WorldWideScience

Sample records for ground reflection effects

  1. Functional proteomic analysis revealed ground-base ion radiations cannot reflect biological effects of space radiations of rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Sun, Yeqing; Zhao, Qian; Han, Lu

    2016-07-01

    Highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as main factor causing biological effects. Radiobiological studies during space flights are unrepeatable due to the variable space radiation environment, ground-base ion radiations are usually performed to simulate of the space biological effect. Spaceflights present a low-dose rate (0.1˜~0.3mGy/day) radiation environment inside aerocrafts while ground-base ion radiations present a much higher dose rate (100˜~500mGy/min). Whether ground-base ion radiation can reflect effects of space radiation is worth of evaluation. In this research, we compared the functional proteomic profiles of rice plants between on-ground simulated HZE particle radiation and spaceflight treatments. Three independent ground-base seed ionizing radiation experiments with different cumulative doses (dose range: 2˜~20000mGy) and different liner energy transfer (LET) values (13.3˜~500keV/μμm) and two independent seed spaceflight experiments onboard Chinese 20th satellite and SZ-6 spacecraft were carried out. Alterations in the proteome were analyzed by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry identifications. 45 and 59 proteins showed significant (pmetabolic process, protein folding and phosphorylation. The results implied that ground-base radiations cannot truly reflect effects of spaceflight radiations, ground-base radiation was a kind of indirect effect to rice causing oxidation and metabolism stresses, but space radiation was a kind of direct effect leading to macromolecule (DNA and protein) damage and signal pathway disorders. This functional proteomic analysis work might provide a new evaluation method for further on-ground simulated HZE radiation experiments.

  2. [The ground reflectance spectrum retrieval from ETM images].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun; Wu, Yu-Hang; Liu, Zhi-Ming; He, Hai-Jian

    2007-04-01

    Retrieval of ground reflectance spectrum from satellite sensor digital count requires knowledge of the atmospheric conditions. Images of spectral radiance from ground-atmosphere system recorded by the multi-spectral imager ETM which boarded Landsat-7 sensor can retrieve the ground reflectivity spectrum. The uncertainty of reflectance spectrum retrieval is no more than 17% at the band 1 of ETM, and less than 10% at the band 2 and 3 of ETM. It is superior to those arithmetics widely used at present. Retrieval of ground radiance spectrum from ground-atmosphere system can be used to synthesize the sRGB true color image, but the definition is not excellent. And it was proved that the color of the images can not reflect the actual nature of earth objects before being adjusted. And the accuracy of interpretation based on true color synthesized images is superior to those based on the source images. So the precision of such reflectance spectrum retrieval is not as good as expected if applied to the true color photography on the ground.

  3. Preliminary results of ground reflectivity measurements using noise radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maślikowski, Łukasz; Krysik, Piotr; Dąbrowska-Zielińska, Katarzyna; Kowalik, Wanda; Bartold, Maciej

    2011-10-01

    The paper describes experimental L-band ground reflectivity measurement using noise radar demonstrator working as a scatterometer. The radar ground return is usually described with a scattering coefficient, a quantity that is independent from the scatterometer system. To calculate the coefficient in a function of incidence angle, range profile values obtained after range compression were used. In order to improve dynamic range of the measurement, antenna cross-path interference was removed using lattice filter. The ground return was measured at L band both for HH and VV polarizations of radar wave as well as for HV and VH crosspolarizations using log-periodic antennas placed at a 10 m high mast directed towards a meadow surface. In the paper the theoretical considerations, noise radar setup, measurement campaign and the results are described.

  4. Unsteady propulsion in ground effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Goon; Kim, Boyoung; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-11-01

    Many animals in nature experience hydrodynamic benefits by swimming or flying near the ground, and this phenomenon is commonly called 'ground effect'. A flexible fin flapping near the ground was modelled, inspired by animals swimming. A transverse heaving motion was prescribed at the leading edge, and the posterior parts of the fin were passively fluttering by the fin-fluid interaction. The fin moved freely horizontally in a quiescent flow, by which the swimming speed was dynamically determined. The fin-fluid interaction was considered by using the penalty immersed boundary method. The kinematics of the flexible fin was altered by flapping near the ground, and the vortex structures generated in the wake were deflected upward, which was qualitatively analyzed by using the vortex dipole model. The swimming speed and the thrust force of the fin increased by the ground effects. The hydrodynamic changes from flapping near the ground affected the required power input in two opposite ways; the increased and decreased hydrodynamic pressures beneath the fin hindered the flapping motion, increasing the power input, while the transversely reduced flapping motion induced the decreased power input. The Froude propulsive efficiency was increased by swimming in the ground effects Creative Research Initiatives (No. 2016-004749) program of the National Research Foundation of Korea (MSIP).

  5. Reflection of ground-source heat pump systems' application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGSuyun; LINZhenguo; WUXiangsheng; WUTian

    2003-01-01

    Ground-source heat pump system is an air-conditioning form of energy efficient and environment protection. This article introduced the forms of ground-source heat pump systems, analyzed the problems of ground-source heat pump systems in application in China, and put forward the solutions to these problems.

  6. Monitoring of landfill leachate dispersion using reflectance spectroscopy and ground-penetrating radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splajt, T; Ferrier, G; Frostick, L E

    2003-09-15

    The utility of ground-penetrating radar and reflectance spectroscopy in the monitoring of landfill sites has been investigated. Strong correlations between red edge inflection position and chlorophyll and heavy metal concentrations have been demonstrated from grassland species affected by leachate contamination of the soil adjacent to the landfill test site. This study demonstrated that reflectance spectroscopy can identify vegetation affected by leachate-contaminated soil at a range of spatial resolutions. To identify the vegetation affected by leachate contamination, the spectroradiometer must have contiguous bands at sufficient spectral resolution over the critical wave range that measures chlorophyll absorption and the red edge (between 650 and 750 nm). The utility of ground-penetrating radar data to identify leachate escaping from breakout points in the contaminant wall has also been demonstrated. An integrated approach using these techniques, combined with field and borehole sampling and contaminant migration modeling, offers a possible cost-effective monitoring approach for landfill sites.

  7. Reflecting on E-Recruiting Research Using Grounded Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolfswinkel, Joost; Furtmüller, Elfi; Wilderom, Celeste

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic review of the e-Recruiting literature through a grounded theory lens. The large number of publications and the increasing diversity of publications on e-Recruiting research, as the most studied area within e-HRM (Electronic Human Resource Management), calls for a syn

  8. Classic Grounded Theory to Analyse Secondary Data: Reality and Reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine Andrews

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper draws on the experiences of two researchers and discusses how they conducted a secondary data analysis using classic grounded theory. The aim of the primary study was to explore first-time parents’ postnatal educational needs. A subset of the data from the primary study (eight transcripts from interviews with fathers was used for the secondary data analysis. The objectives of the secondary data analysis were to identify the challenges of using classic grounded theory with secondary data and to explore whether the re-analysis of primary data using a different methodology would yield a different outcome. Through the process of re-analysis a tentative theory emerged on ‘developing competency as a father’. Challenges encountered during this re-analysis included the small dataset, the pre-framed data, and limited ability for theoretical sampling. This re-analysis proved to be a very useful learning tool for author 1(LA, who was a novice with classic grounded theory.

  9. Clarifying Analysis and Interpretation in Grounded Theory: Using a Conditional Relationship Guide and Reflective Coding Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Wilson Scott PhD

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Although qualitative methods, grounded theory included, cannot be reduced to formulaic procedures, research tools can clarify the process. The authors discuss two instruments supporting grounded theory analysis and interpretation using two examples from doctoral students. The conditional relationship guide contextualizes the central phenomenon and relates categories linking structure with process. The reflective coding matrix serves as a bridge to the final phase of grounded theory analysis, selective coding and interpretation, and, ultimately, to substantive theory generation.

  10. Spectral invariance hypothesis study of polarized reflectance with Ground-based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (GroundMSPI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Christine L.; Kupinski, Meredith; Diner, David J.; Xu, Feng; Chipman, Russell A.

    2015-09-01

    Many models used to represent the boundary condition for the separation of atmospheric scattering from the surface reflectance in polarized remote sensing measurements assume that the polarized surface reflectance is spectrally neutral. The Spectral Invariance Hypothesis asserts that the magnitude and shape of the polarized bidirectional reflectance factor (pBRF) is equal for all wavelengths. In order to test this hypothesis, JPL's Ground-based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (GroundMSPI) is used to measure polarization information of different outdoor surface types. GroundMSPI measures the linear polarization Stokes parameters (I, Q, U), at three wavelengths, 470 nm, 660 nm, and 865 nm. The camera is mounted on a two-axis gimbal to accurately select the view azimuth and elevation directions. On clear sky days we acquired day-long scans of scenes that contain various surface types such as grass, dirt, cement, brick, and asphalt and placed a Spectralon panel in the camera field of view to provide a reflectance reference. Over the course of each day, changing solar position in the sky provides a large range of scattering angles for this study. The polarized bidirectional reflectance factor (pBRF) is measured for the three wavelengths and the best fit slope of the spectral correlation is reported. This work reports the range of best fit slopes measured for five region types.

  11. GPS Multipath Fade Measurements to Determine L-Band Ground Reflectivity Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavak, Adnan; Xu, Guang-Han; Vogel, Wolfhard J.

    1996-01-01

    In personal satellite communications, especially when the line-of-sight is clear, ground specular reflected signals along with direct signals are received by low gain, almost omni-directional subscriber antennas. A six-channel, C/A code processing, GPS receiver with an almost omni-directional patch antenna was used to take measurements over three types of ground to characterize 1.575 GHz specular ground reflections and ground dielectric properties. Fade measurements were taken over grass, asphalt, and lake water surfaces by placing the antenna in a vertical position at a fixed height from the ground. Electrical characteristics (conductivity and dielectric constant) of these surfaces (grass, asphalt, lake water) were obtained by matching computer simulations to the experimental results.

  12. Ground based measurements on reflectance towards validating atmospheric correction algorithms on IRS-P6 AWiFS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani Sharma, Anu; Kharol, Shailesh Kumar; Kvs, Badarinath; Roy, P. S.

    In Earth observation, the atmosphere has a non-negligible influence on the visible and infrared radiation which is strong enough to modify the reflected electromagnetic signal and at-target reflectance. Scattering of solar irradiance by atmospheric molecules and aerosol generates path radiance, which increases the apparent surface reflectance over dark surfaces while absorption by aerosols and other molecules in the atmosphere causes loss of brightness to the scene, as recorded by the satellite sensor. In order to derive precise surface reflectance from satellite image data, it is indispensable to apply the atmospheric correction which serves to remove the effects of molecular and aerosol scattering. In the present study, we have implemented a fast atmospheric correction algorithm to IRS-P6 AWiFS satellite data which can effectively retrieve surface reflectance under different atmospheric and surface conditions. The algorithm is based on MODIS climatology products and simplified use of Second Simulation of Satellite Signal in Solar Spectrum (6S) radiative transfer code, which is used to generate look-up-tables (LUTs). The algorithm requires information on aerosol optical depth for correcting the satellite dataset. The proposed method is simple and easy to implement for estimating surface reflectance from the at sensor recorded signal, on a per pixel basis. The atmospheric correction algorithm has been tested for different IRS-P6 AWiFS False color composites (FCC) covering the ICRISAT Farm, Patancheru, Hyderabad, India under varying atmospheric conditions. Ground measurements of surface reflectance representing different land use/land cover, i.e., Red soil, Chick Pea crop, Groundnut crop and Pigeon Pea crop were conducted to validate the algorithm and found a very good match between surface reflectance and atmospherically corrected reflectance for all spectral bands. Further, we aggregated all datasets together and compared the retrieved AWiFS reflectance with

  13. Simulations of direct and reflected wave trajectories for ground-based GNSS-R experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, N.; Frappart, F.; Ramillien, G.; Darrozes, J.; Desjardins, C.; Gegout, P.; Pérosanz, F.; Biancale, R.

    2014-10-01

    The detection of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals that are reflected off the surface, along with the reception of direct GNSS signals, offers a unique opportunity to monitor water level variations over land and ocean. The time delay between the reception of the direct and reflected signals gives access to the altitude of the receiver over the reflecting surface. The field of view of the receiver is highly dependent on both the orbits of the GNSS satellites and the configuration of the study site geometries. A simulator has been developed to determine the location of the reflection points on the surface accurately by modeling the trajectories of GNSS electromagnetic waves that are reflected by the surface of the Earth. Only the geometric problem was considered using a specular reflection assumption. The orbit of the GNSS constellation satellites (mainly GPS, GLONASS and Galileo), and the position of a fixed receiver, are used as inputs. Four different simulation modes are proposed, depending on the choice of the Earth surface model (local plane, osculating sphere or ellipsoid) and the consideration of topography likely to cause masking effects. Angular refraction effects derived from adaptive mapping functions are also taken into account. This simulator was developed to determine where the GNSS-R receivers should be located to monitor a given study area efficiently. In this study, two test sites were considered: the first one at the top of the 65 m Cordouan lighthouse in the Gironde estuary, France, and the second one on the shore of Lake Geneva (50 m above the reflecting surface), at the border between France and Switzerland. This site is hidden by mountains in the south (orthometric altitude up to 2000 m), and overlooking the lake in the north (orthometric altitude of 370 m). For this second test site configuration, reflections occur until 560 m from the receiver. The planimetric (arc length) differences (or altimetric difference as WGS84

  14. Ground-State Cooling of a Mechanical Oscillator by Interference in Andreev Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, P.; Belzig, W.; Rastelli, G.

    2016-11-01

    We study the ground-state cooling of a mechanical oscillator linearly coupled to the charge of a quantum dot inserted between a normal metal and a superconducting contact. Such a system can be realized, e.g., by a suspended carbon nanotube quantum dot with a capacitive coupling to a gate contact. Focusing on the subgap transport regime, we analyze the inelastic Andreev reflections which drive the resonator to a nonequilibrium state. For small coupling, we obtain that vibration-assisted reflections can occur through two distinct interference paths. The interference determines the ratio between the rates of absorption and emission of vibrational energy quanta. We show that ground-state cooling of the mechanical oscillator can be achieved for many of the oscillator's modes simultaneously or for single modes selectively, depending on the experimentally tunable coupling to the superconductor.

  15. (AJST) EFFECTS OF GROUND INSULATION AND GREENHOUSE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NORBERT OPIYO AKECH

    of plastic digester to produce biogas under natural and greenhouse microenvironment. The specific ... and hydrogen sulphide (H2S). Biogas ... the effect of ground insulation on biogas production. ..... Methane Generation from Human, Animal.

  16. Infrared reflectance spectra: Effects of particle size, provenance and preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Yin-Fong; Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Blake, Thomas A.; Forland, Brenda M.; Szecsody, James E.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2014-09-22

    We have recently developed methods for making more accurate infrared total and diffuse directional - hemispherical reflectance measurements using an integrating sphere. We have found that reflectance spectra of solids, especially powders, are influenced by a number of factors including the sample preparation method, the particle size and morphology, as well as the sample origin. On a quantitative basis we have investigated some of these parameters and the effects they have on reflectance spectra, particularly in the longwave infrared. In the IR the spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: In general, upward-going peaks in the reflectance spectrum result from strong surface scattering, i.e. rays that are reflected from the surface without bulk penetration, whereas downward-going peaks are due to either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signals reflected from solids usually encompass all such effects, but with strong dependencies on particle size and preparation. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 – 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to observe the effects on the spectral features: Bulk materials were ground with a mortar and pestle and sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions between 5 and 500 microns. The median particle size is demonstrated to have large effects on the reflectance spectra. For certain minerals we also observe significant spectral change depending on the geologic origin of the sample. All three such effects (particle size, preparation and provenance) result in substantial change in the reflectance spectra for solid materials; successful identification algorithms will require sufficient flexibility to account for these parameters.

  17. Developing reflective writing as effective pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennison, Monica

    2012-01-01

    While reflective writing about practice experiences is frequently used in nursing curricula to foster critical thinking, faculty members may be unaware of how to help students reflect, what kinds of feedback are helpful, and how to deal with students' concerns. This article describes faculty best practices in mentoring the student to effectively think critically through structured reflective writing. Models of structured reflection, Baker's four-step model and John's revision of Carper's patterns of knowing, are discussed as effective guides at graduate and undergraduate levels. The article addresses potentially problematic issues with the implementation and evaluation of reflective writing assignments in clinical courses. With foresight and planning, reflective writing may be an empowering strategy for facilitating students' thinking skills.

  18. Ground state properties of La isotopes in reflection asymmetric relativistic mean field theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The ground state properties of La isotopes are investigated with the reflection asymmetric relativistic mean field(RAS-RMF) model.The calculation results of binding energies and the quadrupole moments are in good agreements with the experiment.The calculation results indicate the change of the quadrupole deformation with the nuclear mass number.The "kink" on the isotope shifts is observed at A = 139 where the neutron number is the magic number N = 82.It is also found that the octupole deformations may exist in the La isotopes with mass number A ~ 145-155.

  19. Ground state properties of La isotopes in reflection asymmetric relativistic mean field theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Nan; GUO Lu

    2009-01-01

    The ground state properties of La isotopes are investigated with the reflection asymmetric relativistic mean field (RAS-RMF) model.The calculation results of binding energies and the quadrupole moments are in good agreements with the experiment.The calculation results indicate the change of the quadrupole deformation with the nuclear mass number.The "kink" on the isotope shifts is observed at A=139 where the neutron number is the magic number N=82.It is also found that the octupole deformations may exist in the La isotopes with mass number A~ 145-155.

  20. Laboratory-Measured Rainfall Effects on LWIR Soil Reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howington, S. E.; Ballard, J., Jr.; Wilhelms, S.

    2012-12-01

    The long-wave infrared reflectance of soils will often have distinct spectral characteristics that depend on the soil's physical and spectral properties. Rainfall has the effect of sorting soil particles at the ground surface, thus changing its long-wave infrared reflectance. This study examines how rainfall alters the measured directional-hemispherical thermal infrared (8-14 μm) spectral reflectance by comparing disturbed soil with undisturbed soil and pre-rain with post-rain conditions. The study uses a soil with a specified sand/silt ratio and a calibrated, laboratory rainfall simulator. For an accumulated rainfall of 8 cm, the mean disturbed soil thermal infrared spectral reflectance within 8.1 - 9.2 μm waveband increases from an initial reflectance of 13 percent to a maximum reflectance of 31 percent. Sixty percent of this reflectance change occurred with only 1 cm accumulated rainfall. This study shows that, for this described disturbed sand/silt soil mixture, small accumulated rainfall amounts significantly alter the directional-hemispherical thermal infrared spectral reflectance.

  1. Li isotopes reflect chemical weathering intensity in streams and ground waters draining basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Rudnick, R. L.; McDonough, W. F.

    2013-12-01

    Chemical weathering has an important influence on continental crust evolution, as weathering of basalt preferentially removes soluble elements, such as Mg, and can shift the crust composition towards more andesitic compositions, thus helping to solve the crustal composition paradox [1]. The isotopic compositions of soluble elements (e.g., Li and Mg) provide a monitor of chemical weathering of the continents. Along with large isotopic fractionations [2], these elements are preferentially transferred to rivers during weathering, and are useful tracers of weathering processes. The chemical and isotopic compositions of streams and ground waters that reside entirely within the Columbia River Basalts (CRBs) reflect the processes associated with basalt weathering. In addition, stream samples from both west and east of the Cascades were collected during summer and late winter to evaluate seasonal changes in Li isotopic compositions. The Li concentrations ([Li]) vary from 0.2 to 4.7 μg/l in dissolved loads of streams for both sampling seasons; in ground waters, [Li] varies from 2 to 21 μg/l. δ7Li varies by up to 20‰ in streams and ground waters, demonstrating that lithology is not the only influence on water chemistry in the catchments. Calculated mineral saturation suggests that most streams and some ground waters were saturated with respect to most secondary minerals, implying that Li isotopic fractionation was influenced by the development of secondary minerals, such as kaolinite and hematite. The δ7Li and Li/Na in dissolved loads of streams are not sensitive to distance from the coast or climate, but likely reflect the local weathering intensity. The correlated variation in δ7Li and Li/Na ratios seem to have global significance, at least in streams that only drain basalts [3, 4, 5], suggesting that the streams within the CRBs cover a wide range of weathering intensity, with low δ7Li and high Li/Na corresponding to higher weathering intensity. In addition

  2. Ground effects on magnetooptic Bragg cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Feng; WU BaoJian; QIU Kun

    2008-01-01

    Propagation equation of magnetostatic waves in an arbitrarily magnetized yttrium-iron-garnet/gadolinium-gallium-garnet waveguide coated with perfect metal planes is obtained using the method of the surface magnetic permeability. And ground effects on magnetooptic Bragg cells are investigated with the magnetooptic coupled-mode theory. Theoretical analysis indicates that, diffraction efficiency of guided optical waves can be improved by adjusting the spacing of the metal plane from the ferrite film, and ground effects on the diffraction efficiency will be enhanced using an appropriately tilted bias magnetic field. In the metal clad waveguide system, the magnetostatic wave frequency at which the diffraction efficiency peak is obtained corresponds to the "zero-dispersion" point. Performance of RF spectrum analyzers in this system can also be improved by comparing with the case of the sandwich waveguide. Therefore, magnetooptic Bragg cells with the metal clad waveguide are potential applications to the microwave communication and optical signal processing.

  3. Using pattern recognition to automatically localize reflection hyperbolas in data from ground penetrating radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Christian; Schmalzl, Jörg

    2013-08-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is used for the localization of supply lines, land mines, pipes and many other buried objects. These objects can be recognized in the recorded data as reflection hyperbolas with a typical shape depending on depth and material of the object and the surrounding material. To obtain the parameters, the shape of the hyperbola has to be fitted. In the last years several methods were developed to automate this task during post-processing. In this paper we show another approach for the automated localization of reflection hyperbolas in GPR data by solving a pattern recognition problem in grayscale images. In contrast to other methods our detection program is also able to immediately mark potential objects in real-time. For this task we use a version of the Viola-Jones learning algorithm, which is part of the open source library "OpenCV". This algorithm was initially developed for face recognition, but can be adapted to any other simple shape. In our program it is used to narrow down the location of reflection hyperbolas to certain areas in the GPR data. In order to extract the exact location and the velocity of the hyperbolas we apply a simple Hough Transform for hyperbolas. Because the Viola-Jones Algorithm reduces the input for the computational expensive Hough Transform dramatically the detection system can also be implemented on normal field computers, so on-site application is possible. The developed detection system shows promising results and detection rates in unprocessed radargrams. In order to improve the detection results and apply the program to noisy radar images more data of different GPR systems as input for the learning algorithm is necessary.

  4. The influence of critical Moho Reflections on strong ground motions recorded in San Francisco and Oakland during the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Paul; Yoshimura, Joanne

    1990-07-01

    The amplitudes of strong ground motions from the Loma Prieta earthquake recorded in the San Francisco and Oakland areas exceeded the levels predicted by standard empirical attenuation relations. Preliminary analysis of accelerograms having known trigger times strongly suggests that the elevation of ground motion amplitudes in the distance range of approximately 40 to 100 km was due to critical reflections from the base of the crust. These reflections, which are identified on the basis of their arrival times and phase velocity, and by comparison with simulated accelerograms, were large and occurred at relatively close range because of the deep focal depth of the earthquake and the strong velocity gradient at the base of the crust. These motions were further amplified, presumably by impedance contrast effects, at soft soil sites in San Francisco and Oakland. The effect of the critical reflections in amplifying peak accelerations of the Loma Prieta earthquake in the San Francisco and Oakland regions was as large as the effect of soft soil site conditions. Focal depth has an important influence on strong motion attenuation at distances beyond about 40 km, and empirical attenuation relations derived from shallow crustal earthquakes may underpredict the ground motions of deeper crustal events in this distance range. Further analyses using an expanded data base that includes recordings of aftershocks are required to rigorously test the proposed explanation of the ground motions recorded in San Francisco and Oakland, and the conclusions drawn from that explanation.

  5. Ground-penetrating radar study of the Cena Bog, Latvia: linkage of reflections with peat moisture content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karušs, J.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Present work illustrates results of the ground-penetrating radar (GPR study of the Cena Bog, Latvia. Six sub-horizontal reflections that most probably correspond to boundaries between sediments with different electromagnetic properties were identified. One of the reflections corresponds to bog peat mineral bottom interface but the rest are linked to boundaries within the peat body. The radar profiles are incorporated with sediment cores and studies of peat moisture and ash content, and degree of decomposition. Most of the electromagnetic wave reflections are related to changes in peat moisture content. The obtained data show that peat moisture content changes of at least 3 % are required to cause GPR signal reflection. However, there exist reflections that do not correlate with peat moisture content. As a result, authors disagree with a dominant opinion that all reflections in bogs are solely due to changes in volumetric peat moisture content.

  6. The Effect of Reflective Activities on Reflective Thinking Ability in an Undergraduate Pharmacy Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsingos-Lucas, Cherie; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Schneider, Carl R; Smith, Lorraine

    2016-05-25

    Objective. To determine the effectiveness of integrating reflective practice activities into a second-year undergraduate pharmacy curriculum and their impact on reflective thinking ability. Design. A cross-over design with repeated measures was employed. Newly developed reflective modules based on real hospital and community pharmacy cases were integrated into the second-year pharmacy practice curriculum. A novel strategy, the Reflective Ability Clinical Assessment (RACA), was introduced to enhance self- and peer reflection. Assessment. Student responses (n=214) to the adapted Kember et al(1) Reflective Thinking Questionnaire (RTQ) were compared before and after reflective activities were undertaken. Significant improvement in three indicators of reflective thinking was shown after students engaged in reflective activities. Conclusion. Integration of reflective activities into a pharmacy curriculum increased the reflective thinking capacity of students. Enhancing reflective thinking ability may help students make better informed decisions and clinical judgments, thus improving future practice.

  7. Do singing-ground surveys reflect american woodcock abundance in the western Great Lakes region?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew R. Nelson,; Andersen, David E.

    2013-01-01

    The Singing-ground Survey (SGS) is the primary monitoring tool used to assess population status and trends of American woodcock (Scolopax minor). Like most broad-scale surveys, the SGS cannot be directly validated because there are no independent estimates of abundance of displaying male American woodcock at an appropriate spatial scale. Furthermore, because locations of individual SGS routes have generally remained stationary since the SGS was standardized in 1968, it is not known whether routes adequately represent the landscapes they were intended to represent. To indirectly validate the SGS, we evaluated whether 1) counts of displaying male American woodcock on SGS routes related to land-cover types known to be related to American woodcock abundance, 2) changes in counts of displaying male American woodcock through time were related to changes in land cover along SGS routes, and 3) land-cover type composition along SGS routes was similar to land-cover type composition of the surrounding landscape. In Wisconsin and Minnesota, USA, counts along SGS routes reflected known American woodcock-habitat relations. Increases in the number of woodcock heard along SGS routes over a 13-year period in Wisconsin were related to increasing amounts of early successional forest, decreasing amounts of mature forest, and increasing dispersion and interspersion of cover types. Finally, the cover types most strongly associated with American woodcock abundance were represented along SGS routes in proportion to their composition of the broader landscape. Taken together, these results suggest that in the western Great Lakes region, the SGS likely provides a reliable tool for monitoring relative abundance and population trends of breeding, male American woodcock.

  8. Exploration of a Polarized Surface Bidirectional Reflectance Model Using the Ground-Based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Diner

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate characterization of surface reflection is essential for retrieval of aerosols using downward-looking remote sensors. In this paper, observations from the Ground-based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (GroundMSPI are used to evaluate a surface polarized bidirectional reflectance distribution function (PBRDF model. GroundMSPI is an eight-band spectropolarimetric camera mounted on a rotating gimbal to acquire pushbroom imagery of outdoor landscapes. The camera uses a very accurate photoelastic-modulator-based polarimetric imaging technique to acquire Stokes vector measurements in three of the instrument’s bands (470, 660, and 865 nm. A description of the instrument is presented, and observations of selected targets within a scene acquired on 6 January 2010 are analyzed. Data collected during the course of the day as the Sun moved across the sky provided a range of illumination geometries that facilitated evaluation of the surface model, which is comprised of a volumetric reflection term represented by the modified Rahman-Pinty-Verstraete function plus a specular reflection term generated by a randomly oriented array of Fresnel-reflecting microfacets. While the model is fairly successful in predicting the polarized reflection from two grass targets in the scene, it does a poorer job for two manmade targets (a parking lot and a truck roof, possibly due to their greater degree of geometric organization. Several empirical adjustments to the model are explored and lead to improved fits to the data. For all targets, the data support the notion of spectral invariance in the angular shape of the unpolarized and polarized surface reflection. As noted by others, this behavior provides valuable constraints on the aerosol retrieval problem, and highlights the importance of multiangle observations.

  9. Reflective Practice on Effective Teaching Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu-chao

    2014-01-01

    Reflective practice is a vital parts of teaching process. The essay mainly states the theory of reflection, its functions, characteristics, and teachers’reflective practice. After obtaining data from the questionnaire collected from 30 college English teachers’reflective practice, the writer analyzes the data and concludes that:reflection is a useful and necessary tool for successful teaching performance and the development of teachers.

  10. Analysis of partial-reflection data from the solar eclipse of 10 Jul. 1972. [ground-based experiment using vertical incident radio waves partially reflected from D region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, T. A.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    Partial-reflection data collected for the eclipse of July 10, 1972 as well as for July 9 and 11, 1972, are analyzed to determine eclipse effects on D-region electron densities. The partial-reflection experiment was set up to collect data using an on-line PDP-15 computer and DECtape storage. The electron-density profiles show good agreement with results from other eclipses. The partial-reflection programs were changed after the eclipse data collection to improve the operation of the partial-reflection system. These changes were mainly due to expanded computer hardware and have simplified the operations of the system considerably.

  11. Ground-based radar reflectivity mosaic of mei-yu precipitation systems over the Yangtze River-Huaihe River basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yali; Qian, Weimiao; Gong, Yu; Wang, Hongyan; Zhang, Da-Lin

    2016-11-01

    The 3D radar reflectivity produced by a mosaic software system, with measurements from 29 operational weather radars in the Yangtze River-Huaihe River Basins (YRHRB) during the mei-yu season of 2007, is compared to coincident TRMM PR observations in order to evaluate the value of the ground-based radar reflectivity mosaic in characterizing the 3D structures of mei-yu precipitation. Results show reasonable agreement in the composite radar reflectivity between the two datasets, with a correlation coefficient of 0.8 and a mean bias of -1 dB. The radar mosaic data at constant altitudes are reasonably consistent with the TRMM PR observations in the height range of 2-5 km, revealing essentially the same spatial distribution of radar echo and nearly identical histograms of reflectivity. However, at altitudes above 5 km, the mosaic data overestimate reflectivity and have slower decreasing rates with height compared to the TRMM PR observations. The areas of convective and stratiform precipitation, based on the mosaic reflectivity distribution at 3-km altitude, are highly correlated with the corresponding regions in the TRMM products, with correlation coefficients of 0.92 and 0.97 and mean relative differences of -7.9% and -2.5%, respectively. Finally, the usefulness of the mosaic reflectivity at 3-km altitude at 6-min intervals is illustrated using a mesoscale convective system that occurred over the YRHRB.

  12. Wake Vortex Transport and Decay in Ground Effect: Vortex Linking with the Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Hamilton, David W.; Han, Jongil

    2000-01-01

    Numerical simulations are carried out with a three-dimensional Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) model to explore the sensitivity of vortex decay and transport in ground effect (IGE). The vortex decay rates are found to be strongly enhanced following maximum descent into ground effect. The nondimensional decay rate is found to be insensitive to the initial values of circulation, height, and vortex separation. The information gained from these simulations is used to construct a simple decay relationship. This relationship compares well with observed data from an IGE case study. Similarly, a relationship for lateral drift due to ground effect is constructed from the LES data. In the second part of this paper, vortex linking with the ground is investigated. Our numerical simulations of wake vortices for IGE show that a vortex may link with its image beneath the ground, if the intensity of the ambient turbulence is moderate to high. This linking with the ground (which is observed in real cases)gives the appearance of a vortex tube that bends to become vertically oriented and which terminates at the ground. From the simulations conducted, the linking time for vortices in the free atmosphere; i.e., a function of ambient turbulence intensity.

  13. Trawling bats exploit an echo-acoustic ground effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandor eZsebok

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A water surface acts not only as an optic mirror but also as an acoustic mirror. Echolocation calls emitted by bats at low heights above water are reflected away from the bat, and hence the background clutter is reduced. Moreover, targets on the surface create an enhanced echo. Here, we formally quantified the effect of the substrate and target height on both target detection and –discrimination in a combined laboratory and field approach with Myotis daubentonii. In a two-alternative, forced-choice paradigm, the bats had to detect a mealworm and discriminate it from an inedible dummy (20 mm PVC disc. Psychophysical performance was measured as a function of height above either smooth substrates (water or PVC or above a clutter substrate (artificial grass. At low heights above the clutter substrate (10, 20 or 35 cm, the bats’ detection performance was worse than above a smooth substrate. At a height of 50 cm, the substrate structure had no influence on target detection. Above the clutter surface, also target discrimination was significantly impaired with decreasing target height. A detailed analysis of the bats’ echolocation calls during target approach shows that above the clutter substrate, the bats produce calls with significantly higher peak frequency. Flight-path reconstruction revealed that the bats attacked an object from below over water but from above over a clutter substrate.These results are consistent with the hypothesis that trawling bats exploit an echo-acoustic ground effect, in terms of a spatio-temporal integration of direct reflections with indirect reflections from the water surface, to optimize prey detection and –discrimination not only for prey on the water but also for some range above.

  14. Trawling bats exploit an echo-acoustic ground effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsebok, Sandor; Kroll, Ferdinand; Heinrich, Melina; Genzel, Daria; Siemers, Björn M; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    A water surface acts not only as an optic mirror but also as an acoustic mirror. Echolocation calls emitted by bats at low heights above water are reflected away from the bat, and hence the background clutter is reduced. Moreover, targets on the surface create an enhanced echo. Here, we formally quantified the effect of the surface and target height on both target detection and -discrimination in a combined laboratory and field approach with Myotis daubentonii. In a two-alternative, forced-choice paradigm, the bats had to detect a mealworm and discriminate it from an inedible dummy (20 mm PVC disc). Psychophysical performance was measured as a function of height above either smooth surfaces (water or PVC) or above a clutter surface (artificial grass). At low heights above the clutter surface (10, 20, or 35 cm), the bats' detection performance was worse than above a smooth surface. At a height of 50 cm, the surface structure had no influence on target detection. Above the clutter surface, also target discrimination was significantly impaired with decreasing target height. A detailed analysis of the bats' echolocation calls during target approach shows that above the clutter surface, the bats produce calls with significantly higher peak frequency. Flight-path reconstruction revealed that the bats attacked an target from below over water but from above over a clutter surface. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that trawling bats exploit an echo-acoustic ground effect, in terms of a spatio-temporal integration of direct reflections with indirect reflections from the water surface, to optimize prey detection and -discrimination not only for prey on the water but also for some range above.

  15. Ground-Based VIS/NIR Reflectance Spectra of 25143 Itokawa: What Hayabusa will See and How Ground-Based Data can Augment Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas, Faith; Abell, P. A.; Jarvis, K. S.

    2004-01-01

    Planning for the arrival of the Hayabusa spacecraft at asteroid 25143 Itokawa includes consideration of the expected spectral information to be obtained using the AMICA and NIRS instruments. The rotationally-resolved spatial coverage the asteroid we have obtained with ground-based telescopic spectrophotometry in the visible and near-infrared can be utilized here to address expected spacecraft data. We use spectrophotometry to simulate the types of data that Hayabusa will receive with the NIRS and AMICA instruments, and will demonstrate them here. The NIRS will cover a wavelength range from 0.85 m, and have a dispersion per element of 250 Angstroms. Thus, we are limited in coverage of the 1.0 micrometer and 2.0 micrometer mafic silicate absorption features. The ground-based reflectance spectra of Itokawa show a large component of olivine in its surface material, and the 2.0 micrometer feature is shallow. Determining the olivine to pyroxene abundance ratio is critically dependent on the attributes of the 1.0- and 2.0 micrometer features. With a cut-off near 2,1 micrometer the longer edge of the 2.0- feature will not be obtained by NIRS. Reflectance spectra obtained using ground-based telescopes can be used to determine the regional composition around space-based spectral observations, and possibly augment the longer wavelength spectral attributes. Similarly, the shorter wavelength end of the 1.0 micrometer absorption feature will be partially lost to the NIRS. The AMICA filters mimic the ECAS filters, and have wavelength coverage overlapping with the NIRS spectral range. We demonstrate how merging photometry from AMICA will extend the spectral coverage of the NIRS. Lessons learned from earlier spacecraft to asteroids should be considered.

  16. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF THE GROUND EFFECT ON INSECT HOVERING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Tong; LIU Nan-sheng; LU Xi-yun

    2008-01-01

    The ground effect on insect hovering is investigated using an immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method to solve the two-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. A virtual model of an elliptic foil with oscillating translation and rotation near a ground is used. The objective of this study is to deal with the ground effect on the unsteady forces and vortical structures and to get the physical insights in the relevant mechanisms. Two typical insect hovering modes, I.e., normal and dragonfly hovering mode, are examined. Systematic computations have been carried out for some parameters, and the ground effect on the unsteady forces and vortical structures is analyzed.

  17. Effective Reflection Area of a Cube Corner Retroreflector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Yanmin; FANG Zujie; CHEN Gang; CHEN Gaoting

    2000-01-01

    The effective reflection area of a cube corner retroreflector is defined. It is testified for a cube corner retroreflector (CCR) that the ray reflected from a CCR is not parallel with the ray incident on the CCR undersurface. The effective reflection area of CCR is calculated when the ray incident on the CCR undersurface vertically, and the effective reflection area of a CCR is two thirds of the CCR undersurface.

  18. Constructing Grounded Theory: Reflections on a Case Study of a Professor of Architectural Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janesick, Valerie J.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses a case study describing the philosophy of teaching design to architecture students as practiced by one professor. A model of his architectural design curriculum emerged. Three issues arose: constructing theory from data grounded in experience, posing appropriate research questions, and understanding the roots of ethnographic inquiry.…

  19. Teaching Theory Construction With Initial Grounded Theory Tools: A Reflection on Lessons and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmaz, Kathy

    2015-12-01

    This article addresses criticisms of qualitative research for spawning studies that lack analytic development and theoretical import. It focuses on teaching initial grounded theory tools while interviewing, coding, and writing memos for the purpose of scaling up the analytic level of students' research and advancing theory construction. Adopting these tools can improve teaching qualitative methods at all levels although doctoral education is emphasized here. What teachers cover in qualitative methods courses matters. The pedagogy presented here requires a supportive environment and relies on demonstration, collective participation, measured tasks, progressive analytic complexity, and accountability. Lessons learned from using initial grounded theory tools are exemplified in a doctoral student's coding and memo-writing excerpts that demonstrate progressive analytic development. The conclusion calls for increasing the number and depth of qualitative methods courses and for creating a cadre of expert qualitative methodologists.

  20. Reflecting on the role of literature in qualitative public administration research:learning from grounded theory

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWhen undertaking qualitative research, public administration scholars must walk a thin line between being theoretically sensitive and imposing preconceived ideas on their work. This article identifies opportunities and pitfalls in using literature in qualitative public administration research. Whereas the opportunities are already well known within the discipline, the pitfalls remain underexposed. We identify potential pitfalls by using insights from the grounded theory approach. ...

  1. Solid Ground: Comment on "Shifting Sands: Reflections from the Field of Higher Education."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisher, Karen Gayton

    2001-01-01

    Critiques an article on using reflection to examine discrimination in higher education and the academe, presenting one American Indian woman administrator's experience with higher education and beyond. Emphasizes the benefits of: having a mentor, defining an agenda to guide one's research, clearly defining one's expectations for tenure, and…

  2. Applying measured reflection from the ground to simulations of thermal perfromance of solar collectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Janne; Furbo, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Solar radiation on tilted and vertical surfaces in the Arctic is, in large parts of the year, strongly influenced by reflection from snow. In connection with planning and optimization of energy efficient buildings and solar energy systems in the Arctic, it is important to have an accurate represe...

  3. Solid Ground: Comment on "Shifting Sands: Reflections from the Field of Higher Education."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisher, Karen Gayton

    2001-01-01

    Critiques an article on using reflection to examine discrimination in higher education and the academe, presenting one American Indian woman administrator's experience with higher education and beyond. Emphasizes the benefits of: having a mentor, defining an agenda to guide one's research, clearly defining one's expectations for tenure, and…

  4. Performance and Stability of a Winged Vehicle in Ground Effect

    CERN Document Server

    de Divitiis, Nicola

    2009-01-01

    Present work deals with the dynamics of vehicles which intentionally operate in the ground proximity. The dynamics in ground effect is influenced by the vehicle orientation with respect to the ground, since the aerodynamic force and moment coefficients, which in turn depend on height and angle of attack, also vary with the Euler angles. This feature, usually neglected in the applications, can be responsible for sizable variations of the aircraft performance and stability. A further effect, caused by the sink rate, determines unsteadiness that modifies the aerodynamic coefficients. In this work, an analytical formulation is proposed for the force and moment calculation in the presence of the ground and taking the aircraft attitude and sink rate into account. The aerodynamic coefficients are firstly calculated for a representative vehicle and its characteristics in ground effect are investigated. Performance and stability characteristics are then discussed with reference to significant equilibrium conditions, w...

  5. Ground motions and its effects in accelerator design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, G.E.

    1984-07-01

    This lecture includes a discussion of types of motion, frequencies of interest, measurements at SLAC, some general comments regarding local sources of ground motion at SLAC, and steps that can be taken to minimize the effects of ground motion on accelerators. (GHT)

  6. Useful model organisms, indicators, or both? Ground beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae reflecting environmental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Koivula

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Classic studies have successfully linked single-species abundances, life-history traits, assemblage structures and biomass of carabid beetles to past and present, human-caused environmental impacts and variation in ‘natural’ conditions. This evidence has led many to suggest carabids to function as ‘indicators’ − a term that bears multiple meanings. Here, a conservation-oriented definition for an indicator is used, carabid indicator potential from seven views is evaluated, and ways to proceed in indicator research are discussed. (1 Carabid species richness poorly indicates the richness and abundance of other taxa, which underlines the importance of using multiple taxa in environmental assessments. The ability of assemblage indices and specialist or functional-group abundances to reflect rare species and habitats should be examined in detail. (2 Experimental evidence suggests that carabids may potentially serve as keystone indicators. (3 Carabids are sensitive to human-altered abiotic conditions, such as pesticide use in agro-ecosystems and heavy metal contamination of soils. Carabids might thus reflect ecological sustainability and ‘ecosystem health’. (4 Carabid assemblages host abundant species characteristic of particular habitat types or successional stages, which makes them promising dominance indicators. (5 Carabids reflect variation in ‘natural’ conditions, but vegetation and structural features are more commonly adopted as condition indicators. Carabids nevertheless provide yet another, equally accurate, view on the structure of the environment. (6 Carabids may function as early-warning signalers, as suggested by recent studies linking climate and carabid distributions. (7 Carabids reflect natural and human-caused disturbances and management, but the usefulness of these responses for conservation purposes requires further research. In summary, European carabids appear useful model organisms and possibly indicators because

  7. Considerations in Grounded Theory Research Method: A reflection on the lessons learned

    OpenAIRE

    Mavetera, Nehemiah; Kroeze, Jan H

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a discussion on the practical issues faced by Information Systems (IS) professionals when they employ Grounded Theory Method (GTM) in Information Systems research. Various strands of GTM are in use, all of which are derivatives of the grand GTM proposed by Barney G. Glaser and Anselm G. Strauss in 1967. Starting with the dicta proposed by these two authors in 1967 on the use of GTM, the paper explores several variants of the method that have surfaced and are currently in use....

  8. Avoiding genetically modified foods in GMO Ground Zero: A reflective self-narrative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Sachi

    2015-05-01

    I engage in a reflective self-narrative of my experience attempting to maintain a diet free of genetically modified organisms. Social tension over the genetically modified organism industry in Hawai'i, United States, has led to public debates over jobs and social identities. Drawing on local media sources, grassroots organizations, and blog posts, I describe the way this tension has shaped my experience with food, eating, and being with others as a genetically modified organism avoider. I utilize discursive positioning to make sense of my experiences by locating them within the ongoing public conversations that give structure to the daily lives of Hawai'i's residents.

  9. Non-Lambertian effects on remote sensing of surface reflectance and vegetation index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T. Y.; Kaufman, Y. J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of non-Lambertian reflection from a homogeneous surface on remote sensing of the surface reflectance and vegetation index from a satellite. Remote measurement of the surface characteristics is perturbed by atmospheric scattering of sun light. This scattering tends to smooth the angular dependence of non-Lambertian surface reflectances, an effect that is not present in the case of Lambertian surfaces. This effect is calculated to test the validity of a Lambertian assumption used in remote sensing. For the three types of vegetations considered in this study, the assumption of Lambertian surface can be used satisfactorily in the derivation of surface reflectance from remotely measured radiance for a view angle outside the backscattering region. Within the backscattering region, however, the use of the assumption can result in a considerable error in the derived surface reflectance. Accuracy also deteriorates with increasing solar zenith angle. The angular distribution of the surface reflectance derived from remote measurements is smoother than that at the surface. The effect of surface non-Lambertianity on remote sensing of vegetation index is very weak. Since the effect is similiar in the visible and near infrared part of the solar spectrum for the vegetations treated in this study, it is canceled in deriving the vegetation index. The effect of the diffuse skylight on surface reflectance measurements at ground level is also discussed.

  10. Investigation of topographical effects on rupture dynamics and ground motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H.; Chen, X.; Zhang, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Using the curved grid finite-difference method (CG-FDM), we model spontaneous dynamic rupture on vertical strike-slip faults with irregular free surfaces to investigate the effect of topography on near-source ground motion. Four groups of simulations, in which the epicentral distances from the topographical perturbations of the nucleation patch were varied, are modeled in this work. The simulated results show that the presence of irregular topography along the fault trace may increase the ground motion. Whether the irregular topography exhibits higher ground motion overall depends on the irregular topography's ability to prevent the sub-Rayleigh-to-supershear transition. When irregular topography prevents this transition, sub-Rayleigh rupture produces stronger ground motions than those of the sub-Rayleigh-to-supershear transition, although the moment magnitudes does not differ substantially between the two cases. To thoroughly understand the effects of irregular topography on near-source ground motion, we also model spontaneous dynamic rupture on a planar fault in full-space and half-space with varying initial shear stresses, and the corresponding modeling results indicate that the effect of initial shear stress on near-source ground motion is strong. These results may have implications for ground-motion prediction in future earthquakes involving geometrically complex faults.

  11. Effect of ground stress on hydraulic fracturing of methane well

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Chun-zhi; MAO Xian-biao; MIAO Xie-xing; WANG Peng

    2008-01-01

    Most of the coal reservoirs in China are of low-permeability, so hydraulic fracturing is widely used to improve the permeability in the extraction of gas by ground drilling. The ground stress around the well was analyzed by using theory of elasticity. The pressure when the well fractured is formulated and the effect of ground stress on pressure is discussed. The effect of ground-stress-differences on hydraulic fracturing was analyzed by using the numerical software RFPA2D-Flow in reference to the tectonic stress in Jincheng coal area. The results show that: 1) the position where initial fracture appears is random and fracture branches emerge when the fractures expand if ground stresses in any two directions within a horizontal plane are equal; 2) otherwise, the fractures expand in general along the direction of maximum ground stress and the critical pressure decreases with increasing ground-stress-differences and 3) the preferred well-disposition pattern is diamond shaped. The preferred well spacing is 250 m×300 m. This study can provide a reference for the design of wells.

  12. What's on the therapist's mind? A grounded theory analysis of family therapist reflections during individual therapy sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rober, Peter; Elliott, Robert; Buysse, Ann; Loots, Gerrit; De Corte, Kim

    2008-01-01

    The authors used a videotape-assisted recall procedure to study the content of family therapists' inner conversations during individual sessions with a standardized client. Grounded theory was used to analyze therapists' reflections, resulting in a taxonomy of 282 different codes in a hierarchical tree structure of six levels, organized into four general domains: attending to client process; processing the client's story; focusing on therapists' own experience; and managing the therapeutic process. In addition to providing a descriptive model of therapists' inner conversation, this research led to an appreciation of the wealth of therapists' inner conversation. In particular, the authors found that therapists work hard to create an intersubjective space within which to talk by trying to be in tune with their clients and by using clients as a guide.

  13. Dynamic Ground Effects Simulation Using OVERFLOW-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Bill

    1999-01-01

    This presentation is broken into 5 logical sections. The Background Information section describes the technical issues being address by this study. The Approach section describes the organization of the contract effort which was laid out as the most effective means of quantifying, with validated methods, the magnitude of dynamic ground effects for the TCA (Technology Concept Aircraft) configuration. The Validation Case section describes the analysis of the XB-70 configuration in both static and dynamic ground effect, with comparisons to wind tunnel and flight test data. The TCA Analysis section then describes the application of the same codes and methodologies to the TCA in both static and dynamic ground effect. Comparisons are made between the static and dynamic, as well as to early static data from a recent wind tunnel test on the TCA configuration. Finally, the work to date is summarized and the future direction of this study is outlined.

  14. Critical Reflection of an Iranian EFL Classroom: Effective Ploys in Narrative Paragraph Writing Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mohammad Jafari

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a qualitative study that investigated critical reflection in the hope that effective learning is objectified. It is the fruit of rumination on how critical reflection approach would affect learners’ performance in narrative writing. The idea for this paper arose when the researchers consistently utilized ploys effective for five EFL students’ learning of narrative writing in critical reflection process in an institute. Later, these ploys were categorized in three themes under three categories in teaching narrative writing. Data were gathered via students’ reflective writings. Gathered data were interpreted in the real setting by small scale grounded theory analysis. The final upshot demonstrated the criticality of students’ thoughts in their paper. The findings reveal the significance of optimal rapport and intimacy in which participants move ahead from mechanical learning to more cooperative approach in language learning with thorough reflection in their narrations for effective learning to take place. Keywords: Critical Reflection, Narrative Paragraph Writing, Effective Learning, Ploys, Improvisation, Reverse Position, Social Camaraderie

  15. Palliative care teams: effective through moral reflection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermsen, M.A.; Have, H.A.M.J. ten

    2005-01-01

    Working as a multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary team is an essential condition to provide good palliative care. This widespread assumption is based on the idea that teamwork makes it possible to address the various needs of the patient and family more effectively. This article is about teamwork

  16. Experimental Investigation of Rotorcraft Outwash in Ground Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Philip E.; Overmeyer, Austin D.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Bartram, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    The wake characteristics of a rotorcraft are affected by the proximity of a rotor to the ground surface, especially during hover. Ground effect is encountered when the rotor disk is within a distance of a few rotor radii above the ground surface and results in an increase in thrust for a given power relative to that same power condition with the rotor out of ground effect. Although this phenomenon has been highly documented and observed since the beginning of the helicopter age, there is still a relatively little amount of flow-field data existing to help understand its features. Joint Army and NASA testing was conducted at NASA Langley Research Center using a powered rotorcraft model in hover at various rotor heights and thrust conditions in order to contribute to the complete outwash data set. The measured data included outwash velocities and directions, rotor loads, fuselage loads, and ground pressures. The researchers observed a linear relationship between rotor height and percent download on the fuselage, peak mean outwash velocities occurring at radial stations between 1.7 and 1.8 r/R regardless of rotor height, and the measurement azimuthal dependence of the outwash profile for a model incorporating a fuselage. Comparisons to phase-locked PIV data showed similar contours but a more contracted wake boundary for the PIV data. This paper describes the test setup and presents some of the averaged results.

  17. Multiple-reflection effects in photoelastic stress analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmik, A K

    2001-06-01

    The interpretation of fringes observed in photoelastic stress measurements made with coherent well-collimated optical radiation such as a laser beam and slab specimens with parallel surfaces is affected by multiple internal reflections of light within the sample, which are usually negligible when incoherent light is used. An analysis of the multiple-reflection effects in photoelastic measurements involving the plane polariscope configuration is presented. The results show that the isochromatic fringes are modified by the interference of multiply reflected waves. The multipass differential phase accumulations that display oscillatory magnitudes as functions of the model thickness and the optical wavelength result in a shifted and altered intensity profile across the isochromatic fringes. It is shown that for large values of reflectivity, as in the case of samples with reflective coating or partial mirrors, the bright fringes split into multiple peaks.

  18. Aerodynamic ground effect in fruitfly sized insect takeoff

    CERN Document Server

    Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Engels, Thomas; Liu, Hao; Schneider, Kai; Nave, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Flapping-wing takeoff is studied using numerical modelling, considering the voluntary takeoff of a fruitfly as reference. The parameters of the model are then varied to explore the possible effects of interaction between the flapping-wing model and the ground plane. The numerical method is based on a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver and a simple flight dynamics solver that accounts for the body weight, inertia, and the leg thrust. Forces, power and displacements are compared for takeoffs with and without ground effect. Natural voluntary takeoff of a fruitfly, modified takeoffs and hovering are analyzed. The results show that the ground effect during the natural voluntary takeoff is negligible. In the modified takeoffs, the ground effect does not produce any significant increase of the vertical force neither. Moreover, the vertical force even drops in most of the cases considered. There is a consistent increase of the horizontal force, and a decrease of the aerodynamic power, if the rate of climb is suff...

