water absorption peak. The soil-physical model performed very well (R2 > 0.99 but is limited to 4% > θ < 24%. Results from a field experiment show that a short-wave infrared terrestrial laser scanner (λ = 1550 nm can accurately relate surface moisture to reflectance (standard error 2.6%, demonstrating its potential to derive spatially extensive surface moisture maps of a natural coastal beach.

  12. Optical anisotropic reflectance from W720 LIPSS surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvennoinen, Martti; Penttinen, Niko; Hasoň, Stanislav; Silvennoinen, Raimo

    2013-05-01

    Optical anisotropic reflectance from laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) of stainless steel (W720LIPSS), which were produced by a femtosecond laser, were investigated by using polarized probe beam in a spectrophotometer. Remarkable repeatability in optical anisotropic reflectance was recognized.

  13. Controlled reflectance surfaces with film-coupled colloidal nanoantennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Antoine; Ciraci, Cristian; Mock, Jack J.; Hill, Ryan T.; Wang, Qiang; Wiley, Benjamin J.; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Smith, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Efficient and tunable absorption is essential for a variety of applications, such as the design of controlled emissivity surfaces for thermophotovoltaic devices1; tailoring of the infrared spectrum for controlled thermal dissipation2; and detector elements for imaging3. Metamaterials based on metallic elements are particularly efficient as absorbing media, because both the electrical and the magnetic properties of a metamaterial can be tuned by structured design4. To date, metamaterial absorbers in the infrared or visible range have been fabricated using lithographically patterned metallic structures2,5–9, making them inherently difficult to produce over large areas and hence reducing their applicability. We demonstrate here an extraordinarily simple method to create a metamaterial absorber by randomly adsorbing chemically synthesized silver nanocubes onto a nanoscale thick polymer spacer layer on a gold film –making no effort to control the spatial arrangement of the cubes on the film– and show that the film-coupled nanocubes provide a reflectance spectrum that can be tailored by varying the geometry. Each nanocube is the optical analog of the well-known grounded patch antenna, with a nearly identical local field structure that is modified by the plasmonic response of the metal dielectric function, and with an anomalously large absorption efficiency that can be partly attributed to an interferometric effect10. The absorptivity of large surface areas can be controlled using this method, at scales out of reach of lithographic approaches like e-beam lithography otherwise required to manipulate matter at the nanometer scale. PMID:23222613

  14. Asymmetric light reflectance from metal nanoparticle arrays on dielectric surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, K.; Pan, W.; Zhu, J. F.; Li, J. C.; Gao, N.; Liu, C.; Ji, L.; Yu, E. T.; Kang, J.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetric light reflectance associated with localized surface plasmons excited in metal nanoparticles on a quartz substrate is observed and analyzed. This phenomenon is explained by the superposition of two waves, the wave reflected by the air/quartz interface and that reflected by the metal nanoparticles, and the resulting interference effects. Far field behavior investigation suggests that zero reflection can be achieved by optimizing the density of metal nanoparticles. Near field behavior investigation suggests that the coupling efficiency of localized surface plasmon can be additionally enhanced by separating the metal NPs from substrates using a thin film with refractive index smaller than the substrate. The latter behavior is confirmed via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy studies using metal nanoparticles on Si/SiO2 substrates. PMID:26679353

  15. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

    1981-04-01

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium conentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

  16. Directional Reflective Surface Formed via Gradient-Impeding Acoustic Meta-Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyungjun; Kim, Jedo; Hur, Shin; Kwak, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Taesung

    2016-08-01

    Artificially designed acoustic meta-surfaces have the ability to manipulate sound energy to an extraordinary extent. Here, we report on a new type of directional reflective surface consisting of an array of sub-wavelength Helmholtz resonators with varying internal coiled path lengths, which induce a reflection phase gradient along a planar acoustic meta-surface. The acoustically reshaped reflective surface created by the gradient-impeding meta-surface yields a distinct focal line similar to a parabolic cylinder antenna, and is used for directive sound beamforming. Focused beam steering can be also obtained by repositioning the source (or receiver) off axis, i.e., displaced from the focal line. Besides flat reflective surfaces, complex surfaces such as convex or conformal shapes may be used for sound beamforming, thus facilitating easy application in sound reinforcement systems. Therefore, directional reflective surfaces have promising applications in fields such as acoustic imaging, sonic weaponry, and underwater communication.

  17. Directional Reflective Surface Formed via Gradient-Impeding Acoustic Meta-Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyungjun; Kim, Jedo; Hur, Shin; Kwak, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Taesung

    2016-01-01

    Artificially designed acoustic meta-surfaces have the ability to manipulate sound energy to an extraordinary extent. Here, we report on a new type of directional reflective surface consisting of an array of sub-wavelength Helmholtz resonators with varying internal coiled path lengths, which induce a reflection phase gradient along a planar acoustic meta-surface. The acoustically reshaped reflective surface created by the gradient-impeding meta-surface yields a distinct focal line similar to a parabolic cylinder antenna, and is used for directive sound beamforming. Focused beam steering can be also obtained by repositioning the source (or receiver) off axis, i.e., displaced from the focal line. Besides flat reflective surfaces, complex surfaces such as convex or conformal shapes may be used for sound beamforming, thus facilitating easy application in sound reinforcement systems. Therefore, directional reflective surfaces have promising applications in fields such as acoustic imaging, sonic weaponry, and underwater communication. PMID:27562634

  18. North American regional climate reconstruction from ground surface temperature histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaume-Santero, Fernando; Pickler, Carolyne; Beltrami, Hugo; Mareschal, Jean-Claude

    2016-12-01

    Within the framework of the PAGES NAm2k project, 510 North American borehole temperature-depth profiles were analyzed to infer recent climate changes. To facilitate comparisons and to study the same time period, the profiles were truncated at 300 m. Ground surface temperature histories for the last 500 years were obtained for a model describing temperature changes at the surface for several climate-differentiated regions in North America. The evaluation of the model is done by inversion of temperature perturbations using singular value decomposition and its solutions are assessed using a Monte Carlo approach. The results within 95 % confidence interval suggest a warming between 1.0 and 2.5 K during the last two centuries. A regional analysis, composed of mean temperature changes over the last 500 years and geographical maps of ground surface temperatures, show that all regions experienced warming, but this warming is not spatially uniform and is more marked in northern regions.

  19. Ground-based measurement of surface temperature and thermal emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owe, M.; Van De Griend, A. A.

    1994-01-01

    Motorized cable systems for transporting infrared thermometers have been used successfully during several international field campaigns. Systems may be configured with as many as four thermal sensors up to 9 m above the surface, and traverse a 30 m transect. Ground and canopy temperatures are important for solving the surface energy balance. The spatial variability of surface temperature is often great, so that averaged point measurements result in highly inaccurate areal estimates. The cable systems are ideal for quantifying both temporal and spatial variabilities. Thermal emissivity is also necessary for deriving the absolute physical temperature, and measurements may be made with a portable measuring box.

  20. Preschoolers' use of reflective properties: identification of reflections on partially transparent surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzo, E S; Wittgenstein, K M; Benson, K

    2001-12-01

    This exploratory study extended past studies of children's ability to reference the mirror as a tool in locating the source of reflected images to preschoolers' ability to use the affordances of a transparency. Thirty-six children (3.5 to 5 years old) were shown nonreflected lights and lights reflected on a partially transparent, glassy surface. Children did not spontaneously locate the source of the reflected image. However, they were able to verbally discriminate reflected from nonreflected images following training. These findings indicate that, although preschoolers may not spontaneously use transparencies as a perceptual tool, the ability to distinguish visual differences of reflected from nonreflected images on transparencies is likely within preschool children's developmental capacity.

  1. Effect of wildfires on surface reflectance from a savanna ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudyal, R.; Gatebe, C. K.; Ichoku, C. M.; Varnai, T.

    2015-12-01

    During an airborne field campaign in South Africa in 2005, NASA's Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) flew aboard South Africa Weather Service, Aerocommander 690A and measured surface bidirectional reflectance-distribution function (BRDF) over savanna comprised mostly of grasses and a few scattered trees. Savannas cover half the surface of Africa, large areas of Australia, South America, and India. . The region that was studied is located in Kruger National Park in northeastern South Africa, which was heavily affected by the wildfires. The CAR measured surface reflectance along its flight path covering both burned and unburned areas. . In this study, we compared surface reflectance between burnt and un-burnt areas at various wavelengths (340nm, 380nm, 472nm, 682nm, 870nm, 1036nm, 1219nm, 1273nm, and 2205nm) at satellite sub-pixel scales. We found a relative burnt surface reflectance decrease of between 8 and 65% due to fires. These results not only serve to highlight the importance of biomass burning and effects on the energy budgets, but also the need to determine the effects of albedo changes due to fires on soil moisture budget, evapotranspiration, infiltration, and runoff, all of which govern the land-surface component of the water cycle.

  2. Prediction of sound reflection by corrugated porous surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, J-F; Dazel, O; Gautier, G; Groby, J-P; Lauriks, W

    2011-04-01

    The coupled mode (CM) and finite-element methods (FEMs) are developed and used to predict the acoustic reflection coefficient of a semi-infinite porous medium with closely spaced two-dimensional (2D) periodical corrugations. These methods are also applied to predict the reflection coefficient of a periodic array of porous corrugations installed on an acoustically rigid surface. It is shown that the predictions by the both methods agree closely. The reflection coefficient and Brewster angle of total refraction for the corrugated semi-infinite medium predicted with these methods are compared against that predicted by the Biot/Tolstoy/Howe/Twersky and extended Twersky models. A similar analysis is carried out for porous corrugations set on a rigid backing. The behavior of the reflection coefficient and the pole in the expression for the reflection coefficient located close to grazing incidence is studied.

  3. A model of the ground surface temperature for micrometeorological analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf, Julian S.; Erell, Evyatar

    2017-07-01

    Micrometeorological models at various scales require ground surface temperature, which may not always be measured in sufficient spatial or temporal detail. There is thus a need for a model that can calculate the surface temperature using only widely available weather data, thermal properties of the ground, and surface properties. The vegetated/permeable surface energy balance (VP-SEB) model introduced here requires no a priori knowledge of soil temperature or moisture at any depth. It combines a two-layer characterization of the soil column following the heat conservation law with a sinusoidal function to estimate deep soil temperature, and a simplified procedure for calculating moisture content. A physically based solution is used for each of the energy balance components allowing VP-SEB to be highly portable. VP-SEB was tested using field data measuring bare loess desert soil in dry weather and following rain events. Modeled hourly surface temperature correlated well with the measured data (r 2 = 0.95 for a whole year), with a root-mean-square error of 2.77 K. The model was used to generate input for a pedestrian thermal comfort study using the Index of Thermal Stress (ITS). The simulation shows that the thermal stress on a pedestrian standing in the sun on a fully paved surface, which may be over 500 W on a warm summer day, may be as much as 100 W lower on a grass surface exposed to the same meteorological conditions.

  4. Mitigating ground vibration by periodic inclusions and surface structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Bucinskas, Paulius; Persson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    -dimensional finite-element model. The laboratory model employs soaked mattress foam placed within a box to mimic a finite volume of soil. The dynamic properties of the soaked foam ensure wavelengths representative of ground vibration in small scale. Comparison of the results from the two models leads......Ground vibration from traffic is a source of nuisance in urbanized areas. Trenches and wave barriers can provide mitigation of vibrations, but single barriers need to have a large depth to be effective-especially in the low-frequency range relevant to traffic-induced vibration. Alternatively...... well-defined behavior can be expected for transient loads and finite structures. However, some mitigation may occur. The paper aims at quantifying the mitigation effect of nearly periodic masses placed on the ground surface using two approaches: a small-scale laboratory model and a three...

  5. Simulation of the Regional Ground-Water-Flow System and Ground-Water/Surface-Water Interaction in the Rock River Basin, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juckem, Paul F.

    2009-01-01

    A regional, two-dimensional, areal ground-water-flow model was developed to simulate the ground-water-flow system and ground-water/surface-water interaction in the Rock River Basin. The model was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Rock River Coalition. The objectives of the regional model were to improve understanding of the ground-water-flow system and to develop a tool suitable for evaluating the effects of potential regional water-management programs. The computer code GFLOW was used because of the ease with which the model can simulate ground-water/surface-water interactions, provide a framework for simulating regional ground-water-flow systems, and be refined in a stepwise fashion to incorporate new data and simulate ground-water-flow patterns at multiple scales. The ground-water-flow model described in this report simulates the major hydrogeologic features of the modeled area, including bedrock and surficial aquifers, ground-water/surface-water interactions, and ground-water withdrawals from high-capacity wells. The steady-state model treats the ground-water-flow system as a single layer with hydraulic conductivity and base elevation zones that reflect the distribution of lithologic groups above the Precambrian bedrock and a regionally significant confining unit, the Maquoketa Formation. In the eastern part of the Basin where the shale-rich Maquoketa Formation is present, deep ground-water flow in the sandstone aquifer below the Maquoketa Formation was not simulated directly, but flow into this aquifer was incorporated into the GFLOW model from previous work in southeastern Wisconsin. Recharge was constrained primarily by stream base-flow estimates and was applied uniformly within zones guided by regional infiltration estimates for soils. The model includes average ground-water withdrawals from 1997 to 2006 for municipal wells and from 1997 to 2005 for high-capacity irrigation, industrial, and commercial wells. In addition

  6. A Comprehensive Laboratory Study to Improve Ground Truth Calibration of Remotely Sensed Near-Surface Soil Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaeian, E.; Tuller, M.; Sadeghi, M.; Sheng, W.; Jones, S. B.

    2016-12-01

    Optical satellite and airborne remote sensing (RS) have been widely applied for characterization of large-scale surface soil moisture distributions. However, despite the excellent spatial resolution of RS data, the electromagnetic radiation within the optical bands (400-2500 nm) penetrates the soil profile only to a depth of a few millimeters; hence obtained moisture estimates are limited to the soil surface region. Furthermore, moisture sensor networks employed for ground truth calibration of RS observations commonly exhibit very limited spatial resolution, which consequently leads to significant discrepancies between RS and ground truth observations. To better understand the relationship between surface and near-surface soil moisture, we employed a benchtop hyperspectral line-scan imaging system to generate high resolution surface reflectance maps during evaporation from soil columns filled with source soils covering a wide textural range and instrumented with a novel time domain reflectometry (TDR) sensor array that allows monitoring of near surface moisture at 0.5-cm resolution. A recently developed physical model for surface soil moisture predictions from shortwave infrared reflectance was applied to estimate surface soil moisture from surface reflectance and to explore the relationship between surface and near-surface moisture distributions during soil drying. Preliminary results are very promising and their applicability for ground truth calibration of RS observations will be discussed.

  7. Monitoring of landfill leachate dispersion using reflectance spectroscopy and ground-penetrating radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splajt, T; Ferrier, G; Frostick, L E

    2003-09-15

    The utility of ground-penetrating radar and reflectance spectroscopy in the monitoring of landfill sites has been investigated. Strong correlations between red edge inflection position and chlorophyll and heavy metal concentrations have been demonstrated from grassland species affected by leachate contamination of the soil adjacent to the landfill test site. This study demonstrated that reflectance spectroscopy can identify vegetation affected by leachate-contaminated soil at a range of spatial resolutions. To identify the vegetation affected by leachate contamination, the spectroradiometer must have contiguous bands at sufficient spectral resolution over the critical wave range that measures chlorophyll absorption and the red edge (between 650 and 750 nm). The utility of ground-penetrating radar data to identify leachate escaping from breakout points in the contaminant wall has also been demonstrated. An integrated approach using these techniques, combined with field and borehole sampling and contaminant migration modeling, offers a possible cost-effective monitoring approach for landfill sites.

  8. Ground-State Cooling of a Mechanical Oscillator by Interference in Andreev Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, P.; Belzig, W.; Rastelli, G.

    2016-11-01

    We study the ground-state cooling of a mechanical oscillator linearly coupled to the charge of a quantum dot inserted between a normal metal and a superconducting contact. Such a system can be realized, e.g., by a suspended carbon nanotube quantum dot with a capacitive coupling to a gate contact. Focusing on the subgap transport regime, we analyze the inelastic Andreev reflections which drive the resonator to a nonequilibrium state. For small coupling, we obtain that vibration-assisted reflections can occur through two distinct interference paths. The interference determines the ratio between the rates of absorption and emission of vibrational energy quanta. We show that ground-state cooling of the mechanical oscillator can be achieved for many of the oscillator's modes simultaneously or for single modes selectively, depending on the experimentally tunable coupling to the superconductor.

  9. Practical aspects of tritium measurement in ground and surface waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitzsche, O. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physik; Hebert, D. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physik

    1997-03-01

    Tritium measurements are a powerful tool in hydrological and hydrogeological investigations for detecting mean residence times of several water reservoirs. Due to the low tritium activities in precipitation, ground and surface waters a low level measurement is necessary. Therefore often the liquid scintillation counting after an electrolytic enrichment of water is used. In this paper some practical aspects and problems of measurement are discussed and the problem of contamination in low level laboratories is shown. (orig.)

  10. Polarized infrared emissivity of one-dimensional Gaussian sea surfaces with surface reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongkun; Pinel, Nicolas; Bourlier, Christophe

    2011-08-10

    Surface reflection is an important phenomenon that must be taken into account when studying sea surface infrared emissivity, especially at large observation angles. This paper models analytically the polarized infrared emissivity of one-dimensional sea surfaces with shadowing effect and one surface reflection, by assuming a Gaussian surface slope distribution. A Monte Carlo ray-tracing method is employed as a reference. It is shown that the present model agrees well with the reference method. The emissivity calculated by the present model is then compared with measurements. The comparisons show that agreements are greatly improved by taking one surface reflection into account. The Monte Carlo ray-tracing results of sea surface infrared emissivity with two and three reflections are also determined. Their contributions are shown to be negligible.

  11. Quality Assessment of Landsat Surface Reflectance Products Using MODIS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Min; Huang, Chengquan; Channan, Saurabh; Vermote, Eric; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Townshend, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Surface reflectance adjusted for atmospheric effects is a primary input for land cover change detection and for developing many higher level surface geophysical parameters. With the development of automated atmospheric correction algorithms, it is now feasible to produce large quantities of surface reflectance products using Landsat images. Validation of these products requires in situ measurements, which either do not exist or are difficult to obtain for most Landsat images. The surface reflectance products derived using data acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), however, have been validated more comprehensively. Because the MODIS on the Terra platform and the Landsat 7 are only half an hour apart following the same orbit, and each of the 6 Landsat spectral bands overlaps with a MODIS band, good agreements between MODIS and Landsat surface reflectance values can be considered indicators of the reliability of the Landsat products, while disagreements may suggest potential quality problems that need to be further investigated. Here we develop a system called Landsat-MODIS Consistency Checking System (LMCCS). This system automatically matches Landsat data with MODIS observations acquired on the same date over the same locations and uses them to calculate a set of agreement metrics. To maximize its portability, Java and open-source libraries were used in developing this system, and object-oriented programming (OOP) principles were followed to make it more flexible for future expansion. As a highly automated system designed to run as a stand-alone package or as a component of other Landsat data processing systems, this system can be used to assess the quality of essentially every Landsat surface reflectance image where spatially and temporally matching MODIS data are available. The effectiveness of this system was demonstrated using it to assess preliminary surface reflectance products derived using the Global Land Survey (GLS) Landsat

  12. Low-Cost Dielectric Reflective Surface for Low-Level Backscattered Diffuse Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nuaimi, Mustafa K. Taher; Hong, Wei; Gao, Xiqi

    2017-02-01

    This article presents the design of non-subwavelength, non-resonant, and non-absorptive dielectric surface that creates a low-level backward diffuse reflections under illumination of a far-field plane wave at millimeter wave regime. Thus, radar cross section reduction of a solid metallic object can be achieved. The dielectric surface is consist of unit cells of only two different electric permittivity ( ɛ r1 = 6.14 and ɛ r2 = 3.49) distributed across the surface aperture to achieve low-level backscattered diffuse reflections. The unit cells used are having non-subwavelength size (0.53λ80GHz) which ensures an easier fabrication of the presented surface using low cost simple PCB technology, in particular at high frequencies. RCS reduction of more than 10 dBsm is achieved from 70 to 87 GHz (BW ≈ 21.65 %) using the presented dielectric surface of optimized permittivity distribution. The RCS reduction capabilities of the presented surface are studied theoretically under both normal and oblique incidences and then fabricated and verified experimentally by reflectivity measurements.

  13. Anomalous microwave reflection from a metal surface induced by spoof surface plasmon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Liang; Cao Jin-Xiang; Lü You; Liu Lei; Du Yin-Chang; Wang Jian

    2012-01-01

    The reflection of X-band microwaves (8-12 GHz) from a metallic aluminum (Al) surface with groove grating corrugations was investigated experimentally.It was shown that the reflection of p-polarization is much less than the microwave reflected from the corresponding area of an unruled Al surface,with selective wavelength.The experimental results demonstrated that the anomalous microwave reflection is strongly associated with the excitation of spoof surface plasmons at the Al-air interface by the surface grating coupler. This near-total absence of reflected microwaves is similar to the famous Wood's anomaly in the optical regime and is of fundamental importance to the applications of spoof surface plasmons in the microwave regime.

  14. Measuring the Reflection Matrix of a Rough Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Burgi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Phase modulation methods for imaging around corners with reflectively scattered light required illumination of the occluded scene with a light source either in the scene or with direct line of sight to the scene. The RM (reflection matrix allows control and refocusing of light after reflection, which could provide a means of illuminating an occluded scene without access or line of sight. Two optical arrangements, one focal-plane, the other an imaging system, were used to measure the RM of five different rough-surface reflectors. Intensity enhancement values of up to 24 were achieved. Surface roughness, correlation length, and slope were examined for their effect on enhancement. Diffraction-based simulations were used to corroborate experimental results.

  15. Polarized reflectance and transmittance distribution functions of the ocean surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieronymi, Martin

    2016-07-11

    Two aspects of ocean modelling are treated: representation of ocean waves considering all size-classes of waves and tracing of light-interactions at the wavy sea surface. Nonlinear wave profiles are realized accounting for a wide range of climatologically relevant sea states and wind speeds. Polarized ray tracing is used to investigate air-incident and whitecap-free reflectance and transmittance distributions with high angular resolution subject to sea-characterizing parameters, such as significant wave height, peak wave period, wind speed, and surface roughness. Wave-shadowing effects of incident and multiple reflected rays are fully considered. Their influence mostly starts with incidence angles greater than 60°, i.e., when the sun is near the horizon, and is especially pronounced for steep sea states. The net effect of multiple reflections is a redistribution of reflectance and transmittance fractions in their respective hemispheres and a slight increase of the net transmission of light into the sea. Revised reflectance and transmittance distribution functions, RDF and TDF, are provided depending on surface roughness in terms of the mean-square slope; reference is made to other sea state parameters. In comparison with the slope statistics approach, uncertainties related to sun near the horizon are reduced and on average this study yields somewhat higher reflectance values with some variability related to the sea state. By means of provided data, irradiance and radiance reflectances can be computed using desired sky radiance distributions, e.g., clear sky, overcast or partly cloudy sky, as well as wind or sea state information including wave propagation direction.

  16. Ground-Based VIS/NIR Reflectance Spectra of 25143 Itokawa: What Hayabusa will See and How Ground-Based Data can Augment Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas, Faith; Abell, P. A.; Jarvis, K. S.

    2004-01-01

    Planning for the arrival of the Hayabusa spacecraft at asteroid 25143 Itokawa includes consideration of the expected spectral information to be obtained using the AMICA and NIRS instruments. The rotationally-resolved spatial coverage the asteroid we have obtained with ground-based telescopic spectrophotometry in the visible and near-infrared can be utilized here to address expected spacecraft data. We use spectrophotometry to simulate the types of data that Hayabusa will receive with the NIRS and AMICA instruments, and will demonstrate them here. The NIRS will cover a wavelength range from 0.85 m, and have a dispersion per element of 250 Angstroms. Thus, we are limited in coverage of the 1.0 micrometer and 2.0 micrometer mafic silicate absorption features. The ground-based reflectance spectra of Itokawa show a large component of olivine in its surface material, and the 2.0 micrometer feature is shallow. Determining the olivine to pyroxene abundance ratio is critically dependent on the attributes of the 1.0- and 2.0 micrometer features. With a cut-off near 2,1 micrometer the longer edge of the 2.0- feature will not be obtained by NIRS. Reflectance spectra obtained using ground-based telescopes can be used to determine the regional composition around space-based spectral observations, and possibly augment the longer wavelength spectral attributes. Similarly, the shorter wavelength end of the 1.0 micrometer absorption feature will be partially lost to the NIRS. The AMICA filters mimic the ECAS filters, and have wavelength coverage overlapping with the NIRS spectral range. We demonstrate how merging photometry from AMICA will extend the spectral coverage of the NIRS. Lessons learned from earlier spacecraft to asteroids should be considered.

  17. Mercury's Surface Magnetic Field Determined from Proton-Reflection Magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Reka M.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Anderson, Brian J.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Raines, Jim M.; Lillis, Robert J.; Korth, Haje; Slavin, James A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2014-01-01

    Solar wind protons observed by the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit about Mercury exhibit signatures of precipitation loss to Mercury's surface. We apply proton-reflection magnetometry to sense Mercury's surface magnetic field intensity in the planet's northern and southern hemispheres. The results are consistent with a dipole field offset to the north and show that the technique may be used to resolve regional-scale fields at the surface. The proton loss cones indicate persistent ion precipitation to the surface in the northern magnetospheric cusp region and in the southern hemisphere at low nightside latitudes. The latter observation implies that most of the surface in Mercury's southern hemisphere is continuously bombarded by plasma, in contrast with the premise that the global magnetic field largely protects the planetary surface from the solar wind.

  18. Copper-assisted, anti-reflection etching of silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, Fatima; Branz, Howard

    2014-08-26

    A method (300) for etching a silicon surface (116) to reduce reflectivity. The method (300) includes electroless deposition of copper nanoparticles about 20 nanometers in size on the silicon surface (116), with a particle-to-particle spacing of 3 to 8 nanometers. The method (300) includes positioning (310) the substrate (112) with a silicon surface (116) into a vessel (122). The vessel (122) is filled (340) with a volume of an etching solution (124) so as to cover the silicon surface (116). The etching solution (124) includes an oxidant-etchant solution (146), e.g., an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The silicon surface (116) is etched (350) by agitating the etching solution (124) with, for example, ultrasonic agitation, and the etching may include heating (360) the etching solution (124) and directing light (365) onto the silicon surface (116). During the etching, copper nanoparticles enhance or drive the etching process.

  19. Far-infrared emissivity measurements of reflective surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Lange, A. E.; Bock, J. J.

    1996-01-01

    An instrument developed to measure the emissivity of reflective surfaces by comparing the thermal emission of a test sample to that of a reference surface is reported. The instrument can accurately measure the emissivity of mirrors made from lightweight thermally insulating materials such as glass and metallized carbon fiber reinforced plastics. Far infrared measurements at a wavelength of 165 micrometers are reported. The instrument has an absolute accuracy of Delta epsilon = 9 x 10(exp -4) and can reproducibly measure an emissivity of as small as 2 x 10(exp -4) between flat reflective surfaces. The instrument was used to measure mirror samples for balloon-borne and spaceborne experiments. An emissivity of (6.05 +/- 1.24) x 10(exp -3) was measured for gold evaporated on glass, and (6.75 +/- 1.17) x 10(exp -3) for aluminum evaporated on glass.

  20. A surface reflectance scheme for retrieving aerosol optical depth over urban surfaces in MODIS Dark Target retrieval algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pawan; Levy, Robert C.; Mattoo, Shana; Remer, Lorraine A.; Munchak, Leigh A.

    2016-07-01

    The MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments, aboard the two Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites Terra and Aqua, provide aerosol information with nearly daily global coverage at moderate spatial resolution (10 and 3 km). Almost 15 years of aerosol data records are now available from MODIS that can be used for various climate and air-quality applications. However, the application of MODIS aerosol products for air-quality concerns is limited by a reduction in retrieval accuracy over urban surfaces. This is largely because the urban surface reflectance behaves differently than that assumed for natural surfaces. In this study, we address the inaccuracies produced by the MODIS Dark Target (MDT) algorithm aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals over urban areas and suggest improvements by modifying the surface reflectance scheme in the algorithm. By integrating MODIS Land Surface Reflectance and Land Cover Type information into the aerosol surface parameterization scheme for urban areas, much of the issues associated with the standard algorithm have been mitigated for our test region, the continental United States (CONUS). The new surface scheme takes into account the change in underlying surface type and is only applied for MODIS pixels with urban percentage (UP) larger than 20 %. Over the urban areas where the new scheme has been applied (UP > 20 %), the number of AOD retrievals falling within expected error (EE %) has increased by 20 %, and the strong positive bias against ground-based sun photometry has been eliminated. However, we note that the new retrieval introduces a small negative bias for AOD values less than 0.1 due to the ultra-sensitivity of the AOD retrieval to the surface parameterization under low atmospheric aerosol loadings. Global application of the new urban surface parameterization appears promising, but further research and analysis are required before global implementation.

  1. BOREAS RSS-1 PARABOLA SSA Surface Reflectance and Transmittance Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Deering, Donald D.; Eck, Thomas F.; Banerjee, Babu

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-1 team collected surface reflectance and transmittance data from three forested sites in the SSA. This data set contains averaged reflectance factors and transmitted radiances measured by the PARABOLA instrument at selected sites in the BOREAS SSA at different view angles and at three wavelength bands throughout the day. PARABOLA measurements were made during each of the three BOREAS IFCs during the growing season of 1994 at three SSA tower flux sites as well as during the FFC-T. Additional measurements were made in early and mid-1996 during the FFC-W and during IFC-2. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  2. Absolute height measurement of specular surfaces with modified active fringe reflection photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hongyu; Jiang, Xiangqian; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Zonghua

    2014-07-01

    Deflectometric methods have been studied for more than a decade for slope measurement of specular freeform surfaces through utilization of the deformation of a sample pattern after reflection from a tested sample surface. Usually, these approaches require two-directional fringe patterns to be projected on a LCD screen or ground glass and require slope integration, which leads to some complexity for the whole measuring process. This paper proposes a new mathematical measurement model for measuring topography information of freeform specular surfaces, which integrates a virtual reference specular surface into the method of active fringe reflection photogrammetry and presents a straight-forward relation between height of the tested surface and phase signals. This method only requires one direction of horizontal or vertical sinusoidal fringe patterns to be projected from a LCD screen, resulting in a significant reduction in capture time over established methods. Assuming the whole system has been precalibrated during the measurement process, the fringe patterns are captured separately via the virtual reference and detected freeform surfaces by a CCD camera. The reference phase can be solved according to the spatial geometric relation between the LCD screen and the CCD camera. The captured phases can be unwrapped with a heterodyne technique and optimum frequency selection method. Based on this calculated unwrapped-phase and that proposed mathematical model, absolute height of the inspected surface can be computed. Simulated and experimental results show that this methodology can conveniently calculate topography information for freeform and structured specular surfaces without integration and reconstruction processes.

  3. Tailorable reflection of surface plasmons in defect engineered graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Weiwei; Cai, Wei; Wu, Wei; Xiang, Yinxiao; Ren, Mengxin; Zhang, Xinzheng; Xu, Jingjun

    2016-12-01

    The electrical, optical, mechanical and thermal properties of graphene can be significantly altered by defects, thus engineering the defects in graphene is promising for applications in functionalized materials and nanoscale devices. Here the propagations of surface plasmon waves near graphene defect boundaries created by ion beams are studied. Specifically, plasmon reflections are observed near the induced defect boundaries for the first time, which implies that ion-irradiation induced defects act as efficient scattering centers for the plasmonic waves, just like the native grain boundaries. Moreover, engineering the defects with varied ion doses results in tailorable plasmon reflection properties due to changed defect degrees. The controllable plasmon reflections near ion induced defect boundaries open up a new avenue for plasmon wave engineering.

  4. Unmanned aerial system nadir reflectance and MODIS nadir BRDF-adjusted surface reflectances intercompared over Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner Burkhart, John; Kylling, Arve; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Wang, Zhuosen; Bogren, Wiley; Storvold, Rune; Solbø, Stian; Pedersen, Christina A.; Gerland, Sebastian

    2017-07-01

    Albedo is a fundamental parameter in earth sciences, and many analyses utilize the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF)/albedo (MCD43) algorithms. While derivative albedo products have been evaluated over Greenland, we present a novel, direct comparison with nadir surface reflectance collected from an unmanned aerial system (UAS). The UAS was flown from Summit, Greenland, on 210 km transects coincident with the MODIS sensor overpass on board the Aqua and Terra satellites on 5 and 6 August 2010. Clear-sky acquisitions were available from the overpasses within 2 h of the UAS flights. The UAS was equipped with upward- and downward-looking spectrometers (300-920 nm) with a spectral resolution of 10 nm, allowing for direct integration into the MODIS bands 1, 3, and 4. The data provide a unique opportunity to directly compare UAS nadir reflectance with the MODIS nadir BRDF-adjusted surface reflectance (NBAR) products. The data show UAS measurements are slightly higher than the MODIS NBARs for all bands but agree within their stated uncertainties. Differences in variability are observed as expected due to different footprints of the platforms. The UAS data demonstrate potentially large sub-pixel variability of MODIS reflectance products and the potential to explore this variability using the UAS as a platform. It is also found that, even at the low elevations flown typically by a UAS, reflectance measurements may be influenced by haze if present at and/or below the flight altitude of the UAS. This impact could explain some differences between data from the two platforms and should be considered in any use of airborne platforms.

  5. Implementation of solar-reflective surfaces: Materials and utility programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretz, S.; Akbari, H.; Rosenfeld, A.; Taha, H.

    1992-06-01

    This report focuses on implementation issues for using solar-reflective surfaces to cool urban heat islands, with specific examples for Sacramento, California. Advantages of solar-reflective surfaces for reducing energy use are: (1) they are cost-effective if albedo is increased during routine maintenance; (2) the energy savings coincide with peak demand for power; (3) there are positive effects on environmental quality; and (4) the white materials have a long service life. Important considerations when choosing materials for mitigating heat islands are identified as albedo, emissivity, durability, cost, pollution and appearance. There is a potential for increasing urban albedo in Sacramento by an additional 18%. Of residential roofs, we estimate that asphalt shingle and modified bitumen cover the largest area, and that built-up roofing and modified bitumen cover the largest area of commercial buildings. For all of these roof types, albedo may be increased at the time of re-roofing without any additional cost. When a roof is repaired, a solar-reflective roof coating may be applied to significantly increase albedo and extend the life of the root Although a coating may be cost-effective if applied to a new roof following installation or to an older roof following repair, it is not cost-effective if the coating is applied only to save energy. Solar-reflective pavement may be cost-effective if the albedo change is included in the routine resurfacing schedule. Cost-effective options for producing light-colored pavement may include: (1) asphalt concrete, if white aggregate is locally available; (2) concrete overlays; and (3) newly developed white binders and aggregate. Another option may be hot-rolled asphalt, with white chippings. Utilities could promote solar-reflective surfaces through advertisement, educational programs and cost-sharing of road resurfacing.

  6. Migration velocity modeling based on common reflection surface gather

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李振春; 姚云霞; 马在田; 王华忠

    2003-01-01

    The common-reflection-surface (CRS) stacking is a new seismic imaging method, which only depends on seismic three parameters and near-surface velocity instead of macro-velocity model. According to optimized three parameters obtained by CRS stacking, we derived an analytical relationship between three parameters and migration velocity field, and put forward CRS gather migration velocity modeling method, which realize velocity estimation by optimizing three parameters in CRS gather. The test of a sag model proved that this method is more effective and adaptable for velocity modeling of a complex geological body, and the accuracy of velocity analysis depends on the precision of optimized three parameters.

  7. Weissenberg reflection high-energy electron diffraction for surface crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abukawa, Tadashi; Yamazaki, Tomoyuki; Yajima, Kentaro; Yoshimura, Koji

    2006-12-15

    The principle of a Weissenberg camera is applied to surface crystallographic analysis by reflection high-energy electron diffraction. By removing inelastic electrons and measuring hundreds of patterns as a function of sample rotation angle phi, kinematical analysis can be performed over a large volume of reciprocal space. The data set is equivalent to a three-dimensional stack of Weissenberg photographs. The method is applied to analysis of an Si(111)-square root of 3 x square root of 3-Ag surface, and the structural data obtained are in excellent agreement with the known atomic structure.

  8. Emissivity measurements of reflective surfaces at near-millimeter wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, J J; Parikh, M K; Fischer, M L; Lange, A E

    1995-08-01

    We have developed an instrument for directly measuring the emissivity of reflective surfaces at near-millimeter wavelengths. The thermal emission of a test sample is compared with that of a reference surface, allowing the emissivity of the sample to be determined without heating. The emissivity of the reference surface is determined by one's heating the reference surface and measuring the increase in emission. The instrument has an absolute accuracy of Δε = 5 × 10(-4) and can reproducibly measure a difference in emissivity as small as Δε = 10(-4) between flat reflective samples. We have used the instrument to measure the emissivity of metal films evaporated on glass and carbon fiber-reinforced plastic composite surfaces. We measure an emissivity of (2.15 ± 0.4) × 10(-3) for gold evaporated on glass and (2.65 ± 0.5) × 10(-3) for aluminum evaporated on carbon fiber-reinforced plastic composite.

  9. Applying measured reflection from the ground to simulations of thermal perfromance of solar collectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Janne; Furbo, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Solar radiation on tilted and vertical surfaces in the Arctic is, in large parts of the year, strongly influenced by reflection from snow. In connection with planning and optimization of energy efficient buildings and solar energy systems in the Arctic, it is important to have an accurate represe...

  10. Ground state properties of La isotopes in reflection asymmetric relativistic mean field theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The ground state properties of La isotopes are investigated with the reflection asymmetric relativistic mean field(RAS-RMF) model.The calculation results of binding energies and the quadrupole moments are in good agreements with the experiment.The calculation results indicate the change of the quadrupole deformation with the nuclear mass number.The "kink" on the isotope shifts is observed at A = 139 where the neutron number is the magic number N = 82.It is also found that the octupole deformations may exist in the La isotopes with mass number A ~ 145-155.

  11. Ground state properties of La isotopes in reflection asymmetric relativistic mean field theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Nan; GUO Lu

    2009-01-01

    The ground state properties of La isotopes are investigated with the reflection asymmetric relativistic mean field (RAS-RMF) model.The calculation results of binding energies and the quadrupole moments are in good agreements with the experiment.The calculation results indicate the change of the quadrupole deformation with the nuclear mass number.The "kink" on the isotope shifts is observed at A=139 where the neutron number is the magic number N=82.It is also found that the octupole deformations may exist in the La isotopes with mass number A~ 145-155.

  12. Ground Surface Deformations Near a Fault-Bounded Groundwater Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipovsky, B.; Funning, G. J.; Ferretti, A.

    2011-12-01

    Geodetic data often reveal the presence of groundwater aquifers that are bounded by faults (Schmidt and Bürgmann, 2003; Galloway and Hoffmann, 2007; Bell et al., 2008). Whereas unrestricted groundwater aquifers exhibit a radially symmetric pattern of uplift with diffuse boundaries, aquifers that are bounded by faults have one or more sharp, linear boundaries. Interferometric synthetic aperture (InSAR) data, due to their high spatial density, are particularly well suited to observe fault bounded aquifers, and the Santa Clara Aquifer in the San Francisco Bay Area, California, constitutes an excellent example. The largest ground surface displacements in the Bay Area are due to the inflation of the Santa Clara aquifer, and InSAR data plainly show that the Santa Clara aquifer is partitioned by the Silver Creek fault. This study first develops a general model of the displacements at the surface of the Earth due to fluid diffusion through a buried permeable boundary such as a fault zone. This model is compared to InSAR data from the Silver Creek fault and we find that we are able to infer fault zone poromechanical properties from InSAR data that are comparable to in situ measurements. Our theoretical model is constrained by several geological and hydrological observations concerning the structure of fault zones. Analytical solutions are presented for the ground surface displacements due to a perfectly impermeable fault zone. This end-member family of models, however, does not fit the available data. We therefore make allowance for an arbitrarily layered, variably permeable, one-dimensional fault zone. Time-dependent ground surface deformations are calculated in the Laplace domain using an efficient semi-analytic method. This general model is applicable to other poroelastic regimes including geothermal and hydrocarbon systems. We are able to estimate fault zone hydraulic conductivity by comparing theoretical ground surface displacements in a permeable fault zone to

  13. Potential Energy Surfaces of Nitrogen Dioxide for the Ground State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Ju-Xiang; ZHU Zheng-He; CHENG Xin-Lu; YANG Xiang-Dong

    2007-01-01

    The potential energy function of nitrogen dioxide with the C2v symmetry in the ground state is represented using the simplified Sorbie-Murrell many-body expansion function in terms of the symmetry of NO2. Using the potential energy function, some potential energy surfaces of NO2(C2v, X2A1), such as the bond stretching contour plot for a fixed equilibrium geometry angle θ and contour for O moving around N-O (R1), in which R1 is fixed at the equilibrium bond length, are depicted. The potential energy surfaces are analysed. Moreover, the equilibrium parameters for NO2 with the C2v, Cs and D8h symmetries, such as equilibrium geometry structures and energies, are calculated by the ab initio (CBS-Q) method.

  14. Laboratory laser reflectance measurement and applications to asteroid surface analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, A.; Daly, M. G.; Cloutis, E. A.; Tait, K. T.; Izawa, M. R. M.; Barnouin, O. S.; Hyde, B. C.; Nicklin, I.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction Laboratory reflectance measurement of asteroid analogs is an important tool for interpreting the reflectance of asteroids. One dominant factor affecting how measured reflectance changes as a function of phase angle (180° minus the scattering angle) is surface roughness [1], which is related to grain size. A major goal of this study is to be able to use the angular distributions (phase functions) of scattered light from various regions on an asteroid surface to determine the relative grain size between those regions. Grain size affects the spectral albedo and continuum slopes of surface materials, has implications in terms of understanding geologic processes on asteroids and is also valuable for the planning and operations of upcoming missions to asteroids, such as the New Frontiers OSIRIS-REx sample return mission to the asteroid (101955) Bennu [2]. Information on surface roughness is particularly powerful when combined with other datasets, such as thermal inertia maps (e.g., a smooth, low-backscatter surface of low thermal inertia likely contains fine grains). Approach To better constrain the composition and surface texture of Bennu, we are conducting experiments to investigate the laser return signature of terrestrial and meteorite analogs to Bennu. The objective is to understand the nature of laser returns given possible compositional, grain size and slope distributions on the surface of Bennu to allow surface characterization, particularly surface grain size, which would significantly aid efforts to identify suitable sites for sampling by the OSIRIS-REx mission. Setup A 1064-nm laser is used to determine the reflectance of Bennu analogs and their constituents (1064 nm is the wavelength of many laser altimeters including the one planned to fly on OSIRIS-REx). Samples of interest include serpentinites (greenalite, etc.), magnetite, and shungite. To perform the experiments, a goniometer has been built. This instrument allows reflectance measurements

  15. Correlation between gloss reflectance and surface texture in photographic paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessot, Kevin; Messier, Paul; Hyde, Joyce M; Brown, Christopher A

    2015-01-01

    Surface textures of a large collection of photographic papers dating from 1896 to the present were measured using a laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) with four different objective lenses. Roughness characterization parameters were calculated from the texture measurements and were compared with gloss measurements. Characterization by the area-scale fractal dimension (Das) and the area-scale fractal complexity (Asfc) provided the strongest correlations between gloss reflectance and surface texture. The measurements with the 5× and 10× objectives, which contained many large-scale, spiky measurement artifacts that distorted the measurement, resulted in the strongest correlations (R(2)  > 0.8) compared to the 20× and 50× (R(2)  < 0.5). The presence of spiky artifacts in the measurements, which increases when the magnification of the objective lens is decreased, appears to amplify surface features in such a way to improve the correlations.

  16. New Measurements from Old Boreholes: A Look at Interaction Between Surface Air Temperature and Ground Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinle, S. M.; Gosnold, W. D.

    2007-12-01

    We recently logged new field measurements of several boreholes throughout the Midwest, including North Dakota, South Dakota, and Nebraska. We then compared these new measurements against measurements previously obtained. Our comparisons included inverse modeling of past and recent measurements as well as climate modeling based on past surface air temperatures obtained from the weather stations. The data show a good correlation between climate warming in the last century and ground surface warming. Of particular importance is that cooling of air temperatures beginning in the mid 1990s reflects in the ground surface temperatures. The boreholes included in the study consist of three boreholes located in north central North Dakota, including two deeper than 200 meters. Two boreholes in the southwestern part of South Dakota, and two from southeastern South Dakota, all approximately 180 meters deep. Also included, were two boreholes (135 meters and over 200 meters deep) located in southwestern Nebraska, and two boreholes in the panhandle of Nebraska, each over 100 meters deep. We obtained historical surface air temperature from climate stations located near the boreholes, both from the United States Historical Climatology Network and from the Western Regional Climate Center.

  17. Spectral reflectance of SNC meteorites: Relationships to Martian surface composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcfadden, L. A.

    1987-01-01

    The spectral signatures of each of the Shergottite-Nakhlite-Chassignite (SNC) meteorite types measured to date are unique among extraterrestrial materials. Reflectance spectra of dark regions of Mars show evidence of basaltic composition. Analytic analysis of absorption band positions and widths in reflectance spectra of SNC meteorites will permit comparisons with spectra from approximately 600 km sized regions for which high-quality, near-IR spectra are available. Multi-spectral mapping data from orbital spacecraft is expected to provide the necessary spectra to determine basaltic compositions of smaller regions on Mars provided fresh, unaltered basalts can be observed or the effects of Martian weathering can be understood and removed from the spectra. With modeling of spectral weathering and mixing of SNC meteoritic assemblages it should be possible with the Mars Observer data to test for the presence of SNC analogs on the Martian surface. Before the relationship between the basaltic composition of units on Mars and the SNC meteorites can be addressed, it is necessary to analyze the absorption band parameters of the SNC reflectance spectra and to acquire high resolution spectral data on smaller regions of the Martian surface.

  18. Homogenization of seismic surface wave profiling in highly heterogeneous improved ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C.; Chien, C.

    2012-12-01

    of macroscopic property along the survey line. The lateral sampling space of the surface wave testing was also investigated by field tests of different survey line locations relative to the improved columns. The lateral sampling range of MASW depends on the wavelength and should be noted when planning survey line. The engineering information that can be extracted from shear wave velocity measurements obtained by surface wave testing is further studied by numerical simulations. A parametric study was performed by varying the size, spacing, and stiffness of the improved columns. In jet grouting where grout column is much stiffer than soil, velocity increase obtained from MASW after ground improvement reflects ground replacement ratio. Relationship between velocity increase and replacement ratio depends on the ratio of wavelength to the spacing of the columns (λ/W). 2D numerical simulations show homogenization by equivalent velocity when λ/W>4 and homogenization by equivalent modulus when λ/Wbehavior in 3D is under investigation.

  19. Diurnal freeze/thaw cycles of the ground surface on the Tibetan Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG MeiXue; YAO TanDong; GOU XiaoHua; HIROSE Nozomu; FUJII Hide Yuki; HAO LiSheng; D.F.LEVIA

    2007-01-01

    The exchange of energy and water between the lithosphere and atmosphere mainly takes place at the ground surface. Therefore, freeze/thaw condition at the ground surface is an important factor in examining the interactions between the land surface and atmosphere. Based on the observation data obtained by CEOP/CAMP-Tibet, the diurnal freeze/thaw cycles of the ground surface near Naqu, central Tibetan Plateau was preliminarily analyzed. The results show that the surface layer was completely frozen for approximately one month. However, the time that the ground surface experienced diurnal freeze/thaw cycles was about 6 months. The high frequency of freeze/thaw cycles at the ground surface significantly influences water and energy exchanges between ground and atmosphere over half a year. The interaction processes between the ground and atmosphere under different soil conditions (such as complete thaw, complete freeze and diurnal freeze/thaw cycles) are issues worthy of further examination.

  20. Reflectance anisotropy spectra of CdTe(001) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez-Nava, R.A.; Arzate, N.; Mendoza, B.S. [Photonics Division, Centro de Investigaciones en Optica A. C., Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2010-08-15

    We present first-principles calculations of reflectance anisotropy spectra (RAS) of the more common CdTe(001) surface reconstructions: Te-terminated (2 x 1) and Cd-terminated (2 x 1) and c(2 x 2). The last two reconstructions with a Cd coverage of half atomic layers. Calculations have been performed by using the density-functional formalism within the local-density approximation + scissors corrections. The electron-ion interaction has been modeled by ab initio, relativistic norm-conserving pseudopotentials. We have also calculated RAS spectra using a semi-empirical tight binding method (SETB) within a sp{sup 3} s{sup *} basis. We show RAS of each surface reconstruction and compare our theoretical results with experimental results reported in the literature and we found a good agreement between experimental and theoretical spectra for the (2 x 1) reconstructions. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  1. Micro reflectance difference techniques: Optical probes for surface exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lastras-Martinez, L.F.; Del Pozo-Zamudio, O.; Herrera-Jasso, R.; Ulloa-Castillo, N.A.; Balderas-Navarro, R.E.; Ortega-Gallegos, J.; Lastras-Martinez, A. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, 78000 San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. (Mexico)

    2012-06-15

    Micro reflectance difference spectroscopy ({mu}-RDS) is a promising tool for the in-situ and ex-situ characterization of semiconductors surfaces and interfaces. We discuss and compare two different approaches used to measure {mu}-RD spectra. One is based on a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, while the other uses a laser and a XY translation stage. To show the performance of these systems, we have measured surface optical anisotropies of GaSb(001) sample on which anisotropic strains have been generated by preferential mechanical polishing along [110] and [1 anti 10] directions. The spectrometers are complementary and the selection of one of them depends on the sample to be investigated and on experimental conditions. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Reflection properties of road surfaces. Contribution to OECD Scientific Expert Group AC4 on Road Surface Characteristics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    Photometric characteristics of road surfaces are dealt with. Representation of reflection properties in public lighting; quality criteria of road lighting installations; classification of road surfaces; the relation between reflection characteristics and other properties of road pavements in public

  3. Reflection properties of road surfaces. Contribution to OECD Scientific Expert Group AC4 on Road Surface Characteristics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    Photometric characteristics of road surfaces are dealt with. Representation of reflection properties in public lighting; quality criteria of road lighting installations; classification of road surfaces; the relation between reflection characteristics and other properties of road pavements in public

  4. Imaging of lateral heterogeneity by using reflected surface waves. Hansha hyomenha wo mochiita suihei hoko no chika kozo fukinshitsusei no kenshutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiba, Y. (Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)); Kobayashi, Y. (Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Science)

    1991-06-01

    Surface wave holography was applied to the reflected surface waves obtained on the Uji ground, Kyoto University. Clear reflected surface waves were confirmed in the records of waves and it was found possible to detect the surface waves generated by an artificial hypocenter. The reflected waves consisted of two groups having different frequency zones, which were the reflected waves from two different reflectors. It is clear from this result that in the case of the reflected wave groups due to the multiple scatterers, the surface wave holography enables to determine the corresponding locations of respective scatterers. The combination of the back projection method using the reflected wave envelopes and the other method such as incident angles to the array is most effective as the analyzing method. The surface wave holography can be used sufficiently to detect the lateral heterogeneity. 17 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Contamination of ground water, surface water, and soil, and evaluation of selected ground-water pumping alternatives in the Canal Creek area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorah, Michelle M.; Clark, Jeffrey S.

    1996-01-01

    Chemical manufacturing, munitions filling, and other military-support activities have resulted in the contamination of ground water, surface water, and soil in the Canal Creek area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Chlorinated volatile organic compounds, including 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane and trichloroethylene, are widespread ground-water contaminants in two aquifers that are composed of unconsolidated sand and gravel. Distribution and fate of chlorinated organic compounds in the ground water has been affected by the movement and dissolution of solvents in their dense immiscible phase and by microbial degradation under anaerobic conditions. Detection of volatile organic contaminants in adjacent surface water indicates that shallow contaminated ground water discharges to surface water. Semivolatile organic compounds, especially polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, are the most prevalent organic contaminants in soils. Various trace elements, such as arsenic, cadmium, lead, and zinc, were found in elevated concentrations in ground water, surface water, and soil. Simulations with a ground-water-flow model and particle tracker postprocessor show that, without remedial pumpage, the contaminants will eventually migrate to Canal Creek and Gunpowder River. Simulations indicate that remedial pumpage of 2.0 million gallons per day from existing wells is needed to capture all particles originating in the contaminant plumes. Simulated pumpage from offsite wells screened in a lower confined aquifer does not affect the flow of contaminated ground water in the Canal Creek area.

  6. Considerations in Grounded Theory Research Method: A reflection on the lessons learned

    OpenAIRE

    Mavetera, Nehemiah; Kroeze, Jan H

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a discussion on the practical issues faced by Information Systems (IS) professionals when they employ Grounded Theory Method (GTM) in Information Systems research. Various strands of GTM are in use, all of which are derivatives of the grand GTM proposed by Barney G. Glaser and Anselm G. Strauss in 1967. Starting with the dicta proposed by these two authors in 1967 on the use of GTM, the paper explores several variants of the method that have surfaced and are currently in use....

  7. Li isotopes reflect chemical weathering intensity in streams and ground waters draining basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Rudnick, R. L.; McDonough, W. F.

    2013-12-01

    Chemical weathering has an important influence on continental crust evolution, as weathering of basalt preferentially removes soluble elements, such as Mg, and can shift the crust composition towards more andesitic compositions, thus helping to solve the crustal composition paradox [1]. The isotopic compositions of soluble elements (e.g., Li and Mg) provide a monitor of chemical weathering of the continents. Along with large isotopic fractionations [2], these elements are preferentially transferred to rivers during weathering, and are useful tracers of weathering processes. The chemical and isotopic compositions of streams and ground waters that reside entirely within the Columbia River Basalts (CRBs) reflect the processes associated with basalt weathering. In addition, stream samples from both west and east of the Cascades were collected during summer and late winter to evaluate seasonal changes in Li isotopic compositions. The Li concentrations ([Li]) vary from 0.2 to 4.7 μg/l in dissolved loads of streams for both sampling seasons; in ground waters, [Li] varies from 2 to 21 μg/l. δ7Li varies by up to 20‰ in streams and ground waters, demonstrating that lithology is not the only influence on water chemistry in the catchments. Calculated mineral saturation suggests that most streams and some ground waters were saturated with respect to most secondary minerals, implying that Li isotopic fractionation was influenced by the development of secondary minerals, such as kaolinite and hematite. The δ7Li and Li/Na in dissolved loads of streams are not sensitive to distance from the coast or climate, but likely reflect the local weathering intensity. The correlated variation in δ7Li and Li/Na ratios seem to have global significance, at least in streams that only drain basalts [3, 4, 5], suggesting that the streams within the CRBs cover a wide range of weathering intensity, with low δ7Li and high Li/Na corresponding to higher weathering intensity. In addition

  8. GROUND SURFACE VISUALIZATION USING RED RELIEF IMAGE MAP FOR A VARIETY OF MAP SCALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Chiba

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There are many methods to express topographical features of ground surface. In which, contour map has been the traditional method and along with development of digital data, surface model such as shaded relief map has been using for ground surface expression. Recently, data acquisition has been developed very much quick, demanding more advanced visualization method to express ground surface so as to effectively use the high quality data. In this study, the authors using the Red Relief Image Map (RRIM, Chiba et al., 2008 to express ground surface visualization for a variety of map scales. The authors used 30 m mesh data of SRTM to show the topographical features of western Mongolian and micro-topographical features of ground surface in tectonically active regions of Japan. The results show that, compared to traditional and other similar methods, the RRIM can express ground surface more precisely and 3-dimensionally, suggested its advanced usage for many fields of topographical visualization.

  9. Ground Surface Visualization Using Red Relief Image Map for a Variety of Map Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, T.; Hasi, B.

    2016-06-01

    There are many methods to express topographical features of ground surface. In which, contour map has been the traditional method and along with development of digital data, surface model such as shaded relief map has been using for ground surface expression. Recently, data acquisition has been developed very much quick, demanding more advanced visualization method to express ground surface so as to effectively use the high quality data. In this study, the authors using the Red Relief Image Map (RRIM, Chiba et al., 2008) to express ground surface visualization for a variety of map scales. The authors used 30 m mesh data of SRTM to show the topographical features of western Mongolian and micro-topographical features of ground surface in tectonically active regions of Japan. The results show that, compared to traditional and other similar methods, the RRIM can express ground surface more precisely and 3-dimensionally, suggested its advanced usage for many fields of topographical visualization.

