WorldWideScience

Sample records for ground subsidence thermokarst

  1. Circumpolar distribution and carbon storage of thermokarst landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olefeldt, D.; Goswami, S.; Grosse, G.; Hayes, D.; Hugelius, G.; Kuhry, P.; McGuire, A. D.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Sannel, A. B. K.; Schuur, E. A. G.; Turetsky, M. R.

    2016-10-01

    Thermokarst is the process whereby the thawing of ice-rich permafrost ground causes land subsidence, resulting in development of distinctive landforms. Accelerated thermokarst due to climate change will damage infrastructure, but also impact hydrology, ecology and biogeochemistry. Here, we present a circumpolar assessment of the distribution of thermokarst landscapes, defined as landscapes comprised of current thermokarst landforms and areas susceptible to future thermokarst development. At 3.6 × 106 km2, thermokarst landscapes are estimated to cover ~20% of the northern permafrost region, with approximately equal contributions from three landscape types where characteristic wetland, lake and hillslope thermokarst landforms occur. We estimate that approximately half of the below-ground organic carbon within the study region is stored in thermokarst landscapes. Our results highlight the importance of explicitly considering thermokarst when assessing impacts of climate change, including future landscape greenhouse gas emissions, and provide a means for assessing such impacts at the circumpolar scale.

  2. Circumpolar distribution and carbon storage of thermokarst landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olefeldt, D; Goswami, S; Grosse, G; Hayes, D; Hugelius, G; Kuhry, P; McGuire, A D; Romanovsky, V E; Sannel, A B K; Schuur, E A G; Turetsky, M R

    2016-10-11

    Thermokarst is the process whereby the thawing of ice-rich permafrost ground causes land subsidence, resulting in development of distinctive landforms. Accelerated thermokarst due to climate change will damage infrastructure, but also impact hydrology, ecology and biogeochemistry. Here, we present a circumpolar assessment of the distribution of thermokarst landscapes, defined as landscapes comprised of current thermokarst landforms and areas susceptible to future thermokarst development. At 3.6 × 10(6) km(2), thermokarst landscapes are estimated to cover ∼20% of the northern permafrost region, with approximately equal contributions from three landscape types where characteristic wetland, lake and hillslope thermokarst landforms occur. We estimate that approximately half of the below-ground organic carbon within the study region is stored in thermokarst landscapes. Our results highlight the importance of explicitly considering thermokarst when assessing impacts of climate change, including future landscape greenhouse gas emissions, and provide a means for assessing such impacts at the circumpolar scale.

  3. Thermokarst lakes, drainage, and drained basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, G.; Jones, B.; Arp, C.; Shroder, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Thermokarst lakes and drained lake basins are widespread in Arctic and sub-Arctic permafrost lowlands with ice-rich sediments. Thermokarst lake formation is a dominant mode of permafrost degradation and is linked to surface disturbance, subsequent melting of ground ice, surface subsidence, water impoundment, and positive feedbacks between lake growth and permafrost thaw, whereas lake drainage generally results in local permafrost aggradation. Thermokarst lakes characteristically have unique limnological, morphological, and biogeochemical characteristics that are closely tied to cold-climate conditions and permafrost properties. Thermokarst lakes also have a tendency toward complete or partial drainage through permafrost degradation and erosion. Thermokarst lake dynamics strongly affect the development of landscape geomorphology, hydrology, and the habitat characteristic of permafrost lowlands.

  4. Initial Conceptualization and Application of the Alaska Thermokarst Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, W. R.; Lara, M. J.; Genet, H.; Romanovsky, V. E.; McGuire, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Thermokarst topography forms whenever ice-rich permafrost thaws and the ground subsides due to the volume loss when ground ice transitions to water. The Alaska Thermokarst Model (ATM) is a large-scale, state-and-transition model designed to simulate transitions between landscape units affected by thermokarst disturbance. The ATM uses a frame-based methodology to track transitions and proportion of cohorts within a 1-km2 grid cell. In the arctic tundra environment, the ATM tracks thermokarst-related transitions among wetland tundra, graminoid tundra, shrub tundra, and thermokarst lakes. In the boreal forest environment, the ATM tracks transitions among forested permafrost plateau, thermokarst lakes, collapse scar fens and bogs. The transition from one cohort to another due to thermokarst processes can take place if thaw reaches ice-rich ground layers either due to pulse disturbance (i.e. large precipitation event or fires), or due to gradual active layer deepening that eventually results in penetration of the protective layer. The protective layer buffers the ice-rich soils from the land surface and is critical to determine how susceptible an area is to thermokarst degradation. The rate of terrain transition in our model is determined by a set of rules that are based upon the ice-content of the soil, the drainage efficiency (or the ability of the landscape to store or transport water), the cumulative probability of thermokarst initiation, distance from rivers, lake dynamics (increasing, decreasing, or stable), and other factors. Tundra types are allowed to transition from one type to another (for example, wetland tundra to graminoid tundra) under favorable climatic conditions. In this study, we present our conceptualization and initial simulation results from in the arctic (the Barrow Peninsula) and boreal (the Tanana Flats) regions of Alaska.

  5. Ground Subsidence in Areas of Loose Porous Aquifers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yixiang; GAO Guanhua

    2004-01-01

    Groundwater is one of the important water resources in northern China's plain areas. Many severe geological hazards have occurred in these areas due to ground subsidence which is caused by over exploitation of groundwater. This paper introduces and analyses the ground subsidence caused by groundwater exploitation and its mechanism in the northern China's plains. A ground subsidence prediction model has been developed based on the consolidation theory. The authors have tested this model in a case study of Fuyang City, Anhui Province, where ground subsidence is a severe environmental problem. In the case study, the model results match very well with those of the actual measurement. Two schemes of groundwater exploitation are assessed. The conclusion from the study could be used in the long-term water and economical management planning. The strategies for the control of ground subsidence are discussed.

  6. Recent Arctic tundra fire initiates widespread thermokarst development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Benjamin M.; Grosse, Guido; Arp, Christopher D.; Miller, Eric K.; Liu, Lingli; Hayes, Daniel J.; Larsen, Christopher F.

    2015-01-01

    Fire-induced permafrost degradation is well documented in boreal forests, but the role of fires in initiating thermokarst development in Arctic tundra is less well understood. Here we show that Arctic tundra fires may induce widespread thaw subsidence of permafrost terrain in the first seven years following the disturbance. Quantitative analysis of airborne LiDAR data acquired two and seven years post-fire, detected permafrost thaw subsidence across 34% of the burned tundra area studied, compared to less than 1% in similar undisturbed, ice-rich tundra terrain units. The variability in thermokarst development appears to be influenced by the interaction of tundra fire burn severity and near-surface, ground-ice content. Subsidence was greatest in severely burned, ice-rich upland terrain (yedoma), accounting for ~50% of the detected subsidence, despite representing only 30% of the fire disturbed study area. Microtopography increased by 340% in this terrain unit as a result of ice wedge degradation. Increases in the frequency, magnitude, and severity of tundra fires will contribute to future thermokarst development and associated landscape change in Arctic tundra regions.

  7. Modeling vulnerability to thermokarst disturbance and its consequences on regional land cover dynamic in boreal Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genet, H.; Lara, M. J.; Bolton, W. R.; McGuire, A. D.

    2016-12-01

    Estimation of the magnitude and consequences of permafrost degradation in high latitude is one of the most urgent research challenges related to contemporary and future climate change. In addition to widespread vertical degradation, ice-rich permafrost can thaw laterally, often triggering abrupt subsidence of the ground surface called thermokart. In this depression, permafrost plateau vegetation will transition to wetlands or lakes, while surface water of the surrounding landscape may drain towards it. These abrupt changes in land cover and hydrology can have dramatic consequences from wildlife habitat and biogeochemical cycles. Although recent studies have documented an acceleration of the rates of thermokarst formation in boreal and arctic peatlands, the importance of thermokarst at the regional level is still poorly understood. To better understand the vulnerability of the landscape to thermokarst disturbance in Alaska, we developed the Alaska Thermokarst Model (ATM), a state-and-transition model designed to simulate land cover change associated with thermokarst disturbance. In boreal regions, the model simulates transitions from permafrost plateau forest to thermokarst lake, bog or fen, as a function of climate and fire dynamics, permafrost characteristics and physiographic information. This model is designed and parameterized based on existing literature and a new repeated imagery analysis we conducted in a major wetland complex in boreal Alaska. We will present simulation and validation of thermokarst dynamic and associated land cover change in two wetland complexes in boreal Alaska, from 2000 to 2100 for six climate scenarios associating three AR5 emission scenarios and two global circulation model simulations. By 2100, ATM is predicting decrease between 3.5 and 9.1 % in the extent of permafrost plateau forest, mostly to the benefit of thermokarst fen, and lake. This analysis allowed us to assess the importance of thermokarst dynamics and landscape evolution

  8. Modeling Thermokarst Dynamics in Alaska Ecosystems: Description of the Predisposition and Initiation/Expansion Sub-models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; McGuire, A. D.; Genet, H.; Bolton, W. R.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Grosse, G.; Jorgenson, T.; Lara, M.

    2013-12-01

    Warming in northern high latitude regions is increasing the vulnerability of permafrost to thawing. In ice-rich soils, permafrost degradation may result in ground surface subsidence and may cause transitions among ecosystems. These transitions are the result of significant changes in the local hydrology and soil thermal regime that impact vegetation composition and nutrient and carbon cycles. The Alaska Thermokarst Model (ATM) is a state-and-transition model that is being developed to predict thermokarst disturbance in response to climate warming. Predicting thermokarst disturbance requires (1) identifying the proportion of the landscape that is predisposed to thermokarst disturbance, and (2) calculating the proportion of the predisposed landscape that will be disturbed by thermokarst. To address these issues, two sub-models are being developed in the ATM: (1) a predisposition sub-model and (2) an initiation/expansion sub-model. The predisposition sub-model uses ground ice content, and lowland and permafrost distributions to determine the area of the landscape that is predisposed to thermokarst disturbance. In areas that are predisposed to thermokarst disturbance, the initiation/expansion model calculates (1) the area of the landscape in which thermokarst is initiated, and (2) and the annual expansion of the existing thermokarst features in the landscape. The ATM model has been designed to be integrated into the Alaska Integrated Ecosystem Model (AIEM), which includes coupled models of fire disturbance, soil thermal dynamics, and ecosystem structure and function at 1km*1km resolution. The initial application of the ATM in a test area located within the Alaskan boreal forest ecosystem is presented as a 'proof-of-concept' in this presentation.

  9. InSAR Detection and Field Evidence for Thermokarst after a Tundra Wildfire, Using ALOS-PALSAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go Iwahana

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermokarst is the process of ground subsidence caused by either the thawing of ice-rich permafrost or the melting of massive ground ice. The consequences of permafrost degradation associated with thermokarst for surface ecology, landscape evolution, and hydrological processes have been of great scientific interest and social concern. Part of a tundra patch affected by wildfire in northern Alaska (27.5 km2 was investigated here, using remote sensing and in situ surveys to quantify and understand permafrost thaw dynamics after surface disturbances. A two-pass differential InSAR technique using L-band ALOS-PALSAR has been shown capable of capturing thermokarst subsidence triggered by a tundra fire at a spatial resolution of tens of meters, with supporting evidence from field data and optical satellite images. We have introduced a calibration procedure, comparing burned and unburned areas for InSAR subsidence signals, to remove the noise due to seasonal surface movement. In the first year after the fire, an average subsidence rate of 6.2 cm/year (vertical was measured. Subsidence in the burned area continued over the following two years, with decreased rates. The mean rate of subsidence observed in our interferograms (from 24 July 2008 to 14 September 2010 was 3.3 cm/year, a value comparable to that estimated from field surveys at two plots on average (2.2 cm/year for the six years after the fire. These results suggest that this InSAR-measured ground subsidence is caused by the development of thermokarst, a thawing process supported by surface change observations from high-resolution optical images and in situ ground level surveys.

  10. Areas of ground subsidence due to geofluid withdrawal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimsrud, G.P.; Turner, B.L.; Frame, P.A.

    1978-08-01

    Detailed information is provided on four geothermal areas with histories of subsidence. These were selected on the basis of: physical relevance of subsidence areas to high priority US geothermal sites in terms of withdrawn geofluid type, reservoir depth, reservoir geology and rock characteristics, and overburden characteristics; and data completeness, quality, and availability. The four areas are: Chocolate Bayou, Raft River Valley, Wairakei, and the Geysers. (MHR)

  11. Soil data for a thermokarst bog and the surrounding permafrost plateau forest, located at Bonanza Creek Long Term Ecological Research Site, Interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manies, Kristen L.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Jones, Miriam C.; Waldrop, Mark P.; McGeehin, John P.

    2017-01-19

    Peatlands play an important role in boreal ecosystems, storing a large amount of soil organic carbon. In northern ecosystems, collapse-scar bogs (also known as thermokarst bogs) often form as the result of ground subsidence following permafrost thaw. To examine how ecosystem carbon balance changes with the loss of permafrost, we measured carbon and nitrogen storage within a thermokarst bog and the surrounding forest, which continues to have permafrost. These sites are a part of the Bonanza Creek Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site and are located within Interior Alaska. Here, we report on methods used for core collection analysis as well as the cores’ physical, chemical, and descriptive properties.

  12. Thermokarst and thaw-related landscape dynamics -- an annotated bibliography with an emphasis on potential effects on habitat and wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Benjamin M.; Amundson, Courtney L.; Koch, Joshua C.; Grosse, Guido

    2013-01-01

    Permafrost has warmed throughout much of the Northern Hemisphere since the 1980s, with colder permafrost sites warming more rapidly (Romanovsky and others, 2010; Smith and others, 2010). Warming of the near-surface permafrost may lead to widespread terrain instability in ice-rich permafrost in the Arctic and the Subarctic, and may result in thermokarst development and other thaw-related landscape features (Jorgenson and others, 2006; Gooseff and others, 2009). Thermokarst and other thaw-related landscape features result from varying modes and scales of permafrost thaw, subsidence, and removal of material. An increase in active-layer depth, water accumulation on the soil surface, permafrost degradation and associated retreat of the permafrost table, and changes to lake shores and coastal bluffs act and interact to create thermokarst and other thaw-related landscape features (Shur and Osterkamp, 2007). There is increasing interest in the spatial and temporal dynamics of thermokarst and other thaw-related features from diverse disciplines including landscape ecology, hydrology, engineering, and biogeochemistry. Therefore, there is a need to synthesize and disseminate knowledge on the current state of near-surface permafrost terrain. The term "thermokarst" originated in the Russian literature, and its scientific use has varied substantially over time (Shur and Osterkamp, 2007). The modern definition of thermokarst refers to the process by which characteristic landforms result from the thawing of ice-rich permafrost or the melting of massive ice (van Everdingen, 1998), or, more specifically, the thawing of ice-rich permafrost and (or) melting of massive ice that result in consolidation and deformation of the soil surface and formation of specific forms of relief (Shur, 1988). Jorgenson (2013) identifies 23 distinct thermokarst and other thaw-related features in the Arctic, Subarctic, and Antarctic based primarily on differences in terrain condition, ground-ice volume

  13. Application of InSAR and GIS techniques to ground subsidence assessment in the Nobi Plain, Central Japan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zheng, Minxue; Fukuyama, Kaoru; Sanga-Ngoie, Kazadi

    Spatial variation and temporal changes in ground subsidence over the Nobi Plain, Central Japan, are assessed using GIS techniques and ground level measurements data taken over this area since the 1970s...

  14. Seismic fragility formulations for segmented buried pipeline systems including the impact of differential ground subsidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pineda Porras, Omar Andrey [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ordaz, Mario [UNAM, MEXICO CITY

    2009-01-01

    Though Differential Ground Subsidence (DGS) impacts the seismic response of segmented buried pipelines augmenting their vulnerability, fragility formulations to estimate repair rates under such condition are not available in the literature. Physical models to estimate pipeline seismic damage considering other cases of permanent ground subsidence (e.g. faulting, tectonic uplift, liquefaction, and landslides) have been extensively reported, not being the case of DGS. The refinement of the study of two important phenomena in Mexico City - the 1985 Michoacan earthquake scenario and the sinking of the city due to ground subsidence - has contributed to the analysis of the interrelation of pipeline damage, ground motion intensity, and DGS; from the analysis of the 48-inch pipeline network of the Mexico City's Water System, fragility formulations for segmented buried pipeline systems for two DGS levels are proposed. The novel parameter PGV{sup 2}/PGA, being PGV peak ground velocity and PGA peak ground acceleration, has been used as seismic parameter in these formulations, since it has shown better correlation to pipeline damage than PGV alone according to previous studies. By comparing the proposed fragilities, it is concluded that a change in the DGS level (from Low-Medium to High) could increase the pipeline repair rates (number of repairs per kilometer) by factors ranging from 1.3 to 2.0; being the higher the seismic intensity the lower the factor.

  15. Influence of terrain and highway construction on thermokarst distribution, North Slave region, NWT, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Peter; Wolfe, Stephen; McWade, Taylor

    2017-04-01

    Permafrost degradation has been observed throughout the north and is expected to have broad reaching effects on the land and its people. Nevertheless, for much of Northern Canada little quantified information about thermokarst exists. For example, in the southern North Slave region, NWT, thermokarst distribution has never been assessed though permafrost is in thermal disequilibrium and modelling suggests permafrost extent will decline. Additionally, differential subsidence has been observed in the subarctic city of Yellowknife and along highway infrastructure connecting it to the south. To better understand present and future permafrost conditions, we mapped the location and size of thermokarst ponding (a change from forest cover to water) in the study area by comparing historic and modern remotely sensed data sets available from 1945, 1961, and 2005. These data were used to evaluate the dominant terrain controls on the distribution of thermokarst in the region, and the potential influence that highway construction may have had on thermokarst development. Historically, discontinuous permafrost developed in a time-transgressive manner during the Holocene as lake-level receded from glacial Lake McConnell to present-day Great Slave Lake (5 mmṡa-1 over the last 8000 years). As a consequence of inundation the upland areas are characterized by extensive wave-washed bedrock outcrops with glaciolacustrine (GL) sediments and glaciofluvial materials occurring between them, whereas the lowland areas feature prominent GL deposits that cover nearly 70 % of the exposed surface. Throughout much of the region ground ice accumulation likely accompanied permafrost aggradation into fine-grained sediments, as is evident by lithalsa growth in particular. Highway 3, constructed during the mid-1960s, was preferentially aligned to crossed terrain underlain by fine-grained sediments to avoid bedrock and waterbodies. Local silt and clay used for highway embankment construction was sourced

  16. Assessment of radar interferometry performance for ground subsidence monitoring due to underground mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, A.H.M.; Chang, H.C.; Ge, L.L.; Rizos, C.; Omura, M. [Cooperative Research Centre for Spatial Information, Carlton, Vic. (Australia)

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes the results from the recently launched SAR satellites for the purpose of subsidence monitoring over underground coal mine sites in the state of New South Wales, Australia, using differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (DInSAR) technique. The quality of the mine subsidence monitoring results is mainly constrained by noise due to the spatial and temporal decorrelation between the interferometric pair and the phase discontinuities in the interferogram. This paper reports oil the analysis of the impact of these two factors on the performance of DInSAR for monitoring ground deformation. Simulations were carried out prior to real data analyses. SAR data acquired using different operating frequencies, for example, X-, C- and L-band, from the TerraSAR-X, ERS-1/2, ENVISAT, JERS-1 and ALOS satellite missions, were examined. The simulation results showed that the new satellites ALOS, TerraSAR-X and COSMO-SkyMed perform much better than the satellites launched before 2006. ALOS and ENVISAT satellite SAR images with similar temporal coverage were searched for the test site. The ALOS PALSAR DInSAR results have been compared to DInSAR results obtained from ENVISAT ASAR data to investigate the performance of both satellites for ground subsidence monitoring. Strong phase discontinuities and decorrelation have been observed in almost all ENVISAT interferograms and hence it is not possible to generate the displacement maps without errors. However these problems are minimal in ALOS PALSAR interferograms due to its spatial resolution and longer wavelength. Hence ALOS PALSAR is preferred for ground subsidence monitoring in areas covered by vegetation and where there is a high rate ground deformation.

  17. Monitoring ground subsidence due to underground mining using integrated space geodetic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linlin Ge; Michael Hsing-Chung Chang; Chris Rizos [University of NSW, NSW (Australia)

    2004-04-01

    Differential radar interferometry (DInSAR) can deliver {approximately} 1cm height change resolution. The combination of regular radar beam scanning and movement of the satellites carrying the radar sensor enables imaging of the mining region in seconds, from which subtle ground movements can be detected. Quantitative validation comparing the DInSAR-derived subsidence profile against ground truth shows a best RMS error of 1.4cm. A methodology has been developed to use GPS (the Global Positioning System) observations to measure atmospheric disturbances so that the DInSAR results can be corrected. A Geographic Information System (GIS) has been used to post-process InSAR results throughout this project. GIS can be used to present the final results in various formats, for example, profiles for validating with ground truth, subsidence contour maps, and three-dimensional views. Professional looking thematic maps can be generated based on these analyses, lining up with the practice within the mining industry to deliver drawings/maps in a GIS format. Multi-temporal DInSAR results can be analysed using GIS, and the final results compiled into an animation, showing the subsidence region moving as time passes. A virtual reality image has been generated in the GIS, combining DEM, aerial photography, and DInSAR subsidence results. The UNSW InSAR-GPS-GIS Integration Software has been developed to support the seamless flow of data among the three technologies, DInSAR, GPS, and GIS. Several radar satellite missions, some especially designed for InSAR, are scheduled for launch in the near future. Therefore radar data of global coverage with weekly or even daily revisit will be made available at multiple radar bands. With atmospheric disturbances properly accounted for, DInSAR will be a cost-effective, reliable, and operational tool that complements traditional ground survey methods.

  18. Advances in thermokarst lake research in permafrost regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FuJun Niu; GuoDong Cheng; Jing Luo; ZhanJu Lin

    2014-01-01

    A-thermokarst-lake-is-defined-as-a-lake-occupying-a-closed-depression-formed-by-ground-settlement-following-thawing-of-ice-rich-permafrost-or-the-melting-of-massive-ice.-As-it-is-the-most-visible-morphologic-landscape-developed-during-the-process-of-permafrost-degradation,-we-reviewed-recent-literature-on-thermokarst-studies,-and-summarized-the-main-study-topics-as:-development-and-temporal-evolution,-carbon-release,-and-ecological-and-engineering-influence-of-thermokarst-lakes.-The-climate-warming,-forest-fires,-surface-water-pooling,-geotectonic-fault-and-anthropogenic-ac-tivity-are-the-main-influencing-factors-that-cause-an-increase-of-ground-temperatures-and-melting-of-ice-rich-permafrost,-resulting-in-thermokarst-lake-formation.-Normally-a-thermokarst-lake-develops-in-3-5-stages-from-initiation-to-perma-frost-recovery.-Geo-rectified-aerial-photographs-and-remote-sensing-images-show-that-thermokarst-lakes-have-been-mainly-experiencing-the-process-of-shrinkage-or-disappearance-in-most-regions-of-the-Arctic,-while-both-lake-numbers-and-areas-on-the-Qinghai-Tibet-Plateau-have-increased.-Field-studies-and-modeling-indicates-that-carbon-release-from-thermokarst-lakes-can-feedback-significantly-to-global-warming,-thus-enhancing-our-understanding-of-the-influences-of-thermokarst-lakes-on-the-ecological-environment,-and-on-regional-groundwater-through-drainage.-Based-on-field-mon-itoring-and-numerical-simulations,-infrastructure-stability-can-be-affected-by-thermal-erosion-of-nearby-thermokarst-lakes.-This-review-was-undertaken-to-enhance-our-understanding-of-thermokarst-lakes,-and-providing-references-for-future-comprehensive-studies-on-thermokarst-lakes.

  19. Consideration on the restoring plan in the subsidence prone areas through the development of ground stability assessment techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, K.S.; Kim, I.H.; Cho, W.J.; Song, W.K.; Synn, J.H.; Choi, S.O.; Yoon, C.H.; Hong, K.P.; Park, C. [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    The ground stability assessment technique of the subsidence prone area and its restoring plan need to be developed to obtain the ground stability around the mines at rest or closed since 1980's. Up to the present, the assessment of the subsidence risk has been conducted only after the statements of residents or the observation of symptom on the subsidence. Generally, the assessment process at first stage is carried on through the analysis of surface and mining map, the geological survey and the interviews to the residents. Drilling survey, rock property test, geotechnical rock and ground survey, and numerical analyses belong to the second stage. After the completion of the procedure the stability of buildings and the strength of subsidence are determined. The acquisition of the accurate in-situ data, the estimation of mechanical property of rock mass, and the analysis of basic mechanism may affect in the great extent on the assessment of the subsidence risk. In this study, the development of the subsidence risk assessment method was incorporated with the GIS technique which will be used to make the risk information map on the subsidence. The numerical analysis in 2D and 3D using PFC and FLAC has been conducted to estimate the ground stability of Moo-Geuk Mine area. The displacement behavior of the ground and the development of the failed zone due to the cavity were studied from the numerical modelling. The result of the ground stability assessment for the area in question shows that the risk to the subsidence is relatively small. It is, however, necessary to fill the cavity with some suitable materials when considering the new construction of buildings or roads in plan. Finally, the measures to prevent the subsidence and some case studies were presented, in particular the case study on the measurement of the ground movement in a mine were described in detail. (author). 27 refs., 27 tabs., 62 figs.

  20. Monitoring ground subsidence in urban environments: M-30 tunnels under Madrid City (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Martínez Marín

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Big cities improvement usually requires the construction of large underground infrastructures, in order to ensure proper communication and optimize urban use. Monitoring ground subsidences is therefore one of the main challenges in changing urban environments. The "Madrid Río" project (2003-2008 is an effort to reclaim the riverfront land and improve the busy M-30 beltway that involved the construction of 7.93 km of tunnels underneath the southern center of Madrid City. This paper presents a remote-sensing approach to monitor ground subsidences induced by tunneling excavation.  The Persistent Scatterers Interferometry technique (PSI was used to estimate subsidence and displacement time series from Synthetic Aperture Radar images, acquired between August 2003 and April 2008 from ENVISAT.  Remote sensed results were compared to traditional extensometric measures, fitting adequately for selected sectors. Spatial analysis of displacements allowed evaluating impacts of tunneling on surrounding buildings and facilities, highlighting critical areas. The availability of a spatial distribution of displacements in a time series allowed analyzing longitudinal, cross-sectional and temporal dynamics. The main limitations during this work were the heterogeneous spatial distribution of Persistent Scatterers, the absence of measurement points in work areas, the threshold for velocity detection and low temporal resolution of ENVISAT images. Nevertheless, these limitations of DInSAR for monitoring infrastructures are overcome by actual satellites, being a complementary technique with an exceptional added value and temporal analysis capability.

  1. Method of forecasting seismic energy induced by longwall exploitation based on changes in ground subsidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Violetta Sokoola Szewiola

    2011-01-01

    A method of forecasting total seismic energy induced by longwall exploitation,based on changes in ground subsidence,is presented in the form of a linear regression model with one with one independent variable.In the method,ground subsidence is described with a cross-section area of a subsidence trough Pw along a line of observations in the direction of an advancing longwall front,approximately along the axis of the Iongwall area.Total seismic energy is determined on the basis of seismic energy data of tremors induced by exploitation.The presentation consists of a detailed method and evaluation of its predictive ability for the area of longwall exploitation within the region of one of the coal mines in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin.This method can be used for forecasting the total seismic energy released by tremors within the area directly connected with the exploitation,in which the seismic activity induced by this exploitation occurs.The estimation of the parameters of the determined model should each time be carried out with investigations of the correctness of the model.The method cannot be applied when the number of recorded phenomena is small and when there is insufficient data to make it possible to calculate the index Pw.

  2. Ground Subsidence over Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region during Three Periods of 1992 to 2014 Monitored by Interferometric SAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Yonghong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region suffers the most serious ground subsidence in China, which has caused huge economic losses every year. Therefore, ground subsidence was listed as an important mission in the project of geographic conditions monitoring over Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei launched by the National Administration of Surveying, Mapping and Geoinformation in 2013. In this paper, we propose a methodology of ground subsidence monitoring over wide area, which is entitled "multiple master-image coherent target small-baseline interferometric SAR (MCTSB-InSAR". MCTSB-InSAR is an improved time series InSAR technique with some unique features. SAR datasets used for ground subsidence monitoring over the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region include ERS-1/2 SAR images acquired between 1992 to 2000, ENVISAT ASAR images acquired between 2003 to 2010 and RADARSAT-2 images acquired between 2012 to 2014. This research represents a first ever effort on mapping ground subsidence over Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region and over such as a long time span in China. In comparison with more than 120 leveling measurements collected in Beijing and Tianjin, the derived subsidence velocity has the accuracy of 8.7mm/year (1992—2000, 4.7mm/year (2003—2010, and 5.4mm/year (2012—2014 respectively. The spatial-temporal characteristics of the development of ground subsidence in Beijing and Tianjin are analyzed. In general, ground subsidence in Beijing kept continuously expanding in the period of 1992 to 2014. While, ground subsidence in Tianjin had already been serious in 1990s, had dramatically expanded during 2000s, and started to alleviate in recent years. The monitoring result is of high significance for prevention and mitigation of ground subsidence disaster, for making development plan, for efficient and effective utilization of water resource, and for adjustment of economic framework of this region. The result also indicates the effectiveness and reliability of the MCTSB

  3. Spatial distribution of thermokarst terrain in Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, Louise; Mann, Dan H; Grosse, Guido; Jones, Benjamin M.; Romanovsky, Vladimir E

    2016-01-01

    In landscapes underlain by ice-rich permafrost, the development of thermokarst landforms can have drastic impacts on ecosystem processes and human infrastructure. Here we describe the distribution of thermokarst landforms in the continuous permafrost zone of Arctic Alaska, analyze linkages to the underlying surficial geology, and discuss the vulnerability of different types of landscapes to future thaw. We identified nine major thermokarst landforms and then mapped their distributions in twelve representative study areas totaling 300-km2. These study areas differ in their geologic history, permafrost-ice content, and ground thermal regime. Results show that 63% of the entire study area is occupied by thermokarst landforms and that the distribution of thermokarst landforms and overall landscape complexity varies markedly with surficial geology. Areas underlain by ice-rich marine silt are the most affected by thermokarst (97% of total area), whereas areas underlain by glacial drift are least affected (14%). Drained thermokarst-lake basins are the most widespread thermokarst landforms, covering 33% of the entire study region, with greater prevalence in areas of marine silt (48% coverage), marine sand (47%), and aeolian silt (34%). Thermokarst-lakes are the second most common thermokarst landform, covering 16% of the study region, with highest coverage in areas underlain by marine silt (39% coverage). Thermokarst troughs and pits cover 7% of the study region and are the third most prevalent thermokarst landform. They are most common in areas underlain by deltaic sands and gravels (18% coverage) and marine sand (12%). Alas valleys are widespread in areas of aeolian silt (14%) located in gradually sloping uplands. Areas of marine silt have been particularly vulnerable to thaw in the past because they are ice-rich and have low-gradient topography facilitating the repeated development of thermokarst-lakes. In the future, ice-rich aeolian, upland terrain (yedoma) will be

  4. Spatial distribution of thermokarst terrain in Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, L. M.; Mann, D. H.; Grosse, G.; Jones, B. M.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2016-11-01

    In landscapes underlain by ice-rich permafrost, the development of thermokarst landforms can have drastic impacts on ecosystem processes and human infrastructure. Here we describe the distribution of thermokarst landforms in the continuous permafrost zone of Arctic Alaska, analyze linkages to the underlying surficial geology, and discuss the vulnerability of different types of landscapes to future thaw. We identified nine major thermokarst landforms and then mapped their distributions in twelve representative study areas totaling 300-km2. These study areas differ in their geologic history, permafrost-ice content, and ground thermal regime. Results show that 63% of the entire study area is occupied by thermokarst landforms and that the distribution of thermokarst landforms and overall landscape complexity varies markedly with surficial geology. Areas underlain by ice-rich marine silt are the most affected by thermokarst (97% of total area), whereas areas underlain by glacial drift are least affected (14%). Drained thermokarst-lake basins are the most widespread thermokarst landforms, covering 33% of the entire study region, with greater prevalence in areas of marine silt (48% coverage), marine sand (47%), and aeolian silt (34%). Thermokarst-lakes are the second most common thermokarst landform, covering 16% of the study region, with highest coverage in areas underlain by marine silt (39% coverage). Thermokarst troughs and pits cover 7% of the study region and are the third most prevalent thermokarst landform. They are most common in areas underlain by deltaic sands and gravels (18% coverage) and marine sand (12%). Alas valleys are widespread in areas of aeolian silt (14%) located in gradually sloping uplands. Areas of marine silt have been particularly vulnerable to thaw in the past because they are ice-rich and have low-gradient topography facilitating the repeated development of thermokarst-lakes. In the future, ice-rich aeolian, upland terrain (yedoma) will be

  5. Kalman Filters in Geotechnical Monitoring of Ground Subsidence Using Data from MEMS Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Azzam, Rafig; Fernández-Steeger, Tomás M

    2016-07-19

    The fast development of wireless sensor networks and MEMS make it possible to set up today real-time wireless geotechnical monitoring. To handle interferences and noises from the output data, Kalman filter can be selected as a method to achieve a more realistic estimate of the observations. In this paper, a one-day wireless measurement using accelerometers and inclinometers was deployed on top of a tunnel section under construction in order to monitor ground subsidence. The normal vectors of the sensors were firstly obtained with the help of rotation matrices, and then be projected to the plane of longitudinal section, by which the dip angles over time would be obtained via a trigonometric function. Finally, a centralized Kalman filter was applied to estimate the tilt angles of the sensor nodes based on the data from the embedded accelerometer and the inclinometer. Comparing the results from two sensor nodes deployed away and on the track respectively, the passing of the tunnel boring machine can be identified from unusual performances. Using this method, the ground settlement due to excavation can be measured and a real-time monitoring of ground subsidence can be realized.

  6. Experimental study on sliding shaft lining mechanical mechanisms under ground subsidence conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚直书; 杨俊杰; 孙文若

    2003-01-01

    Aimed at more than 60 shaft linings damaged in Huaibei, Datun, Xuzhou and Yanzhou mine areas, this paper presents a new type of sliding shaft lining with asphalt blocks sliding layer. By model test, it is obtained that the deformation characteristics and the mechanical mechanisms of the sliding shaft lining under the condition of ground subsidence. The research results provide a testing basis for the sliding shaft lining design. By now, this kind of sliding shaft lining had been applied in 9 shafts in China and Bangladesh.

  7. Evidence of multiple thermokarst lake generations from an 11800-year-old permafrost core on the northern Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Josefine; Wetterich, Sebastian; Jones, Benjamin M.; Meyer, Hanno; Bobrov, Anatoly; Grosse, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Permafrost degradation influences the morphology, biogeochemical cycling and hydrology of Arctic landscapes over a range of time scales. To reconstruct temporal patterns of early to late Holocene permafrost and thermokarst dynamics, site-specific palaeo-records are needed. Here we present a multi-proxy study of a 350-cm-long permafrost core from a drained lake basin on the northern Seward Peninsula, Alaska, revealing Lateglacial to Holocene thermokarst lake dynamics in a central location of Beringia. Use of radiocarbon dating, micropalaeontology (ostracods and testaceans), sedimentology (grain-size analyses, magnetic susceptibility, tephra analyses), geochemistry (total nitrogen and carbon, total organic carbon, δ13Corg) and stable water isotopes (δ18O, δD, d excess) of ground ice allowed the reconstruction of several distinct thermokarst lake phases. These include a pre-lacustrine environment at the base of the core characterized by the Devil Mountain Maar tephra (22 800±280 cal. a BP, Unit A), which has vertically subsided in places due to subsequent development of a deep thermokarst lake that initiated around 11 800 cal. a BP (Unit B). At about 9000 cal. a BP this lake transitioned from a stable depositional environment to a very dynamic lake system (Unit C) characterized by fluctuating lake levels, potentially intermediate wetland development, and expansion and erosion of shore deposits. Complete drainage of this lake occurred at 1060 cal. a BP, including post-drainage sediment freezing from the top down to 154 cm and gradual accumulation of terrestrial peat (Unit D), as well as uniform upward talik refreezing. This core-based reconstruction of multiple thermokarst lake generations since 11 800 cal. a BP improves our understanding of the temporal scales of thermokarst lake development from initiation to drainage, demonstrates complex landscape evolution in the ice-rich permafrost regions of Central Beringia during the Lateglacial and Holocene

  8. Engineering practice of reducing ground subsidence by grouting into overburden bed-separated and similar model experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Yan-fa; ZHONG Ya-ping; LI Jian-min; WANG Su-hua; ZHANG Qing-song

    2007-01-01

    The subsidence prediction theory under the condition of grouting into bedseparated was developed. Reducing ground subsidence by grouting was carried out on eight fully-mechanized top-coal caving faces, by using the continuous grouting in multiple-layer to obtain experiment results of reducing subsidence under fully mining. The similar material model that can be dismantled under the condition of constant temperature and constant humidity was developed. The model was used to simulate the evolution of overburden bed-separated under such constraints of temperature and humidity, at the same time, and to test the hardening process of similar materials.

  9. An Assessment of Thermokarst Driven Changes in Land Cover of the Tanana Flats Wetland Complex of Alaska from 2009 to 2100 in response to Climate Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Genet, H.; Lara, M. J.; McGuire, A. D.; Roach, J.; Patil, V.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Bolton, W. R.; Rutter, R.

    2014-12-01

    Ongoing climate warming has the potential to affect terrestrial ecosystems and the services they provide to local and regional communities, particularly in high latitude regions. Rising temperatures have increased permafrost vulnerability to thawing. In boreal region, ice-rich permafrost degradation may result in the subsidence of the ground surface and the transition from permafrost plateau forest to wetland ecosystems, with dramatic changes in ecosystem structure and function, e.g. vegetation composition, energy balance, and carbon and nutrient cycles. However, this disturbance is poorly represented in existing ecosystem models. A state-and-transition model, the Alaska Thermokarst Model (ATM), is being developed to predict thermokarst initiation and expansion and to keep track of the associated vegetation transitions in boreal and arctic regions. The drivers of these transitions in the boreal region are highly related to climate, topography, fire disturbance and forest fragmentation. In this study, we applied the ATM in a large wetland complex in Interior Alaska (the Tanana Flats) to predict changes in land cover associated to thermokarst from 2009 to 2100. Preliminary simulations over a 10 km x 10 km area of the Tanana Flats suggests that permafrost plateau forests will decrease by 34.9% and collapse scar fens and bogs will increase by 88.3% in this region. After further testing and refinement of the ATM, a next step will be to couple the ATM with a process-based ecosystem model to evaluate the effects of thermokarst dynamics on carbon dynamics.

  10. Influences of soil hydraulic and mechanical parameters on land subsidence and ground fissures caused by groundwater exploitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈兴贤; 骆祖江; 周世玲

    2014-01-01

    In order to study the influences of hydraulic and mechanical parameters on land subsidence and ground fissure caused by groundwater exploitation, based on the Biot’s consolidation theory and combined with the nonlinear rheological theory of soil, the constitutive relation in Biot’s consolidation theory is extended to include the viscoelastic plasticity, and the dynamic relationship among the porosity, the hydraulic conductivity, the parameters of soil deformation and effective stress is also considered, a three-dimensional full coupling mathematical model is established and applied to the study of land subsidence and ground fissures of Cangzhou in Hebei Province, through the analysis of parameter sensitivity, the influences of soil hydraulic and mechanical parame-ters on land subsidence and ground fissure are revealed. It is shown that the elastic modulus E , the Poisson ratio, the specific yield m and the soil cohesion c have a great influence on the land subsidence and the ground fissures. In addition, the vertical hydraulic conductivity zk and the horizontal hydraulic conductivity ks also have a great influence on the land subsidence and the ground fissures.

  11. Mapping Ground Subsidence Phenomena in Ho Chi Minh City through the Radar Interferometry Technique Using ALOS PALSAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinh Ho Tong Minh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly developing urbanization since the last decade of the 20th century has led to extensive groundwater extraction, resulting in subsidence in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Recent advances in multi-temporal spaceborne SAR interferometry, especially with a persistent scatters interferometry (PSI approach, has made this a robust remote sensing technique for measuring large-scale ground subsidence with millimetric accuracy. This work has presented an advanced PSI analysis, to provide an unprecedented spatial extent and continuous temporal coverage of the subsidence in Ho Chi Minh City from 2006 to 2010. The study shows that subsidence is most severe in the Holocene silt loam areas along the Sai Gon River and in the southwest of the city. The groundwater extraction resulting from urbanization and urban growth is mainly responsible for the subsidence. Subsidence in turn leads to more flooding and water nuisance. The correlation between the reference leveling velocity and the estimated PSI result is R2 = 0.88, and the root mean square error is 4.3 (mm/year, confirming their good agreement. From 2006 to 2010, the estimation of the average subsidence rate is -8.0 mm/year, with the maximum value up to -70 mm/year. After four years, in regions along Sai Gon River and in the southwest of the city, the land has sunk up to -12 cm. If not addressed, subsidence leads to the increase of inundation, both in frequency and spatial extent. Finally, regarding climate change, the effects of subsidence should be considered as appreciably greater than those resulting from rising sea level. It is essential to consider these two factors, because the city is inhabited by more than 7.5 million people, where subsidence directly impacts urban structures and infrastructure.

  12. INVESTIGATION OF GROUND PENETRATING RADAR FOR DETECTION OF ROAD SUBSIDENCE NORTHCOAST OF JAKARTA, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris Budiono

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A survey of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR was conducted in the coastal zone of northern part of Jakarta, Indonesia. The purpose of this survey was to provide the subsurface of coastal Quaternary sedimentary features and stratigraphy disturbances associated with induce post road subsidence 2009. The possibility of subsurface lithology disturbance shown by the GPR record. This record resulted from GPR methods using SIR system 20 GSSI, 270 MHz and 400 MHz and MLF 3200 transducer. The method is a promising tool for resolving changes of physical properties in subsurface lithology condition at the natural scale due to composition changes of physical properties.The reflection data resulted that GPR can distinguish between image the basic geometry forms such as lithology , structure geology , soil and subsurface utilities condition

  13. Ground Subsidence in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region from 1992 to 2014 Revealed by Multiple SAR Stacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghong Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The coordinated development of the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei has become a national strategy with Beijing and Tianjin as twin engines driving the regional development. However, the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region has suffered dramatic ground subsidence during last two to three decades, mainly due to long-term groundwater withdrawal. Although, annual spirit leveling has been conducted routinely in some parts of Beijing and Tianjin, and InSAR technique has also been used to monitor ground subsidence in some local areas of the region, there is a lack of a complete survey of ground subsidence over the whole region. In this paper, we report a research on mapping ground subsidence in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region over a long time span from 1992 to 2014. Three SAR datasets from four satellites are used: ERS-1/2 SAR images from 1992 to 2000, ENVISAT ASAR images from 2003 to 2010, and RADARSAT-2 images from 2012 to 2014. An improved multi-temporal InSAR method, namely “Multiple-master Coherent Target Small-Baseline InSAR” (MCTSB-InSAR, has been developed to process the datasets. A unique feature of MCTSB-InSAR is the adjustment process useful for wide area monitoring which provides an integrated solution for both calibration of InSAR-derived deformation and the harmonization of the deformation estimates from overlapping SAR frames. Three maps of the subsidence rate corresponding to the three periods over the wide Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region are generated, with respective accuracy of 8.7 mm/year (1992–2000, 4.7 mm/year (2003–2010, and 5.4 mm/year (2012–2014 validated by more than 120 leveling measurements. The spatial-temporal characteristics of the development of ground subsidence in Beijing and Tianjin are analyzed. This research represents a first-ever effort on mapping ground subsidence over very large area and over long time span in China. The result is of significance to serve the decision-making on ground subsidence mitigation in the Beijing

  14. Public discussion on ground subsidence of the Wadden Sea, 8 September 1993; Openbare discussiedag `Bodemdaling Waddenzee`, 8 september 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindeboom, H.J. [ed.

    1996-12-31

    On the request of a number of members of the Dutch Parliament and the involved industries NAM (Dutch Oil Company) and Elf Petroland, NIOZ organized a workshop on ground subsidence in the Dutch part of the Wadden Sea as a result of gas exploration. In this report contributions of participants which served as the basis for the discussions, are presented. Also a summary is given of the discussions and impressions of the chairpersons. The contributions deal with the historical development of the Wadden Sea, the predicted ground subsidence, the question whether natural transport of sand can keep up with that subsidence, the possible effects on salt marshes and Wadden Sea birds, and the consequences for the total ecosystem of the Wadden Sea

  15. Dynamic subsidence prediction of ground surface above salt cavern gas storage considering the creep of rock salt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A new model is proposed to predict the dynamic subsidence of ground surface above salt cavern gas storage during the leaching and storage, which takes into account the creep of rock salt. In the model, the extended form of Gaussian curve is adopted to figure out the shape of subsidence areas. The corresponding theoretical formulas are derived. In addition, parameters are studied to investigate the surface subsidence as a function of the salt ejection rate, internal pressure, buried depth, diameter, height, running time, etc. Through an example, the subsidence of the salt cavern gas storage located at Jiangsu of China obtained by the new model was compared with those by Peter A F formula, Schober & Sroka formula and FLAC3D through simulation. The results showed the proposed model is precise and correct, and can meet the actual engineering demands. The surface subsidence is equidirectional with the increase of salt ejection rate, depth, diameter, height, and running time, but reverse to the increase of internal pressure. The depth, diameter, running time and internal pressure have great effects on the subsidence, whereas the salt ejection rate and height have little influences on it.

  16. Performance of pile foundation for the civil infrastructure of high speed rail in severe ground subsidence area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H. W.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the performance of pile foundation is assessed for the 30 km long viaduct bridge structure seating in the ground subsidence area in the central part of Taiwan. The focus of this paper is placed on the settlement behaviour of a continuous 3-span R. C. viaduct bridge supported on piles adjacent to highway embankment. Monitoring data accumulated over the last 12 years indicate that the observed pace of the settlement of the viaduct structure in other sections matches that of the ground. However, the bridge piers adjacent to the embankment have been suffering an additional approximately 1 cm settlement every year since the completion of the embankment construction. It was believed that the piers may suffer from enormous negative skin friction owing to the surcharge from the embankment and groundwater depression. This paper first summarizes the settlement analysis results to quantify the settlement of pile due to regional ground subsidence and the combined effects from ground water fluctuation and embankment surcharge loading. Accordingly, a loading path on P'-q stress space is formulated to illustrate the loading variation subject to the combined loading effects that can explain why the combined effect becoming significant on settlement control for civil infrastructure in ground subsidence area.

  17. Land subsidence, Ground Fissures and Buried Faults: InSAR Monitoring of Ciudad Guzmán (Jalisco, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Alberto Brunori

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We study land subsidence processes and the associated ground fissuring, affecting an active graben filled by thick unconsolidated deposits by means of InSAR techniques and fieldwork. On 21 September 2012, Ciudad Guzmán (Jalisco, Mexico was struck by ground fissures of about 1.5 km of length, causing the deformation of the roads and the propagation of fissures in adjacent buildings. The field survey showed that fissures alignment is coincident with the escarpments produced on 19 September 1985, when a strong earthquake with magnitude 8.1 struck central Mexico. In order to detect and map the spatio-temporal features of the processes that led to the 2012 ground fissures, we applied InSAR multi-temporal techniques to process ENVISAT-ASAR and RADARSAT-2 satellite SAR images acquired between 2003 and 2012. We detect up to 20 mm/year of subsidence of the northwestern part of Ciudad Guzmán. These incremental movements are consistent with the ground fissures observed in 2012. Based on interferometric results, field data and 2D numerical model, we suggest that ground deformations and fissuring are due to the presence of areal subsidence correlated with variable sediment thickness and differential compaction, partly driven by the exploitation of the aquifers and controlled by the distribution and position of buried faults.

  18. Ground subsidence and associated ground fracturing in urban areas: InSAR monitoring of active tectonic structures (Ciudad Guzman, Colima Graben - Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bignami, C.; Brunori, C.; Zucca, F.; Groppelli, G.; Norini, G.; Hernandez, N. D.; Stramondo, S.

    2013-12-01

    This study focuses on the observation of a creeping phenomenon that produces subsidence of the Zapotlan basin and ground fracturing in correspondence of the Ciudad Guzmàn (Jalisco - Mexico). The September 21, 2012, the Ciudad Guzmàn has been struck by a phenomenon of ground fracturing of about 1.5 km of length. This event caused the deformation of the roads and the damage of 30 houses, of which eight have been declared uninhabitable. The alignment of fractures is coincident with the escarpments produced in September 19, 1985, in the Ciudad Guzman urban area, when a strong earthquake, magnitude 8.1, struck the Mexican area, causing the deaths of at least 10,000 people and serious damage in Mexico City. In Ciudad Guzmán, about 60% of the buildings were destroyed, with about 50 loss of life. The city is located in the Zapotlan basin (northern Colima graben), a wide tectonic depression where the depth of the infilling sediments is about 1 km. This subsidence cannot be measured outside the urbanized area, but it can be considered as a deformation mechanism of the central part of the basin. In order to detect and mapping the spatio-temporal features of the processes that led to this event, we applied InSAR multi-temporal techniques to analyze a dataset of ENVISAT satellite SAR images, acquired in a time span between 2003-2010. InSAR techniques detect a subsidence of the north-western part of Ciudad Guzmàn of about 15 mm/yr in the time interval 2003-2010. The displacement occurred in September 21, 2012, was detected using two RadarSAT2 acquisitions (2012-03-22 and 2013-03-17). The explanation of surface movements based on interferometric results, ground data and geological field observations, allowed confirming surface effect due to the overexploitation of the aquifers and highlights a subsidence due to anthropogenic causes coupled to buried tectonic structures.

  19. Monitoring Ground Subsidence in Hong Kong via Spaceborne Radar: Experiments and Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxiao Qin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The persistent scatterers interferometry (PSI technique is gradually becoming known for its capability of providing up to millimeter accuracy of measurement on ground displacement. Nevertheless, there is still quite a good amount of doubt regarding its correctness or accuracy. In this paper, we carried out an experiment corroborating the capability of the PSI technique with the help of a traditional survey method in the urban area of Hong Kong, China. Seventy three TerraSAR-X (TSX and TanDEM-X (TDX images spanning over four years are used for the data process. There are three aims of this study. The first is to generate a displacement map of urban Hong Kong and to check for spots with possible ground movements. This information will be provided to the local surveyors so that they can check these specific locations. The second is to validate if the accuracy of the PSI technique can indeed reach the millimeter level in this real application scenario. For validating the accuracy of PSI, four corner reflectors (CR were installed at a construction site on reclaimed land in Hong Kong. They were manually moved up or down by a few to tens of millimeters, and the value derived from the PSI analysis was compared to the true value. The experiment, carried out in unideal conditions, nevertheless proved undoubtedly that millimeter accuracy can be achieved by the PSI technique. The last is to evaluate the advantages and limitations of the PSI technique. Overall, the PSI technique can be extremely useful if used in collaboration with other techniques, so that the advantages can be highlighted and the drawbacks avoided.

  20. Ground subsidence Wadden Sea 1977-2011. Precision and reliability of measurements. Annex; Bodemdaling Waddenzee 1977-2011. Precisie en betrouwbaarheid uit metingen. Appendix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houtenbos, A.P.E.M.

    2011-12-15

    What about the subsidence caused by gas exploitation around the Wadden Sea? Is subsidence on the Wadden Sea really manageable by extraction with the 'hand on the faucet'? These and other questions are examined in an analysis of the measurements around the Wadden Sea in the period 1977-2011. After publication of the main report on the effects of ground subsidence at the island Ameland-Oost two more aspects were investigated: sedimentation and the speed of ground subsidence. This annex reports on those aspects [Dutch] Hoe staat het met de bodemdaling door gaswinning rond de Waddenzee? Is bodemdaling op de Waddenzee werkelijk beheersbaar door winning met de 'Hand aan de kraan'? Deze en andere vragen zijn onderzocht in een analyse van de metingen rond de Waddenzee tot over de periode 1977-2011. Na publicatie van het hoofdrapport over de effecten van bodemdaling op Ameland-Oost op 9 dec 2011 zijn nog twee aspecten met consequenties voor de bodemdaling op het Wad nader onderzocht: sedimentatie en bodemdalingsnelheid. Deze appendix geeft de resultaten weer.

  1. Regional subsidence modelling in Murcia city (SE Spain using 1-D vertical finite element analysis and 2-D interpolation of ground surface displacements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tessitore

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Subsidence is a hazard that may have natural or anthropogenic origin causing important economic losses. The area of Murcia city (SE Spain has been affected by subsidence due to groundwater overexploitation since the year 1992. The main observed historical piezometric level declines occurred in the periods 1982–1984, 1992–1995 and 2004–2008 and showed a close correlation with the temporal evolution of ground displacements. Since 2008, the pressure recovery in the aquifer has led to an uplift of the ground surface that has been detected by the extensometers. In the present work an elastic hydro-mechanical finite element code has been used to compute the subsidence time series for 24 geotechnical boreholes, prescribing the measured groundwater table evolution. The achieved results have been compared with the displacements estimated through an advanced DInSAR technique and measured by the extensometers. These spatio-temporal comparisons have showed that, in spite of the limited geomechanical data available, the model has turned out to satisfactorily reproduce the subsidence phenomenon affecting Murcia City. The model will allow the prediction of future induced deformations and the consequences of any piezometric level variation in the study area.

  2. 浅议采煤沉陷区移民安置问题%Comments on Immigration Resettlement Problems of Ground Subsidence Area Caused by Underground Coal Mining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宗云峰

    2012-01-01

    分析了淮南矿区近年来在采煤沉陷区移民安置工作中所取得的成果和面临的难题,探讨了如何做好采煤沉陷区移民安置工作,可为煤炭企业提供经验与借鉴。%The paper analyzed the achievements and faced problems of the immigration resettlements of the ground subsidence area caused by underground coal mining and discussed how to well done the immigration resettlements of the ground subsidence area, which could provide the experiences and references to the coal enterprises.

  3. Shallow Groundwater and Brine Processes in Antarctica: Linking Seasonal and Interannual Changes in Active Layer Hydrology to Ecosystem Change and Thermokarst Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    We report on measurements of soil hydrological and thermal properties from the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica (MDV), and relate them to changes in the spatial patterns of shallow groundwater flow (water tracks), landscape subsidence (thermokarst), and microbial and invertebrate ecosystem response. We show that shallow groundwater in the MDV is primarily derived from snowfall and seasonal ground ice melt, but is evaporatively concentrated during the summer flow period to produce saline to hypersaline active layer solutions. Multi-year profiles of soil temperature and soil moisture indicate that water track flow is largely limited to the duration of active layer conditions (~2 months) and that water track discharge is characterized by an early season pulse as ground ice melts, and a late season pulse as solutions flowing downslope accumulate at the base of the water tracks. Evaporative concentration of water track fluids, coupled with soil salt dissolution, and/or cation exchange reactions, result in enrichment of water track fluids in chloride and sulfate salts (depending on local soil chemistry) such that initially fresh snowmelt becomes saline to hypersaline over several km of groundwater flow. These brines shape soil ecosystems in the MDV by controlling salinity-dependent habitat suitability for invertebrates and microbial organisms. We show that these soil salts and shallow groundwater solutions accumulate in local depressions to form ponds, and that where these ponds are located above buried ice, the presence of salts leads to expansion of the basins to form large thermokarst depressions. Because water tracks are primarily snow-fed, and are moderated by shallow groundwater processes, they represent a component of the Antarctic hydrological system that is likely to respond rapidly to regional changes in temperature and precipitation, altering Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems, carbon budgets, and ground ice distribution.

  4. Post-fire Thermokarst Development Along a Planned Road Corridor in Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B. M.; Grosse, G.; Larsen, C. F.; Hayes, D. J.; Arp, C. D.; Liu, L.; Miller, E.

    2015-12-01

    Wildfire disturbance in northern high latitude regions is an important factor contributing to ecosystem and landscape change. In permafrost influenced terrain, fire may initiate thermokarst development which impacts hydrology, vegetation, wildlife, carbon storage and infrastructure. In this study we differenced two airborne LiDAR datasets that were acquired in the aftermath of the large and severe Anaktuvuk River tundra fire, which in 2007 burned across a proposed road corridor in Arctic Alaska. The 2009 LiDAR dataset was acquired by the Alaska Department of Transportation in preparation for construction of a gravel road that would connect the Dalton Highway with the logistical camp of Umiat. The 2014 LiDAR dataset was acquired by the USGS to quantify potential post-fire thermokarst development over the first seven years following the tundra fire event. By differencing the two 1 m resolution digital terrain models, we measured permafrost thaw subsidence across 34% of the burned tundra area studied, and observed less than 1% in similar, undisturbed tundra terrain units. Ice-rich, yedoma upland terrain was most susceptible to thermokarst development following the disturbance, accounting for 50% of the areal and volumetric change detected, with some locations subsiding more than six meters over the study period. Calculation of rugosity, or surface roughness, in the two datasets showed a doubling in microtopography on average across the burned portion of the study area, with a 340% increase in yedoma upland terrain. An additional LiDAR dataset was acquired in April 2015 to document the role of thermokarst development on enhanced snow accumulation and subsequent snowmelt runoff within the burn area. Our findings will enable future vulnerability assessments of ice-rich permafrost terrain as a result of shifting disturbance regimes. Such assessments are needed to address questions focused on the impact of permafrost degradation on physical, ecological, and socio

  5. The effect of the depth and groundwater on the formation of sinkholes or ground subsidence associated with abandoned room and pillar lignite mines under static and dynamic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydan, Ö.; Ito, T.

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that some sinkholes or subsidence take place from time to time in the areas where abandoned room and pillar type mines exist. The author has been involved with the stability of abandoned mines beneath urbanized residential areas in Tokai region and there is a great concern about the stability of these abandoned mines during large earthquakes as well as in the long term. The 2003 Miyagi Hokubu and 2011 Great East Japan earthquakes caused great damage to abandoned mines and resulted in many collapses. The author presents the effect of the depth and groundwater on the formation of sinkholes or ground subsidence associated with abandoned room and pillar lignite mines under static and dynamic conditions and discusses the implications on the areas above abandoned lignite mines in this paper.

  6. Impact of global change on ground subsidence related to aquifer exploitation. The case of the Vega de Granada aquifer (SE Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido-Velazquez, David; María Mateos, Rosa; Rueda, Ramon; Pegalajar-Cuellar, Manuel; Ezquerro, Pablo; Béjar, Marta; Herrera, Gerardo; Collados-Lara, Antonio-Juan

    2017-04-01

    In this research, we intend to develop a methodology to assess the impact of potential global change scenarios on land subsidence. Subsidence rates in wide areas could be estimated by using remote sensing techniques, such as DInSAR and specifically the new radar information obtained by the Sentinel set of satellites from the European Space Agency (ESA). A symbolic regression method will be developed to obtain an explicit quantitative relationship between subsidence, hydraulic head changes and other physical variables (e.g. percentage of clay and silt in the ground, load of buildings and constructions, fill-in works etc.). Different ensemble and downscaling techniques will be used to define potential future global change scenarios for the test-regions based on the data coming from simulations with different Regional Circulation Models (RCMs). Future drawdowns can be estimated from these global change scenarios under different management options. The regression approach will be employed to simulate the impacts of these drawdowns, in terms of land-subsidence, taking into account the estimated hydraulic head changes. It will allow to assess sustainable management of detrital aquifers taking into account subsidence issues. Classic regression analysis attempts to postulate a hypothesis function f, and the regression is reduced to the problem of finding the optimal parameters w of the hypothesis y=f(x, w), to explain a set of dependent variables y from the values of independent variables x, where x and y are known input/output data. Symbolic regression generalizes this process by assuming that f is also unknown in advance, so that the problem is formulated as finding the optimal analytical expression and its parameters that best approximate the data y considering the data in x. To achieve that purpose, in this work Straight Line Programs (SLP) will be used to represent analytical expressions, and a genetic programming approach will be used to find an optimal SLP that

  7. The evolution of a thermokarst-lake landscape: Late Quaternary permafrost degradation and stabilization in interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Mary E.; Grosse, Guido; Jones, Benjamin M.; McDowell, Patricia F.

    2016-01-01

    Thermokarst processes characterize a variety of ice-rich permafrost terrains and often lead to lake formation. The long-term evolution of thermokarst landscapes and the stability and longevity of lakes depend upon climate, vegetation and ground conditions, including the volume of excess ground ice and its distribution. The current lake status of thermokarst-lake landscapes and their future trajectories under climate warming are better understood in the light of their long-term development. We studied the lake-rich southern marginal upland of the Yukon Flats (northern interior Alaska) using dated lake-sediment cores, observations of river-cut exposures, and remotely-sensed data. The region features thick (up to 40 m) Quaternary deposits (mainly loess) that contain massive ground ice. Two of three studied lakes formed ~ 11,000–12,000 cal yr BP through inferred thermokarst processes, and fire may have played a role in initiating thermokarst development. From ~ 9000 cal yr BP, all lakes exhibited steady sedimentation, and pollen stratigraphies are consistent with regional patterns. The current lake expansion rates are low (0 to  5 m amplitude), deep thermo-erosional gullies, and features resembling lake drainage channels, suggesting that highly dynamic surface processes have previously shaped the landscape. Evidently, widespread early Holocene permafrost degradation and thermokarst lake initiation were followed by lake longevity and landscape stabilization, the latter possibly related to establishment of dense forest cover. Partial or complete drainage of three lakes in 2013 reveals that there is some contemporary landscape dynamism. Holocene landscape evolution in the study area differs from that described from other thermokarst-affected regions; regional responses to future environmental change may be equally individualistic.

  8. The evolution of a thermokarst-lake landscape: Late Quaternary permafrost degradation and stabilization in interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Mary; Grosse, Guido; Jones, Benjamin M.; McDowell, Patricia

    2016-07-01

    Thermokarst processes characterize a variety of ice-rich permafrost terrains and often lead to lake formation. The long-term evolution of thermokarst landscapes and the stability and longevity of lakes depend upon climate, vegetation and ground conditions, including the volume of excess ground ice and its distribution. The current lake status of thermokarst-lake landscapes and their future trajectories under climate warming are better understood in the light of their long-term development. We studied the lake-rich southern marginal upland of the Yukon Flats (northern interior Alaska) using dated lake-sediment cores, observations of river-cut exposures, and remotely-sensed data. The region features thick (up to 40 m) Quaternary deposits (mainly loess) that contain massive ground ice. Two of three studied lakes formed ~ 11,000-12,000 cal yr BP through inferred thermokarst processes, and fire may have played a role in initiating thermokarst development. From ~ 9000 cal yr BP, all lakes exhibited steady sedimentation, and pollen stratigraphies are consistent with regional patterns. The current lake expansion rates are low (0 to 5 m amplitude), deep thermo-erosional gullies, and features resembling lake drainage channels, suggesting that highly dynamic surface processes have previously shaped the landscape. Evidently, widespread early Holocene permafrost degradation and thermokarst lake initiation were followed by lake longevity and landscape stabilization, the latter possibly related to establishment of dense forest cover. Partial or complete drainage of three lakes in 2013 reveals that there is some contemporary landscape dynamism. Holocene landscape evolution in the study area differs from that described from other thermokarst-affected regions; regional responses to future environmental change may be equally individualistic.

  9. Microbial communities and greenhouse gas production from a thermokarst bog chronosequence: Mechanisms of rapid carbon loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, M. P.; Jones, M.; Manies, K.; Mcfarland, J. W.; Blazewicz, S.; Keller, J.; Haw, M.; Harden, J. W.; Medvedeff, C.; Turetsky, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change in northern latitudes is expected to cause widespread permafrost thaw in Interior Alaska over the 21st century. Permafrost thaw may result in land subsidence and the formation of thermokarst bogs. In decades following thaw, previously forest floor (silvic) carbon (C) may be rapidly decomposed, likely due to accelerated microbial activities in young bog environments, resulting in a decadal to century scale positive feedback to climate warming. We examined rates and mechanisms of C loss from a thermokarst bog chronosequence (0-500 ybp) at the Alaska Peatland Experiment (APEX), part of the Bonanza Creek LTER near Fairbanks, AK. Silvic C losses were within ranges observed at other thermokarst chronosequence studies. Incubation studies and modeling results indicate that there are accelerated rates of microbial activity within the deeper silvic and humic soil horizons of the youngest bog. We hypothesized two potential mechanisms of rapid C loss and higher microbial activity in young thermokarst bogs: 1) higher availability of electron acceptors from thawed permafrost that fuel microbial activity, and 2) increased availability of labile C from both soil organic matter and dissolved organic matter in young bogs fuel microbial activity. We tested these hypotheses using anaerobic soil incubations and assays of sulfate reduction, Fe reduction, humic substance (HS) reduction, and nitrate reduction, combined with quantitative PCR of microbial functional groups associated with those processes. Assay results indicated that although sulfate reduction and denitrification were detectable in several of the bogs, only HS reduction was unique to the deep layers of the young thermokarst bog. The most striking difference among different aged bogs was dissolved organic matter, which was elevated in the youngest bogs. These results support both of our hypotheses: microbial activity is stimulated by the availability of labile C in the young bog as both a source of C for

  10. Influence of ground subsidence on working behavior of composite foundation%地基土沉降对复合地基工作性状的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏力农; 苗云东; 苗伟波; 周靖; 补国斌; 李训根

    2012-01-01

    采用数值分析方法,考虑桩-土-褥垫层的共同作用,对复合地基在地基土沉降前后的沉降、桩侧摩阻力和桩身轴向应力等工作性状进行了研究.结果表明:与常规条件下相比,在相同上部荷载作用下,地下水位下降使基础和桩顶的沉降增加,桩身轴向应力增大,桩-土应力比提高,上部荷载的增大会加剧这些现象.随着降水造成的地基土沉降增加,加固桩体中负摩阻力的影响逐渐增大,中性点位置下移,负摩阻力引起的下拉力增大,桩侧摩阻力发挥更加充分.%Considering the pile-soil-cushion interaction, the working behaviors of composite foundation fore and after ground subsidence, such as the displacement of soil and reinforced piles, skin friction distribution of pile and pile axial stress are studied by finite element method. The results show that, compared with conventional conditions, the settlement of foundation, including soil and reinforced pile increases, axial stress in pile enhances, pile-soil stress ratio improves while groundwater level lowering in the same applied load. Increase of load acted on the foundation would promote the above-mentioned phenomena. In reinforced piles, the influences of negative skin friction increase gradually, neutral point moves down, down drag caused by negative skin friction increases, skin friction along the piles develops more fully along with the increase of the ground subsidence caused by groundwater level lowering.

  11. 探地雷达在治理城市塌陷区中的应用%GROUND PENETRATING RADAR APPLIED IN TREATMENT OF SUBSIDENCE IN A CITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施延昭; 张国鸿

    2016-01-01

    Ground penetrating radar is a means to detect internal structure and distribution law of underground medium by broadband high-frequency electromagnetic wave, and has been widely applied in many fields such as hazard geology exploration, geotechnical survey and engineering quality inspection. This paper brought an example of the technique used in engineering quality inspection of treatment of city subsidence, by comparison of the detection result of the radar with two high-frequency antennas with 2D model forward modeling result, gave a definite conclusion on the treatment quality and whether a hidden subsidence exists or not.%探地雷达是利用宽带高频电磁波以脉冲形式来探测地表之下介质内部结构分布规律的一种地球物理方法。它广泛用于灾害地质勘查、岩土工程调查和工程质量检测等众多领域。本文给出了一个在治理城市塌陷区的工程质量检测中的应用实例,通过两种高频天线的探地雷达检测和二维模型正演结果对比,对塌陷区治理质量以及是否存在隐伏塌陷隐患给出了明确的结语。

  12. Interannual variations in the hydrothermal regime around a thermokarst lake in Beiluhe, Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Z. J.; Niu, F. J.; Fang, J. H.; Luo, J.; Yin, G. A.

    2017-01-01

    Thermokarst is a term associated with the thaw of ice-rich permafrost and the resulting formation of irregular depressions in the landscape from thaw settlement. Thermokarst lakes may subsequently develop from ponds formed in depressions. These lakes commonly have collapsing shorelines, and the development of thermokarst terrain and associated thermal erosion may significantly influence the stability of infrastructure and the hydrothermal conditions of the surrounding permafrost. In this study, we examined interannual variations in the hydrothermal regime of a thermokarst lake in Beiluhe Basin based on field data measured in 2006-2013. The timing and nature of lake ice growth and melt were recorded. We observed considerable seasonal differences in lake water level ( 0.5 m) and differences in water level between the lake and the water table in the surrounding ground (over 1.0 m). The nearly-saturated ground at the lakeshore ( 35% in maximum volumetric water content) highlights the seepage effect from the lake to the surrounding ground. The vertical temperature profile from + 2 m (air) to - 2 m (lake bottom) and to 60 m depth in the ground was measured. The annual mean air temperature, lake-surface temperature, and annual mean lake-bottom temperature in 2010-2011 were approximately - 3.6, 0.4, and > 5 °C, respectively. The thermal offsets between the air and the lake surface and between the lake surface and lake bottom were 3 and 7 °C, respectively. The annual mean lake-bottom temperatures ranged from 2.3 to 6.9 °C at water depths from 1.2 to 2.1 m. The asymmetry of the bathymetry has resulted in distinct thermal regimes beneath the lake bottom in different locations. A through-talik was present at the deepest side of the lake, but some permafrost extended laterally beneath the lake bottom at the shallower side, forming an hourglass shape in cross section at one end. Lateral thermal erosion along the lakeshore was linked to the lake-bottom temperature and lake

  13. Deriving Spatio-Temporal Development of Ground Subsidence Due to Subway Construction and Operation in Delta Regions with PS-InSAR Data: A Case Study in Guangzhou, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiqiang Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Subways have been an important method for relieving traffic pressures in urban areas, but ground subsidence, during construction and operation, can be a serious problem as it may affect the safety of its operation and that of the surrounding buildings. Thus, conducting long-term ground deformation monitoring and modeling for subway networks are essential. Compared with traditional geodetic methods, the Persistent Scatterer Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PS-InSAR technique offers wider coverage and denser measurements along subway lines. In this study, we mapped the surface deformation of the Guangzhou subway network with Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR and Phased Array Type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR data using the Interferometric Point Target Analysis (IPTA technique. The results indicate that newly excavated tunnels have regional subsidence with an average rate of more than 8 mm/year, as found on Lines Two, Three, Six, and GuangFo (GF. Furthermore, we determined the spatio-temporal subsidence behavior of subways with PALSAR in delta areas using Peck’s formula and the logistic time model. We estimated the tunneling-related parameters in soft soil areas, which had not been previously explored. We examined a section of line GF, as an example, to estimate the ground settlement trough development. The results showed the maximum settlement increased from −5.2 mm to −23.6 mm and its ground loss ratio ranged from 1.5–8.7% between 13 July 2008 and 19 January 2011. In addition, we found that the tunnels in line GF will become stable after a period of about 2300 days in peak subsidence areas. The results show that the proposed approach can help explain the dynamic ground subsidence along a metro line. This study can provide references for urban subway projects in delta areas, and for the risk assessment of nearby buildings and underground pipelines along metro lines.