  19. Aerodynamic Ground Effect in Fruitfly Sized Insect Takeoff.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Kolomenskiy

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic ground effect in flapping-wing insect flight is of importance to comparative morphologies and of interest to the micro-air-vehicle (MAV community. Recent studies, however, show apparently contradictory results of either some significant extra lift or power savings, or zero ground effect. Here we present a numerical study of fruitfly sized insect takeoff with a specific focus on the significance of leg thrust and wing kinematics. Flapping-wing takeoff is studied using numerical modelling and high performance computing. The aerodynamic forces are calculated using a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver based on a pseudo-spectral method with volume penalization. It is coupled with a flight dynamics solver that accounts for the body weight, inertia and the leg thrust, while only having two degrees of freedom: the vertical and the longitudinal horizontal displacement. The natural voluntary takeoff of a fruitfly is considered as reference. The parameters of the model are then varied to explore possible effects of interaction between the flapping-wing model and the ground plane. These modified takeoffs include cases with decreased leg thrust parameter, and/or with periodic wing kinematics, constant body pitch angle. The results show that the ground effect during natural voluntary takeoff is negligible. In the modified takeoffs, when the rate of climb is slow, the difference in the aerodynamic forces due to the interaction with the ground is up to 6%. Surprisingly, depending on the kinematics, the difference is either positive or negative, in contrast to the intuition based on the helicopter theory, which suggests positive excess lift. This effect is attributed to unsteady wing-wake interactions. A similar effect is found during hovering.

  20. Effectiveness of helicopter versus ground ambulance services for interfacility transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfken, C L; Shapiro, M J; Bessey, P Q; Littenberg, B

    1998-10-01

    Helicopters provide rapid interfacility transport, but the effect on patients is largely unknown. Patients requested to be transported between facilities by helicopter were followed prospectively to determine survival, disability, health status, and health care utilization. A total of 1,234 patients were transported by the primary aeromedical company; 153 patients were transported by ground and 25 patients were transported by other aeromedical services because of weather or unavailability of aircraft. There were no differences at 30 days for survivors in disability, health status, or health care utilization. Nineteen percent of helicopter-transported patients died compared with 15% of those transported by ground (p=0.21). The patients transported by helicopter did not have improved outcomes compared with patients transported by ground. These data argue against a large advantage of helicopters for interfacility transport. A randomized trial is needed to address these issues conclusively.

  1. Experimental Effects on IR Reflectance Spectra: Particle Size and Morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiswenger, Toya N.; Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Su, Yin-Fong; Blake, Thomas A.; Ertel, Alyssa B.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Szecsody, James E.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Smith, Milton; Lanker, Cory

    2016-05-23

    For geologic and extraterrestrial samples it is known that both particle size and morphology can have strong effects on the species’ infrared reflectance spectra. Due to such effects, the reflectance spectra cannot be predicted from the absorption coefficients alone. This is because reflectance is both a surface as well as a bulk phenomenon, incorporating both dispersion as well as absorption effects. The same spectral features can even be observed as either a maximum or minimum. The complex effects depend on particle size and preparation, as well as the relative amplitudes of the optical constants n and k, i.e. the real and imaginary components of the complex refractive index. While somewhat oversimplified, upward-going amplitude in the reflectance spectrum usually result from surface scattering, i.e. rays that have been reflected from the surface without penetration, whereas downward-going peaks are due to either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. While the effects are well known, we report seminal measurements of reflectance along with quantified particle size of the samples, the sizing obtained from optical microscopy measurements. The size measurements are correlated with the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 – 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to understand the effects on the spectral features as a function of the mean grain size of the sample. We report results for both sodium sulfate Na2SO4 as well as ammonium sulfate (NH4)2SO4; the optical constants have been measured for (NH4)2SO4. To go a step further from the field to the laboratory we explore our understanding of particle size effects on reflectance spectra in the field using standoff detection. This has helped identify weaknesses and strengths in detection using standoff distances of up 160 meters away from the Target. The studies have

  2. Characterization of the Aerodynamic Ground Effect and Its Influence in Multirotor Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pedro Sanchez-Cuevas; Guillermo Heredia; Anibal Ollero

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyzes the ground effect in multirotors, that is, the change in the thrust generated by the rotors when flying close to the ground due to the interaction of the rotor airflow with the ground surface...

  3. Analysis of ground-based and VIRTIS-M/ROSETTA reflectance spectra of asteroid 2687 Šteins: A comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, K.; Arnold, G.; Hiesinger, H.; Capaccioni, F.

    2012-04-01

    The asteroid 2687 Šteins was encountered by Rosetta in 2008. Prior to the fly-by, ground-based observations of Šteins were performed [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]. We present a summary of ground-based VIS and NIR reflectance spectra of Šteins and compare them with VIRTIS-M-spectra obtained during the fly-by. On the basis of these spectral data we discuss the relationship to meteorite materials, and the classification of Šteins. The ground-based spectra cover a wavelength range from 0.4-2.5 µm. All spectra show a clear absorption feature at ~0.5 µm and a steep spectral slope between ~0.6-0.8 µm. At wavelengths >1 µm the spectra show a neutral to slightly reddish trend. The absorption band at ~0.5 µm is commonly linked to the feature at that wavelength in the oldhamite spectrum [7]. The oldhamite spectrum shows another weaker feature at 0.96 µm. This weaker feature at ~0.96 µm is visible in two of the ground-based spectra. Spectral slopes of most Earth-based spectra are comparable within arrow bars. The uniform spectral characteristics indicate a homogenous surface of Šteins. The VIRTIS-M-spectra of Šteins cover the wavelength range from 0.25-1 µm (VIS) and 1-5 µm (IR). The spectra show an overall flat behavior with a steep red slope at wavelengths 3.5 µm thermal emission contributes significantly to the detected radiation. The thermal properties derived from VIRTIS-M long wavelength measurements suggest a thin regolith layer and a low porosity. The shape of the asteroid is consistent with the hypothesis that Šteins is a rubble-pile. Ground-based and fly-by spectra of Šteins are in good agreement with each other considering the overall spectral characteristics and the occurrence of the absorption feature at 0.5 µm. Prior to the Rosetta fly-by Šteins has been classified (by e.g. [1, 5]) as an E[II]-type asteroid (after [8, 9], also Xe after [10]). VIRTIS data suggest that Šteins can be classified as an igneous E-type asteroid, being a member of the E

  4. Reflection time and the Goos Hänchen effect for reflection by a semi-infinite rectangular barrier

    CERN Document Server

    Floyd, E R

    2000-01-01

    The reflection time, during which a particle is in the classically forbidden region, is described by the trajectory representation for reflection by a semi-infinite rectangular barrier. The Schrödinger wave function has microstates for such reflection. The reflection time is a function of the microstate. For oblique reflection, the Goos-Hänchen effect is also a function of the microstate. For a square well, the reflection time and the period of libration are functions of a constant of the motion that is beyond the Copenhagen interpretation.

  5. Mapping the bathymetry of a turbid, sand-bed river using ground-based reflectance measurements and hyperspectral image data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legleiter, C. J.; Kinzel, P. J.; Nelson, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    The Platte River in central Nebraska encompasses relatively stable, single-thread to island-braided reaches as well as wider, fully braided segments with highly mobile bar forms. Across this range of morphologies, suspended sediment and organic material contribute to turbid water conditions. In addition, the Platte is the focus of management activities intended to mitigate encroachment of vegetation and improve habitat for various migratory bird species, primarily by increasing the areal extent of shallow to slightly emergent mid-channel sand bars. The diversity of channel types and optical properties make this a challenging environment in which to implement a remote sensing approach, but the Platte also provides an opportunity for these methods to support management objectives. To evaluate the potential utility of remote sensing techniques along the Platte, we acquired hyperspectral image data, collected field spectra, and surveyed bed topography for three reaches. Ground-based measurements of reflectance Rλ were made above the water surface for flow depths d from 5 - 67 cm and a range of substrate types. An optimal band ratio analysis (OBRA) of these data, whereby regressions of log-transformed band ratios against measured depths were performed for all possible band combinations, yielded a strong, linear relationship (R2 = 0.95) between ln ({R593}/{R{647}) and d. Similar band ratio analyses were performed using reflectance spectra extracted from the hyperspectral image data for locations at which bed elevations were surveyed and compared to measured water surface elevations to calculate flow depths. Image-based OBRA produced variable results for the three sites. For a narrower, deeper reach lacking mobile mid-channel bars, a ln ({R490}/{R{638}) vs. d relation had an R2 of 0.83; applying this expression to the image generated a bathymetric map that agreed closely with our survey data. The other two sites featured fully braided morphologies, shallower depths, and

  6. The Effects of Coaching Using a Reflective Framework on Early Childhood Science Teachers' Depth of Reflection and Change in Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomquist, Debra L.

    This embedded-mixed methods study examined if the use of a reflective framework with guiding prompts could support early childhood science teachers in improving their reflective practice and subsequently changing their pedagogy. It further investigated whether type of cognitive coaching group, individual or collaborative, impacted teacher depth of reflection and change in practice. Data included teacher reflections that were rated using the Level of Reflection-On-Action Assessment, reflective codes and inductive themes, as well as videos of participants lessons coded using the SCIIENCE instrument. Findings demonstrated that through guided reflection, teachers developed reflective thinking skills, and through this reflection became more critical and began to improve their pedagogical practice. Further findings supported that collaborative cognitive coaching may not be the most effective professional development for all teachers; as some teachers in the study were found to have difficulty improving their reflectivity and thus their teaching practice. Based on these findings it is recommended that coaches and designers of professional development continue to use reflective frameworks with guiding prompts to support teachers in the reflective process, but take into consideration that coaching may need to be differentiated for the various reflective levels demonstrated by teachers. Future studies will be needed to establish why some teachers have difficulty with the reflective process and how coaches or designers of professional development can further assist these teachers in becoming more critical reflectors.

  7. Effect of ground motion from nuclear excavation: interim canal studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, C. Y.; Nadolski, M. E.

    1969-09-01

    The effect of ground motion due to nuclear excavation of a sea-level canal at two alternative routes, 17A and 25E, are discussed from the aspects of motion prediction and structural response. The importance of the high-rise building problem is stressed because of its complexity. Several damage criteria are summarized for advance planning of excavation and operation. The 1964 shot schedule and the latest revised schedule are included for comparison.

  8. Ground-water flow and the possible effects of remedial actions at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, W.B.

    1995-01-01

    J-Field, located in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md, has been used since World War II to test and dispose of explosives, chemical warfare agents, and industrial chemicals resulting in ground-water, surface-water, and soil contami- nation. The U.S. Geological Survey finite-difference model was used to better understand ground-water flow at the site and to simulate the effects of remedial actions. A surficial aquifer and a confined aquifer were simulated with the model. A confining unit separates these units and is represented by leakance between the layers. The area modeled is 3.65 mi2; the model was constructed with a variably spaced 40 X 38 grid. The horizontal and lower boundaries of the model are all no-flow boundaries. Steady-state conditions were used. Ground water at the areas under investigation flows from disposal pit areas toward discharge areas in adjacent estuaries or wetlands. Simulations indicate that capping disposal areas with an impermeable cover effectively slows advective ground water flow by 0.7 to 0.5 times. Barriers to lateral ground-water flow were simulated and effectively prevented the movement of ground water toward discharge areas. Extraction wells were simulated as a way to contain ground-water contamination and to extract ground water for treatment. Two wells pumping 5 gallons per minute each at the toxic-materials disposal area and a single well pumping 2.5 gallons per minute at the riot-control-agent disposal area effectively contained contamination at these sites. A combi- nation of barriers to horizontal flow east and south of the toxic-materials disposal area, and a single extraction well pumping at 5 gallons per minute can extract contaminated ground water and prevent pumpage of marsh water.

  9. Detect ground motion effects on the trajectory at ATF2

    CERN Document Server

    Rénier, Yves; Garcia, Rogelio

    2011-01-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) commissioning group aims to demonstrate the feasibility of the Beam Delivery System (BDS) of the next linear colliders (ILC and CLIC) as well as to define and to test the tunning methods. As the design vertical beam sizes of the linear colliders are about few nanometers, the stability of the trajectory as well as the control of the aberrations are very critical. The magnet displacements induced by ground motion are large enough for CLIC to perturb the beam stability above requirements. It is planned to measure the displacement of the magnets and implement a feed-forward correcting the effects on the beam trajectory with correctors (dipoles). This article studies the possibility to detect ground motion effects on the beam trajectory at ATF2. Characteristics of the ground motion at ATF2 are presented, the effects of the magnet displacements on the beam trajectory are simulated and an algorithm predicting the induced trajectory fluctuations is evaluated. After the estimated...

  10. Relativistic Effects on Reflection X-ray Spectra of AGN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Khee-Gan; /University Coll. London; Fuerst, Steven V.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Brandwardi-Raymond, Graziella; Wu, Kinwah; Crowley, Oliver; /University Coll. London

    2007-01-05

    We have calculated the reflection component of the X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and shown that they can be significantly modified by the relativistic motion of the accretion flow and various gravitational effects of the central black hole. The absorption edges in the reflection spectra suffer severe energy shifts and smearing. The degree of distortion depends on the system parameters, and the dependence is stronger for some parameters such as the inner radius of the accretion disk and the disk viewing inclination angles. The relativistic effects are significant and are observable. Improper treatment of the reflection component of the X-ray continuum in spectral fittings will give rise to spurious line-like features, which will mimic the fluorescent emission lines and mask the relativistic signatures of the lines.

  11. Effects of Ground Conditions on Microbial Cementation in Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daehyeon Kim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to understand the effect of ground conditions on microbial cementation in cohesionless soils. Since the method of microbial cementation is still at the experimental stage, for its practical use in the field, a number of laboratory experiments are required for the quantification of microbial cementation under various ground conditions, such as relative densities, relative compactions and particle size distributions. In this study, in order to evaluate the effectiveness of microbial cementation in treated sands and silts, an experiment was performed for different relative densities of silica sands, for different relative compactions of silts and for different particle size distributions of weathered soils sampled from the field. Scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX spectroscopy and mapping analyses were implemented for the quantification of the levels of microbial cementations for sand, silt and weathered soil specimens. Based on the test results, a considerable microbial cementation was estimated depending on the soil conditions; therefore, an implementation of this new type of bio-grouting on a weak foundation may be possible to increase the strength and stiffness of weak ground.

  12. SIMULATION OF WAKE VORTEX AIRCRAFT IN GROUND EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamfil ŞOMOIAG

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The problem developed in this paper is encountered in airplane aerodynamics and concernsthe influence of long life longitudinal wake vortices generated by wing tips or by external obstaclessuch as reactors or landing gears. More generally it concerns 3D bodies of finite extension in crossflow. At the edge of such obstacles, longitudinal vortices are created by pressure differences inside theboundary layers and rotate in opposite senses. It can constitute a danger to another aircraft that fliesin this wake, especially during takeoff and landing. In this case the wake vortex trajectories andstrengths are altered by ground interactions. This study presents the results of a Large EddySimulation of wake vortex in ground effect providing the vorticity flux behavior.

  13. Grounding Effect on Common Mode Interference of Underground Inverter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHENG Qiang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available For the neutral point not grounded characteristics of underground power supply system in coal mine, this paper studied common mode equivalent circuit of underground PWM inverter, and extracted parasitic parameters of interference propagation path. The author established a common mode and differential mode model of underground inverter. Taking into account the rise time of PWM, the simulation results of conducted interference by Matlab software is compared with measurement spectrum on the AC side and motor side of converter, the difference is consistent showing that the proposed method has some validity. After Comparison of calculation results by Matlab simulation ,it can be concluded that ungrounded neutral of transformer could redue common mode current in PWM system, but not very effective, the most efficient way is to increase grounding  impedance of  inverter and motor.

  14. Journaling: An Effective Approach to Professional Development For Reflective Teachers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Peng

    2008-01-01

    As a new curriculum reform program was put forward in China,higher standards for teachers were given that teachers must have a potential of reflective development.Continuing and effective professional development is a common concern of most teachers and professional educators.Effective professional development usually means that not only does it have immediate impact on the work of the professional educator,but it has a long lasting impact.Unfortunately,such effective professional development activities are rare and,in turn,costly to the organization.The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a form of effective professional development which is not only economical but effective.That is the reflective journal.This article analyzes the application of Journal writing from these aspects of the definition,content and the procedures.

  15. Personal Coaching: Reflection on a Model for Effective Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Kerryn

    2015-01-01

    The article "Personal Coaching: A Model for Effective Learning" (Griffiths, 2006) appeared in the "Journal of Learning Design" Volume 1, Issue 2 in 2006. Almost ten years on, Kerryn Griffiths reflects upon her original article. Specifically, Griffiths looks back at the combined coaching-learning model she suggested in her…

  16. Measuring Effects of Reflection on Learning – A Physiological Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qi, Wen; Verpoorten, Dominique; Westera, Wim

    2014-01-01

    As an economical and feasible intervention, reflection demands learners using critical thinking to examine presented information, questioning its validity, and drawing conclusions based on the resulting ideas during a learning process. The aim of this study is to gain insight into the effects of pra

  17. Spin Hall effect of light in metallic reflection

    CERN Document Server

    Hermosa, N; Aiello, A; Woerdman, J P

    2011-01-01

    We report the first measurement of the Spin Hall Effect of Light (SHEL) on an air-metal interface. The SHEL is a polarization-dependent out-of-plane shift on the reflected beam. For the case of metallic reflection with a linearly polarized incident light, both the spatial and angular variants of the shift are observed and are maximum for -45\\cdot/45\\cdot polarization, but zero for pure s- and p-polarization. For an incoming beam with circular polarization states however, only the spatial out-of-plane shift is present.

  18. Reflecting and transmitting effect of a planar unidirectionally conducting screen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E Peng; JIANG Bin-hao

    2009-01-01

    The reflecting and transmitting effects of a planar unidirectionally conducting screen are analyzed based on the accurate closed-form expression for electric field of an arbitrarily oriented electric dipole. For a dipole oriented along the wire elements of the screen, the screen acts as a perfectly electrically conducting plane.For a dipole perpendicular to the wire elements, the fields reflected by the screen can be interpreted as the contribution of an image dipole and image transmission-line current source, while the transmitted field is arisen from image transmission-line source. The expressions of related surface waves are derived and can be compared with previous results.

  19. The Influencing Factors of Escaped Radon from the Jiayuguan Fault Zone and Its Earthquake Reflecting Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Bo; Huang Fuqiong; Jian Chunlin

    2011-01-01

    The paper analyzes the radon data of nearly two decades on the Jiayuguan fault zone, discusses the main influencing factors, and puts forward the relationship between radon and air temperature, ground temperature and rainfall. We summarized the earthquake reflecting effect for ML≥5. 0 about 400km within the Jiayuguan station, and reached the conclusion that it has better earthquake-reflecting ability before an earthquake, usually appearing as abnormal changes in sustained low value. By extracting the annual trend of radon in Jiayuguan station over many years, we discovered that the annual trend of radon has a close relationship with the seismic activity in surrounding areas, namely, if the annual variation of radon is larger, the seismic activity in surrounding areas is stronger; Otherwise, if the annual variation of radon is relatively stable, the seismic activity in the vicinity is weak.

  20. The Prediction of Jet Noise Ground Effects Using an Acoustic Analogy and a Tailored Green's Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Steven A. E.

    2013-01-01

    An assessment of an acoustic analogy for the mixing noise component of jet noise in the presence of an infinite surface is presented. The reflection of jet noise by the ground changes the distribution of acoustic energy and is characterized by constructive and destructive interference patterns. The equivalent sources are modeled based on the two-point cross- correlation of the turbulent velocity fluctuations and a steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solution. Propagation effects, due to reflection by the surface and refaction by the jet shear layer, are taken into account by calculating the vector Green's function of the linearized Euler equations (LEE). The vector Green's function of the LEE is written in relation to Lilley's equation; that is, approximated with matched asymptotic solutions and the Green's function of the convective Helmholtz equation. The Green's function of the convective Helmholtz equation for an infinite flat plane with impedance is the Weyl-van der Pol equation. Predictions are compared with an unheated Mach 0.95 jet produced by a nozzle with an exit diameter of 0.3302 meters. Microphones are placed at various heights and distances from the nozzle exit in the peak jet noise direction above an acoustically hard and an asphalt surface. The predictions are shown to accurately capture jet noise ground effects that are characterized by constructive and destructive interference patterns in the mid- and far-field and capture overall trends in the near-field.

  1. Effect of wildfires on surface reflectance from a savanna ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudyal, R.; Gatebe, C. K.; Ichoku, C. M.; Varnai, T.

    2015-12-01

    During an airborne field campaign in South Africa in 2005, NASA's Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) flew aboard South Africa Weather Service, Aerocommander 690A and measured surface bidirectional reflectance-distribution function (BRDF) over savanna comprised mostly of grasses and a few scattered trees. Savannas cover half the surface of Africa, large areas of Australia, South America, and India. . The region that was studied is located in Kruger National Park in northeastern South Africa, which was heavily affected by the wildfires. The CAR measured surface reflectance along its flight path covering both burned and unburned areas. . In this study, we compared surface reflectance between burnt and un-burnt areas at various wavelengths (340nm, 380nm, 472nm, 682nm, 870nm, 1036nm, 1219nm, 1273nm, and 2205nm) at satellite sub-pixel scales. We found a relative burnt surface reflectance decrease of between 8 and 65% due to fires. These results not only serve to highlight the importance of biomass burning and effects on the energy budgets, but also the need to determine the effects of albedo changes due to fires on soil moisture budget, evapotranspiration, infiltration, and runoff, all of which govern the land-surface component of the water cycle.

  2. Effects of Rocket Exhaust on Lunar Soil Reflectance Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, R. N.; Jolliff, B. L.; Robinson, M. S.; Hapke, B. W.; Plescia, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    The Apollo, Surveyor, and Luna spacecraft descent engine plumes affected the regolith at and surrounding their landing sites. Owing to the lack of rapid weathering processes on the Moon, surface alterations are still visible as photometric anomalies in Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) images. These areas are interpreted as disturbance of the regolith by rocket exhaust during descent of the spacecraft, which we refer to as "blast zones" (BZs). The BZs consist of an area of lower reflectance (LR-BZ) compared to the surroundings that extends up to a few meters out from the landers, as well as a broader halo of higher reflectance (HR-BZ) that extends tens to hundreds of meters out from the landers. We use phase-ratio images for each landing site to determine the spatial extent of the disturbed regions and to quantify differences in reflectance and backscattering characteristics within the BZs compared to nearby undisturbed regolith. We also compare the reflectance changes and BZ dimensions at the Apollo sites with those at Luna and Surveyor sites. We seek to determine the effects of rocket exhaust in terms of erosion and particle redistribution, as well as the cause(s) of the reflectance variations, i.e., physical changes at the regolith surface. When approximated as an ellipse, the average Apollo BZ area is ~29,000 m2 (~175 ± 60 m by 200 ± 27 m) which is 10x larger than the average Luna BZ, and over 100x larger than the average Surveyor BZ. Moreover, BZ area scales roughly with lander mass (as a proxy for thrust). The LR-BZs are evident at the Apollo sites, especially where astronaut bioturbation has roughened the soil, leading to a 2-14% reduction in reflectance at ~30° phase. The LR-BZs at the Luna and Surveyor sites are less evident and may be mostly confined to the area below the landers. The average normalized reflectance in the HR-BZs for images with a 30° phase angle is 2-16% higher than in the undisturbed surrounding

  3. The Learning Process of Supervisees Who Engage in the Reflecting Team Model within Group Supervision: A Grounded Theory Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pender, Rebecca Lynn

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, counselor educators have begun to incorporate the use of the reflecting team process with the training of counselors. Specifically, the reflecting team has been used in didactic courses (Cox, 2003; Landis & Young, 1994; Harrawood, Wilde & Parmanand, 2011) and in supervision (Cox, 1997; Prest, Darden, & Keller, 1990;…

  4. Local site effects on weak and strong ground motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aki, Keiiti

    1993-02-01

    This is a review of the current state of the art in characterizing effects of local geology on ground motion. A new horizon is clear in this aspect of strong motion studies. Non-linear amplification at sediment sites appears to be more pervasive than seismologists used to think. Several recent observations about the weak motion and the strong motion suggest that the non-linear amplification at sediment sites may be very common. First, on average, the amplification is always greater at the younger sediment sites for all frequencies up to 12 Hz, in the case of weak motion; while the relation is reversed for frequencies higher than 5 Hz, in the case of strong motion. Secondly, the application of the amplification factor determined from weak motion overestimates significantly the strong motion at sediment sites observed during the Loma Prieta earthquake within the epicentral distance of about 50 km. Thirdly, the variance of peak ground acceleration around the mean curve decreases with the increasing earthquake magnitude. Finally, the above non-linear effects are expected from geotechnical studies both in the magnitude of departure from the linear prediction and in the threshold acceleration level beyond which the non-linearity begins.

  5. Cruising the rain forest floor: butterfly wing shape evolution and gliding in ground effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cespedes, Ann; Penz, Carla M; DeVries, Philip J

    2015-05-01

    Flight is a key innovation in the evolutionary success of insects and essential to dispersal, territoriality, courtship and oviposition. Wing shape influences flight performance and selection likely acts to maximize performance for conducting essential behaviours that in turn results in the evolution of wing shape. As wing shape also contributes to fitness, optimal shapes for particular flight behaviours can be assessed with aerodynamic predictions and placed in an ecomorphological context. Butterflies in the tribe Haeterini (Nymphalidae) are conspicuous members of understorey faunas in lowland Neotropical forests. Field observations indicate that the five genera in this clade differ in flight height and behaviour: four use gliding flight at the forest floor level, and one utilizes flapping flight above the forest floor. Nonetheless, the association of ground level gliding flight behaviour and wing shape has never been investigated in this or any other butterfly group. We used landmark-based geometric morphometrics to test whether wing shapes in Haeterini and their close relatives reflected observed flight behaviours. Four genera of Haeterini and some distantly related Satyrinae showed significant correspondence between wing shape and theoretical expectations in performance trade-offs that we attribute to selection for gliding in ground effect. Forewing shape differed between sexes for all taxa, and male wing shapes were aerodynamically more efficient for gliding flight than corresponding females. This suggests selection acts differentially on male and female wing shapes, reinforcing the idea that sex-specific flight behaviours contribute to the evolution of sexual dimorphism. Our study indicates that wing shapes in Haeterini butterflies evolved in response to habitat-specific flight behaviours, namely gliding in ground effect along the forest floor, resulting in ecomorphological partitions of taxa in morphospace. The convergent flight behaviour and wing morphology

  6. Effect of Ground Waste Concrete Powder on Cement Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianwei Ma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paste/mortar attached to the recycled aggregate decreases the quality of the aggregate and needs to be stripped. The stripped paste/mortar is roughly 20% to 50% in waste concrete, but relevant research is very limited. In this paper, the effects of ground waste concrete (GWC powder, coming from the attached paste/mortar, on water demand for normal consistency, setting time, fluidity, and compressive strength of cement were analyzed. The results show that the 20% of GWC powder (by the mass of binder has little effect on the above properties and can prepare C20 concrete; when the sand made by waste red clay brick (WRB replaces 20% of river sand, the strength of the concrete is increased by 17% compared with that without WRB sand.

  7. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfectly all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean and, as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources' right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO's observations and electromagnetic follow-up. These effects can inform electromagnetic follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  8. Earthquake Ground Motion in the Valley of Mexico: Basin Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, L.; Contreras, M.; Bielak, J.; Aguirre, J.

    2007-12-01

    We present a study of the ground motion and resulting amplification in the Mexico City Basin due to strong earthquakes in the Mexican Pacific Coast. We propose an approximation of the regional structure and Mexico City's basin and analyze their response to two shallow earthquakes generated near the coast. We compare two sets of three dimensional simulations: the first includes a soft structure similar in shape and properties to the Valley of Mexico, while the second excludes the soft soil deposits. Our 3D computations, with a maximum resolution of 0.75 Hz, reproduce the amplitude and long durations characteristics usually observed in the basin. We confirm that stations inside the Mexican Volcanic Belt experience amplification. In the frequency band 0.2-0.4 Hz additional amplification occurs inside the valley due to the shallow soil deposits in the lake bed region. We compare the normalized durations of the ground motion at several stations against observed data, and speculate on the durations of the soil motion as being a local effect due to the basin's shape and low velocities.

  9. Effects of propagation conditions on radar beam-ground interaction: impact on data quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fornasiero

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A large part of the research in the radar meteorology is devoted to the evaluation of the radar data quality and to the radar data processing. Even when, a set of absolute quality indexes can be produced (like as ground clutter presence, beam blockage rate, distance from radar, etc., the final product quality has to be determined as a function of the task and of all the processing steps. In this paper the emphasis lies on the estimate of the rainfall at the ground level taking extra care for the correction for ground clutter and beam blockage, that are two main problems affecting radar reflectivity data in complex orography. In this work a combined algorithm is presented that avoids and/or corrects for these two effects. To achieve this existing methods are modified and integrated with the analysis of radar signal propagation in different atmospheric conditions. The atmospheric refractivity profile is retrieved from the nearest in space and time radiosounding. This measured profile is then used to define the `dynamic map' used as a declutter base-field. Then beam blockage correction is applied to the data at the scan elevations computed from this map. Two case studies are used to illustrate the proposed algorithm. One is a summer event with anomalous propagation conditions and the other one is a winter event. The new algorithm is compared to a previous method of clutter removal based only on static maps of clear air and vertical reflectivity continuity test. The improvement in rain estimate is evaluated applying statistical analysis and using rain gauges data. The better scores are related mostly to the ``optimum" choice of the elevation maps, introduced by the more accurate description of the signal propagation. Finally, a data quality indicator is introduced as an output of this scheme. This indicator has been obtained from the general scheme, which takes into account all radar data processing steps.

  10. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel E; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfectly all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean and, as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources' right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO's observations and electromagnetic follow-up. Beyond galactic foregrounds associated with seasonal variations, we find that equatorial observatories can access over $80\\%$ of the localization probability, while mid-latitudes will access closer to $70\\%$. Facilities located near the two LIGO sites can obser...

  11. Characterization of the Aerodynamic Ground Effect and Its Influence in Multirotor Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Sanchez-Cuevas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the ground effect in multirotors, that is, the change in the thrust generated by the rotors when flying close to the ground due to the interaction of the rotor airflow with the ground surface. This effect is well known in single-rotor helicopters but has been assumed erroneously to be similar for multirotors in many cases in the literature. In this paper, the ground effect for multirotors is characterized with experimental tests in several cases and the partial ground effect, a situation in which one or some of the rotors of the multirotor (but not all are under the ground effect, is also characterized. The influence of the different cases of ground effect in multirotor control is then studied with several control approaches in simulation and validated with experiments in a test bench and with outdoor flights.

  12. Comparison between reflectivity statistics at heights of 3 and 6 km and rain rate statistics at ground level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, R. K.

    1975-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to study the relations between the empirical distribution functions of reflectivity at specified locations above the surface and the corresponding functions at the surface. A bistatic radar system was used to measure continuously the scattering cross section per unit volume at heights of 3 and 6 km. A frequency of 3.7 GHz was used in the tests. It was found that the distribution functions for reflectivity may significantly change with height at heights below the level of the melting layer.

  13. Measurement of spin Hall effect of reflected light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yi; Li, Yan; He, Huanyu; Gong, Qihuang

    2009-09-01

    We have measured the spin-dependent nanometer-sized displacements of the spin Hall effect of the reflected light from a planar air-glass interface. In the case of the vertical polarization, the displacement is found to increase with the incident angle and subsequently decrease after approximately 48 deg, while in the case of the horizontal polarization, it changes rapidly near the Brewster angle. For a fixed incident angle of 30 deg, the displacement decreases to zero as the polarization angle approaches approximately 39 deg from 0 deg (the horizontal polarization) and then increases in the opposite direction until 90 deg (the vertical polarization).

  14. Time domain analysis of thin-wire antennas over lossy ground using the reflection-coefficient approximation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernández Pantoja, M.; Yarovoy, A.G.; Rubio Bretones, A.; González García, S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a procedure to extend the methods of moments in time domain for the transient analysis of thin-wire antennas to include those cases where the antennas are located over a lossy half-space. This extended technique is based on the reflection coefficient (RC) approach, which approxim

  15. Ground measurements of the hemispherical-directional reflectance of Arctic snow covered tundra for the validation of satellite remote sensing products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, C. P.; Marks, A. A.; Green, P.; Mac Arthur, A.; Fox, N.; King, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Surface albedo is the hemispherical and wavelength integrated reflectance over the visible, near infrared and shortwave infrared regions of the solar spectrum. The albedo of Arctic snow can be in excess of 0.8 and it is a critical component in the global radiation budget because it determines the proportion of solar radiation absorbed, and reflected, over a large part of the Earth's surface. We present here our first results of the angularly resolved surface reflectance of Arctic snow at high solar zenith angles (~80°) suitable for the validation of satellite remote sensing products. The hemispherical directional reflectance factor (HDRF) of Arctic snow covered tundra was measured using the GonioRAdiometric Spectrometer System (GRASS) during a three-week field campaign in Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, in March/April 2013. The measurements provide one of few existing HDRF datasets at high solar zenith angles for wind-blown Arctic snow covered tundra (conditions typical of the Arctic region), and the first ground-based measure of HDRF at Ny-Ålesund. The HDRF was recorded under clear sky conditions with 10° intervals in view zenith, and 30° intervals in view azimuth, for several typical sites over a wavelength range of 400-1500 nm at 1 nm resolution. Satellite sensors such as MODIS, AVHRR and VIIRS offer a method to monitor the surface albedo with high spatial and temporal resolution. However, snow reflectance is anisotropic and is dependent on view and illumination angle and the wavelength of the incident light. Spaceborne sensors subtend a discrete angle to the target surface and measure radiance over a limited number of narrow spectral bands. Therefore, the derivation of the surface albedo requires accurate knowledge of the surfaces bidirectional reflectance as a function of wavelength. The ultimate accuracy to which satellite sensors are able to measure snow surface properties such as albedo is dependant on the accuracy of the BRDF model, which can only be assessed

  16. The Effect of Incident Light Polarization on Vegetation Bidirectional Reflectance Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Georgi T.; Thome, Kurt; Ranson, Kurtis J.; King, Michael D.; Butler, James J.

    2010-01-01

    The Laboratory-based Bidirectional Reflectance Factor (BRF) polarization study of vegetation is presented in this paper. The BRF was measured using a short-arc Xenon lamp/monochromator assembly producing an incoherent, tunable light source with a well-defined spectral bandpass at visible and near-infrared wavelengths of interest at 470 nm and 870 nm and coherent light source at 1.656 microns. All vegetation samples were measured using P and S linearly polarized incident light over a range of incident and scatter angles. By comparing these results, we quantitatively examine how the BRF of the samples depends on the polarization of the incident light. The differences are significant, depend strongly on the incident and scatter angles, and can be as high as 120% at 67 deg incident and 470nm. The global nature of Earth's processes requires consistent long-term calibration of all instruments involved in data retrieval. The BRF defines the reflection characteristics of Earth surface. It provides the reflectance of a target in a specific direction as a function of illumination and viewing geometry. The BRF is a function of wavelength and reflects the structural and optical properties of the surface. Various space and airborne radiometric and imaging remote sensing instruments are used in the remote sensing characterization of vegetation canopies and soils, oceans, or especially large pollution sources. The satellite data is validated through comparison with airborne, ground-based and laboratory-based data in an effort to fully understand the vegetation canopy reflectance, The Sun's light is assumed to be unpolarized at the top of the atmosphere; however it becomes polarized to some degree due to atmospheric effects by the time it reaches the vegetation canopy. Although there are numerous atmospheric correction models, laboratory data is needed for model verification and improvement.

  17. On the reflection effect in non-synchronous binary components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tassoul, M.; Tassoul, J.-L.

    1988-06-01

    A calculation is made of the photospheric flow caused by the reflection effect in an early-type star, which is a non-synchronously rotating component of a close binary. These large-scale, unsteady currents result from the presence of a moving 'hotspot' that is sweeping the star's equatorial belt. It is shown that they are confined to a thin thermo-viscous boundary layer. Because the radial component of the circulation velocity is very small, it is also concluded that the reflection effect is not likely to hinder systematically the gravitational sorting of the chemical elements in the external layers of a slowly rotating, tidally distorted A-type star. In non-synchronous rotators with very short orbital periods, however, diffusion might have a marked preference away from the equatorial belt, where the vertical speed in the moving 'hotspot' attains its largest value. According to our semiquantitative calculations, this upper limit is still less than a few cm s/sup -1/ in a 4-day period A-type star.

  18. Reflectance conversion methods for the VIS/NIR imaging spectrometer aboard the Chang'E-3 lunar rover: based on ground validation experiment data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Liu; Jian-Zhong Liu; Guang-Liang Zhang; Zong-Cheng Ling; Jiang Zhang; Zhi-Ping He; Ben-Yong Yang

    2013-01-01

    The second phase of the Chang'E Program (also named Chang'E-3) has the goal to land and perform in-situ detection on the lunar surface.A VIS/NIR imaging spectrometer (VNIS) will be carried on the Chang'E-3 lunar rover to detect the distribution of lunar minerals and resources.VNIS is the first mission in history to perform in-situ spectral measurement on the surface of the Moon,the reflectance data of which are fundamental for interpretation of lunar composition,whose quality would greatly affect the accuracy of lunar element and mineral determination.Until now,in-situ detection by imaging spectrometers was only performed by rovers on Mars.We firstly review reflectance conversion methods for rovers on Mars (Viking landers,Pathfinder and Mars Exploration rovers,etc).Secondly,we discuss whether these conversion methods used on Mars can be applied to lunar in-situ detection.We also applied data from a laboratory bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) using simulated lunar soil to test the availability of this method.Finally,we modify reflectance conversion methods used on Mars by considering differences between environments on the Moon and Mars and apply the methods to experimental data obtained from the ground validation of VNIS.These results were obtained by comparing reflectance data from the VNIS measured in the laboratory with those from a standard spectrometer obtained at the same time and under the same observing conditions.The shape and amplitude of the spectrum fits well,and the spectral uncertainty parameters for most samples are within 8%,except for the ilmenite sample which has a low albedo.In conclusion,our reflectance conversion method is suitable for lunar in-situ detection.

  19. Cloud Base Height and Effective Cloud Emissivity Retrieval with Ground-Based Infrared Interferometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Lin-Jun; LU Da-Ren

    2012-01-01

    Based on ground-based Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) observations in Shouxian, Anhui province, China, the authors retrieve the cloud base height (CBH) and effective cloud emissivity by using the minimum root-mean-square difference method. This method was originally developed for satellite remote sensing. The high-temporal-resolution retrieval results can depict the trivial variations of the zenith clouds continu- ously. The retrieval results are evaluated by comparing them with observations by the cloud radar. The compari- son shows that the retrieval bias is smaller for the middle and low cloud, especially for the opaque cloud. When two layers of clouds exist, the retrieval results reflect the weighting radiative contribution of the multi-layer cloud. The retrieval accuracy is affected by uncertainties of the AERI radiances and sounding profiles, in which the role of uncertainty in the temperature profile is dominant.

  20. Launch and Landing Effects Ground Operations (LLEGO) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    LLEGO is a model for understanding recurring launch and landing operations costs at Kennedy Space Center for human space flight. Launch and landing operations are often referred to as ground processing, or ground operations. Currently, this function is specific to the ground operations for the Space Shuttle Space Transportation System within the Space Shuttle Program. The Constellation system to follow the Space Shuttle consists of the crewed Orion spacecraft atop an Ares I launch vehicle and the uncrewed Ares V cargo launch vehicle. The Constellation flight and ground systems build upon many elements of the existing Shuttle flight and ground hardware, as well as upon existing organizations and processes. In turn, the LLEGO model builds upon past ground operations research, modeling, data, and experience in estimating for future programs. Rather than to simply provide estimates, the LLEGO model s main purpose is to improve expenses by relating complex relationships among functions (ground operations contractor, subcontractors, civil service technical, center management, operations, etc.) to tangible drivers. Drivers include flight system complexity and reliability, as well as operations and supply chain management processes and technology. Together these factors define the operability and potential improvements for any future system, from the most direct to the least direct expenses.

  1. Orientation effect on ground motion measurement for Mexican subduction earthquakes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.P Hong; A. Pozos-Estrada; R. Gomez

    2009-01-01

    The existence of the principal directions of the ground motion based on Arias intensity is well-known. These principal directions do not necessarily coincide with the orientations of recording sensors or with the orientations along which the ground motion parameters such as the peak ground acceleration and the pseudo-spectral acceleration (PSA) are maximum. This is evidenced by the fact that the maximum PSA at different natural vibration periods for horizontal excitations do not correspond to the same orientation. A recent analysis carried out for California earthquake records suggests that an orientation-dependent ground motion measurement for horizontal excitations can be developed. The main objective of this study is to investigate and provide seismic ground motion measurements in the horizontal plane, including bidirectional horizontal ground motions, for Mexican interplate and inslab earthquake records. Extensive statistical analyses of PSA are conducted for the assessment, The analysis results suggest that similar to the case of California records, the average behavior of the ratio of the PSA to the maximum resulting PSA can be approximated by a quarter of an ellipse in one quadrant; and that the ratio can be considered to be independent of the value of the maximum resulting PSA, earthquake magnitude, earthquake distance and the focal depth. Sets of response ratios and attenuation relationships that can be used to represent a bidirectional horizontal ground motion measurement for Mexican interplate and inslab earthquakes were also developed.

  2. Environmental Effect / Impact Assessment of Industrial Effulent on Ground Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Parmod Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study the aim of investigation is physical and chemical parameters of ground water and soil. By selected Physical and chemical parameters it is found that (1.Biological oxygen demand (BOD and chemical oxygen demand (COD are directly proportional to each other where dissolved oxygen (DO is indirectly proportional to BOD and COD. (2. Total dissolved solids, alkalinity and hardness are significantly higher in pre monsoon and winter season as compared to monsoon season.(3. High values of different parameters of ground water sources indicate the influence of industrial wastes on ground water.

  3. EFFECT OF GROUND-WATER REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES ON INDIGENOUS MICROFLORA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), working with the Interagency DNAPL Consortium, completed an independent evaluation of microbial responses to ground-water remediation technology demonstrations at Launch Pad 34 at Cape Canaveral Air Station in Brevard Count...

  4. Effect of electrode shape on grounding resistances - Part 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas; Tomaskovicova, Sonia; Dahlin, Torleif

    2016-01-01

    . The focus-one protocol is a new method for estimating single electrode grounding resistances by measuring the resistance between a single electrode in an ERT array and all the remaining electrodes connected in parallel. For large arrays, the measured resistance is dominated by the grounding resistance...... of the electrode under test, the focus electrode. We have developed an equivalent circuit model formulation for the resistance measured when applying the focus-one protocol. Our model depends on the individual grounding resistances of the electrodes of the array, the mutual resistances between electrodes......, and the instrument input impedance. Using analytical formulations for the potentials around prolate and oblate spheroidal electrode models (as approximations for rod and plate electrodes), we have investigated the performance and accuracy of the focus-one protocol in estimating single-electrode grounding resistances...

  5. Ground-water flow and the potential effects of remediation at Graces Quarters, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenbus, F.J.; Fleck, W.B.

    1996-01-01

    Ground water in the east-central part of Graces Quarters, a former open-air chemical-agent test facility at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, is contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds. The U.S. Geological Survey's finite- difference model was used to help understand ground-water flow and simulate the effects of alternative remedial actions to clean up the ground water. Scenarios to simulate unstressed conditions and three extraction well con- figurations were used to compare alternative remedial actions on the contaminant plume. The scenarios indicate that contaminants could migrate from their present location to wetland areas within 10 years under unstressed conditions. Pumping 7 gal/min (gallons per minute) from one well upgradient of the plume will not result in containment or removal of the highest contaminant concentrations. Pumping 7 gal/min from three wells along the central axis of the plume should result in containment and removal of dissolved contami- nants, as should pumping 7 gal/min from three wells at the leading edge of the plume while injecting 7 gal/min back into an upgradient well.

  6. Application of Fault Location Mode Based on Travelling Waves for Neutral Non-effective Grounding Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>Fault location for distribution feeders short circuit especially single-phase grounding fault is an important task in distribution system with non-effectively grounded neutral.Fault location mode for distribution feeders using fault generated current and voltage transient traveling waves was investigated.The characteristics of transient traveling waves resulted from each short circuit fault and their transmission disciplinarian in distribution feeders are analyzed.This paper proposed that double end travelling waves theory which measures arriving time of fault initiated surge at both ends of the monitored line is fit for distribution feeders but single end traveling waves theory not.According to different distribution feeders,on the basis of analyzing original traveling waves reflection rule in line terminal, Current-voltage mode,voltage-voltage mode and current-current mode for fault location based on traveling waves are proposed and aerial mode component of original traveling waves is used to realize fault location.Experimental test verify the feasibility and correctness of the proposed method.

  7. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel E.; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfect all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean, and as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources’ right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO’s observations and electromagnetic (EM) follow-up. Beyond galactic foregrounds associated with seasonal variations, we find that equatorial observatories can access over 80% of the localization probability, while mid-latitudes will access closer to 70%. Facilities located near the two LIGO sites can observe sources closer to their zenith than their analogs in the south, but the average observation will still be no closer than 44° from zenith. We also find that observatories in Africa or the South Atlantic will wait systematically longer before they can begin observing compared to the rest of the world though, there is a preference for longitudes near the LIGOs. These effects, along with knowledge of the LIGO antenna pattern, can inform EM follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  8. Surface roughness effects on the solar reflectance of cool asphalt shingles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul; Akbari, Hashem; Jacobs, Jeffry; Klink, Frank

    2008-02-17

    We analyze the solar reflectance of asphalt roofing shingles that are covered with pigmented mineral roofing granules. The reflecting surface is rough, with a total area approximately twice the nominal area. We introduce a simple analytical model that relates the 'micro-reflectance' of a small surface region to the 'macro-reflectance' of the shingle. This model uses a mean field approximation to account for multiple scattering effects. The model is then used to compute the reflectance of shingles with a mixture of different colored granules, when the reflectances of the corresponding mono-color shingles are known. Simple linear averaging works well, with small corrections to linear averaging derived for highly reflective materials. Reflective base granules and reflective surface coatings aid achievement of high solar reflectance. Other factors that influence the solar reflectance are the size distribution of the granules, coverage of the asphalt substrate, and orientation of the granules as affected by rollers during fabrication.

  9. Effect of Fresnel Reflectivity in a Spherical Turbid Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Elghazaly, A

    2003-01-01

    Radiative transfer problem for anisotropic scattering in a spherical homogeneous, turbid medium with angular dependent (specular) reflecting boundary is solved using the pomraning-Eddington approximation method. The angular dependent reflectivity of the boundary is considered as Fresnel's reflection probability function. The partial heat flux is calculated with anisotropic scattering through a homogeneous solid sphere. our results are compared with the available data and give an excellent agreement.

  10. Effective Installations Technique of Grounding Conductors for Metal Oxide Surge Arresters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B.H.; Kang, S.M. [Inha University, Inchon (Korea); Ryu, I.S. [Korea Electric Power Corporation, Seoul (Korea)

    2002-06-01

    This paper deals with the effects of grounding conductors for metal oxide surge arresters. When surge arresters are improperly installed, the results can cause costly damage of electrical equipments. In particular, the route of surge arrester connection is very important because bends and links of leads increase the impedances to lightning surges and tend to nullify the effectiveness of a grounding conductor. Therefore, there is a need to know how effective installation of lightning surge arresters is made in order to control voltage and to absorb energy at high lightning currents. The effectiveness of a grounding conductor and 18 [kV] metal oxide distribution line arresters was experimentally investigated under the lightning and oscillatory impulse voltages. Thus, the results are as follows; (1) The induced voltage of a grounding conductor is drastically not affected by length of a connecting line, but it is very sensitive to types of grounding conductor. (2) The coaxial cable having a low characteristic impedance is suitable as a grounding conductor. (3) It is also clear from these results that bonding the metal raceway enclosing the grounding conductor to the grounding electrode is very effective because of skin effect. (4) The induced voltages of grounding conductors for the oscillatory impulse voltages are approximately twice as large as those for the lightning impulse voltages. (author). 9 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. The Effect of Shared versus Individual Reflection on Team Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domke-Damonte, Darla J.; Keels, J. Kay

    2015-01-01

    In this study, teams in a strategic management classroom were given one of two versions of an assignment related to the development of a team contract: independent individual reflections on desired team behaviors versus team-level reflections on desired behavioral norms. Results of a multivariate analysis of covariance, controlling for gender and…

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Moisture Effect on Black Soil Reflectance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Huan-Jun; ZHANG Yuan-Zhi; ZHANG Xin-Le; ZHANG Bai; SONG Kai-Shan; WANG Zong-Ming; TANG Na

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that soil reflectance decreases with increasing soil moisture content,or increases when the soil moisture reaches a certain content;however,there are few analyses on the quantitative relationship between soil reflectance and its moisture,especially in the case of black soils in northeast China.A new moisture adjusting method was developed to obtain soil reflectance with a smaller moisture interval to describe the quantitative relationship between soil reflectance and moisture.For the soil samples with moisture contents ranging from air-dry to saturated,the changes in soil reflectance with soil moisture can be depicted using a cubic equation.Both moisture threshold (MT) and moisture inflexion (MI) of soil reflectance can also be determined by the equation.When the moisture range was smaller than MT,soil reflectance can be simulated with a linear model.However,for samples with different soil organic matter (OM),the parameters of the linear model varied regularly with the OM content.Based on their relationship,the soil moisture can be estimated from soil reflectance in the black soil region.

  13. The Effect of Shared versus Individual Reflection on Team Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domke-Damonte, Darla J.; Keels, J. Kay

    2015-01-01

    In this study, teams in a strategic management classroom were given one of two versions of an assignment related to the development of a team contract: independent individual reflections on desired team behaviors versus team-level reflections on desired behavioral norms. Results of a multivariate analysis of covariance, controlling for gender and…

  14. Analysis of landslide mitigation effects using Ground Penetrating Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristic, Aleksandar; Govedarica, Miro; Vrtunski, Milan; Petrovacki, Dusan

    2013-04-01

    Area of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) technology applications becomes wider nowadays. It includes utility mapping as important part of civil engineering applications, geological structure and soil analyses, applications in agriculture, etc. Characteristics of the technology make it suitable for structure analysis of shallow landslides, whose number and impact on environment is dominant in the region. Especially when shallow landslide endangers some man-made structures such as buildings, roads or bridges, analysis of GPR data can yield very useful results. The results of GPR data analysis of the shallow landslide are represented here. It is situated on the mountain Fruska Gora in Serbia. Despite its dimensions (50x20m) this landslide was interesting for analysis for two reasons: - The landslide occurred at the part of the single road between the cement factory and the marl mine. The cement factory "Lafarge" in Beocin (Fruska Gora) is the largest cement manufacturer in the country. One of major priorities of the factory management is to keep the function of this road. The road is heavily exploited and over the years it led to landslide movements and damaging of the road itself. - The landslide dates back to earlier period and the mitigation measures were performed twice. Laying the foundation of the retaining wall was not performed during the first mitigation measures. The second mitigation measures were performed in 2010 and included detailed geotechnical analysis of the location with the appropriate foundation laying. Since the GPR technology can produce high resolution images of subsurface it provides clear insight into the current state of surveyed location. That kind of analysis is necessary to maintain permanent functionality of the road and to check the status of mitigation measures. Furthermore, the location characteristics do not allow easy access so the possibilities of other analysis technologies application are limited. In order to assess the effects of

  15. A ground-based measurement of the relativistic beaming effect in a detached double WD binary

    CERN Document Server

    Shporer, Avi; Steinfadt, Justin D R; Bildsten, Lars; Howell, Steve B; Mazeh, Tsevi

    2010-01-01

    We report on the first ground-based measurement of the relativistic beaming effect (aka Doppler boosting). We observed the beaming effect in the detached, non-interacting eclipsing double white dwarf (WD) binary NLTT 11748. Our observations were motivated by the system's high mass ratio and low luminosity ratio, leading to a large beaming-induced variability amplitude at the orbital period of 5.6 hr. We observed the system during 3 nights at the 2.0m Faulkes Telescope North with the SDSS-g' filter, and fitted the data simultaneously for the beaming, ellipsoidal and reflection effects. Our fitted relative beaming amplitude is (3.0 +/- 0.4) x 10^(-3), consistent with the expected amplitude from a blackbody spectrum given the photometric primary radial velocity amplitude and effective temperature. This result is a first step in testing the relation between the photometric beaming amplitude and the spectroscopic radial velocity amplitude in NLTT 11748 and similar systems. We did not identify any variability due t...

  16. Effects of the Facet Reflectivity of a Laser Diode on Fiber Bragg Grating Semiconductor Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Honggang; Yu; Chang-Qing; Xu; Na; Li; Zhilin; Peng; Jacek; Wojcik; Peter; Mascher

    2003-01-01

    Effects of facet reflectivity of a laser diode on the performance of fiber Bragg grating semiconductor lasers are studied experimentally. Facet reflectivity of less than 10-4 is necessary to obtain stable oscillation wavelength.