  10. An enhanced VIIRS aerosol optical thickness (AOT) retrieval algorithm over land using a global surface reflectance ratio database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai; Kondragunta, Shobha; Laszlo, Istvan; Liu, Hongqing; Remer, Lorraine A.; Huang, Jingfeng; Superczynski, Stephen; Ciren, Pubu

    2016-09-01

    The Visible/Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on board the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite has been retrieving aerosol optical thickness (AOT), operationally and globally, over ocean and land since shortly after S-NPP launch in 2011. However, the current operational VIIRS AOT retrieval algorithm over land has two limitations in its assumptions for land surfaces: (1) it only retrieves AOT over the dark surfaces and (2) it assumes that the global surface reflectance ratios between VIIRS bands are constants. In this work, we develop a surface reflectance ratio database over land with a spatial resolution 0.1° × 0.1° using 2 years of VIIRS top of atmosphere reflectances. We enhance the current operational VIIRS AOT retrieval algorithm by applying the surface reflectance ratio database in the algorithm. The enhanced algorithm is able to retrieve AOT over both dark and bright surfaces. Over bright surfaces, the VIIRS AOT retrievals from the enhanced algorithm have a correlation of 0.79, mean bias of -0.008, and standard deviation (STD) of error of 0.139 when compared against the ground-based observations at the global AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) sites. Over dark surfaces, the VIIRS AOT retrievals using the surface reflectance ratio database improve the root-mean-square error from 0.150 to 0.123. The use of the surface reflectance ratio database also increases the data coverage of more than 20% over dark surfaces. The AOT retrievals over bright surfaces are comparable to MODIS Deep Blue AOT retrievals.

  11. INVESTIGATION OF PROCESS PERTAINING TO INTERACTION OF TRACTOR DRIVING WHEELS WITH GROUND SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Guskov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of investigations on the process pertaining to interaction of a driving wheel with ground surface and describes methodology for optimization of backbone parameters. The mentioned process has some specific differences in comparison with the process of wheel rolling along hard surface. Ground surface is represented by mixture of sandy and clay particles with plant residues and it has a number of physical and mechanical properties. The main of these properties is resistance of soil against compression and displacement. Compression process determines a track depth and resistance to motion and displacement process determines wheel gripping property and its tangential traction force. While executing the investigations laws of compression and displacement proposed by Prof.V. V. Katsygin as the most adequate reflection of actual processes have been used in the paper. Motion of the driving wheel along ground surface is accompanied by its slipping. It has been determined that the maximum wheel traction force is formed not with 100% slipping as it was supposed until present but the value has been obtained at 45–60 % slipping according to soil category. The developed integral equations with due account of the aspect make it possible to calculate road hold characteristics of driving wheels of the designed wheel tractor and evaluate its traction, speed and economic characteristics. Methodology has been developed for optimization of backbone parameters of wheeled running gear in the designed tractor such as design mass and adhesion weight, width, diameter and air pressure in a tire. The proposed methodology has been introduced in designing practice of wheeled tractors at OJSC “Minsk Tractor Works”.

  12. Using pattern recognition to automatically localize reflection hyperbolas in data from ground penetrating radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Christian; Schmalzl, Jörg

    2013-08-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is used for the localization of supply lines, land mines, pipes and many other buried objects. These objects can be recognized in the recorded data as reflection hyperbolas with a typical shape depending on depth and material of the object and the surrounding material. To obtain the parameters, the shape of the hyperbola has to be fitted. In the last years several methods were developed to automate this task during post-processing. In this paper we show another approach for the automated localization of reflection hyperbolas in GPR data by solving a pattern recognition problem in grayscale images. In contrast to other methods our detection program is also able to immediately mark potential objects in real-time. For this task we use a version of the Viola-Jones learning algorithm, which is part of the open source library "OpenCV". This algorithm was initially developed for face recognition, but can be adapted to any other simple shape. In our program it is used to narrow down the location of reflection hyperbolas to certain areas in the GPR data. In order to extract the exact location and the velocity of the hyperbolas we apply a simple Hough Transform for hyperbolas. Because the Viola-Jones Algorithm reduces the input for the computational expensive Hough Transform dramatically the detection system can also be implemented on normal field computers, so on-site application is possible. The developed detection system shows promising results and detection rates in unprocessed radargrams. In order to improve the detection results and apply the program to noisy radar images more data of different GPR systems as input for the learning algorithm is necessary.

  13. Gain-Enhanced On-Chip Antenna Utilizing Artificial Magnetic Conductor Reflecting Surface at 94 GHz

    KAUST Repository

    Nafe, Mahmoud

    2015-08-04

    Nowadays, there is a growing demand for high frequency-bandwidth mm-wave (30-300 GHz) electronic wireless transceiver systems to support applications such as high data-rate wireless communication and high resolution imaging. Such mm-wave systems are becoming more feasible due to the extreme transistor downscaling in silicon-based integrated circuits, which enabled densely-integrated high-speed elec- tronics operating up to more than 100 GHz with low fabrication cost. To further enhance system integrability, it is required to implement all wireless system compo- nents on the chip. Presently, the last major barrier to true System-on-Chip (SoC) realization is the antenna implementation on the silicon chip. Although at mm-wave frequencies the antenna size becomes small enough to fit on chip, the antenna performance is greatly deteriorated due the high conductivity and high relative permittivity of the silicon substrate. The negative e↵ects of the silicon substrate could be avoided by using a metallic reflecting surface on top of silicon, which e↵ectively isolates the antenna from the silicon. However, this approach has the shortcoming of having to implement the antenna on the usually very thin silicon oxide layer of a typical CMOS fabrication process (10’s of μm). This forces the antenna to be in a very close proximity (less than one hundredth of a wavelength) to the reflecting surface. In this regime, the use of conventional metallic reflecting surface for silicon shielding has severe e↵ects on the antenna performance as it tends to reduce the antenna radiation resistance resulting in most of the energy being absorbed rather than radiated. In this work, the use of specially patterned reflecting surfaces for improving on- chip antenna performance is investigated. By using a periodic metallic surface on top of a grounded substrate, the structure can mimic the behavior of a perfect mag- netic conductor, hence called Artificial Magnetic Conductor (AMC) surface

  14. Interferometry of a reflective axicon surface with a small cone angle using an optical inner surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Huimin; Zhang, Xiaodong; Fang, Fengzhou

    2017-09-01

    Reflective axicons, widely used in optical alignment and Bessel-Gauss beam generation, require a highly accurate cone angle and surface metrology. However, current methods focus on the cone angle measurement and it is still difficult to measure the surface of a reflective axicon with a small cone angle. An interferometer measurement method using an optical inner surface is proposed to obtain the surface and cone angle simultaneously. The optical axis of the axicon and the optical inner surface should align together and be parallel to the beam light from the interferometer. The interference fringe would be obtained by the optical system consisting of the axicon and the optical inner surface. The theoretical model is established and analyzed through ray tracing theory, and is verified by optical simulation software. Fabrication errors in the axicon and the inner surface, and misalignment of the measurement setup are investigated systematically and separated in the measurement process. In the experiments, the reflective axicon with a cone angle of about 90° was measured by the proposed method, the results of which show good agreement with a stylus profiler (Taylor-Hobson PGI 3D) in cone angle trend and generatrix error. Experimental results prove the feasibility of the proposed method. This economical and effective method can be widely used with all types of reflective axicons, and it can obtain the surface error map of the axicon as well as the inner cylinder at the same time. The uncertainty and resolution of the proposed method is based on the performance of the interferometer. The uncertainty of alignment angle errors is less than 10-10 rad; the lateral resolution is 53.8 µm.

  15. Evaluation of thermal resistance of building insulations with reflective surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Št'astník, S.

    2012-09-01

    The thermal resistance of advanced insulation materials, applied namely in civil engineering, containing reflective surfaces and air gaps, cannot be evaluated correctly using the valid European standards because of presence of the dominant nonlinear radiative heat transfer and other phenomena not included in the recommended computational formulae. The proper general physical analysis refers to rather complicated problems from classical thermodynamics, whose both existence theory and numerical analysis contain open questions and cannot be done in practice when the optimization of composition of insulation layers is required. This paper, coming from original experimental results, demonstrates an alternative simplified computational approach, taking into account the most important physical processes, useful in the design of modern insulation systems.

  16. Locally controlled globally smooth ground surface reconstruction from terrestrial point clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Rychkov, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Approaches to ground surface reconstruction from massive terrestrial point clouds are presented. Using a set of local least squares (LSQR) planes, the "holes" are filled either from the ground model of the next coarser level or by Hermite Radial Basis Functions (HRBF). Global curvature continuous as well as infinitely smooth ground surface models are obtained with Partition of Unity (PU) using either tensor product B-Splines or compactly supported exponential function. The resulting surface function has local control enabling fast evaluation.

  17. Comparison of P- and S-wave velocity profiles obtained from surface seismic refraction/reflection and downhole data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R.A.; Stephenson, W.J.; Odum, J.K.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection/refraction data were acquired on the ground surface at six locations to compare with near-surface seismic-velocity downhole measurements. Measurement sites were in Seattle, WA, the San Francisco Bay Area, CA, and the San Fernando Valley, CA. We quantitatively compared the data in terms of the average shear-wave velocity to 30-m depth (Vs30), and by the ratio of the relative site amplification produced by the velocity profiles of each data type over a specified set of quarter-wavelength frequencies. In terms of Vs30, similar values were determined from the two methods. There is reflections and first-arrival phase delays are essential for identifying velocity inversions. The results suggest that seismic reflection/refraction data are a fast, non-invasive, and less expensive alternative to downhole data for determining Vs30. In addition, we emphasize that some P- and S-wave reflection travel times can directly indicate the frequencies of potentially damaging earthquake site resonances. A strong correlation between the simple S-wave first-arrival travel time/apparent velocity on the ground surface at 100 m offset from the seismic source and the Vs30 value for that site is an additional unique feature of the reflection/refraction data that could greatly simplify Vs30 determinations. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Ground measurements of the hemispherical-directional reflectance of Arctic snow covered tundra for the validation of satellite remote sensing products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, C. P.; Marks, A. A.; Green, P.; Mac Arthur, A.; Fox, N.; King, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Surface albedo is the hemispherical and wavelength integrated reflectance over the visible, near infrared and shortwave infrared regions of the solar spectrum. The albedo of Arctic snow can be in excess of 0.8 and it is a critical component in the global radiation budget because it determines the proportion of solar radiation absorbed, and reflected, over a large part of the Earth's surface. We present here our first results of the angularly resolved surface reflectance of Arctic snow at high solar zenith angles (~80°) suitable for the validation of satellite remote sensing products. The hemispherical directional reflectance factor (HDRF) of Arctic snow covered tundra was measured using the GonioRAdiometric Spectrometer System (GRASS) during a three-week field campaign in Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, in March/April 2013. The measurements provide one of few existing HDRF datasets at high solar zenith angles for wind-blown Arctic snow covered tundra (conditions typical of the Arctic region), and the first ground-based measure of HDRF at Ny-Ålesund. The HDRF was recorded under clear sky conditions with 10° intervals in view zenith, and 30° intervals in view azimuth, for several typical sites over a wavelength range of 400-1500 nm at 1 nm resolution. Satellite sensors such as MODIS, AVHRR and VIIRS offer a method to monitor the surface albedo with high spatial and temporal resolution. However, snow reflectance is anisotropic and is dependent on view and illumination angle and the wavelength of the incident light. Spaceborne sensors subtend a discrete angle to the target surface and measure radiance over a limited number of narrow spectral bands. Therefore, the derivation of the surface albedo requires accurate knowledge of the surfaces bidirectional reflectance as a function of wavelength. The ultimate accuracy to which satellite sensors are able to measure snow surface properties such as albedo is dependant on the accuracy of the BRDF model, which can only be assessed

  19. Improved Aerosol Optical Thickness, Columnar Water Vapor, and Surface Reflectance Retrieval from Combined CASI and SASI Airborne Hyperspectral Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Yang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available An increasingly common requirement in remote sensing is the integration of hyperspectral data collected simultaneously from different sensors (and fore-optics operating across different wavelength ranges. Data from one module are often relied on to correct information in the other, such as aerosol optical thickness (AOT and columnar water vapor (CWV. This paper describes problems associated with this process and recommends an improved strategy for processing remote sensing data, collected from both visible to near-infrared and shortwave infrared modules, to retrieve accurate AOT, CWV, and surface reflectance values. This strategy includes a workflow for radiometric and spatial cross-calibration and a method to retrieve atmospheric parameters and surface reflectance based on a radiative transfer function. This method was tested using data collected with the Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI and SWIR Airborne Spectrographic Imager (SASI from a site in Huailai County, Hebei Province, China. Various methods for retrieving AOT and CWV specific to this region were assessed. The results showed that retrieving AOT from the remote sensing data required establishing empirical relationships between 465.6 nm/659 nm and 2105 nm, augmented by ground-based reflectance validation data, and minimizing the merit function based on AOT@550 nm optimization. The paper also extends the second-order difference algorithm (SODA method using Powell’s methods to optimize CWV retrieval. The resulting CWV image has fewer residual surface features compared with the standard methods. The derived remote sensing surface reflectance correlated significantly with the ground spectra of comparable vegetation, cement road and soil targets. Therefore, the method proposed in this paper is reliable enough for integrated atmospheric correction and surface reflectance retrieval from hyperspectral remote sensing data. This study provides a good reference for surface

  20. Quantification of the optical surface reflection and surface roughness of articular cartilage using optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarakkala, Simo; Wang Shuzhe; Huang Yanping; Zheng Yongping [Department of Health Technology and Informatics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong (China)], E-mail: simo.saarakkala@uku.fi, E-mail: ypzheng@ieee.org

    2009-11-21

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a promising new technique for characterizing the structural changes of articular cartilage in osteoarthritis (OA). The calculation of quantitative parameters from the OCT signal is an important step to develop OCT as an effective diagnostic technique. In this study, two novel parameters for the quantification of optical surface reflection and surface roughness from OCT measurements are introduced: optical surface reflection coefficient (ORC), describing the amount of a ratio of the optical reflection from cartilage surface with respect to that from a reference material, and OCT roughness index (ORI) indicating the smoothness of the cartilage surface. The sensitivity of ORC and ORI to detect changes in bovine articular cartilage samples after enzymatic degradations of collagen and proteoglycans using collagenase and trypsin enzymes, respectively, was tested in vitro. A significant decrease (p < 0.001) in ORC as well as a significant increase (p < 0.001) in ORI was observed after collagenase digestion. After trypsin digestion, no significant changes in ORC or ORI were observed. To conclude, the new parameters introduced were demonstrated to be feasible and sensitive to detect typical OA-like degenerative changes in the collagen network. From the clinical point of view, the quantification of OCT measurements is of great interest since OCT probes have been already miniaturized and applied in patient studies during arthroscopy or open knee surgery in vivo. Further studies are still necessary to demonstrate the clinical capability of the introduced parameters for naturally occurring early OA changes in the cartilage.

  1. Quantification of the optical surface reflection and surface roughness of articular cartilage using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarakkala, Simo; Wang, Shu-Zhe; Huang, Yan-Ping; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2009-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a promising new technique for characterizing the structural changes of articular cartilage in osteoarthritis (OA). The calculation of quantitative parameters from the OCT signal is an important step to develop OCT as an effective diagnostic technique. In this study, two novel parameters for the quantification of optical surface reflection and surface roughness from OCT measurements are introduced: optical surface reflection coefficient (ORC), describing the amount of a ratio of the optical reflection from cartilage surface with respect to that from a reference material, and OCT roughness index (ORI) indicating the smoothness of the cartilage surface. The sensitivity of ORC and ORI to detect changes in bovine articular cartilage samples after enzymatic degradations of collagen and proteoglycans using collagenase and trypsin enzymes, respectively, was tested in vitro. A significant decrease (p < 0.001) in ORC as well as a significant increase (p < 0.001) in ORI was observed after collagenase digestion. After trypsin digestion, no significant changes in ORC or ORI were observed. To conclude, the new parameters introduced were demonstrated to be feasible and sensitive to detect typical OA-like degenerative changes in the collagen network. From the clinical point of view, the quantification of OCT measurements is of great interest since OCT probes have been already miniaturized and applied in patient studies during arthroscopy or open knee surgery in vivo. Further studies are still necessary to demonstrate the clinical capability of the introduced parameters for naturally occurring early OA changes in the cartilage.

  2. Surface roughness effects on the solar reflectance of cool asphalt shingles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul; Akbari, Hashem; Jacobs, Jeffry; Klink, Frank

    2008-02-17

    We analyze the solar reflectance of asphalt roofing shingles that are covered with pigmented mineral roofing granules. The reflecting surface is rough, with a total area approximately twice the nominal area. We introduce a simple analytical model that relates the 'micro-reflectance' of a small surface region to the 'macro-reflectance' of the shingle. This model uses a mean field approximation to account for multiple scattering effects. The model is then used to compute the reflectance of shingles with a mixture of different colored granules, when the reflectances of the corresponding mono-color shingles are known. Simple linear averaging works well, with small corrections to linear averaging derived for highly reflective materials. Reflective base granules and reflective surface coatings aid achievement of high solar reflectance. Other factors that influence the solar reflectance are the size distribution of the granules, coverage of the asphalt substrate, and orientation of the granules as affected by rollers during fabrication.

  3. Ground-penetrating radar study of the Cena Bog, Latvia: linkage of reflections with peat moisture content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karušs, J.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Present work illustrates results of the ground-penetrating radar (GPR study of the Cena Bog, Latvia. Six sub-horizontal reflections that most probably correspond to boundaries between sediments with different electromagnetic properties were identified. One of the reflections corresponds to bog peat mineral bottom interface but the rest are linked to boundaries within the peat body. The radar profiles are incorporated with sediment cores and studies of peat moisture and ash content, and degree of decomposition. Most of the electromagnetic wave reflections are related to changes in peat moisture content. The obtained data show that peat moisture content changes of at least 3 % are required to cause GPR signal reflection. However, there exist reflections that do not correlate with peat moisture content. As a result, authors disagree with a dominant opinion that all reflections in bogs are solely due to changes in volumetric peat moisture content.

  4. Measured ground-surface movements, Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massey, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    The Cerro Prieto geothermal area in the Mexicali Valley, 30 kilometers southeast of Mexicali, Baja California, incurred slight deformation because of the extraction of hot water and steam, and probably, active tectonism. During 1977 to 1978, the US Geological Survey established and measured two networks of horizontal control in an effort to define both types of movement. These networks consisted of: (1) a regional trilateration net brought into the mountain ranges west of the geothermal area from stations on an existing US Geological Survey crustal-strain network north of the international border; and (2) a local net tied to stations in the regional net and encompassing the present and planned geothermal production area. Electronic distance measuring instruments were used to measure the distances between stations in both networks in 1978, 1979 and 1981. Lines in the regional net averaged 25 km. in length and the standard deviation of an individual measurement is estimated to be approx. 0.3 part per million of line length. The local network was measured using different instrumentation and techniques. The average line length was about 5 km. and the standard deviation of an individual measurement approached 3 parts per million per line length. Ground-surface movements in the regional net, as measured by both the 1979 and 1981 resurveys, were small and did not exceed the noise level. The 1979 resurvey of the local net showed an apparent movement of 2 to 3 centimeters inward toward the center of the production area. This apparent movement was restricted to the general limits of the production area. The 1981 resurvey of the local net did not show increased movement attributable to fluid extraction.

  5. Large-aperture ground glass surface profile measurement using coherence scanning interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Eundeok; Kim, Yunseok; Park, Sanguk; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2017-01-23

    We present a coherence scanning interferometer configured to deal with rough glass surfaces exhibiting very low reflectance due to severe sub-surface light scattering. A compound light source is prepared by combining a superluminescent light-emitting diode with an ytterbium-doped fiber amplifier. The light source is attuned to offer a short temporal coherence length of 15 μm but with high spatial coherence to secure an adequate correlogram contrast by delivering strongly unbalanced optical power to the low reflectance target. In addition, the infrared spectral range of the light source is shifted close to the visible side at a 1,038 nm center wavelength, so a digital camera of multi-mega pixels available for industrial machine vision can be used to improve the correlogram contrast further with better lateral image resolutions. Experimental results obtained from a ground Zerodur mirror of 200 mm aperture size and 0.9 μm rms roughness are discussed to validate the proposed interferometer system.

  6. Landsat surface reflectance quality assurance extraction (version 1.7)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J.W.; Starbuck, M.J.; Jenkerson, C.B.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Land Remote Sensing Program is developing an operational capability to produce Climate Data Records (CDRs) and Essential Climate Variables (ECVs) from the Landsat Archive to support a wide variety of science and resource management activities from regional to global scale. The USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center is charged with prototyping systems and software to generate these high-level data products. Various USGS Geographic Science Centers are charged with particular ECV algorithm development and (or) selection as well as the evaluation and application demonstration of various USGS CDRs and ECVs. Because it is a foundation for many other ECVs, the first CDR in development is the Landsat Surface Reflectance Product (LSRP). The LSRP incorporates data quality information in a bit-packed structure that is not readily accessible without postprocessing services performed by the user. This document describes two general methods of LSRP quality-data extraction for use in image processing systems. Helpful hints for the installation and use of software originally developed for manipulation of Hierarchical Data Format (HDF) produced through the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing System are first provided for users who wish to extract quality data into separate HDF files. Next, steps follow to incorporate these extracted data into an image processing system. Finally, an alternative example is illustrated in which the data are extracted within a particular image processing system.

  7. The Effect of Non-Lambertian Surface Reflectance on Aerosol Radiative Forcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricchiazzi, P.; O' Hirok, W.; Gautier, C.

    2005-03-18

    Surface reflectance is an important factor in determining the strength of aerosol radiative forcing. Previous studies of radiative forcing assumed that the reflected surface radiance is isotropic and does not depend on incident illumination angle. This Lambertian reflection model is not a very good descriptor of reflectance from real land and ocean surfaces. In this study we present computational results for the seasonal average of short and long wave aerosol radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface. The effect of the Lambertian assumption is found through comparison with calculations using a more detailed bi-direction reflectance distribution function (BRDF).

  8. Surface fatigue life of CBN and vitreous ground carburized and hardened AISI 9310 spur gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Dennis P.; Patel, P. R.

    1988-01-01

    Spur gear surface endurance tests were conducted to investigate CBN ground AISI 9310 spur gears for use in aircraft applications, to determine their endurance characteristics and to compare the results with the endurance of standard vitreous ground AISI 9310 spur gears. Tests were conducted with VIM-VAR AISI 9310 carburized and hardened gears that were finish ground with either CBN or vitreous grinding methods. Test conditions were an inlet oil temeprature of 320 K (116 F), an outlet oil temperature of 350 K (170 F), a maximum Hertz stress of 1.71 GPa (248 ksi), and a speed of 10,000 rpm. The CBN ground gears exhibited a surface fatigue life that was slightly better than the vitreous ground gears. The subsurface residual stress of the CBN ground gears was approximately the same as that for the standard vitreous ground gears for the CBN grinding method used.

  9. Fiber optic displacement measurement model based on finite reflective surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuhe; Guan, Kaisen; Hu, Zhaohui

    2016-10-01

    We present a fiber optic displacement measurement model based on finite reflective plate. The theoretical model was derived, and simulation analysis of light intensity distribution, reflective plate width, and the distance between fiber probe and reflective plate were conducted in details. The three dimensional received light intensity distribution and the characteristic curve of light intensity were studied as functions of displacement of finite reflective plate. Experiments were carried out to verify the established model. The physical fundamentals and the effect of operating parameters on measuring system performance were revealed in the end.

  10. RTM-based Teleseismic Reflection Tomography with Free Surface Multiples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, S. A.; De Hoop, M. V.; van der Hilst, R. D.

    2013-12-01

    Receiver function analysis of teleseismic converted and free surface reflected phases has long been a cornerstone of lithospheric studies. Discontinuities in elastic properties are revealed by deconvolving the incident wavefield from scattered phases and projecting the time differences to depth to form an image. The accuracy of the image is determined to a large extent by the accuracy of the method and background velocity model used, but popular approaches for projecting receiver functions to depth commonly rely on simplifying assumptions of a 1D velocity and planar discontinuities. In tectonically complex regions like subduction zones and rift systems, strong heterogeneity can create an ambiguous tradeoff between the background velocity and the depth of the discontinuities. Furthermore, such structures are apt to create caustics at high frequencies, rendering ray-based methods inadequate. In order to better constrain the background velocity and correctly place the discontinuities at depth, we employ a novel reverse-time migration (RTM) based reflection tomography method. We adapt our reflection tomography from exploration seismology for use with teleseismic phases. Active source methods for exploration have focused on the annihilation of extended images - image gathers formed with different subsurface angle or offset information - as a means of judging the accuracy of the model. Applying these approaches to teleseismic data is untenable because 1) the sparse and uneven distribution of earthquake sources leads to the incomplete construction of extended image, 2) the imperfect separation and source deconvolution of the scattered wavefield render previous error measurements unreliable, and 3) the planar geometry of incoming arrivals makes measures of subsurface offset insensitive to perturbations in the model. To overcome these obstacles, we have developed a flexible approach based on pairwise single-source image correlations. We determine the success of the RTM and

  11. Do singing-ground surveys reflect american woodcock abundance in the western Great Lakes region?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew R. Nelson,; Andersen, David E.

    2013-01-01

    The Singing-ground Survey (SGS) is the primary monitoring tool used to assess population status and trends of American woodcock (Scolopax minor). Like most broad-scale surveys, the SGS cannot be directly validated because there are no independent estimates of abundance of displaying male American woodcock at an appropriate spatial scale. Furthermore, because locations of individual SGS routes have generally remained stationary since the SGS was standardized in 1968, it is not known whether routes adequately represent the landscapes they were intended to represent. To indirectly validate the SGS, we evaluated whether 1) counts of displaying male American woodcock on SGS routes related to land-cover types known to be related to American woodcock abundance, 2) changes in counts of displaying male American woodcock through time were related to changes in land cover along SGS routes, and 3) land-cover type composition along SGS routes was similar to land-cover type composition of the surrounding landscape. In Wisconsin and Minnesota, USA, counts along SGS routes reflected known American woodcock-habitat relations. Increases in the number of woodcock heard along SGS routes over a 13-year period in Wisconsin were related to increasing amounts of early successional forest, decreasing amounts of mature forest, and increasing dispersion and interspersion of cover types. Finally, the cover types most strongly associated with American woodcock abundance were represented along SGS routes in proportion to their composition of the broader landscape. Taken together, these results suggest that in the western Great Lakes region, the SGS likely provides a reliable tool for monitoring relative abundance and population trends of breeding, male American woodcock.

  12. Functional proteomic analysis revealed ground-base ion radiations cannot reflect biological effects of space radiations of rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Sun, Yeqing; Zhao, Qian; Han, Lu

    2016-07-01

    Highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as main factor causing biological effects. Radiobiological studies during space flights are unrepeatable due to the variable space radiation environment, ground-base ion radiations are usually performed to simulate of the space biological effect. Spaceflights present a low-dose rate (0.1˜~0.3mGy/day) radiation environment inside aerocrafts while ground-base ion radiations present a much higher dose rate (100˜~500mGy/min). Whether ground-base ion radiation can reflect effects of space radiation is worth of evaluation. In this research, we compared the functional proteomic profiles of rice plants between on-ground simulated HZE particle radiation and spaceflight treatments. Three independent ground-base seed ionizing radiation experiments with different cumulative doses (dose range: 2˜~20000mGy) and different liner energy transfer (LET) values (13.3˜~500keV/μμm) and two independent seed spaceflight experiments onboard Chinese 20th satellite and SZ-6 spacecraft were carried out. Alterations in the proteome were analyzed by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry identifications. 45 and 59 proteins showed significant (pmetabolic process, protein folding and phosphorylation. The results implied that ground-base radiations cannot truly reflect effects of spaceflight radiations, ground-base radiation was a kind of indirect effect to rice causing oxidation and metabolism stresses, but space radiation was a kind of direct effect leading to macromolecule (DNA and protein) damage and signal pathway disorders. This functional proteomic analysis work might provide a new evaluation method for further on-ground simulated HZE radiation experiments.

  13. Modeling and verifying the polarizing reflectance of real-world metallic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Kai; Weidlich, Andrea; Wilkie, Alexander; Magnor, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Using measurements of real-world samples of metals, the proposed approach verifies predictions of bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) models. It employs ellipsometry to verify both the actual polarizing effect and the overall reflectance behavior of the metallic surfaces.

  14. Mercapto-based coupling agent for improved thermophotovoltaic device back surface reflector adhesion and reflectance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernsman, Bernard; Fiedor, Joseph N.; Irr, Lawrence G.; Palmisiano, Marc N.

    2016-10-04

    A back surface reflector (BSR) is described. The BSR includes a reflecting layer, a substrate and an adhesion layer between the reflecting layer and the substrate. The adhesion layer includes 3-mercaptopropyl (trimethoxy) silane (a.k.a. Merc).

  15. Modeling the land surface reflectance for optical remote sensing data in rugged terrain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A model for topographic correction and land surface reflectance estimation for optical remote sensing data in rugged terrian is presented.Considering a directional-directional reflectance that is used for direct solar irradiance correction and a hemispheric-directional reflectance that is used for atmospheric diffuse irradiance and terrain background reflected irradiance correction respectively,the directional reflectance-based model for topographic effects removing and land surface reflectance calculation is developed by deducing the directional reflectance with topographic effects and using a radiative transfer model.A canopy reflectance simulated by GOMS model and Landsat/TM raw data covering Jiangxi rugged area were taken to validate the performance of the model presented in the paper.The validation results show that the model presented here has a remarkable ability to correct topography and estimate land surface reflectance and also provides a technique method for sequently quantitative remote sensing application in terrain area.

  16. Modeling the land surface reflectance for optical remote sensing data in rugged terrain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN JianGuang; LIU QinHuo; XIAO Qing; LIU Qiang; LI XiaoWen

    2008-01-01

    A model for topographic correction and land surface reflectance estimation for optical remote sensing data in rugged terrian is presented. Considering a directional-directional reflectance that is used for direct solar irradiance correction and a hemispheric-directional reflectance that is used for atmospheric diffuse irradiance and terrain background reflected irradiance correction respectively, the directional reflectance-based model for topographic effects removing and land surface reflectance calculation is developed by deducing the directional reflectance with topographic effects and using a radiative transfer model. A canopy reflectance simulated by GOMS model and Landsat/TM raw data covering Jiangxi rugged area were taken to validate the performance of the model presented in the paper. The validation results show that the model presented here has a remarkable ability to correct topography and estimate land surface reflectance and also provides a technique method for sequently quantitative remote sensing application in terrain area.

  17. Surface identification from multiband LADAR reflectance with varied incidence angle via database mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiang, Chona; Jin, Xuemin; Levine, Robert Y

    2015-02-10

    Incident angle dependencies of LADAR reflection depend on bulk material reflectivity and surface texture properties that can be exploited for surface identification. In this paper, surface identification via multiband LADAR reflected radiance is assessed using the nonconventional exploitation factors data system database. A statistics-based dimension reduction algorithm, stochastic neighborhood embedding (t-SNE), is used to separate the data clouds resulting from the monostatic LADAR reflected radiance and corresponding band ratios. The application of t-SNE to multiband reflected radiance effectively separates the data clouds, making surface identification via multiband LADAR reflectance possible in the presence of unknown incident angle dependencies and uncertainties. It is demonstrated that, for both the multiband monostatic reflected radiance and band ratios, the application of t-SNE mapping yields a significant improvement in surface identification from measurements with unknown or varied incident angles.

  18. Ground Plane and Near-Surface Thermal Analysis for NASA's Constellation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasbarre, Joseph F.; Amundsen, Ruth M.; Scola, Salvatore; Leahy, Frank F.; Sharp, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Most spacecraft thermal analysis tools assume that the spacecraft is in orbit around a planet and are designed to calculate solar and planetary fluxes, as well as radiation to space. On NASA Constellation projects, thermal analysts are also building models of vehicles in their pre-launch condition on the surface of a planet. This process entails making some modifications in the building and execution of a thermal model such that the radiation from the planet, both reflected albedo and infrared, is calculated correctly. Also important in the calculation of pre-launch vehicle temperatures are the natural environments at the vehicle site, including air and ground temperatures, sky radiative background temperature, solar flux, and optical properties of the ground around the vehicle. A group of Constellation projects have collaborated on developing a cohesive, integrated set of natural environments that accurately capture worst-case thermal scenarios for the pre-launch and launch phases of these vehicles. The paper will discuss the standardization of methods for local planet modeling across Constellation projects, as well as the collection and consolidation of natural environments for launch sites. Methods for Earth as well as lunar sites will be discussed.

  19. Two decades of temperature-time monitoring experiment: air - ground surface - shallow subsurface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermak, Vladimir; Dedecek, Petr; Safanda, Jan; Kresl, Milan

    2014-05-01

    Long-term observations (1994-2013) of air and shallow ground temperatures at borehole Prague-Sporilov (50º02'28.5"E, 14º28'40.2"N, 274 m a.s.l.) have been thoroughly analyzed to understand the relationship between these quantities and to describe the mechanism of heat transport at the land-atmosphere boundary layer. Data provided a surprisingly small mean ground-air temperature offset of only 0.31 K with no clear annual course and with the offset value changing irregularly even on a daily scale. Such value is substantially lower than similar values (1-2 K and more) found elsewhere, but may well characterize a mild temperate zone, when all so far available information referred rather to southern locations. Borehole data were correlated with similar observations in a polygon-site under four types of surface conditions (grass, soil, sand and asphalt) completed with registration of meteorological variables (wind direction & velocity, air & soil humidity, direct & reflected solar radiation, precipitation and snow cover). The "thermal orbits" technique proved to be an effective tool for the fast qualitative diagnostics of the thermal regime in the subsurface (conductive versus non-conductive).

  20. Anti- reflective device having an anti-reflection surface formed of silicon spikes with nano-tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Youngsman (Inventor); Mooasser, Sohrab (Inventor); Manohara, Harish (Inventor); Lee, Choonsup (Inventor); Bae, Kungsam (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Described is a device having an anti-reflection surface. The device comprises a silicon substrate with a plurality of silicon spikes formed on the substrate. A first metallic layer is formed on the silicon spikes to form the anti-reflection surface. The device further includes an aperture that extends through the substrate. A second metallic layer is formed on the substrate. The second metallic layer includes a hole that is aligned with the aperture. A spacer is attached with the silicon substrate to provide a gap between an attached sensor apparatus. Therefore, operating as a Micro-sun sensor, light entering the hole passes through the aperture to be sensed by the sensor apparatus. Additionally, light reflected by the sensor apparatus toward the first side of the silicon substrate is absorbed by the first metallic layer and silicon spikes and is thereby prevented from being reflected back toward the sensor apparatus.

  1. Anti-reflective device having an anti-reflective surface formed of silicon spikes with nano-tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Youngsam (Inventor); Manohara, Harish (Inventor); Mobasser, Sohrab (Inventor); Lee, Choonsup (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Described is a device having an anti-reflection surface. The device comprises a silicon substrate with a plurality of silicon spikes formed on the substrate. A first metallic layer is formed on the silicon spikes to form the anti-reflection surface. The device further includes an aperture that extends through the substrate. A second metallic layer is formed on the substrate. The second metallic layer includes a hole that is aligned with the aperture. A spacer is attached with the silicon substrate to provide a gap between an attached sensor apparatus. Therefore, operating as a Micro-sun sensor, light entering the hole passes through the aperture to be sensed by the sensor apparatus. Additionally, light reflected by the sensor apparatus toward the first side of the silicon substrate is absorbed by the first metallic layer and silicon spikes and is thereby prevented from being reflected back toward the sensor apparatus.

  2. Surface and borehole ground-penetrating-radar developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slob, E.C.; Sato, M.; Olhoeft, G.

    2010-01-01

    During the past 80 years, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) has evolved from a skeptically received glacier sounder to a full multicomponent 3D volume-imaging and characterization device. The tool can be calibrated to allow for quantitative estimates of physical properties such as water content. Becau

  3. Mitigating ground vibration by periodic inclusions and surface structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Bucinskas, Paulius; Persson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Ground vibration from traffic is a source of nuisance in urbanized areas. Trenches and wave barriers can provide mitigation of vibrations, but single barriers need to have a large depth to be effective-especially in the low-frequency range relevant to traffic-induced vibration. Alternatively, per...

  4. Topographical Anisotropy and Wetting of Ground Stainless Steel Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Bellmann

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic and physico-chemical methods were used for a comprehensive surface characterization of different mechanically modified stainless steel surfaces. The surfaces were analyzed using high-resolution confocal microscopy, resulting in detailed information about the topographic properties. In addition, static water contact angle measurements were carried out to characterize the surface heterogeneity of the samples. The effect of morphological anisotropy on water contact angle anisotropy was investigated. The correlation between topography and wetting was studied by means of a model of wetting proposed in the present work, that allows quantifying the air volume of the interface water drop-stainless steel surface.

  5. Concentration distributions of thoron and radon near the ground surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katase, Akira [Tohwa Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-12-01

    One dimensional diffusion model with a constant diffusion coefficient is applied to the thoron concentration distributions in air above the ground. The experimental distributions are well described by the exponential function obtained from the model. Diffusion coefficients and thoron exhalation rates are estimated from the measured distributions, which are the average values for three months. The present values of thoron exhalation are however several times as small as those measured by other researchers. (author)

  6. Ground effects of space weather investigated by the surface impedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirjola, R.; Boteler, D.; Trichtchenko, L.

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide a discussion of the surface impedance applicable in connection with studies of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) in technological systems. This viewpoint means that the surface impedance is regarded as a tool to determine the horizontal (geo)electric field at the Earth's surface, which is the key quantity for GIC. Thus the approach is different from the traditional magnetotelluric viewpoint. The definition of the surface impedance usually involves wavenumber-frequency-domain fields, so inverse Fourier transforming the expression of the electric field in terms of the surface impedance and the geomagnetic field results in convolution integrals in the time and space domains. The frequency-dependent surface impedance has a high-pass filter character whereas the corresponding transfer function between the electric field and the time derivative of the magnetic field is of a low-pass filter type. The relative change of the latter transfer function with frequency is usually smaller than that of the surface impedance, which indicates that the geoelectric field is closer to the time derivative than to the magnetic field itself. An investigation of the surface impedance defined by the space-domain electric and magnetic components indicates that the largest electric fields are not always achieved by the plane wave assumption, which is sometimes regarded as an extreme case for GIC. It is also concluded in this paper that it is often possible to apply the plane wave relation locally between the surface electric and magnetic fields. The absolute value of the surface impedance decreases with an increasing wavenumber although the maximum may also be at a non-zero value of the wavenumber. The imaginary part of the surface impedance usually much exceeds the real part.

  7. Ground-based radar reflectivity mosaic of mei-yu precipitation systems over the Yangtze River-Huaihe River basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yali; Qian, Weimiao; Gong, Yu; Wang, Hongyan; Zhang, Da-Lin

    2016-11-01

    The 3D radar reflectivity produced by a mosaic software system, with measurements from 29 operational weather radars in the Yangtze River-Huaihe River Basins (YRHRB) during the mei-yu season of 2007, is compared to coincident TRMM PR observations in order to evaluate the value of the ground-based radar reflectivity mosaic in characterizing the 3D structures of mei-yu precipitation. Results show reasonable agreement in the composite radar reflectivity between the two datasets, with a correlation coefficient of 0.8 and a mean bias of -1 dB. The radar mosaic data at constant altitudes are reasonably consistent with the TRMM PR observations in the height range of 2-5 km, revealing essentially the same spatial distribution of radar echo and nearly identical histograms of reflectivity. However, at altitudes above 5 km, the mosaic data overestimate reflectivity and have slower decreasing rates with height compared to the TRMM PR observations. The areas of convective and stratiform precipitation, based on the mosaic reflectivity distribution at 3-km altitude, are highly correlated with the corresponding regions in the TRMM products, with correlation coefficients of 0.92 and 0.97 and mean relative differences of -7.9% and -2.5%, respectively. Finally, the usefulness of the mosaic reflectivity at 3-km altitude at 6-min intervals is illustrated using a mesoscale convective system that occurred over the YRHRB.

  8. Photodetachment Spectrum of Hydrogen Negative Ion Near a Partially Reflecting Spherical Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afaq, A.; Iqbal, Azmat; Rahman, Amin Ur; Khan, Naveed; Aleem, Fazal-e.-; Ansari, M. Mushraf

    2016-10-01

    Photodetachment of negative ions near surfaces is of great interest in view of its fundamental significance and technological applications. We reinvestigate the dynamics of photoelectrons in H - photodetachment near a partially reflecting spherical surface by the semiclassical closed-orbit theory. Reflection parameter R and curvature K is used to observe inelastic and spherical effects of the surface, respectively. The classical action is evaluated from the photodetached electron trajectories incident normally at the surface, arising simultaneously from the source and its image. The derived analytical formula of photodetachment cross section correctly recovers the results of reflective spherical surface published recently based on theoretical imaging method.

  9. Analysis on effect of surface fault to site ground motion using finite element method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹炳政; 罗奇峰

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic contact theory is applied to simulate the sliding of surface fault. Finite element method is used to analyze the effect of surface fault to site ground motions. Calculated results indicate that amplification effect is obvious in the area near surface fault, especially on the site that is in the downside fault. The results show that the effect of surface fault should be considered when important structure is constructed in the site with surface fault.

  10. Mapping the bathymetry of a turbid, sand-bed river using ground-based reflectance measurements and hyperspectral image data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legleiter, C. J.; Kinzel, P. J.; Nelson, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    The Platte River in central Nebraska encompasses relatively stable, single-thread to island-braided reaches as well as wider, fully braided segments with highly mobile bar forms. Across this range of morphologies, suspended sediment and organic material contribute to turbid water conditions. In addition, the Platte is the focus of management activities intended to mitigate encroachment of vegetation and improve habitat for various migratory bird species, primarily by increasing the areal extent of shallow to slightly emergent mid-channel sand bars. The diversity of channel types and optical properties make this a challenging environment in which to implement a remote sensing approach, but the Platte also provides an opportunity for these methods to support management objectives. To evaluate the potential utility of remote sensing techniques along the Platte, we acquired hyperspectral image data, collected field spectra, and surveyed bed topography for three reaches. Ground-based measurements of reflectance Rλ were made above the water surface for flow depths d from 5 - 67 cm and a range of substrate types. An optimal band ratio analysis (OBRA) of these data, whereby regressions of log-transformed band ratios against measured depths were performed for all possible band combinations, yielded a strong, linear relationship (R2 = 0.95) between ln ({R593}/{R{647}) and d. Similar band ratio analyses were performed using reflectance spectra extracted from the hyperspectral image data for locations at which bed elevations were surveyed and compared to measured water surface elevations to calculate flow depths. Image-based OBRA produced variable results for the three sites. For a narrower, deeper reach lacking mobile mid-channel bars, a ln ({R490}/{R{638}) vs. d relation had an R2 of 0.83; applying this expression to the image generated a bathymetric map that agreed closely with our survey data. The other two sites featured fully braided morphologies, shallower depths, and

  11. National Enforcement Initiative: Preventing Animal Waste from Contaminating Surface and Ground Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page describes EPA's goal in preventing animal waste from contaminating surface and ground Water. It is an EPA National Enforcement Initiative. Both enforcement cases, and a map of enforcement actions are provided.

  12. Reflectance conversion methods for the VIS/NIR imaging spectrometer aboard the Chang'E-3 lunar rover: based on ground validation experiment data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Liu; Jian-Zhong Liu; Guang-Liang Zhang; Zong-Cheng Ling; Jiang Zhang; Zhi-Ping He; Ben-Yong Yang

    2013-01-01

    The second phase of the Chang'E Program (also named Chang'E-3) has the goal to land and perform in-situ detection on the lunar surface.A VIS/NIR imaging spectrometer (VNIS) will be carried on the Chang'E-3 lunar rover to detect the distribution of lunar minerals and resources.VNIS is the first mission in history to perform in-situ spectral measurement on the surface of the Moon,the reflectance data of which are fundamental for interpretation of lunar composition,whose quality would greatly affect the accuracy of lunar element and mineral determination.Until now,in-situ detection by imaging spectrometers was only performed by rovers on Mars.We firstly review reflectance conversion methods for rovers on Mars (Viking landers,Pathfinder and Mars Exploration rovers,etc).Secondly,we discuss whether these conversion methods used on Mars can be applied to lunar in-situ detection.We also applied data from a laboratory bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) using simulated lunar soil to test the availability of this method.Finally,we modify reflectance conversion methods used on Mars by considering differences between environments on the Moon and Mars and apply the methods to experimental data obtained from the ground validation of VNIS.These results were obtained by comparing reflectance data from the VNIS measured in the laboratory with those from a standard spectrometer obtained at the same time and under the same observing conditions.The shape and amplitude of the spectrum fits well,and the spectral uncertainty parameters for most samples are within 8%,except for the ilmenite sample which has a low albedo.In conclusion,our reflectance conversion method is suitable for lunar in-situ detection.

  13. Low-reflectance laser-induced surface nanostructures created with a picosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarbada, Shashank; Huang, Zhifeng; Shin, Yung C.; Ruan, Xiulin

    2016-04-01

    Using high-speed picosecond laser pulse irradiation, low-reflectance laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) have been created on polycrystalline silicon. The effects of laser fluence, scan speed, overlapping ratio and polarization angle on the formation of LIPSS are reported. The anti-reflective properties of periodic structures are discussed, and the ideal LIPSS for low surface reflectance is presented. A decrease of 35.7 % in average reflectance of the silicon wafer was achieved over the wavelength range of 400-860 nm when it was textured with LIPSS at high scan speeds of 4000 mm/s. Experimental results of broadband reflectance of silicon wafers textured with LIPSS have been compared with finite difference time domain simulations and are in good agreement, showing high predictability in reflectance values for different structures. The effects of changing the LIPSS profile, fill factor and valley depth on the surface reflectance were also analyzed through simulations.

  14. Multicusp caustics formed from reflections of warped surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocaris, P S

    1988-02-15

    The optical method of caustics developed mainly for studying singularities in stress fields was extended to define quantitatively the slope variation of warped surfaces. The existing theory was concerned with the study of infinitesimal but abrupt variations of thickness in elastic and plastic stress fields containing stress singularities due to either loading or geometry. In this paper the theory of caustics was extended to study the warping of any surface due mainly to twisting loads- While the caustics developed in previous uses were generalized epicycloid surfaces with or without a single cusp line, in the cases studied in this paper multicusp surfaces were developed. The quantitative interrelationship between the shape and size of the caustic and the respective mode of twisting of the surface was established, and interesting properties of these surfaces were disclosed. Applications to twisted elliptic, triangular, and square elastic bars clearly illustrate the importance of the method.

  15. Urban Visible/SWIR surface reflectance ratios from satellite and sun photometer measurements in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. de Almeida Castanho

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The surface reflectance ratio between the visible (VIS and shortwave infrared (SWIR radiation is an important quantity for the retrieval of the aerosol optical depth (τa from the MODIS sensor data. Based on empirically determined VIS/SWIR ratios, MODIS τa retrieval uses the surface reflectance in the SWIR band (2.1 μm, where the interaction between solar radiation and the aerosol layer is small, to predict the visible reflectances in the blue (0.47 μm and red (0.66 μm bands. Therefore, accurate knowledge of the VIS/SWIR ratio is essential for achieving accurate retrieval of aerosol optical depth from MODIS. The heterogeneity of the surface cover in an urban environment increases the uncertainties in the estimation of the surface reflectance and, consequently, τa. We analyzed the surface reflectance over some distinct surface covers in and around the Mexico City metropolitan area (MCMA using MODIS radiances at 0.66 μm and 2.1 μm. The analysis was performed at 1.5 km×1.5 km spatial resolution. Also, ground-based AERONET sun-photometer data acquired in Mexico City from 2002 to 2005 were analyzed for aerosol optical thickness and other aerosol optical properties. In addition, a network of hand-held sun-photometers deployed in Mexico City, as part of the MCMA-2006 Study during the MILAGRO Campaign, provided an unprecedented measurement of τa in 5 different sites well distributed in the city. We found that the average RED/SWIR ratio representative of the urbanized sites analyzed is 0.73±0.06. This average ratio was significantly different for non-urban sites, which was approximately 0.55. The aerosol optical thickness retrieved from MODIS radiances at a spatial resolution of 1.5 km×1.5 km and averaged within 10 x 10 km boxes were compared with collocated 1-h τa averaged from sun-photometer measurements. The use of the new RED/SWIR ratio of 0.73 in

  16. Light Reflection from Water Surfaces Perturbed by Falling Rain Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molesini, Giuseppe; Vannoni, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    An account of peculiar light patterns produced by reflection in a pool under falling rain droplets was recently reported by Molesini and Vannoni (2008 Eur. J. Phys. 29 403-11). The mathematical approach, however, only covered the case of a symmetrical location of a light source and the observer's eyes with respect to the vertical of the falling…

  17. The Simulation of Grinding Wheels and Ground Surface Roughness Based on Virtual Reality Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes the feasibility and method of the application of virtual reality technology to grinding process, and introduces the modeling method of object entity in the environment of virtual reality. The simulation process of grinding wheels and ground surface roughness is discussed, and the computation program system of numerical simulation is compiled with Visual C++ programming language. At the same time, the three-dimensional simulation models of grinding wheels and ground surface roughness are ...

  18. Uncertainties and shortcomings of ground surface temperature histories derived from inversion of temperature logs

    OpenAIRE

    Hartmann, Andreas; Rath, Volker

    2008-01-01

    Analysing borehole temperature data in terms of ground surface history can add useful information to reconstructions of past climates. Therefore, a rigorous assessment of uncertainties and error sources is a necessary prerequisite for the meaningful interpretation of such ground surface temperature histories. This study analyses the most prominent sources of uncertainty. The diffusive nature of the process makes the inversion relatively robust against incomplete knowledge of the thermal diffu...

  19. Different Multifractal Scaling of the 0 cm Average Ground Surface Temperature of Four Representative Weather Stations over China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The temporal scaling properties of the daily 0 cm average ground surface temperature (AGST records obtained from four selected sites over China are investigated using multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA method. Results show that the AGST records at all four locations exhibit strong persistence features and different scaling behaviors. The differences of the generalized Hurst exponents are very different for the AGST series of each site reflecting the different scaling behaviors of the fluctuation. Furthermore, the strengths of multifractal spectrum are different for different weather stations and indicate that the multifractal behaviors vary from station to station over China.

  20. A Monte Carlo reflectance model for soil surfaces with three-dimensional structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, K. D.; Smith, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    A Monte Carlo soil reflectance model has been developed to study the effect of macroscopic surface irregularities larger than the wavelength of incident flux. The model treats incoherent multiple scattering from Lambertian facets distributed on a periodic surface. Resulting bidirectional reflectance distribution functions are non-Lambertian and compare well with experimental trends reported in the literature. Examples showing the coupling of the Monte Carlo soil model to an adding bidirectional canopy of reflectance model are also given.

  1. Coherent reflection of He atom beams from rough surfaces at near-grazing incidence

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, B.; Schewe, C.; Meijer, G.; Schöllkopf, W.

    2010-01-01

    We report coherent reflection of thermal He atom beams from various microscopically rough surfaces at grazing incidence. For a sufficiently small normal component kz of the incident wave- vector of the atom the reflection probability is found to be a function of kz only. This behavior is explained by quantum-reflection at the attractive branch of the Casimir-van der Waals interaction potential. For larger values of kz the overall reflection probability decreases rapidly and is found to also d...

  2. Monitoring surface geothermal features using time series of aerial and ground-based photographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromley, C.; van Manen, S. M.; Graham, D.

    2010-12-01

    Geothermal systems are of high conservation and scientific value and monitoring of these is an important management tool to assess natural variations and changes resulting from development and utilization. This study examines time series of aerial and ground-based photographs of geothermal areas within the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand. A time series of aerial photographs from 1946-2007 of the Broadlands Road Scenic Reserve (Taupo, New Zealand) highlights large changes to this small area as the result of the start of geothermal fluid production for the nearby Wairakei power plant in 1958 and other causes. Prior to the opening of the plant the area was not geothermally active, but expansion of steam zones due to pressure drawdown has resulted in significant thermal changes in the subsurface. These subsurface thermal changes are evident in the aerial photographs as the appearance of hydrothermal eruption craters and areas of thermal bare ground, which are too hot for vegetation to grown on. In addition, in the late 1960’s thermotolerant vegetation started to establish itself in the adjacent area. Changes in the surface area covered by each of these, reflect changes in the geothermal system as well as changes in management (e.g. exclusion of livestock), and a time series of these changes has been produced using ArcMap™. Monthly photographs of surface geothermal expressions in the Rotorua area show changes in colour and size of chloride springs with time. Colour and size changes are difficult to quantify due to varying exposure settings, weather conditions, and vantage points. However, these qualitative descriptions can be combined with quantitative time series such as temperature measurements, to provide better insight into surface changes that have occurred at this geothermal field. This study highlights the value of both qualitative and quantitative data that can be obtained from time series of photographs, including photographs that were obtained before the

  3. Ground-water and surface-water quality data for the West Branch Canal Creek area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Tracey A.; Phelan, Daniel J.; Olsen, Lisa D.; Lorah, Michelle M.

    2001-01-01

    This report presents ground-water and surface-water quality data from samples collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from November 1999 through May 2001 at West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The report also provides a description of the sampling and analytical methods that were used to collect and analyze the samples, and includes an evaluation of the quality-assurance data. The ground-water sampling network included two 4-inch wells, two 2-inch wells, sixteen 1-inch piezometers, one hundred thirteen 0.75-inch piezometers, two 0.25-inch flexible-tubing piezo-meters, twenty-seven 0.25-inch piezometers, and forty-two multi-level monitoring system depths at six sites. Ground-water profiler samples were collected from nine sites at 34 depths. In addition, passive-diffusion-bag samplers were deployed at four sites, and porous-membrane sampling devices were installed in the upper sediment at five sites. Surface-water samples were collected from 20 sites. Samples were collected from wells and 0.75-inch piezometers for measurement of field parameters and reduction-oxidation constituents, and analysis of inorganic and organic constituents, during three sampling events in March?April and June?August 2000, and May 2001. Surface-water samples were collected from November 1999 through September 2000 during five sampling events for analysis of organic constituents. Ground-water profiler samples were collected in April?May 2000, and analyzed for field measure-ments, reduction-oxidation constituents, and inorganic constituents and organic constituents. Passive-diffusion-bag samplers were installed in September 2000, and samples were analyzed for organic constituents. Multi-level monitoring system samples were collected and analyzed for field measurements and reduction-oxidation con-stituents, inorganic constituents, and organic con-stituents in March?April and June?August 2000. Field measurements and organic constituents were collected from 0.25-inch

  4. Measurement of bidirectional reflection distribution function on material surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Hongyuan Wang; Zhile Wang

    2009-01-01

    Two automatic measurement methods of bidirectional reflection distribution function (BRDF) are pre sented based on absolute and relative definition. Measurement principle and scheme of the methods are analyzed. A real-time measurement device is developed, the measurement spectral range of which is from ultraviolet to near infrared with 2.4-nm wavelength resolution, and the angular range is 0掳鈥? 360掳 in az imuth angle and 0掳 - 85掳 in zenith angle with 0.01掳 angle resolution. Absolute measurements of BRDF on tinfoil and ceramic tile are performed and the test materials present apparent specular reflection char acteristics. The theoretical error in the experiment is about 6.05%. The BRDF measurement results are closely related to the precision of measurement platform, the sensitivity of measurement instrument, and the stability of illuminating light source.

  5. Spectral reflectance of surface soils - A statistical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouse, K. R.; Henninger, D. L.; Thompson, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship of the physical and chemical properties of soils to their spectral reflectance as measured at six wavebands of Thematic Mapper (TM) aboard NASA's Landsat-4 satellite was examined. The results of performing regressions of over 20 soil properties on the six TM bands indicated that organic matter, water, clay, cation exchange capacity, and calcium were the properties most readily predicted from TM data. The middle infrared bands, bands 5 and 7, were the best bands for predicting soil properties, and the near infrared band, band 4, was nearly as good. Clustering 234 soil samples on the TM bands and characterizing the clusters on the basis of soil properties revealed several clear relationships between properties and reflectance. Discriminant analysis found organic matter, fine sand, base saturation, sand, extractable acidity, and water to be significant in discriminating among clusters.

  6. A Computer Model for Bistatic Sea Surface Microwave Reflectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-14

    height of the rough surface in the z-direction. The rough sea surface is then modeled as a two-dimensional Gaussian random surface according to Beckmann ...Bistatic RCS In Beckmann and Spizzichino, [1] an equation was derived for the bistatic RCS based on an evaluation of the statistical properties of the...x y G x y S x y x y     (10) In Eq. (10),  ( , )G x y accounts for the wave-slope statistics (the classical Beckmann and Spizzichino

  7. Analysis of ground-based and VIRTIS-M/ROSETTA reflectance spectra of asteroid 2687 Šteins: A comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, K.; Arnold, G.; Hiesinger, H.; Capaccioni, F.