  14. Model experimental research on deformation and subsidence characteristics of ground and wall rock due to mining under thick overlying terrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weizhong Ren; Chengmai Guo; Ziqiang Peng; Yonggang Wang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan (China). Institute of Rock and Soil Mechanics

    2010-06-15

    Based on the prototype of a mine, a physical simulation test is conducted. The characteristics of the deformation and failure of the ground surface and the wall rock around a goaf, as well as the creep behavior of the wall rock deformation and the failure mechanism, are analyzed. The simulation test has greatly improved our understanding on the wall rock's deformation and failure characteristics. For the first time, digital close-range photogrammetry was used to measure the displacements in a sectional model test. The measurements by this technique agreed very well with those obtained by other methods, such as using dial gauges.

  15. Detecting unfrozen sediments below thermokarst lakes with surface nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsekian, Andrew D.; Grosse, Guido; Walbrecker, Jan O.; Müller-Petke, Mike; Keating, Kristina; Liu, Lin; Jones, Benjamin M.; Knight, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    A talik is a layer or body of unfrozen ground that occurs in permafrost due to an anomaly in thermal, hydrological, or hydrochemical conditions. Information about talik geometry is important for understanding regional surface water and groundwater interactions as well as sublacustrine methane production in thermokarst lakes. Due to the direct measurement of unfrozen water content, surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a promising geophysical method for noninvasively estimating talik dimensions. We made surface NMR measurements on thermokarst lakes and terrestrial permafrost near Fairbanks, Alaska, and confirmed our results using limited direct measurements. At an 8 m deep lake, we observed thaw bulb at least 22 m below the surface; at a 1.4 m deep lake, we detected a talik extending between 5 and 6 m below the surface. Our study demonstrates the value that surface NMR may have in the cryosphere for studies of thermokarst lake hydrology and their related role in the carbon cycle.

  16. The investigation of dangerous geological processes resulting in land subsidence while designing the main gas pipeline in South Yakutia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strokova, L. A.; Ermolaeva, A. V.; Golubeva, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    The number of gas main accidents has increased recently due to dangerous geological processes in underdeveloped areas located in difficult geological conditions. The paper analyses land subsidence caused by karst and thermokarst processes in the right of way, reveals the assessment criteria for geological hazards and creates zoning schemes considering the levels of karst and thermorkarst hazards.

  17. Seasonal thaw settlement at drained thermokarst lake basins, Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Schaefer, Kevin; Gusmeroli, Alessio; Grosse, Guido; Jones, Benjamin M.; Zhang, Tinjun; Parsekian, Andrew; Zebker, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Drained thermokarst lake basins (DTLBs) are ubiquitous landforms on Arctic tundra lowland. Their dynamic states are seldom investigated, despite their importance for landscape stability, hydrology, nutrient fluxes, and carbon cycling. Here we report results based on high-resolution Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) measurements using space-borne data for a study area located on the North Slope of Alaska near Prudhoe Bay, where we focus on the seasonal thaw settlement within DTLBs, averaged between 2006 and 2010. The majority (14) of the 18 DTLBs in the study area exhibited seasonal thaw settlement of 3–4 cm. However, four of the DTLBs examined exceeded 4 cm of thaw settlement, with one basin experiencing up to 12 cm. Combining the InSAR observations with the in situ active layer thickness measured using ground penetrating radar and mechanical probing, we calculated thaw strain, an index of thaw settlement strength along a transect across the basin that underwent large thaw settlement. We found thaw strains of 10–35% at the basin center, suggesting the seasonal melting of ground ice as a possible mechanism for the large settlement. These findings emphasize the dynamic nature of permafrost landforms, demonstrate the capability of the InSAR technique to remotely monitor surface deformation of individual DTLBs, and illustrate the combination of ground-based and remote sensing observations to estimate thaw strain. Our study highlights the need for better description of the spatial heterogeneity of landscape-scale processes for regional assessment of surface dynamics on Arctic coastal lowlands.

  18. Preventing and controlling land subsidence in Shanghai -towards more integrated and effective land use and ground water governance in the Yangtze Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Liping

    2016-04-01

    The Yangtze Delta, covers 210,700 square kilometers and with 156 million inhabitants (NRDC, 2010; The National Bureau of Statistics, 2011), is one of the areas most severely affected by land subsidence in China. Up to 2012, the area with cumulative subsidence above 200 mm in Yangtze Delta has been closed to 10,000 square kilometers. Shanghai, located at the estuary of the Yangtze River and with a population of 23 million, is the most densely populated city in Yangtze Delta (The National Bureau of Statistics, 2011). Since 1921, the recorded cumulative subsidence has been 200 to 300 mm in the central area of the city (Chai, Shen, Zhu, & Zhang, 2005). Excessive pumping of groundwater is considered to be the leading reason, accounts for nearly 70%, of the city's land subsidence, the weight of skyscrapers and global warming also play hefty roles (30%) (Springer, 2012). Research has shown that the main method to control land subsidence in Shanghai is to prevent groundwater from dropping (Chai, Shen, Zhu, & Zhang, 2005), the city has made great efforts in this regard since 1965 (the beginning of the so-called "control period"), for example, it has been recharging underground water through 121 wells with more than 60,000 tons every day since 2012 (Chinadaily, 2012). It is a huge burden considering the city has been suffering from a shortage of fresh water. In 2013, with the other two provinces of Jiangsu and Zhejiang in Yangtze Delta, Shanghai signed a delta cooperation agreement on the prevention and control of land subsidence and jointly issued a Prevention and Control Planning on Land Subsidence in Yangtze Delta (2014-2020), which aims to establish a long-effect mechanism in the delta scope. This research aims to analyze and assess the land and groundwater governance arrangements related to land subsidence in the Yangtze Delta in general and Shanghai in specific, in order to develop optimizing adaptation strategies and associated governance arrangements. It examines the

  19. Permafrost landscapes in transition - towards modeling interactions, thresholds and feedbacks related to ice-rich ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermann, Sebastian; Langer, Moritz; Lee, Hanna; Berntsen, Terje; Boike, Julia; Krinner, Gerhard; Aalstad, Kristoffer; Schanke Aas, Kjetil; Peter, Maria; Heikenfeld, Max; Etzelmüller, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    Thawing of permafrost is governed by a complex interplay of different processes, of which only conductive heat transfer is taken into account in most model studies. However, heat conduction alone can not account for the dynamical evolution of many permafrost landscapes, e.g. in areas rich in ground ice shaped by thermokarst ponds and lakes. Novel process parameterizations are required to include such phenomena in future projections of permafrost thaw and hereby triggered climatic feedbacks. Recently, we have demonstrated a physically-based parameterization for thaw process in ice-rich ground in the permafrost model CryoGrid 3, which can reproduce the formation of thermokarst ponds and subsidence of the ground following thawing of ice-rich subsurface layers. Long-term simulations for different subsurface stratigraphies in the Lena River Delta, Siberia, demonstrate that the hydrological regime can both accelerate and delay permafrost thawing. If meltwater from thawed ice-rich layers can drain, the ground subsides while at the same time the formation of a talik is delayed. If the meltwater pools at the surface, a pond is formed which enhances heat transfer in the ground and leads to the formation of a talik. The PERMANOR project funded by the Norwegian Research Council until 2019 will extend this work by integrating such small-scale processes in larger-scale Earth System Models (ESMs). For this purpose, the project will explore and develop statistical approaches, in particular tiling, to represent permafrost landscape dynamics on subgrid scale. Ultimately, PERMANOR will conceptualize process understanding from in-situ studies to develop new model algorithms and pursue their implementation in a coupled ESM framework.

  20. Ground subsidence Wadden Sea 1977-2011. Precision and reliability of measurements; Bodemdaling Waddenzee 1977-2011. Precisie en betrouwbaarheid uit metingen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houtenbos, A.P.E.M.

    2011-12-15

    What about the subsidence caused by gas exploitation around the Wadden Sea? Is subsidence on the Wadden Sea really manageable by extraction with the 'hand on the faucet'? These and other questions are examined in an analysis of the measurements around the Wadden Sea in the period 1977-2011 [Dutch] Hoe staat het met de bodemdaling door gaswinning rond de Waddenzee? Is bodemdaling op de Waddenzee werkelijk beheersbaar door winning met de 'Hand aan de kraan'? Deze en andere vragen zijn onderzocht in een analyse van de metingen rond de Waddenzee tot over de periode 1977-2011.

  1. Three-dimensional numerical simulation of influences of ground subsidence on composite foundation%地基土沉降对复合地基影响的三维数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏力农; 苗云东; 廖常斌

    2012-01-01

    通过对复合地基在正常使用条件下和地基土沉降后的三维数值模拟,研究了复合地基由地下水位下降引起的地基土沉陷后的沉降、桩体摩阻力分布和桩身轴力分布的变化.分析表明:随着地基土沉降的增加,加固桩体和基础的沉降加大,中性点位置逐渐下降,桩身轴力有所增大;在加强桩中,中心桩的中性点最低,边桩次之,角桩最高;随着地基土沉降的增加,各桩中性点位置差异逐渐减小,桩体上部负摩阻力作用的桩身长度更长,负摩阻力值逐渐增大.%Based on three-dimensional numerical simulations of composite foundation both on the condition of ordinary use and ground subsidence, changes of settlement, skin friction distribution and axial force of pile in composite foundation after ground subsidence induced by groundwater level lowering are analyzed. It is shown that, settlement of reinforced pile and foundation increases, and neutral point in pile moves down gradually, axial forces in reinforced pile increase gradually along with ground subsidence increasing. In reinforced piles of composite foundation, neutral point in centre pile is the lowest, neutral point in border pile is the second, neutral point in corner pile is the highest. Along with ground subsidence increasing, the differences of neutral point position in centre pile, border pile and corner pile decrease gradually, the length impacted by negative skin friction of upper part pile over neutral point lengthens gradually, value of negative skin friction increases gradually.

  2. Research on ground subsidence monitoring of Ge Ting coal mine based on D-InSAR and GIS techniques%基于D-InSAR技术的葛亭煤矿地面沉降监测研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄宝伟; 宋小刚; 王振杰; 单新建

    2012-01-01

    为了为矿区安全开采和塌陷区环境综合治理提供科学依据,利用精细的D-InSAR技术对7景ENVISAT ASAR影像进行处理,获得了2004~2005年和2008~2009年葛亭煤矿多期地面沉降分布图。然后将D-InSAR结果导入GIS中做后处理,叠加0.25m分辨率的数字正射影像图(DOM)和开采平面图等来分析地面沉降,并以剖面图、3D可视图等进行显示。通过多期结果的相互验证,并与水准资料进行了比较。结果表明,D-InSAR结果可以清楚可靠地给出矿区沉降区域分布和演化,并且获得的矿区沉降范围和位置与实际基本吻合,沉降幅度较小的区域在数量级上和水准资料一致,而最大沉降量出现偏差,这是由于高形变梯度引起了干涉图的完全失相关,超出了D-InSAR技术形变探测的能力范围。%In order to provide scientific basis for safety mining and environment comprehensive management of collapse region,in this paper,7 ENVISAT ASAR images are processed by D-InSAR technique to acquire multi-period ground subsidence distribution maps from 2004 to 2005 and from 2008 to 2009 in Ge Ting coal mine area.The D-InSAR results are then exported to the GIS for post-processing.Digital Orthophoto Map(DOM) with 0.25m resolution and mine plan etc.are used to analyze the ground subsidence which is displayed through profiles,contour lines and 3D views.Cross-validation of multi-period results and the comparison with leveling data show that D-InSAR results can give the distribution of mining subsidence area clearly and reliably,and the range and location of the ground subsidence are basically consistent with the actual range and location.The subsidence magnitude in the areas with small subsidence is consistent with the leveling data.However,the maximum amount of subsidence occurred bias,which is due to the interferograms decorrelation caused by high deformation gradient that is beyond the capabilities of deformation detection of D

  3. 基于多影响因子计算模型在城市地面沉降监测中的应用研究%Study on Application of Multiple - influence - factor - based Calculation Model in Monitoring Urban Ground Subsidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝亚东; 许加东; 张勇

    2011-01-01

    Research purposes: In recent years, with the urban development and utilization of underground water, a large number of underground water have been pumped out, and it will bring out the ground subsidence.This paper describes the influences of the changes of underwater level, pore water pressure and ground load on the ground subsidence and analyzes the influence mechanism of these factors.A calculation model was established for monitoring the ground subsidence with the principles of regression analysis, and the model accuracy was verified by using it to monitoring the ground subsidence.The model can be used for providing the scientific basis for determining the quantity and density of underground water pumping well and it is of great significance to predicting the ground subsidence in urban areas and along the transportation routes and prevention of the disasters.Research conclusions: The calculation model of monitoring subsidence affected directly the calculation results of ground subsidence.Based on the relation between the groundwater table, pore water pressure, ground load and ground subsidence, this model established with the regression analysis principle is suitable for monitoring the ground subsidence in urban areas and along transportation routes.%研究目的:近年来,随着城市地下水被开发利用,大量地下水被抽取,久而久之将引起地表沉降.本文阐述地下水位变化、孔隙水压力变化和地面荷载变化对地面沉降的影响,分析这些因素的影响机理;应用回归分析原理,建立地面沉降监测计算模型,并结合实例,分析验证该模型,为城市取水井的数量和密度布设提供科学依据,对城市区域、交通干线地面沉降的预测及减灾、防灾具有重要意义.研究结论:沉降监测计算模型直接影响地面沉降计算结果:基于地下水位、孔隙水压力和荷载与地面沉降的关系,应用逐步回归分析原理建立的地面沉降计算模型,适合城市

  4. Expansion rate and geometry of floating vegetation mats on the margins of thermokarst lakes, northern Seward Peninsula, Alaska, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsekian, A.D.; Jones, Benjamin M.; Jones, M.; Grosse, G.; Walter, Anthony K.M.; Slater, L.

    2011-01-01

    Investigations on the northern Seward Peninsula in Alaska identified zones of recent (<50years) permafrost collapse that led to the formation of floating vegetation mats along thermokarst lake margins. The occurrence of floating vegetation mat features indicates rapid degradation of near-surface permafrost and lake expansion. This paper reports on the recent expansion of these collapse features and their geometry is determined using geophysical and remote sensing measurements. The vegetation mats were observed to have an average thickness of 0.57m and petrophysical modeling indicated that gas content of 1.5-5% enabled floatation above the lake surface. Furthermore, geophysical investigation provides evidence that the mats form by thaw and subsidence of the underlying permafrost rather than terrestrialization. The temperature of the water below a vegetation mat was observed to remain above freezing late in the winter. Analysis of satellite and aerial imagery indicates that these features have expanded at maximum rates of 1-2myr-1 over a 56year period. Including the spatial coverage of floating 'thermokarst mats' increases estimates of lake area by as much as 4% in some lakes. ?? 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. November 2016 West Hackberry Subsidence Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriarty, Dylan Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lord, Anna C. Snider [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Subsidence monitoring is a critical component to understanding the cavern integrity of salt storage caverns. This report looks at historical and recent data from two of the three West Hackberry dome cavern operators. DOE SPR and LA Storage are coordinating subsidence surveys to create a comprehensive understanding of ground movement above the dome. Data from annual level and rod surveys, GPS, and tiltmeter data show the sites are experiencing typical ground movement. The highest subsidence rate is seen in the middle of the DOE SPR site at just under one inch per year with less ground movement around the edge of the site. A GPS and tiltmeter instrument in the northeast areas of the DOE SPR site has not seen any trend change since the devices were installed in 2013. Comparison between recent ground movement data and historical trends suggest that there is no reason to believe that any DOE SPR or LA Storage caverns have been structurally compromised.

  6. Lava Lake Level Drop and Related Ground Subsidence in the Nyiragongo Main Crater (D.R.Congo) Measured by Close-Range Photogrammetry and InSAR Time-Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smets, B.; d'Oreye, N.; Samsonov, S. V.; Nobile, A.; Geirsson, H.; Kervyn, F.

    2015-12-01

    Nyiragongo volcano is the most active African volcano and among the most active volcanoes on Earth. It is also among the infrequent volcanoes that host a long-lived lava lake. The morphology of the Nyiragongo main crater is characterized by 2 levels of remnant platforms partly preserved and attached to its inner flanks, which correspond to former lava lake levels, and by a bottom "active" platform, which delimits the current active lava lake. The elevation of the bottom platform increases through time, with successive lava lake overflows. After a period of low level between late 2010 and August 2011, the lava lake next came back to its highest level. However, on September 30, 2011, it started a long and progressive fall, reaching ~70 m below the bottom platform in July 2014. This recent evolution of the lava lake, which occurred at the same time period as eruptive events at the neighboring Nyamulagira volcano, was accompanied by a ground subsidence of the bottom platform, leading to the appearance of ring fissures. This ground deformation is restricted to the bottom platform and, hence, suggests a very shallow source for the observed movement. All these changes in the Nyiragongo main crater were recorded by time-series of photographs, allowing the 3D reconstruction of the crater using close-range photogrammetric techniques and, hence, a detailed measurement of the observed changes. The ground subsidence was also recorded by time-series of RADARSAT-2 and CosmoSky-Med SAR interferograms, providing more detailed information on the velocity of deformation. Based on field data and the photogrammetric and InSAR time-series measurements, several hypotheses on the cause(s) of these changes in the Nyiragongo crater are discussed. The present work also highlights the potential of close-range photogrammetry and high-resolution InSAR to study and monitor active volcanoes in Equatorial environment.

  7. Land Subsidence International Symposium held in Venice

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Third International Symposium on Land Subsidence was held March 18-25, 1984, in Venice, Italy. Sponsors were the Ground-Water Commission of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS), the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the Italian National Research Council (CNR), the Italian Regions of Veneto and Emilia-Romagna, the Italian Municipalities of Venice, Ravenna, and Modena, the Venice Province, and the European Research Office. Cosponsors included the International Association of Hydrogeologists (IAH), the International Society for Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering (ISSMFE), and the Association of Geoscientists for International Development (AGID).Organized within the framework of UNESCO's International Hydrological Program, the symposium brought together over 200 international interdisciplinary specialists in the problems of land subsidence due to fluid and mineral withdrawal. Because man's continuing heavy development of groundwater, gas, oil, and minerals is changing the natural regime and thus causing more and more subsiding areas in the world, there had been sufficient new land subsidence occurrence, problems, research, and remedial measures since the 1976 Second International Symposium held in Anaheim, California, to develop a most interesting program of nearly 100 papers from about 30 countries. The program consisted of papers covering case histories of fluid and mineral withdrawal, engineering theory and analysis, karst “sink-hole”-type subsidence, subsidence due to dewatering of organic deposits or due to application of water (hydrocompaction), instrumentation, legal, socioeconomic, and environmental effects of land subsidence, and remedial works.

  8. Review: Regional land subsidence accompanying groundwater extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Devin L.; Burbey, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    The extraction of groundwater can generate land subsidence by causing the compaction of susceptible aquifer systems, typically unconsolidated alluvial or basin-fill aquifer systems comprising aquifers and aquitards. Various ground-based and remotely sensed methods are used to measure and map subsidence. Many areas of subsidence caused by groundwater pumping have been identified and monitored, and corrective measures to slow or halt subsidence have been devised. Two principal means are used to mitigate subsidence caused by groundwater withdrawal—reduction of groundwater withdrawal, and artificial recharge. Analysis and simulation of aquifer-system compaction follow from the basic relations between head, stress, compressibility, and groundwater flow and are addressed primarily using two approaches—one based on conventional groundwater flow theory and one based on linear poroelasticity theory. Research and development to improve the assessment and analysis of aquifer-system compaction, the accompanying subsidence and potential ground ruptures are needed in the topic areas of the hydromechanical behavior of aquitards, the role of horizontal deformation, the application of differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry, and the regional-scale simulation of coupled groundwater flow and aquifer-system deformation to support resource management and hazard mitigation measures.

  9. Modeling the development of martian sublimation thermokarst landforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundas, Colin M.; Byrne, Shane; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2015-12-01

    Sublimation-thermokarst landforms result from collapse of the surface when ice is lost from the subsurface. On Mars, scalloped landforms with scales of decameters to kilometers are observed in the mid-latitudes and considered likely thermokarst features. We describe a landscape evolution model that couples diffusive mass movement and subsurface ice loss due to sublimation. Over periods of tens of thousands of Mars years under conditions similar to the present, the model produces scallop-like features similar to those on the martian surface, starting from much smaller initial disturbances. The model also indicates crater expansion when impacts occur in surfaces underlain by excess ice to some depth, with morphologies similar to observed landforms on the martian northern plains. In order to produce these landforms by sublimation, substantial quantities of excess ice are required, at least comparable to the vertical extent of the landform, and such ice must remain in adjacent terrain to support the non-deflated surface. We suggest that martian thermokarst features are consistent with formation by sublimation, without melting, and that significant thicknesses of very clean excess ice (up to many tens of meters, the depth of some scalloped depressions) are locally present in the martian mid-latitudes. Climate conditions leading to melting at significant depth are not required.

  10. Modeling the development of martian sublimation thermokarst landforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundas, Colin M.; Byrne, Shane; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2015-01-01

    Sublimation-thermokarst landforms result from collapse of the surface when ice is lost from the subsurface. On Mars, scalloped landforms with scales of decameters to kilometers are observed in the mid-latitudes and considered likely thermokarst features. We describe a landscape evolution model that couples diffusive mass movement and subsurface ice loss due to sublimation. Over periods of tens of thousands of Mars years under conditions similar to the present, the model produces scallop-like features similar to those on the Martian surface, starting from much smaller initial disturbances. The model also indicates crater expansion when impacts occur in surfaces underlain by excess ice to some depth, with morphologies similar to observed landforms on the Martian northern plains. In order to produce these landforms by sublimation, substantial quantities of excess ice are required, at least comparable to the vertical extent of the landform, and such ice must remain in adjacent terrain to support the non-deflated surface. We suggest that Martian thermokarst features are consistent with formation by sublimation, without melting, and that significant thicknesses of very clean excess ice (up to many tens of meters, the depth of some scalloped depressions) are locally present in the Martian mid-latitudes. Climate conditions leading to melting at significant depth are not required.

  11. Prediction of delayed subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, K.

    A predictive model of delayed subsidence is discussed. A numerical implementation is tested on one of the best-described study areas, Allegheny County in Pennsylvania. In planning insurance of restitution measures, a predictive model is of value in estimating the magnitude of the problem and the size of long-term budgetary commitments. Contrary to active subsidence, which occurs concurrently with mining operations, or is completed within a few days following coal extraction, delayed subsidence may take many years to appear at the surface after coal mines are abandoned. There are two principal morphological types of delayed subsidence: troughs, which are shallow depressions, and sinks, which are steep-sided crown pits. Both types are damaging to surface structures, and a variety of methods were introduced to deal with the problem, ranging from subsidence insurance to site restitution.

  12. Assessing seedbank recruitment windows of opportunity in thaw slump thermokarsts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, D. C.; Bret-Harte, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Tall shrub thickets (>1m) of birch and willow have been observed in stabilized lobes of thaw slump thermokarsts (gullies cause by thawed permafrost) in the Low Arctic near Toolik Lake, Alaska. We tested whether there are differences in seedling recruitment and establishment in thermokarsts vs outside the disturbance by comparing in-situ seedling presence, greenhouse germination of natural seedbanks, and cohort age groups of willow (Salix spp.) and birch in two 50m transects sampled in thermokarst lobes of different age: one young lobe of 7 y.a. at Lake NE-14, and one older lobe of 22 y.a. at Lake I-minus 1 vs. two transects outside the lobes. Young thermokarsts may provide germination windows of opportunity for fast growing species like graminoids and deciduous shrubs. In-situ seedling observations generally agreed with expectations. Fifteen times as many live seedlings were observed in the young lobe vs. outside, composed mainly of graminoids and willows, and five times more seedlings were observed inside the older lobe vs. outside, including 25% birch. Germination trials of seedbanks, as expected, showed a reverse trend. The smaller seedbanks in the young lobe had far fewer germinants than outside: over 49 times more seedlings germinated in the outside seedbank compared to the thermokarst, and were composed mainly of longer-lived evergreen shrubs in the genera Ledum and Rhododendron. The older lobe, by contrast, showed seven times greater germination than outside and was composed mainly of graminoids. Birch made up only 5%, reflecting variation in species composition between sites. ANOVA of seedbank germination across sites showed unit increase in number of germinated seeds was negatively correlated to percent cover of bare soil, positively correlated to the amount of organic matter present in the surface soil as reflected in sample volume, and positively correlated to thaw depth. Reverse trends in germination trials vs. presence of live seedlings may be

  13. Subsidence due to geothermal fluid withdrawal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narasimhan, T. N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Goyal, K. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1984-12-01

    Single-phase and two-phase geothermal reservoirs are currently being exploited for power production in Italy, Mexico, New Zealand, the United States, and elsewhere. Vertical ground displacements of up to 4.5 m and horizontal ground displacements of up to 0.5 m have been observed at Wairakei, New Zealand, that are clearly attributable to the resource exploitation. Similarly, vertical displacements of about 0.13 m have been recorded at The Geysers, California. No significant ground displacements that are attributable to large-scale fluid production have been observed at Larderello, Italy, and Cerro Prieto, Mexico. In this paper, observations show that subsidence due to geothermal fluid production is characterized by such features as an offset of the subsidence bowl from the main area of production, time-lag between production and subsidence, and nonlinear stress-strain relationships. Several plausible conceptual models, of varying degrees of sophistication, have been proposed to explain the observed features. At present, relatively more is known about the physical mechanisms that govern subsidence than the relevant thermal mechanisms. Finally, although attempts have been made to simulate observed geothermal subsidence, the modeling efforts have been seriously limited by a lack of relevant field data needed to sufficiently characterize the complex field system.

  14. Subsidence due to geothermal fluid withdrawal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narasimhan, T.N.; Goyal, K.P.

    1982-10-01

    Single-phase and two-phase geothermal reservoirs are currently being exploited for power production in Italy, Mexico, New Zealand, the U.S. and elsewhere. Vertical ground displacements of upto 4.5 m and horizontal ground displacements of up t o 0.5 m have been observed at Wairakei, New Zealand that are clearly attributable to the resource exploitation. Similarly, vertical displacements of about 0.13 m have been recorded at The Geysers, California. No significant ground displacements that are attributable to large-scale fluid production have been observed at Larderello, Italy and Cerro Prieto, Mexico. Observations show that subsidence due to geothermal fluid production is characterized by such features as an offset of the subsidence bowl from the main area of production, time-lag between production and subsidence and nonlinear stress-strain relationships. Several plausible conceptual models, of varying degrees of sophistication, have been proposed to explain the observed features. At present, relatively more is known about the physical mechanisms that govern subsidence than the relevant therma mechanisms. Although attempts have been made to simulate observed geothermal subsidence, the modeling efforts have been seriously limited by a lack of relevant field data needed to sufficiently characterize the complex field system.

  15. Significant melting of ice-wedges and formation of thermocirques on hill-slopes of thermokarst lakes in Central Yakutia (Siberia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séjourné, Antoine; Costard, François; Gargani, Julien; Fedorov, Alexander; Skorve, Johnny

    2013-04-01

    On Earth, permafrost containing a high ice volume (referred as ice-rich) are sensible to climate change, they have been regionally degraded (thermokarst) during the early Holocene climatic optimum forming numerous thermokarst lakes in Central Yakutia (eastern Siberia). Recent temperature increases in the Arctic and Subarctic have been significantly greater than global averages. The frequency and magnitude of terrain disturbances associated with thawing permafrost are increasing in these regions and are thought to intensify in the future. Therefore, understand how is the current development of thermokarst is a critical question. Here, we describe the significant melting of ice-wedges on slopes of thermokarst lakes that leads to formation of amphitheatrical hollows referred as thermocirques. The evolution of thermocirques in Central Yakutia has been little studied and analyzing their formation could help to understand the recent thermokarst in relation to climate change in Central Yakutia. We studied the thermocirques at two scales: (i) field surveys of different thermocirques in July 2009-2010 and October 2012 to examine the processes and origin of melting of ice-wedges and; (ii) photo-interpretation of time series of satellite images (KH-9 Hexagon images of 6-9 m/pixel and GeoEye images of 50 cm/pixel) to study the temporal evolution of thermocirques. The melting of ground-ice on the scarp of thermocirque triggers falls and small mud-flows that induce the retreat of the scarp parallel to itself. Based on field studies and on GeoEye image comparison, we show that their rate of retrogressive growth is 1-2 m/year. On the hill-slopes of lakes, the thermokarst could be initiated by different processes that lead to the uncover and then melting of ice-wedges: thermal erosion by the waves of the ice-rich bluff; active-layer detachment (a form of slope failure linked to detachment of the seasonally thawed upper ground); flowing of water on the slope (precipitation) or

  16. A Quantification of Climate Feedback from Permafrost Degradation, Thermokarst-Lake Expansion, and Subsequent Methane Emission Under Climate Policy and Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, C. A.; Gao, X.; Sokolov, A. P.; Walter Anthony, K.

    2011-12-01

    A direct consequence of climate warming in the Arctic will be the likelihood of widespread permafrost degradation. Subsequent subsidence of the landscape and hydrologic changes would then support the expansion of saturated areas such as thermokarst lakes and wetlands. These conditions over regions of carbon-rich, yedoma soils present a strong potential for increased methane emissions. In this study, we quantify the future changes in the high latitude near-surface permafrost and methane emission from thermokarst lake regions from climate projections of the 21st century. For the model simulations, we use the MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) framework, which considers the full range of plausible transient climate response (TCR), emissions uncertainty with or without greenhouse gas stabilization targets, as well as a provision for uncertainty in regional climate changes. To account for this regional climate-change uncertainty, we modify the geographic shifts in precipitation, temperature and radiation conditioned by results from general circulation models (GCMs) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) archive. The numerical experiments with the IGSM indicate that the Arctic undergoes widespread and nearly complete degradation of the (near-surface) permafrost under a "No Policy" case. The uncertainties in TCR, emissions, and regional climate change have little effect on this end-of-century outcome, but affect the dynamic response. Under an aggressive greenhouse stabilization target and the full range of uncertainties, the IGSM simulations substantially reduce the permafrost degradation extent. Subsequent to the permafrost degradation, the simulated expanse of saturated areas can be large (up to 50%), but the uncertainties in TCR and the regional climate response have a large impact in both the dynamic and the end-of-century response. The corresponding, inferred increases in methane emission rates by the end of the century from thermokarst lakes

  17. 基于三维模型技术的城市地铁施工期地面沉降分析%Analysis of ground subsidence in subway construction based on 3D model technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周立国; 孙树林; 张淦钰; 郑青海; 唐俊

    2011-01-01

    Taking construction surveying of a Nanjing subway station as an example,the spatial analysis and three-dimensional analysis modules in professional GIS software,ArcView,are used for collection of ground subsidence data by leveling and Peck formula respectively,and the IDW method is used to interpolate and fit of the ground deformation.A comprehensive three-dimensional analysis is conducted to provide technical supports and decision-making evidences for project managers and construction workers in a more intuitive and vivid way.%应用GIS专业软件ArcView中的空间分析和三维分析模块,以南京地铁某车站施工为例,采用水准测量法和Peck公式法分别进行地表沉降离散数据采集,然后选取反距离权重法(IDW)进行空间插值拟合出地面变形的DEM趋势面,并进行综合三维分析,以更加直观、生动的方式为项目决策者和施工人员提供技术支持和决策依据。

  18. 关于地下水开采引发地面沉降灾害的思考%Countermeasures against disasters of ground subsidence caused by  groundwater exploitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈崇希

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the countermeasures against ground subsidence is “exploitation of largest amount of groundwater with smallest amount of grou nd subsidence”, with the objective function S=rw∫zgzl so dz. The specific capacity obtained from pumping test generally does not r eflect the water abundance of aquifer and so cannot be taken as the basis for the sele ction of the exploited horizon of groundwater. The misunderstood “Dupuit stable well flow model” (“model of radius of influence”) is the main “theoretical ” basis of the unreasonable selection of exploited horizon of groundwater. An a ctive measure for ground subsidence control is to move the exploited horizon upw ard to shallow area and make it close to the recharge and discharge area of grou ndwater. In order to enlarge the water receiving capacity of the well, it is sug gested to use the horizontal and radiated wells, and a new type of well which ca n increase the water yield, the “son-and-mother” well is put forward.%对地面沉降对策的目标是“多开采,少沉降”,提出目标函数 S=rw∫zgzl so dz。用抽水试验获得的单位涌水量一般不反映含水层的富水性,不宜依它来选择地下水的开采层位。被误解了的“裘布依稳定井流模型”(“影响半径模型”)是不合理选择地下水开采层位的主要“理论”依据。控制地面沉降的一个积极措施是将开采层位上移至浅层,使其接近地下水的补给区和排泄区。为增大井孔的进水能力,建议采用水平井、辐射井,并提出可能增加出水量的井型——“子母井”。

  19. Modeled response of talik development under thermokarst lakes to permafrost thickness on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Ling; QingBai Wu; FuJun Niu; TingJun Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Permafrost thickness under identical climates in cold regions can vary significantly because it is severely affected by climate change, topography, soil physical and thermal properties, and geothermal conditions. This study numerically in-vestigates the response of ground thermal regime and talik development processes to permafrost with different thicknesses under a thermokarst lake on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. On the basis of observed data and information from a representative monitored lake in the Beiluhe Basin, we used a heat transfer model with phase change under a cylindrical coordinate system to conduct three simulation cases with permafrost thicknesses of 45 m, 60 m, and 75 m, respectively. The simulated results indicate that increases in permafrost thickness not only strongly retarded the open talik formation time, but also delayed the permafrost lateral thaw process after the formation of open talik. Increasing the permafrost thickness by 33.3%and 66.7%led to open talik formation time increases of 83.66%and 207.43%, respectively, and resulted in increases in the lateral thaw duration of permafrost under the modeled thermokarst lake by 28.86%and 46.54%, respectively, after the formation of the open taliks.

  20. Comparison of estimated and background subsidence rates in Texas-Louisiana geopressured geothermal areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, L.M.; Clayton, M.; Everingham, J.; Harding, R.C.; Massa, A.

    1982-06-01

    A comparison of background and potential geopressured geothermal development-related subsidence rates is given. Estimated potential geopressured-related rates at six prospects are presented. The effect of subsidence on the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast is examined including the various associated ground movements and the possible effects of these ground movements on surficial processes. The relationships between ecosystems and subsidence, including the capability of geologic and biologic systems to adapt to subsidence, are analyzed. The actual potential for environmental impact caused by potential geopressured-related subsidence at each of four prospects is addressed. (MHR)

  1. Thermokarst-lake methanogenesis along a complete talik profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, J. K.; Anthony, K. M. Walter; Sepulveda-Jauregui, A.; Martinez-Cruz, K.; Bondurant, A.; Grosse, G.; Jones, M. C.

    2015-03-01

    Thermokarst (thaw) lakes emit methane (CH4) to the atmosphere formed from thawed permafrost organic matter (OM), but the relative magnitude of CH4 production in surface lake sediments vs. deeper thawed permafrost horizons is not well understood. We assessed anaerobic CH4 production potentials from various depths along a 590 cm long lake sediment core that captured the entire sediment package of the talik (thaw bulb) beneath the center of an interior Alaska thermokarst lake, Vault Lake, and the top 40 cm of thawing permafrost beneath the talik. We also studied the adjacent Vault Creek permafrost tunnel that extends through ice-rich yedoma permafrost soils surrounding the lake and into underlying gravel. Our results showed CH4 production potentials were highest in the organic-rich surface lake sediments, which were 151 cm thick (mean ± SD 5.95 ± 1.67 μg C-CH4 g dw-1 d-1; 125.9± 36.2 μg C-CH4 g C-1org d-1). High CH4 production potentials were also observed in recently-thawed permafrost (1.18± 0.61 μg C-CH4g dw-1 d-1; 59.60± 51.5 μg C-CH4 g C-1org d-1) at the bottom of the talik, but the narrow thicknesses (43 cm) of this horizon limited its overall contribution to total sediment column CH4 production in the core. Lower rates of CH4 production were observed in sediment horizons representing permafrost that has been thawed in the talik for longer periods of time. No CH4 production was observed in samples obtained from the permafrost tunnel, a non-lake environment. Our findings imply that CH4 production is highly variable in thermokarst-lake systems and that both modern OM supplied to surface sediments and ancient OM supplied to both surface and deep lake sediments by in situ thaw as well as shore erosion of yedoma permafrost are important to lake CH4 production.

  2. Thermokarst lake methanogenesis along a complete talik profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, J. K.; Anthony, K. M. Walter; Sepulveda-Jauregui, A.; Martinez-Cruz, K.; Bondurant, A.; Grosse, G.; Jones, M. C.

    2015-07-01

    Thermokarst (thaw) lakes emit methane (CH4) to the atmosphere formed from thawed permafrost organic matter (OM), but the relative magnitude of CH4 production in surface lake sediments vs. deeper thawed permafrost horizons is not well understood. We assessed anaerobic CH4 production potentials from various depths along a 590 cm long lake sediment core that captured the entire sediment package of the talik (thaw bulb) beneath the center of an interior Alaska thermokarst lake, Vault Lake, and the top 40 cm of thawing permafrost beneath the talik. We also studied the adjacent Vault Creek permafrost tunnel that extends through ice-rich yedoma permafrost soils surrounding the lake and into underlying gravel. Our results showed CH4 production potentials were highest in the organic-rich surface lake sediments, which were 151 cm thick (mean ± SD: 5.95 ± 1.67 μg C-CH4 g dw-1 d-1; 125.9 ± 36.2 μg C-CH4 g C-1org d-1). High CH4 production potentials were also observed in recently thawed permafrost (1.18 ± 0.61 μg C-CH4g dw-1 d-1; 59.60± 51.5 μg C-CH4 g C-1org d-1) at the bottom of the talik, but the narrow thicknesses (43 cm) of this horizon limited its overall contribution to total sediment column CH4 production in the core. Lower rates of CH4 production were observed in sediment horizons representing permafrost that has been thawing in the talik for a longer period of time. No CH4 production was observed in samples obtained from the permafrost tunnel, a non-lake environment. Our findings imply that CH4 production is highly variable in thermokarst lake systems and that both modern OM supplied to surface sediments and ancient OM supplied to both surface and deep lake sediments by in situ thaw and shore erosion of yedoma permafrost are important to lake CH4 production.

  3. Impact of rock salt creep law choice on subsidence calculations for hydrocarbon reservoirs overlain by evaporite caprocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marketos, G.; Spiers, C.J.; Govers, R.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate forward modeling of surface subsidence above producing hydrocarbons reservoirs requires an understanding of the mechanisms determining how ground deformation and subsidence evolve. Here we focus entirely on rock salt, which overlies a large number of reservoirs worldwide, and specifically

  4. A shift of thermokarst lakes from carbon sources to sinks during the Holocene epoch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter Anthony, K. M.; Zimov, S. A.; Grosse, G.; Jones, Miriam C.; Anthony, P.; Chapin, F. S.; Finlay, J. C.; Mack, M. C.; Davydov, S.; Frenzel, P.F.; Frolking, S.

    2014-01-01

    Thermokarst lakes formed across vast regions of Siberia and Alaska during the last deglaciation and are thought to be a net source of atmospheric methane and carbon dioxide during the Holocene epoch1,2,3,4. However, the same thermokarst lakes can also sequester carbon5, and it remains uncertain whether carbon uptake by thermokarst lakes can offset their greenhouse gas emissions. Here we use field observations of Siberian permafrost exposures, radiocarbon dating and spatial analyses to quantify Holocene carbon stocks and fluxes in lake sediments overlying thawed Pleistocene-aged permafrost. We find that carbon accumulation in deep thermokarst-lake sediments since the last deglaciation is about 1.6 times larger than the mass of Pleistocene-aged permafrost carbon released as greenhouse gases when the lakes first formed. Although methane and carbon dioxide emissions following thaw lead to immediate radiative warming, carbon uptake in peat-rich sediments occurs over millennial timescales. We assess thermokarst-lake carbon feedbacks to climate with an atmospheric perturbation model and find that thermokarst basins switched from a net radiative warming to a net cooling climate effect about 5,000 years ago. High rates of Holocene carbon accumulation in 20 lake sediments (47±10 grams of carbon per square metre per year; mean±standard error) were driven by thermokarst erosion and deposition of terrestrial organic matter, by nutrient release from thawing permafrost that stimulated lake productivity and by slow decomposition in cold, anoxic lake bottoms. When lakes eventually drained, permafrost formation rapidly sequestered sediment carbon. Our estimate of about 160petagrams of Holocene organic carbon in deep lake basins of Siberia and Alaska increases the circumpolar peat carbon pool estimate for permafrost regions by over 50 per cent (ref. 6). The carbon in perennially frozen drained lake sediments may become vulnerable to mineralization as permafrost disappears7

  5. 地陷%The Ground Subsidence (novella)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    光盘

    2011-01-01

    @@ 付小清付小盆兄弟以及他们的父亲失踪四天后,村里人才猛醒过来.宁土坡立即带上村里的中壮年人进山搜寻.他们一路寻找,一路叫喊,声音在山林里回荡.到傍晚,他们终于发现了地陷.地陷的位置非常隐蔽,如果不是听见付小清的呼救,你就是经过它身边也不一定发现得了.付小清用力大喊,快来人,快救命,我们在这里,我们快要死了!

  6. Numerical Simulation of the Effect of Preexisting Fault on Land Subsidence and Ground Fissures During Pumping%先存断裂对抽水沉降及地裂缝活动影响的数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋臻蔚; 彭建兵; 王启耀

    2012-01-01

    The effect of pumping on ground fissures caused by fault is obvious, but its mechanism is rather complicated. Most of the previous corresponding researches are simple qualitative analysis, while numerical simulation and quantitative analysis are few. A new method was adopted to simulate the fault effect on ground fissures during pumping, which is based on Biot seepage and consolidation theory and contact surface element considering the contact relationship of side A and B. The results indicate that pumping could arouse stress change around pumping well, the horizontal earth stress near the well ascend while descend far away from it, causing cracks come into being from above to below when horizontal stress exceed the tensile strength. Additionally, preexisting fault affect the stress redistribution distinctly. Due to the low strength of fault surface, it is easy for stratum to be tore apart or slide along the fault, promoting the activity of ground fissures. In general, the effect of preexisting fault on ground subsidence and fissures includes induction, segregation and amplification.%过度抽取地下水对断层构造型地裂缝的加剧作用是很明显的,但具体的作用机制却很复杂,过去的研究多是简单的定性分析,数值模拟和定量计算少有报道.笔者采用比奥(Biot)固结渗流理论和基于A、B面接触判断的库仑滑动和张裂的接触面单元,对抽水作用下地裂缝的活动进行了数值模拟,初步探讨了抽水活动引发和加剧地裂缝活动的机制.结果表明:抽水作用下抽水井周围水平应力场发生近井区挤压、远井区拉张的变化,当拉张区内的拉应力超过土体抗拉强度时将会出现自上而下的张裂缝;先存断裂的存在将影响应力变化的模式,同时由于断裂的软弱性,使得地层容易沿其发生滑动或拉裂,从而加剧地裂缝的活动;先存断裂对地面沉降和地裂缝具有诱导、隔离和放大的作用.

  7. Seismic reflection characteristics of naturally-induced subsidence affecting transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Steeples, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution seismic reflections have been used effectively to investigate sinkholes formed from the dissolution of a bedded salt unit found throughout most of Central Kansas. Surface subsidence can have devastating effects on transportation structures. Roads, rails, bridges, and pipelines can even be dramatically affected by minor ground instability. Areas susceptible to surface subsidence can put public safety at risk. Subsurface expressions significantly larger than surface depressions are consistently observed on seismic images recorded over sinkholes in Kansas. Until subsidence reaches the ground surface, failure appears to be controlled by compressional forces evidenced by faults with reverse orientation. Once a surface depression forms or dissolution of the salt slows or stops, subsidence structures are consistent with a tensional stress environment with prevalent normal faults. Detecting areas of rapid subsidence potential, prior to surface failure, is the ultimate goal of any geotechnical survey where the ground surface is susceptible to settling. Seismic reflection images have helped correlate active subsidence to dormant paleofeatures, project horizontal growth of active sinkholes based on subsurface structures, and appraise the risk of catastrophic failure. ?? China University of Geosciences (Wuhan) and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2009.

  8. Seismic Reflection Characteristics of Naturally-Induced Subsidence Affecting Transportation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard D Miller; Jianghai Xia; Don W Steeples

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution seismic reflections have been used effectively to investigate sinkholes formed from the dissolution of a bedded salt unit found throughout most of Central Kansas. Surface subsidence can have devastating effects on transportation structures. Roads, rails, bridges, and pipeliues can even be dramatically affected by minor ground instability. Areas susceptible to surface subsidence can put public safety at risk. Subsurface expressions significantly larger than surface depressions are consistently observed on seismic images recorded over sinkholes in Kansas. Until subsidence reaches the ground surface, failure appears to be controlled by compressional forces evidenced by faults with reverse orientation. Once a surface depression forms or dissolution of the salt slows or stops, subsidence structures are consistent with a tensional stress environment with prevalent normal faults. Detecting areas of rapid subsidence potential, prior to surface failure, is the ultimate goal of any geotechnical survey where the ground surface is susceptible to settling. Seismic reflection images have helped correlate active subsidence to dormant paleofeatures, project horizontal growth of active sinkholes based on subsurface structures, and appraise the risk of catastrophic failure.

  9. Simulating the thermal regime and thaw processes of ice-rich permafrost ground with the land-surface model CryoGrid 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermann, S.; Langer, M.; Boike, J.; Heikenfeld, M.; Peter, M.; Etzelmüller, B.; Krinner, G.

    2016-02-01

    Thawing of permafrost in a warming climate is governed by a complex interplay of different processes of which only conductive heat transfer is taken into account in most model studies. However, observations in many permafrost landscapes demonstrate that lateral and vertical movement of water can have a pronounced influence on the thaw trajectories, creating distinct landforms, such as thermokarst ponds and lakes, even in areas where permafrost is otherwise thermally stable. Novel process parameterizations are required to include such phenomena in future projections of permafrost thaw and subsequent climatic-triggered feedbacks. In this study, we present a new land-surface scheme designed for permafrost applications, CryoGrid 3, which constitutes a flexible platform to explore new parameterizations for a range of permafrost processes. We document the model physics and employed parameterizations for the basis module CryoGrid 3, and compare model results with in situ observations of surface energy balance, surface temperatures, and ground thermal regime from the Samoylov permafrost observatory in NE Siberia. The comparison suggests that CryoGrid 3 can not only model the evolution of the ground thermal regime in the last decade, but also consistently reproduce the chain of energy transfer processes from the atmosphere to the ground. In addition, we demonstrate a simple 1-D parameterization for thaw processes in permafrost areas rich in ground ice, which can phenomenologically reproduce both formation of thermokarst ponds and subsidence of the ground following thawing of ice-rich subsurface layers. Long-term simulation from 1901 to 2100 driven by reanalysis data and climate model output demonstrate that the hydrological regime can both accelerate and delay permafrost thawing. If meltwater from thawed ice-rich layers can drain, the ground subsides, as well as the formation of a talik, are delayed. If the meltwater pools at the surface, a pond is formed that enhances heat

  10. An Integrated Assessment Framework for land subsidence in Delta cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucx, T.; van Ruiten, K.; Erkens, G.

    2013-12-01

    In many delta cities land subsidence exceeds absolute sea level rise up to a factor of ten. Without change, parts of Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Bangkok and numerous other delta (and coastal) cities will sink below sea level. Increased flooding and also other wide¬spread impacts of land subsidence result already in damage of billions of dollars per year to roads, embankments, subsurface infrastructure and housing. Moreover the potential damage caused by increased flood risk is around the same amount of money. A major cause for severe land subsidence is excessive groundwater extraction related to rapid urbanization and population growth. A major rethink is needed to resolve the ';hidden' but urgent threat of subsidence in a multi-sectoral perspective. A comprehensive approach is presented to address land subsidence for more sustainable and resilient urban development. Land subsidence is an issue that involves many policy fields, complex technical aspects and governance. There is a need for an integrated approach in order to manage subsidence and to develop appropriate strategies and measures that are effective and efficient on both the short and long term. Urban (ground)water management, adaptive flood risk management and related spatial planning strategies should be taken into account. This presentation will introduce and illustrate an Integrated Assessment Framework (IAF) for land subsidence that has been developed in the European FP7 project Subcoast. This framework is based on an integrated (multi-sectoral) approach and can be used to gain insight in the complex aspects of subsidence, to raise awareness and to support decision making on appropriate adaptation strategies and measures. The IAF is addressing all aspects of subsidence: from primary causes, vulnerability, impacts and risks towards responses and solutions. It will also take into account the three spatial layers (Occupation, Network and Base layer), governance aspects and several scenarios (economic

  11. Prevention partition for land subsidence induced by engineering dewatering in Shanghai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. X.; Liu, X. T.; Yang, T. L.

    2015-11-01

    Land subsidence in shanghai has been found for more than 70 years. In the early years, it was mainly caused by groundwater exploitation. In recent years, engineering dewatering in shallow ground (within 90 m) has become a major source for land subsidence in the rapid urbanization course. A management partition of land subsidence induced by foundation pit dewatering for the first confined aquifer was suggested.

  12. Characterizing post-drainage succession in Thermokarst Lake Basins on the Seward Peninsula, Alaska with TerraSAR-X Backscatter and Landsat-based NDVI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Prajna; Grosse, Guido; Jones, Miriam C.; Jones, Benjamin M.; Walter Anthony, Katey

    2012-01-01

    Drained thermokarst lake basins accumulate significant amounts of soil organic carbon in the form of peat, which is of interest to understanding carbon cycling and climate change feedbacks associated with thermokarst in the Arctic. Remote sensing is a tool useful for understanding temporal and spatial dynamics of drained basins. In this study, we tested the application of high-resolution X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data of the German TerraSAR-X satellite from the 2009 growing season (July–September) for characterizing drained thermokarst lake basins of various age in the ice-rich permafrost region of the northern Seward Peninsula, Alaska. To enhance interpretation of patterns identified in X-band SAR for these basins, we also analyzed the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) calculated from a Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper image acquired on July 2009 and compared both X-band SAR and NDVI data with observations of basin age. We found significant logarithmic relationships between (a) TerraSAR-X backscatter and basin age from 0 to 10,000 years, (b) Landat-5 TM NDVI and basin age from 0 to 10,000 years, and (c) TerraSAR-X backscatter and basin age from 50 to 10,000 years. NDVI was a better indicator of basin age over a period of 0–10,000 years. However, TerraSAR-X data performed much better for discriminating radiocarbon-dated basins (50–10,000 years old). No clear relationships were found for either backscatter or NDVI and basin age from 0 to 50 years. We attribute the decreasing trend of backscatter and NDVI with increasing basin age to post-drainage changes in the basin surface. Such changes include succession in vegetation, soils, hydrology, and renewed permafrost aggradation, ground ice accumulation and localized frost heave. Results of this study show the potential application of X-band SAR data in combination with NDVI data to map long-term succession dynamics of drained thermokarst lake basins.

  13. Characterizing Post-Drainage Succession in Thermokarst Lake Basins on the Seward Peninsula, Alaska with TerraSAR-X Backscatter and Landsat-based NDVI Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prajna Regmi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Drained thermokarst lake basins accumulate significant amounts of soil organic carbon in the form of peat, which is of interest to understanding carbon cycling and climate change feedbacks associated with thermokarst in the Arctic. Remote sensing is a tool useful for understanding temporal and spatial dynamics of drained basins. In this study, we tested the application of high-resolution X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR data of the German TerraSAR-X satellite from the 2009 growing season (July–September for characterizing drained thermokarst lake basins of various age in the ice-rich permafrost region of the northern Seward Peninsula, Alaska. To enhance interpretation of patterns identified in X-band SAR for these basins, we also analyzed the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI calculated from a Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper image acquired on July 2009 and compared both X-band SAR and NDVI data with observations of basin age. We found significant logarithmic relationships between (a TerraSAR-X backscatter and basin age from 0 to 10,000 years, (b Landat-5 TM NDVI and basin age from 0 to 10,000 years, and (c TerraSAR-X backscatter and basin age from 50 to 10,000 years. NDVI was a better indicator of basin age over a period of 0–10,000 years. However, TerraSAR-X data performed much better for discriminating radiocarbon-dated basins (50–10,000 years old. No clear relationships were found for either backscatter or NDVI and basin age from 0 to 50 years. We attribute the decreasing trend of backscatter and NDVI with increasing basin age to post-drainage changes in the basin surface. Such changes include succession in vegetation, soils, hydrology, and renewed permafrost aggradation, ground ice accumulation and localized frost heave. Results of this study show the potential application of X-band SAR data in combination with NDVI data to map long-term succession dynamics of drained thermokarst lake basins.

  14. How to deal with subsidence in the Dutch delta?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stouthamer, Esther; Erkens, Gilles

    2017-04-01

    In many deltas worldwide subsidence still is an underestimated problem, while the threat posed by land subsidence to low-lying urbanizing and urbanized deltas exceeds the threat of sea-level rise induced by climate change. Human-induced subsidence is driven by the extraction of hydrocarbons and groundwater, drainage of phreatic groundwater, and loading by buildings and infrastructure. The consequences of subsidence are increased flood risk and flood water depth, rising groundwater levels relative to the land surface, land loss, damage to buildings and infrastructure, and salinization of ground and surface water.. The Netherlands has a long history of subsidence. Large-scale drainage of the extensive peatlands in the western and northern parts of the Netherlands started approximately 1000 years ago as a result of rapid population growth. Subsidence is still ongoing due to (1) continuous drainage of the former peatland, which is now mainly in use as agricultural land and built-up area, (2) expansion of the built-up area and the infrastructural network, (3) salt mining and the extraction of gas in the northern Netherlands. Mitigating subsidence and its negative impacts requires understanding of the relative contribution of the drivers contributing to total subsidence, accurate predictions of land subsidence under different management scenarios, and its impacts. Such understanding enables the development of effective and sustainable management strategies. In the Netherlands, a lot of effort is put into water management aiming at amongst others the protection against floods and the ensuring agricultural activities, but a specific policy focusing on subsidence is lacking. The development of strategies to cope with subsidence is very challenging, because (1) the exact contribution of different drivers of subsidence to total subsidence is spatially different within the Netherlands, (2) there is no single problem owner, which makes it difficult to recognize this a common

  15. BP神经网络模型在采水地面沉降中的应用研究%Application of BP neural network model to ground subsidence of mining water area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周复旦; 赵长胜; 高卫东

    2011-01-01

    随着我国各项建设对永资源的需求越来越大,导致由地下水开采而引起的沉降问题成为当前研究的热点课题.本文对某矿区采水地面沉降进行了模型设计,通过对部分实测数据的训练,优选出该模型的网络结构和网络参数,并且用Matlab软件编程实现对其他监测点的计算和预测.通过研究表明本文所建立的BP神经网络模型能较准确反映采水地面沉降的规律,同时也能较准确地预测地下水开采引起的地面沉降.%With the growing water demand in China domestic construction, subsidence caused by groundwater over-exploitation has become a topic of current research. This article made model design in light of water area' s subsidence. By training some monitoring points' measured data, it selected the network structure and parameters of this model. By using the models, it calculated and predicted other monitoring points with the help of Matlab software. Research results indicated that the BP neural network model could accurately reflect the spatial law of water area' s subsidence and predict the subsidence caused by underground mining precisely.

  16. Investigation and characterization of mining subsidence in Kaiyang Phosphorus Mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Jian; BIAN Li

    2007-01-01

    In Kaiyang Phosphorus Mine, serious environmental and safety problems are caused by large scale mining activities in the past 40 years. These problems include mining subsidence, low recovery ratio, too much dead ore in pillars, and pollution of phosphorus gypsum. Mining subsidence falls into four categories: curved ground and mesa, ground cracks and collapse hole, spalling and eboulement, slope slide and creeping. Measures to treat the mining subsidence were put forward: finding out and managing abandoned stopes, optimizing mining method (cut and fill mining method), selecting proper backfilling materials (phosphogypsum mixtures), avoiding disorder mining operation, and treating highway slopes. These investigations and engineering treatment methods are believed to be able to contribute to the safety extraction of ore and sustainable development in Kaiyang Phosphorus Mine.

  17. Modeling of time dependent subsidence for coal and ore deposits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ryszard Hejmanowski

    2015-01-01

    Coal and ore underground mining generates subsidence and deformation of the land surface. Those defor-mations may cause damage to buildings and infrastructures. The environmental impact of subsidence will not be accepted in the future by the society in many countries. Especially there, where the mining regions are densely urbanized, the acceptance of the ground deformations decreases every year. The only solution is to limit the subsidence or its impact on the infrastructure. The first is not rentable for the mining industry, the second depends on the precise subsidence prediction and good preventing management involved in the mining areas. The precision of the subsidence prediction depends strictly on the mathematical model of the deformation phenomenon and on the uncertainty of the input data. The subsidence prediction in the geological conditions of the raw materials used to be made on the basis of numerical modeling or the stochastic models. A modified solution of the stochastic model by Knothe will be presented in the paper. The author focuses on the precise description of the deposit shape and on the time dependent displacements of the rock mass. A two parameters’ time function has been introduced in the algorithm.

  18. Impacts of shore expansion and catchment characteristics on lacustrine thermokarst records in permafrost lowlands, Alaska Arctic Coastal Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Josefine; Jones, Benjamin M.; Wetterich, Sebastian; Tjallingii, Rik; Fritz, Michael; Arp, Christopher D.; Rudaya, Natalia; Grosse, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Arctic lowland landscapes have been modified by thermokarst lake processes throughout the Holocene. Thermokarst lakes form as a result of ice-rich permafrost degradation, and they may expand over time through thermal and mechanical shoreline erosion. We studied proximal and distal sedimentary records from a thermokarst lake located on the Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska to reconstruct the impact of catchment dynamics and morphology on the lacustrine depositional environment and to quantify carbon accumulation in thermokarst lake sediments. Short cores were collected for analysis of pollen, sedimentological, and geochemical proxies. Radiocarbon and 210Pb/137Cs dating, as well as extrapolation of measured historic lake expansion rates, were applied to estimate a minimum lake age of ~1400 calendar years BP. The pollen record is in agreement with the young lake age as it does not include evidence of the “alder high” that occurred in the region ~4000 cal yr BP. The lake most likely initiated from a remnant pond in a drained thermokarst lake basin (DTLB) and deepened rapidly as evidenced by accumulation of laminated sediments. Increasing oxygenation of the water column as shown by higher Fe/Ti and Fe/S ratios in the sediment indicate shifts in ice regime with increasing water depth. More recently, the sediment source changed as the thermokarst lake expanded through lateral permafrost degradation, alternating from redeposited DTLB sediments, to increased amounts of sediment from eroding, older upland deposits, followed by a more balanced combination of both DTLB and upland sources. The characterizing shifts in sediment sources and depositional regimes in expanding thermokarst lakes were, therefore, archived in the thermokarst lake sedimentary record. This study also highlights the potential for Arctic lakes to recycle old carbon from thawing permafrost and thermokarst processes.

  19. Modern thermokarst lake dynamics in the continuous permafrost zone, northern Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Benjamin M.; Grosse, G.; Arp, C.D.; Jones, M.C.; Walter, Anthony K.M.; Romanovsky, V.E.

    2011-01-01

    Quantifying changes in thermokarst lake extent is of importance for understanding the permafrost-related carbon budget, including the potential release of carbon via lake expansion or sequestration as peat in drained lake basins. We used high spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery from 1950/51, 1978, and 2006/07 to quantify changes in thermokarst lakes for a 700 km2 area on the northern Seward Peninsula, Alaska. The number of water bodies larger than 0.1 ha increased over the entire observation period (666 to 737 or +10.7%); however, total surface area decreased (5,066 ha to 4,312 ha or -14.9%). This pattern can largely be explained by the formation of remnant ponds following partial drainage of larger water bodies. Thus, analysis of large lakes (>40 ha) shows a decrease of 24% and 26% in number and area, respectively, differing from lake changes reported from other continuous permafrost regions. Thermokarst lake expansion rates did not change substantially between 1950/51 and 1978 (0.35 m/yr) and 1978 and 2006/07 (0.39 m/yr). However, most lakes that drained did expand as a result of surface permafrost degradation before lateral drainage. Drainage rates over the observation period were stable (2.2 to 2.3 per year). Thus, analysis of decadal-scale, high spatial resolution imagery has shown that lake drainage in this region is triggered by lateral breaching and not subterranean infiltration. Future research should be directed toward better understanding thermokarst lake dynamics at high spatial and temporal resolution as these systems have implications for landscape-scale hydrology and carbon budgets in thermokarst lake-rich regions in the circum-Arctic.

  20. Subsidence prediction in Estonia's oil shale mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastarus, J.R. [Tallinn Technical University, Tallinn (Estonia); Toomik, A. [Institute of Ecology, Johvi (Estonia)

    2000-07-01

    This paper analysis the stability of the mining blocks in Estonian oil shale mines, where the room-and-pillar mining system is used. The pillars are arranged in a singular grid. The oil shale bed is embedded at the depth of 40-75 m. The processes in overburden rocks and pillars have caused the subsidence of the ground surface. The conditional thickness and sliding rectangle methods performed calculations. The results are presented by conditional thickness contours. Error does not exceed 4%. Model allows determining the parameters of spontaneous collapse of the pillars and surface subsidence. The surface subsidence parameters will be determined by conventional calculation scheme. Proposed method suits for stability analysis, failure prognosis and monitoring. 8 refs.

  1. Analysis on the Ground water Supply Regular in Subsidence Area in Xinglongzhuang Coal Mining%兴隆庄采煤塌陷区地下水补给规律分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯忠伦; 袁娜; 王雅欣; 徐健; 杨丹; 林洪孝

    2014-01-01

    本文在分析降水与地下水埋深关系的基础上,采用地下水位波动法研究兴隆庄采煤塌陷区蓄水与地下水的补给规律,得出研究区地下水补给量的变化规律为从东北向西南递减,与地下水流向基本一致;补给量随降水量增大而增大,但在降水量增大到一定程度后变化趋于平稳,与地下水埋深的关系则为先增后减;将塌陷前后地下水补给量进行对比,表明塌陷后地下水对塌陷区蓄水有较大补给作用。此研究成果可为塌陷区蓄水与地下水的综合开发利用提供重要参考。%Based on the analysis of the relationship between the rainfall and groundwater depth on the groundwater recharge, the water-table fluctuation method was adopted in this paper to estimate the groundwater recharge around Xinglongzhuang coal mining subsidence area. This paper reached a conclusion that the changes of groundwater recharge amount decreased from northeast to southwest, and basically the same as the groundwater flow. The groundwater recharge generally increased with rainfall, however, as the rainfall increases to a certain extent, the change trend will not increase obviously, but the relationship with the buried depth of groundwater is first increased and then decreased. Meanwhile, the comparison of groundwater recharge before and after the collapse shows that the subsidence area will be recharged by groundwater after the collapse. The research results can provide an important reference for the comprehensive development and utilization of water in the subsidence area.

  2. Land Subsidence Caused by Groundwater Exploitation in Quetta Valley, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeebullah Kakar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Land subsidence is affecting several metropolitan cities in developing as well as developed countries around the world such as Nagoya (Japan, Shanghai (China, Venice (Italy and San Joaquin valley (United States. This phenomenon is attributed to natural as well as anthropogenic activities that include extensive groundwater withdrawals. Quetta is the largest city of Balochistan province in Pakistan. This valley is mostly dry and ground water is the major source for domestic and agricultural consumption. The unplanned use of ground water resources has led to the deterioration of water quality and quantity in the Quetta valley. Water shortage in the region was further aggravated by the drought during (1998-2004 that hit the area forcing people to migrate from rural to urban areas. Refugees from the war torn neighboring Afghanistan also contributed to rapid increase in population of Quetta valley that has increased from 0.26 million in 1975 to 3.0 million in 2016. The objective of this study was to measure the land subsidence in Quetta valley and identify the effects of groundwater withdrawals on land subsidence. To achieve this goal, data from five Global Positioning System (GPS stations were acquired and processed. Furthermore the groundwater decline data from 41 observation wells during 2010 to 2015 were calculated and compared with the land deformation. The results of this study revealed that the land of Quetta valley is subsiding from 30mm/y on the flanks to 120 mm/y in the central part. 1.5-5.0 m/y of groundwater level drop was recorded in the area where the rate of subsidence is highest. So the extensive groundwater withdrawals in Quetta valley is considered to be the driving force behind land subsidence.

  3. Review: Advances in delta-subsidence research using satellite methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Stephanie A.

    2016-05-01

    Most of the world's major river deltas are sinking relative to local sea level. The effects of subsidence can include aquifer salinization, infrastructure damage, increased vulnerability to flooding and storm surges, and permanent inundation of low-lying land. Consequently, determining the relative importance of natural vs. anthropogenic pressures in driving delta subsidence is a topic of ongoing research. This article presents a review of knowledge with respect to delta surface-elevation loss. The field is rapidly advancing due to applications of space-based techniques: InSAR (interferometric synthetic aperture radar), GPS (global positioning system), and satellite ocean altimetry. These techniques have shed new light on a variety of subsidence processes, including tectonics, isostatic adjustment, and the spatial and temporal variability of sediment compaction. They also confirm that subsidence associated with fluid extraction can outpace sea-level rise by up to two orders of magnitude, resulting in effective sea-level rise that is one-hundred times faster than the global average rate. In coming years, space-based and airborne instruments will be critical in providing near-real-time monitoring to facilitate management decisions in sinking deltas. However, ground-based observations continue to be necessary for generating complete measurements of surface-elevation change. Numerical modeling should seek to simulate couplings between subsidence processes for greater predictive power.

  4. Detecting methane ebullition on thermokarst lake ice using high resolution optical aerial imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Lindgren

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Thermokarst lakes are important emitters of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. However, accurate estimation of methane flux from thermokarst lakes is difficult due to their remoteness and observational challenges associated with the heterogeneous nature of ebullition (bubbling. We used multi-temporal high-resolution (9–11 cm aerial images of an interior Alaskan thermokarst lake, Goldstream Lake, acquired 2 and 4 days following freeze-up in 2011 and 2012, respectively, to characterize methane ebullition seeps and to estimate whole-lake ebullition. Bubbles impeded by the lake ice sheet form distinct white patches as a function of bubbling rate vs. time as ice thickens. Our aerial imagery thus captured in a single snapshot the ebullition events that occurred before the image acquisition. Image analysis showed that low-flux A- and B-type seeps are associated with low brightness patches and are statistically distinct from high-flux C-type and Hotspot seeps associated with high brightness patches. Mean whole-lake ebullition based on optical image analysis in combination with bubble-trap flux measurements was estimated to be 174 ± 28 and 216 ± 33 mL gas m−2 d−1 for the years 2011 and 2012, respectively. A large number of seeps demonstrated spatio-temporal stability over our two-year study period. A strong inverse exponential relationship (R2 ≥ 0.79 was found between percent surface area of lake ice covered with bubble patches and distance from the active thermokarst lake margin. Our study shows that optical remote sensing is a powerful tool to map ebullition seeps on lake ice, to identify their relative strength of ebullition and to assess their spatio-temporal variability.

  5. Landscape-gradient assessment of thermokarst lake hydrology using water isotope tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narancic, Biljana; Wolfe, Brent B.; Pienitz, Reinhard; Meyer, Hanno; Lamhonwah, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Thermokarst lakes are widespread in arctic and subarctic regions. In subarctic Québec (Nunavik), they have grown in number and size since the mid-20th century. Recent studies have identified that these lakes are important sources of greenhouse gases. This is mainly due to the supply of catchment-derived dissolved organic carbon that generates anoxic conditions leading to methane production. To assess the potential role of climate-driven changes in hydrological processes to influence greenhouse-gas emissions, we utilized water isotope tracers to characterize the water balance of thermokarst lakes in Nunavik during three consecutive mid- to late summer sampling campaigns (2012-2014). Lake distribution stretches from shrub-tundra overlying discontinuous permafrost in the north to spruce-lichen woodland with sporadic permafrost in the south. Calculation of lake-specific input water isotope compositions (δI) and lake-specific evaporation-to-inflow (E/I) ratios based on an isotope-mass balance model reveal a narrow hydrological gradient regardless of diversity in regional landscape characteristics. Nearly all lakes sampled were predominantly fed by rainfall and/or permafrost meltwater, which suppressed the effects of evaporative loss. Only a few lakes in one of the southern sampling locations, which overly highly degraded sporadic permafrost terrain, appear to be susceptible to evaporative lake-level drawdown. We attribute this lake hydrological resiliency to the strong maritime climate in coastal regions of Nunavik. Predicted climate-driven increases in precipitation and permafrost degradation will likely contribute to persistence and expansion of thermokarst lakes throughout the region. If coupled with an increase in terrestrial carbon inputs to thermokarst lakes from surface runoff, conditions favorable for mineralization and emission of methane, these water bodies may become even more important sources of greenhouse gases.