  17. Quantifying the effect of riming on snowfall using ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisseev, Dmitri; von Lerber, Annakaisa; Tiira, Jussi

    2017-04-01

    Ground-based observations of ice particle size distribution and ensemble mean density are used to quantify the effect of riming on snowfall. The rime mass fraction is derived from these measurements by following the approach that is used in a single ice-phase category microphysical scheme proposed for the use in numerical weather prediction models. One of the characteristics of the proposed scheme is that the prefactor of a power law relation that links mass and size of ice particles is determined by the rime mass fraction, while the exponent does not change. To derive the rime mass fraction, a mass-dimensional relation representative of unrimed snow is also determined. To check the validity of the proposed retrieval method, the derived rime mass fraction is converted to the effective liquid water path that is compared to microwave radiometer observations. Since dual-polarization radar observations are often used to detect riming, the impact of riming on dual-polarization radar variables is studied for differential reflectivity measurements. It is shown that the relation between rime mass fraction and differential reflectivity is ambiguous, other factors such as change in median volume diameter need also be considered. Given the current interest on sensitivity of precipitation to aerosol pollution, which could inhibit riming, the importance of riming for surface snow accumulation is investigated. It is found that riming is responsible for 5% to 40% of snowfall mass. The study is based on data collected at the University of Helsinki field station in Hyytiälä during U.S. Department of Energy Biogenic Aerosols Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC) field campaign and the winter 2014/2015. In total 22 winter storms were analyzed, and detailed analysis of two events is presented to illustrate the study.

  18. Effect of particle nonsphericity on bidirectional reflectance of cirrus clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishchenko, M.I.; Rossow, W.B.; Macke, A.; Lacis, A.A. [Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the use of the fractal ice particle method to study the differences in bidirectional reflectance caused by the differences in the single scattering phase functions of spherical water droplets and nonspherical ice crystals.

  19. Ground-water, surface-water, and bottom-sediment contamination in the O-field area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, and the possible effects of selected remedial actions on ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Lorah, Michelle M.; Oliveros, James P.

    1995-01-01

    Disposal of munitions and chemical-warfare substances has introduced inorganic and organic contaminants to the ground water, surface water, and bottom sediment at O-Field, in the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Contaminants include chloride, arsenic, transition metals, chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic compounds, and organosulfur and organophosphorus compounds. The hydrologic effects of several remedial actions were estimated by use of a ground-water-flow model. The remedial actions examined were an impermeable covering, encapsulation, subsurface barriers, a ground-water drain, pumping of wells to manage water levels or to remove contaminated ground water for treatment, and no action.

  20. Experimental Investigation Into the Aerodynamic Ground Effect of a Tailless Chevron and Lambda-shaped UCAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Significant advances during the last quarter-century in computing capabilities, electronics miniaturization, communications , guidance, navigation, and...Grumman X-47. The X-45 will combine advance air vehicle hardware, including integrated sensors, communication , navigation equipment and low...USNR for UCAV Ground Effects Test**** %****** Re-adapted by Won In, Capt, USAF for UCAV Ground Efects Test ****** %******************* Calculation

  1. Unsteady Computations of a Jet in a Crossflow with Ground Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Shishir; Murman, Scott; Venkateswaran, Sankaran; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A numerical study of a jet in crossflow with ground effect is conducted using OVERFLOW with dual time-stepping and low Mach number preconditioning. The results of the numerical study are compared to an experiment to show that the numerical methods are capable of capturing the dominant features of the flow field as well as the unsteadiness associated with the ground vortex.

  2. Total Internal Reflection for Effectively Transparent Solar Cell Contacts

    CERN Document Server

    Jahelka, Phillip; Atwater, Harry

    2016-01-01

    A new strategy for eliminating photocurrent losses due to the metal contacts on the front of a solar cell was proposed, simulated, and tested. By placing triangular cross-section lines of low refractive index on top of the contacts, total-internal reflection at the interface of the low-index triangles and the surrounding material can direct light away from the metal and into the photoactive absorber. Simulations indicated that losses can be eliminated for any incident angle, and that yearly energy production improvements commensurate with the metallized area are possible. Proof of principle experiments were carried out to eliminate the reflective losses of a commercial solar cell's busbar contact. Spatially resolved laser beam induced current measurements demonstrated that reflection losses due to the busbar were reduced by voids with triangular cross-section.

  3. Ground state of a confined Yukawa plasma including correlation effects

    CERN Document Server

    Henning, C; Filinov, A; Piel, A; Bonitz, M

    2007-01-01

    The ground state of an externally confined one-component Yukawa plasma is derived analytically using the local density approximation (LDA). In particular, the radial density profile is computed. The results are compared with the recently obtained mean-field (MF) density profile \\cite{henning.pre06}. While the MF results are more accurate for weak screening, LDA with correlations included yields the proper description for large screening. By comparison with first-principle simulations for three-dimensional spherical Yukawa crystals we demonstrate that both approximations complement each other. Together they accurately describe the density profile in the full range of screening parameters.

  4. Effect of sewage sludge on formation of acidic ground water at a reclaimed coal mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravotta, C.A.

    1998-01-01

    Data on rock, ground water, vadose water, and vadose gas chemistry were collected for two years after sewage sludge was applied at a reclaimed surface coal mine in Pennsylvania to determine if surface-applied sludge is an effective barrier to oxygen influx, contributes metals and nutrients to ground water, and promotes the acidification of ground water. Acidity, sulfate, and metals concentrations were elevated in the ground water (6- to 21-m depth) from spoil relative to unmined rock because of active oxidation of pyrite and dissolution of aluminosilicate, carbonate, and Mn-Fe-oxide minerals in the spoil. Concentrations of acidity, sulfate, metals (Fe, Mn, Al, Cd, Cu, Cr, Ni, Zn), and nitrate, and abundances of iron-oxidizing bacteria were elevated in the ground water from sludge-treated spoil relative to untreated spoil having a similar mineral composition; however, gaseous and dissolved oxygen concentrations did not differ between the treatments. Abundances of iron-oxidizing bacteria in the ground water samples were positively correlated with concentrations of ammonia, nitrate, acidity, metals, and sulfate. Concentrations of metals in vadose water samples (iron-oxidizing bacteria, the oxidation of pyrite, and the acidification of ground water. Nevertheless, the overall effects on ground water chemistry from the sludge were small and probably short-lived relative to the effects from mining only.

  5. Quadrifilar Helix Antenna for Enhanced Air-to-Ground Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    5d. PROJECT NUMBER TPA # CE-SE-2014-09 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) US Army...effect of the metallic ground plane provided by the aircraft fuselage is explored through simulation, and the ideal standoff distance from this ground...Fig. 5 Effect of ground plane and absorber on QHA reflection coefficient .....4 Fig. 6 Effect of ground plane and absorber on QHA radiation pattern

  6. British politics today: moral grounds as reflected in conceptual metaphor. Britų politikos vertinimas: konceptualiosios moralės metaforos analizė

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudmila Arcimavičienė

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Šio straipsnio tikslas – atskleisti, kokia pagrindinė konceptualioji metafora vyrauja šiuolaikiniame britų politiniame diskurse ir kokie jos struktūriniai elementai sudaro bendro moralinio vertinimo pagrindą. Tyrimui buvo pasirinkta trisdešimt analitinių politinių straipsnių iš The Economist elektroninio archyvo. Straipsniai analizuojami remiantis kognityvinės lingvistikos principais bei kokybiniu analizės metodu, kurie leidžia atskleisti kalbiniuose pasakymuose (linguistic expressions glūdinčias konceptualiąsias metaforas. Nustatyta, kad Britų politikos moralinis vertinimas yra grindžiamas konceptualiąja metafora POLITINIS GYVENIMAS KAIP KELIONĖ. Išanalizavus šios metaforos kalbinę raišką, paaiškėjo, kad straipsniuose vyrauja neigiamas britų politikos vertinimas, atsispindintis konceptualiosios metaforos POLITINIS GYVENIMAS YRA KELIONĖelementų kalbinėje raiškoje, kai politikos veikėjai (1 vaizduojami kaip „dėmėtos reputacijos“ klajūnai, (2 keliaujantys be tikslo, (3 peržengiantys nustatytas ribas, (4 nesugebantys apeiti/įveikti kelyje pasitaikančių kliūčių ir t.t. ------ The present study aims at examining the moral grounds of today’s British political life as reflected in conceptual metaphors of political discourse. The method applied to analyze the moral grounds is that of hypothetical deduction combined with the theoretical framework of cognitive linguistics (qualitative analysis. The research findings reveal that the underlying conceptual metaphor of British critical political discourse is that of POLITICS AS JOURNEY. The use of this metaphorshows the moral unacceptability of today’s British political life due to the failed moral obligations of British politicians.

  7. Constructive Alignment in Economics Teaching: A Reflection on Effective Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The typical approach to student-centred learning in Economics has focused on innovation within the classroom, with little thought given to how this complements teaching and learning and, crucially, assessment. This paper reflects on the implementation of constructive alignment in a final year managerial economics course. It demonstrates how it is…

  8. Constructive Alignment in Economics Teaching: A Reflection on Effective Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The typical approach to student-centred learning in Economics has focused on innovation within the classroom, with little thought given to how this complements teaching and learning and, crucially, assessment. This paper reflects on the implementation of constructive alignment in a final year managerial economics course. It demonstrates how it is…

  9. Far field effects of complex noise barrier reflections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutgendorf, D.; Wessels, P.W.; Eerden, F.J.M. van den; Roo, F. de

    2012-01-01

    Within the EU FP7 QUIESST project, QUIeting the Environment for a Sustainable Surface Transport, a test method is being developed for the reflectivity of noise barriers. The method needs to account for a complex shape of barriers and the use of various types of absorbing materials. The performance o

  10. Effect of the surface geology on strong ground motions due to the 2016 Central Tottori Earthquake, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Takao; Noguchi, Tatsuya; Yoshida, Shohei; Yamamoto, Shinji

    2017-08-01

    On October 21, 2016, an earthquake with Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) magnitude 6.6 hit the central part of Tottori Prefecture, Japan. This paper demonstrates two notable effects of the surface geology on strong ground motions due to the earthquake. One is a predominant period issue observed over a large area. A seismic intensity of 6 lower on the JMA scale was registered at three sites in the disaster area. However, the peak ground acceleration ranged from 0.3 to 1.4 G at the three sites because of the varying peak periods of observed strong ground motions. The spectral properties of the observations also reflect the damage around the sites. Three-component microtremors were observed in the area; the predominant ground period distributions based on horizontal to vertical spectral ratios were provided by the authors. The peak periods of the strong motion records agree well with predominant periods estimated from microtremor observations at a rather hard site; however, the predominant periods of the microtremors are slightly shorter than those of the main shock at the other two soft sites. We checked the nonlinear effect at the sites by comparing the site responses to small events and the main shock. The peak periods of the main shock were longer than those of the weak motions at the sites. This phenomenon indicates a nonlinear site effect due to large ground motions caused by the main shock. A horizontal component of the accelerogram showed rather pulsating swings that indicate cyclic mobility behavior, especially at a site close to a pond shore; ground subsidence of 20 cm was observed around the site. The peak periods of weak motions agree well with those of the microtremor observations. This implies an important issue that the predominant periods estimated by microtremors are not sufficient to estimate the effect of surface geology for disaster mitigation. We have to estimate the predominant periods under large ground motions considering the nonlinear site

  11. Aerodynamics of flapping insect wing in inclined stroke plane hovering with ground effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda v, Krishne; Vengadesan, S.

    2014-11-01

    This work presents the time-varying aerodynamic forces and the unsteady flow structures of flapping insect wing in inclined stroke plane hovering with ground effect. Two-dimensional dragonfly model wing is chosen and the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically by using immersed boundary method. The main objective of the present work is to analyze the ground effect on the unsteady forces and vortical structures for the inclined stroke plane motions. We also investigate the influences of kinematics parameters such as Reynolds number (Re), stroke amplitude, wing rotational timing, for various distances between the airfoil and the ground. The effects of aforementioned parameters together with ground effect, on the stroke averaged force coefficients and regimes of force behavior are similar in both normal (horizontal) and inclined stroke plane motions. However, the evolution of the vortex structures which produces the effects are entirely different.

  12. The Effect of Guided Reflection on Test Anxiety in Nursing Students

    OpenAIRE

    Sharif, Farkhondeh; Dehbozorgi, Razieh; Mani, Arash; Vossoughi, Mehrdad; Tavakoli, Pouran

    2013-01-01

    Background: Anxiety disorders are common and test stress affects many students. Guided reflection is a new and effective method for reducing stress. Objectives: To assess the effect of guided reflection on test anxiety in second and third-year nursing students of Fatima Nursing and Midwifery College, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Materials and Method: This study was designed to assess the effect of guided reflection on test anxiety among nursing students of second and t...

  13. Citric acid and sodium citrate effects on pink color development of cooked ground turkey irradiated pre- and post-cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammel, L M; Claus, J R

    2006-03-01

    The effects of citric acid (0.15%, 0.3%) and sodium citrate (0.5%, 1.0%) on pink color development in ground turkey following irradiation (0, 2.5, 5.0kGy) were examined. Citric acid and sodium citrate had little effect on pink color when samples were irradiated prior to cooking. In contrast, when samples were cooked prior to irradiation, citric acid (0.3%) and sodium citrate (1.0%) reduced redness as indicated by eliminating a reflectance minimum at approximately 571nm, lessening greater reflectance in the red wavelength region, and preventing greater reducing conditions caused by irradiation. Citric acid significantly reduced pH and yields whereas sodium citrate reduced pH and yields to a lesser extent. Both citric acid and sodium citrate are potential ingredients that can be added during processing to prevent undesirable pink color in precooked irradiated ground turkey and therefore can result in greater acceptance of irradiated products by consumers.

  14. Effects of Reflection Category and Reflection Quality on Learning Outcomes during Web-Based Portfolio Assessment Process: A Case Study of High School Students in Computer Application Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Pao-Nan; Chang, Chi-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the effects of reflection category and reflection quality on learning outcomes during Web-based portfolio assessment process. Experimental subjects consist of forty-five eight-grade students in a "Computer Application" course. Through the Web-based portfolio assessment system, these students write reflection, and join…

  15. Effect of Antioxidants on DC Tree and Grounded DC Tree in XLPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanami, Hiroshi; Komatsu, Isao; Sekii, Yasuo; Saito, Mitsugu; Sugi, Kazuyuki

    To study the effects of antioxidants on the initiation of the DC tree and the grounded DC tree, experiments were conducted using XLPE specimens containing phenolic and sulfur type antioxidants. Experimental results showed that sulfur type antioxidants in XLPE have the effect of increasing inception voltages of both the DC tree and the grounded DC tree. Based on results of those experiments, the mechanism of increase in the inception voltage of the DC tree and the grounded DC tree by antioxidants was examined along with the mechanism of polarity effects on those trees. Results showed a promotional effect of charge injection from a needle electrode by antioxidants, which are responsible for the increased inception voltages of the DC tree. Charge trapping by antioxidants explains the increase of inception voltages of the grounded DC tree.

  16. Effects of Color Reversal of Figure and Ground Drawing Materials on Drawing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Deborah C.

    1978-01-01

    Studied were the effects of reversing the color of white and black figure and ground drawings on Goodenough-Harris Drawing Test performance of 21 cerebral palsied and 21 normal children (all 5 to 18 years old). (Author/SBH)

  17. Effect of oil extracted from coffee grounds in the radiolytic stabilization of PVC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Thaysa Araujo de; Aquino, Katia Aparecida da Silva; Araujo, Elmo S., E-mail: aquino@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    Commercial Poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) containing oil extracted from coffee grounds (OCG) at concentrations of 0.50; 1.00 and 1.50 wt% were investigated. The samples were irradiated with gamma radiation ({sup 60}Co) at room temperature and air atmosphere. The viscosity-average molar mass (M{sub v}) was measured for PVC systems without and with oil. Decreases in molar mass observed when the systems were gamma irradiated reflect the random scission effects that take place in the main chain. Degradation index (DI) value was also obtained by viscosity analysis. DI results showed that the addition of OCG at 0.5 wt% into PVC matrix irradiated at dose of 25 kGy decreased the number of main chain scissions and was calculated a protection index of 67% in PVC matrix. Results about the free radical scavenger action of the OCG were obtained by use of 2,2-diphenyl-1-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)-hydrazyl radical (DPPH) and are discussed in this study. Decrease of 7% of Young's modulus value and a decrease of 31.5% on the elongation at break value were recorded for PVC films exposed to gamma irradiation. However, no significant changes were recorded in mechanical properties of PVC with OCG. (author)

  18. Density-Dependent Effects of an Invasive Ant on a Ground-Dwelling Arthropod Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooling, M; Sim, D A; Lester, P J

    2015-02-01

    It is frequently assumed that an invasive species that is ecologically or economically damaging in one region, will typically be so in other environments. The Argentine ant Linepithema humile (Mayr) is listed among the world's worst invaders. It commonly displaces resident ant species where it occurs at high population densities, and may also reduce densities of other ground-dwelling arthropods. We investigated the effect of varying Argentine ant abundance on resident ant and nonant arthropod species richness and abundance in seven cities across its range in New Zealand. Pitfall traps were used to compare an invaded and uninvaded site in each city. Invaded sites were selected based on natural varying abundance of Argentine ant populations. Argentine ant density had a significant negative effect on epigaeic ant abundance and species richness, but hypogaeic ant abundance and species richness was unaffected. We observed a significant decrease in Diplopoda abundance with increasing Argentine ant abundance, while Coleoptera abundance increased. The effect on Amphipoda and Isopoda depended strongly on climate. The severity of the impact on negatively affected taxa was reduced in areas where Argentine ant densities were low. Surprisingly, Argentine ants had no effect on the abundance of the other arthropod taxa examined. Morphospecies richness for all nonant arthropod taxa was unaffected by Argentine ant abundance. Species that are established as invasive in one location therefore cannot be assumed to be invasive in other locations based on presence alone. Appropriate management decisions should reflect this knowledge. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. The Effect of Non-Lambertian Surface Reflectance on Aerosol Radiative Forcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricchiazzi, P.; O' Hirok, W.; Gautier, C.

    2005-03-18

    Surface reflectance is an important factor in determining the strength of aerosol radiative forcing. Previous studies of radiative forcing assumed that the reflected surface radiance is isotropic and does not depend on incident illumination angle. This Lambertian reflection model is not a very good descriptor of reflectance from real land and ocean surfaces. In this study we present computational results for the seasonal average of short and long wave aerosol radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface. The effect of the Lambertian assumption is found through comparison with calculations using a more detailed bi-direction reflectance distribution function (BRDF).

  20. The effect of cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum burmanii) essential oil microcapsules on vacuumed ground beef quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilliana, I. N.; Manuhara, G. J.; Utami, R.; Khasanah, L. U.

    2017-04-01

    Ground beef has a short shelf life because it is susceptible to damage due to microbial contamination and lipid oxidation. So some sort of preservation method such as refrigerated storage, vacuum packaging or natural preservative addition is needed to extend the shelf life of ground beef. A natural preservative that can be used as a food preservative is the cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum burmanii) essential oil microcapsules. The aim of the research was to determine the influence of a cinnamon bark essential oil microcapsules (0%;0.5% and 1% w/w of the ground beef) on the Total Plate Count (TPC), Thiobarbituric Acid (TBA), pH and color of ground beef during refrigerated storage (4±1°C). The result showed that cinnamon bark essential oil microcapsules affected the TPC, TBA, pH and color of ground beef. The addition of the cinnamon bark essential oil microcapsules on ground beef can inhibit microbial growth, inhibit lipid oxidation, inhibit discoloration and lowering pH of fresh ground beef during refrigerated storage compared to the control sample. The higher of the microcapsules were added, the higher the inhibition of microbial growth, lipid oxidation and discoloration of ground beef, indicating better preservation effects.

  1. The effect of disturbances of lower ionospheric parameters by powerful radio waves on partially reflected signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynenko, S. I.; Chernogor, L. F.

    The interaction of intense pulsed short-wave radiation with ionospheric plasma in the D region is studied. Also considered is the effect of the disturbances caused by this radiation on the characteristics of the partially reflected radio signals used in the method of partial reflections. Calculations are carried out showing that present installations designed for the method of partial reflections can have a significant effect on the parameters of the lower ionosphere. Recommendations are made for the maximum power of these installations.

  2. Ground-Wave Propagation Effects on Transmission Lines through Error Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uribe-Campos Felipe Alejandro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic transient calculation of overhead transmission lines is strongly influenced by the natural resistivity of the ground. This varies from 1-10K (Ω·m depending on several media factors and on the physical composition of the ground. The accuracy on the calculation of a system transient response depends in part in the ground return model, which should consider the line geometry, the electrical resistivity and the frequency dependence of the power source. Up to date, there are only a few reports on the specialized literature about analyzing the effects produced by the presence of an imperfectly conducting ground of transmission lines in a transient state. A broad range analysis of three of the most often used ground-return models for calculating electromagnetic transients of overhead transmission lines is performed in this paper. The behavior of modal propagation in ground is analyzed here into effects of first and second order. Finally, a numerical tool based on relative error images is proposed in this paper as an aid for the analyst engineer to estimate the incurred error by using approximate ground-return models when calculating transients of overhead transmission lines.

  3. Critical Reflection of an Iranian EFL Classroom: Effective Ploys in Narrative Paragraph Writing Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Fatemeh Mohammad; Ameri, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a qualitative study that investigated critical reflection in the hope that effective learning is objectified. It is the fruit of rumination on how critical reflection approach would affect learners' performance in narrative writing. The idea for this paper arose when the researchers consistently utilized ploys effective for…

  4. Examining the Effects of Reflective Journals on Pre-Service Science Teachers' General Chemistry Laboratory Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Canan; Karatas, Faik Özgür

    2015-01-01

    The general chemistry laboratory is an appropriate place for learning chemistry well. It is also effective for stimulating higher-order thinking skills, including reflective thinking, a skill that is crucial for science teaching as well as learning. This study aims to examine the effects of feedback-supported reflective journal-keeping activities…

  5. Generic Reflective Feedback: An Effective Approach to Developing Clinical Reasoning Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcikowski, K.; Brownie, S.

    2013-01-01

    Problem-based learning can be an effective tool to develop clinical reasoning skills. However, it traditionally takes place in tutorial groups, giving students little flexibility in how and when they learn. This pilot study compared the effectiveness of generic reflective feedback (GRF) with tutorial-based reflective feedback on the development of…

  6. The Effect of Thickness of Aluminium Films on Optical Reflectance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Lugolole

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In Uganda and Africa at large, up to 90% of the total energy used for food preparation and water pasteurization is from fossil fuels particularly firewood and kerosene which pollute the environment, yet there is abundant solar energy throughout the year, which could also be used. Uganda is abundantly rich in clay minerals such as ball clay, kaolin, feldspar, and quartz from which ceramic substrates were developed. Aluminium films of different thicknesses were deposited on different substrates in the diffusion pump microprocessor vacuum coater (Edwards AUTO 306. The optical reflectance of the aluminium films was obtained using a spectrophotometer (SolidSpec-3700/DUV-UV-VIS-NIR at various wave lengths. The analysis of the results of the study revealed that the optical reflectance of the aluminium films was above 50% and increased with increasing film thickness and wavelength. Thus, this method can be used to produce reflector systems in the technology of solar cooking and other appliances which use solar energy.

  7. A Critical Review of the Transport and Decay of Wake Vortices in Ground Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarpkaya, T.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the transport and decay of wake vortices in ground effect and cites a need for a physics-based parametric model. The encounter of a vortex with a solid body is always a complex event involving turbulence enhancement, unsteadiness, and very large gradients of velocity and pressure. Wake counter in ground effect is the most dangerous of them all. The interaction of diverging, area-varying, and decaying aircraft wake vortices with the ground is very complex because both the vortices and the flow field generated by them are altered to accommodate the presence of the ground (where there is very little room to maneuver) and the background turbulent flow. Previous research regarding vortex models, wake vortex decay mechanisms, time evolution within in ground effect of a wake vortex pair, laminar flow in ground effect, and the interaction of the existing boundary layer with a convected vortex are reviewed. Additionally, numerical simulations, 3-dimensional large-eddy simulations, a probabilistic 2-phase wake vortex decay and transport model and a vortex element method are discussed. The devising of physics-based, parametric models for the prediction of (operational) real-time response, mindful of the highly three-dimensional and unsteady structure of vortices, boundary layers, atmospheric thermodynamics, and weather convective phenomena is required. In creating a model, LES and field data will be the most powerful tools.

  8. An evaluation of the appropriateness and effectiveness of structured reflection for midwifery students in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Louise; Lawler, Denise; Brady, Vivienne; OBoyle, Colm; Deasy, Anna; Muldoon, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Midwifery students undertaking the undergraduate midwifery education programme in Ireland participate in facilitated reflective sessions that aim to develop their skills of reflecting on and in clinical practice. This paper presents a qualitative evaluation of the appropriateness and effectiveness of the facilitated reflection sessions for pre and post-registration midwifery students in two large Dublin maternity teaching hospitals. The aim was to evaluate structured reflective practice sessions which sought to assist midwifery students to become competent reflective practitioners. Group reflection sessions were conducted weekly in a clinical practice area at the same time each week over one academic year. After the series of structured reflective sessions, midwifery students and facilitating staff were invited to evaluate the reflective process. This evaluation consisted of a self-completion survey to identify the factors that facilitated and impeded student participation in the sessions. Respondents answered a series of questions about the reflective practice sessions and were also invited to enter qualitative data regarding their subjective experiences of the process in free text boxes. The data were then collated into themes by an independent reviewer. The results of the evaluation clearly indicate that midwifery students and facilitators welcomed the opportunity to engage in group reflection sessions as a form of peer support and as a catalyst for learning from clinical practice. Findings suggest that reflective practice can contribute to the development of skilled, self-aware and engaged practitioners.

  9. The Effect of Enhanced Experiential Learning on the Personal Reflection of Undergraduate Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aukes, Leo C.; Geertsma, Jelle; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Zwierstra, Rein P.; Slaets, Joris P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study's aim was to test the expectation that enhanced experiential learning is an effective educational method that encourages personal reflection in medical students. Methods: Using a pre post-test follow-up design, the level of the personal reflection ability of an exposure group of first-year medical students participating in a new enhanced experiential learning program was compared to that of a control group of second- and third-year medical students participating in a standard problem-based learning program. Personal reflection was assessed using the Groningen Reflection Ability Scale (GRAS). Students’ growth in reflection was analyzed with multilevel analysis. Results: After one year, first-year medical students in the exposure group achieved a level of personal reflection comparable to that reached by students of the control group in their third year. This difference in growth of reflection was statistically significant (p<.001), with a small effect size (effect size = 0.18). The reflection growth curve of the control group declined slightly in the third year as a function of study time. Conclusion: Enhanced experiential learning has a positive effect on the personal reflection ability of undergraduate medical students. PMID:20165543

  10. Measuring and modeling the effect of surface moisture on the spectral reflectance of coastal beach sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolet, Corjan; Poortinga, Ate; Roosjen, Peter; Bartholomeus, Harm; Ruessink, Gerben

    2014-01-01

    Surface moisture is an important supply limiting factor for aeolian sand transport, which is the primary driver of coastal dune development. As such, it is critical to account for the control of surface moisture on available sand for dune building. Optical remote sensing has the potential to measure surface moisture at a high spatio-temporal resolution. It is based on the principle that wet sand appears darker than dry sand: it is less reflective. The goals of this study are (1) to measure and model reflectance under controlled laboratory conditions as function of wavelength (λ) and surface moisture (θ) over the optical domain of 350-2500 nm, and (2) to explore the implications of our laboratory findings for accurately mapping the distribution of surface moisture under natural conditions. A laboratory spectroscopy experiment was conducted to measure spectral reflectance (1 nm interval) under different surface moisture conditions using beach sand. A non-linear increase of reflectance upon drying was observed over the full range of wavelengths. Two models were developed and tested. The first model is grounded in optics and describes the proportional contribution of scattering and absorption of light by pore water in an unsaturated sand matrix. The second model is grounded in soil physics and links the hydraulic behaviour of pore water in an unsaturated sand matrix to its optical properties. The optical model performed well for volumetric moisture content θ 0.97), but underestimated reflectance for θ between 24-30% (R2 > 0.92), most notable around the 1940 nm water absorption peak. The soil-physical model performed very well (R2 > 0.99) but is limited to 4% > θ < 24%. Results from a field experiment show that a short-wave infrared terrestrial laser scanner (λ = 1550 nm) can accurately relate surface moisture to reflectance (standard error 2.6%), demonstrating its potential to derive spatially extensive surface moisture maps of a natural coastal beach.

  11. Measuring and modeling the effect of surface moisture on the spectral reflectance of coastal beach sand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corjan Nolet

    Full Text Available Surface moisture is an important supply limiting factor for aeolian sand transport, which is the primary driver of coastal dune development. As such, it is critical to account for the control of surface moisture on available sand for dune building. Optical remote sensing has the potential to measure surface moisture at a high spatio-temporal resolution. It is based on the principle that wet sand appears darker than dry sand: it is less reflective. The goals of this study are (1 to measure and model reflectance under controlled laboratory conditions as function of wavelength (λ and surface moisture (θ over the optical domain of 350-2500 nm, and (2 to explore the implications of our laboratory findings for accurately mapping the distribution of surface moisture under natural conditions. A laboratory spectroscopy experiment was conducted to measure spectral reflectance (1 nm interval under different surface moisture conditions using beach sand. A non-linear increase of reflectance upon drying was observed over the full range of wavelengths. Two models were developed and tested. The first model is grounded in optics and describes the proportional contribution of scattering and absorption of light by pore water in an unsaturated sand matrix. The second model is grounded in soil physics and links the hydraulic behaviour of pore water in an unsaturated sand matrix to its optical properties. The optical model performed well for volumetric moisture content θ 0.97, but underestimated reflectance for θ between 24-30% (R2 > 0.92, most notable around the 1940 nm water absorption peak. The soil-physical model performed very well (R2 > 0.99 but is limited to 4% > θ < 24%. Results from a field experiment show that a short-wave infrared terrestrial laser scanner (λ = 1550 nm can accurately relate surface moisture to reflectance (standard error 2.6%, demonstrating its potential to derive spatially extensive surface moisture maps of a natural coastal beach.

  12. Ground-ice stable isotopes and cryostratigraphy reflect late Quaternary palaeoclimate in the Northeast Siberian Arctic (Oyogos Yar coast, Dmitry Laptev Strait)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opel, Thomas; Wetterich, Sebastian; Meyer, Hanno; Dereviagin, Alexander Y.; Fuchs, Margret C.; Schirrmeister, Lutz

    2017-06-01

    To reconstruct palaeoclimate and palaeoenvironmental conditions in the northeast Siberian Arctic, we studied late Quaternary permafrost at the Oyogos Yar coast (Dmitry Laptev Strait). New infrared-stimulated luminescence ages for distinctive floodplain deposits of the Kuchchugui Suite (112.5 ± 9.6 kyr) and thermokarst-lake deposits of the Krest Yuryakh Suite (102.4 ± 9.7 kyr), respectively, provide new substantial geochronological data and shed light on the landscape history of the Dmitry Laptev Strait region during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5. Ground-ice stable-isotope data are presented together with cryolithological information for eight cryostratigraphic units and are complemented by data from nearby Bol'shoy Lyakhovsky Island. Our combined record of ice-wedge stable isotopes as a proxy for past winter climate conditions covers about 200 000 years and is supplemented by stable isotopes of pore and segregated ice which reflect annual climate conditions overprinted by freezing processes. Our ice-wedge stable-isotope data indicate substantial variations in northeast Siberian Arctic winter climate conditions during the late Quaternary, in particular between glacial and interglacial times but also over the last millennia to centuries. Stable isotope values of ice complex ice wedges indicate cold to very cold winter temperatures about 200 kyr ago (MIS7), very cold winter conditions about 100 kyr ago (MIS5), very cold to moderate winter conditions between about 60 and 30 kyr ago, and extremely cold winter temperatures during the Last Glacial Maximum (MIS2). Much warmer winter conditions are reflected by extensive thermokarst development during MIS5c and by Holocene ice-wedge stable isotopes. Modern ice-wedge stable isotopes are most enriched and testify to the recent winter warming in the Arctic. Hence, ice-wedge-based reconstructions of changes in winter climate conditions add substantial information to those derived from paleoecological proxies stored in

  13. Neutron reflection from condensed matter, the Goos-Haenchen effect and coherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignatovich, V.K

    2004-02-23

    The Goos-Haenchen (GH) effect for neutron reflection from condensed matter is considered. An experiment to quantify the effect is proposed. The relation of GH shift to the neutron coherence length is considered.

  14. On the unsteady motion and stability of a heaving airfoil in ground effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Molina; Xin Zhang; David Angland

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the fluid mechanics and force generation capabilities of an inverted heaving airfoil placed close to a moving ground using a URANS solver with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. By varying the mean ground clearance and motion frequency of the airfoil, it was possible to construct a frequency-height diagram of the various forces acting on the airfoil. The ground was found to enhance the downforce and reduce the drag with respect to freestream. The unsteady motion induces hysteresis in the forces' behaviour. At moderate ground clearance, the hysteresis increases with frequency and the airfoil loses energy to the flow, resulting in a stabilizing motion. By analogy with a pitching motion, the airfoil stalls in close proximity to the ground. At low frequencies, the motion is unstable and could lead to stall flutter. A stall flutter analysis was undertaken. At higher frequencies, inviscid effects overcome the large separation and the motion becomes stable. Forced trailing edge vortex shedding appears at high frequencies. The shedding mechanism seems to be independent of ground proximity.However, the wake is altered at low heights as a result of an interaction between the vortices and the ground.

  15. Soft Soil Site Characterization on the Coast of Yantai and Its Effect on Ground Motion Parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü Yuejun; Tang Rongyu; Peng Yanju

    2005-01-01

    According to the Chinese GB50011-2001 code and the recommended provisions of FEMANEHRP and EUROCODE 8, by using shear wave velocity and borehole data, the site classification is evaluated for a typical soft soil site on the Yantai seacoast. The site seismic ground motion effect is analyzed and the influence of the coastal soil on design ground motion parameters is discussed. The results show that the brief site classification can not represent the real conditions of a soft soil site; the soft soil on the coast has a remarkable impact on the magnitude and spectrum of ground motion acceleration. The magnification on peak acceleration is bigger, however, due to the nonlinear deformation of the soil. The magnification is reduced nonlinearly with the increase of input ground motion; the spectrum is broadened and the characteristic period elongated on the soft soil site.

  16. Effects of aging on figure-ground perception: Convexity context effects and competition resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass, Jordan W; Bennett, Patrick J; Peterson, Mary A; Sekuler, Allison B

    2017-02-01

    We examined age-related differences in figure-ground perception by exploring the effect of age on Convexity Context Effects (CCE; Peterson & Salvagio, 2008). Experiment 1, using Peterson and Salvagio's procedure and black and white stimuli consisting of 2 to 8 alternating concave and convex regions, established that older adults exhibited reduced CCEs compared to younger adults. Experiments 2 and 3 demonstrated that this age difference was found at various stimulus durations and sizes. Experiment 4 compared CCEs obtained with achromatic stimuli, in which the alternating convex and concave regions were each all black or all white, and chromatic stimuli in which the concave regions were homogeneous in color but the convex regions varied in color. We found that the difference between CCEs measured with achromatic and colored stimuli was larger in older than in younger adults. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the senescent visual system is less able to resolve the competition among various perceptual interpretations of the figure-ground relations among stimulus regions.

  17. The Effect of Gender and Age on Iranian EFL Teachers` Reflectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozhin Ghaslani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays reflective teaching is promoted as the appropriate teacher education model around the world and it has received too much attention in language teaching. The rise of reflective teaching in English Language Teaching (ELT has encouraged ELT teachers to engage in reflective practices in order to increase their professional success and to deal with their professional environment problems and challenges. Regarding the importance of reflective teaching, the current study was conducted to explore the effect of some factors such as demographic variables on the level of teachers` reflection. 125 Iranian EFL teachers were chosen from several Language institutes in Kurdistan and Hamedan randomly. Teacher reflectivity questionnaire developed by AKbari, Behzadpour and Dadvand (2010 was used. In order to investigate the research questions, an independent sample t-test, a one way ANOVA analysis and two MANOVA analyses were run. The findings of the study showed that male and female teachers were different in the level of reflection and they were also different in the level of critical, cognitive and practical components of reflection. In addition, the results of the study showed that there were no significant differences in the level of teachers` reflection and reflection components with respect to different ages of teachers.

  18. Effects of Sample Preparation on the Infrared Reflectance Spectra of Powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauer, Carolyn S.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Myers, Tanya L.; Su, Yin-Fong; Blake, Thomas A.; Forland, Brenda M.

    2015-05-22

    While reflectance spectroscopy is a useful tool in identifying molecular compounds, laboratory measurement of solid (particularly powder) samples often is confounded by sample preparation methods. For example, both the packing density and surface roughness can have an effect on the quantitative reflectance spectra of powdered samples. Recent efforts in our group have focused on developing standard methods for measuring reflectance spectra that accounts for sample preparation, as well as other factors such as particle size and provenance. In this work, the effect of preparation method on sample reflectivity was investigated by measuring the directional-hemispherical spectra of samples that were hand-packed as well as pressed into pellets using an integrating sphere attached to a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The results show that the methods used to prepare the sample have a substantial effect on the measured reflectance spectra, as do other factors such as particle size.

  19. Effect of aperiodicity on the broadband reflection of silicon nanorod structures for photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chenxi; Huang, Ningfeng; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2012-01-02

    We carry out a systematic numerical study of the effects of aperiodicity on silicon nanorod anti-reflection structures. We use the scattering matrix method to calculate the average reflection loss over the solar spectrum for periodic and aperiodic arrangements of nanorods. We find that aperiodicity can either improve or deteriorate the anti-reflection performance, depending on the nanorod diameter. We use a guided random-walk algorithm to design optimal aperiodic structures that exhibit lower reflection loss than both optimal periodic and random aperiodic structures.

  20. Effects of Ground Motion Input on the Derived Fragility Functions: Case study of 2010 Haiti Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancilar, Ufuk; Harmandar, Ebru; Çakti, Eser

    2014-05-01

    Empirical fragility functions are derived by statistical processing of the data on: i) Damaged and undamaged buildings, and ii) Ground motion intensity values at the buildings' locations. This study investigates effects of different ground motion inputs on the derived fragility functions. The previously constructed fragility curves (Hancilar et al. 2013), which rely on specific shaking intensity maps published by the USGS after the 2010 Haiti Earthquake, are compared with the fragility functions computed in the present study. Building data come from field surveys of 6,347 buildings that are grouped with respect to structural material type and number of stories. For damage assessment, the European Macroseismic Scale (EMS-98) damage grades are adopted. The simplest way to account for the variability in ground motion input could have been achieved by employing different ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) and their standard variations. However, in this work, we prefer to rely on stochastically simulated ground motions of the Haiti earthquake. We employ five different source models available in the literature and calculate the resulting strong ground motion in time domain. In our simulations we also consider the local site effects by published studies on NEHRP site classes and micro-zoning maps of the city of Port-au-Prince. We estimate the regional distributions from the waveforms simulated at the same coordinates that we have damage information from. The estimated spatial distributions of peak ground accelerations and velocities, PGA and PGV respectively, are then used as input to fragility computations. The results show that changing the ground motion input causes significant variability in the resulting fragility functions.

  1. Study on the effect of ground motion direction on the response of engineering structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Menghan; Fan, Feng; Sun, Baitao; Zhi, Xudong

    2016-12-01

    Due to the randomness of earthquake wave magnitude and direction, and the uncertain direction of strong axis and weak axis in the construction of engineering structures, the effect of the direction of ground motion on a structure are studied herein. Ground motion records usually contain three vertical ground motion data, which are obtained by sensors arranged in accordance with the EW (East -West) direction, NS (South- North) direction and perpendicular to the surface ( z) direction, referring to the construction standard of seismic stations. The seismic records in the EW and NS directions are converted to Cartesian coordinates in accordance with the rotation of θ = 0°-180°, and consequently, a countless group of new ground motion time histories are obtained. Then, the characteristics of the ground motion time history and response spectrum of each group were studied, resulting in the following observations: (1) the peak and phase of ground motion are changed with the rotation of direction θ, so that the direction θ of the maximum peak ground motion can be determined; (2) response spectrum values of each group of ground motions change along with the direction θ, and their peak, predominant period and declining curve are also different as the changes occur; then, the angle θ in the direction of the maximum peak value or the widest predominant period can be determined; and (3) the seismic response of structures with different directions of ground motion inputs has been analyzed under the same earthquake record, and the results show the difference. For some ground motion records, such as the Taft seismic wave, these differences are significant. Next, the Lushan middle school gymnasium structure was analyzed and the calculation was checked using the proposed method, where the internal force of the upper space truss varied from 25% to 28%. The research results presented herein can be used for reference in choosing the ground motion when checking the actual damage

  2. The Effect of Specific Feedback on Critical Reflection of Physical Therapy Students during Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Deanna; Scott, Karen Wilson; Ostrom, Lee; Devine, Nancy; Leight, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    An essential component of expert professional practice is a practitioner's ability to critically reflect on one's performance. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of specific electronic feedback provided by the coordinator of clinical education on students' critical reflection ability displayed in weekly journal writings during…

  3. Effects of free, cued and modelled reflection on medical students' diagnostic competence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ibiapina, Cassio; Mamede, Sílvia; Moura, Alexandre; Elói-Santos, Silvana; van Gog, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    Context: Structured reflection while practising the diagnosing of cases has been shown to improve medical students' learning of clinical diagnosis. The present study investigated whether additional instructional guidance increases the benefits of reflection by comparing the effects of free, cued and

  4. Effects of free, cued and modelled reflection on medical students' diagnostic competence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ibiapina, Cassio; Mamede, Sílvia; Moura, Alexandre; Elói-Santos, Silvana; van Gog, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    Context: Structured reflection while practising the diagnosing of cases has been shown to improve medical students' learning of clinical diagnosis. The present study investigated whether additional instructional guidance increases the benefits of reflection by comparing the effects of free, cued and

  5. Effect of Reflective Teaching Training and Teaching Aptitude on Teaching Skills among Elementary Teacher Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaya Kumari, S. N.; Naik, Savita P.

    2016-01-01

    Teachers serve education, which is an effective instrument of man making. The teachers learn this art through Preservice teacher education programme. Teaching has been a reflective process from the beginning. Reflection is used in all sectors of teacher education, including Vocational and Adult education, for a number of years. Despite numerous…

  6. Examining the Effects of Computer-Based Scaffolds on Novice Teachers' Reflective Journal Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Guolin; Calandra, Brendan

    2010-01-01

    This study employed an explanatory mixed methods design to examine the effects of two computer-based scaffolds on novice teachers' reflective journal writing. The context for the study was an attempt to refine the reflective writing component of a large scale electronic portfolio system. Quantitative results indicated that the computer-based…

  7. Narrative Reflection as a Means to Explore Team Effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohuis, Anne Marie; Sools, Anneke; Vuuren, van Mark; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to explore how teams make sense of their effectiveness over time by telling their team story. We selected five team stories from health care teams perceived by the organization as effective. We analyzed their stories using three-level narrative analysis, which addresses th

  8. Narrative reflection as a means to explore team effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohuis, Anne Marie; Sools, Anna Maria; van Vuuren, Hubrecht A.; Bohlmeijer, Ernst Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to explore how teams make sense of their effectiveness over time by telling their team story. We selected five team stories from health care teams perceived by the organization as effective. We analyzed their stories using three-level narrative analysis, which addresses

  9. Associations between teaching effectiveness and participant self-reflection in continuing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratelle, John T; Bonnes, Sara L; Wang, Amy T; Mahapatra, Saswati; Schleck, Cathy D; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Mauck, Karen F; Beckman, Thomas J; Wittich, Christopher M

    2017-03-16

    Effective medical educators can engage learners through self-reflection. However, little is known about the relationships between teaching effectiveness and self-reflection in continuing medical education (CME). We aimed to determine associations between presenter teaching effectiveness and participant self-reflection in conference-based CME. This cross-sectional study evaluated presenters and participants at a national CME course. Participants provided CME teaching effectiveness (CMETE) ratings and self-reflection scores for each presentation. Overall CMETE and CME self-reflection scores (five-point Likert scale with one as strongly disagree and five as strongly agree) were averaged for each presentation. Correlations were measured among self-reflection, CMETE, and presentation characteristics. In total, 624 participants returned 430 evaluations (response, 68.9%) for the 38 presentations. Correlation between CMETE and self-reflection was medium (Pearson correlation, 0.3-0.5) or large (0.5-1.0) for most presentations (n = 33, 86.9%). Higher mean (SD) CME reflection scores were associated with clinical cases (3.66 [0.12] vs. 3.48 [0.14]; p = 0.003) and audience response (3.66 [0.12] vs. 3.51 [0.14]; p = 0.005). To our knowledge, this is the first study to show a relationship between teaching effectiveness and participant self-reflection in conference-based CME. Presenters should consider using clinical cases and audience response systems to increase teaching effectiveness and promote self-reflection among CME learners.

  10. Combining dual-polarization radar and ground-based observations to study the effect of riming on ice particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisseev, Dmitri; von Lerber, Annakaisa; Tiira, Jussi

    2017-04-01

    Recently a new microphysical scheme based on a single ice-phase category was proposed for the use in numerical weather prediction models. In the proposed scheme, ice particle properties are predicted and vary in time and space. One of the attributes of the proposed scheme is that the prefactor of a power-law relation that links mass and size of ice particles is determined by the rime mass fraction, while the exponent is kept constant. According to this the maximum dimensions of ice particles do not change during riming until graupel growth phase is reached. The dual-polarization radar observations given an additional insight on what are the physical properties of ice particles. Often, it is assumed that differential reflectivity should decrease because of riming. The motivation for this is that heavy riming would transform an ice particle to graupel. A graupel particle typically would have an almost spherical shape and therefore the differential reflectivity will become smaller. On the other hand, at the earlier stages ice particle shape may not change much, while its mass and therefore the density increases. This would lead to the increase of the differential reflectivity, for example. By combining ground-based observations, which allow to quantify the effect of riming on snowfall, and dual-polarization radar observations we investigate the impact of riming on ice particle properties, i.e. mass, density and shape. Furthermore, a connection between, bulk properties of ice particles, liquid water path, radar equivalent reflectivity factor and precipitation rate observations is established. The study is based on data collected during US DOE Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC) field campaign that took place in Hyytiala, Finland. A detailed analysis of two events is presented to illustrate the method.

  11. Near-fault directivity pulse-like ground motion effect on high-speed railway bridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈令坤; 张楠; 蒋丽忠; 曾志平; 陈格威; 国巍

    2014-01-01

    The vehicle-track-bridge (VTB) element was used to investigate how a high-speed railway bridge reacted when it was subjected to near-fault directivity pulse-like ground motions. Based on the PEER NAG Strong Ground Motion Database, the spatial analysis model of a vehicle-bridge system was developed, the VTB element was derived to simulate the interaction of train and bridge, and the elasto-plastic seismic responses of the bridge were calculated. The calculation results show that girder and pier top displacement, and bending moment of the pier base increase subjected to near-fault directivity pulse-like ground motion compared to far-field earthquakes, and the greater deformation responses in near-fault shaking are associated with fewer reversed cycles of loading. The hysteretic characteristics of the pier subjected to a near-fault directivity pulse-like earthquake should be explicitly expressed as the bending moment-rotation relationship of the pier base, which is characterized by the centrally strengthened hysteretic cycles at some point of the loading time-history curve. The results show that there is an amplification of the vertical deflection in the girder’s mid-span owing to the high vertical ground motion. In light of these findings, the effect of the vertical ground motion should be used to adjust the unconservative amplification constant 2/3 of the vertical-to-horizontal peak ground motion ratio in the seismic design of bridge.

  12. Bonding effectiveness of different adhesion approaches to unground versus ground primary tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knirsch, M S; Bonifácio, C C; Shimaoka, A M; Andrade, A P; Carvalho, R C R

    2009-06-01

    This study aims to evaluate the bonding effectiveness of self-etch and etch-and-rinse adhesive systems in on intact and ground primary tooth enamel. Sixty primary incisors were divided into 6 groups according to the adhesive system (etch-and-rinse - Adper Single Bond 2 - SB, 2 steps self-etch -Clearfil SE Bond - SE, and 1 step self-etch - One Up Bond F Plus OBF) and to the substrate (ground or intact enamel): G1-SB/intact enamel; G2-SE/intact enamel; G3- OBF/intact enamel; G4-SB/ground enamel; G5- SE/ground enamel and G6-OBF/ground enamel. Microshear bond test specimens were prepared with microhybrid composite and after 24h of water storage the microshear test was performed. Data were submitted to statistical analysis using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (penamel characteristics (ground or intact) only when SE was used a statistically significant difference was found, as G2 (21.12+/-4.52) was statistically lower than G5 (33.29+/-5.44). Among the intact enamel groups, SB (26.11+/-7.56) was statistically superior to SE (21.12+/-4.52) and OBF (17.01+/-3.96). However, when comparisons were made among groups of ground enamel, SE (33.29+/-5.44) was significantly higher than SB (26.35+/-8.18) and OBF (17.52+/-3.46). The two-step self-etch adhesive system is a reliable alternative to etch and rinse adhesive systems on both ground and intact primary enamel.

  13. Ground effect on the aerodynamics of a two-dimensional oscillating airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H.; Lua, K. B.; Lim, T. T.; Yeo, K. S.

    2014-07-01

    This paper reports results of an experimental investigation into ground effect on the aerodynamics of a two-dimensional elliptic airfoil undergoing simple harmonic translation and rotational motion. Ground clearance ( D) ranging from 1 c to 5 c (where c is the airfoil chord length) was investigated for three rotational amplitudes ( α m) of 30°, 45° and 60° (which respectively translate to mid-stroke angle of attack of 60°, 45° and 30°). For the lowest rotational amplitude of 30°, results show that an airfoil approaching a ground plane experiences a gradual decrease in cycle-averaged lift and drag coefficients until it reaches D ≈ 2.0 c, below which they increase rapidly. Corresponding DPIV measurement indicates that the initial force reduction is associated with the formation of a weaker leading edge vortex and the subsequent force increase below D ≈ 2.0 c may be attributed to stronger wake capture effect. Furthermore, an airfoil oscillating at higher amplitude lessens the initial force reduction when approaching the ground and this subsequently leads to lift distribution that bears striking resemblance to the ground effect on a conventional fixed wing in steady translation.

  14. Effects of ascorbic acid and antioxidants on color, lipid oxidation and volatiles of irradiated ground beef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, D. U.; Nam, K. C.

    2004-09-01

    Beef loins with 3 different aging times after slaughter were ground, added with none, 0.1% ascorbic acid, 0.01% sesamol+0.01% α-tocopherol, or 0.1% ascorbic acid+0.01% sesamol+0.01% tocopherol. The meats were packaged in oxygen-permeable bags, irradiated at 2.5 kGy, and color, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), lipid oxidation and volatile profiles were determined. Irradiation decreased the redness of ground beef, and visible color of beef changed from a bright red to a green/brown depending on the age of meat. Addition of ascorbic acid prevented color changes in irradiated beef, and the effect of ascorbic acid became greater as the age of meat or storage time after irradiation increased. The ground beef added with ascorbic acid had lower ORP than control, and the low ORP of meat helped maintaining the heme pigments in reduced form. During aerobic storage, S-volatiles disappeared while volatile aldehydes significantly increased in irradiated beef. Addition of ascorbic acid at 0.1% or sesamol+α-tocopherol at each 0.01% level to ground beef prior to irradiation were effective in reducing lipid oxidation and S-volatiles. As storage time increased, however, the antioxidant effect of sesamol+tocopherol in irradiated ground beef was superior to that of ascorbic acid.

  15. Effects of ascorbic acid and antioxidants on color, lipid oxidation and volatiles of irradiated ground beef

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, D.U. E-mail: duahn@iastate.edu; Nam, K.C

    2004-10-01

    Beef loins with 3 different aging times after slaughter were ground, added with none, 0.1% ascorbic acid, 0.01% sesamol+0.01% {alpha}-tocopherol, or 0.1% ascorbic acid+0.01% sesamol+0.01% tocopherol. The meats were packaged in oxygen-permeable bags, irradiated at 2.5 kGy, and color, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), lipid oxidation and volatile profiles were determined. Irradiation decreased the redness of ground beef, and visible color of beef changed from a bright red to a green/brown depending on the age of meat. Addition of ascorbic acid prevented color changes in irradiated beef, and the effect of ascorbic acid became greater as the age of meat or storage time after irradiation increased. The ground beef added with ascorbic acid had lower ORP than control, and the low ORP of meat helped maintaining the heme pigments in reduced form. During aerobic storage, S-volatiles disappeared while volatile aldehydes significantly increased in irradiated beef. Addition of ascorbic acid at 0.1% or sesamol+{alpha}-tocopherol at each 0.01% level to ground beef prior to irradiation were effective in reducing lipid oxidation and S-volatiles. As storage time increased, however, the antioxidant effect of sesamol+tocopherol in irradiated ground beef was superior to that of ascorbic acid.