    2012-04-01

    The asteroid 2687 Šteins was encountered by Rosetta in 2008. Prior to the fly-by, ground-based observations of Šteins were performed [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]. We present a summary of ground-based VIS and NIR reflectance spectra of Šteins and compare them with VIRTIS-M-spectra obtained during the fly-by. On the basis of these spectral data we discuss the relationship to meteorite materials, and the classification of Šteins. The ground-based spectra cover a wavelength range from 0.4-2.5 µm. All spectra show a clear absorption feature at ~0.5 µm and a steep spectral slope between ~0.6-0.8 µm. At wavelengths >1 µm the spectra show a neutral to slightly reddish trend. The absorption band at ~0.5 µm is commonly linked to the feature at that wavelength in the oldhamite spectrum [7]. The oldhamite spectrum shows another weaker feature at 0.96 µm. This weaker feature at ~0.96 µm is visible in two of the ground-based spectra. Spectral slopes of most Earth-based spectra are comparable within arrow bars. The uniform spectral characteristics indicate a homogenous surface of Šteins. The VIRTIS-M-spectra of Šteins cover the wavelength range from 0.25-1 µm (VIS) and 1-5 µm (IR). The spectra show an overall flat behavior with a steep red slope at wavelengths 3.5 µm thermal emission contributes significantly to the detected radiation. The thermal properties derived from VIRTIS-M long wavelength measurements suggest a thin regolith layer and a low porosity. The shape of the asteroid is consistent with the hypothesis that Šteins is a rubble-pile. Ground-based and fly-by spectra of Šteins are in good agreement with each other considering the overall spectral characteristics and the occurrence of the absorption feature at 0.5 µm. Prior to the Rosetta fly-by Šteins has been classified (by e.g. [1, 5]) as an E[II]-type asteroid (after [8, 9], also Xe after [10]). VIRTIS data suggest that Šteins can be classified as an igneous E-type asteroid, being a member of the E

  8. Imaging Geological Structures Up to the Acquisition Surface Using a Hybrid Refraction-Reflection Seismic Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendes M.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of seismic imaging is to reconstruct the reflectivity associated with subsurface structures. In standard imaging techniques, the reflectivity model usually starts a few meters below the surface, the actual depth being dependent on data acquisition parameters and the mute used to remove stretching of first arrivals after normal moveout correction. In this paper, we describe a method to image the reflectivity of near-surface structures starting from the acquisition surface. This is achieved by processing both the first arrivals and the reflected phases present in data collected for refraction surveys. The proposed imaging procedure works in three steps. First, we obtain a velocity model for the shallow region by combining the Plus-Minus method of refraction interpretation with tomographic inversion of first arrival times. Second, by processing reflection events present in the refraction data, we obtain a standard reflectivity section for the deeper region. Finally, we compute reflectivity for the shallow region using the velocity model estimated from first arrival information in step 1. This velocity model is used both to compute reflectivity and to convert it in time. The reflectivity obtained for the shallow region is associated with velocity contrasts. In order to merge it with the reflectivity section for the deeper region a scaling factor between the two sets of reflectivity sections must be computed and applied. The novelty of this contribution is the use the tomographic velocity model in evaluating reflectivity for the upper part of the section. This improves the continuity of information about all near-surface structures in comparison with previous works that were limited to reflection data. Three field examples illustrate the proposed procedure showing continuous information about reflectivity of structures starting from the acquisition surface.

  9. Comparison between reflectivity statistics at heights of 3 and 6 km and rain rate statistics at ground level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, R. K.

    1975-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to study the relations between the empirical distribution functions of reflectivity at specified locations above the surface and the corresponding functions at the surface. A bistatic radar system was used to measure continuously the scattering cross section per unit volume at heights of 3 and 6 km. A frequency of 3.7 GHz was used in the tests. It was found that the distribution functions for reflectivity may significantly change with height at heights below the level of the melting layer.

  10. Determination of land surface reflectance using the AATSR dual-view capability

    OpenAIRE

    Sogacheva, L.; Kolmonen, P; T. H. Virtanen; Rodriguez, E.; A.-M. Sundström; G. de Leeuw

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a method is presented to retrieve the surface reflectance using reflectance measured at the top of the atmosphere for the two views provided by the Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR). In the first step, the aerosol optical depth (AOD) is obtained using the AATSR dual view algorithm (ADV) by eliminating the effect of the surface on the measured radiances. Hence the AOD is independent of surface properties and can thus be used in the second step to p...

  11. Constructing Grounded Theory: Reflections on a Case Study of a Professor of Architectural Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janesick, Valerie J.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses a case study describing the philosophy of teaching design to architecture students as practiced by one professor. A model of his architectural design curriculum emerged. Three issues arose: constructing theory from data grounded in experience, posing appropriate research questions, and understanding the roots of ethnographic inquiry.…

  12. Model of Reflection Spectra of Rock Surface in 2π Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hongying; ZHAO Hu; YAN Lei; ZHAO Yunsheng

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with reflection spectra and polarized reflection spectra of 20 sorts of rock in 2π space, and then creates a model of reflection spectra of rock surface in 2π space. We measured the change of reflection and polarized reflection spectra as altering the incidence angle, vertex angle, azimuth angle, band and polarization. The results show that influence of the incidence angle on spectral curves is very strong. And when the vertex angle is constant, the horizontal azimuth polarizes rock spectra, and distorts the circular spectrum to become elliptic. The polarization influences the reflection intensity of rock spectra, but has no evident influence on the characteristics of wave forms of rock in 2π space. Therefore, we can describe the whole reflection spectral characteristics, including polarization,of rock surface in 2π space by measuring and calculating the e and p values in several key directions.

  13. Removal of Surface-Reflected Light for the Measurement of Remote-Sensing Reflectance from an Above-Surface Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-06

    REPORT DATE IDD-MM- YYYY) 14-02-2011 2. REPORT TYPE Journal Article 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Removal of Surface...impossible to obtain Rr, from measurements of vertical profiles of Lu and Elt [6]. During the experiment, the surface was calm [see Fig. 8(a)] and

  14. Adaption of the MODIS aerosol retrieval algorithm using airborne spectral surface reflectance measurements over urban areas: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäkel, E.; Mey, B.; Levy, R.; Gu, X.; Yu, T.; Li, Z.; Althausen, D.; Heese, B.; Wendisch, M.

    2015-12-01

    MODIS (MOderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) retrievals of aerosol optical depth (AOD) are biased over urban areas, primarily because the reflectance characteristics of urban surfaces are different than that assumed by the retrieval algorithm. Specifically, the operational "dark-target" retrieval is tuned towards vegetated (dark) surfaces and assumes a spectral relationship to estimate the surface reflectance in blue and red wavelengths. From airborne measurements of surface reflectance over the city of Zhongshan, China, were collected that could replace the assumptions within the MODIS retrieval algorithm. The subsequent impact was tested upon two versions of the operational algorithm, Collections 5 and 6 (C5 and C6). AOD retrieval results of the operational and modified algorithms were compared for a specific case study over Zhongshan to show minor differences between them all. However, the Zhongshan-based spectral surface relationship was applied to a much larger urban sample, specifically to the MODIS data taken over Beijing between 2010 and 2014. These results were compared directly to ground-based AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) measurements of AOD. A significant reduction of the differences between the AOD retrieved by the modified algorithms and AERONET was found, whereby the mean difference decreased from 0.27±0.14 for the operational C5 and 0.19±0.12 for the operational C6 to 0.10±0.15 and -0.02±0.17 by using the modified C5 and C6 retrievals. Since the modified algorithms assume a higher contribution by the surface to the total measured reflectance from MODIS, consequently the overestimation of AOD by the operational methods is reduced. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the MODIS AOD retrieval with respect to different surface types was investigated. Radiative transfer simulations were performed to model reflectances at top of atmosphere for predefined aerosol properties. The reflectance data were used as input for the retrieval methods. It

  15. High quality broadband spatial reflections of slow Rayleigh surface acoustic waves modulated by a graded grooved surface

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-01-21

    We report high quality broadband spatial reflections of Rayleigh surface acoustic waves (SAWs) through a graded grooved surface. High quality means that no wave is allowed to transmit and the incident wave is nearly all reflected to the input side. The graded grooved surface is structured by drilling one dimensional array of graded grooves with increased depths on a flat surface. We investigate SAW dispersion relations, wave field distribution at several typical SAW wavelengths, and time evolution of a Gaussian pulse through the graded grooved surface. Results show that the input broadband Rayleigh SAWs can be slowed, spatially enhanced and stopped, and finally reflected to the input side. The study suggests that engraving the flat surface can be used as an efficient and economical way to manipulate Rayleigh SAWs, which has potential application in novel SAW devices such as filters, reflectors, sensors, energy harvesters, and diodes.

  16. Joint laminate degradation assessed by reflected ultrasound from the cartilage surface and osteochondral junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, C P; Crawford, R W; Oloyede, A [School of Engineering Systems, IHBI, QUT, Brisbane (Australia); Hughes, S W [School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, QUT, Brisbane (Australia)], E-mail: k.oloyede@qut.edu.au

    2008-08-07

    The ability to quantify and qualify the progression of joint degeneration is becoming increasingly important in surgery. This paper examines the patterns of relative ultrasound reflection from normal, artificially and naturally degraded cartilage-on-bone, particularly investigating the potential of the ratio of reflection coefficients from the surface and osteochondral junction in distinguishing normal from osteoarthritic tissue. To this end, the reflection coefficients from the articular surface and osteochondral junction of normal cartilage-on-bone samples were calculated and compared to samples after the removal of proteoglycans, disruption of the collagen meshwork, delipidization of the articular surface and mechanical abrasion. Our results show that the large variation across normal and degraded joint samples negates the use of an isolated bone reflection measurement and to a lesser extent, an isolated surface reflection. The relative surface to bone reflections, calculated as a ratio of reflection coefficients, provided a more consistent and statistically significant (p < 0.001) method for distinguishing each type of degradation, especially osteoarthritic degradation, and due to the complementary relationship between surface and bone reflections was found to be an effective method for distinguishing degraded from normal tissue in the osteoarthritic joint, independent of the site of initiation of the osteoarthritic process.

  17. Joint laminate degradation assessed by reflected ultrasound from the cartilage surface and osteochondral junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C. P.; Hughes, S. W.; Crawford, R. W.; Oloyede, A.

    2008-08-01

    The ability to quantify and qualify the progression of joint degeneration is becoming increasingly important in surgery. This paper examines the patterns of relative ultrasound reflection from normal, artificially and naturally degraded cartilage-on-bone, particularly investigating the potential of the ratio of reflection coefficients from the surface and osteochondral junction in distinguishing normal from osteoarthritic tissue. To this end, the reflection coefficients from the articular surface and osteochondral junction of normal cartilage-on-bone samples were calculated and compared to samples after the removal of proteoglycans, disruption of the collagen meshwork, delipidization of the articular surface and mechanical abrasion. Our results show that the large variation across normal and degraded joint samples negates the use of an isolated bone reflection measurement and to a lesser extent, an isolated surface reflection. The relative surface to bone reflections, calculated as a ratio of reflection coefficients, provided a more consistent and statistically significant (p < 0.001) method for distinguishing each type of degradation, especially osteoarthritic degradation, and due to the complementary relationship between surface and bone reflections was found to be an effective method for distinguishing degraded from normal tissue in the osteoarthritic joint, independent of the site of initiation of the osteoarthritic process.

  18. Urban archaeological investigations using surface 3D Ground Penetrating Radar and Electrical Resistivity Tomography methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Nikos; Sarris, Apostolos; Yi, Myeong-Jong; Kim, Jung-Ho

    2009-02-01

    Ongoing and extensive urbanisation, which is frequently accompanied with careless construction works, may threaten important archaeological structures that are still buried in the urban areas. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) methods are most promising alternatives for resolving buried archaeological structures in urban territories. In this work, three case studies are presented, each of which involves an integrated geophysical survey employing the surface three-dimensional (3D) ERT and GPR techniques, in order to archaeologically characterise the investigated areas. The test field sites are located at the historical centres of two of the most populated cities of the island of Crete, in Greece. The ERT and GPR data were collected along a dense network of parallel profiles. The subsurface resistivity structure was reconstructed by processing the apparent resistivity data with a 3D inversion algorithm. The GPR sections were processed with a systematic way, applying specific filters to the data in order to enhance their information content. Finally, horizontal depth slices representing the 3D variation of the physical properties were created. The GPR and ERT images significantly contributed in reconstructing the complex subsurface properties in these urban areas. Strong GPR reflections and high-resistivity anomalies were correlated with possible archaeological structures. Subsequent excavations in specific places at both sites verified the geophysical results. The specific case studies demonstrated the applicability of ERT and GPR techniques during the design and construction stages of urban infrastructure works, indicating areas of archaeological significance and guiding archaeological excavations before construction work.

  19. Monte Carlo method of macroscopic modulation of small-angle charged particle reflection from solid surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bratchenko, M I

    2001-01-01

    A novel method of Monte Carlo simulation of small-angle reflection of charged particles from solid surfaces has been developed. Instead of atomic-scale simulation of particle-surface collisions the method treats the reflection macroscopically as 'condensed history' event. Statistical parameters of reflection are sampled from the theoretical distributions upon energy and angles. An efficient sampling algorithm based on combination of inverse probability distribution function method and rejection method has been proposed and tested. As an example of application the results of statistical modeling of particles flux enhancement near the bottom of vertical Wehner cone are presented and compared with simple geometrical model of specular reflection.

  20. Noninvasive assessment of articular cartilage surface damage using reflected polarized light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Ruby N; Nehmetallah, George; Raub, Christopher B

    2017-06-01

    Articular surface damage occurs to cartilage during normal aging, osteoarthritis, and in trauma. A noninvasive assessment of cartilage microstructural alterations is useful for studies involving cartilage explants. This study evaluates polarized reflectance microscopy as a tool to assess surface damage to cartilage explants caused by mechanical scraping and enzymatic degradation. Adult bovine articular cartilage explants were scraped, incubated in collagenase, or underwent scrape and collagenase treatments. In an additional experiment, cartilage explants were subject to scrapes at graduated levels of severity. Polarized reflectance parameters were compared with India ink surface staining, features of histological sections, changes in explant wet weight and thickness, and chondrocyte viability. The polarized reflectance signal was sensitive to surface scrape damage and revealed individual scrape features consistent with India ink marks. Following surface treatments, the reflectance contrast parameter was elevated and correlated with image area fraction of India ink. After extensive scraping, polarized reflectance contrast and chondrocyte viability were lower than that from untreated explants. As part of this work, a mathematical model was developed and confirmed the trend in the reflectance signal due to changes in surface scattering and subsurface birefringence. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of polarized reflectance microscopy to sensitively assess surface microstructural alterations in articular cartilage explants.

  1. Unmanned aerial system nadir reflectance and MODIS nadir BRDF-adjusted surface reflectances intercompared over Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Burkhart

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Albedo is a fundamental parameter in earth sciences, and many analyses utilize the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF/albedo (MCD43 algorithms. While derivative albedo products have been evaluated over Greenland, we present a novel, direct comparison with nadir surface reflectance collected from an unmanned aerial system (UAS. The UAS was flown from Summit, Greenland, on 210 km transects coincident with the MODIS sensor overpass on board the Aqua and Terra satellites on 5 and 6 August 2010. Clear-sky acquisitions were available from the overpasses within 2 h of the UAS flights. The UAS was equipped with upward- and downward-looking spectrometers (300–920 nm with a spectral resolution of 10 nm, allowing for direct integration into the MODIS bands 1, 3, and 4. The data provide a unique opportunity to directly compare UAS nadir reflectance with the MODIS nadir BRDF-adjusted surface reflectance (NBAR products. The data show UAS measurements are slightly higher than the MODIS NBARs for all bands but agree within their stated uncertainties. Differences in variability are observed as expected due to different footprints of the platforms. The UAS data demonstrate potentially large sub-pixel variability of MODIS reflectance products and the potential to explore this variability using the UAS as a platform. It is also found that, even at the low elevations flown typically by a UAS, reflectance measurements may be influenced by haze if present at and/or below the flight altitude of the UAS. This impact could explain some differences between data from the two platforms and should be considered in any use of airborne platforms.

  2. Study on the Surface Free Energy of Ground CaO by IGC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    CaO formed by decomposing CaCO3 at 1450℃ was ground in a vibrational mill,then the long-time ground sample was reheated at different temperatures.Inverse Gas Chromatography (IGC) was used to measure the variation of the sample′s surface free energy under grinding and reheating.It is concluded that the total surface free energy and the London dispersive component of the surface free energy increases with grinding,while the polar component first increases with grinding,and then decreases,and finally disappears.When the long-time ground sample was reheated,its total surface free energy decreases,among which the London component decreases,but the polar component appears again.

  3. Polarization of the reflectivity of paints and other rough surfaces in the infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheim, Uri P.; Feiner, Yoram

    1995-04-01

    In this study the IR reflectivity of painted and rough surfaces was investigated, and an attempt was made to represent the surfaces by a complex refractive index. A CO2 laser was used as a collimated source in the thermal IR region, and the polarization properties of reflected radiation were measured. The samples chosen were flat surfaces of sandblasted aluminum, concrete, painted metal, and asphalt. Values of the bidirectional reflectance function were obtained in the two orthogonal states of polarization, based on sulfur as the Lambertian standard. Many samples, such as painted metals, showed specular behavior and could be characterized by Fresnel equations. For some of these surfaces optical constants were calculated from the reflectivity measurements. Good agreement was obtained between the calculated and measured values of the percent of polarization for these surfaces.

  4. STACKING ON COMMON REFLECTION SURFACE WITH MULTIPARAMETER TRAVELTIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montes V. Luis A.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Commonly seismic images are displayed in time domain because the model in depth can be known only in well logs. To produce seismic sections, pre and post stack processing approaches use time or depth velocity models whereas the common reflection method does not, instead it requires a set of parameters established for the first layer. A set of synthetic data of an anticline model, with sources and receivers placed on a flat topography, was used to observe the performance of this method. As result, a better reflector recovering compared against conventional processing sequence was observed.
    The procedure was extended to real data, using a dataset acquired on a zone characterized by mild topography and quiet environment reflectors in the Eastern Colombia planes, observing an enhanced and a better continuity of the reflectors in the CRS stacked section.

  5. Teaching Theory Construction With Initial Grounded Theory Tools: A Reflection on Lessons and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmaz, Kathy

    2015-12-01

    This article addresses criticisms of qualitative research for spawning studies that lack analytic development and theoretical import. It focuses on teaching initial grounded theory tools while interviewing, coding, and writing memos for the purpose of scaling up the analytic level of students' research and advancing theory construction. Adopting these tools can improve teaching qualitative methods at all levels although doctoral education is emphasized here. What teachers cover in qualitative methods courses matters. The pedagogy presented here requires a supportive environment and relies on demonstration, collective participation, measured tasks, progressive analytic complexity, and accountability. Lessons learned from using initial grounded theory tools are exemplified in a doctoral student's coding and memo-writing excerpts that demonstrate progressive analytic development. The conclusion calls for increasing the number and depth of qualitative methods courses and for creating a cadre of expert qualitative methodologists.

  6. Reflecting on the role of literature in qualitative public administration research:learning from grounded theory

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWhen undertaking qualitative research, public administration scholars must walk a thin line between being theoretically sensitive and imposing preconceived ideas on their work. This article identifies opportunities and pitfalls in using literature in qualitative public administration research. Whereas the opportunities are already well known within the discipline, the pitfalls remain underexposed. We identify potential pitfalls by using insights from the grounded theory approach. ...

  7. Surface Bubbles in the Bathtub and Reflections on Ripple Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    Bathtubs are splendid places for studying physics! Recently I was happily splashing about and noticed that the light from the lamp above me was being focused as bright spots on the bottom of the tub. Closer inspection showed that the spots were surrounded by dark rings. This pattern turned out to be due to the lensing effect of bubbles floating on the surface of the water.

  8. Solid Ground: Comment on "Shifting Sands: Reflections from the Field of Higher Education."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisher, Karen Gayton

    2001-01-01

    Critiques an article on using reflection to examine discrimination in higher education and the academe, presenting one American Indian woman administrator's experience with higher education and beyond. Emphasizes the benefits of: having a mentor, defining an agenda to guide one's research, clearly defining one's expectations for tenure, and…

  9. Solid Ground: Comment on "Shifting Sands: Reflections from the Field of Higher Education."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisher, Karen Gayton

    2001-01-01

    Critiques an article on using reflection to examine discrimination in higher education and the academe, presenting one American Indian woman administrator's experience with higher education and beyond. Emphasizes the benefits of: having a mentor, defining an agenda to guide one's research, clearly defining one's expectations for tenure, and…

  10. Salmonella pollution in ground and surface waters. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the contamination of ground waters and surface waters by Salmonella bacteria. Articles discuss the occurence, survival, origin, and control of these bacteria in water sources including rivers, reservoirs, swimming pools, wastewater, aquifers, and ground water. Citations also address the use of Salmonella populations as biological indicators of pollution in aquatic systems. (Contains a minimum of 102 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  11. SO2 frost - UV-visible reflectivity and Io surface coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, D. B.; Fanale, F. P.; Nelson, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The reflectance spectrum in the range 0.24-0.85 microns of SO2 frost is measured in light of the discovery of SO2 gas in the atmosphere of Io and the possible discovery of the frost on its surface. Frost deposits up to 1.5 mm thick were grown in vacuum at 130 K and bi-directional reflectance spectra were obtained. Typical SO2 frost is found to exhibit very low reflectivity (2-5%) at 0.30 microns, rising steeply at 0.32 microns to attain a maximum reflectivity (75-80%) at 4.0 microns and uniformly high reflectivity throughout the visible and near infrared. Comparison with the full disk spectrum of Io reveals that no more than 20% of the surface can be covered with optically thick SO2 frost. Combinations of surface materials including SO2 frost which can produce the observed spectrum are indicated.

  12. SO2 frost - UV-visible reflectivity and Io surface coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, D. B.; Fanale, F. P.; Nelson, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The reflectance spectrum in the range 0.24-0.85 microns of SO2 frost is measured in light of the discovery of SO2 gas in the atmosphere of Io and the possible discovery of the frost on its surface. Frost deposits up to 1.5 mm thick were grown in vacuum at 130 K and bi-directional reflectance spectra were obtained. Typical SO2 frost is found to exhibit very low reflectivity (2-5%) at 0.30 microns, rising steeply at 0.32 microns to attain a maximum reflectivity (75-80%) at 4.0 microns and uniformly high reflectivity throughout the visible and near infrared. Comparison with the full disk spectrum of Io reveals that no more than 20% of the surface can be covered with optically thick SO2 frost. Combinations of surface materials including SO2 frost which can produce the observed spectrum are indicated.

  13. Useful model organisms, indicators, or both? Ground beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae reflecting environmental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Koivula

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Classic studies have successfully linked single-species abundances, life-history traits, assemblage structures and biomass of carabid beetles to past and present, human-caused environmental impacts and variation in ‘natural’ conditions. This evidence has led many to suggest carabids to function as ‘indicators’ − a term that bears multiple meanings. Here, a conservation-oriented definition for an indicator is used, carabid indicator potential from seven views is evaluated, and ways to proceed in indicator research are discussed. (1 Carabid species richness poorly indicates the richness and abundance of other taxa, which underlines the importance of using multiple taxa in environmental assessments. The ability of assemblage indices and specialist or functional-group abundances to reflect rare species and habitats should be examined in detail. (2 Experimental evidence suggests that carabids may potentially serve as keystone indicators. (3 Carabids are sensitive to human-altered abiotic conditions, such as pesticide use in agro-ecosystems and heavy metal contamination of soils. Carabids might thus reflect ecological sustainability and ‘ecosystem health’. (4 Carabid assemblages host abundant species characteristic of particular habitat types or successional stages, which makes them promising dominance indicators. (5 Carabids reflect variation in ‘natural’ conditions, but vegetation and structural features are more commonly adopted as condition indicators. Carabids nevertheless provide yet another, equally accurate, view on the structure of the environment. (6 Carabids may function as early-warning signalers, as suggested by recent studies linking climate and carabid distributions. (7 Carabids reflect natural and human-caused disturbances and management, but the usefulness of these responses for conservation purposes requires further research. In summary, European carabids appear useful model organisms and possibly indicators because

  14. A Universal Dynamic Threshold Cloud Detection Algorithm (UDTCDA) supported by a prior surface reflectance database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lin; Wei, Jing; Wang, Jian; Mi, Xueting; Guo, Yamin; Lv, Yang; Yang, Yikun; Gan, Ping; Zhou, Xueying; Jia, Chen; Tian, Xinpeng

    2016-06-01

    Conventional cloud detection methods are easily affected by mixed pixels, complex surface structures, and atmospheric factors, resulting in poor cloud detection results. To minimize these problems, a new Universal Dynamic Threshold Cloud Detection Algorithm (UDTCDA) supported by a priori surface reflectance database is proposed in this paper. A monthly surface reflectance database is constructed using long-time-sequenced MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer surface reflectance product (MOD09A1) to provide the surface reflectance of the underlying surfaces. The relationships between the apparent reflectance changes and the surface reflectance are simulated under different observation and atmospheric conditions with the 6S (Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum) model, and the dynamic threshold cloud detection models are developed. Two typical remote sensing data with important application significance and different sensor parameters, MODIS and Landsat 8, are selected for cloud detection experiments. The results were validated against the visual interpretation of clouds and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation cloud measurements. The results showed that the UDTCDA can obtain a high precision in cloud detection, correctly identifying cloudy pixels and clear-sky pixels at rates greater than 80% with error rate and missing rate of less than 20%. The UDTCDA cloud product overall shows less estimation uncertainty than the current MODIS cloud mask products. Moreover, the UDTCDA can effectively reduce the effects of atmospheric factors and mixed pixels and can be applied to different satellite sensors to realize long-term, large-scale cloud detection operations.

  15. Cost/performance of solar reflective surfaces for parabolic dish concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquet, F.

    1980-01-01

    Materials for highly reflective surfaces for use in parabolic dish solar concentrators are discussed. Some important factors concerning performance of the mirrors are summarized, and typical costs are treated briefly. Capital investment cost/performance ratios for various materials are computed specifically for the double curvature parabolic concentrators using a mathematical model. The results are given in terms of initial investment cost for reflective surfaces per thermal kilowatt delivered to the receiver cavity for various operating temperatures from 400 to 1400 C. Although second surface glass mirrors are emphasized, first surface, chemically brightened and anodized aluminum surfaces as well as second surface, metallized polymeric films are treated. Conventional glass mirrors have the lowest cost/performance ratios, followed closely by aluminum reflectors. Ranges in the data due to uncertainties in cost and mirror reflectance factors are given.

  16. Three-dimensional shape measurement of a highly reflected, specular surface with structured light method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongwei; Ji, Lishuan; Liu, Shugui; Li, Shaohui; Han, Shujian; Zhang, Xiaojie

    2012-11-01

    This paper proposes a mathematical measurement model of a highly reflected, specular surface with structured light method. In the measurement, an auxiliary fringe pattern named amplitude perturbation is adopted to be projected onto the measured surface. The amplitude perturbation can ease the procedure of searching the corresponding points between the phase map of the measured surface and that of the reference plane by locking up the most reliable point as the starting unwrapping point whose true phase can be calculated accurately. The proposed method is also suitable for measuring the step surfaces such as gauge blocks with different heights. Furthermore, the image segmentation technology is introduced in the phase unwrapping procedure to increase the speed. Based on the unwrapped phase map, zonal wave-front reconstruction algorithm is implemented to realize three-dimensional, highly reflected, specular surface reconstruction. Experimental studies show that the developed methodology displays accuracy and high stability for highly reflected, specular surface measurement.

  17. LiDAR Relative Reflectivity Surface (2011) for the St. Thomas East End Reserve, St. Thomas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a LiDAR (Light Detection & Ranging) 0.3x0.3 meter resolution relative seafloor reflectivity surface for the St. Thomas East End Reserve...

  18. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of AVHRR Surface Reflectance, Version 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains gridded daily surface reflectance and brightness temperatures derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) sensors onboard...

  19. On Ground Surface Extraction Using Full-Waveform Airborne Laser Scanner for Cim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, K.; Chikatsu, H.

    2015-05-01

    Satellite positioning systems such as GPS and GLONASS have created significant changes not only in terms of spatial information but also in the construction industry. It is possible to execute a suitable construction plan by using a computerized intelligent construction. Therefore, an accurate estimate of the amount of earthwork is important for operating heavy equipment, and measurement of ground surface with high accuracy is required. A full-waveform airborne laser scanner is expected to be capable of improving the accuracy of ground surface extraction for forested areas, in contrast to discrete airborne laser scanners, as technological innovation. For forested areas, fundamental studies for construction information management (CIM) were conducted to extract ground surface using full-waveform airborne laser scanners based on waveform information.

  20. ON GROUND SURFACE EXTRACTION USING FULL-WAVEFORM AIRBORNE LASER SCANNER FOR CIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nakano

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Satellite positioning systems such as GPS and GLONASS have created significant changes not only in terms of spatial information but also in the construction industry. It is possible to execute a suitable construction plan by using a computerized intelligent construction. Therefore, an accurate estimate of the amount of earthwork is important for operating heavy equipment, and measurement of ground surface with high accuracy is required. A full-waveform airborne laser scanner is expected to be capable of improving the accuracy of ground surface extraction for forested areas, in contrast to discrete airborne laser scanners, as technological innovation. For forested areas, fundamental studies for construction information management (CIM were conducted to extract ground surface using full-waveform airborne laser scanners based on waveform information.

  1. Characterizing near-surface firn from the scattered signal component of glacier surface reflections detected in airborne radio-echo sounding measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutishauser, A.; Grima, C.; Sharp, M. J.; Blankenship, D. D.; Young, D. A.; Cawkwell, F.; Dowdeswell, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    With recent summer warming, surface melt on Canadian Arctic ice caps has intensified and extended to higher elevations in ice cap accumulation areas. Consequently, more meltwater percolates into the near-surface firn, and refreezes as ice layers where firn temperatures are below freezing. This process can increase firn densification rates, causing a lowering of the glacier surface height even in the absence of mass changes. Thus, knowledge of spatio-temporal variations in the near-surface firn stratigraphy is important for interpreting altimetrically-derived estimates of ice cap mass balance. We investigate the use of the scattering signal component of glacier surface reflections in airborne radio-echo sounding (RES) measurements to characterize the near-surface firn stratigraphy. The scattering signal distribution over Devon Ice Cap is compared to firn stratigraphy derived from ground-based radar data. We identify three distinct firn facies zones at different elevation ranges. The scattered signal component changes significantly between the different firn facies zones: low scattering correlates to laterally homogeneous firn containing thin, flat and continuous ice layers at elevations above 1800 m and below 1200 m, where firn consists mainly of ice. Higher scattering values are found from 1200-1800 m where the firn contains discrete, undulating ice layers. No correlation was found between the scattering component and surface roughness. Modelled scattering values for the measured roughness were significantly less than the observed values, and did not reproduce their observed spatial distribution. This indicates that the scattering component is determined mainly by the structure of near-surface firn. Our results suggest that the scattering component of surface reflections from airborne RES measurements has potential for characterizing heterogeneity in the spatial structure of firn that is affected by melting and refreezing processes.

  2. Furnace construction having an ash pit with a radiation reflecting surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, W.H.

    1984-05-01

    A water-wall, coal-fired furnace has a Coutant transition section extending down from the lower end to the water wall to the surface of water impounded in the lower ash hopper. The surface of the water is provided with a reflecting material which will permit the passage of solid residue from the coal firing into the water while reflecting incident radiant heat back up into the generating section of the furnace.

  3. The effect of surface microstructure on the optical reflectance of monocrystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quanji; Zhou, Weidong; Chen, Fangfang; Yang, Ruizhao

    2016-12-01

    Surface texturing is an important technique used to enhance the light absorption by forming certain microstructures on silicon surface. In this article, four different microstructures, based on repeat units of triangles, perpendicular grooves, hexagons and parallel grooves respectively, were fabricated directly on the surface of monocrystalline silicon wafers by using femtosecond laser texturing technique. Compare to the silicon wafers that were not treated by laser, a significant decrease of light reflectance can be observed for those laser etched silicon surfaces. And the treated silicon surface with triangles texture was found to have the lowest relative reflectance of ∼20% in the wavelength range from 400 to 1000 nm, if the textured surfaces were irradiated using the same laser fabrication condition. In addition, the relative reflectance of laser etched silicon surfaces with similar repeat unit but different structural period was investigated as well. The results show that the relative reflectance of the treated surface increases along with the increase of structural period size. These results obtained here can provide a useful guide for fabricating silicon-based optoelectronic devices with a more excellent anti-reflective performance.

  4. Avoiding genetically modified foods in GMO Ground Zero: A reflective self-narrative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Sachi

    2015-05-01

    I engage in a reflective self-narrative of my experience attempting to maintain a diet free of genetically modified organisms. Social tension over the genetically modified organism industry in Hawai'i, United States, has led to public debates over jobs and social identities. Drawing on local media sources, grassroots organizations, and blog posts, I describe the way this tension has shaped my experience with food, eating, and being with others as a genetically modified organism avoider. I utilize discursive positioning to make sense of my experiences by locating them within the ongoing public conversations that give structure to the daily lives of Hawai'i's residents.

  5. Topographical changes of ground surface affected by the Tarim Desert Highway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shengyu; LEI Jiaqiang; XU Xinwen; WANG Lixin; ZHOU Zhibin; LI Hongzhong

    2006-01-01

    The Tarim Desert Highway is the longest highway crossing the mobile desert in the world. The highway and its sand protection system were established in 1995. This great project must have significant effect on the aeolian environment in its neighborhoods. In 2004, we investigated the topographic changes of ground surface within the sand protection system and its external adjacent area in the hinterland of the Taklimakan Desert. The results showed that (i) the original topographic patterns of ground surface were greatly changed, and erosion as well as deposition was distributed clearly on the ground surface, affected by the road and its sand protection system; (ii) sediment deposited in the sand protection system gradually heightened the ground surface, but each part in the system changed differently: in the sand-blocking belt, a transverse sand ridge was formed in the same direction as the upright sand barrier; in the sand-binding belt, sediment was aggraded on the original surface in a certain thickness; at the initial stages since the establishment of the sand protection system, erosion had taken place in the un-stabilized area named by the deposition belt between the sand-blocking belt and the sand-binding belt, the inner of sand-binding belt, the windward slope of dunes in the sand-binding belt, and the neighboring leeward area of the sand protection system.

  6. Effect of the surface geology on strong ground motions due to the 2016 Central Tottori Earthquake, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Takao; Noguchi, Tatsuya; Yoshida, Shohei; Yamamoto, Shinji

    2017-08-01

    On October 21, 2016, an earthquake with Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) magnitude 6.6 hit the central part of Tottori Prefecture, Japan. This paper demonstrates two notable effects of the surface geology on strong ground motions due to the earthquake. One is a predominant period issue observed over a large area. A seismic intensity of 6 lower on the JMA scale was registered at three sites in the disaster area. However, the peak ground acceleration ranged from 0.3 to 1.4 G at the three sites because of the varying peak periods of observed strong ground motions. The spectral properties of the observations also reflect the damage around the sites. Three-component microtremors were observed in the area; the predominant ground period distributions based on horizontal to vertical spectral ratios were provided by the authors. The peak periods of the strong motion records agree well with predominant periods estimated from microtremor observations at a rather hard site; however, the predominant periods of the microtremors are slightly shorter than those of the main shock at the other two soft sites. We checked the nonlinear effect at the sites by comparing the site responses to small events and the main shock. The peak periods of the main shock were longer than those of the weak motions at the sites. This phenomenon indicates a nonlinear site effect due to large ground motions caused by the main shock. A horizontal component of the accelerogram showed rather pulsating swings that indicate cyclic mobility behavior, especially at a site close to a pond shore; ground subsidence of 20 cm was observed around the site. The peak periods of weak motions agree well with those of the microtremor observations. This implies an important issue that the predominant periods estimated by microtremors are not sufficient to estimate the effect of surface geology for disaster mitigation. We have to estimate the predominant periods under large ground motions considering the nonlinear site

  7. Determination of land surface reflectance using the AATSR dual-view capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sogacheva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a method is presented to retrieve the surface reflectance using reflectance measured at the top of the atmosphere for the two views provided by the Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR. In the first step, the aerosol optical depth (AOD is obtained using the AATSR dual view algorithm (ADV by eliminating the effect of the surface on the measured radiances. Hence the AOD is independent of surface properties and can thus be used in the second step to provide the aerosol part of the atmospheric correction which is needed for the surface reflectance retrieval. The method is applied to provide monthly maps of both AOD and surface reflectance at two wavelengths (555 and 659 nm for the whole year of 2007. The results are validated vs. surface reflectance provided by the AERONET-based Surface Reflectance Validation Network (ASRVN. Correlation coefficients are 0.8 and 0.9 for 555 and 659 nm, respectively. The standard deviation is 0.001 for both wavelengths and the absolute error is less than 0.02. Pixel-by-pixel comparison with MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectrometer monthly averaged surface reflectances show a good correlation (0.91 and 0.89 for 555 and 659 nm, respectively with some (up to 0.05 overestimation by ADV over bright surfaces. The difference between the ADV and MODIS retrieved surface reflectance is smaller than ±0.025 for 68.3% of the collocated pixels at 555 nm and 79.9% of the collocated pixels at 659 nm. An application of the results over Australia illustrates the variation of the surface reflectances for different land cover types. The validation and comparison results suggest that the algorithm can be successfully used for the both AATSR and ATSR-2 (which has characteristics similar to AATSR missions, which together cover 17 years period of measurements (1995–2012, as well as a prototype for The Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR to be launched in 2015 onboard the Sentinel-3 satellite.

  8. Coherent reflection of He atom beams from rough surfaces at near-grazing incidence

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Bum Suk; Meijer, Gerard; Schöllkopf, Wieland

    2010-01-01

    We here report coherent reflection of thermal He atom beams from various microscopically rough surfaces at grazing incidence. For a sufficiently small normal component $k_z$ of the incident wave-vector of the atom the reflection probability is found to be a function of $k_z$ only. This behavior is explained by quantum-reflection at the attractive branch of the Casimir-van der Waals interaction potential. For larger values of $k_z$ the overall reflection probability decreases rapidly and is found to also depend on the parallel component $k_x$ of the wave-vector. The material specific $k_x$ dependence for this classical reflection at the repulsive branch of the potential is explained qualitatively in terms of the averaging-out of the surface roughness under grazing incidence conditions.

  9. Coherent Reflection of He Atom Beams from Rough Surfaces at Grazing Incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bum Suk; Schewe, H. Christian; Meijer, Gerard; Schöllkopf, Wieland

    2010-09-01

    We report coherent reflection of thermal He atom beams from various microscopically rough surfaces at grazing incidence. For a sufficiently small normal component kz of the incident wave vector of the atom the reflection probability is found to be a function of kz only. This behavior is explained by quantum reflection at the attractive branch of the Casimir-van der Waals interaction potential. For larger values of kz the overall reflection probability decreases rapidly and is found to also depend on the parallel component kx of the wave vector. The material specific kx dependence for this classic reflection at the repulsive branch of the potential is discussed in terms of an averaging out of the surface roughness under grazing incidence conditions.

  10. The Effect of Images on Surface Potential and Resistance Calculation of Grounding Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARTINS, A.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the grounding systems with a two layers soil, the calculation of the surface potential using the image method is sometimes impossible due to singularities, avoiding researchers to use the method for electrodes in the bottom layer. In the literature this problem solution is refereed as unreliable or solved with other more complex methods. This paper presents a new approach to calculate the surface potentials in a two. layer soil, for electrodes in the bottom layer, when images are at surface. The singularities in computing surface voltage, when the first image upwards lies at surface, are analysed and it's shown that a small change in top layer thickness allows an approximate solution. Surface potentials due to grid conductor are also considered and the values of resistance are compared with those from other methodologies. Singularities for a ground rod that crosses the two layers are also treated. The obtained values of resistance are not satisfactory, due to lower segments images that overlap the upper segments. This paper also proposes shifting the surface of the upper part of the ground rod, in the upper layer, or taking the modulus of the mutual resistance, to overcome this difficulty.

  11. Size of craters produced by explosive charges on or above the ground surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, R. D.; Luccioni, B. M.; Danesi, R. F.; Riera, J. D.; Rocha, M. M.

    The results of a series of tests performed with different amounts of explosive at short distances above and below ground level, as well as on the soil surface are briefly described. After an introductory description of both the main features of the blast wave and the mechanics of crater formation, a brief review of empirical methods for crater size prediction is presented. Next, the experimental design and the results obtained are described. The crater dimensions for underground explosions coincide with those found in the literature. For explosions at ground level the results are qualitatively described by empirical equations. For explosive charges situated above ground level, the dimensions of the craters are smaller than those observed in underground and near the surface explosions. Two new single prediction equations for this case are presented.

  12. Data-driven inversion of GPR surface reflection data for lossless layered media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slob, E.C.; Wapenaar, C.P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Two wavefields can be retrieved from the measured reflection response at the surface. One is the Green’s function at a chosen virtual receiver depth level in a layered model generated by a source at the surface. The other wavefield consists of the upgoing and downgoing parts of a wavefield that focu

  13. Accounting for surface reflectance anisotropy in satellite retrievals of tropospheric NO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Buchmann

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Surface reflectance is a key parameter in satellite trace gas retrievals in the UV/visible range and in particular for the retrieval of nitrogen dioxide (NO2 vertical tropospheric columns (VTCs. Current operational retrievals rely on coarse-resolution reflectance data and do not account for the generally anisotropic properties of surface reflectance. Here we present a NO2 VTC retrieval that uses MODIS bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF data at high temporal (8 days and spatial (1 km×1 km resolution in combination with the LIDORT radiative transfer model to account for the dependence of surface reflectance on viewing and illumination geometry. The method was applied to two years of NO2 observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI over Europe. Due to its wide swath, OMI is particularly sensitive to BRDF effects. Using representative BRDF parameters for various land surfaces, we found that in July (low solar zenith angles and November (high solar zenith angles and for typical viewing geometries of OMI, differences between MODIS black-sky albedos and surface bi-directional reflectances are of the order of 0–10% and 0–40%, respectively, depending on the position of the OMI pixel within the swath. In the retrieval, black-sky albedo was treated as a Lambertian (isotropic reflectance, while for BRDF effects we used the kernel-based approach in the MODIS BRDF product. Air Mass Factors were computed using the LIDORT radiative transfer model based on these surface reflectance conditions. Differences in NO2 VTCs based on the Lambertian and BRDF approaches were found to be of the order of 0–3% in July and 0–20% in November with the extreme values found at large viewing angles. The much larger differences in November are partly due to higher solar zenith angles and partly to the choice of a priori NO2 profiles – the latter typically have more pronounced maxima in the boundary layer during the cold season. However, BRDF

  14. Inferring snow pack ripening and melt out from distributed ground surface temperature measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-O. Schmid

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal snow cover and its melting are heterogeneous both in space and time. Describing and modelling this variability are important because it affects divers phenomena such as runoff, ground temperatures or slope movements. This study investigates the derivation of melting characteristics based on spatial clusters of temperature measurements. Results are based on data from Switzerland where ground surface temperatures were measured with miniature loggers (iButtons at 40 locations, referred to as footprints. At each footprint, ten iButtons have been distributed randomly few cm below the ground surface over an area of 10 m × 10 m. Footprints span elevations of 2100–3300 m a.s.l. and slope angles of 0–55°, as well as diverse slope expositions and types of surface cover and ground material. Based on two years of temperature data, the basal ripening date and the melt-out date are determined for each iButton, aggregated to the footprint level and further analysed. The date of melt out could be derived for nearly all iButtons, the ripening date could be extracted for only approximately half of them because it requires ground freezing below the snow pack. The variability within a footprint is often considerable and one to three weeks difference between melting or ripening of the points in one footprint is not uncommon. The correlation of mean annual ground surface temperatures, ripening date and melt-out date is moderate, making them useful intuitive complementary measured for model evaluation.

  15. Determination of land surface reflectance using the AATSR dual-view capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogacheva, L.; Kolmonen, P.; Virtanen, T. H.; Rodriguez, E.; Sundström, A.-M.; de Leeuw, G.

    2015-02-01

    In this study, a method is presented to retrieve the surface reflectance using the radiances measured at the top of the atmosphere for the two views provided by the Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR). In the first step, the aerosol optical depth (AOD) is obtained using the AATSR dual-view algorithm (ADV) by eliminating the effect of the surface on the measured radiances. Hence the AOD is independent of surface properties and can thus be used in the second step to provide the aerosol part of the atmospheric correction which is needed for the surface reflectance retrieval. The method is applied to provide monthly maps of both AOD and surface reflectance at two wavelengths (555 and 659 nm) for the whole year of 2007. The results are validated versus surface reflectance provided by the AERONET-based Surface Reflectance Validation Network (ASRVN). Correlation coefficients are 0.8 and 0.9 for 555 and 659 nm, respectively. The standard deviation is 0.001 for both wavelengths and the absolute error is less than 0.02. Pixel-by-pixel comparison with MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) monthly averaged surface reflectances show a good correlation (0.91 and 0.89 for 555 and 659 nm, respectively) with somewhat higher values (up to 0.05) obtained by ADV over bright surfaces. The difference between the ADV- and MODIS-retrieved surface reflectances is smaller than ±0.025 for 68.3% of the collocated pixels at 555 nm and 79.9% of the collocated pixels at 659 nm. An application of the results over Australia illustrates the variation in the surface reflectances for different land cover types. The validation and comparison results suggest that the algorithm can be successfully used for both the AATSR and ATSR-2 (which has characteristics similar to AATSR) missions, which together cover a 17-year period of measurements (1995-2012), as well as a prototype for the Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR) planned to be launched in the fall of 2015

  16. Supplementary report on surface-water and ground-water surveys, Nueces River Basin, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadhurst, W.L.; Ellsworth, C.E.

    1950-01-01

    A report on the ground-water and surface-water surveys of the Nueces River Basin was included in a report by the Bureau of Reclamation, entitled "Comprehensive plan for water-resources development of the Nueces River Basin project planning report number 5-14.04-3, February 1946".

  17. Ground states for a modified capillary surface equation in weighted Orlicz-Sobolev space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqing Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we prove a compact embedding theorem for the weighted Orlicz-Sobolev space of radially symmetric functions. Using the embedding theorem and critical points theory, we prove the existence of multiple radial solutions and radial ground states for the following modified capillary surface equation $$\\displaylines{ -\\operatorname{div}\\Big(\\frac{|\

  18. Light scattering by a rough surface of human skin. 2. Diffuse reflectance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barun, V V; Ivanov, A P [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus)

    2013-10-31

    Based on the previously calculated luminance factors, we have investigated the integral characteristics of light reflection from a rough surface of the skin with large-scale inhomogeneities under various conditions of the skin illumination. Shadowing of incident and scattered beams by relief elements is taken into account. Diffuse reflectances by the Gaussian and the quasi-periodic surfaces are compared and, in general, both these roughness models are shown to give similar results. We have studied the effect of the angular structure of radiation multiply scattered deep in the tissue and the refraction of rays as they propagate from the dermis to the surface of the stratum corneum on the reflection characteristics of the skin surface. The importance of these factors is demonstrated. The algorithms constructed can be included in the schemes of calculation of the light fields inside and outside the medium in solving various direct and inverse problems of optics of biological tissues. (biophotonics)

  19. Surface reflectance retrieval from the intensity data of a terrestrial laser scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kai; Cheng, Xiaojun

    2016-04-01

    The intensity data recorded by terrestrial laser scanning systems are considered significant measures of the spectral property of scanned objects. These data can be used in an extensive range of object-based applications. However, the direct retrieval of reflectance from intensity information is infeasible because intensity data are influenced by multiple variables, particularly distance and incidence angle. This study proposes a new method to recover the absolute reflectance value of the scanned surface by eliminating the effects of distance and incidence angle. The Faro Focus3D 120 terrestrial scanner is utilized in the case study. Two sets of experiments are designed to estimate the parameters of the developed model by using Lambertian targets at different reflectance values. With the estimated parameters, the proposed method is applied to recover the reflectance values of natural surfaces. The deviation of the retrieved reflectance values of natural surfaces from the reflectance values measured by a spectrometer is approximately 2.64%. Results show that the proposed method exhibits high accuracy in retrieving reflectance values and can be utilized for actual mapping tasks and geological applications.

  20. Estimates of radiance reflected towards the zenith at the surface of the sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Aas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing of water colour by ship-mounted sensors represents an important tool for the validation of satellite products and the monitoring of water quality. The recorded radiance from the sea has to be corrected for the surface-reflected radiance from sun and sky in order to obtain the water-leaving radiance. Here the simple case of radiance reflected towards the zenith is studied. A set of observed sky radiance and solar irradiance data from Oslo has been used together with a Gaussian slope distribution for the sea surface in order to estimate the reflected radiance. The spectral range studied is 405–650 nm, the solar zenith angles are in the range 37°–76°, and the wind speeds are up to 10 m s−1. The analysis of the results show that the reflected radiance has to be separated into three contributions: sky radiance and sun rays reflected at the foam-free surface and irradiance reflected by whitecaps and foam. It is then demonstrated that by using four input values, namely the downward irradiance, the sky radiance from the zenith, the solar zenith angle and the wind speed, it is possible to obtain by simple expressions estimates of the reflected radiance that only differ from the former calculated values by relative errors of less than 5%. The analysis also indicates that for the spectral range studied neither the water-leaving radiance nor the surface-reflected radiance can be disregarded relative to the other one in the Case 2 waters of the Oslofjord-Skagerrak area. The results form a first step towards the study of reflected radiance in viewing angles differing from the nadir direction.

  1. Estimates of radiance reflected towards the zenith at the surface of the sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Aas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing of water colour by ship-mounted sensors represents an important tool for the validation of satellite products and the monitoring of water quality. The recorded radiance from the sea has to be corrected for the surface-reflected radiance from sun and sky in order to obtain the water-leaving radiance. Here the simple case of radiance reflected towards the zenith is studied. A set of observed sky radiance and solar irradiance data from Oslo has been used together with a Gaussian slope distribution for the sea surface in order to estimate the reflected radiance. The spectral range studied is 405–650 nm, the solar zenith angles are in the range 37°–76°, and the wind speeds are up to 10 m s−1. The analysis of the results show that the reflected radiance has to be separated into three contributions: sky radiance and sun rays reflected at the foam-free surface and irradiance reflected by whitecaps and foam. It is then demonstrated that by using four input values, namely the downward irradiance, the sky radiance from the zenith, the solar zenith angle and the wind speed, it is possible to obtain by simple expressions estimates of the reflected radiance that only differ from the former calculated values by relative errors of 4% or less. The analysis also indicates that for the spectral range studied neither the water-leaving radiance nor the surface-reflected radiance can be disregarded relative to the other one in the Case 2 waters of the Oslofjord-Skagerrak area. The results form a first step towards the study of reflected radiance in viewing angles differing from the nadir direction.

  2. Derivation of Land Surface Albedo at High Resolution by Combining HJ-1A/B Reflectance Observations with MODIS BRDF Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Gao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Land surface albedo is an essential parameter for monitoring global/regional climate and land surface energy balance. Although many studies have been conducted on global or regional land surface albedo using various remote sensing data over the past few decades, land surface albedo product with a high spatio–temporal resolution is currently very scarce. This paper proposes a method for deriving land surface albedo with a high spatio–temporal resolution (space: 30 m and time: 2–4 days. The proposed method works by combining the land surface reflectance data at 30 m spatial resolution obtained from the charge-coupled devices in the Huanjing-1A and -1B (HJ-1A/B satellites with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS land surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF parameters product (MCD43A1, which is at a spatial resolution of 500 m. First, the land surface BRDF parameters for HJ-1A/B land surface reflectance with a spatial–temporal resolutions of 30 m and 2–4 day are calculated on the basis of the prior knowledge from the MODIS BRDF product; then, the calculated high resolution BRDF parameters are integrated over the illuminating/viewing hemisphere to produce the white- and black-sky albedos at 30 m resolution. These results form the basis for the final land surface albedo derivation by accounting for the proportion of direct and diffuse solar radiation arriving at the ground. The albedo retrieved by this novel method is compared with MODIS land surface albedo products, as well as with ground measurements. The results show that the derived land surface albedo during the growing season of 2012 generally achieved a mean absolute accuracy of ±0.044, and a root mean square error of 0.039, confirming the effectiveness of the newly proposed method.

  3. Simultaneous Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Optical Properties from Combined Airborne- and Ground-Based Direct and Diffuse Radiometric Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Dubovik, O.; King, M. D.; Sinyuk, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for simultaneously retrieving aerosol and surface reflectance properties from combined airborne and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements. The method is based on the standard Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) method for retrieving aerosol size distribution, complex index of refraction, and single scattering albedo, but modified to retrieve aerosol properties in two layers, below and above the aircraft, and parameters on surface optical properties from combined datasets (Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) and AERONET data). A key advantage of this method is the inversion of all available spectral and angular data at the same time, while accounting for the influence of noise in the inversion procedure using statistical optimization. The wide spectral (0.34-2.30 m) and angular range (180 ) of the CAR instrument, combined with observations from an AERONET sunphotometer, provide sufficient measurement constraints for characterizing aerosol and surface properties with minimal assumptions. The robustness of the method was tested on observations made during four different field campaigns: (a) the Southern African Regional Science Initiative 2000 over Mongu, Zambia, (b) the Intercontinental Transport Experiment-Phase B over Mexico City, Mexico (c) Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Central Facility, Oklahoma, USA, and (d) the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) over Elson Lagoon in Barrow, Alaska, USA. The four areas are dominated by different surface characteristics and aerosol types, and therefore provide good test cases for the new inversion method.

  4. Determination of land surface reflectance using the AATSR dual-view capability

    OpenAIRE

    Sogacheva, L.; Kolmonen, P; T. H. Virtanen; Rodriguez, E.; Sundström, A.-M.; G. de Leeuw

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a method is presented to retrieve the surface reflectance using the radiances measured at the top of the atmosphere for the two views provided by the Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR). In the first step, the aerosol optical depth (AOD) is obtained using the AATSR dual-view algorithm (ADV) by eliminating the effect of the surface on the measured radiances. Hence the AOD is independent of surface properties and can thus be used in the second step ...

  5. Aerosol optical depth under "clear" sky conditions derived from sea surface reflection of lidar signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Min; Hu, Yongxiang; Huang, Jian Ping; Stamnes, Knut

    2016-12-26

    There are considerable demands for accurate atmospheric correction of satellite observations of the sea surface or subsurface signal. Surface and sub-surface reflection under "clear" atmospheric conditions can be used to study atmospheric correction for the simplest possible situation. Here "clear" sky means a cloud-free atmosphere with sufficiently small aerosol particles. The "clear" aerosol concept is defined according to the spectral dependence of the scattering cross section on particle size. A 5-year combined CALIPSO and AMSR-E data set was used to derive the aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the lidar signal reflected from the sea surface. Compared with the traditional lidar-retrieved AOD, which relies on lidar backscattering measurements and an assumed lidar ratio, the AOD retrieved through the surface reflectance method depends on both scattering and absorption because it is based on two-way attenuation of the lidar signal transmitted to and then reflected from the surface. The results show that the clear sky AOD derived from the surface signal agrees with the clear sky AOD available in the CALIPSO level 2 database in the westerly wind belt located in the southern hemisphere, but yields significantly higher aerosol loadings in the tropics and in the northern hemisphere.

  6. What's on the therapist's mind? A grounded theory analysis of family therapist reflections during individual therapy sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rober, Peter; Elliott, Robert; Buysse, Ann; Loots, Gerrit; De Corte, Kim

    2008-01-01

    The authors used a videotape-assisted recall procedure to study the content of family therapists' inner conversations during individual sessions with a standardized client. Grounded theory was used to analyze therapists' reflections, resulting in a taxonomy of 282 different codes in a hierarchical tree structure of six levels, organized into four general domains: attending to client process; processing the client's story; focusing on therapists' own experience; and managing the therapeutic process. In addition to providing a descriptive model of therapists' inner conversation, this research led to an appreciation of the wealth of therapists' inner conversation. In particular, the authors found that therapists work hard to create an intersubjective space within which to talk by trying to be in tune with their clients and by using clients as a guide.

  7. Forming high efficiency silicon solar cells using density-graded anti-reflection surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hao-Chih; Branz, Howard M.; Page, Matthew R.

    2014-09-09

    A method (50) is provided for processing a graded-density AR silicon surface (14) to provide effective surface passivation. The method (50) includes positioning a substrate or wafer (12) with a silicon surface (14) in a reaction or processing chamber (42). The silicon surface (14) has been processed (52) to be an AR surface with a density gradient or region of black silicon. The method (50) continues with heating (54) the chamber (42) to a high temperature for both doping and surface passivation. The method (50) includes forming (58), with a dopant-containing precursor in contact with the silicon surface (14) of the substrate (12), an emitter junction (16) proximate to the silicon surface (14) by doping the substrate (12). The method (50) further includes, while the chamber is maintained at the high or raised temperature, forming (62) a passivation layer (19) on the graded-density silicon anti-reflection surface (14).