  6. Application of InSAR and Gravimetry for Land Subsidence Hazard Zoning in Aguascalientes, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Pacheco-Martínez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present an application of InSAR and gravimetric surveys for risk management related to land subsidence and surface ground faulting generation. A subsidence velocity map derived from the 2007–2011 ALOS SAR imagery and a sediment thicknesses map obtained from the inversion of gravimetric data were integrated with a surface fault map to produce a subsidence hazard zoning in the city of Aguascalientes, Mexico. The resulting zoning is presented together with specific recommendations about geotechnical studies needed for further evaluation of surface faulting in these hazard zones. The derived zoning map consists in four zones including null hazard (stable terrain without subsidence, low hazard (areas prone to subsidence, medium hazard (zones with subsidence and high hazard (zones with surface faulting. InSAR results displayed subsidence LOS velocities up to 10 cm/year and two subsidence areas unknown before this study. Gravimetric results revealed that the thicker sediment sequence is located toward north of Aguascalientes City reaching up to 600 m in thickness, which correspond to a high subsidence LOS velocity zone (up to 6 cm/year.

  7. Changes in lake area in response to thermokarst processes and climate in Old Crow Flats, Yukon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, T. C.; Turner, K. W.

    2015-03-01

    Growing evidence indicates that lake-dominated ecosystems at high latitudes are undergoing significant hydrological changes. Research examining these changes is complicated because both thermokarst and climatic processes likely influence lake dynamics. To examine the relative impacts of these processes in permafrost landscapes, we investigated the dynamics of lake area and number in Old Crow Flats (OCF), Yukon using historical air photos and satellite imagery. Between 1951 and 2007, OCF experienced a decline of ~6000 ha in total lake area but gained 232 lakes. Close to half (49%) of the difference in lake area was driven by the rapid and persistent drainage of 38 large lakes. These catastrophic drainages were associated with new or enlarged outlet channels, resulted in the formation of numerous residual ponds, and were likely driven by thermokarst processes. Our analysis shows that catastrophic lake drainages have become more than 5 times more frequent in recent decades. These changes are likely related to the impacts of increased temperature and precipitation on thermokarst processes. Fifty-nine of the 170 intensively studied lakes showed either large bidirectional fluctuations or gradual cumulative declines. These changes affected a much smaller portion of OCF and were likely driven by interactions between increased precipitation and temperature and individual catchment characteristics. To anticipate landscape-scale changes in these systems, and assess their impact on hydrology, wildlife habitat, and carbon storage, field research is required to better characterize the mechanisms responsible for changes.

  8. A Picture of Subsidized Households 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — Picture of Subsidized Households describes the nearly 5 million households living in HUD-subsidized housing in the United States for the year 2009. Picture 2009...

  9. A Picture of Subsidized Housholds 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — Picture of Subsidized Households describes the nearly 5 million households living in HUD-subsidized housing in the United States for the year 2008. Picture 2008...

  10. Study of "3-Step Mining" Subsidence Control in Coal Mining Under Buildings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Guang-li; ZHA Jian-feng; WU Bin; JIA Xin-guo

    2007-01-01

    Mining subsidence damage is the main factor of restricting coal mining under buildings. To control or ease effectively the degree of mining subsidence and deformation is essential to resolve this problem. Through analyzing both advantages and disadvantages of some technologies such as mining with stowing, partial extraction and grouting in separated beds of overburden, we used the principle of load replacement and propose a "3-step mining" method, a new pattern of controlling mining subsidence, which consists of: strip mining, i.e. grouting to fill and consolidate the caving zone and retained strip pillar mining. The mechanism of controlling mining subsidence by using the "3-step mining" pattern is analyzed. The effect of the control is numerically simulated. The preliminary analysis shows that the "3-step mining" can effectively control ground subsidence and deformation. By using this method, the ground subsidence factor can be controlled to a value of about 0.25. Coal recovery can reach 80%-90%. Coal mining without removing surface buildings can be realized and the economic loss resulting from ground subsidence can be greatly reduced.

  11. Spatial-temporal heterogeneity of land subsidence evolution in Beijing based on InSAR and cluster analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Y.; Li, Y.; Gong, H.; Pan, Y.; Zhu, L.; Chen, B.

    2015-12-01

    Land subsidence is a common natural hazard occurring in extensive areas in the world. In Beijing, the capital city of China, there has been serious land subsidence due to overexploitation of ground water during the recent decades. Five major subsidence tunnels have formed. Across the Beijing plain area, the ground is sinking at the rate of 30-100mm/year. Uneven subsidence leads to ground fissure and building destruction, and has caused great economical and property loss. To better characterize and understand regional land subsidence evolution, it is critical to monitor the time-series dynamics of subsidence, and capture the spatial-temporal heterogeneity of the subsidence evolution. Interferometric SAR technique, as it provides high spatial resolution and wide range of observation, have been successfully used to monitor regional ground deformation. The objective of this study is to derive time-series regional land subsidence dynamics in Beijing, and based on which, analyze and assess the spatial-temporal heterogeneity of the evolution using cluster analysis. First, ENVISAT ASAR (2003-2009 years, 28 scenes, track number: 218) datasets during 2003-2010 covering Beijing plain area were utilized to obtain time-series subsidence rate using Persistent Scatter InSAR (PS-InSAR) technique provided in SARProz software. Second, time-series subsidence characteristics of the PS points were analyzed and the PS points were clustered based on Self-Organization feature Maps (SOM) algorithm considering environmental factors such as groundwater level and lithologic characters. This study demonstrates that based on InSAR measurements and SOMs algorithm, the spatial-temporal heterogeneity of land subsidence evolution can be captured. Each cluster shows unique spatial-temporal evolution pattern. The results of this study will facilitate further land subsidence modeling and prediction at regional spatial scale.

  12. Ground ice and hydrothermal ground motions on aufeis plots of river valleys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. R. Alekseev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Localized groundwater outflow and layered freezing of them in forms of large ice clusters on the surface creates specific conditions for energy and mass exchange in the «atmosphere–soil–lithosphere» system. In winter, the soil temperature profile is essentially deformed due to heat emission by the aufeis layer of water at its freezing that forms a specific thermocline layer. Deformation of the temperature profile, gradually decreasing, moves down the cross-section and disappearing at the interface between frozen and thawed rocks. Magnitude and number of the temperature deviations from a «normal» state depends on the heat storage of the aufeis-forming waters and on the number of outflows at a given point. The thermocline formation changes conditions of freezing for underlying ground layers together with mechanism of ice saturation of them, and that results in formation of two-layer ice-ground complexes (IGC which differ drastically from cryogenic features in adjacent parts of the valley. Analysis of genetic characteristics and relation of components of the surface and subsurface layers allowed identification of seven types of the aufeis IGC: massive-segregation, cement-basal, layered-segregation, basal-segregation, vacuum-filtration, pressureinjection, and fissure-vein. Yearly formation and destruction of aufeises and subsurface ices is accompanied by a sequence of particularly hazardous geodynamical phenomena, among which the most important are winter flooding of territories, layered freezing of water, ground heaving, thermokarst, and thermoerosion. Combination of these processes may cause a rapid (often unexpected reconfiguration of channels of both surface and subsurface runoff, abrupt uplifts and subsidences of the surface, and decompaction and «shaking-up» of seasonally thawing and seasonally freezing rocks, which may create exceptionally unfavorable conditions for construction and operation of engineering structures. Aufeis plots

  13. Effect of permafrost thawing on organic carbon and trace element colloidal speciation in the thermokarst lakes of western Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Pokrovsky

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available To examine the mechanisms of carbon mobilization and biodegradation during permafrost thawing and to establish a link between organic carbon (OC and other chemical and microbiological parameters in forming thermokarst (thaw lakes, we studied the biogeochemistry of OC and trace elements (TEs in a chronosequence of small lakes that are being formed due to permafrost thawing in the northern part of western Siberia. Twenty lakes and small ponds of various sizes and ages were sampled for dissolved and colloidal organic carbon, metals and culturable heterotrophic bacterial cell number. We observed a sequence of ecosystems from peat thawing and palsa degradation due to permafrost subsidence in small ponds to large, km-size lakes that are subject to drainage to, finally, the khasyrey (drained lake formation. There is a systematic evolution of both total dissolved and colloidal concentration of OC and TEs in the lake water along with the chronosequence of lake development that may be directly linked to the microbial mineralization of dissolved organic matter and the liberation of the inorganic components (Fe, Al, and TEs from the organo-mineral colloids.

    In this chronosequence of lake development, we observed an apparent decrease in the relative proportion of low molecular weight <1 kDa (1 kDa ~ 1 nm OC concentration along with a decrease in the concentration of total dissolved (<0.45 μm OC. This decrease was accompanied by an increase in the small size organic ligands (probably autochthonous exometabolites produced by the phytoplankton and a simultaneous decrease in the proportion of large-size organic (humic complexes of allochthonous (soil origin. This evolution may be due to the activity of heterotrophic bacterioplankton that use allochthonous organic matter and dissolved nutrients originating from peat lixiviation. Most insoluble TEs demonstrate a systematic decrease in concentration during filtration (5 μm, 0.45 μm exhibiting a similar

  14. Do hospitals cross-subsidize?

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Guy; Lindrooth, Richard C; Helmchen, Lorens A; Burns, Lawton R

    2014-09-01

    Despite its salience as a regulatory tool to ensure the delivery of unprofitable medical services, cross-subsidization of services within hospital systems has been notoriously difficult to detect and quantify. We use repeated shocks to a profitable service in the market for hospital-based medical care to test for cross-subsidization of unprofitable services. Using patient-level data from general short-term hospitals in Arizona and Colorado before and after entry by cardiac specialty hospitals, we study how incumbent hospitals adjusted their provision of three uncontested services that are widely considered to be unprofitable. We estimate that the hospitals most exposed to entry reduced their provision of psychiatric, substance-abuse, and trauma care services at a rate of about one uncontested-service admission for every four cardiac admissions they stood to lose. Although entry by single-specialty hospitals may adversely affect the provision of unprofitable uncontested services, these findings warrant further evaluation of service-line cross-subsidization as a means to finance them.

  15. Methods for monitoring land subsidence and earth fissures in the Western USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergason, K. C.; Rucker, M. L.; Panda, B. B.

    2015-11-01

    Depletion of groundwater resources in many deep alluvial basin aquifers in the Western USA is causing land subsidence, as it does in many regions worldwide. Land subsidence can severely and adversely impact infrastructure by changing the ground elevation, ground slope (grade) and through the development of ground cracks known as earth fissures that can erode into large gullies. Earth fissures have the potential to compromise the foundations of dams, levees, and other infrastructure and cause failure. Subsequent to an evaluation of the overall subsidence experienced in the vicinity of subsidence-impacted infrastructure, a detailed investigation to search for earth fissures, and design and/or mitigation of potentially effected infrastructure, a focused monitoring system should be designed and implemented. Its purpose is to provide data, and ultimately knowledge, to reduce the potential adverse impacts of land subsidence and earth fissure development to the pertinent infrastructure. This risk reduction is realized by quantifying the rate and distribution of ground deformation, and to detect ground rupture if it occurs, in the vicinity of the infrastructure. The authors have successfully designed and implemented monitoring systems capable of quantifying rates and distributions of ground subsidence and detection of ground rupture at multiple locations throughout the Western USA for several types of infrastructure including dams, levees, channels, basins, roadways, and mining facilities. Effective subsidence and earth fissure monitoring requires understanding and quantification of historic subsidence, estimation of potential future subsidence, delineation of the risk for earth fissures that could impact infrastructure, and motivation and resources to continue monitoring through time. A successful monitoring system provides the means to measure ground deformation, grade changes, displacement, and anticipate and assess the potential for earth fissuring. Employing multiple

  16. Time-varying land subsidence detected by radar altimetry: California, Taiwan and north China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Cheinway; Yang, Yuande; Kao, Ricky; Han, Jiancheng; Shum, C K; Galloway, Devin L; Sneed, Michelle; Hung, Wei-Chia; Cheng, Yung-Sheng; Li, Fei

    2016-06-21

    Contemporary applications of radar altimetry include sea-level rise, ocean circulation, marine gravity, and icesheet elevation change. Unlike InSAR and GNSS, which are widely used to map surface deformation, altimetry is neither reliant on highly temporally-correlated ground features nor as limited by the available spatial coverage, and can provide long-term temporal subsidence monitoring capability. Here we use multi-mission radar altimetry with an approximately 23 year data-span to quantify land subsidence in cropland areas. Subsidence rates from TOPEX/POSEIDON, JASON-1, ENVISAT, and JASON-2 during 1992-2015 show time-varying trends with respect to displacement over time in California's San Joaquin Valley and central Taiwan, possibly related to changes in land use, climatic conditions (drought) and regulatory measures affecting groundwater use. Near Hanford, California, subsidence rates reach 18 cm yr(-1) with a cumulative subsidence of 206 cm, which potentially could adversely affect operations of the planned California High-Speed Rail. The maximum subsidence rate in central Taiwan is 8 cm yr(-1). Radar altimetry also reveals time-varying subsidence in the North China Plain consistent with the declines of groundwater storage and existing water infrastructure detected by the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites, with rates reaching 20 cm yr(-1) and cumulative subsidence as much as 155 cm.

  17. Time-varying land subsidence detected by radar altimetry: California, Taiwan and north China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Cheinway; Yang, Yuande; Kao, Ricky; Han, Jiancheng; Shum, C.K.; Galloway, Devin L.; Sneed, Michelle; Hung, Wei-Chia; Cheng, Yung-Sheng; Li, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary applications of radar altimetry include sea-level rise, ocean circulation, marine gravity, and ice sheet elevation change. Unlike InSAR and GNSS, which are widely used to map surface deformation, altimetry is neither reliant on highly temporally-correlated ground features nor as limited by the available spatial coverage, and can provide long-term temporal subsidence monitoring capability. Here we use multi-mission radar altimetry with an approximately 23 year data-span to quantify land subsidence in cropland areas. Subsidence rates from TOPEX/POSEIDON, JASON-1, ENVISAT, and JASON-2 during 1992–2015 show time-varying trends with respect to displacement over time in California’s San Joaquin Valley and central Taiwan, possibly related to changes in land use, climatic conditions (drought) and regulatory measures affecting groundwater use. Near Hanford, California, subsidence rates reach 18 cm/yr with a cumulative subsidence of 206 cm, which potentially could adversely affect operations of the planned California High-Speed Rail. The maximum subsidence rate in central Taiwan is 8 cm/yr. Radar altimetry also reveals time-varying subsidence in the North China Plain consistent with the declines of groundwater storage and existing water infrastructure detected by the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites, with rates reaching 20 cm/yr and cumulative subsidence as much as 155 cm.

  18. Time-varying land subsidence detected by radar altimetry: California, Taiwan and north China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Cheinway; Yang, Yuande; Kao, Ricky; Han, Jiancheng; Shum, C. K.; Galloway, Devin L.; Sneed, Michelle; Hung, Wei-Chia; Cheng, Yung-Sheng; Li, Fei

    2016-06-01

    Contemporary applications of radar altimetry include sea-level rise, ocean circulation, marine gravity, and icesheet elevation change. Unlike InSAR and GNSS, which are widely used to map surface deformation, altimetry is neither reliant on highly temporally-correlated ground features nor as limited by the available spatial coverage, and can provide long-term temporal subsidence monitoring capability. Here we use multi-mission radar altimetry with an approximately 23 year data-span to quantify land subsidence in cropland areas. Subsidence rates from TOPEX/POSEIDON, JASON-1, ENVISAT, and JASON-2 during 1992–2015 show time-varying trends with respect to displacement over time in California’s San Joaquin Valley and central Taiwan, possibly related to changes in land use, climatic conditions (drought) and regulatory measures affecting groundwater use. Near Hanford, California, subsidence rates reach 18 cm yr‑1 with a cumulative subsidence of 206 cm, which potentially could adversely affect operations of the planned California High-Speed Rail. The maximum subsidence rate in central Taiwan is 8 cm yr‑1. Radar altimetry also reveals time-varying subsidence in the North China Plain consistent with the declines of groundwater storage and existing water infrastructure detected by the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites, with rates reaching 20 cm yr‑1 and cumulative subsidence as much as 155 cm.

  19. Study on Land Subsidence Incangzhou Area Basedon SENTINEL-1A/B Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, H.; Wang, Y.; Yan, S.

    2017-09-01

    This paper, obtaining 39scenesof images of the Sentinel-1 A/B, monitored the Cangzhou area subsidence from Mar. 2015 to Dec. 2016 basing on using PS-InSAR technique. The annual average subsidence rate and accumulative subsidence were obtained. The results showed that the ground surface of Xian County,Cang County, Cangzhou urban area had a rebound trend; Qing County, the east of Cang County ,the west of Nanpi County and Dongguang County appeared obvious subsidence, and the accumulated subsidence in Hezhuang village of Dongguang County reached 47 mm. And from that the main reason leading to these obvious subsidence was over-exploitation of ground-water. At last, it analyzed the settlement of the High-Speed Railway (HR) which was north from the Machang town of QingCounty and south to the Lian town of Dongguang County in Cangzhou.The relative deformation of the HR between the two sections which was Lierzhuang village of Cang County and Chenxin village of Nanpi County arrived at 30 mm. Moreover, this paper discussed the application of Sentinel-1 A/B SAR images in monitoring urban land subsidence and the results provided important basic data for the relevant departments.

  20. STUDY ON LAND SUBSIDENCE INCANGZHOU AREA BASEDON SENTINEL-1A/B DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Zhou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper, obtaining 39scenesof images of the Sentinel-1 A/B, monitored the Cangzhou area subsidence from Mar. 2015 to Dec. 2016 basing on using PS-InSAR technique. The annual average subsidence rate and accumulative subsidence were obtained. The results showed that the ground surface of Xian County,Cang County, Cangzhou urban area had a rebound trend; Qing County, the east of Cang County ,the west of Nanpi County and Dongguang County appeared obvious subsidence, and the accumulated subsidence in Hezhuang village of Dongguang County reached 47 mm. And from that the main reason leading to these obvious subsidence was over-exploitation of ground-water. At last, it analyzed the settlement of the High-Speed Railway (HR which was north from the Machang town of QingCounty and south to the Lian town of Dongguang County in Cangzhou.The relative deformation of the HR between the two sections which was Lierzhuang village of Cang County and Chenxin village of Nanpi County arrived at 30 mm. Moreover, this paper discussed the application of Sentinel-1 A/B SAR images in monitoring urban land subsidence and the results provided important basic data for the relevant departments.

  1. Subsidence characterization and modeling for engineered facilities in Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, M. L.; Fergason, K. C.; Panda, B. B.

    2015-11-01

    Several engineered facilities located on deep alluvial basins in southern Arizona, including flood retention structures (FRS) and a coal ash disposal facility, have been impacted by up to as much as 1.8 m of differential land subsidence and associated earth fissuring. Compressible basin alluvium depths are as deep as about 300 m, and historic groundwater level declines due to pumping range from 60 to more than 100 m at these facilities. Addressing earth fissure-inducing ground strain has required alluvium modulus characterization to support finite element modeling. The authors have developed Percolation Theory-based methodologies to use effective stress and generalized geo-material types to estimate alluvium modulus as a function of alluvium lithology, depth and groundwater level. Alluvial material modulus behavior may be characterized as high modulus gravel-dominated, low modulus sand-dominated, or very low modulus fines-dominated (silts and clays) alluvium. Applied at specific aquifer stress points, such as significant pumping wells, this parameter characterization and quantification facilitates subsidence magnitude modeling at its' sources. Modeled subsidence is then propagated over time across the basin from the source(s) using a time delay exponential decay function similar to the soil mechanics consolidation coefficient, only applied laterally. This approach has expanded subsidence modeling capabilities on scales of engineered facilities of less than 2 to more than 15 km.

  2. Effects of varying obliquity on Martian sublimation thermokarst landforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundas, Colin M.

    2017-01-01

    Scalloped depressions in the Martian mid-latitudes are likely formed by sublimation of ice-rich ground. The stability of subsurface ice changes with the planetary obliquity, generally becoming less stable at lower axial tilt. As a result, the relative rates of sublimation and creep change over time. A landscape evolution model shows that these variations produce internal structure in scalloped depressions, commonly in the form of arcuate ridges, which emerge as depressions resume growth after pausing or slowing. In other scenarios, the formation of internal structure is minimal. Significant uncertainties in past climate and model parameters permit a range of scenarios. Ridges observed in some Martian scalloped depressions could date from obliquity lows or periods of low ice stability occurring <5 Ma, suggesting that the pits are young features and may be actively evolving.

  3. Land subsidence in major cities of Central Mexico: Interpreting InSAR-derived land subsidence mapping with hydrogeological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellazzi, Pascal; Arroyo-Domínguez, Norma; Martel, Richard; Calderhead, Angus I.; Normand, Jonathan C. L.; Gárfias, Jaime; Rivera, Alfonso

    2016-05-01

    Significant structural damages to urban infrastructures caused by compaction of over-exploited aquifers are an important problem in Central Mexico. While the case of Mexico City has been well-documented, insight into land subsidence problems in other cities of Central Mexico is still limited. Among the cities concerned, we present and discuss the cases of five of them, located within the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB): Toluca, Celaya, Aguascalientes, Morelia, and Queretaro. Applying the SBAS-InSAR method to C-Band RADARSAT-2 data, five high resolution ground motion time-series were produced to monitor the spatio-temporal variations of displacements and fracturing from 2012 to 2014. The study presents recent changes of land subsidence rates along with concordant geological and water data. It aims to provide suggestions to mitigate future damages to infrastructure and to assist in groundwater resources management. Aguascalientes, Celaya, Morelia and Queretaro (respectively in order of decreasing subsidence rates) are typical cases of fault-limited land subsidence of Central Mexico. It occurs as a result of groundwater over-exploitation in lacustrine and alluvial deposits covering highly variable bedrock topography, typical of horst-graben geological settings. Aguascalientes and Toluca show high rates of land subsidence (up to 10 cm/yr), while Celaya and Morelia show lower rates (from 2 to 5 cm/yr). Comparing these results with previous studies, it is inferred that the spatial patterns of land subsidence have changed in the city of Toluca. This change appears to be mainly controlled by the spatial heterogeneity of compressible sediments since no noticeable change occurred in groundwater extraction and related drawdown rates. While land subsidence of up to 8 cm/yr has been reported in the Queretaro Valley before 2011, rates inferior to 1 cm/yr are measured in 2013-2014. The subsidence has been almost entirely mitigated by major changes in the water management

  4. Thermokarst Rates Intensify Due to Climate Change and Forest Fragmentation in an Alaskan Boreal Forest Lowland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, M. J.; Genet, H.; McGuire, A. D.; Euskirchen, E. S.; Zhang, Y.; Brown, D. N.; Jorgenson, T.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Breen, A. L.; Bolton, W. R.

    2015-12-01

    Lowland boreal forest ecosystems in Alaska are dominated by wetlands comprised of a complex mosaic of fens, collapse scar-bogs, low shrub/scrub, and forests growing on elevated ice rich permafrost soils. Thermokarst has affected the lowlands of the Tanana Flats in central Alaska for centuries, as thawing permafrost collapses forests that transition to wetlands. Located within the discontinuous permafrost zone, this region has significantly warmed over the past half-century, and much of these carbon-rich permafrost soils are now within ~0.5o C of thawing. Increases in the collapse of lowland boreal forests in response to warming may have consequences for the climate system. This study evaluates the trajectories and potential drivers of 60 years of forest change in a landscape subjected to permafrost thaw in unburned dominant forest types (paper birch and black spruce) associated with location on elevated permafrost plateau and across multiple time periods (1949, 1978, 1986, 1998 and 2009) using historical and contemporary aerial and satellite images for change detection. We developed (i) a deterministic statistical model to evaluate the potential climatic controls on forest change using gradient boosting and regression tree analysis, and (ii) a 30x30 m land cover map of the Tanana Flats to estimate the potential landscape-level losses of forest area due to thermokarst from 1949 to 2009. Over the 60-year period, we observed a nonlinear loss of birch forests and a relatively continuous gain of spruce forest associated with thermokarst and forest succession, respectively. Gradient boosting and regression tree models identify precipitation and forest fragmentation as the primary factors controlling birch and spruce forest change, respectively. Between 1950-2009 landscape-level analysis estimates a transition of ~15 km² of birch forest area to wetlands on the Tanana Flats, where the greatest change followed warm periods. This work highlights the vulnerability of lowland

  5. Methane sources in arctic thermokarst lake sediments on the North Slope of Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheus Carnevali, P B; Rohrssen, M; Williams, M R; Michaud, A B; Adams, H; Berisford, D; Love, G D; Priscu, J C; Rassuchine, O; Hand, K P; Murray, A E

    2015-03-01

    The permafrost on the North Slope of Alaska is densely populated by shallow lakes that result from thermokarst erosion. These lakes release methane (CH4 ) derived from a combination of ancient thermogenic pools and contemporary biogenic production. Despite the potential importance of CH4 as a greenhouse gas, the contribution of biogenic CH4 production in arctic thermokarst lakes in Alaska is not currently well understood. To further advance our knowledge of CH4 dynamics in these lakes, we focused our study on (i) the potential for microbial CH4 production in lake sediments, (ii) the role of sediment geochemistry in controlling biogenic CH4 production, and (iii) the temperature dependence of this process. Sediment cores were collected from one site in Siqlukaq Lake and two sites in Sukok Lake in late October to early November. Analyses of pore water geochemistry, sedimentary organic matter and lipid biomarkers, stable carbon isotopes, results from CH4 production experiments, and copy number of a methanogenic pathway-specific gene (mcrA) indicated the existence of different sources of CH4 in each of the lakes chosen for the study. Analysis of this integrated data set revealed that there is biological CH4 production in Siqlukaq at moderate levels, while the very low levels of CH4 detected in Sukok had a mixed origin, with little to no biological CH4 production. Furthermore, methanogenic archaea exhibited temperature-dependent use of in situ substrates for methanogenesis, and the amount of CH4 produced was directly related to the amount of labile organic matter in the sediments. This study constitutes an important first step in better understanding the actual contribution of biogenic CH4 from thermokarst lakes on the coastal plain of Alaska to the current CH4 budgets. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Methane turnover and environmental change from Holocene biomarker records in a thermokarst lake in Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvert, Marcus; Pohlman, John; Becker, Kevin W.; Gaglioti, Benjamin V.; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Wooller, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Arctic lakes and wetlands contribute a substantial amount of methane to the contemporary atmosphere, yet profound knowledge gaps remain regarding the intensity and climatic control of past methane emissions from this source. In this study, we reconstruct methane turnover and environmental conditions, including estimates of mean annual and summer temperature, from a thermokarst lake (Lake Qalluuraq) on the Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska for the Holocene by using source-specific lipid biomarkers preserved in a radiocarbon-dated sediment core. Our results document a more prominent role for methane in the carbon cycle when the lake basin was an emergent fen habitat between ~12,300 and ~10,000 cal yr BP, a time period closely coinciding with the Holocene Thermal Maximum (HTM) in North Alaska. Enhanced methane turnover was stimulated by relatively warm temperatures, increased moisture, nutrient supply, and primary productivity. After ~10,000 cal yr BP, a thermokarst lake with abundant submerged mosses evolved, and through the mid-Holocene temperatures were approximately 3°C cooler. Under these conditions, organic matter decomposition was attenuated, which facilitated the accumulation of submerged mosses within a shallower Lake Qalluuraq. Reduced methane assimilation into biomass during the mid-Holocene suggests that thermokarst lakes are carbon sinks during cold periods. In the late-Holocene from ~2700 cal yr BP to the most recent time, however, temperatures and carbon deposition rose and methane oxidation intensified, indicating that more rapid organic matter decomposition and enhanced methane production could amplify climate feedback via potential methane emissions in the future.

  7. Tectonic subsidence of the Sirte Basin, Libya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumati, Y.D.; Nairn, A.E.M. (South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (US). Earth Sciences and Resources Inst.)

    1991-01-01

    The Sirte Basin of Libya has a history of faulting and differential subsidence brought about by lithospheric extension during a 25 MM (million) year period beginning in the Late Cretaceous. The first phase of extension and initial subsidence, with faulting and graben formation, occurred from Cenomanian to Campanian times. Following extension, there occurred widespread thermally-driven subsidence from Maastrichtian through Eocene and Oligocene times, accounting for about half of the total subsidence. Details of basin subsidence, sediment accumulation rates and facies variations have been reconstructed for the northern Sirte Basin from a suite of approximately 100 completion well logs and numerous seismic lines. These show that at various times in the late Cretaceous and Paleocene-Eocene, renewed differential subsidence followed fault reactivation. Tectonic subsidence maps show a systematic SE to NW shift in the loci of maximum and minimum subsidence, which parallels the structural trend of the basin. The greatest subsidence observed in the Sirte Trough is 2,085 meters, whereas subsidence of the horsts is generally less than 1,000 meters. The stretching factor ({beta}: in the range of 1.1 to 1.75), corresponds to an extension of 10-75%, with an average of less than 50%. The greatest stretching is associated with the central graben. (Author).

  8. Impacts of Thermokarst Formation and Wildfire on Boreal Forest Carbon Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, J. P.; Estop-Aragones, C.; Thierry, A.; Hartley, I. P.; Murton, J.; Charman, D.; Williams, M.; Phoenix, G. K.

    2014-12-01

    At the global scale permafrost temperatures are increasing, leading to a thickening of the active layer and an increase in the amount of previously immobilised C exposed to microbial decay and subsequent release to the atmosphere. Against the backdrop of this overall trend, perturbations to permafrost systems caused by wildfires or thermokarst driven wetland formation can cause dramatic shifts in the C exchange of these ecosystems as a result of the changes in plant communities and soil thermal regimes they cause. These dynamic components of permafrost landscapes are often neglected in coupled climate-C models. However, a clear understanding of the impact of these perturbations on C cycling is crucial if we are to accurately predict future permafrost feedbacks to climate change. This is particularly pertinent given that the frequency of both forest fires and thermokarst formation is likely to increase with future climate warming. In order to assess the impact of these perturbations on C cycling we established paired burned and unburned spruce forest and paired peat plateau and thaw feature field sites near Whitehorse, YT and Yellowknife, NT within the boreal region of Canada. At each site tree photosynthetic biomass was quantified using DBH based allometric scaling equations. A combination of percentage cover surveys, biomass harvests, and leaf area determination were used to calculate understory and wetland photosynthetic biomass. Measurements of spruce and understory photosynthesis and plant and soil respiration were made using specialised acrylic chambers and an IRGA. Combining these data has allowed us to determine the impact of thermokarst formation and wildfire on C exchange with the atmosphere. This has allowed us to assess whether the dramatic increase in plant productivity between peat plateau and wetland habitats has the potential to offset thermokarst associated C losses. We have also gained an understanding of whether increases in light availability for

  9. Rapid groundwater-related land subsidence in Yemen observed by multi-temporal InSAR

    KAUST Repository

    Abdullin, Ayrat

    2015-04-01

    Several basins in Yemen are suffering from a rapid drawdown of groundwater, which is the most important water source for agricultural irrigation, industry and domestic use. However, detailed geodetic measurements in the region have been lacking and the extent and magnitude of groundwater-related land subsidence has been poorly known. We used 13 ascending ALOS and 15 descending Envisat images to study land subsidence of several basins in Yemen, with a special focus on the Sana\\'a and Mabar basins. From multitemporal synthetic aperture radar interferometric analysis (persistent scatterers (PS) and small baseline subsets (SBAS)) we examined the spatio-temporal behavior of the subsidence induced by depletion of groundwater aquifer systems from November 2003 to February 2011. In the interferometric data processing, we carefully chose interferogram pairs to minimize spatial and temporal decorrelation, because of high subsidence rates and the type of land cover. Our results show that the spatial pattern of subsidence remained quite stable during the observation period in both the Sana\\'a and Mabar basins. In the Sana\\'a basin, the maximum subsidence rate exceeded 14 cm/year in the radar line-of-sight (LOS) direction between 2003 and 2008 in an agricultural area just north of Sana\\'a city, where water wells have been drying up according to the well data. The subsidence rate was lower in the urban areas, or approximately 1 cm/year, exhibiting annual variations. The main subsidence was found in the center and southern parts of the city, while deformation in the northern part is less obvious. For the Mabar basin, the subsidence rate exceeded 30 cm/year in the agricultural area north of the town of Mabar during 2007 - 2011. The southern part of the Mabar basin also experienced high subsidence rates, although somewhat lower than to the north. Excessive water pumping is the main cause of the ground subsidence and it has already led to extensive ground fracturing at the edge

  10. Correlation between precision gravity and subsidence measurements at Cerro Prieto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelwer, R.; Grannell, R.B.

    1982-10-01

    Precision gravity measurements were made in the region of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field at yearly intervals from 1977 to 1981 to assess the feasibility of using gravity to determine subsurface reservoir changes with time. The extent of mass recharge in response to the continued production of fluids from this field was studied. Changes in gravity and ground elevation were observed throughout the region for the period of observation. Results indicate that the largest changes observed were the result of the Magnitude 6.1 (Caltech) Victoria earthquake of 8 June 1980. The epicenter of this earthquake was located 25 km southeast of the field on the Cerro Prieto Fault, which bounds the field on the southwest. Subsidence of up to 55 cm was measured east of the power plant, in the region between the northern end of the Cerro Prieto Fault and the southern end of the Imperial Fault. This area has been postulated to be the site of an active spreading center or pull-apart basin, and has been characterized by a high level of seismic activity during the last 10 years. Minor subsidence and small related gravity changes for the period preceeding the Victoria earthquake suggest that in spite of large fluid production rates, the reservoir is being almost completely recharged and that a measurable increase in subsurface density may be taking place. The results of measurements of horizontal ground motions made in this area are discussed in relation to the gravity and subsidence observations.

  11. Determination of intensity functions for predicting subsidence from coal mining, potash mining, and groundwater withdrawal using the influence function technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triplett, T.; Yurchak, D. [Twin Cities Research Center, Bureau of Mines, US Dept. of the Interior, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents research, conducted by the Bureau of Mines, on modifying the influence function method to predict subsidence. According to theory, this technique must incorporate an intensity function to represent the relative significance of the causes of subsidence. This paper shows that the inclusion of a reasonable intensity function increases the accuracy of the technique, then presents the required functions for case studies of longwall coal mining subsidence in Illinois, USA, potash mining subsidence in new Mexico, USA, and subsidence produced by ground water withdrawal in California, USA. Finally, the paper discusses a method to predict the resultant strain from a simply measured site constant and ground curvatures calculated by the technique. (orig.)

  12. Development and Application of a Regional Land Subsidence Model for the Plain of Tianjin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yali Cui; Chen Su; Jingli Shao; Yabin Wang; Xiaoyuan Cao

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a coupled numerical groundwater and land subsidence model was devel-oped for the Tianjin Plain. The model was employed to investigate the groundwater resources and their changes over the last decade, and to further predict the changing patterns of the groundwater level and associated land subsidence in future. First, according to the regional hydrogeology, the simulation area was defined with an area of 10.6×103 km2, which was divided into six aquifer units. A coupled ground-water and land subsidence numerical model was built by using Modflow2005 and the land subsidence simulation module SUB (subsidence and aquifer-system compaction), in which the groundwater flow was modeled as three-dimensional unsteady flow and the land subsidence simulation was based on one-dimensional consolidation theory. The model was then calibrated by using the groundwater level contour lines, hydrographs, and land subsidence hydrographs over the period of 1998-2008. In addition, groundwater balance analysis of the simulation period indicated that under multi-year groundwater withdrawal condition the cross-flow recharge, compression release, and lateral boundary inflow con-tributed 44.43%, 32.14%, and 21.88%to the deep aquifer recharge, respectively. Finally, the model was applied to predict the changing patterns of the groundwater levels and the associated variations in land subsidence under the control of groundwater exploitation after implementation of the south-to-north water diversion project. The simulation results demonstrated that the groundwater level may gradually increase year by year with an decrease in the groundwater withdrawal;and the land in dominated land subsidence regions including the urban area, Dagang, Hangu, Jinghai, Wuqing, and Jinnan, may re-bound at an average rate of 2-3 mm/a, and the land subsidence rate in the other regions may decrease.

  13. September 2016 Bayou Choctaw Subsidence Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriarty, Dylan Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lord, Anna C. Snider [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Subsidence monitoring is a crucial component to understanding cavern integrity of salt storage caverns. This report looks at historical and current data at the Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve Site. Data from the most recent land-based annual surveys, GPS, and tiltmeter indicate the subsidence rates across the site are approximately 0.0 ft./yr. Because of this, there is no evidence from the subsidence survey to suggest any of the DOE caverns have been structurally compromised.

  14. Planetary plains: subsidence and warping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochemasov, G.

    A common feature of all celestial bodies is their tectonic dichotomy best studied, naturally, at Earth [1]. Here there is an opposition of the eastern continental hemisphere and the western oceanic one. The first one is uplifted and cracked, the second one subsided, squeezed and warped. The next excellent example of dichotomy is at Mars where the subsided northern hemisphere is opposed by the highly uplifted southern one. The enigmatic two-face Iapetus now with help of Cassini SC presents a more clear picture: the leading dark hemisphere is opposed by the trailing light one. The light hemisphere is built mainly of water ice, the dark one of some more dense material. Bean-shaped asteroids with one convex and another concave hemispheres are best exemplified by Ida. Examples of dichotomic asteroids, satellites, planets and stars could be extended. Ubiquity of this phenomenon was expressed as the 1st theorem of the planetary wave tectonics [2 & others]: "Celestial bodies are dichotomic". A reason of this phenomenon is in action of inertia-gravity waves occurring in any celestial body because of its movement in non-round but elliptical (parabolic) orbit with periodically changing accelerations. The inertia-gravity standing waves warp rotating bodies (but all bodies rotate !) in 4 ortho- and diagonal interfering directions and in several harmonic wave-lengths. The fundamental wave1 produces ubiquitous tectonic dichotomy (2πR-structure): an opposition of two hemispheres with different planetary radii. To keep angular momenta of two hemispheres equal (otherwise a body will fall apart) the lower subsiding one is constructed of denser material than the higher one. Normally in terrestrial planets lowlands are filled with dense basalts, highlands are built by lighter lithologies. A subsidence means diminishing radius, otherwise, the larger surface must be fit into a smaller space. It is possible only if an original infilling is warped. At Earth cosmic altimetry shows complex

  15. Permafrost thaw and intense thermokarst activity decreases abundance of stream benthic macroinvertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Krista S; Lento, Jennifer; Culp, Joseph M; Lacelle, Denis; Kokelj, Steven V

    2016-08-01

    Intensification of permafrost thaw has increased the frequency and magnitude of large permafrost slope disturbances (mega slumps) in glaciated terrain of northwestern Canada. Individual thermokarst disturbances up to 40 ha in area have made large volumes of previously frozen sediments available for leaching and transport to adjacent streams, significantly increasing sediment and solute loads in these systems. To test the effects of this climate-sensitive disturbance regime on the ecology of Arctic streams, we explored the relationship between physical and chemical variables and benthic macroinvertebrate communities in disturbed and undisturbed stream reaches in the Peel Plateau, Northwest Territories, Canada. Highly disturbed and undisturbed stream reaches differed with respect to taxonomic composition and invertebrate abundance. Minimally disturbed reaches were not differentiated by these variables but rather were distributed along a disturbance gradient between highly disturbed and undisturbed sites. In particular, there was evidence of a strong negative relationship between macroinvertebrate abundance and total suspended solids, and a positive relationship between abundance and the distance from the disturbance. Increases in both sediments and nutrients appear to be the proximate cause of community differences in highly disturbed streams. Declines in macroinvertebrate abundance in response to slump activity have implications for the food webs of these systems, potentially leading to negative impacts on higher trophic levels, such as fish. Furthermore, the disturbance impacts on stream health can be expected to intensify as climate change increases the frequency and magnitude of thermokarst.

  16. SAR Inteferometry and GPS Surveying for Subsidence Monitoring and its Contribution to Risk Management, the Case Study of Aguascalientes, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel, R.; Castaneda, L. P.

    2013-05-01

    Aguascalientes valley is just one of many regions affected by ground subsidence in Mexico, results of GPS monitoring from 2003 to date and differential SAR interferometry using Envisat archived data show subsidence maximums of 15 centimeters but with a decreasing rate with time. Recent implementation of TerraSAR-X stripmap mode images allowed a more accurate estimation of displacements, which are being used for subsidence mapping and to develop models for corrections to geodetic positions. In addition, results of the study are also being used to the development of the State's atlas of hazards and will contribute by detecting new ground failures and areas susceptible to failure.

  17. Roadbed Subsidence Prediction and Its Security Evaluation%路基沉陷预计及其安全性评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永树; 韩丽萍

    2002-01-01

    A roadbed subsidence pattern for predicting the security of roadbed in ground subsidence area with complicated structure strata and any shape of excavations is proposed in this paper. The methods for computing the values of the movements and deformations of the roadbed characteristic points are investigated. The calculating formulae for predicting the roadbed subsidence,inclined deformation,curvature deformation,horizontal displacement and horizontal deformation are provided. The methods for evaluating roadbed security and predicting disastrous accidents of roadbed in ground subsidence area are also discussed. Finally,a practical example is given for applying the method to evaluate roadbed security.

  18. Simulating the hydrologic cycle in coal mining subsidence areas with a distributed hydrologic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhua; Lu, Chuiyu; Sun, Qingyan; Xiao, Weihua; Cao, Guoliang; Li, Hui; Yan, Lingjia; Zhang, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale ground subsidence caused by coal mining and subsequent water-filling leads to serious environmental problems and economic losses, especially in plains with a high phreatic water level. Clarifying the hydrologic cycle in subsidence areas has important practical value for environmental remediation, and provides a scientific basis for water resource development and utilisation of the subsidence areas. Here we present a simulation approach to describe interactions between subsidence area water (SW) and several hydrologic factors from the River-Subsidence-Groundwater Model (RSGM), which is developed based on the distributed hydrologic model. Analysis of water balance shows that the recharge of SW from groundwater only accounts for a small fraction of the total water source, due to weak groundwater flow in the plain. The interaction between SW and groundwater has an obvious annual cycle. The SW basically performs as a net source of groundwater in the wet season, and a net sink for groundwater in the dry season. The results show there is an average 905.34 million m3 per year of water available through the Huainan coal mining subsidence areas (HCMSs). If these subsidence areas can be integrated into water resource planning, the increasingly precarious water supply infrastructure will be strengthened. PMID:28106048

  19. Simulating the hydrologic cycle in coal mining subsidence areas with a distributed hydrologic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhua; Lu, Chuiyu; Sun, Qingyan; Xiao, Weihua; Cao, Guoliang; Li, Hui; Yan, Lingjia; Zhang, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale ground subsidence caused by coal mining and subsequent water-filling leads to serious environmental problems and economic losses, especially in plains with a high phreatic water level. Clarifying the hydrologic cycle in subsidence areas has important practical value for environmental remediation, and provides a scientific basis for water resource development and utilisation of the subsidence areas. Here we present a simulation approach to describe interactions between subsidence area water (SW) and several hydrologic factors from the River-Subsidence-Groundwater Model (RSGM), which is developed based on the distributed hydrologic model. Analysis of water balance shows that the recharge of SW from groundwater only accounts for a small fraction of the total water source, due to weak groundwater flow in the plain. The interaction between SW and groundwater has an obvious annual cycle. The SW basically performs as a net source of groundwater in the wet season, and a net sink for groundwater in the dry season. The results show there is an average 905.34 million m3 per year of water available through the Huainan coal mining subsidence areas (HCMSs). If these subsidence areas can be integrated into water resource planning, the increasingly precarious water supply infrastructure will be strengthened.

  20. InSAR derived horizontal subsidence gradient as a tool for hazard assessment in urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral-Cano, E.; Dixon, T.; Diaz-Molina, O.

    2007-05-01

    Mexico City's subsidence has been recognized for over a century, after the first well battery was drilled to supply water to the rapidly growing city at the end of the XIX century. Consequences of the subsidence process are costly but the economic consequences of subsidence in urban areas is hard to assess due to the fact that their costs are generally factored into yearly maintenance budgets rather than accounting for them as a unique natural disaster. It has thus become increasingly important to assess the extent and magnitude of damage due to ground subsidence in the Mexico City metropolitan area. Periodic InSAR and GPS measurements including data from an 8 site permanent GPS network in Mexico City has enabled us to derive an integrated composite displacement map for Mexico City. This image was used to calculate the horizontal subsidence gradient for areas smaller than 100x100m throughout the city by computing the observed displacement difference divided by the respective pixel to pixel horizontal distance and comparing similarly calculated values from all adjacent pixels in order to select the maximum gradient. Both empiric and analytical approaches can been used to correlate the potential for surface faulting in high horizontal subsidence gradient zones and show that the principal factor for constraining these areas can be successfully determined using a combined Differential InSAR and GPS approach. We present surface faulting risk maps for several cities in central Mexico derived from the horizontal subsidence gradient approach as an example of this technique.

  1. A snapshot of CO2 and CH4 evolution in a thermokarst pond near Igarka, northern Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodau, Christian; Rees, Rainer; Flessa, Heiner; Rodionov, Andrej; Guggenberger, Georg; Knorr, Klaus-Holger; Shibistova, Olga; Zrazhevskaya, Galina; Mikheeva, Natalia; Kasansky, Oleg A.

    2008-09-01

    Thermokarst wetlands and ponds in the subarctic, which are located in land surface depressions resulting from permafrost melt, are strong sources of CH4, but little is known about respiration processes supporting these emissions. We determined CH4 fluxes and concentration profiles of dissolved gases and anions and some δ13C ratios of CO2 and CH4 in a thermokarst pond and adjacent smaller thermokarst depressions in the forest tundra near Igarka, northern Siberia in August 2006. Methane was emitted at 110-170 mg m-2 d-1 and produced mostly by CO2 reduction, which also provided high Gibbs free energies on the order of 50-70 KJ mol-1 H2 due to high H2 concentrations. The diffusive flux calculated from CH4 gradients in the floating mat contributed floating mat and the water body below. Anaerobic respiration required to reproduce nonsteady state CO2 concentration maxima in the floating mat above the water body was 30-80 nmol cm-3 d-1 or 250 mg m-2 d-1 and thus on a similar order of magnitude as CH4 fluxes. The results suggest that floating mat-covered thermokarst ponds located in northern Siberian bogs effectively convert recently fixed carbon into CH4 and thus allow for emissions independently from the finite, bog-derived carbon source. The relative contribution of recently fixed and old bog-derived carbon to C fluxes requires further investigation, however.

  2. A synthesis of thermokarst lake water balance in high-latitude regions of North America from isotope tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Lauren A.; Wolfe, Brent B.; Turner, Kevin W.; Anderson, Lesleigh; Arp, Christopher D.; Birks, Jean; Bouchard, Frédéric; Edwards, Thomas W.D.; Farquharson, Nicole; Hall, Roland I.; McDonald, Ian; Narancic, Biljana; Ouimet, Chantal; Pienitz, Reinhard; Tondu, Jana; White, Hilary

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies utilizing remote sensing imagery and other methods have documented that thermokarst lakes are undergoing varied hydrological transitions in response to recent climate changes, from surface area expansion to drainage and evaporative desiccation. Here, we provide a synthesis of hydrological conditions for 376 lakes of mainly thermokarst origin across high-latitude North America. We assemble surface water isotope compositions measured during the past decade at five lake-rich landscapes including Arctic Coastal Plain (Alaska), Yukon Flats (Alaska), Old Crow Flats (Yukon), northwestern Hudson Bay Lowlands (Manitoba), and Nunavik (Quebec). These landscapes represent the broad range of thermokarst environments by spanning gradients in meteorological, permafrost, and vegetation conditions. An isotope framework was established based on flux-weighted long-term averages of meteorological conditions for each lake to quantify water balance metrics. The isotope composition of source water and evaporation-to-inflow ratio for each lake were determined, and the results demonstrated a substantial array of regional and subregional diversity of lake hydrological conditions. Controls on lake water balance and how these vary among the five landscapes and with differing environmental drivers are assessed. Findings reveal that lakes in the Hudson Bay Lowlands are most vulnerable to evaporative desiccation, whereas those in Nunavik are most resilient. However, we also identify the complexity in predicting hydrological responses of these thermokarst landscapes to future climate change.

  3. 30 CFR 817.121 - Subsidence control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Subsidence control. 817.121 Section 817.121... ACTIVITIES § 817.121 Subsidence control. (a) Measures to prevent or minimize damage. (1) The permittee must... control plan prepared pursuant to § 784.20 of this chapter. (c) Repair of damage—(1) Repair of damage...

  4. Peat accumulation in drained thermokarst lake basins in continuous, ice-rich permafrost, northern Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Miriam C.; Grosse, Guido; Jones, Benjamin M.; Anthony, Katey Walter

    2012-01-01

    Thermokarst lakes and peat-accumulating drained lake basins cover a substantial portion of Arctic lowland landscapes, yet the role of thermokarst lake drainage and ensuing peat formation in landscape-scale carbon (C) budgets remains understudied. Here we use measurements of terrestrial peat thickness, bulk density, organic matter content, and basal radiocarbon age from permafrost cores, soil pits, and exposures in vegetated, drained lake basins to characterize regional lake drainage chronology, C accumulation rates, and the role of thermokarst-lake cycling in carbon dynamics throughout the Holocene on the northern Seward Peninsula, Alaska. Most detectable lake drainage events occurred within the last 4,000 years with the highest drainage frequency during the medieval climate anomaly. Peat accumulation rates were highest in young (50–500 years) drained lake basins (35.2 g C m−2 yr−1) and decreased exponentially with time since drainage to 9 g C m−2 yr−1 in the oldest basins. Spatial analyses of terrestrial peat depth, basal peat radiocarbon ages, basin geomorphology, and satellite-derived land surface properties (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI); Minimum Noise Fraction (MNF)) from Landsat satellite data revealed significant relationships between peat thickness and mean basin NDVI or MNF. By upscaling observed relationships, we infer that drained thermokarst lake basins, covering 391 km2 (76%) of the 515 km2 study region, store 6.4–6.6 Tg organic C in drained lake basin terrestrial peat. Peat accumulation in drained lake basins likely serves to offset greenhouse gas release from thermokarst-impacted landscapes and should be incorporated in landscape-scale C budgets.

  5. Coastal subsidence and relative sea level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Galloway, Devin L.

    2014-01-01

    Subsurface fluid-pressure declines caused by pumping of groundwater or hydrocarbons can lead to aquifer-system compaction and consequent land subsidence. This subsidence can be rapid, as much as 30 cm per year in some instances, and large, totaling more than 13 m in extreme examples. Thus anthropogenic subsidence may be the dominant contributor to relative sea-level rise in coastal environments where subsurface fluids are heavily exploited. Maximum observed rates of human-induced subsidence greatly exceed the rates of natural subsidence of unconsolidated sediments (~0.1–1 cm yr−1) and the estimated rates of ongoing global sea-level rise (~0.3 cm yr−1).

  6. Thermokarst rates intensify due to climate change and forest fragmentation in an Alaskan boreal forest lowland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Mark J; Genet, Hélène; McGuire, Anthony D; Euskirchen, Eugénie S; Zhang, Yujin; Brown, Dana R N; Jorgenson, Mark T; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Breen, Amy; Bolton, William R

    2016-02-01

    Lowland boreal forest ecosystems in Alaska are dominated by wetlands comprised of a complex mosaic of fens, collapse-scar bogs, low shrub/scrub, and forests growing on elevated ice-rich permafrost soils. Thermokarst has affected the lowlands of the Tanana Flats in central Alaska for centuries, as thawing permafrost collapses forests that transition to wetlands. Located within the discontinuous permafrost zone, this region has significantly warmed over the past half-century, and much of these carbon-rich permafrost soils are now within ~0.5 °C of thawing. Increased permafrost thaw in lowland boreal forests in response to warming may have consequences for the climate system. This study evaluates the trajectories and potential drivers of 60 years of forest change in a landscape subjected to permafrost thaw in unburned dominant forest types (paper birch and black spruce) associated with location on elevated permafrost plateau and across multiple time periods (1949, 1978, 1986, 1998, and 2009) using historical and contemporary aerial and satellite images for change detection. We developed (i) a deterministic statistical model to evaluate the potential climatic controls on forest change using gradient boosting and regression tree analysis, and (ii) a 30 × 30 m land cover map of the Tanana Flats to estimate the potential landscape-level losses of forest area due to thermokarst from 1949 to 2009. Over the 60-year period, we observed a nonlinear loss of birch forests and a relatively continuous gain of spruce forest associated with thermokarst and forest succession, while gradient boosting/regression tree models identify precipitation and forest fragmentation as the primary factors controlling birch and spruce forest change, respectively. Between 1950 and 2009, landscape-level analysis estimates a transition of ~15 km² or ~7% of birch forests to wetlands, where the greatest change followed warm periods. This work highlights that the vulnerability and resilience of

  7. Thermokarst rates intensify due to climate change and forest fragmentation in an Alaskan boreal forest lowland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, M.; Genet, Helene; McGuire, Anthony; Euskirchen, Eugénie S.; Zhang, Yujin; Brown, Dana R. N.; Jorgenson, M.T.; Romanovsky, V.; Breen, Amy L.; Bolton, W.R.

    2016-01-01

    Lowland boreal forest ecosystems in Alaska are dominated by wetlands comprised of a complex mosaic of fens, collapse-scar bogs, low shrub/scrub, and forests growing on elevated ice-rich permafrost soils. Thermokarst has affected the lowlands of the Tanana Flats in central Alaska for centuries, as thawing permafrost collapses forests that transition to wetlands. Located within the discontinuous permafrost zone, this region has significantly warmed over the past half-century, and much of these carbon-rich permafrost soils are now within ~0.5 °C of thawing. Increased permafrost thaw in lowland boreal forests in response to warming may have consequences for the climate system. This study evaluates the trajectories and potential drivers of 60 years of forest change in a landscape subjected to permafrost thaw in unburned dominant forest types (paper birch and black spruce) associated with location on elevated permafrost plateau and across multiple time periods (1949, 1978, 1986, 1998, and 2009) using historical and contemporary aerial and satellite images for change detection. We developed (i) a deterministic statistical model to evaluate the potential climatic controls on forest change using gradient boosting and regression tree analysis, and (ii) a 30 × 30 m land cover map of the Tanana Flats to estimate the potential landscape-level losses of forest area due to thermokarst from 1949 to 2009. Over the 60-year period, we observed a nonlinear loss of birch forests and a relatively continuous gain of spruce forest associated with thermokarst and forest succession, while gradient boosting/regression tree models identify precipitation and forest fragmentation as the primary factors controlling birch and spruce forest change, respectively. Between 1950 and 2009, landscape-level analysis estimates a transition of ~15 km² or ~7% of birch forests to wetlands, where the greatest change followed warm periods. This work highlights that the vulnerability and resilience of

  8. Organic matter mineralization and trace element post-depositional redistribution in Western Siberia thermokarst lake sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Audry

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the very first results on high-resolution sampling of sediments and their porewaters from three thermokarst (thaw lakes representing different stages of ecosystem development located within the Nadym-Pur interfluve of the Western Siberia plain. Up to present time, the lake sediments of this and other permafrost-affected regions remain unexplored regarding their biogeochemical behavior. The aim of this study was to (i document the early diagenesic processes in order to assess their impact on the organic carbon stored in the underlying permafrost, and (ii characterize the post-depositional redistribution of trace elements and their impact on the water column. The estimated organic carbon (OC stock in thermokarst lake sediments of 14 ± 2 kg m−2 is low compared to that reported for peat soils from the same region and denotes intense organic matter (OM mineralization. Mineralization of OM in the thermokarst lake sediments proceeds under anoxic conditions in all the three lakes. In the course of the lake development, a shift in mineralization pathways was evidenced from nitrate and sulfate to Fe- and Mn-oxyhydroxides as the main terminal electron acceptors in the early diagenetic reactions. This shift was promoted by the diagenetic consumption of nitrate and sulfate and their gradual depletion in the water column due to progressively decreasing frozen peat lixiviation occurring at the lake's borders. Trace elements were mobilized from host phases (OM and Fe- and Mn-oxyhydroxides and partly sequestered in the sediment in the form of authigenic Fe-sulfides. Arsenic and Sb cycling was also closely linked to that of OM and Fe- and Mn-oxyhydroxides. Shallow diagenetic enrichment of particulate Sb was observed in the less mature stages. As a result of authigenic sulfide precipitation, the sediments of the early stage of ecosystem development were a sink for water column Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb and Sb. In contrast, at all stages of

  9. Organic matter mineralization and trace element post-depositional redistribution in Western Siberia thermokarst lake sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audry, S.; Pokrovsky, O. S.; Shirokova, L. S.; Kirpotin, S. N.; Dupré, B.

    2011-11-01

    This study reports the very first results on high-resolution sampling of sediments and their porewaters from three thermokarst (thaw) lakes representing different stages of ecosystem development located within the Nadym-Pur interfluve of the Western Siberia plain. Up to present time, the lake sediments of this and other permafrost-affected regions remain unexplored regarding their biogeochemical behavior. The aim of this study was to (i) document the early diagenesic processes in order to assess their impact on the organic carbon stored in the underlying permafrost, and (ii) characterize the post-depositional redistribution of trace elements and their impact on the water column. The estimated organic carbon (OC) stock in thermokarst lake sediments of 14 ± 2 kg m-2 is low compared to that reported for peat soils from the same region and denotes intense organic matter (OM) mineralization. Mineralization of OM in the thermokarst lake sediments proceeds under anoxic conditions in all the three lakes. In the course of the lake development, a shift in mineralization pathways from nitrate and sulfate to Fe- and Mn-oxyhydroxides as the main terminal electron acceptors in the early diagenetic reactions was suggested. This shift was likely promoted by the diagenetic consumption of nitrate and sulfate and their gradual depletion in the water column due to progressively decreasing frozen peat lixiviation occurring at the lake's borders. Trace elements were mobilized from host phases (OM and Fe- and Mn-oxyhydroxides) and partly sequestered in the sediment in the form of authigenic Fe-sulfides. Arsenic and Sb cycling was also closely linked to that of OM and Fe- and Mn-oxyhydroxides. Shallow diagenetic enrichment of particulate Sb was observed in the less mature stages. As a result of authigenic sulfide precipitation, the sediments of the early stage of ecosystem development were a sink for water column Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb and Sb. In contrast, at all stages of ecosystem development

  10. Organic matter mineralization and trace element post-depositional redistribution in Western Siberia thermokarst lake sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Audry

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the very first results on high-resolution sampling of sediments and their porewaters from three thermokarst (thaw lakes representing different stages of ecosystem development located within the Nadym-Pur interfluve of the Western Siberia plain. Up to present time, the lake sediments of this and other permafrost-affected regions remain unexplored regarding their biogeochemical behavior. The aim of this study was to (i document the early diagenesic processes in order to assess their impact on the organic carbon stored in the underlying permafrost, and (ii characterize the post-depositional redistribution of trace elements and their impact on the water column. The estimated organic carbon (OC stock in thermokarst lake sediments of 14 ± 2 kg m−2 is low compared to that reported for peat soils from the same region and denotes intense organic matter (OM mineralization. Mineralization of OM in the thermokarst lake sediments proceeds under anoxic conditions in all the three lakes. In the course of the lake development, a shift in mineralization pathways from nitrate and sulfate to Fe- and Mn-oxyhydroxides as the main terminal electron acceptors in the early diagenetic reactions was suggested. This shift was likely promoted by the diagenetic consumption of nitrate and sulfate and their gradual depletion in the water column due to progressively decreasing frozen peat lixiviation occurring at the lake's borders. Trace elements were mobilized from host phases (OM and Fe- and Mn-oxyhydroxides and partly sequestered in the sediment in the form of authigenic Fe-sulfides. Arsenic and Sb cycling was also closely linked to that of OM and Fe- and Mn-oxyhydroxides. Shallow diagenetic enrichment of particulate Sb was observed in the less mature stages. As a result of authigenic sulfide precipitation, the sediments of the early stage of ecosystem development were a sink for water column Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb and Sb. In contrast, at all

  11. Sea Level Rise and Subsidence in the Gulf of Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemnil, Sommart

    In the Thailand -EC GEO2TECDI-SONG Project we investigate the sea level change and vertical land motion in Thailand. First, Bangkok is situated in river delta and average height is closed to sea level. Second, it is subsiding due to ground water extraction. Third, it is experiencing post-seismic motion due to nearby mega thrust earthquakes and fourth, it suffers from rising of sea levels due to global climate change. This poses a serious threat on Thai society and economy. Before mitigation methods can be devised we aim at charting, qualifying and quantifying all contributing effects by the use of satellite altimetry, GNSS, InSAR techniques and combining results with the in situ observations like tide gauge and with geophysical modeling. Adding GPS based vertical land motion to the tide gauge sea level registration reveals the absolute sea level change, which is nicely confirmed by altimetry. We find an average absolute rise of 3.5 mm/yr + 0.7, but nears mouth of Chao Praya River (Bangkok) and the Mekong delta (Ho Chi Min City), this mounts to 4 to 5 mm/yr, faster than global average. This is reinforced when accounting for the tectonic subsidence that resulted from 2004 9.1Mw Sumatra/Andaman earthquake; from 2005 onwards we find downfall in the order of 10 mm/yr. RADARSAT InSAR analyses show subsidence rates up to 25 mm/yr at many places along coastal Bangkok.

  12. Integrating wireless sensor network for monitoring subsidence phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marturià, Jordi; Lopez, Ferran; Gigli, Giovanni; Intrieri, Emanuele; Mucchi, Lorenzo; Fornaciai, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    An innovative wireless sensor network (WSN) for the 3D superficial monitoring of deformations (such as landslides and subsidence) is being developed in the frame of the Wi-GIM project (Wireless sensor network for Ground Instability Monitoring - LIFE12 ENV/IT/001033). The surface movement is detected acquiring the position (x, y and z) by integrating large bandwidth technology able to detect the 3D coordinates of the sensor with a sub-meter error, with continuous wave radar, which allows decreasing the error down to sub-cm. The Estació neighborhood in Sallent is located over the old potassium mine Enrique. This zone has been affected by a subsidence process over more than twenty years. The implementation of a wide network for ground auscultation has allowed monitoring the process of subsidence since 1997. This network consists of: i) a high-precision topographic leveling network to control the subsidence in surface; ii) a rod extensometers network to monitor subsurface deformation; iii) an automatic Leica TCA Total Station to monitor building movements; iv) an inclinometers network to measure the horizontal displacements on subsurface and v) a piezometer to measure the water level. Those networks were implemented within an alert system for an organized an efficient response of the civil protection authorities in case of an emergency. On 23rd December 2008, an acceleration of subsoil movements (of approx. 12-18 cm/year) provoked the activation of the emergency plan by the Catalan Civil Protection. This implied the preventive and scheduled evacuation of the neighbours (January 2009) located in the area with a higher risk of collapse: around 120 residents of 43 homes. As a consequence, the administration implemented a compensation plan for the evacuation of the whole neighbourhood residents and the demolition of 405 properties. In this work, the adaptation and integration process of Wi-GIM system with those conventional monitoring network are presented for its testing

  13. Transformation of terrestrial organic matter along thermokarst-affected permafrost coasts in the Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanski, George; Lantuit, Hugues; Ruttor, Saskia; Knoblauch, Christian; Radosavljevic, Boris; Strauss, Jens; Wolter, Juliane; Irrgang, Anna M; Ramage, Justine; Fritz, Michael

    2017-03-01

    The changing climate in the Arctic has a profound impact on permafrost coasts, which are subject to intensified thermokarst formation and erosion. Consequently, terrestrial organic matter (OM) is mobilized and transported into the nearshore zone. Yet, little is known about the fate of mobilized OM before and after entering the ocean. In this study we investigated a retrogressive thaw slump (RTS) on Qikiqtaruk - Herschel Island (Yukon coast, Canada). The RTS was classified into an undisturbed, a disturbed (thermokarst-affected) and a nearshore zone and sampled systematically along transects. Samples were analyzed for total and dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen (TOC, DOC, TN, DN), stable carbon isotopes (δ(13)C-TOC, δ(13)C-DOC), and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), which were compared between the zones. C/N-ratios, δ(13)C signatures, and ammonium (NH4-N) concentrations were used as indicators for OM degradation along with biomarkers (n-alkanes, n-fatty acids, n-alcohols). Our results show that OM significantly decreases after disturbance with a TOC and DOC loss of 77 and 55% and a TN and DN loss of 53 and 48%, respectively. C/N-ratios decrease significantly, whereas NH4-N concentrations slightly increase in freshly thawed material. In the nearshore zone, OM contents are comparable to the disturbed zone. We suggest that the strong decrease in OM is caused by initial dilution with melted massive ice and immediate offshore transport via the thaw stream. In the mudpool and thaw stream, OM is subject to degradation, whereas in the slump floor the nitrogen decrease is caused by recolonizing vegetation. Within the nearshore zone of the ocean, heavier portions of OM are directly buried in marine sediments close to shore. We conclude that RTS have profound impacts on coastal environments in the Arctic. They mobilize nutrients from permafrost, substantially decrease OM contents and provide fresh water and nutrients at a point source.

  14. Offshore gravimetric and subsidence monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenvold, Torkjell

    2008-06-15

    The introduction (Chapter 1) is complemented by the introductions given in Chapters 2 to 8. I am the first author of the articles in chapter 2 and 8. For the 5 articles in between I am a coauthor, and the sum of my contributions to those articles (as quantified by the respective first authors) represents about one article. Chapter 2 contains the article 'High-precision relative depth and subsidence mapping from seafloor water-pressure measurements' by Stenvold et al. (2006), published in the SPE Journal. It was submitted in March 2005, and a revised version that also contained results from the Troll 2005 survey (August) was submitted in February 2006. The method of obtaining high-precision relative depth measurements by the use of mobile pressure gauges is presented. Intra-survey and inter-survey depth repeatabilities from six surveys are presented, and the individual contributing errors are discussed and estimated. Average reservoir compressibility for the Troll field between 2002 and 2005 is obtained by matching measured subsidence with modeled subsidence. Chapter 3 contains the article 'A new seafloor gravimeter' by Sasagawa et al. (2003), published in Geophysics. It was submitted in September 2001, and a revised version was submitted in August 2002. This article describes the ROVDOG (Remotely operated Vehicledeployed Deep-Ocean Gravimeter) in detail. Gravity and pressure repeatability results from the two first Troll surveys in 1998 and 2000 are presented. Data reduction, instrumental and environmental corrections are also presented. Chapter 4 contains the article 'Precision of seafloor gravity and pressure measurements for reservoir monitoring' by Zumberge et al., and was submitted 29 February 2008 to Geophysics. This builds on the article by Sasagawa et al. (Chapter 3). Improvements and upto date intra- and inter survey repeatability results are presented. The emphasis is on gravity results since the relative depth measurements

  15. Physical processes of thermokarst lakes in the continuous permafrost zone of northern Siberia – observations and modeling (Lena River Delta, Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Boike

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The thermal regimes of five lakes located within the continuous permafrost zone of northern Siberia (Lena River Delta have been investigated using hourly water temperature and water level records covering a three year period (2009–2012, together with bathymetric survey data. The lakes included thermokarst lakes located on Holocene river terraces that may be connected to Lena River water during spring flooding, and a thermokarst lake located on deposits of the Pleistocene Ice Complex. The data were used for numerical modeling with FLake software, and also to determine the physical indices of the lakes. The lakes vary in area, depths and volumes. The winter thermal regime is characterized by an ice cover up to 2 m thick that survives for more than 7 months of the year, from October until about mid-June. Lake-bottom temperatures increase at the start of the ice-covered period due to upward-directed heat flux from the underlying thawed sediment. The effects of solar radiation return prior to ice break-up, effectively warming the water beneath the ice cover and inducing convective mixing. Ice break-up starts the beginning of June and takes until the middle or end of June for completion. Mixing occurs within the entire water column from the start of ice break-up and continues during the ice-free periods, as confirmed by the Wedderburn numbers. Some of the lakes located closest to the Lena River are subjected to varying levels of spring flooding with river water, on an annual basis. Numerical modeling using FLake software indicates that the vertical heat flux across the bottom sediment tends towards an annual mean of zero, with maximum downward fluxes of about 5 W m−2 in summer and with heat released back into the water column at a~rate of less than 1 W m−2 during the ice-covered period. The lakes are shown to be efficient heat absorbers and effectively distribute the heat through mixing. Monthly bottom water temperatures during the ice

  16. Anatomy of Subsidence in Tianjin from Time Series InSAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Liu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater is a major source of fresh water in Tianjin Municipality, China. The average rate of groundwater extraction in this area for the last 20 years fluctuates between 0.6 and 0.8 billion cubic meters per year. As a result, significant subsidence has been observed in Tianjin. In this study, C-band Envisat (Environmental Satellite ASAR (Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar images and L-band ALOS (Advanced Land Observing Satellite PALSAR (Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar data were employed to recover the Earth’s surface evolution during the period between 2007 and 2009 using InSAR time series techniques. Similar subsidence patterns can be observed in the overlapping area of the ASAR and PALSAR mean velocity maps with a maximum radar line of sight rate of ~170 mm·year−1. The west subsidence is modeled for ground water volume change using Mogi source array. Geological control by major faults on the east subsidence is analyzed. Storage coefficient of the east subsidence is estimated by InSAR displacements and temporal pattern of water level changes. InSAR has proven a useful tool for subsidence monitoring and displacement interpretation associated with underground water usage.