  16. Interpretation of the distortion of ground-penetrating radar propagated and reflected waves - development of a multi-frequency tomography; Interpretation de la distorsion des signaux georadar propages et reflechis. Developpement d'une tomographie par bandes de frequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollender, F

    1999-07-01

    Within the framework of research for waste disposal in deep geological formations, the French agency for nuclear waste management (ANDRA) has to dispose of non-destructive investigation methods to characterize the medium. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) could be used for this purpose in the case of granitic sites. The work presented here deals with this geophysical method. The classical interpretation of GPR data consists in the localization of geological discontinuities by signal amplitude or arrival time analysis. The main objective of our studies is the interpretation of the radar wave distortion (due to propagation and reflection phenomena), not only to localize discontinuities but also to contribute to their identification. Three preliminary studies have been carried out in order to understand on the one hand, the complexity of the electromagnetic phenomena in the geological medium at radar frequency, and on the other hand, the radar equipment constraints. First, the dispersion and the attenuation characterized by a Q variable factor of the GPR waves are shown with the support of dielectric laboratory measurements. A model, which only requires three parameters, is proposed in order to describe this behavior. Second, the radiation patterns of borehole radar antenna are studied. We show that the amplitude and frequency content of the emitted signal are variable versus the emission angle. An analytical method is proposed to study these phenomena. Finally, instrumental drifts of GPR equipment are studied. Emission time, sampling frequency and amplitude fluctuations are described. These elements are taken into account for the processing of propagated signals by tomographic inversion. Medium anisotropy and borehole trajectory errors are inserted in algorithms in order to cancel artifacts which compromised the previous interpretation. A pre-processing method, based on wave separation algorithm, is applied on data in order to increase tomogram resolution. A new

  17. Longitudinal static stability requirements for wing in ground effect vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Yang, Zhigang; Collu, Maurizio

    2015-06-01

    The issue of the longitudinal stability of a WIG vehicle has been a very critical design factor since the first experimental WIG vehicle has been built. A series of studies had been performed and focused on the longitudinal stability analysis. However, most studies focused on the longitudinal stability of WIG vehicle in cruise phase, and less is available on the longitudinal static stability requirement of WIG vehicle when hydrodynamics are considered: WIG vehicle usually take off from water. The present work focuses on stability requirement for longitudinal motion from taking off to landing. The model of dynamics for a WIG vehicle was developed taking into account the aerodynamic, hydrostatic and hydrodynamic forces, and then was analyzed. Following with the longitudinal static stability analysis, effect of hydrofoil was discussed. Locations of CG, aerodynamic center in pitch, aerodynamic center in height and hydrodynamic center in heave were illustrated for a stabilized WIG vehicle. The present work will further improve the longitudinal static stability theory for WIG vehicle.

  18. Longitudinal static stability requirements for wing in ground effect vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The issue of the longitudinal stability of a WIG vehicle has been a very critical design factor since the first experimental WIG vehicle has been built. A series of studies had been performed and focused on the longitudinal stability analysis. However, most studies focused on the longitudinal stability of WIG vehicle in cruise phase, and less is available on the longitudinal static stability requirement of WIG vehicle when hydrodynamics are considered: WIG vehicle usually take off from water. The present work focuses on stability requirement for longitudinal motion from taking off to landing. The model of dynamics for a WIG vehicle was developed taking into account the aerodynamic, hydrostatic and hydrodynamic forces, and then was analyzed. Following with the longitudinal static stability analysis, effect of hydrofoil was discussed. Locations of CG, aerodynamic center in pitch, aerodynamic center in height and hydrodynamic center in heave were illustrated for a stabilized WIG vehicle. The present work will further improve the longitudinal static stability theory for WIG vehicle.

  19. Longitudinal static stability requirements for wing in ground effect vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The issue of the longitudinal stability of a WIG vehicle has been a very critical design factor since the first experimental WIG vehicle has been built. A series of studies had been performed and focused on the longitudinal stability analysis. However, most studies focused on the longitudinal stability of WIG vehicle in cruise phase, and less is available on the longitudinal static stability requirement of WIG vehicle when hydrodynamics are considered: WIG vehicle usually take off from water. The present work focuses on stability requirement for longitudinal motion from taking off to landing. The model of dynamics for a WIG vehicle was developed taking into account the aerodynamic, hydrostatic and hydrodynamic forces, and then was analyzed. Following with the longitudinal static stability analysis, effect of hydrofoil was discussed. Locations of CG, aerodynamic center in pitch, aerodynamic center in height and hydrodynamic center in heave were illustrated for a stabilized WIG vehicle. The present work will further improve the longitudinal static stability theory for WIG vehicle.

  20. A Digital Ground Distance Relaying Algorithm to Reduce the Effect of Fault Resistance during Single Phase to Ground and Simultaneous Faults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Razaz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an algorithm of fault resistance compensation for digital ground distance relay considering the voltage and current transformer effects. Performance of the conventional ground distance relaying manner is adversely affected by different ground faults and also typical type, called a simultaneous open conductor and ground fault. The proposed scheme by using local-end data only, has shown satisfactory performances under wide variations in fault location, with different values of fault resistance and having positive and negative of power transfer angle. The presented method which has been carried out on the IEEE 14 bus benchmark is executed in PSCAD/EMTDC and MATLAB software, and the results show the accurate performance of mentioned configuration.

  1. Effect of an Opaque Reflecting Layer on the Thermal Behavior of a Thermal Barrier Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuckler, Charles M.

    2007-01-01

    A parametric study using a two-flux approximation of the radiative transfer equation was performed to examine the effects of an opaque reflective layer on the thermal behavior of a typical semitransparent thermal barrier coating on an opaque substrate. Some ceramic materials are semitransparent in the wavelength ranges where thermal radiation is important. Even with an opaque layer on each side of the semitransparent thermal barrier coating, scattering and absorption can have an effect on the heat transfer. In this work, a thermal barrier coating that is semitransparent up to a wavelength of 5 micrometers is considered. Above 5 micrometers wavelength, the thermal barrier coating is opaque. The absorption and scattering coefficient of the thermal barrier was varied. The thermal behavior of the thermal barrier coating with an opaque reflective layer is compared to a thermal barrier coating without the reflective layer. For a thicker thermal barrier coating with lower convective loading, which would be typical of a combustor liner, a reflective layer can significantly decrease the temperature in the thermal barrier coating and substrate if the scattering is weak or moderate and for strong scattering if the absorption is large. The layer without the reflective coating can be about as effective as the layer with the reflective coating if the absorption is small and the scattering strong. For low absorption, some temperatures in the thermal barrier coating system can be slightly higher with the reflective layer. For a thin thermal barrier coating with high convective loading, which would be typical of a blade or vane that sees the hot sections of the combustor, the reflective layer is not as effective. The reflective layer reduces the surface temperature of the reflective layer for all conditions considered. For weak and moderate scattering, the temperature of the TBC-substrate interface is reduced but for strong scattering, the temperature of the substrate is increased

  2. Observational learning from animated models: Effects of modality and reflection on transfer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Pieter; Paas, Fred; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen

    2008-01-01

    Wouters, P.J.M., Paas, F. & van Merriënboer, J. J. G. (2008). Observational learning from animated models: Effects of modality and reflection on transfer. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 34, 1-8.

  3. An effective reflectance method for designing broadband antireflection films coupled with solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhan Feng; He Ji-Fang; Shang Xiang-Jun; Li Mi-Feng; Ni Hai-Qiao; Xu Ying-Qiang; Niu Zhi-Chuan

    2012-01-01

    The solar spectrum covers a broad wavelength range,which requires that antireflection coating (ARC) is effective over a relatively wide wavelength range for more incident light coming into the cell.In this paper,we present two methods to measure the composite reflection of SiO2/ZnS double-layer ARC in the wavelength ranges of 300-870 nm (dualjunction) and 300-1850 nm (triple-junction),under the solar spectrum AM0.In order to give sufficient consideration to the ARC coupled with the window layer and the dispersion effect of the refractive index of each layer,we use multidimensional matrix data for reliable simulation.A comparison between the results obtained from the weighted-average reflectance (WAR) method commonly used and that from the effective-average reflectance (EAR) method introduced here shows that the optimized ARC through minimizing the effective-average reflectance is convenient and available.

  4. Effects of soil amplification ratio and multiple wave interference for ground motion due to earthquake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhixin; XU Jiren; Ryuji Kubota

    2004-01-01

    Influences on the ground motion simulations by soil amplification effects and multiple seismic wave interferences in the heterogeneous medium are investigated. Detailed velocity structure obtained from the microtremor array survey is adopted in the ground motion simulation. Analyses for amplification ratios of core samples of ten drill holes with 40 m deep in the sedimentary layers show that the soil amplification ratio influences nonlinearly the seismic ground motion. Based on the above analysis results, the ground motion in the heavily damaged zone in the Japanese Kobe earthquake of 1995 is simulated in a digital SH seismic wave model by using the pseudospectral method with the staggered grid RFFT differentiation (SGRFFTD). The simulated results suggest that the heterogeneous velocity structure results in a complicated distribution of the maximum amplitudes of acceleration waveforms with multiple peaks at the surface. Spatial distribution of the maximum amplitudes coincides well with that of collapse ratios of buildings in Kobe. The dual peaks of the collapse ratios away from the earthquake fault coincide well with the double peak amplitudes of simulated seismic acceleration waves also. The cause for the first peak amplitude of the ground motion is attributable to the interference of the secondary surface wave from the bedrock propagating horizontally along the surface sedimentary layer and the body wave from the basin bottom according to analyses of wave snapshots propagating in inhomogeneous structure of the Osaka group layers. The second peak amplitude of the ground motion may be attributive to the interference of the secondary surface wave from the tunneling waves in the shallow sediments and the body wave. It is important for the study on complicated distributions of earthquake damages to investigate influences on the ground motion by soil amplification effects and multiple seismic wave interferences due to the structure. Explorations of the structure to the

  5. Effect of Ground Motion Directionality on Fragility Characteristics of a Highway Bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swagata Banerjee Basu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is difficult to incorporate multidimensional effect of the ground motion in the design and response analysis of structures. The motion trajectory in the corresponding multi-dimensional space results in time variant principal axes of the motion and defies any meaningful definition of directionality of the motion. However, it is desirable to consider the directionality of the ground motion in assessing the seismic damageability of bridges which are one of the most vulnerable components of highway transportation systems. This paper presents a practice-oriented procedure in which the structure can be designed to ensure the safety under single or a pair of independent orthogonal ground motions traveling horizontally with an arbitrary direction to structural axis. This procedure uses nonlinear time history analysis and accounts for the effect of directionality in the form of fragility curves. The word directionality used here is different from “directivity” used in seismology to mean a specific characteristic of seismic fault movement.

  6. Effective wave identification and interference analysis of the seismic reflection method in mines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yun-bing; WU Yan-qing; KANG Hou-qing

    2009-01-01

    Through discussion of the time-distance curve characteristics of the direct wave and from the front, side and rear of the reflection waves of the seismic reflection method for advanced exploration in mines, and analysis of several major interference waves in mines, the differences in time-distance curve, frequency, apparent velocity between the effective wave and interference wave in the seismic reflection method for advanced ex-ploration are obtained. According to the differences, the effective wave is extracted and the interference wave is filtered and the system's precision and accuracy is improved.

  7. Experimental Study on Effects of Ground Roughness on Flow Characteristics of Tornado-Like Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Cao, Shuyang; Pang, Weichiang; Cao, Jinxin

    2017-02-01

    The three-dimensional wind velocity and dynamic pressure for stationary tornado-like vortices that developed over ground of different roughness categories were investigated to clarify the effects of ground roughness. Measurements were performed for various roughness categories and two swirl ratios. Variations of the vertical and horizontal distributions of velocity and pressure with roughness are presented, with the results showing that the tangential, radial, and axial velocity components increase inside the vortex core near the ground under rough surface conditions. Meanwhile, clearly decreased tangential components are found outside the core radius at low elevations. The high axial velocity inside the vortex core over rough ground surface indicates that roughness produces an effect similar to a reduced swirl ratio. In addition, the pressure drop accompanying a tornado is more significant at elevations closer to the ground under rough compared with smooth surface conditions. We show that the variations of the flow characteristics with roughness are dependent on the vortex-generating mechanism, indicating the need for appropriate modelling of tornado-like vortices.

  8. The Effect of Degradation of Ground water Resources on Capital of Pistachio Growers in Kerman Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mostafa Mortazavi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Real cost evaluation of water is necessary in agricultural products depending on obtained value by this input. In most areas of world especially in arid and semiarid areas, exist over pumping of ground water because the real value of water is much most than the costs of water supply and the lack of fit management water resources. In this study, using a sample of 110 farmers, water dealing value of over using of groundwater in Rafsanjan pistachio production area were investigated. Analysis and regression methods were used in this regard. The average determined value obtained 24 cents, for each share of water in this region which with over drafting of ground water, and decreasing quality and quantity of water has had significant relationship in the one percent significance level. Finally, for elimination or reduction of ground water degradation and its effects, this paper recommended in addition to reduction of licenses for ground water pumping. Determination of optimal economic water/land ratio in new and old pistachio producing areas is the other proposal of this research for alleviation groundwater over drafting effects. Permission for water conduction between wells and combination of fresh and saline water and also using desalination systems are methods for solving low quality of ground water.

  9. Effects of ground cover from branches of arboreal species on weed growth and maize yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Sérgio Lima e Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTCultivating maize under systems of alley cropping results in improvements to the soil, a reduction in weeds and an increase in yield. Studies using ground cover from tree shoots produce similar results. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects on weed growth and maize yield of ground cover made up of 30 t ha-1 (fresh matter of branches from the tree species: neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss, gliricidia [Gliricidia sepium(Jacq. Kunth ex Walp.], leucaena [Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. de Wit.] and sabiá (Mimosa caesalpiniifolia Benth.. Two treatment groups (cultivars and weed control were evaluated. The cultivars AG 1041 and AL Bandeirantes were subjected to the following treatments: no hoeing, double hoeing, and ground a cover of branches of the above species when sowing the maize. A randomised block design was used with split lots (cultivars in the lots and ten replications. The cultivars did not differ for green ear or grain yield. Double hoeing was more effective than ground cover at reducing the growth of weeds. However, both weeding and ground cover resulted in similar yields for green ears and grain, which were greater than those obtained with the unweeded maize.

  10. Effects of Nanoparticle Size and Morphology on IR Diffuse Reflection Spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Xiao-dong; ZHU Mei-wu; ZHENG Jia-sheng

    2003-01-01

    Two kinds of nanopowders were studied. One is NiFe2O4 spherical nanopowders which have different particle sizes. Another is ZnO nanopowders including two series of spherical particles and tetrapod nanowhiskers. Through measuring the infrared diffuse reflection spectra of nanopowders, it can be found that the particle size and morphology affect the infrared diffuse reflection spectra. For the NiFe2O4 nanopowders the smaller the particle size, the larger the K-M value. And when the particle size is large enough , the effect of the particle size on infrared diffuse reflection spectra would disappear. For the ZnO nanopowders the effects of the particle size and morphology are more special. The effect of the particle sizes of tetrapod whisker nanopowders on infrared diffuse reflection spectra is more than that of spherical nanopowders.

  11. Effects of cost reflective electricity tariffs in Namibia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-04-15

    The power balance in Southern Africa is changing. Namibia faces the choice between increased reliance on imports of electricity or expanding domestic generation. One option is to build a gas fired power plant at Kudu. This plant will have an average generation cost well above the projected import cost. The changing power balance in the region may warrant that Namibia incurs substantial costs to ensure energy security. If Kudu is not built, we project that real end user tariffs will peak in 2010/11 at a level 22 percent higher than in 2006, but then gradually revert towards the 2006 level. The effects of this tariff scenario on the economy should not be dramatic, and we would not recommend to subsidise electricity in this case. This forecast is based on an assumed 67 percent increase the real price of imports. In this and all other scenarios we assume that the unit costs of distribution in Namibia and local surcharges will decline. Namibia has experienced temporary halts in imports of electricity. As the balance in the Southern African power market is changing, the risks of capacity shortages appear to have increased. Frequent power outages could be very costly to the economy, and one may thus argue that Namibia should accept the higher costs of electricity to ensure stable supply. Building Kudu could be one, and possibly the only, viable option to reduce the risks of capacity shortages. The cost of generation at Kudu, if it is built, is uncertain. We have assumed a cost at 44 c/kWh. This can be viewed as an upper bound of the cost range. If Kudu is built at this cost, the end user tariff would have to increase by 85 per cent in real terms over the 2006-2011 period to finance Kudu in full, having factored in projected exports earnings. The real tariff will decline slowly after 2011. This appears a risky scenario, not least for the effects on investments in exports sectors and businesses facing international competition in the Namibian market. If Kudu is built at

  12. Analysis on effect of surface fault to site ground motion using finite element method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹炳政; 罗奇峰

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic contact theory is applied to simulate the sliding of surface fault. Finite element method is used to analyze the effect of surface fault to site ground motions. Calculated results indicate that amplification effect is obvious in the area near surface fault, especially on the site that is in the downside fault. The results show that the effect of surface fault should be considered when important structure is constructed in the site with surface fault.

  13. Ground Motion Prediction for the Vicinity by Using the Microtremor Site-effect Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. M.; Wen, K. L.; Kuo, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    This study develops a method analyzing the seismograms of a strong-motion station and the microtremor site effects (H/V ratios) around it to predict the ground motion of its vicinity. The Hsinchu Science Park (HSP) in Taiwan was chosen as our study site. The horizontal S-wave seismograms of the TCU017 strong-motion station, which locates at the center of the HSP, were convoluted by the difference of the microtremor H/V ratio between various sites to synthesize the seismograms of several strong-motion stations around the HSP. The comparisons between synthetic and observed seismograms show that this method of ground motion prediction for the vicinity is feasible for far-field earthquakes. However, the seismic source and attenuation effects make this method ineffectual for near-field earthquakes. Because the microtremor H/V ratios at about 200 sites, which are densely distributed in the HSP, were conducted, the seismic ground motion distributions of some historical earthquakes were synthesized by this study. The synthetic ground motion distributions ignore the seismic source and attenuation effects but still show notable variations in the HSP because of the seismic site effects.

  14. Effect of low-temperature aging on the mechanical behavior of ground Y-TZP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, G.K.R.; Amaral, M.; Cesar, P.F.; Bottino, M.C.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Valandro, L.F.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of low-temperature aging on the surface topography, phase transformation, biaxial flexural strength, and structural reliability of a ground Y-TZP ceramic. Disc-shaped specimens were manufactured and divided according to two factors: "grinding" - without grinding

  15. A Grounded Theory Study of Effective Global Leadership Development Strategies: Perspectives from Brazil, India, and Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokkesmoe, Karen Jane

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative, grounded theory study focuses on global leadership and global leadership development strategies from the perspective of people from three developing countries, Brazil, India, and Nigeria. The study explores conceptualizations of global leadership, the skills required to lead effectively in global contexts, and recommended…

  16. Leading Effective Educational Technology in K-12 School Districts: A Grounded Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Lara Gillian C.

    2011-01-01

    A systematic grounded theory qualitative study was conducted investigating the process of effectively leading educational technology in New Jersey public K-12 school districts. Data were collected from educational technology district leaders (whether formal or non-formal administrators) and central administrators through a semi-structured online…

  17. Effects of Outdoor School Ground Lessons on Students' Science Process Skills and Scientific Curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Kan Lin; Siew, Nyet Moi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of outdoor school ground lessons on Year Five students' science process skills and scientific curiosity. A quasi-experimental design was employed in this study. The participants in the study were divided into two groups, one subjected to the experimental treatment, defined as…

  18. Single Phase-to-Ground Fault Line Identification and Section Location Method for Non-Effectively Grounded Distribution Systems Based on Signal Injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Zhencun; WANG Chengshan; CONG Wei; ZHANG Fan

    2008-01-01

    A diagnostic signal current trace detecting based single phase-to-ground fault line identifica- tion and section location method for non-effectively grounded distribution systems is presented in thisi oaper. A special diagnostic signal current is injected into the fault distribution system, and then it is de- tected at the outlet terminals to identify the fault line and at the sectionalizing or branching point along the fault line to locate the fault section. The method has been put into application in actual distribution network and field experience shows that it can identify the fault line and locate the fault section correctly and effectively.

  19. Effect of Passive Pile on 3D Ground Deformation and on Active Pile Response

    OpenAIRE

    Bingxiang Yuan; Rui Chen; Jun Teng; Tao Peng; Zhongwen Feng

    2014-01-01

    Using a series of model tests, this study investigated the effect of a passive pile on 3D ground deformation around a laterally loaded pile and on that laterally loaded pile’s response in sand. The active pile head was subjected to lateral loads, and the passive pile was arranged in front of the active pile. In the model tests, the distance between the two pile centers was set to zero (i.e., a single pile test), 2.5, 4, and 6 times the pile width (B). The 3D ground surface deformations around...

  20. Viscous flowfields induced by three-dimensional lift jets in ground effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, W. W.

    1982-01-01

    The turbulent flowfields associated with single and multiple jets impinging on a ground plane are relevant to the aerodynamics of VTOL aircraft in ground effect. These flowfields are computed using the Reynolds equations and a two-equation turbulence model to describe an isolated jet and two interacting jets with fountain formation. Coordinate transformations are employed to apply the boundary conditions for the governing equations in the far field, and a third-order-accurate upwind-difference scheme is used to discretize the resulting system. Flowfield properties calculated for these impinging-jet configurations are presented and compared with experimental data.

  1. Effect of ship structure and size on grounding and collision damage distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Zhang, Shengming

    2000-01-01

    of the ship have the same probability density distributions regardless of a particular structural design and ship size.The present paper explores analytical methods for assessing the overall effect of structural design on the damage distributions in accidental grounding and collisions. The results...... of a larger relative damage length than that of a smaller ship in grounding damage. On the other hand, the damages to the side structure caused by ship collisions are found to be relatively smaller for large ships.The main conclusion is that the existing IMO damage distributions will severely underestimate...

  2. The Effectiveness of Reflection in Developing Students' Oracy in English at the Faculties of Tourism and Hospitality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayed, Jihan El-Sayed Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at determining the effectiveness of using reflection in developing Tourism and Hospitality students' oracy in English. Two modes of reflection (i.e., "active reflection" and "proactive reflection") were used for developing two aspects of oracy: language awareness of some features of spoken language (i.e.,…

  3. The anti-obesity effect of natural vanadium-containing Jeju ground water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seon-Joo; Youn, Cha-Kyung; Hyun, Jin Won; You, Ho Jin

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated the anti-obesity effects of Jeju ground water containing the vanadium components S1 (8.0 ± 0.9 μg/l) and S3 (26.0 ± 2.09 μg/l) on the differentiation of 3 T3-L1 preadipocytes and obesity in mice that were fed a high-fat diet (HFD). The 3 T3-L1 preadipocyte cells were cultured and differentiated in media consisting of Jeju ground water (S1, S3) or deionized water (DW) containing dexamethasone, isobutylmethylxanthine, and insulin. Oil Red O staining showed that lipid accumulation was attenuated in adipocyte cells treated with Jeju ground water. S3 significantly decreased peroxisome-activated receptor γ and CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein α mRNA expression levels, which play major roles in the transcriptional control of adipogenesis, compared to DW. Furthermore, mRNA expression levels of targeted genes, such as adipocyte fatty acid, lipoprotein lipase, and leptin, were decreased by S3 treatment compared with the control group. In mice with HFD-induced obesity, Jeju ground water decreased HFD-induced body weight gain and reduced total cholesterol, triglyceride, and glucose levels in the plasma compared to control mice. Taken together, Jeju ground water inhibits preadipocyte differentiation and adipogenesis in obesity animal models.

  4. Effects of 3D random correlated velocity perturbations on predicted ground motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, S.; Harmsen, S.; Frankel, A.

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional, finite-difference simulations of a realistic finite-fault rupture on the southern Hayward fault are used to evaluate the effects of random, correlated velocity perturbations on predicted ground motions. Velocity perturbations are added to a three-dimensional (3D) regional seismic velocity model of the San Francisco Bay Area using a 3D von Karman random medium. Velocity correlation lengths of 5 and 10 km and standard deviations in the velocity of 5% and 10% are considered. The results show that significant deviations in predicted ground velocities are seen in the calculated frequency range (≤1 Hz) for standard deviations in velocity of 5% to 10%. These results have implications for the practical limits on the accuracy of scenario ground-motion calculations and on retrieval of source parameters using higher-frequency, strong-motion data.

  5. EFFECT OF SANTA ROSA LAKE ON GROUND WATER FLOW TO THE PECOS RIVER, NEW MEXICO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risser, Dennis W.

    1985-01-01

    In 1980, Santa Rosa Dam began impounding water on the Pecos River about 7 miles (11 kilometers) north of Santa Rosa, New Mexico, to provide flood control and storage for irrigation. Santa Rosa Lake has caused changes in the ground water flow system, which may cause changes in the streamflow of the Pecos River that cannot be detected at the present streamflow-gaging stations, which are used to administer water rights along the Pecos River. The effect of the lake on streamflow was investigated using a three-dimensional ground water flow model. These simulations indicated that the net change in ground water flow to the river would be almost zero if the lake were maintained at its flood control pool for 90 days.

  6. Temperature and energy deficit in the ground during operation and recovery phases of closed-loop ground source heat pump system: Effect of the groundwater flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Selcuk; Francois, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    The advection/dispersion mechanism of the groundwater flow in the ground has a significant effect on a borehole heat exchanger (BHE) to enhance its thermal performance. However, the amount of energy extracted from the ground never disappears and only shifts with the magnitude of the effective thermal velocity in the infinite domain. In this work, we focus on the temperature and the energy balance of the ground in an advection/dispersion dominated heat transfer system during the operation period of a BHE and the subsequent recovery phase when the system is idle. The problem is treated with single BHE and multi-BHEs systems, for different representative geology and different groundwater flow velocity. In order to assess the thermal energy deficit due to heat extraction from the ground, we used the finite line source analytical model, developed recently (Erol et al., 2015) that provides the temperature distributions around the boreholes for discontinuous heat extraction. The model is developed based on the Green's function, which is the solution of heat conduction/advection/dispersion equation in porous media, for discontinuous heat extraction by analytically convoluting rectangular function or pulses in time domain. The results demonstrate the significant positive impact of the groundwater flow for the recovery in terms of temperature deficit at the location of the borehole. However, the total thermal energy deficit is not affected by the groundwater movement. The energy balance of the ground is the same no matter the prevailing heat transfer system, which can be only conduction or advection/dispersion. In addition, the energy balance of the ground is not based on either the duration of the production period operation or of the recovery phase, but depends on the total amount of heat that is extracted and on the bulk volumetric heat capacity of the ground.

  7. Effect of initial stress on reflection at the free surface of anisotropic elastic medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M D Sharma

    2007-12-01

    The propagation of plane waves is considered in a general anisotropic elastic medium in the presence of initial stress. The Christoffel equations are solved into a polynomial of degree six. The roots of this polynomial represent the vertical slowness values for the six quasi-waves resulting from the presence of a discontinuity in the medium. Three of these six values are identified with the three quasi-waves traveling in the medium but away from its boundary. Reflection at the free plane surface is studied for partition of energy among the three reflected waves. For post-critical incidence, the reflected waves are inhomogeneous (evanescent) waves. Numerical examples are considered to exhibit the effects of initial stress on the phase direction, attenuation and reflection coefficients of the reflected waves. The phase velocities and energy shares of the reflected waves change significantly with initial stress as well as anisotropic symmetry. The presence of initial stress, however, has a negligible effect on the phase directions of reflected waves.

  8. Experimental Study of Ground Effect on Three-Dimensional Insect-Like Flapping Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohu; Lua, Kim Boon; Chang, Rong; Lim, Tee Tai; Yeo, Khoon Seng

    2014-11-01

    This paper focuses on an experimental investigation aimed at evaluating the aerodynamics force characteristics of three-dimensional (3D) insect-like flapping motion in the vicinity of ground. The purpose is to establish whether flapping wing insects can derive aerodynamic benefit from ground effect similar to that experienced by a fixed wing aircraft. To evaluate this, force measurements were conducted in a large water tank using a 3D flapping mechanism capable of executing various insect flapping motions. Here, we focus on three types of flapping motions, namely simple harmonic flapping motion, hawkmoth-like hovering motion and fruitfly-like hovering motion, and two types of wing planforms (i.e. hawkmoth-like wing and fruitfly-like wing). Results show that hawkmoth-like wing executing simple harmonic flapping motion produces average lift to drag ratio (\\bar C\\bar L/\\bar C\\bar D) similar to that of fruitfly wing executing the same motion. In both cases, they are relatively independent of the wing distance from the ground. On the other hand, a hawkmoth wing executing hawkmoth flapping motion produces (\\bar C\\bar L/\\bar C\\bar D) characteristic different from that of fruitfly wing executing fruitfly motion. While the (\\bar C\\bar L/\\bar C\\bar D) value of the former is a function of the wing distance from the ground, the latter is minimally affected by ground effect. Unlike fixed wing aerodynamics, all the flapping wing cases considered here do not show a monotonic increase in (\\bar C\\bar L/\\bar C\\bar D) with decreasing wing distance from the ground.

  9. Effects of a Group of High-Rise Structures on Ground Motions under Seismic Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-jun Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional simulation was created to determine the seismic performance of coupled systems with a group of up to 100 pile-high-rise structures resting on soil layers using system modal, harmonic, and time domain analysis. The results demonstrated that the existence of a structural group mitigates the structural responses with respect to the single-structure-soil interaction (SSI and results in significantly nonuniform ground seismic motions. Due to the influence of a structural group, adjacent structures can exhibit fully alternating mechanical behavior, and buildings in the urban fringe are subjected to stronger shaking than downtown buildings. The overall trend of the influence of structural groups is that ground motions are lessened inside an urban area, and ground motions at the locations between structures differ from those at the locations of the structures. Moreover, the effective distance of a structural group on ground motions is associated with the urban width. Less distance between structures enhances the interaction effect. In addition, the soil properties can greatly influence the system’s seismic responses and can even completely change the effect trends. The results in our paper are consistent with the phenomena observed in the Mexico City earthquake and the 1976 earthquake in Friuli, Italy.

  10. Effect of vehicle front end profiles leading to pedestrian secondary head impact to ground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vishal; Yang, King H

    2013-11-01

    Most studies of pedestrian injuries focus on reducing traumatic injuries due to the primary impact between the vehicle and the pedestrian. However, based on the Pedestrian Crash Data Study (PCDS), some researchers concluded that one of the leading causes of head injury for pedestrian crashes can be attributed to the secondary impact, defined as the impact of the pedestrian with the ground after the primary impact of the pedestrian with the vehicle. The purpose of this study is to understand if different vehicle front-end profiles can affect the risk of pedestrian secondary head impact with the ground and thus help in reducing the risk of head injury during secondary head impact with ground. Pedestrian responses were studied using several front-end profiles based off a mid-size vehicle and a SUV that have been validated previously along with several MADYMO pedestrian models. Mesh morphing is used to explore changes to the bumper height, bonnet leading-edge height, and bonnet rear reference-line height. Simulations leading up to pedestrian secondary impact with ground are conducted at impact speeds of 40 and 30 km/h. In addition, three pedestrian sizes (50th, 5th and 6yr old child) are used to enable us to search for a front-end profile that performs well for multiple sizes of pedestrians, not just one particular size. In most of the simulations, secondary ground impact with pedestrian head/neck/shoulder region occurred. However, there were some front-end profiles that promoted secondary ground impact with pedestrian lower extremities, thus avoiding pedestrian secondary head impact with ground. Previous pedestrian safety research work has suggested the use of active safety methods, such as 'pop up hood', to reduce pedestrian head injury during primary impact. Accordingly, we also conducted simulations using a model with the hood raised to capture the effect of a pop-up hood. These simulations indicated that even though pop-up hood helped reducing the head injury

  11. Statistical evaluation of effects of riparian buffers on nitrate and ground water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruill, T.B.

    2000-01-01

    A study was conducted to statistically evaluate the effectiveness of riparian buffers for decreasing nitrate concentrations in ground water and for affecting other chemical constituents. Values for pH, specific conductance, alkalinity, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), silica, ammonium, phosphorus, iron, and manganese at 28 sites in the Contentnea Creek Basin were significantly higher (p 20 yr) discharging ground water draining areas with riparian buffers compared with areas without riparian buffers. No differences in chloride, nitrate nitrogen, calcium, sodium, and dssolved oxygen concentrations in old ground water between buffer and nonbuffer areas were detected. Comparison of samples of young (20 yr) discharging ground water draining areas with riparian buffers compared with areas without riparian buffers. No differences in chloride, nitrate nitrogen, calcium, sodium, and dissolved oxygen concentrations in old ground water between buffer and nonbuffer areas were detected. Comparison of samples of young (water samples from buffer and nonbuffer areas indicated significantly higher specific conductance, calcium, chloride, and nitrate nitrogen in nonbuffer areas. Riparian buffers along streams can affect the composition of the hyporheic zone by providing a source of organic carbon to the streambed, which creates reducing geochemical conditions that consequently can affect the chemical quality of old ground water discharging through it. Buffer zones between agricultural fields and streams facilitate dilution of conservative chemical constituents in young ground water that originate from fertilizer applications and also allow denitrification in ground water by providing an adequate source of organic carbon generated by vegetation in the buffer zone. Based on the median chloride and nitrate values for young ground water in the Contentnea Creek Basin, nitrate was 95% lower in buffer areas compared with nonbuffer areas, with a 30 to 35% reduction estimated to be due to

  12. Effects of prompting in reflective learning tools: Findings from experimental field, lab, and online studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina eRenner

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Reflective learning is an important type of learning both in formal and informal situations—in school, higher education, at the workplace, and in everyday life. People may benefit from technical support for reflective learning, in particular when supporting each other by reflecting not only upon their own but also upon other people’s problems. We refer to this collective approach where people come together to think about experiences and find solutions to problems as collaborative reflection. We present three empirical studies about the effects of prompting in reflective learning tools in such situations where people reflect on others’ issues. In Study 1 we applied a three-stage within-group design in a field experiment, where 39 participants from two organizations received different types of prompts while they used a reflection app. We found that prompts that invited employees to write down possible solutions led to more comprehensive comments on their colleagues’ experiences. In Study 2 we used a three-stage between-group design in a laboratory experiment, where 78 university students were invited to take part in an experiment about the discussion of problems at work or academic studies in online forums. Here we found that short, abstract prompts showed no superiority to a situation without any prompts with respect to quantity or quality of contributions. Finally, Study 3 featured a two-stage between-group design in an online experiment, where 60 participants received either general reflection instructions or detailed instructions about how to reflect on other people’s problems. We could show that detailed reflection instructions supported people in producing more comprehensive comments that included more general advice. The results demonstrate that to increase activity and to improve quality of comments with prompting tools require detailed instructions and specific wording of the prompts.

  13. A Ground-based Measurement of the Relativistic Beaming Effect in a Detached Double White Dwarf Binary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shporer, Avi; Kaplan, David L.; Steinfadt, Justin D. R.; Bildsten, Lars; Howell, Steve B.; Mazeh, Tsevi

    2010-12-01

    We report on the first ground-based measurement of the relativistic beaming effect (aka Doppler boosting). We observed the beaming effect in the detached, non-interacting eclipsing double white dwarf (WD) binary NLTT 11748. Our observations were motivated by the system's high mass-ratio and low-luminosity ratio, leading to a large beaming-induced variability amplitude at the orbital period of 5.6 hr. We observed the system during three nights at the 2.0 m Faulkes Telescope North with the SDSS-g' filter and fitted the data simultaneously for the beaming, ellipsoidal, and reflection effects. Our fitted relative beaming amplitude is (3.0 ± 0.4) × 10-3, consistent with the expected amplitude from a blackbody spectrum given the photometric primary radial velocity (RV) amplitude and effective temperature. This result is a first step in testing the relation between the photometric beaming amplitude and the spectroscopic RV amplitude in NLTT 11748 and similar systems. We did not identify any variability due to the ellipsoidal or reflection effects, consistent with their expected undetectable amplitude for this system. Low-mass, helium-core WDs are expected to reside in binary systems, where in some of those systems the binary companion is a faint C/O WD and the two stars are detached and non-interacting, as in the case of NLTT 11748. The beaming effect can be used to search for the faint binary companion in those systems using wide-band photometry.

  14. Effect of Two Temperatures on Reflection Coefficient in Micropolar Thermoelastic with and without Energy Dissipation Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajneesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The reflection of plane waves at the free surface of thermally conducting micropolar elastic medium with two temperatures is studied. The theory of thermoelasticity with and without energy dissipation is used to investigate the problem. The expressions for amplitudes ratios of reflected waves at different angles of incident wave are obtained. Dissipation of energy and two-temperature effects on these amplitude ratios with angle of incidence are depicted graphically. Some special and particular cases are also deduced.

  15. Effect of spatial coherence on laser beam self-focusing from orbit to the ground in the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hanling; Ji, Xiaoling; Li, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Xianqu; Zhang, Yuqiu

    2016-06-27

    The effect of spatial coherence on laser beam self-focusing in the atmosphere to assist delivering powerful laser beams from orbit to the ground is studied. It is found that a fully coherent beam is more strongly compressed on the ground than a partially (spatial) coherent beam (PCB), even so, for a PCB the compressed spot size on the ground may be reduced below the diffraction limit due to self-focusing effect, and a PCB has higher threshold critical power than a fully coherent beam. Furthermore, an effective design rule for maximal compression without beam splitting of the transported PCB from orbit to the ground is presented.

  16. Parasitic Effects of Grounding Paths on Common-Mode EMI Filter's Performance in Power Electronics Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shuo [ORNL; Maillet, Yoann [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Wang, Fei [ORNL; Lai, Rixin [General Electric; Luo, Fang [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Boroyevich, Dushan [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech)

    2010-01-01

    High-frequency common-mode (CM) electromagnetic-interference (EMI) noise is difficult to suppress in electronics systems. EMI filters are used to suppress CM noise, but their performance is greatly affected by the parasitic effects of the grounding paths. In this paper, the parasitic effects of the grounding paths on an EMI filter's performance are investigated in a motor-drive system. The effects of the mutual inductance between two grounding paths are explored. Guidelines for the grounding of CM EMI filters are derived. Simulations and experiments are finally carried out to verify the theoretical analysis.

  17. Apparent depth of pictures reflected by a mirror: the plastic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiyama, Atsuki; Shimono, Koichi

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the plastic effect in picture perception, in which the apparent depth of a picture is increased when it is reflected by a mirror. The plastic effect was well known in the mid-18th century, but very few studies have elucidated its nature. In Experiment 1, we examined how often the plastic effect occurs in different ocular conditions. A group of 22 observers compared directly observed pictures and their mirror-reflected images in each of free-binocular, free-monocular, and restrictive-monocular conditions. When the observers were forced to choose the picture that appeared greater in depth, 73 % of them chose the reflected pictures, regardless of oculomotor condition. In Experiment 2, we examined how often the plastic effect is detected as a function of observation time. When 22 observers compared a directly watched movie and its mirror-reflected movie for 5 min, the number of observers who judged the reflected movie to be greater in depth was about 55 % at the onset of the trial but was 86 % at the end. In Experiment 3, we examined transfer of the plastic effect. Ten observers judged the change in apparent depth of directly observed pictures after prolonged exposure to the same reflected or actual pictures. Transfer was confirmed and was greater for pictures that represented greater depth (r = .88). We suggested that the plastic effect is mainly induced by the double apparent locations of a reflected picture. From the long incubation time and the transfer to real pictures, we also suggested that it involves perceptual learning regarding visual skill.

  18. Is ground cover vegetation an effective biological control enhancement strategy against olive pests?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Paredes

    Full Text Available Ground cover vegetation is often added or allowed to generate to promote conservation biological control, especially in perennial crops. Nevertheless, there is inconsistent evidence of its effectiveness, with studies reporting positive, nil or negative effects on pest control. This might arise from differences between studies at the local scale (e.g. orchard management and land use history, the landscape context (e.g. presence of patches of natural or semi-natural vegetation near the focal orchard, or regional factors, particularly climate in the year of the study. Here we present the findings from a long-term regional monitoring program conducted on four pest species (Bactrocera oleae, Prays oleae, Euphyllura olivina, Saissetia oleae in 2,528 olive groves in Andalusia (Spain from 2006 to 2012. Generalized linear mixed effect models were used to analyze the effect of ground cover on different response variables related to pest abundance, while accounting for variability at the local, landscape and regional scales. There were small and inconsistent effects of ground cover on the abundance of pests whilst local, landscape and regional variability explained a large proportion of the variability in pest response variables. This highlights the importance of local and landscape-related variables in biological control and the potential effects that might emerge from their interaction with practices, such as groundcover vegetation, implemented to promote natural enemy activity. The study points to perennial vegetation close to the focal crop as a promising alternative strategy for conservation biological control that should receive more attention.

  19. Is ground cover vegetation an effective biological control enhancement strategy against olive pests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Daniel; Cayuela, Luis; Gurr, Geoff M; Campos, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    Ground cover vegetation is often added or allowed to generate to promote conservation biological control, especially in perennial crops. Nevertheless, there is inconsistent evidence of its effectiveness, with studies reporting positive, nil or negative effects on pest control. This might arise from differences between studies at the local scale (e.g. orchard management and land use history), the landscape context (e.g. presence of patches of natural or semi-natural vegetation near the focal orchard), or regional factors, particularly climate in the year of the study. Here we present the findings from a long-term regional monitoring program conducted on four pest species (Bactrocera oleae, Prays oleae, Euphyllura olivina, Saissetia oleae) in 2,528 olive groves in Andalusia (Spain) from 2006 to 2012. Generalized linear mixed effect models were used to analyze the effect of ground cover on different response variables related to pest abundance, while accounting for variability at the local, landscape and regional scales. There were small and inconsistent effects of ground cover on the abundance of pests whilst local, landscape and regional variability explained a large proportion of the variability in pest response variables. This highlights the importance of local and landscape-related variables in biological control and the potential effects that might emerge from their interaction with practices, such as groundcover vegetation, implemented to promote natural enemy activity. The study points to perennial vegetation close to the focal crop as a promising alternative strategy for conservation biological control that should receive more attention.

  20. Effect of spin-orbit coupling on the ground state structure of mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vinayak; Gyanchandani, Jyoti; Chaturvedi, Shashank; Sikka, S. K.

    2014-05-01

    Near zero kelvin ground state structure of mercury is the body centered tetragonal (BCT) structure (β Hg). However, in all previously reported density functional theory (DFT) calculations, either the rhombohedral or the HCP structure has been found to be the ground state structure. Based on the previous calculations it was predicted that the correct treatment of the SO effects would improve the result. We have performed FPLAPW calculations, with and without inclusion of the SO coupling, for determining the ground state structure. These calculations determine rhombohedral structure as the ground state structure instead of BCT structure. The calculations, without inclusion of SO effect, predict that the energies of rhombohedral and BCT structures are very close to each other but the energy of rhombohedral structure is lower than that of BCT structure at ambient as well as high pressure. On the contrary, the SO calculations predict that though at ambient conditions the rhombohedral structure is the stable structure but on applying a pressure of 3.2 GPa, the BCT structure becomes stable. Hence, instead of predicting the stability of BCT structure at zero pressure, the SO calculations predict its stability at 3.2 GPa. This small disagreement is expected when the energy differences between the structures are small.

  1. Effect of four different reflective barriers on black-globe temperatures in calf hutches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, T H; Haberman, J A; Binion, W R

    2014-12-01

    Polyethylene hutches are a popular method of housing dairy calves from 0 to 60 or more days of age, although these hutches get hot when in full sun. This study characterized the relative differences in the ability of four different types of radiant barriers to reduce black-globe temperature within these hutches. Treatments included three different types of covers (two types of laminates (Cadpak P and Cadpak ESD) and an aluminized 3.0-mil white low-density polyethylene (LDPE)) and a reflective paint (LO/MIT-1). The reflective covers were 1.8 × 3 m finished size, and covered the top and sides of the hutch down to 0.15 m above the ground, leaving the front and back exposed. The LO/MIT-1 paint covered the entire sides and roof of the hutch. Two 24-h trials 1 week apart were conducted during relatively hot and clear days in early August. Black-globe temperatures were recorded in duplicate and averaged at 20-min intervals using blackened table tennis balls mounted 0.3 m above the floor in the center of each hutch. Ambient temperature (shade) during the hottest 2-h period for both trials averaged 39.9 °C while the uncovered control averaged 41.1 °C, and LO/MIT-1 averaged 39.9 °C; both of which were significantly higher (P temperatures followed by hutches painted with reflective paint, while control hutches had the highest temperature.

  2. Effect of mustard seed and sodium isoascorbate on lipid oxidation and colour of ground beef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Karwowska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of the mustard seed in reducing lipid oxidation in ground beef compared to sodium isoascorbate. The research material were meat samples, prepared in four variants. The differentiating addition was ground white mustard (Sinapis alba, used in the native and autoclaved form. Reference were a control sample and a sample with the addition of sodium isoascorbate. The following were assayed during the study: TBARS value, redox potential, pH and colour parameters CIE L*a*b*. The addition of mustard had no effect on the pH value in comparison to the control sample and sodium isoascorbate. It has been shown that the use of mustard either native and autoclaved, decreased the value of TBARS ratio, and showed a similar effectiveness in preventing the oxidation of lipids as sodium isoascorbate.

  3. Reflection: a critical proficiency essential to the effective development of a high competence in communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Cindy L; Nestel, Debra; Wolf, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Reflection, or the ability to step back from an experience and consider it critically, in an analytical, non-subjective manner, is an essential aspect of problem solving and decision making, and also of effective communication with clients and colleagues. Reflective practice has been described as the essence of professionalism and is therefore a core professional skill; rarely, however, has it been explicitly taught in veterinary curricula, and it has only a recent history in undergraduate human medical curricula. We describe here two preliminary case studies, one in a veterinary medical education context and the other within a human medical education framework, as examples of approaches to assessing a student's ability for ''reflection.'' The case studies also illustrate some of the key principles. Both of the case studies described had as their end goal the enhancement of communication skills through critical reflection. At Monash University, Australia, the majority of students were assessed as being at a level of ''reflection in development.'' The students in the Ontario Veterinary College case study showed moderately good use of self-awareness and critical reflection as a basis for modifying and integrating communication skills into practice. While both preliminary case studies point to the fact that students recognize the importance of communication and value the opportunity to practice it, few students in either case study identified the importance of reflection for lifelong learning and professional competence. Opportunities to complete critical reflection exercises in other parts of curricula and outside of communication would likely reinforce its importance as a generic skill. Ongoing scholarly approaches to teaching, learning, and evaluating reflection and self-awareness are needed.

  4. Species composition and fire: non-additive mixture effects on ground fuel flammability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra eVan Altena

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Biodiversity effects on many aspects of ecosystem function have been well documented. However, fire is an exception: fire experiments have mainly included single species, bulk litter, or vegetation, and, as such, the role of biodiversity as a determinant of flammability, a crucial aspect of ecosystem function, is poorly understood. This study is the first to experimentally test whether flammability characteristics of two-species mixtures are non-additive, i.e. differ from expected flammability based on the component species in monoculture. In standardized fire experiments on ground fuels, including monocultures and mixtures of five contrasting subarctic plant fuel types in a controlled laboratory environment, we measured flame speed, flame duration and maximum temperature. Broadly half of the mixture combinations showed non-additive effects for these flammability indicators; these were mainly enhanced dominance effects, where the fuel types with the more flammable value for a characteristic determined the flammability of the whole mixture. The high incidence of species non-additive effects on ground fuel flammability suggest that the combinations of fuel types may have important effects on ground fire regimes in vegetations differing or changing in species composition.

  5. Modeling the effects of a single reflection on binaural speech intelligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennies, Jan; Warzybok, Anna; Brand, Thomas; Kollmeier, Birger

    2014-03-01

    Recently the influence of delay and azimuth of a single speech reflection on speech reception thresholds (SRTs) was systematically investigated using frontal, diffuse, and lateral noise [Warzybok et al. (2013). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 269-282]. The experiments showed that the benefit of an early reflection was independent of its azimuth and mostly independent of noise type, but that the detrimental effect of a late reflection depended on its direction relative to the noise. This study tests if different extensions of a binaural speech intelligibility model can predict these data. The extensions differ in the order in which binaural processing and temporal integration of early reflections take place. Models employing a correction for the detrimental effects of reverberation on speech intelligibility after performing the binaural processing predict SRTs in symmetric masking conditions (frontal, diffuse), but cannot predict the measured interaction of temporal and spatial integration. In contrast, a model extension accounting for the distinction between useful and detrimental reflections before the binaural processing stage predicts the data with an overall R(2) of 0.95. This indicates that any model framework predicting speech intelligibility in rooms should incorporate an interaction between binaural and temporal integration of reflections at a comparatively early stage.

  6. Helping students learn effective problem solving strategies by reflecting with peers

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We describe a study in which introductory physics students engage in reflection with peers about problem solving. The recitations for an introductory physics course with 200 students were broken into the "Peer Reflection" (PR) group and the traditional group. Each week in recitation, students in the PR group reflected in small teams on selected problems from the homework and discussed why solutions of some students employed better problem solving strategies than others. The graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants (TAs) in the PR group recitations provided guidance and coaching to help students learn effective problem solving heuristics. In the recitations for the traditional group, students had the opportunity to ask the graduate TA questions about the homework before they took a weekly quiz. The traditional group recitation quiz questions were similar to the homework questions selected for "peer reflection" in the PR group recitations. As one measure of the impact of this intervention, we investigated...

  7. Effects on biological systems of reflected light from a satellite power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M.

    1981-01-01

    Light reflection produced by the satellite power system and the possible effects of that light on the human eye, plants, and animals were studied. For the human eye, two cases of reflected light, might cause eye damage if viewed for too long. These cases are: (1) if, while in low Earth orbit, the orbital transfer vehicle is misaligned to reflect the Sun to Earth there exists a maximum safe fixation time for the naked eye of 42.4 secs; (2) reflection from the aluminum paint on the back of the orbital transfer vehicle, while in or near low Earth orbit, can be safely viewed by the naked eye for 129 sec. For plants and animals the intensity and timing of light are not a major problem. Ways for reducing and/or eliminating the irradiances are proposed.

  8. Effects of nitrogen fertilization on growth and reflectance characteristics of winter wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinzman, L. D.; Bauer, M. E.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    1986-01-01

    The use of remote sensing to determine seasonal changes in agronomic and spectral properties of winter wheat canopies with different levels of N fertilization is investigated. Field experiments were conducted at Purdue Agronomy Farm, West Lafayette, IN during the 1978-1979 and 1979-1980 growing season. Spectral reflectance, total leaf N concentration, leaf chlorophyll concentration, leaf are index (LAI), and fresh and dry phytomass are measured and analyzed. Three distinct wheat canopies are detected for the O, 60, and 120 kg N/ha levels of fertilization; it is observed that with an increase in N the reflectance in the visible, and middle IR wavelengths decrease, and the IR reflectance is increased. The canopies with 120 kg N/ha display the highest LAI, maintain green leaf area the longest, and increase in fresh and dry phytomass. The relationship between spectral and agronomic variables is examined; the effect of changing chlorophyll concentration and LAI on the reflectance is studied.

  9. Optical Waveguide Switches Employing Total-Internal-Reflection (TIR) Effect (Invited Paper)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, our recent research work on the total-internal-reflection optical switch is presented. The thermo-optic effect of polymeric materials and the photon-induced carrier effect of GaAlAs/GaAs are used in our devices.

  10. Ground-Water Resources in Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park, Island of Hawaii, and Numerical Simulation of the Effects of Ground-Water Withdrawals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Delwyn S.; Tribble, Gordon W.; Souza, William R.; Bolke, Edward L.

    1999-01-01

    Within the Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park, which was established in 1978, the ground-water flow system is composed of brackish water overlying saltwater. Ground-water levels measured in the Park range from about 1 to 2 feet above mean sea level, and fluctuate daily by about 0.5 to 1.5 feet in response to ocean tides. The brackish water is formed by mixing of seaward flowing fresh ground water with underlying saltwater from the ocean. The major source of fresh ground water is from subsurface flow originating from inland areas to the east of the Park. Ground-water recharge from the direct infiltration of precipitation within the Park area, which has land-surface altitudes less than 100 feet, is small because of low rainfall and high rates of evaporation. Brackish water flowing through the Park ultimately discharges to the fishponds in the Park or to the ocean. The ground water, fishponds, and anchialine ponds in the Park are hydrologically connected; thus, the water levels in the ponds mark the local position of the water table. Within the Park, ground water near the water table is brackish; measured chloride concentrations of water samples from three exploratory wells in the Park range from 2,610 to 5,910 milligrams per liter. Chromium and copper were detected in water samples from the three wells in the Park and one well upgradient of the Park at concentrations of 1 to 5 micrograms per liter. One semi-volatile organic compound, phenol, was detected in water samples from the three wells in the Park at concentrations between 4 and 10 micrograms per liter. A regional, two-dimensional (areal), freshwater-saltwater, sharp-interface ground-water flow model was used to simulate the effects of regional withdrawals on ground-water flow within the Park. For average 1978 withdrawal rates, the estimated rate of fresh ground-water discharge to the ocean within the Park is about 6.48 million gallons per day, or about 3 million gallons per day per mile of coastline

  11. Effectiveness of light-reflecting devices: A systematic reanalysis of animal-vehicle collision data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieger, Falko; Hagen, Robert; Vetter, Daniela; Dormann, Carsten F; Storch, Ilse

    2016-12-01

    Every year, approximately 500 human fatalities occur due to animal-vehicle collisions in the United States and Europe. Especially heavy-bodied animals affect road safety. For more than 50 years, light-reflecting devices such as wildlife warning reflectors have been employed to alert animals to traffic when crossing roads during twilight and night. Numerous studies addressed the effectiveness of light-reflecting devices in reducing collisions with animals in past decades, but yielded contradictory results. In this study, we conducted a systematic literature review to investigate whether light-reflecting devices contribute to an effective prevention of animal-vehicle collisions. We reviewed 53 references and reanalyzed original data of animal-vehicle collisions with meta-analytical methods. We calculated an effect size based on the annual number of animal-vehicle collisions per kilometer of road to compare segments with and without the installation of light-reflecting devices for 185 roads in Europe and North America. Our results indicate that light-reflecting devices did not significantly reduce the number of animal-vehicle collisions. However, we observed considerable differences of effect sizes with respect to study duration, study design, and country. Our results suggest that length of the road segment studied, study duration, study design and public attitude (preconception) to the functioning of devices may affect whether the documented number of animal-vehicle collisions in- or decrease and might in turn influence whether results obtained were published. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Photothermal and thermo-refractive effects in high reflectivity mirrors at room and cryogenic temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Farsi, Alessandro; Marino, Francesco; Marin, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Increasing requirements in the sensitivity of interferometric measurements is a common feature of several research fields, from gravitational wave detection to quantum optics. This motivates refined studies of high reflectivity mirrors and of noise sources that are tightly related to their structure. In this work we present an experimental characterization of photothermal and thermo-refractive effects in high reflectivity mirrors, i.e., of the variations in the position of their effective reflection plane due to weak residual power absorption. The measurements are performed by modulating the impinging power in the range 10 Hz $\\div$ 100 kHz. The experimental results are compared with an expressly derived theoretical model in order to fully understand the phenomena and exploit them to extract useful effective thermo-mechanical parameters of the coating. The measurements are extended at cryogenic temperature, where most high sensitivity experiments are performed (or planned in future versions) and where charact...