  8. Evaluation of the ground surface Enthalpy balance from bedrock shallow borehole temperatures (Livingston Island, Maritime Antarctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ramos

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The annual evolution of the ground temperatures from Incinerador borehole in Livingston Island (South Shetlands, Antarctic is studied. The borehole is 2.4 m deep and is located in a quartzite outcrop in the proximity of the Spanish Antarctic Station Juan Carlos I. In order to model the movement of the 0°C isotherm (velocity and maximum depth hourly temperature profiles from: (i the cooling periods of the frost seasons of 2000 to 2005, and (ii the warming periods of the thaw seasons of 2002–2003, 2003–2004 and 2004–2005, were studied. In this modelling approach, heat gains and losses across ground surface are considered to be the causes for the 0°C isotherm movement. A methodological approach to calculate the Enthalpy change based on the thermodynamic analysis of the ground during the cooling and warming periods is proposed. The Enthalpy change is equivalent to the heat exchange through the ground surface during each season, thus enabling to describe the interaction ground-atmosphere and providing valuable data for studies on permafrost and periglacial processes. The bedrock density is considered to be constant in the borehole and initial isothermal conditions at 0°C are assumed to run the model. The final stages correspond to the temperatures at the end of the cooling and warming periods (annual minima and maxima.

  9. A shear wave ground surface vibration technique for the detection of buried pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggleton, J. M.; Papandreou, B.

    2014-07-01

    A major UK initiative, entitled 'Mapping the Underworld' aims to develop and prove the efficacy of a multi-sensor device for accurate remote buried utility service detection, location and, where possible, identification. One of the technologies to be incorporated in the device is low-frequency vibro-acoustics; the application of this technology for detecting buried infrastructure, in particular pipes, is currently being investigated. Here, a shear wave ground vibration technique for detecting buried pipes is described. For this technique, shear waves are generated at the ground surface, and the resulting ground surface vibrations measured. Time-extended signals are employed to generate the illuminating wave. Generalized cross-correlation functions between the measured ground velocities and a reference measurement adjacent to the excitation are calculated and summed using a stacking method to generate a cross-sectional image of the ground. To mitigate the effects of other potential sources of vibration in the vicinity, the excitation signal can be used as an additional reference when calculating the cross-correlation functions. Measurements have been made at two live test sites to detect a range of buried pipes. Successful detection of the pipes was achieved, with the use of the additional reference signal proving beneficial in the noisier of the two environments.

  10. Evaluation of the ground surface Enthalpy balance from bedrock shallow borehole temperatures (Livingston Island, Maritime Antarctic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, M.; Vieira, G.

    2008-03-01

    The annual evolution of the ground temperatures from Incinerador borehole in Livingston Island (South Shetlands, Antarctic) is studied. The borehole is 2.4 m deep and is located in a quartzite outcrop in the proximity of the Spanish Antarctic Station Juan Carlos I. In order to model the movement of the 0°C isotherm (velocity and maximum depth) hourly temperature profiles from: (i) the cooling periods of the frost seasons of 2000 to 2005, and (ii) the warming periods of the thaw seasons of 2002-2003, 2003-2004 and 2004-2005, were studied. In this modelling approach, heat gains and losses across ground surface are considered to be the causes for the 0°C isotherm movement. A methodological approach to calculate the Enthalpy change based on the thermodynamic analysis of the ground during the cooling and warming periods is proposed. The Enthalpy change is equivalent to the heat exchange through the ground surface during each season, thus enabling to describe the interaction ground-atmosphere and providing valuable data for studies on permafrost and periglacial processes. The bedrock density is considered to be constant in the borehole and initial isothermal conditions at 0°C are assumed to run the model. The final stages correspond to the temperatures at the end of the cooling and warming periods (annual minima and maxima).

  11. Terahertz reflection and emission associated with nonequilibrium surface plasmon polaritons in n-GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melentyev, G. A.; Shalygin, V. A.; Moldavskaya, M. D.; Panevin, V. Yu; Vorobjev, L. E.; Firsov, D. A.; Nykänen, H.; Riuttanen, L.; Svensk, O.; Suihkonen, S.

    2015-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons are investigated in heavily doped n-GaN epitaxial layers. The grating etched on the surface of the epitaxial layer is used to convert photons into the surface plasmon polaritons and vice versa. The spectral study of reflection demonstrates the possibility of nonequilibrium surface plasmon polaritons excitation due to terahertz radiation scattering on the grating. Terahertz electroluminescence is investigated under lateral electric field. The luminescence spectrum demonstrates a significant contribution of nonequilibrium surface plasmon polariton scattering to terahertz radiation emission.

  12. Interannual changes in snow cover and its impact on ground surface temperatures in Livingston Island (Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwendam, Alexandre; Ramos, Miguel; Vieira, Gonçalo

    2015-04-01

    In permafrost areas the seasonal snow cover is an important factor on the ground thermal regime. Snow depth and timing are important in ground insulation from the atmosphere, creating different snow patterns and resulting in spatially variable ground temperatures. The aim of this work is to characterize the interactions between ground thermal regimes and snow cover and the influence on permafrost spatial distribution. The study area is the ice-free terrains of northwestern Hurd Peninsula in the vicinity of the Spanish Antarctic Station "Juan Carlos I" and Bulgarian Antarctic Station "St. Kliment Ohridski". Air and ground temperatures and snow thickness data where analysed from 4 sites along an altitudinal transect in Hurd Peninsula from 2007 to 2012: Nuevo Incinerador (25 m asl), Collado Ramos (110 m), Ohridski (140 m) and Reina Sofia Peak (275 m). The data covers 6 cold seasons showing different conditions: i) very cold with thin snow cover; ii) cold with a gradual increase of snow cover; iii) warm with thick snow cover. The data shows three types of periods regarding the ground surface thermal regime and the thickness of snow cover: a) thin snow cover and short-term fluctuation of ground temperatures; b) thick snow cover and stable ground temperatures; c) very thick snow cover and ground temperatures nearly constant at 0°C. a) Thin snow cover periods: Collado Ramos and Ohridski sites show frequent temperature variations, alternating between short-term fluctuations and stable ground temperatures. Nuevo Incinerador displays during most of the winter stable ground temperatures; b) Cold winters with a gradual increase of the snow cover: Nuevo Incinerador, Collado Ramos and Ohridski sites show similar behavior, with a long period of stable ground temperatures; c) Thick snow cover periods: Collado Ramos and Ohridski show long periods of stable ground, while Nuevo Incinerador shows temperatures close to 0°C since the beginning of the winter, due to early snow cover

  13. S-wave reflection and surface wave surveys in liquefaction affected areas: a case study of the Hinode area, Itako, Ibaraki, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Toshiyuki; Jinguuji, Motoharu; Yamanaka, Yoshiaki; Murata, Kazunori

    2017-10-01

    Property damage results from liquefaction that occurs easily in soft sandy layers. Moreover, liquefaction damage tends to be more serious at locations where earthquake ground motions are locally amplified. It is commonly understood that ground stiffness is correlated with S-wave velocity (Vs); in addition, the structure of the local subsurface is important for predicting local earthquake ground motion. Surface wave and S-wave reflection surveys are efficient, non-destructive techniques used to obtain two-dimensional S-wave velocity distributions and to map subsurface structures. In this study, we performed surface wave and S-wave reflection surveys to investigate the Hinode area of Itako, Ibaraki, Japan. This area suffered serious liquefaction damage during the Great Eastern Japan Earthquake of 2011. Using subsurface boundaries imaged by the reflection surveys and the Vs structures obtained by surface wave analyses, it is possible to extrapolate geological and hydraulic information obtained by boring and cone penetration tests (CPTs). The combined information was used to delineate the layer in which liquefaction occurred, identified as an artificial layer of sandy dredged material, formed after 1970. The results of this study confirmed the effectiveness and applicability of geophysical surveys to the evaluation of the liquefaction potential. These methods enable us to predict the spatial distribution of liquefiable soils for future large earthquakes.

  14. A preliminary study on surface ground deformation near shallow foundation induced by strike-slip faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Pei-Syuan; Lin, Ming-Lang

    2016-04-01

    According to investigation of recent earthquakes, ground deformation and surface rupture are used to map the influenced range of the active fault. The zones of horizontal and vertical surface displacements and different features of surface rupture are investigated in the field, for example, the Greendale Fault 2010, MW 7.1 Canterbury earthquake. The buildings near the fault rotated and displaced vertically and horizontally due to the ground deformation. Besides, the propagation of fault trace detoured them because of the higher rigidity. Consequently, it's necessary to explore the ground deformation and mechanism of the foundation induced by strike-slip faulting for the safety issue. Based on previous study from scaled analogue model of strike-slip faulting, the ground deformation is controlled by material properties, depth of soil, and boundary condition. On the condition controlled, the model shows the features of ground deformation in the field. This study presents results from shear box experiment on small-scale soft clay models subjected to strike-slip faulting and placed shallow foundations on it in a 1-g environment. The quantifiable data including sequence of surface rupture, topography and the position of foundation are recorded with increasing faulting. From the result of the experiment, first en echelon R shears appeared. The R shears rotated to a more parallel angle to the trace and cracks pulled apart along them with increasing displacements. Then the P shears crossed the basement fault in the opposite direction appears and linked R shears. Lastly the central shear was Y shears. On the other hand, the development of wider zones of rupture, higher rising surface and larger the crack area on surface developed, with deeper depth of soil. With the depth of 1 cm and half-box displacement 1.2 cm, en echelon R shears appeared and the surface above the fault trace elevated to 1.15 mm (Dv), causing a 1.16 cm-wide zone of ground-surface rupture and deformation

  15. Seasonal Distribution of Trace Metals in Ground and Surface Water of Golaghat District, Assam, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boarh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A study has been carried out on the quality of ground and surface water with respect to chromium, manganese, zinc, copper, nickel, cadmium and arsenic contamination from 28 different sources in the predominantly rural Golaghat district of Assam (India. The metals were analysed by using atomic absorption spectrometer. Water samples were collected from groundwater and surface water during the dry and wet seasons of 2008 from the different sources in 28 locations (samples. The results are discussed in the light of possible health hazards from the metals in relation to their maximum permissible limits. The study shows the quality of ground and surface water in a sizeable number of water samples in the district not to be fully satisfactory with respect to presence of the metals beyond permissible limits of WHO. The metal concentration of groundwater in the district follows the trend As>Zn>Mn>Cr>Cu>Ni>Cd in both the seasons.

  16. Ground-water, surface-water, and bottom-sediment contamination in the O-field area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, and the possible effects of selected remedial actions on ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Lorah, Michelle M.; Oliveros, James P.

    1995-01-01

    Disposal of munitions and chemical-warfare substances has introduced inorganic and organic contaminants to the ground water, surface water, and bottom sediment at O-Field, in the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Contaminants include chloride, arsenic, transition metals, chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic compounds, and organosulfur and organophosphorus compounds. The hydrologic effects of several remedial actions were estimated by use of a ground-water-flow model. The remedial actions examined were an impermeable covering, encapsulation, subsurface barriers, a ground-water drain, pumping of wells to manage water levels or to remove contaminated ground water for treatment, and no action.

  17. Highly reflective and adhesive surface of aluminized polyvinyl chloride film by vacuum evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Denian; Tai, Qile; Feng, Qiang; Li, Qi; Xu, Xizhe; Li, Hairong; Huang, Jing; Dong, Lijie; Xie, Haian; Xiong, Chuanxi

    2014-08-01

    Aluminized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) film with high reflectivity and strong adhesion was facilely fabricated by vacuum evaporation. The technical study revealed that both alkali-pretreatment of the PVC matrix and thermal annealing after aluminization could greatly promote the peeling adhesion force of this metal/polymer composite by producing interfacial active chemical groups and removing the inner stress, respectively. Reflectivity test and AFM study indicated that the reflecting capacitance of the aluminum coating was closely related to the surface roughness, which can be easily controlled by modulating deposition of aluminum. Moreover, the formation of aluminum layer follows an island model process, and a continuous and smooth coating with highest reflectivity and lowest surface resistance was achieved at deposition time of 60 s. We anticipate that the cost-effective metallized PVC film by this strategy may find extensive applications in light harvesting, solar energy, and flexible mirrors, among others.

  18. Determining the location of buried plastic water pipes from measurements of ground surface vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggleton, J. M.; Brennan, M. J.; Gao, Y.

    2011-09-01

    ‘Mapping the Underworld' is a UK-based project, which aims to create a multi-sensor device that combines complementary technologies for remote buried utility service detection and location. One of the technologies to be incorporated in the device is low-frequency vibro-acoustics, and techniques for detecting buried infrastructure, in particular plastic water pipes, are being investigated. One of the proposed techniques involves excitation of the pipe at some known location with concurrent vibrational mapping of the ground surface in order to infer the location of the remainder of the pipe. In this paper, measurements made on a dedicated pipe rig are reported. Frequency response measurements relating vibrational velocity on the ground to the input excitation were acquired. Contour plots of the unwrapped phase revealed the location of the pipe to within 0.1-0.2 m. Magnitude contour plots revealed the excitation point and also the location of the pipe end. By examining the unwrapped phase gradients along a line above the pipe, it was possible to identify the wave-type within the pipe responsible for the ground surface vibration. Furthermore, changes in the ground surface phase speed computed using this method enabled the location of the end of the pipe to be confirmed.

  19. Simulation and Measurement of Angle Resolved Reflectance from Black Si Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Wu, Kaiyu; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    2015-01-01

    reflectance below 0.1% at incident angles below 70o is seen. In both simulation and experiment the specular reflectance is below 10% at incident angles below 65o and below 1% at incident angles below 45o in the case of non-linear graded refractive index. From the simulation results the non-linear graded...... refractive index yields lower reflectance than the linearly graded refractive index.......In this work angle-resolved reflectance from nanostructured Si surfaces realized by maskless RIE texturing has been simulated and measured. The simulation and experimental measurement data show the same trend. Experimentally a total reflectance below 1% for incident angles below 30o and specular...

  20. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) responses for sub-surface salt contamination and solid waste: modeling and controlled lysimeter studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijewardana, Y N S; Shilpadi, A T; Mowjood, M I M; Kawamoto, K; Galagedara, L W

    2017-02-01

    The assessment of polluted areas and municipal solid waste (MSW) sites using non-destructive geophysical methods is timely and much needed in the field of environmental monitoring and management. The objectives of this study are (i) to evaluate the ground-penetrating radar (GPR) wave responses as a result of different electrical conductivity (EC) in groundwater and (ii) to conduct MSW stratification using a controlled lysimeter and modeling approach. A GPR wave simulation was carried out using GprMax2D software, and the field test was done on two lysimeters that were filled with sand (Lysimeter-1) and MSW (Lysimeter-2). A Pulse EKKO-Pro GPR system with 200- and 500-MHz center frequency antennae was used to collect GPR field data. Amplitudes of GPR-reflected waves (sub-surface reflectors and water table) were studied under different EC levels injected to the water table. Modeling results revealed that the signal strength of the reflected wave decreases with increasing EC levels and the disappearance of the subsurface reflection and wave amplitude reaching zero at higher EC levels (when EC >0.28 S/m). Further, when the EC level was high, the plume thickness did not have a significant effect on the amplitude of the reflected wave. However, it was also found that reflected signal strength decreases with increasing plume thickness at a given EC level. 2D GPR profile images under wet conditions showed stratification of the waste layers and relative thickness, but it was difficult to resolve the waste layers under dry conditions. These results show that the GPR as a non-destructive method with a relatively larger sample volume can be used to identify highly polluted areas with inorganic contaminants in groundwater and waste stratification. The current methods of MSW dumpsite investigation are tedious, destructive, time consuming, costly, and provide only point-scale measurements. However, further research is needed to verify the results under heterogeneous aquifer

  1. Reducing The Light Reflected by Silicon Surface Using ZnO/TS Antireflection Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhandi, Andi; Tayubi, Yuyu R.; Wibowo, Firmanul C.; Arifin, Pepen; Supriyatman

    2017-07-01

    Zinc Oxide (ZnO) thin films was coated on a texturized silicon (TS) surface using a spincoating technique. The TS layer was prepared by a wet etching method using 20 % KOH solution at temperature of 80°C for 5 minutes. To prepared precursor solution for ZnO layer, zinc acetate dehydrate, 2-methoxyethanol and monoethanolamine are used as a starting material, solvent and stabilizer, respectively. The XRD and SEM measurements confirmed that the thin films grown by spincoating technique have a single oriented crystal plane and homogenous surfaces. From photoluminescence measurement found that the optical band gap of grown films to be 3.44 eV. The optical reflectance of the grown films is characterized by UV-VIS spectrometry show that the presence of anti-reflection coating ZnO/TS is proven to reduce the reflection of solar radiation by silicon surface significantly.

  2. SHAPE RESTORATIONS OF OBJECT SURFACE ON POLARIZATION STRUCTURE OF REFLECTED ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVE FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A problem of electromagnetic wave backscattering on a chosen 3D object is solved. A differential equation which is linked change of polarization coefficient of reflected wave with variation of matrix elements of object scattering is ob- tained. Obtained relation enables to develop algorithms of fast numerical solution of inverse problem of scattering on this object that is determination of complex function of object surface scattering and restoration of unknown object shape on phase distribution of reflected wave. The method uses ray representation of scattering fields based on principle Huygens- Fresnel. The algorithm of object shape restoration on phase of reflected wave allows to restore not only smooth surfaces, but also object surfaces with smaller roughness than a wave length.

  3. Static and dynamic detection of axial surface defects on metallic wires by conical triple laser reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmann, P.; Martínez-Antón, J. C.; Bernabeu, E.

    2004-08-01

    The quality of the surface of metallic wires is relevant for different applications. The reflection of a laser beam on the surface of a metallic cylindrical wire provides an efficient way to inspect the quality of its surface. Our interest is focused in the detection of axially oriented defects, which are the most relevant for the wire drawing process. We present a simple interference-geometrical model to describe the light pattern reflected from a wire with defects. This model adequately accounts for the observed results from an industrial prototype developed for the purpose. It incorporates three-laser beams incident on the wire at equidistant locations in its perimeter, which produce three reflection cones with a CCD. This configuration permits to explore the whole perimeter of the wire. Several results are presented, both in static operation and in production line, in agreement with qualitative and quantitative predictions.

  4. Second-surface silvered glass solar mirrors of very high reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butel, Guillaume P.; Coughenour, Blake M.; Macleod, H. Angus; Kennedy, Cheryl E.; Olbert, Blain H.; Angel, J. Roger P.

    2011-10-01

    This paper reports methods developed to maximize the overall reflectance second-surface silvered glass. The reflectance at shorter wavelengths is increased with the aid of a dielectric enhancing layer between the silver and the glass, while at longer wavelengths it is enhanced by use of glass with negligible iron content. The calculated enhancement of reflectance, compared to unenhanced silver on standard low-iron float glass, corresponds to a 4.4% increase in reflectance averaged across the full solar spectrum, appropriate for CSP, and 2.7% for CPV systems using triple junction cells. An experimental reflector incorporating these improvements, of drawn crown glass and a silvered second-surface with dielectric boost, was measured at NREL to have 95.4% solar weighted reflectance. For comparison, non-enhanced, wetsilvered reflectors of the same 4 mm thickness show reflectance ranging from 91.6 - 94.6%, depending on iron content. A potential drawback of using iron-free drawn glass is reduced concentration in high concentration systems because of the inherent surface errors. This effect is largely mitigated for glass shaped by slumping into a concave mold, rather than by bending.

  5. Developmental prosopagnosia and super-recognition: no special role for surface reflectance processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard; Chatterjee, Garga; Nakayama, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Face recognition by normal subjects depends in roughly equal proportions on shape and surface reflectance cues, while object recognition depends predominantly on shape cues. It is possible that developmental prosopagnosics are deficient not in their ability to recognize faces per se, but rather in their ability to use reflectance cues. Similarly, super-recognizers' exceptional ability with face recognition may be a result of superior surface reflectance perception and memory. We tested this possibility by administering tests of face perception and face recognition in which only shape or reflectance cues are available to developmental prosopagnosics, super-recognizers, and control subjects. Face recognition ability and the relative use of shape and pigmentation were unrelated in all the tests. Subjects who were better at using shape or reflectance cues were also better at using the other type of cue. These results do not support the proposal that variation in surface reflectance perception ability is the underlying cause of variation in face recognition ability. Instead, these findings support the idea that face recognition ability is related to neural circuits using representations that integrate shape and pigmentation information.

  6. Reflection of plane waves from free surface of a microstretch elastic solid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Baljeet Singh

    2002-03-01

    In the present investigation, it is shown that there exists five basic waves in a microstretch elastic solid half-space. The problem of reflection of plane waves from free surface of a microstretch elastic solid half-space is studied. The energy ratios for various reflected waves are obtained for aluminium- epoxy composite as a microstretch elastic solid half-space. The variations of the energy ratios with the angle of incidence are shown graphically. The microstretch effect is shown on various reflected waves.

  7. Reflection and transmission at the surface of a chiral negative refractive medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields at the surface of a chiral negative refraction medium (the chirality parameter is larger than the refractive index) are analyzed theoretically. For obtaining chirality parameter,the normalized reflected and transmitted powers as a function of the incident angle are given for the perpendicular (TE) and parallel (TM) polarized incident wave.Brewster angle and total internal reflection angle are discussed. Due to the negative refraction of one eigen-wave in the chiral medium, the reflection, transmission and Brewster angle characteristics are very different from those in the normal chiral medium.

  8. Reflection of Electromagnetic Waves by a Nonuniform Plasma Layer Covering a Metal Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Hong-Mei; FA Peng-Ting

    2008-01-01

    Reflection coefficients of electromagnetic waves in a nonuniform plasma layer with electrons, positive ions and negative ions, covering a metal surface are investigated by using the finite-difference-time-domain method. It is shown that the reflection coefficients are influenced greatly by the density gradient on the layer edge, layer thickness and electron proportion, i.e., the effect of the negative ions. It is also found that low reflection or high attenuation can be reached by properly choosing high electron proportion, thick plasma layer, and smooth density gradient in the low frequency regime, but sharp density gradient in the high frequency regime.

  9. Monitoring ground-surface heating during expansion of the Casa Diablo production well field at Mammoth Lakes, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergfeld, D.; Vaughan, R. Greg; Evans, William C.; Olsen, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The Long Valley hydrothermal system supports geothermal power production from 3 binary plants (Casa Diablo) near the town of Mammoth Lakes, California. Development and growth of thermal ground at sites west of Casa Diablo have created concerns over planned expansion of a new well field and the associated increases in geothermal fluid production. To ensure that all areas of ground heating are identified prior to new geothermal development, we obtained high-resolution aerial thermal infrared imagery across the region. The imagery covers the existing and proposed well fields and part of the town of Mammoth Lakes. Imagery results from a predawn flight on Oct. 9, 2014 readily identified the Shady Rest thermal area (SRST), one of two large areas of ground heating west of Casa Diablo, as well as other known thermal areas smaller in size. Maximum surface temperatures at 3 thermal areas were 26–28 °C. Numerous small areas with ground temperatures >16 °C were also identified and slated for field investigations in summer 2015. Some thermal anomalies in the town of Mammoth Lakes clearly reflect human activity.Previously established projects to monitor impacts from geothermal power production include yearly surveys of soil temperatures and diffuse CO2 emissions at SRST, and less regular surveys to collect samples from fumaroles and gas vents across the region. Soil temperatures at 20 cm depth at SRST are well correlated with diffuse CO2 flux, and both parameters show little variation during the 2011–14 field surveys. Maximum temperatures were between 55–67 °C and associated CO2 discharge was around 12–18 tonnes per day. The carbon isotope composition of CO2 is fairly uniform across the area ranging between –3.7 to –4.4 ‰. The gas composition of the Shady Rest fumarole however has varied with time, and H2S concentrations in the gas have been increasing since 2009.

  10. Impact of caprock permeability on vertical ground surface displacements in geological underground utilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempka, Thomas; Tillner, Elena

    2015-04-01

    Geological underground utilisation inducing pore pressure changes in underground reservoirs is generally accompanied by hydro-mechanical processes. Thereby, pore pressure increase due to fluid injection may trigger ground surface uplift, while a decrease in pore pressure due to reservoir fluid production is known to induce ground subsidence. Different coupled hydro-mechanical simulation studies (e.g. Klimkowski et al., 2015, Kempka et al., 2014, Tillner et al., 2014) indicate that ground surface displacements can achieve a magnitude of several decimetres, if storage or production operations are being carried out at an industrial scale. Consequently, detailed knowledge on the parameters impacting ground surface uplift or subsidence is of major interest for the success of any geological underground utilisation in order to avoid surface infrastructure damage by spatially varying deformations. Furthermore, ground subsidence may result increased groundwater levels as experienced in different underground coal mining districts. In the present study, we carried out coupled hydro-mechanical simulations to account for the impact of caprock permeability on ground surface displacements resulting from geological underground utilisation. Thereto, different simulation scenarios were investigated using a synthetic 3D coupled numerical simulation model with varying caprock permeability and vertical location of the open well section in the target reservoir. Material property ranges were derived from available literature, while a normal faulting stress state was applied in all simulation scenarios. Our simulation results demonstrate that caprock permeability has a significant impact on the pressure development, and thus on vertical displacements at the ground surface as well as at the reservoir top. An increase in caprock permeability from 1 x 10-20 m2 by two orders of magnitude doubles vertical displacements at the ground surface, whereas vertical displacements at the reservoir top

  11. Seismic interferometry of railroad induced ground motions: body and surface wave imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiros, Diego A.; Brown, Larry D.; Kim, Doyeon

    2016-04-01

    Seismic interferometry applied to 120 hr of railroad traffic recorded by an array of vertical component seismographs along a railway within the Rio Grande rift has recovered surface and body waves characteristic of the geology beneath the railway. Linear and hyperbolic arrivals are retrieved that agree with surface (Rayleigh), direct and reflected P waves observed by nearby conventional seismic surveys. Train-generated Rayleigh waves span a range of frequencies significantly higher than those recovered from typical ambient noise interferometry studies. Direct P-wave arrivals have apparent velocities appropriate for the shallow geology of the survey area. Significant reflected P-wave energy is also present at relatively large offsets. A common midpoint stack produces a reflection image consistent with nearby conventional reflection data. We suggest that for sources at the free surface (e.g. trains) increasing the aperture of the array to record wide angle reflections, in addition to longer recording intervals, might allow the recovery of deeper geological structure from railroad traffic. Frequency-wavenumber analyses of these recordings indicate that the train source is symmetrical (i.e. approaching and receding) and that deeper refracted energy is present although not evident in the time-offset domain. These results confirm that train-generated vibrations represent a practical source of high-resolution subsurface information, with particular relevance to geotechnical and environmental applications.

  12. Advantages of analytically computing the ground heat flux in land surface models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Valentijn R. N.; Daly, Edoardo

    2016-11-01

    It is generally accepted that the ground heat flux accounts for a significant fraction of the surface energy balance. In land surface models, the ground heat flux is typically estimated through a numerical solution of the heat conduction equation. Recent research has shown that this approach introduces errors in the estimation of the energy balance. In this paper, we calibrate a land surface model using a numerical solution of the heat conduction equation with four different vertical spatial resolutions. It is found that the thermal conductivity is the most sensitive parameter to the spatial resolution. More importantly, the thermal conductivity values are directly related to the spatial resolution, thus rendering any physical interpretation of this value irrelevant. The numerical solution is then replaced by an analytical solution. The results of the numerical and analytical solutions are identical when fine spatial and temporal resolutions are used. However, when using resolutions that are typical of land surface models, significant differences are found. When using the analytical solution, the ground heat flux is directly calculated without calculating the soil temperature profile. The calculation of the temperature at each node in the soil profile is thus no longer required, unless the model contains parameters that depend on the soil temperature, which in this study is not the case. The calibration is repeated, and thermal conductivity values independent of the vertical spatial resolution are obtained. The main conclusion of this study is that care must be taken when interpreting land surface model results that have been obtained using numerical ground heat flux estimates. The use of exact analytical solutions, when available, is recommended.

  13. Results of the application of seismic-reflection and electromagnetic techniques for near-surface hydrogeologic and environmental investigations at Fort Bragg, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M.T.; Fine, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Facilities Investigations at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, selected geophysical techniques were evaluated for their usefulness as assessment tools for determining subsurface geology, delineating the areal extent of potentially contaminated landfill sites, and locating buried objects and debris of potential environmental concern. Two shallow seismic-reflection techniques (compression and shear wave) and two electromagnetic techniques (ground-penetrating radar and terrain conductivity) were evaluated at several sites at the U.S. Army Base. The electromagnetic techniques also were tested for tolerance to cultural noise, such as nearby fences, vehicles, and power lines. For the terrain conductivity tests, two instruments were used--the EM31 and EM34, which have variable depths of exploration. The shallowest reflection event was 70 feet below land surface observed in common-depth point, stacked compression-wave data from 24- and 12-fold shallow-seismic-reflection surveys. Several reflection events consistent with clay-sand interfaces between 70 and 120 feet below land surface, along with basement-saprolite surfaces, were imaged in the 24-fold, common- depth-point stacked data. 12-fold, common-depth-point stacked data set contained considerably more noise than the 24-fold, common-depth-point data, due to reduced shot-to-receiver redundancy. Coherent stacked reflection events were not observed in the 24-fold, common-depth-point stacked shear-wave data because of the partial decoupling of the shear- wave generator from the ground. At one site, ground-penetrating radar effectively delineated a shallow, 2- to 5-foot thick sand unit bounded by thin (less than 1 foot) clay layers. The radar signal was completely attenuated where the overlying and underlying clay units thickened and the sand unit thinned. The pene- tration depth of the radar signal was less than 10 feet below land surface. A slight

  14. Evaluation of the ground surface Enthalpy balance from bedrock temperatures (Livingston Island, Maritime Antarctic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, M.; Vieira, G.

    2009-05-01

    The annual evolution of the ground temperatures from Incinerador borehole in Livingston Island (South Shetlands, Antarctic) is studied. The borehole is 2.4 m deep and is located in a massive quartzite outcrop with negligible water content, in the proximity of the Spanish Antarctic Station Juan Carlos I. In order to model the movement of the 0°C isotherm (velocity and maximum depth) hourly temperature profiles from: (i) the cooling periods of the frost season of 2000 to 2005, and (ii) the warming periods of the thaw season of 2002-2003, 2003-2004 and 2004-2005, were studied. In this modelling approach, heat gains and losses across the ground surface are assumed to be the causes for the 0°C isotherm movement. A methodological approach to calculate the ground Enthalpy change based on the thermodynamic analysis of the ground during the cooling and warming periods is proposed. The Enthalpy change into the rock is equivalent to the heat exchange through the ground surface during each season, thus enabling to describe the interaction ground-atmosphere and providing valuable data for studies on permafrost and periglacial processes. The bedrock density and thermal conductivity are considered to be constant and initial isothermal conditions at 0°C are assumed (based in collected data and local meteorological conditions in this area) to run the model in the beginning of each season. The final stages correspond to the temperatures at the end of the cooling and warming periods (annual minima and maxima). The application of this method avoids error propagation induced by the heat exchange calculations from multiple sensors using the Fourier method.

  15. Evaluation of the ground surface Enthalpy balance from bedrock temperatures (Livingston Island, Maritime Antarctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ramos

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The annual evolution of the ground temperatures from Incinerador borehole in Livingston Island (South Shetlands, Antarctic is studied. The borehole is 2.4 m deep and is located in a massive quartzite outcrop with negligible water content, in the proximity of the Spanish Antarctic Station Juan Carlos I. In order to model the movement of the 0°C isotherm (velocity and maximum depth hourly temperature profiles from: (i the cooling periods of the frost season of 2000 to 2005, and (ii the warming periods of the thaw season of 2002–2003, 2003–2004 and 2004–2005, were studied. In this modelling approach, heat gains and losses across the ground surface are assumed to be the causes for the 0°C isotherm movement. A methodological approach to calculate the ground Enthalpy change based on the thermodynamic analysis of the ground during the cooling and warming periods is proposed. The Enthalpy change into the rock is equivalent to the heat exchange through the ground surface during each season, thus enabling to describe the interaction ground-atmosphere and providing valuable data for studies on permafrost and periglacial processes. The bedrock density and thermal conductivity are considered to be constant and initial isothermal conditions at 0°C are assumed (based in collected data and local meteorological conditions in this area to run the model in the beginning of each season. The final stages correspond to the temperatures at the end of the cooling and warming periods (annual minima and maxima. The application of this method avoids error propagation induced by the heat exchange calculations from multiple sensors using the Fourier method.

  16. Influence of Holocene stratigraphic architecture on ground surface settlements: A case study from the City of Pisa (Tuscany, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarti, Giovanni; Rossi, Veronica; Amorosi, Alessandro

    2012-12-01

    The Holocene stratigraphic architecture of modern coastal and deltaic plains has peculiar characteristics that may influence ground surface settlements. In the Pisa urban area, the inhomogeneous spatial distribution of geotechnically weak layers, typically formed during the mid-late Holocene (highstand) coastal progradation, is inferred to be responsible for urban ground settlement and building damage, as evidenced by the tilt of several surface structures, among which the famous Leaning Tower of Pisa is the most prominent. On the basis of integrated stratigraphic, sedimentological and geotechnical data from a wide georeferenced database, three facies associations with high deformability potential (Units 1-3) are identified in the uppermost 30 m as opposed to depositional facies (Units 4-5) with higher geotechnical strength. Whereas Unit 1 represents a thick, laterally extensive lagoonal clay deposit, the overlying highly deformable units (Units 2-3) show more discontinuous spatial distribution controlled by the Holocene paleohydrographic evolution of the Arno coastal plain. Unit 2, dated between the Neolithic and the Etruscan age (ca. 5000-2000 yr BP), is composed of swamp clays and silty clays recording lagoon infilling due to Arno Delta progradation. Units 3 and 4, which consist of wet levee deposits and stiff floodplain clays, respectively, formed during the subsequent phases of alluvial plain construction started around the Roman age (from ca. 2000 yr BP). Whereas Units 3 and 4 are recorded within the uppermost 5 m, fluvial and distributary channel sands (Unit 5) cut the underlying deltaic-alluvial succession at various stratigraphic levels, down to Unit 1. The spatial distribution of these units gives rise to three, locally juxtaposed, stratigraphic motifs in Pisa underground, reflecting different potential risks for settlement under building loads. We show how lateral changes in stratigraphic architecture account for the irregular spatial distribution of

  17. Specular reflection based sensing surface deformation of gas tungsten arc weld pool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Shiliang; Gao Jinqiang; Wu Chuansong; Zhang Yuming

    2007-01-01

    A sensing system is developed to measure the weld pool boundary and pool surface deformation in gas tungsten arc welding. LaserStrobe technique is used to eliminate the strong arc light interference, and specular reflection from the pool surface is sensed to describe the relation between the deformed stripes and pool surface depression. Clear images of both the pool boundary and the deformed stripes edges are obtained during gas tungsten arc welding process, which lays foundation for real-time monitoring the pool surface depression and weld penetration.

  18. Coherence Solution for Bidirectional Reflectance of Surfaces with Wavelength-Scale Statistics (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    Gamiz Vol. 23, No. 2 /February 2006 /J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 319B gr = GR = 0 rJ0Rrgrdr. 23 xpressing the Bessel function in its integral...current odel with global constraints such as Helmholtz eciprocity.90 Such an approach would effectively deter- ine the reflected emittance from surface...surface s assumed to be globally planar, and the surface S is aken as a phantom planar surface just above the actual urface, which implies that n̂1= n̂2

  19. Numerical study of three-dimensional sound reflection from corrugated surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Youngmin; Song, H C; Seong, Woojae

    2016-10-01

    When a sound wave propagates in a water medium bounded by a smooth surface wave, reflection from a wave crest can lead to focusing and result in rapid variation of the received waveform as the surface wave moves [Tindle, Deane, and Preisig, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 125, 66-72 (2009)]. In prior work, propagation paths have been constrained to be in a plane parallel to the direction of corrugated surface waves, i.e., a two-dimensional (2-D) propagation problem. In this paper, the azimuthal dependence of sound propagation as a three-dimensional (3-D) problem is investigated using an efficient, time-domain Helmholtz-Kirchhoff integral formulation. When the source and receiver are in the plane orthogonal to the surface wave direction, the surface wave curvature vanishes in conventional 2-D treatments and the flat surface simply moves up and down, resulting in minimal temporal variation of the reflected signal intensity. On the other hand, the 3-D propagation analysis reveals that a focusing phenomenon occurs in the reflected signal due to the surface wave curvature formed along the orthogonal plane, i.e., out-of-plane scattering.

  20. Ground surface temperature and humidity, ground temperature cycles and the ice table depths in University Valley, McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, David A.; Lacelle, Denis; Pollard, Wayne; Davila, Alfonso; McKay, Christopher P.

    2016-11-01

    In the upper McMurdo Dry Valleys, 90% of the measured ice table depths range from 0 to 80 cm; however, numerical models predict that the ice table is not in equilibrium with current climate conditions and should be deeper than measured. This study explored the effects of boundary conditions (air versus ground surface temperature and humidity), ground temperature cycles, and their diminishing amplitude with depth and advective flows (Darcy flow and wind pumping) on water vapor fluxes in soils and ice table depths using the REGO vapor diffusion model. We conducted a series of numerical experiments that illustrated different hypothetical scenarios and estimated the water vapor flux and ice table depth using the conditions in University Valley, a small high elevation valley. In situ measurements showed that while the mean annual ground surface temperature approximates that in the air, the mean annual ground surface relative humidity (>85%ice) was significantly higher than in the atmosphere ( 50%ice). When ground surface temperature and humidity were used as boundary conditions, along with damping diurnal and annual temperature cycles within the sandy soil, REGO predicted that measured ice table depths in the valley were in equilibrium with contemporary conditions. Based on model results, a dry soil column can become saturated with ice within centuries. Overall, the results from the new soil data and modeling have implications regarding the factors and boundary conditions that affect the stability of ground ice in cold and hyperarid regions where liquid water is rare.

  1. Electric Signals on and under the Ground Surface Induced by Seismic Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Takeuchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We constructed three observation sites in northeastern Japan (Honjo, Kyowa, and Sennan with condenser-type large plate electrodes (4 × 4 m2 as sensors supported 4 m above the ground and with pairs of reference electrodes buried vertically at 0.5 m and 2.5 m depth (with a ground velocity sensor at Sennan only. Electrical signals of an earthquake (M6.3 in northeastern Japan were detected simultaneously with seismic waves. Their waveforms were damped oscillations, with greatly differing signal amplitudes among sites. Good positive correlation was found between the amplitudes of signals detected by all electrodes. We propose a signal generation model: seismic acceleration vertically shook pore water in the topsoil, generating the vertical streaming potential between the upper unsaturated water zone and the lower saturated water zone. Maximum electric earth potential difference was observed when one electrode was in the saturated water zone, and the other was within the unsaturated water zone, but not when the electrodes were in the saturated water zone. The streaming potential formed a charge on the ground surface, generating a vertical atmospheric electric field. The large plate electrode detected electric signals related to electric potential differences between the electrode and the ground surface.

  2. In situ probing of surface hydrides on hydrogenated amorphous silicon using attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kessels, W M M; Sanden, M C M; Aydil, E S

    2002-01-01

    An in situ method based on attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) is presented for detecting surface silicon hydrides on plasma deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films and for determining their surface concentrations. Surface silicon hydrides are desorbed by exposing the a-Si:H films to low energy ions from a low density Ar plasma and by comparing the infrared spectrum before and after this low energy ion bombardment, the absorptions by surface hydrides can sensitively be separated from absorptions by bulk hydrides incorporated into the film. An experimental comparison with other methods that utilize isotope exchange of the surface hydrogen with deuterium showed good agreement and the advantages and disadvantages of the different methods are discussed. Furthermore, the determination of the composition of the surface hydrogen bondings on the basis of the literature data on hydrogenated crystalline silicon surfaces is presented, and quantification of the h...

  3. Kinetics of the forelimb in horses circling on different ground surfaces at the trot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chateau, Henry; Camus, Mathieu; Holden-Douilly, Laurène; Falala, Sylvain; Ravary, Bérangère; Vergari, Claudio; Lepley, Justine; Denoix, Jean-Marie; Pourcelot, Philippe; Crevier-Denoix, Nathalie

    2013-12-01

    Circling increases the expression of distal forelimb lameness in the horse, depending on rein, diameter and surface properties of the circle. However, there is limited information about the kinetics of horses trotting on circles. The aim of this study was to quantify ground reaction force (GRF) and moments in the inside and outside forelimb of horses trotting on circles and to compare the results obtained on different ground surfaces. The right front hoof of six horses was equipped with a dynamometric horseshoe, allowing the measurement of 3-dimensional GRF, moments and trajectory of the centre of pressure. The horses were lunged at slow trot (3 m/s) on right and left 4 m radius circles on asphalt and on a fibre sand surface. During circling, the inside forelimb produced a smaller peak vertical force and the stance phase was longer in comparison with the outside forelimb. Both right and left circling produced a substantial transversal force directed outwards. On a soft surface (sand fibre), the peak transversal force and moments around the longitudinal and vertical axes of the hoof were significantly decreased in comparison with a hard surface (asphalt). Sinking of the lateral or medial part of the hoof in a more compliant surface enables reallocation of part of the transversal force into a proximo-distal force, aligned with the limb axis, thus limiting extrasagittal stress on the joints.

  4. Directional reflectance factors for monitoring spatial changes in soil surface structure and soil organic matter erosion in agricultural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, H.; Anderson, K.

    2012-04-01

    values varied from 8.70 to 20.05% and SOC from 1.33 to 1.05%, across all soil plots. Each plot was characterised using a close-range laser scanning device with a 2 mm sampling interval. The point laser data were geostatistically analysed to provide a spatially-distributed measure of SSR, giving sill variance values from 3.15 to 22.99. Reflectance factors from the soil states were measured using a ground-based hyperspectral spectroradiometer (400-2500 nm) attached to an A-frame device. This method allowed measurement at a range of viewing zenith angles from extreme forwardscatter (-60°) to extreme backscatter (+60°) at a 10° sampling resolution in the solar principal plane. Reflectance measurements were compared to geostatistically-derived indicators of SSR from the laser profile data. Forward-scattered reflectance factors exhibited a very strong relationship to SSR (R2 = 0.84 at -60°; p< 0.05), demonstrating the operational potential of directional reflectance for providing SSR measurements, despite conflicting variation in SSM. SSM also presented an interesting directional signal (R2 = 0.99 at +20°; p< 0.01). Furthermore, the results showed an important link between SRR decline as measured using directional reflectance, with a decline in aggregate stability and SOC content. These findings provide an empirical and theoretical basis for the future retrieval of spatially-continuous assessments of soil surface structure and carbon turnover within a landscape context.

  5. Near-surface 3D reflections seismic survey; Sanjigen senso hanshaho jishin tansa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahigashi, H.; Mitsui, H.; Nakano, O.; Kobayashi, T. [DIA Consultants Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    Faults are being actively investigated across Japan since the Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake. Discussed in this report is the application of the 3D near-surface reflection seismic survey in big cities. Data from trenching and drilling is used for the geological interpretation of the surroundings of a fault, and the reflection seismic survey is used to identify the position, etc., of the fault. In this article, when the results obtained from the experimental field are examined, it is found that the conventional 2D imaging reflection survey betrays the limit of its capability when the geological structure is complicated, that the 3D reflection seismic survey, on the contrary, is capable of high-precision imaging and, when augmented by drilling, etc., becomes capable of a more detailed interpretation, and that it also contributes effectively to the improvement of local disaster prevention in big cities. Using as the model the Tachikawa fault that runs near JR Tachikawa Station, embodiment of the 3D reflection seismic survey is reviewed. For the acquisition of data excellent in quality in a 3D reflection seismic survey conducted utilizing the roads in the sector chosen for experiment in the urban area, the shock generating points and receiving points should be positioned by taking into account the parameters in the bin arranging process so that the mid-points will be regularly distributed on the surface. 3 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Impact of MODIS Sensor Calibration Updates on Greenland Ice Sheet Surface Reflectance and Albedo Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Kimberly A.; Polashenski, Chris M.; Chen, Justin; Tedesco, Marco

    2017-01-01

    We evaluate Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) surface reflectance and albedo trends using the newly released Collection 6 (C6) MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) products over the period 2001-2016. We find that the correction of MODIS sensor degradation provided in the new C6 data products reduces the magnitude of the surface reflectance and albedo decline trends obtained from previous MODIS data (i.e., Collection 5, C5). Collection 5 and 6 data product analysis over GrIS is characterized by surface (i.e., wet vs. dry) and elevation (i.e., 500-2000 m, 2000 m and greater) conditions over the summer season from 1 June to 31 August. Notably, the visible-wavelength declining reflectance trends identified in several bands of MODIS C5 data from previous studies are only slightly detected at reduced magnitude in the C6 versions over the dry snow area. Declining albedo in the wet snow and ice area remains over the MODIS record in the C6 product, albeit at a lower magnitude than obtained using C5 data. Further analyses of C6 spectral reflectance trends show both reflectance increases and decreases in select bands and regions, suggesting that several competing processes are contributing to Greenland Ice Sheet albedo change. Investigators using MODIS data for other ocean, atmosphere and/or land analyses are urged to consider similar re-examinations of trends previously established using C5 data.

  7. ON GROUND SURFACE EXTRACTION USING FULL-WAVEFORM AIRBORNE LASER SCANNER FOR CIM

    OpenAIRE

    Nakano, K.; H. Chikatsu

    2015-01-01

    Satellite positioning systems such as GPS and GLONASS have created significant changes not only in terms of spatial information but also in the construction industry. It is possible to execute a suitable construction plan by using a computerized intelligent construction. Therefore, an accurate estimate of the amount of earthwork is important for operating heavy equipment, and measurement of ground surface with high accuracy is required. A full-waveform airborne laser scanner is expected to be...

  8. Efficiency of silver nanoparticles against bacterial contaminants isolated from surface and ground water in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem Dosoky

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The bactericidal efficiency of silver nanoparticles (AgNP was evaluated against bacteria isolated from surface and ground water samples in Egypt. The AgNP were synthesized by typical one-step synthesis protocol, and were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The bactericidal efficiency of AgNP was evaluated by its application in three concentrations i.e., 0.1, 0.05 and 0.01 ppm to water sample, and allowed to interact with bacteria for different duration e.g., 5 min 15 min, 30 min, 1 h and 2 h. Then, the bactericidal efficiency of AgNPs was determined by comparing the counted bacteria before and after the treatments. Higher mean values of total bacterial count (TBC, total coliform count (TCC, and total streptococcal count (TFS were detected in surface water than in ground water. Also, the results showed that TBC, TCC and TFS exceeded permissible limits. Application of AgNP at different concentration, the number of bacteria in TBC was significantly reduced in all AgNP-exposed samples as compared to the control group (p<0.05. The highest concentration of AgNP exhibited highest bactericidal efficiency in TBC, where, after two hours, 0.1, 0.05 and 0.01 mg/L AgNP was found to be sufficient to inhibit 91.85, 89.14 and 74.92%, and 92.33, 85.23 and 53.17% in TBC of surface and ground water, respectively. Moreover, the inhibition efficiency of the highest concentration (0.1 ppm against TCC reached to 98.10 and 99.88% in surface water and 95.54 and 99.20% in ground water after 1 h and 2 h, respectively. Similar results were found against TFS count. The AgNPs were found to be effective against bacteria of water origin.

  9. Derivation of Ground Surface and Vegetation in a Coastal Florida Wetland with Airborne Laser Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raabe, Ellen A.; Harris, Melanie S.; Shrestha, Ramesh L.; Carter, William E.

    2008-01-01

    The geomorphology and vegetation of marsh-dominated coastal lowlands were mapped from airborne laser data points collected on the Gulf Coast of Florida near Cedar Key. Surface models were developed using low- and high-point filters to separate ground-surface and vegetation-canopy intercepts. In a non-automated process, the landscape was partitioned into functional landscape units to manage the modeling of key landscape features in discrete processing steps. The final digital ground surface-elevation model offers a faithful representation of topographic relief beneath canopies of tidal marsh and coastal forest. Bare-earth models approximate field-surveyed heights by + 0.17 m in the open marsh and + 0.22 m under thick marsh or forest canopy. The laser-derived digital surface models effectively delineate surface features of relatively inaccessible coastal habitats with a geographic coverage and vertical detail previously unavailable. Coastal topographic details include tidal-creek tributaries, levees, modest topographic undulations in the intertidal zone, karst features, silviculture, and relict sand dunes under coastal-forest canopy. A combination of laser-derived ground-surface and canopy-height models and intensity values provided additional mapping capabilities to differentiate between tidal-marsh zones and forest types such as mesic flatwood, hydric hammock, and oak scrub. Additional derived products include fine-scale shoreline and topographic profiles. The derived products demonstrate the capability to identify areas of concern to resource managers and unique components of the coastal system from laser altimetry. Because the very nature of a wetland system presents difficulties for access and data collection, airborne coverage from remote sensors has become an accepted alternative for monitoring wetland regions. Data acquisition with airborne laser represents a viable option for mapping coastal topography and for evaluating habitats and coastal change on marsh

  10. Interpreting Ground Temperature Measurements for Thermophysical Properties on Complex Surfaces of the Moon and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasavada, A. R.; Hamilton, V. E.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    With the successful deployments of the Diviner radiometer on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter and the REMS ground temperature sensor on the Curiosity Mars rover, records of ground temperature with high accuracy and finely sampled diurnal and seasonal cycles have become available. The detailed shapes of these temperature profiles allow inferences beyond just bulk thermophysical properties. Subtle (or sometime significant) effects of surface roughness, slope, and lateral and vertical heterogeneity may be identified in the surface brightness temperature data. For example, changes in thermal or physical properties with depth in the shallow subsurface affect the conduction and storage of thermal energy. These affect the surface energy balance and therefore surface temperatures, especially the rate of cooling at night. Making unique determinations of subsurface soil properties requires minimizing the uncertainties introduced by other effects. On Mars, atmospheric aerosol opacity and wind-driven sensible heat fluxes also affect the diurnal and annual temperature profiles. On both bodies, variations in thermal inertia, slopes, roughness, albedo, and emissivity within the radiometer footprint will cause the composite brightness temperature to differ from a kinetic temperature. Nevertheless, we have detected potential effects of complex surfaces in the temperature data from both Diviner and Curiosity. On the Moon, the results reveal a nearly ubiquitous surface structure, created mechanically by impact gardening, that controls the thermal response of the surface. On Mars, the thermal response is controlled primarily by grain size, cementation, lithification, and composition. However, the secondary effects of near-surface layering aid in the interpretation of stratigraphy and in the identification of geologic processes that have altered the surface.

  11. A geometrical optics polarimetric bidirectional reflectance distribution function for dielectric and metallic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, M W; Schmidt, J D; Havrilla, M J

    2009-11-23

    A polarimetric bidirectional reflectance distribution function (pBRDF), based on geometrical optics, is presented. The pBRDF incorporates a visibility (shadowing/masking) function and a Lambertian (diffuse) component which distinguishes it from other geometrical optics pBRDFs in literature. It is shown that these additions keep the pBRDF bounded (and thus a more realistic physical model) as the angle of incidence or observation approaches grazing and better able to model the behavior of light scattered from rough, reflective surfaces. In this paper, the theoretical development of the pBRDF is shown and discussed. Simulation results of a rough, perfect reflecting surface obtained using an exact, electromagnetic solution and experimental Mueller matrix results of two, rough metallic samples are presented to validate the pBRDF.

  12. Laser trapping and assembling of nanoparticles at solution surface studied by reflection micro-spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shun-Fa; Yuyama, Ken-ichi; Suigiyama, Teruki; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    We present the laser power dependent behavior of optical trapping assembling of 208-nm polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles at the solution surface layer. The assembling dynamics is examined by reflection microspectroscopy as well as transmission and backscattering imaging. The transmission imaging shows that the laser irradiation at the solution surface layer forms a nanoparticle assembly, whose diameter becomes large with the increase in the laser power. The backscattering image of the assembly gives structural color, meaning that nanoparticles are periodically arranged over the whole assembly region. In reflection microspectroscopy, one band appears at long wavelength and is gradually shifted to the short wavelength with the irradiation. After the blue shift, the reflection band is located at the shorter wavelength under the laser irradiation at the higher power. We discuss these spectral changes from the viewpoint of the inter-particle distance determined by the dynamic balance between attractive optical force and repulsive electrostatic force among nanoparticles.

  13. High-resolution x-ray scatter and reflectivity study of sputtered IR surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Abdali, S.; Hornstrup, Allan

    1993-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in the possible use of Ir as the reflecting surface in X-ray telescope programs. An X-ray study of such surfaces produced by sputtering of Ir on highly polished Zerodur flats is presented here. The study was performed using Fe K(alpha) 1 (6.......404 Kev) and Cu K(alpha) 1 (8.048 keV) and includes measurement of total external reflection and scattering. The scattering measurement was made with three different instruments arrangements; one employed a 1D position sensitive detector for low resolution studies giving approximately 30 arcsec resolution...... (FWHM), and the other two arrangements employed channel cut crystals providing resolutions (FWHM) of 5 arcsec and 1 arcsec, respectively at Cu K(alpha) 1. The reflectivity study revealed a very close correspondence with a theoretical model based on recently published optical constants. This important...

  14. High-resolution x-ray scatter and reflectivity study of sputtered IR surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Abdali, S.; Hornstrup, Allan

    1993-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in the possible use of Ir as the reflecting surface in X-ray telescope programs. An X-ray study of such surfaces produced by sputtering of Ir on highly polished Zerodur flats is presented here. The study was performed using Fe K(alpha) 1 (6.......404 Kev) and Cu K(alpha) 1 (8.048 keV) and includes measurement of total external reflection and scattering. The scattering measurement was made with three different instruments arrangements; one employed a 1D position sensitive detector for low resolution studies giving approximately 30 arcsec resolution...... (FWHM), and the other two arrangements employed channel cut crystals providing resolutions (FWHM) of 5 arcsec and 1 arcsec, respectively at Cu K(alpha) 1. The reflectivity study revealed a very close correspondence with a theoretical model based on recently published optical constants. This important...

  15. Software simulator for design and optimization of the kaleidoscopes for the surface reflectance measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havran, Vlastimil; Bittner, Jiří; Čáp, Jiří; Hošek, Jan; Macúchová, Karolina; Němcová, Šárka

    2015-01-01

    Realistic reproduction of appearance of real-world materials by means of computer graphics requires accurate measurement and reconstruction of surface reflectance properties. We propose an interactive software simulation tool for modeling properties of a kaleidoscopic optical system for surface reflectance measurement. We use ray tracing to obtain fine grain simulation results corresponding to the resolution of a simulated image sensor and computing the reflections inside this system based on planar mirrors. We allow for a simulation of different geometric configurations of a kaleidoscope such as the number of mirrors, the length, and the taper angle. For accelerating the computation and delivering interactivity we use parallel processing of large groups of rays. Apart from the interactive mode our tool also features batch optimization suitable for automatic search for optimized kaleidoscope designs. We discuss the possibilities of the simulation and present some preliminary results obtained by using it in practice.

  16. Real-world face recognition: the importance of surface reflectance properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard; Sinha, Pawan

    2007-01-01

    The face recognition task we perform [corrected] most often in everyday experience is the identification of people with whom we are familiar. However, because of logistical challenges, most studies focus on unfamiliar-face recognition, wherein subjects are asked to match or remember images of unfamiliar people's faces. Here we explore the importance of two facial attributes -shape and surface reflectance-in the context of a familiar-face recognition task. In our experiment, subjects were asked to recognise color images of the faces of their friends. The images were manipulated such that only reflectance or only shape information was useful for recognizing any particular face. Subjects were actually better at recognizing their friends' faces from reflectance information than from shape information. This provides evidence that reflectance information is important for face recognition in ecologically relevant contexts.

  17. Reflection of P and SV waves from free surface of an elastic solid with generalized thermodiffusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Baljeet Singh

    2005-04-01

    The governing equations for generalized thermodiffusion in an elastic solid are solved. There exists three kinds of dilatational waves and a Shear Vertical (SV) wave in a two-dimensional model of the solid. The reflection phenomena of P and SV waves from free surface of an elastic solid with thermodiffusion is considered. The boundary conditions are solved to obtain a system of four non-homogeneous equations for reflection coefficients. These reflection coefficients are found to depend upon the angle of incidence of P and SV waves, thermodiffusion parameters and other material constants. The numerical values of modulus of the reflection coefficients are presented graphically for different values of thermodiffusion parameters. The dimensional velocities of various plane waves are also computed for different material constants.

  18. Hyperspectral surface reflectance data detect low moisture status of pecan orchards during flood irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    For large fields, remote sensing might permit plant low moisture status to be detected early, and this may improve drought detection and monitoring. The objective of this study was to determine whether canopy and soil surface reflectance data derived from a handheld spectroradiometer can detect mois...

  19. Vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser vapor sensor using swelling polymer reflection modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor; Nielsen, Claus Højgård; Dohn, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Vapor detection using a low-refractive index polymer for reflection modulation of the top mirror in a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) is demonstrated. The VCSEL sensor concept presents a simple method to detect the response of a sensor polymer in the presence of volatile organic...

  20. LiDAR Relative Reflectivity Surface (2011) for Fish Bay, St. John

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a LiDAR (Light Detection & Ranging) 0.3x0.3 meter resolution relative seafloor reflectivity surface for Fish Bay, St. John in the U.S....

  1. A compact ESPI system for displacement measurements of specular reflecting or optical rough surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, R.S.