  17. Pyrosequencing-based assessment of bacterial community structure in mine soils affected by mining subsidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yuanyuan a; Chen Longqian a; ⇑; Wen Hongyu b; Zhou Tianjian a; Zhang Ting a

    2014-01-01

    Based on the 454 pyrosequencing approach, this research evaluated the influence of coal mining subsi-dence on soil bacterial diversity and community structure in Chinese mining area. In order to characterize the bacterial community comparatively, this study selected a field experiment site with coal-excavated subsidence soils and an adjacent site with non-disturbed agricultural soils, respectively. The dataset com-prises 24512 sequences that are affiliated to the 7 phylogenetic groups: proteobacteria, actinobacteria, bacteroidetes, gemmatimonadetes, chloroflexi, nitrospirae and unclassified phylum. Proteobacteria is the largest bacterial phylum in all samples, with a marked shift of the proportions of alpha-, beta-, and gammaproteobacteria. The results show that undisturbed soils are relatively more diverse and rich than subsided soils, and differences in abundances of dominant taxonomic groups between the two soil groups are visible. Compared with the control, soil nutrient contents decline achieves significant level in subsided soils. Correlational analysis showed bacterial diversity indices have significantly positive corre-lation with soil organic matter, total N, total P, and available K, but in negative relation with soil salinity. Ground subsidence noticeably affects the diversity and composition of soil microbial community. Degen-eration of soil fertility and soil salinization inhibits the sole-carbon-source metabolic ability of microbial community, leading to the simplification of advantage species and uneven distribution of microbial spe-cies. This work demonstrates the great potential of pyrosequencing technique in revealing microbial diversity and presents background information of microbial communities of mine subsidence land.

  18. Monitoring subsidence rates along road network by persistent scatterer SAR interferometry with high-resolution TerraSAR-X imagery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Yu; Guoxiang Liu; Rui Zhang; Hongguo Jia; Tao Li; Xiaowen Wang; Keren Dai; Deying Ma

    2013-01-01

    Ground subsidence is one of the key factors damaging transportation facilities, e.g., road networks consisting of highways and railways. In this paper, we propose to apply the persistent scatterer synthetic aperture radar interferometry (PS-InSAR) approach that uses high-resolution TerraSAR-X (TSX) imagery to extract the regional scale subsidence rates (i.e., average annual sub-sidence in mm/year) along road networks. The primary procedures involve interferometric pair selection, interfer-ogram generation, persistent scatterer (PS) detection, PS networking, phase parameterization, and subsidence rate estimation. The Xiqing District in southwest Tianjin (China) is selected as the study area. This district contains one railway line and several highway lines. A total of 15 TSX images covering this area between April 2009 and June 2010 are utilized to obtain the subsidence rates by using the PS-InSAR (PSI) approach. The subsidence rates derived from PSI range from -68.7 to -1.3 mm/year. These findings show a significantly uneven subsidence pattern along the road network. Comparison between the PSI-derived subsidence rates and the leveling data obtained along the highways shows that the mean and standard deviation (SD) of the discrepancies between the two types of subsidence rates are 0.1 and ±3.2 mm/year, respec-tively. The results indicate that the high-resolution TSX PSI is capable of providing comprehensive and detailed subsidence information regarding road networks with millimeter-level accuracy. Further inspections under geo-logical conditions and land-use categories in the study area indicate that the observed subsidence is highly related to aquifer compression due to groundwater pumping. There-fore, measures should be taken to mitigate groundwater extraction for the study area.

  19. Impact of rock salt creep law choice on subsidence calculations for hydrocarbon reservoirs overlain by evaporite caprocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marketos, G.; Spiers, C. J.; Govers, R.

    2016-06-01

    Accurate forward modeling of surface subsidence above producing hydrocarbons reservoirs requires an understanding of the mechanisms determining how ground deformation and subsidence evolve. Here we focus entirely on rock salt, which overlies a large number of reservoirs worldwide, and specifically on the role of creep of rock salt caprocks in response to production-induced differential stresses. We start by discussing available rock salt creep flow laws. We then present the subsidence evolution above an axisymmetric finite element representation of a generic reservoir that extends over a few kilometers and explore the effects of rock salt flow law choice on the subsidence response. We find that if rock salt creep is linear, as appropriate for steady state flow by pressure solution, the subsidence response to any pressure reduction history contains two distinct components, one that leads to the subsidence bowl becoming narrower and deeper and one that leads to subsidence rebound and becomes dominant at later stages. This subsidence rebound becomes inhibited if rock salt deforms purely through steady state power law creep at low stresses. We also show that an approximate representation of transient creep leads to relatively small differences in subsidence predictions. Most importantly, the results confirm that rock salt flow must be modeled accurately if good subsidence predictions are required. However, in practice, large uncertainties exist in the creep behavior of rock salt, especially at low stresses. These are a consequence of the spatial variability of rock salt physical properties, which is practically impossible to constrain. A conclusion therefore is that modelers can only resort to calculating bounds for the subsidence evolution above producing rock salt-capped reservoirs.

  20. Offshore gravimetric and subsidence monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenvold, Torkjell

    2008-06-15

    The introduction (Chapter 1) is complemented by the introductions given in Chapters 2 to 8. I am the first author of the articles in chapter 2 and 8. For the 5 articles in between I am a coauthor, and the sum of my contributions to those articles (as quantified by the respective first authors) represents about one article. Chapter 2 contains the article 'High-precision relative depth and subsidence mapping from seafloor water-pressure measurements' by Stenvold et al. (2006), published in the SPE Journal. It was submitted in March 2005, and a revised version that also contained results from the Troll 2005 survey (August) was submitted in February 2006. The method of obtaining high-precision relative depth measurements by the use of mobile pressure gauges is presented. Intra-survey and inter-survey depth repeatabilities from six surveys are presented, and the individual contributing errors are discussed and estimated. Average reservoir compressibility for the Troll field between 2002 and 2005 is obtained by matching measured subsidence with modeled subsidence. Chapter 3 contains the article 'A new seafloor gravimeter' by Sasagawa et al. (2003), published in Geophysics. It was submitted in September 2001, and a revised version was submitted in August 2002. This article describes the ROVDOG (Remotely operated Vehicledeployed Deep-Ocean Gravimeter) in detail. Gravity and pressure repeatability results from the two first Troll surveys in 1998 and 2000 are presented. Data reduction, instrumental and environmental corrections are also presented. Chapter 4 contains the article 'Precision of seafloor gravity and pressure measurements for reservoir monitoring' by Zumberge et al., and was submitted 29 February 2008 to Geophysics. This builds on the article by Sasagawa et al. (Chapter 3). Improvements and upto date intra- and inter survey repeatability results are presented. The emphasis is on gravity results since the relative depth measurements

  1. Magnitude and extent of land subsidence in central Mexico revealed by regional InSAR ALOS time-series survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaussard, E.; Wdowinski, S.; Amelung, F.; Cabral-Cano, E.

    2013-05-01

    Massive groundwater extraction is very common in Mexico and is well known to result in land subsidence. However, most surveys dedicated to land subsidence focus on one single city, mainly Mexico City, and thus fail to provide a comprehensive picture of the problem. Here we use a space-based radar remote sensing technique, known as Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) to detect land subsidence in the entire central Mexico area. We used data from the Japanese satellite ALOS, processed over 600 SAR images acquired between 2007-2011 and produced over 3000 interferograms to cover and area of 200,000 km2 in central Mexico. We identify land subsidence in twenty-one areas, including seventeen cities, namely from east to west, Puebla, Mexico city, Toluca de Lerdo, Queretaro, San Luis de la Paz, south of San Luis de la Paz, Celaya, south of Villa de Reyes, San Luis Potosi, west of Villa de Arista, Morelia, Salamanca, Irapuato, Silao, Leon, Aguascalientes, north of Aguascalientes, Zamora de Hidalgo, Guadalajara, Ahuacatlan, and Tepic. Subsidence rates of 30 cm/yr are observed in Mexico City, while in the other locations typical rates of 5-10 cm/yr are noticed. Regional surveys of this type are necessary for the development of hazard mitigation plans and efficient use of ground-based monitoring. We additionally correlate subsidence with land use, surface geology, and faults distribution and suggest that groundwater extraction for agricultural, urban, and industrial uses are the main causes of land subsidence. We also reveal that the limits of the subsiding areas often correlate with existing faults, motion on these faults being driven by water extraction rather than by tectonic activity. In all the subsiding locations we observe high ground velocity gradients emphasizing the significant risks associated with land subsidence in central Mexico. Averaged 2007-2011 ground velocity map from ALOS InSAR time-series in central Mexico, revealing land subsidence in 21

  2. Integrating interferometric SAR data with levelling measurements of land subsidence using geostatistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Y.; Stein, A.; Molenaar, M.

    2003-01-01

    Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) interferometric (D-InSAR) data of ground surface deformation are affected by several error sources associated with image acquisitions and data processing. In this paper, we study the use of D-InSAR for quantifying land subsidence due to groundwater extract

  3. Land subsidence induced by groundwater extraction and building damage level assessment-a case study of Datun,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Qi-yan; LIU Gang-jun; MENG Lei; FU Er-jiang; ZHANG Hai-rong; ZHANG Ke-fei

    2008-01-01

    As in many parts of the world, long-term excessive extraction of groundwater has caused significant land-surface subsidence in the residential areas of Datun coal mining district in East China. The recorded maximum level of subsidence in the area since 1976 to 2006 is 863 mm, and the area with an accumulative subsidence more than 200 mm has reached 33.1 km2 by the end of 2006. Over ten cases of building crack due to ground subsidence have already been observed. Spatial variation in ground subsidence often leads to a corresponding pattern of ground deformation. Buildings and underground infrastructures have been under a higher risk of damage in locations with greater differential ground deformation. Governmental guideline in China classifies building damages into four different levels, based on the observable measures such as the width of wall crack, the degree of door and window deformation, the degree of wall inclination and the degree of structural destruction. Building damage level (BDL) is estimated by means of ground deformation analysis in terms of variations in slope gradient and curvature. Ground deformation analysis in terms of variations in slope gradient has shown that the areas of BDL Ⅲ and BDL Ⅱ sites account for about 0.013 km2 and 0.284km2 respectively in 2006, and the predicted areas of BDL (define this first) Ⅲ and Ⅱ sites will be about 0.029 km2 and 0.423 km2respectively by 2010. The situation is getting worse as subsidence continues. That calls for effective strategies for subsidence mitigation and damage reduction, in terms of sustainable groundwater extraction, enhanced monitoring and the establishment of early warning systems.

  4. The impact of permafrost thaw and climatic fluctuations on the geochemistry of thermokarst lakes of Yamal peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvornikov, Yury; Khomutov, Artem

    2016-04-01

    Climate warming in the Arctic might lead to increase of organic matter inflow to lakes by accelerating permafrost thaw and vegetation dynamics. Colored fraction of dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is a significant component of the aquatic ecosystems including thermokarst lakes in the high Arctic. The work presents results of study of CDOM in thermokarst lakes of Yamal peninsula (Western Siberia, Russia). CDOM absorption and spectral slope (S) values, suspended matter concentrations (SPM) in several thermokarst lakes were obtained during 2011 - 2015 field campaigns. Lake characteristics were compared with different catchment properties (cryogenic processes, geomorphology, productivity of vegetation, snow accumulation), hydrology (drainage regimes, seasonal water level changes, volume of lake water) as well as with climatic controls (air temperature, atmospheric precipitation). The climatic fluctuations and thermal denudation in the shore line seem to be responsible for the additional portion of terrestrial organic input into the thermokarst lakes. Measured CDOM concentration is at least twice higher in lakes affected by thermal denudation (and accompanied by declined S values) than in not affected lakes. The increase of CDOM concentration in 2012 compared to that in 2011 is probably due to higher summer air temperature and higher amount of atmospheric precipitation. Decrease of S values explains the increase of mobilized organic matter recently stored in permafrost in past years. Generally, variation of CDOM in studied lakes is very high due to different conditions in which the lakes are located. The catchment properties (especially vegetation) may explain the differences in CDOM concentrations between Yamal lakes. The presence of high productive shrubs and sedges in this particular area makes the CDOM concentration parameter comparable with more southern regions like taiga within the tree line.

  5. Liquefaction-fluidization induced land subsidence: impact of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake on reclaimed land around Tokyo bay area, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    A. Kagawa; Furuno, K; Kusuda, T.; Sakai, Y.; Yoshida, T.; Kazaoka, O.

    2015-01-01

    The 2011 Tohoku earthquake caused major liquefaction-induced, ground deformation of the reclaimed land surrounding Tokyo Bay. In this area, liquefaction was visibly manifest by sand boils, ejection of sandy water, land subsidence and floating underground tanks. The level measurements show a correspondence between the degree of liquefaction-fluidization and the amount of subsidence. The strata most susceptible to liquefaction are hydraulically emplaced dredged fill and artifi...

  6. New information on regional subsidence and soil fracturing in Mexico City Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvinet, G.; Méndez-Sánchez, E.; Juárez-Camarena, M.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, updated information about regional subsidence in Mexico City downtown area is presented. Data obtained by R. Gayol in 1891, are compared with information obtained recently from surveys using the reference points of Sistema de Aguas de la Ciudad de México (2008) and on the elevation of a cloud of points on the ground surface determined using Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) technology. In addition, this paper provides an overview of recent data obtained from systematic studies focused on understanding soil fracturing associated with regional land subsidence and mapping of areas susceptible to cracking in Mexico City Valley.

  7. Diploptene δ13C values from contemporary thermokarst lake sediments show complex spatial variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Kimberley L.; Pancost, Richard D.; Edwards, Mary E.; Anthony, Katey M. Walter; Langdon, Peter G.; Chaves Torres, Lidia

    2016-05-01

    Cryospheric changes in northern high latitudes are linked to significant greenhouse gas flux to the atmosphere, for example, methane that originates from organic matter decomposition in thermokarst lakes. The set of pathways that link methane production in sediments, via oxidation in the lake system, to the flux of residual methane to the atmosphere is complex and exhibits temporal and spatial variation. The isotopic signal of bacterial biomarkers (hopanoids, e.g. diploptene) in sediments has been used to identify contemporary ocean-floor methane seeps and, in the geological record, periods of enhanced methane production (e.g. the PETM). The biomarker approach could potentially be used to assess temporal changes in lake emissions through the Holocene via the sedimentary biomarker record. However, there are no data on the consistency of the signal of isotopic depletion in relation to source or on the amount of noise (unexplained variation) in biomarker values from modern lake sediments. We assessed methane oxidation as represented by the isotopic signal of biomarkers from methane oxidising bacteria (MOB) in multiple surface sediment samples in three distinct areas known to emit varying levels of methane in two shallow Alaskan thermokarst lakes. Diploptene was present and had δ13C values lower than -38 ‰ in all sediments analysed, suggesting methane oxidation was widespread. However, there was considerable variation in δ13C values within each area. The most 13C-depleted diploptene was found in an area of high methane ebullition in Ace Lake (diploptene δ13C values between -68.2 and -50.1 ‰). In contrast, significantly higher diploptene δ13C values (between -42.9 and -38.8 ‰) were found in an area of methane ebullition in Smith Lake. δ13C values of diploptene between -56.8 and -46.9 ‰ were found in the centre of Smith Lake, where ebullition rates are low but diffusive methane efflux occurs. The small-scale heterogeneity of the samples may reflect patchy

  8. Detecting, mapping and monitoring of land subsidence in Jharia Coalfield, Jharkhand, India by spaceborne differential interferometric SAR, GPS and precision levelling techniques

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R S Chatterjee; Shailaja Thapa; K B Singh; G Varunakumar; E V R Raju

    2015-08-01

    The study aims at detection, mapping and monitoring of land subsidence in Jharia Coalfield, Jharkhand, India by spaceborne DInSAR, GPS and precision levelling techniques. Using multi-frequency C- and L-band DInSAR, both slowly and rapidly subsiding areas were identified and DInSAR-based subsidence maps were prepared. C-band DInSAR was found useful for detection of slowly subsiding areas whereas L-band DInSAR for rapidly subsiding and/or adverse land cover areas. Due to dynamic nature of mining and adverse land cover, temporal decorrelation poses a serious problem particularly in C-band DInSAR. Specially designed InSAR coherence guided adaptive filtering was found useful to highlight the deformation fringes. Collateral GPS and levelling observations were conducted in three test sites to validate DInSAR measurements and to determine the net displacement vectors. We observed an appreciable horizontal displacement component of land subsidence in all the test sites. For comparison of results, we calculated InSAR coherence weighted LOS displacement rates from the unwrapped differential interferograms of smaller spatial subsets and LOS projected ground-based displacement rates in three test sites. We found good agreement between DInSAR and ground-based measurements except for C-band observation in Dobari test site primarily due to large difference in observation periods and temporally inconsistent land subsidence. Collateral spaceborne and ground-based observations were also found useful for characterization of subsidence phenomena to determine net displacement vector and horizontal displacement component. In coal mining areas with spatially scattered and temporally irregular land subsidence phenomena, the adopted methodology can be used successfully for detection, mapping and monitoring of the subsiding areas vulnerable to future collapse. This will facilitate efficient planning and designing of surface infrastructures and other developmental structures in the mining

  9. Characteristics of spatio-temporal evolution in Beijing land subsidence, 2003-2009, using PS-InSAR technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Z.; Gong, H.; Lu, X.; Zhang, Y.; Chen, B.; Liu, H.; Wang, S.

    2013-12-01

    Two thirds of water supply in Beijing city has come from groundwater, surveyed by Beijing Institute of Hydrogeology and Engineering Geology. During the past several years, Beijing city has suffers severe groundwater decline and land subsidence, induced by continuous over-exploitation of groundwater for nearly 60 years. The maximum of subsidence has reached up to 1096mm since 60 decades, and the rates in these subsidence bowls is between 10 mm/yr to 20 mm/yr, and The cumulative subsidence greater than 300mm is up to 1300km2, which pose a great challenge to public infrastructure and mitigate hazard in Beijing municipal. Permanent Scatterers Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (PS-InSAR) can quickly obtain surface deformation details with high resolution, compared to traditional leveling and extensometer techniques. In this paper we use PS-InSAR technique and 29 acquisitions by Envisat between 2003 and 2009 to monitor recent land subsidence in Beijing plain area. we studied the characteristics of spatio-temporal evolution of Beijing subsidence. The results suggests subsidence bowls have been bounded together in Beijing plain area, which covers Chaoyang, Changping, Shunyi, Tongzhou area, and the range of subsidence has a eastward trend. With conventional of emergency water resource in Changping, Huairou, Pinggu, the rates have increased from more than 10-20mm/yr to about 20-30mm/yr, 50 percent increase in subsidence bowls. What's more, the spatial and temporal distribution of deformation is not only controlled by tectonic but influenced by stress-strain behavior (elastic - plastic - viscoelastic) of aquifer systems. Keywords: Land Subsidence; PS-InSAR; Beijing; Ground fissure; Stress-strain analysis

  10. Using Persistent Scatterers Interferometry to create a subsidence map of the Nile Delta in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouali, E. Y.; Sultan, M.; Becker, R.; Cherif, O.

    2013-12-01

    Inhabitants of the Nile Delta in Egypt, especially those who live around the coast, are threatened by two perpetual hazards: (1) sea level rise and encroachment from the Mediterranean Sea and (2) land subsidence that is inherent in deltaic environments. With cities like Alexandria and Port Said currently only one meter above sea level, it is important to understand the nature of the sea level rise and land subsidence, both spatially and temporally, and to be able to quantify these hazards. The magnitude of sea level rise has been actively monitored in stations across the Mediterranean Sea; the subsidence of the Nile Delta, as a whole system however, has not been adequately quantified. We have employed the Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) technique known as Persistent Scatterers Interferometry (PSI) across the entire northern parts of the Nile Delta. A dataset of 106 ENVISAT single look complex (SLC) scenes (four descending tracks: 164, 207, 436, and 479) acquired throughout the time period 2003 to 2010 were obtained from the European Space Agency and utilized for radar interferometric purposes. Multiple combinations of these scenes - used for output optimization and validation - were processed. Due to the nature of the PSI technique, subsidence rates calculated using this technique are values measured from cities and urban areas - where PSI works well. The methodology of choice is to calculate the subsidence rates on a city-by-city basis by: (1) choosing an urban area and cutting the SLC scene stack down to a small area (25 - 200 km2); (2) processing this area multiple times using difference scene and parameter combinations in order to best optimize persistent scatterer (PS) abundance and ground displacement measurements; (3) calibrating the relative ground motion measured by PSI to known locations of minimal subsidence rates. The final result is a spatial representation of the subsidence rates across the Nile Delta in Egypt. Measured

  11. Robust processing of mining subsidence monitoring data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Mingzhong; Huang Guogang [Pingdingshan Mining Bureau (China); Wang Yunjia; Guogangli [China Univ. of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou (China)

    1996-12-31

    Since China began to do research on mining subsidence in 1950s, more than one thousand lines have been observed. Yet, monitoring data sometimes contain quite a lot of outliers because of the limit of observation and geological mining conditions. In China, nowdays, the method of processing mining subsidence monitoring data is based on the principle of the least square method. It is possible to produce lower accuracy, less reliability, or even errors. For reason given above, the authors, according to Chinese actual situation, have done some research work on the robust processing of mining subsidence monitoring data in respect of how to get prediction parameters. The authors have derived related formulas, designed some computational programmes, done a great quantity of actual calculation and simulation, and achieved good results. (orig.)

  12. Effect of permafrost thawing on the organic carbon and trace element colloidal speciation and microbial activity in thermokarst lakes of Western Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Pokrovsky

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the mechanisms of carbon mobilization and biodegradation during permafrost thawing and to establish the link between the organic carbon (OC, and other chemical and microbiological parameters in forming thermokarstic (thaw lakes, we studied biogeochemistry of OC and trace elements (TE in a chronosequence of small lakes that are being formed due to permafrost thawing in the northern part of Western Siberia. About 20 lakes and small ponds of various sizes and ages were sampled for dissolved and colloidal organic carbon and metals and culturable heterotrophic bacterial cell number. We observed a sequence of ecosystem stages corresponding to the evolution from peat thawing and palsa degradation due to permafrost subsidence in small ponds to large, km – size lakes subject to drainage and, finally, the khasyrey (drained lake formation. There is a systematic evolution of both total dissolved and colloidal concentration of OC and TE in the lake water along the chronosequence of lake development that may be directly linked to microbial mineralization of dissolved organic matter and liberation of the mineral part (Fe, Al, TE from organo-mineral colloids.

    In this chronosequence of lake development, we observe a clear decrease of the relative proportion of <1 kDa (1 kDa~1 nm OC concentration along with concentration of total dissolved (<0.45 μm OC. This is accompanied by an increase of the small size organic ligands (probably autochtonous exometabolites produced by the phytoplankton and a concomitant decrease of the proportion of large-size organic (humic complexes having allochtonous (soil origin. This evolution may be due to the activity of heterotrophic bacterioplancton that uses allochtonous organic matter and dissolved nutrients originated from the peat lixiviation. Most insoluble TE demonstrate a systematic decrease of concentration during filtration (5 μm, 0.45 μm exhibiting a similar pattern among different

  13. Thermokarst, mantling and Late Amazonian Epoch periglacial-revisions in the Argyre region, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soare, R. J.; Baoini, D.; Conway, S. J.; Dohm, J. M.; Kargel, J. S.

    2015-10-01

    Thermokarst, mantling and Late Amazonian Epoch periglacial-revisions in the Argyre region, Mars R.J. Soare(1), D. Baioni(2), S.J. Conway (3), J.M. Dohm(4)and J.S. Kargel (5)(1) Geography Department, Dawson College, Montreal, Canada H3Z 1A4 rsoare@dawsoncollege.qc.ca.(2) Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra,della Vita e Ambiente, Università di Urbino "Carlo Bo", Campus SOGESTA, 61029 Urbino (PU) Italy. (3) Department of Physical Sciences, Open University, Milton Keynes, United Kingdom, MK7 6AA. (4) The University Museum, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-, Japan.(5) Department of Hydrology & Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA 85719.1.Introduction Metre to decametre-deep depressions that are rimless, relatively flat-floored, polygonised and scallop-shaped have been widely observed in Utopia Planitia (UP) [e.g. 1-5] and Malea Planum (MP) [6-8]. Although there is some debate about whether the depressions formed by means of sublimation or evaporation, it is commonly believed that the terrain in which the depressions occur is ice-rich.Moreover, most workers assume that this "ice-richness" is derived of a bi-hemispheric, latitudinally-dependent and atmospherically-precipitated mantle that is metres thick [2,4,6-10].

  14. Wetland succession in a permafrost collapse: Interactions between fire and thermokarst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers-Smith, I. H.; Harden, J.W.; Wilmking, M.; Fuller, C.C.; McGuire, A.D.; Chapin, F. S.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the influence of fire and thermokarst in a boreal landscape, we investigated peat cores within and adjacent to a permafrost collapse feature on the Tanana River Floodplain of Interior Alaska. Radioisotope dating, diatom assemblages, plant macrofossils, charcoal fragments, and carbon and nitrogen content of the peat profile indicate ???600 years of vegetation succession with a transition from a terrestrial forest to a sedge-dominated wetland over 100 years ago, and to a Sphagnum-dominated peatland in approximately 1970. The shift from sedge to Sphagnum, and a decrease in the detrended tree-ring width index of black spruce trees adjacent to the collapse coincided with an increase in the growing season temperature record from Fairbanks. This concurrent wetland succession and reduced growth of black spruce trees indicates a step-wise ecosystem-level response to a change in regional climate. In 2001, fire was observed coincident with permafrost collapse and resulted in lateral expansion of the peatland. These observations and the peat profile suggest that future warming and/or increased fire disturbance could promote permafrost degradation, peatland expansion, and increase carbon storage across this landscape; however, the development of drought conditions could reduce the success of both black spruce and Sphagnum, and potentially decrease the long-term ecosystem carbon storage.

  15. Capability of Detecting Rapid Subsidence with COSMO SKYMED and Sentinel-1 Dataset over Konya City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canaslan Comut, Fatma; Ustun, Aydin; Lazecky, Milan; Perissin, Daniele

    2016-08-01

    The current state of work demonstrated in this paper is maps of the spatial and temporal patterns of deformation at ground subsidence by using advanced InSAR methods at specific areas surrounding Konya closed basin and its near vicinities. This work aims to significantly support AFAD's (Disaster and Emergency Management Authority) susceptibility maps over Konya city subsidence using satellite based interferometry using new satellite systems. Cosmo SkyMed and Sentinel-1 satellites' data evaluated using PS InSAR processing and other multitemporal technique such as Quasi-PS InSAR, SBAS methods, based on SARPROZ software package abilities. Time series of several PS points especially over Konya City Center show a general trend of the subsidence that is approximately between -40 to -60 mm/year from the both C and X band satellites, Sentinel-1 and Cosmo SkyMed.

  16. Current Land Subsidence in Tianjin, China Recorded by Three Continuous GPS stations (2010-2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, X.; Jing, Q.; Yan, B.; Yu, J.; Gan, W.; Wang, G.

    2014-12-01

    In the past two decades, Global Positioning System (GPS) technologies have been frequently applied to urban subsidence studies, both as a complement, and an alternative to conventional surveying methods. These studies have demonstrated that high-accuracy GPS techniques are an efficient tool in tracking long-term land subsidence. A great number of Continuously Operating Reference GPS Stations (CORS) have been installed in China during the past five years. Considerable land subsidence has been observed from CORS stations installed in several large cities. This study investigated GPS time series observed at three CORS in Tianjin: TJBD (2010-2014), TJBH (2010-2014), and TJWQ (2010-2014). Tianjin is one of the largest cities that is experiencing severe land subsidence problems in China. The observations at the three GPS sites indicate different subsidence rates. The average subsidence rate over four years are 0.2 cm/year at TJBD, 2 cm/year at TJBH, and 4.4 cm/year at TJWQ. The GPS station TJBD is located at Baodi, Tianjin. This area is the least economically developed and have the smallest population compared to the other two areas. Over 80% of water usage in Baodi is for agriculture and only less than 15% is from groundwater. The rapid subsidence at TJBH and TJWQ were caused by huge groundwater withdrawals associate with rapid urban and industrial developments in Binhai and Wuqing. Wuqing district, with a unique location advantage called "Corridor of Beijing and Tianjin", has been experiencing major urbanization. The population has reached 1,053,300 and the water usage has reached 350 million cubic meters in 2012. Over 25% of water usage is from groundwater. Significant annual and half-annual seasonal ground surface fluctuation has been observed from all three GPS stations. The peak-to-peak amplitude of the annual signal is 1.5 cm.

  17. Investigation of Land Subsidence using ALOS PALSAR data: a case study in Mentougou (Beijing, China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianping; Xiang, Jie; Xie, Shuai; Liu, Jing; Tarolli, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    Mining activities have been documented for centuries in Mentougou, and land subsidence resulting from mining operations has already been known over the past few decades. However, there has been ongoing concern that excessive groundwater extraction may lead to further subsidence. Therefore it is critical to map the land cover changes to understand the actual impact of these activities. So, the land cover changes from 2006 to 2011 were examined based on multi-source remote sensing imageries( including ALOS and landsat-7) by using object-oriented classifications combined with a decision tree and retrospective approaches. Also, land subsidence in Mentougou between 2006 and 2011 has been mapped using the interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time-series analysis with the ALOS L-band SAR data. We processed 14 ascending SAR images during May 2006 to July 2011. Comparison of InSAR measurements with the land cover changes and pre-existing faults suggest that mining activities is the main cause of land subsidence. The land subsidence observed from InSAR data are approximately up to 15 mm/year in open-pit mining area and up to 24 mm/year in underground mining areas. The InSAR result are validated by the ground survey data in several areas, and the comparison between the InSAR result with the mining schedule showed there were some correlations between them. The result underline the potential use of InSAR measurements to provide better investigation for land subsidence, and also suggest that the most influential factors for land subsidence is underground coal mine.

  18. Subsidence and capillary effects in chalks

    CERN Document Server

    Delage, Pierre; Cui, Yu Jun

    2008-01-01

    Based on the concepts of the mechanics of unsaturated soils where capillary phenomena arise between the wetting fluid (water) and the non-wetting one (air), the subsidence of chalks containing oil (non-wetting fluid) during water injection (wetting fluid) is analysed. It is shown that the collapse phenomenon of unsaturated soils under wetting provides a physical explanation and a satisfactory prediction of the order of magnitude of the subsidence of the chalk. The use of a well established constitutive model for unsaturated soils allows a description of the hydro-mechanical history of the chalk, from its deposition to the oil exploitation.

  19. Effects of anthropogenic land-subsidence on inundation dynamics: the case study of Ravenna, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carisi, Francesca; Domeneghetti, Alessio; Castellarin, Attilio

    2016-05-01

    Can differential land-subsidence significantly alter river flooding dynamics, and thus flood risk in flood prone areas? Many studies show how the lowering of the coastal areas is closely related to an increase in the flood-hazard due to more important tidal flooding and see level rise. The literature on the relationship between differential land-subsidence and possible alterations to riverine flood-hazard of inland areas is still sparse, although several geographical areas characterized by significant land-subsidence rates during the last 50 years experienced intensification in both inundation magnitude and frequency. We investigate the possible impact of a significant differential ground lowering on flood hazard over a 77 km2 area around the city of Ravenna, in Italy. The rate of land-subsidence in the study area, naturally in the order of a few mm year-1, dramatically increased up to 110 mm year-1 after World War II, primarily due to groundwater pumping and gas production platforms. The result was a cumulative drop that locally exceeds 1.5 m. Using a recent digital elevation model (res. 5 m) and literature data on land-subsidence, we constructed a ground elevation model over the study area in 1897 and we characterized either the current and the historical DEM with or without road embankments and land-reclamation channels in their current configuration. We then considered these four different topographic models and a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model to simulate and compare the inundation dynamics associated with a levee failure scenario along embankment system of the river Montone, which flows eastward in the southern portion of the study area. For each topographic model, we quantified the flood hazard in terms of maximum water depth (h) and we compared the actual effects on flood-hazard dynamics of differential land-subsidence relative to those associated with other man-made topographic alterations, which resulted to be much more significant.

  20. InSAR Time Series Analysis of Natural and Anthropogenic Coastal Plain Subsidence: The Case of Sibari (Southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Cianflone

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We applied the Small Baseline Subset multi-temporal InSAR technique (SBAS to two SAR datasets acquired from 2003 up to 2013 by Envisat (ESA, European Space Agency and COSMO-SkyMed (ASI, Italian Space Agency satellites to investigate spatial and temporal patterns of land subsidence in the Sibari Plain (Southern Italy. Subsidence processes (up to ~20 mm/yr were investigated comparing geological, hydrogeological, and land use information with interferometric results. We suppose a correlation between subsidence and thickness of the Plio-Quaternary succession suggesting an active role of the isostatic compensation. Furthermore, the active back thrusting in the Corigliano Gulf could trigger a flexural subsidence mechanism even if fault activity and earthquakes do not seem play a role in the present subsidence. In this context, the compaction of Holocene deposits contributes to ground deformation. Despite the rapid urbanization of the area in the last 50 years, we do not consider the intensive groundwater pumping and related water table drop as the main triggering cause of subsidence phenomena, in disagreement with some previous publications. Our interpretation for the deformation fields related to natural and anthropogenic factors would be a comprehensive and exhaustive justification to the complexity of subsidence processes in the Sibari Plain.

  1. Subsidence history and forming mechanism of anomalous tectonic subsidence in the Bozhong depression, Bohaiwan basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Bozhong depression of the Bohaiwan basin belongs to a family of extensional basins in East China, but is quite different from other parts of the basin. The Cenozoic subsidence of the depression is controlled by a combination of lithospheric thinning and polycyclic strike-slip movements. Three episodic rifts have been identified, i.e. Paleocence-early Eocene, middle-late Eocene and Oligocene age. The depression underwent syn-rift and post-rift stages, but two episodic dextral movement events of the strike-slip faults modify the subsidence of the Bozhong depression since the Oligocene. The early dextral movement of the Tan-Lu fault associated with crustal extension resulted in accelerated subsidence during the time of deposition of the Dongying Formation with a maximum thickness of 4000 m. A late reactivation of dextral movement of the Tan-Lu fault began in late Miocene (about 12 Ma), which resulted in the intense subsidence of Minghuazhen Formation and Quaternary. In addition, dynamic mantle convection-driven topography also accelerated the post-rift anomalous subsidence since the Miocene (24.6 Ma). Our results indicate that the primary control on rapid subsidence both during the rift and post-rift stages in the Bozhong depression originates from a combination of multiple episodic crustal extension and polycyclic dextral movements of strike-slip faults, and dynamic topography. tectonic subsidence, strike-slip, dynamic topography, Bozhong depression, Bohaiwan basin

  2. Integrated geophysical survey in defining subsidence features on a golf course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jianghai; Miller, Richard D.

    2007-12-01

    Subsidence was observed at several places on the Salina Municipal Golf Course in areas known to be built over a landfill in Salina, Kansas. High-resolution magnetic survey (~5400 m2), multi-channel electrical resistivity profiling (three 154 m lines) and microgravity profiling (23 gravity-station values) were performed on a subsidence site (Green 16) to aid in determining boundaries and density deficiency of the landfill in the vicinity of the subsidence. Horizontal boundaries of the landfill were confidently defined by both magnetic anomalies and the pseudo-vertical gradient of total field magnetic anomalies. Furthermore, the pseudo-vertical gradient of magnetic anomalies presented a unique anomaly at Green 16, which provided a criterion for predicting other spots with subsidence potential using the same gradient property. Results of multi-channel electrical resistivity profiling (ERP) suggested the bottom limit of the landfill at Green 16 was around 21 m below the ground surface based on the vertical gradient of electric resistivity and a priori information on the depth of the landfill. ERP results also outlined several possible landfill bodies based on their low resistivity values. Microgravity results suggested a -0.14 g cm-3 density deficiency at Green 16 that could equate to future surface subsidence of as much as 1.5 m due to gradual compaction.

  3. Land subsidence in the southwestern Mojave Desert, California, 1992–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Justin; Sneed, Michelle

    2017-07-19

    Groundwater has been the primary source of domestic, agricultural, and municipal water supplies in the southwestern Mojave Desert, California, since the early 1900s. Increased demands on water supplies have caused groundwater-level declines of more than 100 feet (ft) in some areas of this desert between the 1950s and the 1990s (Stamos and others, 2001; Sneed and others, 2003). These water-level declines have caused the aquifer system to compact, resulting in land subsidence. Differential land subsidence (subsidence occurring at different rates across the landscape) can alter surface drainage routes and damage surface and subsurface infrastructure. For example, fissuring across State Route 247 at Lucerne Lake has required repairs as has pipeline infrastructure near Troy Lake.Land subsidence within the Mojave River and Morongo Groundwater Basins of the southwestern Mojave Desert has been evaluated using InSAR, ground-based measurements, geology, and analyses of water levels between 1992 and 2009 (years in which InSAR data were collected). The results of the analyses were published in three USGS reports— Sneed and others (2003), Stamos and others (2007), and Solt and Sneed (2014). Results from the latter two reports were integrated with results from other USGS/ MWA cooperative groundwater studies into the broader scoped USGS Mojave Groundwater Resources Web site (http://ca.water.usgs.gov/ mojave/). This fact sheet combines the detailed analyses from the three subsidence reports, distills them into a longer-term context, and provides an assessment of options for future monitoring.

  4. Assessment of pot-hole subsidence risk for Indian coal mines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lokhande D. Ritesh; Murthy Vemavarapu M.S.R.; Vellanky Venkateswarlu; Singh B. Kalendra

    2015-01-01

    Ground subsidence induced by extraction of coal seam belowground brings about changes in surface environment leading to trough and pot-hole subsidence. Pot-hole subsidence is extremely hazardous and does not give any prior indication before its occurrence. In India, several pot-holes have occurred in the coal mines of South Eastern Coalfields Limited triggering the need for in-depth studies. In line with the requirement, literature review and field investigations were conducted to develop an in-depth under-standing of various parameters influencing the occurrence of pot-holes. The critical parameters identified were rock to soil ratio, depth to height of extraction ratio, brittleness index of rock and rock density. Risk assessment of pot-hole subsidence has been done by developing an empirical rating approach named as pot-hole subsidence rating (PHSR), involving the critical parameters with suitable corrections for certain structural and mining conditions to obtain corrected PHSR (CPHSR). CPHSR was then applied for all the 34 pot-holes studied and it was found that all the pot-holes fall under Class I and Class II category of risk representing a very high to high risk class. An effort was made for the estimation of pot-hole depth uti-lizing the developed CPHSR in both the development and depillaring cases. The developed approach was found to yield consistent results in pot-hole depth prediction.

  5. CHARACTERISTICS OF MOVEMENT OF SURFACE POINT IN DYNAMIC SUBSIDENCE BASIN AND ITS DEFORMATION CALCULATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGShidao; HUANGPeizhu

    1995-01-01

    Along with underground mining, movement and deformation of overburden gradually extends in all directions and up to the ground surface and finally forms a surface subsidence basin. The surface movement progressively stabilizes until coal mining is completed and forms a stable movement basin. Two types of basins, i.e. static and dynamic subsidence basins are distinguished in the paper, a classification of the basins and a description of their characteristics are presented. Based on the analysis of measured data by Yanzhou Coal Mining Bureau, during mining operation, the movement characteristics of surface point, subsidence equation, subsidence rate equation and the law of distribution of movement parameters of surface point relative to principal section of movement basin are addressed in this paper. Moreover the calculating formula of the movement parameters for an arbitrary surface point and the expression for calculating the maximum subsidence rate are also proposed. On the basis of the findings, the movement deformation formula for an arbitrary surface point in any directions during mining operation is highlighted.

  6. Integrated geophysical survey in defining subsidence features on a golf course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.

    2007-01-01

    Subsidence was observed at several places on the Salina Municipal Golf Course in areas known to be built over a landfill in Salina, Kansas. High-resolution magnetic survey (???5400 m2), multi-channel electrical resistivity profiling (three 154 m lines) and microgravity profiling (23 gravity-station values) were performed on a subsidence site (Green 16) to aid in determining boundaries and density deficiency of the landfill in the vicinity of the subsidence. Horizontal boundaries of the landfill were confidently defined by both magnetic anomalies and the pseudo-vertical gradient of total field magnetic anomalies. Furthermore, the pseudo-vertical gradient of magnetic anomalies presented a unique anomaly at Green 16, which provided a criterion for predicting other spots with subsidence potential using the same gradient property. Results of multi-channel electrical resistivity profiling (ERP) suggested the bottom limit of the landfill at Green 16 was around 21 m below the ground surface based on the vertical gradient of electric resistivity and a priori information on the depth of the landfill. ERP results also outlined several possible landfill bodies based on their low resistivity values. Microgravity results suggested a -0.14 g cm-3 density deficiency at Green 16 that could equate to future surface subsidence of as much as 1.5 m due to gradual compaction. ?? 2007 Nanjing Institute of Geophysical Prospecting.

  7. Semi-analytic modelling of subsidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokker, P.A.; Orlic, B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a forward model for subsidence prediction caused by extraction of hydrocarbons. The model uses combinations of analytic solutions to the visco-elastic equations, which approximate the boundary conditions. There are only a few unknown parameters to be estimated, and, consequently,

  8. Flooding and subsidence in the Thames Gateway: impact on insurance loss potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royse, Katherine; Horn, Diane; Eldridge, Jillian; Barker, Karen

    2010-05-01

    and sediment, or rehydration of sediment under flood water. The latter mechanism may be particularly critical on sites where Holocene sediments are currently protected from flooding and are no longer subsiding. Holocene deposits tend to compress, either under their own weight or under a superimposed load such as made ground, built structures or flood water. If protected dry sediments become flooded in the future, subsidence would be expected to resume. This research project aims to investigate the correlation between flood hazards and subsidence hazards and the effect that these two sources of risk will have on insurance losses in the Thames Gateway. In particular, the research will explore the potential hydrological and geophysical drivers and links between flood and subsidence events within the Thames Gateway, assessing the potential for significant event occurrence within the timescales relevant to insurers. In the first part of the project we have identified flood risk areas within the Thames Gateway development zone which have a high risk of flooding and may be affected by renewed or increased subsidence. This has been achieved through the use of national and local-scale 2D and 3D geo-environmental information such as the Geosure dataset (e.g. swell-shrink, collapsible and compressible deposits data layers), PSI data, thickness of superficial and artificial land deposits, and flood potential data etc. In the second stage of the project we will investigate the hydrological and geophysical links between flooding and subsidence events on developed sites; quantify the insurance loss potential in the Thames Gateway from correlated flooding and subsidence events; consider how climate change will affect risk to developments in the Thames Gateway in the context of subsidence and flooding; and develop new ways of communicating and visualise correlated flood and subsidence risk to a range of stakeholders, including the insurance industry, planners, policy makers and the

  9. Evolution of long-term land subsidence near Mexico City: Review, field investigations, and predictive simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Zamora, Dalia; Ortega-Guerrero, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Aquitard consolidation in the Chalco Plain is the most recent of a series of major land subsidence problems near Mexico City caused by leaky-aquifer pumping and involving a complex distribution of basalt flows within a lacustrine sequence. This study first conducted a ground magnetic survey combined with lithologic logs to map the extension of basalts. Then it assessed the evolution of ground surface elevations and updated hydraulic heads in the aquifer and aquitard in order to verify the accuracy of previous simulations and develop new predictions on land subsidence employing a one-dimensional, nonlinear, groundwater flow-consolidation model. Results show the presence of shallow basalts that extend from Sierra Santa Catarina into the Chalco Plain, causing a differential consolidation that controls both the distribution of large-scale fractures in the aquitard and the shape of a new lake. Cumulative land subsidence in the center of the Chalco Plain reached 13 m in 2006, thus closely matching previous numerical estimations. Since 1985, the ground surface decline has continued at a rate of ˜0.40 m/yr, while the potentiometric surface decline in the aquifer proceeds at an average rate of ˜1.5 m/yr, indicating that the flow system has not yet reached steady-state conditions. Numerical predictions show that under current pumping rates, where the aquitard is 300 m, total land subsidence will reach ˜19 m by the year 2020; while where the aquitard is 140 m thick, total land subsidence will reach ˜12 m, and increase the risk of flooding and aquitard fracturing for nearby urban centers.

  10. Coral reef evolution on rapidly subsiding margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, J.M.; Braga, J.C.; Clague, D.A.; Gallup, C.; Hein, J.R.; Potts, D.C.; Renema, W.; Riding, R.; Riker-Coleman, K.; Silver, E.; Wallace, L.M.

    2009-01-01

    A series of well-developed submerged coral reefs are preserved in the Huon Gulf (Papua New Guinea) and around Hawaii. Despite different tectonics settings, both regions have experienced rapid subsidence (2-6??m/ka) over the last 500??ka. Rapid subsidence, combined with eustatic sea-level changes, is responsible for repeated drowning and backstepping of coral reefs over this period. Because we can place quantitative constraints on these systems (i.e., reef drowning age, eustatic sea-level changes, subsidence rates, accretion rates, basement substrates, and paleobathymetry), these areas represent unique natural laboratories for exploring the roles of tectonics, reef accretion, and eustatic sea-level changes in controlling the evolution of individual reefs, as well as backstepping of the entire system. A review of new and existing bathymetric, radiometric, sedimentary facies and numerical modeling data indicate that these reefs have had long, complex growth histories and that they are highly sensitive, recording drowning not only during major deglaciations, but also during high-frequency, small-amplitude interstadial and deglacial meltwater pulse events. Analysis of five generalized sedimentary facies shows that reef drowning is characterized by a distinct biological and sedimentary sequence. Observational and numerical modeling data indicate that on precessional (20??ka) and sub-orbital timescales, the rate and amplitude of eustatic sea-level changes are critical in controlling initiation, growth, drowning or sub-aerial exposure, subsequent re-initiation, and final drowning. However, over longer timescales (> 100-500??ka) continued tectonic subsidence and basement substrate morphology influence broad scale reef morphology and backstepping geometries. Drilling of these reefs will yield greatly expanded stratigraphic sections compared with similar reefs on slowly subsiding, stable and uplifting margins, and thus they represent a unique archive of sea-level and climate

  11. Subsidence Contours for South Louisiana; UTM 15N NAD83; LRA (2005); [subsidence_contours

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — The GIS data shapefile represents average subsidence contour intervals (0.02 cm/year over 10,000 years) for Coastal LA derived from the following: Kulp, M.A., 2000,...

  12. Femoral prosthesis subsidence in asymptomatic patients. A stereophotogrammetric assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafetz, N; Baumrind, S; Murray, W R; Genant, H K

    1984-01-01

    A radiographic stereophotogrammetric technique (SPG) was used to evaluate quantitatively the presence of early femoral prosthesis subsidence after total hip arthroplasty (THA). This paper focuses on the measurement of subsidence in 12 patients who remained asymptomatic during the first two years after surgery. Only one of these had SPG estimated subsidence in excess of one millimeter at any timepoint. These findings are consistent with the conclusion that early postoperative subsidence is not a common finding among asymptomatic THA patients.

  13. THE THREE DIMENSIONAL MODELS AND THEIR IDENTIFICATION MINING SUBSIDENCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUGe; SHENGuanghan; JIXiaoming; WANGQuanke

    1995-01-01

    The theory and method for selecting the three dimensional prediction models of mining subsidence are studied in this paper. Namely, based on system identification and statistics theory, an optimum mining subsidence prediction model can be selected. The method proved by a typical case has a good prospect for determining the physical model of rock mass for mining subsidence prediction.

  14. Computer program for predicting surface subsidence resulting from pressure depletion in geopressured wells: subsidence prediction for the DOW test well No. 1, Parcperdue, Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, J.C.; Carver, D.R.; Bebout, D.G.; Bachman, A.L. (eds.)

    1981-01-01

    The nucleus-of-strain concept is used to construct a computer program for predicting surface subsidence due to pressure reduction in geopressured reservoirs. Numerical integration allows one to compute the vertical displacement of the ground surface directly above and beyond the aquifer boundaries which results from the pressure reduction in each of the small finite volumes into which the aquifer is partitioned. The program treats depth (measured from the surface to the mean thickness of the aquifer) as a constant. Variation in aquifer thickness is accounted for by linear interpolation from one boundary to its opposite. In this simple model, subsidence is proportional to the pressure reduction (considered constant in this presentation) and to but one physical parameter, Cm(1-..nu..), in which Cm is its coefficient of uniaxial compaction, and ..nu.. is Poisson's ratio.

  15. Subsidizing purchase of apartments and residential construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baturan Luka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During last few years, Republic of Serbia has been allowing significant resources for subsidizing purchase of apartments and residential construction. Explanation for this is desire to help construction sector to overcome consequences of economic crisis, as well as social categories to solve housing issue. The paper analyzes economic consequences, benefits and costs of conducting this economic policy, as well as reasons leading to its establishment.

  16. Land Subsidence in and around Bangkok area using ALOS/PALSAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, A.; Mio, A.; Saito, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The metropolitan area of Bangkok, Thailand, has been subsided during the past decades. To effectively monitor, assess, and manage this ground deformation on various time scales and over broad areas, understanding these processes is of critical importance. This ground deformation has been monitored using leveling surveys since 1978 and InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) analysis. These results show that the Bangkok metropolitan city is subsiding with a rate of -20 mm/year in recent years, due to the law limiting groundwater pumping since the late 1980s, although in 1981 the highest subsidence rate up to 120 mm/year had been recorded in the eastern area [Phien-wej et al., 2006]. However, these studies were focused in the Bangkok metropolitan city using C-band satellites images. In this study, we applied the method of measuring long-term land subsidence by Differential InSAR and InSAR time series analysis using ALOS (Advanced Land Observing Satellite) PALSAR (Phased Array type L-band SAR) data acquired between 2007 and 2010 to investigate ground deformation in and around Bangkok area. The ground deformation were detected both near the Chao Phraya river and the Tha Chin river, which is a distributary of the Chao Phraya river and flows westerly from the Chao Phraya through the central plains of Thailand until it mouths into the Gulf of Thailand. We compared our results with previous leveling and InSAR studies to find an overall consistency in the deformation estimates. The deformation rates have been monitored, with velocity a maximum rate of about -20 mm/year, and showed consistent with previous studies (e.g., Aobpaet et al., 2009). These results verify the validity of the method and data used.

  17. Subsidence crack closure: rate, magnitude and sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Graff, J.V.; Romesburg, H.C.

    1981-06-01

    Tension cracks are a major surface disturbance resulting from subsidence and differential settlement above underground coal mines. Recent engineering studies of subsidence indicate that cracks may close where tensile stresses causing the cracks are reduced or relaxed. This stress reduction occurs as mining in the area is completed. Crack closure was confirmed by a study in the Wasatch Plateau coal field of central Utah. Cracks occurred in both exposed bedrock and regolith in an area with maximum subsidence of 3 m. Mean closure rate was 0.3 cm per week with individual crack closure rates between 0.2 cm and 1.0 cm per week. The mean crack closure magnitude was 80% with closure magnitudes varying between 31% and 100%. Actual magnitude values ranged from 0.6 cm to 6.5 cm with a mean value of 3.8 cm. Statistical analysis compared width change status among cracks over time. It was found that: 1) a 41% probability existed that a crack would exhibit decreasing width per weekly measurement, 2) closure state sequences seem random over time, and 3) real differences in closure state sequence existed among different cracks. (6 refs.) (In English)

  18. Instruments for subsurface monitoring of geothermal subsidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Rourke, J.E.; Ranson, B.B.

    1979-07-01

    The requirements for a subsurface geothermal subsidence instrument were reviewed. Available instruments for monitoring subsurface displacements, both vertical and horizontal, were studied and the most capable instruments identified. Techniques and materials for improving existing or developing new instruments were evaluated. Elements of sensor and signal technology with potential for high temperature monitoring of subsidence were identified. Drawing from these studies, methods to adapt production wells for monitoring were proposed and several new instrumentation systems were conceptually designed. Finally, four instrumentation systems were selected for future development. These systems are: triple sensor induction sensor probe (with casing collar markers); triple sensor gamma ray detector probe (with radioactive markers); triple sensor reed switch probe (with magnet markers); and triple sensor oscillator-type magnet detector probe (with magnet markers). All are designed for use in well casing incorporating slip couplings or bellows sections, although the gamma ray detector probe may also be used in unlined holes. These systems all measure vertical moement. Instruments to measure horizontal displacement due to geothermal subsidence were studied and the required instrument performance was judged to be beyond the state-of-the-art. Thus, no conceptual designs for instruments to monitor horizontal movement are included.

  19. Comparison of Two Methods in Multi-Temporal Differential Interferometry: Application to the Measurement of Mexico City Subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Y.; Doin, M. P.; Lopez-Quiroz, P.; Tupin, F.; Fruneau, B.; Trouve, E.; Pinel, V.

    2010-03-01

    In multi-temporal InSAR processing, both the Permanent Scatterer (PS) and Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) methods are optimized to obtain ground displacement rates with a nominal accuracy of millimetres per year. The PS approach extracts deformation signals on point targets by modelling and analyzing their phase value that remains stable in time for all interferograms performed with a common master image. The SBAS approach is developped to maximize the spatial and temporal coherence by construction of small baseline interferograms. In this paper, we evaluate the performance of both approaches, their limitations and their complementarity through an inter-comparison. We apply both the Gamma-IPTA chain (PS approach) and the SBAS approach developped by Lopez-Quiroz et al. on 38 ENVISAT images from November 2002 to March 2007 to map the Mexico City subsidence. The subsidence rate maps obtained by both approaches are compared quantitatively and analysed at different steps of the PS approach.The difference is partly explained by errors in the spatial integration of subsidence rates in the PS approach. At a local scale, outside subsiding area, the difference standard deviation drops to 0.9 mm/yr, close to the nominal accuracy of both approaches. On the other hand, within the subsiding area, it increases to 3.6 mm/yr, that may be partly interpreted as punctual differential subsidence between various human-made structures unseen by the SBAS approach.

  20. Integration of MODIS data and Short Baseline Subset (SBAS) technique for land subsidence monitoring in Datong, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chao-ying; Zhang, Qin; Yang, Chengsheng; Zou, Weibao

    2011-07-01

    Datong is located in the north of Shanxi Province, which is famous for its old-fashioned coal-mining preservation in China. Some serious issues such as land subsidence, ground fissures, mining collapse, and earthquake hazards have occurred over this area for a long time resulting in significant damages to buildings and roads. In order to monitor and mitigate these natural man-made hazards, Short Baseline Subsets (SBAS) InSAR technique with ten Envisat ASAR data is applied to detect the surface deformation over an area of thousands of square kilometers. Then, five MODIS data are used to check the atmospheric effects on InSAR interferograms. Finally, nine nonlinear land subsidence cumulative results during September 2004 and February 2008 are obtained. Based on the deformation data, three kinds of land subsidence are clearly detected, caused by mine extraction, underground water withdrawal and construction of new economic zones, respectively. The annual mean velocity of subsidence can reach 1 to 4 cm/year in different subsidence areas. A newly designed high-speed railway (HSR) with speeds of 350 km/h will cross through the Datong hi-tech zone. Special measures should be taken for the long run of this project. In addition, another two subsidence regions need further investigation to mitigate such hazards.

  1. Integration of MODIS data and short baseline subset (SBAS) technique for land subsidence monitoring in Datong, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, C.Y.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, C.S.; Zou, W.B. [Changan University, Xian (China)

    2011-07-15

    Datong is located in the north of Shanxi Province, which is famous for its old-fashioned coal-mining preservation in China. Some serious issues such as land subsidence, ground fissures, mining collapse, and earthquake hazards have occurred over this area for a long time resulting in significant damages to buildings and roads. In order to monitor and mitigate these natural man-made hazards, Short Baseline Subsets (SBAS) InSAR technique with ten Envisat ASAR data is applied to detect the surface deformation over an area of thousands of square kilometers. Then, five MODIS data are used to check the atmospheric effects on InSAR interferograms. Finally, nine nonlinear land subsidence cumulative results during September 2004 and February 2008 are obtained. Based on the deformation data, three kinds of land subsidence are clearly detected, caused by mine extraction, underground water withdrawal and construction of new economic zones, respectively. The annual mean velocity of subsidence can reach 1 to 4 cm/year in different subsidence areas. A newly designed high-speed railway (HSR) with speeds of 350 km/h will cross through the Datong hi-tech zone. Special measures should be taken for the long run of this project. In addition, another two subsidence regions need further investigation to mitigate such hazards.

  2. Using temporarily coherent point interferometric synthetic aperture radar for land subsidence monitoring in a mining region of western China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongdong; Xu, Qiang; Hu, Zhongbo; Du, Sen

    2017-04-01

    Yuyang mine is located in the semiarid western region of China where, due to serious land subsidence caused by underground coal exploitation, the local ecological environment has become more fragile. An advanced interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) technique, temporarily coherent point InSAR, is applied to measure surface movements caused by different mining conditions. Fifteen high-resolution TerraSAR-X images acquired between October 2, 2012, and March 27, 2013, were processed to generate time-series data for ground deformation. The results show that the maximum accumulated values of subsidence and velocity were 86 mm and 162 mm/year, respectively; these measurements were taken above the fully mechanized longwall caving faces. Based on the dynamic land subsidence caused by the exploitation of one working face, the land subsidence range was deduced to have increased 38 m in the mining direction with 11 days' coal extraction. Although some mining faces were ceased in 2009, they could also have contributed to a small residual deformation of overlying strata. Surface subsidence of the backfill mining region was quite small, the maximum only 21 mm, so backfill exploitation is an effective method for reducing the land subsidence while coal is mined.

  3. Effects of groundwater regulation on aquifer-system compaction and subsidence in the Houston-Galveston Region, Texas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, M. J.; Petrov, A.

    2015-11-01

    Subsidence has been a primary concern in the Houston area for many years. Since 1906, about 4 m of subsidence has occurred in the coastal areas, with a broad area of about 2 m of subsidence existing today throughout most of the Houston Area. In 1975, as a result of area residents and local governments becoming increasingly alarmed by the continued impact of subsidence on economic growth and quality of life in the region, the Harris-Galveston Subsidence District was created by the 64th Texas Legislature as an underground water conservation district with the mission to provide for the regulation of the withdrawal of groundwater to control subsidence. Over its nearly 40 years of existence, the District has developed substantial data sets providing the foundation for its regulatory plan. The District's regulatory plan allows groundwater users an amount of annual groundwater based on a percentage of an individual permitee's total water demand. The management of the groundwater resources within the District has involved significant coordination with regional ground and surface water suppliers; ongoing interaction with other state and local regulatory bodies; analysis of accurate and up to date predictions on water usage; the enforcement of disincentives to those who rely too heavily on groundwater and a commitment to practicing and promoting water conservation. Areas nearest the Gulf of Mexico coast have completed the conversion to alternative (other than groundwater) water sources, consequently the effective stress on the aquifer has decreased and subsidence rates have been reduced. Areas within the District further inland are currently proceeding through the conversion process, and subsidence has continued in those areas as development of the groundwater resources has continued.

  4. FINITE ELEMENT NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF LAND SUBSIDENCE AND GROUNDWATER EXPLOITATION BASED ON VISCO-ELASTIC PLASTIC BLOT'S CONSOLIDATION THEORY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Zu-jiang; ZENG Feng

    2011-01-01

    The land subsidence due to groundwater exploitation has an obvious hysteretic nature with respect to the decrease of the under groundwater level,and the uneven settlement often causes ground fissures.To study these important features,a visco-elastic plastic constitutive relationship with consideration of the coupling of seepage and soil deformation is proposed,and a finite element model with variable coefficients based on the Biot's consolidation theory is built.With the groundwater exploitation and the land subsidence control in Cangzhou City,Hebei Province as an example,the variations of the under groundwater level and the development of the land subsidence due to the groundwater exploitation are simulated and ground fissures are predicted by the horizontaldisplacement calculation.The results show that the lag time between the land subsidence and the under groundwater level descent is about a month,and the simulated results of fissures agree well with the observed data.The model can well reveal the characterization of the interaction between the land subsidence and the groundwater exploitation.

  5. Simulation-Optimization Model for Water-Resources and Land-Subsidence Management, Edwards Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, T.; Freckleton, J. R.

    2001-12-01

    Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in southern California has relied historically on ground water to meet its water-supply needs. However, the extraction of ground water has led to problems such as declining water levels and land subsidence. In response to these problems, EAFB has gained access to imported water and plans to inject this imported water into the ground-water system during the winter to help recharge the aquifers and control land subsidence. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with EAFB, has developed a simulation-optimization model to identify optimal management strategies for conjunctive use and for ground-water recharge. The simulation-optimization model is formulated as a mixed-integer, linear programming problem with a planning horizon of 5 years using monthly management periods. Two objectives are being tested: maximizing the minimum hydraulic heads and minimizing the cost of water supply and injection. The constraint set includes meeting water demand, maintaining simulated heads at or above year-2000 levels at key locations to control land subsidence, and setting limits on the supply of imported water and pumping capacities. Existing water-supply wells can be used for pumping or injection; therefore, zero-one integer variables are being used to ensure that a well cannot be used for pumping and injection simultaneously. The decision variables are the volume and timing of imported water (for consumption throughout the year and injection in the winter) and ground-water pumpage. The state variables are hydraulic heads. Preliminary results indicate that year-2000 heads cannot be maintained for either objective using the same constraint set (i.e., the formulations are infeasible); however, using relaxed head constraints (i.e., lower allowable heads), we identified optimal solutions that will help control adverse impacts. The optimal pumping/injection strategy that maximizes the minimum head resulted in very little subsidence (0.07 ft) with some

  6. Polyphase tectonic subsidence evolution of the Vienna Basin inferred from quantitative subsidence analysis of the northern and central parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Young; Wagreich, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The Vienna Basin is a tectonically complex Neogene basin situated at the Alpine-Carpathian transition. This study analyzes a detailed quantification of subsidence in the northern and central parts of the Vienna Basin to understand its tectonic subsidence evolution. About 200 wells were used to arrange stratigraphic setting, and wells reaching the pre-Neogene basement were analyzed for subsidence. To enhance the understanding of the regional subsidences, the wells were sorted into ten groups based on their position on major fault blocks. In the Early Miocene, subsidence was slow and along E-W to NE-SW trending axis, indicating the development of thrust-controlled piggyback basins. During the late Early Miocene data show abruptly increasing subsidence, making the initiation of the Vienna pull-apart basin system. From the Middle Miocene, the tectonic subsidence curves show regionally different patterns. The tectonic subsidence during the Middle Miocene varies laterally across the Vienna Basin, and the differential subsidence can be related to the changing tensional regime of weakening transtension and strengthening extension toward the late Middle Miocene. From the late Middle Miocene to the Late Miocene, the tectonic subsidence occurred dominantly along the regional active faults, and corresponds to the axis of E-W trending extension of the western parts of the Pannonian Basin system. In the Quaternary the Vienna Basin has been reactivated, and resulted in subsidence along the NE-SW trending Vienna Basin transfer fault system.

  7. Subsidence and Stress Change in the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, B. C., Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacka, E.; Sarychikhina, O.; Nava, F. A.

    2005-11-01

    Previous works have shown that ground deformation and seismicity in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field (CPGF) are due to both tectonics and field exploitation. Here, we use information about current tectonics and data from precision leveling surveys, to model tectonic and anthropogenic subsidence. Our results show that tectonic subsidence constitutes only ˜4% of the measured subsidence. Anthropogenic subsidence was evaluated using a model of rectangular tensional cracks, based on the hydrological model of the field, together with the Coulomb 2.0 program. From the resulting values of the fissure parameters and from extraction and injection data, we calculate that the volume changes caused by closure of the geothermal and cold water reservoirs account for only ˜3% and ˜7%, respectively, of the volume change which should occur due to extraction. Since 18% of the extracted fluids are reinjected, external recharge must compensate for about 72% of the expected volume reduction. An analysis of the changes in Coulomb stress caused by exploitation of the geothermal field suggest that even though the anthropogenic stresses account for only a fraction of tectonic stresses, they are large enough to trigger seismicity.

  8. Ideas and perspectives: Holocene thermokarst sediments of the Yedoma permafrost region do not increase the northern peatland carbon pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugelius, Gustaf; Kuhry, Peter; Tarnocai, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Permafrost deposits in the Beringian Yedoma region store large amounts of organic carbon (OC). Walter Anthony et al. (2014) describe a previously unrecognized pool of 159 Pg OC accumulated in Holocene thermokarst sediments deposited in Yedoma region alases (thermokarst depressions). They claim that these alas sediments increase the previously recognized circumpolar permafrost peat OC pool by 50 %. It is stated that previous integrated studies of the permafrost OC pool have failed to account for these deposits because the Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database (NCSCD) is biased towards non-alas field sites and that the soil maps used in the NCSCD underestimate coverage of organic permafrost soils. Here we evaluate these statements against a brief literature review, existing data sets on Yedoma region soil OC storage and independent field-based and geospatial data sets of peat soil distribution in the Siberian Yedoma region. Our findings are summarized in three main points. Firstly, the sediments described by Walter Anthony et al. (2014) are primarily mineral lake sediments and do not match widely used international scientific definitions of peat or organic soils. They can therefore not be considered an addition to the circumpolar peat carbon pool. We also emphasize that a clear distinction between mineral and organic soil types is important since they show very different vulnerability trajectories under climate change. Secondly, independent field data and geospatial analyses show that the Siberian Yedoma region is dominated by mineral soils, not peatlands. Thus, there is no evidence to suggest any systematic bias in the NCSCD field data or maps. Thirdly, there is spatial overlap between these Holocene thermokarst sediments and previous estimates of permafrost soil and sediment OC stocks. These carbon stocks were already accounted for by previous studies and they do not significantly increase the known circumpolar OC pool. We suggest that these inaccurate

  9. Liquefaction-fluidization induced land subsidence: impact of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake on reclaimed land around Tokyo bay area, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, A.; Furuno, K.; Kusuda, T.; Sakai, Y.; Yoshida, T.; Kazaoka, O.

    2015-11-01

    The 2011 Tohoku earthquake caused major liquefaction-induced, ground deformation of the reclaimed land surrounding Tokyo Bay. In this area, liquefaction was visibly manifest by sand boils, ejection of sandy water, land subsidence and floating underground tanks. The level measurements show a correspondence between the degree of liquefaction-fluidization and the amount of subsidence. The strata most susceptible to liquefaction are hydraulically emplaced dredged fill and artificial strata on thick uncompacted Holocene deposits. On the other hand, the phenomena of seismic isolation coursed by liquefaction had saved the single-family houses from collapse.

  10. Analysis of spatial correlation between the phenomenon land subsidence and rob (tidal inundation) using sentinel-1 SAR, GPS and geological data in Semarang city-Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyo, Yudo; Fahrudin, Islam, Lukman Juhdi Fahri

    2017-07-01

    Semarang city is the capital of Central Java province that is experiencing growth and rapid urban growth. But as the development, Semarang indicated experiencing the phenomenon of land subsidence. This happens because the geological structure of the city of Semarang is formed of young alluvial deposits in which still allows the compaction can cause ground subsidence. In addition, groundwater extraction also contributed in the process of land subsidence in the city of Semarang. Other problems are more widespread and increasing phenomenon of tidal inundation (rob) in some areas that were previously normal. The phenomenon of land subsidence and inundation becomes one inhibiting the rate of development progress Semarang. This study aimed to explore the spatial correlation between the appearances of the widespread phenomenon of robs inundation to the level of land subsidence in the area of Semarang. Hypotheses are constructed in this study that the increasing value of land subsidence will provide significant implications for the spread of rob area in the city of Semarang. The method used is the analysis of the spatial correlation between the data processing results of sentinel-1 SAR using DINSAR method between the years 2015-2016, GPS observation data between the years 2015-2016 and geological data in the form of hydrogeology, underground and ground rock distribution also geology structure data. These data are processed simultaneously, including a compilation of the field validation method for determining the distribution of rob inundation and anticipates the new rob area. The results are analyzed in a spatial to see whether the emergence of a new robs area has a significant correlation to the increase in value of land subsidence in that area. In general, the land subsidence in Semarang based methods DINSAR and GPS ranges around 0.07 to 0.21 m/yr with standard deviation around 0.03 m. Expected results of this study can help Semarang city governments in anticipation of

  11. Analysis of Subsidence Data for the Big Hill Site, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Stephen J.

    1999-06-01

    The elevation change data measured at the Big Hill SPR site over the last 10 years has been studied and a model utilized to project elevation changes into the future. The subsidence rate at Big Hill is low in comparison with other Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites and has decreased with time due to the maintenance of higher operating pressures and the normal decrease in creep closure rate of caverns with time. However, the subsidence at the site is projected to continue. A model was developed to project subsidence values 20 years into the future; no subsidence related issues are apparent from these projections.

  12. Is There a Tectonic Component On The Subsidence Process In Morelia, Mexico?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral-Cano, E.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Diaz-Molina, O.; Garduno-Monroy, V.; Avila-Olivera, J.; Hernández-Madrigal, V.; Hernández-Quintero, E.

    2009-12-01

    Subsidence and faulting have affected cities in central Mexico for decades. This process causes substantial damages to the urban infrastructure, housing and large buildings, and is an important factor to be consider when planning urban development, land use zoning and hazard mitigation strategies. In Mexico, studies using InSAR and GPS based observations have shown that high subsidence areas are usually associated with the presence of thick lacustrine and fluvial deposits. In most cases the subsidence is closely associated with intense groundwater extraction that results in sediment consolidation. However, recent studies in the colonial city of Morelia in central Mexico show a different scenario, where groundwater extraction cannot solely explain the observed surface deformation. Our results indicate that a more complex interplay between sediment consolidation and tectonic forces is responsible for the subsidence and fault distribution within the city. The city of Morelia has experienced fault development recognized since the 80’s. This situation has led to the recognition of 9 NE-SW trending faults that cover most of its urbanized area. Displacement maps derived from differential InSAR analysis show that the La Colina fault is the highest subsiding area in Morelia with maximum annual rates over -35 mm/yr. However, lithological mapping and field reconnaissance clearly show basalts outcropping this area of high surface deformation. The subsurface characterization of the La Colina fault was carried out along 27 Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) sections and 6 seismic tomography profiles. Assuming a constant, linear past behavior of the subsidence as observed by InSAR techniques, and based on the interpretation of the fault dislocation imaged by the shallow GPR and seismic tomography, it is suggested that the La Colina fault may have been active for the past 220-340 years and clearly pre-dates the intense water well extraction from the past century. These conditions

  13. U.S. Geological Survey Subsidence Interest Group conference, Edwards Air Force Base, Antelope Valley, California, November 18-19, 1992; abstracts and summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Keith R.; Galloway, Devin L.; Leake, Stanley A.