  13. Pilot Study on the Effect of Grounding on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Dick; Hill, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The purpose of this pilot study was to determine whether there are markers that can be used to study the effects of grounding on delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Design and subjects Eight (8) healthy subjects were exposed to an eccentric exercise that caused DOMS in gastrocnemius muscles of both legs. Four (4) subjects were grounded with electrode patches and patented conductive sheets connected to the earth. Four (4) control subjects were treated identically, except that the grounding systems were not connected to the earth. Outcome measures Complete blood counts, blood chemistry, enzyme chemistry, serum and saliva cortisols, magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy and pain levels were taken at the same time of day before the eccentric exercise and 24, 48, and 72 hours afterwards. Parameters consistently differing by 10% or more, normalized to baseline, were considered worthy of further study. Results Parameters that differed by these criteria included white blood cell counts, bilirubin, creatine kinase, phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphate ratios, glycerolphosphorylcholine, phosphorylcholine, the visual analogue pain scale, and pressure measurements on the right gastrocnemius. Conclusions In a pilot study, grounding the body to the earth alters measures of immune system activity and pain. Since this is the first intervention that appears to speed recovery from DOMS, the pilot provides a basis for a larger study. PMID:20192911

  14. Kin effects on energy allocation in group-living ground squirrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viblanc, Vincent A; Saraux, Claire; Murie, Jan O; Dobson, F Stephen

    2016-09-01

    The social environment has potent effects on individual phenotype and fitness in group-living species. We asked whether the presence of kin might act on energy allocation, a central aspect of life-history variation. Using a 22-year data set on reproductive and somatic allocations in Columbian ground squirrels (Urocitellus columbianus), we tested the effects of co-breeding and non-breeding kin on the fitness and energy allocation balance between reproduction and personal body condition of individual females. Greater numbers of co-breeding kin had a positive effect on the number of offspring weaned, through the mechanism of altering energy allocation patterns. On average, females with higher numbers of co-breeding kin did not increase energy income but biased energy allocation towards reproduction. Co-breeding female kin ground squirrels maintain close nest burrows, likely providing a social buffer against territorial invasions from non-kin ground squirrels. Lower aggressiveness, lower risks of infanticide from female kin and greater protection of territorial boundaries may allow individual females to derive net fitness benefits via their energy allocation strategies. We demonstrated the importance of kin effects on a fundamental life-history trade-off.

  15. Ground shock from multiple earth penetrator bursts: Effects for hexagonal weapon arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kmetyk, L.N.; Yarrington, P.

    1990-08-01

    Calculations have been performed with the HULL hydrocode to study ground shock effects for multiple earth penetrator weapon (EPW) bursts in hexagonal-close-packed (HCP) arrays. Several different calculational approaches were used to treat this problem. The first simulations involved two-dimensional (2D) calculations, where the hexagonal cross-section of a unit-cell in an effectively-infinite HCP array was approximated by an inscribed cylinder. Those calculations showed substantial ground shock enhancement below the center of the array. To refine the analysis, 3D unit-cell calculations were done where the actual hexagonal cross-section of the HCP array was modelled. Results of those calculations also suggested that the multiburst array would enhance ground shock effects over those for a single burst of comparable yield. Finally, 3D calculations were run in which an HCP array of seven bursts was modelled explicitly. In addition, the effects of non-simultaneity were investigated. Results of the seven-burst HCP array calculations were consistent with the unit-cell results and, in addition, provided information on the 3D lethal contour produced by such an array.

  16. Laser wavelength effect on nanosecond laser light reflection in ablation of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, O.; de la Cruz May, L.; Mejia, E. B.; Ruz Hernandez, J. A.; Flores Gil, A.

    2016-12-01

    Reflection of nanosecond laser pulses with different wavelengths (1.06 and 0.69 µm) in ablation of titanium in air is studied experimentally. The laser wavelength effect on reflection is essential at low laser fluence values. However, it becomes negligible for laser fluence values by about an order of magnitude higher than the plasma ignition threshold. We speculate that the disappearance of the wavelength effect is explained by counter-acting processes of the laser light absorption in plasma, which increases with laser wavelength, and absorption in the surface layer, which decreases with increasing laser wavelength.

  17. Computer predictions of ground storage effects on performance of Galileo and ISPM generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, A.

    1983-01-01

    Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) that will supply electrical power to the Galileo and International Solar Polar Mission (ISPM) spacecraft are exposed to several degradation mechanisms during the prolonged ground storage before launch. To assess the effect of storage on the RTG flight performance, a computer code has been developed which simulates all known degradation mechanisms that occur in an RTG during storage and flight. The modeling of these mechanisms and their impact on the RTG performance are discussed.

  18. The antioxidant epazote effect (Chenopodium ambrosioides L.) on raw ground beef

    OpenAIRE

    Luz H. Villalobos-Delgado; Edith G. Gonzalez-Mondragon; Alma Yadira Salazar-Govea; Joaquin T. Santiago-Castro; Juana Ramirez-Andrade

    2016-01-01

    For this paper, solid-liquid extractions of epazote (Chenopodium ambrosioides L.) were carried out using water (IE) and ethanol (EtOHE) as solvents, with the objective of evaluating its antioxidant effect on raw ground beef stored at 4 °C for 9 days. The analysis was carried out under the following treatments: CTL (meat without antioxidants), CIE (meat with infusion of epazote), CEtOHE (meat with ethanolic extract of epazote) and ASC (meat with sodium ascorbate solution). The characteristics ...

  19. THE EFFECTS OF REFLECTIVE TEACHING ON AN INTENSIVE TEACHER TRAINING PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Hua Lan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The preliminary case study was conducted to understand the effects of reflective teaching approach on English teachers' teaching performances in a short-term intensive teacher training program, and to know the participating English teachers’ feedback to the program. Totally 13 English teachers, who had taught English for 1 to 5 years, participated in this program for 3 weeks with 54 instruction hours. During the intensive program, teachers were asked to design lesson plans and demonstrate their lessons, while their peers, other experienced teachers, provided them with constructive feedback. In addition, the presenters self-assessed and reflected on their own teaching. Through several cycles of teaching demonstrations, peer-assessments, self-assessments and reflections, most teachers indicated that the reflective teaching approach was beneficial for sharpening their teaching skills, equipping them with additional teaching strategies and class management skills, and raising their awareness of the needs for examinations of their teaching reflectively in the future, and the importance of reflection of their own teaching for improvements. To give the teachers more inputs and inspirations, experienced teachers with creative teaching ideas were invited as guest speakers, and positive feedback to the guest speeches was also drawn. The findings of this study were expected to provide some pedagogical inspirations for the related fields, especially English teacher training in EFL contexts.

  20. Effects of large-scale wildfire on ground foraging ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Tritia; Turschak, Greta; Brehme, Cheryl; Rochester, Carlton; Mitrovich, Milan; Fisher, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effect of broad-scale wildfire on ground foraging ants within southern California. In October and November of 2003, two wildfires burned large portions of the wildlands within San Diego County. Between January 2005 and September 2006, we surveyed 63 plots across four sites to measure the effect of the fires on the ant assemblages present in four vegetation types: 1) coastal sage scrub, 2) chaparral, 3) grassland, and 4) woodland riparian. Thirty-six of the 63 plots were sampled before the fires between March 2001 and June 2003. Mixed model regression analyses, accounting for the burn history of each plot and our pre- and postfire sampling efforts, revealed that fire had a negative effect on ant species diversity. Multivariate analyses showed that ant community structure varied significantly among the four vegetation types, and only the ant assemblage associated with coastal sage scrub exhibited a significant difference between burned and unburned samples. The most notable change detected at the individual species level involved Messor andrei (Mayr), which increased from ant samples to 32.1% in burned plots postfire. We theorize that M. andrei responded to the increase of bare ground and postfire seed production, leading to an increase in the detection rate for this species. Collectively, our results suggest that wildfires can have short-term impacts on the diversity and community structure of ground foraging ants in coastal sage scrub. We discuss these findings in relation to management implications and directions for future research.

  1. Application of Ground Phosphate Rock to Diminish the Effects of Simulated Acid Rain of Soil Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONGYUAN-YAN; LIXUE-YUAN

    1992-01-01

    The effects of simulated acid rain retained in soil on the properties of acid soil and its diminishing by application of ground phosphate rock were investigated by using the sorption method.Results show as follows:(1)For yellow brown soil,the effect of simulated acid rain on the properties of soil with a pH value of 5.9 was relatively small,except a great quantity of acid rain deposited on it.(2) for red soil,the effect of simulated acid rain on the properties of soil was significant.With the increase of the amount of acid deposition,the pH value of soil was declined,but the contents of exchangeable H+,Al3+ and Mn2+ and the amount of SO41- retention were increased.(3) Many properties of acid soils could be improved by applying ground phosphate rock.For example,pH value of soils and the amounts of available P and exchangeable Ca2+ and Mg2+ were increased,and the amounts of exchangeable H+ and Al3+ and SO42- retained was reduced.The application of ground posphate rock could effctively diminish the pollution of acid rain to soil.

  2. The Effects of the Ionosphere on Ground-based Detection of the Global 21 cm Signal from the Cosmic Dawn and the Dark Ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Abhirup; Bradley, Richard; Burns, Jack O.; Harker, Geraint; Komjathy, Attila; Lazio, T. Joseph W.

    2016-11-01

    Detection of the global H i 21 cm signal from the Cosmic Dawn and the Epoch of Reionization is the key science driver for several ongoing ground-based and future ground-/space-based experiments. The crucial spectral features in the global 21 cm signal (turning points) occur at low radio frequencies ≲ 100 {{MHz}}. In addition to the human-generated radio frequency interference, Earth’s ionosphere drastically corrupts low-frequency radio observations from the ground. In this paper, we examine the effects of time-varying ionospheric refraction, absorption, and thermal emission at these low radio frequencies and their combined effect on any ground-based global 21 cm experiment. It should be noted that this is the first study of the effect of a dynamic ionosphere on global 21 cm experiments. The fluctuations in the ionosphere are influenced by solar activity with flicker noise characteristics. The same characteristics are reflected in the ionospheric corruption to any radio signal passing through the ionosphere. As a result, any ground-based observations of the faint global 21 cm signal are corrupted by flicker noise (or 1/f noise, where f is the dynamical frequency) which scales as {ν }-2 (where ν is the frequency of radio observation) in the presence of a bright galactic foreground (\\propto {ν }-s, where s is the radio spectral index). Hence, the calibration of the ionosphere for any such experiment is critical. Any attempt to calibrate the ionospheric effects will be subject to the inaccuracies in the current ionospheric measurements using Global Positioning System (GPS) ionospheric measurements, riometer measurements, ionospheric soundings, etc. Even considering an optimistic improvement in the accuracy of GPS-total electron content measurements, we conclude that Earth’s ionosphere poses a significant challenge in the absolute detection of the global 21 cm signal below 100 MHz.

  3. A specially curved wedge for eliminating wedge angle effect in unsteady shock reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He; Zhai, Zhigang; Luo, Xisheng; Yang, Jiming; Lu, Xiyun

    2017-08-01

    A curved wedge with a specific shape is designed and manufactured to guarantee the wedge angle unvaried during the cylindrically converging shock moving along the wedge. Thus the variation of the wedge angle caused by the wedge will be eliminated in unsteady shock reflection. Different initial wedge angles are considered to observe regular reflection and Mach reflection. When Mach reflection occurs, it is found that direct Mach reflection is persisted over the wedge without wave pattern transitions, which differs from our previous work with varied wedge angles [Zhang et al. "Reflection of cylindrical converging shock wave over a plane wedge," Phys. Fluids 28, 086101 (2016)]. Moreover, the Mach stem is nearly straight when the wedge angle is relatively large, and the trajectory of triple point can be well predicted by three-shock theory. It is believed that the straight Mach stem results from the coupling effect of the converging shock and the convexly curved wedge, which exert opposite effects on the Mach stem curvature. As the wedge angle reduces, the three-shock theory prediction deviates from the present results owing to the curved Mach stem. Stronger vortices are produced near the wall, which are caused by the interaction of two shear layers, and whether the stronger vortices will be generated near the wall depends on the reflection number of the shock wave over the tube wall and wedge. The length of disturbed shock front in the Mach reflection is found to increase nonlinearly due to the unsteady feature of the flow. The growth rate of length reduces as the shock converges because of the geometrical contraction effect. Further the lengths of the Mach stem and the disturbed shock front are compared, and the results show that although the difference exists between them, both of them show a similar variation tendency. Compared with our previous work with varied wedge angles, the variation of the wedge angle has great effects on the Mach stem length and wave

  4. Reflections on the Use of Grounded Theory to Uncover Patterns of Exclusion in an Online Discussion Forum at an Institution of Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Postma PhD

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on an example of grounded theory methodology used in a case study to describe power inequalities among participants in an online forum at a higher education institution in South Africa. Critical poststructuralist theory informs the study as it investigates how hegemony influences the strategic interaction of participants. An interpretive analysis through coding procedures uncovered elements of intensified exclusion, inequality, and oppression. This took place within a virtual space which is theoretically idealized as an equalizer and promoter of freedom of speech. The process involved in the eliciting of voices and in the analysing and interpreting of subjective accounts is described to give an account of disillusioned experiences with a potentially liberating form of technology. The article contributes to qualitative methodology in applying the generic paradigmatic conditions within grounded theory and illustrates both the interrelatedness and the cyclic nature of the conditions within the specific paradigms of participants.

  5. Adaptive Ground Penetrating Radar Systems to Visualize Antipersonnel Plastic Landmines Based on Local Texture in Scattering / Reflection Data in Space and Frequency Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Nakano, Yukimasa; Hirose, Akira

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, first we explained the ground-penetrating radars (GPRs) which are studied currently as a new technology for the antipersonnel plastic landmine detection. In this field, researchers usually choose a measurement type from the pulse GPR or the stepped frequency GPR. Though both of these methods have merits and demerits, a steppedfrequency GPR has an advantage in the high ability to extract features over a pulse GPR.

  6. Exploring the Effects of Cloud Vertical Structure on Cloud Microphysical Retrievals based on Polarized Reflectances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D. J.; Zhang, Z.; Platnick, S. E.; Ackerman, A. S.; Cornet, C.; Baum, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    A polarized cloud reflectance simulator was developed by coupling an LES cloud model with a polarized radiative transfer model to assess the capabilities of polarimetric cloud retrievals. With future remote sensing campaigns like NASA's Aerosols/Clouds/Ecosystems (ACE) planning to feature advanced polarimetric instruments it is important for the cloud remote sensing community to understand the retrievable information available and the related systematic/methodical limitations. The cloud retrieval simulator we have developed allows us to probe these important questions in a realistically relevant test bed. Our simulator utilizes a polarized adding-doubling radiative transfer model and an LES cloud field from a DHARMA simulation (Ackerman et al. 2004) with cloud properties based on the stratocumulus clouds observed during the DYCOMS-II field campaign. In this study we will focus on how the vertical structure of cloud microphysics can influence polarized cloud effective radius retrievals. Numerous previous studies have explored how retrievals based on total reflectance are affected by cloud vertical structure (Platnick 2000, Chang and Li 2002) but no such studies about the effects of vertical structure on polarized retrievals exist. Unlike the total cloud reflectance, which is predominantly multiply scattered light, the polarized reflectance is primarily the result of singly scattered photons. Thus the polarized reflectance is sensitive to only the uppermost region of the cloud (tau~influencer on the microphysical development of cloud droplets, can be potentially studied with polarimetric retrievals.

  7. Effects and implications of fault zone heterogeneity and anisotropy on earthquake strong ground motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei-Jou

    This thesis consists of two parts. Part one is concerned with the effect of fault zone heterogeneity on the strong ground motion of the Loma Preita earthquake. Part two is concerned with the effect of the effective hexagonal anisotropy of a fault zone on strong ground motion. A superposition of Gaussian beams is used to analyze these problems because it can account for both the rupture history of the fault plane and the fault zone heterogeneity. We also extend this method to investigate the combined effects of the rupture process on a fault plane and medium anisotropy on the synthetic seismograms. The strong ground motion of the Loma Prieta Earthquake is synthesized using a known three-dimensional crustal model of the region, a rupture model determined under the assumption of laterally homogeneous structure, and Green's functions computed by superposition of Gaussian beams. Compared to results obtained assuming a laterally homogeneous crust, stations lying to the northeast of the rupture zone are predicted to be defocused, while stations lying to the west of the fault trace are predicted to be focused. The defocusing is caused by a zone of high velocity material between the San Andreas and Sargent faults, and the focusing is caused by a region of low velocity lying between the Zayantes and San Andreas faults. If lateral homogeneity is assumed, the net effect of the predicted focusing and defocusing is to bias estimates of the relative slip of two high slip regions found in inversions of local and teleseismic body waves. These biases are similar in magnitude to those estimated for waveform inversions from the effects of using different subsets of data and/or different misfit functions and are similar in magnitude to the effects predicted for non-linear site responses.

  8. The effect of short ground vegetation on terrestrial laser scans at a local scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lei; Powrie, William; Smethurst, Joel; Atkinson, Peter M.; Einstein, Herbert

    2014-09-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) can record a large amount of accurate topographical information with a high spatial accuracy over a relatively short period of time. These features suggest it is a useful tool for topographical survey and surface deformation detection. However, the use of TLS to survey a terrain surface is still challenging in the presence of dense ground vegetation. The bare ground surface may not be illuminated due to signal occlusion caused by vegetation. This paper investigates vegetation-induced elevation error in TLS surveys at a local scale and its spatial pattern. An open, relatively flat area vegetated with dense grass was surveyed repeatedly under several scan conditions. A total station was used to establish an accurate representation of the bare ground surface. Local-highest-point and local-lowest-point filters were applied to the point clouds acquired for deriving vegetation height and vegetation-induced elevation error, respectively. The effects of various factors (for example, vegetation height, edge effects, incidence angle, scan resolution and location) on the error caused by vegetation are discussed. The results are of use in the planning and interpretation of TLS surveys of vegetated areas.

  9. How flexibility and dynamic ground effect could improve bio-inspired propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    Swimming animals use complex fin motions to reach remarkable levels of efficiency, maneuverability, and stealth. Propulsion systems inspired by these motions could usher in a new generation of advanced underwater vehicles. Two aspects of bio-inspired propulsion are discussed here: flexibility and near-boundary swimming. Experimental work on flexible propulsors shows that swimming efficiency depends on wake vortex timing and boundary layer attachment, but also on fluid-structure resonance. As a result, flexible vehicles or animals could potentially improve their performance by tracking their resonance properties. Bio-inspired propulsors were also found to produce more thrust with no loss in efficiency when swimming near a solid boundary. Higher lift-to-drag ratios for near-ground fixed-wing gliders is commonly known as ground effect. This newly observed "dynamic ground effect" suggests that bio-inspired vehicles and animals could save energy by harnessing the performance gains associated with near-boundary swimming. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research (MURI N00014-08-1-0642, Program Director Dr. Bob Brizzolara) and the National Science Foundation (DBI-1062052, PI Lisa Fauci; EFRI-0938043, PI George Lauder).

  10. Does reflection have an effect upon case-solving abilities of undergraduate medical students?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koole, Sebastiaan; Dornan, Tim; Aper, Leen; Scherpbier, Albert; Valcke, Martin; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Derese, Anselme

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reflection on professional experience is increasingly accepted as a critical attribute for health care practice; however, evidence that it has a positive impact on performance remains scarce. This study investigated whether, after allowing for the effects of knowledge and consultation

  11. Nature of Science Instruction to Turkish Prospective Chemistry Teachers: The Effect of Explicit-Reflective Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglarci, Oya; Sariçayir, Hakan; Sahin, Musa

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of explicit-reflective nature of science (NOS) instruction on Turkish prospective chemistry teachers' (PCTs) views of NOS. In the research, case study as a qualitative design was used and PCTs' views were examined thoroughly. The participants of the study consisted of 22 senior PCTs. Data…

  12. Does reflection have an effect upon case-solving abilities of undergraduate medical students?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koole, Sebastiaan; Dornan, Tim; Aper, Leen; Scherpbier, Albert; Valcke, Martin; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Derese, Anselme

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reflection on professional experience is increasingly accepted as a critical attribute for health care practice; however, evidence that it has a positive impact on performance remains scarce. This study investigated whether, after allowing for the effects of knowledge and consultation sk

  13. Characterizing the surface heterogeneity of fire effects using multi-temporal reflective wavelength data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roy, DP

    2005-10-10

    Full Text Available both the location and degree of change and retrieving information concerning the disturbance process are primary goals. This paper studies changes in reflective wavelength data caused by the action of fire. We consider the heterogeneity of fire effects...

  14. The Effect of Reflective Science Journal Writing on Students' Self-Regulated Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawahi, Nawar M.; Al-Balushi, Sulaiman M.

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigates the effectiveness of grade-ten students' reflective science journal writing on their self-regulated learning strategies. We used a pre-post control group quasi-experimental design. The sample consisted of 62 tenth-grade students (15 years old) in Oman, comprising 32 students in the experimental group and 30 students…

  15. Investigation of Reflective Teaching Practice Effect on Training Development Skills of the Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töman, Ufuk

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of the reflective teaching practice on the development of teaching skills of the pre-service teachers. This study is designed in the form of action research due to the nature of the case examined. The participants were 32 pre-service teachers at Bayburt University Faculty of Education Department of…

  16. The Effects of Guided Video Analysis on Teacher Candidates' Reflective Ability and Instructional Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagro, Sarah A.; deBettencourt, Laurie U.; Rosenberg, Michael S.; Carran, Deborah T.; Weiss, Margaret P.

    2017-01-01

    Internships are central to teacher preparation, but many novice teachers do not feel such student teaching experiences prepared them for teaching realities. The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to understand the effects of guiding teacher candidates through common video-recording and self-reflection activities during student teaching…

  17. Ground-water system, estimation of aquifer hydraulic properties, and effects of pumping on ground-water flow in Triassic sedimentary rocks in and near Lansdale, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Lisa A.; Goode, Daniel J.

    1999-01-01

    Ground water in Triassic-age sedimentary fractured-rock aquifers in the area of Lansdale, Pa., is used as drinking water and for industrial supply. In 1979, ground water in the Lansdale area was found to be contaminated with trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, and other man-made organic compounds, and in 1989, the area was placed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) National Priority List as the North Penn Area 6 site. To assist the USEPA in the hydrogeological assessment of the site, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study in 1995 to describe the ground-water system and to determine the effects of changes in the well pumping patterns on the direction of ground-water flow in the Lansdale area. This determination is based on hydrologic and geophysical data collected from 1995-98 and on results of the simulation of the regional ground-water-flow system by use of a numerical model.Correlation of natural-gamma logs indicate that the sedimentary rock beds strike generally northeast and dip at angles less than 30 degrees to the northwest. The ground-water system is confined or semi-confined, even at shallow depths; depth to bedrock commonly is less than 20 feet (6 meters); and depth to water commonly is about 15 to 60 feet (5 to 18 meters) below land surface. Single-well, aquifer-interval-isolation (packer) tests indicate that vertical permeability of the sedimentary rocks is low. Multiple-well aquifer tests indicate that the system is heterogeneous and that flow appears primarily in discrete zones parallel to bedding. Preferred horizontal flow along strike was not observed in the aquifer tests for wells open to the pumped interval. Water levels in wells that are open to the pumped interval, as projected along the dipping stratigraphy, are drawn down more than water levels in wells that do not intersect the pumped interval. A regional potentiometric map based on measured water levels indicates that ground water flows from Lansdale towards discharge

  18. The effects of the physical and chemical properties of soils on the spectral reflectance of soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, O. L.; Baumgardner, M. F.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of organic matter, free iron oxides, texture, moisture content, and cation exchange capacity on the spectral reflectance of soils were investigated along with techniques for differentiating soil orders by computer analysis of multispectral data. By collecting soil samples of benchmark soils from the different climatic regions within the United States and using the extended wavelength field spectroradiometer to obtain reflectance values and curves for each sample, average curves were constructed for each soil order. Results indicate that multispectral analysis may be a valuable tool for delineating and quantifying differences between soils.

  19. Abnormal N400 Semantic Priming Effect May Reflect Psychopathological Processes in Schizophrenia: A Twin Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Activation of semantic networks is indexed by the N400 effect. We used a twin study design to investigate whether N400 effect abnormalities reflect genetic/trait liability or are related to psychopathological processes in schizophrenia. Methods. We employed robust linear regression to compare N400 and behavioral priming effects across 36 monozygotic twin pairs (6 pairs concordant for schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder, 11 discordant pairs, and 19 healthy control pairs performing a lexical decision task. Moreover, we examined the correlation between Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS score and the N400 effect and the influence of medication status on this effect. Results. Regression yielded a significant main effect of group on the N400 effect only in the direct priming condition (p=0.003. Indirect condition and behavioral priming effect showed no significant effect of group. Planned contrasts with the control group as a reference group revealed that affected concordant twins had significantly reduced N400 effect compared to controls, and discordant affected twins had a statistical trend for reduced N400 effect compared to controls. The unaffected twins did not differ significantly from the controls. There was a trend for correlation between reduced N400 effect and higher BPRS scores, and the N400 effect did not differ significantly between medicated and unmedicated patients. Conclusions. Reduced N400 effect may reflect disease-specific processes in schizophrenia implicating frontotemporal brain network in schizophrenia pathology.

  20. Resonant tunneling effect in one-dimensional twinned lattice photonic crystal under total reflection conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xi; Li, Hu; Yuxia, Tang

    2016-07-01

    Under total reflection conditions, it typically seems as though light waves will be reflected completely on the interface; in actuality, the waves can penetrate the medium as evanescent waves. In this paper, we present a twinned lattice photonic crystal with a unit cell composed of AB layers and their mirror. We assume that the refractive index n 0 of the input and output end is equal to n B and larger than n A . We first demonstrate the dependence of band structure on the incidence angle and normalized wavelength, in which the resonant tunneling bands are exposed. We then draw a comparison of bands between ABBA and AB. To conclude, we discuss the resonant tunneling effect in the twinned lattice photonic crystal under the total reflection conditions. As incidence angle increases, the resonant tunneling band ultimately vanishes completely.

  1. Using Reflection with Peers to Help Students Learn Effective Problem Solving Strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We describe a study in which introductory physics students engage in reflection with peers about problem solving. The recitations for an introductory physics course with 200 students were broken into the "Peer Reflection" (PR) group and the traditional group. Each week in recitation, students in the PR group reflected in small teams on selected problems from the homework. The graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants (TAs) in the PR group recitations provided guidance and coaching to help students learn effective problem solving heuristics. In the recitations for the traditional group, students had the opportunity to ask the graduate TA questions about the homework before they took a weekly quiz. On the final exam with only multiple-choice questions, the PR group drew diagrams on more problems than the traditional group, even when there was no external reward for doing so. Since there was no partial credit for drawing the diagrams on the scratch books, students did not draw diagrams simply to get credit ...

  2. Effect of bottom reflectivity on the performance of a solar pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, J.; Suha, A.

    1987-01-01

    The reflectivity of the bottom of a solar pond increases on account of the accumulation of dirt or the presence of undissolved salt. The effect of the reflection of the solar radiation at the bottom of the pond on the seasonal performance of the pond has been studied using a three zone model. The spectral reflectivity of dirt and common salt were measured in the laboratory and used in the analysis. The results obtained from the analysis show that the presence of dirt at the bottom of the pond does not affect the performance of the pond substantially. On the other hand, the presence of undissolved salt at the bottom of the pond results in substantial deterioration of the pond performance.

  3. Effect of PCC Joint Skew on Reflective Cracking in HMA Overlays

    CERN Document Server

    Ghauch, By Ziad G

    2011-01-01

    Reflective cracking is a relatively premature distress that occurs in HMA materials overlaying cracked and jointed underlying pavements. The high concentration of stresses and strains in the vicinity of the discontinuity of the old pavement causes the cracks to reflect into the newly placed HMA overlay. While it is a common practice to use skewed transverse joints in rigid pavements to improve the latter's performance, the impact of such a practice on the cracking of a potential HMA overlay has not been examined so far. In this context, this study investigates the effect of using skewed transverse joints in rigid pavements on reflective cracking development in the HMA overlay. Advanced three-dimensional Finite Element models including viscoelastic material properties for the HMA overlay, 3D beam modeling of dowel bars, non-uniform tire-pavement contact stresses, friction interfaces, and infinite boundary elements were constructed for both normal and skewed transverse joints using ABAQUS v-6.11. The potential ...

  4. Effect of end reflections on conversion efficiency of coaxial relativistic backward wave oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Yan; Chen, Changhua; Sun, Jun; Shi, Yanchao; Ye, Hu; Wu, Ping; Li, Shuang; Xiong, Xiaolong

    2015-11-01

    This paper theoretically investigates the effect of end reflections on the operation of the coaxial relativistic backward wave oscillator (CRBWO). It is found that the considerable enhancement of the end reflection at one end increases the conversion efficiency, but excessively large end reflections at both ends weaken the asynchronous wave-beam interaction and thus reduce the conversion efficiency. Perfect reflection at the post end significantly improves the interaction between the electron beam and the asynchronous harmonic so that the conversion efficiency is notably increased. Based on the theoretical research, the diffraction-CRBWO with the generated microwave diffracted and output through the front end of the coaxial slow wave structure cavity is proposed. The post end is conductively closed to provide the perfect reflection. This promotes the amplitude and uniformity of the longitudinal electric field on the beam transmission line and improves the asynchronous wave-beam interaction. In numerical simulations under the diode voltage and current of 450 kV and 5.84 kA, microwave generation with the power of 1.45 GW and the conversion efficiency of 55% are obtained at the frequency of 7.45 GHz.

  5. Effect of end reflections on conversion efficiency of coaxial relativistic backward wave oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, Yan; Chen, Changhua; Sun, Jun; Shi, Yanchao; Ye, Hu; Wu, Ping; Li, Shuang; Xiong, Xiaolong [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an 710024 (China)

    2015-11-07

    This paper theoretically investigates the effect of end reflections on the operation of the coaxial relativistic backward wave oscillator (CRBWO). It is found that the considerable enhancement of the end reflection at one end increases the conversion efficiency, but excessively large end reflections at both ends weaken the asynchronous wave-beam interaction and thus reduce the conversion efficiency. Perfect reflection at the post end significantly improves the interaction between the electron beam and the asynchronous harmonic so that the conversion efficiency is notably increased. Based on the theoretical research, the diffraction-CRBWO with the generated microwave diffracted and output through the front end of the coaxial slow wave structure cavity is proposed. The post end is conductively closed to provide the perfect reflection. This promotes the amplitude and uniformity of the longitudinal electric field on the beam transmission line and improves the asynchronous wave-beam interaction. In numerical simulations under the diode voltage and current of 450 kV and 5.84 kA, microwave generation with the power of 1.45 GW and the conversion efficiency of 55% are obtained at the frequency of 7.45 GHz.

  6. Predicting the effect of proteolysis on ruminal crude protein degradation of legume and grass silages using near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, P C; Brehm, N M; Combs, D K; Bauman, L M; Peters, J B; Undersander, D J

    1999-04-01

    Two studies were conducted to assess whether routine applications of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy could predict the effects of silage proteolysis on ruminal crude protein (CP) degradation of legume and grass silages. A preliminary study was conducted to assess the effect of laboratory drying method on ruminal CP degradation of silages. Thirty legume and grass silages were freeze-, oven-, or microwave-dried and incubated in situ in the ventral rumen of three ruminally cannulated cows for 24 h. Freeze-drying was considered least likely to alter ruminal CP degradation of the silages; therefore, oven- and microwave-drying were compared using first-order regression with freeze-drying. Oven-drying for 48 h at 55 degrees C compared favorably (R2 = 0.84) with freeze-drying. Microwave-drying resulted in a large bias (2.84 g/10(-1) kg of CP) and was poorly related (R2 = 0.48) to freeze-drying. In a second study, alfalfa and timothy were cut at three maturities and allowed to wilt for 0, 10, 24, 32, 48, and 54 h. Forages were ensiled in triplicate cylindrical mini silos and allowed to ferment for 120 d. After fermentation, silages were oven-dried, ground, and scanned on a near-infrared reflectance spectrophotometer. Duplicate, dried, 2-mm ground silage samples were incubated in the ventral rumen of three ruminally cannulated cows for 24 h. Forage species, maturity, and wilting time significantly affected 24-h ruminal CP degradation of the silages. Near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy accurately predicted (R2 = 0.91) 24-h ruminal CP degradation of silages. Data suggest near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy can accurately assess the effects of forage species, maturity, and wilting time (proteolysis) on 24-h ruminal CP degradation of legume and grass silages.

  7. Detection of ground ice using ground penetrating radar method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gennady M. Stoyanovich; Viktor V. Pupatenko; Yury A. Sukhobok

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a ground penetrating radar (GPR) application for the detection of ground ice. We com-bined a reflection traveltime curves analysis with a frequency spectrogram analysis. We found special anomalies at specific traces in the traveltime curves and ground boundaries analysis, and obtained a ground model for subsurface structure which allows the ground ice layer to be identified and delineated.

  8. Structure of Ground state Wave Functions for the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect: A Variational Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sutirtha; Mandal, Sudhansu

    The internal structure and topology of the ground states for fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) are determined by the relative angular momenta between all the possible pairs of electrons. Laughlin wave function is the only known microscopic wave function for which these relative angular momenta are homogeneous (same) for any pair of electrons and depend solely on the filling factor. Without invoking any microscopic theory, considering only the relationship between number of flux quanta and particles in spherical geometry, and allowing the possibility of inhomogeneous (different) relative angular momenta between any two electrons, we develop a general method for determining a closed-form ground state wave function for any incompressible FQHE state. Our procedure provides variationally obtained very accurate wave functions, yet having simpler structure compared to any other known complex microscopic wave functions for the FQHE states. This method, thus, has potential in predicting a very accurate ground state wave function for the puzzling states such as the state at filling fraction 5/2. We acknowledge support from Department of Science and Technology, India.

  9. Effects of heavy metals on the absorbance and reflectance spectra of plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horler, D. N. H.; Barber, J.; Barringer, A. R.

    1980-01-01

    The spectral responses of plants to various concentrations of heavy metals in their rooting media are investigated in relation to the application of remote sensing methods to the detection of vegetation under stress. Absorption photometry of chloroplasts, measurements of metal and chlorophyll concentrations and reflectance spectrometry were performed on leaves of pea, sunflower and soybean plants grown under greenhouse conditions with the addition of various concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn to their rooting media and on leaves of oak trees growing naturally in an area of a copper-arsenic mineralization. Under laboratory conditions, the most general effect observed was growth inhibition and ultimately death, with pea plants also exhibiting changes of chlorophyll a/ chlorophyll b ratios with Cd and Cu and reflectance increases in the visible and decreases in the infrared. Although results for other species indicate that reflectance effects are dependent on species, correlations between reflectance and metal exposure is confirmed by the field investigations. It is concluded that a remote sensing system would be improved by the inclusion of bands around 1.65 and 2.20 microns to detect soil mineralization from plant spectra.

  10. Cost-Effective Control of Ground-Level Ozone Pollution in and around Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Xuxuan; Zhang Shiqiu; Xu Jianhua; Wu Dan; Zhu Tong

    2012-01-01

    Ground level ozone pollution has become a significant air pollution problem in Beijing. Because of the complex way in which ozone is formed, it is difficult for policy makers to identify optimal control options on a cost-effective basis. This paper identi- fies and assesses a range of options for addressing this problem. We apply the Ambient Least Cost Model and compare the eco- nomic costs of control options, then recommend the most effective sequence to realize pollution control at the lowest cost. The study finds that installing of Stage II gasoline vapor recovery system at Beijing's 1446 gasoline stations would be the most cost-effective option. Overall, options to reduce ozone pollution by cutting ve- hicular emissions are much more cost-effective than options to "clean up" coal-fired power plants.

  11. Effectiveness of adaptive optics system in satellite-to-ground coherent optical communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Huang; Ke, Deng; Chao, Liu; Peng, Zhang; Dagang, Jiang; Zhoushi, Yao

    2014-06-30

    Adaptive optics (AO) systems can suppress the signal fade induced by atmospheric turbulence in satellite-to-ground coherent optical communication. The lower bound of the signal fade under AO compensation was investigated by analyzing the pattern of aberration modes for a one-stage imaging AO system. The distribution of the root mean square of the residual aberration is discussed on the basis of the spatial and temporal characteristics of the residual aberration of the AO system. The effectiveness of the AO system for improving the performance of coherent optical communication is presented in terms of the bit error rate and system availability.

  12. Numerical Study of a Long-Lived, Isolated Wake Vortex in Ground Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Fred H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines a case observed during the 1990 Idaho Falls Test program, in which a wake vortex having an unusually long lifetime was observed while in ground effect. A numerical simulation is performed with a Large Eddy Simulation model to understand the response of the environment in affecting this event. In the simulation, it was found that one of the vortices decayed quickly, with the remaining vortex persisting beyond the time-bound of typical vortex lifetimes. This unusual behavior was found to be related to the first and second vertical derivatives of the ambient crosswind.

  13. Mapping to know: The effects of representational guidance and reflective assessment on scientific inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdosne Toth, Eva; Suthers, Daniel D.; Lesgold, Alan M.

    2002-03-01

    This study documents an instructional methodology to teach a fundamental reasoning skill during scientific inquiry: the evaluation of empirical evidence against multiple hypotheses. Using the design experiment approach, with iterative cycles we developed an instructional framework that lends itself to authentic scientific inquiry by providing a nontraditional approach to three aspects of learning: the activities students are engaged in during scientific inquiry, the tools students use while constructing knowledge, and the assessment of learning outcomes. The present article focuses on the contribution of two components of this instructional framework: the effect of technology-based knowledge-representation tools and the effect of reflective assessment on learning to act and think scientifically. The technological tools of the framework allowed students to represent their developing knowledge of natural phenomena with either graphical mapping or with word-processed prose. The reflective assessment we used was a form of inquiry rubrics that provided clear expectations for optimal progress throughout the entire process of inquiry by indicating specific assessment criteria for the various components of scientific inquiry. The results indicated that in real-life-like classroom investigations designed to teach students how to evaluate data in relation to theories, the use of evidence mapping is superior to prose writing. Furthermore, this superior effect of evidence mapping was greatly enhanced by the use of reflective assessment throughout the inquiry process. Modes of representational guidance explain both the superior effect of evidence mapping as well as the discrepancy between the effects of explicit reflection on evidence mapping compared to prose writing. These results have fundamental implications for the development of cognitively-based classroom learning environments and for the design of further research on learning.

  14. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a powered NASP-like configuration in ground effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatlin, Gregory M.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented on the low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a simplified NASP (for National Aerospace Plane Program)-like configuration, obtained in the NASA-Langley 14-by-22-foot subsonic tunnel. The model consisted of a triangular wedge forebody, a rectangular midsection housing the propulsion simulation system, and a rectangular wedge aftbody; it also included a delta wing, exhaust flow deflectors, and aftbody fences. Flow visualization was obtained by injecting water into the engine simulator inlets and using a laser light sheet to illuminate the resulting exhaust flow. It was found that power-on ground effects for NASP-like configuration can be substantial; these effects can be reduced by increasing the angle-of-attack to the value of the aftbody ramp angle. Power-on lift losses in ground effect increased with increasing thrust, but could be reduced by the addition of a delta wing to the configuration. Power-on lift losses also increased with use of aftbody fences.

  15. Direct effects of tillage on the activity density of ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) weed seed predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearin, A F; Reberg-Horton, S C; Gallandt, E R

    2007-10-01

    Ground beetles are well known as beneficial organisms in agroecosystems, contributing to the predation of a wide range of animal pests and weed seeds. Tillage has generally been shown to have a negative effect on ground beetles, but it is not known whether this is because of direct mortality or the result of indirect losses resulting from dispersal caused by habitat deterioration. In 2005, field experiments measured direct, tillage-induced mortality, of four carabid weed seed predators, Harpalus rufipes DeGeer, Agonum muelleri Herbst, Anisodactylus merula Germar, and Amara cupreolata Putzeys, and one arthropod predator, Pterostichus melanarius Illiger, common to agroecosystems in the northeastern United States. Three tillage treatments (moldboard plow, chisel plow, and rotary tillage) were compared with undisturbed controls at two sites (Stillwater and Presque Isle) and at two dates (July and August) in Maine. Carabid activity density after disturbance was measured using fenced pitfall traps installed immediately after tillage to remove any effects of dispersal. Rotary tillage and moldboard plowing reduced weed seed predator activity density 52 and 54%, respectively. Carabid activity density after chisel plowing was similar to the undisturbed control. This trend was true for each of the weed seed predator species studied. However, activity density of the arthropod predator P. melanarius was reduced by all tillage types, indicating a greater sensitivity to tillage than the four weed seed predator species. These results confirm the need to consider both direct and indirect effects of management in studies of invertebrate seed predators.

  16. An early attempt at an integrated home energy system including solar thermal, ground source heat pump, radiant floor heating, reflective and dynamic insulation and ground-tempered makeup air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, T.

    2005-07-01

    This paper described an attempt to design and build a comfortable and energy efficient home that integrates solar thermal panels with active and passive features. The exterior walls of the 1700 square foot house were interlocking concrete blocks with radiant floor heating pipes fastened to the outside, which was later covered with rigid insulation and stucco. The active heating system included 4 solar panels and a ground source heat pump with supply lines buried horizontally 5 feet below the surface of the back yard on the south side of the building. The solar panels were used for different purposes in different seasons. The system was monitored for the first winter only. For 4 hours a day in January, 10 per cent more solar energy was measured on the vertical collectors than is available from direct solar insolation at summer solstice. With an outside temperature of -33 degrees C, the solar collectors were capable of maintaining an almost constant core wall temperature of 12 degrees C. The total electricity bill for this all-electric house averaged $60 month during for an entire year, with a single occupant. Despite these results, funding to optimize the control system was not granted. The house was sold at a loss and the heat pump was eventually replaced by a natural gas boiler, which reduced the energy efficiency of the house, but which satisfied the bank who wanted a conventional heating system before approving a mortgage. 2 figs.

  17. Effect of facet phases and reflectivity on the internal optical field in QWS-DFB semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Shahshahani, F; Mirabbaszadeh, K

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of reflected waves of the facets on the internal optical intensity of semiconductor DFB lasers are investigated. The uniformity of optical intensity along the cavity length is evaluated with flatness parameter. The dependence of this parameter on coupling coefficient, reflectivity and grating phase at the facets is also studied. This investigation shows that in some structures reflected waves of the facets cause optical intensity along the cavity length to have more uniformed distribution than a DFB laser with anti-reflective facets. It is also shown that flatness parameter is very sensitive to grating phase. thus it is necessary for designing a DFB laser to consider the effects of reflected wave and grating phase at both ends of cavity in order to increase the stability of the laser against SHB (Spatial Hole Burning) effect. The effects of reflectivity and grating phase on longitudinal distribution of photon and carrier density above threshold are investigated, too.

  18. Atmospheric infrasound propagation modelling using the reflectivity method with a direct formulation of the wind effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, Valerie; Näsholm, Sven Peter; Schweitzer, Johannes; Gibbons, Steven J.

    2016-04-01

    We recently advocated using the reflectivity method, also known as the wavenumber integration method or fast-field program, to model atmospheric infrasound propagation at regional distances. The advantage of the reflectivity method is its ability to model the full wavefield, including diffractive effects with head waves and shadow zone arrivals, in a broad frequency range but still at a relatively low computational cost. Attenuation can easily be included, giving the possibility to analyse relative amplitudes and frequency content of the different arrivals. It has clear advantages compared with ray theory in terms of predicting phases considering the particular frequent occurrence of shadow zone arrivals in infrasound observations. Its main limitation, at least in the traditional form of the method, lies in the fact that it can only handle range-independent models. We presented earlier some reflectivity method simulations of an observed accidental explosion in Norway. Wind intensity and direction are non-negligible parameters for infrasound propagation and these are appropriately taken into account in most infrasound ray-tracing codes. On the other hand, in the previous reflectivity simulations wind was taken into account only through the effective sound speed approximation where the horizontal projection of the wind field is added to the adiabatic sound speed profiles. This approximation is appropriate for dominantly horizontal propagation but can give incorrect arrival times and shadow zone locations for waves which have a significant portion of their propagation path at more vertical incidence, like thermospheric arrivals. We present here how we have modified the original reflectivity algorithm in order to take the wind into account in a more correct fashion, and how this improvement influences the synthetics.

  19. Effect of music therapy on oncologic staff bystanders: a substantive grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Clare; Magill, Lucanne

    2009-06-01

    Oncologic work can be satisfying but also stressful, as staff support patients and families through harsh treatment effects, uncertain illness trajectories, and occasional death. Although formal support programs are available, no research on the effects of staff witnessing patients' supportive therapies exists. This research examines staff responses to witnessing patient-focused music therapy (MT) programs in two comprehensive cancer centers. In Study 1, staff were invited to anonymously complete an open-ended questionnaire asking about the relevance of a music therapy program for patients and visitors (what it does; whether it helps). In Study 2, staff were theoretically sampled and interviewed regarding the personal effects of witnessing patient-centered music therapy. Data from each study were comparatively analyzed according to grounded theory procedures. Positive and negative cases were evident and data saturation arguably achieved. In Study 1, 38 staff unexpectedly described personally helpful emotional, cognitive, and team effects and consequent improved patient care. In Study 2, 62 staff described 197 multiple personal benefits and elicited patient care improvements. Respondents were mostly nursing (57) and medical (13) staff. Only three intrusive effects were reported: audibility, initial suspicion, and relaxation causing slowing of work pace. A substantive grounded theory emerged applicable to the two cancer centers: Staff witnessing MT can experience personally helpful emotions, moods, self-awarenesses, and teamwork and thus perceive improved patient care. Intrusive effects are uncommon. Music therapy's benefits for staff are attributed to the presence of live music, the human presence of the music therapist, and the observed positive effects in patients and families. Patient-centered oncologic music therapy in two cancer centers is an incidental supportive care modality for staff, which can reduce their stress and improve work environments and perceived

  20. Effect of experimental parameters on optimal reflection of light from opaque media

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Benjamin R; Eilers, Hergen

    2016-01-01

    Previously we considered the effect of experimental parameters on optimized transmission through opaque media using spatial light modulator (SLM)-based wavefront shaping. In this study we consider the opposite geometry, in which we optimize reflection from an opaque surface such that the backscattered light is focused onto a spot on an imaging detector. By systematically varying different experimental parameters (genetic algorithm iterations, bin size, SLM active area, target area, spot size, and sample angle with respect to the optical axis) and optimizing the reflected light we determine how each parameter affects the intensity enhancement. We find that the effects of the experimental parameters on the enhancement are similar to those measured for a transmissive geometry, but with the exact functional forms changed due to the different geometry and the use of a genetic algorithm instead of an iterative algorithm. Additionally, we find preliminary evidence of greater enhancements than predicted by random mat...

  1. Effect of interface reflection in pseudophakic eyes with an additional refractive intraocular lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrecker, Jens; Zoric, Katja; Meßner, Arthur; Eppig, Timo

    2012-09-01

    To compare the surface reflections in a pseudophakic model eye with and without a monofocal additional refractive intraocular lens (add-on IOL). Department of Ophthalmology, Rudolf-Virchow-Klinikum Glauchau, Glauchau, and Experimental Ophthalmology, Saarland University, Homburg, Germany. Experimental study. The Liou and Brennan model eye was used to determine the retinal surface reflections in a pseudophakic model eye with and without an add-on IOL. The crystalline lens of the model eye was replaced by (1) a standard posterior chamber IOL (PC IOL) with a refractive power of 22.0 diopters (D) and (2) a PC IOL and an add-on IOL with refractive powers of 19.0 D and 2.5 D, respectively. To theoretically estimate the impact of the reflected images to visual impression, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was calculated under 2 conditions: without and with straylight and double reflection effects. Compared with the pseudophakic model eye without an add-on IOL, the pseudophakic model eye with an add-on IOL showed no relevant differences in the SNR under both conditions. Findings indicate that implantation of monofocal add-on IOLs will not induce relevant additional disturbing glare compared with conventional pseudophakia. Copyright © 2012 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. EFFECTS OF FATLIQURING PROCESS ON LEATHERS COLOURED WITH IR REFLECTIVE DYES AND PIGMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUTLU Mehmet Mete

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Black coloured materials and consumer goods are known to be heating up more, because they absorb sun radiation more than light colours. This heating is a problem for the users for black automotive or motorcycle leathers and also for dark shoes and boots which are exposed to sun heat. Human vision system can distinguish visible colours between the wavelengths of 390-700 nm. So reflecting the sun radiation in the infrared area of radiation spectrum higher than 700nm, is a solution for heating problem without affecting the visible colour. For this reason IR reflective dyes and pigments are designed. A leading Leather Chemical Company has developed an IR reflecting dyeing system for leather keeping the dark coloured leathers cooler under sun radiation. Additionally in theory, fat and water content of leather affects its heating properties. In this study, effect of natural, synthetic and waterproof fatliquoring systems on heating properties of leathers coloured with IR reflective dyes and pigments are investigated.

  3. Modeling forest defoliation using simulated BRDF and assessing its effect on reflectance and sensor reaching radiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengarajan, Rajagopalan; Schott, John R.

    2016-09-01

    Remote sensing techniques such as change detection are widely used for mapping and monitoring forest cover to detect the declining health and vigor of forests. These techniques rely on the assumption that the biophysical variation in the forest introduces a corresponding variation in its reflectance. The biophysical variations are assessed by foresters, but these assessment techniques are expensive and cannot be performed frequently to identify a specific level of change in the forest, for example, infection due to gypsy moths that results in forest defoliation. Further, the interaction of atmosphere, sensor characteristics, and phenology that are inherent in the remotely sensed images makes it difficult to separate biophysical changes from observational effects. We have addressed these limitations by developing a method to model the spectral reflectance properties of forests with varying degrees of defoliation using the Digital Image and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) tool. This paper discusses the in-canopy radiative approach and the impact of defoliation on the reflectance and radiance observed by sensors such as Landsat. The results indicate that the relative variation in forest reflectance between a non-defoliated and a 30% defoliated deciduous forest can be as high as 10% in the NIR spectral band. A function can be fit to predict the level of defoliation from the relative variation in radiance. The modeling and analysis techniques can be extended to assess the impact of atmospheric factors and sensor characteristics relative to the biophysical changes as well as for assessing other biophysical variables in forests.

  4. Helping students learn effective problem solving strategies by reflecting with peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Andrew; Singh, Chandralekha

    2010-07-01

    We study how introductory physics students engage in reflection with peers about problem solving. The recitations for an introductory physics course with 200 students were broken into a "peer reflection" (PR) group and a traditional group. Each week in recitation, small teams of students in the PR group reflected on selected problems from the homework and discussed why the solutions of some students employed better problem solving strategies than others. The graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants in the PR recitations provided guidance and coaching to help students learn effective problem solving heuristics. In the traditional group recitations students could ask the graduate TA questions about the homework before they took a weekly quiz. The traditional group recitation quiz questions were similar to the homework questions selected for peer reflection in the PR group recitations. As one measure of the impact of this intervention, we investigated how likely students were to draw diagrams to help with problem solving on the final exam with only multiple-choice questions. We found that the PR group drew diagrams on more problems than the traditional group even when there was no explicit reward for doing so. Also, students who drew more diagrams for the multiple-choice questions outperformed those who did not, regardless of which group they were a member.

  5. Ground Observation and Correction of P-band Radar Imaging Ionospheric Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Ning

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available For high resolution space-borne P-band SAR system, ionospheric effects could cause serious phase errors. These errors are causally related to the radar frequency and the TEC of ionosphere and make the image quality degraded. To guarantee the image quality, the ionosphere errors must be emended. Based on the mismatched filter model caused by ionosphere, it is pointed out that accurate ionosphere TEC is the key for phase error correction, a high precision ionosphere TEC measurement method is further put forward by using the phase errors of SAR echoes, which is validated by processing the data of a ground based P-band radar with well focused radar image of the international space station obtained. The results indicate that the method can effectively increase the accuracy of ionosphere TEC estimation, and thus improve the radar imaging quality, it is applicable to low frequency space-borne SAR systems for reducing the ionosphere effects.