    2004-01-01

    A stable and compact speckle interferometer for doing out-of-plane displacement measurements on reflective as well as diffusely scattering object surfaces is demonstrated. The set-up is based on a nearly path length compensated interferometer of the Fizeau type and uses diffuse illumination of th...

  2. Effects of surface reflectance on local second order shape estimation in dynamic scenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dövencioglu, D.N.; Wijntjes, M.W.A.; Ben-Sharar, O.; Doerschner, K.

    2015-01-01

    In dynamic scenes, relative motion between the object, the observer, and/or the environment projects as dynamic visual information onto the retina (optic flow) that facilitates 3D shape perception. When the object is diffusely reflective, e.g. a matte painted surface, this optic flow is directly lin

  3. The adsorption of fluorinated dopants at the surface of 5CB: a neutron reflection study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mears, Laura L.E.; Vos, de Wiebe M.; Prescott, Stuart W.; Magro, Germinal; Rogers, Sarah; Skoda, Maximilian W.A.; Watkins, Erik B.; Zimmerman, Herbert; Richardson, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of dopants at the surface of 5CB has been studied using neutron reflection. The dopants were versions of 11OCB with partly fluorinated chains, and the 5CB was interfaced with air or with silica treated with fluorocarbon or hydrocarbon coatings. At the air interface, the F17-11OCB adso

  4. LiDAR Relative Reflectivity Surface (2011) for Coral Bay, St. John

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a LiDAR (Light Detection & Ranging) 0.3x0.3 meter resolution relative seafloor reflectivity surface for Coral Bay, St. John in the U.S....

  5. Effect of initial stress on reflection at the free surface of anisotropic elastic medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M D Sharma

    2007-12-01

    The propagation of plane waves is considered in a general anisotropic elastic medium in the presence of initial stress. The Christoffel equations are solved into a polynomial of degree six. The roots of this polynomial represent the vertical slowness values for the six quasi-waves resulting from the presence of a discontinuity in the medium. Three of these six values are identified with the three quasi-waves traveling in the medium but away from its boundary. Reflection at the free plane surface is studied for partition of energy among the three reflected waves. For post-critical incidence, the reflected waves are inhomogeneous (evanescent) waves. Numerical examples are considered to exhibit the effects of initial stress on the phase direction, attenuation and reflection coefficients of the reflected waves. The phase velocities and energy shares of the reflected waves change significantly with initial stress as well as anisotropic symmetry. The presence of initial stress, however, has a negligible effect on the phase directions of reflected waves.

  6. The utility of surface reflectance for the recognition of upright and inverted faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard; Biederman, Irving; Nederhouser, Marissa; Sinha, Pawan

    2007-01-01

    The variation among faces can be partitioned into two sources: (a) shape and (b) surface reflectance. To compare the utility of shape and reflectance for face recognition, we created two sets of faces, with individual exemplars differing only by shape in one set and only by reflectance in the other set. Grayscale and full color versions of the stimuli were used in separate experiments; the physical variation between exemplars was equated across the two sets with the grayscale but not the full color stimuli. Subjects performed a matching task in which both the target and distractor were drawn from the same set, so that only shape or only reflectance information could be used to perform the task. With the grayscale stimuli, performance was better in the shape condition, but with the color stimuli, performance was better in the reflectance condition. Inversion of the faces disrupted performance with the shape and reflectance sets about equally, suggesting that the inversion effect is not caused specifically by the spacing of facial features, or even by shape information more generally. These results provide evidence that facial identity is a function of reflectance as well as shape, and place important constraints on explanations of why inversion impairs face recognition.

  7. Modeling ground surface uplift during CO2 sequestration: the case of In Salah, Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Antonio Pio; Rutqvist, Jonny; Finsterle, Stefan; Liu, Hui-Hai

    2016-04-01

    Observable ground deformation, common in storage projects, carries useful information on processes occurring at the injection depth. The Krechba gas field at In Salah (Algeria) is one of the best known sites for studying ground surface deformation during geological storage. Being the first industrial-scale on-shore CO2 demonstration project, the site is well known for satellite-based ground-deformation monitoring data of remarkable quality. In this work, we carry out coupled fluid flow and geomechanical simulations to understand the uplift at three different CO2 injection wells (KB-501, KB-502, KB-503). Previous numerical studies focused on the KB-502 injection well, where a double-lobe uplift pattern has been observed in the ground-deformation data. The observed uplift patterns at KB-501 and KB-503 are different, but also indicate the influence of deep fracture zone mechanical responses. The current study improves the previous modeling approach by introducing an injection reservoir and a fracture zone, both responding to a Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. In addition, we model a stress-dependent permeability and bulk modulus, according to a dual continuum model. Mechanical and hydraulic properties were determined through inverse modeling by matching the simulated spatial and temporal evolution of uplift to the corresponding InSAR observations as well as by matching simulated and measured pressures. The numerical simulations are in excellent agreement with observed spatial and temporal variation of ground surface uplift, as well as with measured pressures. The estimated values for the parameterized mechanical and hydraulic properties are in good agreement with previous numerical results, although with uncertainty.

  8. Detailed analytical approach to the Gaussian surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function specular component applied to the sea surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Vincent; Dion, Denis; Potvin, Guy

    2005-11-01

    A statistical sea surface specular BRDF (bidirectional reflectance distribution function) model is developed that includes mutual shadowing by waves, wave facet hiding, and projection weighting. The integral form of the model is reduced to an analytical form by making minor and justifiable approximations. The new form of the BRDF thus allows one to compute sea reflected radiance more than 100 times faster than the traditional numerical solutions. The repercussions of the approximations used in the model are discussed. Using the analytical form of the BRDF, an analytical approximation is also obtained for the reflected sun radiance that is always good to within 1% of the numerical solution for sun elevations of more than 10 degrees above the horizon. The model is validated against measured sea radiances found in the literature and is shown to be in very good agreement.

  9. Reflection and transmission of regular waves at a surface-pitching slotted barrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The interactions between regular surface waves and a surface-pitching slotted barrier are investigated both analytically and experimentally.A quasi-linear theory is developed using the eigenfunction expansion method.The energy dissipation within the barriers is modeled by a quadratic friction factor, and an equivalent linear dissipation coefficient, which is depth-varying, wave-height dependent, is introduced to linearize the matching condition at the surface-pitching barrier.By comparing the theoretical results with laboratory experiments, it is shown that the present method can satisfactorily predict the variation of the reflection and transmission coefficients with wave height.

  10. Stresses and strains developed by the reflection of seismic waves at a free surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banister, J.R.; Ellett, D.M.; Mehl, C.R.; Dean, F.F.

    1978-07-01

    Exact and approximate equations have been derived for the stresses and strains beneath a free surface when an incoming longitudinal wave and an incoming shear wave reflect from the surface. Results of the approximate solution for depths much less than the wave length of the incoming wave are given in tabular form and are graphed for Poisson's ratios of 0.25, 0.3, and 0.333. The results should be of use in categorizing the magnitude of near-surface stresses and strains resulting from seismic waves produced by deeply buried explosives or earthquakes.

  11. A facile method for preparing highly conductive and reflective surface-silvered polyimide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yuan; Cao, Bing; Wang, Wen-Cai; Zhang, Liqun; Wu, Dezhen; Jin, Riguang

    2009-07-01

    A novel method was developed for the preparation of reflective and electrically conductive surface-silvered polyimide (PI) films. The polyimide films were functionalized with poly(dopamine), simply by dipping the PI films into aqueous dopamine solution and mildly stirring at room temperature. Electroless plating of silver was readily carried out on the poly(dopamine) deposited PI (PI-DOPA) surface. The surface compositions of the modified PI films were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS results show that the PI-DOPA surfaces were successfully deposited with ploy(dopamine) and were ready for electroless deposition of silver. The poly(dopamine) layer was used not only as the chemi-sorption sites for silver particles during the electroless plating of silver, but also as an adhesion promotion layer for the electrolessly deposited silver. The as-prepared silvered PI films show high conductivity and reflectivity, with a surface resistance of 1.5 Ω and a reflectivity of 95%, respectively.

  12. A facile method for preparing highly conductive and reflective surface-silvered polyimide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao Yuan; Cao Bing [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, and the Key Laboratory of Beijing City on Preparation and Processing of Novel Polymer Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, 15 Beisanhuan East Road, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang Wencai, E-mail: wangw@mail.buct.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, and Key Laboratory of Beijing City on Preparation and Processing of Novel Polymer Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, 15 Beisanhuan East Road, Beijing 100029 (China); Zhang Liqun; Wu Dezhen; Jin Riguang [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, and Key Laboratory of Beijing City on Preparation and Processing of Novel Polymer Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, 15 Beisanhuan East Road, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2009-07-15

    A novel method was developed for the preparation of reflective and electrically conductive surface-silvered polyimide (PI) films. The polyimide films were functionalized with poly(dopamine), simply by dipping the PI films into aqueous dopamine solution and mildly stirring at room temperature. Electroless plating of silver was readily carried out on the poly(dopamine) deposited PI (PI-DOPA) surface. The surface compositions of the modified PI films were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS results show that the PI-DOPA surfaces were successfully deposited with ploy(dopamine) and were ready for electroless deposition of silver. The poly(dopamine) layer was used not only as the chemi-sorption sites for silver particles during the electroless plating of silver, but also as an adhesion promotion layer for the electrolessly deposited silver. The as-prepared silvered PI films show high conductivity and reflectivity, with a surface resistance of 1.5 {Omega} and a reflectivity of 95%, respectively.

  13. Critical coupling of surface plasmons in graphene attenuated total reflection geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuevas, Mauro, E-mail: cuevas@df.uba.ar [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) and Facultad de Ingeniería y Tecnología Informática, Universidad de Belgrano, Villanueva 1324, C1426BMJ, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Grupo de Electromagnetismo Aplicado, Departamento de Física, FCEN, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón I, C1428EHA, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-12-09

    We study the optical response of an attenuated total reflection (ATR) structure in Otto configuration with graphene sheet, paying especial attention to the occurrence of total absorption. Our results show that due to excitation of surface plasmons on the graphene sheet, two different conditions of total absorption may occur. At these conditions, the energy loss of the surface plasmon by radiation is equal to its energy loss by absorption into the graphene sheet. We give necessary conditions on ATR parameters for the existence of total absorption. - Highlights: • Attenuated total reflection (ATR) structure with graphene sheet. • Surface plasmons and power matched condition. • Necessary conditions on ATR parameters for the existence of total absorption.

  14. A new model on bidirectional reflectance surface-atmospheric coupled radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU; Jinhuan; (邱金桓)

    2001-01-01

    An exact and available model on bidirectional reflectance surface-atmospheric coupled radiation is of great significance for spaceborne remote sensing application. Based on the physical process of interaction of solar radiation with the surface and the atmosphere, a new model on bidirectional reflectance surface-atmospheric coupled radiation is developed in this paper. As shown in numerical simulation, this model is evidently better than the 6S model. The standard error among 110112 sets of upward radiance data calculated by this new model is only 0.49%, which is about one fourth of the one by 6S. In the condition of the solar zenith angle qs≤75°and the viewing angle qv≤60°, the error by the new model is usually smaller than 2.5%.

  15. Surface Gap Soliton Ground States for the Nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger Equation

    CERN Document Server

    Dohnal, Tomáš; Reichel, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    We consider the nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equation $(-\\Delta +V(x))u = \\Gamma(x) |u|^{p-1}u$, $x\\in \\R^n$ with $V(x) = V_1(x) \\chi_{\\{x_1>0\\}}(x)+V_2(x) \\chi_{\\{x_10\\}}(x)+\\Gamma_2(x) \\chi_{\\{x_1<0\\}}(x)$ and with $V_1, V_2, \\Gamma_1, \\Gamma_2$ periodic in each coordinate direction. This problem describes the interface of two periodic media, e.g. photonic crystals. We study the existence of ground state $H^1$ solutions (surface gap soliton ground states) for $0<\\min \\sigma(-\\Delta +V)$. Using a concentration compactness argument, we provide an abstract criterion for the existence based on ground state energies of each periodic problem (with $V\\equiv V_1, \\Gamma\\equiv \\Gamma_1$ and $V\\equiv V_2, \\Gamma\\equiv \\Gamma_2$) as well as a more practical criterion based on ground states themselves. Examples of interfaces satisfying these criteria are provided. In 1D it is shown that, surprisingly, the criteria can be reduced to conditions on the linear Bloch waves of the operators $-\\tfrac{d^2}{dx^2} +V_1(x)$ an...

  16. Evaluation of BRDF Archetypes for Representing Surface Reflectance Anisotropy Using MODIS BRDF Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF archetypes extracted from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS BRDF/Albedo product over the global Earth Observing System Land Validation Core Sites can be used to simplify BRDF models. The present study attempts to evaluate the representativeness of BRDF archetypes for surface reflectance anisotropy. Five-year forward-modeled MODIS multi-angular reflectance (MCD-ref and aditional actual MODIS multi-angular observations (MCD-obs in four growing periods in 2008 over three tiles were taken as validation data. First, BRDF archetypes in the principal plane were qualitatively compared with the time-series MODIS BRDF product of randomly sampled pixels. Secondly, BRDF archetypes were used to fit MCD-ref, and the average root-mean-squared errors (RMSEs over each tile were examined for these five years. Finally, both BRDF archetypes and the MODIS BRDF were used to fit MCD-obs, and the histograms of the fit-RMSEs were compared. The consistency of the directional reflectance between the BRDF archetypes and MODIS BRDFs in nadir-view, hotspot and entire viewing hemisphere at 30° and 50° solar geometries were also examined. The results confirm that BRDF archetypes are representative of surface reflectance anisotropy for available snow-free MODIS data.

  17. Application of Hapke photometric model to three geologic surfaces using PARABOLA bidirectional reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Michael K.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Deering, Donald W.

    1991-01-01

    The Geologic Remote Sensing Field Experiment (GRSFE) was conducted in July and September of 1989 to collect data with both ground and airborne instrumentation. A major objective of GRSFE was to collect data which could be used to test radiative transfer models for the extraction of composition and textural surface properties from remotely acquired data. Reported here are the initial results from an application of the Hapke photometric model, using data from the Portable Apparatus for Remote Acquisition of Bidirectional Observations of Land and Atmosphere (PARABOLA), a ground based radiometer with three spectral channels. PARABOLA data was collected in the Lunar Crater Volcanic Field in Nevada, specifically from the region of Lunar Lake, a playa. The Hapke model was found to be inadequate for three relatively common geologic surfaces (a clay-rich, hard packed surface with decimeter sized mudcracks; a cobble site, similar to a playa site, but strewn with basaltic cobbles and pebbles; and a surface mantled basalt lava flow). The model is not at fault; rather, the complexity of most geologic surfaces is not accounted for in the initial assumptions.

  18. Ray splitting in the reflection and refraction of surface acoustic waves in anisotropic solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Every, A G; Maznev, A A

    2010-05-01

    This paper examines the conditions for, and provides examples of, ray splitting in the reflection and refraction of surface acoustic waves (SAW) in elastically anisotropic solids at straight obstacles such as edges, surface breaking cracks, and interfaces between different solids. The concern here is not with the partial scattering of an incident SAW's energy into bulk waves, but with the occurrence of more than one SAW ray in the reflected and/or transmitted wave fields, by analogy with birefringence in optics and mode conversion of bulk elastic waves at interfaces. SAW ray splitting is dependent on the SAW slowness curve possessing concave regions, which within the constraint of wave vector conservation parallel to the obstacle allows multiple outgoing SAW modes for certain directions of incidence and orientation of obstacle. The existence of pseudo-SAW for a given surface provides a further channel for ray splitting. This paper discusses some typical material configurations for which SAW ray splitting occurs. An example is provided of mode conversion entailing backward reflection or negative refraction. Experimental demonstration of ray splitting in the reflection of a laser generated SAW in GaAs(111) is provided. The calculation of SAW mode conversion amplitudes lies outside the scope of this paper.

  19. Impact of surface reflection on transmission eigenvalue statistics and energy distributions inside random media

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Xiaojun; Lowell, Zachary; Zhao, Liyi; Genack, Azriel Z

    2016-01-01

    The impact of surface reflection upon transmission through and energy distributions within random media has generally been described in terms of the boundary extrapolation lengths $z_b, z_b'$ at the input and output end of an open sample, which are the distance beyond the sample surfaces at which the energy density within the sample extrapolates to zeroThe importance of reflection at the sample boundaries plays a key role in the scaling of transmission. Here we consider the impact of surface reflection on the propagation of diffusive waves in terms of the modification of the distribution of transmission eigenvalues (DTE). We review our finding of a transition in the analytical form of the DTE at the point that the sample length equals $|z_b-z_b'|$. The highest transmission eigenvalue for stronger asymmetry in boundary reflection is strictly smaller than unity. The average transmission and profiles of energy density inside the sample can still be described in terms of the sample length, $L$, and the boundary e...

  20. The development of differential reflectance spectroscopy, and its application to the study of semiconductor surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, D

    2000-01-01

    good agreement with grazing incidence x-ray reflectivity measurements, where the two overlap. DRS is superior for measurements of layers between 0.5 mu m to 2 mu m. Overall, DRS is shown to be an economically viable alternative to more established techniques, and applicable in a wide range of circumstances where measurements of the surface and near surface regions are required. Differential Reflectance Spectroscopy (DRS) is a technique that can be used to study changes in electronic structure in the surface layer of solids by measuring spatial variation in specular reflectivity for wavelengths of light near the visible spectrum. Based on this concept, an instrument has been built that can resolve differences in reflectivity as small as one part in a thousand between a test sample and a reference standard. The instrument covers the spectrum from close to the vacuum ultra-violet up to the near infra-red, and measurements are made at near normal incidence. The concepts, detailed design and evaluation of the inst...

  1. Relationship between subsurface damage and surface roughness of ground optical materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Sheng-yi; WANG Zhuo; WU Yu-lie

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical model of relationship between subsurface damage and surface roughness was established to realize rapid and non-destructive measurement of subsurface damage of ground optical materials. Postulated condition of the model was that subsurface damage depth and peak-to-valley surface roughness are equal to depth of radial and lateral cracks in brittle surface induced by small-radius (radius≤200 μm) spherical indenter, respectively. And contribution of elastic stress field to the radial cracks propagation was also considered in the loading cycle. Subsurface damage depth of ground BK7 glasses was measured by magnetorheological finishing spot technique to validate theoretical ratio of subsurface damage to surface roughness. The results show that the ratio is directly proportional to load of abrasive grains and hardness of optical materials, while inversely proportional to granularity of abrasive grains and fracture toughness of optical materials. Moreover, the influence of the load and fracture toughness on the ratio is more significant than the granularity and hardness, respectively. The measured ratios of 80 grit and 120 grit fixed abrasive grinding of BK7 glasses are 5.8 and 5.4, respectively.

  2. Constraining Planetary Boundary Layer Retrievals with Surface Reflections from GNSS Radio Occultation Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, C. O.; Shume, E. B.; Hajj, G. A.; Meehan, T. K.

    2016-12-01

    In an earlier study, we demonstrated that grazing surface reflection observed from GNSS radio occultation (RO) data yields frequency shifts that are sensitive to refractivity within the planetary boundary layer (PBL). In this presentation, we show our latest progress in retrieving PBL refractivity using a combination of direct and reflected RO data. Through forward simulations, we first assess how the reflected Doppler frequency will vary as a function of refractivity parameters in the PBL. Next, we describe our method for extracting the reflected Doppler signal from actual COSMIC and TerraSAR-X observations and discuss its associated uncertainty. We focus our attention to RO soundings from the subtropical Eastern oceans where large negative refractivity biases within the PBL have been reported. We investigate the feasibility of using the inferred reflected signal to correct the negative bias. Finally, we discuss how future RO observations such as those from COSMIC-2 can be enhanced to provide stronger reflection signals through changes in the GNSS receiver configurations.

  3. The effect of surface texture on total reflection of neutrons and X-rays from modified interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldar, A.; Roser, S.J.; Hughes, A.

    2002-01-01

    X-ray and neutron scattering from macroscopically rough surfaces and interfaces is considered and a new method of analysis based on the variation of the shape of the total reflection edge in the reflectivity profile is proposed. It was shown that in the limit that the correlation length and the h......X-ray and neutron scattering from macroscopically rough surfaces and interfaces is considered and a new method of analysis based on the variation of the shape of the total reflection edge in the reflectivity profile is proposed. It was shown that in the limit that the correlation length...... and the height of the surface roughness are larger than the wavelength (at least 100 times bigger) of the incoming beam, the total reflection edge in the reflection profile becomes rounded. This technique allows direct analysis of the variation of the reflectivity pro le in terms of the structure of the surface...

  4. Simultaneous retrieval of aerosol and surface optical properties from combined airborne- and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. K. Gatebe

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new method for simultaneously retrieving aerosol and surface reflectance properties from combined airborne and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements. The method is based on the standard Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET method for retrieving aerosol size distribution, complex index of refraction, and single scattering albedo, but modified to retrieve aerosol properties in two layers, below and above the aircraft, and parameters on surface optical properties from combined datasets (Cloud Absorption Radiometer, CAR, and AERONET data. A key advantage of this method is the inversion of all available spectral and angular data at the same time, while accounting for the influence of noise in the inversion procedure using statistical optimization. The wide spectral (0.34–2.30 μm and angular range (180° of the CAR instrument, combined with observations from an AERONET sunphotometer, provide sufficient measurement constraints for characterizing aerosol and surface properties with minimal assumptions. The robustness of the method was tested on observations made during four different field campaigns: (a the Southern African Regional Science Initiative 2000 over Mongu, Zambia, (b the Intercontinental Transport Experiment-Phase B over Mexico City, Mexico (c Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Central Facility, Oklahoma, USA, and (d the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS over Elson Lagoon in Barrow, Alaska, USA. The four areas are dominated by different surface characteristics and aerosol types, and therefore provide good test cases for the new inversion method.

  5. Simultaneous retrieval of aerosol and surface optical properties from combined airborne- and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. K. Gatebe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new method for simultaneously retrieving aerosol and surface reflectance properties from combined airborne and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements. The method is based on the standard Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET method for retrieving aerosol size distribution, complex index of refraction, and single scattering albedo, but modified to retrieve aerosol properties in two layers, below and above the aircraft, and parameters on surface optical properties from combined datasets (Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR and AERONET data. A key advantage of this method is the inversion of all available spectral and angular data at the same time, while accounting for the influence of noise in the inversion procedure using statistical optimization. The wide spectral (0.34–2.30 μm and angular range (180° of the CAR instrument, combined with observations from an AERONET sunphotometer, provide sufficient measurement constraints for characterizing aerosol and surface properties with minimal assumptions. The robustness of the method was tested on observations made during four different field campaigns: (a the Southern African Regional Science Initiative 2000 over Mongu, Zambia, (b the Intercontinental Transport Experiment-Phase B over Mexico City, Mexico (c Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Central Facility, Oklahoma, USA, and (d the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS over Elson Lagoon in Barrow, Alaska, USA. The four areas are dominated by different surface characteristics and aerosol types, and therefore provide good test cases for the new inversion method.

  6. Assessment of dry season surface, ground, and treated water quality in the Cape Coast municipality of Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quagraine, E K; Adokoh, C K

    2010-01-01

    This aim of this monitoring was to assess water quality in a dry season for the Cape Coast municipality in Ghana, which has been experiencing chronic water shortages. Fifteen different sampling stations--four surface, five ground, and six tap water samples--were analyzed for physicochemical and microbiological parameters during January to April 2005. Levels or trends in water quality that may be deleterious to sensitive water uses, including drinking, irrigation, and livestock watering have been noted with reference to well-established guidelines. Exceedances to some health-based drinking water guidelines included positive coliform for various water samples; pH for all groundwater samples (pH 5.9+/-0.3); conductivity for 50% groundwater; color for about a third of groundwater and tap water; Mn for 44% tap water, 67% groundwater, and 50% surface water samples. The World Health Organization laundry staining Fe guideline of 0.3 mg/l was exceeded by 75% of surface water, 44% tap water, and 53% groundwater samples. The corresponding Mn guideline of 0.1 mg/l was exceeded by all the water samples. Respectively, all surface water samples and also 75% of the surface water exceeded some known Cu and Zn guideline for the protection of aquatic life. Compared to some historic data for Fosu Lagoon, the current study shows a lowering of approximately 1 pH unit, increase of approximately 65% NH3, one to two orders of magnitude increase in PO4(3-), and more than two orders of magnitude increase in NO3-. In several instances, tap water samples collected at the consumers' end of the distribution system did not reflect on the true quality of the treated water. Mn, SO4(2-), PO4(3-), Cu, and Zn were among the chemical contaminations observed to occur in the distribution system.

  7. Organochlorine pesticides in surface soils from obsolete pesticide dumping ground in Hyderabad City, Pakistan: contamination levels and their potential for air-soil exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamdar, Ambreen; Syed, Jabir Hussain; Malik, Riffat Naseem; Katsoyiannis, Athanasios; Liu, Junwen; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan; Jones, Kevin C

    2014-02-01

    This study was conducted to examine organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) contamination levels in the surface soil and air samples together with air-soil exchange fluxes at an obsolete pesticide dumping ground and the associated areas from Hyderabad City, Pakistan. Among all the sampling sites, concentrations of OCPs in the soil and air samples were found highest in obsolete pesticide dumping ground, whereas dominant contaminants were dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDTs) (soil: 77-212,200 ng g(-1); air: 90,700 pg m(-3)) and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCHs) (soil: 43-4,090 ng g(-1); air: 97,400 pg m(-3)) followed by chlordane, heptachlor and hexachlorobenzene (HCB). OCPs diagnostic indicative ratios reflect historical use as well as fresh input in the study area. Moreover, the air and soil fugacity ratios (0.9-1.0) at the dumping ground reflecting a tendency towards net volatilization of OCPs, while at the other sampling sites, the fugacity ratios indicate in some cases deposition and in other cases volatilization. Elevated concentrations of DDTs and HCHs at pesticide dumping ground and its surroundings pose potential exposure risk to biological organisms, to the safety of agricultural products and to the human health. Our study thus emphasizes the need of spatio-temporal monitoring of OCPs at local and regional scale to assess and remediate the future adverse implications.

  8. Studies of float glass surfaces by neutron and x-ray reflection

    CERN Document Server

    Dalgliesh, R

    2001-01-01

    applicability of current off-specular scattering models. A rich surface structure has been found which results in reflection effects that cannot be explained by these models. Model systems have also been developed in an attempt to combine x-ray fluorescence techniques with reflectivity. The surface of glass and glass coatings have been studied using x-ray and neutron scattering techniques. In particular, the effect of aqueous solutions and humid atmospheres on both the fire polished and the tin rich side of float glass have been investigated using neutron and x-ray reflection. Isotopic substitution has enabled the number density of water molecules within the float glass surface to be monitored with respect to immersion time, temperature and impurity content. A thin gel-like water-rich layer of thickness approx 30A is observed at the surface accompanied by a more deeply penetrating layer which increases in depth with time reaching approx 500A after 6 months. The rate of water ingression is higher than predicte...

  9. Spectrally selective surfaces for ground and space-based instrumentation: support for a resource base

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Susan H.; Sinclair, R. Lawrence; Pompea, Stephen M.; Breault, Robert P.

    1993-11-01

    The performance of space telescopes, space instruments, and space radiator systems depends critically upon the selection of appropriate spectrally selective surfaces. Many space programs have suffered severe performance limitations, schedule setbacks, and spent hundreds of thousands of dollars in damage control because of a lack of readily-accessible, accurate data on the properties of spectrally selective surfaces, particularly black surfaces. A Canadian effort is underway to develop a resource base (database and support service) to help alleviate this problem. The assistance of the community is required to make the resource base comprehensive and useful to the end users. The paper aims to describe the objectives of this project. In addition, a request for information and support is made for various aspects of the project. The resource base will be useful for both ground and space-based instrumentation.

  10. Wavefields Near Transverse Cusp Caustics Produced by Reflecting Ultrasonic Transients and Tone Bursts from Curved Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederickson, Carl King

    Ultrasonic wavefields reflected from curved surfaces were studied in the vicinity of caustics. Acoustical and optical transverse cusp diffraction catastrophes produced by reflections from a curved metal surface in water were imaged by displaying the amplitude or intensity in an observation plane transverse to the general direction of propagation. The optical image was used to locate the cusp point in the observation plane. Acoustical diffraction patterns for sine waves, described by the Pearcey function, were calculated with the parameters determined by the experimental setup leaving no adjustable scaling parameters. The calculated and experimental acoustical diffraction patterns showed good agreement near the cusp point. The acoustical diffraction pattern showed the expected mirror symmetry about an axis. The pattern was shown to scale properly with frequency. The transverse cusp caustic separates space into a region with three rays and a region with one ray. Inside the caustic there are three rays, on the curve two of the rays merge and disappear leaving one ray outside. Transient signals reflected from curved surfaces exhibited the merging and disappearance of rays on the caustic. Relative arrival times for signals in calculated and recorded time traces agree well. The relation to the wavefront parameters of the temporal orientation of the travel time surface is discussed. The general shape of the travel time surface is that of the swallow tail caustic surface. The temporal shape of the transient echoes was seen to be generally that of the incident signal or of its Hilbert transform. The Hilbert transform shape identifies the signals that have touched the caustic. The observed arrival sequence of the transient signals was shh inside the caustic and one h outside, where s stands for a signal with the general shape of the incident signal and h for its Hilbert transform. The relation between the surface and wavefront parameters and the arrival sequence is given.

  11. Analysis of partial-reflection data from the solar eclipse of 10 Jul. 1972. [ground-based experiment using vertical incident radio waves partially reflected from D region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, T. A.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    Partial-reflection data collected for the eclipse of July 10, 1972 as well as for July 9 and 11, 1972, are analyzed to determine eclipse effects on D-region electron densities. The partial-reflection experiment was set up to collect data using an on-line PDP-15 computer and DECtape storage. The electron-density profiles show good agreement with results from other eclipses. The partial-reflection programs were changed after the eclipse data collection to improve the operation of the partial-reflection system. These changes were mainly due to expanded computer hardware and have simplified the operations of the system considerably.

  12. The Potential Energy Surface for the Electronic Ground State of H 2Se Derived from Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, P.; Kozin, I. N.

    1993-07-01

    The present paper reports a determination of the potential energy surface for the electronic ground state of the hydrogen selenide molecule through a direct least-squares fitting to experimental data using the MORBID (Morse oscillator rigid bender internal dynamics) approach developed by P. Jensen [ J. Mol. Spectrosc.128, 478-501 (1988); J. Chem. Soc. Faraday Trans. 284, 1315-1340 (1988)]. We have fitted a selection of 303 rotation-vibration energy spacings of H 280Se, D 280Se, and HD 80Se involving J ≤ 5 with a root-mean-square deviation of 0.0975 cm -1 for the rotational energy spacings and 0.268 cm -1 for the vibrational spacings. In the fitting, 14 parameters were varied. On the basis of the fitted potential surface we have studied the cluster effect in the vibrational ground state of H 2Se, i.e., the formation of nearly degenerate, four-member groups of rotational energy levels [see I. N. Kozin, S. Klee, P. Jensen, O. L. Polyansky, and I. M. Pavlichenkov. J. Mol. Spectrosc., 158, 409-422 (1993), and references therein]. The cluster formation becomes more pronounced with increasing J. For example, four-fold clusters formed in the vibrational ground state of H 280Se at J = 40 are degenerate to within a few MHz. Our predictions of the D 280Se energy spectrum show that for this molecule, the cluster formation is displaced towards higher J values than arc found for H 280Se. In the vibrational ground state, the qualitative deviation from the usual rigid rotor picture starts at J = 12 for H 280Se and at J = 18 for D 280Se, in full agreement with predictions from semiclassical theory. An interpretation of the cluster eigenstates is discussed.

  13. Conceptual Tenets of the Theory of Hydration of Heterogeneous Surface with Polar Order of Disperse Ground Layers of Sedimentary Genesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara G. Makeeva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article, basing on the established regularity defines the basic tenets of the theory of hydration of heterogeneous surface with polar order of disperse ground layers of sedimentary genesis. It offers classification and formula for the associated water density, valid corrections for the associated water density, calculates the water film thickness in disperse ground, develops the reliable physicochemical model of the disperse ground, determines the range of applicability of the existing laboratory and field methods.

  14. The normalization of surface anisotropy effects present in SEVIRI reflectances by using the MODIS BRDF method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proud, Simon Richard; Zhang, Qingling; Schaaf, Crystal;

    2014-01-01

    A modified version of the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) algorithm is presented for use in the angular normalization of surface reflectance data gathered by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI...... acquisition period than the comparable MODIS products while, at the same time, removing many of the angular perturbations present within the original MSG data. The NBAR data are validated against reflectance data from the MODIS instrument and in situ data gathered at a field location in Africa throughout 2008....... It is found that the MSG retrievals are stable and are of high-quality across much of the SEVIRI disk while maintaining a higher temporal resolution than the MODIS BRDF products. However, a number of circumstances are discovered whereby the BRDF model is unable to function correctly with the SEVIRI...

  15. Three-dimensional reconstruction of specular reflecting technical surfaces using structured light microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettel, Johannes; Müller, Claas; Reinecke, Holger

    2014-11-01

    In computer assisted quality control the three-dimensional reconstruction of technical surfaces is playing an ever more important role. Due to the demand on high measurement accuracy and data acquisition rates, structured light optical microscopy has become a valuable solution for the three-dimensional measurement of technical surfaces with high vertical and lateral resolution. However, the three-dimensional reconstruction of specular reflecting technical surfaces with very low surface-roughness and local slopes still remains a challenge to optical measurement principles. Furthermore the high data acquisition rates of current optical measurement systems depend on highly complex and expensive scanning-techniques making them impractical for inline quality control. In this paper we present a novel measurement principle based on a multi-pinhole structured light solution without moving parts which enables the threedimensional reconstruction of specular and diffuse reflecting technical surfaces. This measurement principle is based on multiple and parallel processed point-measurements. These point measurements are realized by spatially locating and analyzing the resulting Point Spread Function (PSF) in parallel for each point measurement. Analysis of the PSF is realized by pattern recognition and model-fitting algorithms accelerated by current Graphics-Processing-Unit (GPU) hardware to reach suitable measurement rates. Using the example of optical surfaces with very low surface-roughness we demonstrate the three-dimensional reconstruction of these surfaces by applying our measurement principle. Thereby we show that the resulting high measurement accuracy enables cost-efficient three-dimensional surface reconstruction suitable for inline quality control.

  16. Reflectance anisotropy for characterising fine-scale changes in soil surface condition across different soil types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Holly; Anderson, Karen; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2010-05-01

    Soils can experience rapid structural degradation in response to land cover changes, resulting in a reduction in soil productivity, an increased susceptibility to erosion and increased release of greenhouse gases. Soil surface roughness at the centimetre scale plays a fundamental role in affecting soil erosion and surface runoff pathways. A decline in surface roughness can also be used to infer soil degradation as soil aggregates are broken down through raindrop impact. However, due to the time and resources involved in using traditional field sampling techniques, there is a lack of spatially-distributed information on soil surface condition. Remotely sensed data can provide a cost-effective means of monitoring changes in soil surface condition over broad spatial extents. Furthermore, a growing recognition into the importance of the directional reflectance domain has led to an increasing number of satellites with multiple view angle (MVA) capabilities (e.g. MISR, CHRIS on Proba). This is potentially useful for monitoring soil degradation and susceptibility to erosion because changes in soil surface roughness, associated with the breakdown of macro-aggregates, have a measurable effect on directional reflectance factors. Consequently, field and laboratory data are required for an empirical understanding of soil directional reflectance characteristics, underpinning subsequent model development. This study assessed the extent to which a hyperspectral MVA approach (350-2500 nm) could detect fine-scale changes in soil crusting states across five different soil types. A series of soil crusting states were produced for all five soil types, using an artificial rainfall simulator. The controlled conditions allowed the production of a series of stages in the soil crusting process; showing progressively declining surface roughness values. Each soil state was then spatially characterised, using a laboratory laser device at 2 mm sample spacing, over a 10 x 10 cm area. Laser data

  17. Energy loss of MeV protons specularly reflected from metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juaristi, J.I. [Departamento Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Quimicas, Universidad del Pais Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibersitatea, Apartado Postal 1072, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); Garcia de Abajo, F.J. [Departamento Ciencias de la Computacion e Inteligencia Artificial, Facultad de Informatica, Universidad del Pais Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibersitatea, Apartado Postal 649, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); Echenique, P.M. [Departamento Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Quimicas, Universidad del Pais Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibersitatea, Apartado Postal 1072, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain)

    1996-05-01

    A parameter-free model is presented to study the energy loss of fast protons specularly reflected from metal surfaces. The contributions to the energy loss from excitation of valence-band electrons and ionization of localized target-atom electronic states are calculated separately. The former is calculated from the induced surface wake potential using linear response theory and the specular-reflection model, while the latter is calculated in the first Born approximation. The results obtained are in good agreement with available experimental data. However, the experimental qualitative trend of the energy loss as a function of the angle of incidence is obtained when the valence-band electron model is replaced by localized target atom electron states, though with a worse quantitative agreement. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. Development of Regional TSS Algorithm over Penang using Modis Terra (250 M Surface Reflectance Product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Abd Rahman Mat

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Total suspended sediment (TSS plays a significant role in the environment. Many researchers show that TSS has a high correlation with the red portion of the visible light spectrum. The correlation is highly dependent on geography of the study area. The aim of this study was to develop specific algorithms utilizing corrected MODIS Terra 250-m surface reflectance (Rrs product (MOD09 to map TSS over the Penang coastal area. Field measurements of TSS were performed during two cruise trips that were conducted on 8 December 2008 and 29 January 2010 over the Penang coastal area. The relationship between TSS and the surface reflectance of MOD09 was analysed using regression analysis. The developed algorithm showed that Rrs are highly correlated with the in-situ TSS with R2 is 0.838. The result shows that the Rrs product could be used to estimate TSS over the Penang area.

  19. Matter-wave soliton bouncing on a reflecting surface under the effect of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benseghir, A.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Baizakov, B. B.; Abdullaev, F. Kh.

    2014-08-01

    The dynamics of a matter-wave soliton bouncing on the reflecting surface (atomic mirror) under the effect of gravity has been studied by analytical and numerical means. The analytical description is based on the variational approach. Resonant oscillations of the soliton's center of mass and width, induced by appropriate modulation of the atomic scattering length and the slope of the linear potential, are analyzed. In numerical experiments we observe the Fermi-type acceleration of the soliton when the vertical position of the reflecting surface is periodically varied in time. Analytical predictions are compared to the results of numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation and qualitative agreement between them is found.

  20. Polarized properties of the directional-hemispherical reflectance and emissivity of an opaque surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Richard A.

    1992-12-01

    The measurement of temperature of the earth's surface from space is an important remote sensing parameter and depends upon the surface emissivity. Directional-hemispherical emissivities have been measured for several different soil samples with 10 micrometers CO2 laser radiation. The CO2 laser is a possible polarized source for active remote sensing. The angular variation of the directional-hemispherical emissivity has been calculated from directional reflectance measurements for horizontal and vertical polarized CO2 radiation on different soil samples and they depended upon the polarization of the incident light. In this paper it is demonstrated that the directional-hemispherical reflectance, absorbance, and emissivity are 4 X 4 Mueller matrices. For uniform incident radiance of definite state of polarization incident on an area dA' within a projected solid angle d(Omega) ' equals Cos(Theta) 'd(omega) ' at angles ((Theta) ', (phi) ') Kirchhoff's formula relating the emissivity and reflectance involves definite sums and/or differences of Mueller matrix components of the reflectance and emissivity and depends on the polarization of the incident light. The directional-hemispherical emissivity of opaque soil samples are polarization dependent.

  1. Accounting for surface reflectance in the derivation of vertical column densities of NO2 from airborne imaging DOAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Andreas Carlos; Schönhardt, Anja; Richter, Andreas; Bösch, Tim; Seyler, André; Constantin, Daniel Eduard; Shaiganfar, Reza; Merlaud, Alexis; Ruhtz, Thomas; Wagner, Thomas; van Roozendael, Michel; Burrows, John. P.

    2016-04-01

    the derivation of air mass factors used to convert the measurements into vertical columns. Due to the high-resolution measurements, no data product of surface reflectance with sufficient spatial resolution is available. Thus the surface reflectance is estimated from AirMAP's own spectra. In this work the results of the research flights will be presented. The study focuses on the validation of AirMAP's measurements by comparison to other ground-based platforms like (mobile) MAX-DOAS measurements. Conclusions will be drawn on the quality of the measurements, their applicability for satellite data validation and possible improvements for future measurements.

  2. Mapping of permafrost surface using ground-penetrating radar at Kangerlussuaq Airport, western Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders Stuhr; Andreasen, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Kangerlussuaq Airport is located at 67°N and 51°W in the zone of continuous permafrost in western Greenland. Its proximity to the Greenlandic ice sheet results in a dry sub-arctic climate with a mean annual temperature of −5.7 °C. The airport is built on a river terrace mostly consisting of fluvial...... deposits overlying fine-grained marine melt-water sediments and bedrock. A ground-penetrating radar (GPR) survey was performed to study the frozen surface beneath the airfield. The measurements were carried out in late July 2005 on the southern parking area in Kangerlussuaq Airport. Five years earlier...

  3. Influence of geology on arsenic concentrations in ground and surface water in central Lesvos, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloupi, Maria; Angelidis, Michael O; Gavriil, Apostolos M; Koulousaris, Michael; Varnavas, Soterios P

    2009-04-01

    The occurrence of As was studied in groundwater used for human consumption and irrigation, in stream water and sediments and in water from thermal springs in the drainage basin of Kalloni Gulf, island of Lesvos, Greece, in order to investigate the potential influence of the geothermal field of Polichnitos-Lisvori on the ground and surface water systems of the area. Total dissolved As varied in the range geology exerts a determinant influence on As geochemical behaviour. On the other hand, the geothermal activity manifested in the area of Polichnitos-Lisvori does not affect the presence of As in groundwater and streams.

  4. Asymmetric Rock Pressure on Shallow Tunnel in Strata with Inclined Ground Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xiao-jun; YANG Chang-yu

    2007-01-01

    By building a tunnel model with a semi-circular crown, the asymmetric rock pressure applied to the shallow tunnel in strata with inclined ground surface is analyzed. Formulae, which not only include the parameters related to both tunnel structure and surrounding rock mass, but the overburden depth, are developed. The computation for four tunnel models show that the method presented is feasible and convenient. Furthermore, the influence of the overburden depth on the rock pressure is elaborated, and the criterion to identify the deep or shallow tunnels is formulated as well.

  5. Transitioning MODIS to VIIRS observations for Land: Surface Reflectance results, Status and Long-term Prospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermote, E.

    2015-12-01

    Surface reflectance is one of the key products from VIIRS and as with MODIS, is used in developing several higher-order land products. The VIIRS Surface Reflectance (SR) IP is based on the heritage MODIS Collection 5 product (Vermote et al. 2002). The quality and character of surface reflectance depends on the accuracy of the VIIRS Cloud Mask (VCM) and aerosol algorithms and of course on the adequate calibration of the sensor. Early evaluation of the VIIRS SR product in the context of the maturity of the operational processing system known as the Interface Data Processing System (IDPS), has been a major focus of work to-date, but is now evolving into the development of a VIIRS suite of Climate Data Records produced by the NASA Land Science Investigator Processing System (SIPS). We will present the calibration performance and the role of the surface reflectance in calibration monitoring, the performance of the cloud mask with a focus on vegetation monitoring (no snow conditions), the performance of the aerosol input used in the atmospheric correction with quantitative results of the performance of the SR product over AERONET sites. Based on those elements and further assessment, we will address the readiness of the SR product for the production of higher-order land products such as Vegetation Indices, Albedo and LAI/FPAR, the its application to agricultural monitoring and in particular the integration of VIIRS data into the global agricultural monitoring (GLAM) system developed at UMd. Finally from the lessons learned, we will articulate a set of critical recommendations to ensure consistency and continuity of the JPSS mission with the MODIS data record.

  6. Combined analysis of surface reflection imaging and vertical seismic profiling at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daley, T.M.; Majer, E.L.; Karageorgi, E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

    1994-08-01

    This report presents results from surface and borehole seismic profiling performed by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) on Yucca Mountain. This work was performed as part of the site characterization effort for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository. Their objective was to provide seismic imaging from the near surface (200 to 300 ft. depth) to the repository horizon and below, if possible. Among the issues addressed by this seismic imaging work are location and depth of fracturing and faulting, geologic identification of reflecting horizons, and spatial continuity of reflecting horizons. The authors believe their results are generally positive, with tome specific successes. This was the first attempt at this scale using modem seismic imaging techniques to determine geologic features on Yucca Mountain. The principle purpose of this report is to present the interpretation of the seismic reflection section in a geologic context. Three surface reflection profiles were acquired and processed as part of this study. Because of environmental concerns, all three lines were on preexisting roads. Line 1 crossed the mapped surface trace of the Ghost Dance fault and it was intended to study the dip and depth extent of the fault system. Line 2 was acquired along Drill Hole wash and was intended to help the ESF north ramp design activities. Line 3 was acquired along Yucca Crest and was designed to image geologic horizons which were thought to be less faulted along the ridge. Unfortunately, line 3 proved to have poor data quality, in part because of winds, poor field conditions and limited time. Their processing and interpretation efforts were focused on lines 1 and 2 and their associated VSP studies.

  7. Development of Regional TSS Algorithm over Penang using Modis Terra (250 M) Surface Reflectance Product

    OpenAIRE

    Amin Abd Rahman Mat; Abdullah Khiruddin; Lim Hwee San; Embong Muhd Fauzi; Ahmad Fadhli; Yaacob Rosnan

    2016-01-01

    Total suspended sediment (TSS) plays a significant role in the environment. Many researchers show that TSS has a high correlation with the red portion of the visible light spectrum. The correlation is highly dependent on geography of the study area. The aim of this study was to develop specific algorithms utilizing corrected MODIS Terra 250-m surface reflectance (Rrs) product (MOD09) to map TSS over the Penang coastal area. Field measurements of TSS were performed during two cruise trips that...

  8. Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Wind of Hurricane Michael by GPS Reflected Signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the propagating geometry and the waveform of the GPS reflected signals are expatiated in detail. Furthermore, the principle and the method of retrieving sea surface wind are presented. In order to test the feasibility of retrieval, the experiment data obtained by NASA in Hurricane Michael are used. The result shows that the retrieval accuracy of wind speed is about 2 m/s.

  9. Measuring the specific surface area of wet snow using 1310 nm reflectance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-C. Gallet

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The specific surface area (SSA of snow can be used as an objective measurement of grain size and is therefore a central variable to describe snow physical properties such as albedo. Snow SSA can now be easily measured in the field using optical methods based on infrared reflectance. However, existing optical methods have only been validated for dry snow. Here we test the possibility to use the DUFISSS instrument, based on the measurement of the 1310 nm reflectance of snow with an integrating sphere, to measure the SSA of wet snow. We perform cold room experiments where we measure the SSA of a wet snow sample, freeze it and measure it again, to quantify the difference in reflectance between frozen and wet snow. We study snow samples in the SSA range 12–37 m2 kg−1 and in the mass liquid water content range 5–32%. We conclude that the SSA of wet snow can be obtained from the measurement of its 1310 nm reflectance using three simple steps. In most cases, the SSA thus obtained is less than 10% different from the value that would have been obtained if the sample had been considered dry, so that the three simple steps constitute a minor correction. We also run two optical models to interpret the results, but no model reproduces correctly the water-ice distribution in wet snow, so that their predictions of wet snow reflectance are imperfect.

  10. Near-surface sensitivity suppression way for diffuse reflective optical tomography: simulation and a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Keiko; Fujii, Mamiko

    2007-07-01

    Diffuse reflective optical measurement is a useful approach for monitoring the oxygen consumption of living tissue such as brain and muscle. To improve the oxygen consumption measurement accuracy, we propose a method for suppressing the near-surface sensitivity. Diffuse reflective light is detected at the aperture used for irradiating the light and is used as a cancellation signal for near-field sensitivity in the conventional measurement scheme. Photon fluence density functions and positional dependences of detected light sensitivity to change in absorbance were simulated. The sensitivity detected at the same position (aperture) as irradiation was significantly high for the near-surface region. With our method, the near-surface sensitivity is reduced by more than 90% while keeping target sensitivity almost constant (only 3% deterioration). The near-surface and deep-field sensitivity was measured with a phantom with light (785 nm) modulated at 1 kHz through an optical fiber bundle. It confirmed suppressed the near-surface sensitivity by subtracting the light detected at the same aperture from the light detected at another aperture.

  11. Formation of reflective and conductive silver film on ABS surface via covalent grafting and solution spray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dexin; Zhang, Yan [School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, South China University of Technology, 381 Wushan, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Bessho, Takeshi [Higashifuji Technical Center, Toyota Motor Corporation, 1200 Mishuku, Susono, Shizuoka 410-1193 (Japan); Kudo, Takahiro; Sang, Jing; Hirahara, Hidetoshi; Mori, Kunio [Faculty of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Kang, Zhixin, E-mail: zxkang@scut.edu.cn [School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, South China University of Technology, 381 Wushan, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A pure and homogenous silver film was deposited by spray-style plating technique. • The mechanism of covalent bonding between coating and substrate was studied. • The silver coating is highly reflective and conductive. • UV light was used to activate the ABS surface with triazine azide derivative. - Abstract: Conductive and reflective silver layers on acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) plastics have been prepared by photo grafting of triazine azides upon ultraviolet activation, self-assembling of triazine dithiols and silver electroless plating by solution spray based on silver mirror reaction. The as-prepared silver film exhibited excellent adhesion with ABS owing to covalent bonds between coating and substrate, and the detailed bonding mechanism have been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). X-ray diffraction (XRD) result revealed that silver film on ABS was pure and with a nanocrystalline structure. Atomic force microscope (AFM) analysis demonstrated that massive silver particles with sizes varying from 80 to 120 nm were deposited on ABS and formed a homogenous and smooth coating, resulting in highly reflective surface. Furthermore, silver maintained its unique conductivity even as film on ABS surface in term of four-point probe method.

  12. Estimating Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity from Surface Ground-Penetrating Radar Monitoring of Infiltration

    CERN Document Server

    Léger, Emmanuel; Coquet, Yves

    2013-01-01

    In this study we used Hydrus-1D to simulate water infiltration from a ring infiltrometer. We generated water content profiles at each time step of infiltration, based on a particular value of the saturated hydraulic conductivity while knowing the other van Genuchten parameters. Water content profiles were converted to dielectric permittivity profiles using the Complex Refractive Index Method relation. We then used the GprMax suite of programs to generate radargrams and to follow the wetting front using arrival time of electromagnetic waves recorded by a Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR). Theoretically, the depth of the inflection point of the water content profile simulated at any infiltration time step is related to the peak of the reflected amplitude recorded in the corresponding trace in the radargram. We used this relationship to invert the saturated hydraulic conductivity for constant and falling head infiltrations. We present our method on synthetic examples and on two experiments carried out on sand. We f...

  13. Ground-state charge transfer as a mechanism for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippitsch, Max E.

    1984-03-01

    A model is presented for the contribution of ground-state charge transfer between a metal and adsorbate to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). It is shown that this contribution can be understood using the vibronic theory for calculating Raman intensities. The enhancement is due to vibronic coupling of the molecular ground state to the metal states, the coupling mechanism being a modulation of the ground-state charge-transfer energy by the molecular vibrations. An analysis of the coupling operator gives the selection rules for this process, which turn out to be dependent on the overall symmetry of the adsorbate-metal system, even if the charge transfer is small enough for the symmetry of the adsorbate to remain the same as that of the free molecule. It is shown that the model can yield predictions on the properties of SERS, e.g., specificity to adsorption geometry, appearance of forbidden bands, dependence on the applied potential, and dependence on the excitation wavelength. The predictions are in good agreement with experimental results. It is also deduced from this model that in many cases atomic-scale roughness is a prerequisite for the observation of SERS. A result on the magnitude of the enhancement can only be given in a crude approximation. Although in most cases an additional electromagnetic enhancement seems to be necessary to give an observable signal, this charge-transfer mechanism should be important in many SERS systems.

  14. Surface Signature Characterization at SPE through Ground-Proximal Methods: Methodology Change and Technical Justification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-09

    A portion of LANL’s FY15 SPE objectives includes initial ground-based or ground-proximal investigations at the SPE Phase 2 site. The area of interest is the U2ez location in Yucca Flat. This collection serves as a baseline for discrimination of surface features and acquisition of topographic signatures prior to any development or pre-shot activities associated with SPE Phase 2. Our team originally intended to perform our field investigations using previously vetted ground-based (GB) LIDAR methodologies. However, the extended proposed time frame of the GB LIDAR data collection, and associated data processing time and delivery date, were unacceptable. After technical consultation and careful literature research, LANL identified an alternative methodology to achieve our technical objectives and fully support critical model parameterization. Very-low-altitude unmanned aerial systems (UAS) photogrammetry appeared to satisfy our objectives in lieu of GB LIDAR. The SPE Phase 2 baseline collection was used as a test of this UAS photogrammetric methodology.

  15. Surface geophysical methods for characterising frozen ground in transitional permafrost landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Martin; Campbell, Seth; Nolan, Jay; Walvoord, Michelle Ann; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Lane, John

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of shallow frozen ground is paramount to research in cold regions, and is subject to temporal and spatial changes influenced by climate, landscape disturbance and ecosystem succession. Remote sensing from airborne and satellite platforms is increasing our understanding of landscape-scale permafrost distribution, but typically lacks the resolution to characterise finer-scale processes and phenomena, which are better captured by integrated surface geophysical methods. Here, we demonstrate the use of electrical resistivity imaging (ERI), electromagnetic induction (EMI), ground penetrating radar (GPR) and infrared imaging over multiple summer field seasons around the highly dynamic Twelvemile Lake, Yukon Flats, central Alaska, USA. Twelvemile Lake has generally receded in the past 30 yr, allowing permafrost aggradation in the receded margins, resulting in a mosaic of transient frozen ground adjacent to thick, older permafrost outside the original lakebed. ERI and EMI best evaluated the thickness of shallow, thin permafrost aggradation, which was not clear from frost probing or GPR surveys. GPR most precisely estimated the depth of the active layer, which forward electrical resistivity modelling indicated to be a difficult target for electrical methods, but could be more tractable in time-lapse mode. Infrared imaging of freshly dug soil pit walls captured active-layer thermal gradients at unprecedented resolution, which may be useful in calibrating emerging numerical models. GPR and EMI were able to cover landscape scales (several kilometres) efficiently, and new analysis software showcased here yields calibrated EMI data that reveal the complicated distribution of shallow permafrost in a transitional landscape.

  16. Quality of surface and ground waters, Yakima Indian Reservation, Washington, 1973-74

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fretwell, M.O.

    1977-01-01

    This report describes the quality of the surface and ground waters of the Yakima Indian Reservation in south-central Washington, during the period November 1973-October 1974. The average dissolved-solids concentrations ranged from 48 to 116 mg/L (milligrams per liter) in the mountain streams, and from 88 to 372 mg/L in the lowland streams, drains, and a canal. All the mountain streams contain soft water (classified as 0-60 mg/L hardness as CaC03), and the lowland streams, drains, and canal contain soft to very hard water (more than 180 mg/L hardness as CaC03). The water is generally of suitable quality for irrigation, and neither salinity nor sodium hazards are a problem in waters from any of the streams studied. The specific conductance of water from the major aquifers ranged from 20 to 1 ,540 micromhos. Ground water was most dilute in mineral content in the Klickitat River basin and most concentrated in part of the Satus Creek basin. The ground water in the Satus Creek basin with the most concentrated mineral content also contained the highest percentage composition of sulfate, chloride, and nitrate. For drinking water, the nitrate-nitrogen concentrations exceeded the U.S. Public Health Service 's recommended limit of 10 mg/L over an area of several square miles, with a maximum observed concentration of 170 mg/L. (Woodard-USGS).

  17. The influence of critical Moho Reflections on strong ground motions recorded in San Francisco and Oakland during the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Paul; Yoshimura, Joanne

    1990-07-01

    The amplitudes of strong ground motions from the Loma Prieta earthquake recorded in the San Francisco and Oakland areas exceeded the levels predicted by standard empirical attenuation relations. Preliminary analysis of accelerograms having known trigger times strongly suggests that the elevation of ground motion amplitudes in the distance range of approximately 40 to 100 km was due to critical reflections from the base of the crust. These reflections, which are identified on the basis of their arrival times and phase velocity, and by comparison with simulated accelerograms, were large and occurred at relatively close range because of the deep focal depth of the earthquake and the strong velocity gradient at the base of the crust. These motions were further amplified, presumably by impedance contrast effects, at soft soil sites in San Francisco and Oakland. The effect of the critical reflections in amplifying peak accelerations of the Loma Prieta earthquake in the San Francisco and Oakland regions was as large as the effect of soft soil site conditions. Focal depth has an important influence on strong motion attenuation at distances beyond about 40 km, and empirical attenuation relations derived from shallow crustal earthquakes may underpredict the ground motions of deeper crustal events in this distance range. Further analyses using an expanded data base that includes recordings of aftershocks are required to rigorously test the proposed explanation of the ground motions recorded in San Francisco and Oakland, and the conclusions drawn from that explanation.