    1995-01-01

    Land subsidence, the loss of surface elevation as a result of the removal of subsurface support, affects every state in the United States. More than 17,000 mi2 of land in the United States has been lowered by the various processes that produce land subsidence with annual costs from resulting flooding and structural damage that exceed $125 million. It is estimated that an additional $400 million is spent nationwide in attempts to control subsidence. Common causes of land subsidence include the removal of oil, gas, and water from underground reservoirs; dissolution of limestone aquifers (sinkholes); underground mining activities; drainage of organic soils; and hydrocompaction (the initial wetting of dry soils). Overdrafting of aquifers is the major cause of areally extensive land subsidence, and as ground-water pumping increases, land subsidence also will increase. Land subsidence and its effects on engineering structures have been recognized for centuries, but it was not until this century that the processes that produce land subsidence were identified and understood. In 1928, while working with field data from a test of the Dakota Sandstone aquifer, O.E. Meinzer of the U.S. Geological Survey recognized the compressibility of aquifers. Around the same time, Karl Terzaghi, a soil scientist working at Harvard University, developed the one-dimensional consolidation theory that provided a quantitative means of predicting soil compaction resulting from the drainage of compressible soils. Thus, with the recognition of the compressibility of aquifers (Meinzer), and the development of a quantitative means of predicting soil compaction as a consequence of the reduction of intergranular pore pressure (Terzaghi), the theory of aquifer-system compaction was formed. With the widespread availa- bility of electric power in rural areas, and the advent of the deep turbine pump, ground-water withdrawals increased dramatically throughout the country in the 1940's and 1950's. Along

  14. Finite layer and triangular prism element method to subsidence prediction and stress analysis in underground mining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Li-min(刘立民); LIU Han-long(刘汉龙); LIAN Chuan-jie(连传杰)

    2003-01-01

    The application of the finite layer & triangular prism element method to the 3D ground subsidence and stress analysis caused by mining is presented. The layer elements and the triangular prism elements have been alternatively used in the numerical simulation system, the displacement pattern, strain matrix, elastic matrix, stiffness matrix, load matrix and the stress matrix of the layer element and triangular prism element have been presented. By means of the Fortran90 programming language, a numerical simulation system based on finite layer & triangular prism element have been built up, and this system is suitable for subsidence prediction and stress analysis of all mining condition and mining methods. Comparing with the infinite element method, this approach dramatically reduces the size of the set of equations that need to be solved, and greatly reduces the amount of data preparation required. It not only saves the internal storage, and the computation time, but also decreases the cost.

  15. Effects of anthropogenic land-subsidence on inundation dynamics: the case study of Ravenna, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Carisi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Can differential land-subsidence significantly alter river flooding dynamics, and thus flood risk in flood prone areas? Many studies show how the lowering of the coastal areas is closely related to an increase in the flood-hazard due to more important tidal flooding and see level rise. The literature on the relationship between differential land-subsidence and possible alterations to riverine flood-hazard of inland areas is still sparse, although several geographical areas characterized by significant land-subsidence rates during the last 50 years experienced intensification in both inundation magnitude and frequency. We investigate the possible impact of a significant differential ground lowering on flood hazard over a 77 km2 area around the city of Ravenna, in Italy. The rate of land-subsidence in the study area, naturally in the order of a few mm year−1, dramatically increased up to 110 mm year−1 after World War II, primarily due to groundwater pumping and gas production platforms. The result was a cumulative drop that locally exceeds 1.5 m. Using a recent digital elevation model (res. 5 m and literature data on land-subsidence, we constructed a ground elevation model over the study area in 1897 and we characterized either the current and the historical DEM with or without road embankments and land-reclamation channels in their current configuration. We then considered these four different topographic models and a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model to simulate and compare the inundation dynamics associated with a levee failure scenario along embankment system of the river Montone, which flows eastward in the southern portion of the study area. For each topographic model, we quantified the flood hazard in terms of maximum water depth (h and we compared the actual effects on flood-hazard dynamics of differential land-subsidence relative to those associated with other man-made topographic alterations, which resulted to be much

  16. Combination of poroelasticity theory and constant strain rate test in modelling land subsidence due to groundwater extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tien Hung; Rühaak, Wolfram; Sass, Ingo

    2017-04-01

    Extensive groundwater extraction leads to a drawdown of the ground water table. Consequently, soil effective stress increases and can cause land subsidence. Analysis of land subsidence generally requires a numerical model based on poroelasticity theory, which was first proposed by Biot (1941). In the review of regional land subsidence accompanying groundwater extraction, Galloway and Burbey (2011) stated that more research and application is needed in coupling of stress-dependent land subsidence process. In geotechnical field, the constant rate of strain tests (CRS) was first introduced in 1969 (Smith and Wahls 1969) and was standardized in 1982 through the designation D4186-82 by American Society for Testing and Materials. From the reading values of CRS tests, the stress-dependent parameters of poroelasticity model can be calculated. So far, there is no research to link poroelasticity theory with CRS tests in modelling land subsidence due to groundwater extraction. One dimensional CRS tests using conventional compression cell and three dimension CRS tests using Rowe cell were performed. The tests were also modelled by using finite element method with mixed elements. Back analysis technique is used to find the suitable values of hydraulic conductivity and bulk modulus that depend on the stress or void ratio. Finally, the obtained results are used in land subsidence models. Biot, M. A. (1941). "General theory of three-dimensional consolidation." Journal of applied physics 12(2): 155-164. Galloway, D. L. and T. J. Burbey (2011). "Review: Regional land subsidence accompanying groundwater extraction." Hydrogeology Journal 19(8): 1459-1486. Smith, R. E. and H. E. Wahls (1969). "Consolidation under constant rates of strain." Journal of Soil Mechanics & Foundations Div.

  17. Subsidence history of the city of Morelia, Mexico based on InSAR images processed as time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, S. H.; Suárez, G.; López-Quiroz, P.

    2012-04-01

    The city of Morelia in central Mexico sits on lacustrine and fluvio-lacustrine deposits. Subsidence due to the extraction of water from the subsoil is evidenced by the presence of differential soil compaction, causing faulting and cracking of the ground and adjacent constructions. In order to study the subsidence history of the past nine years, twenty-eight ENVISAT Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images acquired between May 2003 and September 2010 were processed using ROI_PAC. All scenes are descending orbit images. The resulting interferograms were filtered using an adaptive filter and, in order to increase coherence and signal-to-noise ratio, they were unwrapped using the "branch-cut" algorithm. A subset of the resulting interferograms was selected based on the following criteria. Only interferograms with spatial baseline of less than 400 m and a temporal baseline of less than 420 days were considered. The primary objective of our work was to determine the temporal evolution of the subsidence in different parts of the city. To this end, selected pixels are inverted in an independent manner from neighbouring pixels using a time series analysis. Preliminary results suggest that the central part of the basin, near the fault known as the "Central Camionera", the subsidence is almost constant with a value of 3 to 4 cm/yr until 2008. From this date on, the subsidence rates increase to values with an average of 7 to 8 cm/yr. This increase in the subsidence rate is clearly appreciated in the appearance of two clearly visible circular patterns from 2008 to 2010. Currently, an inversion is being conducted to obtain the overall subsidence history of the basin.

  18. Development of a complex groundwater model to assess the relation among groundwater resource exploitation, seawater intrusion and land subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsi Ting, Fang; Yih Chi, Tan; Chen, Jhong Bing

    2016-04-01

    The land subsidence, which is usually irreversible, in Taiwan Pintung Plain occurred due to groundwater overexploitation. Many of the land subsidence areas in Taiwan are located in coastal area. It could not only result in homeland loss, but also vulnerability to flooding because the function of drainage system and sea wall are weakened for the lowered ground surface. Groundwater salinization and seawater intrusion could happen more easily as well. This research focuses on grasping the trend of environmental change due to the damage and impact from inappropriate development of aquaculture in the last decades. The main task is developing the artificial neural networks (ANNs) and complex numerical model for conjunctive use of surface and groundwater which is composed of a few modules such as land use, land subsidence, contamination transportation and etc. An approach based on self-organizing map (SOM) is proposed to delineate groundwater recharge zones. Several topics will be studied such as coupling of surface water and groundwater modeling, assessing the benefit of improving groundwater resources by recharge, identifying the improper usage of groundwater resources, and investigating the effect of over-pumping on land subsidence in different depth. In addition, a complete plan for managing both the flooding and water resources will be instituted by scheming non-engineering adaptation strategies for homeland planning, ex. controlling pumping behavior in area vulnerable to land subsidence and increasing groundwater recharge.

  19. Advanced interpretation of subsidence in Murcia (SE Spain using A-DInSAR data – modelling and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Herrera

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Subsidence is a natural hazard that affects wide areas in the world causing important economic costs annually. This phenomenon has occurred in the metropolitan area of Murcia City (SE Spain as a result of groundwater overexploitation. In this work aquifer system subsidence is investigated using an advanced differential SAR interferometry remote sensing technique (A-DInSAR called Stable Point Network (SPN. The SPN derived displacement results, mainly the velocity displacement maps and the time series of the displacement, reveal that in the period 2004–2008 the rate of subsidence in Murcia metropolitan area doubled with respect to the previous period from 1995 to 2005. The acceleration of the deformation phenomenon is explained by the drought period started in 2006. The comparison of the temporal evolution of the displacements measured with the extensometers and the SPN technique shows an average absolute error of 3.9±3.8 mm. Finally, results from a finite element model developed to simulate the recorded time history subsidence from known water table height changes compares well with the SPN displacement time series estimations. This result demonstrates the potential of A-DInSAR techniques to validate subsidence prediction models as an alternative to using instrumental ground based techniques for validation.

  20. Flooding hazards from sea extremes and subsidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Carlo; Vognsen, Karsten; Broge, Niels

    2015-01-01

    If we do not understand the effects of climate change and sea level rise (SLR) we cannot live in low-lying coastal areas in the future. Permanent inundation may become a prevalent issue but more often floods related to extreme events have the largest damage potential, and the management of flooding...... hazards needs to integrate the water loading from various sources. Furthermore, local subsidence must be accounted for in order to evaluate current and future flooding hazards and management options. We present the methodology (Figure) and preliminary results from the research project “Coastal Flooding...... Hazards due to Storm Surges and Subsidence” (2014-2017) with the objective to develop and test a practice oriented methodology for combining extreme water level statistics and land movement in coastal flooding hazard mapping and in climate change adaptation schemes in Denmark. From extreme value analysis...

  1. Correlation between precision gravity and subsidence measurements at Cerro Prieto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelwer, R.; Grannell, R. B.

    1982-10-01

    Precision gravity measurements were made in the region of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field at yearly intervals from 1977 to 1981 to assess the feasibility of using gravity to determine subsurface reservoir changes with time. The extent of mass recharge in response to the continued production of fluids from this field was studied. Changes in gravity and ground elevation were observed throughout the region for the period of observation. Results indicate that the largest changes observed were the result of the Magnitude 6.1 (Caltech) Victoria earthquake of 8 June 1980. The epicenter of this earthquake was located 25 km southeast of the field on the Cerro Prieto Fault, which bounds the field on the southwest. Subsidence of up to 55 cm was measured east of the power plant, in the region between the northern end of the Cerro Prieto Fault and the southern end of the Imperial Fault. This area has been postulated to be the site of an active spreading center or pull-apart basin, and has been characterized by a high level of seismic activity during the last 10 years.

  2. Subsidence in the holocene delta of The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonhögen, L.M.; Doornenbal, P.J.; Lange, G. de; Fokker, P.A.; Gunnink, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    The low-lying part of The Netherlands is very vulnerable in terms of surface subsidence due to peat oxidation and peat/clay compaction. To gain knowledge about this kind of subsidence and the factors driving it, a study was performed in which as many surface elevation data were collected as possible

  3. Estimating Trapped Gas Concentrations as Bubbles Within Lake Ice Using Ground Penetrating Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantello, N.; Parsekian, A.; Walter Anthony, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Climate warming is currently one of the most important issues that we are facing. The degradation of permafrost beneath thermokarst lakes has been associated with enhanced methane emissions and it presents a positive feedback to climate warming. Thermokarst lakes release methane to the atmosphere mainly by ebullition (bubbling) but there are a large number of uncertainties regarding the magnitude and variability of these emissions. Here we present a methodology to estimate the amount of gas released from thermokarst lakes through ebullition using ground-penetrating radar (GPR). This geophysical technique is well suited for this type of problem because it is non-invasive, continuous, and requires less effort and time than the direct visual inspection. We are studying GPR data collected using 1.2 GHz frequency antennas in Brooklyn Lake, Laramie, WY, in order to quantify the uncertainties in the method. Although this is not a thermokarst lake, gas bubbles are trapped in the ice and spatial variability in bubble concentration within the ice is evident. To assess the variability in bulk physical properties of the ice due to bubbles, we gathered GPR data from different types of ice. We compared the velocity of the groundwave and reflection obtained from radargrams, and found on each case a larger value for the groundwave velocity suggesting a non-homogeneous medium and that the concentration of bubbles is prone to be near the surface instead of at greater depths. We use a multi-phase dielectric-mixing model to estimate the amount of gas present in a sample of volume of ice and found an uncertainty in relative permittivity (estimated using reflection velocity) of 0.0294, which translates to an uncertainty of 1.1% in gas content; and employing groundwave velocity we found 0.0712 and 2.9%, respectively. If locations of gas seeps in lakes could be detected and quantified using GPR along with field measurements, this could help to constrain future lake-source carbon gas

  4. Coal mining GPS subsidence monitoring technology and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jian; Peng Xiangguo; Xu Chang hui

    2011-01-01

    We proved theoretically that geodetic height,measured with Global Positioning System (GPS),can be applied directly to monitor coal mine subsidence.Based on a Support Vector Machine (SVM) model,we built a regional geoid model with a Gaussian Radial Basis Function (RBF) and the technical scheme for GPS coal mine subsidence monitoring is presented to provide subsidence information for updating the regional Digital Elevation Model (DEM).The theory proposed was applied to monitor mining subsidence in an Inner Mongolia coal mine in China.The scheme established an accurate GPS reference network and a comprehensive leveling conjunction provided the normal height of all GPS control points.According to the case study,the SVM model to establish geoid-model is better than a polynomial fit or a Genetic Algorithm based Back Propagation (GA-BP) neural network.GPS-RTK measurements of coal mine subsidence information can be quickly acquired for updating the DEM.

  5. Genetic Programming Approach for Predicting Surface Subsidence Induced by Mining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The surface subsidence induced by mining is a complex problem, which is related with many complex and uncertain factors.Genetic programming (GP) has a good ability to deal with complex and nonlinear problems, therefore genetic programming approach is proposed to predict mining induced surface subsidence in this article.First genetic programming technique is introduced, second, surface subsidence genetic programming model is set up by selecting its main affective factors and training relating to practical engineering data, and finally, predictions are made by the testing of data, whose results show that the relative error is approximately less than 10%, which can meet the engineering needs, and therefore, this proposed approach is valid and applicable in predicting mining induced surface subsidence.The model offers a novel method to predict surface subsidence in mining.

  6. Evolution of soil and vegetation cover on the bottom of drained thermokarst lake (a case study in the European Northeast of Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaverin, Dmitry; Pastukhov, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The evolution of soils and landscapes has been studied in a lake bed of former thermokarst lake, which was totally drained in 1979. Melioration of thermokarst lakes was conducted experimentally and locally under Soviet economics program during 1970-s. The aim of the program was to increase in biomass productivity of virgin tundra permafrost-thermokarst sites under agricultural activities. The former thermokarst lake "Opytnoe" located in the Bolshezemelskaya Tundra, Russian European Northeast. The lake bed is covered by peat-mineral sediments, which serves as soil-forming sediments favoring subsequent permafrost aggradation and cryogenic processes as well. Initially, after drainage, swampy meadows had been developed almost all over the lake bed. Further on, succession of landscape went diversely, typical and uncommon tundra landscapes formed. When activated, cryogenic processes favored the formation of peat mounds under dwarf shrub - lichen vegetation (7% of the area). Frost cracks and peat circles affected flat mounds all over the former lake bottom. On drained peat sites, with no active cryogenic processes, specific grass meadows on Cryic Sapric Histosols were developed. Totally, permafrost-affected soils occupy 77% of the area (2011). In some part of the lake bed further development of waterlogging leads to the formation of marshy meadows and willow communities where Gleysols prevail. During last twenty years, permafrost degradation has occurred under tall shrub communities, and it will progress in future. Water erosion processes in the drained lake bottom promoted the formation of local hydrographic network. In the stream floodplain grassy willow-stands formed on Fluvisols (3% of the area). The study has been conducted under Clima-East & RFBR 14-05-31111 projects.

  7. An analysis on the relationship between land subsidence and floods at the Kujukuri Plain in Chiba Prefecture, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Y.; Chen, H.; Sawamukai, M.; Su, T.; Tokunaga, T.

    2015-11-01

    Surface environments at the Kujukuri Plain in Chiba Prefecture, Japan, in 1970, 2004, and 2013, were analyzed and compared to discuss the possible impact of land subsidence on the occurrence of floods. The study area has been suffered from land subsidence due to ground deformation from paleo-earthquakes, tectonic activities, and human-induced subsidence by groundwater exploitation. Meteorological data, geomorphological data including DEM obtained from the airborne laser scanning (1-m spatial resolution), leveling data, and the result of our assessment map (Chen et al., 2015) were used in this study. Clear relationship between floods and land subsidence was not recognized, while geomorphological setting, urbanization, and change of precipitation pattern were found to contribute to the floods. The flood prone-area is distributed on the characteristic geomorphological setting such as floodplain and back swamp. It was revealed that the urban area has been expanded on these geomorphological setting in recent years. The frequency of hourly precipitation was also shown to be increased in the past ca. 40 years, and this could induce rapid freshet and overflow of small- and medium-sized rivers and sewerage lines. The distribution of depression areas was increased from 2004 to 2013. This change could be associated with the ground deformation after the Tohoku earthquake (Mw = 9.0) in 2011.

  8. Subsidence monitoring in coal area using time-series InSAR combining persistent scatterers and distributed scatterers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengjia; Wang, Chao; Tang, Yixian; Fu, Qiaoyan; Zhang, Hong

    2015-07-01

    In coal mining areas, ground subsidence persistently happens, which produces serious environmental issues and affects the development of cities. To monitor the ground deformation due to coal mining, a modified time-series InSAR technique combining persistent scatterers (PSs) and distributed scatterers (DSs) is presented in this paper. In particular, DSs are efficiently identified using classified information and statistical characteristics. Furthermore, a two-scale network is introduced into traditional PSI to deal with PSs and DSs in a multi-layer framework by taking the advantage of the robust of PSs and the widely distribution of DSs. The proposed method is performed to investigate the subsidence of Huainan City, Anhui province (China), during 2012-2013 using 14 scenes of Radarsat-2 images. Experimental results show that the proposed method can ease the estimation complexity and significantly increase the spatial density of measurement points, which can provide more detailed deformation information. Result shows that there are obvious subsidence areas detected in the test site with subsidence velocity larger than 5 cm/year. The proposed method brings practical applications for non-urban area deformation monitoring.

  9. Mercury's Crater-Hosted Hollows: Chalcogenide Pryo-Thermokarst, and Permafrost Analogs on Earth, Mars, and Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargel, Jeffrey

    2013-04-01

    MESSENGER has acquired stunning images of pitted, light-toned and variegated light/dark terrains located primarily on the floors—probably impact-melt sheets—of many of Mercury's large craters. Termed "hollows", the pitted terrains are geomorphologically similar to some on Mars formed by sublimation of ice-rich permafrost and to lowland thermokarst on Earth formed by permafrost thaw; to "swiss cheese" terrain forming by sublimation of frozen CO2 at the Martian South Pole; and to suspected hydrocarbon thermokarst at Titan's poles. I shall briefly review some analogs on these other worlds. The most plausible explanation for Mercury's hollows is terrain degradation involving melting or sublimation of heterogeneous chalcogenide and sulfosalt mineral assemblages. I refer to these Mercurian features as pyrothermokarst; the etymological redundancy distinguishes the conditions and mineral agents from the ice-related features on Earth and Mars, though some of the physical processes may be similar. Whereas ice and sulfur have long been suspected and ice recently was discovered in permanently shadowed craters of Mercury's polar regions, the hollows occur down to the equator, where neither ice nor sulfur is plausible. The responsible volatiles must be only slightly volatile on the surface and/or in the upper crust of Mercury's low to middle latitudes at 400-800 K, but they must be capable of either melting or sublimating on geologically long time scales. Under prevailing upper crustal and surface temperatures, chalcophile-rich "permafrost" can undergo either desulfidation or melting reactions that could cause migration or volume changes of the permafrost, and hence lead to collapse and pitting. I propose the initial emplacement of crater-hosted chalcogenides, sulfosalts and related chalcophile materials such as pnictides, in impact-melt pools (involving solid-liquid and silicate-sulfide fractionation) and further differentiation by associated dry or humid fumaroles (solid

  10. Land subsidence of clay deposits after the Tohoku-Pacific Ocean Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, K.; Kazama, M.

    2015-11-01

    Extensive infrastructure collapse resulted from the cataclysmic earthquake that struck off the eastern coast of Japan on 11 March 2011 and from its consequent gigantic tsunami, affecting not only the Tohoku region but also the Kanto region. Among the geological and geotechnical processes observed, land subsidence occurring in both coastal and inland areas and from Tohoku to Kanto is an extremely important issue that must be examined carefully. This land subsidence is classifiable into three categories: (i) land sinking along the coastal areas because of tectonic movements, (ii) settlement of sandy deposits followed by liquefaction, and (iii) long-term post-earthquake recompression settlement in soft clay caused by dissipation of excess pore pressure. This paper describes two case histories of post-earthquake settlement of clay deposits from among the three categories of ground sinking and land subsidence because such settlement has been frequently overlooked in numerous earlier earthquakes. Particularly, an attempt is made to propose a methodology for predicting such settlement and for formulating remedial or responsive measures to mitigate damage from such settlement.

  11. Subsidence and Deforestation: Implications for Flooding in Delta’s Southeast and East Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . Nurhamidah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Delta is a low-lying area which can be found at the mouth of a river. Nowadays, concentration of flooding occurs in many deltaic areas due to combination of several factors. Meanwhile, a big number of people live on flood plain of main rivers and river deltas which will be threatened by flooding.  Land subsidence and deforestation are two phenomena which had been occurring very high until recently in SEE Asia region. Increasing of population strongly influences the natural hydrological processes. Due to pressure for land, substantial areas of peat swamps in SEE Asia have been presently are being reclaimed for agriculture or for other land use. In natural conditions swamp areas functioned as a retention area by adsorbing flood water, thereby preventing or mitigation flooding in downstream areas. But unfortunately, large areas of the original forests in large peat swamp forests have disappeared due to human activities such as illegal logging and fires. In other side increasing population, industries, agricultures and plantations will increase water demand. Activities of ground water extraction will be increasing as well. It can cause land subsidence and furthermore tide can easily propagate into deltaic areas moreover compounded by lowering of land surface due to land subsidence. Since flooding is an issue has been identified then these two phenomena need to be identified as well.

  12. Monitoring delta subsidence with Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, S.; Overeem, I.; Syvitski, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Can subsidence in river deltas be monitored in near real-time at the spatial and temporal resolution needed for informing critical management decisions? Interferometric Synthetic Radar Aperture (InSAR) is a satellite-based technique that can map ground deformation with millimeter-scale vertical resolution over thousands of square kilometers. InSAR has enormous potential to shed light on the dynamics of actively subsiding deltas, but the technique is not commonly applied outside of major cities due to the difficulty of performing InSAR in wet, vegetated settings. Given these limitations, how can InSAR best serve the global effort to monitor sinking deltas? Here, an overview of InSAR processing is provided that addresses delta-specific challenges, including frequent cloud-cover in tropical areas; noisy signals in wetlands and flooded fields; dense forests that interact unpredictably with different radar wavelengths; flat landscapes that hinder image stacking algorithms; rapid urban development that can render Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) inaccurate; and a lack of in situ GPS (Global Positioning System) receivers for InSAR calibration. InSAR has unique value for monitoring subsidence in deltas, and some natural and anthropogenic drivers of subsidence can be resolved by InSAR. High-resolution InSAR measurements from the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta (GBD) are then presented and validated against GPS data. Surface motion is shown to reflect subsurface stratigraphy, and sediment compaction is shown to be the most important factor in this delta on short (non-tectonic) timescales. Average compaction rates throughout the eastern delta range from 0 to > 18 mm/y, varying by more than an order of magnitude depending on the ages and grain sizes of surface and subsurface sediment layers. Fastest subsidence is observed in Holocene organic-rich mud, and slowest subsidence is observed along the Meghna River and in areas with surface or subsurface sand deposits. Although groundwater

  13. GPS geodetic measurements of subsidence from groundwater drawdown in central Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansma, P.; Mattioli, G.; Marshall, A.; Czarnecki, J.

    2005-05-01

    The state of Arkansas ranks fifth in the nation in ground water consumption, largely fueled by its robust rice and manufacturing industries. The region centered on Lonoke, Arkansas, Jefferson and Monroe counties in the center of the state has seen dramatic drawdown of its ground-water resources and development of significant cones of depression. Subsidence of 1.5 meters over a few decades was postulated for portions of Arkansas county on the basis of elevation changes of benchmarks. These results were preliminary and measurements were not made with geodetic grade equipment. Validation of these results is the primary goal of our on-going work. We are developing an extensive network of suitable benchmarks throughout central and eastern Arkansas, whose vertical position can be monitored using high-precision Global Positioning System geodesy. Campaign GPS measurements were first obtained in summer 2003. Second epoch observations were acquired throughout 2004. Although errors are high due to the limited temporal dataset, preliminary GPS geodetic results are consistent with subsidence of the ground surface above the cones of depression on the order of tens of millimeters per year.

  14. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Mexico City Subsidence by Means of Interferometric Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Quiroz, P.; Tupin, F.; Briole, P.; Doin, M.; Nicolas, J.

    2007-05-01

    study, no displacement time series could be obtained from interferometry due to difficulties in the unwrapping process. We present a work based on interferometry to measure subsidence evolution spatially and temporally using the whole 54 ERS1&2/ENVISAT images set and covering 11 years (1995-2006) of ground motion. The two main obstacles are temporal decorrelation and phase unwrapping. We test a 'traditional' interferometric method (Cavalié et al., 2006) and a Persistent Scatterer method (Hooper, 2006). To maximize coherence and facilitate unwrapping, the first method uses high coherent interferograms issued from short time span image pairs. Interferograms are corrected from a layered atmospheric phase screen and from residual orbital and topographical errors. We also derive a method to unwrap 6 months to one year interferograms. Corrected interferograms are inverted to obtain deformation time series and mitigate atmospheric artifacts. The second method uses all available images to construct interferograms with respect to a common master. It performs a correction of geometrical effects and uses amplitude and phase to select pixels not affected by decorrelation, thus carrying reliable phase information. We test the 3-D (space-time) unwrapping algorithm of Hooper to recover radar propagation delays and finally separate subsidence from atmospheric artifacts. Time series obtained from the application of both methods are analyzed, compared and discussed.

  15. An integrated assessment framework for land subsidence in delta cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. H. M. Bucx

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In many delta cities land subsidence exceeds absolute sea level rise up to a factor of ten by excessive groundwater extraction related to rapid urbanization and population growth. Without change, parts of Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Bangkok and numerous other delta (and coastal cities will sink below sea level. Increased flooding and also other widespread impacts of land subsidence result already in damage of billions of dollars per year. In order to gain insight in the complex, multi-sectoral aspects of subsidence, to raise awareness and to support decision making on appropriate adaptation strategies and measures, an Integrated Assessment Framework (IAF for subsidence is introduced, illustrated by several (delta case studies. Based on that a list of 10 generic key issues and possible solutions is presented in order to further develop and support a (generic approach how to deal with subsidence in current and future subsidence-prone areas. For exchange of experiences and knowledge development.on subsidence in deltas the Delta Alliance, a knowledge network of deltas worldwide, can be supportive.

  16. The interaction between land subsidence and urban development in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Wang, R.; Zhou, Y.; Jiang, Y.; Wang, X.

    2015-11-01

    The Yangtze River Delta and North China Plain are experiencing serious land subsidence development and are also the areas that have undergone the fastest urbanization. Rapid urban development inevitably requires more water resources. However, China is a country with small per capita water resources, nonuniform distribution of water resources, and over-exploitation of groundwater - all of which are critical factors contributing to the potential for a land subsidence disaster. In addition, land subsidence has brought about elevation loss, damaged buildings, decreased safety of rail transit projects, lowered land value, and other huge economic losses and potential safety hazards in China. In this paper, Beijing, a typical northern Chinese city deficient in water, is taken as an example to explore (a) the problems of urban development, utilization of water resources, and land subsidence development; (b) the harm and influence of land subsidence hazards on urban construction; and (c) the relationship between urban development and land subsidence. Based on the results, the author has predicted the trend of urban development and land subsidence in Beijing and puts forward her viewpoints and suggestions.

  17. An integrated assessment framework for land subsidence in delta cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucx, T. H. M.; van Ruiten, C. J. M.; Erkens, G.; de Lange, G.

    2015-11-01

    In many delta cities land subsidence exceeds absolute sea level rise up to a factor of ten by excessive groundwater extraction related to rapid urbanization and population growth. Without change, parts of Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Bangkok and numerous other delta (and coastal) cities will sink below sea level. Increased flooding and also other widespread impacts of land subsidence result already in damage of billions of dollars per year. In order to gain insight in the complex, multi-sectoral aspects of subsidence, to raise awareness and to support decision making on appropriate adaptation strategies and measures, an Integrated Assessment Framework (IAF) for subsidence is introduced, illustrated by several (delta) case studies. Based on that a list of 10 generic key issues and possible solutions is presented in order to further develop and support a (generic) approach how to deal with subsidence in current and future subsidence-prone areas. For exchange of experiences and knowledge development.on subsidence in deltas the Delta Alliance, a knowledge network of deltas worldwide, can be supportive.

  18. Abandoned deep mine subsidence investigation and remedial design, Interstate 70, Guernsey County, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, A.G.; Clark, D.M.; Bechtel, T.D.

    1999-07-01

    A two thousand linear foot, undermined section of Interstate 70 in Guernsey County, Ohio experienced settlements due to pothole type subsidence events within the travel lanes, shoulders and adjacent right-of-way areas. Potholes measured approximately ten feet in depth and width. The subsidence occurred after the dewatering of the abandoned deep mine during auger mining operations west of the site. A two-phase emergency investigation was undertaken by the Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) and Gannett Fleming Cord dry and Carpenter (GF). The purpose of the investigation was to assess the immediate danger of potholes occurring in the traveled lanes and paved shoulders, to identify the subsidence mechanisms, and to design a remediation program. Phase one investigations involved the review of existing subsurface data, the advancement of shallow borings and the performance of multiple geophysical surveys including ground penetrating radar, seismic refraction and electromagnetic terrain conductivity. The Phase one investigations did not reveal the presence of subsidence voids. Phase two investigations included borings to the mine level and videotaping of mine conditions. The mine was found to be completely flooded. Based upon the collected data, two mechanisms of failure, localized roof fall and piping of overburden soils into the mine void, were identified. Two remedial alternatives, (1) the filling of the mine void, and (2) the reinforcement of the highway using geotextiles, were evaluated, Filling of the mined interval and grouting of overburden bedrock fractures and voids, within a limited area, were selected. Construction plans, specifications and cost estimates were prepared for bidding and award. During the bidding process, a catastrophic, pothole type failure of the I-70 travel lanes occurred. The interstate was closed and the planned remediation activities were performed as an emergency project. The mine interval was grouted and portions of the highway

  19. Barrier Vibration Isolation to Work-Place Vibration and Its Influence on Uneven Subsidence of Pillar Foundation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Aiming at practice, the wave propagation in soil has been comprehensively studied on the basis of FEM analyzing model being established. An investigation has also been performed on how to solve the problems of simulating transient vibration in actual foundation with FEM, and the result of calculating to the real transient vibration of actual foundation with FEM software ANSYS agrees with that of measuring. The vibration variation in the ground and the uneven subsidence of the factory houses' pillars, with and without barrier vibration isolation, are calculated by employing FEM. The results show that proper barrier isolation can diminish the ground vibration displacement but likely to magnify the dynamic stress and vibration frequency within a certain region, which would aggravate the uneven subsidence of the factory house pillars.

  20. Measurements of Land Subsidence Rates on the North-western Portion of the Nile Delta Using Radar Interferometry Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugate, Joseph M.

    The Nile Delta is home to around 75 million people and most of Egypt's farmland and agricultural production. This area is currently threatened by Mediterranean Sea waters due to factors such as sediment starvation, climate change, and sea level fluctuations as well as subsidence. The low elevation and relief of the Nile Delta exposes many coastal communities, including the city of Alexandria, to potential inundation. This situation has become a concern for the area's residents but a better understanding of the processes occurring there can aid in deciding a suitable response. Recent studies have documented Holocene subsidence rates in the northeast part of the Nile Delta that average up to 8mm/year. In this study, PS-InSAR techniques are used to measure modern land subsidence rates on the north-central and north-western Nile Delta. Persistent Scatterer Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PS-InSAR) techniques were applied to 23 ESA radar scenes from 2 orbital tracks spanning from 1992 to 2000 in the north-central and north-west portions of the Nile Delta. The area includes the cities of Alexandria, Greater Mahala, and Mansoura as well as the Rosetta promontory and lake Burullus, Idku Lagoon, and Maryut Lagoon. Results indicate that modern average-vertical ground motion velocities for the north-western and north-central Nile Delta range from emergent to subsidence of 8.5 mm/yr. The range of velocities measured are spatially varied in a complex way across the study area. Patterns of subsidence correlate closely to areas of most recent sediment deposition such as along coastlines and rivers, as well as in lagoons and lakes. Average subsidence velocities are also lower across the western sections of the Nile Delta than in the northeastern delta.

  1. On the use of InSAR technology to assess land subsidence in Jakarta coastal flood plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudogbo, Fifame; Duro, Javier; Garcia Robles, Javier; Arnaud, Alain; Abidin, Hasanuddin Z.

    2014-05-01

    Jakarta is the capital of Indonesia and is home to approximately 10 million people on the coast of the Java Sea. It is situated on the northern coastal alluvial plane of Java which shares boundaries with West Java Province in the south and in the east, and with Banten Province in the west. The Capital District of Jakarta (DKI) sits in the lowest lying areas of the basin. Its topography varies, with the northern part just meters above current sea level and lying on a flood plain. Subsequently, this portion of the city frequently floods. The southern part of the city is hilly. Thirteen major rivers flow through Jakarta to the Java Sea. The Ciliwung River is the most significant river and divides the city West to East. In the last three decades, urban growing of Jakarta has been very fast in sectors as industry, trade, transportation, real estate, among others. This exponential development has caused several environmental issues; land subsidence is one of them. Subsidence in Jakarta has been known since the early part of the 20th century. It is mainly due to groundwater extraction, the fast development (construction load), soil natural consolidation and tectonics. Evidence of land subsidence exists through monitoring with GPS, level surveys and InSAR investigations. InSAR states for "Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar". Its principle is based on comparing the distance between the satellite and the ground in consecutive satellite passes over the same area on the Earth's surface. Radar satellites images record, with very high precision, the distance travelled by the radar signal that is emitted by the satellite is registered. When this distance is compared through time, InSAR technology can provide highly accurate ground deformation measurements. ALTAMIRA INFORMATION, company specialized in ground motion monitoring, has developed GlobalSARTM, which combines several processing techniques and algorithms based on InSAR technology, to achieve ground motion

  2. Land Subsidence and Aquifer-System Compaction in the Tucson Active Management Area, South-Central Arizona, 1987-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruth, Rob; Flynn, Pool; Donald, R.; Anderson, Carl E.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey monitors land subsidence and aquifer-system compaction caused by ground-water depletion in Tucson Basin and Avra Valley - two of the three alluvial basins within the Tucson Active Management Area. In spring 1987, the Global Positioning System was used to measure horizontal and vertical positions for bench marks at 43 sites to establish a network for monitoring land subsidence in Tucson Basin and Avra Valley. Between 1987 and 2005, the original number of subsidence monitoring stations was gradually increased to more than 100 stations to meet the need for information in the growing metropolitan area. Data from approximately 60 stations common to the Global Positioning System surveys done after an initial survey in 1987 are used to document land subsidence. For the periods of comparison, average land-surface deformation generally is less than the maximum subsidence at an individual station and takes into account land-surface recovery from elastic aquifer-system compaction. Between 1987 and 1998, as much as 3.2 inches of subsidence occurred in Tucson Basin and as much as 4 inches of subsidence occurred in Avra Valley. For the 31 stations that are common to both the 1987 and 1998 Global Positioning System surveys, the average subsidence during the 11-year period was about 0.5 inch in Tucson Basin and about 1.2 inches in Avra Valley. For the approximately 60 stations that are common to both the 1998 and 2002 Global Positioning System surveys, the data indicate that as much as 3.5 inches of subsidence occurred in Tucson Basin and as much as 1.1 inches of subsidence occurred in Avra Valley. The average subsidence for the 4-year period is about 0.4 inch in Tucson Basin and 0.6 inch in Avra Valley. Between the 2002 and the 2005 Global Positioning System surveys, the data indicate that as much as 0.2 inch of subsidence occurred in Tucson Basin and as much as 2.2 inches of subsidence occurred in Avra Valley. The average subsidence for the 3-year

  3. Subsidence in the Parícutin lava field: Causes and implications for interpretation of deformation fields at volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaussard, Estelle

    2016-06-01

    Assessment of volcanic hazards includes interpretation of ground deformation signal, which, at polygenetic volcanoes often results from the superposition of deformation due to pressure changes in the magmatic system and due to surficial processes such as cooling of emplaced lava. The deformation signal associated with emplaced lava is sometimes considered negligible if fields are decades old, but if the lava thickness is great, deformation may still be occurring, possibly leading to misinterpretation of the observed deformation. Here I evaluate the 2007-2011 ground motion of the 1943-1952 lava field of the Parícutin monogenetic cinder cone, Mexico. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) time series reveal patchy subsidence restricted to the lava field and following linear rates up to 5.5 cm/year. There is a clear correlation between subsidence rates and topography suggesting a causal relationship with deposits or lava thickness. I estimate these thicknesses in the subsiding areas using pre- and post-eruption topographic maps and show that they reach up to 200 m. A numerical model for lava flow cooling was developed considering radiation and convection from the surface, conductive transfer inside the flow and to the ground, and vesiculation and latent heat generation at the top and bottom of the flow. The model shows that compaction induced by cooling of the thick deposits emplaced ~ 60 years ago explains the observed subsidence when conductive transfer to the ground is considered. These results demonstrate that thick deposits can keep deforming significantly even decades after their emplacement, emphasizing the importance of considering cooling processes when interpreting deformation fields at polygenetic volcanoes producing massive lava fields.

  4. Land subsidence in the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, 1 Baja California, Mexico, from 1994 to 2005. An integrated analysis of DInSAR, levelingand geological data.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarychikhina, O; Glowacka, E; Mellors, R; Vidal, F S

    2011-03-03

    Cerro Prieto is the oldest and largest Mexican geothermal field in operation and has been producing electricity since 1973. The large amount of geothermal fluids extracted to supply steam to the power plants has resulted in considerable deformation in and around the field. The deformation includes land subsidence and related ground fissuring and faulting. These phenomena have produced severe damages to infrastructure such as roads, irrigation canals and other facilities. In this paper, the technique of Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) is applied using C-band ENVISAR ASAR data acquired between 2003 and 2006 to determine the extent and amount of land subsidence in the Mexicali Valley near Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field. The DInSAR results were compared with published data from precise leveling surveys (1994- 1997 and 1997-2006) and detailed geological information in order to improve the understanding of temporal and spatial distributions of anthropogenic subsidence in the Mexicali Valley. The leveling and DInSAR data were modeled to characterize the observed deformation in terms of fluid extraction. The results confirm that the tectonic faults control the spatial extent of the observed subsidence. These faults likely act as groundwater flow barriers for aquifers and reservoirs. The shape of the subsiding area coincides with the Cerro Prieto pull-apart basin. In addition, the spatial pattern of the subsidence as well as changes in rate are highly correlated with the development of the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field.

  5. InSAR Time-Series Analysis of Land Subsidence under Different Land Use Types in the Eastern Beijing Plain, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaofan Zhou

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the Beijing plain, the long-term groundwater overexploitation, exploitation, and the utilization of superficial urban space have led to land subsidence. In this study, the spatial–temporal analysis of land subsidence in Beijing was assessed by using the small baseline subset (SBAS interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR technique based on 47 TerraSAR-X SAR images from 2010 to 2015. Distinct variations of the land subsidence were found in the study regions. The maximum annual land subsidence rate was 146 mm/year from 2011 to 2015. The comparison between the SBAS InSAR results and the ground leveling measurements showed that the InSAR land subsidence results achieved a precision of 2 mm. In 2013, the maximum displacement reached 132 and 138 mm/year in the Laiguangying and DongbalizhuangDajiaoting area. Our analysis showed that the serious land subsidence mainly occurred in the following land use types: water area and wetland, paddy field, upland soils, vegetable land, and peasant-inhabited land. Our results could provide a useful reference for groundwater exploitation and urban planning.

  6. Land subsidence in the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, Baja California, Mexico, from 1994 to 2005: An integrated analysis of DInSAR, leveling and geological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarychikhina, Olga; Glowacka, Ewa; Mellors, Robert; Vidal, Francisco Suárez

    2011-07-01

    Cerro Prieto is the oldest and largest Mexican geothermal field in operation and has been producing electricity since 1973. The large amount of geothermal fluids extracted to supply steam to the power plants has resulted in considerable deformation in and around the field. The deformation includes land subsidence and related ground fissuring and faulting. These phenomena have produced severe damages to the local infrastructure such as roads, irrigation canals and other facilities. In this paper, the technique of Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) is applied using C-band ENVISAR ASAR data acquired between 2003 and 2006 to determine the extent and amount of land subsidence in the Mexicali Valley near Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field. The DInSAR results were compared with published data from precise leveling surveys (1994-1997 and 1997-2006) and detailed geological information in order to improve understanding of the temporal and spatial distributions of anthropogenic subsidence in the Mexicali Valley. The leveling and DInSAR data were modeled to characterize the observed deformation in terms of fluid extraction. The results confirm that the tectonic faults control the spatial extent of the observed subsidence. These faults likely act as groundwater flow barriers for aquifers and reservoirs. The shape of the subsiding area coincides with the Cerro Prieto pull-apart basin. In addition, the changes in spatial pattern and rate of the subsidence are correlated with the development of the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field.

  7. Evaluation of Subterranean Subsidence at Seal Beach National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this study was to determine the amount of subsurface subsidence at Naval Weapons Station Seal Beach (NWSSB) areas which include Seal Beach National...

  8. Subsidence of the femoral prosthesis. A stereophotogrammetric evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafetz, N; Baumrind, S; Murray, W R; Genant, H K; Korn, E L

    1985-12-01

    A quantitative three-dimensional measurement method, radiographic stereophotogrammetry (SPG), was employed to assess the relation between early subsidence of the femoral prosthesis after total hip arthroplasty (THA) and subsequent clinical course. The SPG technique and the authors' error control mechanisms are described in 15 patients in the early postoperative period, and the findings are correlated with those of follow-up clinical examinations. Among the 12 patients who remained clinically asymptomatic with respect to pain, only one had an SPG estimate of subsidence in excess of 1 mm at any point in time. Each of the three patients who later became symptomatic had SPG estimates of subsidence in excess of 1.75 mm within six months of the operation. Thus far, the patient with the largest estimate of subsidence is the only one who required surgical revision.

  9. How a Curvilinear Continental Margin Influences Its Subsidence History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacek, V.; Ussami, N.

    2012-12-01

    Current one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) thermo-mechanical models successfully explain the first-order vertical motions of sedimentary basins created by lithospheric extension. However, the modeling of second-order effects such as extra-subsidence, non-monotonic-subsidence or protracted-subsidence still remains controversial. One aspect that has not been fully considered in the current models is that the rifting direction leading to the continental break-up does not always follow a straight line, which demands a three-dimensional (3D) approach. The aim of this work is to demonstrate the importance of using a 3D model that takes into account the curvature of rifting along the margin and theoretically predicts some of the second-order subsidence observations. Our results indicate that concave oceanward margins tend to subside faster than convex ones. This differential subsidence of the margin is a result of the combined effect of lateral thermal conduction, small-scale mantle (or edge driven) convection and the curvature of the rifting. We have used the finite element code CITCOM (Moresi & Gurnis, 1996; Zhong et al., 2000) to construct 3D numerical models of the mantle convection and its effect on the surface evolution. We observed that the differential subsidence along a curved margin is dependent on the viscosity structure of the mantle: for an asthenospheric viscosity of 5×1020 Pa.s the differential subsidence can reach more than 700 m assuming a sediment filled basin; however, for low asthenospheric viscosity (geometry. As an application of this 3D conceptual model for curved margin, we analysed the stratigraphic evolution of the Santos Basin, offshore Southeastern Brazil, and we propose that the variations in the subsidence history along the margin can be explained by its 3D geometry and the dynamical evolution of the mantle. We conclude that the incorporation of the third dimension in the study of the subsidence history of divergent margins may

  10. Subsidence history and forming mechanism of anomalous tectonic subsidence in the Bozhong depression, Bohaiwan basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE; XiNong

    2007-01-01

    [1]Li D S.Tectonic framework of the Bohai Gulf and coastal basins.Mar Sci,1982,1:82-93[2]Li S T.Basin geodynamics background of formation of huge petroleum systems (in Chinese).Earth Sci-J China Univ Geosci,2004,29(5):505-512[3]Allen M B,Macdonald D I M,Zhao X,et al.Early Cenozoic two-phase extension and late Cenozoic thermal subsidence and inversion of the Bohai basin,northern China.Mar Petrol Geol,1997,14(7/8):951-972[4]Gong Z S,Wang G C.Neotectonism and late hydrocarbon accumulation in Bohai Sea.Acta Pet Sin (in Chinese),2001,22(2):1-8[5]Hu S B,O'Sullivan P B,Raza A,et al.Thermal history and tectonic subsidence of the Bohai Basin,northern China:a Cenozoic rifted and local pull-apart basin.Phys Earth Planet Int,2001,126:221-235[6]Ren J Y,Tamaki K,Li S T,et al.Late Mesozoic and Cenozoic rifting and its dynamic setting in Eastern China and adjacent areas.Tectonophysics,2002,344:175-205[7]Li D S.Tectonics of Petroliferous Basins in China (in Chinese).Beijing:Petroleum Industry Press,2002.674[8]Xu J,Ma Z J,Deng Q D,et al.Regional tectonic conditions for intensive subsidence of the middle Bohai Sea since Oligocene.Acta Pet Sin (in Chinese),2004,25(5):11-16[9]Sclater J G,Christie P A F.Continental stretching:an explanation of the post Mid-Cretaceous subsidence of the central North Sea basin.J Geophys Res,1980,85:3711-3739[10]Xie X N,Müller R D,Li S T,et al.Origin of anomalous tectonic subsidence along the northern South China Sea Margin and its relationship to dynamic topography.Mar Pet Geol,2006,23(7):745-765[11]White N.Recovery of strain-rate variation from inversion of subsidence data.Nature,1993,366(6454):449-452[12]White N.An inverse method for determining lithosphere strain rate variation on geological time scales.Earth Planet Sci Lett,1994,122:351-371[13]Xie X N,Bethke C M,Li S T,et al.Overpressure and Petroleum generation and accumulation in the Dongying Depression of the Bohaiwan Basin,China.Geofluids,2001,1(4):257-271[14]Hall R.Reconstructing Cenozoic SE

  11. Adaptation and mitigation of land subsidence in Semarang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreas, Heri; Abidin, Hasanuddin Z.; Gumilar, Irwan; Sidiq, Teguh Purnama; Yuwono, Bambang

    2017-07-01

    Land subsidence is not a new phenomenon for Semarang. Some report said the subsidence in Semarang probably is occurring for more than 100 years. Based on the leveling surveys conducted by the Centre of Environmental Geology from 1999 to 2003 it was found that relatively large subsidence was detected around Semarang Harbor, Pondok Hasanuddin, Bandar Harjo and around Semarang Tawang Railway station, with the rates ranging from 1 to 17 cm/year. Results derived from GPS show that land subsidence in Semarang has spatial and temporal variations. In general, subsidence rates in Semarang have an average rate of about 6 to 7 cm/year, with maximum rates that can go up to 14-19 cm/year at certain locations. The impact of land subsidence in Semarang can be seen in several forms, such as the wider expansion of (coastal) flooding areas "rob", cracking of buildings and infrastructure, and increased inland sea water intrusion. It also badly influences the quality and amenity of the living environment and life (e.g. health and sanitation condition) in the affected areas. In the case of Semarang, adaptation and mitigation are considered very important. We have been done some investigations to this area by field observations (mapping the flooded area, mapping the infrastructure problems, interviewing people and seeing the adaptations, conduct GPS measurement to see deformation, etc.), gather information from Government, from digital media, etc., and we noticed people increased their house, and the local goverment elevated the road and the bridge, etc. regulary over less decade periode as part of adaptation. We also noticed the Central Goverment built the dyke and pumping station. Our conclusions said that the adaptation only made temporaly since significant land subsidence keep coming and worsening by the sea level which is keep rising. Another conclusion, so far we have seen lack of mitigation program, monitoring or even inevective mitigation in Semarang related to this subsidence

  12. Using Radar Interferometry (DinSAR) to Evaluate Land Subsidence Caused by Excessive Groundwater Withdrawal in Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, M. C.; Milewski, A.; El Kadiri, R.

    2013-12-01

    The combination of natural, anthropogenic, and climate change impacts on the water resources of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region has devastated its water resources well beyond its current and projected populations. The increased exploitation of groundwater resources in the past half-century coupled with successive droughts has resulted in the acceleration of subsidence rates in the Souss and Massa basins in Morocco. We have completed a preliminary investigation of these impacts on the Souss and Massa basins (~27,000 km2) in the southwestern part of Morocco. This area is characterized by a semi-arid climate (annual precipitation 70-250 mm/year) with agriculture, tourism, and commercial fishing as the primary economic activities, all of which require availability of adequate freshwater resources. Additionally the primary groundwater aquifer (Plio-Quaternary Plain Aquifer), an unconfined aquifer formed mostly of sand and gravel, is being harvested by >20,000 wells at a rate of 650 MCM/yr., exceeding the rate of recharge by 260 MCM/year. Intense development over the past 50 years has exposed the aquifer to a serious risk of groundwater table drawdown (0.5m-2.5m/yr.), land subsidence, loss of artesian pressure, salinization, salt water intrusions along the coast, and deterioration of water quality across the watershed. Differential Interferometry Synthetique Aperture Radar (DInSAR) was utilized to measure ground subsidence induced by groundwater withdrawal. Land subsidence caused by excessive groundwater extraction was determined using a threefold methodology: (1) extraction of subsidence and land deformation patterns using radar interferometry, (2) correlation of the high subsidence areas within the basins to possible natural and anthropogenic factors (e.g. sea level rise, unconsolidated lithological formations distribution, urbanization, excessive groundwater extraction), and (3) forecasting the future of the Souss and Massa basins over the next century

  13. Land subsidence monitoring by D-InSAR technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Hongdong; Deng Kazhong; Ju Chengyu; Zhu Chuanguang; Xue Jiqun

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays,the researches of using Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (D-InSAR) technique to monitor the land subsidence are mainly on how to qualitatively analyze the subsidence areas and values,but the analysis of subsidence process and mechanism are insufficient.In order to resolve these problems,6 scenes of ERS1/2 images captured during 1995 and 2000 in a certain place of Jiangsu province were selected to obtain the subsidence and velocities in three time segments by “two-pass” DInSAR method.Then the relationships among distributions of pumping wells,exploitation quantity of groundwater,and confined water levels were studied and the subsidence mechanism was systematically analyzed.The results show that using D-InSAR technique to monitor the deformation of large area can obtain high accuracies,the disadvantages of classical observation methods can be remedied and there is a linear relationship among the velocities of land subsidence,the water level and the exploitation quantity.

  14. Detecting and monitoring UCG subsidence with InSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellors, R J; Foxall, W; Yang, X

    2012-03-23

    The use of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) to measure surface subsidence caused by Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) is tested. InSAR is a remote sensing technique that uses Synthetic Aperture Radar images to make spatial images of surface deformation and may be deployed from satellite or an airplane. With current commercial satellite data, the technique works best in areas with little vegetation or farming activity. UCG subsidence is generally caused by roof collapse, which adversely affects UCG operations due to gas loss and is therefore important to monitor. Previous studies have demonstrated the usefulness of InSAR in measuring surface subsidence related to coal mining and surface deformation caused by a coal mining roof collapse in Crandall Canyon, Utah is imaged as a proof-of-concept. InSAR data is collected and processed over three known UCG operations including two pilot plants (Majuba, South Africa and Wulanchabu, China) and an operational plant (Angren, Uzbekistan). A clear f eature showing approximately 7 cm of subsidence is observed in the UCG field in Angren. Subsidence is not observed in the other two areas, which produce from deeper coal seams and processed a smaller volume. The results show that in some cases, InSAR is a useful tool to image UCG related subsidence. Data from newer satellites and improved algorithms will improve effectiveness.

  15. Development of TDR distributed sensors for land subsidence measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chih-Chung; Lin, Chih-Ping

    2016-04-01

    The influences subjected by land subsidence and notably inundation are raising in Taiwan recently. To efficiently access the problems, historical trends and the instant field measurement data (at least by days), including multi-depth subsidence leveling and water leveling, are essential and urgent. However, current multi-depth subsidence leveling with magnetic rings conducted by manual operating, for example, lacks high temporal and spatial resolution data, which cannot evaluate the consistency between the subsidence leveling and the limited underground water levels in the same aquifer layer appropriately. To improve the field measurements, this study is carried out based on the core technology of Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR). In the preliminary idea, TDR distributed sensors, as magnetic rings for land subsidence measurements in a borehole, are developed with the underground water level sensors embedded. The prototypes of TDR distributed sensors indicates the feasibility of measuring, but the influence of signal dissipating due to the long transmission line (>100 m) need to be brought attention to, as well as the corresponding measurement accuracy. Therefore, a laboratorial physical modeling is suggested for further evaluation, and this modeling is constructed now. All the measurement data are expected to be employed and fed back as the calibrators and indicators to propose the defense strategy for land subsidence and inundation.

  16. Highway Subsidence Analysis Based on the Advanced InSAR Time Series Analysis Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingyun; Zhang, Jingfa; Liu, Guolin; Li, Yongsheng

    2016-08-01

    The synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) measurements have the advantages of all-weather, wide range, high precision on the surface deformation monitoring. Highway as an important index of modern social and economic development, the quality and deformation changes in the process of using have a significant impact in the social development and people's life and property security. In practical applications the InSAR technology should do a variety of error correction analysis. By using a new analysis method – FRAM- SBAS time-series analysis method, to analyze the settlement of highway on Yanzhou area by the ALOS PALSAR datas. Use FRAM- SBAS timing analysis method to obtain the surface timing changes during 2008-09-21 to 2010-07-18 in the Jining area and obtained good results, the Jining area maximum timing settlement is 60mm, the maximum settlement rate reached 30mm/yr. The maximum settlement of the highway section is 53mm, the maximum settlement rate is 32mm/yr. And the settlement of highway worst sections were in severe ground subsidence, thus proving the mining and vehicle load effect on settlement of highway. And it is proved that the timing method on the ground and highway subsidence monitoring is feasible.

  17. Study on relation between tectonic stress and coal-mining subsidence with similar material simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Yu-cheng; ZHI Jian-feng; SUN Xue-yang

    2005-01-01

    Using a minitype and stress-type test device for similar material simulation of coal-mining subsidence, the relation between tectonic stress and coal-mining subsidence was successfully simulated, furthermore, the test period of similar material simulation was obviously shortened and the test process was more dexterous and convenient. To do similar material simulation with the minitype and stress-type test device was feasible and high-efficient. Bringing two models with the same geological and mining conditions to bear lateral compressive stress and tensile stress respectively and simulating the process of underground mining, the test results indicate that: under the compressive stress, the collapse of the coal roof occurs belatedly and the damaged range in cover of coal seam is smaller, therefore the movement and deformation of the cover and its damage to the ground geological environment are not evident; whereas under tensile stress, the situation is contrary to which mentioned above. A conclusion was obtained from the test that the ground environment hazards in coal mining areas were controlled by the regional geological tectonic stress field.

  18. Numerical modeling of land subsidence due to groundwater withdrawal in Aguascalientes Valley using regional coefficients of deformation determined by InSAR analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, J.; Cabral, E.; Wdowinski, S.; Hernandez-Marin, M.; Ortíz, J. Á.; Solano Rojas, D. E.; Oliver-Cabrera, T.

    2014-12-01

    Land subsidence due to groundwater over-exploitation is a deformation process affecting many cities around the world. This type of subsidence develops gradual vertical deformations reaching only a few centimeters per year, but can affect large areas. Consequently, inhabitants of subsiding areas are not aware of the process until others effects are observed, such as ground surface faulting, damage to building, or changes in the natural superficial drain. In order to mitigate and forecast subsidence consequences, it is useful to conduct numerical modeling of the subsidence process. Modeling the subsidence includes the following three basic tasks: a) Delimitation of the shape of the deforming body; b) Determination of the forces that are causing the deformations; and c) Determination of the mechanical properties of the deforming body according with an accepted rheological model. In the case of a land subsidence process, the deforming body is the aquifer system that is being drained. Usually, stratigraphic information from pumping wells, and other geophysical data are used to define the boundaries and shape of the aquifer system. The deformation governing forces, or stresses, can be calculated using the theory of "effective stress". Mechanical properties are usually determined with laboratory testing of samples from shallow strata, because the determination of these properties in samples from the deepest strata is economically or technically unviable. Consequently, the results of the numerical modeling do not necessarily match the observed subsidence evolution and ground faulting. We present in this work numerical simulation results of the land subsiding of the Valley of Aguascalientes, Mexico. Two analyses for the same subsiding area are presented. In the first of them, we used the mechanical properties of only the shallow strata, whereas in the second analysis we used "macroscopic" mechanical properties data determined for the whole aquifer system using In

  19. Land Subsidence Monitoring Using PS-InSAR Technique for L-Band SAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, S.; Chatterjee, R. S.; Singh, K. B.; Kumar, D.

    2016-10-01

    Differential SAR-Interferometry (D-InSAR) is one of the potential source to measure land surface motion induced due to underground coal mining. However, this technique has many limitation such as atmospheric in homogeneities, spatial de-correlation, and temporal decorrelation. Persistent Scatterer Interferometry synthetic aperture radar (PS-InSAR) belongs to a family of time series InSAR technique, which utilizes the properties of some of the stable natural and anthropogenic targets which remain coherent over long time period. In this study PS-InSAR technique has been used to monitor land subsidence over selected location of Jharia Coal field which has been correlated with the ground levelling measurement. This time series deformation observed using PS InSAR helped us to understand the nature of the ground surface deformation due to underground mining activity.

  20. Simulation of regional land subsidence in the southern Yangtze Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Investigation of the deformation characteristics of individual hydrostratigraphic units is the key to construct a regional land subsidence model. All of 12 hydrostratigraphic units in the study area were discussed throughout. On the basis of the measured data of groundwater level, five kinds of changing patterns of groundwater level were deduced and the relationship between the deformation characteris-tics of aquifer units and the corresponding changing patterns of groundwater level was discussed. The study area is 1.7×104 km2, where the geological condition is complex. The changing patterns of groundwater level the hydrostratigraphic units have experienced vary from site to site and from time to time. Consequently, the deformation characteristics of units are sophisticated. An identical hydros-tratigraphic unit may exhibit different deformation characteristics, such as elasticity, elasto-plasticity, visco-elasticity, and visco-elasto-plasticity, at different sites or during different periods, not to mention the different units. The existing models are difficult to describe the complex visco-elasto-plastic con-stitutive law under the condition of land subsidence. So the Merchant’s model was modified to depict the visco-elasto-plastic behavior of units. Then a three-dimensional flow model with variable parame-ters and a vertical one-dimensional subsidence model were constructed and coupled. The coupled model was applied in simulating land subsidence in the southern Yangtze Delta and a satisfactory re-sult was obtained. The simulation results show that the new coupled model can depict the complex geological conditions and describe the developing process of land subsidence very well in the south-ern Yangtze Delta. The new model can surely be used to predict land subsidence in the future, which is very helpful to taking measurements to control land subsidence.

  1. The Identification of Land Subsidance by Levelling Measurement and GPR Data at Tanjung Emas Harbour, Semarang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purnomo Raharjo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the main problem in Semarang City is flood. This area has low relief that consists of coastal alluvial deposits, swamp and marine sediments. The coastline is characterized by muddy, sandy, and rocky coasts, and mangrove coast. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR records, show that subsurface geological condition of northern part of Semarang is coastal alluvial deposit and in the south is volcanic rocks. The aims of this this research is to determine land subsidence by levelling measurement in 2005 in Tanjung Emas Harbour area built on 1995. During ten years, there are various land subsidance in this area: in Coaster Street (21 – 41 cm, container wharf (62 – 94 cm, north breakwater (64 – 79 cm, west breakwater (74 – 140 cm, east groin (76 – 89 cm, and stacking area ( 77 – 109 cm. According to this research, it is concluded that one reason causes of flooding in this area is land subsidence. Keywords : flood, land subsidence, levelling, Tanjung Emas Harbour, Semarang   Permasalahan yang berkembang di Kota Semarang saat ini adalah terjadinya banjir. Kawasan ini berelief rendah yang disusun oleh endapan aluvial pantai, rawa dan sedimen laut. Karakteristik garis pantai dicirikan oleh pantai berlumpur, berpasir dan berbatuan, serta pantai berbakau. Rekaman Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR menunjukkan kondisi geologi bawah permukaan utara kota Semarang merupakan endapan aluvial pantai dan bagian selatan disusun oleh batuan vulkanik. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui kondisi penurunan tanah melalui pengukuran sifatdatar yang dilakukan pada tahun 2005, di kawasan Pelabuhan Tanjung Emas yang dibangun pada tahun 1995. Dalam kurun waktu 10 tahun, diketahui bahwa terdapat variasi penurunan tanah di kawasan ini: ruas jalan Coaster (21-41 cm, di kawasan dermaga peti kemas (62-94 cm, pemecah gelombang sebelah utara (64-79 cm, pemecah gelombang sebelah barat (74-140 cm, penahan gelombang sebelah timur (76-89 cm, dan pelataran peti kemas

  2. Traces of warping subsided tectonic blocks on Miranda, Enceladus, Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochemasov, G.

    2007-08-01

    Icy satellites of the outer Solar system have very large range of sizes - from kilometers to thousands of kilometers. Bodies less than 400-500 km across have normally irregular shapes , often presenting simple Plato's polyhedrons woven by standing inertiagravity waves (see an accompanying abstract of Kochemasov). Larger bodies with enhanced gravity normally are rounded off and have globular shapes but far from ideal spheres. This is due to warping action of inertia-gravity waves of various wavelengths origin of which is related to body movements in elliptical keplerian orbits with periodically changing accelerations (alternating accelerations cause periodically changing forces acting upon a body what means oscillations of its spheres in form of standing warping waves). The fundamental wave 1 and its first overtone wave 2 produce ubiquitous tectonic dichotomy - two segmental structure and tectonic sectoring superimposed on this dichotomy. Two kinds of tectonic blocks (segments and sectors) are formed: uplifted (+) and subsided (-). Uplifting means increasing planetary radius of blocks, subsiding - decreasing radius (as a sequence subsiding blocks diminishing their surfaces must be warped, folded, wrinkled; uplifting blocks increasing their surfaces tend to be deeply cracked, fallen apart). To level changing angular momenta of blocks subsided areas are filled with denser material than uplifted ones (one of the best examples is Earth with its oceanic basins filled with dense basalts and uplifted continents built of less dense on average andesitic material). Icy satellites follow the same rule. Their warped surfaces show differing chemistries or structures of constructive materials. Uplifted blocks are normally built with light (by color and density) water ice. Subsided blocks - depressions, "seas', "lakes", coronas - by somewhat denser material differing in color from water ice (very sharply - Iapetus, moderately - Europa, slightly - many saturnian satellites). A very

  3. Subsidence and carbon loss in drained tropical peatlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hooijer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Conversion of tropical peatlands to agriculture leads to a release of carbon from previously stable, long-term storage, resulting in land subsidence that can be a surrogate measure of CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. We present an analysis of recent large-scale subsidence monitoring studies in Acacia and oil palm plantations on peatland in SE Asia, and compare the findings with previous studies. Subsidence in the first 5 yr after drainage was found to be 142 cm, of which 75 cm occurred in the first year. After 5 yr, the subsidence rate in both plantation types, at average water table depths of 0.7 m, remained constant at around 5 cm yr−1. The results confirm that primary consolidation contributed substantially to total subsidence only in the first year after drainage, that secondary consolidation was negligible, and that the amount of compaction was also much reduced within 5 yr. Over 5 yr after drainage, 75 % of cumulative subsidence was caused by peat oxidation, and after 18 yr this was 92 %. The average rate of carbon loss over the first 5 yr was 178 t CO2eq ha−1 yr−1, which reduced to 73 t CO2eq ha−1 yr−1 over subsequent years, potentially resulting in an average loss of 100 t CO2eq ha−1 yr−1 over 25 yr. Part of the observed range in subsidence and carbon loss values is explained by differences in water table depth, but vegetation cover and other factors such as addition of fertilizers also influence peat oxidation. A relationship with groundwater table depth shows that subsidence and carbon loss are still considerable even at the highest water levels theoretically possible in plantations. This implies that improved plantation water management will reduce these impacts by 20 % at most, relative to current conditions, and that high rates of carbon loss and land subsidence are

  4. Combined Use of C- and X-Band SAR Data for Subsidence Monitoring in an Urban Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Solari

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we present the detection and characterization of ground displacements in the urban area of Pisa (Central Italy using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR products. Thirty RADARSAT-2 and twenty-nine COSMO-SkyMed images have been analyzed with the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS algorithm, in order to quantify the ground subsidence and its temporal evolution in the three-year time interval from 2011 to 2014. A borehole database was reclassified in stratigraphical and geotechnical homogeneous units, providing the geological background needed for the local scale analysis of the recorded displacements. Moreover, the interferometric outputs were compared with the last 30 years’ urban evolution of selected parts of the city. Two deformation patterns were recorded by the InSAR data: very slow vertical movements within the defined stability threshold (±2.5 mm/yr and areas with subsidence rates down to −5 to −7 mm/yr, associated with high peak velocities (−15 to −20 mm/yr registered by single buildings or small groups of buildings. Some of these structures are used to demonstrate that the high subsidence rates are related to the recent urbanization, which is the trigger for the accelerated consolidation process of highly compressible layers. Finally, this urban area was a valuable test site for demonstrating the different results of the C- and X-band data processing, in terms of the density of points and the quality of the time series of deformation.

  5. What’s the Score? Walkable Environments and Subsidized Households

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jae Kim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neighborhood walkability can influence individual health, social interactions, and environmental quality, but the relationships between subsidized households and their walkable environment have not been sufficiently examined in previous empirical studies. Focusing on two types of subsidized housing developments (Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC and Public Housing (PH in Austin, Texas, this study evaluates the neighborhood walkability of place-based subsidized households, utilizing objectively measured Walk Score and walking-related built environment data. We also used U.S. Census block group data to account for the socio-demographic covariates. Based on various data, we employed bivariate and multivariate analyses to specify the relationships between subsidized households and their neighborhood walkable environment. The results of our bivariate analyses show that LIHTC households tend to be located in car-dependent neighborhoods and have more undesirable walking-related built environment conditions compared with non-LIHTC neighborhoods. Our regression results also represent that LIHTC households are more likely to be exposed to neighborhoods with low Walk Score, less sidewalk coverage, and more highways and major roads, while there are no significant associations for PH households. These findings imply that more attention and effort toward reducing the inequitable distributions of walkable neighborhood features supporting rather than hindering healthy lifestyles must be provided to subsidized households.

  6. Statistical elaborations of PS DInSAR data applied to the analysis of the subsidence affecting the Venetian coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessitore, Serena; Fiaschi, Simone; Achilli, Vladimiro; Fabris, Massimo; Floris, Mario

    2015-04-01

    Subsidence is a hazard that may have natural or anthropic origin. It can affect wide areas causing important economic losses. The area of the Venetian coast is affected by subsidence mainly due to the exploitation of its resources (gas and water). In particular, about 40% of the Italian extraction activities are on this area and here the subsidence arise in conjunction with the industrial revolution (1950-1970). An effective monitoring system is necessary for the correct management of the resources exploitation that, very often, is not supervised. To this aim, the innovative DInSAR techniques have been effectively employed as monitoring systems for the risk assessments of various instability phenomena, such as subsidence, landslides, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, sinkholes. These techniques represent a powerful investigation tool for their high spatial and multi-temporal coverage, fast data acquisition, and overall low costs. Their results are the displacement estimates along the satellite Line of Sight (LOS), the velocity map and the displacements time series for the whole observation period. In the present work, the ERS and ENVISAT DInSAR data, achieved through the Persistent Scatterers (PS) technique, have been used to produce the iso-kinetic maps of deformation for an area of about 4300 Km2. Here, the mean velocities computed along the ERS and ENVISAT observation periods 1992-2000 and 2003-2010 have been interpolated through the Ordinary Kriging (OK) method. Simulated values and estimations of subsidence uncertainties have been analysed to advance the current understanding on the phenomenon that affects the study area. The achieved maps give information about the spatial distribution of the rates of deformation, which could be correlated with the available geological, hydrogeological and geotechnical data, as well as with the recorded damage to the structures and infrastructures. Then, local Authorities can use these maps as useful tools for the monitoring

  7. Fault Length Vs Fault Displacement Evaluation In The Case Of Cerro Prieto Pull-Apart Basin (Baja California, Mexico) Subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacka, E.; Sarychikhina, O.; Nava Pichardo, F. A.; Farfan, F.; Garcia Arthur, M. A.; Orozco, L.; Brassea, J.