  6. EMPIRICAL REFLECTIONS ON MIGRATION PHENOMENON. MAJOR EFFECTS OF MIGRATION ON THE HUMAN CAPITAL

    OpenAIRE

    Simona BUTA; Rozalia Iuliana KICSI

    2013-01-01

    The paper Empirical reflections on migration phenomenon. Major effects of migration on the human capital analyzes the migration flows of the workforce (as part of the human capital) globally/regionally, especially the highly qualified workforce migration. The qualified manpower processes of attracting on the work market have not been always well understood and, in some cases, have generated a series of difficulties. This is the reason why we will focus on the „waste of brains” phenomenon, whi...

  7. Reflecting Teaching——An Effective Strategy of College English Teachers ' Autonomous Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马宗娟

    2015-01-01

    Reflecing teaching is an effective way for college English teachers'autonomous development,college English teach-ers must concern about it.There are some Some specific ways of reflecting teaching for college English teachers,such as:Teach-ing journals,Surveys and questionnaire,Lesson reports,Audio or video recording of lesson,Observation.If these ways can be involved in the daily teaching,college English teachers'ability will be improved greatly.

  8. Reflections and mirror effect of parametrically-excited solitons at a boundary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王新龙

    1995-01-01

    Some of the up-to-date experimental results on the parametrically-excited solitons in arectangular trough of water are provided, including the periodical reflection of a soliton at an end wall of a trough, the collision dynamics of two solitons of like polarity and the existence of mirror effect at boundaries. Attempts are made to explain the observed phenomena and a conception of virtual solitons is proposed.

  9. Engineering characteristics of near-fault vertical ground motions and their effect on the seismic response of bridges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xinle; Dou Huijuan; Zhu Xi

    2007-01-01

    A wide variety of near-fault strong ground motion records were collected from various tectonic environments worldwide and were used to study the peak value ratio and response spectrum ratio of the vertical to horizontal component of ground motion,focusing on the effect of earthquake magnitude,site conditions,pulse duration,and statistical component.The results show that both the peak value ratio and response spectrum ratio are larger than the 2/3 value prescribed in existing seismic codes,and the relationship between the vertical and horizontal ground motions is comparatively intricate.In addition,the effect of the near-fault ground motions on bridge performance is analyzed,considering both the material nonlinear characteristics and the P~△ effect.

  10. Combined Effects of High-Speed Railway Noise and Ground Vibrations on Annoyance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoshima, Shigenori; Morihara, Takashi; Sato, Tetsumi; Yano, Takashi

    2017-07-27

    The Shinkansen super-express railway system in Japan has greatly increased its capacity and has expanded nationwide. However, many inhabitants in areas along the railways have been disturbed by noise and ground vibration from the trains. Additionally, the Shinkansen railway emits a higher level of ground vibration than conventional railways at the same noise level. These findings imply that building vibrations affect living environments as significantly as the associated noise. Therefore, it is imperative to quantify the effects of noise and vibration exposures on each annoyance under simultaneous exposure. We performed a secondary analysis using individual datasets of exposure and community response associated with Shinkansen railway noise and vibration. The data consisted of six socio-acoustic surveys, which were conducted separately over the last 20 years in Japan. Applying a logistic regression analysis to the datasets, we confirmed the combined effects of vibration/noise exposure on noise/vibration annoyance. Moreover, we proposed a representative relationship between noise and vibration exposures, and the prevalence of each annoyance associated with the Shinkansen railway.

  11. Effects of Cooling on Ankle Muscle Strength, Electromyography, and Gait Ground Reaction Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitava Halder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of cooling on neuromuscular function and performance during gait are not fully examined. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of local cooling for 20 min in cold water at 10°C in a climate chamber also at 10°C on maximal isometric force and electromyographic (EMG activity of the lower leg muscles. Gait ground reaction forces (GRFs were also assessed. Sixteen healthy university students participated in the within subject design experimental study. Isometric forces of the tibialis anterior (TA and the gastrocnemius medialis (GM were measured using a handheld dynamometer and the EMG was recorded using surface electrodes. Ground reaction forces during gait and the required coefficient of friction (RCOF were recorded using a force plate. There was a significantly reduced isometric maximum force in the TA muscle (P<0.001 after cooling. The mean EMG amplitude of GM muscle was increased after cooling (P<0.003, indicating that fatigue was induced. We found no significant changes in the gait GRFs and RCOF on dry and level surface. These findings may indicate that local moderate cooling 20 min of 10°C cold water, may influence maximal muscle performance without affecting activities at sub-maximal effort.

  12. Pounding Effects in Simply Supported Bridges Accounting for Spatial Variability of Ground Motion: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Tecchio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study carries out a parametrical analysis of the seismic response to asynchronous earthquake ground motion of a long multispan rc bridge, the Fener bridge, located on a high seismicity area in the north-east of Italy. A parametrical analysis has been performed investigating the influence of the seismic input correlation level on the structural response: a series of nonlinear time history analyses have been executed, in which the variation of the frequency content in the accelerograms at the pier bases has been described by considering the power spectral density function (PSD and the coherency function (CF. In order to include the effects due to the main nonlinear behaviours of the bridge components, a 3D finite element model has been developed, in which the pounding of decks at cap-beams, the friction of beams at bearings, and the hysteretic behaviour of piers have been accounted for. The sensitivity analysis has shown that the asynchronism of ground motion greatly influences pounding forces and deck-pier differential displacements, and these effects have to be accurately taken into account for the design and the vulnerability assessment of long multispan simply supported bridges.

  13. Simple method to measure effects of horizontal atmospherical turbulence at ground level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tíjaro Rojas, Omar J.; Galeano Traslaviña, Yuber A.; Torres Moreno, Yezid

    2016-09-01

    The Kolmogorov's theory has been used to explain physical phenomena like the vertical turbulence in atmosphere, others recent works have made new advances and have improved K41 theory. In addition, this theory has been applied to studying different issues associated to measure atmospheric effects, and have special interest to find answers in optics to questions as e.g. at ground level, Could it find edges of two or more close objects, from a distant observer? (Classic resolution problem). Although this subject is still open, we did a model using the statistics of the centroid and the diameter of the laser beam propagated under horizontal turbulence at ground level until the object plane. The goal is to measure efficiently the turbulence effects in the long horizontal path propagation of electromagnetic wave. Natural movement of laser beam within the cavity needs be subtracted from the total transversal displacement in order to obtain a best approach. This simple proposed method is used to find the actual statistics of the centroid and beam diameter on the object plane where the turbulence introduces an additional transversal shift. And it has been tested for different values of horizontal distances under non-controlled environment in a synchronized acquisition scheme. Finally, we show test results in open very strong turbulence with high controlled temperature. This paper presents the implemented tests mainly into laboratory and discuss issues to resolve.

  14. The antioxidant epazote effect (Chenopodium ambrosioides L. on raw ground beef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz H. Villalobos-Delgado

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available For this paper, solid-liquid extractions of epazote (Chenopodium ambrosioides L. were carried out using water (IE and ethanol (EtOHE as solvents, with the objective of evaluating its antioxidant effect on raw ground beef stored at 4 °C for 9 days. The analysis was carried out under the following treatments: CTL (meat without antioxidants, CIE (meat with infusion of epazote, CEtOHE (meat with ethanolic extract of epazote and ASC (meat with sodium ascorbate solution. The characteristics determined for both IE and EtOHE before being added to the meat were pH, antioxidant activity (AA, total polyphenols (TP and total flavonoids (TF. The antioxidant effect on the ground beef was evaluated using the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS method and instrumental color. EI showed the highest TF content. Meat with IE and EtOHE treatments had lower TBARS values than control meat, and higher of L* and b* values, which indicate greater clarity in both treatments. In conclusion, under these conditions, epazote has potential as a natural antioxidant in order to extend the shelf life of meat and meat products.

  15. Effects of the herbicide diuron on cordgrass (Spartina foliosa) reflectance and photosynthetic parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, S.L.; Carranza, A.; Kunzelman, J.; Datta, S.; Kuivila, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    Early indicators of salt marsh plant stress are needed to detect stress before it is manifested as changes in biomass and coverage. We explored a variety of leaf-level spectral reflectance and fluorescence variables as indicators of stress in response to the herbicide diuron. Diuron, a Photosystem II inhibitor, is heavily used in areas adjacent to estuaries, but its ecological effects are just beginning to be recognized. In a greenhouse experiment, we exposed Spartina foliosa, the native cordgrass in California salt marshes, to two levels of diuron. After plant exposure to diuron for 28 days, all spectral reflectance indices and virtually all fluorescence parameters indicated reduced pigment and photosynthetic function, verified as reduced CO2 assimilation. Diuron exposure was not evident, however, in plant morphometry, indicating that reflectance and fluorescence were effective indicators of sub-lethal diuron exposure. Several indices (spectral reflectance index ARI and fluorescence parameters EQY, Fo, and maximum rETR) were sensitive to diuron concentration. In field trials, most of the indices as well as biomass, % cover, and canopy height varied predictably and significantly across a pesticide gradient. In the field, ARI and Fo regressed most significantly and strongly with pesticide levels. The responses of ARI and Fo in both the laboratory and the field make these indices promising as sensitive, rapid, non-destructive indicators of responses of S. foliosa to herbicides in the field. These techniques are employed in remote sensing and could potentially provide a link between landscapes of stressed vegetation and the causative stressor(s), which is crucial for effective regulation of pollution. ?? 2008 Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation.

  16. Effects of irradiation on trans fatty acids formation in ground beef

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, M.S. E-mail: msavoy@net.ipen.br; Villavicencio, A.L.C.H. E-mail: villavic@net.ipen.br; Mancini-filho, Jorge

    2002-03-01

    In order to give the consumer the assurance that meat processed by irradiation is a safe product, a great deal of research has been developed in the world. The effect of irradiation on the hygienic quality of meat and meat products is considered as related to the control of meat-borne parasites of humans; elimination of pathogens from fresh meat and poultry; and elimination of pathogens from processed meat. Lipid oxidation and associated changes are the major causes of the quality deterioration of meat during storage. Irradiation of lipids induces the production of free radicals, which react with oxygen, leading to the formation of carbonyls, responsible for alterations in food nutritional and sensorial characteristics. Trans fatty acids are present in ground beef and can also be formed during its processing. Interestingly, the trans fatty acids, due to their chemical and physical characteristics, show more resistance to the oxidizing process. This property motivated us to investigate the level of the trans fatty acids, as well as the level of oxidation in irradiated ground beef. Irradiation of ground beef was performed by gamma rays from a {sup 60}Co source. The applied radiation doses were 0; 1.0; 2.0; 3.0; 4.0; 5.0; 6.0; 7.0 and 8.0 kGy. Lipid peroxidation in terms of TBA number and carbonyl content was monitored during storage. The sample characteristics and trans fatty acids composition were measured, following irradiation and after 60 and 90 days of storage at -10 deg. C.

  17. The effect of ground electrode on the sensitivity, symmetricity and technical feasibility of scalp EEG recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paukkunen, Antti Kimmo Olavi; Sepponen, Raimo

    2008-09-01

    Although the choice of the measurement reference strongly affects the measurement sensitivity, validity and comparability, selection is often based on tradition, convenience and comparability to earlier results [Dien in Behav Res Methods Ins C 30(1):34-43, 1998; Femi and Sundor in Int J Psychosom 36(1-4):23-33; 1989]. Artificial means can be applied to compensate for the referential issues, but they cannot restore any lost data. The validity of the recorded data is ultimately defined by the hardware setup. In this simulation study, common average ground reference (AR) is characterized and compared to two alternative common ground reference schemes in respect to their influence on the sensitivity distribution and technical feasibility of scalp EEG recording. It was found that, despite the polar average reference effect [Junghöfer et al. in Clin Neurophysiol 110(6):1149-1155; 1999], AR merits a significantly higher symmetricity and should be promoted generally not only in high-electrode-density studies, but also in low-channel-count studies if the stringent design requirements can be met. In low-electrode-density studies, balancing the setup may prove challenging, but successful implementation can provide nearly undistorted data. Isolation of the system is a critical parameter, but technological advances enable the requirements to be fulfilled. A physical ground should be applied if high isolation is not applicable or if it is defined by the application. The results will apply for the applied homogenous concentric 3-sphere model, but should be further studied in a realistic context if more detailed and case-sensitive information is required; the underlying phenomena are generally applicable.

  18. Reflecting reflection in supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    Reflection has moved from the margins to the mainstream in supervision. Notions of reflection have become well established since the late 1980s. These notions have provided useful framing devices to help conceptualize some important processes in guidance and counseling. However, some applications...

  19. Determination of the effect of brand and product identification on consumer palatability ratings of ground beef patties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilfong, A K; McKillip, K V; Gonzalez, J M; Houser, T A; Unruh, J A; Boyle, E A E; O'Quinn, T G

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of brand and product identification on consumer palatability ratings of ground beef patties. Six treatments were used in the study: 90/10 Certified Angus Beef (CAB) ground sirloin, 90/10 ground beef, 80/20 CAB ground chuck, 80/20 ground chuck, 80/20 ground beef, and 73/27 CAB ground beef. Ground beef was processed into 151.2-g patties using a patty former with 2 consecutively formed patties assigned to blind consumer testing and the following 2 assigned to informed testing. Following cooking to 74°C, patties were cut into quarters and served to consumers. Consumers ( = 112) evaluated samples in 2 rounds for tenderness, juiciness, flavor liking, texture liking, and overall liking. Each trait was also rated as either acceptable or unacceptable. In the first round of testing, samples were blind evaluated, with no information about the treatments provided to consumers, but in the second round, product type and brand were disclosed prior to sample evaluation. Additionally, texture profile and shear force analyses were performed on patties from each treatment. Few differences were observed for palatability traits during blind consumer testing; however, during informed testing, 90/10 CAB ground sirloin was rated greatest ( brand disclosure. Increased ( branded product that received increased ( brand and product information, few consumers find differences in eating quality among ground beef treatments; however, when consumers are aware of the brand, fat level, and subprimal blend prior to sampling, these factors have a large impact on consumer eating satisfaction.

  20. Spatial genetic structure of bristle-thighed curlews (Numenius tahitiensis): breeding area differentiation not reflected on the non-breeding grounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Tibbitts, T. Lee; Gill, Robert E.; Williams, Ian S.; Talbot, Sandra L.

    2015-01-01

    Migratory birds occupy geographically and ecologically disparate areas during their annual cycle with conditions on breeding and non-breeding grounds playing separate and important roles in population dynamics. We used data from nuclear microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA control region loci to assess the breeding and non-breeding spatial genetic structure of a transoceanic migrant shorebird, the bristle-thighed curlew. We found spatial variance in the distribution of allelic and haplotypic frequencies between the curlew's two breeding areas in Alaska but did not observe this spatial structure throughout its non-breeding range on low-lying tropical and subtropical islands in the Central Pacific (Oceania). This suggests that the two breeding populations do not spatially segregate during the non-breeding season. Lack of migratory connectivity is likely attributable to the species' behavior, as bristle-thighed curlews exhibit differential timing of migration and some individuals move among islands during non-breeding months. Given the detrimental impact of many past and current human activities on island ecosystems, admixture of breeding populations in Oceania may render the bristle-thighed curlew less vulnerable to perturbations there, as neither breeding population will be disproportionally affected by local habitat losses or by stochastic events. Furthermore, lack of migratory connectivity may enable bristle-thighed curlews to respond to changing island ecosystems by altering their non-breeding distribution. However, availability of suitable non-breeding habitat for curlews in Oceania is increasingly limited on both low-lying and high islands by habitat loss, sea level rise, and invasive mammalian predators that pose a threat to flightless and flight-compromised curlews during the molting period.

  1. Effects of Dielectric Substrates and Ground Planes on Resonance Frequency of Archimedean Spirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Jerris W; Ramaswamy, Vijaykumar; Arora, Rajendra K; Edison, Arthur S; Brey, William W

    2016-04-01

    Superconducting self-resonant spiral structures are of current interest for applications both in metamaterials and as probe coils for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for high-sensitivity chemical analysis. Accurate spiral models are available in the literature for behavior of a spiral below and up to self-resonance. However, knowledge of the higher modes is also important. We present the relationships between the spiral parameters and the multiple mode frequencies of single sided spirals on dielectric substrates as modeled by method of moments simulation. In the absence of a ground plane, we find that the mode frequency has a linear though not necessarily harmonic dependence on the mode number. The effect of a thick substrate can be approximated by an effective dielectric constant. But when the thickness is less than 20% of the spiral trace width (router - rinner) this approximation is no longer accurate. We have developed a simple empirical formula to predict the higher modes.

  2. High-Density Effects in X-ray Reflection Models from Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    García, Javier A; Kallman, Timothy R; Dauser, Thomas; Parker, Michael L; McClintock, Jeffrey E; Steiner, James F; Wilms, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    The current models for the X-ray reflected spectrum from accretion disks around compact objects are commonly calculated for a constant density along a few Thomson depths from in the direction normal to the irradiated surface. In this models an important simplification is adopted, that is that the ionization structure of the material is completely governed by the the ratio of the incident flux to the gas density (i.e., the ionization parameter $\\xi$. In this setup the value of the density is is typically fixed at $n=10^{15}$ cm$^{-3}$, as it is assumed that the ionization state of the gas is the same for equal values of $\\xi$. In this paper we explore the limitations of this assumption by computing the reflected spectra for various values of the gas density. We show that for large values ($n \\gtrsim 10^{17}$ cm$^{-3}$) the high-density effects become important, significantly modifying the reflected spectrum. The main observed effect is a large increase of thermal emission at soft energies (below $\\sim2$ keV), ...

  3. Transfer matrix analysis of backscattering and reflection effects on WDM-PON systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simatupang, Joni Welman; Lee, San-Liang

    2013-11-18

    This paper proposes using power transfer matrix analysis to characterize the effects of Rayleigh backscattering and Fresnel reflection on WDM-PON systems. The modeling of a WDM-PON system can be carried out simply by matrix multiplication of the corresponding matrices for all the building blocks, where all possible guided backward lights and resonant configurations along the optical network can be accounted for. The total sum of all interferences affecting the bidirectional transmission that leads to an optical crosstalk-to-signal (C/S) ratio can be modeled as back-reflections through cascaded two-port networks for the downstream and upstream signals. This approach is simple, robust, efficient, and also accurate. Its accuracy is verified for simple system architectures and then applied to study more complicated cases. The results show its versatility to analyze a wide variety of bidirectional optical transmission systems.

  4. Measurement of stress-induced birefringence in glasses based on reflective laser feedback effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisha, Niu; YanXiong, Niu; Jiyang, Li

    2017-02-01

    A glass birefringence measurement system utilizing the reflective laser feedback (RLF) effect is presented. The measurement principle is analyzed based on the equivalent cavity of a Fabry-Perot interferometer, and the experiments are conducted with a piece of quartz glass with applied extrusion force. In the feedback system, aluminum film used as a feedback mirror is affixed to the back of the sample. When the light is reflected back into the cavity, as the reinjected light is imprinted with the birefringence information in the sample, the gain and polarization states of the laser are modulated. The variation of optical power and polarization states hopping is monitored to obtain the magnitude of the stress. The system has advantages such as simplicity and low-cost with a precision of 1.9 nm. Moreover, by adjusting the position of the aluminum, large-area samples can be measured anywhere at any place.

  5. Matter-wave soliton bouncing on a reflecting surface under the effect of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benseghir, A.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Baizakov, B. B.; Abdullaev, F. Kh.

    2014-08-01

    The dynamics of a matter-wave soliton bouncing on the reflecting surface (atomic mirror) under the effect of gravity has been studied by analytical and numerical means. The analytical description is based on the variational approach. Resonant oscillations of the soliton's center of mass and width, induced by appropriate modulation of the atomic scattering length and the slope of the linear potential, are analyzed. In numerical experiments we observe the Fermi-type acceleration of the soliton when the vertical position of the reflecting surface is periodically varied in time. Analytical predictions are compared to the results of numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation and qualitative agreement between them is found.

  6. Effect of perfectly matched layer reflection coefficient on modal analysis of leaky waveguide modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chih-Hsien; Chang, Hung-chun

    2011-01-17

    The reflection coefficient is one important parameter of the perfectly matched layer (PML). Here we investigate its effect on the modal analysis of leaky waveguide modes by examining three different leaky waveguide structures, i.e., the holey fiber, the air-core terahertz pipe waveguide, and the gain-guided and index-antiguided slab waveguide. Numerical results reveal that the typical values 10(-8) ~10(-12) are inadequate for obtaining the imaginary part of the complex propagation constant, and the suggested reflection coefficient would be much smaller, for example, 10(-50) or 10(-100). With such a small coefficient, both the computational window size and the PML thickness can be significantly reduced without loss of stability. Moreover, in some cases, the modal field profiles can only be accurately obtained with such a small coefficient.

  7. The Town Effect: Dynamic Interaction between a Group of Structures and Waves in the Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uenishi, Koji

    2010-11-01

    In a conventional approach, the mechanical behaviour of a structure subjected to seismic or blast waves is treated separately from its surroundings, and in many cases, the dynamic coupling effect between multiple structures and the waves propagating in the ground is disregarded. However, if many structures are built densely in a developed urban area, this dynamic interaction may not become negligible. The first purpose of this contribution is to briefly show the effect of multiple interactions between waves and surface buildings in a town. The analysis is based on a recently developed, fully coupled, rigorous mathematical study, and for simplicity, each building in the town is represented by a rigid foundation, a mass at the top and an elastic spring that connects the foundation and mass. The buildings stand at regular spatial intervals on a linear elastic half-space and are subjected to two-dimensional anti-plane vibrations. It is found that the buildings in this model significantly interact with each other through the elastic ground, and the resonant (eigen) frequencies of the collective system (buildings or town) become lower than that of a single building with the same rigid foundation. This phenomenon may be called the “town effect” or “city effect.” Then, second, it is shown that the actual, unique structural damage pattern caused by the 1976 Friuli, Italy, earthquake may better be explained by this “town effect,” rather than by investigating the seismic performance of each damaged building individually. The results suggest that it may also be possible to evaluate the physical characteristics of incident seismic/blast waves “inversely” from the damage patterns induced to structures by the waves.

  8. High Re wall-modeled LES of aircraft wake vortices in ground effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiry, Olivier; Winckelmans, Gregoire; Duponcheel, Matthieu

    2014-11-01

    We have been able to perform wall-resolved LES, using a fourth order code, to simulate (aircraft) wake vortices interacting with the ground, also with cross or head winds, up to Reynolds numbers of the order of Re = Γ / ν = 2 ×104 . The present work aims at providing higher Re simulations, and also simulations with rough walls (e.g., grass), through the use of LES with near wall modeling. Various types of models are compared: point-wise and averaged algebraic models, and two-layers models. When using averaged models, the averaging methodology is of importance, since there is essentially no homogeneous direction in the case of wake vortices in ground effects. Uni- and multi-directional averaging strategies, with and without additional time averaging will be considered. When two-layer models are used, a RANS sub-layer will be compared to a simpler approach based on simplified turbulent boundary layer equations. The approaches are first validated on simpler flows, channel flow or wake flow, for which reference wall-resolved LES or DNS results are available. Research fellow (Ph.D. student) at the F.R.S.-FNRS (Belgium)

  9. Embodiment of abstract categories in space… grounding or mere compatibility effects? The case of politics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Ana Rita; Garrido, Margarida V; Semin, Gün R

    2016-05-01

    In two experiments, the role played by stimulus response compatibility in driving the spatial grounding of abstract concepts is examined. In Experiment 1, participants were asked to classify politics-related words appearing to the left or the right side of a computer monitor as socialist or conservative. Responses were given by pressing vertically aligned keys and thus orthogonal to the spatial information that may have been implied by the words. Responses given by left or right index finger were counterbalanced. In Experiment 2, a lexical decision task, participants categorized political words or non-words presented to the left or the right auditory channels, by pressing the top/bottom button of a response box. The response category labels (word or non-word) were also orthogonal to the spatial information that may have been implied by the stimulus words. In both experiments, responses were faster when socialism-related words were presented on the left and conservatism-related words were presented on the right, irrespective of the reference of the response keys or labels. Overall, our findings suggest that the spatial grounding of abstract concepts (or at least politics-related ones) is independent of experimentally driven stimulus-response compatibility effects.

  10. Effects of uranium-mining releases on ground-water quality in the Puerco River Basin, Arizona and New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Metre, Peter C.; Wirt, Laurie; Lopes, T.J.; Ferguson, S.A.

    1997-01-01

    Shallow ground water beneath the Puerco River of Arizona and New Mexico was studied to determine the effects of uranium-mining releases on water quality. Ground-water samples collected from 1989 to 1991 indicate that concentrations of dissolved uranium have decreased. Most samples from the alluvial aquifer downstream from Gallup, New Mexico, met with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant levels for gross alpha, gross beta, and radium and the proposed maximum contaminant level for uranium.

  11. Effective dose conversion coefficients for radionuclides exponentially distributed in the ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Kimiaki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokyo (Japan); Ishigure, Nobuhito [Nagoya University, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya City (Japan); Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Schlattl, Helmut [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen-German Research Center for Environmental Health, Department of Radiation Physics and Diagnostics, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    In order to provide fundamental data required for dose evaluation due to environmental exposures, effective dose conversion coefficients, that is, the effective dose rate per unit activity per unit area, were calculated for a number of potentially important radionuclides, assuming an exponential distribution in ground, over a wide range of relaxation depths. The conversion coefficients were calculated for adults and a new-born baby on the basis of dosimetric methods that the authors and related researchers have previously developed, using Monte Carlo simulations and anthropomorphic computational phantoms. The differences in effective dose conversion coefficients due to body size between the adult and baby phantoms were found to lie within 50 %, for most cases; however, for some low energies, differences could amount to a factor of 3. The effective dose per unit source intensity per area was found to decrease by a factor of 2-5, for increasing relaxation depths from 0 to 5 g/cm{sup 2}, above a source energy of 50 keV. It is also shown that implementation of the calculated coefficients into the computation of the tissue weighting factors and the adult reference computational phantoms of ICRP Publication 103 does not significantly influence the effective dose conversion coefficients of the environment. Consequently, the coefficients shown in this paper could be applied for the evaluation of effective doses, as defined according to both recommendations of ICRP Publications 103 and 60. (orig.)

  12. Dynamic Response and Ground-Motion Effects of Building Clusters During Large Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbiliroglu, Y. D.; Taborda, R.; Bielak, J.

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the response of building clusters during earthquakes, the effect that they have on the ground motion, and how individual buildings interact with the surrounding soil and with each other. We conduct a series of large-scale, physics-based simulations that synthesize the earthquake source and the response of entire building inventories. The configuration of the clusters, defined by the total number of buildings, their number of stories, dynamic properties, and spatial distribution and separation, is varied for each simulation. In order to perform these simulations efficiently while recurrently modifying these characteristics without redoing the entire "source to building structure" simulation every time, we use the Domain Reduction Method (DRM). The DRM is a modular two-step finite-element methodology for modeling wave propagation problems in regions with localized features. It allows one to store and reuse the background motion excitation of subdomains without loss of information. Buildings are included in the second step of the DRM. Each building is represented by a block model composed of additional finite-elements in full contact with the ground. These models are adjusted to emulate the general geometric and dynamic properties of real buildings. We conduct our study in the greater Los Angeles basin, using the main shock of the 1994 Northridge earthquake for frequencies up to 5Hz. In the first step of the DRM we use a domain of 82 km x 82 km x 41 km. Then, for the second step, we use a smaller sub-domain of 5.12 km x 5.12 km x 1.28 km, with the buildings. The results suggest that site-city interaction effects are more prominent for building clusters in soft-soil areas. These effects consist in changes in the amplitude of the ground motion and dynamic response of the buildings. The simulations are done using Hercules, the parallel octree-based finite-element earthquake simulator developed by the Quake Group at Carnegie

  13. Modeling of Regional Climate Change Effects on Ground-Level Ozone and Childhood Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, Perry E.; Knowlton, Kim; Carr, Jessie L.; Kinney, Patrick L.

    2011-01-01

    Background The adverse respiratory effects of ground-level ozone are well-established. Ozone is the air pollutant most consistently projected to increase under future climate change. Purpose To project future pediatric asthma emergency department visits associated with ground-level ozone changes, comparing 1990s to 2020s. Methods This study assessed future numbers of asthma emergency department visits for children aged 0–17 years using (1) baseline New York City metropolitan area emergency department rates, (2) a dose–response relationship between ozone levels and pediatric asthma emergency department visits, and (3) projected daily 8-hour maximum ozone concentrations for the 2020s as simulated by a global-to-regional climate change and atmospheric chemistry model. Sensitivity analyses included population projections and ozone precursor changes. This analysis occurred in 2010. Results In this model, climate change could cause an increase in regional summer ozone-related asthma emergency department visits for children aged 0–17 years of 7.3% across the New York City metropolitan region by the 2020s. This effect diminished with inclusion of ozone precursor changes. When population growth is included, the projections of morbidity related to ozone are even larger. Conclusions The results of this analysis demonstrate that the use of regional climate and atmospheric chemistry models make possible the projection of local climate change health effects for specific age groups and specific disease outcomes – such as emergency department visits for asthma. Efforts should be made to improve on this type of modeling to inform local and wider-scale climate change mitigation and adaptation policy. PMID:21855738

  14. Effect of coated and uncoated ground flaxseed addition on rheological, physical and sensory properties of Taftoon bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roozegar, M H; Shahedi, M; Keramet, J; Hamdami, N; Roshanak, S

    2015-08-01

    Flaxseed is used to fortify bread. In order to reduce cyanogenic glycosides compounds of flaxseed, ground flaxseed was incubated at 30 °C and heated in a kitchen microwave oven. The cyanogenic compounds of flaxseed were reduced to 13.4 %. Treated ground flaxseed was coated with Arabic gum solution containing ascorbic acid and hydrogenated fat and was stored at 25 °C for 80 days in order to prevent oxidation of flaxseed oil. Results showed that oxidation in coated samples was lower than that in control samples and that there was a significant difference between them (p bread. Rheological, physical and organoleptic tests were carried out in order to evaluate dough and bread properties. Results showed that with increasing coated and uncoated ground flaxseed percentages, a decrease in water absorption and an increase in stability, dough development and relaxation time of dough occurred. The lowest water absorption was observed by adding 25 % coated ground flaxseed with hydrogenated fat. The highest dough development and dough stability time were observed by adding 25 % coated ground flaxseed with Arabic gum. Results indicated that coated and uncoated ground flaxseed has a good effect on decreasing the staling rate compared to the control bread. Results of organoleptic test showed that bread with 5 and 15 % coated and uncoated ground flaxseed had better acceptability.

  15. Simulated Sea-Level Rise Effects on the Above and Below-Ground Growth of Two Tidal Marsh Plant Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schile, L. M.; Callaway, J. C.; Kelly, M.

    2011-12-01

    Sea-level is expected to rise between 55 and 140 cm in the next century and is likely to have significant effects on the distribution and maintenance of tidal wetlands; however, little is known about the effects of increased sea level on Pacific coast tidal marsh vegetation. We initiated a field experiment in March 2011 to examine how increased depth and duration of inundation affect above and below-ground growth of two tidal wetland plant species: Schoenoplectus acutus and S. americanus. PVC planters, referred to as marsh organs, were installed at fixed elevations in channels at two ancient marshes in the San Francisco Bay Estuary: Browns Island and Rush Ranch. Each marsh organ structure is comprised of five rows of three six-inch PVC pipes, with each row 15cm lower than the row above, and was filled with surrounding mudflat sediment. Elevations span 60 cm and were chosen to be lower than the average current elevations of both species at each marsh to reflect projected increases in sea level. Rhizomes were collected from Browns Island, the less-saline site, and were cut to uniform sizes before planting. In every row, each species was grown individually and together. On a monthly basis, plant heights were recorded and pore-water sulfide concentration, salinity, and soil oxidation-reduction potential were measured. Schoenoplectus americanus growth and density significantly decreased with increased inundation at both sites. Schoenoplectus acutus growth was impacted more significantly at lower elevations at Rush Ranch but had little variation in density and growth across elevations at Browns Island. Salinity and sulfide concentrations varied little across elevations within a site but differed between sites. Above and belowground biomass will be collected in September 2011 to measure total annual productivity. The experiment provides basic yet crucial information on the impacts of increased inundation on tidal wetland vegetation and insight into potential changes in

  16. Effect of arsenic on reflectance spectra and chlorophyll fluorescence of aquatic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriel, Analia; Dundas, Gavin; Fernández Cirelli, Alicia; Lagorio, Maria G

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic pollution of groundwater is a serious problem in many regions of Latin America that causes severe risks to human health. As a consequence, non-destructive monitoring methodologies, sensitive to arsenic presence in the environment and able to perform a rapid screening of large polluted areas, are highly sought-after. Both chlorophyll - a fluorescence and reflectance of aquatic plants may be potential indicators to sense toxicity in water media. In this work, the effects of arsenic on the optical and photophysical properties of leaves of different aquatic plants (Vallisneria gigantea, Azolla filiculoides and Lemna minor) were evaluated. Reflectance spectra were recorded for the plant leaves from 300 to 2400 nm. The spectral distribution of the fluorescence was also studied and corrected for light re-absorption processes. Photosynthetic parameters (Fv/Fm and ΦPSII) were additionally calculated from the variable chlorophyll fluorescence recorded with a pulse amplitude modulated fluorometer. Fluorescence and reflectance properties for V. gigantea and A. filiculoides were sensitive to arsenic presence in contrast to the behaviour of L. minor. Observed changes in fluorescence spectra could be interpreted in terms of preferential damage in photosystem II. The quantum efficiency of photosystem II for the first two species was also affected, decreasing upon arsenic treatment. As a result of this research, V. gigantea and A. filiculoides were proposed as bioindicators of arsenic occurrence in aquatic media.

  17. Using Reflection with Peers to Help Students Learn Effective Problem Solving Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Andrew; Singh, Chandralekha

    2010-10-01

    We describe a study in which introductory physics students engage in reflection with peers about problem solving. The recitations for an introductory physics course with 200 students were broken into the "Peer Reflection" (PR) group and the traditional group. Each week in recitation, students in the PR group reflected in small teams on selected problems from the homework. The graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants (TAs) in the PR group recitations provided guidance and coaching to help students learn effective problem solving heuristics. In the recitations for the traditional group, students had the opportunity to ask the graduate TA questions about the homework before they took a weekly quiz. On the final exam with only multiple-choice questions, the PR group drew diagrams on more problems than the traditional group, even when there was no external reward for doing so. Since there was no partial credit for drawing the diagrams on the scratch books, students did not draw diagrams simply to get credit for the effort shown and must value the use of diagrams for solving problems if they drew them. We also find that, regardless of whether the students belonged to the traditional or PR groups, those who drew more diagrams for the multiple-choice questions outperformed those who did not draw them.

  18. Effects of porous films on the light reflectivity of pigmentary titanium dioxide particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yong; Qiao, Bing; Wang, Tig-Jie; Gao, Han; Yu, Keyi

    2016-11-01

    The light reflectivity of the film-coated titanium dioxide particles (TiO2) as a function of the film refractive index was derived and calculated using a plane film model. For the refractive index in the range of 1.00-2.15, the lower the film refractive index is, the higher is the light reflectivity of the film. It is inferred that the lower apparent refractive index of the porous film resulted in the higher reflectivity of light, i.e., the higher hiding power of the titanium dioxide particles. A dense film coating on TiO2 particles with different types of oxides, i.e., SiO2, Al2O3, MgO, ZnO, ZrO2, TiO2, corresponding to different refractive indices of the film from 1.46 to 2.50, was achieved, and the effects of refractive index on the hiding power from the model prediction were confirmed. Porous film coating of TiO2 particles was achieved by adding the organic template agent triethanolamine (TEA). The hiding power of the coated TiO2 particles was increased from 88.3 to 90.8 by adding the TEA template to the film coating (5-20 wt%). In other words, the amount of titanium dioxide needed was reduced by approximately 10% without a change in the hiding power. It is concluded that the film structure coated on TiO2 particle surface affects the light reflectivity significantly, namely, the porous film exhibits excellent performance for pigmentary titanium dioxide particles with high hiding power.

  19. Effects of Stress Activated Positive-Hole Charge Carriers on Radar Reflectance of Gabbro-Diorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C.; Vanderbilt, V. C.; Dahlgren, R.; Cherukupally, A.; Freund, F. T.

    2011-12-01

    When load is applied to igneous or high-grade metamorphic rocks, trapped electron vacancy defects are activated and become mobile positive-hole charge carriers. These mobile charge carriers repel each other through Coulomb interactions and move outward from the stressed region. As large numbers of positive-holes reach the surface of the rock, this surface charge may cause an observable change in radar reflectance. In this experiment, a series of holes is drilled into a large gabbro-diorite boulder from the A.R. Wilson Quarry in Aromas, CA. Bustar, an expansive, non-explosive demolition agent, is poured into the holes while a 1.2 GHz radar system measures the amplitude of radar waves reflected from the rock's surface. Over the course of the experiment, the radar antenna is swept repeatedly across one face of the rock, pausing in one of twelve positions to collect data before moving to the next position. At the end of each sweep, the radar is calibrated against both a corner reflector and a flat-plate reflector. This sampling method is employed to detect and assign a cause to transient effects observed at any one location. An initial analysis of the radar data shows a high level of agreement between readings from the flat-plate and corner reflectors, supporting the use of flat-plate reflectors as a calibration source for this omnidirectional radar system. Fitting a trend to the amplitude of the wave reflected from the rock's surface is complicated by the presence of unexpected outliers and noise artifacts from the radar system itself. It appears that such a trend, if present, would likely indicate a change in amplitude of the reflected signal of less than 5 percent over the course of the experiment.

  20. Environmental conditions enhance toxicant effects in larvae of the ground beetle Pterostichus oblongopunctatus (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bednarska, Agnieszka J., E-mail: a.bednarska@uj.edu.p [Institute of Environmental Sciences, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 7, 30-387 Krakow (Poland); Laskowski, Ryszard, E-mail: ryszard.laskowski@uj.edu.p [Institute of Environmental Sciences, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 7, 30-387 Krakow (Poland)

    2009-05-15

    The wide geographical distribution of ground beetles Pterostichus oblongopunctatus makes them very likely to be exposed to several environmental stressors at the same time. These could include both climatic stress and exposure to chemicals. Our previous studies demonstrated that the combined effect of nickel (Ni) and chlorpyrifos (CHP) was temperature (T)-dependent in adult P. oblongopunctatus. Frequently the different developmental stages of an organism are differently sensitive to single stressors, and for a number of reasons, such as differences in exposure routes, their interactions may also take different forms. Because of this, we studied the effects of the same factors on the beetle larvae. The results showed that all factors, as well as their interactions, influenced larvae survival. The synergistic effect of Ni and CPF was temperature-dependent and the effect of Ni x T interaction on the proportion of emerged imagines indicated stronger toxicity of Ni at 25 deg. C than at 10 deg. C. - Combined negative effects of nickel and chlorpyrifos on carabid beetles depend on ambient temperature.

  1. Strong ground movement induced by mining activities and its effect on power transmission structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Kao-shan; CHEN Shen-en

    2009-01-01

    Surface mining activities may introduce damages to nearby infrastructure. Concerns are put forward by the power company about structural integrity of electric power transmission structures in areas where coal mining activities cause strong ground vibrations. Common practice in the power industry is to limit ground motion by specifying maximum Peak Particle Velocity. So far, there is a lack of industry-wide recognized guidelines on how ground vibration limits should be set for the transmission structures. In order to develop a defense strategy to protect power transmission lines against strong ground motions in mining areas, a systematic research work was conducted to establish strong ground vibration characteristics and to study impacts of ground excitations on transmission pole structures. Ground movements were recorded using geophones and wireless tri-axial sensing units. The process of generating ground motion response spectra via analyzing actual ground motion measurements is described in the paper. These spectra developed based on peak particle velocities were used as a basis for spectral analysis performed using validated Finite Element models to obtain structural displacements, reactions and stress states of the transmission pole structures in the mining sites. A quantitative ground motion limit was established by comparing structural responses with the corresponding design requirements.

  2. 2.5D Simulation of basin-edge effects on the ground motion characteristics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J P Narayan

    2003-09-01

    The effects of basin-edge and soil velocity on the ground motion characteristics have been simulated using 2.5D modeling. One of the most significant advantages of the 2.5D simulation is that 3D radiation pattern can be generated in a 2D numerical grid using double-couple shear dislocation source. Further, 2.5D numerical modeling avoids the extensive computational cost of 3D modeling. The responses of basin-edge model using different soil velocities revealed that surface waves were generated near the edge of the basin and propagated normal to the edge, towards the basin. Further, the results depict increase of amplification, duration and surface wave generation with the decrease in soil velocity.

  3. Health effects of digital textbooks on school-age children: a grounded theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seomun, Gyeongae; Lee, Jung-Ah; Kim, Eun-Young; Im, Meeyoung; Kim, Miran; Park, Sun-A; Lee, Youngjin

    2013-10-01

    This qualitative study used the grounded theory approach to analyze digital textbook-related health experiences of school-age children. In-depth interviews were held with 40 elementary school students who had used digital textbooks for at least a year. Data analysis revealed a total of 56 concepts, 20 subcategories, and 11 categories related to digital textbook health issues, the central phenomena being "health-related experiences." Students' health-related experiences were classified into "physical" and "psychological" symptoms. Adverse health effects related to digital textbook usage were addressed via both "student-led" and "instructor-led" coping strategies. Students' coping strategies were often inefficient, but instructor-led strategies seemed to prevent health problems. When health issues were well managed, students tended to accept digital textbooks as educational tools. Our findings suggest that students can form healthy computer habits if digital textbook usage is directed in a positive manner.

  4. Self contamination effects in the TAUVEX UV Telescope: Ground testing and computer simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifshitz, Y.; Noter, Y.; Grossman, E.; Genkin, L.; Murat, M.; Saar, N.; Blasberger, A.

    1994-01-01

    The contamination effects due to outgassing from construction materials of the TAUVEX (Tel Aviv University UV Telescope) were evaluated using a combination of ground testing and computer simulations. Tests were performed from the material level of the system level including: (1) High sensitivity CVCM(10(exp -3 percent) measurements of critical materials. (2) Optical degradation measurements of samples specially contaminated by outgassing products at different contamination levels. (3) FTIR studies of chemical composition of outgassed products on above samples. (4) High resolution AFM studies of surface morphology of contaminated surfaces. The expected degradation of TAUVEX performance in mission was evaluated applying a computer simulation code using input parameters determined experimentally in the above tests. The results have served as guidelines for the proper selection of materials, cleanliness requirements, determination of the thermal conditions of the system and bakeout processes.

  5. An Efficient approach for Shielding Effect of the Grounding Electrodes under Impulse-Current Voltage based on MATLAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyani Pole

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The lightning current waveform has a major influence on the dynamic performance of ground electrodes. While high lightning current intensity improves the dynamic grounding performance due to ionization of the soil, very fast fronted pulses might worsen the performance in case of inductive behaviour. The previous analysis has often been based on quasistatic approximation that is not applicable to very fast fronted pulses. Previous Research focused on analyzing the impulse current dispersal regularity of different branches when injecting at one point. Comparing with the leakage current distribution of a single ground electrode, it is found that the leakage currents along the branches increase with the distance to the current feed point, and the more conductors near the injection point, the more uneven the leakage current distribution is. In this paper by simulation result we indicate that shielding effect should be taken into account when analyzing the impulse characteristics of grounding electrodes. Based on the simulation results, new empirical formulas applicable for slow and very fast fronted lightning current pulses are proposed. The effects of the ionization of the soil are disregarded; therefore, the new formulas are applicable for a conservative estimate of the upper bound of the impulse impedance of ground electrodes. In this paper we also analyze and compare by the MATLAB. We also provide dynamic behavior of ground electrodes.

  6. Detection of the Zeeman effect in atmospheric O2 using a ground-based microwave radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Murk, Axel; Larsson, Richard; Buehler, Stefan A.; Eriksson, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    In this work we study the Zeeman effect on stratospheric O2 using ground-based microwave radiometer measurements. The Zeeman effect is a phenomenon which occurs when an external magnetic field interacts with a molecule or an atom of total electron spin different from zero. Such an interaction will split an original energy level into several sub-levels [1]. In the atmosphere, oxygen is an abundant molecule which in its ground electronic state has a permanent magnetic dipole moment coming from two parallel electron spins. The interaction of the magnetic dipole moment with the Earth magnetic field leads to a Zeeman splitting of the O2 rotational transitions which polarizes the emission spectra. A special campaign was carried out in order to measure this effect in the oxygen emission line centered at 53.07 GHz in Bern (Switzerland). The measurements were possible using a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) spectrometer with 1 GHz of band width to measure the whole oxygen emission line centered at 53.07 GHz and a narrow spectrometer (4 MHz) to measure the center of the line with a very high resolution (1 kHz). Both a fixed and a rotating mirror were incorporated to the TEMPERA (TEMPERature RAdiometer) radiometer in order to be able to measure under different observational angles. This new configuration allowed us to change the angle between the observational path and the Earth magnetic field direction. The measured spectra showed a clear polarized signature when the observational angles were changed evidencing the Zeeman effect in the oxygen molecule. In addition, simulations carried out with the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS) [2] allowed us to verify the microwave measurements showing a very good agreement between model and measurements. The incorporation of this effect to the forward model will allow to extend the temperature retrievals beyond 50 km. This improvement in the forward model will be very useful for the assimilation of brightness temperatures in

  7. Effective algorithm for ray-tracing simulations of lobster eye and similar reflective optical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichý, Vladimír; Hudec, René; Němcová, Šárka

    2016-06-01

    The algorithm presented is intended mainly for lobster eye optics. This type of optics (and some similar types) allows for a simplification of the classical ray-tracing procedure that requires great many rays to simulate. The method presented performs the simulation of a only few rays; therefore it is extremely effective. Moreover, to simplify the equations, a specific mathematical formalism is used. Only a few simple equations are used, therefore the program code can be simple as well. The paper also outlines how to apply the method to some other reflective optical systems.

  8. Effect of Vacuum on the Laser-Induced Damage of Anti-Reflection Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LING Xiu-Lan; ZHAO Yuan-An; LI Da-Wei; ZHOU Ming; SHAO Jian-Da; FAN Zheng-Xiu

    2009-01-01

    In the comparison of damage modifications, absorption measurement and energy dispersive x-ray analysis, the effect of vacuum on the laser-induced damage of anti-reflection coatings is analyzed. It is found that vacuum decreases the laser-induced damage threshold of the films. The low laser-induced damage threshold in vacuum environments as opposed to air environments is attributed to water absorption and the formation of the O/Si,O/Zr sub-stoichiometry in the course of laser irradiation.

  9. Ground-temperature controlling effects of duct-ventilated railway embankment in permafrost regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU; Fujun; CHENG; Guodong

    2004-01-01

    Based on observed data from field-testing embankment of the Qinghai-Tibet Railway, ground-temperature controlling effect of duct-ventilated embankment is studied in this paper.The results show that ventilation ducts can effectively cool the soils surrounding the ducts of the embankment, and the heat budget of the ambient soils in a year shows as heat release. Temperature status of the permafrost below the embankment with ducts buried in the relatively high position is similar to that of the common embankment. The permafrost processes warming all along in the two freezing-thawing cycles when the embankment was constructed. However, the temperature of the frozen soils below the embankment, in which the ducts buried in the relatively low position, rises a little in the initial stage. After that, it cools down gradually. At the same time,ventilation ducts can effectively reduce the thermal disturbance caused by the filled soils. The frozen soils below the common embankment and that with high-posited ducts absorb heat all along in the initial two cycles. While the soils below the embankment with low-posited ducts begin to release heat in the second cycle. This phenomenon proves that the ventilation embankment with low-posited ducts shows efficient temperature-controlling effect. Such embankment can actively cool the subgrade soils and therefore keeps the roadbed thermally stable.

  10. Acute fatigue effects on ground reaction force of lower limbs during countermovement jumps

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Gabriel Fábrica; González,Paula V.; Jefferson Fagundes Loss

    2013-01-01

    Parameters associated with the performance of countermovement jumps were identified from vertical ground reaction force recordings during fatigue and resting conditions. Fourteen variables were defined, dividing the vertical ground reaction force into negative and positive external working times and times in which the vertical ground reaction force values were lower and higher than the participant's body weight. We attempted to explain parameter variations by considering the relationship betw...

  11. Pupil old/new effects reflect stimulus encoding and decoding in short-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocher, Andreas; Graf, Tim

    2016-12-01

    We conducted five pupil old/new experiments to examine whether pupil old/new effects can be linked to familiarity and/or recollection processes of recognition memory. In Experiments 1-3, we elicited robust pupil old/new effects for legal words and pseudowords (Experiment 1), positive and negative words (Experiment 2), and low-frequency and high-frequency words (Experiment 3). Importantly, unlike for old/new effects in ERPs, we failed to find any effects of long-term memory representations on pupil old/new effects. In Experiment 4, using the words and pseudowords from Experiment 1, participants made lexical decisions instead of old/new decisions. Pupil old/new effects were restricted to legal words. Additionally requiring participants to make speeded responses (Experiment 5) led to a complete absence of old/new effects. Taken together, these data suggest that pupil old/new effects do not map onto familiarity and recollection processes of recognition memory. They rather seem to reflect strength of memory traces in short-term memory, with little influence of long-term memory representations. Crucially, weakening the memory trace through manipulations in the experimental task significantly reduces pupil/old new effects.

  12. Multi-Pulse Effects in the Damage to the LCLS Reflective Optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryutov, D

    2004-07-29

    A number of experiments to be performed on the planned Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) will have to use various types of reflective optics (see, e.g., [1]). On the other hand, LCLS will operate at a rate of 120 x-ray pulses per second. Therefore, when considering effects leading to the damage to its optics, one has to be concerned not only with a possible damage within one pulse, but also with effects accumulating during many pulses. We identify and analyze two of such effects: a thermal fatigue, and the intensity-dependent radiation damage. The first effect is associated with thermal stresses and deformations that occur in every pulse. The heating of the surface layers of the optics leads to a peculiar distribution of stresses, with a strong concentration near the surface. The quasistatic analysis of this problem was presented in [2]. In the present study, we show that transients in both transverse and longitudinal acoustic perturbations play a significant role and generally worsen the situation. If the maximum stresses approach the yield strength, the thermal fatigue causes degradation of the surface within a few thousands pulses. The second effect is related to formation of clusters of ionized atoms which lead to gross deformation of the lattice and formation of numerous vacancies and interstitials. At maximum LCLS fluxes, the number of displacements per atom may reach values exceeding unity during a few hours of operation of LCLS, meaning degradation of reflective properties of the surface of the optics. We derive constraints on the admissible fluence per pulse and suggest ways for decreasing the impact of the multipulse effects.

  13. Investigation of full and partial ground effects on a flapping foil hovering above a finite-sized platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Yeung, Ronald W.

    2016-07-01

    The full and partial ground effects on the lift generation of a flapping airfoil in normal hovering mode are investigated numerically using the discrete vortex method in two dimensions. To achieve full ground effect, the airfoil of chord c is made to hover above the center of a finite-sized platform of length 10c. We have observed the force-enhancement, force-reduction, and force-recovery regimes at low, medium, and high ground clearances in line with the existing literature. This paper puts special focus on partial ground effect when the airfoil is hovering near the edge of the platform. Lift-modifying mechanisms not previously observed under full ground effect have been discovered. When stroke reversal occurs near the edge of the platform, a relatively stationary strong vortex may form above the platform edge. This strong vortex can either increase or decrease the instantaneous lift force on the airfoil depending on the position of the airfoil relative to the platform edge. Also, the platform edge may lead to the formation of an additional vortex pair which increases the instantaneous lift force as the airfoil sweeps past the edge under suitable conditions. Lastly, the platform edge can lead to the formation of a reverse von Kármán vortex street that extends well below the stroke plane under suitable geometric arrangements.

  14. Pile-soil stress ratio in bidirectionally reinforced composite ground by considering soil arching effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹新军; 杨眉; 赵明华; 杨小礼

    2008-01-01

    To discuss the soil arching effect on the load transferring model and sharing ratios by the piles and inter-pile subsoil in the bidirectionally reinforced composite ground, the forming mechanism, mechanical behavior and its effect factors were discussed in detail. Then, the unified strength theory was introduced to set up the elastoplastic equilibrium differential equation of the subsoil under the limit equilibrium state. And from the equation, the solutions were derived with the corresponding formulas presented to calculate the earth pressure over and beneath the horizontal reinforced cushion or pillow, the stress of inter-pile subsoil and the pile-soil stress ratio. Based on the obtained solutions and measured data from an engineering project, the influence rules by the soil property parameters (i.e., the cohesion c and internal friction angle φ) and pile spacing on the pile-soil stress ratio n were discussed respectively. The results show that to improve the load sharing ratio by the piles, the more effective means for filling materials with a larger value of φ is to increase the ratio of pile cap size to spacing, while to reduce the pile spacing properly and increase the value of cohesion c is advisable for those filling materials with a smaller value of φ.