  18. Surface Compositional Units on Mercury from Spectral Reflectance at Ultraviolet to Near-infrared Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izenberg, N. R.; Holsclaw, G. M.; Domingue, D. L.; McClintock, W. E.; Klima, R. L.; Blewett, D. T.; Helbert, J.; Head, J. W.; Sprague, A. L.; Vilas, F.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has been acquiring reflectance spectra of Mercury's surface for over 16 months. The Visible and Infrared Spectrograph (VIRS) component of MASCS has accumulated a global data set of more than 2 million spectra over the wavelength range 300-1450 nm. We have derived a set of VIRS spectral units (VSUs) from the following spectral parameters: visible brightness (R575: reflectance at 575 nm); visible/near-infrared reflectance ratio (VISr: reflectance at 415 nm to that at 750 nm); and ultraviolet reflectance ratio (UVr: reflectance at 310 nm to that at 390 nm). Five broad, slightly overlapping VSUs may be distinguished from these parameters. "Average VSU" areas have spectral parameters close to mean global values. "Dark blue VSU" areas have spectra with low R575 and high UVr. "Red VSU" areas have spectra with low UVr and higher VISr and R575 than average. "Intermediate VSU" areas have spectra with higher VISr than VSU red, generally higher R575, and a wide range of UVr. "Bright VSU" areas have high R575 and VISr and intermediate UVr. Several units defined by morphological or multispectral criteria correspond to specific VSUs, including low-reflectance material (dark blue VSU), pyroclastic deposits (red VSU), and hollows (intermediate VSU), but these VSUs generally include other types of areas as well. VSU definitions are complementary to those obtained by unsupervised clustering analysis. The global distribution of VIRS spectral units provides new information on Mercury's geological evolution. Much of Mercury's northern volcanic plains show spectral properties ranging from those of average VSU to those of red VSU, as does a large region in the southern hemisphere centered near 50°S, 245°E. Dark blue VSU material is widely distributed, with concentrations south of the northern plains, around the Rembrandt and

  19. Mechanism and bounding of earthquake energy input to building structure on surface ground subjected to engineering bedrock motion

    OpenAIRE

    Kojima, K; Sakaguchi, K; Takewaki, I.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of earthquake energy input to building structures is clarified by considering the surface ground amplification and soil–structure interaction. The earthquake input energies to superstructures, soil–foundation systems and total swaying–rocking system are obtained by taking the corresponding appropriate free bodies into account and defining the energy transfer functions. It has been made clear that, when the ground surface motion is white, the input energy to the swaying–rocking m...

  20. Data Service Platform for Sentinel-2 Surface Reflectance and Value-Added Products: System Use and Examples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Vuolo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This technical note presents the first Sentinel-2 data service platform for obtaining atmospherically-corrected images and generating the corresponding value-added products for any land surface on Earth (http://s2.boku.eodc.eu/. Using the European Space Agency’s (ESA Sen2Cor algorithm, the platform processes ESA’s Level-1C top-of-atmosphere reflectance to atmospherically-corrected bottom-of-atmosphere (BoA reflectance (Level-2A. The processing runs on-demand, with a global coverage, on the Earth Observation Data Centre (EODC, which is a public-private collaborative IT infrastructure in Vienna (Austria for archiving, processing, and distributing Earth observation (EO data (http://www.eodc.eu. Using the data service platform, users can submit processing requests and access the results via a user-friendly web page or using a dedicated application programming interface (API. Building on the processed Level-2A data, the platform also creates value-added products with a particular focus on agricultural vegetation monitoring, such as leaf area index (LAI and broadband hemispherical-directional reflectance factor (HDRF. An analysis of the performance of the data service platform, along with processing capacity, is presented. Some preliminary consistency checks of the algorithm implementation are included to demonstrate the expected product quality. In particular, Sentinel-2 data were compared to atmospherically-corrected Landsat-8 data for six test sites achieving a R2 = 0.90 and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE = 0.031. LAI was validated for one test site using ground estimations. Results show a very good agreement (R2 = 0.83 and a RMSE of 0.32 m2/m2 (12% of mean value.

  1. Modeling surface and ground water mixing in the hyporheic zone using MODFLOW and MT3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautz, Laura K.; Siegel, Donald I.

    2006-11-01

    We used a three-dimensional MODFLOW model, paired with MT3D, to simulate hyporheic zones around debris dams and meanders along a semi-arid stream. MT3D simulates both advective transport and sink/source mixing of solutes, in contrast to particle tracking (e.g. MODPATH), which only considers advection. We delineated the hydrochemically active hyporheic zone based on a new definition, specifically as near-stream subsurface zones receiving a minimum of 10% surface water within a 10-day travel time. Modeling results indicate that movement of surface water into the hyporheic zone is predominantly an advective process. We show that debris dams are a key driver of surface water into the subsurface along the experimental reach, causing the largest flux rates of water across the streambed and creating hyporheic zones with up to twice the cross-sectional area of other hyporheic zones. Hyporheic exchange was also found in highly sinuous segments of the experimental reach, but flux rates are lower and the cross-sectional areas of these zones are generally smaller. Our modeling approach simulated surface and ground water mixing in the hyporheic zone, and thus provides numerical approximations that are more comparable to field-based observations of surface-groundwater exchange than standard particle-tracking simulations.

  2. Modelling the Influence of Ground Surface Relief on Electric Sounding Curves Using the Integral Equations Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balgaisha Mukanova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of electrical sounding of a medium with ground surface relief is modelled using the integral equations method. This numerical method is based on the triangulation of the computational domain, which is adapted to the shape of the relief and the measuring line. The numerical algorithm is tested by comparing the results with the known solution for horizontally layered media with two layers. Calculations are also performed to verify the fulfilment of the “reciprocity principle” for the 4-electrode installations in our numerical model. Simulations are then performed for a two-layered medium with a surface relief. The quantitative influences of the relief, the resistivity ratios of the contacting media, and the depth of the second layer on the apparent resistivity curves are established.

  3. Flux of benzo(a)pyrene to the ground surface and its distribution in the ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milukaite, A. [Institute of Physics, Vilnius (Lithuania)

    1998-07-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BP) has been investigated in bulk atmospheric deposition, moss, needles of pine and some species of vascular plants. At two remote Lithuanian sites, for 1990-1995 the flux of benzo(a)pyrene from the atmosphere to the ground surface varied between 0.3 to 4.8 {mu}g{sup -2} mo{sup -1}. Consequently the territory of Lithuania (65,000 km{sup 2}) yearly was exposed to 624-2574 kg of carcinogen. The distribution of BP in soil and various vascular plant tissues (trifolium tepens, Elitrygea repens, Thymus serpyllum) indicates that benzo(a)pyrene is assimilated by flora. The concentration of BP is different in various organs of vascular plants and mostly depends on the degree of soil pollution. More than 300 samples of moss, mostly Hylocomium spendens and Pleurozium schreberi were analysed for BP. From 3.1 to 896.0 {mu}g kg{sup -1} of BP were measured in the moss samples. The flux of BP to the ground surface correlates well with its concentration in moss. A map of BP flux across Lithuania was created. 20 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Human health impacts of drinking water (surface and ground) pollution Dakahlyia Governorate, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandour, R. A.

    2012-09-01

    This study was done on 30 drinking tap water samples (surface and ground) and 30 urine samples taken from patients who attended some of Dakahlyia governorate hospitals. These patients were complaining of poor-quality tap water in their houses, which was confirmed by this study that drinking water is contaminated with trace elements in some of the studied areas. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the contaminant drinking water (surface and ground) in Dakahlyia governorate and its impact on human health. This study reports the relationship between nickel and hair loss, obviously shown in water and urine samples. Renal failure cases were related to lead and cadmium contaminated drinking water, where compatibilities in results of water and urine samples were observed. Also, liver cirrhosis cases were related to iron-contaminated drinking water. Studies of these diseases suggest that abnormal incidence in specific areas is related to industrial wastes and agricultural activities that have released hazardous and toxic materials in the drinking water and thereby led to its contamination in these areas. We conclude that trace elements should be removed from drinking water for human safety.

  5. Analysis of selected herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribner, E.A.; Thurman, E.M.; Zimmerman, L.R.

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary goals of the US Geological Survey (USGS) Laboratory in Lawrence, Kansas, is to develop analytical methods for the analysis of herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water that are vital to the study of herbicide fate and degradation pathways in the environment. Methods to measure metabolite concentrations from three major classes of herbicides - triazine, chloroacetanilide and phenyl-urea - have been developed. Methods for triazine metabolite detection cover nine compounds: six compounds are detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry; one is detected by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection; and eight are detected by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Two metabolites of the chloroacetanilide herbicides - ethane sulfonic acid and oxanilic acid - are detected by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Alachlor ethane sulfonic acid also has been detected by solid-phase extraction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Six phenylurea metabolites are all detected by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry; four of the six metabolites also are detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Additionally, surveys of herbicides and their metabolites in surface water, ground water, lakes, reservoirs, and rainfall have been conducted through the USGS laboratory in Lawrence. These surveys have been useful in determining herbicide and metabolite occurrence and temporal distribution and have shown that metabolites may be useful in evaluation of non-point-source contamination. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  6. An Algorithm for the Retrieval of 30-m Snow-Free Albedo from Landsat Surface Reflectance and MODIS BRDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Yanmin; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Gao, Feng; Schaaf, Crystal B.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new methodology to generate 30-m resolution land surface albedo using Landsat surface reflectance and anisotropy information from concurrent MODIS 500-m observations. Albedo information at fine spatial resolution is particularly useful for quantifying climate impacts associated with land use change and ecosystem disturbance. The derived white-sky and black-sky spectral albedos maybe used to estimate actual spectral albedos by taking into account the proportion of direct and diffuse solar radiation arriving at the ground. A further spectral-to-broadband conversion based on extensive radiative transfer simulations is applied to produce the broadband albedos at visible, near infrared, and shortwave regimes. The accuracy of this approach has been evaluated using 270 Landsat scenes covering six field stations supported by the SURFace RADiation Budget Network (SURFRAD) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains (ARM/SGP) network. Comparison with field measurements shows that Landsat 30-m snow-free shortwave albedos from all seasons generally achieve an absolute accuracy of +/-0.02 - 0.05 for these validation sites during available clear days in 2003-2005,with a root mean square error less than 0.03 and a bias less than 0.02. This level of accuracy has been regarded as sufficient for driving global and regional climate models. The Landsat-based retrievals have also been compared to the operational 16-day MODIS albedo produced every 8-days from MODIS on Terra and Aqua (MCD43A). The Landsat albedo provides more detailed landscape texture, and achieves better agreement (correlation and dynamic range) with in-situ data at the validation stations, particularly when the stations include a heterogeneous mix of surface covers.

  7. Long-term Datasets of Aerosol and Surface Reflectance from ERS-2, ENVISAT and Sentinel-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, P. R.; Heckel, A.; Davies, W.; Bevan, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    We present results of a new global retrieval of aerosol optical thickness and size distribution from the ESA ATSR instrument series on ERS-2 and ENVISAT (1995-2012), developed under the ESA Aerosol Climate Change Initiative. Further testing of a new algorithm developed for Sentinel-3, with planned operation 2013-2030 is also discussed. The ATSR series instruments on ERS-2 and ENVISAT together provide one of the longest available, well-calibrated datasets of satellite radiance measurements. The dual-angle viewing capability gives two near-simultaneous images at differing slant paths though the atmosphere, allowing global retrieval of aerosol optical thickness without assumptions on surface spectral properties. We present the global ATSR time series and analysis of trends, and give comparison with AERONET and with MODIS and MISR global datasets. The algorithm has been developed for application to Sentinel-3 to make use of synergistic retrieval from two sensors, OLCI and SLSTR. The research explores the gain by using information from both instruments simultaneously to constrain atmospheric profile, characterise cloud, and provide improved atmospheric correction to surface reflectance. The algorithm has been implemented on the ESA BEAM system and tested on MERIS and AATSR data, and compared with existing algorithms. The retrieval also forms the basis of simultaneous estimation surface reflectance corrected for atmospheric scattering, which underpins retrieval of albedo and other surface properties in the ESA GLobAlbedo and SEN4LST projects.

  8. [The research of the relationship between snow properties and the bidirectional polarized reflectance from snow surface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhong-Qiu; Wu, Zheng-Fang; Zhao, Yun-Sheng

    2014-10-01

    In the context of remote sensing, the reflectance of snow is a key factor for accurate inversion for snow properties, such as snow grain size, albedo, because of it is influenced by the change of snow properties. The polarized reflectance is a general phenomenon during the reflected progress in natural incident light In this paper, based on the correct measurements for the multiple-angle reflected property of snow field in visible and near infrared wavelength (from 350 to 2,500 nm), the influence of snow grain size and wet snow on the bidirectional polarized property of snow was measured and analyzed. Combining the results measured in the field and previous conclusions confirms that the relation between polarization and snow grain size is obvious in infrared wavelength (at about 1,500 nm), which means the degree of polarization increasing with an increase of snow grain size in the forward scattering direction, it is because the strong absorption of ice near 1,500 nm leads to the single scattering light contributes to the reflection information obtained by the sensor; in other word, the larger grain size, the more absorption accompanying the larger polarization in forward scattering direction; we can illustrate that the change from dry snow to wet snow also influences the polarization property of snow, because of the water on the surface of snow particle adheres the adjacent particles, that means the wet snow grain size is larger than the dry snow grain size. Therefore, combining the multiple-angle polarization with reflectance will provide solid method and theoretical basis for inversion of snow properties.

  9. Reflection mode X-ray absorption spectroscopy: new applications in surface science research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luetzenkirchen-Hecht, Dirk [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik und Institut fuer Materialwissenschaften, Fachbereich C-Physik, Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Gaussstr. 20, D-42097 Wuppertal (Germany)]. E-mail: dirklh@uni-wuppertal.de; Frahm, Ronald [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik und Institut fuer Materialwissenschaften, Fachbereich C-Physik, Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Gaussstr. 20, D-42097 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2005-02-28

    Reflection mode grazing incidence X-ray absorption spectroscopy (GIXAFS) was applied for the in situ investigation of solid/liquid interfaces. Results obtained during the active dissolution of metals are presented. In the case of silver in neutral or weakly acidic Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions (pH 6.5), the formation of an Ag-O species at the surface of the Ag-electrode can be proven, i.e. the active dissolution proceeds via a non-protecting surface layer, the thickness of which was estimated to be about 5 nm. The atomic short-range order of this surface layer is different from polycrystalline silver oxides (Ag{sub 2}O and AgO) and relates to a more disordered or amorphous Ag{sup 1+} oxide.

  10. Seasonal Influences on Ground-Surface Water Interactions in an Arsenic-Affected Aquifer in Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, L. A.; Magnone, D.; Van Dongen, B.; Bryant, C.; Boyce, A.; Ballentine, C. J.; Polya, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Millions of people in South and Southeast Asia consume drinking water daily which contains dangerous levels of arsenic exceeding health-based recommendations [1]. A key control on arsenic mobilization in aquifers in these areas has been controversially identified as the interaction of 'labile' organic matter contained in surface waters with groundwaters and sediments at depth [2-4], which may trigger the release of arsenic from the solid- to aqueous-phase via reductive dissolution of iron-(hyr)oxide minerals [5]. In a field site in Kandal Province, Cambodia, which is an arsenic-affected area typical to others in the region, there are strong seasonal patterns in groundwater flow direction, which are closely related to monsoonal rains [6] and may contribute to arsenic release in this aquifer. The aim of this study is to explore the implications of the high susceptibility of this aquifer system to seasonal changes on potential ground-surface water interactions. The main objectives are to (i) identify key zones where there are likely ground-surface water interactions, (ii) assess the seasonal impact of such interactions and (iii) quantify the influence of interactions using geochemical parameters (such as As, Fe, NO3, NH4, 14C, 3T/3He, δ18O, δ2H). Identifying the zones, magnitude and seasonal influence of ground-surface water interactions elucidates new information regarding potential locations/pathways of arsenic mobilization and/or transport in affected aquifers and may be important for water management strategies in affected areas. This research is supported by NERC (NE/J023833/1) to DP, BvD and CJB and a NERC PhD studentship (NE/L501591/1) to DM. References: [1] World Health Organization, 2008. [2] Charlet & Polya (2006), Elements, 2, 91-96. [3] Harvey et al. (2002), Science, 298, 1602-1606. [4] Lawson et al. (2013), Env. Sci. Technol. 47, 7085 - 7094. [5] Islam et al. (2004), Nature, 430, 68-71. [6] Benner et al. (2008) Appl. Geochem. 23(11), 3072 - 3087.

  11. Imaging of complex basin structures with the common reflection surface (CRS) stack method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menyoli, Elive; Gajewski, Dirk; Hübscher, Christian

    2004-06-01

    Common reflection surface (CRS) stack technology is applied to seismic data from certain areas of the Donbas Foldbelt, Ukraine, after conventional seismic methods gave unsatisfactory results. On the conventionally processed post-stack migrated section the areas of interest already showed clear features of the basin structure, but reflector continuity and image quality were poor. It was our objective to improve the image quality in these areas to better support the geological interpretation and the model building. In contrast to the standard common mid-point (CMP) stack, in which a stacking trajectory is used, the CRS method transforms pre-processed multicoverage data into a zero-offset section by summing along stacking surfaces. The stacking operator is an approximation of the reflection response of a curved interface in an inhomogeneous medium. The primary advantage of the data-driven CRS stack method is its model independence and the enhancement of the signal-to-noise ratio of the stacked sections through a stacking reflection response along traces from more than one CMP gather. The presented results show that the multifold strength of the CRS stack is of particular advantage in the case of complex inverted features of Devonian-Carboniferous sediments in the Donbas Foldbelt data. We observe that in these areas where the confidence level for picking and interpretation of the stacking velocity model is low, imaging without a macrovelocity model gives improved results, because errors due to wrong or poor stacking velocity models are avoided.

  12. The Normalization of Surface Anisotropy Effects Present in SEVIRI Reflectances by Using the MODIS BRDF Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proud, Simon Richard; Zhang, Qingling; Schaaf, Crystal; Fensholt, Rasmus; Rasmussen, Mads Olander; Shisanya, Chris; Mutero, Wycliffe; Mbow, Cheikh; Anyamba, Assaf; Pak, Ed; Sandholt, Inge

    2014-01-01

    A modified version of the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) algorithm is presented for use in the angular normalization of surface reflectance data gathered by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) aboard the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites. We present early and provisional daily nadir BRDFadjusted reflectance (NBAR) data in the visible and near-infrared MSG channels. These utilize the high temporal resolution of MSG to produce BRDF retrievals with a greatly reduced acquisition period than the comparable MODIS products while, at the same time, removing many of the angular perturbations present within the original MSG data. The NBAR data are validated against reflectance data from the MODIS instrument and in situ data gathered at a field location in Africa throughout 2008. It is found that the MSG retrievals are stable and are of high-quality across much of the SEVIRI disk while maintaining a higher temporal resolution than the MODIS BRDF products. However, a number of circumstances are discovered whereby the BRDF model is unable to function correctly with the SEVIRI observations-primarily because of an insufficient spread of angular data due to the fixed sensor location or localized cloud contamination.

  13. The influence of surface reflectance anisotropy on estimation of soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomeus, Harm; Roosjen, Peter; Clevers, Jan

    2014-05-01

    The spatial variation in soil properties is an important factor for agricultural management. Unmanned airborne vehicles (UAV's) equipped with a hyperspectral mapping system may provide these data, but anisotropic reflectance effects may have an influence on the derived soil properties. Besides influencing the reflectance, angular observations may deliver added information about soil properties. We investigated the anisotropic behavior of 59 soil samples with a large variation in soil composition, by measuring their reflectance (350-2500 nm) over 92 different angles using a robot-based laboratory goniometer system. The results show that the anisotropic behavior of the soils influences the measured reflectance significantly, which limits the accurate prediction of soil properties (OM and clay especially). However, prediction accuracies of OM increase when spectra are measured under specific angles. Prediction accuracies further increase when a combination of observation angles is being used. Apart from that, using UAV's the wavelength range is limited to about 1000 nm. In general, this will decrease the model performance, but our results show that this effect can largely be compensated by combining multiple observation angles. Altogether, we demonstrate that surface anisotropy influences the prediction of soil properties negatively. This effect can be reduced by combining spectra acquired under different angles. Moreover, predictions can be improved if combinations of different observation angles are used.

  14. Reflectance spectroscopy of natural organic solids, iron sulfides and their mixtures as refractory analogues for Rosetta/VIRTIS' surface composition analysis of 67P/CG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Lyuba V.; Markus, Kathrin; Arnold, Gabriele; Henckel, Daniela; Kappel, David; Schade, Ulrich; Rousseau, Batiste; Quirico, Eric; Schmitt, Bernard; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; Filacchione, Gianrico; Érard, Stéphane; Leyrat, Cedric; VIRTIS Team

    2016-10-01

    Analysis of 0.25-5 µm reflectance spectra provided by the Visible and InfraRed Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS) onboard Rosetta orbiter revealed that the surface of 67P/CG is dark from the near-UV to the IR and is enriched in refractory phases such as organic and opaque components. The broadness and complexity of the ubiquitous absorption feature around 3.2 µm suggest a variety of cometary organic constituents. For example, complex hydrocarbons (aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic) can contribute to the feature between 3.3 and 3.5 µm and to the low reflectance of the surface in the visible. Here we present the 0.25-5 µm reflectance spectra of well-characterized terrestrial hydrocarbon materials (solid oil bitumens, coals) and discuss their relevance as spectral analogues for a hydrocarbon part of 67P/CG's complex organics. However, the expected low degree of thermal processing of cometary hydrocarbons (high (H+O+N+S)/C ratios and low carbon aromaticities) suggests high IR reflectance, intense 3.3-3.5 µm absorption bands and steep red IR slopes that are not observed in the VIRTIS spectra. Fine-grained opaque refractory phases (e.g., iron sulfides, Fe-Ni alloys) intimately mixed with other surface components are likely responsible for the low IR reflectance and low intensities of absorption bands in the VIRTIS spectra of the 67P/CG surface. In particular, iron sulfides are common constituents of cometary dust, "cometary" chondritic IDPs, and efficient darkening agents in primitive carbonaceous chondrites. Their effect on reflectance spectra of an intimate mixture is strongly affected by grain size. We report and discuss the 0.25-5 µm reflectance spectra of iron sulfides (meteoritic troilite and several terrestrial pyrrhotites) ground and sieved to various particle sizes. In addition, we present reflectance spectra of several intimate mixtures of powdered iron sulfides and solid oil bitumens. Based on the reported laboratory data, we discuss the ability of

  15. Surface-Water and Ground-Water Interactions in the Central Everglades, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Judson W.; Newlin, Jessica T.; Krest, James M.; Choi, Jungyill; Nemeth, Eric A.; Krupa, Steven L.

    2004-01-01

    Recharge and discharge are hydrological processes that cause Everglades surface water to be exchanged for subsurface water in the peat soil and the underlying sand and limestone aquifer. These interactions are thought to be important to water budgets, water quality, and ecology in the Everglades. Nonetheless, relatively few studies of surface water and ground water interactions have been conducted in the Everglades, especially in its vast interior areas. This report is a product of a cooperative investigation conducted by the USGS and the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) aimed at developing and testing techniques that would provide reliable estimates of recharge and discharge in interior areas of WCA-2A (Water Conservation Area 2A) and several other sites in the central Everglades. The new techniques quantified flow from surface water to the subsurface (recharge) and the opposite (discharge) using (1) Darcy-flux calculations based on measured vertical gradients in hydraulic head and hydraulic conductivity of peat; (2) modeling transport through peat and decay of the naturally occurring isotopes 224Ra and 223Ra (with half-lives of 4 and 11 days, respectively); and (3) modeling transport and decay of naturally occurring and 'bomb-pulse' tritium (half-life of 12.4 years) in ground water. Advantages and disadvantages of each method for quantifying recharge and discharge were compared. In addition, spatial and temporal variability of recharge and discharge were evaluated and controlling factors identified. A final goal was to develop appropriately simplified (that is, time averaged) expressions of the results that will be useful in addressing a broad range of hydrological and ecological problems in the Everglades. Results were compared with existing information about water budgets from the South Florida Water Management Model (SFWMM), a principal tool used by the South Florida Water Management District to plan many of the hydrological aspects of the

  16. Recent Developments in the X-Ray Reflectivity Analysis for Rough Surfaces and Interfaces of Multilayered Thin Film Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshikazu Fujii

    2013-01-01

    X-ray reflectometry is a powerful tool for investigations on rough surface and interface structures of multilayered thin film materials. The X-ray reflectivity has been calculated based on the Parratt formalism, accounting for the effect of roughness by the theory of Nevot-Croce conventionally. However, in previous studies, the calculations of the X-ray reflectivity often show a strange effect where interference effects would increase at a rough surface. And estimated surface and interface ro...

  17. Martian Surface Temperature and Spectral Response from the MSL REMS Ground Temperature Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Torres, Javier; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Zorzano, María-Paz; Serrano, María; Mendaza, Teresa; Hamilton, Vicky; Sebastián, Eduardo; Armiens, Carlos; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; REMS Team

    2013-04-01

    The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) offers the opportunity to explore the near surface atmospheric conditions and, in particular will shed new light into the heat budget of the Martian surface. This is important for studies of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), as the ground and air temperatures measured directly by REMS control the coupling of the atmosphere with the surface [Zurek et al., 1992]. This coupling is driven by solar insolation. The ABL plays an important role in the general circulation and the local atmospheric dynamics of Mars. One of the REMS sensors, the ground temperature sensor (GTS), provides the data needed to study the thermal inertia properties of the regolith and rocks beneath the MSL rover. The GTS includes thermopile detectors, with infrared bands of 8-14 µm and 16-20 µm [Gómez-Elvira et al., 2012]. These sensors are clustered in a single location on the MSL mast and the 8-14 µm thermopile sounds the surface temperature. The infrared radiation reaching the thermopile is proportional to the emissivity of the surface minerals across these thermal wavelengths. We have developed a radiative transfer retrieval method for the REMS GTS using a database of thermal infrared laboratory spectra of analogue minerals and their mixtures. [Martín Redondo et al. 2009, Martínez-Frías et al. 2012 - FRISER-IRMIX database]. This method will be used to assess the perfomance of the REMS GTS as well as determine, through the error analysis, the surface temperature and emissivity values where MSL is operating. Comparisons with orbiter data will be performed. References Gómez-Elvira et al. [2012], REMS: The Environmental Sensor Suite for the Mars Science Laboratory Rover, Space Science Reviews, Volume 170, Issue 1-4, pp. 583-640. Martín-Redondo et al. [2009] Journal of Environmental Monitoring 11:, pp. 1428-1432. Martínez-Frías et al. [2012] FRISER-IRMIX database http

  18. Ground Surface Deformation around Tehran due to Groundwater Recharge: InSAR Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourmelen, N.; Peyret, M.; Fritz, J. F.; Cherry, J.

    2003-04-01

    Tehran is located on an active tectonic and seismic zone. The surface deformation monitoring provides a powerful tool for getting a better understanding of faults kinematics and mechanisms. Used in conjunction with GPS networks, InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) provides dense and precise deformation measurements which are essential for mapping complex heterogeneous deformation fields. Moreover, urban and arid areas preserve interferometric phase coherence. The archived acquisitions of ERS that span 9 months between September 1998 and June 1999 reveal wide areas of surface uplift (by as much as 9 cm). This vertical deformation (gradual in time) has probably no tectonic meaning but is rather the ground response to ground water recharge. These zones are all located dowstream of large alluvial fans like the one of Karaj. The variation of effective stress caused by intersticial water draining could explain such surface deformation. It can also be noticed that some faults act as boundary for these deformation zones and fluid motion. The understanding of this deformation is relevant for groundwater monitoring and urban developement management. It is also necessary for discriminating it from tectonic deformation that also occurs on this zone. Due to the lack of attitude control of satellite ERS-2 since February 2001, the last images acquired could not be combined with the former acquisitions. Nevertheless, we expect to be able to enrich our set of images in order to map tectonic deformation on a longer period and to monitor in a more continuous way the deformation due to groundwater evolution. This would allow to quantify the permanent and reversible part of this signal.

  19. Reflection of and SV waves at the free surface of a monoclinic elastic half-space

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sarva Jit Singh; Sandhya Khurana

    2002-12-01

    The propagation of plane waves in an anisotropic elastic medium possessing monoclinic symmetry is discussed. The expressions for the phase velocity of qP and qSV waves propagating in the plane of elastic symmetry are obtained in terms of the direction cosines of the propagation vector. It is shown that, in general, qP waves are not longitudinal and qSV waves are not transverse. Pure longitudinal and pure transverse waves can propagate only in certain specific directions. Closed-form expressions for the reflection coefficients of qP and qSV waves incident at the free surface of a homogeneous monoclinic elastic half-space are obtained. These expressions are used for studying numerically the variation of the reflection coefficients with the angle of incidence. The present analysis corrects some fundamental errors appearing in recent papers on the subject.

  20. Mathematical Modeling of Radiant Heat Transfer in Mirror Systems Considering Deep Reflecting Surface Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Leonov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available When designing large-sized mirror concentrating systems (MCS for high-temperature solar power plants, one must have at disposal reasonably reliable and economical methods and tools, making it possible to analyze its characteristics, to predict them depending on the operation conditions and accordingly to choose the most suitable system for the solution of particular task.Experimental determination of MCS characteristics requires complicated and expensive experimentation, having significant limitations on interpretation of the results, as well as limitations imposed due to the size of the structure. Therefore it is of particular interest to develop a mathematical model capable of estimating power characteristics of MCS considering the influence of operating conditions, design features, roughness and other surface defects.For efficient solution of the tasks the model must ensure simulation of solar radiant flux as well as simulation of geometrical and optical characteristics of reflection surface and their interaction. In this connection a statistical mathematical model of radiation heat exchange based on use of Monte Carlo methods and Finite Element Method was developed and realized in the software complex, making it possible to determine main characteristics of the MCS.In this paper the main attention is given to definition of MCS radiation characteristics with account for deep reflecting surface defects (cavities, craters. Deep cavities are not typical for MCS, but their occurrence is possible during operation as a result of erosion or any physical damage. For example, for space technology it is primarily micrometeorite erosion.

  1. Quantifying Libya-4 Surface Reflectance Heterogeneity With WorldView-1, 2 and EO-1 Hyperion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neigh, Christopher S. R.; McCorkel, Joel; Middleton, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    The land surface imaging (LSI) virtual constellation approach promotes the concept of increasing Earth observations from multiple but disparate satellites. We evaluated this through spectral and spatial domains, by comparing surface reflectance from 30-m Hyperion and 2-m resolution WorldView-2 (WV-2) data in the Libya-4 pseudoinvariant calibration site. We convolved and resampled Hyperion to WV-2 bands using both cubic convolution and nearest neighbor (NN) interpolation. Additionally, WV-2 and WV-1 same-date imagery were processed as a cross-track stereo pair to generate a digital terrain model to evaluate the effects from large (>70 m) linear dunes. Agreement was moderate to low on dune peaks between WV-2 and Hyperion (R2 0.6). Our results provide a satellite sensor intercomparison protocol for an LSI virtual constellation at high spatial resolution, which should start with geolocation of pixels, followed by NN interpolation to avoid tall dunes that enhance surface reflectance differences across this internationally utilized site.

  2. 3D shape measurement of objects with high dynamic range of surface reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gui-hua; Liu, Xian-Yong; Feng, Quan-Yuan

    2011-08-10

    This paper presents a method that allows a conventional dual-camera structured light system to directly acquire the three-dimensional shape of the whole surface of an object with high dynamic range of surface reflectivity. To reduce the degradation in area-based correlation caused by specular highlights and diffused darkness, we first disregard these highly specular and dark pixels. Then, to solve this problem and further obtain unmatched area data, this binocular vision system was also used as two camera-projector monocular systems operated from different viewing angles at the same time to fill in missing data of the binocular reconstruction. This method involves producing measurable images by integrating such techniques as multiple exposures and high dynamic range imaging to ensure the capture of high-quality phase of each point. An image-segmentation technique was also introduced to distinguish which monocular system is suitable to reconstruct a certain lost point accurately. Our experiments demonstrate that these techniques extended the measurable areas on the high dynamic range of surface reflectivity such as specular objects or scenes with high contrast to the whole projector-illuminated field.

  3. Broadband, ultralow reflectance surface structures on silica windows for high-energy laser applications (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Lynda E.; Frantz, Jesse A.; Shaw, L. Brandon; Poutous, Menelaos K.; Aggarwal, Ishwar D.; Sanghera, Jasbinder S.

    2017-05-01

    The characteristics of broadband transmission, environmental durability, and laser damage resistance are critical for silica glass exit aperture windows for their use in kW-level, high energy laser systems. The use of conventional antireflective (AR) coatings on windows for high energy lasers operating in the near infrared is impacted by laser induced damage that occurs under high power irradiation as well as the potential for delamination in operational environments. Novel methods for fabricating antireflective surface structures (ARSS) directly on optics have resulted not only in reduced reflection loss, but also in other advantages to AR coatings as well. The ARSS approach involves sub-wavelength surface structures fabricated directly into the actual surface of the window, eliminating the need for a coating of extraneous materials. We will report on results for ARSS fabricated on silica glass windows. Recently we have reported broadband, low reflectance (laser damage thresholds of 100 J/cm2 at 1.06 µm, which is 5x the threshold measured for a conventional AR coating. We will also present results for MILSPEC durability tests on silica windows, both with and without ARSS, for rain and sand erosion as well as salt fog testing, conducted at a government facility. We will also report on scale up of ARSS on silica windows of large sizes (33 cm), making them practical for system implementation.

  4. Geologic Evidence for Late-Stage Equatorial Surface and Ground Ice on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, M. G.

    2003-12-01

    New imagery data from the Mars Observer Camera suggest that the equatorial canyon of Valles Marineris contained surface and ground ice relatively late in Martian history. Some troughs (or chasmata) of Valles Marineris contain large mounds and mesas of interior layered deposits (ILDs) that formed in the Late Hesperian to Early Amazonian. Although the origin of the ILDs remains controversial, their characteristics suggest that the strongest hypotheses origin are lacustrine or volcanic processes; some workers have suggested a compromise origin, noting that many MOC observations of ILDs are similar to those of terrestrial sub-ice volcanoes that erupt in meltwater lakes. Lacustrine deposition and sub-ice volcanism require that chamata water or ice would have had to remain stable on the surface long enough to form either (1) extremely thick (1 km to > 4 km) deposits of fine-grained suspended lacustrine materials or (2) numerous sub-ice volcanic edifices with heights that compare to those of Hawaiian oceanic volcanoes. However, a dust cover on top of ice or an ice-covered lake could aid in preventing rapid sublimation. If the ILDs are sub-ice volcanoes than new MOLA topographic data can be used to (1) measure the heights of their subaerial caprock and (2) estimate corresponding volumes of ice. For example, the largest ILD mound in the 113,275 km3 void of Juventae Chasma resembles a capped sub-ice volcanic ridge. The mound is about 2 km high; with the highest point of the cap reaching an elevation of about +80 m. GIS measurement indicate that the maximum volume of ice below the elevation of +80 m is 56,423 km3, so roughly half of the Chasma could have been filled with ice. If the ILDs are lacustrine, then the heights of some other mounds that rival the surrounding plateau elevation would have required a volume of water almost equal to their enclosing chasma. Later in the Amazonian, after sublimation of any putative surface water or ice, MOC imagery attests to ground ice

  5. Lagrangian flows within reflecting internal waves at a horizontal free-slip surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Qi, E-mail: q.zhou@damtp.cam.ac.uk [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Diamessis, Peter J. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    In this paper sequel to Zhou and Diamessis [“Reflection of an internal gravity wave beam off a horizontal free-slip surface,” Phys. Fluids 25, 036601 (2013)], we consider Lagrangian flows within nonlinear internal waves (IWs) reflecting off a horizontal free-slip rigid lid, the latter being a model of the ocean surface. The problem is approached both analytically using small-amplitude approximations and numerically by tracking Lagrangian fluid particles in direct numerical simulation (DNS) datasets of the Eulerian flow. Inviscid small-amplitude analyses for both plane IWs and IW beams (IWBs) show that Eulerian mean flow due to wave-wave interaction and wave-induced Stokes drift cancels each other out completely at the second order in wave steepness A, i.e., O(A{sup 2}), implying zero Lagrangian mean flow up to that order. However, high-accuracy particle tracking in finite-Reynolds-number fully nonlinear DNS datasets from the work of Zhou and Diamessis suggests that the Euler-Stokes cancelation on O(A{sup 2}) is not complete. This partial cancelation significantly weakens the mean Lagrangian flows but does not entirely eliminate them. As a result, reflecting nonlinear IWBs produce mean Lagrangian drifts on O(A{sup 2}) and thus particle dispersion on O(A{sup 4}). The above findings can be relevant to predicting IW-driven mass transport in the oceanic surface and subsurface region which bears important observational and environmental implications, under circumstances where the effect of Earth rotation can be ignored.

  6. Documentation of the Santa Clara Valley regional ground-water/surface-water flow model, Santa Clara Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, R.T.; Li, Zhen; Faunt, C.C.

    2004-01-01

    The Santa Clara Valley is a long, narrow trough extending about 35 miles southeast from the southern end of San Francisco Bay where the regional alluvial-aquifer system has been a major source of water. Intensive agricultural and urban development throughout the 20th century and related ground-water development resulted in ground-water-level declines of more than 200 feet and land subsidence of as much as 12.7 feet between the early 1900s and the mid-1960s. Since the 1960s, Santa Clara Valley Water District has imported surface water to meet growing demands and reduce dependence on ground-water supplies. This importation of water has resulted in a sustained recovery of the ground-water flow system. To help support effective management of the ground-water resources, a regional ground-water/surface-water flow model was developed. This model simulates the flow of ground water and surface water, changes in ground-water storage, and related effects such as land subsidence. A numerical ground-water/surface-water flow model of the Santa Clara Valley subbasin of the Santa Clara Valley was developed as part of a cooperative investigation with the Santa Clara Valley Water District. The model better defines the geohydrologic framework of the regional flow system and better delineates the supply and demand components that affect the inflows to and outflows from the regional ground-water flow system. Development of the model includes revisions to the previous ground-water flow model that upgraded the temporal and spatial discretization, added source-specific inflows and outflows, simulated additional flow features such as land subsidence and multi-aquifer wellbore flow, and extended the period of simulation through September 1999. The transient-state model was calibrated to historical surface-water and ground-water data for the period 197099 and to historical subsidence for the period 198399. The regional ground-water flow system consists of multiple aquifers that are grouped

  7. Classification of Clean and Dirty Pighouse Surfaces Based on Spectral Reflectance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, Mogens; Braithwaite, Ian David; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2004-01-01

    Current pig house cleaning procedures are hazardous to the health of farm workers, and yet necessary if the spread of disease between batches of animals is to be satisfactorily controlled. Autonomous cleaning using robot technology offers salient benefits. This report addresses the feasibility...... of designing a vision based system to locate dirty areas and subsequently direct a cleaning robot to remove dirt. Novel results include the characterisation of the spectral reflectance of real surfaces and dirt in a pig house and the design of illumination to obtain discrimination of clean from dirty areas...

  8. Suppress the Finger Reflection Error of Littlewood-pelay Wavelet Transformation Device of Surface Acoustic Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yuanyuan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a Wavelet Transformation (WT device of Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW technology is developed on the basis of acoustics, electronics, wavelet theory, applied mathematics and semiconductor planar technology. The Finger Reflection (FR error is the primary reason for this kind of device. To solve the problem, a mathematic model of Littlewood-pelay wavelet was established first, which is matched with the model of SAW. Using the methods of split finger and fake finger to design IDT of Littlewood-pelay WT device of SAW with L-edit software, the FR error can be reduced and the equivalent construction of IDT is simulated.

  9. Broadband convergence of acoustic energy with binary reflected phases on planar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xu-Dong; Zhu, Yi-Fan; Liang, Bin; Yang, Jing; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2016-12-01

    We propose to produce efficient three-dimensional sound converging in broadband with binary reflected phases on a planar surface with unit cells consisting of only two kinds of elements. The mechanism is experimentally demonstrated by focusing airborne sound and by forming an "acoustic needle," with handmade arrays of commercial test tubes with/without lids. Both the simulated and measured results show the precise control of converging acoustic energy despite misalignment errors obvious even to naked eyes. Our approach with extreme simplicity yet good robustness may apply in various scenarios that conventionally need complicated elements and continuous variation of parameters for focusing sound.

  10. Highly directive Fabry-Perot leaky-wave nanoantennas based on optical partially reflective surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorente-Crespo, M.; Mateo-Segura, C., E-mail: C.Mateo-Segura@hw.ac.uk [Institute of Sensors, Signals and Systems, Heriot-Watt University, EH14 4AS Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-04

    Nanoantennas enhance the conversion between highly localized electromagnetic fields and far-field radiation. Here, we investigate the response of a nano-patch partially reflective surface backed with a silver mirror to an optical source embedded at the centre of the structure. Using full wave simulations, we demonstrate a two orders of magnitude increased directivity compared to the isotropic radiator, 50% power confinement to a 13.8° width beam and a ±16 nm bandwidth. Our antenna does not rely on plasmonic phenomena thus reducing non-radiative losses and conserving source coherence.

  11. Development and applications of retro-reflective surfaces for ultrasound in LBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-07-01

    pulse or a complete absence of a reflection like a shadow. In that way, it suffices to align the sensor with the diaphragm instead of the fuel assembly which is much easier to achieve as the robotics on which the sensor is mounted move parallel with the diaphragm. The alignment requirement in the latter approach can be further relaxed by using a tiling of retro-reflectors on the lower surface of the diaphragm. In that way, alignment becomes less vital and the main source of acoustic energy loss - geometric spread of the beam - is almost completely removed, leaving only absorption losses. In this paper, we present the first results in developing a retro reflectance surface for ultrasound in LBE. We present experimental results for different designs of retro-reflectors in both water and LBE. We discuss both linear and array retro-reflectors of different sizes and investigate the influence of the main relevant ultrasonic parameters such as wavelength and spot size on the strength of the received reflection under different alignment angles. We also demonstrate how retro-reflective surfaces can be exploited when localizing objects using linear and rotating scanning methods. (authors)

  12. Mesoscale climatic simulation of surface air temperature cooling by highly reflective greenhouses in SE Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campra, Pablo; Millstein, Dev

    2013-01-01

    A long-term local cooling trend in surface air temperature has been monitored at the largest concentration of reflective greenhouses in the world, at the Province of Almeria, SE Spain, associated with a dramatic increase in surface albedo in the area. The availability of reliable long-term climatic field data at this site offers a unique opportunity to test the skill of mesoscale meteorological models describing and predicting the impacts of land use change on local climate. Using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) mesoscale model, we have run a sensitivity experiment to simulate the impact of the observed surface albedo change on monthly and annual surface air temperatures. The model output showed a mean annual cooling of 0.25 °C associated with a 0.09 albedo increase, and a reduction of 22.8 W m(-2) of net incoming solar radiation at surface. Mean reduction of summer daily maximum temperatures was 0.49 °C, with the largest single-day decrease equal to 1.3 °C. WRF output was evaluated and compared with observations. A mean annual warm bias (MBE) of 0.42 °C was estimated. High correlation coefficients (R(2) > 0.9) were found between modeled and observed values. This study has particular interest in the assessment of the potential for urban temperature cooling by cool roofs deployment projects, as well as in the evaluation of mesoscale climatic models performance.

  13. Angle-tunable enhanced infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy via grating-coupled surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petefish, Joseph W; Hillier, Andrew C

    2014-03-04

    Surface enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) spectroscopy is an attractive method for increasing the prominence of vibrational modes in infrared spectroscopy. To date, the majority of reports associated with SEIRA utilize localized surface plasmon resonance from metal nanoparticles to enhance electromagnetic fields in the region of analytes. Limited work has been performed using propagating surface plasmons as a method for SEIRA excitation. In this report, we demonstrate angle-tunable enhancement of vibrational stretching modes associated with a thin poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) film that is coupled to a silver-coated diffraction grating. Gratings are fabricated using laser interference lithography to achieve precise surface periodicities, which can be used to generate surface plasmons that overlap with specific vibrational modes in the polymer film. Infrared reflection absorption spectra are presented for both bare silver and PMMA-coated silver gratings at a range of angles and polarization states. In addition, spectra were obtained with the grating direction oriented perpendicular and parallel to the infrared source in order to isolate plasmon enhancement effects. Optical simulations using the rigorous coupled-wave analysis method were used to identify the origin of the plasmon-induced enhancement. Angle-dependent absorption measurements achieved signal enhancements of more than 10-times the signal in the absence of the plasmon.

  14. Multipitched Diffraction Gratings for Surface Plasmon Resonance-Enhanced Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petefish, Joseph W; Hillier, Andrew C

    2015-11-03

    We demonstrate the application of metal-coated diffraction gratings possessing multiple simultaneous pitch values for surface enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) spectroscopy. SEIRA increases the magnitude of vibrational signals in infrared measurements by one of several mechanisms, most frequently involving the enhanced electric field associated with surface plasmon resonance (SPR). While the majority of SEIRA applications to date have employed nanoparticle-based plasmonic systems, recent advances have shown how various metals and structures lead to similar signal enhancement. Recently, diffraction grating couplers have been demonstrated as a highly tunable platform for SEIRA. Indeed, gratings are an experimentally advantageous platform due to the inherently tunable nature of surface plasmon excitation at these surfaces since both the grating pitch and incident angle can be used to modify the spectral location of the plasmon resonance. In this work, we use laser interference lithography (LIL) to fabricate gratings possessing multiple pitch values by subjecting photoresist-coated glass slides to repetitive exposures at varying orientations. After metal coating, these gratings produced multiple, simultaneous plasmon peaks associated with the multipitched surface, as identified by infrared reflectance measurements. These plasmon peaks could then be coupled to vibrational modes in thin films to provide localized enhancement of infrared signals. We demonstrate the flexibility and tunability of this platform for signal enhancement. It is anticipated that, with further refinement, this approach might be used as a general platform for broadband enhancement of infrared spectroscopy.

  15. Quantum state-resolved gas/surface reaction dynamics probed by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Ueta, Hirokazu; Bisson, Régis; Beck, Rainer D

    2013-05-01

    We report the design and characterization of a new molecular-beam/surface-science apparatus for quantum state-resolved studies of gas/surface reaction dynamics combining optical state-specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage with detection of surface-bound reaction products by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). RAIRS is a non-invasive infrared spectroscopic detection technique that enables online monitoring of the buildup of reaction products on the target surface during reactant deposition by a molecular beam. The product uptake rate obtained by calibrated RAIRS detection yields the coverage dependent state-resolved reaction probability S(θ). Furthermore, the infrared absorption spectra of the adsorbed products obtained by the RAIRS technique provide structural information, which help to identify nascent reaction products, investigate reaction pathways, and determine branching ratios for different pathways of a chemisorption reaction. Measurements of the dissociative chemisorption of methane on Pt(111) with this new apparatus are presented to illustrate the utility of RAIRS detection for highly detailed studies of chemical reactions at the gas/surface interface.

  16. Optical design and laser ablation of surface textures: demonstrating total internal reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gommans, Hans; Booij, Silvia; Pijlman, Fetze; Krijn, Marcel; de Zwart, Siebe; Sepkhanov, Ruslan; Beaumont, Dave; van der Schaft, Hans; Sanders, Rene

    2015-09-01

    In lighting applications key drivers for optical design of surface textures are integration of optical elements, the disentanglement of optical functionality and appearance and late stage configuration. We investigated excimer laser ablation as a mastering technology for micro textured surfaces, where we targeted an increase in correspondence between surface design and ablated surface for high aspect ratio structures. To achieve this we have improved the photo mask design using a heuristic algorithm that corrects for the angular dependence of the ablation process and the loss of image resolution at ablation depths that exceed the depth of field. Using this approach we have been able to demonstrate close correspondence between designed and ablated facet structures up to 75° inclination at 75 μm depth. These facet design parameters allow for total internal reflection (TIR) as a means of beam deflection which is demonstrated in a range of mono shaped cone arrays in hexagonal tessellation. BSDF analysis was used to characterize the narrow TIR deflection beams that matched the peak positions of the design down to 28° apex. In addition, a single surface TIR-Fresnel lens design with focal distance 5 mm has been manufactured using this photo mask design algorithm and beam collimation up to 12° beam angle and 32° field angle is shown. These outcomes demonstrate that the laser ablation process intrinsically yields sufficient small dispersion in structure and fillet radii for lighting applications.

  17. Interfaces Supporting Surface Gap Soliton Ground States in the 1D Nonlinear Schroedinger Equation

    CERN Document Server

    Dohnal, Tomas; Plum, Michael; Reichel, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    We consider the problem of verifying the existence of $H^1$ ground states of the 1D nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation for an interface of two periodic structures: $$-u" +V(x)u -\\lambda u = \\Gamma(x) |u|^{p-1}u \\ {on} \\R$$ with $V(x) = V_1(x), \\Gamma(x)=\\Gamma_1(x)$ for $x\\geq 0$ and $V(x) = V_2(x), \\Gamma(x)=\\Gamma_2(x)$ for $x1$. The article [T. Dohnal, M. Plum and W. Reichel, "Surface Gap Soliton Ground States for the Nonlinear Schr\\"odinger Equation," \\textit{Comm. Math. Phys.} \\textbf{308}, 511-542 (2011)] provides in the 1D case an existence criterion in the form of an integral inequality involving the linear potentials $V_{1},V_2$ and the Bloch waves of the operators $-\\tfrac{d^2}{dx^2}+V_{1,2}-\\lambda$. We choose here the classes of piecewise constant and piecewise linear potentials $V_{1,2}$ and check this criterion for a set of parameter values. In the piecewise constant case the Bloch waves are calculated explicitly and in the piecewise linear case verified enclosures of the Bloch waves are computed ...

  18. Surface roughening of ground fused silica processed by atmospheric inductively coupled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, Qiang; Li, Na; Wang, Jun; Wang, Bo, E-mail: bradywang@hit.edu.cn; Li, Guo; Ding, Fei; Jin, Huiliang

    2015-06-30

    Highlights: • The morphology evolution of ground fused silica, processed by atmospheric plasma, was investigated experimentally. • The roughness development results from opening and coalescing of the plasma-etched cracks. • The shapes of grain-like etched pits are the results of the adjacent cracks coalescing with one another. • The descent of the pits density is due to some smaller etched pits that are swallowed up by larger pits. • Leading role in surface smoothing is laterally etching away the side walls of the intersecting pits. - Abstract: Subsurface damage (SSD) is a defect that is inevitably induced during mechanical processes, such as grinding and polishing. This defect dramatically reduces the mechanical strength and the laser damage thresholds of optical elements. Compared with traditional mechanical machining, atmospheric pressure plasma processing (APPP) is a relatively novel technology that induces almost no SSD during the processing of silica-based optical materials. In this paper, a form of APPP, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), is used to process fused silica substrates with fluorocarbon precursor under atmospheric pressure. The surface morphology evolution of ICP-processed substrates was observed and characterized by confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM), field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that the roughness evolves with the etching depth, and the roughness evolution is a single-peaked curve. This curve results from the opening and the coalescing of surface cracks and fractures. The coalescence procedure of these microstructures was simulated with two common etched pits on a polished fused silica surface. Understanding the roughness evolution of plasma-processed surface might be helpful in optimizing the optical fabrication chain that contains APPP.

  19. Numerical modelling of ground-borne noise and vibration in buildings due to surface rail traffic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiala, P.; Degrande, G.; Augusztinovicz, F.

    2007-04-01

    This paper deals with the numerical computation of the structural and acoustic response of a building to an incoming wave field generated by high-speed surface railway traffic. The source model consists of a moving vehicle on a longitudinally invariant track, coupled to a layered ground modelled with a boundary element formulation. The receiver model is based on a substructuring formulation and consists of a boundary element model of the soil and a finite element model of the structure. The acoustic response of the building's rooms is computed by means of a spectral finite element formulation. The paper investigates the structural and acoustic response of a multi-story portal frame office building up to a frequency of 150 Hz to the passage of a Thalys high-speed train at constant velocity. The isolation performance of three different vibration countermeasures: a floating-floor, a room-in-room, and base-isolation, are examined.

  20. Sampling and analysis for radon-222 dissolved in ground water and surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWayne, Cecil L.; Gesell, T.F.

    1992-01-01

    Radon-222 is a naturally occurring radioactive gas in the uranium-238 decay series that has traditionally been called, simply, radon. The lung cancer risks associated with the inhalation of radon decay products have been well documented by epidemiological studies on populations of uranium miners. The realization that radon is a public health hazard has raised the need for sampling and analytical guidelines for field personnel. Several sampling and analytical methods are being used to document radon concentrations in ground water and surface water worldwide but no convenient, single set of guidelines is available. Three different sampling and analytical methods - bubbler, liquid scintillation, and field screening - are discussed in this paper. The bubbler and liquid scintillation methods have high accuracy and precision, and small analytical method detection limits of 0.2 and 10 pCi/l (picocuries per liter), respectively. The field screening method generally is used as a qualitative reconnaissance tool.

  1. Surface Properties and Characteristics of Mars Landing Sites from Remote Sensing Data and Ground Truth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombek, M. P.; Haldemann, A. F.; Simpson, R. A.; Furgason, R. L.; Putzig, N. E.; Huertas, A.; Arvidson, R. E.; Heet, T.; Bell, J. F.; Mellon, M. T.; McEwen, A. S.

    2008-12-01

    Surface characteristics at the six sites where spacecraft have successfully landed on Mars can be related favorably to their signatures in remotely sensed data from orbit and from the Earth. Comparisons of the rock abundance, types and coverage of soils (and their physical properties), thermal inertia, albedo, and topographic slope all agree with orbital remote sensing estimates and show that the materials at the landing sites can be used as ground truth for the materials that make up most of the equatorial and mid- to moderately high-latitude regions of Mars. The six landing sites sample two of the three dominant global thermal inertia and albedo units that cover ~80% of the surface of Mars. The Viking, Spirit, Mars Pathfinder, and Phoenix landing sites are representative of the moderate to high thermal inertia and intermediate to high albedo unit that is dominated by crusty, cloddy, blocky or frozen soils (duricrust that may be layered) with various abundances of rocks and bright dust. The Opportunity landing site is representative of the moderate to high thermal inertia and low albedo surface unit that is relatively dust free and composed of dark eolian sand and/or increased abundance of rocks. Rock abundance derived from orbital thermal differencing techniques in the equatorial regions agrees with that determined from rock counts at the surface and varies from ~3-20% at the landing sites. The size-frequency distributions of rocks >1.5 m diameter fully resolvable in HiRISE images of the landing sites follow exponential models developed from lander measurements of smaller rocks and are continuous with these rock distributions indicating both are part of the same population. Interpretation of radar data confirms the presence of load bearing, relatively dense surfaces controlled by the soil type at the landing sites, regional rock populations from diffuse scattering similar to those observed directly at the sites, and root-mean-squared slopes that compare favorably

  2. The Learning Process of Supervisees Who Engage in the Reflecting Team Model within Group Supervision: A Grounded Theory Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pender, Rebecca Lynn

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, counselor educators have begun to incorporate the use of the reflecting team process with the training of counselors. Specifically, the reflecting team has been used in didactic courses (Cox, 2003; Landis & Young, 1994; Harrawood, Wilde & Parmanand, 2011) and in supervision (Cox, 1997; Prest, Darden, & Keller, 1990;…

  3. Ground Boundary Conditions for Thermal Convection Over Horizontal Surfaces at High Rayleigh Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanjalić, K.; Hrebtov, M.

    2016-07-01

    We present "wall functions" for treating the ground boundary conditions in the computation of thermal convection over horizontal surfaces at high Rayleigh numbers using coarse numerical grids. The functions are formulated for an algebraic-flux model closed by transport equations for the turbulence kinetic energy, its dissipation rate and scalar variance, but could also be applied to other turbulence models. The three-equation algebraic-flux model, solved in a T-RANS mode ("Transient" Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes, based on triple decomposition), was shown earlier to reproduce well a number of generic buoyancy-driven flows over heated surfaces, albeit by integrating equations up to the wall. Here we show that by using a set of wall functions satisfactory results are found for the ensemble-averaged properties even on a very coarse computational grid. This is illustrated by the computations of the time evolution of a penetrative mixed layer and Rayleigh-Bénard (open-ended, 4:4:1 domain) convection, using 10 × 10 × 100 and 10 × 10 × 20 grids, compared also with finer grids (e.g. 60 × 60 × 100), as well as with one-dimensional treatment using 1 × 1 × 100 and 1 × 1 × 20 nodes. The approach is deemed functional for simulations of a convective boundary layer and mesoscale atmospheric flows, and pollutant transport over realistic complex hilly terrain with heat islands, urban and natural canopies, for diurnal cycles, or subjected to other time and space variations in ground conditions and stratification.