    2013-05-01

    The Cerro Prieto pull-apart basin is located in the southern part of San Andreas Fault system, and is characterized by high seismicity, recent volcanism, tectonic deformation and hydrothermal activity (Lomnitz et al, 1970; Elders et al., 1984; Suárez-Vidal et al., 2008). Since the Cerro Prieto geothermal field production started, in 1973, significant subsidence increase was observed (Glowacka and Nava, 1996, Glowacka et al., 1999), and a relation between fluid extraction rate and subsidence rate has been suggested (op. cit.). Analysis of existing deformation data (Glowacka et al., 1999, 2005, Sarychikhina 2011) points to the fact that, although the extraction changes influence the subsidence rate, the tectonic faults control the spatial extent of the observed subsidence. Tectonic faults act as water barriers in the direction perpendicular to the fault, and/or separate regions with different compaction, and as effect the significant part of the subsidence is released as vertical displacement on the ground surface along fault rupture. These faults ruptures cause damages to roads and irrigation canals and water leakage. Since 1996, a network of geotechnical instruments has operated in the Mexicali Valley, for continuous recording of deformation phenomena. To date, the network (REDECVAM: Mexicali Valley Crustal Strain Measurement Array) includes two crackmeters and eight tiltmeters installed on, or very close to, the main faults; all instruments have sampling intervals in the 1 to 20 minutes range. Additionally, there are benchmarks for measuring vertical fault displacements for which readings are recorded every 3 months. Since the crackmeter measures vertical displacement on the fault at one place only, the question appears: can we use the crackmeter data to evaluate how long is the lenth of the fractured fault, and how quickly it grows, so we can know where we can expect fractures in the canals or roads? We used the Wells and Coppersmith (1994) relations between

  8. MECHANISM OF WATER-SOIL COUPLED ACTION DURING MINING SUBSIDENCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    狄乾生; 黄山民

    1991-01-01

    This paper,on the basis ot the scientific research of engineering geological exploration in a mining area ,systematically studies the reasons and influence factors of consolidation and deformation of the saturated soil included in the thick loose water-bearing overburden due to mining subsidence ,and analyses the dissipation of hyperstatic pore water pressure during the change of original stress and strain state of, the soil. Again,by means of the coupled model based on Cambridge model and Biot's three-dimensional consolidation theory,adopting a great many physico-mechanical parameters measured in various soil layers,the paper analyses the consolidation and deformation of saturated soil affected by mining subsidence with elasto-plastic finite element method. Thus ,the research not only reveals the regulation of stress ,straln,displacement and hyperstatic pore water pressure dissipation in overlying soil mass,but also opens up a new direction and way for the research of mining subsidence.

  9. Linking oil production to surface subsidence from satellite radar interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haibin; Dvorkin, Jack; Nur, Amos

    Land subsidence over the Belridge and Lost Hills oil fields, Southern California, was measured using spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). During the 105-day period between 11/5/95 and 2/17/96, the subsidence in the center of the Lost Hills field reached 15 cm. We assume that this surface subsidence resulted from the vertical shrinkage of the reservoir, which in turn was due to oil production and the resulting pore pressure drop. We model this mechanical effect using an elastic deformation theoretical solution with input constants taken from relevant experiments. The modeled surface deformation matches the InSAR measured values. This result indicates that it is possible, in principle, to monitor hydrocarbon production using satellite-based measurements of earth deformation.

  10. Study on neural network model for calculating subsidence factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Wen-bing; ZHANG Jie

    2007-01-01

    The major factors influencing subsidence factor were comprehensively analyzed. Then the artificial neural network model for calculating subsidence factor was set up with the theory of artificial neural network (ANN). A large amount of data from observation stations in China was collected and used as learning and training samples to train and test the artificial neural network model. The calculated results of the ANN model and the observed values were compared and analyzed in this paper. The results demonstrate that many factors can be considered in this model and the result is more precise and closer to observed values to calculate the subsidence factor by the ANN model. It can satisfy the need of engineering.

  11. The UNESCO-IHP Working Group on Land Subsidence: Four Decades of International Contributions to Hydrogeological Related Subsidence Research and Knowledge Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, D. L.; Carreon-Freyre, D.; Teatini, P.; Ye, S.

    2015-12-01

    Subsidence is globally prevalent and because much of it is related to hydrological processes affected by human development of local land and water resources, "Land Subsidence" was included in the UNESCO programme of the International Hydrological Decade (IHD), 1965-1974 and an ad hoc working group on land subsidence was formed. In 1975 subsidence was retained under the framework of the UNESCO IHP (subproject 8.4: "Investigation of Land Subsidence due to Groundwater Exploitation"), and UNESCO IHP formerly codified the Working Group on Land Subsidence (WGLS). In 1984 the WGLS produced a comprehensive guidebook to serve scientists and engineers, confronting land subsidence problems, particularly in developing countries (http://unesdoc.unesco.org/$other/unesdoc/pdf/065167eo.pdf). During the IHD, UNESCO IHP convened the 1st International Symposium on Land Subsidence in 1969 in Tokyo, Japan. In collaboration with UNESCO IHP, IAHS, and other scientific organizations, the WGLS has convened eight more International Symposia on Land Subsidence in different countries in Asia, Europe and North America. The 9 published symposia proceedings constitute an important source of global subsidence research and case studies during the past 45 years, covering both anthropogenic and natural subsidence processes. Currently, the WGLS comprising 20 subsidence experts from 9 countries promotes and facilitates the international exchange of information regarding the design, implementation and evaluation of risk assessments and mitigation measures, the definition of water and land resource-management strategies that support sustainable development in areas vulnerable to subsidence (http://landsubsidence-unesco.org), and the assessment of related geological risks such as earth fissuring and fault activation (www.igcp641.org). The WGLS has become an important global leader in promoting subsidence awareness, scientific research and its application to subsidence monitoring, analysis and management.

  12. Investigation of subsidence in the Manfredonia Gulf (Southern Italy) through multitemporal DInSAR techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triggiani, M.; Refice, A.; Capolongo, D.; Bovenga, F.; Caldara, M.

    2009-04-01

    tourist sea village "Ippocampo". Here, unpublished studies based on ground data indicate average subsidence rates of the order of 0.20 mm/y in the last 125 ka for the inland area next to the village. More recently, height maps issued by the Italian Military Geographic Institute (IGM) in the 1950s report heights a.s.l. of the order of a few m. Observing that today the area is practically at sea level, an average subsidence of the order of tens of mm/y can be inferred for the last 50 years. To gain insight into the recent evolution of these phenomena, we investigate vertical movements on the coastal Tavoliere area through multitemporal differential Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (DInSAR) techniques. We use a persistent scatterers interferometry (PSI) processing methodology [2] to estimate subsidence displacement rates from long temporal series of SAR acquisitions. PSI techniques, first developed at POLIMI [3], allow to retrieve phase information from stacks of co-registered SAR interferograms spanning many years and taken from different directions with large baselines, by restricting the analysis to selected image pixels containing single objects with strong radar backscatter returns. Exploiting the high temporal stability of radar returns from these targets, it is possible to correct the images from spurious phase contributions such as atmospheric phase artefacts and errors in the digital elevation models used to account for topographic InSAR phase. Such stable objects typically coincide with man-made features, so successful applications of PSI techniques are mainly reported over urban centers. We processed a total of 105 SAR images acquired from the ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT satellites, organized in 3 stacks related to both descending (50 ERS-1/2 scenes) and ascending (25 ERS-1/2 and 30 ENVISAT scenes) acquisition geometries. The acquisitions refer to the temporal periods from 1995 to 2000 (ERS) and 2003 to 2008 (ENVISAT), respectively, with a temporal repetition

  13. Flash Flood Hazard Susceptibility Mapping Using Frequency Ratio and Statistical Index Methods in Coalmine Subsidence Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Cao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on producing flash flood hazard susceptibility maps (FFHSM using frequency ratio (FR and statistical index (SI models in the Xiqu Gully (XQG of Beijing, China. First, a total of 85 flash flood hazard locations (n = 85 were surveyed in the field and plotted using geographic information system (GIS software. Based on the flash flood hazard locations, a flood hazard inventory map was built. Seventy percent (n = 60 of the flooding hazard locations were randomly selected for building the models. The remaining 30% (n = 25 of the flooded hazard locations were used for validation. Considering that the XQG used to be a coal mining area, coalmine caves and subsidence caused by coal mining exist in this catchment, as well as many ground fissures. Thus, this study took the subsidence risk level into consideration for FFHSM. The ten conditioning parameters were elevation, slope, curvature, land use, geology, soil texture, subsidence risk area, stream power index (SPI, topographic wetness index (TWI, and short-term heavy rain. This study also tested different classification schemes for the values for each conditional parameter and checked their impacts on the results. The accuracy of the FFHSM was validated using area under the curve (AUC analysis. Classification accuracies were 86.61%, 83.35%, and 78.52% using frequency ratio (FR-natural breaks, statistical index (SI-natural breaks and FR-manual classification schemes, respectively. Associated prediction accuracies were 83.69%, 81.22%, and 74.23%, respectively. It was found that FR modeling using a natural breaks classification method was more appropriate for generating FFHSM for the Xiqu Gully.

  14. Subsidence monitoring network: an Italian example aimed at a sustainable hydrocarbon E&P activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacome, M. C.; Miandro, R.; Vettorel, M.; Roncari, G.

    2015-11-01

    According to the Italian law in order to start-up any new hydrocarbon exploitation activity, an Environmental Impact Assessment study has to be presented, including a monitoring plan, addressed to foresee, measure and analyze in real time any possible impact of the project on the coastal areas and on those ones in the close inland located. The occurrence of subsidence, that could partly be related to hydrocarbon production, both on-shore and off-shore, can generate great concern in those areas where its occurrence may have impacts on the local environment. ENI, following the international scientific community recommendations on the matter, since the beginning of 90's years, implemented a cutting-edge monitoring network, with the aim to prevent, mitigate and control geodynamics phenomena generated in the activity areas, with a particular attention to conservation and protection of environmental and territorial equilibrium, taking care of what is known as "sustainable development". The current ENI implemented monitoring surveys can be divided as: - Shallow monitoring: spirit levelling surveys, continuous GPS surveys in permanent stations, SAR surveys, assestimeter subsurface compaction monitoring, ground water level monitoring, LiDAR surveys, bathymetrical surveys. - Deep monitoring: reservoir deep compaction trough radioactive markers, reservoir static (bottom hole) pressure monitoring. All the information, gathered through the monitoring network, allow: 1. to verify if the produced subsidence is evolving accordingly with the simulated forecast. 2. to provide data to revise and adjust the prediction compaction models 3. to put in place the remedial actions if the impact exceeds the threshold magnitude originally agreed among the involved parties. ENI monitoring plan to measure and monitor the subsidence process, during field production and also after the field closure, is therefore intended to support a sustainable field development and an acceptable exploitation

  15. Adevelopment test on porous concrete material with coal gangue and fly ash used for farmland drainage in coal mining subsidence area with high ground-water level%利用煤矸石粉煤灰制成农田排水混凝土材料的研制实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦倩; 王金满; 胡斯佳

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to solve drainage problems of coal mining subsidence area with high groundwater level ,while improving the utilization rate of mine solid wastes including coal gangue and fly ash .This paper carried out a test on the new porous concrete drainage ditch with coal gangue and fly ash . Two experiments was designed ,one was the test of permeability coefficient and compressive strength of the concrete with coal gangue and fly ash .Five treatments were set up ,respectively using coal gangue instead of 25% and 15% aggregate ,fly ash instead 10% and 15% cement ,also included a blank control group ;Another was the test for the permeable rate of indoor simulated drainage ditch by choosing the concrete mix proportion of treatment 5 which had the maximum permeability coefficient and met the compressive strength standard in experiment one .It was proved that the concrete with coal gangue and fly ash had better water permeability ,and the largest one was treatments 5(coal gangue instead of 30% gravel and fly ash instead of 15% cement) .Besides ,the compressive strength of it was 12 .03MPa ,meeting the standard ;the permeable rate of indoor simulation of farmland drainage ditch was 0 .072cm/h and the modulus of subsurface drainage can reach 0 .01m3/(s .km2 ) when assuming it was applied in the field .The results indicated that this kind of concrete can be applied in the area in which the modulus of subsurface drainage is not larger than the value . The porous concrete drainage ditch with coal gangue and fly ash will have a broad application prospect ;this study can provide supporting for its application .%为了解决高潜水位采煤塌陷区的排水问题,同时提高矿山固体废弃物煤矸石粉煤灰的利用率,本文开展了新型透水性煤矸石粉煤灰混凝土排水沟试验研究。本研究设计了两个试验,一是煤矸石粉煤灰混凝土透水系数和抗压强度测定试验:共设置了五个试验处

  16. A new soil mechanics approach to quantify and predict land subsidence by peat compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Kay; Erkens, Gilles; Zwanenburg, Cor

    2016-10-01

    Land subsidence threatens many coastal areas. Quantifying current and predicting future subsidence are essential to sustain the viability of these areas with respect to rising sea levels. Despite its scale and severity, methods to quantify subsidence are scarce. In peat-rich subsidence hot spots, subsidence is often caused by peat compression. We introduce the standard Cone Penetration Test (CPT) as a technique to quantify subsidence due to compression of peat. In a test in the Holland coastal plain, the Netherlands, we found a strong relationship between thickness reduction of peat and cone resistance, due to an increase in peat stiffness after compression. We use these results to quantify subsidence of peat in subsiding areas of Sacramento-San Joaquin delta and Kalimantan, and found values corresponding with previously made observations. These results open the door for CPT as a new method to document past and predict future subsidence due to peat compression over large areas.

  17. Experimental Study of the Subsidence Characteristics of Clayey Loess

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Lan; Wang Lanmin

    2007-01-01

    Presented in this paper are the results of experimental study and analysis of the subsidence characteristics obtained from soil samples with different contents of clay particles though laboratory dynamic triaxial test, Laser particle size analysis, chemical analysis and electronic microscope scanning. By comparison of the obtained data, the following conclusions are drawn out: (1)The stability of the loess varies with different content of clay; (2) The relation between the dynamic shear strength and the clay particles is not monotonous, but parabolic; (3) In the same consolidation ratio, the clayey loess is the weakest subsidence-resistant when the clay particle content is between 16% ~ 17%.

  18. A study on subsidization of private schools in China

    OpenAIRE

    高, 暁楠

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this Paper is to analyze the policies of subsidization of private schools in China, mainly base on the Law of the People’s Republic of China on Promotion of Privately-run Schools and the Regulations for the implementation of this standardization law, which have been promulgated recently. But for the particularity of private schools in China, the general view of the private schools in China, includes the concept of private school and the idea of subsidization of private schools,...

  19. Coastal Flooding Hazards due to storm surges and subsidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Carlo; Knudsen, Per; Andersen, Ole B.

    Flooding hazard and risk mapping are major topics in low-lying coastal areas before even considering the adverse effects of sea level rise (SLR) due to climate change. While permanent inundation may be a prevalent issue, more often floods related to extreme events (storm surges) have the largest...... damage potential.Challenges are amplified in some areas due to subsidence from natural and/or anthropogenic causes. Subsidence of even a few mm/y may over time greatly impair the safety against flooding of coastal communities and must be accounted for in order to accomplish the economically most viable...

  20. Dissolved organic carbon, CO2, and CH4 concentrations and their stable isotope ratios in thermokarst lakes on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuicui Mu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermokarst lakes are widely distributed on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP, which accounts for 8% of the global permafrost area. These lakes probably promote organic matter biodegradation and thus accelerate the emission of carbon-based greenhouse gases. However, little is known about greenhouse gas concentrations and their stable isotopes characteristics of these lakes. In this study, we measured the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC, dissolved CO2 and CH4, as well as the distribution of δ13CCO2, δ13CCH4, and δ13COM (organic matter of lake sediments in thermokarst lakes on the QTP. Results showed that the OM of the lake sediments was highly decomposed. The concentrations of DOC, CO2 and CH4 in the lake water on the QTP were 1.2–49.6 mg L–1, 3.6–45.0 μmol L–1 and 0.28–3.0 μmol L–1, respectively. The highest CO2 and CH4 concentrations were recorded in July while the lowest values in September, which suggested that temperature had an effect on greenhouse gas production, although this pattern may also relate to thermal stratification of the water column. The results implied that thermokast lakes should be paid more attention to regarding carbon cycle and greenhouse gas emissions on the QTP.

  1. Detection of the Subsidence Affecting a Shopping Center in Marseilles (France) using Sar Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feurer, D.; Le Mouelic, S.; Raucoules, D.; Carnec, C.; Nédellec, J.-L.

    2004-06-01

    Help of satellite radar interferometry for urban subsidence observation has been demonstrated for several years now. This monitoring tool is able to provide an assessment of the ground motion with a millimetric accuracy and a large spatial coverage. We present here a result of this technique applied to the monitoring of a small area : the shopping centre complex and cinema multiplex in Marseilles, France. This construction work was one of the most important construction site of this last few years in France. Inaugurated in October, 1997, the multiplex had to close 6 of its 15 cinemas five months later because of collapsing risks due to important ground movements. It has been totally closed in July, 1999. The multiplex building demolition is currently under way. Finally, this "flop" represents a cost of 30 millions euros. 14 ERS images acquired between 1992 and 2000 had been processed in order to produce a set of 105 differential interferograms. We performed a recursive correction of orbital and topographic fringes using a FFT computation and a Digital Elevation Model provided by the French National Institute (IGN). The analysis of the interferograms series has allowed to detect unambiguously a signature of few pixels corresponding to the ground movement. From this study, we observed a ground deformation during 1997 to 1998, an overall stability during late 1998 to 1999 and again a deformation during late 1999 to 2000. This study shows that, in specific cases, traditional InSAR is able to provide valuable information on very localised ground deformation. It also shows the interest of a comprehensive study of the full ERS archive of this site in order to assess the stability of the ground before, when no ground-based measurements were available, during, and after the construction works.

  2. Land subsidence and caprock dolines caused by subsurface gypsum dissolution and the effect of subsidence on the fluvial system in the Upper Tigris Basin (between Bismil Batman, Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Uğur

    2005-11-01

    Karstification-based land subsidence was found in the Upper Tigris Basin with dimensions not seen anywhere else in Turkey. The area of land subsidence, where there are secondary and tertiary subsidence developments, reaches 140 km 2. Subsidence depth ranges between 40 and 70 m. The subsidence was formed as a result of subsurface gypsum dissolution in Lower Miocene formation. Although there are limestones together with gypsum and Eocene limestone below them in the area, a subsidence with such a large area is indicative of karstification in the gypsum. The stratigraphical cross-sections taken from the wells and the water analyses also verify this fact. The Lower Miocene gypsum, which shows confined aquifer features, was completely dissolved by the aggressive waters injected from the top and discharged through by Zellek Fault. This resulted in the development of subsidence and formation of caprock dolines on loosely textured Upper Miocene-Pliocene cover formations. The Tigris River runs through the subsidence area between Batman and Bismil. There are four terrace levels as T1 (40 m), T2 (30 m), T3 (10 m) and T4 (4-5 m) in the Tigris River valley. It was also found that there were some movements of the levels of the terraces in the valley by subsidence. The subsidence developed gradually throughout the Quaternary; however no terrace was formed purely because of subsidence.

  3. Comparison of water-level, extensometric, DInSAR and simulation data for quantification of subsidence in Murcia City (SE Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessitore, S.; Fernández-Merodo, J. A.; Herrera, G.; Tomás, R.; Ramondini, M.; Sanabria, M.; Duro, J.; Mulas, J.; Calcaterra, D.

    2016-05-01

    Subsidence due to groundwater overexploitation has been recognized in the metropolitan area of Murcia (25 km2) in south-eastern Spain since the early 1990s. Previous published works have focused their attention on land subsidence that occurred during the drought period between 1995 and 2008. This work first analyzes the groundwater recovery that has occurred since 2008 and then determines the kind of associated ground deformation detected by the new extensometric data. Subsequently, subsidence time series are computed on 24 geotechnical boreholes scattered throughout the study area by means of a hydro-mechanical finite element code and a linear-elastic constitutive law. A spatio-temporal interpolation of the numerically modeled surface displacements is performed over the whole domain and compared with extensometers and DInSAR-derived displacement maps in two different periods: the drought period from 2004 to 2008, and the recovery period from 2008 to 2012. In spite of the limited information on the geomechanical parameters characterizing the modelled geological formations, the proposed approach is able to discriminate areas where the soils have an elastic behavior (small differences in the comparisons) or an elasto-plastic behavior (large differences in the comparisons). This zonation enhances the understanding of the subsidence phenomenon in Murcia City and could prevent, from a quantitatively point of view, future severe subsidence due to aquifer overexploitation.

  4. Interpolation of GPS and Geological Data Using InSAR Deformation Maps: Method and Application to Land Subsidence in the Alto Guadalentín Aquifer (SE Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Béjar-Pizarro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Land subsidence resulting from groundwater extractions is a global phenomenon adversely affecting many regions worldwide. Understanding the governing processes and mitigating associated hazards require knowing the spatial distribution of the implicated factors (piezometric levels, lithology, ground deformation, usually only known at discrete locations. Here, we propose a methodology based on the Kriging with External Drift (KED approach to interpolate sparse point measurements of variables influencing land subsidence using high density InSAR measurements. In our study, located in the Alto Guadalentín basin, SE Spain, these variables are GPS vertical velocities and the thickness of compressible soils. First, we estimate InSAR and GPS rates of subsidence covering the periods 2003–2010 and 2004–2013, respectively. Then, we apply the KED method to the discrete variables. The resulting continuous GPS velocity map shows maximum subsidence rates of 13 cm/year in the center of the basin, in agreement with previous studies. The compressible deposits thickness map is significantly improved. We also test the coherence of Sentinel-1 data in the study region and evaluate the applicability of this methodology with the new satellite, which will improve the monitoring of aquifer-related subsidence and the mapping of variables governing this phenomenon.

  5. Land subsidence in the Saga plane due to water shortage in 1994; Saga heiya ni okeru 1994 nen ijo kassui to jiban chinka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachiya, Y.; Kitajima, J. [Saga Prefectural Government Office, Saga (Japan); Jinno, K. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-08-21

    This paper reports land subsidence in Saga Plane during the abnormal drought in 1994. Saga Plane is arranged with a table land with a height of 20 m or lower above sea level, an alluvial fan, an inundation plane, and a delta in that order, with a reclaimed land spreading in front thereof. Groundwater is utilized mainly for industrial use in the Saga district, with consumption of 12 million m{sup 3} per year in around 1975 and 3.5 million m{sup 3} per year in recent years. The Shiraishi district uses groundwater mainly for tap water supply and agriculture, with normal consumption of 600 to 900 m{sup 3} per year having risen to 2000 m{sup 3} per year in 1994 when the abnormal drought has been experienced. The Saga prefectural government has been conducting groundwater collection amount survey, groundwater level measurement and level survey every year. As a result of observations, annual maximum subsidence has stopped at 3.3 cm and subsidence volume of 1280 m{sup 3} as a result of reduced groundwater collection in the Saga area. The Shiraishi area had ground water collection greatly increased due to drought, with the annual maximum subsidence having reached 16.0 cm and the subsidence volume of 5.9 million m{sup 3}. 7 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Land subsidence caused by groundwater exploitation in Suzhou City, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chongxi; Pei, Shunping; Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    2002-09-01

    Suzhou City, located at the lower reaches of the Yangtze River in southeastern Jiangsu Province, is one of the few cities in China which suffer from severe ground settlement. A research project was carried out to investigate this problem. Geological and hydrogeological studies show that there is a multi-layered aquifer system with three distinct, soft mud layers of marine and lagoonal origins. An examination of historical records of groundwater extraction, water levels, and ground settlement shows that the ground subsidence is associated with the continuously increasing groundwater extraction in the deep, confined aquifer. It is believed that the consolidation of the soft mud layers, especially the third layer which is thick and close to the main pumped aquifer, contributes to the ground settlement. A three-dimensional finite difference numerical model representing the multi-layered aquifer system was developed to study the ground settlement in response to groundwater extraction. By calibrating the model with both the measured groundwater level and ground settlement, the aquifer parameters were estimated. The model outputs fit reasonably well with the observed results, which indicates that the numerical model can reproduce the dynamic processes of both groundwater flow and soil consolidation. The hydraulic conductivity of the third mud layer near the center of the ground settlement has been reduced by over 30% in the last 14 years. The gradual deterioration in the hydraulic conductivity of the mud may have significant adverse effect on the sustainable groundwater resource of the deep confined aquifer, since the recharge from the shallow aquifers through the mud layer is the only source of water to the deep aquifer. An analysis of the spatial distributions of groundwater drawdown and ground settlement shows that the area with maximum drawdown is not necessarily the area with maximum ground settlement due to the occurrence of the soft mud layer. A simple reallocation

  7. Limits to foundation displacement of an extra high voltage transmission tower in a mining subsidence area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu Qianjin; Yuan Guanglin; Guo Guangli; Zhang Yunfei

    2012-01-01

    Given the background of a transmission tower erected on a particular mining subsidence area,we used finite element modeling to analyze the anti-deformation performance of transmission towers under a number of different load conditions,including horizontal foundation displacement,uneven vertical downward displacement,wind loads and icing conditions.The results show that the failure in stability of a single steel angle iron represents the limit of the tower given ground deformation.We calculated the corresponding limits of foundation displacements.The results indicate that compression displacement of the foundation is more dangerous than tension displacement.Under complex foundation displacement conditions,horizontal foundation displacement is a key factor leading to failure in the stability of towers.Under conditions of compression or tension displacement of the foundation,wind load becomes the key factor.Towers do not fail when foundation displacements are smaller than 1% (under tension) or 0.5% (under horizontal compression or single foundation subsidence) of the distance between two supports.

  8. A Study of Ground Deformation in the Guangzhou Urban Area with Persistent Scatterer Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available TheInterferometric Point Target Analysis (IPTA technique and Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR images acquired over Hong Kong from 2007–2008 were used to detect ground deformation in the urban area of Guangzhou city in South China. A ground deformation rate map with scattered distribution of point targets shows the maximum subsidence (rise rate as high as -26 to -20 mma-1 (16–21 mma-1, implying that the study area is an active zone for ground deformation. Based on the point target map, a contour ground deformation rate map is generated. The map shows three major subsidence zones located in the middle-west, the east, and the southwest of the study area, respectively. All the six ground collapse accidents that occurred in 2007–2008 fall within the subsidence zones, qualitatively validating the IPTA results. Ground subsidence and geological conditions on Datansha Island are examined. The results indicate that the local geological conditions, such as limestone Karst geomorphology as well as silt layers characterized by high water content, high void ratio, high compressibility, low bearing capacity and low shear strength, and underground engineering projects are responsible for ground subsidence and ground collapse accidents occurred there.

  9. A study of ground deformation in the guangzhou urban area with persistent scatterer interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qing; Lin, Hui; Jiang, Liming; Chen, Fulong; Cheng, Shilai

    2009-01-01

    The Interferometric Point Target Analysis (IPTA) technique and Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) images acquired over Hong Kong from 2007-2008 were used to detect ground deformation in the urban area of Guangzhou city in South China. A ground deformation rate map with scattered distribution of point targets shows the maximum subsidence (rise) rate as high as -26 to -20 mma(-1) (16-21 mma(-1)), implying that the study area is an active zone for ground deformation. Based on the point target map, a contour ground deformation rate map is generated. The map shows three major subsidence zones located in the middle-west, the east, and the southwest of the study area, respectively. All the six ground collapse accidents that occurred in 2007-2008 fall within the subsidence zones, qualitatively validating the IPTA results. Ground subsidence and geological conditions on Datansha Island are examined. The results indicate that the local geological conditions, such as limestone Karst geomorphology as well as silt layers characterized by high water content, high void ratio, high compressibility, low bearing capacity and low shear strength, and underground engineering projects are responsible for ground subsidence and ground collapse accidents occurred there.

  10. Coastal city subsidence in Shenzhen (China), monitored using multi-frequency radar interferometry time-series techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Li, Yongsheng; Singleton, Andrew; Li, Qingquan; Zhang, Jingfa; Li, Zhenhong

    2014-05-01

    In just 26 years, the coastal city of Shenzhen (Southern China) has been transformed from a small fishing village to a modern city with a population exceeding 8.5 million people. Following its designation as a Special Economic Zone in the 1980s, the city became a test bed for China's economic reforms and currently leads many new practices in urban planning. The rapid economic development was matched by a sharp increase in the demand for usable land and consequently, extensive coastal reclamation has been undertaken by piling rock fragments from nearby hills onto the seabed. However, it has recently been reported that new apartments, offices and transport networks built on the reclaimed land have become unusable due to ground subsidence. The additional threat of coastal inundation from sea-level rise also requires serious consideration. InSAR time-series techniques (such as Persistent Scatterer and Small Baseline InSAR) are capable of detecting sub-centimetre elevation changes of the Earth's surface over large areas and at a density far exceeding the capabilities of a GPS network - particularly for such an urban environment as Shenzhen. This study uses numerous independent tracks of SAR data (two ENVISAT C-band tracks and two ALOS L-band tracks) to determine the surface movements between 2004 and 2013. Quantitative comparative analyses are carried out in the overlapping area between two adjacent tracks, and thus no ground data is required to validate InSAR results. The results show greatest subsidence in coastal areas with the areas of reclaimed land also predominantly undergoing subsidence. The combination of different ascending and descending tracks allows 2D velocity fields to be estimated and it will be important to determine whether the subsidence from the recently reclaimed land is consolidation or part of a longer-term trend. This ability to provide accurate measurements of ground stability for the city of Shenzhen will help focus investigations into areas of

  11. Numerical analysis of surface subsidence in asymmetric parallel highway tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratan Das

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tunnelling related hazards are very common in the Himalayan terrain and a number of such instances have been reported. Several twin tunnels are being planned for transportation purposes which will require good understanding for prediction of tunnel deformation and surface settlement during the engineering life of the structure. The deformational behaviour, design of sequential excavation and support of any jointed rock mass are challenging during underground construction. We have raised several commonly assumed issues while performing stability analysis of underground opening at shallow depth. For this purpose, Kainchi-mod Nerchowck twin tunnels (Himachal Pradesh, India are taken for in-depth analysis of the stability of two asymmetric tunnels to address the influence of topography, twin tunnel dimension and geometry. The host rock encountered during excavation is composed mainly of moderately to highly jointed grey sandstone, maroon sandstone and siltstones. In contrast to equidimensional tunnels where the maximum subsidence is observed vertically above the centreline of the tunnel, the result from the present study shows shifting of the maximum subsidence away from the tunnel centreline. The maximum subsidence of 0.99 mm is observed at 4.54 m left to the escape tunnel centreline whereas the maximum subsidence of 3.14 mm is observed at 8.89 m right to the main tunnel centreline. This shifting clearly indicates the influence of undulating topography and in-equidimensional noncircular tunnel.

  12. At Whose Service? Subsidizing Services and the Skill Premium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Groezen, B.J.A.M.; Meijdam, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the effects of subsidizing low-skilled, labourintensive services hired by high-skilled individuals in the presence of labour income taxation. Whether such a subsidy can be Paretoimproving depends crucially on the degree of substitutability of both types of labour in the

  13. Subsidence of residual soils in a karst terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumm, E.C.; Kane, W.F.; Ben-Hassine, J.; Scarborough, J.A. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA)); Ketelle, R.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Siting and operating landfills for solid waste disposal in eastern Tennessee that can operate with minimum impact on groundwater is problematic. The operational requirement of thick, excavational soils and the regulatory requirement of a buffer between disposal units and an aquifer result in siting most operating East Tennessee landfills in outcrop areas of the Knox Group. However, the common occurrence of karst terrain and sinkholes in the Knox Group indicates the vulnerability of such sites to rapid groundwater recharge and flow and the potential for subsidence or collapse of soil into bedrock cavities. To address the potential for subsidence or collapse of soils at the East Chestnut Ridge site on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the following activities and analyses were completed: The locations of karst features on the site were determined by field reconnaissance; several sinkholes were selected for detailed examination; soil boring, sampling, and physical testing were performed in soils located within, adjacent to, and outside of sinkholes to characterize soil strength at various depths; detailed plane surveys were made for 11 sinkholes to measure accurately their dimension and shape for use in determining profile functions for subsidence basins at the site; The stress-deformation response of a typical soil profile overlying a hypothetical bedrock cavity was analyzed numerically for a range of soil thickness and a range of cavity radii. A consistent estimate of the relationship between subsidence basin dimension, soil thickness, and cavity radius has been derived. 30 refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. IMPACT OF OIL ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOIL SUBSIDENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Алексей Алексеевич Бурцев

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper studied the effect of oil content on the mechanical properties of soil subsidence - Ek modulus and compressibility factor m0, obtained in the laboratory with the help of artificial impregnation oil soil samples. A comparison of the above parameters with samples of the same soil in the natural and water-saturated conditions has been perfomed.

  15. Tectonics and subsidence evolution of the Sirt Basin, Libya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abadi, A.M.; Wees, J.D. van; Dijk, P.M. van; Cloetingh, S.A.P.L.

    2005-01-01

    Backstripping analysis of 225 wells located within the Sirt Basin (Fig. 1) provide new constraints on the Sirt Basin development. Four coherent tectonic phases from Late Jurassic to present. The presentation of contour maps of subsidence and crustal stretching allows to visualize spatial and tempora

  16. Land subsidence and hydrodynamic compaction of sedimentary basins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kooi

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional model is used to investigate the relationship between land subsidence and compaction of basin sediments in response to sediment loading. Analysis of the model equations and numerical experiments demonstrate quasi-linear systems behaviour and show that rates of land subsidence due to compaction: (i can attain a significant fraction (>40% of the long-term sedimentation rate; (ii are hydrodynamically delayed with respect to sediment loading. The delay is controlled by a compaction response time τc that can reach values of 10-5-107 yr for thick shale sequences. Both the behaviour of single sediment layers and multiple-layer systems are analysed. Subsequently the model is applied to the coastal area of the Netherlands to illustrate that lateral variability in compaction-derived land subsidence in sedimentary basins largely reflects the spatial variability in both sediment loading and compaction response time. Typical rates of compaction-derived subsidence predicted by the model are of the order of 0.1 mm/yr but may reach values in excess of 1 mm/yr under favourable conditions.

  17. How large-scale subsidence affects stratocumulus transitions (discussion paper)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Dussen, J.J.; De Roode, S.R.; Siebesma, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    Some climate modeling results suggest that the Hadley circulation might weaken in a future climate, causing a subsequent reduction in the large-scale subsidence velocity in the subtropics. In this study we analyze the cloud liquid water path (LWP) budget from large-eddy simulation (LES) results of

  18. Subsidized Housing, Public Housing, and Adolescent Violence and Substance Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leech, Tamara G. J.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the separate relationships of public housing residence and subsidized housing residence to adolescent health risk behavior. Data include 2,530 adolescents aged 14 to 19 who were children of the National the Longitudinal Study of Youth. The author used stratified propensity methods to compare the behaviors of each…

  19. The Opportunity Illusion: Subsidized Housing and Failing Schools in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Deirdre

    2009-01-01

    Since the late 1980s, the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program has funded the bulk of subsidized development nationwide, enabling the construction of over 100,000 units targeted to lower income households in California alone (California Tax Credit Allocation Committee 2009c). Yet, by not encouraging the siting of projects in racially…

  20. Collaboration and Subsidized Early Care and Education Programs in Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielberger, Julie; Zanoni, Wladimir; Barisik, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    As a result of policy changes following welfare reform in 1996 and the costs associated with providing high-quality early care and education for children of low-income working families, agency collaboration in the state of Illinois has become an increasingly salient feature of subsidized early care and education programs (SECE). The authors…

  1. Satellite signal shows storage-unloading subsidence in North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiwo, J. P.; Tao, F.

    2015-06-01

    Worsening water storage depletion (WSD) contributes to environmental degradation, land subsidence and earthquake and could disrupt food production/security and social stability. There is need for efficient water use strategies in North China, a pivotal agrarian, industrial and political base in China with a widespread WSD. This study integrates satellite, model and field data products to investigate WSD and land subsidence in North China. In the first step, GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) mass rates are used to show WSD in the region. Next, GRACE total water storage (TWS) is corrected for soil water storage (SWS) to derive groundwater storage (GWS) using GLDAS (Global Land Data Assimilation System) data products. The derived GWS is compared with GWS obtained from field-measured groundwater level to show land subsidence in the study area. Then GPS (Global Positioning System) data of relative land surface change (LSC) are used to confirm the subsidence due to WSD. A total of ~ 96 near-consecutive months (January 2002 through December 2009) of datasets are used in the study. Based on GRACE mass rates, TWS depletion is 23.76 ± 1.74 mm yr-1 or 13.73 ± 1.01 km3 yr-1 in the 578 000 km2 study area. This is ~ 31 % of the slated 45 km3 yr-1 water delivery in 2050 via the South-North Water Diversion Project. Analysis of relative LSC shows subsidence of 7.29 ± 0.35 mm yr-1 in Beijing and 2.74 ± 0.16 mm yr-1 in North China. About 11.53 % (2.74 ± 0.18 mm or 1.58 ± 0.12 km3) of the TWS and 8.37 % (1.52 ± 0.70 mm or 0.88 ± 0.03 km3) of the GWS are attributed to storage reductions accompanying subsidence in the region. Although interpretations of the findings require caution due to the short temporal and large spatial coverage, the concurrence of WSD and land subsidence could have adverse implications for the study area. It is critical that the relevant stakeholders embark on resource-efficient measures to ensure water availability, food security, ecological

  2. Salt Marsh Response and Recovery to Coseismic Subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, A. N.; Carlin, J. A.; Rhodes, B. P.; Kirby, M.; Leeper, R. J.; Smith, R. W.

    2016-12-01

    Salt marshes worldwide are under increasing stress from eustatic sea level rise. Along the tectonically active west coast of North America, some salt marshes are also vulnerable to abrupt increases in relative sea level rise (RSLR) resulting from coseismic subsidence. Elevation zonation of sub-environments within a marsh provides the opportunity to interpret the sedimentary record in marshes to infer past earthquakes, which may improve understanding of regional seismic hazards and ecosystem response to increases in sea level. Our study area is the Seal Beach Wetlands (SBW), an 3 km2 salt marsh straddling the seismically active Newport-Inglewood fault zone in southern California. A previous study of the SBW identified sedimentary evidence of three coseismic subsidence events. Here, our goals were to identify coseismic subsidence events preserved in SBW stratigraphy and to quantify marsh recovery following an earthquake to assess marsh resiliency to rapid RSLR. To do this, we focused on one core collected near the fringe of the SBW and applied a suite of sedimentary and geochemical analyses. Our results indicated that the SBW may preserve sedimentary evidence of four potential coseismic subsidence events. Events were distinguished in the stratigraphy by a sharp upper contact interpreted as an abrupt shift in marsh depositional sub-environments, from a vegetated marsh, to an intertidal mudflat or a subtidal environment. This stratigraphy suggests that the marsh rapidly subsided, preserving the evidence of the vegetated marsh as a peat deposit overlain by a low-organic mud or muddy-sand layer. A typical marsh accretion facies succession occurred above each earthquake event in the core, suggesting full marsh recovery. From the core data, we also observed that the net average rate of marsh recovery, i.e., marsh accretion, was consistent. Estimated recovery rates between 0.6 and 1.1 mm/yr were comparable to the overall accretion rate and regional late Holocene RSLR rate

  3. Spatiotemporal Characterization of Land Subsidence and Uplift (2009–2010 over Wuhan in Central China Revealed by TerraSAR-X InSAR Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Bai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of ground deformation pose a significant geo-hazard to the environment and infrastructure in Wuhan, the most populous city in Central China, in the eastern Jianghan Plain at the intersection of the Yangtze and Han rivers. Prior to this study, however, rates and patterns of region-wide ground deformation in Wuhan were little known. Here we employ multi-temporal SAR interferometry to detect and characterize spatiotemporal variations of ground deformation in major metropolitan areas in Wuhan. A total of twelve TerraSAR-X images acquired during 2009–2010 are used in the InSAR time series analysis. InSAR-derived results are validated by levelling survey measurements and reveal a distinct subsidence pattern within six zones in major commercial and industrial areas, with a maximum subsidence rate up to −67.3 mm/year. A comparison analysis between subsiding patterns and urban developments as well as geological conditions suggests that land subsidence in Wuhan is mainly attributed to anthropogenic activities, natural compaction of soft soil, and karst dissolution of subsurface carbonate rocks. However, anthropogenic activities related to intensive municipal construction and industrial production have more significant impacts on the measured subsidence than natural factors. Moreover, remarkable signals of secular land uplift are found along both banks of the Yangtze River, especially along the southern bank, with deformation rates ranging mostly from +5 mm/year to +17.5 mm/year. A strong temporal correlation is highlighted between the detected displacement evolutions and the water level records of the Yangtze River, inferring that this previously unknown deformation phenomenon is likely related to seasonal fluctuations in water levels of the Yangtze River.

  4. Impacts of 25 years of groundwater extraction on subsidence in the Mekong delta, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many major river deltas in the world are subsiding and consequently become increasingly vulnerable to flooding and storm surges, salinization and permanent inundation. For the Mekong Delta, annual subsidence rates up to several centimetres have been reported. Excessive groundwate...

  5. Groundwater Regulation in the Houston-Galveston Region to Control Subsidence - Balancing Total Water Demand, Available Alternative Water Supplies, and Groundwater Withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    In 1975, as a result of area residents and local governments becoming increasingly alarmed by the continued impact of subsidence on economic growth and quality of life in the region, the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District was created by the 64th Texas Legislature as an underground water conservation district. The primary mission of what is now the Harris-Galveston Subsidence District, is to provide for the regulation of the withdrawal of groundwater to control subsidence. Subsidence has been a concern in the Houston, TX area throughout most of recent history. Since 1906, over 10 feet of subsidence has occurred, with a broad area of 6 feet of subsidence throughout most of the Houston Area.Over its nearly forty years of existence, the District has developed substantial data sets providing the foundation for its regulatory plan. Annual water-level measurements, a network of deep extensometers, over 80 subsidence GPS monitors, and updated numerical and analytical models have been utilized. Periodically, the District utilizes U.S. Census data to predict the future magnitude and location of population and water demand. In 2013, all of these data sets were combined producing an updated regulatory plan outlining the timelines of conversion to alternative sources of water and defining the maximum percentage groundwater can contribute to a user's total water demand.The management of the groundwater resources within the District has involved significant coordination with regional ground and surface water suppliers; ongoing interaction with other state and local regulatory bodies; analysis of accurate and up to date predictions on water usage; the enforcement of real disincentives to those who rely too heavily on groundwater and a commitment to practicing and promoting water conservation.Water supplies in the region are projected to continue to be stressed in the future due to rapid population increases in the region. Future District efforts will be focused on

  6. Monitoring and modeling land subsidence at the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, Baja California, Mexico, using SAR interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnec, Claudie; Fabriol, Hubert

    Images derived from repeat-pass spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) systems offer the possibility of mapping surface deformation of small spatial extent and monitoring its spatio-temporal evolution. A slow local subsidence has been detected at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field from images acquired by the European Space Agency remote sensing satellites ERS-1/2 between 1993 and 1997. Although agricultural activity in the area limited the investigation, interferometric monitoring revealed that the ground deformation is associated with the withdrawal of geothermal fluid and agreed with the leveling data. Modeling of the subsidence was carried out assuming elastic deformation in a half-space from simple point sources, of which five were necessary to reproduce the fringe patterns observed on the interferograms. The depths and locations of three of the sources are compatible with the location of the known reservoir. The study improves prior knowledge of the displacement field and of the mecanisms involved in the subsidence phenomenon.

  7. Inversion of Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferograms for Sources of Production-Related Subsidence at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foxall, W; Vasco, D

    2003-02-07

    We used synthetic aperture radar interferograms to image ground subsidence that occurred over the Dixie Valley geothermal field during different time intervals between 1992 and 1997. Linear elastic inversion of the subsidence that occurred between April, 1996 and March, 1997 revealed that the dominant sources of deformation during this time period were large changes in fluid volumes at shallow depths within the valley fill above the reservoir. The distributions of subsidence and subsurface volume change support a model in which reduction in pressure and volume of hot water discharging into the valley fill from localized upflow along the Stillwater range frontal fault is caused by drawdown within the upflow zone resulting from geothermal production. Our results also suggest that an additional source of fluid volume reduction in the shallow valley fill might be similar drawdown within piedmont fault zones. Shallow groundwater flow in the vicinity of the field appears to be controlled on the NW by a mapped fault and to the SW by a lineament of as yet unknown origin.

  8. Differential substrate subsidence of the EnviHUT project pitched extensive green roof

    OpenAIRE

    Nečadová Klára; Selník Petr; Karafiátová Hana

    2017-01-01

    In primary phase of testing building physical characteristics of the EnviHUT project extensive and semi-intensive roofs with 30° inclination occurred exceptional substrate subsidence. An extensive testing field with retaining geocell-system evinced differential subsidence of individual sectors after six months. Measured subsidence of installed substrate reached 40 % subsidence compared to originally designed height (intended layer thickness). Subsequent deformation of geocell-system additiona...

  9. UAVSAR and TerraSAR-X Based InSAR Detection of Localized Subsidence in the New Orleans Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, R. G.; An, K.; Jones, C. E.; Latini, D.

    2014-12-01

    Vulnerability of the US Gulf coast to inundation has received increased attention since hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Compounding effects of sea level rise, wetland loss, and regional and local subsidence makes flood protection a difficult challenge, and particularly for the New Orleans area. Key to flood protection is precise knowledge of elevations and elevation changes. Analysis of historical and continuing geodetic measurements show surprising complexity, including locations subsiding more rapidly than considered during planning of hurricane protection and coastal restoration projects. Combining traditional, precise geodetic data with interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) observations can provide geographically dense constraints on surface deformation. The Gulf Coast environment is challenging for InSAR techniques, especially with systems not designed for interferometry. We use two InSAR capable systems, the L- band (24 cm wavelength) airborne JPL/NASA UAVSAR, and the DLR/EADS Astrium spaceborne TerraSAR X-band (3 cm wavelength), and compare results. First, we are applying pair-wise InSAR to the longer wavelength UAVSAR data to detect localized elevation changes potentially impacting flood protection infrastructure from 2009 - 2014. We focus on areas on and near flood protection infrastructure to identify changes indicative of subsidence, structural deformation, and/or seepage. The Spaceborne TerraSAR X-band SAR system has relatively frequent observations, and dense persistent scatterers in urban areas, enabling measurement of very small displacements. We compare L-band UAVSAR results with permanent scatterer (PS-InSAR) and Short Baseline Subsets (SBAS) interferometric analyses of a stack composed by 28 TerraSAR X-band images acquired over the same period. Thus we can evaluate results from the different radar frequencies and analyses techniques. Preliminary results indicate subsidence features potentially of a variety of causes, including ground water

  10. U.S. Geological Survey Subsidence Interest Group Conference; proceedings of the Technical Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada, February 14-16, 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Keith R.; Leake, Stanley A.

    1997-01-01

    Introducation to Papers: This report is a compilation of short papers that are based on oral presentations summarizing the results of recent research that were given at the third meeting of the Subsidence Interest Group held in Las Vegas, Nevada, February 14?16, 1995. The report includes case studies of land subsidence and aquifer-system deformation resulting from fluid withdrawal, geothermal development, and mine collapse. Methods for monitoring land subsidence using Global Positioning System technology for the rapid and accurate measurement of changes in land-surface altitude also are described. The current status of numerical simulation of land subsidence in the USGS is summarized, and several of the short papers deal with the development and application of new numerical techniques for simulation and quantification of aquifersystem deformation. Not all oral presentations made at the meeting are documented in this report. Several of the presentations were of ongoing research and as such, the findings were provisional in nature and were offered at the meeting to stimulate scientific discussion and debate among colleagues. The information presented in this report, although only a subset of the proceedings of the meeting in Las Vegas, should help expand the scientific basis for management decisions to mitigate or control the effects of land subsidence. The short papers describing the results of these studies provide a cross section of ongoing research in aquifer mechanics and land subsidence and also form an assessment of the current technology and 'state of the science.' The analytical and interpretive methods described in this report will be useful to scientists involved in studies of ground-water hydraulics and aquifer-system deformation.

  11. Mining Land Subsidence Monitoring Using SENTINEL-1 SAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, W.; Wang, Q.; Fan, J.; Li, H.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, DInSAR technique was used to monitor land subsidence in mining area. The study area was selected in the coal mine area located in Yuanbaoshan District, Chifeng City, and Sentinel-1 data were used to carry out DInSAR techniqu. We analyzed the interferometric results by Sentinel-1 data from December 2015 to May 2016. Through the comparison of the results of DInSAR technique and the location of the mine on the optical images, it is shown that DInSAR technique can be used to effectively monitor the land subsidence caused by underground mining, and it is an effective tool for law enforcement of over-mining.

  12. Stratigraphic record of Holocene coseismic subsidence, Padang, West Sumatra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dura, Tina; Rubin, Charles M.; Kelsey, Harvey M.; Horton, Benjamin P.; Hawkes, Andrea; Vane, Christopher H.; Daryono, Mudrik; Pre, Candace Grand; Ladinsky, Tyler; Bradley, Sarah

    2011-11-01

    Stratigraphic evidence is found for two coseismic subsidence events that underlie a floodplain 20 km south of Padang, West Sumatra along the Mentawai segment (0.5°S-0.3°S) of the Sunda subduction zone. Each earthquake is marked by a sharp soil-mud contact that represents a sudden change from mangrove to tidal flat. The earthquakes occurred about 4000 and 3000 cal years B.P. based on radiocarbon ages of detrital plant fragments and seeds. The absence of younger paleoseismic evidence suggests that late Holocene relative sea level fall left the floodplain too high for an earthquake to lower it into the intertidal zone. Our results point to a brief, few thousand year window of preservation of subsidence events in tidal-wetland stratigraphic sequences, a result that is generally applicable to other emergent coastlines of West Sumatra.

  13. Sinkhole formation and subsidence along the Dead Sea coast, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yechieli, Yoseph; Abelson, Meir; Baer, Gideon

    2016-05-01

    More than 4,000 sinkholes have formed since the 1980s within a 60-km-long and 1-km-wide strip along the western coast of the Dead Sea (DS) in Israel. Their formation rate accelerated in recent years to >400 sinkholes per year. They cluster mostly in specific sites up to 1,000 m long and 200 m wide, which align parallel to the general direction of the fault systems associated with the DS Rift. The abrupt appearance of the sinkholes reflects changes to the groundwater regime around the shrinking DS. The eastward retreat of the shoreline and the lake-level drop (1 m/year in recent years) cause an eastward and downward migration of the fresh/saline groundwater interface. Consequently, a subsurface salt layer, which was previously enveloped by saline groundwater, is gradually being invaded and submerged by relatively fresh groundwater, and cavities form due to the rapid dissolution of the salt. Collapse of the overlying sediments into these cavities results in sinkholes at the surface. An association between sinkhole sites and land subsidence is revealed by interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) measurements. On a broad scale (hundreds of meters), subsidence occurs due to compaction of fine-grained sediments as groundwater levels decline along the retreating DS shoreline. At smaller scales (tens of meters), subsidence appears above subsurface cavities in association with the sinkholes, serving in many cases as sinkhole precursors, a few weeks to more than a year before their actual appearance at the surface. This paper overviews the processes of sinkhole formation and their relation to land subsidence.

  14. Study of Subsidence and Earthquake Swarms in the Western Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingqiu Huang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the Quetta Valley and surrounding areas have experienced unprecedented levels of subsidence, which has been attributed mainly to groundwater withdrawal. However, this region is also tectonically active and is home to several regional strike-slip faults, including the north–south striking left-lateral Chaman Fault System. Several large earthquakes have occurred recently in this area, including one deadly Mw 6.4 earthquake that struck on 28 October 2008. This study integrated Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR results with GPS, gravity, seismic reflection profiles, and earthquake centroid-moment-tensor (CMT data to identify the impact of tectonic and anthropogenic processes on subsidence and earthquake patterns in this region. To detect and map the spatial-temporal features of the processes that led to the surface deformation, this study used two Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR time series, i.e., 15 Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR images acquired by an Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS from 2006–2011 and 40 Environmental Satellite (ENVISAT Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR images spanning 2003–2010. A Small Baseline Subset (SBAS technique was used to investigate surface deformation. Five seismic lines totaling ~60 km, acquired in 2003, were used to map the blind thrust faults beneath a Quaternary alluvium layer. The median filtered SBAS-InSAR average velocity profile supports groundwater withdrawal as the dominant source of subsidence, with some contribution from tectonic subsidence in the Quetta Valley. Results of SBAS-InSAR multi-temporal analysis provide a better explanation for the pre-, co-, and post-seismic displacement pattern caused by the 2008 earthquake swarms across two strike-slip faults.

  15. Subsidizing Start-Ups: Policy Targeting and Policy Effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Kösters, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Start-up subsidies are a frequently employed policy instrument, the use of which is justified by alleged market failure resulting from positive external effects and capital market imperfections. This article investigates whether the allocation of subsidies reflects a policy focus on addressing these market failure occurrences. However, using survey data from the East German state of Thuringia, logistic regressions reveal a rather random subsidization of start-ups. Furthermore, propensity scor...

  16. Putting teenagers on the pill: The consequences of subsidized contraception

    OpenAIRE

    Grönqvist, Hans

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the consequences of a series of Swedish policy changes beginning in 1989 where different regions started subsidizing the birth control pill. The reforms were significant and applied to all types of oral contraceptives. My identification strategy takes advantage of the fact that the reforms were implemented successively over time and targeted specific cohorts of young women, in particular teenagers. This generates plausibly exogenous variation in access to the subsidy. ...

  17. Ers and Envisat Differential Sar Interferometry for subsidence monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Wegmüller, Urs; Strozzi, Tazio; Tosi, Luigi

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports on the potential of differential SAR interferometry to map land subsidence. After a presentation of the methodology, the focus will be on feasibility demonstration and accuracy assessment. The theoretical considerations are verified with the selected cases Ruhrgebiet, Mexico City, Bologna, and Euganean Geothermal Basin, representing fast (m/year) to slow (mm/year) deformation velocities. The accuracy of the generated deformation maps and the maturity of the required process...

  18. Ers and Envisat Differential Sar Interferometry for subsidence monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports on the potential of differential SAR interferometry to map land subsidence. After a presentation of the methodology, the focus will be on feasibility demonstration and accuracy assessment. The theoretical considerations are verified with the selected cases Ruhrgebiet, Mexico City, Bologna, and Euganean Geothermal Basin, representing fast (m/year) to slow (mm/year) deformation velocities. The accuracy of the generated deformation maps and the maturity of the required process...

  19. Problem definition study of subsidence caused by geopressured geothermal resource development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    The environmental and socio-economic settings of four environmentally representative Gulf Coast geopressured geothermal fairways were inventoried. Subsidence predictions were prepared using feasible development scenarios for the four representative subsidence sites. Based on the results of the subsidence estimates, an assessment of the associated potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts was prepared. An inventory of mitigation measures was also compiled. Results of the subsidence estimates and impact assessments are presented, as well as conclusions as to what are the major uncertainties, problems, and issues concerning the future study of geopressured geothermal subsidence.

  20. Early Tertiary subsidence and sedimentary facies - Northern Sirte Basin, Libya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumati, Y.D.; Kanes, W.H.

    1985-12-01

    The subsidence curves and subsidence rate curves for the Sirte basin, constructed from the stratigraphic record, show that subsidence was continuous throughout Late Cretaceous and Tertiary times, reaching a maximum during the Paleocene and Eocene, when a major reactivation of faults occurred. Shales and carbonates were deposited during all of the Late Cretaceous and Tertiary. Abrupt lateral facies changes occur from the platform areas toward the deeper troughs along with steep downdip thickening. The absence of upper Paleozoic and lower Mesozoic sediments suggests that the area was domed, faulted, and eroded during the late Mesozoic. As a result of crustal extension during the Paleocene, a marked lithologic and structural change occurred. The Heira Shale succeeded the Kalash Limestone in the Marada trough. Reactivation of the earlier faults, accompanied by an increase in the sediment supply from the south, caused these lower Paleocene shales to cover the entire area, with the exception of the old highs where carbonate deposition continued. An intercalation of shales and carbonates provides a sensitive indicator of change of depth and sediment type. 14 figures.

  1. Early Tertiary subsidence and sedimentary facies - northern Sirte Basin, Libya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumati, Y.D.; Kanes, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    The subsidence curves and subsidence rate curves for the Sirte basin, constructed from the stratigraphic record, show that subsidence was continuous throughout Late Cretaceous and Tertiary times, reaching a maximum during the Paleocene and Eocene, when a major reactivation of faults occurred. Shales and carbonates were deposited during all of the Late Cretaceous and Tertiary. Abrupt lateral facies changes occur from the platform areas toward the deeper troughs along with steep downdip thickening. These conditions were probably assisted by contemporaneous faulting along structurally weak hinge lines where the dominant structural elements are normal step faults. The absence of upper Paleozoic and lower Mesozoic sediments suggests that the area was domed, faulted, and eroded during the late Mesozoic. As a result of crustal extension during the Paleocene, a marked lithologic and structural change occurred. The Heira Shale succeeded the Kalash Limestone in the Marada trough. Reactivation of the earlier faults, accompanied by an increase in the sediment supply from the south, caused these lower Paleocene shales to cover the entire area, with the exception of the old highs where carbonate deposition continued. An intercalation of shales and carbonates provides a sensitive indicator of change of depth and sediment type.

  2. Catastrophic subsidence: An environmental hazard, shelby county, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoreaux, Philip E.; Newton, J. G.

    1986-03-01

    Induced sinkholes (catastrophic subsidence) are those caused or accelerated by human activities These sinkholes commonly result from a water level decline due to pumpage Construction activities in a cone of depression greatly increases the likelihood of sinkhole occurrence Almost all occur where cavities develop in unconsolidated deposits overlying solution openings in carbonate rocks. Triggering mechanisms resulting from water level declines are (1) loss of buoyant support of the water, (2) increased gradient and water velocity, (3) water-level fluctuations, and (4) induced recharge Construction activities triggering sinkhole development include ditching, removing overburden, drilling, movement of heavy equipment, blasting and the diversion and impoundment of drainage Triggering mechanisms include piping, saturation, and loading Induced sinkholes resulting from human water development/management activities are most predictable in a youthful karst area impacted by groundwater withdrawals Shape, depth, and timing of catastrophic subsidence can be predicted in general terms Remote sensing techniques are used in prediction of locations of catastrophic subsidence. This provides a basis for design and relocation of structures such as a gas pipeline, dam, or building Utilization of techniques and a case history of the relocation of a pipeline are described

  3. Characterization of land subsidence induced by groundwater withdrawals in Wenyu River alluvial fan, Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Luo, Y.; Yang, Y.; Tian, F.; Zhou, Y.; Tian, M.-Z.

    2015-11-01

    The Beijing plain area has suffered from severe land subsidence owing to groundwater overdraft. A major example is the Wenyu River alluvial fan in the Beijing plain area. This area has experienced as much as 10 m of land subsidence through 2000s. An integrated subsidence-monitoring program, including borehole extensometer and multilayer monitoring of groundwater, has been designed to meet the needs of monitoring land subsidence in this region. This work has allowed us to characterize land subsidence and understand the mechanical properties of the strata. The analysis results show the development of the land subsidence in this area is consistent with water-level change. The major strata contributing to compression deformation are Mid-Pleistocene stratum which contributed around 70 % of total subsidence. The shallow stratum and deep stratum show elastic mechanical behavior the intermediate stratum exhibit elastic-plastic mechanical behavior.

  4. Advancing Coastal Climate Adaptation in Denmark by Land Subsidence Mapping using Sentinel-1 Satellite Imagery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Carlo Sass; Broge, Niels H.; Mølgaard, Mads R.

    2016-01-01

    There are still large uncertainties in projections of climate change and sea level rise. Here, land subsidence is an additional factor that may adversely affect the vulnerability towards floods in low-lying coastal communities. The presented study performs an initial assessment of subsidence...... mapping using Sentinel-1 satellite imagery and leveling at two coastal locations in Denmark. Within both investigated areas current subsidence rates of 5-10 millimeters per year are found. This subsidence is related to the local geology, and challenges and potentials in bringing land subsidence mapping...... and geology into climate adaptation are discussed in relation to perspectives of a national subsidence monitoring system partly based on the findings from the two coastal locations. The current lack of subsidence data and a fragmentation of geotechnical information are considered as hindrances to optimal...

  5. Safety appraisement on building natural gas pipeline over coal mining subsidence area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Wei-jia; LIU Jin-xiao; WEN Xing-lin

    2007-01-01

    The target of the text is to scientifically appraise dynamic development of surface deformation in subsidence area and its influence on groundwork stability of natural pipe and then adopt some technological measures to ensure safe circulation of natural pipeline. Analysed the influence on natural pipeline from coal mining subsidence in the way of pipeline grade variation, vertical curve variation, transverse deformation, horizontal pull and compression deformation and pipe stress variation etc., and described detailed surface subsidence product and its used time among initial phase, active phase and decline phase in the course of surface movement deformation time. In the context of considering surface subsidence that doesn't reach basic latter end and residual subsidence quantity, the text confirmed the calculation method of residual deformation in surface subsidence area, and gave the technological measures about building natural gas pipeline in subsidence area finally.

  6. MAPPING POTENTIAL AREAS OF GROUND SUBSIDENCE IN ESTONIAN UNDERGROUND OIL SHALE MINING DISTRICT

    OpenAIRE

    Valgma, Ingo

    1999-01-01

    Northeast part of Estonia has been subject to oil shale mining since 1916. Oil shale as main source for power industry in Estonia is mined in amount of 12 million tonnes per year. The underground production rate is about 6 million tonnes of the mineral annually. Currently three open casts and six underground mines are operating, hi past 6 underground oil shale mines have been closed. Totally 979 million tonnes of rock, including oil shale has been mined underground. Today, about 305 km2 area ...

  7. Characterization of the multi-component driving land subsidence using Persistent Scatterer Interferometry technique: the Ravenna case of study (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonì, Roberta; Fiaschi, Simone; Calcaterra, Domenico; Di Martire, Diego; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Meisina, Claudia; Perini, Luisa; Ramondini, Massimo; Tessitore, Serena; Floris, Mario

    2015-04-01

    images acquired by ERS-1/2 (1992-2000), ENVISAT (2003-2010) and TERRASAR-X (2012-2014) sensors. The test site is located in the south-eastern sector of the Po River plain, along the Adriatic Sea, where there are present around 1500-3000 m of Quaternary deposits, mainly constituted by sandy and silty-clay layers of alluvial and marine origin. These sediments lay on a pre-Quaternary substratum characterized by buried active thrusts, which are parallel to the Apennine alignment. The particular geological context deserves special attention, because it hosts several municipalities and relevant infrastructures, where a long-trend of subsidence rate has been recorded over the last decades, representing the result of superimposed phenomena: tectonic, depositional, climatic and man-induced processes. The definition of the multi-component contribution is intended as a crucial step towards a more reliable subsidence prediction model, which, in turn, will help to better calibrate the suitable remedial measures as to prevent further ground deformations of this important coastal lowland.

  8. Multiband PSInSAR and long-period monitoring of land subsidence in a strategic detrital aquifer (Vega de Granada, SE Spain): An approach to support management decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, Rosa María; Ezquerro, Pablo; Luque-Espinar, Juan Antonio; Béjar-Pizarro, Marta; Notti, Davide; Azañón, Jose Miguel; Montserrat, Oriol; Herrera, Gerardo; Fernández-Chacón, Francisca; Peinado, Tomás; Galve, Jorge Pedro; Pérez-Peña, Vicente; Fernández-Merodo, Jose A.; Jiménez, Jorge

    2017-10-01

    This work integrates detailed geological and hydrogeological information with PSI data to obtain a better understanding of subsidence processes detected in the detrital aquifer of the Vega de Granada (SE Spain) during the past 13 years. Ground motion was monitored by exploiting SAR images from the ENVISAT (2003-2009), Cosmo-SkyMed (2011-2014) and Sentinel-1A (2015-2016) satellites. PSInSAR results show an inelastic deformation in the aquifer and small land surface displacements (up to -55 mm). The most widespread land subsidence is detected during the ENVISAT period (2003-2009), which coincided with a long, dry period in the region. The highest displacement rates recorded during this period (up to 10 mm/yr) were detected in the central part of the aquifer, where many villages are located. For this period, there is a good correlation between groundwater level depletion and the augmentation of the average subsidence velocity and slight hydraulic head changes (management plan for the sustainable use of this strategic aquifer, taking into account critical levels of groundwater depletion to avoid land subsidence in the areas identified as vulnerable. The European Space Agency satellite Sentinel-1A could be an effective decision-making tool in the near future.

  9. Mechanism Analysis and Detection on Paddy Field Water Leakage Caused by Mining Subsidence in Southwest of China%我国西南地区采煤塌陷水田漏水探测及机理分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓静; 胡振琪; 赵艳玲; 李晶; 信凯

    2012-01-01

    为解决我国西南地区采煤塌陷地造成水田塌陷破坏问题,恢复塌陷地水田隔水层的持水能力,重构土壤水田隔水层,利用探地雷达和高密度电法2种手段进行现场探测,并结合地域特点,调查水田塌陷地的破坏特点,总结西南地区采煤塌陷地水田破坏形式及漏水特征,并分析了其漏水机理。结果表明:西南地区采煤塌陷导致地下水位下降、地表裂缝生成等;塌陷区水田的破坏形式主要有塌陷田、漏水田、裂缝田3种。通过现场调查和探测认为采煤塌陷影响了水田隔水层的保水作用是导致塌陷地水田漏水的主要原因。%In order to solve the paddy field subsidence and failure caused by the coal mining subsidence in the southwest part of China, to recovery the water holding capacity of the water insolated stratum for the paddy fields in the mining subsidence area and to reconstruct the water insolated stratum in the soil, ground radar and high density electric method were applied to the site exploration. In combination with the regional features, the failure features of the paddy field subsidence area were investigated. The paddy field failure way and the wa- ter leakage features of the paddy field in the mining subsidence of Southwest China were summarized. The water leakage mechanism was analyzed. The results showed that the mining subsidence in Southwest China would cause the underground water dropping, the surface ground cracking and others. The paddy field failures in the mining subsidence area would have the subsidence field, water leakage field and land cracking field. The site investigation and the exploration held the coal mining subsidence affected to the water keeping function of the paddy field insolated stratum would be the main reason to cause the paddy field water leakage in the subsidence area.

  10. Mapping and monitoring coal mine subsidence using LiDAR and InSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froese, C.R.; Mei, S. [Alberta Geological Survey, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Energy Resources Conservation Board

    2008-07-01

    In the early 1900s, the abandonment of coal mines in Alberta was not regulated and closure documentation was poor. Although the general locations of mines are known, the locations of the specific adits and shafts are not. As such, there are many cases in southwestern Alberta where infrastructure was built on top of old coal mine workings without any detailed records of the abandoned mine or displacement monitoring. The crowns of these workings have been subject to ongoing strain that is reflected at the surface. The rate at which the strain is progressing prior to collapse is not well understood. Mitigation of collapse events is site specific and reactive. This paper demonstrated that airborne LiDAR and spaceborne InSAR technologies can provide valuable information on the distribution of abandoned underground coal mine workings. Both remote sensing techniques were used on Turtle Mountain in the Crowsnest Pass to obtain quantitative information on landslide mechanics, including the patterns and rate of ground movement and subsidence. These techniques can be used to map the location of surface collapse and delineate the location of the coal mine workings that were not previously documented. It was concluded that these technologies will likely become more readily available in the future and incorporated into geo-engineering practices for use in ground hazard detection, monitoring and management. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Research on Ground Movement Laws for Strip Mining Under Thick Alluvium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭志祥; 邓喀中; 杨军

    2002-01-01

    With the discrete element method, the simulation and analysis of a series of numerical models were made. This research revealed ground movement laws for strip mining under thick alluvium and gave calculation formulae for the maximum ground subsidence and horizontal movement as a function of basement rock thickness and mining width, thus providing sound evidence for future strip mining under thick alluvium.

  12. Land subsidence monitoring and prediction in Beijing based on multi-sensor InSAR and improved Gray-Markov model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Y.; Deng, Z.; Gong, H.; Guo, L.; Li, X.

    2016-12-01

    Land subsidence induced by excessive groundwater withdrawal has posed a severe threat to city infrastructures, buildings and water and gas pipes, and has caused considerable economic loss. With rapid population increase and the corresponding rising demand for ground water, the land deformation rate has sped up. It was reported that by the end of 2010, over 65% (4281km2) of the plain area in Beijing has suffered ground settlement of over 50mm. Timely monitoring of land subsidence is a prerequisite for understanding of spatiotemporal evolution and the mechanism of the process. Prediction of future land subsidence development assists decision making for prevention of the hazard. In this study, we combined InSAR techniques with an improved Gray-Markov model (GMM) to predict the spatiotemporal trend of ground settlement in Beijing. First, ENVISAT ASAR data from 2003 to 2010 and Radarsat-2 data from 2010 to 2014 were used to monitor land subsidence during the recent 11 years by PS-InSAR technique. Three settlement bowls were demonstrated in the study area and located in Chaoyang, Changping, and Tongzhou districts. The maximum displacement rate reached around 125mm/year and the maximum cumulative deformation reached over 1.3m. For each PS pixels, we developed an improved GMM in order to predict the deformation trend in the next three years. GMM was improved in two aspects. First, we adapted GMM model based on metabolism principle by assigning newer information with higher priority. Second, we applied k-means method to automatically partition the states in Markov chain instead of manually assigning Markov intervals. By applying the improved GMM to PS pixels over the study area, the deformation maps from 2015 to 2017 were generated and it was found that the maximum cumulative deformation will reach 1.6m by the end of 2017.