  15. [Diversity and stability of arthropod community in peach orchard under effects of ground cover vegetation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jie-xian; Wan, Nian-feng; Ji, Xiang-yun; Dan, Jia-gui

    2011-09-01

    A comparative study was conducted on the arthropod community in peach orchards with and without ground cover vegetation. In the orchard with ground cover vegetation, the individuals of beneficial, neutral, and phytophagous arthropods were 1.48, 1.84 and 0.64 times of those in the orchard without ground cover vegetation, respectively, but the total number of arthropods had no significant difference with that in the orchard without ground cover vegetation. The species richness, Shannon's diversity, and Pielou's evenness index of the arthropods in the orchard with ground cover vegetation were 83.733 +/- 4.932, 4.966 +/- 0.110, and 0.795 +/- 0.014, respectively, being significantly higher than those in the orchard without ground cover vegetation, whereas the Berger-Parker's dominance index was 0.135 +/- 0.012, being significantly lower than that (0.184 +/- 0.018) in the orchard without ground cover vegetation. There were no significant differences in the stability indices S/N and Sd/Sp between the two orchards, but the Nn/Np, Nd/Np, and Sn/Sp in the orchard with ground cover vegetation were 0.883 +/- 0.123. 1714 +/- 0.683, and 0.781 +/- 0.040, respectively, being significantly higher than those in the orchard without ground cover vegetation. Pearson's correlation analysis indicated that in the orchard with ground cover vegetation, the Shannon's diversity index was significantly negatively correlated with Nd/Np, Sd/Sp, and S/N but had no significant correlations with Nn/Np and Sn/Sp, whereas in the orchard without ground cover vegetation, the diversity index was significantly positively correlated with Nn/Np and Nd/Np and had no significant correlations with Sd/Sp, Sn/Sp, and S/N.

  16. Effect of experimental parameters on optimal reflection of light from opaque media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Benjamin R.; Gunawidjaja, Ray; Eilers, Hergen

    2016-01-01

    Previously we considered the effect of experimental parameters on optimized transmission through opaque media using spatial light modulator (SLM)-based wavefront shaping. In this study we consider the opposite geometry, in which we optimize reflection from an opaque surface such that the backscattered light is focused onto a spot on an imaging detector. By systematically varying different experimental parameters (genetic algorithm iterations, bin size, SLM active area, target area, spot size, and sample angle with respect to the optical axis) and optimizing the reflected light we determine how each parameter affects the intensity enhancement. We find that the effects of the experimental parameters on the enhancement are similar to those measured for a transmissive geometry, but with the exact functional forms changed due to the different geometry and the use of a genetic algorithm instead of an iterative algorithm. Additionally, we find preliminary evidence of greater enhancements than predicted by random matrix theory, suggesting a possibly new physical mechanism to be investigated in future work.

  17. Why is the Ratio of Reflectivity Effective for Chlorophyll Estimation in the Lake Water?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Oki

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The reasons why it is effective to estimate the chlorophyll-a concentration with the ratio of spectral radiance reflectance at the red light region and near infrared regions were shown in theory using a two-flow model. It was found that all of the backscattering coefficients can consequently be ignored by using the ratio of spectral radiance reflectance, which is the ratio of the upward radiance to the downward irradiance, at the red light and near infrared regions. In other words, the ratio can be expressed by using only absorption coefficients, which are more stable for measurement than backscattering coefficients. In addition, the band selection is crucial for producing the band ratio when the chlorophyll-a concentration is estimated without the effects of backscattering. I conclude that the two wavelengths selected must be close, but one must be within the absorption range of chlorophyll-a, and the other must be outside of the absorption range of chlorophyll-a, in order to accurately estimate the chlorophyll-a concentration.

  18. Shrub encroachment in Arctic tundra: Betula nana effects on above- and below-ground litter decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Jennie R; Buckeridge, Kate M; van de Weg, Martine J; Shaver, Gaius R; Schimel, Joshua P; Gough, Laura

    2017-03-06

    Rapid arctic vegetation change as a result of global warming includes an increase in the cover and biomass of deciduous shrubs. Increases in shrub abundance will result in a proportional increase of shrub litter in the litter community, potentially affecting carbon turnover rates in arctic ecosystems. We investigated the effects of leaf and root litter of a deciduous shrub, Betula nana, on decomposition, by examining species-specific decomposition patterns, as well as effects of Betula litter on the decomposition of other species. We conducted a two-year decomposition experiment in moist acidic tundra in northern Alaska, where we decomposed three tundra species (Vaccinium vitis-idaea, Rhododendron palustre, and Eriophorum vaginatum) alone and in combination with Betula litter. Decomposition patterns for leaf and root litter were determined using three different measures of decomposition (mass loss, respiration, extracellular enzyme activity). We report faster decomposition of Betula leaf litter compared to other species, with support for species differences coming from all three measures of decomposition. Mixing effects were less consistent among the measures, with negative mixing effects shown only for mass loss. In contrast, there were few species differences or mixing effects for root decomposition. Overall, we attribute longer-term litter mass loss patterns in to patterns created by early decomposition processes in the first winter. We note numerous differences for species patterns between leaf and root decomposition, indicating that conclusions from leaf litter experiments should not be extrapolated to below-ground decomposition. The high decomposition rates of Betula leaf litter aboveground, and relatively similar decomposition rates of multiple species below, suggest a potential for increases in turnover in the fast-decomposing carbon pool of leaves and fine roots as the dominance of deciduous shrubs in the Arctic increases, but this outcome may be tempered

  19. The effects of positive versus negative impact reflection on change in job performance and work-life conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardador, M Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Research on task significance and relational job design suggests that information from beneficiaries of one's work fosters perceptions of impact, and thus improved work outcomes. This paper presents results from a longitudinal field experiment examining the effect of another strategy for fostering perceptions of impact - engaging employees in regular reflection about how their work benefits others. With a sample of professionals from multiple organizations, this longitudinal study examined the effect on job performance and work-life conflict of both positive and negative impact reflection. Results show that negative impact reflection had a pronounced negative effect on job performance, but no effect on work-life conflict. Positive impact reflection had a weak positive effect on work-life conflict, but no significant effect on job performance. The direction of effects seen in the no intervention condition mirrored that of the negative impact reflection condition, suggesting a possible buffering effect for positive impact reflection. This research provides empirical and theoretical contributions to the literatures on relational job design and task significance.

  20. Effect of Pulsed Plasma Jets on the Recovering Boundary Layer Downstream of a Reflected Shock Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Benton; Clemens, Noel; Magari, Patrick; Micka, Daniel; Ueckermann, Mattheus

    2015-11-01

    Shock-induced turbulent boundary layer separation can have many detrimental effects in supersonic inlets including flow distortion and instability, structural fatigue, poor pressure recovery, and unstart. The current study investigates the effect of pulsed plasma jets on the recovering boundary layer downstream of a reflected shock wave-boundary layer interaction. The effects of pitch and skew angle of the jet as well as the heating parameter and discharge time scale are tested using several pulsing frequencies. In addition, the effect of the plasma jets on the undisturbed boundary layer at 6 mm and 11 mm downstream of the jets is measured. A pitot-static pressure probe is used to measure the velocity profile of the boundary layer 35 mm downstream of the plasma jets, and the degree of boundary layer distortion is compared between the different models and run conditions. Additionally, the effect of each actuator configuration on the shape of the mean separated region is investigated using surface oil flow visualization. Previous studies with lower energy showed a weak effect on the downstream boundary layer. The current investigation will attempt to increase this effect using a higher-energy discharge. Funded by AFRL through and SBIR in collaboration with Creare, LLC.

  1. Effects of microbial transglutaminase, fibrimex and alginate on physicochemical properties of cooked ground meat with reduced salt level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atilgan, Esra; Kilic, Birol

    2017-02-01

    Effects of microbial transglutaminase (MTGase), fibrin/thrombin combination (fibrimex), alginate or combination of these binding agents on physicochemical parameters of cooked ground beef with reduced salt level were investigated. Seventeen treatments included three control (no binding agent) groups incorporated with varying concentrations of salt (0.5, 1, 2%, w/w) and fourteen treatment groups produced with MTGase or fibrimex or alginate or their combinations at 0.5 or 1% salt levels. The samples were analyzed for cooking loss (CL), pH, color, moisture, fat, protein, ash, salt, texture and TBARS. The results indicated that the use of MTGase or fibrimex or MTGase/fibrimex combination had significant effect on preventing textural deterioration caused by salt reduction. Even though the use of MTGase resulted in higher CL values, formulation of ground beef with fibrimex or alginate or MTGase/fibrimex/alginate combinations reduced CL when compared with the control groups. The use of fibrimex in ground beef resulted in a decrease in TBARS, lightness, redness and pH values. However, the use of alginate caused an increase in pH, lightness and redness values of ground beef. Based on the present study, the use of fibrimex or a combination of fibrimex with MTGase in the product formulation can be an effective strategy to reduce cooking loss, to improve or maintain the textural properties and to extend shelf life of cooked ground beef with reduced salt level.

  2. Current climate change effects on the ground thermal regime in Central Yakutia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stepan Varlamov; Yuri Skachkov; Pavel Skryabin

    2014-01-01

    The-evolution-of-ground-thermal-state-has-been-studied-to-assess-impacts-of-current-climatic-warming-on-permafrost-in-Central-Yakutia.-The-analysis-of-long-term-data-of-regional-weather-stations-has-revealed-one-of-the-highest-increasing-trends-in-mean-annual-air-temperature-in-northern-Russia.-A-forecast-of-surface-air-temperature-fluctuations-has-been-made-by-applying-a-frequency-analysis-method.-Monitoring-of-ground-thermal-conditions-allows-us-to-identify-inter-annual-and-long-term-variability-among-a-wide-range-of-natural-conditions.-Experimental-research-has-indicated-a-long-term-dynamics-of-ground-thermal-state-evolution:-ground-temperatures-at-the-depth-of-zero-annual-amplitude-and-seasonally-thawed-layer-depth.-Long-term-variability-of-thaw-depth-shows-near-zero-to-weak-positive-trends-in-small-valleys-in-contrast-to-weak-negative-trends-on-slopes.-With-significant-climatic-warming,-the-thermal-state-of-near-surface-layers-of-permafrost-demonstrates-steadiness.-Anthropogenic-impacts-on-ground-thermal-regime-in-various-terrain-types-have-been-qualitatively-evaluated.-Clear-cutting,-ground-cover-stripping,-and-post-fire-deforestation-in-inter-alas-type-terrains-result-in-a-significant-increase-of-temperature-and-seasonal-ground-thaw-depth,-as-well-as-adverse-cryogenic-processes.-The-dynamics-of-mean-annual-ground-temperature-in-slash-and-burn-sites-have-been-evaluated-in-reference-to-stages-of-successive-vegetation-recovery.

  3. Contextual effects on perceived contrast : Figure-ground assignment and orientation contrast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Self, Matthew W; Mookhoek, Aart; Tjalma, Nienke; Roelfsema, Pieter R

    2015-01-01

    Figure-ground segregation is an important step in the path leading to object recognition. The visual system segregates objects ('figures') in the visual scene from their backgrounds ('ground'). Electrophysiological studies in awake-behaving monkeys have demonstrated that neurons in early visual area

  4. Effects of Spatial Dispersion on Reflection from Mushroom-type Artificial Impedance Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Luukkonen, Olli; Yakovlev, Alexander B; Simovski, Constantin R; Nefedov, Igor S; Tretyakov, Sergei A

    2008-01-01

    Several recent works have emphasized the role of spatial dispersion in wire media, and demonstrated that arrays of parallel metallic wires may behave very differently from a uniaxial local material with negative permittivity. Here, we investigate using local and non-local homogenization methods the effect of spatial dispersion on reflection from the mushroom structure introduced by Sievenpiper. The objective of the paper is to clarify the role of spatial dispersion in the mushroom structure and demonstrate that under some conditions it is suppressed. The metamaterial substrate, or metasurface, is modeled as a wire medium covered with an impedance surface. Surprisingly, it is found that in such configuration the effects of spatial dispersion may be nearly suppressed when the slab is electrically thin, and that the wire medium can be modeled very accurately using a local model. This result paves the way for the design of artificial surfaces that exploit the plasmonic-type response of the wire medium slab.

  5. Visco-thermal effects in acoustic metamaterials: from total transmission to total reflection and high absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Molerón, Miguel; Daraio, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate visco-thermal effects on the acoustic propagation through metamaterials consisting of rigid slabs with subwavelength slits embedded in air. We demonstrate that this unavoidable loss mechanism is not merely a refinement, but it plays a dominant role in the actual acoustic response of the structure. Specifically, in the case of very narrow slits, the visco-thermal losses avoid completely the excitation of Fabry-Perot resonances, leading to 100% reflection. This is exactly opposite to the perfect transmission predicted in the idealised lossless case. Moreover, for a wide range of geometrical parameters, there exists an optimum slit width at which the energy dissipated in the structure can be as high as 50%. This work provides a clear evidence that visco-thermal effects are necessary to describe realistically the acoustic response of locally resonant metamaterials.

  6. Acute fatigue effects on ground reaction force of lower limbs during countermovement jumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Gabriel Fábrica

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Parameters associated with the performance of countermovement jumps were identified from vertical ground reaction force recordings during fatigue and resting conditions. Fourteen variables were defined, dividing the vertical ground reaction force into negative and positive external working times and times in which the vertical ground reaction force values were lower and higher than the participant's body weight. We attempted to explain parameter variations by considering the relationship between the set of contractile and elastic components of the lower limbs. We determined that jumping performance is based on impulsion optimization and not on instantaneous ground reaction force value: the time in which the ground reaction force was lower than the body weight, and negative external work time was lower under fatigue. The results suggest that, during fatigue, there is less contribution from elastic energy and from overall active state. However, the participation of contractile elements could partially compensate for the worsening of jumping performance.

  7. Feedback providing improvement strategies and reflection on feedback use: Effects on students' writing motivation, process, and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Duijnhouwer; F.J. Prins; K.M. Stokking

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of feedback providing improvement strategies and a reflection assignment on students’ writing motivation, process, and performance. Students in the experimental feedback condition (n = 41) received feedback including improvement strategies, whereas students in the

  8. Effects of gully terrain on stress field distribution and ground pressure behavior in shallow seam mining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jianwei; Liu Changyou; Zhao Tong

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a novel approach to study stress field distribution and overlying ground pressure behavior in shallow seam mining in gully terrain. This approach combines numerical simulations and field tests based on the conditions of gully terrain in the Chuancao Gedan Mine. The effects of gully ter-rain on the in situ stress field of coal beds can be identified by the ratio of self-weight stress to vertical stress (g) at the location corresponding to the maximum vertical stress. Based on the function g=f(h), the effect of gully terrain on the stress field of overlying strata of the entire field can be characterized as a significantly affected area, moderately affected area, or non-affected area. Working face 6106 in the Chuancao Gedan Mine had a coal bed depth<80 m and was located in what was identified as a signifi-cantly affected area. Hence, mining may cause sliding of the gully slope and increased loading (including significant dynamic loading) on the roof strata. Field tests suggest that significant dynamic pressures were observed at the body and foot of the gully slope, and that dynamic loadings were observed upslope of the working face expansion, provided that the expanding direction of the working face is parallel to the gully.

  9. Effect of starting distance on vertical ground reaction forces in the normal dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuLaney, D; Purinton, T; Dookwah, H; Budsberg, S

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of starting distance on the peak vertical force (PVF) and associated vertical impulses (VI) of normal dogs. Five dogs of similar weight and body type were trotted at a velocity of 1.6-2.2 m/s from each of three starting distances; 2, 4, and 6 m, from the first plate in a two plate test field. A total of ten trials were recorded from each starting distance, five left first contacts and five right first contacts. Each ground reaction force (GRF) of interest was evaluated both within and between the three starting distances using a complete block ANOVA. There was not any significant effect of distance found on peak vertical forces in our study. However, distance did affect VI. Forelimb VI generated at a 2 m trot was significantly less than VI generated at a 6 m trot. Neither extreme distance was found to be significantly different than the 4 m VI. The VI of the hind limb was not significantly affected.

  10. Schemed Power-augmented Flow for Wing-in-ground Effect Craft in Cruise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Wei; YANG Zhigang

    2011-01-01

    To provide detailed insight into schemed power-angmented flow for wing-in-ground effect (WIG) craft in view of the concept of cruising with power assistance, this paper presents a numerical study.The engine installed before the wing for power-augmented flow is replaced by a simplified engine model in the simulations, and is considered to be equipped with a thrust vector nozzle.Flow features with different deflected nozzle angles are studied.Comparisons are made on aerodynamics to evaluate performance of power-augmented ram (PAR) modes in cruise.Considerable schemes of power-augmented flow in cruise are described.The air blown from the PAR engine accelerates the flow around wing and a high-speed attached flow near the trailing edge is recorded for certain deflected nozzle angles.This effect takes place and therefore the separation is prevented not only at the trailing edge but also on the whole upper side.The realization of suction varies with PAR modes.It is also found that scheme of blowing air under the wing for PAR engine is aerodynamically not efficient in cruise.The power-augmented flow is extremely complicated.The numerical results give clear depiction of the flow.Optimal scheme of power-augmented flow with respect to the craft in cruise depends on the specific engines and the flight regimes.

  11. Quantitative sensory tests fairly reflect immediate effects of oxycodone in chronic low-back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schliessbach, Jürg; Siegenthaler, Andreas; Bütikofer, Lukas; Vuilleumier, Pascal; Jüni, Peter; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Curatolo, Michele

    2017-08-09

    Quantitative sensory tests (QST) can be used for profiling anti-nociceptive effects of analgesics. However, anti-nociceptive effects detected by QST are not necessarily associated with analgesic effects in pain patients. As part of a large investigation on low back pain, this paper describes the immediate analgesic and anti-nociceptive effects of oxycodone in chronic low-back pain and ranks different QST according to their ability to reflect this effect. The results are expected to support the selection of QST for future studies on potential novel opioid agonists in human pain. In this randomized, placebo-controlled and double-blinded cross-over study, 50 patients with chronic low-back pain received a single oral dose of oxycodone 15mg or active placebo, and underwent multiple QST testing. The intensity of low-back pain was recorded during 2h. The areas under the ROC curves and 95% confidence intervals were determined, whereby responder status (≥30% pain reduction) was set as reference variable and changes in QST from baseline were set as classifiers. Significant analgesic effect on low-back pain as well as anti-nociceptive effects for almost all QST parameters were observed. The QST with the highest area under the curve were heat pain detection threshold (0.65, 95%-CI 0.46 to 0.83), single-stimulus electrical pain threshold (0.64, 95%-CI 0.47 to 0.80) and pressure pain detection threshold (0.63, 95%-CI 0.48 to 0.79). The results suggest that anti-nociceptive effects assessed by QST fairly reflect clinical efficacy of oxycodone on low-back pain. Pressure pain detection threshold, heat pain detection threshold and single-stimulus electrical pain threshold may be more suitable to sort out potential non-responders rather than identifying potential responders to opioid medication. Future pre-clinical human research may consider these results when investigating the analgesic effect of opioid agonists by means of QST. Copyright © 2017 Scandinavian Association for the

  12. Reflective Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Thomas S. C.

    2013-01-01

    Thomas Farrell's "Reflective Teaching" outlines four principles that take teachers from just doing reflection to making it a way of being. Using the four principles, Reflective Practice Is Evidence Based, Reflective Practice Involves Dialogue, Reflective Practice Links Beliefs and Practices, and Reflective Practice Is a Way of Life,…

  13. The role of reflection in the effects of community service on adolescent development: A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Goethem, Anne A J; Van Hoof, Anne; Orobio De Castro, Bram; Van Aken, Marcel A G; Hart, Daniel A.; Leerstoel Aken; Leerstoel Orobio de Castro; Faculteit Sociale Wetenschappen

    2014-01-01

    This meta-analysis assessed the effect of community service on adolescent development and the moderation of this effect by reflection, community service, and adolescent characteristics to explicate the mechanisms underlying community service effects. Random effects analyses, based on 49 studies (24,

  14. The Role of Reflection in the Effects of Community Service on Adolescent Development : A Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Goethem, Anne; Van Hoof, Anne; Orobio de Castro, Bram; Van Aken, Marcel; Hart, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This meta-analysis assessed the effect of community service on adolescent development and the moderation of this effect by reflection, community service, and adolescent characteristics to explicate the mechanisms underlying community service effects. Random effects analyses, based on 49 studies (24,

  15. Deconvolution effect of near-fault earthquake ground motions on stochastic dynamic response of tunnel-soil deposit interaction systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hacıefendioğlu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The deconvolution effect of the near-fault earthquake ground motions on the stochastic dynamic response of tunnel-soil deposit interaction systems are investigated by using the finite element method. Two different earthquake input mechanisms are used to consider the deconvolution effects in the analyses: the standard rigid-base input and the deconvolved-base-rock input model. The Bolu tunnel in Turkey is chosen as a numerical example. As near-fault ground motions, 1999 Kocaeli earthquake ground motion is selected. The interface finite elements are used between tunnel and soil deposit. The mean of maximum values of quasi-static, dynamic and total responses obtained from the two input models are compared with each other.

  16. Effects of temperature and ground-state coherence decay on enhancement and amplification in a Delta atomic system

    CERN Document Server

    Manjappa, Manukumara; Karigowda, Asha; Narayanan, Andal; Sanders, Barry C

    2014-01-01

    We study phase-sensitive amplification of electromagnetically induced transparency in a warm $^{85}$Rb vapor wherein a microwave driving field couples the two lower energy states of a $\\Lambda$ energy-level system thereby transforming into a $\\Delta$ system. Our theoretical description includes effects of ground-state coherence decay and temperature effects. In particular, we demonstrate that driving-field enhanced electromagnetically induced transparency is robust against significant loss of coherence between ground states. We also show, that for specific field intensities, a threshold rate of ground-state coherence decay exists at every temperature. This threshold separates the probe-transmittance behavior into two regimes: probe amplification vs. probe attenuation. Thus, electromagnetically induced transparency plus amplification is possible at any temperature in a $\\Delta$ system.

  17. Chimeras in leaky integrate-and-fire neural networks: effects of reflecting connectivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigkri-DeSmedt, Nefeli Dimitra; Hizanidis, Johanne; Schöll, Eckehard; Hövel, Philipp; Provata, Astero

    2017-07-01

    The effects of attracting-nonlocal and reflecting connectivity are investigated in coupled Leaky Integrate-and-Fire (LIF) elements, which model the exchange of electrical signals between neurons. Earlier investigations have demonstrated that repulsive-nonlocal and hierarchical network connectivity can induce complex synchronization patterns and chimera states in systems of coupled oscillators. In the LIF system we show that if the elements are nonlocally linked with positive diffusive coupling on a ring network, the system splits into a number of alternating domains. Half of these domains contain elements whose potential stays near the threshold and they are interrupted by active domains where the elements perform regular LIF oscillations. The active domains travel along the ring with constant velocity, depending on the system parameters. When we introduce reflecting coupling in LIF networks unexpected complex spatio-temporal structures arise. For relatively extensive ranges of parameter values, the system splits into two coexisting domains: one where all elements stay near the threshold and one where incoherent states develop, characterized by multi-leveled mean phase velocity profiles.

  18. Effects of ground fires on element dynamics in mountainous coniferous forest in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Näthe

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Disturbances such as fires are a natural phenomenon of forested ecosystems, having a different impact on (micro- climate (e.g. emissions of gases and aerosols, ecology (destruction of flora and fauna and nutrient cycles especially in the soils. Forest fires alter the spatial distribution (forest floor vs. mineral soil, binding forms (organic vs. inorganic and availability (water solubility of organic substances and nutrients. The effects of fires on chemical, biological and physical soil properties in forested ecosystems have been intensively studied in the last decades, especially in the Mediterranean area and North America. However, differences in fire intensity, forest type (species, age and location (climate, geological substrate, nutrient status lead to divergent results. Furthermore, only a few case studies focused on the effects of ground fires in hilly landscapes, on the vertical and lateral water-driven fluxes of elements (C, N, nutrients, as well as on the input of fire-released terrestrial nutrients into aquatic ecosystems. Thus, this study will evaluate the effects of low-severity fires on nutrient cycling in a coniferous forest in a hilly landscape connected to an aquatic system. At three spatially independent sites three paired plots (control and manipulated were chosen at a forested site in Thuringia, Germany. All plots are similar in the vegetation cover and pedogenetic properties.In relation to control sites, this study will examine the effects of low-severity fires on:a the mobilization of organic carbon and nutrients (released from ash material and the forest floor via leachate and erosion paths,b the binding form (inorganic/organic of elements and organic compounds, and c the particle size fraction (DOM/POM of elements and organic compounds.The goal of this study is a better understanding of the impact of forest fires on element cycling and release in a hilly landscape connected to an aquatic system, supposedly driven by

  19. An Efficient approach for Shielding Effect of the Grounding Electrodes under Impulse-Current Voltage based on Matlab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms. Kalyani Pole

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The lightning current waveform has a majorinfluence on the dynamic performance of groundelectrodes. While high lightning current intensityimproves the dynamic grounding performance dueto ionization of the soil, very fast fronted pulsesmight worsen the performance in case of inductivebehaviour. The previous analysis has often beenbased on quasistatic approximation that is notapplicable to very fast fronted pulses. PreviousResearch focused on analyzing the impulse currentdispersal regularity of different branches wheninjecting at one point. Comparing with the leakagecurrent distribution of a single ground electrode, itis found that the leakage currents along thebranches increase with the distance to the currentfeed point, and the more conductors near theinjection point, the more uneven the leakagecurrent distribution is. In this paper by simulationresult we indicate that shielding effect should betaken into account when analyzing the impulsecharacteristics of grounding electrodes. Based onthe simulation results, new empirical formulasapplicable for slow and very fast fronted lightningcurrent pulses are proposed. The effects of theionization of the soil are disregarded; therefore, thenew formulas are applicable for a conservativeestimate of the upper bound of the impulseimpedance of ground electrodes. In this paper wealso analyze and compare by the MATLAB. We alsoprovide dynamic behavior of ground electrodes.

  20. Effects of light polarization and waves slope statistics on the reflectance factor of the sea surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alimonte, Davide; Kajiyama, Tamito

    2016-04-18

    Above-water radiometry depends on estimates of the reflectance factor ρ of the sea surface to compute the in situ water-leaving radiance. The Monte Carlo code for ocean color simulations MOX is used in this study to analyze the effect of different environmental components on ρ values. A first aspect is examining the reflectance factor without and by accounting for the sky-radiance polarization. The influence of the sea-surface statistics at discrete grid points is then considered by presenting a new scheme to define the variance of the waves slope. Results at different sun elevations and sensor orientations indicate that the light polarization effect on ρ simulations reduces from ∼17 to ∼10% when the wind speed increases from 0 to 14m s-1. An opposite tendency characterizes the modeling of the sea-surface slope variance, with ρ differences up to ∼12% at a wind speed of 10m s-1. The joint effect of polarization and the the sea-surface statistics displays a less systematic dependence on the wind speed, with differences in the range ∼13 to ∼18%. The ρ changes due to the light polarization and the variance of the waves slope become more relevant at sky-viewing geometries respectively lower and higher than 40° with respect to the zenith. An overall compensation of positive and negative offsets due to light polarization is finally documented when considering different sun elevations. These results address additional investigations which, by combining the modeling and experimental components of marine optics, better evaluate specific measurement protocols for collecting above-water radiometric data in the field.

  1. The Influence of Negative Emotion on the Simon Effect as Reflected by P300

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingguo Ma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Simon effect refers to the phenomenon that reaction time (RT is faster when stimulus and response location are congruent than when they are not. This study used the priming-target paradigm to explore the influence of induced negative emotion on the Simon effect with event-related potential techniques (ERPs. The priming stimuli were composed of two kinds of pictures, the negative and neutral pictures, selected from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS. The target stimuli included chessboards of two color types. One was red and black the other one was green and black. Each chessboard was presented on the left or the right of the screen. The participants were asked to press the response keys according to the colors of the chessboards. It was called the congruent condition if the chessboard and the response key were on the same side, otherwise incongruent condition. In this study, the emotion-priming Simon effect was found in terms of RT and P300. Negative emotion compared with neutral emotion significantly enhanced the Simon effect in the cognitive process, reflected by a larger difference of P300 latency between the incongruent and congruent trials. The results suggest that the induced negative emotion influenced the Simon effect at the late stage of the cognitive process, and the P300 latency could be considered as the reference measure. These findings may be beneficial to researches in psychology and industrial engineering in the future.

  2. The influence of negative emotion on the Simon effect as reflected by p300.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qingguo; Shang, Qian

    2013-01-01

    The Simon effect refers to the phenomenon that reaction time (RT) is faster when stimulus and response location are congruent than when they are not. This study used the priming-target paradigm to explore the influence of induced negative emotion on the Simon effect with event-related potential techniques (ERPs). The priming stimuli were composed of two kinds of pictures, the negative and neutral pictures, selected from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS). The target stimuli included chessboards of two color types. One was red and black the other one was green and black. Each chessboard was presented on the left or the right of the screen. The participants were asked to press the response keys according to the colors of the chessboards. It was called the congruent condition if the chessboard and the response key were on the same side, otherwise incongruent condition. In this study, the emotion-priming Simon effect was found in terms of RT and P300. Negative emotion compared with neutral emotion significantly enhanced the Simon effect in the cognitive process, reflected by a larger difference of P300 latency between the incongruent and congruent trials. The results suggest that the induced negative emotion influenced the Simon effect at the late stage of the cognitive process, and the P300 latency could be considered as the reference measure. These findings may be beneficial to researches in psychology and industrial engineering in the future.

  3. Effects of nitrogen nutrition on the growth, yield and reflectance characteristics of corn canopies. [Purdue Agronomy Farm, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, M. E. (Principal Investigator); Walburg, G.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    1981-01-01

    Spectral and agronomic measurements were collected from corn (Zea mays L.) canopies under four nitrogen treatment levels (0, 67, 134, and 202 kg/ha) on 11 dates during 1978 and 12 dates during 1979. Data were analyzed to determine the relationship between the spectral responses of canopies and their argonomic characteristics as well as the spectral separability of the four treatments. Red reflectance was increased, while the near infrared reflectance was decreased for canopies under nitrogen deprivation. Spectral differences between treatments were seen throughout each growing season. The near infrared/red reflectance ratio increased spectral treatment differences over those shown by single band reflectance measures. Of the spectral variables examined, the near infrared/red reflectance ratio most effectively separated the treatments. Differences in spectral response between treatments were attributed to varying soil cover, leaf area index, and leaf pigmentation values, all of which changed with N treatment.

  4. Phase statistics of light wave reflected from one-dimensional optical disordered media and its effects on light transport properties

    CERN Document Server

    Pradhan, Prabhakar

    2015-01-01

    Light wave reflection from optical disordered media is always associate with its phase, and the phase statistics influence the reflection statistics. We report a detailed numerical study of the statistics of the reflection coefficient RR* and its associated phase(theta) for plane electromagnetic waves reflected from one dimensional (1D) Gaussian white-noise optical disordered media, ranging from weak to strong disordered regimes. We solve numerically the full Fokker-Planck (FP) equation for the joint probability distribution in the RR* - phase(theta) space for different lengths of the sample with different disorder strengths. The statistical optical transport properties of 1D optical disordered media are calculated using the full FP equation numerically. This constitutes a complete solution for the reflection phase statistics and its effects on light transport properties in a 1D Gaussian white-noise disordered optical potentials. Our results show the regime of the validation of the random phase approximations...

  5. Experimental investigation on tip vortices and aerodynamics of a wing with ground effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruimin; Sun; Daichin

    2011-01-01

    The tip vortices and aerodynamics of a NACA0012 wing in the vicinity of the ground were studied in a wind tunnel.The wing tip vortex structures and lift/drag forces were measured by a seven-hole probe and a force balance,respectively.The evolution of the flow structures and aerodynamics with a ground height were analyzed.The vorticity of tip vortices was found to reduce with the decreasing of the ground height,and the position of vortex-core moved gradually to the outboard of the wing tip.Therefore,the d...

  6. Reflection enhances creativity: Beneficial effects of idea evaluation on idea generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Ning; Ku, Yixuan; Liu, Meigui; Hu, Yi; Bodner, Mark; Grabner, Roland H; Fink, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to explore the neural correlates underlying the effects of idea evaluation on idea generation in creative thinking. Participants were required to generate original uses of conventional objects (alternative uses task) during EEG recording. A reflection task (mentally evaluating the generated ideas) or a distraction task (object characteristics task) was inserted into the course of idea generation. Behavioral results revealed that participants generated ideas with higher originality after evaluating the generated ideas than after performing the distraction task. The EEG results revealed that idea evaluation was accompanied with upper alpha (10-13 Hz) synchronization, most prominent at frontal cortical sites. Moreover, upper alpha activity in frontal cortices during idea generation was enhanced after idea evaluation. These findings indicate that idea evaluation may elicit a state of heightened internal attention or top-down activity that facilitates efficient retrieval and integration of internal memory representations.

  7. Studies on the grain boundary effect in polycrystalline CdTe films using optical reflectance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, J. (Dept. of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Calcutta (India)); Pal, R. (Dept. of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Calcutta (India)); Bhattacharyya, S.K. (Central Glass and Ceramic Research Inst., Calcutta (India)); Chaudhuri, S. (Dept. of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Calcutta (India)); Pal, A.K. (Dept. of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Calcutta (India))

    1993-11-15

    The grain boundary effect in polycrystalline CdTe films deposited at various substrate temperatures has been studied critically. The grain boundary potential, the density of trap states at the boundary region and the carrier concentration in the films were obtained by an alternative technique that utilizes the reflectance measurements of the highly resistive films deposited on a nonabsorbing substrate. The barrier height in the CdTe films decreased from 0.34 to 0.2 eV as the grain size increased from 60 to 133 nm, owing to the increase in the deposition temperature from 373 to 523 K. Correspondingly, the density of trap states in the grain boundary region decreased from 1.63x10[sup 13] to 6.15x10[sup 12] cm[sup -2]. (orig.)

  8. The Effect of Cr content on the Reflectance Properties of Mg-Spinel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, K. B.; Jackson, C.; Cheek, L.; Prissel, T. C.; Parman, S. W.; Pieters, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    Recent analyses of Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) data have identified an Mg-spinel lithology previously unobserved on the lunar surface [1,2]. Although some examples of chromite have been identified in M3 spectra for the Sinus Aestuum region [3], most spinel observations thus far appear to be Mg-Al spinel. This study seeks to identify the influence of chromium content on spectral characteristics of synthetic spinel in order to provide a calibration for interpreting spinel composition from M3 observations. Experiments to constrain the Cr and Fe content of the Mg-rich spinel will help characterize the melt involved in its formation, providing valuable information for models of its petrogenesis. Previous studies indicate that spinel displays a 2 μm absorption, corresponding to tetrahedrally coordinated Fe2+. At FeO contents ≥5 wt% [4], synthetic spinel have a 1 μm octahedral absorption due to the availability of Fe2+ to occupy additional sites in the mineral structure [5]. A separate absorption, centered at 0.55 μm, has been attributed to Cr3+. Given the competition between Cr3+ and Al3+ for octahedral crystallographic sites in spinel, the presence of Cr may influence the strength of the 1 μm iron absorption. Fe content and grain size have well-known effects on spectral reflectance band depth, however due to competition for octahedral sites the effect of Cr on reflectance properties within the 0.55-1 μm wavelengths has yet to be clearly identified. Two preliminary experiments successfully produced Mg-spinel containing Cr in octahedral sites, as evidenced by a well-defined 0.55 μm absorption in the spectra. The samples were produced by mixing reagent-grade oxide powders in approximately stoichiometric proportions, and sintering in a horizontal gas mixing furnace at fO2 IW for 72 hours. Sample 1 (mixed with Al2O3 in excess) resulted in spinel with 6% Cr2O3, 6% FeO. Sample 2 (mixed with stoichiometric Al2O3) contained 5% Cr2O3, 5% FeO. Microprobe analyses of this

  9. The effects of atmospheric pressure on infrared reflectance spectra of Martian analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Pieters, Carle M.; Pratt, Stephen F.; Patterson, William

    1993-01-01

    The use of terrestrial samples as analogs of Mars soils are complicated by the Martian atmosphere. Spectral features due to the Martian atmosphere can be removed from telescopic spectra of Mars and ISM spectra of Mars, but this does not account for any spectral differences resulting from atmospheric pressure or any interactions between the atmosphere and the surface. We are examining the effects of atmospheric pressure on reflectance spectra of powdered samples in the laboratory. Contrary to a previous experiment with granite, no significant changes in albedo or the Christiansen feature were observed from 1 bar pressure down to a pressure of 8 micrometers Hg. However, reducing the atmospheric pressure does have a pronounced affect on the hydration features, even for samples retained in a dry environment for years.

  10. Planting depth and rhizome size effects on below ground growth of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    reza vali allah poor

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was carried out to evaluate the effects of planting depth and rhizome sizes on below ground growth of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra L. at research glasshouse of Mashhad Unversity in 2001. Factorial experiment containing 2 factors of planting depth (10, 20 and 40‌cm and rhizome sizes (1,2 and 3 buds or 4,7 and 10 gr with two replications in completely randomized block design was employed. Development of different variables during growing season including root and mother rhizome dry weight were measured.The highest and the lowest root dry weight (RDWhave been seen in depth of 20 and 40 cm‌, respectively. About 100 days after planting (DAP, RDW increaseed very slowly but thenafter increased faster‌. Rhizome of any sizes in‌ 20 cm, gave the highest RDW‌. Three-bud rhizomes produced the highest RDW and 1-bud rhizome produced the lowest. Mother rhizome dry weight (MRDW reduced untill 60 days after planting. After 75th day, MRDW has increased and all plants started to fill their mother rhizome and finally rhizome of depth 20 cm produced the highest dry weight. In 160 days after planting, mother rhizomes started to lose their weight‌. 1and 3 -bud mother rhizome produce the lowest and highest MRDW, respectively.

  11. EFFECT OF DIELECTRIC CONSTANT ON THE EXCITON GROUND STATE ENERGY OF CdSe QUANTUM DOTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUI PING

    2000-01-01

    The B-spline technique is used in the calculation of the exciton ground state energy based on the effective mass approximation (EMA) model.The exciton is confined in CdSe microspherical crystallites with a finite-height potential wall (dots).In this approach,(a) the wave function is allowed to penetrate to the outside of the dots; (b) the dielectric constants of the quantum dot and the surrounding material are considered to be different; and (c) the dielectric constant of the dots are size-dependent.The exciton energies as functions of radii of the dots in the range 0.5-3.5nm are calculated and compared with experimental and previous theoretical data.The results show that: (1) The exciton energy is convergent as the radius of the dot becomes very small.(2) A good agreement with the experimental data better than other theoretical results is achieved.(3) The penetration (or leaking) of the wave function and the difference of the dielectric constants in different regions are necessary for correcting the Coulomb interaction energy and reproducing experimental data.(4) The EMA model with B-spline technique can describe the status of excition confined in quantum dot very well.

  12. Effect of incorporation of Moringa oleifera leaves extract on quality of ground pork patties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukumar, M; Naveena, B M; Vaithiyanathan, S; Sen, A R; Sureshkumar, K

    2014-11-01

    Present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of addition of different levels of Moringa oleifera leaves extract (MLE) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) in raw and cooked pork patties during refrigerated storage. Five treatments evaluated include: Control (without MLE/BHT), MLE 300 (300 ppm equivalent M. oleifera leaves phenolics), MLE 450 (450 ppm equivalent M. oleifera leaves phenolics), MLE 600 (600 ppm equivalent M. oleifera leaves phenolics) and BHT 200 (200 ppm BHT). Total phenolic content ranged from 60.78 to 70.27 mg per gram. A concentration dependent increase in reducing power and 1,1-diphenyl 2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity of both MLE and BHT was noticed. Higher (P BHT 200 compared to control. Addition of MLE did not affect the sensory attributes or microbial quality. These results showed that M. oleifera leaves can be used as a potential source of natural antioxidants to inhibit lipid oxidation in ground pork patties.

  13. The isolating and insulating effects of hepatitis C: a substantive grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreaddie, May; Lyons, Imogen; Horsburgh, Dorothy; Miller, Margot; Frew, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C has a global prevalence of 3%, causing chronic infection in 75% of cases, and is currently the main cause of liver transplant in the United Kingdom. This study reviewed patients' and service providers' perspectives on hepatitis C as an enduring condition, using a constructivist grounded theory approach. A constant comparative approach to data collection and analyses incorporating a coding paradigm was applied to semistructured interviews, focus groups, and memos. Sixteen patients and three focus groups of staff (n = 17) were recruited via purposive theoretical sampling (February through August 2008). A negative synergistic relationship between the condition hepatitis C, patients, and service providers that creates isolating and insulating effects for the relevant parties emerged from the data as a middle-range theory. Stigma and contagion create a "real" or perceived sense of isolation for hepatitis C comorbid and itinerant patients, who require the right support at the right time. Healthcare staff adhere to professional demarcation lines to manage potentially untenable patient caseloads. In turn, patients and professionals perceive that a crisis may be required to bring about successful therapeutic intervention. A service that incorporates seamless outreach services and facilitates interdisciplinary working is needed to manage complex patients with this enduring condition.

  14. Effects of 10% biofuel substitution on ground level ozone formation in Bangkok, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milt, Austin; Milano, Aaron; Garivait, Savitri; Kamens, Richard

    2009-12-01

    The Thai Government's search for alternatives to imported petroleum led to the consideration of mandating 10% biofuel blends (biodiesel and gasohol) by 2012. Concerns over the effects of biofuel combustion on ground level ozone formation in relation to their conventional counterparts need addressing. Ozone formation in Bangkok is explored using a trajectory box model. The model is compared against O 3, NO, and NO 2 time concentration data from air monitoring stations operated by the Thai Pollution Control Department. Four high ozone days in 2006 were selected for modeling. Both the traditional trajectory approach and a citywide average approach were used. The model performs well with both approaches but slightly better with the citywide average. Highly uncertain and missing data are derived within realistic bounds using a genetic algorithm optimization. It was found that 10% biofuel substitution will lead to as much as a 16 ppb peak O 3 increase on these four days compared to a 48 ppb increase due to the predicted vehicle fleet size increase between 2006 and 2012. The approach also suggests that when detailed meteorological data is not available to run three dimensional airshed models, and if the air is stagnant or predominately remains over an urban area during the day, that a simple low cost trajectory analysis of O 3 formation may be applicable.

  15. Ground measurements in Israel of solar events and their effects on the electrical parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaniv, Roy; Yair, Yoav; Price, Colin

    2017-04-01

    Solar events impact the Earth with fluxes of energetic particles or x-ray radiation and sometimes both together. The energetic particles induce pressure on the magnetosphere, generate enhanced and disruptive geomagnetic storms and deposit their energy to the Earth by altering the chemistry and changing the ionization in the upper atmosphere [Rycroft 2012]. Past measurements showed that in times of geomagnetic disturbances due to solar activity, an increase of the potential gradient (PG or Ez) and the conduction current (Jz) are observed on the day of the impact and on subsequent days [Cobb 1967, Reiter 1969, Nicoll and Harrison 2014, Elhalel et al., 2014, Mironova et al 2015]. We report on ground-based measurements of the Ez and Jz that were conducted continuously from two locations in Israel to measure the effect of solar events in low latitudes (30o35'N, 34o45'E 840m - Mitzpe Ramon and 33o18'N 35o47.2'E 2100m - Mt. Hermon) during days that were defined meteorologically as fair weather days. We present preliminary results of several case studies of solar events, that show a consistent increase of more than 50% in Ez during solar events compared to average fair weather values and to Kp and particles fluxes.

  16. Effect of Surface Geology on Ground Motions: The Case of Station TAP056 - Chutzuhu Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Liang Wen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Tatun mountain area of northern Taiwan are two strong motion stations approximately 2.5 km apart, TAP056 and TAP066 of the TSMIP network. The accelerometer at station TAP056 is often triggered by earthquakes, but that at TAP066 station is not. Comparisons of vertical and horizontal peak ground accelerations reveal PGA in the vertical, east-west, and north-south components at TAP056 station to be 3.89, 7.57, and 5.45 times those at station TAP066, respectively. The PGA ratio does not seem to be related to earthquake source or path. Fourier spectra of earthquake records at station TAP056 always have approximately the same dominant frequency; however, those at station TAP066 are different due to different sources and paths of different events. This shows that spectra at TAP056 station are mainly controlled by local site effects. The spectral ratios of TAP056/TAP066 show the S-wave is amplified at around 8 ~ 10 Hz. The horizontal/vertical spectral ratios of station TAP056 also show a dominant frequency at about 6 and 8 ~ 10 Hz. After dense microtremor surveying and the addition of one accelerometer just 20 meters away from the original observation station, we can confirm that the top soft soil layer upon which the observation station is constructed generates the local site response at station TAP056.

  17. Self-perception of knowledge and adherence reflecting the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagli-Hernandez, Carolina; Lucchetta, Rosa Camila; de Nadai, Tales Rubens; Galduróz, José Carlos Fernandez; Mastroianni, Patricia de Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate which indirect method for assessing adherence best reflects highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) effectiveness and the factors related to adherence. This descriptive, cross-sectional study was performed in 2012 at a reference center of the state of São Paulo. Self-report (simplified medication adherence questionnaire [SMAQ]) and drug refill parameters were compared to the viral load (clinical parameter of the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy [EP]) to evaluate the EP. The "Cuestionario para la Evaluación de la Adhesión al Tratamiento Antiretroviral" (CEAT-VIH) was used to evaluate factors related to adherence and the EP and, complementarily, patient self-perception of adherence was compared to the clinical parameter of the EP. Seventy-five patients were interviewed, 60 of whom were considered as adherent from the clinical parameter of the EP and ten were considered as adherent from all parameters. Patient self-perception about adherence was the instrument that best reflected the EP when compared to the standardized self-report questionnaire (SMAQ) and drug refill parameter. The level of education and the level of knowledge on HAART were positively correlated to the EP. Forgetfulness, alcohol use, and lack of knowledge about the medications were the factors most frequently reported as a cause of nonadherence. A new parameter of patient self-perception of adherence, which is a noninvasive, inexpensive instrument, could be applied and assessed as easily as self-report (SMAQ) during monthly drug refill, since it allows monitoring adherence through pharmaceutical assistance. Therefore, patient adherence to HAART could be evaluated using self-perception (CEAT-VIH) and the viral load test.

  18. Self-perception of knowledge and adherence reflecting the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagli-Hernandez, Carolina; Lucchetta, Rosa Camila; de Nadai, Tales Rubens; Galduróz, José Carlos Fernandez; Mastroianni, Patricia de Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate which indirect method for assessing adherence best reflects highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) effectiveness and the factors related to adherence. Method This descriptive, cross-sectional study was performed in 2012 at a reference center of the state of São Paulo. Self-report (simplified medication adherence questionnaire [SMAQ]) and drug refill parameters were compared to the viral load (clinical parameter of the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy [EP]) to evaluate the EP. The “Cuestionario para la Evaluación de la Adhesión al Tratamiento Antiretroviral” (CEAT-VIH) was used to evaluate factors related to adherence and the EP and, complementarily, patient self-perception of adherence was compared to the clinical parameter of the EP. Results Seventy-five patients were interviewed, 60 of whom were considered as adherent from the clinical parameter of the EP and ten were considered as adherent from all parameters. Patient self-perception about adherence was the instrument that best reflected the EP when compared to the standardized self-report questionnaire (SMAQ) and drug refill parameter. The level of education and the level of knowledge on HAART were positively correlated to the EP. Forgetfulness, alcohol use, and lack of knowledge about the medications were the factors most frequently reported as a cause of nonadherence. Conclusion A new parameter of patient self-perception of adherence, which is a noninvasive, inexpensive instrument, could be applied and assessed as easily as self-report (SMAQ) during monthly drug refill, since it allows monitoring adherence through pharmaceutical assistance. Therefore, patient adherence to HAART could be evaluated using self-perception (CEAT-VIH) and the viral load test. PMID:27695297

  19. Effect of soil roughness on the inversion of off-ground monostatic GPR signal for noninvasive quantification of soil properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambot, S.; Antoine, M.; Vanclooster, M.; Slob, E.C.

    2006-01-01

    We report on a laboratory experiment that investigates the effect of soil surface roughness on the identification of the soil electromagnetic properties from full-wave inversion of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data in the frequency domain. The GPR system consists of an ultrawide band stepped-frequ

  20. The Effects of Opposition and Gender on Knee Kinematics and Ground Reaction Force during Landing from Volleyball Block Jumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Gerwyn; Watkins, James; Owen, Nick

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of opposition and gender on knee kinematics and ground reaction force during landing from a volleyball block jump. Six female and six male university volleyball players performed two landing tasks: (a) an unopposed and (b) an opposed volleyball block jump and landing. A 12-camera motion analysis…

  1. Effects of above- and below-ground competition from shrubs on photosynthesis, transpiration and growth in Quercus robur L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anna M. Jensen; Magnus Lof; Emile S. Gardiner

    2011-01-01

    For a tree seedling to successfully establish in dense shrubbery, it must maintain function under heterogeneous resource availability. We evaluated leaf-level acclimation in photosynthetic capacity, seedling-level transpiration, and seedling morphology and growth to gain an understanding of the effects of above- and below-ground competition on Quercus robur seedlings....

  2. A summary of ground motion effects at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) resulting from the Oct 17th 1989 earthquake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruland, R.E.

    1990-08-01

    Ground motions resulting from the October 17th 1989 (Loma Prieta) earthquake are described and can be correlated with some geologic features of the SLAC site. Recent deformations of the linac are also related to slow motions observed over the past 20 years. Measured characteristics of the earthquake are listed. Some effects on machine components and detectors are noted. 18 refs., 16 figs.

  3. The Effects of Opposition and Gender on Knee Kinematics and Ground Reaction Force during Landing from Volleyball Block Jumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Gerwyn; Watkins, James; Owen, Nick

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of opposition and gender on knee kinematics and ground reaction force during landing from a volleyball block jump. Six female and six male university volleyball players performed two landing tasks: (a) an unopposed and (b) an opposed volleyball block jump and landing. A 12-camera motion analysis…

  4. Simulation of spatially varying ground motions including incoherence, wave‐passage and differential site‐response effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konakli, Katerina; Der Kiureghian, Armen

    2012-01-01

    A method is presented for simulating arrays of spatially varying ground motions, incorporating the effects of incoherence, wave passage, and differential site response. Non‐stationarity is accounted for by considering the motions as consisting of stationary segments. Two approaches are developed....... In the first, simulated motions are consistent with the power spectral densities of a segmented recorded motion and are characterized by uniform variability at all locations. Uniform variability in the array of ground motions is essential when synthetic motions are used for statistical analysis of the response...

  5. Projected effects of proposed chloride-control projects on shallow ground water; preliminary results for the Wichita River basin, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Sergio

    1983-01-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' plan to control the natural chloride pollution in the Wichita River basin includes the construction of Truscott Brine Lake on a tributary of the North Wichita River. In connection with the proposed brine lake, the U.S. Geological Survey was requested to: (1) Define the existing ground-water conditions in the shallow fresh-water system of the project area; and (2) project the post-construction effects of the proposed lake on the fresh-water aquifer, especially in relation to hydraulic-head changes but also with respect to possible changes in the chemical quality of the ground water.

  6. Effects of ground hazelnut shell, wood, and tea waste on the mechanical properties of cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirbas, A. [Black Sea Technical Univ., Trabzon (Turkey). Fatih Education Faculty; Aslan, A. [Celal Bayar Univ., Manisa (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-08-01

    In this study, the mechanical properties of Portland cement mixes with an admixture such as ground hazelnut shell, spruce and beech woods, and tea waste were studied. The compressive and bending strengths test results obtained from these mixes were investigated with comparing to the control mix. From results, it was obtained that especially ground hazelnut shell and beech wood can be used as additives or partial replacement for Portland cement.

  7. Effect of liquid municipal biosolid application method on tile and ground water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapen, D R; Topp, E; Edwards, M; Sabourin, L; Curnoe, W; Gottschall, N; Bolton, P; Rahman, S; Ball-Coelho, B; Payne, M; Kleywegt, S; McLaughlin, N

    2008-01-01

    This study examined bacteria and nutrient quality in tile drainage and shallow ground water resulting from a fall land application of liquid municipal biosolids (LMB), at field application rates of 93,500 L ha(-1), to silt-clay loam agricultural field plots using two different land application approaches. The land application methods were a one-pass AerWay SSD approach (A), and surface spreading plus subsequent incorporation (SS). For both treatments, it took between 3 and 39 min for LMB to reach tile drains after land application. The A treatment significantly (p Kjeldahl N (TKN), NH(4)-N, Total P (TP), PO(4)-P, E. coli., and Clostridium perfringens. E. coli contamination resulting from application occurred to at least 2.0-m depth in ground water, but was more notable in ground water immediately beneath tile depth (1.2 m). Treatment ground water concentrations of selected nutrients and bacteria for the study period ( approximately 46 d) at 1.2-m depth were significantly higher in the treatment plots, relative to control plots. The TKN and TP ground water concentrations at 1.2-m depth were significantly (p 0.1) treatment differences for the bacteria. For the macroporous field conditions observed, pre-tillage by equipment such as the AerWay SSD, will reduce LMB-induced tile and shallow ground water contamination compared to surface spreading over non-tilled soil, followed by incorporation.