  4. Modified coherent gradient sensing method for slope measurement of reflective surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kang; Xie, Huimin

    2015-05-01

    A phase shifting method was developed for Coherent Gradient Sensing (CGS) using a three-step phase shifting method. Three different inteferograms were obtained by changing the distance between two gratings. The phase filed can be calculated accurately from the three inteferograms. The interference fringes (phase field) in reflection mode represent the gradient contours of the out-of-plane displacement of a surface. The curvatures and shape of the surface both can be calculated by numerical methods using the fringe patterns. The measurement principle and experimental setup were introduced in detail. As an application, a standard specimen with a curvature radius of 5 m was measured. From the analysis of the experimental results, we find that the relative error of the curvature using this method was about 0.78%. The method has good potentials for measuring the slopes, curvatures and shapes of thin film/substrate systems.

  5. Light scattering by a rough surface of human skin. 1. The luminance factor of reflected light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barun, V V [Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics, Minsk (Belarus); Ivanov, A P [B.I.Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus)

    2013-08-31

    Based on the analytical solution of Maxwell's equations, we have studied the angular structure of the luminance factor of light reflected by the rough skin surface with large-scale relief elements, illuminated by a directed radiation beam incident at an arbitrary angle inside or outside the medium. The parameters of the surface inhomogeneities are typical of human skin. The calculated angular dependences are interpreted from the point of view of the angular distribution function of micro areas. The results obtained can be used for solving direct and inverse problems in biomedical optics, in particular for determining the depth of light penetration into a biological tissue, for studying the light action spectra on tissue chromophores under the in vivo conditions, for developing diagnostic methods of structural and biophysical parameters of a medium, and for optimising the mechanisms of interaction of light with biological tissues under their noninvasive irradiation through skin. (biomedical optics)

  6. Light scattering by a rough surface of human skin. 1. The luminance factor of reflected light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barun, V. V.; Ivanov, A. P.

    2013-08-01

    Based on the analytical solution of Maxwell's equations, we have studied the angular structure of the luminance factor of light reflected by the rough skin surface with large-scale relief elements, illuminated by a directed radiation beam incident at an arbitrary angle inside or outside the medium. The parameters of the surface inhomogeneities are typical of human skin. The calculated angular dependences are interpreted from the point of view of the angular distribution function of micro areas. The results obtained can be used for solving direct and inverse problems in biomedical optics, in particular for determining the depth of light penetration into a biological tissue, for studying the light action spectra on tissue chromophores under the in vivo conditions, for developing diagnostic methods of structural and biophysical parameters of a medium, and for optimising the mechanisms of interaction of light with biological tissues under their noninvasive irradiation through skin.

  7. Effects of Spatial Dispersion on Reflection from Mushroom-type Artificial Impedance Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Luukkonen, Olli; Yakovlev, Alexander B; Simovski, Constantin R; Nefedov, Igor S; Tretyakov, Sergei A

    2008-01-01

    Several recent works have emphasized the role of spatial dispersion in wire media, and demonstrated that arrays of parallel metallic wires may behave very differently from a uniaxial local material with negative permittivity. Here, we investigate using local and non-local homogenization methods the effect of spatial dispersion on reflection from the mushroom structure introduced by Sievenpiper. The objective of the paper is to clarify the role of spatial dispersion in the mushroom structure and demonstrate that under some conditions it is suppressed. The metamaterial substrate, or metasurface, is modeled as a wire medium covered with an impedance surface. Surprisingly, it is found that in such configuration the effects of spatial dispersion may be nearly suppressed when the slab is electrically thin, and that the wire medium can be modeled very accurately using a local model. This result paves the way for the design of artificial surfaces that exploit the plasmonic-type response of the wire medium slab.

  8. Modified polarimetric bidirectional reflectance distribution function with diffuse scattering: surface parameter estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Hanyu; Voelz, David G.

    2016-12-01

    The polarimetric bidirectional reflectance distribution function (pBRDF) describes the relationships between incident and scattered Stokes parameters, but the familiar surface-only microfacet pBRDF cannot capture diffuse scattering contributions and depolarization phenomena. We propose a modified pBRDF model with a diffuse scattering component developed from the Kubelka-Munk and Le Hors et al. theories, and apply it in the development of a method to jointly estimate refractive index, slope variance, and diffuse scattering parameters from a series of Stokes parameter measurements of a surface. An application of the model and estimation approach to experimental data published by Priest and Meier shows improved correspondence with measurements of normalized Mueller matrix elements. By converting the Stokes/Mueller calculus formulation of the model to a degree of polarization (DOP) description, the estimation results of the parameters from measured DOP values are found to be consistent with a previous DOP model and results.

  9. Andreev reflection without Fermi surface alignment in high-T c van der Waals heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zareapour, Parisa; Hayat, Alex; Zhao, Shu Yang F.; Kreshchuk, Michael; Xu, Zhijun; Liu, T. S.; Gu, G. D.; Jia, Shuang; Cava, Robert J.; Yang, H.-Y.; Ran, Ying; Burch, Kenneth S.

    2017-04-01

    We address the controversy over the proximity effect between topological materials and high-T c superconductors. Junctions are produced between Bi2Sr2CaCu2O{}8+δ and materials with different Fermi surfaces (Bi2Te3 and graphite). Both cases reveal tunneling spectra that are consistent with Andreev reflection. This is confirmed by a magnetic field that shifts features via the Doppler effect. This is modeled with a single parameter that accounts for tunneling into a screening supercurrent. Thus the tunneling involves Cooper pairs crossing the heterostructure, showing that the Fermi surface mismatch does not hinder the ability to form transparent interfaces, which is accounted for by the extended Brillouin zone and different lattice symmetries.

  10. Evaluation of lateral resolution of scanning surface microscopy by total internal reflection with thermal lens effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimosaka, Takuya; Izako, Masakazu; Uchiyama, Katsumi; Hobo, Toshiyuki

    2003-06-01

    We have developed a novel method for in situ and non-destructive surface analyses, or a total internal reflection with thermal lens spectroscopy (TIR-TLS), which has sufficient sensitivity to monitor phenomena in thin films, such as lipid bilayers. In this study, we applied TIR-TLS to microscopy for surface analyses, and we experimentally obtained its lateral resolution using the edge of a chromium film made by a photolithography technique. The obtained resolution was 20 microm, which was 60% of the diameter of an excitation beam at the interface. The estimated resolution with a simple model agreed with the experimental one, and from this model, TIR-TLS microscopy has the same resolution as that of ordinary optical microscopy. The microscopy by TIR-TLS was applied to a sample whose contrast was too weak to be visually seen, and an image of the sample was obtained without any loss of resolution.

  11. Interaction of mineral surfaces with simple organic molecules by diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy (DRIFT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Joan E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2008-06-01

    Diffuse reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to characterize multi-layers of lysine, glutamic acid and salicylic acid on -alumina and kaolinite surfaces. The results agreed well with those previously obtained by ATR-IR in aqueous media where available, indicating that DRIFT may be regarded as effectively an in-situ spectroscopy for these materials. In the case of salicylic acid adsorption onto γ-alumina, DRIFTS was used to identify monolayer coverage and to detect molecules down to coverage of 3% of a monolayer. The spectroscopic results as to coverage were confirmed by analysis of the solutions used for treatment. The spectra obtained allowed identification of changes in the bonding environment with increasing surface coverage. DRIFTS, offers several advantages in terms of materials, experimental technique and data treatment, motivating further investigations.

  12. Experimental reflectance study of methane and ethane ice at Titan's surface conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G.; Singh, S.; Wagner, A.; Chevrier, V. F.; Combe, J.-P.; Gainor, M.

    2017-10-01

    Cassini's Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) has provided evidence of several different hydrocarbons on the surface of Titan using seven atmospheric windows. Methane (CH4) and ethane (C2H6) are suggested to exist in both the liquid and solid states on Titan. Even if the average surface temperature (90-94 K) of Titan is clearly in the liquid stability field of both CH4 and C2H6, the particles can condense in the atmosphere (˜65 km for C2H6 and lower stratosphere for CH4 Anderson et al. in Icarus, 243:129-138, 2014) and precipitate allowing them to melt and/or sublimate. It is also suggested that these liquids can freeze on the surface due to evaporative cooling. We conducted a laboratory study at Titan surface conditions to determine the phase change of CH4 and C2H6 and to test if they would freeze on the surface of Titan. Using NIR reflectance spectroscopy, we calculated the reflectivity ratio (R_{solid}/R_{liquid}) of CH4 and C2H6 of 1.08 and 1.36, respectively, suggesting an 8% increase in reflectivity for CH4 and a 36% increase for C2H6 during phase change. The low albedo in liquid phase for both CH4 and C2H6 is consistent with observations made by VIMS in both Titan's northern and southern latitudes. We also find the evaporation rate of amorphous CH4 close to Titan conditions, which is 9.0 ± 0.3 × 10^{-5} kg s^{-1} m^{-2} at 87 K and we estimated a sublimation rate of 0.22 × 10^{-5} kg s^{-1} m^{-2} at 83 K for a 1.5 bar N2 atmosphere. The freezing rate of ˜46 m/year for C2H6 was observed whereas, for CH4, we observed that CH4 does not freeze at 87 K due to a high N2 dissolution rate. However, the viscosity of CH4 increases with a decreasing temperature that results in amorphous CH4. The results show a remarkable difference between the formation of ice for two liquids with different N2 dissolution rates. Consequently, using the results obtained from the laboratory study we predict that the observed change is albedo during and after rainfall

  13. Scalable and Detail-Preserving Ground Surface Reconstruction from Large 3D Point Clouds Acquired by Mobile Mapping Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craciun, D.; Serna Morales, A.; Deschaud, J.-E.; Marcotegui, B.; Goulette, F.

    2014-08-01

    The currently existing mobile mapping systems equipped with active 3D sensors allow to acquire the environment with high sampling rates at high vehicle velocities. While providing an effective solution for environment sensing over large scale distances, such acquisition provides only a discrete representation of the geometry. Thus, a continuous map of the underlying surface must be built. Mobile acquisition introduces several constraints for the state-of-the-art surface reconstruction algorithms. Smoothing becomes a difficult task for recovering sharp depth features while avoiding mesh shrinkage. In addition, interpolation-based techniques are not suitable for noisy datasets acquired by Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS) systems. Furthermore, scalability is a major concern for enabling real-time rendering over large scale distances while preserving geometric details. This paper presents a fully automatic ground surface reconstruction framework capable to deal with the aforementioned constraints. The proposed method exploits the quasi-flat geometry of the ground throughout a morphological segmentation algorithm. Then, a planar Delaunay triangulation is applied in order to reconstruct the ground surface. A smoothing procedure eliminates high frequency peaks, while preserving geometric details in order to provide a regular ground surface. Finally, a decimation step is applied in order to cope with scalability constraints over large scale distances. Experimental results on real data acquired in large urban environments are presented and a performance evaluation with respect to ground truth measurements demonstrate the effectiveness of our method.

  14. Effects of light polarization and waves slope statistics on the reflectance factor of the sea surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alimonte, Davide; Kajiyama, Tamito

    2016-04-18

    Above-water radiometry depends on estimates of the reflectance factor ρ of the sea surface to compute the in situ water-leaving radiance. The Monte Carlo code for ocean color simulations MOX is used in this study to analyze the effect of different environmental components on ρ values. A first aspect is examining the reflectance factor without and by accounting for the sky-radiance polarization. The influence of the sea-surface statistics at discrete grid points is then considered by presenting a new scheme to define the variance of the waves slope. Results at different sun elevations and sensor orientations indicate that the light polarization effect on ρ simulations reduces from ∼17 to ∼10% when the wind speed increases from 0 to 14m s-1. An opposite tendency characterizes the modeling of the sea-surface slope variance, with ρ differences up to ∼12% at a wind speed of 10m s-1. The joint effect of polarization and the the sea-surface statistics displays a less systematic dependence on the wind speed, with differences in the range ∼13 to ∼18%. The ρ changes due to the light polarization and the variance of the waves slope become more relevant at sky-viewing geometries respectively lower and higher than 40° with respect to the zenith. An overall compensation of positive and negative offsets due to light polarization is finally documented when considering different sun elevations. These results address additional investigations which, by combining the modeling and experimental components of marine optics, better evaluate specific measurement protocols for collecting above-water radiometric data in the field.

  15. Estimating and Mapping Urban Impervious Surfaces: Reflection on Spectral, Spatial, and Temporal Resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Q.

    2007-12-01

    , respectively, were used to test the seasonal sensitivity of impervious surface estimation. Our results indicated that the summer (June) image was better than the spring (April) and the fall (October) ones. The summer image was most appropriate because there was full growth of vegetation, and mapping of impervious surfaces was more effective with contrasting spectral response from green vegetation. The mixing space, based on the four endmembers was perfectly three-dimensional. In contrast, there was significant amount of bare soils/grounds and non-photosynthesis vegetation in the spring and fall images. Plant phenology caused changes in the variance partitioning and impacted the mixing space characterization, leading to the difficulty in the estimation of impervious surfaces.

  16. Temporal Monitoring of the Soil Freeze-Thaw Cycles over a Snow-Covered Surface by Using Air-Launched Ground-Penetrating Radar

    KAUST Repository

    Jadoon, Khan

    2015-09-18

    We tested an off-ground ground-penetrating radar (GPR) system at a fixed location over a bare agricultural field to monitor the soil freeze-thaw cycles over a snow-covered surface. The GPR system consisted of a monostatic horn antenna combined with a vector network analyzer, providing an ultra-wideband stepped-frequency continuous-wave radar. An antenna calibration experiment was performed to filter antenna and back scattered effects from the raw GPR data. Near the GPR setup, sensors were installed in the soil to monitor the dynamics of soil temperature and dielectric permittivity at different depths. The soil permittivity was retrieved via inversion of time domain GPR data focused on the surface reflection. Significant effects of soil dynamics were observed in the time-lapse GPR, temperature and dielectric permittivity measurements. In particular, five freeze and thaw events were clearly detectable, indicating that the GPR signals respond to the contrast between the dielectric permittivity of frozen and thawed soil. The GPR-derived permittivity was in good agreement with sensor observations. Overall, the off-ground nature of the GPR system permits non-invasive time-lapse observation of the soil freeze-thaw dynamics without disturbing the structure of the snow cover. The proposed method shows promise for the real-time mapping and monitoring of the shallow frozen layer at the field scale.

  17. Temporal Monitoring of the Soil Freeze-Thaw Cycles over a Snow-Covered Surface by Using Air-Launched Ground-Penetrating Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Zaib Jadoon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We tested an off-ground ground-penetrating radar (GPR system at a fixed location over a bare agricultural field to monitor the soil freeze-thaw cycles over a snow-covered surface. The GPR system consisted of a monostatic horn antenna combined with a vector network analyzer, providing an ultra-wideband stepped-frequency continuous-wave radar. An antenna calibration experiment was performed to filter antenna and back scattered effects from the raw GPR data. Near the GPR setup, sensors were installed in the soil to monitor the dynamics of soil temperature and dielectric permittivity at different depths. The soil permittivity was retrieved via inversion of time domain GPR data focused on the surface reflection. Significant effects of soil dynamics were observed in the time-lapse GPR, temperature and dielectric permittivity measurements. In particular, five freeze and thaw events were clearly detectable, indicating that the GPR signals respond to the contrast between the dielectric permittivity of frozen and thawed soil. The GPR-derived permittivity was in good agreement with sensor observations. Overall, the off-ground nature of the GPR system permits non-invasive time-lapse observation of the soil freeze-thaw dynamics without disturbing the structure of the snow cover. The proposed method shows promise for the real-time mapping and monitoring of the shallow frozen layer at the field scale.

  18. Theoretical analysis of reflected ray error from surface slope error and their application to the solar concentrated collector

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Weidong

    2011-01-01

    Surface slope error of concentrator is one of the main factors to influence the performance of the solar concentrated collectors which cause deviation of reflected ray and reduce the intercepted radiation. This paper presents the general equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error from slope error through geometry optics, applying the equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error for 5 kinds of solar concentrated reflector, provide typical results. The results indicate that the slope error is transferred to the reflected ray in more than 2 folds when the incidence angle is more than 0. The equation for reflected ray error is generally fit for all reflection surfaces, and can also be applied to control the error in designing an abaxial optical system.

  19. A high efficiency spectrometer for reflection (e,2e) experiments at surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liscio, A. [CNR - IMIP, Area della Ricerca di Roma, Via Salaria km 29.300, 00016 Monterotondo (Italy); Dip.to di Fisica Universita di Roma Tre, Via Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Roma (Italy); Ruocco, A.; Stefani, G. [Dip.to di Fisica Universita di Roma Tre, Via Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Roma (Italy); Iacobucci, S. [CNR - ISC, Area della Ricerca di Roma, Via Salaria km 29.300, 00016 Monterotondo (Italy)], E-mail: stefano.iacobucci@isc.cnr.it

    2007-10-15

    To study electron momentum densities in solids by grazing angle reflection kinematics has been shown to be feasible [S. Iacobucci, S. Rioual, A. Ruocco, M. Mastropietro, G. Stefani, Surf. Sci. 454 (2000) 1026], but development of this spectroscopy has been hampered by long acquisition time; to fully exploit potentialities of this method is mandatory to reduce duration of the experiment within times comparable with clean surface lifetimes in ultra-high vacuum. This paper reports on recent developments of the reflection (e,2e) spectrometer that make a sizeable step forward in attaining this goal. It operates in asymmetric kinematics and at small grazing angle, thus allowing to enhance the surface sensitivity. A drastic reduction in acquisition time has been achieved by implementing parallel acquisition, both in energy and angle, of the detected electron pairs. To achieve parallel acquisition in energy and momentum, each of the two electron analysers is equipped with a two-dimensional position sensitive detector. A custom-made electronic hardware and software have been developed for the automatic control of the experiment and for acquisition and storage of the coincidence events. After discussing in some details the relevant features of the new spectrometer, few examples of valence band mapping and electron momentum densities measured in highly oriented pyrolitic graphite with energy and momentum resolutions of 1.3 eV and 0.15 A{sup -1} are given.

  20. Solar wind reflection from the lunar surface: The view from far and near

    CERN Document Server

    Saul, L; Vorburger, A; M., D F Rodríguez; Fuselier, S A; McComas, D J; Möbius, E; Barabash, S; Funsten, Herb; Janzen, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The Moon appears bright in the sky as a source of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs). These ENAs have recently been imaged over a broad energy range both from near the lunar surface, by India's Chandrayaan-1 mission (CH-1), and from a much more distant Earth orbit by NASA's Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) satellite. Both sets of observations have indicated that a relatively large fraction of the solar wind is reflected from the Moon as energetic neutral hydrogen. CH-1's angular resolution over different viewing angles of the lunar surface has enabled measurement of the emission as a function of angle. IBEX in contrast views not just a swath but a whole quadrant of the Moon as effectively a single pixel, as it subtends even at the closest approach no more than a few degrees on the sky. Here we use the scattering function measured by CH-1 to model global lunar ENA emission and combine these with IBEX observations. The deduced global reflection is modestly larger (by a factor of 1.25) when the angular scatteri...

  1. Ground surface thermal regime of rock glaciers in the High Tatra Mts., Slovakia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uxa, Tomáš; Mida, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Numerous lobate- or tongue-shaped debris accumulations, mostly interpreted as rock glaciers, have recently been recognized in the High Tatra Mts., Slovakia (49˚ 10' N, 20˚ 08' E). These prominent landforms arise due to creep of voluminous debris-ice mixtures, and as such they are excellent indicators of present or past permafrost existence. Hence rock glaciers are extensively utilized to model the distribution of permafrost in mountain areas. However, commonly applied rules of thumb may not be entirely indicative to discriminate particularly between the inactive (permafrost in disequilibrium with present climate) and relict (without permafrost) rock glaciers, which may substantially complicate permafrost modelling. Accordingly, the information about their thermal state is essential to calibrate and validate regional permafrost models. Limited ground temperature data have been, however, available from the High Tatra Mts. to date and therefore, we bring the updated and enhanced results from the thermal investigations of eleven rock glaciers located in the Slavkovská dolina and Veľká Studená dolina valleys at elevations between 1832 and 2090 m asl. Ground surface temperature (GST) has been continuously monitored at seven rock glaciers between October 2014 and September 2016 using nine Minikin Tie (EMS Brno Inc.) and iButton DS1922L (Maxim Integrated Inc.) loggers with an accuracy of ±0.2 and ±0.5 ˚ C, respectively. In addition, the bottom temperature of snow (BTS) was measured at 306 locations during spring of 2015 and 2016 to map potential permafrost occurrence within all the surveyed rock glaciers and in their immediate surroundings. Mean annual ground surface temperature (MAGST) of the rock glaciers ranged between -1.3 ˚ C and +2.6 ˚ C and averaged +1.0 ˚ C and +0.8 ˚ C in 2014-2015 and 2015-2016, respectively. Two sites continually showed negative MAGST and two other sites were below +0.5 ˚ C and +1.0 ˚ C, respectively. This strongly contrasts with

  2. Ground and surface water for drinking: a laboratory study on genotoxicity using plant tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Feretti

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Surface waters are increasingly utilized for drinking water because groundwater sources are often polluted. Several monitoring studies have detected the presence of mutagenicity in drinking water, especially from surface sources due to the reaction of natural organic matter with disinfectant. The study aimed to investigate the genotoxic potential of the products of reaction between humic substances, which are naturally present in surface water, and three disinfectants: chlorine dioxide, sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid. Commercial humic acids dissolved in distilled water at different total organic carbon (TOC concentrations were studied in order to simulate natural conditions of both ground water (TOC=2.5 mg/L and surface water (TOC=7.5 mg/L. These solutions were treated with the biocides at a 1:1 molar ratio of C:disinfectant and tested for genotoxicity using the anaphase chromosomal aberration and micronucleus tests in Allium cepa, and the Vicia faba and Tradescantia micronucleus tests. The tests were carried out after different times and with different modes of exposure, and at 1:1 and 1:10 dilutions of disinfected and undisinfected humic acid solutions. A genotoxic effect was found for sodium hypochlorite in all plant tests, at both TOCs considered, while chlorine dioxide gave positive results only with the A.cepa tests. Some positive effects were also detected for PAA (A.cepa and Tradescantia. No relevant differences were found in samples with different TOC values. The significant increase in all genotoxicity end-points induced by all tested disinfectants indicates that a genotoxic potential is exerted even in the presence of organic substances at similar concentrations to those frequently present in drinking water.

  3. Ground and surface water for drinking: a laboratory study on genotoxicity using plant tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feretti, Donatella; Ceretti, Elisabetta; Gustavino, Bianca; Zerbini, Llaria; Zani, Claudia; Monarca, Silvano; Rizzoni, Marco

    2012-02-17

    Surface waters are increasingly utilized for drinking water because groundwater sources are often polluted. Several monitoring studies have detected the presence of mutagenicity in drinking water, especially from surface sources due to the reaction of natural organic matter with disinfectant. The study aimed to investigate the genotoxic potential of the products of reaction between humic substances, which are naturally present in surface water, and three disinfectants: chlorine dioxide, sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid. Commercial humic acids dissolved in distilled water at different total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations were studied in order to simulate natural conditions of both ground water (TOC=2.5 mg/L) and surface water (TOC=7.5 mg/L). These solutions were treated with the biocides at a 1:1 molar ratio of C:disinfectant and tested for genotoxicity using the anaphase chromosomal aberration and micronucleus tests in Allium cepa, and the Vicia faba and Tradescantia micronucleus tests. The tests were carried out after different times and with different modes of exposure, and at 1:1 and 1:10 dilutions of disinfected and undisinfected humic acid solutions. A genotoxic effect was found for sodium hypochlorite in all plant tests, at both TOCs considered, while chlorine dioxide gave positive results only with the A.cepa tests. Some positive effects were also detected for PAA (A.cepa and Tradescantia). No relevant differences were found in samples with different TOC values. The significant increase in all genotoxicity end-points induced by all tested disinfectants indicates that a genotoxic potential is exerted even in the presence of organic substances at similar concentrations to those frequently present in drinking water.

  4. Airborne hyperspectral observations of surface and cloud directional reflectivity using a commercial digital camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ehrlich

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Spectral radiance measurements by a digital single-lens reflex camera were used to derive the directional reflectivity of clouds and different surfaces in the Arctic. The camera has been calibrated radiometrically and spectrally to provide accurate radiance measurements with high angular resolution. A comparison with spectral radiance measurements with the Spectral Modular Airborne Radiation measurement sysTem (SMART-Albedometer showed an agreement within the uncertainties of both instruments (6% for both. The directional reflectivity in terms of the hemispherical directional reflectance factor (HDRF was obtained for sea ice, ice-free ocean and clouds. The sea ice, with an albedo of ρ = 0.96 (at 530 nm wavelength, showed an almost isotropic HDRF, while sun glint was observed for the ocean HDRF (ρ = 0.12. For the cloud observations with ρ = 0.62, the cloudbow – a backscatter feature typically for scattering by liquid water droplets – was covered by the camera. For measurements above heterogeneous stratocumulus clouds, the required number of images to obtain a mean HDRF that clearly exhibits the cloudbow has been estimated at about 50 images (10 min flight time. A representation of the HDRF as a function of the scattering angle only reduces the image number to about 10 (2 min flight time.

    The measured cloud and ocean HDRF have been compared to radiative transfer simulations. The ocean HDRF simulated with the observed surface wind speed of 9 m s−1 agreed best with the measurements. For the cloud HDRF, the best agreement was obtained by a broad and weak cloudbow simulated with a cloud droplet effective radius of Reff = 4 μm. This value agrees with the particle sizes derived from in situ measurements and retrieved from the spectral radiance of the SMART-Albedometer.

  5. Quasi-parabolic reflecting bottom surfaces of the Drygalski Antarctic floating ice tongue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, C.; Chiappini, M.; Zirizzotti, A.; Zuccheretti, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Rome (Italy); Tabacco, I. E. [Milan Univ., Milan (Italy). Sez. Geofisica

    2001-06-01

    Very high frequency deep radio sounding systems for ice thickness measurements are practically the only useful apparatuses for large scale radar flight surveys in polar regions. The morphology of the bottom surface of a n Antarctic floating ice tongue, in the Ross Sea area, East Antarctica, was studied using the arrival times of signal echoes of the radio sounding system. The amplitude variations of radar signals from the reflecting surface were analyzed to determine the gain or the loss of the reflectors. Such surfaces show quasi-parabolic geometrical shapes at the ice/water interface with both concave and convex faces towards the sounding system. Electromagnetic analysis performed on radar echoes indicates that amplitude variations detected by the antenna are focusing or defocusing effects only due to the reflector's shape. A factor in the radar equation that represents the surface shape when coherent reflectors are involved is introduced. This factor allows everyone to determine more precisely the morphology and electromagnetic characteristics of the interface between the media investigated by means of radio echo sounding.

  6. Quasi-parabolic reflecting bottom surfaces of the Drygalski Antarctic floating ice tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Zuccheretti

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Very high frequency deep radio sounding systems for ice thickness measurements are practically the only useful apparatuses for large scale radar flight surveys in polar regions. The morphology of the bottom surface of an Antarctic floating ice tongue, in the Ross Sea area, East Antarctica, was studied using the arrival times of signal echoes of the radio sounding system. The amplitude variations of radar signals from the reflecting surface were analyzed to determine the gain or the loss of the reflectors. Such surfaces show quasi-parabolic geometrical shapes at the ice/water interface with both concave and convex faces towards the sounding system. Electromagnetic analysis performed on radar echoes indicates that amplitude variations detected by the antenna are focusing or defocusing effects only due to the reflector's shape. A factor in the radar equation that represents the surface shape when coherent reflectors are involved is introduced. This factor allows us to determine more precisely the morphology and electromagnetic characteristics of the interface between the media investigated by means of radio echo sounding.

  7. Reflection of resonant light from a plane surface of an ensemble of motionless point scatters: Quantum microscopic approach

    CERN Document Server

    Kuraptsev, A S

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of general theoretical results developed previously in [JETP 112, 246 (2011)], we analyze the reflection of quasiresonant light from a plane surface of dense and disordered ensemble of motionless point scatters. Angle distribution of the scattered light is calculated both for s and p polarizations of the probe radiation. The ratio between coherent and incoherent (diffuse) components of scattered light is calculated. We analyze the contributions of scatters located at different distances from the surface and determine on this background the thickness of surface layer responsible for reflected beam generation. The inhomogeneity of dipole-dipole interaction near the surface is discussed.We study also dependence of total reflected light power on the incidence angle and compare the results of the microscopic approach with predictions of the Fresnel reflection theory. The calculations are performed for different densities of scatters and different frequencies of a probe radiation.

  8. Atrazine and its degradation products in surface and ground waters in Zhangjiakou District, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A method using the solid phase extraction (SPE) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to analyse atrazine and its degradation products at levels of low nanograms per liter in water has been developed. The environmental water samples were filtered and then extracted by SPE with a new sulfonation of poly(divinylbenzene-co-N- vinylpyrrolidone) sorbents MCX. HPLC/APCIMS was used for the analysis of atrazine and its degradation products, desethylatrazine (DEA), deisopropylatrazine (DIA), didealkylatrazine (DEDIA), and hydroxyatrazine (HYA). The detection limits ranged from 10-50 ng/L in water samples. Samples were collected from deep wells and a reservoir near a plant that produced atrazine. Atrazine concentration levels in most surface samples were above the limit of the China Surface Water Regulation (3 mg/L). In ground water, the levels of degradation product were more than 0.1 mg/L and 5-10 times greater than those of atrazine. The highest DEA concentration in the groundwater sample taken at the 130 m depth was 7.2 ug/L.

  9. Spectroscopic determination of ground and excited state vibrational potential energy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laane, Jaan

    Far-infrared spectra, mid-infrared combination band spectra, Raman spectra, and dispersed fluorescence spectra of non-rigid molecules can be used to determine the energies of many of the quantum states of conformationally important vibrations such as out-of-plane ring modes, internal rotations, and molecular inversions in their ground electronic states. Similarly, the fluorescence excitation spectra of jet-cooled molecules, together with electronic absorption spectra, provide the information for determining the vibronic energy levels of electronic excited states. One- or two-dimensional potential energy functions, which govern the conformational changes along the vibrational coordinates, can be determined from these types of data for selected molecules. From these functions the molecular structures, the relative energies between different conformations, the barriers to molecular interconversions, and the forces responsible for the structures can be ascertained. This review describes the experimental and theoretical methodology for carrying out the potential energy determinations and presents a summary of work that has been carried out for both electronic ground and excited states. The results for the out-of-plane ring motions of four-, five-, and six-membered rings will be presented, and results for several molecules with unusual properties will be cited. Potential energy functions for the carbonyl wagging and ring modes for several cyclic ketones in their S1(n,pi*) states will also be discussed. Potential energy surfaces for the three internal rotations, including the one governing the photoisomerization process, will be examined for trans-stilbene in both its S0 and S1(pi,pi*) states. For the bicyclic molecules in the indan family, the two-dimensional potential energy surfaces for the highly interacting ring-puckering and ring-flapping motions in both the S0 and S1(pi,pi*) states have also been determined using all of the spectroscopic methods mentioned above

  10. Nonlinear reflection from the surface of neutron stars and features of radio emission from the pulsar in the Crab nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontorovich, V. M.

    2016-08-01

    There are no explanations for the high-frequency component of the emission from the pulsar in the Crab nebula, but it may be a manifestation of instability in nonlinear reflection from the star's surface. Radiation from relativistic positrons flying from the magnetosphere to the star and accelerated by the electric field of the polar gap is reflected. The instability involves stimulated scattering on surface waves.

  11. Design of an optical lens combined with a total internal reflection (TIR) freeform surface for a LED front fog lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Li, Xiufeng; Ge, Peng

    2017-02-01

    We propose a design method of an optical lens combined with a total internal reflection (TIR) freeform surface for a LED front fog lamp. The TIR freeform surface controls the edge rays of the LED source. It totally reflects the edge rays and makes them emit from the top surface of the lens. And the middle rays of the LED source go through the refractive surface and reach the measured plane. We simulate the model by Monte Carlo method. Simulation results show that the front fog lamp system can satisfy the requirement of ECE R19 Rev7. The light control efficiency can reach up to 76%.

  12. A prototype for automation of land-cover products from Landsat Surface Reflectance Data Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rover, J.; Goldhaber, M. B.; Steinwand, D.; Nelson, K.; Coan, M.; Wylie, B. K.; Dahal, D.; Wika, S.; Quenzer, R.

    2014-12-01

    Landsat data records of surface reflectance provide a three-decade history of land surface processes. Due to the vast number of these archived records, development of innovative approaches for automated data mining and information retrieval were necessary. Recently, we created a prototype utilizing open source software libraries for automatically generating annual Anderson Level 1 land cover maps and information products from data acquired by the Landsat Mission for the years 1984 to 2013. The automated prototype was applied to two target areas in northwestern and east-central North Dakota, USA. The approach required the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) and two user-input target acquisition year-days. The Landsat archive was mined for scenes acquired within a 100-day window surrounding these target dates, and then cloud-free pixels where chosen closest to the specified target acquisition dates. The selected pixels were then composited before completing an unsupervised classification using the NLCD. Pixels unchanged in pairs of the NLCD were used for training decision tree models in an iterative process refined with model confidence measures. The decision tree models were applied to the Landsat composites to generate a yearly land cover map and related information products. Results for the target areas captured changes associated with the recent expansion of oil shale production and agriculture driven by economics and policy, such as the increase in biofuel production and reduction in Conservation Reserve Program. Changes in agriculture, grasslands, and surface water reflect the local hydrological conditions that occurred during the 29-year span. Future enhancements considered for this prototype include a web-based client, ancillary spatial datasets, trends and clustering algorithms, and the forecasting of future land cover.

  13. W-Band Characterization of Grounded Frequency Selective Surface Arrays Composed of Nonequal Slot Length Subarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Islam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the design and construction of Frequency Selective Surface arrays composed of two subarrays of different slot lengths. We investigated their response variations with the variation of slot length differences of the elementary sub-arrays. Such nonhomogeneous arrays cannot be simulated with Computer Aided Design (CAD programs because the boundary conditions are not fulfilled by the simulator. In infinite array simulation, the periodic boundary conditions are prescribed on the walls of the unit cell, whereas in the case of sub-arrays of unequal slot length such boundary conditions are not applicable. The CAD simulation of such combined array gives incorrect values of amplitude and phase responses. In this work, we investigate the characteristics of such complex arrays by using heuristic experimental approach. The results of the experimental approach demonstrate that the resultant reflection amplitude and phase of such complex array depend on the difference of slot lengths (ΔL of the two sub-arrays.

  14. Ozone treatment of coal- and coffee grounds-based active carbons: Water vapor adsorption and surface fractal micropores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsunoda, Ryoichi; Ozawa, Takayoshi; Ando, Junichi [Kanagawa Industrial Technology Research Inst., Ebina, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1998-09-15

    Characteristics of the adsorption iostherms of water vapor on active carbons from coal and coffee grounds and those ozonized ones from the surface fractal dimension analysis are discussed. The upswing of the adsorption isotherms in the low relative pressure of coffee grounds-based active carbon, of which isotherms were not scarcely affected on ozonization, was attributed to the adsorption of water molecules on the metallic oxides playing the role of oxygen-surface complexes, which formed the corrugated surfaces on the basal planes of micropore walls with the surface fractal dimension D{sub s} > 2. On the other hand, coal-based active carbon with D{sub s} < 2, which indicated the flat surfaces of micropore walls, showed little effect on the upswing even on ozonization, even though the adsorption amounts of water vapor were increased in the low relative pressure.

  15. Groundwater Surface Trends at Van Norden Meadow, California, from Ground Penetrating Radar Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadrick, N. I.; Blacic, T. M.; Yarnell, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Van Norden meadow in the Donner Summit area west of Lake Tahoe is one of the largest sub-alpine meadows in the Sierra Nevada mountain range. As natural water retention basins, meadows attenuate floods, improve water quality and support vegetation that stabilizes stream banks and promotes high biodiversity. Like most meadows in the Sierras however, over-grazing, road-building, and development has resulted in localized stream incision, degradation, and partial conversion from wet to dry conditions in Van Norden. Additionally, a small dam at the base of the meadow has partially flooded the lower meadow creating reservoir conditions. Privately owned since the late 1800s, Van Norden was recently purchased by a local land trust to prevent further development and return the area to public ownership. Restoration of the natural meadow conditions will involve notching the dam in 2016 to reduce currently impounded water volumes from 250 to less than 50 acre-feet. To monitor the effects of notching the dam on the upstream meadow conditions, better understanding of the surface and groundwater hydrology both pre- and post-restoration is required. We surveyed the meadow in summer 2014 with ground penetrating radar (GPR) to map the groundwater surface prior to restoration activities using a 270MHz antenna to obtain a suite of longitudinal and transverse transects. Groundwater level within the meadow was assessed using both piezometer readings and sweeps of the GPR antenna. Seventeen piezometers were added this year to the 13 already in place to monitor temporal changes in the groundwater surface, while the GPR profiles provided information about lateral variations. Our results provide an estimate of the groundwater depth variations across the upper portion of the meadow before notching. We plan to return in 2015 to collect GPR profiles during wetter conditions, which will provide a more complete assessment of the pre-notching groundwater hydrology.

  16. Surface Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SNMR - A new method for exploration of ground water and aquifer properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Yaramanci

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The Surface Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SNMR method is a fairly new technique in geophysics to assess ground water, i.e. existence, amount and productibility by measurements at the surface. The NMR technique used in medicine, physics and lately in borehole geophysics was adopted for surface measurements in the early eighties, and commercial equipment for measurements has been available since the mid nineties. The SNMR method has been tested at sites in Northern Germany with Quaternary sand and clay layers, to examine the suitability of this new method for groundwater exploration and environmental investigations. More information is obtained by SNMR, particularly with respect to aquifer parameters, than with other geophysical techniques. SNMR measurements were carried out at three borehole locations, together with 2D and 1D direct current geoelectrics and well logging (induction log, gamma-ray log and pulsed neutron-gamma log. Permeabilities were calculated from the grain-size distributions of core material determined in the laboratory. It is demonstrated that the SNMR method is able to detect groundwater and the results are in good agreement with other geophysical and hydrogeological data. Using the SNMR method, the water content of the unsaturated and saturated zones (i.e. porosity of an aquifer can be reliably determined. This information and resistivity data permit in-situ determination of other aquifer parameters. Comparison of the SNMR results with borehole data clearly shows that the water content determined by SNMR is the free or mobile water in the pores. The permeabilities estimated from the SNMR decay times are similar to those derived from sieve analysis of core material. Thus, the combination of SNMR with geoelectric methods promises to be a powerful tool for studying aquifer properties.

  17. Transport and fate of nitrate at the ground-water/surface-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckett, L.J.; Zamora, C.; Essaid, H.; Wilson, J.T.; Johnson, H.M.; Brayton, M.J.; Vogel, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    Although numerous studies of hyporheic exchange and denitrification have been conducted in pristine, high-gradient streams, few studies of this type have been conducted in nutrient-rich, low-gradient streams. This is a particularly important subject given the interest in nitrogen (N) inputs to the Gulf of Mexico and other eutrophic aquatic systems. A combination of hydrologic, mineralogical, chemical, dissolved gas, and isotopic data, were used to determine the processes controlling transport and fate of NO3- in streambeds at five sites across the USA. Water samples were collected from streambeds at depths ranging from 0.3 to 3 m at three to five points across the stream and in two to five separate transects. Residence times of water ranging from 0.28 to 34.7 d m-1 in the streambeds of N-rich watersheds played an important role in allowing denitrification to decrease NO3- concentrations. Where potential electron donors were limited and residence times were short, denitrification was limited. Consequently, in spite of reducing conditions at some sites, NO3- was transported into the stream. At two of the five study sites, NO3- in surface water infiltrated the streambeds and concentrations decreased, supporting current models that NO3- would be retained in N-rich streams. At the other three study sites, hydrogeologic controls limited or prevented infiltration of surface water into the streambed, and ground-water discharge contributed to NO 3- loads. Our results also show that in these low hydrologic-gradient systems, storm and other high-flow events can be important factors for increasing surface-water movement into streambeds. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  18. A comparative study of the phosphate levels in some surface and ground water bodies of Swaziland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Fadiran

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The levels of total phosphate in selected surface water and groundwater bodies from Manzini and Lubombo regions of Swaziland were determined using UV spectroscopic method. Samples were collected from three rivers (upstream and downstream of each, three industrial effluents, one reservoir, one pond, one tap water and fifteen boreholes. Mean phosphate levels in the tap water and reservoir varied between 0.08-0.09 mg/L while for the river samples, the range was 0.11-0.37 and for the industrial discharge, it was 0.11-1.60 mg/L PO4–P. For the ground water systems it ranged between 0.10-0.49 mg/L PO4–P. The mean phosphate levels in all the analyzed surface and groundwater samples were below the recommended maximum contaminant level (MCL by SWSC (Swaziland Water Service Corporation – i.e. 1.0 mg/L for drinking water; 2.0 mg/L for rivers and industrial effluents, and the South African criterion of 1.0 mg/L PO4–P, for sewage effluents being discharged into receiving waters. However, pooled mean values for all the sites were higher than the USEPA criterion of 0.03 mg/L maximum for uncontaminated lakes. Dominant factors considered to have influenced the levels of phosphates in both the surface and groundwater samples analyzed include industrial activities (where present, agricultural activities (including livestock, population density, location (urban, suburban or rural, soil/rock type in the vicinity of the sampling point, climate and rainfall pattern of the area or region concerned.

  19. Daytime Water Detection Based on Sky Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Arturo; Matthies, Larry; Bellutta, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    A water body s surface can be modeled as a horizontal mirror. Water detection based on sky reflections and color variation are complementary. A reflection coefficient model suggests sky reflections dominate the color of water at ranges > 12 meters. Water detection based on sky reflections: (1) geometrically locates the pixel in the sky that is reflecting on a candidate water pixel on the ground (2) predicts if the ground pixel is water based on color similarity and local terrain features. Water detection has been integrated on XUVs.

  20. X-ray Reflectivity Study of Ionic Liquids at Electrified Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Miaoqi

    X-ray reflectivity (XRR) versatile technique that characterize the surface structures. However, due to the lack of phase information of X-ray data, the reconstruction of electron density profile (EDP) from XRR data is an ill-posed inverse problem that requires extra attention. In Chapter 1, several key concepts in XRR data analysis are reviewed. The typical XRR data acquisition procedure and methods of modeling electron density are introduced. The widely used logarithm form of merit function is justified with mathematical deduction and numerical experiment. A scheme that generates artificial reflectivity data with theoretical statistical error but not systematical error is proposed. With the methods and schemes described in Chapter 1, simulated reflectivity data of a simple one-slab model is generated and fitted to test the efficient of EDP reconstruction. By isolating the parameters, the effects of slab width, electron density contrast and maximal wave transfer are studied individually. It?s demonstrated that best-fit/global minima, result reported by most XRR studies, don?t necessary reflect the real EDP. By contrast, mapping the merit function in the parametric space can capture much more details. Additionally, the widely accepted concept about the XRR theoretical spatial resolution (pi/q_{max}) as well the using Patterson function are brought to test. In the perspective of XRR data analysis, this chapter puts forward general rules to design and optimize XRR experiments. It also demonstrates how susceptible the fitting result will be if it?s not done carefully. In Chapter 3, the interface between hydrophobic OTS film and several solvents is studied with XRR in a transmission-cell setup. The solvents, from water, acetone, to alcohol (methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol), to alkane (pentane, hexane and heptane), vary significantly in terms of polarity and hydrogen bonding. However, the XRR data from different solvents are subtle. The methods and principles elicited in

  1. Multilayers at the surface of solutions of exogenous lung surfactant: direct observation by neutron reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follows, D; Tiberg, F; Thomas, R K; Larsson, M

    2007-02-01

    Pharmacy-grade exogenous lung surfactant preparations of bovine and porcine origin, dispersed in physiological electrolyte solution have been studied. The organization and dynamics at the air/water interface at physiological temperature was analysed by neutron reflection. The results show that a well-defined surface phase is formed, consisting of a multilayer structure of lipid/protein bilayers alternating with aqueous layers, with a repetition period of about 70 A and correlation depths of 3 to >25 bilayers, depending on electrolyte composition and time. The experimental surfactant concentration of 0.15% (w/w) is far below that used in therapeutic application of exogenous surfactants and it is therefore likely that similar multilayer structures are also formed at the alveolar surface in the clinical situation during surfactant substitution therapy. Lung surfactant preparations in dry form swell in aqueous solution towards a limit of about 60% (w/w) of water, forming a lamellar liquid-crystalline phase above about 34 degrees C, which disperses into lamellar bodies at higher water concentrations. The lamellar spacings in the surface multilayers at the air/water interface are smaller than those in the saturated limit even though they are in contact with much greater water concentrations. The surface multilayers are laterally disordered in a way that is consistent with fragments of Lalpha-phase lamellae. The near surface layers of the multilayer structure have a significant protein content (only SP-B and SP-C are present in the preparations). The results demonstrate that a multilayer structure can be formed in exogenous surfactant even at very low concentrations and indicate that multilayers need to be incorporated into present interpretations of in vitro studies of similar lung surfactant preparations, which are largely based on monolayer models.

  2. Are boundary conditions in surface productivity at the Southern Polar Front reflected in benthic activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Angelika; Vanreusel, Ann; Bracher, Astrid; Jule Marie Hoppe, Clara; Lins, Lidia; Meyer-Löbbecke, Anna; Altenburg Soppa, Mariana; Würzberg, Laura

    2014-10-01

    In austral summer 2012, during the expedition ANT-XXVIII/3 on board RV Polarstern, two sites were sampled 1600 km apart in the South Polar Front area (52°S) at the boundary of different productivity regimes for meio- and macrobenthos using a multiple-corer and an epibenthic sledge, respectively. Patterns in density and abundance data were compared between different size classes of the benthos and interpreted in relation to surface primary productivity data and sediment oxygen consumption. We tested the hypothesis that long-term satellite-derived surface phytoplankton biomass, in situ real time biomass, and productivity measurements at the surface and throughout the euphotic zone are reflected in abyssal benthos densities, abundances and activity. Specifically, we investigated the effect of boundary conditions for lower and higher surface productivity. Surface and integrated to 100 m depth biomass and primary productivity measurements vary stations, with the lowest values at station 85 (0.083 mg Chl-a m-3 at surface, 9 mg Chl-a m-2 and 161 mg C m-2 d-1- integrated over the first 100 m depth), and the highest values at station 86 (2.231 mg Chl-a m-3 at surface, 180 mg Chl-a m-2 and 2587 mg C m-2 d-1 integrated over first 100 m depth). Total meiofaunal densities varied between 102 and 335 individuals/10 cm². Densities were the highest at station 86-30 (335 individuals) and lowest at station 81-13 (102 individuals). Total macrofaunal densities (individuals/1000 m²) varied between 26 individuals at station 81-17 and 194 individuals at station 86-24. However, three EBS hauls were taken at station 86 with a minimum of 80 and a maximum of 194 individuals. Sediment oxygen consumption did not vary significantly between stations from east to west. Bentho-pelagic coupling of meio- and macrobenthic communities could not be observed in the South Polar Front at the boundary conditions from low to high surface productivity between stations 81 and 86.

  3. Simulation of reflectance from white-anodised aluminium surfaces using polyurethane–TiO2 composite coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Johansen, Villads Egede; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical calculations and experimental studies were carried out on polyurethane (PU)–TiO2 composite coatings on bright and matte aluminium surfaces with an aim to understand and tailor the light scattering from particles incorporated into an anodised layer for designing the optical appearance...... of anodised surfaces. PU matrix was selected for its matching refractive-index (n = 1.7) with anodic alumina layer. Three different TiO2 particle size distributions were dispersed in PU and spin coated onto bright high-gloss and matte caustic-etched aluminium substrates. The reflectance spectra of coated...... surfaces in the visible region were analysed using an integrating sphere-spectrophotometer. Data showed that the coated surfaces have a high diffuse reflectance due to the multiple scattering from TiO2 particles and the coating–substrate interface. The diffuse reflectance spectra of the coated surfaces...

  4. Different size biomolecules anchoring on porous silicon surface: fluorescence and reflectivity pores infiltration comparative studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovannozzi, Andrea M.; Rossi, Andrea M. [National Institute for Metrological Research, Thermodynamic Division, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Renacco, Chiara; Farano, Alessandro [Ribes Ricecrhe Srl, Via Lavoratori Vittime del Col du Mont 24, 11100 Aosta (Italy); Derosas, Manuela [Biodiversity Srl, Via Corfu 71, 25124 Brescia (Italy); Enrico, Emanuele [National Institute for Metrological Research, Electromagnetism Division, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    The performance of porous silicon optical based biosensors strongly depends on material nanomorphology, on biomolecules distribution inside the pores and on the ability to link sensing species to the pore walls. In this paper we studied the immobilization of biomolecules with different size, such as antibody anti aflatoxin (anti Aflatox Ab, {proportional_to}150 KDa), malate dehydrogenase (MDH, {proportional_to}36KDa) and metallothionein (MT, {proportional_to}6KDa) at different concentrations on mesoporous silicon samples ({proportional_to}15 nm pores diameter). Fluorescence measurements using FITC- labeled biomolecules and refractive index analysis based on reflectivity spectra have been employed together to detect the amount of proteins bound to the surface and to evaluate their diffusion inside the pores. Here we suggest that these two techniques should be used together to have a better understanding of what happens at the porous silicon surface. In fact, when pores dimensions are not perfectly tuned to the protein size a higher fluorescence signal doesn't often correspond to a higher biomolecules distribution inside the pores. When a too much higher concentration of biomolecule is anchored on the surface, steric crowd effects and repulsive interactions probably take over and hinder pores infiltration, inducing a small or absent shift in the fringe pattern even if a higher fluorescence signal is registered. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Neutron reflectivity study of substrate surface chemistry effects on supported phospholipid bilayer formation on (1120) sapphire.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oleson, Timothy A. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Sahai, Nita [University of Akron; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Dura, Joseph A [ORNL; Majkrzak, Charles F [ORNL; Giuffre, Anthony J. [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2012-01-01

    Oxide-supported phospholipid bilayers (SPBs) used as biomimetric membranes are significant for a broad range of applications including improvement of biomedical devices and biosensors, and in understanding biomineralization processes and the possible role of mineral surfaces in the evolution of pre-biotic membranes. Continuous-coverage and/or stacjed SPBs retain properties (e.,g. fluidity) more similar to native biological membranes, which is desirable for most applications. Using neutron reflectivity, we examined face coverage and potential stacking of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers on the (1120) face of sapphire (a-Al2O3). Nearly full bilayers were formed at low to neutral pH, when the sapphire surface is positively charged, and at low ionic strength (l=15 mM NaCl). Coverage decreased at higher pH, close to the isoelectric point of sapphire, and also at high I>210mM, or with addition of 2mM Ca2+. The latter two effects are additive, suggesting that Ca2+ mitigates the effect of higher I. These trends agree with previous results for phospholipid adsorption on a-Al2O3 particles determined by adsorption isotherms and on single-crystal (1010) sapphire by atomic force microscopy, suggesting consistency of oxide surface chemistry-dependent effects across experimental techniques.

  6. Direct laser writing of microstructures on optically opaque and reflective surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekštytė, S.; Jonavičius, T.; Malinauskas, M.

    2014-02-01

    Direct laser writing (DLW) based on ultra-localized polymerization is an efficient way to produce three-dimensional (3D) micro/nano-structures for diverse applications in science and industry. It is attractive for its flexibility to materialize CAD models out of wide spectrum of materials on the desired substrates. In case of direct laser lithography, photo-crosslinking can be achieved by tightly focusing ultrashort laser pulses to a photo- or thermo-polymers. Selectively exposing material to laser radiation allows creating fully 3D structures with submicrometer spatial resolution. In this paper we present DLW results of hybrid organic-inorganic material SZ2080 on optically opaque and reflective surfaces, such as silicon and various metals (Cr, Ti, Au). Our studies prove that one can precisely fabricate 2D and 3D structures with lower than 1 μm spatial resolution even on glossy or rough surfaces (surface roughness rms 0.068-0.670 μm) using sample translation velocities of up to 1 mm/s. Using femtosecond high pulse repetition rate laser, sample translation velocity can reach over 1 mm/s ensuring repeatable submicrometer structuring resolution.

  7. Contribution of ground surface altitude difference to thermal anomaly detection using satellite images: Application to volcanic/geothermal complexes in the Andes of Central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Francisco J.; Lemus, Martín; Parada, Miguel A.; Benavente, Oscar M.; Aguilera, Felipe A.

    2012-09-01

    Detection of thermal anomalies in volcanic-geothermal areas using remote sensing methodologies requires the subtraction of temperatures, not provided by geothermal manifestations (e.g. hot springs, fumaroles, active craters), from satellite image kinetic temperature, which is assumed to correspond to the ground surface temperature. Temperatures that have been subtracted in current models include those derived from the atmospheric transmittance, reflectance of the Earth's surface (albedo), topography effect, thermal inertia and geographic position effect. We propose a model that includes a new parameter (K) that accounts for the variation of temperature with ground surface altitude difference in areas where steep relief exists. The proposed model was developed and applied, using ASTER satellite images, in two Andean volcanic/geothermal complexes (Descabezado Grande-Cerro Azul Volcanic Complex and Planchón-Peteroa-Azufre Volcanic Complex) where field data of atmosphere and ground surface temperature as well as radiation for albedo calibration were obtained in 10 selected sites. The study area was divided into three zones (Northern, Central and Southern zones) where the thermal anomalies were obtained independently. K value calculated for night images of the three zones are better constrained and resulted to be very similar to the Environmental Lapse Rate (ELR) determined for a stable atmosphere (ELR > 7 °C/km). Using the proposed model, numerous thermal anomalies in areas of ≥ 90 m × 90 m were identified that were successfully cross-checked in the field. Night images provide more reliable information for thermal anomaly detection than day images because they record higher temperature contrast between geothermal areas and its surroundings and correspond to more stable atmospheric condition at the time of image acquisition.

  8. Questa baseline and pre-mining ground-water quality investigation. 10. Geologic influences on ground and surface waters in the lower Red River watershed, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludington, Steve; Plumlee, Geoff; Caine, Jonathan; Bove, Dana; Holloway, JoAnn; Livo, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: This report is one in a series that presents results of an interdisciplinary U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) study of ground-water quality in the lower Red River watershed prior to open-pit and underground molybdenite mining at Molycorp's Questa mine. The stretch of the Red River watershed that extends from just upstream of the town of Red River, N. Mex., to just above the town of Questa includes several mineralized areas in addition to the one mined by Molycorp. Natural erosion and weathering of pyrite-rich rocks in the mineralized areas has created a series of erosional scars along this stretch of the Red River that contribute acidic waters, as well as mineralized alluvial material and sediments, to the river. The overall goal of the USGS study is to infer the premining ground-water quality at the Molycorp mine site. An integrated geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical model for ground water in the mineralized-but unmined-Straight Creek drainage (a tributary of the Red River) is being used as an analog for the geologic, geochemical, and hydrologic conditions that influenced ground-water quality and quantity in the Red River drainage prior to mining. This report provides an overall geologic framework for the Red River watershed between Red River and Questa, in northern New Mexico, and summarizes key geologic, mineralogic, structural and other characteristics of various mineralized areas (and their associated erosional scars and debris fans) that likely influence ground- and surface-water quality and hydrology. The premining nature of the Sulphur Gulch and Goat Hill Gulch scars on the Molycorp mine site can be inferred through geologic comparisons with other unmined scars in the Red River drainage.

  9. A mixed space-time and wavenumber-frequency domain procedure for modelling ground vibration from surface railway tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroma, S. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Hussein, M. F. M.; Ntotsios, E.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a methodology for studying ground vibration in which the railway track is modelled in the space-time domain using the finite element method (FEM) and, for faster computation, discretisation of the ground using either FEM or the boundary element method (BEM) is avoided by modelling it in the wavenumber-frequency domain. The railway track is coupled to the ground through a series of rectangular strips located at the surface of the ground; their vertical interaction is described by a frequency-dependent dynamic stiffness matrix whose elements are represented by discrete lumped parameter models. The effectiveness of this approach is assessed firstly through frequency domain analysis using as excitation a stationary harmonic load applied on the rail. The interaction forces at the ballast/ground interface are calculated using the FE track model in the space-time domain, transformed to the wavenumber domain, and used as input to the ground model for calculating vibration in the free field. Additionally, time domain simulations are also performed with the inclusion of nonlinear track parameters. Results are presented for the coupled track/ground model in terms of time histories and frequency spectra for the track vibration, interaction forces and free-field ground vibration. For the linear track model, the results from the mixed formulation are in excellent agreement with those from a semi-analytical model formulated in the wavenumber-frequency domain, particularly in the vicinity of the loading point. The accuracy of the mixed formulation away from the excitation point depends strongly on the inclusion of through-ground coupling in the lumped parameter model, which has been found to be necessary for both track dynamics and ground vibration predictions.