  13. Measuring Spatiotemporal Features of Land Subsidence, Groundwater Drawdown, and Compressible Layer Thickness in Beijing Plain, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongyong Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Beijing is located on multiple alluvial-pluvial fans with thick Quaternary unconsolidated sediments. It has suffered serious groundwater drawdown and land subsidence due to groundwater exploitation. This study aimed to introduce geographical distribution measure methods into land subsidence research characterizing, geographically, land subsidence, groundwater drawdown, and compressible layer thickness. Therefore, we used gravity center analysis and standard deviational ellipse (SDE methods in GIS to statistically analyze their concentration tendency, principle orientation, dispersion trend, and distribution differences in 1995 (1999, 2007, 2009, 2011, and 2013. Results show that they were all concentrated in Chaoyang District of Urban Beijing. The concentration trend of land subsidence was consistent with that of groundwater drawdown. The principle orientation of land subsidence was SW–NE, which was more similar with that of the static spatial distribution of the compressible layer. The dispersion tendency of land subsidence got closer to that of the compressible layer with its increasing intensity. The spatial distribution difference between land subsidence and groundwater drawdown was about 0.2, and that between land subsidence and compressible layer thickness it decreased from 0.22 to 0.07, reflecting that the spatial distribution pattern of land subsidence was increasingly close to that of the compressible layer. Results of this study are useful for assessing the distribution of land subsidence development and managing groundwater resources.

  14. Regional Sea Level Variation: California Coastal Subsidence (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewitt, G.; Hammond, W. C.; Nerem, R.

    2013-12-01

    Satellite altimetry over the last two decades has measured variations in geocentric sea level (GSL), relative to the Earth system center of mass, providing valuable data to test models of physical oceanography and the effects of global climate change. The societal impacts of sea level change however relate to variations in local sea level (LSL), relative to the land at the coast. Therefore, assessing the impacts of sea level change requires coastal measurements of vertical land motion (VLM). Indeed, ΔLSL = ΔGSL - ΔVLM, with subsidence mapping 1:1 into LSL. Measurements of secular coastal VLM also allow tide-gauge data to test models of GSL over the last century in some locations, which cannot be provided by satellite data. Here we use GPS geodetic data within 15 km of the US west coast to infer regional, secular VLM. A total of 89 GPS stations met the criteria that time series span >4.5 yr, and do not have obvious non-linear variation, as may be caused by local instability. VLM rates for the GPS stations are derived in the secular reference frame ITRF2008, which aligns with the Earth system center of mass to ×0.5 mm/yr. We find that regional VLM has different behavior north and south of the Mendocino Triple Junction (MTJ). The California coast has a coherent regional pattern of subsidence averaging 0.5 mm/yr, with an increasing trend to the north. This trend generally matches GIA model predictions. Around San Francisco Bay, the observed coastal subsidence of 1.0 mm/yr coherently decreases moving away from the Pacific Ocean to very small subsidence on the east shores of the bay. This gradient is likely caused by San Andreas-Hayward Fault tectonics, and possibly by differential surface loading across the bay and Sacramento-San Joachim River Delta. Thus in addition to the trend in subsidence from GIA going northward along the California coast, tectonics may also play a role where the plate boundary fault system approaches the coast. In contrast, we find that VLM

  15. Investigation on Mining Subsidence Based on Multi-Temporal InSAR and Time-Series Analysis of the Small Baseline Subset—Case Study of Working Faces 22201-1/2 in Bu’ertai Mine, Shendong Coalfield, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Ma

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available High-intensity coal mining (large mining height, shallow mining depth, and rapid advancing frequently causes large-scale ground damage within a short period of time. Understanding mining subsidence under high-intensity mining can provide a basis for mining-induced damage assessment, land remediation in a subsidence area, and ecological reconstruction in vulnerable ecological regions in Western China. In this study, the mining subsidence status of Shendong Coalfield was investigated and analyzed using two-pass differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (DInSAR technology based on high-resolution synthetic aperture radar data (RADARSAT-2 precise orbit, multilook fine, 5 m collected from 20 January 2012 to June 2013. Surface damages in Shendong Coalfield over a period of 504 days under open-pit mining and underground mining were observed. Ground deformation of the high-intensity mining working faces 22201-1/2 in Bu’ertai Mine, Shendong Coalfield was monitored using small baseline subset (SBAS InSAR technology. (1 DInSAR detected and located 85 ground deformation areas (including ground deformations associated with past-mining activity. The extent of subsidence in Shendong Coalfield presented a progressive increase at an average monthly rate of 13.09 km2 from the initial 54.98 km2 to 225.20 km2, approximately, which accounted for 7% of the total area of Shendong Coalfield; (2 SBAS-InSAR reported that the maximum cumulative subsidence area reached 5.58 km2 above the working faces 22201-1/2. The advance speed of ground destruction (7.9 m/day was nearly equal to that of underground mining (8.1 m/day.

  16. A knowledge base system for ground control over abandoned mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazimko, V.V.; Zviagilsky, E.L. [Donetsk State Technical University, Donetsk (Ukraine)

    1999-07-01

    The knowledge of engineering systems has been developed to choose optimal technology for subsidence prevention over abandoned mines. The expert system treats a specific case, maps consequences of actions and derives relevant technology (or a set of technologies) that should be used to prevent ground subsidence. Input parameters that characterise the case are treated using fuzzy logic and are then fed to a neural network. The network has been successfully trained by a backpropagation algorithm on the basis of three fuzzy rules. 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Recent ground fissures in the Hetao basin, Inner Mongolia, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhongtai; Ma, Baoqi; Long, Jianyu; Zhang, Hao; Liang, Kuan; Jiang, Dawei

    2017-10-01

    Ground fissures are a geological hazard with complex formation mechanisms. Increasing amounts of human activity have created more ground fissures, which can destroy buildings and threaten human security. Some ground fissures indicate potentially devastating earthquakes, so we must pay attention to these hazards. This paper documents recently discovered ground fissures in the Hetao basin. These ground fissures are located along the frontal margins of the terraces of the Sertengshan piedmont fault. These fissures are 600-1600 m long, 5-50 cm wide, and at most 1 m deep. These ground fissures emerged after 2010 and ruptured newly constructed roads and field ridges. The deep geodynamic mechanisms within this extensional environment, which is dominated by NE-SW principal compressive shear, involve N-S tensile stress, which has produced continuous subsidence in the Hetao basin and continuous activity along the Sertengshan piedmont fault since the late Quaternary. Trenches across the ground fissures reveal that the fissures are the latest manifestation of the activity of preexisting faults and are the result of creep-slip movement along the faults. The groundwater level in the Hetao basin has been dropping since the 1960s because of overexploitation, resulting in subsidence. When the tensile stress exceeds the ultimate tensile strength of the strata, the strata rupture along preexisting faults, producing ground fissures. Thus, the Sertengshan piedmont fault planes are the structural foundation of the ground fissures, and groundwater extraction induces the development of ground fissures.

  18. Grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Tina

    2015-04-29

    Grounded theory is a popular research approach in health care and the social sciences. This article provides a description of grounded theory methodology and its key components, using examples from published studies to demonstrate practical application. It aims to demystify grounded theory for novice nurse researchers, by explaining what it is, when to use it, why they would want to use it and how to use it. It should enable nurse researchers to decide if grounded theory is an appropriate approach for their research, and to determine the quality of any grounded theory research they read.

  19. Aspects of sedimentary basin evolution assessed through tectonic subsidence analysis. Example: northern Gulf of Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigott, John D.; Sattayarak, Nares

    Tectonic subsidence and subsidence rate analyses were conducted using a forward burial technique for the Cenozoic sediments of the northern Gulf of Thailand, a region presently bounded and intersected by major strike-slip fault systems. Basins represented by the seven wells studied are the Thon Buri, Hua Hin, Chumphon, Kra, and Pattani basins. The total observed subsidence was stratigraphically calibrated using well biostratigraphy and/or regional seismic stratigraphy. Tectonic subsidence was subsequently determined assuming local Airy isostasy by correcting decompacted sediments for sediment loading and variations in paleowater depths. Statistical comparison of the observed tectonic subsidence profile versus the theoretical thermal subsidence profile reveals zero-intercept times of incipient thermal-rifting and furthermore helps differentiate times of thermal subsidence from episodes of fault-controlled mechanical subsidence. Differences in tectonic subsidence, tectonic subsidence rates, and in the zero-intercept times of thermal rifting imply the Paleogene thermal associated rifting of the northern Gulf of Thailand was neither restricted spatially nor universally synchronous among the basins, but instead both spatially and time transgressive. Although coupled thermal-mechanical subsidence played a major role in the evolution for most of these basins, in some basins, e.g. the Thon Buri and northern Kra basins, subsidence was not thermally initiated. Instead, these basins experienced relatively slow-paced sediment loaded subsidence until a sudden fault-associated acceleration commenced in the Pliocene. Additional evidence for temporal and spatial changes in local strain is demonstrated by observed asynchronous episodes of "see-saw" subsidence-uplift of the basin floors. For example, while the northern Hua Hin Basin experienced Miocene-Pliocene alternations of subsidence and uplift, portions of the Pattani Basin to the southeast underwent periods of subsidence and

  20. Using high resolution data to reveal depth-dependent mechanisms that drive land subsidence: The Venice coast, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, L.; Teatini, P.; Carbognin, L.; Brancolini, G.

    2009-09-01

    Recent research has provided a high-resolution map that depicts the effect of land subsidence on the Venice coastal plain of Italy. The map, which covers the decade of 1992 to 2002, was obtained by an innovative "Subsidence Integrated Monitoring System" (SIMS), which efficiently merges the different displacement measurements obtained by high precision-leveling, differential and continuous Global Positing System data (GPS), and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)-based interferometry. The displacement rates exhibit significant spatial variability, ranging from a slight 1 to 2 mm/yr uplift, to a serious subsidence of more than 10 mm/yr. This paper aims to describe the many natural and anthropogenic mechanisms that drive the pattern of the ground displacement. The movement sources are presented based on their depth of occurrence. Deep causes act at depths generally greater than 400 m below m.s.l. (mean sea level), and are recognizable in the movement of the pre-Quaternary basement. Medium causes act at depths between 400 and 50 m below m.s.l., and include geological features, such as a major presence of compressible clay layers in the southern and northern portions of the study area and groundwater withdrawals, mainly in the north-eastern coastland and western mainland. Shallow causes, i.e. those occurring from a depth of 50 m up to the ground surface, are related to the architecture and geomechanical properties of the Pleistocene and Holocene deposits, which are more thick and compressible approaching the littoral belt; geochemical compaction, due to the increasing salt concentration in the clayey sediments; and oxidation of the outcropping organic soils drained by land reclamation. These two latter factors primarily involve the southern portion of the Venice coast. The building loads in newly developed areas also cause local compaction of shallow deposits. We conclude that the consolidation of Holocene deposits and anthropogenic activities (groundwater withdrawal, land

  1. Land subsidence and problems affecting land use at Edwards Air Force Base and vicinity, California, 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodgett, James C.; Williams, J. S.

    Land subsidence in Antelope Valley, which includes Edwards Air Force Base, was first reported in the 1950's; by 1967, about 200 square miles of Antelope Valley were affected by as much as 2 feet of subsidence. The purpose of the report is to present the results to date of recent studies done by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of the Air Force, to determine the cause and areal extent of land subsidence and surface deformation on Rogers Lakebed and vicinity, and the effects of surface deformation on runways used for aircraft landings at Edwards AFB in southern California. Because of the time-related effects of land subsidence, several years of data collection will be needed to establish subsidence trends and evaluate those factors causing land subsidence.

  2. Assessment, management rehabilitation of surface water losses due to longwall coal mining subsidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawkins, A.P. [Coffey Geosciences Pty. Ltd., Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    1999-07-01

    Subsidence due to longwall coal mining has generated notable effects on surface water and groundwater above numerous longwall coal mines in Queensland and NSW. This paper deals with the methods which can be used to assess, predict and rehabilitate the effects of longwall surface subsidence on surface water bodies. Aspects discussed cover the subsidence model, hydrological and hydrogeological assessment, hydrogeochemical changes and subsidence rehabilitation issues. The paper concludes that longwall surface subsidence can significantly affect the mine's local environment. However, with sufficient baseline data and a thorough assessment of site specific issues, longwalls can be planned to account for subsidence effects on surface water, and possible deleterious effects can be mitigated. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Land subsidence risk assessment and protection in mined-out regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zhao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Land subsidence due to underground mining is an important hazard that causes large damages and threatens to social and economic activities. The China government has started a national project to estimate the risk of land subsidence in the main coal production provinces, such as Heilongjiang, Anhui and Shanxi Provinces. Herein, the investigation methods for land subsidence identification were reported, some types of land settlement are summarized, and some successful engineering measures to mitigate the subsidence are discussed. A Geographical Information System (GIS for land subsidence risk assessment is developed and is based on site investigations and numerrical simulation of the subsidence process. In this system, maps of mining intensity and risk ranks are developed.

  4. Spatial variability of diploptene δ13C values in thermokarst lakes: the potential to analyse the complexity of lacustrine methane cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. L. Davies

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cryospheric changes in northern high latitudes are linked to significant greenhouse gas flux to the atmosphere, including methane release that originates from organic matter decomposition in thermokarst lakes. The connections between methane production in sediments, transport pathways and oxidation are not well understood and this has implications for any attempts to reconstruct methane production from sedimentary archives. We assessed methane oxidation as represented by methane oxidising bacteria across the surface sediments of two interior Alaska thermokarst lakes in relation to methane emissions via ebullition (bubbling. The bacterial biomarker diploptene was present and had low δ13C values (lower than −38 ‰ in all sediments analysed, suggesting methane oxidation was widespread. The most δ13C-depleted diploptene was found in the area of highest methane ebullition emissions in Ace Lake (δ13C diplotene values between −68.2 and −50.1 ‰, suggesting a positive link between methane production, oxidation, and emission in this area. In contrast, significantly less depleted diploptene δ13C values (between −42.9 and −38.8 ‰ were found in the area of highest methane ebullition emissions in Smith Lake. Lower δ13C values of diploptene were found in the central area of Smith Lake (between −56.8 and −46.9 ‰, where methane ebullition rates are low but methane diffusion appears high. Using δ13C-diplotene as a proxy for methane oxidation activity, we suggest the observed differences in methane oxidation levels among sites within the two lakes could be linked to differences in source area of methane production (e.g. age and type of organic carbon and bathymetry as it relates to varying oxycline depths and changing pressure gradients. As a result, methane oxidation is highly lake-dependent. The diploptene δ13C values also highlight strong within-lake variability, implying that single-value, down-core records of hopanoid isotopic

  5. Life in Ice: Microbial Growth Dynamics and Greenhouse Gas Production During Winter in a Thermokarst Bog Revealed by Stable Isotope Probing Targeted Metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazewicz, S.; White, R. A., III; Tas, N.; Euskirchen, E. S.; Mcfarland, J. W.; Jansson, J.; Waldrop, M. P.

    2016-12-01

    Permafrost contains a reservoir of frozen C estimated to be twice the size of the current atmospheric C pool. In response to changing climate, permafrost is rapidly warming which could result in widespread seasonal thawing. When permafrost thaws, soils that are rich in ice and C often transform into thermokarst wetlands with anaerobic conditions and significant production of atmospheric CH4. While most C flux research in recently thawed permafrost concentrates on the few summer months when seasonal thaw has occurred, there is mounting evidence that sizeable portions of annual CO2 and CH4 efflux occurs over winter or during a rapid burst of emissions associated with seasonal thaw. A potential mechanism for such efflux patterns is microbial activity in frozen soils over winter where gasses produced are partially trapped within ice until spring thaw. In order to better understand microbial transformation of soil C to greenhouse gas over winter, we applied stable isotope probing (SIP) targeted metagenomics combined with process measurements and field flux data to reveal activities of microbial communities in `frozen' soil from an Alaskan thermokarst bog. Field studies revealed build-up of CO2 and CH4 in frozen soils suggesting that microbial activity persisted throughout the winter in soils poised just below the freezing point. Laboratory incubations designed to simulate in-situ winter conditions (-1.5 °C and anaerobic) revealed continuous CH4 and CO2 production. Strikingly, the quantity of CH4 produced in 6 months in frozen soil was equivalent to approximately 80% of CH4 emitted during the 3 month summer `active' season. Heavy water SIP targeted iTag sequencing revealed growing bacteria and archaea in the frozen anaerobic soil. Growth was primarily observed in two bacterial phyla, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, suggesting that fermentation was likely the major C mineralization pathway. SIP targeted metagenomics facilitated characterization of the primary metabolic

  6. Along ridge variation of the seafloor cooling and subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Po-Ju; Chiao, Ling-Yun

    2013-04-01

    Bathymetry is linearly proportional to the square root of the seafloor age according to decades of observations. It is well explained by the essentially one-dimensional thermal contraction such as that demonstrated in the classical half-space cooling model and the subsequent 2-D modifications such as the plate model, GDH1 model, PSM model etc. However, much less efforts have been undertaken on study of variation of seafloor cooling along the ridge axis. We carefully examine corridors in the spreading direction that avoid seamounts and other some secondary structures, in addition to the sediment correction. We find that subsidence rates vary along major mid-ocean ridges. It would require a range of 400 to -600°C difference if the subsidence rate variations are attributed entirely to sub-ridge mantle temperature anomalies. Pronounced anomalies include the noticeable lows at the equator in the mid-Atlantic ridge and the northern section of East Pacific Rise that might be attributed to the close by continental lithosphere. The eastern section in mid-Indian ridge is also significantly cooler within regions of the Australian-Antarctic Discordance (AAD), which has been attributed to an ancient slab stalled beneath the present-day Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR). Further researches that take into account of trends of geoid data is underway to make consistent interpretations.

  7. Chesapeake Bay subsidence monitored as wetlands loss continues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerem, R. S.; van Dam, T. M.; Schenewerk, M. S.

    Fragile wetland ecosystems, which support an abundance of wildlife, are being lost around the Chesapeake Bay at an alarming rate due to an increase in sea level. For example, one third of the total area of the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge (Figure 1) (approximately 20 km2) was lost between 1938 and 1979 [Leatherman, 1992]. Approximately 4,100 km2 of the perimeter of the Chesapeake Bay are covered by wetlands of which 58% forested wetlands and 28% are salt marshes. It is likely that many factors are responsible for the wetlands loss, some that have global implications, and some that reflect local phenomena.Understanding the mechanisms responsible for wetlands deterioration and loss, however, has been impeded by the lack of adequate data including quantitative monitoring of the types and distribution of flora, Tthe boundaries of specific habitat types, and data on the spatial variations in sea level and land subsidence. This article focuses on the latter problem, which is to determine the relative roles of sea level rise and land subsidence in the region. Over the past four years, a small network of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers have been installed near tide gauges in the Chesapeake Bay to help determine the cause of relative sea level rise in this region. These receivers are just beginning to yield results.

  8. Time series prediction of mining subsidence based on a SVM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Peixian; Tan Zhixiang; Yah Lili; Deng Kazhong

    2011-01-01

    In order to study dynamic laws of surface movements over coal mines due to mining activities,a dynamic prediction model of surface movements was established,based on the theory of support vector machines (SVM) and times-series analysis.An engineering application was used to verify the correctness of the model.Measurements from observation stations were analyzed and processed to obtain equal-time interval surface movement data and subjected to tests of stationary,zero means and normality.Then the data were used to train the SVM model.A time series model was established to predict mining subsidence by rational choices of embedding dimensions and SVM parameters.MAPE and WIA were used asindicators to evaluate the accuracy of the model and for generalization performance.In the end,the model was used to predict future surface movements.Data from observation stations in Huaibei coal mining area were used as an example.The results show that the maximum absolute error of subsidence is 9 mm,the maximum relative error 1.5%.the maximum absolute error of displacement 7 mm and the maximum relative error 1.8%.The accuracy and reliability of the model meet the requirements of on-site engineering.The results of the study provide a new approach to investigate the dynamics of surface movements.

  9. Subsidence and collapse sinkholes in soluble rock: a numerical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Georg; Romanov, Douchko; Hiller, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Soluble rocks such as limestone, gypsum, anhydrite, and salt are prone to subsidence and the sudden creation of collapse sinkholes. The reason for this behaviour stems from the solubility of the rock: Water percolating through fissures and bedding partings can remove material from the rock walls and thus increase the permeability of the host rock by orders of magnitudes. This process occurs on time scales of 1,000-100,000 years, resulting in enlarged fractures, voids and cavities, which then carry flow efficiently through the rock. The enlargement of sub-surface voids to the meter-size within such short times creates mechanical conditions prone to collapse. The collapse initiates at depth, but then propagates to the surface. By means of numerical modelling, we discuss the long-term evolution of secondary porosity in gypsum rocks, resulting in zones of sub-surface voids, which then become mechanically unstable and collapse. We study two real-world case scenarios, in which we can relate field observations to our numerical model: (i) A dam-site scenario, where flow around the dam caused widespread dissolution of gypsum and subsequent subsidence of the dam and a nearby highway. (ii) A natural collapse sinkhole forming as a result of freshwater inflow into a shallow anhydrite formation with rapid evolution of voids in the sub-surface.

  10. Recharge from a subsidence crater at the Nevada test site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, G. V.; Ely, D.M.; Hokett, S. L.; Gillespie, D. R.

    2000-01-01

    Current recharge through the alluvial fans of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is considered to be negligible, but the impact of more than 400 nuclear subsidence craters on recharge is uncertain. Many of the craters contain a playa region, but the impact of these playas has not been addressed. It was hypothesized that a crater playa would focus infiltration through the surrounding coarser-grained material, thereby increasing recharge. Crater U5a was selected because it represented a worst case for runoff into craters. A borehole was instrumented for neutron logging beneath the playa center and immediately outside the crater. Physical and hydraulic properties were measured along a transect in the crater and outside the crater. Particle-size analysis of the 14.6 m of sediment in the crater and morphological features of the crater suggest that a large ponding event of ≈63000 m3 had occurred since crater formation. Water flow simulations with HYDRUS-2D, which were corroborated by the measured water contents, suggest that the wetting front advanced initially by as much as 30 m yr−1 with a recharge rate 32 yr after the event of 2.5 m yr−1Simulations based on the measured properties of the sediments suggest that infiltration will occur preferentially around the playa perimeter. However, these sediments were shown to effectively restrict future recharge by storing water until removal by evapotranspiration (ET). This work demonstrated that subsidence craters may be self-healing.

  11. Analysis of elastoplasticity and rheology due to mining subsidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xiong; WANG XiaoGang; DUAN QingWei; JIA ZhiXin; XU NengXiong; SUN YanDong

    2008-01-01

    At present, as the easily mining resources are being increasingly depleted, the exploitation of coal under buildings, water-bodies and railways is imminent for the sustainable production. Probability in-tegral method is a general method for mining subsidence in the coal system. Because of poor under-standing of mining subsidence for other sections, the authors suggest probability integral method for the study of coal mining under buildings, water-bodies and railways. Moreover, the calculation result of probability integral method should be corrected by numerical simulation method. Based on practical projects, the impact has been evaluated on the security of Xifeihe left embankment under coal mining. Combining with the results of probability integral method, we propose that the 600 m far from em-bankment is a good rationality. This article provides the basis for the rational exploitation of coal re-source which is a major practical problem under the premise of Water Infrastructure Security. Fur-thermore, it also can be served as a reference for the similar projects, such as mining Xiaolangdi res-ervoir area, mining Yuecheng reservoir and mining the major channels of Middle Route South to North Water Transfer.

  12. Research on the surface subsidence monitoring technology based on fiber Bragg grating sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinyu; Jiang, Long; Sun, Zengrong; Hu, Binxin; Zhang, Faxiang; Song, Guangdong; Liu, Tongyu; Qi, Junfeng; Zhang, Longping

    2017-03-01

    In order to monitor the process of surface subsidence caused by mining in real time, we reported two types of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) based sensors. The principles of the FBG-based displacement sensor and the FBG-based micro-seismic sensor were described. The surface subsidence monitoring system based on the FBG sensing technology was designed. Some factual application of using these FBG-based sensors for subsidence monitoring in iron mines was presented.

  13. The analysis of subsidence associated with geothermal development. Volume 1. Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atherton, R.W.; Finnemore, E.J.; Gillam, M.L.

    1976-09-01

    This study evaluates the state of knowledge of subsidence associated with geothermal development, and provides preliminary methods to assess the potential of land subsidence for any specific geothermal site. The results of this study are presented in three volumes. Volume 1 is designed to serve as a concise reference, a handbook, for the evaluation of the potential for land subsidence from the development of geothermal resources.

  14. Assessing the Land Subsidence Governance in Ningbo City: By a Close Study of the Building Collapse at the Strictly Protected Land Subsidence Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xia

    2016-04-01

    Ningbo is a coastal city in East China, its land subsidence problem was noticed in the 1960s. However, scientific management was insufficient at that time, so with the fast city development from the 1980s, groundwater was used by a large amount of small factories, and tall buildings were built on the land. It was in 2008, scientists predicted that if without doing anything to prevent the land from subsiding, the city will be covered by the East Sea in 2030. From then on, the local government implied several policies, such as shut down most of the groundwater pumping wells, set up a new authority to enhance the cooperation among different administration departments, and also set up a land subsidence monitoring center for the city. Recently, it is declared that a Stereo regulatory system of land subsidence governance has been achieved. However, in 2012, a 23-years old building in the city center collapsed. According to the City Planning 2009, this building is located just in the strictly protected land subsidence area. The experts, however, think that land subsidence is not the main reason, since there are many illegal changes to the building during the past 23 years. The aim of my research is to assess the land subsidence governance in Ningbo city. I studied the collapsed building, how it was built, what has changed after building, how the environment changed in this area, and how this area became the strictly protected land subsidence area, and what kind of protections have been made. Actually, during the case study I discuss the land subsidence governance design of Ningbo, and to see what practices and lessons we can learn from this case.

  15. Land subsidence of coastal areas of Jiangsu Province, China: historical review and present situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Q. Zhu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface faults related to land subsidence have been observed in coastal cities, such as Nantong, Yancheng, and Lian Yungang, in Jiangsu Province (CAJS since the early 1970s. Nowadays, increases flooding and rising sea levels are attributed to subsidence caused by groundwater pumping. In this work we present a brief description of land subsidence in CAJS, we examine the mechanisms of land subsidence induced mainly by groundwater pumping and its evolution and economic implications as well as the implemented measures by the local government to prevent new damage.

  16. Quantitative evaluation of soil erosion of land subsided by coal mining using RUSLE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Lei; Feng Qiyan; Wu Kan; Meng Qingjun

    2012-01-01

    Based on a RUSLE model,we identified the key factors of the impact on soil erosion induced by coal mining subsidence.We designed a method for predicting LS factors of a mining subsidence basin,using analytical GIS spatial technology.Using the Huainan mining area as an example,we calculated the modulus of erosion,its volume and classified the grade of soil erosion for both the original area and the subsidence basin.The results show that the maximum modulus of erosion and the volume of erosion of the subsidence basin without water logging would increase by 78% and 23% respectively compared with the original situation.The edge of the subsidence basin,where the land subsidence was uneven,is subject to the greatest acceleration in soil erosion.In the situation of water logging after subsidence,the maximum modulus of erosion would decrease if the accumulated slope length were reduced.This maximum modulus around the water logged area within the subsidence basin is equal to that without water logging,while the total volume of erosion decreases.Therefore,mining subsidence aggravates soil erosion especially at the edge of basins where water and soil conservation measures should be taken.

  17. Monitoring Land Subsidence over Mining Areas with Sentinel-1 Differential SAR Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirek, Katarzna

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents possibilities for monitoring man- made surface deformation on example of two areas (Fig. 1): Upper Silesian Coal Basin and Lubelskie Coal Basin (Poland). Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images acquired by Sentinel-1A satellite are utilized in subsidence studies. Satellite radar interferometry technique (InSAR) was used to detecting and monitoring subsidence. There are clearly visible on obtained interferograms subsidence troughs as a distinctive concentric fringes. This study is a part of initiated the SSUMMO project (Surface Subsidence Multidisciplinary Monitoring). The project will provide multidisciplinary monitoring of mining areas and it will prepare the methodology and research software for continuous observation of the impact of exploitation on surface.

  18. Imaging Land Subsidence Induced by Groundwater Extraction in Beijing (China Using Satellite Radar Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Chen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Beijing is one of the most water-stressed cities in the world. Due to over-exploitation of groundwater, the Beijing region has been suffering from land subsidence since 1935. In this study, the Small Baseline InSAR technique has been employed to process Envisat ASAR images acquired between 2003 and 2010 and TerraSAR-X stripmap images collected from 2010 to 2011 to investigate land subsidence in the Beijing region. The maximum subsidence is seen in the eastern part of Beijing with a rate greater than 100 mm/year. Comparisons between InSAR and GPS derived subsidence rates show an RMS difference of 2.94 mm/year with a mean of 2.41 ± 1.84 mm/year. In addition, a high correlation was observed between InSAR subsidence rate maps derived from two different datasets (i.e., Envisat and TerraSAR-X. These demonstrate once again that InSAR is a powerful tool for monitoring land subsidence. InSAR derived subsidence rate maps have allowed for a comprehensive spatio-temporal analysis to identify the main triggering factors of land subsidence. Some interesting relationships in terms of land subsidence were found with groundwater level, active faults, accumulated soft soil thickness and different aquifer types. Furthermore, a relationship with the distances to pumping wells was also recognized in this work.

  19. 淮南采煤沉陷区积水过程地下水作用机制%Groundwater influencing mechanism in water-ponding process of Huainan coal mining subsidence area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆垂裕; 陆春辉; 李慧; 柳炳俊; 孙青言; 李翠

    2015-01-01

    Groundsubsidence caused by coal mining activity commonly exists in the coal belt of China eastern plain area. Subsidence area is on average 0.18-0.33 hm2 per ten thousand tons of coal mining. The subsidence coefficient there is about 0.8-0.9, which means coal mining of one cubic meters result in ground subsidence of 0.8-0.9 m3. In the environment with high groundwater level, the situation is worse, for once the ground sinks due to coal mining, large area of water-ponding occurs. Due to limited source of backfill material, high cost, the long time needed to wait for the stable state of subsidence and other factors, traditional land remediation pattern for coal mining subsidence in China faces difficulties, and land reclamation rate by now is only 12%. From other point of view, coal mining subsidence area is potentially useful water storage structure, and recently some researchers start to study a new remediation pattern of using them for water resource development. However, a prerequisite for the new pattern is to learn where the water comes from. Related to the environment background with high groundwater level, it seems that water stored in coal mining subsidence areas may mainly come from groundwater, but by now this viewpoint has not been proved in detail yet. The article researched the law of water-ponding process in coal mining subsidence area by means of hydrological reasoning and water cycle simulation. In this paper, Huainan coal mining area is taken as study area, which is the largest coal production base of East China area with its coal reserves accounting for 74% of Anhui Province, and 50% of East China area. According to statistical data in 2010, after long-term coal mining activity of dozens of years, the maximum subsidence depth of Huainan coal mining area has reached 7.6m, and the ground subsidence area has reached 108.3 km2, along with the total subsidence volume of 0.314×109 m3. Some meaningful conclusions are drawn through our study. Firstly, the

  20. Subsidence hazard and risk assessments for Mexico City: An interdisciplinary analysis of satellite-derived subsidence map (PSInSAR) and census data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano Rojas, D. E.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Wdowinski, S.; Hernaández Espriú, A.; Falorni, G.; Bohane, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Mexico City Metropolitan Area is the largest urban center in the American continent, with 20.4 millions of inhabitants, representing 17.8% of the total population of the country. Over the past several decades Mexico City has been experienced rapid subsidence, up to ~370 mm/yr, caused by groundwater extraction. The subsidence rate is inhomogeneous, as it controlled by the local geology. Unconsolidated sediments tend to compact and induce rapid subsidence, whereas subsurface volcanic rocks are less prone to subsidence. Intensive faulting in the city has been observed in areas of differential deformation; in these areas buildings and infrastructure are highly damaged. Quantification of subsidence-induce damage is needed for establishing the magnitude of the phenomenon. Our study uses three data sources: a satellite-derived subsidence map, census information of population distribution for 2010, and information on buildings and infrastructure. The subsidence map was calculated from 29 SAR scene acquired by the Envisat satellite during the years 2003-2010 using the Persistent Scatterers Interferometry (PSI) method with the SqueeSAR algorithm. The information of the census of population comes from the National Institute of Statistics and Geography (INEGI), which also provides the information about infrastructure. We intersected the information from the three maps using a geographic information system (GIS), which cover an area of 1, 640 km2. As subsidence-induced damage occurs mainly in areas of differential subsidence, we based the GIS analysis on the subsidence gradients, rather than subsidence rates. In order to evaluate subsidence-induced faulting risk, we generated a risk matrix that worked as the main parameter to create a risk map. We then reclassified the urban area into 5 zones according to the related risk, with R0 for the lowest risk and R4 for the highest. Our counting showed that 350 km2 of the city is located in an urban area of high to very high risk

  1. Regional ground deformation and its controlling measures in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhifang; Zhu, Haisheng; Huang, Yong

    2006-12-01

    With the development of construction of China Cities, there exist a lot of environmental geological problems involved in the geofracture, land subsidence, collapse, landslide, devolution, mudrock flow, floating sand, piping and soft ground deformation. Of big cities whose population is over one million in China, about 30 cities appears the land subsidence region. Other cities locate in the regions of collapse yellow earth or expand soil of strong swell-shrink charasteristic, soft ground and karst. In the paper, the cause and hazard of regionality ground deformation is summed up. The causes of regional land deformation caused by the natural geological effect and activities of human being are analyzed. According to the length of deformation course and endanger of society, economy and life, land deformation involves three types, that is, the delay, rapid and break land deformation. And the concrete countermeasure and method are provided.

  2. Was Miyakejima undergoing subsidence before the 2000 caldera collapse? JERS1 InSAR results: 1992-1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, M.

    2003-12-01

    Miyakejima volcano is a basaltic strato volcano island on the eastern edge of the Philippine Sea Plate, and was undergoing a number of eruption activities over the past centuries. In July-August 2000, the Miyakejima volcano underwent a caldera collapse, prompting many modern geodetic and geophysical measurements (e.g., Geshi et al. 2002; Furuya et al. 2003). The observation results on the pre-caldera-collapse stages are, however, limitted. Were there any precursory secular subsidence before the collapse? Though Miyazaki (1990) reported a secular subsidence at the Miyakejima, using leveling technique, there are no documented reports, to my knowledge, which employed radar interferometry to examine the ground displacements at Miyakejima. Here I will report on the results derived from the radar interferometry at Miyakejima volcano. I chose JERS-1 data (L-band HH) for the analysis, so that I could get rid of the loss of coherence; most of the Miyakejima is covered with vegetation. To remove the topographic fringes as well as to re-estimate the spatial baseline data (Rosen et al. 1996), I employed 10-meter resolution digital elevation map derived by Geographical Survey Institute, Japan. I could generate 24 differential interferograms at the time of writing this text. However, I do not yet recognize any significant "signals" that can be discriminated with the atmospheric "noise". There appears to be no specific subsidence pattern, which are detected in a number of other volcanos in the world (e.g., Lu et al. 2002; Yarai et al. 2002; Okuyama et al. 2002). I am going to show a stacked interferogram like that in Fujiwara et al. (1998) and to examine the existence of volcanic signals.

  3. Grounded cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsalou, Lawrence W

    2008-01-01

    Grounded cognition rejects traditional views that cognition is computation on amodal symbols in a modular system, independent of the brain's modal systems for perception, action, and introspection. Instead, grounded cognition proposes that modal simulations, bodily states, and situated action underlie cognition. Accumulating behavioral and neural evidence supporting this view is reviewed from research on perception, memory, knowledge, language, thought, social cognition, and development. Theories of grounded cognition are also reviewed, as are origins of the area and common misperceptions of it. Theoretical, empirical, and methodological issues are raised whose future treatment is likely to affect the growth and impact of grounded cognition.

  4. Monitoring coal mine induced residual land subsidence using SBAS and PSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzovic, M.; Ghulam, A.

    2013-12-01

    Underground coal mining can cause damage to both property and the environment as a result of mining-induced land subsidence. Illinois, a major coal producer in the United States, is particularly susceptible to mining-induced land subsidence because it has large reserves of underground coal. Identifying and monitoring mining-induced land subsidence is important in order to assist in subsidence planning, minimizing damage to the environment, and prevent damage to structures. Since 1983, coal mining companies are responsible for preventing or correcting damage caused by mining-induced land subsidence. During active mining, land subsidence is monitored using traditional surveying methods, but this monitoring ends after active mining has stopped. In addition, mining-induced land subsidence can continue for decades after the completion of active mining. Traditional surveying methods are time consuming and expensive; therefore, a low-cost method of monitoring land subsidence is of great interest. Satellite based synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) provides a way to remotely measure land subsidence at low-cost, and with multitemporal methods of processing satellite data it reduces problems with standard InSAR and becomes a valuable tool to monitor mining-induced land subsidence. Permanent scatterer interferometry (PSI; Ferretti, et al., 2000, 2001) is a proven method that uses temporally coherent objects, such as buildings and rock outcrops, to improve the accuracy of land displacement measurements. PSI works well in urban areas because of the abundance of buildings, but it is less useful in rural areas. Small baseline subset (SBAS; Berardino, et al., 2002) interferometry uses multiple differential interferograms with small satellite baselines to improve spatial correlation. Both of these methods were used to measure land subsidence from 1992 to 2009 in Springfield, Illinois. Springfield presents a challenge because of the large surrounding rural areas. By

  5. Assessment of the Economic Losses Resulting from Land Subsidence in Bandung Basin, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, H. Z.; Gumilar, I.; Andreas, H.; Fukuda, Y.

    2012-04-01

    The Bandung Basin is a large intra-montane basin surrounded by volcanic highlands, in western Java, Indonesia, inhabited by more than seven million people. The basin, an area of about 2300 km2, is a highland plateau at approximately 650-700 m above sea level and is surrounded by up to 2400 m high Late Tertiary and Quaternary volcanic terrain. Based on the results of 9 GPS surveys conducted since 2000 up to 2011 it was shown that several locations in the Bandung Basin have experienced land subsidence, with an average rate of about -8 cm/year and can go up to about -23 cm/year in certain locations. A similar rate of subsidence was also detected by the InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) technique. In general, the impacts of land subsidence in Bandung basin could be seen in several forms, such as cracking of houses, permanent constructions and roads, changes in river canal and drain flow systems, wider expansion of flooding areas, and malfunction of drainage system. The tangible and intangible impacts of land subsidence cannot be underestimated. The primary environmental and economic effects of land subsidence phenomena can vary from negligible to severe depending on the present land-use nature of the affected area and the subsidence magnitude and coverage. The indirect effects of subsidence through aggravation of other hazards already present in the area are frequently more severe than the direct effects. In the case of Bandung basin, the increase in flooding coverage caused by continuing subsidence introduce more problems compared to other indirect effects of land subsidence. Land subsidence also Increases the maintenance costs for the affected buildings and infrastructure, and lowering the quality of living environment (e.g. health and sanitation condition) and ecosystem in the affected areas. Although not easy, quantitative assessment of economic losses resulting from land subsidence in Bandung basin has been carried out. Methodology and estimated

  6. Cenozoic uplift and subsidence in the North Atlantic region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anell, Ingrid Anna Margareta; Thybo, Hans; Artemieva, Irina

    2009-01-01

    , time and amplitude (where possible) of topographic changes in the North Atlantic region during the Cenozoic (65-0 Ma). Our compilation is based on published results from reflection seismic studies, AFT (apatite fission track) studies, VR (vitrinite reflectance) trends, maximum burial, sediment supply...... studies, mass balance calculations and extrapolation of seismic profiles to onshore geomorphological features. The integration of about 200 published results reveal a clear pattern of topographic changes in the North Atlantic region during the Cenozoic: (1) The first major phase of Cenozoic regional...... and the surrounding areas. (2) A regional increase in subsidence in the offshore marginal areas of Norway, the northern North Sea, the northern British Isles and west Greenland took place in the Eocene (ca 57-35 Ma). (3) The Oligocene and Miocene (35-5 Ma) were characterized by regional tectonic quiescence, with only...

  7. Groundwater management based on monitoring of land subsidence and groundwater levels in the Kanto Groundwater Basin, Central Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuno, K.; Kagawa, A.; Kazaoka, O.; Kusuda, T.; Nirei, H.

    2015-11-01

    Over 40 million people live on and exploit the groundwater resources of the Kanto Plain. The Plain encompasses metropolitan Tokyo and much of Chiba Prefecture. Useable groundwater extends to the base of the Kanto Plain, some 2500 to 3000 m below sea level. Much of the Kanto Plain surface is at sea level. By the early 1970s, with increasing urbanization and industrial expansion, local overdraft of groundwater resources caused major ground subsidence and damage to commercial and residential structures as well as to local and regional infrastructure. Parts of the lowlands around Tokyo subsided to 4.0 m below sea level; particularly affected were the suburbs of Funabashi and Gyotoku in western Chiba. In the southern Kanto Plain, regulations, mainly by local government and later by regional agencies, led to installation of about 500 monitoring wells and almost 5000 bench marks by the 1990's. Many of them are still working with new monitoring system. Long-term monitoring is important. The monitoring systems are costly, but the resulting data provide continuous measurement of the "health" of the Kanto Groundwater Basin, and thus permit sustainable use of the groundwater resource.

  8. Inverting subsidence data to detect possible compartmentalization in a gas reservoir in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, K.; Muntendam-Bos, A.G.; Kunakbayeva, G.; Leeuwenburgh, O.; Peters, E.; Fokker, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    Subsidence can be induced by hydrocarbon production, due to the decrease in pore pressure in the reservoir which causes the reservoir to compact. The subsidence at any point on the surface is a result of the compaction over a large area of the reservoir. The properties of the reservoir and thus the

  9. Time-dependent inversion of surface subsidence due to dynamic reservoir compaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muntendam-Bos, A.G.; Kroon, I.C.; Fokker, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a novel, time-dependent inversion scheme for resolving temporal reservoir pressure drop from surface subsidence observations (from leveling or GPS data, InSAR, tiltmeter monitoring) in a single procedure. The theory is able to accommodate both the absence of surface subsidence estimates

  10. Estimating Natural Environmental Characteristics of Subsidized Households: A Case Study of Austin, Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jae Kim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Compared to the traditional public housing program, the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC program has been regarded as a better tool to ensure the quality of housing structure for subsidized households and the mixing of incomes in neighborhoods. Previous studies related to LIHTC developments have solely focused on the relationships between subsidized households and socioeconomic environments, such as income, race, poverty, etc. Beyond the socioeconomic environments where subsidized households are located, there is a limited understanding about whether subsidized households experience healthier natural environments in their neighborhoods. This study aims to investigate whether LIHTC-subsidized housing neighborhoods provide adequate natural environments to the subsidized households in Austin, Texas, compared to the public housing households. We employ comparison t-tests and binomial logistic regression models. The results show that LIHTC households are significantly exposed to unhealthy natural environmental settings such as a lack of green vegetation and steep slopes while no statistical evidence is reported for public housing neighborhoods. Findings from this study may help policymakers and planners improve their understanding of whether subsidized housing developments offer better natural environments for disadvantaged populations and help them develop effective environmental intervention strategies to improve the quality of life of subsidized households.

  11. Anelastic modeling of surface subsidence induced by the Crandall Mine (Utah) collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, Christina; Wdowinski, Shimon; Dixon, Tim

    2010-05-01

    The Crandall Mine collapsed in August 2007 and resulted in the death of 6 miners. The collapse induced surface subsidence visible by satellite geodesy. We processed data from ALOS satellite acquired before and after the collapse to quantify the subsidence and infer the deformation at depth. Our InSAR results show a localized oval shaped (1000 x 500 m2) pattern of subsidence with a maximum vertical displacement of 29 cm. Profiles across the subsided area show a steep V-shaped pattern. We first model the collapse using an elastic halfspace model. However, we find poor agreement between the elastic model solution and the InSAR observations, mainly because the elastic solution is characterized by a broad subsidence pattern. To improve this fit, we apply a model predicting surface settlement from tunneling (Loganathan and Poulos, 1998), where the internal friction angle is considered in the solution. To account for the flat shape of the collapse strata, we modify the model by changing its geometry from circular shape to elliptical (500 x 2.4 m). Our results show a very good fit in terms of the subsidence pattern, in particular the localization of the subsidence. We found that the surface subsidence was caused by a 7.7% collapse of the mine elliptical shaped mine. Although our simple model does not explain all the observed features, we find it more suitable than elastic halfspace models to explain the localized deformation pattern.

  12. STUDY OF THE PIEZOMETRIC SURFACE AND HYDROCOMPACTION AT CONFINED AQUIFER CAUSED THE LAND SUBSIDENCE IN SEMARANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahrudin Fahrudin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Semarang city has experienced of the land subsidence that be caused by intake groundwater in confined aquiferabundant. The land subsidence happened during range of time 20 years, it’s critical boundary so that result theenvironmental damage. Hence needed a study of cause of the land subsidence. This study aim to know theposition of piezometric surface and also explain the mechanism hydrogeology when happened the landsubsidence. The study of spreading aquifer has been done by the analysis of secondary data which is in the formof drilling log data, piezometric surface and soil mechanics test obtained from PLG (Environmental Center ofGeology Bandung. Later then, between the land subsidence and piezometric surface be overlay becamezonation. From the data made a analysis of cause of the land subsidence. This aquifer has the land subsidence.The land subsidence explainable with the experienced phenomenon fact for example degradation of piezometricsurface at confined aquifer and process of hydrocompaction. That process influenced by two factors that areassess the pore number (e and specific gravity (Gs. The degradation of piezometric surface formed the trapezeof water table until 20 m from sea level with the mean 0.7 - 1.1 m/year. Hydrocompaction cause the degradationof number of mean pore 0.145 - 0.5 and specific gravity 0.009 - 0.073 . The degradation of piezometric surfaceand process the hydrocompaction cause the fast of land subsidence around 0.5 - 1.75 cm/year.

  13. Cenozoic Subsidence Features of Beitang Sag and Relationship with Tectonic Evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Tingting; Wang Hua; Yue Yong; Huang Chuanyan; Zhang Liwei

    2009-01-01

    Based on the application of the EBM basin modeling software and 2-D seismic profiles, the Paleogene and Neogene shubsidence histories of the Beitang(北塘) sag are simulated with the backstripping technique,and the relationship between subsidence character and tectonic revolution is discussed.Moreover,the result of the basin modeling reveals that the subsidence history of the Beitang sag has the characteristics of several geological periods,and these succeeding periods have shown certain inheritance and difference characteristics.At the early (Es3) and middle (Es2-Es1) rifting periods,the subsidence reaction of the Beitang sag was mainly in the charge of tectonic activity,while at the late (Ng-Nm+Q) rifting period-post rifting period and post rifting subsidence-acceleration period-the subsidence type is mainly that of thermal subsidence or regional depression effect; from the beginning of the subsidence history to the end,the reason for the basin subsidence has changed from tectonic activity to non-tectonic activity.

  14. STUDY ON THE SUBSIDING LAND EXTRACTION FROM LANDSAT TM IMAGE SUPPORTED BY GIS AND DOMAIN KNOWLEDGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The subsiding land can be extracted from Remote Sensing image based on its spectral and spatial features. The features of subsiding land caused by mining, especially its RS information features and relative knowledge are proposed. Three methods can be used to extract subsiding land from RS image. The first is to categorize the region into different blocks (or layers) according to their features and apply corresponding strategies for each block, the second is to identify the changeable region based on GIS firstly and then to classify those regions, and the third is to post-process the classified image by traditional methods or ANN(Artificial Neural Network) methods based on domain knowledge and GIS. Two direct extraction methods are introduced also. One is the extraction based on the water accumulating property of subsiding land, and the other is based on the dynamic change of land cover in subsiding land.

  15. Measurements of the Balance of Subsidence and Sedimentation in the Coastal Zone of Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckler, M. S.; Mondal, D. R.; Akhter, S. H.; Davis, J. L.; Goodbred, S. L., Jr.; Wilson, C.; Bulbul, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In the face of rising sea levels, the balance of land subsidence, sea level rise and sedimentation is critical for low-lying deltaic regions. Deltas commonly experience subsidence due to compaction of their thick sediment accumulations and other processes. Many are susceptible to growth faulting and seaward collapse of the sediment pile on detachment layers (salt and/or shales) leading to even greater subsidence. We present evidence for moderate subsidence rates and continuing active sedimentation at the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta in Bangladesh. Subsidence rates are based on continuous GPS, including three new coastal stations established in 2012, hourly tide gauge data for 1977-2012 at 16 sites, two historical sites with ages of 300 years (salt-making kilns) and 400 years (Hindu temple), and sedimentation accumulation rates of near-sea-level deposits from hand-drilled tube wells. Results so far suggest that most sites are subsiding at 3-4 mm/y, although some higher rates are recorded. Updated estimates for subsidence will be presented. Two sets of vertical optical strainmeters record sediment compaction and inform its variation with depth. Sedimentation estimates based on sedimentation plots, marker horizons, and surface elevation tables (SETs) suggest that accumulation rates in natural areas near the coast currently compensate for relative subsidence, whereas human-modified areas farther inland receive insufficient sediment and are at risk. We hypothesize that the moderate subsidence rate of the delta is due to buttressing of the margin by the continental rise. The slope-rise break is shallow at 1 km water depth due to the high sediment supply feeding the Bengal Fan. Thus the thick wedge of continental rise sediments rise higher than the top of the weak overpressured sediments in the delta that could act as a décollement surface. This prevents the seaward collapse of the delta and associated higher rates of subsidence.

  16. Subsidence of polyetheretherketone cage after minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon-Chan; Chung, Hung-Tae; Cho, Jae-Lim; Kim, Dong-Jun; Chung, Nam-Su

    2013-04-01

    A retrospective case series. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of cage subsidence after minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MITLIF) conducted using a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage, and to identify associated risk factors. Although various rates of cage subsidence after lumbar interbody fusion have been reported, few studies have addressed subsidence rate after MITLIF using PEEK cage. A total of 104 consecutive patients who had undergone MITLIF using a PEEK cage with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included in this study. Cage subsidence was defined to have occurred when a cage was observed to sink into an adjacent vertebral body by ≥2 mm on the postoperative or serial follow-up lateral radiographs. The demographic variables considered to affect cage subsidence were the following: age, sex, body mass index, bone mineral density, diagnosis, number of fusion segment, and the quality/quantity of back muscle, and the cage-related variables considered were: level of fusion, intervertebral angle, cage size, cage position, and postoperative distraction of disc height. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to explore relations between these variables and cage subsidence. : For the 122 cages inserted, the rate of cage subsidence was 14.8% (18 cages), and cage subsidence occurred within 7.2±8.5 (1-25) months of surgery. The odds ratios for factors found to significantly increase the risk of cage subsidence were; 1.950 (95% confidence interval, 1.002-4.224) for L5-S1 level, and 1.018 (95% confidence interval, 1.000-1.066) for anterior cage position. The rate of PEEK cage subsidence after MITLIF was relatively low. End-plate manipulation and cage insertion during MITLIF were not influenced by a small operation window.

  17. Subsidence Serves as an Indicator of Groundwater Arsenic Risk in the San Joaquin Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.; Knight, R. J.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater arsenic concentrations dominantly result from anaerobic conditions. Within aquifers, clays are typically the major hosts of solid-phase arsenic, and clay layers often have restricted oxygen supply, resulting in anaerobic conditions and the concomitant relase of arsenic to groundwater. But it is not until water is drawn from the clay layers, through over-pumping of aquifers, that arsenic enters the water supply. Due to the mechanical properties of clays, the volume of groundwater withdrawn is effectively approximated by their vertical deformation, the sum of which is expressed at the surface as subsidence. As a result, subsidence can serve as an indicator, or "early warning system", of the presence of arsenic in the pumped groundwater. In the San Joaquin Valley of California, there has been significant subsidence due to groundwater extraction from clays for nearly a century. Historical subsidence in this area has been measured with leveling surveys, GPS and extensometers, and has been reproduced in groundwater models. More recent subsidence can be measured directly using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). We use recent (post-2007) arsenic level data from the southern portion of the San Joaquin Valley to train a random forest model. Predictors in the model include historical (pre-2002) estimates of subsidence, more recent (2007-2011) InSAR estimates of subsidence, and other predictors representing additional mechanisms that could affect arsenic levels in groundwater, such as groundwater flow, redox potential and position in the basin. We find that recent subsidence is a strong predictor of arsenic levels; historical subsidence could have some impact but is less significant. These results indicate that avoiding over-pumping of the aquifer may improve water quality over a time period on the order of 10 years. Incorporating subsidence into arsenic prediction maps can improve our ability to identify and manage areas that have a higher risk of

  18. Ground Wars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Kleis

    Political campaigns today are won or lost in the so-called ground war--the strategic deployment of teams of staffers, volunteers, and paid part-timers who work the phones and canvass block by block, house by house, voter by voter. Ground Wars provides an in-depth ethnographic portrait of two...... infrastructures that utilize large databases with detailed individual-level information for targeting voters, and armies of dedicated volunteers and paid part-timers. Nielsen challenges the notion that political communication in America must be tightly scripted, controlled, and conducted by a select coterie...... of professionals. Yet he also quashes the romantic idea that canvassing is a purer form of grassroots politics. In today's political ground wars, Nielsen demonstrates, even the most ordinary-seeming volunteer knocking at your door is backed up by high-tech targeting technologies and party expertise. Ground Wars...

  19. Mechanisms, Monitoring and Modeling Earth Fissure generation and Fault activation due to subsurface Fluid exploitation (M3EF3): A UNESCO-IGCP project in partnership with the UNESCO-IHP Working Group on Land Subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teatini, P.; Carreon-Freyre, D.; Galloway, D. L.; Ye, S.

    2015-12-01

    Land subsidence due to groundwater extraction was recently mentioned as one of the most urgent threats to sustainable development in the latest UNESCO IHP-VIII (2014-2020) strategic plan. Although advances have been made in understanding, monitoring, and predicting subsidence, the influence of differential vertical compaction, horizontal displacements, and hydrostratigraphic and structural features in groundwater systems on localized near-surface ground ruptures is still poorly understood. The nature of ground failure may range from fissuring, i.e., formation of an open crack, to faulting, i.e., differential offset of the opposite sides of the failure plane. Ground ruptures associated with differential subsidence have been reported from many alluvial basins in semiarid and arid regions, e.g. China, India, Iran, Mexico, Saudi Arabia, Spain, and the United States. These ground ruptures strongly impact urban, industrial, and agricultural infrastructures, and affect socio-economic and cultural development. Leveraging previous collaborations, this year the UNESCO Working Group on Land Subsidence began the scientific cooperative project M3EF3 in collaboration with the UNESCO International Geosciences Programme (IGCP n.641; www.igcp641.org) to improve understanding of the processes involved in ground rupturing associated with the exploitation of subsurface fluids, and to facilitate the transfer of knowledge regarding sustainable groundwater management practices in vulnerable aquifer systems. The project is developing effective tools to help manage geologic risks associated with these types of hazards, and formulating recommendations pertaining to the sustainable use of subsurface fluid resources for urban and agricultural development in susceptible areas. The partnership between the UNESCO IHP and IGCP is ensuring that multiple scientific competencies required to optimally investigate earth fissuring and faulting caused by groundwater withdrawals are being employed.

  20. Volcanic subsidence triggered by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake in Japan: Hot and weak material hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Youichiro; Fukushima, Yo

    2014-05-01

    With spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) analysis, we found that the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquake in Japan (March 11, 2011) has triggered unprecedented subsidence of multiple volcanoes. Similar phenomenon has been reported for the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake (Pritchard et al., 2013). We used SAR data acquired before and after the mainshock by ALOS (PALSAR). By removing long wave-length phase trend from InSAR images, we obtained the localized subsidence signals at five active volcanoes: Mt. Akitakoma, Mt. Kurikoma, Mt. Zao, Mt. Azuma, and Mt. Nasu. All of them belong to the volcanic front of Northeast Japan. The subsidence areas exhibit elliptic shape elongated in the North-South direction - perpendicular to the principal axis of the extensional stress change due to the Tohoku earthquake. Major axis of the ellipse reaches 15 - 20 km, and the amount of subsidence is up to 15 cm (Mt. Azuma). GPS data from two volcanoes also indicate surface subsidence consistent with the satellite radar observations. Furthermore, the GPS data show that the subsidence occurred immediately after the earthquake. A common feature of the five volcanoes is their high geothermal activity. The areas of high geothermal gradient and high thermal water temperature are in good agreement with the area of subsidence detected by InSAR. Also, the Late Cenozoic calderas cluster around the subsidence regions, which implies that hot plutonic bodies once intruded are still hot and highly deformable even now. According to numerical modelling, the observed subsidence can be explained by the co-seismic response of fluid-filled ellipsoid beneath each volcano. We confirmed that the surface subsidence is also caused by the ellipsoid filled with elastic body of low shear strength. We further checked that an ellipsoid is more effective to cause the subsidence than a sphere when the ellipsoid is elongated perpendicular to the tension axis of the imposed stress. References: Takada, Y. and

  1. Modeling Surface Subsidence from Hydrocarbon Production and Induced Fault Slip in the Louisiana Coastal Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallman, E. P.; Zoback, M. D.

    2005-12-01

    Coastal wetland loss in southern Louisiana poses a great threat to the ecological and economic stability of the region. In the region of interest, wetland loss is a combination of land subsidence along with eustatic sea level rise, sediment accumulation, erosion, filling and drainage. More than half of the land loss in coastal Louisiana between 1932 and 1990 was related to subsidence due to the complicated interaction of multiple natural and anthropogenic processes, including compaction of Holocene sediments in the Mississippi River delta, lithospheric flexure as a response to sediment loading, and natural episodic movement along regional growth faults. In addition to these mechanisms, it has recently been suggested that subsurface oil and gas production may be a large contributing factor to surface subsidence in the Louisiana Coastal Zone. We model the effect of fluid withdrawal from oil and gas fields in the Barataria Bay region of the Louisiana Coastal Zone on surface subsidence and its potential role in inducing fault slip on the region's growth faults. Along the western edge of Barataria Basin is a first-order leveling line to constrain our model of land subsidence. The rates for this leveling line show numerous locations of increased subsidence rate over the surrounding area, which tend to be located over the large oil and gas fields in the region. However, also located in the regions of high subsidence rate and oil and gas fields are the regional normal faults. Slip on these growth faults is important in two contexts: Regional subsidence would be expected along these faults as a natural consequence of naturally-occurring slip over time. In addition, slip along the faults can be exacerbated by production such that surface subsidence would be localized near the oil and gas fields. Using pressure data from wells in the Valentine, Golden Meadow, and Leeville oil and gas fields we estimate the amount of compaction of the various reservoirs, the resulting surface

  2. Application of the spatial data mining module in analysis of mining ground deformation factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Blachowski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Spatial data mining methods for example those based on artificial neural networks (ANN allow extraction of information from databases and detection of otherwise hidden patterns occurring in these data and in consequence acquiring new knowledge on the analysed phenomena or processes. One of these techniques is the multivariate statistical analysis, which facilitates identification of patterns otherwise difficult to observe. In the paper an attempt of applying self-organising maps (SOM to explore and analyse spatial data related to studies of ground subsidence associated with underground mining has been described. The study has been carried out on a selected part of a former underground coal mining area in SW Poland with the aim to analyse the influence of particular ground deformation factors on the observed subsidence and the relationships between these factors. The research concerned the uppermost coal panels and the following factors: mining system, time of mining activity and inclination, thickness and depth below the ground of the exploited coal panels. It has been found that the exploratory spatial data analysis can be used to identify relationships in multidimensional data related to mining induced ground subsidence. The proposed approach may be found useful in identification of areas threatened by mining related subsidence and in creating scenarios of developing deformation zones and therefore aid spatial development of mining grounds.

  3. Regional subsidence history and 3D visualization with MATLAB of the Vienna Basin, central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E.; Novotny, J.; Wagreich, M.

    2013-12-01

    This study reconstructed the subsidence history by the backstripping and 3D visualization techniques, to understand tectonic evolution of the Neogene Vienna Basin. The backstripping removes the compaction effect of sediment loading and quantifies the tectonic subsidence. The amount of decompaction was calculated by porosity-depth relationships evaluated from seismic velocity data acquired from two boreholes. About 100 wells have been investigated to quantify the subsidence history of the Vienna Basin. The wells have been sorted into 10 groups; N1-4 in the northern part, C1-4 in the central part and L1-2 in the northernmost and easternmost parts, based on their position within the same block bordered by major faults. To visualize 3D subsidence maps, the wells were arranged to a set of 3D points based on their map location (x, y) and depths (z1, z2, z3 ...). The division of the stratigraphic column and age range was arranged based on the Central Paratethys regional Stages. In this study, MATLAB, a numerical computing environment, was used to calculate the TPS interpolation function. The Thin-Plate Spline (TPS) can be employed to reconstruct a smooth surface from a set of 3D points. The basic physical model of the TPS is based on the bending behavior of a thin metal sheet that is constrained only by a sparse set of fixed points. In the Lower Miocene, 3D subsidence maps show strong evidence that the pre-Neogene basement of the Vienna Basin was subsiding along borders of the Alpine-Carpathian nappes. This subsidence event is represented by a piggy-back basin developed on top of the NW-ward moving thrust sheets. In the late Lower Miocene, Group C and N display a typical subsidence pattern for the pull-apart basin with a very high subsidence event (0.2 - 1.0 km/Ma). After the event, Group N shows remarkably decreasing subsidence, following the thin-skinned extension which was regarded as the extension model of the Vienna Basin in the literature. But the subsidence in

  4. DISASTER ANALYSIS AND COUNTERMEASURES OF LAND SUBSIDENCE CAUSED BY COAL CUTTING IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Tong-guang; JIANG Lu-guang; LI Yue; YANG Yong-liang

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, many coal-producing countries have paid great attention to the land subsidence causedby coal cutting. In China, because of the dense population in coalfield areas, the land subsidence hazard is more seri-ous. After a brief analysis on the mechanism of land subsidence, this paper gives a comprehensive and systematical ac-count on all kinds of hazards caused by the land subsidence in China. The study shows that land subsidence has endan-gered land, buildings, traffic and communication lines, dykes and dams. It also causes damage to ecological and socialenvironment. In order to lessen the hazard of land subsidence, preventive measures should be taken to reduce the col-lapse amount, such as extraction with stowing, banded mining system, succession and coordination mining system, orhigh-pressure mudflow between rock strata. Measures of reinforcing or moving certain buildings should also be taken toreduce the destructive degree. In order to harness the subsidence land and bring them under control for farming, mea-sures should be taken such as filling with spoil or fine breeze, excavating the deeper and covering the shallower land.

  5. Quantitative prediction of mining subsidence and its impact on the environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianjun Song; Chunjian Han; Ping Li; Junwei Zhang; Deyuan Liu; Minde Jiang; Lin Zheng; Jingkai Zhang; Jianying Song

    2012-01-01

    This study is focused on the prediction of mining subsidence and its impact on the environment in the Hongqi mining area.The study was carried out by means of a probability integral model based,in first instance based on field surveys and the analysis of data collected from this area.Isolines of mining subsidence were then drawn and the impact caused by mining subsidence on the environment was analyzed quantitatively by spatial analysis with Geographic Information System (GIS).The results indicate that the subsidence area of the first working-mine can be as large as 2.54 km2,the maximum subsidence is 3440 mm which will cause 1524 houses to be relocated.The entire subsidence area of the mine can reach 8.09 km2,with a maximum subsidence of 3590 mm.Under these circumstances the value of the loss of ecosystem services will reach 5.371 million Yuan and the cost of relocating buildings will increase to 6.858 million Yuan.

  6. Monitoring land subsidence by PS-DInSAR and SBAS methods in Tianjin City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongdong; Deng, Kazhong; Zhu, Chuanguang; Xue, Jiqun

    2011-10-01

    Because of groundwater over-exploitation, the land subsidence of Tianjin city has become more and more serious. Some researchers tried to use D-InSAR technique to monitor the subsidence of this area. However, D-InSAR has some problems such as space and time baseline decorrelation and atmospheric influence. In order to obtain long time series land deformation with high accuracy, SAR image set to monitor land subsidence has become a research focus. PSDInSAR (Persistent Scatterers-DInSAR) and SBAS (Small Baseline Sets) are two classical methods to monitor land subsidence by SAR images. The former chooses one image as the master and the latter chooses several images as the masters according to the threshold of baselines. Using eighteen ERS images and SRTM DEM data the land subsidence of Tianjin city from 1992 to 1998 was obtained by two methods mentioned. 18906 and 42041 PS points were identified respectively by PS-DInSAR and SBAS. While, 16.4 mm/a and 24.2 mm/a of the mean maximal subsidence velocities were obtained respectively. Although they are different in values, the distributions and subsidence laws of points are nearly same.

  7. Time function of surface subsidence based on Harris model in mined-out area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xinrong; Wang Junbao; Guo Jianqiang; Yuan Hong; Li Peng

    2013-01-01

    The surface subsidence is a common environmental hazard in mined-out area.Based on careful analysis of the regularity of surface subsidence in mined-out area,we proposed a new time function based on Harris curve model in consideration of the shortage of current surface subsidence time functions.By analyzing the characteristics of the new time function,we found that it could meet the dynamic process,the velocity change process and the acceleration change process during surface subsidence.Then its rationality had been verified through project cases.The results show that the proposed time function model can give a good reflection of the regularity of surface subsidence in mined-out area and can accurately predict surface subsidence.And the prediction data of the model are a little greater than measured data on condition of proper measured data quantity,which is safety in the engineering.This model provides a new method for the analysis of surface subsidence in mined-out area and reference for future prediction,and it is valuable to engineering application.

  8. Dynamic subsidence basins in coal mines based on rock mass theological theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Yu; Gong Zhiqiang; Liang Bing

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the surface deformation caused by coal mining and to reduce environmental damage,more accurate information of dynamic subsidence basins,caused by coal mining,is needed.Based on rheological theory,we discuss surface deformation mechanism of dynamic subsidence on the assumption that both the roof and the coal seam are visco-elastic media,put forward the idea that the principle of surface deformation is similar to that of roofs,except for their parameters.Therefore,a surface deformation equation can be obtained,given the equation of the roof deformation derived.from using a HM rheological model.In the end,we apply the equation of surface deformation as a practical subsidence prediction in a coal mine.Given the rheologic properties of a rock mass,the results of our research of a dynamic subsidence basin can predict the development of surface deformation as a function of time.which is more important than the ultimate subsidence itself.The results indicate that using rheological theory to calculate the deformation of a dynamic subsidence basin is suitable and provides some reference for surface deformation of dynamic subsidence basins.

  9. Aquifer-System Compaction and Land Subsidence: Measurements, Analyses, and Simulations-the Holly Site, Edwards Air Force Base, Antelope Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneed, Michelle; Galloway, Devin L.

    2000-01-01

    Land subsidence resulting from ground-water-level declines has long been recognized as a problem in Antelope Valley, California. At Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), ground-water extractions have caused more than 150 feet of water-level decline, resulting in nearly 4 feet of subsidence. Differential land subsidence has caused sinklike depressions and earth fissures and has accelerated erosion of the playa lakebed surface of Rogers Lake at EAFB, adversely affecting the runways on the lakebed which are used for landing aircraft such as the space shuttles. Since 1990, about 0.4 foot of aquifer-system compaction has been measured at a deep (840 feet) borehole extensometer (Holly site) at EAFB. More than 7 years of paired ground-water-level and aquifer-system compaction measurements made at the Holly site were analyzed for this study. Annually, seasonal water-level fluctuations correspond to steplike variations in aquifer-system compaction; summer water-level drawdowns are associated with larger rates of compaction, and winter water-level recoveries are associated with smaller rates of compaction. The absence of aquifer-system expansion during recovery is consistent with the delayed drainage and resultant delayed, or residual, compaction of thick aquitards. A numerical one-dimensional MODFLOW model of aquitard drainage was used to refine estimates of aquifer-system hydraulic parameters that control compaction and to predict potential future compaction at the Holly site. The analyses and simulations of aquifer-system compaction are based on established theories of aquitard drainage. Historical ground-water-level and land-subsidence data collected near the Holly site were used to constrain simulations of aquifer-system compaction and land subsidence at the site for the period 1908?90, and ground-water-level and aquifer- system compaction measurements collected at the Holly site were used to constrain the model for the period 1990?97. Model results indicate that two thick

  10. Surface subsidence induced by the Crandall Mine (Utah) collapse: InSAR observations and anelastic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, C.; Wdowinski, S.; Dixon, T. H.; Govers, R. M.

    2009-12-01

    The Crandall Mine collapsed in August 2007 and resulted in the death of 6 miners. The collapse induced surface subsidence visible by satellite geodesy. We processed data from ALOS satellite acquired before and after the collapse to quantify the subsidence and infer the deformation at depth. Our InSAR results show a localized oval shaped (1000 x 500 m2) pattern of subsidence with a maximum vertical displacement of 29 cm. Profiles across the subsided area show a steep V-shaped pattern. We first model the collapse using an elastic halfspace model. However, we find poor agreement between the elastic model solution and the InSAR observations, mainly because the elastic solution is characterized by a broad subsidence pattern, as elasticity does not explain localized strain. To overcome this limitation, we investigated analytical models that consider strain localization due to material failure. Here, we apply a model predicting surface settlement from tunneling (Loganathan and Poulos, 1998). This model uses the internal friction angle to define the maximum width of the subsidence area. To account for the flat shape of the collapse strata, we modify the model by changing its geometry from circular shape to elliptical (500 x 2.4 m). Our results show a very good fit in terms of the subsidence pattern, in particular the localization of the subsidence. We found that the surface subsidence was caused by a 7.7% collapse of the mine elliptical shaped mine. Although our simple model does not explain all the observed features, we find it more suitable than elastic halfspace models to explain the localized deformation pattern.