  10. Assessment of volatile organic compounds in surface water at West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Lisa D.; Spencer, Tracey A.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected 13 surface-water samples and 3 replicates from 5 sites in the West Branch Canal Creek area at Aberdeen Proving Ground from February through August 1999, as a part of an investigation of ground-water contamination and natural attenuation processes. The samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds, including trichloroethylene, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, carbon tetrachloride, and chloroform, which are the four major contaminants that were detected in ground water in the Canal Creek area in earlier USGS studies. Field blanks were collected during the sampling period to assess sample bias. Field replicates were used to assess sample variability, which was expressed as relative percent difference. The mean variability of the surface-water replicate analyses was larger (35.4 percent) than the mean variability of ground-water replicate analyses (14.6 percent) determined for West Branch Canal Creek from 1995 through 1996. The higher variability in surface-water analyses is probably due to heterogeneities in the composition of the surface water rather than differences in sampling or analytical procedures. The most frequently detected volatile organic compound was 1,1,2,2- tetrachloroethane, which was detected in every sample and in two of the replicates. The surface-water contamination is likely the result of cross-media transfer of contaminants from the ground water and sediments along the West Branch Canal Creek. The full extent of surface-water contamination in West Branch Canal Creek and the locations of probable contaminant sources cannot be determined from this limited set of data. Tidal mixing, creek flow patterns, and potential effects of a drought that occurred during the sampling period also complicate the evaluation of surface-water contamination.

  11. Ground surface temperature histories in northern Ontario and Québec for the past 500 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickler, Carolyne; Beltrami, Hugo; Mareschal, Jean-Claude

    2016-04-01

    We have used 19 temperature-depth profiles measured in boreholes from eastern Canada to reconstruct the ground surface temperature histories of the region. The boreholes are located north of 51oN, and west and east of James Bay in northern Ontario and Québec. The 8 boreholes in northern Ontario come from 3 sites in a region of extensive discontinuous permafrost, while the 11 holes from Québec come from 6 sites in a region of sporadic discontinuous permafrost. The depths of the holes range between 400 and 800 m, allowing a reconstruction of the ground surface temperature histories for the past 500 years. Present ground surface temperatures are higher in Québec, perhaps because the region receives more snowfall as shown by meteorological records and proxy data. The ground surface temperature histories indicate a present-day warming of ˜2-2.5oC in Ontario and ˜1-1.5oC in Québec relative to the reference surface temperature 500 years BP. These results are in agreement with available proxy data for the recent warming in eastern North America. Furthermore, they suggest that the higher snowfall and strong cooling during the Little Ice Age could have muted the borehole temperature record of climate change in Québec.

  12. An Upscaling Algorithm to Obtain the Representative Ground Truth of LAI Time Series in Heterogeneous Land Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuechan Shi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Upscaling in situ leaf area index (LAI measurements to the footprint scale is important for the validation of medium resolution remote sensing products. However, surface heterogeneity and temporal variation of vegetation make this difficult. In this study, a two-step upscaling algorithm was developed to obtain the representative ground truth of LAI time series in heterogeneous surfaces based on in situ LAI data measured by the wireless sensor network (WSN observation system. Since heterogeneity within a site usually arises from the mixture of vegetation and non-vegetation surfaces, the spatial heterogeneity of vegetation and land cover types were separately considered. Representative LAI time series of vegetation surfaces were obtained by upscaling in situ measurements using an optimal weighted combination method, incorporating the expectation maximum (EM algorithm to derive the weights. The ground truth of LAI over the whole site could then be determined using area weighted combination of representative LAIs of different land cover types. The algorithm was evaluated using a dataset collected in Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research (HiWater experiment. The proposed algorithm can effectively obtain the representative ground truth of LAI time series in heterogeneous cropland areas. Using the normal method of an average LAI measurement to represent the heterogeneous surface produced a root mean square error (RMSE of 0.69, whereas the proposed algorithm provided RMSE = 0.032 using 23 sampling points. The proposed ground truth derived method was implemented to validate four major LAI products.

  13. Bio-inspired, subwavelength surface structures to control reflectivity, transmission, and scattering in the infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lora Gonzalez, Federico

    Controlling the reflection of visible and infrared (IR) light at interfaces is extremely important to increase the power efficiency and performance of optics, electro-optical and (thermo)photovoltaic systems. The eye of the moth has evolved subwavelength protuberances that increase light transmission into the eye tissue and prevent reflection. The subwavelength protuberances effectively grade the refractive index from that of air (n=1) to that of the tissue (n=1.4), making the interface gradual, suppressing reflection. In theory, the moth-eye (ME) structures can be implemented with any material platform to achieve an antireflectance effect by scaling the pitch and size of protuberances for the wavelength range of interest. In this work, a bio-inspired, scalable and substrate-independent surface modification protocol was developed to realize broadband antireflective structures based on the moth-eye principle. Quasi-ordered ME arrays were fabricated in IR relevant materials using a colloidal lithography method to achieve highly efficient, omni-directional transmission of mid and far infrared (IR) radiation. The effect of structure height and aspect ratio on transmittance and scattering is explored, with discussion on experimental techniques and effective medium theory (EMT). The highest aspect ratio structures (AR = 9.4) achieved peak single-side transmittance of 98%, with >85% transmission for lambda = 7--30 microns. A detailed photon balance constructed by transmission, forward scattering, specular reflection and diffuse reflection measurements to quantify optical losses due to near-field effects will be discussed. In addition, angle-dependent transmission measurements showed that moth-eye structures provide superior antireflective properties compared to unstructured interfaces over a wide angular range (0--60° incidence). Finally, subwavelength ME structures are incorporated on a Si substrate to enhance the absorption of near infrared (NIR) light in PtSi films to

  14. Recent Developments in the X-Ray Reflectivity Analysis for Rough Surfaces and Interfaces of Multilayered Thin Film Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Fujii

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray reflectometry is a powerful tool for investigations on rough surface and interface structures of multilayered thin film materials. The X-ray reflectivity has been calculated based on the Parratt formalism, accounting for the effect of roughness by the theory of Nevot-Croce conventionally. However, in previous studies, the calculations of the X-ray reflectivity often show a strange effect where interference effects would increase at a rough surface. And estimated surface and interface roughnesses from the X-ray reflectivity measurements did not correspond to the TEM image observation results. The strange result had its origin in a used equation due to a serious mistake in which the Fresnel transmission coefficient in the reflectivity equation is increased at a rough interface because of a lack of consideration of diffuse scattering. In this review, a new accurate formalism that corrects this mistake is presented. The new accurate formalism derives an accurate analysis of the X-ray reflectivity from a multilayer surface of thin film materials, taking into account the effect of roughness-induced diffuse scattering. The calculated reflectivity by this accurate reflectivity equation should enable the structure of buried interfaces to be analyzed more accurately.

  15. Fabrication of hard-coated optical absorbers with microstructured surfaces using etched ion tracks: Toward broadband ultra-low reflectance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amemiya, Kuniaki, E-mail: k.amemiya@aist.go.jp [National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8563 (Japan); Koshikawa, Hiroshi; Yamaki, Tetsuya; Maekawa, Yasunari [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Shitomi, Hiroshi; Numata, Takayuki; Kinoshita, Kenichi; Tanabe, Minoru; Fukuda, Daiji [National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8563 (Japan)

    2015-08-01

    Highlights: • A hard-coated optical absorber with microstructured surface was fabricated. • Etched ion tracks coated with diamond-like carbon were used. • The reflectance was below 2% for wavelengths in the 400–1400 nm range. • Fabricated optical absorber exhibited temporal durability and mechanical stability. • Further improvement of the design and process will yield reflectance of ∼0.1%. - Abstract: Broadband low reflectance materials have various applications in the field of optical energy management; however, materials with ultra-low reflectance (below 0.1%) have been considered as mechanically delicate. We have developed a novel hard-surface optical absorber with microstructured, diamond-like carbon coated ion tracks on CR-39 plastic substrate. The spectral reflectance of the first prototype was below 2% for wavelengths ranging from 400 nm to 1400 nm; moreover, the optical absorber had mechanically hard surface and exhibited temporal durability. Choosing the appropriate design of the surface structure and coating layer is likely to reduce the reflectance to the order of 0.1%. This technique yields easy-to-handle broadband ultra-low reflectance absorbers.

  16. Reflection and refraction of narrow Gaussian beams with general astigmatism at tilted optical surfaces: a derivation oriented toward lens design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Vincenzo; Giusfredi, Giovanni

    2007-02-01

    The formulas for the reflection and refraction of a narrow Gaussian beam with general astigmatism at a tilted optical surface are derived by ray-tracing techniques. The propagation direction of the reflected and refracted beams is computed by tracing the central ray of the incident beam, and the characteristic parameters of the respective wavefronts are worked out by applying the formulas developed for the generalized ray tracing. Moreover, the Gaussian form of the reflected and refracted amplitude distributions along the transverse coordinates is determined by requiring the matching of the incident, reflected, and refracted light spots on the optical surface. No limiting assumptions are made regarding the form of the optical interface or the orientation of the incident astigmatic wavefront. In the end, to illustrate a simple application of these formulas, the reflection of a Gaussian beam at a conicoid is considered, and a simple property of the conicoidal mirrors is reported.

  17. BOREAS Level-2 MAS Surface Reflectance and Temperature Images in BSQ Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey (Editor); Lobitz, Brad; Spanner, Michael; Strub, Richard; Lobitz, Brad

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Staff Science Aircraft Data Acquisition Program focused on providing the research teams with the remotely sensed aircraft data products they needed to compare and spatially extend point results. The MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) images, along with other remotely sensed data, were collected to provide spatially extensive information over the primary study areas. This information includes biophysical parameter maps such as surface reflectance and temperature. Collection of the MAS images occurred over the study areas during the 1994 field campaigns. The level-2 MAS data cover the dates of 21-Jul-1994, 24-Jul-1994, 04-Aug-1994, and 08-Aug-1994. The data are not geographically/geometrically corrected; however, files of relative X and Y coordinates for each image pixel were derived by using the C130 navigation data in a MAS scan model. The data are provided in binary image format files.

  18. DESIGN NOTE: Surface microscopy and fibre characterization using a multimode-fibre reflectance microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukins, P. B.; Rehman, S.; Stevens, G. B.

    2000-04-01

    A remarkably simple scanning infrared surface-reflectance microscope based on a multimode-fibre-coupled diode laser together with straightforward electronics and scanning stage is described. The design does not require alignment and completely avoids the use of objectives, beamsplitters and other optics normally associated with such microscopes. The axial response, resolution and imaging properties for non-interferometric operation are characterized. A geometric model for the transmission of such a microscope using an idealized step/graded-index multimode fibre is presented. This model is used to explain the axial response of the microscope. Finally, a new method for determination of the numerical aperture and index-grading parameter of multimode fibres is proposed. This method is based on the geometric model together with axial-response measurements using the microscope in such a way that the fibre probe is the actual test fibre.

  19. Online Monitoring of Laser-Generated XUV Radiation Spectra by Surface Reflectivity Measurements with Particle Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hoffmann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, we present a wavelength-sensitive method for the detection of extreme ultraviolet (XUV photon energies between 30 eV and 120 eV. The method is based on 45° reflectivity from either a cesium iodide-coated or an uncoated metal surface, which directs the XUV beam onto an electron or ion detector and its signal is used to monitor the XUV beam. The benefits of our approach are a spectrally sensitive diagnosis of the XUV radiation at the interaction place of time-resolved XUV experiments and the detection of infrared leak light though metal filters in high-harmonic generation (HHG experiments. Both features were tested using spectrally shaped XUV pulses from HHG in a capillary, and we have achieved excellent agreement with XUV spectrometer measurements and reflectivity calculations. Our obtained results are of interest for time-resolved XUV experiments presenting an additional diagnostic directly in the interaction region and for small footprint XUV beamline diagnostics.

  20. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy of single bowtie nano-antennas using a differential reflectivity method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaniber, M; Schraml, K; Regler, A; Bartl, J; Glashagen, G; Flassig, F; Wierzbowski, J; Finley, J J

    2016-03-23

    We report on the structural and optical properties of individual bowtie nanoantennas both on glass and semiconducting GaAs substrates. The antennas on glass (GaAs) are shown to be of excellent quality and high uniformity reflected by narrow size distributions with standard deviations for the triangle and gap size of = 4.5 nm = 2.6 nm and = 5.4 nm = 3.8 nm, respectively. The corresponding optical properties of individual nanoantennas studied by differential reflection spectroscopy show a strong reduction of the localised surface plasmon polariton resonance linewidth from 0.21 eV to 0.07 eV upon reducing the antenna size from 150 nm to 100 nm. This is attributed to the absence of inhomogeneous broadening as compared to optical measurements on nanoantenna ensembles. The inter-particle coupling of an individual bowtie nanoantenna, which gives rise to strongly localised and enhanced electromagnetic hotspots, is demonstrated using polarization-resolved spectroscopy, yielding a large degree of linear polarization of ρmax ~ 80%. The combination of highly reproducible nanofabrication and fast, non-destructive and non-contaminating optical spectroscopy paves the route towards future semiconductor-based nano-plasmonic circuits, consisting of multiple photonic and plasmonic entities.

  1. Simulation of ground-water/surface-water flow in the Santa Clara-Calleguas ground-water basin, Ventura County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Randall T.; Martin, Peter; Koczot, Kathryn M.

    2003-01-01

    Ground water is the main source of water in the Santa Clara-Calleguas ground-water basin that covers about 310 square miles in Ventura County, California. A steady increase in the demand for surface- and ground-water resources since the late 1800s has resulted in streamflow depletion and ground-water overdraft. This steady increase in water use has resulted in seawater intrusion, inter-aquifer flow, land subsidence, and ground-water contamination. The Santa Clara-Calleguas Basin consists of multiple aquifers that are grouped into upper- and lower-aquifer systems. The upper-aquifer system includes the Shallow, Oxnard, and Mugu aquifers. The lower-aquifer system includes the upper and lower Hueneme, Fox Canyon, and Grimes Canyon aquifers. The layered aquifer systems are each bounded below by regional unconformities that are overlain by extensive basal coarse-grained layers that are the major pathways for ground-water production from wells and related seawater intrusion. The aquifer systems are bounded below and along mountain fronts by consolidated bedrock that forms a relatively impermeable boundary to ground-water flow. Numerous faults act as additional exterior and interior boundaries to ground-water flow. The aquifer systems extend offshore where they crop out along the edge of the submarine shelf and within the coastal submarine canyons. Submarine canyons have dissected these regional aquifers, providing a hydraulic connection to the ocean through the submarine outcrops of the aquifer systems. Coastal landward flow (seawater intrusion) occurs within both the upper- and lower-aquifer systems. A numerical ground-water flow model of the Santa Clara-Calleguas Basin was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey to better define the geohydrologic framework of the regional ground-water flow system and to help analyze the major problems affecting water-resources management of a typical coastal aquifer system. Construction of the Santa Clara-Calleguas Basin model required

  2. Spectral reflectance properties of minerals exposed to simulated Mars surface conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloutis, E. A.; Craig, M. A.; Kruzelecky, R. V.; Jamroz, W. R.; Scott, A.; Hawthorne, F. C.; Mertzman, S. A.

    2008-05-01

    A number of mineral species were exposed to martian surface conditions of atmospheric pressure and composition, temperature, and UV light regime, and their evolution was monitored using reflectance spectroscopy. The stabilities for different groups varied widely. Phyllosilicate spectra all showed measurable losses of interlayer H 2O, with some structural groups showing more rapid H 2O loss than others. Loss of OH from the phyllosilicates is not always accompanied by a change in metal-OH overtone absorption bands. OH-bearing sulfates, such as jarosite and alunite, show no measurable change in spectral properties, suggesting that they should be spectrally detectable on Mars on the basis of diagnostic absorption bands in the 0.4-2.5 μm region. Fe 3+- and H 2O-bearing sulfates all showed changes in the appearance and/or reduction in depths of hydroxo-bridged Fe 3+ absorption bands, particularly at 0.43 μm. The spectral changes were often accompanied by visible color changes, suggesting that subsurface sulfates exposed to the martian surface environment may undergo measurable changes in reflectance spectra and color over short periods of time (days to weeks). Organic-bearing geological materials showed no measurable change in C sbnd H related absorption bands, while carbonates and hydroxides also showed no systematic changes in spectral properties. The addition of ultraviolet irradiation did not seem to affect mineral stability or rate of spectral change, with one exception (hexahydrite). In some cases, spectral changes could be related to the formation of specific new phases. The data also suggest that hydrated minerals detected on Mars to date retain their diagnostic spectral properties that allow their unique identification.

  3. Modeling short wave radiation and ground surface temperature: a validation experiment in the Western Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogliotti, P.; Cremonese, E.; Dallamico, M.; Gruber, S.; Migliavacca, M.; Morra di Cella, U.

    2009-12-01

    Permafrost distribution in high-mountain areas is influenced by topography (micro-climate) and high variability of ground covers conditions. Its monitoring is very difficult due to logistical problems like accessibility, costs, weather conditions and reliability of instrumentation. For these reasons physically-based modeling of surface rock/ground temperatures (GST) is fundamental for the study of mountain permafrost dynamics. With this awareness a 1D version of GEOtop model (www.geotop.org) is tested in several high-mountain sites and its accuracy to reproduce GST and incoming short wave radiation (SWin) is evaluated using independent field measurements. In order to describe the influence of topography, both flat and near-vertical sites with different aspects are considered. Since the validation of SWin is difficult on steep rock faces (due to the lack of direct measures) and validation of GST is difficult on flat sites (due to the presence of snow) the two parameters are validated as independent experiments: SWin only on flat morphologies, GST only on the steep ones. The main purpose is to investigate the effect of: (i) distance between driving meteo station location and simulation point location, (ii) cloudiness, (iii) simulation point aspect, (iv) winter/summer period. The temporal duration of model runs is variable from 3 years for the SWin experiment to 8 years for the validation of GST. The model parameterization is constant and tuned for a common massive bedrock of crystalline rock like granite. Ground temperature profile is not initialized because rock temperature is measured at only 10cm depth. A set of 9 performance measures is used for comparing model predictions and observations (including: fractional mean bias (FB), coefficient of residual mass (CMR), mean absolute error (MAE), modelling efficiency (ME), coefficient of determination (R2)). Results are very encouraging. For both experiments the distance (Km) between location of the driving meteo

  4. Time domain analysis of thin-wire antennas over lossy ground using the reflection-coefficient approximation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernández Pantoja, M.; Yarovoy, A.G.; Rubio Bretones, A.; González García, S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a procedure to extend the methods of moments in time domain for the transient analysis of thin-wire antennas to include those cases where the antennas are located over a lossy half-space. This extended technique is based on the reflection coefficient (RC) approach, which approxim

  5. Transport of a nematicide in surface and ground waters in a farmed tropical catchment with volcanic substratum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, J.-B.; Cattan, P.; Voltz, M.; Moussa, R.

    2009-04-01

    Assessment of water-pollution risks in agricultural regions requires studying pesticide transport processes in soil and water compartments at the catchment scale. In tropical regions, banana (Musa spp.) plantations are located in zones with abundant rainfalls and soils with high infiltration rates, which lead to washout and leaching of soil-applied pesticides, causing severe diffuse pollution of water resources. The aim of this paper is to determine how the nematicide cadusafos [S,S-di-sec-butyl O-ethyl phosphorodithioate], used in banana plantations, contaminates water and soils at the two scales of subcatchment and catchment. The study site was a small banana-growing catchment on the tropical volcanic island of Guadeloupe in the Caribbean (FWI). The catchment is located in pedoclimatic conditions where rainfall is abundant (> 4000 mm/year), and soil permeable (saturated hydraulic conductivity of Andosol Ks > 30 mm/h). Two campaigns of nematicide application were conducted, one in 2003 over 40% of the catchment and one in 2006 over 12%. For 100 days after application, we monitored the surface water and groundwater flows and the cadusafos concentrations in the soil and in surface and ground waters in a 2400 m² subcatchment and a 17.8 ha catchment. The results show that at the subcatchment scale the high retention in the A horizon of the soil limited the transport of cadusafos by runoff, whereas the lower retention of the molecule in the B horizon favoured percolation towards the shallow groundwater. The contamination levels of surface water, as well as shallow and deep groundwaters, reflected the geological structure of the Féfé catchment: i.e. a shallow aquifer in the most recent volcanic deposits that is rapidly exposed to pollution and a deeper aquifer that is relatively protected from the pollution coming from the treated fields. Comparing the losses of cadusafos at the subcatchment and at the catchment scales revealed that the nematicide re-infiltrated in

  6. The impact of municipal landfill on surface and ground water quality in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Nyengera

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Leachate from Richmond municipal landfill, underlain by the Matsheumhlope unconfined aquifer in Bulawayo city and its consequent water resource quality impacts are evaluated. Leachate samples from collection ponds and water samples from a stream, and up and down-gradient boreholes fromthe landfill were tested for nine pollutants. The leachate pollutants found in both surface and ground water included metals (Fe, Pb and Hg and organic compounds that are hazardous to both human and the environmental health. Borehole water quality compliance with the relevant national and international regulations is reported. From borehole water samples, only chloride and nitrate with concentrations of 56.9 mg/ℓ and 2.26 mg/ℓ, respectively, were within the World Health Organisation (WHO recommended limits for drinking water of 250 mg/ℓ and 10 mg/ℓ, respectively. Lead and mercury concentrations of 0.22 mg/ℓ and 0.04 mg/ℓ were 10 times higher than WHO guidelines of 0.01 and 0.001 mg/ℓ, respectively. Both landfill and informal settlement activities near the landfill impact negatively to water resources quality in the area. City council should minimize waste by recycling, pre-treat collected leachate and drill monitoring wells around the landfill to check possible leachate leaks to water resources and take remedial actions, such assubmerged leachate combustion and evaporation.

  7. A study of the efficiency of spur gears made of powder metallurgy materials - ground versus super-finished surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xinmin; Sosa, Mario; Andersson, Martin; Olofsson, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Power loss is one of the main concerns in gear transmission systems. In this study a recirculating power back-to-back FZG test rig was used to investigate the efficiency of spur gears made of powder metallurgy (PM) material using two different surface manufacturing methods (ground and super-finished). The results were compared with previously presented results of standard gear material from the same test rig. The influence of the material (Wrought steel or PM) and surface roughness on the gea...

  8. Lithium content in potable water, surface water, ground water, and mineral water on the territory of Republic of Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Vesna Kostik; Biljana Bauer; Zoran Kavrakovski

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine lithium concentration in potable water, surface water, ground, and mineral water on the territory of the Republic of Macedonia. Water samples were collected from water bodies such as multiple public water supply systems located in 13 cities, wells boreholes located in 12 areas, lakes and rivers located in three different areas. Determination of lithium concentration in potable water, surface water was performed by the technique of inductively coupl...

  9. Influence of aerosol and surface reflectance variability on hyperspectral observed radiance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bassani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Current aerosol retrievals based on visible and near infrared remote-sensing, are prone to loss of accuracy, where the assumptions of the applied algorithm are violated. This happens mostly over land and it is related to misrepresentation of specific aerosol conditions or surface properties. New satellite missions, based on high spectral resolution instruments, such as PRISMA (Hyperspectral Precursor of the Application Mission, represent a valuable opportunity to improve the accuracy of τa550 retrievable from a remote-sensing system developing new atmospheric measurement techniques. This paper aims to address the potential of these new observing systems in more accurate retrieving τa550, specifically over land in heterogeneous and/or homogeneous areas composed by dark and bright targets. The study shows how the variation of the hyperspectral observed radiance can be addressed to recognise a variation of Δτa550 = 0.02. The goal has been achieved by using simulated radiances by combining two aerosol models (urban and continental and two reflecting surfaces: dark (represented by water and bright (represented by sand for the PRISMA instrument, considering the environmental contribution of the observed radiance, i.e., the adjacency effect. Results showed that, in the continental regime, the expected instrument sensitivity would allow for retrieval accuracy of the aerosol optical thickness at 550 nm of 0.02 or better, with a dark surface surrounded by dark areas. The study also showed that for the urban regime, the surface plays a more significant role, with a bright surface surrounded by dark areas providing favourable conditions for the aerosol load retrievals, and dark surfaces representing less suitable situations for inversion independently of the surroundings. However, over all, the results obtained provide evidence that high resolution observations of Earth spectrum between

  10. Use of chemical and isotopic tracers to characterize the interactions between ground water and surface water in mantled karst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, B.G.; Coplen, T.B.; Bullen, T.D.; Hal, Davis J.

    1997-01-01

    In the mantled karst terrane of northern Florida, the water quality of the Upper Floridan aquifer is influenced by the degree of connectivity between the aquifer and the surface. Chemical and isotopic analyses [18O/16O (??18O), 2H/1H (??D), 13C/12C (??13C), tritium(3H), and strontium-87/strontium-86(87Sr/86Sr)]along with geochemical mass-balance modeling were used to identify the dominant hydrochemical processes that control the composition of ground water as it evolves downgradient in two systems. In one system, surface water enters the Upper Floridan aquifer through a sinkhole located in the Northern Highlands physiographic unit. In the other system, surface water enters the aquifer through a sinkhole lake (Lake Bradford) in the Woodville Karst Plain. Differences in the composition of water isotopes (??18O and ??D) in rainfall, ground water, and surface water were used to develop mixing models of surface water (leakage of water to the Upper Floridan aquifer from a sinkhole lake and a sinkhole) and ground water. Using mass-balance calculations, based on differences in ??18O and ??D, the proportion of lake water that mixed with meteoric water ranged from 7 to 86% in water from wells located in close proximity to Lake Bradford. In deeper parts of the Upper Floridan aquifer, water enriched in 18O and D from five of 12 sampled municipal wells indicated that recharge from a sinkhole (1 to 24%) and surface water with an evaporated isotopic signature (2 to 32%) was mixing with ground water. The solute isotopes, ??13C and 87Sr/86Sr, were used to test the sensitivity of binary and ternary mixing models, and to estimate the amount of mass transfer of carbon and other dissolved species in geochemical reactions. In ground water downgradient from Lake Bradford, the dominant processes controlling carbon cycling in ground water were dissolution of carbonate minerals, aerobic degradation of organic matter, and hydrolysis of silicate minerals. In the deeper parts of the Upper

  11. Using distributed temperature sensing to monitor field scale dynamics of ground surface temperature and related substrate heat flux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bense, V.F.; Read, T.; Verhoef, A.

    2016-01-01

    We present one of the first studies of the use of distributed temperature sensing (DTS) along fibre-optic cables to purposely monitor spatial and temporal variations in ground surface temperature (GST) and soil temperature, and provide an estimate of the heat flux at the base of the canopy layer

  12. Comparison of experiment with Monte Carlo simulations on a reflective gap using a detailed surface properties model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaworski, J.; Welty, J.R. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Palmer, B.J.; Drost, M.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The spatial distribution of light through a rectangular gap bounded by highly reflective, diffuse surfaces was measured and compared with the results of Monte Carlo simulations. Incorporating radiant properties for real surfaces into a Monte Carlo code was seen to be a significant problem; a number of techniques for accomplishing this are discussed. Independent results are reported for measured values of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function over incident polar angles from 0 to 90 deg for a semidiffuse surface treatment (Krylon flat white spray paint). The inclusion of this information into a Monte Carlo simulation yielded various levels of agreement with experimental results. The poorest agreement occurred when the incident radiation was at a grazing angle with respect to the surface and the reflectance was nearly specular. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  13. A Free Surface Frequency Domain Green Function with Viscous Dissipation and Partial Reflections from Side Walls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongde Qin; Jing Shen; Xiaobo Chen

    2011-01-01

    The free-surface Green function method is widely used in solving the radiation or diffraction problems caused by a ship or ocean structure oscillating on the waves.In the context of inviscid potential flow,hydrodynamic problems such as multi-body interaction and tank side wall effect cannot be properly dealt with based on the traditional free-surface frequency domain Green function method,in which the water viscosity is omitted and the energy dissipation effect is absent.In this paper,an open-sea Green function with viscous dissipation was presented within the theory of visco-potential flow.Then the tank Green function with a partial reflection from the side walls in wave tanks was formulated as a formal sum of open-sea Green functions representing the infinite images between two parallel side walls of the source in the tank.The new far-field characteristics of the tank Green function is vitally important for improving the validity of side-wall effects evaluation,which can be used in supervising the tank model tests.

  14. An analytical and numerical study of the nonlinear reflection at a stress-free surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romer, Anne; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2015-03-01

    Implementation of the ultrasonic second harmonic generation has typically been restricted to simple setups such as through-transmission or Rayleigh surface waves. Recent research has evaluated the second harmonic waves generation in P- and SV- waves reflected from a stress-free surface to enable the single-sided interrogation of a specimen. This research considers the second harmonic generation in an aluminum specimen, which is analytically evaluated using an approach based on a perturbation method. Here, the model is chosen to mimic an experimental setup where the longitudinal wave is generated at oblique angle using a wedge transducer. Due to the mode conversion at the interface of the wedge and the specimen, it is necessary to evaluate longitudinal and shear waves, determining all second harmonic waves generated in the bulk and at the stress-free boundary. The theoretically developed model is then implemented in a commercial finite element code, COMSOL, using increasing fundamental wave amplitudes for different values of third order elastic constants. The results of this computational model verify the analytical approach and the proposed measurement setup, taking into account assumptions and approximations of the solution procedure. Furthermore, the computational model is used to draw important conclusions relevant to the experimental setup, including the need to avoid interaction with diffracted waves.

  15. An analytical and numerical study of the nonlinear reflection at a stress-free surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romer, Anne, E-mail: anne.romer@gmx.net; Kim, Jin-Yeon, E-mail: anne.romer@gmx.net [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Jacobs, Laurence J. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA and G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2015-03-31

    Implementation of the ultrasonic second harmonic generation has typically been restricted to simple setups such as through-transmission or Rayleigh surface waves. Recent research has evaluated the second harmonic waves generation in P- and SV- waves reflected from a stress-free surface to enable the single-sided interrogation of a specimen. This research considers the second harmonic generation in an aluminum specimen, which is analytically evaluated using an approach based on a perturbation method. Here, the model is chosen to mimic an experimental setup where the longitudinal wave is generated at oblique angle using a wedge transducer. Due to the mode conversion at the interface of the wedge and the specimen, it is necessary to evaluate longitudinal and shear waves, determining all second harmonic waves generated in the bulk and at the stress-free boundary. The theoretically developed model is then implemented in a commercial finite element code, COMSOL, using increasing fundamental wave amplitudes for different values of third order elastic constants. The results of this computational model verify the analytical approach and the proposed measurement setup, taking into account assumptions and approximations of the solution procedure. Furthermore, the computational model is used to draw important conclusions relevant to the experimental setup, including the need to avoid interaction with diffracted waves.

  16. A free surface frequency domain green function with viscous dissipation and partial reflections from side walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hongde; Shen, Jing; Chen, Xiaobo

    2011-09-01

    The free-surface Green function method is widely used in solving the radiation or diffraction problems caused by a ship or ocean structure oscillating on the waves. In the context of inviscid potential flow, hydrodynamic problems such as multi-body interaction and tank side wall effect cannot be properly dealt with based on the traditional free-surface frequency domain Green function method, in which the water viscosity is omitted and the energy dissipation effect is absent. In this paper, an open-sea Green function with viscous dissipation was presented within the theory of visco-potential flow. Then the tank Green function with a partial reflection from the side walls in wave tanks was formulated as a formal sum of open-sea Green functions representing the infinite images between two parallel side walls of the source in the tank. The new far-field characteristics of the tank Green function is vitally important for improving the validity of side-wall effects evaluation, which can be used in supervising the tank model tests.

  17. Surface reflectance and conversion efficiency dependence of technologies for mitigating global warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmonds, Ian [Solartran Pty Ltd., 12 Lentara St, Kenmore, Brisbane 4069 (Australia); Smith, Geoff [Physics and Advanced Materials, University of Technology, Sydney, PO Box 123, Broadway, New South Wales 2007 (Australia)

    2011-05-15

    A means of assessing the relative impact of different renewable energy technologies on global warming has been developed. All power plants emit thermal energy to the atmosphere. Fossil fuel power plants also emit CO{sub 2} which accumulates in the atmosphere and provides an indirect increase in global warming via the greenhouse effect. A fossil fuel power plant may operate for some time before the global warming due to its CO{sub 2} emission exceeds the warming due to its direct heat emission. When a renewable energy power plant is deployed instead of a fossil fuel power plant there may be a significant time delay before the direct global warming effect is less than the combined direct and indirect global warming effect from an equivalent output coal fired plant - the ''business as usual'' case. Simple expressions are derived to calculate global temperature change as a function of ground reflectance and conversion efficiency for various types of fossil fuelled and renewable energy power plants. These expressions are used to assess the global warming mitigation potential of some proposed Australian renewable energy projects. The application of the expressions is extended to evaluate the deployment in Australia of current and new geo-engineering and carbon sequestration solutions to mitigate global warming. Principal findings are that warming mitigation depends strongly on the solar to electric conversion efficiency of renewable technologies, geo-engineering projects may offer more economic mitigation than renewable energy projects and the mitigation potential of reforestation projects depends strongly on the location of the projects. (author)

  18. An Operational Scheme for Deriving Standardised Surface Reflectance from Landsat TM/ETM+ and SPOT HRG Imagery for Eastern Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Flood

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Operational monitoring of vegetation and land surface change over large areas can make good use of satellite sensors that measure radiance reflected from the Earth’s surface. Monitoring programs use multiple images for complete spatial coverage over time. Accurate retrievals of vegetation cover and vegetation change estimates can be hampered by variation, in both space and time, in the measured radiance, caused by atmospheric conditions, topography, sensor location, and sun elevation. In order to obtain estimates of cover that are comparable between images, and to retrieve accurate estimates of change, these sources of variation must be removed. In this paper we present a preprocessing scheme for minimising atmospheric, topographic and bi-directional reflectance effects on Landsat-5 TM, Landsat-7 ETM+ and SPOT-5 HRG imagery. The approach involves atmospheric correction to compute surface-leaving radiance, and bi-directional reflectance modelling to remove the effects of topography and angular variation in reflectance. The bi-directional reflectance model has been parameterised for eastern Australia, but the general approach is more widely applicable. The result is surface reflectance standardised to a fixed viewing and illumination geometry. The method can be applied to the entire record for these instruments, without intervention, which is of increasing importance with the increased availability of long term image archives. Validation shows that the corrections improve the estimation of reflectance at any given angular configuration, thus allowing the removal from the reflectance signal of much variation due to factors independent of the land surface. The method has been used to process over 45,000 Landsat-5 TM and Landsat-7 ETM+ scenes and 2,500 SPOT-5 scenes, over eastern Australia, and is now in use in operational monitoring programs.

  19. Selective reflection technique as a probe to monitor the growth of a metallic thin film on dielectric surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, Weliton Soares; Chevrollier, Martine; de Silans, Thierry Passerat

    2013-01-01

    Controlling thin film formation is technologically challenging. The knowledge of physical properties of the film and of the atoms in the surface vicinity can help improve control over the film growth. We investigate the use of the well-established selective reflection technique to probe the thin film during its growth, simultaneously monitoring the film thickness, the atom-surface van der Waals interaction and the vapor properties in the surface vicinity.

  20. Getting saturated hydraulic conductivity from surface Ground-Penetrating Radar measurements inside a ring infiltrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leger, E.; Saintenoy, A.; Coquet, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Hydraulic properties of soils, described by the soil water retention and hydraulic conductivity functions, strongly influence water flow in the vadoze zone, as well as the partitioning of precipitation between infiltration into the soil and runoff along the ground surface. Their evaluation has important applications for modelling available water resources and for flood forecasting. It is also crucial to evaluate soil's capacity to retain chemical pollutants and to assess the potential of groundwater pollution. The determination of the parameters involved in soil water retention functions, 5 parameters when using the van Genuchten function, is usually done by laboratory experiments, such as the water hanging column. Hydraulic conductivity, on the other hand can be estimated either in laboratory, or in situ using infiltrometry tests. Among the large panel of existing tests, the single or double ring infiltrometers give the field saturated hydraulic conductivity by applying a positive charge on soils, whereas the disk infiltrometer allows to reconstruct the whole hydraulic conductivity curve, by applying different charges smaller than or equal to zero. In their classical use, volume of infiltrated water versus time are fitted to infer soil's hydraulic conductivity close to water saturation. Those tests are time-consuming and difficult to apply to landscape-scale forecasting of infiltration. Furthermore they involve many assumptions concerning the form of the infiltration bulb and its evolution. Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a geophysical method based on electromagnetic wave propagation. It is highly sensitive to water content variations directly related to the dielectric permittivity. In this study GPR was used to monitor water infiltration inside a ring infiltrometer and retrieve the saturated hydraulic conductivity. We carried out experiments in a quarry of Fontainebleau sand, using a Mala RAMAC system with antennae centered on 1600 MHz. We recorded traces at

  1. Implementing ground surface deformation tools to characterize field-scale properties of a fractured aquifer during a short hydraulic test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuite, Jonathan; Longuevergne, Laurent; Bour, Olivier; Boudin, Frédérick; Durand, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    In naturally fractured reservoirs, fluid flow is governed by the structural and hydromechanical properties of fracture networks or conductive fault zones. In order to ensure a sustained exploitation of resources or to assess the safety of underground storage, it is necessary to evaluate these properties. As they generally form highly heterogeneous and anisotropic reservoirs, fractured media may be well characterized by means of several complementary experimental methods or sounding techniques. In this framework, the observation of ground deformation has been proved useful to gain insight of a fractured reservoir's geometry and hydraulic properties. Commonly, large conductive structures like faults can be studied from surface deformation from satellite methods at monthly time scales, whereas meter scale fractures have to be examined under short-term in situ experiments using high accuracy intruments like tiltmeters or extensometers installed in boreholes or at the ground's surface. To the best of our knowledge, the feasability of a field scale (~ 100 m) characterization of a fractured reservoir with geodetic tools in a short term experiment has not yet been addressed. In the present study, we implement two complementary ground surface geodetic tools, namely tiltmetry and optical leveling, to monitor the deformation induced by a hydraulic recovery test at the Ploemeur hydrological observatory (France). Employing a simple purely elastic modeling approach, we show that the joint use of time constraining data (tilt) and spatially constraining data (vertical displacement) makes it possible to evaluate the geometry (dip, root depth and lateral extent) and the storativity of a hydraulically active fault zone, in good agreement with previous studies. Hence we demonstrate that the adequate use of two complementary ground surface deformation methods offer a rich insight of large conductive structure's properties using a single short term hydraulic load. Ground surface

  2. Automated sulcal depth measurement on cortical surface reflecting geometrical properties of sulci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuk Jin Yun

    Full Text Available Sulcal depth that is one of the quantitative measures of cerebral cortex has been widely used as an important marker for brain morphological studies. Several studies have employed Euclidean (EUD or geodesic (GED algorithms to measure sulcal depth, which have limitations that ignore sulcal geometry in highly convoluted regions and result in under or overestimated depth. In this study, we proposed an automated measurement for sulcal depth on cortical surface reflecting geometrical properties of sulci, which named the adaptive distance transform (ADT. We first defined the volume region of cerebrospinal fluid between the 3D convex hull and the cortical surface, and constructed local coordinates for that restricted region. Dijkstra's algorithm was then used to compute the shortest paths from the convex hull to the vertices of the cortical surface based on the local coordinates, which may be the most proper approach for defining sulcal depth. We applied our algorithm to both a clinical dataset including patients with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD and 25 normal controls and a simulated dataset whose shape was similar to a single sulcus. The mean sulcal depth in the mild AD group was significantly lower than controls (p = 0.007, normal [mean±SD]: 7.29±0.23 mm, AD: 7.11±0.29 and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was relatively high, showing the value of 0.818. Results from clinical dataset that were consistent with former studies using EUD or GED demonstrated that ADT was sensitive to cortical atrophy. The robustness against inter-individual variability of ADT was highlighted through simulation dataset. ADT showed a low and constant normalized difference between the depth of the simulated data and the calculated depth, whereas EUD and GED had high and variable differences. We suggest that ADT is more robust than EUD or GED and might be a useful alternative algorithm for measuring sulcal depth.

  3. Phase analysis for three-dimensional surface reconstruction of apples using structured-illumination reflectance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuzhen; Lu, Renfu

    2017-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) shape information is valuable for fruit quality evaluation. This study was aimed at developing phase analysis techniques for reconstruction of the 3-D surface of fruit from the pattern images acquired by a structuredillumination reflectance imaging (SIRI) system. Phase-shifted sinusoidal patterns, distorted by the fruit geometry, were acquired and processed through phase demodulation, phase unwrapping and other post-processing procedures to obtain phase difference maps relative to the phase of a reference plane. The phase maps were then transformed into height profiles and 3-D shapes in a world coordinate system based on phase-to-height and in-plane calibrations. A reference plane-based approach, coupled with the curve fitting technique using polynomials of order 3 or higher, was utilized for phase-to-height calibrations, which achieved superior accuracies with the root-mean-squared errors (RMSEs) of 0.027- 0.033 mm for a height measurement range of 0-91 mm. The 3rd-order polynomial curve fitting technique was further tested on two reference blocks with known heights, resulting in relative errors of 3.75% and 4.16%. In-plane calibrations were performed by solving a linear system formed by a number of control points in a calibration object, which yielded a RMSE of 0.311 mm. Tests of the calibrated system for reconstructing the surface of apple samples showed that surface concavities (i.e., stem/calyx regions) could be easily discriminated from bruises from the phase difference maps, reconstructed height profiles and the 3-D shape of apples. This study has laid a foundation for using SIRI for 3-D shape measurement, and thus expanded the capability of the technique for quality evaluation of horticultural products. Further research is needed to utilize the phase analysis techniques for stem/calyx detection of apples, and optimize the phase demodulation and unwrapping algorithms for faster and more reliable detection.

  4. The laboratory investigation of surface envelope solitons: reflection from a vertical wall and collisions of solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slunyaev, Alexey; Klein, Marco; Clauss, Günther F.

    2016-04-01

    Envelope soliton solutions are key elements governing the nonlinear wave dynamics within a simplified theory for unidirectional weakly modulated weakly nonlinear wave groups on the water surface. Within integrable models the solitons preserve their structure in collisions with other waves; they do not disperse and can carry energy infinitively long. Steep and short soliton-like wave groups have been shown to exist in laboratory tests [1] and, even earlier, in numerical simulations [2, 3]. Thus, long-living wave groups may play important role in the dynamics of intense sea waves and wave-structure interactions. The solitary wave groups may change the wave statistics and can be taken into account when developing approaches for the deterministic forecasting of dangerous waves, including so-called rogue waves. An experimental campaign has been conducted in the wave basin of the Technical University of Berlin on simulations of intense solitary wave groups. The first successful experimental observation of intense envelope solitons took place in this facility [1]. The new experiments aimed at following main goals: 1) to reproduce intense envelope solitons with different carrier wave lengths; 2) to estimate the rate of envelope soliton dissipation; 3) to consider the reflection of envelope solitons on a vertical wall; 4) to consider head-on collisions of envelope solitons, and 5) to consider overtaking interactions of envelope solitons. Up to 9 wave gauges were used in each experimental run, which enabled registration of the surface movement at different distances from the wavemaker, at different locations across the wave flume and near the wall. Besides surface displacements, the group envelope shapes were directly recorded, with use of phase shifts applied to the modulated waves generated by the wavemaker. [1] A. Slunyaev, G.F. Clauss, M. Klein, M. Onorato, Simulations and experiments of short intense envelope solitons of surface water waves. Phys. Fluids 25, 067105

  5. On the wettability diversity of C/SiC surface: Comparison of the ground C/SiC surface and ablated C/SiC surface from three aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, M. L.; Ren, C. Z.; Xu, H. Z.

    2016-11-01

    The coefficient of thermal conductivity was influenced by the wetting state of material. The wetting state usually depends on the surface wettability. C/SiC is a promising ceramic composites with multi-components. The wettability of C/SiC composites is hard to resort to the classical wetting theory directly. So far, few investigations focused on C/SiC surface wettability diversity after different material removal processes. In this investigation, comparative studies of surface wettability of ground C/SiC surface and laser-ablated C/SiC surface were carried out through apparent contact angle (APCA) measurements. The results showed that water droplets easily reached stable state on ground C/SiC surface; while the water droplets rappidly penetrated into the laser-ablated C/SiC surface. In order to find out the reason for wettability distinctions between the ground C/SiC surface and the laser-ablated C/SiC surface, comparative studies on the surface micro-structure, surface C-O-Si distribution, and surface C-O-Si weight percentage were carried out. The results showed that (1) A large number of micro cracks in the fuzzy pattern layer over laser-ablated C/SiC surfaces easily destoried the surface tension of water droplets, while only a few cracks existed over the ground C/SiC surfaces. (2) Chemical components (C, O, Si) were non-uniformly distributed on ground C/SiC surfaces, while the chemical components (C, O, Si) were uniformly distributed on laser-ablated C/SiC surfaces. (3) The carbon weight percentage on ground C/SiC surfaces were higher than that on laser-ablated C/SiC surfaces. All these made an essential contribution to the surface wettability diversity of C/SiC surface. Although more investigations about the quantitative influence of surface topography and surface chemical composition on composites wettability are still needed, the conslusion can be used in application: the wettability of C/SiC surface can be controlled by different material removal process

  6. Impact of the variability of the seasonal snow cover on the ground surface regimes in Hurd Peninsula (Livingston Island, Antarctic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwendam, Alexandre; Ramos, Miguel; Vieira, Gonçalo

    2014-05-01

    Seasonally snow cover has a great impact on the thermal regime of the active layer and permafrost. Ground temperatures over a year are strongly affected by the timing, duration, thickness, structure and physical and thermal properties of snow cover. The purpose of this communication is to characterize the shallow ground thermal regimes, with special reference to the understanding of the influence snow cover in permafrost spatial distribution, in the ice-free areas of the north western part of Hurd Peninsula in the vicinity of the Spanish Antarctic Station "Juan Carlos I" and Bulgarian Antarctic Station "St. Kliment Ohridski". We have analyzed and ground temperatures as well as snow thickness data in four sites distributed along an altitudinal transect in Hurd Peninsula from 2007 to 2013: Nuevo Incinerador (25 m asl), Collado Ramos (110 m), Ohridski (140 m) and Reina Sofia Peak (275 m). At each study site, data loggers were installed for the monitoring of air temperatures (at 1.5 m high), ground temperatures (5, 20 and 40 cm depth) and for snow depth (2, 5, 10, 20, 40, 80 and 160 cm) at 4-hour intervals. The winter data suggests the existence of three types of seasonal stages regarding the ground surface thermal regime and the thickness of snow cover: (a) shallow snow cover with intense ground temperatures oscillations; (b) thick snow cover and low variations of soil temperatures; and (c) stability of ground temperatures. Ground thermal conditions are also conditioned by a strong variability. Winter data indicates that Nuevo Incinerador site experiences more often thicker snow cover with higher ground temperatures and absence of ground temperatures oscillations. Collado Ramos and Ohridski show frequent variations of snow cover thickness, alternating between shallow snow cover with high ground temperature fluctuation and thick snow cover and low ground temperature fluctuation. Reina Sofia in all the years has thick snow cover with little variations in soil

  7. Acceptable distortion and magnification of images on reflective surfaces in an augmented reality system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shoji; Hosokawa, Natsumi; Yokoya, Mayu; Tsumura, Norimichi

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we investigated the consistency of visual perception for the change of reflection images in an augmented reality setting. Reflection images with distortion and magnification were generated by changing the capture position of the environment map. Observers evaluated the distortion and magnification in reflection images where the reflected objects were arranged symmetrically or asymmetrically. Our results confirmed that the observers' visual perception was more sensitive to changes in distortion than in magnification in the reflection images. Moreover, the asymmetrical arrangement of reflected objects effectively expands the acceptable range of distortion compared with the symmetrical arrangement.

  8. From Ground Truth to Space: Surface, Subsurface and Remote Observations Associated with Nuclear Test Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, A. J.; Anderson, D.; Burt, C.; Craven, J.; Kimblin, C.; McKenna, I.; Schultz-Fellenz, E. S.; Miller, E.; Yocky, D. A.; Haas, D.

    2016-12-01

    Underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) result in numerous signatures that manifest on a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. Currently, prompt signals, such as the detection of seismic waves provide only generalized locations and the timing and amplitude of non-prompt signals are difficult to predict. As such, research into improving the detection, location, and identification of suspect events has been conducted, resulting in advancement of nuclear test detection science. In this presentation, we demonstrate the scalar variably of surface and subsurface observables, briefly discuss current capabilities to locate, detect and characterize potential nuclear explosion locations, and explain how emergent technologies and amalgamation of disparate data sets will facilitate improved monitoring and verification. At the smaller scales, material and fracture characterization efforts on rock collected from legacy UNE sites and from underground experiments using chemical explosions can be incorporated into predictive modeling efforts. Spatial analyses of digital elevation models and orthoimagery of both modern conventional and legacy nuclear sites show subtle surface topographic changes and damage at nearby outcrops. Additionally, at sites where such technology cannot penetrate vegetative cover, it is possible to use the vegetation itself as both a companion signature reflecting geologic conditions and showing subsurface impacts to water, nutrients, and chemicals. Aerial systems based on RGB imagery, light detection and ranging, and hyperspectral imaging can allow for combined remote sensing modalities to perform pattern recognition and classification tasks. Finally, more remote systems such as satellite based synthetic aperture radar and satellite imagery are other techniques in development for UNE site detection, location and characterization.

  9. Impacts of dust aerosol and adjacency effects on the accuracy of Landsat 8 and RapidEye surface reflectances

    KAUST Repository

    Houborg, Rasmus

    2017-03-29

    The atmospheric correction of satellite data is challenging over desert agricultural systems, due to the relatively high aerosol optical thicknesses (τ550), bright soils, and a heterogeneous surface reflectance field. Indeed, the contribution of reflected radiation from adjacent pixels scattered into the field of view of a target pixel is considerable and can significantly affect the fidelity of retrieved reflectances. In this study, uncertainties and quantitative errors associated with the atmospheric correction of multi-spectral Landsat 8 and RapidEye data were characterized over a desert agricultural landscape in Saudi Arabia. Surface reflectances were retrieved using an implementation of the 6SV atmospheric correction code, and validated against field collected spectroradiometer measurements over desert, cultivated soil, and vegetated surface targets. A combination of satellite and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data were used to parameterize aerosol properties and atmospheric state parameters. With optimal specification of τ550 and aerosol optical properties and correction for adjacency effects, the relative Mean Absolute Deviation (MAD) for all bands combined was 5.4% for RapidEye and 6.8% for Landsat 8. However uncertainties associated with satellite-based τ550 retrievals were shown to introduce significant error into the reflectance estimates. With respect to deriving common vegetation indices from corrected reflectance data, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was associated with the smallest errors (3–8% MAD). Surface reflectance errors were highest for bands in the visible part of the spectrum, particularly the blue band (5–16%), while there was more consistency within the red-edge (~ 5%) and near-infrared (5–7%). Results were generally better constrained when a τ550-dependent aerosol model for desert dust particles, parameterized on the basis of nearby AERONET site data, was used in place of a generic rural or background

  10. Adaption of the MODIS aerosol retrieval algorithm by airborne spectral surface reflectance measurements over urban areas: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Jäkel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available MODIS retrievals of the aerosol optical depth (AOD are biased over urban areas, where surface reflectance is not well characterized. Since the operational MODIS aerosol retrieval for dark targets assumes fixed spectral slopes to calculate the surface reflectance at 0.47 μm, the algorithm may fail in urban areas with different spectral characteristics of the surface reflectance. To investigate this bias we have implemented variable spectral slopes into the operational MODIS aerosol algorithms of Collection 5 (C5 and C6. The variation of slopes is based on airborne measurements of surface reflectances over the city of Zhongshan, China. AOD retrieval results of the operational and the modified algorithms were compared for a MODIS measurement over Zhongshan. For this case slightly lower AOD values were derived using the modified algorithm. The retrieval methods were additionally applied to MODIS data of the Beijing area for a period between 2010–2014 when also AERONET data were available. A reduction of the differences between the AOD retrieved using the modified C5 algorithm and AERONET was found, whereby the mean difference from 0.31 ± 0.11 for the operational C5 and 0.18 ± 0.12 for the operational C6 where reduced to a mean difference of 0.09 ± 0.18 by using the modified C5 retrieval. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the MODIS AOD retrieval for several surface types was investigated. Radiative transfer simulations were performed to model reflectances at top of atmosphere for predefined aerosol properties. The reflectances were used as input for the retrieval methods. It is shown that the operational MODIS AOD retrieval over land reproduces the AOD reference input of 0.85 for dark surface types [retrieved AOD = 0.87 (C5]. An overestimation of AOD = 0.99 is found for urban surfaces, whereby the modified C5 algorithm shows a good performance with a retrieved value of AOD = 0.86.

  11. [Heavy metals in the surface sediment of the dumping ground outside Jiaozhou Bay and their potential ecological risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Cong-hua; Zhang, Nai-xing; Wu, Feng-cong; Sun, Bin; Ren, Rong-zhu; Sun, Xu; Lin, Sen; Zhang, Shao-ping

    2011-05-01

    Based on the monitoring data of heavy metals (Cr, Hg, Cd, Pb, Zn, Cu) in the surface sediment of the dumping ground outside Jiaozhou Bay from 2003 to 2008, the distribution patterns, factors controlling the distribution, and the potential ecological risks of heavy metals were studied with the data in 2007-08, and the fluctuation trends of heavy metals in the surface sediment over the 6 years were also discussed. The average concentrations of heavy metals Cr, Hg, Cd, Pb, Zn, Cu in the surface sediment were 29.47, 0.065, 0.105, 1.145, 9.63, 3.355 microg/g, respectively. Except for Cr, the concentration of heavy metals was high in the central dumping area while low outside the dumping ground, suggesting that the dredged material dumped was the main source of heavy metals. Organic carbon content in the surface sediment had a significant positive correlation with heavy metals except for Cr. Based on the results of ecological risk assessment, Hg had a medium potential ecological risk, while the other heavy metals had low potential ecological risk. The overall risk index (RI) of the heavy metals was 100.50, which was considered as a level of low potential ecological risk. The average concentration of heavy metals showed a decreasing trend over the 6 years, except Hg. In conclusion, the quality of surface sediment in term of heavy metals in the dumping ground outside Jiaozhou Bay is relatively good.

  12. Application of terrestrial laser scanning for detection of ground surface deformation in small mud volcano (Murono, Japan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Yuichi S.; Kusumoto, Shigekazu; Matta, Nobuhisa

    2016-07-01

    We perform terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to detect changes in surface morphology of a mud volcano in Murono, north-central Japan. The study site underwent significant deformation by a strong earthquake in 2011, and the surface deformation has continued in the following years. The point cloud datasets were obtained by TLS at three different times in 2011, 2013 and 2014. Those point clouds were aligned by cloud-based registration, which minimizes the closest point distance of point clouds of unchanged ground features, and the TLS-based point cloud data appear to be suitable for detecting centimeter-order deformations in the central domain of the mud volcano, as well as for measurements of topographic features including cracks of paved ground surface. The spatial patterns and accumulative amount of the vertical deformation during 2011-2014 captured by TLS correspond well with those previously reported based on point-based leveling surveys, supporting the validity of TLS survey.

  13. Calculation of Electric Field at Ground Surface and ADSS Cable Prepared Hanging Point near EHV Power Transmission Tower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Bao-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A simplified model of the 750kV tower is established by CDEGS software which is based on the Method Of Moment. The power frequency electric field distribution on the ground is achieved by software calculation and field-measuring. The validity of the calculation is proved when compare the calculation and experiment results. The model also can be used to calculate the electric field in prepared hanging points on the tower. Results show that the electric field distribution on the ground surface around the tower and prepared hanging points are meet the standard by calculation and experiment.

  14. Objective and Subjective Evaluation of Reflecting and Diffusing Surfaces in Auditoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Trevor John

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The performance of reflectors and diffusers used in auditoria have been evaluated both objectively and subjectively. Two accurate systems have been developed to measure the scattering from surfaces via the cross correlation function. These have been used to measure the scattering from plane panels, curved panels and quadratic residue diffusers (QRDs). The scattering measurements have been used to test theoretical prediction methods based on the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff integral equation. Accurate prediction methods were found for all surfaces tested. The limitations of the more approximate methods have been defined. The assumptions behind Schroeder's design of the QRD have been tested and the local reacting admittance assumption found to be valid over a wide frequency range. It was found that the QRD only produces uniform scattering at low frequencies. For an on-axis source the scattering from a curved panel was as good as from a QRD. For an oblique source the QRD produced much more uniform scattering than the curved panel. The subjective measurements evaluated the smallest perceivable change in the early sound field, the part most influenced by reflectors and diffusers. A natural sounding simulation of a concert hall field within an anechoic chamber was used. Standard objective parameters were reasonable values when compared to values found in real halls and subjective preference measurements. A difference limen was measured for early lateral energy fraction (.048 +/-.005); inter aural cross correlation (.075 +/-.008); clarity index (.67 +/-.13 dB); and centre time (8.6 +/- 1.6 ms). It was found that: (i) when changes are made to diffusers and reflectors, changes in spatial impression will usually be larger than those in clarity; and (ii) acousticians can gain most by paying attention to lateral sound in auditoria. It was also found that: (i) diffuse reflections in the early sound field

  15. Ge