  11. Sinkholes, subsidence and subrosion on the eastern shore of the Dead Sea as revealed by a close-range photogrammetric survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Halbouni, Djamil; Holohan, Eoghan P.; Saberi, Leila; Alrshdan, Hussam; Sawarieh, Ali; Closson, Damien; Walter, Thomas R.; Dahm, Torsten

    2017-05-01

    Ground subsidence and sinkhole collapse are phenomena affecting regions of karst geology worldwide. The rapid development of such phenomena around the Dead Sea in the last four decades poses a major geological hazard to the local population, agriculture and industry. Nonetheless many aspects of this hazard are still incompletely described and understood, especially on the eastern Dead Sea shore. In this work, we present a first low altitude (tectonic faults. The estimated minimum volume loss of this subsided zone is 1.83 ṡ 106 m3 with an average subsidence rate of 0.21 m yr-1 over the last 25 years. Sinkholes in the surveyed area are localized mainly within this depression. The sinkholes are commonly elliptically shaped (mean eccentricity 1.31) and clustered (nearest neighbor ratio 0.69). Their morphologies and orientations depend on the type of sediment they form in: in mud, sinkholes have a low depth to diameter ratio (0.14) and a long-axis azimuth of NNE-NE. In alluvium, sinkholes have a higher ratio (0.4) and are orientated NNW-N. From field work, we identify actively evolving artesian springs and channelized, sediment-laden groundwater flows that appear locally in the main depression. Consequently, subrosion, i.e. subsurface mechanical erosion, is identified as a key physical process, in addition to dissolution, behind the subsidence and sinkhole hazard. Furthermore, satellite image analysis links the development of the sinuous depression and sinkhole formation at Ghor Al-Haditha to preferential groundwater flow paths along ancient and current wadi riverbeds.

  12. Prediction maps of land subsidence caused by groundwater exploitation in Hanoi, Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thinh Hong Phi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents study results of the land subsidence caused by groundwater exploitation in Hanoi, Vietnam. The study includes collection and analysis of data on geology, hydrology, soil properties and settlements observed at 10 monitoring stations as well as models of the time-dependent settlement. The calculated settlements are relatively close to actual monitoring data. The models were done for prediction of the land subsidence at 92 selected points by the finite element method. Prediction maps are made for prediction of the land subsidence in 2020 and 2030. Recommendations are proposed for potential zones of groundwater exploitation in Hanoi.

  13. Prediction of land subsidence caused by groundwater exploitation in Hanoi, Vietnam, using multifactorial correlation analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thinh Hong Phi; Ludmila Aleksandrovna Strokova

    2013-01-01

    Multifactorial correlation analysis is a new method used to predict the land subsidence caused by groundwater exploitation. This article introduces and applies the method to establish the function of the surface settlement rate (Vs) and the function of the time-dependent surface settlement (St) caused by groundwater exploitation, based on data acquired at three land subsidence monitoring stations in the Hanoi area of Vietnam. Comparison with actual monitoring data indicates that the prediction results are relatively close to the monitoring data. From this, we conclude that multifactorial correlation analysis is a reliable method and can be used to predict future land subsidence caused by groundwater exploitation in Hanoi.

  14. The Lagoon of Venice: geological setting,evolution and land subsidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AntonioBrambati; LauraCarbognin; TullioQuaia; PietroTeatini; LuigiTosi

    2003-01-01

    The paper deals with the geological setting, history and subsidence of the Venetian Plain. Major attention is paid to the Pleistocene-Holocene stratigraphic sequence in the Lagoon of Venice, in relation to its origin that datesback to 6-7 kyr BP. Geological land subsidence, which played an important role in the origin and the evolution of the lagoon, and anthropogenic subsidence, that has recently assumed a major importance for the Venetian environment, are discussed. Considering also the sealevel rise, 23 cm loss in land elevation has occurred in the last century, leading to increased flooding events and environmental problems that require protective works.

  15. Research on inspection of stability of subsiding area in composite rock-mass roadway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    来兴平

    2002-01-01

    The research concentrates mainly on the development of failure process in composite rock-mass through acoustic emission, convergence inspection, stress measurement, subside area measurement, level measurement in the process of stability and safety monitoring as well as inspecting of subside area in composite hard rock. In terms of the modern signal analysis technology, various aspects are discussed. The monitoring result and the stability of rock mass can be synthetically evaluated and inferred, and the location of acoustic origin according to the acoustic emission regularity can be successfully detected. Finally the key factors of the deformation can be inferred from in subside area.

  16. Survey of land subsidence – case study: The land subsidence formation in artificial recharge ponds at South Hamadan Power Plant, northwest of Iran

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ahmad Khorsandi Aghai

    2015-02-01

    The artificial recharge is a technique of aquifer conservation for land subsidence. But in this article, the phenomenon of land subsidence and the resulting cracks and fissures at the study area are formed in recharge ponds. This is a new phenomenon and in this research the geometrical properties of the fissures of recharge ponds are measured. The results reveal the existence of fine layers in the geology of the aquifer, which are displaced in the long run as the consequence of groundwater overdraft. At the site of the artificial recharge subject of this research, the difference between the quality of recharge water and the aquifer and their interaction have intensified the instability and the movement of the fine sediments. In addition, the neglect of hydraulic principles of the groundwater during the construction and operation of the recharge wells has resulted in turbulent and speed flows, intensified displacement of fine sediments and ultimately the localized subsidence at the site of the plan.

  17. Model for the estimate of the global subsidence in sublevel caving of wide layers in big slopes; Modelo para el Calculo de la Subsidencia Global en la Exploatacion de Capas Anchas y de Fuerte Pendiente por Sutiraje

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The Sociedad Anonima Hullera Vasco-Leonesa (HVL) is working in a highly tectonised deposit, which very thick and irregular sub vertical seams, whose particular characteristics led to follow an investigation project for the final preparation of a model to estimate the global subsidence produced during and after the works. The working method in use has been basically observatory, until the necessary values were achieved to establish a representative model of the subsidence phenomenon. The information was gathered in two stages: the most interesting details in existence were collected in the first stage and in the second one, a wide measurement work was accomplished, in order to how the ground moved while the subsidence process. The movements of the ground were measured on the surface, with classical topographic means, as well as in the underground with extensometers. Different methods have been followed for the final preparation of the estimate model, in order to select the most suitable one. Some models have been studied: the classical procedures of influence functions, the tenso-deformational models solved by means of numerical models in computers and the theoretical models based on closed solutions. A theoretical model has been selected, following J. LITWINSISZYN and S. G. AVERSHING`s theory, which has been solved using the method of finite differences in an elasticity system. Finally two computer applications were created: one of them which allows to obtain subsidence previsions and deformations, and another one focused to make the accomplishment of topographic control measurement easier. As a whole, it can be stated that, starting from this project, HVL has a suitable means to continue controlling the evolution of the subsidence and, if needed, to adjust adequately the defined model. (Author)

  18. Water-gas dynamics and coastal land subsidence over Chioggia Mare field, northern Adriatic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teatini, Pietro; Baú, Domenico; Gambolati, Giuseppe

    2000-09-01

    A major development programme comprising 15 gas fields of the northern Adriatic Sea has recently been submitted to the Ministry of the Environment, VIA Committee for the assessment of the environmental impact, by ENI-Agip, the Italian national oil company. One of the largest reservoirs is Chioggia Mare, located about 10 km offshore of the Venetian littoral, with a burial depth of 1000-1400 m. The planned gas production from this field is expected to impact the shoreline stability with a potential threat to the city of Venice, 25 km northwest of the center of Chioggia Mare. To evaluate the risk of anthropogenic land subsidence due to gas withdrawal, a numerical model was developed that predicts the compaction of both the gas-bearing formations and the lateral/bottom aquifer (water drive) during a 13-year producing and a 12-year post-production period, and the transference of the deep compaction to the ground surface. To address the uncertainty of a few important hydromechanical parameters, several scenarios are simulated and the most pessimistic predictions obtained. The modeling results show that at most 1 cm of land subsidence over 25 years may be expected at the city of Chioggia, whereas Venice is not subject to settlement. If aquifer drawdown is mediated by water injection, land subsidence is arrested 5 km offshore, with the Chioggia littoral zone experiencing a rebound of 0.6-0.7 cm. Résumé. Un important programme de développement portant sur 15 gisements de gaz du nord de l'Adriatique a été récemment soumis au Comité VIA pour l'évaluation de l'impact sur l'environnement du Ministère de l'Environnement, par la société ENI-Agip, la compagnie nationale pétrolière italienne. L'un des plus importants réservoirs est celui de Chioggia Mare, situé à environ 10 km au large du littoral vénitien, à une profondeur de 1000 à 1400 m. La production de gaz prévue pour ce gisement laisse envisager un impact sur la stabilité du trait de côte, avec une

  19. The Land Subsidence and Relative Sea Level Rise in Chinese Delta Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YeYincan; LiuDujuan

    2004-01-01

    Based on some experts' research effort, the problems of land subsidence and relative sea level rise in three Chinese delta areas(Huanghe, Changjiang and Zhujiang Delta) are analyzed and discussed in this paper. The authors' opinion is that the land subsidence is mainly induced by human activity and has made the greater contributions to the relative sea level rise and become one of the geological hazards in these areas. In Tianjin and Shanghai areas where had ever existed serious land subsidence problem, due to the positive and effective control methods, the ratio of man-induced land subsidence to relative sea level rise decreased from 80% - 90% in 1960s - 1970s to less than 60% at present. But it is estimated that in the next tens of years this ratio will still be considerable. So human being must keep its eyes on this phenomenon and take more positive countermeasures to control the land subsidenee.

  20. Case study data base companion report 3 to simulation of geothermal subsidence (LBL-10571)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, I.; Dershowitz, W.; Jones, K.; Myer, L.; Roman, K.; Schauer, M.

    1980-03-01

    The data base developed for selection and evaluation of geothermal subsidence case studies is presented. Data from this data base were used in case studies of Wairakei, The Geysers, and Austin Bayou Prospect (Report LBL 10571).

  1. Study on the forecasting and maintenance system of special railway subsidence in mine area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王喜富; 朱德明; 任占营

    2003-01-01

    The fully mechanized caving coal mining under the railway in mine area will result in difficulty maintenance of railway because of great distortion and subsidence speed of terrene and railway. If the subsidence forecasting is incorrect and maintenance measure is not suitable in the preceding and the process of mining, the normal operation of the railway in mine area will not be ensured and perhaps the safety accident will be resulted. The railway subsidence forecasting and maintenance system for fully mechanized caving coal face are studied and developed in this connection. Based on the accurate subsidence forecasting of the terrene and railway, the maintenance measure for track and switch turnout in railway is put forward in this system.

  2. Long Wall Mining Subsidence and Fluvial Stream Changes: an Ecological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, R.; Proch, T.

    2005-05-01

    Long wall mining is a high efficiency underground coal extraction technique that removes large panels of coal and causes immediate subsidence of the overburden. Surface subsidence may vary between 0.3 meters and 2 meters depending on the depth of the coal seam. Fractures in the overburden allow perched water tables to drain to greater depths and dries up their associated springs. Base flow in headwater streams is often eliminated. Subsidence also changes the physical characteristics of streams. Typical riffle pool sequences are replaced with long pools and glides. Benthic invertebrate and fish community assemblages reflect the physical habitat changes. EPT invertebrate taxa are replaced with Odonates and Diptera larvae associated with glide/pool habitat. Fish community diversity is negatively impacted. Diverse riffle dwelling assemblages are replaced and dominated by increasingly homogenous pool dwelling fish communities. Stream subsidence effectively increases the stream order without increasing its size or flow regime.

  3. Modeling an RF Cold Crucible Induction Heated Melter with Subsidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant L. Hawkes

    2004-07-01

    A method to reduce radioactive waste volume that includes melting glass in a cold crucible radio frequency induction heated melter has been investigated numerically. The purpose of the study is to correlate the numerical investigation with an experimental apparatus that in the above mentioned melter. Unique to this model is the subsidence of the glass as it changes from a powder to molten glass and drastically changes density. A model has been created that couples the magnetic vector potential (real and imaginary) to a transient startup of the melter process. This magnetic field is coupled to the mass, momentum, and energy equations that vary with time and position as the melt grows. The coupling occurs with the electrical conductivity of the glass as it rises above the melt temperature of the glass and heat is generated. Natural convection within the molten glass helps determine the shape of the melt as it progresses in time. An electromagnetic force is also implemented that is dependent on the electrical properties and frequency of the coil. This study shows the progression of the melt shape with time along with temperatures, power input, velocities and magnetic vector potential. Coupled to all of this is a generator that will be used for this lab sized experiment. The coupling with the 60 kW generator occurs with the impedance of the melt as it progresses and changes with time. A power controller has been implemented that controls the primary coil current depending on the power that is induced into the molten glass region.

  4. Subsidence of ash-flow calderas: Relation to caldera size and magma-chamber geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, P.W.

    1997-01-01

    Diverse subsidence geometries and collapse processes for ash-flow calderas are inferred to reflect varying sizes, roof geometries, and depths of the source magma chambers, in combination with prior volcanic and regional tectonic influences. Based largely on a review of features at eroded pre-Quaternary calderas, a continuum of geometries and subsidence styles is inferred to exist, in both island-arc and continental settings, between small funnel calderas and larger plate (piston) subsidences bounded by arcuate faults. Within most ring-fault calderas, the subsided block is variably disrupted, due to differential movement during ash-flow eruptions and postcollapse magmatism, but highly chaotic piecemeal subsidence appears to be uncommon for large-diameter calderas. Small-scale downsag structures and accompanying extensional fractures develop along margins of most calderas during early stages of subsidence, but downsag is dominant only at calderas that have not subsided deeply. Calderas that are loci for multicyclic ash-flow eruption and subsidence cycles have the most complex internal structures. Large calderas have flared inner topographic walls due to landsliding of unstable slopes, and the resulting slide debris can constitute large proportions of caldera fill. Because the slide debris is concentrated near caldera walls, models from geophysical data can suggest a funnel geometry, even for large plate-subsidence calderas bounded by ring faults. Simple geometric models indicate that many large calderas have subsided 3-5 km, greater than the depth of most naturally exposed sections of intracaldera deposits. Many ring-fault platesubsidence calderas and intrusive ring complexes have been recognized in the western U.S., Japan, and elsewhere, but no well-documented examples of exposed eroded calderas have large-scale funnel geometry or chaotically disrupted caldera floors. Reported ignimbrite "shields" in the central Andes, where large-volume ash-flows are inferred to

  5. L ogistic 模型在地面沉降预测中的应用%Application research of Logistic model to the prediction of land subsidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    凌胜任

    2016-01-01

    随着城市大规模工程建设的开展,由此引发的地面沉降对区域生态环境、基础设施的影响不容忽视,地面沉降预测与控制是亟待深入研究的重要课题。研究表明,地面沉降基本经历发生、发展、成熟,最后到达一定极限沉降量的过程,这与Logistic模型反映事物的发展规律非常接近。文中建立地面沉降量Logistic预测模型,以某地区地面沉降实测数据为例进行定量模拟预测,结果表明,Logistic预测模型能很好的拟合沉降量—时间关系曲线,而且能够对地面沉降进行较为准确的预测。%With the economic globalization and large‐scale of city project construction ,the impact on infrastructure ,regional ecological environment caused by the ground subsidence cannot be ignored .The prediction and control of ground settlement are the important issue which needs to be studied further . Research show s that land subsidence has experienced occurring ,development ,mature and finally reached a certain limit settlement ,w hich is similar to the Logistic model reflecting the law of development of things . Therefore ,the Logistic prediction model of land subsidence is established in this paper .The ground settlement data of a certain area is used for quantitative simulation and prediction .The results show that Logistic prediction model can well fit the relationship between the amount of time settlement curve ,and can carry on the accurate prediction of land subsidence .

  6. DInSAR technique: basis and applications to terrain subsidence monitoring in construction works

    OpenAIRE

    Sillerico, E.; Marchamalo, M.; Rejas, J. G.; MARTíNEZ, R

    2010-01-01

    Subsidences are defined as slow and gradual movements of the terrain or built surface. These may affect all types of terrains, and are caused by tension-induced changes for many reasons, such as lowering water tables (groundwater extraction), underground mining (minerals, coal, salt), excavation of tunnels, extraction of oil or gas, slow processes of dissolution and lixiviation of materials, consolidation of soft soils, organic soils,... The measurement and monitoring of land subsidences are ...

  7. Monitoring Mining Subsidence Using A Combination of Phase-Stacking and Offset-Tracking Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongdong Fan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available An approach to study the mechanism of mining-induced subsidence, using a combination of phase-stacking and sub-pixel offset-tracking methods, is reported. In this method, land subsidence with a small deformation gradient was calculated using time-series differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (D-InSAR data, whereas areas with greater subsidence were calculated by a sub-pixel offset-tracking method. With this approach, time-series data for mining subsidence were derived in Yulin area using 11 TerraSAR-X (TSX scenes from 13 December 2012 to 2 April 2013. The maximum mining subsidence and velocity values were 4.478 m and 40 mm/day, respectively, which were beyond the monitoring capabilities of D-InSAR and advanced InSAR. The results were compared with the GPS field survey data, and the root mean square errors (RMSE of the results in the strike and dip directions were 0.16 m and 0.11 m, respectively. Four important results were obtained from the time-series subsidence in this mining area: (1 the mining-induced subsidence entered the residual deformation stage within about 44 days; (2 the advance angle of influence changed from 75.6° to 80.7°; (3 the prediction parameters of mining subsidence; (4 three-dimensional deformation. This method could be used to predict the occurrence of mining accidents and to help in the restoration of the ecological environment after mining activities have ended.

  8. Employer perspectives on the role of soft skills in subsidized employment relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Camochan, S; Taylor, S.; Pascual, G.; Austin, MJ

    2014-01-01

    ©Alliance for Children and Families. The dual objective of subsidized employment programs is to support employers and low-income job seekers. However, few studies of these programs have examined employer perspectives or reflected critically on the role of soft skills in relationships between employers and subsidized employees. This qualitative study examined employer perspectives on soft skills, drawing on the concept of fit from the person-in-environment perspective, as framed by personnel p...

  9. Evaluating Land Subsidence Rates and Their Implications for Land Loss in the Lower Mississippi River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available High subsidence rates, along with eustatic sea-level change, sediment accumulation and shoreline erosion have led to widespread land loss and the deterioration of ecosystem health around the Lower Mississippi River Basin (LMRB. A proper evaluation of the spatial pattern of subsidence rates in the LMRB is the key to understanding the mechanisms of the submergence, estimating its potential impacts on land loss and the long-term sustainability of the region. Based on the subsidence rate data derived from benchmark surveys from 1922 to 1995, this paper constructed a subsidence rate surface for the region through the empirical Bayesian kriging (EBK interpolation method. The results show that the subsidence rates in the region ranged from 1.7 to 29 mm/year, with an average rate of 9.4 mm/year. Subsidence rates increased from north to south as the outcome of both regional geophysical conditions and anthropogenic activities. Four areas of high subsidence rates were found, and they are located in Orleans, Jefferson, Terrebonne and Plaquemines parishes. A projection of future landscape loss using the interpolated subsidence rates reveals that areas below zero elevation in the LMRB will increase from 3.86% in 2004 to 19.79% in 2030 and 30.88% in 2050. This translates to a growing increase of areas that are vulnerable to land loss from 44.3 km2/year to 240.7 km2/year from 2011 to 2050. Under the same scenario, Lafourche, Plaquemines and Terrebonne parishes will experience serious loss of wetlands, whereas Orleans and Jefferson parishes will lose significant developed land, and Lafourche parish will endure severe loss of agriculture land.

  10. Radiologic Assessment of Subsidence in Stand-Alone Cervical Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) Cage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Sung-Kon; Park, Jung-Yul; Kim, Se-Hoon; Lim, Dong-Jun; Kim, Sang-Dae; Lee, Sang-Kook

    2008-12-01

    Aim of study was to find a proper method for assessing subsidence using a radiologic measurement following anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with stand-alone polyetheretherketone (PEEK), Solistrade mark cage. Forty-two patients who underwent ACDF with Solistrade mark cage were selected. With a minimum follow-up of 6 months, the retrospective investigation was conducted for 37 levels in 32 patients. Mean follow-up period was 18.9 months. Total intervertebral height (TIH) of two fused vertebral bodies was measured on digital radiographs with built-in software. Degree of subsidence (DeltaTIH) was reflected by the difference between the immediate postoperative and follow-up TIH. Change of postoperative disc space height (CT-MRDeltaTIH) was reflected by the difference between TIH of the preoperative mid-sagittal 2D CT and that of the preoperative mid-sagittal T1-weighted MRI. Compared to preoperative findings, postoperative disc height was increased in all cases and subsidence was observed only in 3 cases. For comparison of subsidence and non-subsidence group, TIH and CT-MRDeltaTIH of each group were analyzed. There was no statistically significant difference in TIH and CT-MRDeltaTIH between each group at 4 and 8 weeks, but a difference was observed at the last follow-up TIH (p=0.0497). ACDF with Solistrade mark cage was associated with relatively good radiologic long-term results. Fusion was achieved in 94.5% and subsidence occurred in 8.1% by the radiologic assessment. Statistical analysis reveals that the subsidence seen later than 8 weeks after surgery and the development of subsidence does not correlate statistically with the change of the postoperative disc space height.

  11. Circumpolar mapping of ground-fast lake ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Annett; Pointner, Georg; Leibman, Marina O.; Dvornikov, Yuri A.; Khomutov, Artem V.; Trofaier, Anna M.

    2017-02-01

    Shallow lakes are common across the entire Arctic. They play an important role as methane sources and wildlife habitats, and they are also associated with thermokarst processes which are characteristic of permafrost environments. Many lakes freeze to the ground along their rims and often over the entire extent during winter time. Knowledge on the spatial patterns of ground-fast and floating ice is important as it relates to methane release, talik formation and hydrological processes, but no circumpolar account of this phenomenon is currently available. Previous studies have shown that ground-fast ice can easily be detected using C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) backscatter intensity data acquired from satellites. A major challenge is that backscatter intensity varies across the satellite scenes due to incidence angle effects. Circumpolar application therefore requires the inclusion of incidence angle dependencies into the detection algorithm. An approach using ENVISAT ASAR Wide Swath data (approximately 120 m spatial resolution) has therefore been developed supported by bathymetric measurements for lakes in Siberia. This approach was then further applied across the entire Arctic for late winter 2008. Ground-fast ice fraction has been derived for (1) two million lake objects larger than 0.025 km² (post-processed GlobeLand30), (2) a 50 x 50 km grid and (3) within certain zones relevant for climate studies (permafrost type, last glacial maximum, Yedoma). Especially lakes smaller than approximately 0.1 km² may freeze completely to the ground. The proportion of ground-fast ice increases with increasing soil organic carbon content in the proximity of the lakes. This underlines the importance of such lakes for emission studies and the need to map the occurrence of ground-fast lake ice. Clusters of variable fractions of ground-fast ice occur especially in Yedoma regions of Eastern Siberia and Alaska. This reflects the nature of thaw lake dynamics. Analyses of lake

  12. Rapid post-rift tectonic subsidence events in the Pearl River Mouth Basin, northern South China Sea margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Min; Zhong, Guangfa; Liu, Xuefeng; Liu, Lihua; Shen, Xinping; Wu, Zhe; Huang, Ke

    2017-10-01

    Data from 26 drill wells and 27 regional seismic profiles were integrated to investigate the timing, phase and origin of the post-rift subsidence in the middle to eastern Pearl River Mouth Basin (PRMB) of the northern South China Sea using the traditional 1-D backstripping technique. Different from previous research of backstripped tectonic subsidence in the basin, we calculated the tectonic subsidence using the newly built local porosity-depth relationships for decompaction and updated sedimentological and paleontological data for paleobathymetry reconstruction. Well-data based subsidence curves reveal a roughly decaying pattern in both the magnitude and rate of the post-rift subsidence in the PRMB, which is in accordance with the general decreasing trend of the thermal subsidence typical of a passive margin. Two events of rapid post-rift tectonic subsidence were identified, which occurred in the Early to early Middle Miocene and the Pliocene. The timing of the first rapid post-rift subsidence event varies and is earlier in the southern rather than northern part of the basin. Additionally, the amplitude of contemporaneous tectonic subsidence is greater in the southern part of the basin. The second rapid tectonic subsidence event occurred simultaneously in both the southern and northern parts of the basin, with the amplitude of subsidence being much greater in the southern part. We associate the first rapid subsidence event with the southward jump of the South China Sea spreading ridge, which occurred between the Oligocene and Early Miocene, while the second event with the arc-continent collision at Taiwan since the latest Late Miocene. The southern PRMB in the deep-water slope area shows a much higher magnitude of tectonic subsidence in both events than its northern counterpart in the shelf area, which could be associated with its much thinner lithosphere. The latter could cause upswelling of denser lower crust and upper mantle material, resulting in more rapid

  13. Crustal rifting and subsidence of Sirte basin, Libya: a mature hydrocarbon Province

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumati, Y.; Schamel, S.; Nairn, A.E.M.

    1985-02-01

    The complex rifting and subsidence history of the Sirte basin serves as an instructive case study of the tectonic evolution of an intercratonic extensional basin. The Sirte basin formed by collapse of the Sirte arch in the mid-Cretaceous. Marine sediments accumulated following initial crustal arching and rifting as the basin was flooded from the north. Upper Cretaceous strata lie unconformably on igneous and metamorphic rocks of the Precambrian basement complex, Cambrian-Ordovician Gargaf Group, or the pre-Cretaceous continental Nubian Sandstone. The most rapid subsidence and accumulation of basinal strata occurred in the early Cenozoic; however, the basin has been relatively stable since the Oligocene. The basin is floored by a northwest-southeast-trending mosaic of narrow horsts and grabens, an important structural characteristic that distinguishes it from the adjacent intracratonic Kufra, Murzuk, and Ghadames basins. The details of basin subsidence, sediment accumulation rates, and facies variations have been reconstructed for the northern Sirte basin from a suite of approximately 100 well logs and numerous seismic lines. Subsidence-rate maps for short time intervals from the mid-Cretaceous through the Eocene show a continual shifting of the loci of maximum and minimum subsidence. The nonsteady character of basin subsidence may reflect a periodicity of movement on the major basement-rooted growth faults bounding the underlying horsts and grabens.

  14. Threat of land subsidence in and around Kolkata City and East Kolkata Wetlands, West Bengal, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Sahu; P K Sikdar

    2011-06-01

    This paper attempts to estimate the possible rate of land subsidence of Kolkata City including Salt Lake City and the adjoining East Kolkata Wetlands located at the lower part of the deltaic alluvial plain of South Bengal basin. Demand of groundwater for drinking, agricultural and industrial purposes has increased due to rapid urbanization. The subsurface geology consists of Quaternary sediments comprising a succession of clay, silty clay and sand of various grades. Groundwater occurs mostly under confined condition except in those places where the top aquitard has been obliterated due to the scouring action of past channels. Currently, the piezometric head shows a falling trend and it may be accelerated due to further over-withdrawal of groundwater resulting in land subsidence. The estimated mean land subsidence rate is 13.53 mm/year and for 1 m drop in the piezometric head, the mean subsidence is 3.28 cm. The surface expression of the estimated land subsidence is however, cryptic because of a time lag between the settlement of the thick low-permeable aquitard at the top and its surface expression. Therefore, groundwater of the cities and wetland areas should be developed cautiously based on the groundwater potential to minimize the threat of land subsidence.

  15. Preliminary survey and performance of land subsidence in North Semarang Demak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuwono, B. D.; Abidin, H. Z.; Gumilar, I.; Andreas, H.; Awaluddin, M.; Haqqi, K. F.; Khoirunisa, R.

    2016-05-01

    Land subsidence in Semarang is a severe hazard threatening people and urban infrastructure. Land subsidence is suspected expand to North Demak. It shows that has been leading to severe and costly damages to urban infrastructure such as buildings and roads. Another disaster like flooding will ruin the city frequently and is increasingly severely affecting the living conditions. The Principle of land subsidence monitoring with a GPS is to determine the coordinates of a point on a carefully selected location and are conducted periodically at regular. By studying the characteristic and speed of change in ellipsoid height of the point - the point of the survey is a survey to the next, then the greater the reduction in soil characteristics and will be known. This paper mainly discusses the results obtained by GPS surveys that have been conducted in 2011, 2013, 2014 and2015. Land subsidence in Semarang until now still occur, especially in the northern region of Semarang. In the range of 2011-2015 land subsidence rates of 15 cm / year besides that for studying land subsidence in Demak, there was 10 Bench Mark was established.

  16. Monitoring on subsidence due to repeated excavation with DInSAR technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Zhenguo; Bian Zhengfu; Lü Fuxiang; Dong Baoquan

    2013-01-01

    DInSAR technology was used to monitor subsidence caused by underground coal mining activities in mountainous area,with multi source SAR data,including 8 EnviSAT C-band and 4 ALOS L-band,and 4 programmed TerraSAR-X dataset.The results revealed that 2-pass DInSAR technique sometimes failed to retrieve the mining-caused subsidence due to spatial and/or temporal de-correlation.We also noticed that there existed residual topographic phase after the compensation with SRTM DEM,which could almost overwhelm the subsidence information when the perpendicular baseline was relatively large.Based on the mining materials,analysis was made on the shape of subsidence area.For the well geocoded results from TerraSAR-X,confirmed by GPS surveying results of corner reflectors,we tried to extract the advance distance of influence besides the subsidence area.Due to the big deformation gradient over stopingfaces,the X-band SAR data could not capture the maximum value subsidence revealed by GPS survey in our preliminary results,the same as C-band EnviSAT data.This will turn to be our research subject in the next few months.

  17. Evaluation model coupling exploitable groundwater resources and land subsidence control in regional loose sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Z. J.; Zhao, S. J.; Jin, WZ; Ma, Q. S.; Wu, X. H.

    2016-08-01

    The loose sediments in the Yangtze River Delta, the North China Plain, the plain of Northern Jiangsu and other districts in China are of great thickness, complex in structure and abundant in groundwater. Groundwater overexploitation easily results in geological disasters of land subsidence. Aiming at the issues, assessment models coupling exploitable groundwater resources and land subsidence control in regional loose sediments were brought up in this paper. The two models were: (1) a three dimensional groundwater seepage model with land subsidence based on the one dimensional Terzaghi consolidation theory; (2) a three dimensional full coupling model on groundwater seepage and land subsidence based on the Biot consolidation theory to simulate and calculate. It can be used to simulate and calculate the problems in real situations. Thus, the groundwater seepage and land subsidence were coupled together in the model to evaluate the amount of exploitable groundwater under the specific requirements of land subsidence control. The full coupling model, which considers the non-linear characteristics of soil mass and the dynamic changes of soil permeability with stress state based on the Biot consolidation theory, is more coincident with the variation characteristics of the hydraulic and mechanical properties of soil mass during the pumping process, making the evaluation results more scientific and reasonable.

  18. Six years of land subsidence in shanghai revealed by JERS-1 SAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damoah-Afari, P.; Ding, X.-L.; Li, Z.; Lu, Zhiming; Omura, M.

    2008-01-01

    Differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) (DInSAR) has proven to be very useful in mapping and monitoring land subsidence in many regions of the world. Shanghai, China's largest city, is one of such areas suffering from land subsidence as a result of severe withdrawal of groundwater for different usages. DInSAR application in Shanghai with the C-band European Remote Sensing 1 & 2 (ERS-1/2) SAR data has been difficult mainly due to the problem of decorrelation of InSAR pairs with temporal baselines larger than 10 months. To overcome the coherence loss of C-band InSAR data, we used eight L-band Japanese Earth Resource Satellite (JERS-1) SAR data acquired during 2 October 1992 to 15 July 1998 to study land subsidence phenomenon in Shanghai. Three of the images were used to produce two separate digital elevation models (DEMs) of the study area to remove topographic fringes from the interferograms used for subsidence mapping. Six interferograms were used to generate 2 different time series of deformation maps over Shanghai. The cumulative subsidence map generated from each of the time series is in agreement with the land subsidence measurements of Shanghai city from 1990-1998, produced from other survey methods. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  19. 基于弹性地基梁法的沉陷区埋地管道应力变形分析%Stress and Deformation Analysis of Buried Pipelines on Subsidence Area by Base Beam Method of Elastic Foundation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱彦鹏; 赵忠忠

    2016-01-01

    The differential settlement of ground is one of the main reasons which causes pipeline damages. The research and analysis on buried pipelines under effect of settlement usually divide the pipeline crossing area into subsidence area and non-subsidence area.Deflection curve equation of deformation of pipelines in non-subsidence area can be simulated and deduced by using base beam model of elastic foundation.Pipeline deformation on subsidence area can be stimulated into cubic curve equation,and then concluded internal force and displacement equation of pipeline on subsidence area by using boundary conditions.The conclu-sions after combining living examples and analysis indicate that maximum stress of pipelines locates on the interface between subsidence area and non-subsidence area.Maximum stress of pipeline on subsidence area is jointly constituted by axial stress caused by pipeline internal pressure,bending stress and axial stress caused by effect of settlement.As pipeline of non-subsidence area mainly suffers axial stress caused by in-ternal pressure,the effect of internal pressure shall be taken into consideration.The principle influence fac-tors that affect pipeline deformation on subsidence area are settlement volume,width of subsidence area, pipeline diameter and burial depth,among which settlement volume and width of subsidence area have the biggest influence,and burial depth mainly affects axial stress of pipeline,which nearly has no influence on blending stress.%场地的不均匀沉降是导致管道破坏的主要原因之一.对沉陷作用下埋地管道进行研究分析,将管道跨越区分为沉陷区和非沉陷区,非沉陷区管道的变形可利用弹性地基梁模型模拟推导出其挠曲线方程,沉陷区管道变形可模拟成三次曲线方程,然后利用边界条件,求得沉陷区管道的内力和位移方程.最后通过实例分析表明:管道的最大应力位于沉陷区与非沉陷区交界面处,且沉陷区管道的最大应

  20. A large 3D physical model: a tool to investigate the consequences of ground movements on the surface structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hor B.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil subsidence of various extend and amplitude can result from the failure of underground cavities, whether natural (for example caused by the dissolution of rocks by underground water flow or man-made (such as mines. The impact of the ground movements on existing structures (houses, buildings, bridges, etc… is generally dramatic. A large small-scale physical model is developed in order to improve our understanding of the behaviour of the building subjected to ground subsidence or the collapse of cavities. We focus on the soil-structure interaction and on the mitigation techniques allowing reducing the vulnerability of the buildings (structures.

  1. Analysis of long-term land subsidence near Mexico City: Field investigations and predictive modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Guerrero, Adrian; Rudolph, David L.; Cherry, John A.

    1999-11-01

    The Mexico City region has several flat plains formed on exceptionally porous (60-90%) lacustrine deposits overlying a highly productive regional aquifer. Severe land subsidence due to consolidation of the lacustrine aquitard caused by aquifer exploitation has resulted in restrictions on pumping in the core of Mexico City. This has led to large increases in aquifer pumping in the outlying lacustrine plains where satellite communities are rapidly expanding. The Chalco Basin is one of these lacustrine areas where pumping began in the 1950s and greatly increased in the 1980s. The lacustrine sequence in the Chalco area is significantly thicker than anywhere else in the Basin of Mexico averaging 100 m and reaching a maximum thickness of 300 m. Consequently, this area is susceptible to the highest potential land subsidence effects as a result of groundwater extraction of anywhere in the basin. Land subsidence in the central part of the Chalco Basin has increased to 0.4 m/yr since 1984 and by 1991 total subsidence had reached 8 m. The rapid land subsidence in this area is causing the accumulation of meteoric waters during the rainy season resulting in extensive flooding of farmland. This study first demonstrates a methodology for combining hydraulic data from a network of monitoring wells, geotechnical data from core samples, and a compilation of historical information on land surface elevation to quantify groundwater flow and land subsidence phenomena within the rapidly subsiding Chalco Basin. Then a one-dimensional mathematical model is employed to develop predictions of future land subsidence under a range of pumping conditions. The model permits the hydraulic properties of the aquitard to vary as transient functions of hydraulic head and porosity. Simulations suggest that under current pumping rates, total land subsidence in the area of thickest lacustrine sediment will reach 15 m by the year 2010. If pumping is reduced to the extent that further decline in the

  2. On Assessment and Estimation of Potential Losses due to Land Subsidence in Urban Areas of Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Hasanuddin Z.; Andreas, Heri; Gumilar, Irwan; Sidiq, Teguh P.

    2016-04-01

    Land subsidence is natural-anthropogenic hazard affecting several large urban areas in Indonesia, i.e. Jakarta, Bandung and Semarang. Geodetic based results from various techniques (e.g. Leveling, GPS and InSAR) show that land subsidence rates in all three cities generally have spatial and temporal variations, and their magnitude is in average about 5-10 cm/year. The impacts of subsidence in those cities can be seen in the field in various forms such as cracking of permanent constructions and roads, tilting of houses and buildings, 'sinking' of houses and buildings, changes in river canal and drain flow systems, wider expansion of coastal and/or inland flooding areas, and increased inland sea water intrusion. These impacts can be categorized into infrastructure, environmental, economic, and social impacts. The potential losses due to land subsidence in urban areas are actually quite significant. Related infrastructural, social and environmental costs due to direct and indirect impacts of land subsidence are economically quite significant, and can not be underestimated in sustainable urban development. The planning, development and maintenance costs of building and infrastructures in the affected areas are usually much higher than the normal situation. The collateral impact of coastal subsidence in Jakarta and Semarang, in the form of coastal flooding during high tides is also quite damaging. This repeated coastal flooding in several areas along the coast will deteriorate the structure and function of building and infrastructures, badly influences the quality of the living environment and life (e.g. health and sanitation condition), and also disrupts economic and social activities in the affected areas. As in the case of Bandung, inland subsidence also has a quite significant impact on inland flooding phenomena, since it will theoretically lead to expanded coverage and deeper water depth of flooded (inundated) areas. Since the direct and indirect impacts of

  3. Surface Subsidence Analysis by Multi-Temporal InSAR and GRACE: A Case Study in Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiming Guo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between surface subsidence and groundwater changes. To investigate this relationship, we first analyzed surface subsidence. This paper presents the results of a case study of surface subsidence in Beijing from 1 August 2007 to 29 September 2010. The Multi-temporal Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (multi-temporal InSAR technique, which can simultaneously detect point-like stable reflectors (PSs and distributed scatterers (DSs, was used to retrieve the subsidence magnitude and distribution in Beijing using 18 ENVISAT ASAR images. The multi-temporal InSAR-derived subsidence was verified by leveling at an accuracy better than 5 mm/year. Based on the verified multi-temporal InSAR results, a prominent uneven subsidence was identified in Beijing. Specifically, most of the subsidence velocities in the downtown area were within 10 mm/year, and the largest subsidence was detected in Tongzhou, with velocities exceeding 140 mm/year. Furthermore, Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE data were used to derive the groundwater change series and trend. By comparison with the multi-temporal InSAR-derived subsidence results, the long-term decreasing trend between groundwater changes and surface subsidence showed a relatively high consistency, and a significant impact of groundwater changes on the surface subsidence was identified. Additionally, the spatial distribution of the subsidence funnel was partially consistent with that of groundwater depression, i.e., the former possessed a wider range than the latter. Finally, the relationship between surface subsidence and groundwater changes was determined.

  4. 'Grounded' Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Garbi

    2012-01-01

    play within one particular neighbourhood: Nørrebro in the Danish capital, Copenhagen. The article introduces the concept of grounded politics to analyse how groups of Muslim immigrants in Nørrebro use the space, relationships and history of the neighbourhood for identity political statements....... The article further describes how national political debates over the Muslim presence in Denmark affect identity political manifestations within Nørrebro. By using Duncan Bell’s concept of mythscape (Bell, 2003), the article shows how some political actors idealize Nørrebro’s past to contest the present...

  5. Study on the risk and impacts of land subsidence in Jakarta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, H. Z.; Andreas, H.; Gumilar, I.; Brinkman, J. J.

    2015-11-01

    Jakarta is the capital city of Indonesia located in the west-northern coast of Java island, within a deltaic plain and passes by 13 natural and artificial rivers. This megapolitan has a population of about 10.2 million people inhabiting an area of about 660 km2, with relatively rapid urban development. It has been reported for many years that several places in Jakarta are subsiding at different rates. The main causative factors of land subsidence in Jakarta are most probably excessive groundwater extraction, load of constructions (i.e., settlement of high compressibility soil), and natural consolidation of alluvial soil. Land subsidence in Jakarta has been studied using leveling surveys, GPS surveys, InSAR and Geometric-Historic techniques. The results obtained from leveling surveys, GPS surveys and InSAR technique over the period between 1974 and 2010 show that land subsidence in Jakarta has spatial and temporal variations with typical rates of about 3-10 cm year-1. Rapid urban development, relatively young alluvium soil, and relatively weak mitigation and adapatation initiatives, are risk increasing factors of land subsidence in Jakarta. The subsidence impacts can be seen already in the field in forms of cracking and damage of housing, buildings and infrastructure; wider expansion of (riverine and coastal) flooding areas, malfunction of drainage system, changes in river canal and drain flow systems and increased inland sea water intrusion. These impacts can be categorized into infrastructural, environmental, economic and social impacts. The risk and impacts of land subsidence in Jakarta and their related aspects are discussed in this paper.

  6. Growth and subsidence of carbonate platforms: numerical modelling and application to the Dolomites, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bosellini

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of subsidence induced by the growth of carbonate platforms has been investigated with the aid of numerical modelling. The research aimed to quantify the relative contribution of this process in the creation of the accommodation space required to pile up thick neritic bodies. We analysed two end-member deformation styles, namely the elastic behaviour of the lithosphere when locally loaded and the plastic-like reaction of a sedimentary succession underlying a growing carbonate buildup. The former process, analysed using a modified flexural model, generates a regional subsidence. In contrast, the latter process, simulated by considering the compaction occurring in soft sediments, generates a local subsidence. We attempted to quantify the amount and distribution of subsidence occurring below and surrounding an isolated platform and in the adjacent basin. The major parameters playing a role in the process are discussed in detail. The model is then applied to the Late Anisian-Early Ladinian generation of carbonate platforms of the Dolomites, Northern Italy, where they are spectacularly exposed. Taking also into account the Tertiary shortening that occurred in the area, both local and regional subsidence contributions of major platform bodies have been calculated aimed at a reconstruction of the map of the induced subsidence. A major outcome of this study is that the accommodation space, that allowed the accumulation of very thick shallow-water carbonate successions in the Dolomites, was only partially due to lithospheric stretching while the contribution given by the 'local' overload is as high as 20-40% of the total subsidence. Our results also shed some light on the water-depth problem of the Triassic basins as well as on the basin-depth to platform-thickness relationships.

  7. Water availability and land subsidence in the Central Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunt, Claudia; Sneed, Michelle; Traum, Jonathan A.; Brandt, Justin

    2016-01-01

    The Central Valley in California (USA) covers about 52,000 km2 and is one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world. This agriculture relies heavily on surface-water diversions and groundwater pumpage to meet irrigation water demand. Because the valley is semi-arid and surface-water availability varies substantially, agriculture relies heavily on local groundwater. In the southern two thirds of the valley, the San Joaquin Valley, historic and recent groundwater pumpage has caused significant and extensive drawdowns, aquifer-system compaction and subsidence. During recent drought periods (2007–2009 and 2012-present), groundwater pumping has increased owing to a combination of decreased surface-water availability and land-use changes. Declining groundwater levels, approaching or surpassing historical low levels, have caused accelerated and renewed compaction and subsidence that likely is mostly permanent. The subsidence has caused operational, maintenance, and construction-design problems for water-delivery and flood-control canals in the San Joaquin Valley. Planning for the effects of continued subsidence in the area is important for water agencies. As land use, managed aquifer recharge, and surface-water availability continue to vary, long-term groundwater-level and subsidence monitoring and modelling are critical to understanding the dynamics of historical and continued groundwater use resulting in additional water-level and groundwater storage declines, and associated subsidence. Modeling tools such as the Central Valley Hydrologic Model, can be used in the evaluation of management strategies to mitigate adverse impacts due to subsidence while also optimizing water availability. This knowledge will be critical for successful implementation of recent legislation aimed toward sustainable groundwater use.

  8. Sea Level Rise and Land Subsidence Contributions to the Signals from the Tide Gauges of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Albert

    2016-06-01

    The tide gauges measure the local oscillations of the sea level vs. the tide gauge instrument. The tide gauge instrument is generally subjected to the general subsidence or uplift of the nearby inland, plus some additional subsidence for land compaction and other localised phenomena. The paper proposes a non-linear model of the relative sea level oscillations including a long term trend for the absolute sea level rise, another term for the subsidence of the instrument, and finally a sinusoidal approximation for the cyclic oscillations of periodicities up to decades. This non-linear model is applied to the tide gauges of China. The paper shows that the limited information available for China does not permit to infer any proper trend for the relative rates of rise, as the tide gauge records are all short or incomplete and the vertical movement of the tide gauge instruments is unassessed. The only tide gauge record of sufficient length that may be assembled for China is obtained by combining the North Point and Quarry Bay tide gauges in Hong Kong (NPQB). This NQPB composite tide gauge record is shown to have similarities with the tide gauge records of Sydney, equally in the West pacific, and San Diego, in the east Pacific, oscillating about the longer term trend mostly determined by the local subsidence. As it is very well known that China generally suffers of land subsidence, and the tide gauge installations may suffer of additional subsidence vs. the inland, it may be concluded from the analysis of the other worldwide tide gauges that the sea levels of China are very likely rising about the same amount of the subsidence of the tide gauges, with the sea level acceleration component still negligible.

  9. Water availability and land subsidence in the Central Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunt, Claudia C.; Sneed, Michelle; Traum, Jon; Brandt, Justin T.

    2016-05-01

    The Central Valley in California (USA) covers about 52,000 km2 and is one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world. This agriculture relies heavily on surface-water diversions and groundwater pumpage to meet irrigation water demand. Because the valley is semi-arid and surface-water availability varies substantially, agriculture relies heavily on local groundwater. In the southern two thirds of the valley, the San Joaquin Valley, historic and recent groundwater pumpage has caused significant and extensive drawdowns, aquifer-system compaction and subsidence. During recent drought periods (2007-2009 and 2012-present), groundwater pumping has increased owing to a combination of decreased surface-water availability and land-use changes. Declining groundwater levels, approaching or surpassing historical low levels, have caused accelerated and renewed compaction and subsidence that likely is mostly permanent. The subsidence has caused operational, maintenance, and construction-design problems for water-delivery and flood-control canals in the San Joaquin Valley. Planning for the effects of continued subsidence in the area is important for water agencies. As land use, managed aquifer recharge, and surface-water availability continue to vary, long-term groundwater-level and subsidence monitoring and modelling are critical to understanding the dynamics of historical and continued groundwater use resulting in additional water-level and groundwater storage declines, and associated subsidence. Modeling tools such as the Central Valley Hydrologic Model, can be used in the evaluation of management strategies to mitigate adverse impacts due to subsidence while also optimizing water availability. This knowledge will be critical for successful implementation of recent legislation aimed toward sustainable groundwater use.

  10. Land subsidence in the San Joaquin Valley, California, USA, 2007-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneed, M.; Brandt, J. T.

    2015-11-01

    Rapid land subsidence was recently measured using multiple methods in two areas of the San Joaquin Valley (SJV): between Merced and Fresno (El Nido), and between Fresno and Bakersfield (Pixley). Recent land-use changes and diminished surface-water availability have led to increased groundwater pumping, groundwater-level declines, and land subsidence. Differential land subsidence has reduced the flow capacity of water-conveyance systems in these areas, exacerbating flood hazards and affecting the delivery of irrigation water. Vertical land-surface changes during 2007-2014 were determined by using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS), and extensometer data. Results of the InSAR analysis indicate that about 7600 km2 subsided 50-540 mm during 2008-2010; CGPS and extensometer data indicate that these rates continued or accelerated through December 2014. The maximum InSAR-measured rate of 270 mm yr-1 occurred in the El Nido area, and is among the largest rates ever measured in the SJV. In the Pixley area, the maximum InSAR-measured rate during 2008-2010 was 90 mm yr-1. Groundwater was an important part of the water supply in both areas, and pumping increased when land use changed or when surface water was less available. This increased pumping caused groundwater-level declines to near or below historical lows during the drought periods 2007-2009 and 2012-present. Long-term groundwater-level and land-subsidence monitoring in the SJV is critical for understanding the interconnection of land use, groundwater levels, and subsidence, and evaluating management strategies that help mitigate subsidence hazards to infrastructure while optimizing water supplies.

  11. Subsidence monitoring with geotechnical instruments in the Mexicali Valley, Baja California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacka, E.; Sarychikhina, O.; Márquez Ramírez, V. H.; Robles, B.; Nava, F. A.; Farfán, F.; García Arthur, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    The Mexicali Valley (northwestern Mexico), situated in the southern part of the San Andreas fault system, is an area with high tectonic deformation, recent volcanism, and active seismicity. Since 1973, fluid extraction, from the 1500-3000 m depth range, at the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field (CPGF), has influenced deformation in the Mexicali Valley area, accelerating the subsidence and causing slip along the traces of tectonic faults that limit the subsidence area. Detailed field mapping done since 1989 (González et al., 1998; Glowacka et al., 2005; Suárez-Vidal et al., 2008) in the vicinity of the CPGF shows that many subsidence induced fractures, fissures, collapse features, small grabens, and fresh scarps are related to the known tectonic faults. Subsidence and fault rupture are causing damage to infrastructure, such as roads, railroad tracks, irrigation channels, and agricultural fields. Since 1996, geotechnical instruments installed by CICESE (Centro de Investigación Ciéntifica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada, B.C.) have operated in the Mexicali Valley, for continuous recording of deformation phenomena. Instruments are installed over or very close to the affected faults. To date, the network includes four crackmeters and eight tiltmeters; all instruments have sampling intervals in the 1 to 20 min range. Instrumental records typically show continuous creep, episodic slip events related mainly to the subsidence process, and coseismic slip discontinuities (Glowacka et al., 1999, 2005, 2010; Sarychikhina et al., 2015). The area has also been monitored by levelling surveys every few years and, since the 1990's by studies based on DInSAR data (Carnec and Fabriol, 1999; Hansen, 2001; Sarychikhina et al., 2011). In this work we use data from levelling, DInSAR, and geotechnical instruments records to compare the subsidence caused by anthropogenic activity and/or seismicity with slip recorded by geotechnical instruments, in an attempt to obtain more information

  12. The influence of faulting on ground movement due to coalmining: the UK and European experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heltewell, E.G.

    1988-01-01

    It has been recognised from the time of the earliest investigations into coal mining subsidence that geological faults can play a significant role in determining the nature of ground movement resulting from coal extraction. However, the limited research undertaken on this aspect has been spasmodic yet wide ranging and has resulted in the findings being published in diverse sources. The paper summarises the evidence and conclusions of observers in the UK and Europe and therefore reveals the present state of knowledge in this aspect of coal mining subsidence. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Polyphase basin evolution of the Vienna Basin inferred from 3D visualization of sedimentation setting and quantitative subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Young; Novotny, Johannes; Wagreich, Michael

    2016-04-01

    This study analyzed and visualized data from 210 wells using a MATLAB-based program (BasinVis 1.0) for 3D visualization of sediment distribution, thickness, and quantitative subsidence of the northern and central Vienna Basin. The sedimentation settings for selected horizons were visualized to 3D sediment distribution maps, isopach maps, and cross-sections. Subsidence of the study area resulted in 3D subsidence depth and rate maps of basement and tectonic subsidences. Due to the special position of the Vienna Basin, the basin evolution was influenced by the regional tectonics of surrounding units. The 2D/3D maps provided insights into the polyphase evolution of the Vienna Basin, which is closely related to changes in the changing regional stress field and the paleoenvironmental setting. In the Early Miocene, the sedimentation and subsidence were shallow and E-W/NE-SW trending, indicating the development of piggy-back basins. During the late Early Miocene, maps show wider sedimentation and abruptly increasing subsidence by sinistral strike-slip faults, which initiated the Vienna pull-apart basin system. The sediments of the Early Miocene were supplied through a small deltaic system entering from the south. After thin sedimentation and shallow subsidence of the early Middle Miocene, the development of the Vienna Basin was controlled and accelerated mainly by NE-SW trending synsedimentary normal faults, especially the Steinberg fault. From the Middle Miocene, the subsidence was decreasing overall, however the tectonic subsidence show regionally different patterns. This study suggests that a major tensional regime change, from transtension to E-W extension, caused laterally varying subsidence across the Vienna Basin. The Late Miocene was characterized by the slowing down of basement and tectonic subsidence. From the middle Middle to Late Miocene, enormous amount of sediments supplied by a broad paleo-Danube delta complex on the western flank of the basin. The latest

  14. Groundwater Resources and Land Subsidence investigations in the Toluca Valley, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderhead, A. I.; Martel, R.; Rivera, A.; Garfias, J.; Therrien, R.

    2007-05-01

    The sustained growth in population in the Toluca Valley and neighboring Mexico City has primarily depended on the continuous development of both local and regional water resources for industrial, agricultural and domestic uses. The Toluca Valley Basin, covering an area of approximately 2000 Km2, is the focus of this study. Currently, there is a significant net loss of water within the basin primarily due to groundwater pumping, and the loss is increasing with time. These stresses on the aquifer have caused significant changes on the water flow patterns, a reversal in the direction of hydraulic gradients, the disappearance of artesian springs and wetlands and noticeable land subsidence within the basin. Neighboring Mexico City's land subsidence problems have been well documented, however, no comprehensive studies exist for the Toluca Basin. This study is divided into two parts: 1) investigation of groundwater depletion in the Toluca Valley; and 2) assessment of land subsidence in the Toluca Valley. We examine various changes in regional flow patterns, and groundwater levels decline throughout the valley and 3D numerical flow simulations are run to predict the ever decreasing level of the piezometric surface. Currently there is a net loss (recharge - extraction) of 142 Mm3 per year of groundwater within the Toluca Basin aquifers. We have documented a decrease in groundwater levels with a rate of up to 1.4 m/year between 1970 and 2006 in the central part of the valley. At the current rate of consumption, groundwater resources will not be sustainable for the population of the valley. Directly related to the drawdown in groundwater levels is the occurrence of land subsidence throughout the valley. Neighboring Mexico City, where total subsidence of up to 9 meters has been observed, has a similar geology as the one in the Toluca valley. We have documented several sites in the Toluca Valley where land subsidence is occurring. Ongoing work includes the mapping of regional

  15. Pengaruh Land Subsidence terhadap Genangan Banjir dan Rob di Semarang Timur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ratih Pujiastuti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Inundation of flood and rob (flood due to high tides in Semarang City is increase wtithin area and depth. It be more seroius condition because of land subsisdence that happened in coastal area of Semarang City. This research is foccused on prediction and mapping of inundation flood and rob due to land subsidence effect in East Semarang, especially Tenggang Watershed and Sringin Watershed. On this research, data analysis including analysis of land subsidence, analysis of hydrological data, analysis of flood discharge with HEC-HMS, hydraulics analysis with HEC-RAS and then mapping the results of the flood inundation with Arc GIS. The inundation will be create with overlay the DEM of flood water level and DEM of topographic. According to the results of analysis is known that minimum land subsidence is 0 cm/year that happened in south area of Semarang and more higher ini north area with maximum land subsidence is 5.58 cm/year. On periode   2014-2031, the contribute of land subsidence to increase the inundation of flood and rob is 1.39%/year.

  16. Characteristics of the main polluting trace elements in the water environment of mining subsidence pools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO En-qin; GUI He-rong

    2008-01-01

    Mining subsidence pools are water bodies formed by soil subsidence near mines. We studied the impact the surrounding coal production activities and power plants have on these waters by measuring the concentrations of harmful trace elements in these waters. The concentration of the four elements F, Hg, Se and As increased by 0.92%, 0.78%, 0.70% and 0.81%, respectively, in the Datong mining subsidence pool from November 2004 to November 2006. The four elements increased by 1.58%, 1.23%, 1.08% and 0.92%, respectively, in the Xie'er mining subsidence pool and 1.16%, 1.06%, 1.02% and 1.01%, respectively, in the Pansan mining subsidence pool over the same time period. The absolute levels of F, Hg, Se and As in the pool are related to the background levels of the elements. A close relationship between nearby coal mines and power plants and increasing levels of the measured elements is noted.

  17. Consolidation and shear failure leading to subsidence and settlement. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeele, W.; Nyhan, J.W.; Hakonson, T.E.; Drennon, B.J.; Lopez, E.A.; Herrera, W.J.; Langhorst, G.J.; Martinez, J.L.; Trujillo, G.

    1986-02-01

    Subsidence and settlement are phenomena that are much more destructive than generally thought. In shallow land burials they may lead to cracking of the overburden and eventual exposure and escape of waste material. The primary causes are consolidation and cave-ins. Laboratory studies performed at Los Alamos permit us to predict settlement caused by consolidation or natural compaction of the crushed tuff overburden. We have also investigated the shear failure characteristics of crushed tuff that may lead to subsidence. Examples of expected settlement and subsidence are calculated based on the known geotechnical characteristics of crushed tuff. The same thing is done for bentonite/tuff mixes because some field experiments were performed using this additive (bentonite) to reduce the hydraulic conductivity of the crushed tuff. Remedial actions, i.e., means to limit the amount of settlement, are discussed. We finally discuss our field experiment, which studies the influence of subsidence on layered systems in general and on biobarriers in particular. The share of the produced cavities is compared with cavities produced by idealized voids in an idealized environment. Study of root penetration at subsidence sites gives us an indication of the remaining degree of integrity. 30 refs., 24 figs., 19 tabs.

  18. Geomechanics of subsidence above single and multi-seam coal mining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.M. Suchowerska Iwanec; J.P. Carter; J.P. Hambleton

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of surface subsidence due to the extraction of underground coal seams is a significant challenge in geotechnical engineering. This task is further compounded by the growing trend for coal to be extracted from seams either above or below previously extracted coal seams, a practice known as multi-seam mining. In order to accurately predict the subsidence above single and multi-seam longwall panels using numerical methods, constitutive laws need to appropriately represent the mechanical behaviour of coal measure strata. The choice of the most appropriate model is not always straightforward. This paper compares predictions of surface subsidence obtained using the finite element method, considering a range of well-known constitutive models. The results show that more sophisticated and numerically taxing constitutive laws do not necessarily lead to more accurate predictions of subsidence when compared to field measurements. The advantages and limitations of using each particular constitutive law are discussed. A comparison of the numerical predictions and field measurements of surface subsidence is also provided.

  19. Geomechanics of subsidence above single and multi-seam coal mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Suchowerska Iwanec

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurate prediction of surface subsidence due to the extraction of underground coal seams is a significant challenge in geotechnical engineering. This task is further compounded by the growing trend for coal to be extracted from seams either above or below previously extracted coal seams, a practice known as multi-seam mining. In order to accurately predict the subsidence above single and multi-seam longwall panels using numerical methods, constitutive laws need to appropriately represent the mechanical behaviour of coal measure strata. The choice of the most appropriate model is not always straightforward. This paper compares predictions of surface subsidence obtained using the finite element method, considering a range of well-known constitutive models. The results show that more sophisticated and numerically taxing constitutive laws do not necessarily lead to more accurate predictions of subsidence when compared to field measurements. The advantages and limitations of using each particular constitutive law are discussed. A comparison of the numerical predictions and field measurements of surface subsidence is also provided.

  20. Contribution of Sediment Compaction/Loading to the Ganges-Bangladesh Delta Subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpytchev, Mikhail; Krien, Yann; Ballu, Valerie; Becker, Melanie; Calmant, Stephane; Spada, Giorgio; Guo, Junyi; Khan, Zahirul; Shum, Ck

    2016-04-01

    A pronounced spatial variability characterizes the subsidence/uplift rates in the Ganges-Bangladesh delta estimated from both sediment cores and modern geodetic techniques. The large variability of the subsidence rates suggests an interplay of different natural and anthropogenic processes including tectonics, sediment loading and sediment compaction, groundwater extaction among many others drivers of the delta vertical land movements.In this study, we focus on estimating the subsidence rates due to the sediments transported by the Ganges-Brahmaputra since the last 18 000 years. The delta subsidence induced by the sediment loading and the resulting sea level changes are modelled by the TABOO and SELEN software (Spada, 2003; Stocchi and Spada, 2007) in the framework of a gravitationally self-consistent Earth model. The loading history was obtained from available sediment cores and from the isopach map of Goodbread and Kuehl (2000). The results demonstrate that the delta loading enhanced by the Holocene sedimention can be responsable for a regular subsidence across the Ganges-Brahmaputra delta with an amplitude of 1-5 mm/yr along the Bengal coast. These estimates demonstrate that the contribution of the Holocene as well as modern sediment loading should be taken into account in climate change mitigation politicy for Bangladesh.

  1. Tectonic subsidence analyses of miogeoclinal strata from mesozoic marginal basin of Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    The Western Peruvian trough is composed of an eastern miogeoclinical facies of carbonate and clastic strata, and a western eugeoclinal facies consisting of a succession of volcanic and sedimentary rocks. In norther and central Peru, the miogeocline is located between a tectonic hinge adjacent to platformal facies of the Maranon geanticline on the east, and an outer marginal high bounded by the Cordillera Blanca fault and Tapacocha axis on the west. Miogeoclinal and platformal strata in southern Peru occur in a broad belt between Arequipa and Lago Titicaca. A marginal basin setting has been proposed for the Western Peruvian trough and the several kilometers of subsidence in the basin has been attributed to back-arc extension and crustal thinning. As a test of this model, quantitative tectonic subsidence curves were constructed from representative sections within miogeoclinar strata from four localities. Preliminary results indicate that the calculated curves have the same overall form as the age-depth curve for ocean floor, suggesting that subsidence was controlled by cooling and thermal contraction of heated lithosphere. The slopes of the curves are less than those for subsidence of oceanic lithosphere. However, they are in agreement with geologic evidence that the miogeocline accumulated on continental crust. Significant variations in the timing of onset, duration, and magnitude of subsidence are observed between sections from northern and southern Peru.

  2. Effects of Active Subsidence Vs. Existing Basin Geometry on Fluviodeltaic Channels and Stratal Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, M.; Kim, W.; Passalacqua, P.

    2015-12-01

    Tectonic subsidence and basin topography, both determining the accommodation, are fundamental controls on the basin filling processes. Their effects on the fluvial organization and the resultant subsurface patterns remain difficult to predict due to the lack of understanding about interaction between internal dynamics and external controls. Despite the intensive studies on tectonic steering effects on alluvial architecture, how the self-organization of deltaic channels, especially the distributary channel network, respond to tectonics and basin geometry is mostly unknown. Recently physical experiments and field studies have hinted dramatic differences in fluviodeltaic evolution between ones associated with active differential subsidence and existing basin depth. In this work we designed a series of numerical experiments using a reduced-complexity channel-resolving model for delta formation, and tested over a range of localized subsidence rates and topographic depression in basin geometry. We also used a set of robust delta metrics to analyze: i) shoreline planform asymmetry, ii) channel and lobe geometry, iii) channel network pattern, iv) autogenic timescales, and v) subsurface structure. The modeling results show that given a similar final thickness, active subsidence enhances channel branching with smaller channel sand bodies that are both laterally and vertically connected, whereas existing topographic depression causes more large-scale channel avulsions with larger channel sand bodies. In general, both subsidence and existing basin geometry could steer channels and/or lock channels in place but develop distinct channel patterns and thus stratal architecture.

  3. Ground engineering principles and practices for underground coal mining

    CERN Document Server

    Galvin, J M

    2016-01-01

    This book teaches readers ground engineering principles and related mining and risk management practices associated with underground coal mining. It establishes the basic elements of risk management and the fundamental principles of ground behaviour and then applies these to the essential building blocks of any underground coal mining system, comprising excavations, pillars, and interactions between workings. Readers will also learn about types of ground support and reinforcement systems and their operating mechanisms. These elements provide the platform whereby the principles can be applied to mining practice and risk management, directed primarily to bord and pillar mining, pillar extraction, longwall mining, sub-surface and surface subsidence, and operational hazards. The text concludes by presenting the framework of risk-based ground control management systems for achieving safe workplaces and efficient mining operations. In addition, a comprehensive reference list provides additional sources of informati...

  4. Experiences of the measurement of the extent of surface subsidence in the area of the Thorez Opencast mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdelyi, L.

    1987-01-01

    Experiences gained in the course of subsidence measurement in the environs of the Thorez opencast mine (North Hungary) and the results of recent subsidence measurements are summarized. The direction, size, extension and temporal variation of surficial movements caused by draining of formation water are dealt with. Two cases are dealt with in detail which were not caused by surficial movements and the real causes were revealed just by the subsidence measurements.

  5. Neogene residual subsidence and its response to a sinking slab in the deep mantle of eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiang; Liu, ShaoFeng; Bai, Yu; Ji, HuiLi

    2017-08-01

    Mantle convection could have a significant effect on basin evolution; however, research quantifying this relationship is controversial. To understand the formation mechanism and evolution of the Cenozoic rift basins in eastern China, we applied the back-stripping technique and strain rate inversion modeling to 119 wells from Sangjiang Basin, Bohai Bay Basin, North Yellow Sea Basin, South Yellow Sea Basin, East China Sea Shelf Basin, and four basins within the northern South China Sea margin. The modeled results can be used to reconstruct the tectonic subsidence history and further assess the potential subsidence mechanisms of eastern China. Residual subsidence is defined as the difference between the theoretical and observed tectonic subsidences. Our results show that the residual subsidence since 20 Ma in eastern China generally increases from ∼100 to 300 m in terrestrial areas to ∼1.2-1.8 km on the continental shelf. Our observed residual subsidence is generally consistent with the present-day dynamic topography that is predicted from mantle flow models, and it is associated with a stagnant slab within the mantle that has been observed by seismic tomography. The migration pathway of the residual subsidence since 20 Ma is consistent with the movement direction of the Pacific and Philippine plates. Therefore, we suggest that the residual subsidence might be a dynamic subsidence induced by a negative buoyancy of the sinking slab in the deep mantle beneath eastern China.

  6. Source Characterization and Temporal Variation of Methane Seepage from Thermokarst Lakes on the Alaska North Slope in Response to Arctic Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2012-09-30

    The goals of this research were to characterize the source, magnitude and temporal variability of methane seepage from thermokarst lakes (TKL) within the Alaska North Slope gas hydrate province, assess the vulnerability of these areas to ongoing and future arctic climate change and determine if gas hydrate dissociation resulting from permafrost melting is contributing to the current lake emissions. Analyses were focused on four main lake locations referred to in this report: Lake Qalluuraq (referred to as Lake Q) and Lake Teshekpuk (both on Alaska's North Slope) and Lake Killarney and Goldstream Bill Lake (both in Alaska's interior). From analyses of gases coming from lakes in Alaska, we showed that ecological seeps are common in Alaska and they account for a larger source of atmospheric methane today than geologic subcap seeps. Emissions from the geologic source could increase with potential implications for climate warming feedbacks. Our analyses of TKL sites showing gas ebullition were complemented with geophysical surveys, providing important insight about the distribution of shallow gas in the sediments and the lake bottom manifestation of seepage (e.g., pockmarks). In Lake Q, Chirp data were limited in their capacity to image deeper sediments and did not capture the thaw bulb. The failure to capture the thaw bulb at Lake Q may in part be related to the fact that the present day lake is a remnant of an older, larger, and now-partially drained lake. These suggestions are consistent with our analyses of a dated core of sediment from the lake that shows that a wetland has been present at the site of Lake Q since approximately 12,000 thousand years ago. Chemical analyses of the core indicate that the availability of methane at the site has changed during the past and is correlated with past environmental changes (i.e. temperature and hydrology) in the Arctic. Discovery of methane seeps in Lake Teshekpuk in the northernmost part of the lake during 2009

  7. Residual subsidence analysis after the end of coal mine work. Example from Lorraine Colliery, France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Heib, M. [INERIS LAEGO - Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Nancy, 54 - Nancy (France); Nicolas, M.; Noirel, J.F. [Charbonnage de France, 57 - Freyming-Merlebach (France); Wojtkowiak, F

    2005-07-01

    This paper describes the residual movements associated with the deep coal mines. The studied case relates to works located into Lorraine coal basin. The paper is divided into two sections. The first one describes subsidence phenomena, especially the residual phase in terms of amplitude, duration and localization. The second one focus on Morsbach case: the total and residual subsidence measurements will be analyzed and compared to the state of the art as well as the currant knowledge. The results of the analysis show that the duration of residual movements does not exceed 24 months and their amplitude is about 5% of total subsidence. We analyze also the declarations of the mining damage during and after the mining period. Damages occur, after this period are probably due to late observations. (authors)

  8. Extracting mining subsidence land from remote sensing images based on domain knowledge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xing-feng; WANG Yun-jia; HUANG Tai

    2008-01-01

    Extracting mining subsidence land from RS images is one of important research contents for environment monitoring in mining area. The accuracy of traditional extracting models based on spectral features is low. In order to extract subsidence land from RS images with high accuracy, some domain knowledge should be imported and new models should be proposed. This paper, in terms of the disadvantage of traditional extracting models, imports domain knowledge from practice and experience, converts semantic knowledge into digital information, and proposes a new model for the specific task. By selecting Luan mining area as study area, this new model is tested based on GIS and related knowledge. The result shows that the proposed method is more pre- cise than traditional methods and can satisfy the demands of land subsidence monitoring in mining area.

  9. Subsidence Detection Using InSAR and Geodetic Measurements in the North-West of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, Morteza

    2010-05-01

    The subsidence of the Earth surface is a phenomenon that occurs in some places in the world which overuse underground sources of water. As Iran has semi-arid and arid climate and the rate of rainfall is lower than the mean rate in the world then nowadays we are encountered by over-exploitation of groundwater in agricultural areas and also for extending the cities and industrial areas. Geodetic measurements i.e., repeated leveling measurements of first order leveling network of Iran and c