  8. Comparison of the effect of grounding the column wall in gas-solid fluidized beds on electrostatic charge generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowinski, Andrew; Mayne, Antonio; Javed, Bassam; Mehrani, Poupak, E-mail: poupak.mehrani@uottawa.ca [University of Ottawa, Chemical and Biological Engineering Department, 161 Louis Pasteur St., Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2011-06-23

    In gas-solid fluidized beds as particles are fluidized, they continuously come into contact with other particles, as well as the fluidization column wall. This generates electrostatic charges by means of triboelectrification and frictional charging, leading to particle agglomeration, reactor wall fouling, and eventually process downtime and large financial losses. Grounding the fluidization column has been considered as a means of helping electrostatic charge dissipation within fluidized beds; however, in industrial applications despite the process vessels being grounded, the electrostatic problem still persists. This work focused on the effect of fluidization column grounding on particle wall fouling. Experiments were conducted in an atmospheric system consist of a 0.1 m in diameter carbon steel fluidization column. The mass and charge-to-mass ratio (q/m) of the particles that remained adhered to the column wall upon the completion of one hour fluidization period were measured in an electrically isolated and grounded columns to quantitatively determine the amount of reactor wall fouling. Polyethylene particles with different particle size ranges (300- 1000 {mu}m) were fluidized with extra dry air at 1.5 times their respective minimum fluidization velocity (u{sub mf}). Results obtained in the grounded fluidization column were not significantly different from those in the isolated column for all particle size ranges tested where the particles mass collected and q/m and were found to be generally similar.

  9. Research of the Effectiveness of Using Air and Ground Low-grade Heat for Buildings Heating in Different Regions of Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilyev G.P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of research on zoning of the Russian Federation based on efficiency of utilization of the low-grade heat of ground and air as well as combinations thereof for heating buildings. When modeling thermal behavior of geothermal HHS in the climatic conditions of various regions of the Russian Federation we considered the effect of long-term recovery of geothermal heat on the thermal behavior of the ground, as well as the effect of the ground pore water phase transitions on the operational efficiency of geothermal heat pump heating systems. The zoning took into account temperature drop of the ground mass caused by many years of heat recovery from the ground. Ground temperatures expected for the 5th year of geothermal HHS operation were used as design ground mass temperatures.

  10. Neutron reflectivity study of substrate surface chemistry effects on supported phospholipid bilayer formation on (1120) sapphire.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oleson, Timothy A. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Sahai, Nita [University of Akron; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Dura, Joseph A [ORNL; Majkrzak, Charles F [ORNL; Giuffre, Anthony J. [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2012-01-01

    Oxide-supported phospholipid bilayers (SPBs) used as biomimetric membranes are significant for a broad range of applications including improvement of biomedical devices and biosensors, and in understanding biomineralization processes and the possible role of mineral surfaces in the evolution of pre-biotic membranes. Continuous-coverage and/or stacjed SPBs retain properties (e.,g. fluidity) more similar to native biological membranes, which is desirable for most applications. Using neutron reflectivity, we examined face coverage and potential stacking of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers on the (1120) face of sapphire (a-Al2O3). Nearly full bilayers were formed at low to neutral pH, when the sapphire surface is positively charged, and at low ionic strength (l=15 mM NaCl). Coverage decreased at higher pH, close to the isoelectric point of sapphire, and also at high I>210mM, or with addition of 2mM Ca2+. The latter two effects are additive, suggesting that Ca2+ mitigates the effect of higher I. These trends agree with previous results for phospholipid adsorption on a-Al2O3 particles determined by adsorption isotherms and on single-crystal (1010) sapphire by atomic force microscopy, suggesting consistency of oxide surface chemistry-dependent effects across experimental techniques.

  11. The temporal orienting P3 effect to non-target stimuli: does it reflect motor inhibition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Kathrin

    2012-02-01

    Temporal orienting enhances early (N1) and late (P3) stages of auditory processing. However, the functional significance of these effects has not been settled yet. The present study tested a motor inhibition account on the temporal orienting P3 effect to non-target stimuli. A temporal cuing paradigm was used, where the level of motor preparation (high vs. low) was varied: If motor preparation is higher, more inhibition is necessary to withhold a response when a non-target is presented at the attended time point. Consequently, if the enhanced P3 to temporally attended non-targets reflected increased motor inhibition, higher motor preparation should further enhance the P3. Overall, temporal orienting enhanced both the N1 and the P3, thus replicating earlier findings. Moreover, the temporal orienting P3 effect was larger when motor preparation was higher. Inconsistent with the motor-inhibition account, however, the P3 to temporally attended non-targets did not differ as a function of motor preparation.

  12. Letter to the Editor Aerosol radiative forcing over land: effect of surface and cloud reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Satheesh

    Full Text Available It is now clearly understood that atmospheric aerosols have a significant impact on climate due to their important role in modifying the incoming solar and outgoing infrared radiation. The question of whether aerosol cools (negative forcing or warms (positive forcing the planet depends on the relative dominance of absorbing aerosols. Recent investigations over the tropical Indian Ocean have shown that, irrespective of the comparatively small percentage contribution in optical depth ( ~ 11%, soot has an important role in the overall radiative forcing. However, when the amount of absorbing aerosols such as soot are significant, aerosol optical depth and chemical composition are not the only determinants of aerosol climate effects, but the altitude of the aerosol layer and the altitude and type of clouds are also important. In this paper, the aerosol forcing in the presence of clouds and the effect of different surface types (ocean, soil, vegetation, and different combinations of soil and vegetation are examined based on model simulations, demonstrating that aerosol forcing changes sign from negative (cooling to positive (warming when reflection from below (either due to land or clouds is high.Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (aerosols and particles History of Geophysics (atmospheric sciences Hydrology (anthropogenic effects

  13. English language and literature students' perceptions of reflective writing, its effects on engagement in writing and literature

    OpenAIRE

    UÇAR, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of Teaching English as a Foreign Language, Bilkent University, 2013. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2013. Includes bibliographical references leaves 122-139. This study investigated the effects of the reflective writing process on English Language and Literature students’ engagement with writing and literature and their demonstrated engagement level in the reflective writing process. This study was conducted over a period of nine weeks with...

  14. Traveling wave effect on the seismic response of a steel arch bridge subjected to near fault ground motions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Yan; George C Lee

    2007-01-01

    In the 1990s, several major earthquakes occurred throughout the world, with a common observation that near fault ground motion (NFGM) characteristics had a distinct impact on causing damage to civil engineering structures that could not be predicted by using far field ground motions. Since then, seismic responses of structures under NFGMs have been extensively examined, with most of the studies focusing on structures with relatively short fundamental periods, where the traveling wave effect does not need to be considered. However, for long span bridges, especially arch bridges, the traveling wave (only time delay considered) effect may be very distinct and is therefore important. In this paper, the results from a case study on the seismic response of a steel arch bridge under selected NFGMs is presented by considering the traveling wave effect with variable apparent velocities. The effects of fling step and long period pulses of NFGMs on the seismic responses of the arch bridge are also discussed.

  15. TOMS and Ground-based Measurements: Long-term Trends, Spatial Variability, Cloud Effects, and Data Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, H. A.; Dahlback, A.; Stamnes, K.; Høyskar, B.; Olsen, R.; Schmidlin, F.; Tsay, S.

    2003-12-01

    Ground-based measurements and TOMS measurements are mutually beneficial to each other. Ground-based measurements of UV radiation and total column ozone amounts are important for the validation of TOMS measurements. For example, it has been shown that TOMS measurements has a tendency to under-estimate ground UV exposure. Some of these effects can perhaps be ascribed to local cloud effects or choice of ozone profiles in the retrieval algorithm. More ground-based measurements are needed to establish the cause of these discrepancies. Recent technology advances have made ground-based measurements of UV doses and ozone column amounts with inexpensive multi-channel filter instruments not only possible, but also an attractive alternative to other more labor-intensive and weather dependent methods. Filter instruments can operate unattended for long periods of time, and it is possible to obtain accurate ozone column amounts even on cloudy days. We present results from extensive comparisons of the performance of several ground-based instruments (the NILU-UV and GUV filter instruments, as well as the Dobson and Brewer instruments) against the EP-TOMS instrument. The data used in the comparisons are from three different sites where we have had the opportunity to operate more than one type of UV instruments for extended periods of time. The sites include the University of Oslo, Norway, the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center facilities at Wallops Island, VA, and Greenbelt, MD and the University of Alaska, Fairbanks (during the TOMS3F campaign). Our results show that ozone column amounts obtained with current filter-type instruments are just as good as those obtained with the Dobson instrument, and might even out-perform the Dobson instrument on cloudy days. The TOMS measurements are shown to exhibit some more variability, but there is on average very good agreement with the ground- based measurements even for high solar zenith angles (SZA). Further more, our comparison shows that

  16. Grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Tina

    2015-04-29

    Grounded theory is a popular research approach in health care and the social sciences. This article provides a description of grounded theory methodology and its key components, using examples from published studies to demonstrate practical application. It aims to demystify grounded theory for novice nurse researchers, by explaining what it is, when to use it, why they would want to use it and how to use it. It should enable nurse researchers to decide if grounded theory is an appropriate approach for their research, and to determine the quality of any grounded theory research they read.

  17. Amplification Effect of Peak Ground Motion Acceleration in Class Ⅱ and Ⅲ Sites over Shandong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Diao Ting; Chen Shijun; Jiang Zaofeng

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the amplification factor (ks ) of peek ground motion with different exceedance probability in class Ⅱ and Ⅲ sites over Shandong Province was estimated by analyzing the seismic response data of soil layers collected from 358 boreholes of class Ⅱ sites and 140 boreholes of class Ⅲ site. From the results, one can conclude that: (1) The scatter plot of ks generally obeys a normal distribution ; (2) ks decreases with the increase of the strength of input ground motion, which is more apparent in Class Ⅲ site than in class lI site; (3) for class Ⅱ site, with the increase of depth of the bedrock interface where ground motion inputs, ks increases gradually until to a stable value when the depth reaches up to approximately 20 meters or larger. Yet, for class Ⅲ site, ks is insensitive to the depth; (4) the average of ks for class Ⅱ site is 1.47, slightly larger than that used in the Seismic Ground Motion Parameters Zonation Map of China ( GB 18306-2001 ). Also, ks in class Ⅱ and Ⅲ sites at different levels of peak ground acceleration over Shandong Province is preliminarily discussed in the paper.

  18. Atmospheric effects on infrared measurements at ground level: Application to monitoring of transport infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Vincent; Dumoulin, Jean

    2014-05-01

    Being able to perform easily non-invasive diagnostics for surveillance and monitoring of critical transport infrastructures is a major preoccupation of many technical offices. Among all the existing electromagnetic methods [1], long term thermal monitoring by uncooled infrared camera [2] is a promising technique due to its dissemination potential according to its low cost on the market. Nevertheless, Knowledge of environmental parameters during measurement in outdoor applications is required to carry out accurate measurement corrections induced by atmospheric effects at ground level. Particularly considering atmospheric effects and measurements in foggy conditions close as possible to those that can be encountered around transport infrastructures, both in visible and infrared spectra. In the present study, atmospheric effects are first addressed by using data base available in literature and modelling. Atmospheric attenuation by particles depends greatly of aerosols density, but when relative humidity increases, water vapor condenses onto the particulates suspended in the atmosphere. This condensed water increases the size of the aerosols and changes their composition and their effective refractive index. The resulting effect of the aerosols on the absorption and scattering of radiation will correspondingly be modified. In a first approach, we used aerosols size distributions derived from Shettle and Fenn [3] for urban area which could match some of experimental conditions encountered during trials on transport infrastructures opened to traffic. In order to calculate the influence of relative humidity on refractive index, the Hänel's model [4] could be used. The change in the particulate size is first related to relative humidity through dry particle radius, particle density and water activity. Once the wet aerosol particle size is found, the effective complex refractive index is the volume weighted average of the refractive indexes of the dry aerosol substance

  19. IMF By effects on ground magnetometer response to increased solar wind dynamic pressure derived from global MHD simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Dogacan Su; Zou, Shasha; Slavin, James A.

    2017-05-01

    During sudden solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements, the magnetosphere undergoes rapid compression resulting in a reconfiguration of the global current systems, most notably the field-aligned currents (FACs). Ground-based magnetometers are traditionally used to study such compression events. However, factors affecting the polarity and magnitude of the ground-based magnetic perturbations are still not well understood. In particular, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By is known to create significant asymmetries in the FAC patterns. We use the University of Michigan Block Adaptive Tree Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS'R'US) magnetohydrodynamic code to investigate the effects of IMF By on the global variations of ground magnetic perturbations during solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements. Using virtual magnetometers in three idealized simulations with varying IMF By, we find asymmetries in the peak amplitude and magnetic local time of the ground magnetic perturbations during the preliminary impulse (PI) and the main impulse (MI) phases. These asymmetries are especially evident at high-latitude ground magnetometer responses where the peak amplitudes differ by 50 nT at different locations. We show that the FACs related with the PI are due to magnetopause deformation, and the FACs related with the MI are generated by vortical flows within the magnetosphere, consistent with other simulation results. The perturbation FACs due to pressure enhancements and their magnetospheric sources do not differ much under different IMF By polarities. However, the conductance profile affected by the superposition of the preexisting FACs and the perturbation FACs including their closure currents is responsible for the magnitude and location asymmetries in the ground magnetic perturbations.

  20. The Effects of Spinoza's Philosophy: The Reflections of Spinozism on Different Periods and Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Cihan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available With the thoughts he put forward, Spinoza is an influential philosopher yet from the beginning of his era. Spinoza philosophy is a philosophy which has influence not only on a specific field but also has influence on fields from ethics to politics, from anthropology to literature, from psychology to physics. According to this, Spinoza developed a discipline affecting not only philosophers but also men of letters, poets and scientists. Spinoza, with the works firstly Ethica, and named Theological-Political Treatise and Political Treatise, became effective both during his era on the era after his era. Indeed, with the thoughts he put forward, Spinoza is one of the philosophers who is mentioned and is worked through mostly today. On the other hand, the concern about the Spinoza is increasing day by day. Thereby, Spinozism will probably affect the next culture, science and intellectual world as it showed its effects on quite a few fields from past to present. The aim of this study is to emphasize its importance within the intellectual history revealing its reflections in different periods and fields.

  1. Cost-effective monitoring of ground motion by joint use of a single-frequency GPS and a MEMS accelerometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Rui; Wang, Rongjiang; Ge, Maorong; Walter, Thomas R.; Ramatschi, Markus; Milkereit, Claus; Bindi, Dino; Dahm, Torsten

    2014-05-01

    Real-time detection and precise estimation of strong ground motion are crucial for rapid assessment and early warning of geohazards such as earthquakes, landslides, and volcanic activity. This challenging task can be accomplished by combining GPS and accelerometer measurements because of their complementary capabilities to resolve broadband ground motion signals. However, for implementing an operational monitoring network of such joint measurement systems, cost-effective techniques need to be developed and rigorously tested. We propose a new approach for joint processing of single-frequency GPS and MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems) accelerometer data in real time. To demonstrate the performance of our method, we describe results from outdoor experiments under controlled conditions. For validation, we analysed dual-frequency GPS data and images recorded by a video camera. The results of the different sensors agree very well, suggesting that real-time broadband information of ground motion can be provided by using single-frequency GPS and MEMS accelerometers. Reference: Tu, R., R. Wang, M. Ge, T. R. Walter, M. Ramatschi, C. Milkereit, D. Bindi, and T. Dahm (2013), Cost-effective monitoring of ground motion related to earthquakes, landslides, or volcanic activity by joint use of a single-frequency GPS and a MEMS accelerometer, Geophysical Research Letters, 40, 3825-3829, doi:10.1002/grl.50653.

  2. Calcium chloride and tricalcium phosphate effects on the pink color defect in cooked ground and intact turkey breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammel, L M; Claus, J R

    2007-12-01

    Calcium chloride (250, 500ppm) was examined for its ability to reduce the pink color defect induced by sodium nitrite (10ppm) and nicotinamide (1.0%) in cooked ground turkey in the presence and absence of sodium tripolyphosphate (0.25, 0.5%) and sodium citrate (0.5, 1.0%). The ability of tricalcium phosphate (0.1-0.5%) to reduce pink cooked color also was evaluated in ground turkey and both calcium chloride and tricalcium phosphate were tested for their effects on pink cooked color in whole breast muscle. The combination of calcium chloride and sodium tripolyphosphate, not calcium chloride alone, was necessary for a reduction in pink cooked color induced by nicotinamide. Subsequently, in the presence of phosphate, both calcium chloride and sodium citrate reduced pink cooked color and were most effective in combination. Tricalcium phosphate also was capable of reducing pink cooked color in ground turkey, however substituting tricalcium phosphate for sodium tripolyphosphate resulted in lower pH and cooking yields. Neither calcium chloride nor tricalcium phosphate was capable of reducing pink cooked color in whole turkey breast. Currently, a combination of sodium tripolyphosphate, calcium chloride, and sodium citrate represents the most suitable means for reducing or preventing the pink color defect in uncured ground turkey.

  3. Effective rumen degradation of dry matter, crude protein and neutral detergent fibre in forage determined by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlsson, Christer; Houmøller, Lars P.; Weisbjerg, Martin R.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine if near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) could be used to predict degradation parameters and effective degradation from scans of original forage samples. Degradability of dry matter (DM), crude protein (CP) and neutral detergent fibre (NDF...... calculated. Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy was examined for its ability to predict degradation parameters and to make a direct prediction of effective degradation from scans of the original samples of perennial ryegrass and orchardgrass. Prediction of effective degradation of the different feed...

  4. Spatiotemporal Effects of Supplementary Feeding of Wild Boar (Sus scrofa on Artificial Ground Nest Depredation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragne Oja

    Full Text Available Supplementary feeding of ungulates, being widely used in game management, may have unwanted consequences. Its role in agricultural damage is well-studied, but few studies have considered the potential for the practice to attract ground nest predators. Our goal was to identify the factors influencing ground nest predation in the vicinity of year-round supplementary feeding sites for wild boar and to characterise their spatiotemporal scope. We conducted two separate artificial ground nest experiments in five different hunting districts in south-eastern Estonia. The quantity of food provided and distance of a nest from the feeding site were the most important factors determining predation risk. Larger quantities of food resulted in higher predation risk, while predation risk responded in a non-linear fashion to distance from the feeding site. Although predation risk eventually decreases if supplementary feeding is ceased for at least four years, recently abandoned feeding sites still pose a high predation risk.

  5. Spatiotemporal Effects of Supplementary Feeding of Wild Boar (Sus scrofa) on Artificial Ground Nest Depredation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oja, Ragne; Zilmer, Karoline; Valdmann, Harri

    2015-01-01

    Supplementary feeding of ungulates, being widely used in game management, may have unwanted consequences. Its role in agricultural damage is well-studied, but few studies have considered the potential for the practice to attract ground nest predators. Our goal was to identify the factors influencing ground nest predation in the vicinity of year-round supplementary feeding sites for wild boar and to characterise their spatiotemporal scope. We conducted two separate artificial ground nest experiments in five different hunting districts in south-eastern Estonia. The quantity of food provided and distance of a nest from the feeding site were the most important factors determining predation risk. Larger quantities of food resulted in higher predation risk, while predation risk responded in a non-linear fashion to distance from the feeding site. Although predation risk eventually decreases if supplementary feeding is ceased for at least four years, recently abandoned feeding sites still pose a high predation risk.

  6. Effect of pesticide use in fruit production orchards on shallow ground water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewy, R M; Carvajal, L G; Novelli, M; de D'Angelo, A M Pechen

    2003-05-01

    As a part of landscape-scale study, ground water samples were collected from 30 wells located in fruit production farms belonging to the valley of Neuquen river during the period 1995-1998 and analyzed for organophosphate pesticides. As a consequence of the leaching process, ground water from the Valley of Neuquen River frequently contained concentrations of organophosphorus pesticides that exceeded acute toxicity risk ratios established to protect aquatic life. It was found that some pesticides, as azinphos methyl, had a high detection frequency, 66% of the samples, with concentrations varying from no detection to 48.9 ppb. Dimethoate, metidathion and phosmet were also detected with frequencies of 14.1, 13.6 and 10.8% and with concentration ranks from no detection to a maximum value of 10.9, 2.0 and 15.5 ppb, respectively. Seasonal variations and temporal trends were found for these compounds in ground water.

  7. The effect of experimental resolution on crystal reflectivity and secondary extinction in neutron diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, O.W.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1965-01-01

    The reflectivity for neutrons of a plane slab crystal is calculated in the transmission case when the crystal is placed between two Seller collimators. The calculations indicate that the crystal reflectivity, as well as the secondary extinction coefficient, depends signicantly on the angular...... resolution of the collimators. Curves are given for the extinction of the crystal with different crystal and collimator parameters....

  8. Numerical simulation of the sound reflection effects of noise barriers in near and far field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutgendorf, D.; Roo, F. de; Eerden, F.J.M. van der; Jean, P.; Ecotière, D.; Dutilleux, G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the first stages of the development of a new test method for evaluating the reflectivity performance of noise barriers. The reflectivity performance describes the increase in sound level at a receiver due to the presence of the noise barrier. First the current test method for s

  9. Reflective, Ethical, and Moral Constructs in Educational Leadership Preparation: Effects on Graduates Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucinski, Daisy Arredondo; Bauch, Patricia A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: A 34-item Likert-type survey instrument, The Reflective, Ethical, and Moral Assessment Survey (REMAS), measuring perceptions of use of reflective, ethical and moral dispositions and leadership practices was developed. Items, component factors, and results of the self-assessment of graduates from an educational leadership preparation…

  10. Effects of Reflection Prompts on Learning Outcomes and Learning Behaviour in Statistics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Robin; Krause, Ulrike-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Starting from difficulties that students display when they deal with correlation analysis, an e-learning environment ("Koralle") was developed. The design was inspired by principles of situated and example-based learning. In order to facilitate reflective processes and thus enhance learning outcomes, reflection prompts were integrated into the…

  11. The Effects of Reflective Activities on Skill Adaptation in a Work-Related Instrumental Learning Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessger, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    In work-related instrumental learning contexts, the role of reflective activities is unclear. Kolb's experiential learning theory and Mezirow's transformative learning theory predict skill adaptation as an outcome. This prediction was tested by manipulating reflective activities and assessing participants' response and error rates during novel…

  12. Mobile and Online Learning Journal: Effects on Apprentices' Reflection in Vocational Education and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauroux, Laetitia; Könings, Karen D.; Zufferey, Jessica Dehler; Gurtner, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    While learning journals (LJs) have been shown to support self-regulated learning strategies, reflection and learning outcomes in academic contexts, few studies have investigated their relevance in vocational education. A mobile and online learning journal (MOLJ) was developed to support reflection on workplace experiences. However, acceptance of…

  13. The effects of structural setting on the azimuthal velocities of blast induced ground motion in perlite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beattie, S.G. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    1995-02-01

    A series of small scale explosive tests were performed during the spring of 1994 at a perlite mine located near Socorro, NM. The tests were designed to investigate the azimuthal or directional relationship between small scale geologic structures such as joints and the propagation of explosively induced ground motion. Three shots were initiated within a single borehole located at ground zero (gz) at depths varying from the deepest at 83 m (272 ft) to the shallowest at 10 m (32 ft). The intermediate shot was initiated at a depth of 63 m (208 ft). An array of three component velocity and acceleration transducers were placed in two concentric rings entirely surrounding the single shot hole at 150 and 300 azimuths as measured from ground zero. Data from the transducers was then used to determine the average propagation velocity of the blast vibration through the rock mass at the various azimuths. The rock mass was mapped to determine the prominent joint orientations (strike and dip) and the average propagation velocities were correlated with this geologic information. The data from these experiments shows that there is a correlation between the orientation of prominent joints and the average velocity of ground motion. It is theorized that this relationship is due to the relative path the ground wave follows when encountering a joint or structure within the rock mass. The more prominent structures allow the wave to follow along their strike thereby forming a sort of channel or path of least resistance and in turn increasing the propagation velocity. Secondary joints or structures may act in concert with more prominent features to form a network of channels along which the wave moves more freely than it may travel against the structure. The amplitudes of the ground motion was also shown to vary azimuthally with the direction of the most prominent structures.

  14. Investigating the build-up of precedence effect using reflection masking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartcher-O'Brien, Jessica; Buchholz, Jörg

    2006-01-01

    The auditory processing level involved in the build-up of precedence [Freyman et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 90, 874–884 (1991)] has been investigated here by employing reflection masked threshold (RMT) techniques. Given that RMT techniques are generally assumed to address lower levels of the auditory...... signal processing, such an approach represents a bottom-up approach to the buildup of precedence. Three conditioner configurations measuring a possible buildup of reflection suppression were compared to the baseline RMT for four reflection delays ranging from 2.5–15 ms. No buildup of reflection...... suppression was observed for any of the conditioner configurations. Buildup of template (decrease in RMT for two of the conditioners), on the other hand, was found to be delay dependent. For five of six listeners, with reflection delay=2.5 and 15 ms, RMT decreased relative to the baseline. For 5- and 10-ms...

  15. Self-perception of knowledge and adherence reflecting the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagli-Hernandez C

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carolina Dagli-Hernandez,1 Rosa Camila Lucchetta,1 Tales Rubens de Nadai,2 José Carlos Fernandez Galduróz,3 Patricia de Carvalho Mastroianni1 1Department of Drugs and Medications, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of the UNESP – Univ Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, 2Department of Surgery and Anatomy, Americo Brasiliense State Hospital, 3Department of Psychobiology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP, São Paulo, Brazil Objectives: To evaluate which indirect method for assessing adherence best reflects highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART effectiveness and the factors related to adherence. Method: This descriptive, cross-sectional study was performed in 2012 at a reference center of the state of São Paulo. Self-report (simplified medication adherence questionnaire [SMAQ] and drug refill parameters were compared to the viral load (clinical parameter of the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy [EP] to evaluate the EP. The “Cuestionario para la Evaluación de la Adhesión al Tratamiento Antiretroviral” (CEAT-VIH was used to evaluate factors related to adherence and the EP and, complementarily, patient self-perception of adherence was compared to the clinical parameter of the EP. Results: Seventy-five patients were interviewed, 60 of whom were considered as adherent from the clinical parameter of the EP and ten were considered as adherent from all parameters. Patient self-perception about adherence was the instrument that best reflected the EP when compared to the standardized self-report questionnaire (SMAQ and drug refill parameter. The level of education and the level of knowledge on HAART were positively correlated to the EP. Forgetfulness, alcohol use, and lack of knowledge about the medications were the factors most frequently reported as a cause of nonadherence. Conclusion: A new parameter of patient self-perception of adherence, which is a noninvasive, inexpensive instrument, could be applied and assessed as easily as self

  16. Effects of highway-deicer application on ground-water quality in a part of the Calumet Aquifer, northwestern Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Lee R.; Bayless, E. Randall; Buszka, Paul M.; Wilson, John T.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of highway-deicer application on ground-water quality were studied at a site in northwestern Indiana using a variety of geochemical indicators. Site characteristics such as high snowfall rates; large quantities of applied deicers; presence of a high-traffic highway; a homogeneous, permeable, and unconfined aquifer; a shallow water table; a known ground-water-flow direction; and minimal potential for other sources of chloride and sodium to complicate source interpretation were used to select a study area where ground water was likely to be affected by deicer application. Forty-three monitoring wells were installed in an unconfined sand aquifer (the Calumet aquifer) near Beverly Shores in northwestern Indiana. Wells were installed along two transects that approximately paralleled groundwater flow in the Calumet aquifer and crossed US?12. US?12 is a highway that receives Indiana?s highest level of maintenance to maintain safe driving conditions. Ground-water quality and water-level data were collected from the monitoring wells, and precipitation and salt-application data were compiled from 1994 through 1997. The water-quality data indicated that chloride was the most easily traced indicator of highway deicers in ground water. Concentration ratios of chloride to iodide and chloride to bromide and Stiff diagrams of major element concentrations indicated that the principal source of chloride and sodium in ground water from the uppermost one-third to one-half of the Calumet relative electromagnetic conductivity defined a distinct plume of deicer-affected water in the uppermost 8 feet of aquifer at about 9 feet horizontally from the paved roadway edge and a zone of higher conductivity than background in the lower one-third of the aquifer. Chloride and sodium in the deep parts of the aquifer originated from natural sources. Chloride and sodium from highway deicers were present in the aquifer throughout the year. The highest concentrations of chloride and sodium

  17. Localizing Ground-Penetrating Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    ing Ground-Penetrating Radar (LGPR) uses very high frequency (VHF) radar reflections of underground features to generate base- line maps and then...Innovative ground- penetrating radar that maps underground geological features provides autonomous vehicles with real-time localization. Localizing...NOV 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Localizing Ground-Penetrating Radar 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  18. Impact of Guided Reflection with Peers on the Development of Effective Problem Solving Strategies and Physics Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Andrew J.; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    Students must learn effective problem solving strategies in order to develop expertise in physics. Effective problem solving strategies include a conceptual analysis of the problem followed by planning of the solution, and then implementation, evaluation, and reflection upon the process. Research suggests that converting a problem from the initial…

  19. Effects of a competency-oriented learning environment and teacher training on reflection skills of nursing students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijsmans, Dominique; Smits, M.; Jochems, W.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of a competency‐oriented course and the effects of feedback training on students’ reflection skills. Thirty‐one nursing students enrolled in a conventional course with lectures and assignments following a traditional test. Subsequently, they enrolled in a competen

  20. Temperature Effect in Secondary Cosmic Rays (MUONS) Observed at the Ground: Analysis of the Global MUON Detector Network Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mendonça, R. R. S.; Braga, C. R.; Echer, E.; Dal Lago, A.; Munakata, K.; Kuwabara, T.; Kozai, M.; Kato, C.; Rockenbach, M.; Schuch, N. J.; Jassar, H. K. Al; Sharma, M. M.; Tokumaru, M.; Duldig, M. L.; Humble, J. E.; Evenson, P.; Sabbah, I.

    2016-10-01

    The analysis of cosmic ray intensity variation seen by muon detectors at Earth's surface can help us to understand astrophysical, solar, interplanetary and geomagnetic phenomena. However, before comparing cosmic ray intensity variations with extraterrestrial phenomena, it is necessary to take into account atmospheric effects such as the temperature effect. In this work, we analyzed this effect on the Global Muon Detector Network (GMDN), which is composed of four ground-based detectors, two in the northern hemisphere and two in the southern hemisphere. In general, we found a higher temperature influence on detectors located in the northern hemisphere. Besides that, we noticed that the seasonal temperature variation observed at the ground and at the altitude of maximum muon production are in antiphase for all GMDN locations (low-latitude regions). In this way, contrary to what is expected in high-latitude regions, the ground muon intensity decrease occurring during summertime would be related to both parts of the temperature effect (the negative and the positive). We analyzed several methods to describe the temperature effect on cosmic ray intensity. We found that the mass weighted method is the one that best reproduces the seasonal cosmic ray variation observed by the GMDN detectors and allows the highest correlation with long-term variation of the cosmic ray intensity seen by neutron monitors.

  1. Effect of spaceflight hardware on the skeletal properties of ground control mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Ted; Lloyd, Shane; Dunlap, Alex; Ferguson, Virginia; Simske, Steven; Stodieck, Louis; Livingston, Eric

    Introduction: Spaceflight experiments using mouse or rat models require habitats that are specifically designed for the microgravity environment. During spaceflight, rodents are housed in a specially designed stainless steel meshed cage with gravity-independent food and water delivery systems and constant airflow to push floating urine and feces towards a waste filter. Differences in the housing environment alone, not even considering the spaceflight environment itself, may lead to physiological changes in the animals contained within. It is important to characterize these cage differences so that results from spaceflight experiments can be more reliably compared to studies from other laboratories. Methods: For this study, we examined the effect of NASA's Animal Enclosure Module (AEM) spaceflight hardware on the skeletal properties of 8-week-old female C57BL/6J mice. This 13-day experiment, conducted on the ground, modeled the flight experiment profile of the CBTM-01 payload on STS-108, with standard vivarium-housed mice being compared to AEM-housed mice (n = 12/group). Functional differences were compared via mechanical testing, micro-hardness indentation, microcomputed tomography, and mineral/matrix composition. Cellular changes were examined by serum chemistry, histology, quantitative histomorphometry, and RT-PCR. A Student's t-test was utilized, with the level of Type I error set at 95 Results: There was no change in elastic, maximum, or fracture force mechanical properties at the femur mid-diaphysis, however, structural stiffness was -17.5 Conclusions: Housing mice in the AEM spaceflight hardware had minimal effects on femur cortical bone properties. However, trabecular bone at the proximal tibia in AEM mice experi-enced large increases in microarchitecture and mineral composition. Increases in bone density were accompanied by reductions in bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts, representing a general decline in bone turnover at this site

  2. SAW reflection and scattering by electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei-biao; HAN Tao; ZHANG Xiao-dong; WU Hao-dong; SHUI Yong-an

    2005-01-01

    A rigorous analysis of surface acoustic wave (SAW) reflection and scattering by electrodes is of paramount importance in the design of SAW identification tags and sensors. In this paper, a new method based on Green's function concept is used to study reflection and scattering coefficients. By this method the reflection coefficient with its phase angle, transmission coefficient, and bulk wave scattering coefficient, can be obtained rapidly and accurately. To get precise result, the influence of static charge must be taken into account. In the work, we successfully cancelled out the effect of static charge and the validity of the results was checked. As an example, the reflection, transmission and scattering coefficients ora single grounded electrode on 128°YX LiNbO3 is shown.

  3. Impacts of dust aerosol and adjacency effects on the accuracy of Landsat 8 and RapidEye surface reflectances

    KAUST Repository

    Houborg, Rasmus

    2017-03-29

    The atmospheric correction of satellite data is challenging over desert agricultural systems, due to the relatively high aerosol optical thicknesses (τ550), bright soils, and a heterogeneous surface reflectance field. Indeed, the contribution of reflected radiation from adjacent pixels scattered into the field of view of a target pixel is considerable and can significantly affect the fidelity of retrieved reflectances. In this study, uncertainties and quantitative errors associated with the atmospheric correction of multi-spectral Landsat 8 and RapidEye data were characterized over a desert agricultural landscape in Saudi Arabia. Surface reflectances were retrieved using an implementation of the 6SV atmospheric correction code, and validated against field collected spectroradiometer measurements over desert, cultivated soil, and vegetated surface targets. A combination of satellite and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data were used to parameterize aerosol properties and atmospheric state parameters. With optimal specification of τ550 and aerosol optical properties and correction for adjacency effects, the relative Mean Absolute Deviation (MAD) for all bands combined was 5.4% for RapidEye and 6.8% for Landsat 8. However uncertainties associated with satellite-based τ550 retrievals were shown to introduce significant error into the reflectance estimates. With respect to deriving common vegetation indices from corrected reflectance data, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was associated with the smallest errors (3–8% MAD). Surface reflectance errors were highest for bands in the visible part of the spectrum, particularly the blue band (5–16%), while there was more consistency within the red-edge (~ 5%) and near-infrared (5–7%). Results were generally better constrained when a τ550-dependent aerosol model for desert dust particles, parameterized on the basis of nearby AERONET site data, was used in place of a generic rural or background

  4. Energetic Sn{sup +} irradiation effects on ruthenium mirror specular reflectivity at 13.5-nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allain, J.P. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Nieto-Perez, M. [CICATA-IPN, Cimatario, Queretaro (Mexico); Hendricks, M.R. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Zink, P. [Philips Extreme UV, Aachen (Germany); Metzmacher, C. [Philips Research Laboratories, Aachen (Germany); Bergmann, K. [Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology, Aachen (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    Sn{sup +} irradiations of Ru single-layer mirrors (SLM) simulate conditions of fast-Sn ion exposure in high-intensity 13.5 nm lithography lamps. Ultra-shallow implantation of Sn is measured down to 1-1.5 nm depth for energies between 1-1.3 keV at near-normal incident angles on Ru mirror surfaces. The Sn surface concentration reaches an equilibrium of 55-58% Sn/Ru for near-normal incidence and 36-38% for grazing incidence at approximately 63 degrees with respect to the mirror surface normal. The relative reflectivity at 13.5 nm at 15-degree incidence was measured in-situ during Sn{sup +} irradiation. For near-normal Sn{sup +} exposures the reflectivity is measured to decrease between 4-7% for a total Sn fluence of 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. Theoretical Fresnel reflectivity modeling shows for the same fluence assuming all Sn atoms form a layer on the Ru mirror surface, that the reflectivity loss should be between 15-18% for this dose. Ex-situ absolute 13.5 nm reflectivity data corroborate these results, indicating that implanted energetic Sn atoms mixed with Ru reflect 13.5-nm light differently than theoretically predicted by Fresnel reflectivity models. (orig.)

  5. Effect of retro-reflective materials on temperature environment in tents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the low thermal inertia and poor thermal insulation of ultrathin envelope in tents, its indoor temperature environment is extremely bad and its occupants are tormented. Especially under the high solar radiation, both indoor air temperature and inner surface radiation temperature increase rapidly. And thereby, decreasing radiation heat gain in summer is necessary to refine indoor temperature environment in tents. Retro-reflective materials make it a reasonable choice due to their high reflectivity for solar radiation. To reveal the temperature environment improvement of tents by integrating with retro-reflective materials, a comparative experiment is carried out under the summer climatic conditions of Chengdu city, China. Experimental results show that due to integrating with retro-reflective materials, indoor air peak temperature in the tent can be reduced by more than 7.7 °C, while inner surface radiant temperature can be lowered up to 4.8 °C in the day time. It shows retro-reflective materials could refine indoor temperature environment in tents. Through a comparison of the walls in different orientations, on which retro-reflective materials are covered, the top, east and north walls are found to be better choices, while the north wall is the worst one for retro-reflective materials.

  6. Effects of Particle Size on the Attenuated Total Reflection Spectrum of Minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udvardi, Beatrix; Kovács, István J; Fancsik, Tamás; Kónya, Péter; Bátori, Miklósné; Stercel, Ferenc; Falus, György; Szalai, Zoltán

    2017-06-01

    This study focuses on particle size effect on monomineralic powders recorded using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy. Six particle size fractions of quartz, feldspar, calcite, and dolomite were prepared (size. As particle size increases, the intensity and area of IR bands usually decrease while the width of bands increases. The band positions usually shifted to higher wavenumbers with decreasing particle size. Infrared spectra of minerals are the most intensive in the particle size fraction of 2-4 µm. However, if the particle size is very small (size are compared, as in regression analysis for modal predictions using ATR FT-IR, it is also important to report the grain size distribution or surface area of samples. The band area of water (3000-3620 cm(-1)) is similar in each mineral fraction, except for the particles below 2 µm. It indicates that the finest particles could have disproportionately more water adsorbed on their larger surface area. Thus, these higher wavenumbers of the ATR FT-IR spectra may be more sensitive to this spectral interference if the number of particles below 2 µm is considerable. It is also concluded that at least a proportion of the moisture could be very adhesive to the particles due to the band shift towards lower wavenumbers in the IR range of 3000-3620 cm(-1).

  7. Evaluating the effects of urbanization and land-use planning using ground-water and surface-water models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, R.J.; Steuer, J.J.

    2001-01-01

    Why are the effects of urbanization a concern? As the city of Middleton, Wisconsin, and its surroundings continue to develop, the Pheasant Branch watershed (fig.l) is expected to undergo urbanization. For the downstream city of Middleton, urbanization in the watershed can mean increased flood peaks, water volume and pollutant loads. More subtly, it may also reduce water that sustains the ground-water system (called "recharge") and adversely affect downstream ecosystems that depend on ground water such as the Pheasant Branch Springs (hereafter referred to as the Springs). The relation of stormwater runoff and reduced ground-water recharge is complex because the surface-water system is coupled to the underlying ground-water system. In many cases there is movement of water from one system to the other that varies seasonally or daily depending on changing conditions. Therefore, it is difficult to reliably determine the effects of urbanization on stream baseflow and spring flows without rigorous investigation. Moreover, mitigating adverse effects after development has occurred can be expensive and administratively difficult. Overlying these concerns are issues such as stewardship of the resource, the rights of the public, and land owners' rights both of those developing their land and those whose land is affected by this development. With the often- contradictory goals, a scientific basis for assessing effects of urbanization and effectiveness of mitigation measures helps ensure fair and constructive decision-making. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Middleton and Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, completed a study that helps address these issues through modeling of the hydrologic system. This Fact Sheet discusses the results of this work.

  8. Effect of boiling water carcass immersion on aerobic bacteria counts of poultry skin and processed ground poultry meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, N M; Avens, J S; Kendall, P A; Salman, M D

    2008-06-01

    This study was conducted to determine the relationship between bacteria destruction on poultry carcass skin and bacteria in raw ground poultry meat from the same carcasses. Immersion time in boiling water of broiler chicken whole carcasses required for maximum reduction of naturally occurring aerobic bacterial count on skin was measured. Treatments for chicken carcasses consisted of immersion in boiling water (approximately 95 degrees C) for 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5, and 4 min. Four skin samples taken following treatment and three taken from subsequently ground carcass meat were analyzed for total aerobic plate counts (APC). Analysis of the data indicated a linear increase in bacterial destruction on skin with increased boiling water immersion time from 0 to 4 min. Reduction of skin bacteria to less than 1 log10 occurred at 3 min carcass immersion or longer. The analysis also indicated that treatment with boiling water and removal of skin was effective in reducing bacterial counts in ground meat to similar levels at all treatment times from 0.5 to 4.0 min. Findings from this study indicated that a boiling water immersion intervention and removal of skin could reduce subsequent bacteria contamination of ground meat. This intervention could minimize the risk of pathogen-contaminated primary processed poultry carcasses used in further processing.

  9. Ground state energy of dilute neutron matter at next-to-leading order in lattice chiral effective field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Epelbaum, Evgeny; Lee, Dean; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2008-01-01

    We present lattice calculations for the ground state energy of dilute neutron matter at next-to-leading order in chiral effective field theory. This study follows a series of recent papers on low-energy nuclear physics using chiral effective field theory on the lattice. In this work we introduce an improved spin- and isospin-projected leading-order action which allows for a perturbative treatment of corrections at next-to-leading order and smaller estimated errors. Using auxiliary fields and Euclidean-time projection Monte Carlo, we compute the ground state of 8, 12, and 16 neutrons in a periodic cube, covering a density range from 2% to 10% of normal nuclear density.

  10. Effects of Prophylactic Ankle Supports on Vertical Ground Reaction Force During Landing: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxin Niu, Tienan Feng, Lejun Wang, Chenghua Jiang, Ming Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There has been much debate on how prophylactic ankle supports (PASs may influence the vertical ground reaction force (vGRF during landing. Therefore, the primary aims of this meta-analysis were to systematically review and synthesize the effect of PASs on vGRF, and to understand how PASs affect vGRF peaks (F1, F2 and the time from initial contact to peak loading (T1, T2 during landing. Several key databases, including Scopus, Cochrane, Embase, PubMed, ProQuest, Medline, Ovid, Web of Science, and the Physical Activity Index, were used for identifying relevant studies published in English since inception to April 1, 2015. The computerized literature search and cross-referencing the citation list of the articles yielded 3,993 articles. Criteria for inclusion required that 1 the study was conducted on healthy adults; 2 the subject number and trial number were known; 3 the subjects performed landing with and without PAS; 4 the landing movement was in the sagittal plane; 5 the comparable vGRF parameters were reported; and 6 the F1 and F2 must be normalized to the subject’s body weight. After the removal of duplicates and irrelevant articles, 6, 6, 15 and 11 studies were respectively pooled for outcomes of F1, T1, F2 and T2. This study found a significantly increased F2 (.03 BW, 95% CI: .001, .05 and decreased T1 (-1.24 ms, 95% CI: -1.77, -.71 and T2 (-3.74 ms, 95% CI: -4.83, -2.65 with the use of a PAS. F1 was not significantly influenced by the PAS. Heterogeneity was present in some results, but there was no evidence of publication bias for any outcome. These changes represented deterioration in the buffering characteristics of the joint. An ideal PAS design should limit the excessive joint motion of ankle inversion, while allowing a normal range of motion, especially in the sagittal plane.

  11. Urine Metabolites Reflect Time-Dependent Effects of Cyclosporine and Sirolimus on Rat Kidney Function☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klawitter, Jost; Bendrick-Peart, Jamie; Rudolph, Birgit; Beckey, Virginia; Klawitter, Jelena; Haschke, Manuel; Rivard, Christopher; Chan, Laurence; Leibfritz, Dieter; Christians, Uwe; Schmitz, Volker

    2009-01-01

    Background The clinical use of the immunosuppressant calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine is limited by its nephrotoxicity. This is enhanced when combined with the immunosuppressive mTOR inhibitor sirolimus. Nephrotoxicity of both drugs is not yet fully understood. Methods The goal was to gain more detailed mechanistic insights into the time-dependent effects of cyclosporine and sirolimus on the rat kidney by using a comprehensive approach including metabolic profiling in urine (1H-NMR spectroscopy), kidney histology, kidney function parameters in plasma, measurement of glomerular filtration rates, the oxidative stress marker 15-F2t-isoprostane in urine and immunosuppressant concentrations in blood and kidney. Male Wistar rats were treated with vehicle (controls), cyclosporine (10/25mg/kg/d) and/or sirolimus (1mg/kg/d) by oral gavage once daily for 6 and 28 days. Results Twenty-eight day treatment led to a decrease of glomerular filtration rates (cyclosporine -59%, sirolimus -25%). These were further decreased when both drugs were combined (-86%). Histology revealed tubular damage after treatment with cyclosporine, which was enhanced when sirolimus was added. No other part of the kidney was affected. 1H-NMR spectroscopy analysis of urine (day 6) revealed time-dependent changes of 2-oxoglutarate, citrate and succinate concentrations. In combination with increased urine isoprostane concentrations these changes indicated oxidative stress. After 28 days of cyclosporine treatment, urine metabonomics shifted to patterns typical for proximal tubular damage with reduction of Krebs cycle intermediates and trimethylamine-N-oxide concentrations whereas acetate, lactate, trimethylamine and glucose concentrations increased. Again, sirolimus enhanced these negative effects. Conclusions Our results indicate that cyclosporine and/or sirolimus induce damage of the renal tubular system. This is reflected by urine metabolite patterns, which seem to be more sensitive than currently used

  12. Grounded cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsalou, Lawrence W

    2008-01-01

    Grounded cognition rejects traditional views that cognition is computation on amodal symbols in a modular system, independent of the brain's modal systems for perception, action, and introspection. Instead, grounded cognition proposes that modal simulations, bodily states, and situated action underlie cognition. Accumulating behavioral and neural evidence supporting this view is reviewed from research on perception, memory, knowledge, language, thought, social cognition, and development. Theories of grounded cognition are also reviewed, as are origins of the area and common misperceptions of it. Theoretical, empirical, and methodological issues are raised whose future treatment is likely to affect the growth and impact of grounded cognition.

  13. The Effect of a Self-Reflection and Insight Program on the Nursing Competence of Nursing Students: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Hsiang-Chu

    2015-01-01

    Nurses have to solve complex problems for their patients and their families, and as such, nursing care capability has become a focus of attention. The aim of this longitudinal study was to develop a self-reflection practice exercise program for nursing students to be used during clinical practice and to evaluate the effects of this program empirically and longitudinally on change in students' clinical competence, self-reflection, stress, and perceived teaching quality. An additional aim was to determine the predictors important to nursing competence. We sampled 260 nursing students from a total of 377 practicum students to participate in this study. A total of 245 students nurse completed 4 questionnaires, Holistic Nursing Competence Scale, Self-Reflection and Insight Scale, Perceived Stress Scale, and Clinical Teaching Quality Scale, at 2, 4, and 6 months after clinical practice experience. Generalized estimating equation models were used to examine the change in scores on each of the questionnaires. The findings showed that, at 6 months after clinical practice, nursing competence was significantly higher than at 2 and 4 months, was positively related to self-reflection and insight, and was negatively related to practice stress. Nursing students' competence at each time period was positively related to clinical teachers' instructional quality at 4 and 6 months. These results indicate that a clinical practice program with self-reflection learning exercise improves nursing students' clinical competence and that nursing students' self-reflection and perceived practice stress affect their nursing competence. Nursing core competencies are enhanced with a self-reflection program, which helps nursing students to improve self-awareness and decrease stress that may interfere with learning. Further, clinical practice experience, self-reflection and insight, and practice stress are predictors of nursing students' clinical competence.

  14. Theoretical and experimental study of the Stark effect in the ground state of alkali atoms in helium crystals

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    This thesis work describes a detailed study of the Stark interaction in the ground state of cesium atoms trapped in a solid helium matrix. The motivation for the investigation of electric field effects on alkali species implanted in solid helium is related to the original main goal of our experimental activities, i.e., the measurement of a permanent atomic electric dipole moment (EDM). The existence of an atomic EDM simultaneously violates the discrete symmetries of time reversal (T) and pari...

  15. On the effectiveness of the vlf-em method For ground water prospecting in the Basement terrains, Sinai, Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Shendi, El-Arabi Hendi [العربيى هندي شندي

    1997-01-01

    The VLF-EM method is proved to be an effective, fast and inexpensive tool for ground water prospecting in the basement terrains of Southern Sinai. The resistive shallow alluvial deposits increase the penetration depth of the received VLF waves to as deep as 40 meters which is very reasonable to detect the water bearing alluvium in the studied areas. The measured horizontal and vertical components of the resultant VLF-EM field were used to calculate the apparent resistivities of the conductive...

  16. The effect of inundation frequency on ground beetle communities in a channelized mountain stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalski, T.; Kedzior, R.; Radecki-Pawlik, A.

    2012-04-01

    Under natural conditions, river channels and floodplains are shaped by flow and sediment regime and are one of the most dynamic ecosystems. At present, European river floodplains are among the most endangered landscapes due to human modifications to river systems, including channel regulation and floodplain urbanization, and land use changes in the catchments. Situated in a transition zone between terrestrial and aquatic environments, exposed riverine sediments (ERS) play a key role in the functioning of riverine ecosystems. This study aimed to verify whether the bare granular substrate is the only factor responsible for sustaining the biota associated with ERS or the inundation frequency also plays a role, modifying the potential of particular species to colonize these habitats. Ground beetles (Col. Carabidae) were selected as the investigated group of organisms and the study was carried out in Porębianka, a Polish Carpathian stream flowing through both unconstrained channel sections and sections with varied channelization schemes (rapid hydraulic structures, concrete revetments or rip-rap of various age). In each of the distinguished channel types, four replicates of 10 pitfall traps were established in three rows varying in distance to the mean water level (at three different benches). Almost 7000 individuals belonging to 102 species were collected on 60 plots. Forward selection of redundancy analysis revealed four factors significantly describing the variation in ground beetle species data: bank modification, potential bankfull discharge, frequency of inundation and plant height. Most of the biggest species were ordered at the positive site of first axis having the highest values of periods between floods. Total biomass of ground beetles and mean biomass of individuals differed significantly between sites of various frequency of inundation, whereas the variation in abundance and species richness of ground beetles was independent of the river dynamics. The body

  17. Towards an effective non-reflective boundary condition for computational aeroacoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, James; Fattah, Ryu; Zhang, Xin

    2017-03-01

    A generic, non-reflective zonal transverse characteristic boundary condition is described for computational aeroacoustics, which shows superior performance to existing non-reflective boundary conditions for two-dimensional linearized Euler simulations. The new condition is based on a characteristic non-reflective method, and also contains optimised use of transverse characteristic terms and a zonal forcing region. The performance of the new method and several existing non-reflective acoustic boundary conditions is quantitatively compared using a plane wave test case. The performance of buffer zone, perfectly matched layer, far-field, and characteristic non-reflective methods is compared, following an optimisation of the tuneable parameters in each method to give best performance. The study uses a high-order linearised Euler equation solver to assess non-reflective boundary conditions with a variety of cases. The performance is compared for downstream travelling acoustic waves with varying frequency and incident angle, and at various Mach numbers. The current study includes a more comprehensive evaluation than previous studies which used constant values of tuneable parameters or qualitative assessment methods. The new zonal transverse characteristic boundary condition is shown to give improved performance in comparison to the other tested outflow boundary conditions for two-dimensional linearized Euler simulations, and is also shown to give good performance when used as an inflow condition.

  18. Effects of carbaryl-bran bait on trap catch and seed predation by ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Dennis J; DeFoliart, Linda S; Hagerty, Aaron M

    2013-04-01

    Carbaryl-bran bait is effective against grasshoppers without many impacts on nontarget organisms, but ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) may be susceptible to these baits. Carabids are beneficial in agricultural settings as predators of insect pests and weed seeds. Carabid species and their consumption of weed seeds have not been previously studied in agricultural settings in Alaska. This study examined the effect of grasshopper bran bait on carabid activity-density, as measured by pitfall trap catches, and subsequent predation by invertebrates of seeds of three species of weed. Data were collected in fallow fields in agricultural landscape in the interior of Alaska, near Delta Junction, in 2008 and 2010. Bait applications reduced ground beetle activity-density by over half in each of 2 yr of bait applications. Seed predation was generally low overall (1-10%/wk) and not strongly affected by the bait application, but predation of lambsquarters (Chenopodium album L.) seed was lower on treated plots in 1 yr (340 seeds recovered versus 317 seeds, on treated versus untreated plots, respectively). Predation of dandelion (Taraxacum officinale G. H. Weber ex Wiggers) seeds was correlated with ground beetle activity-density in 1 yr, and predation of dragonhead mint (Dracocephalum parvifolium Nutt.) seed in the other year. We conclude that applications of carbaryl-bran bait for control of grasshoppers will have only a small, temporary effect on weed seed populations in high-latitude agricultural ecosystems.

  19. Seismic ground motion analysis of Shanghai Pudong Airport site considering the effects of spatial correlation and irregular topography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Tong; CHEN Laiyun; XING Hailing; L(U) Xilin

    2007-01-01

    The terminal No.Ⅱ of Shanghai Pudong International Airport is located at Pudong District of Shanghai City near shore of East China Sea,and the area of the long-span terminal is 400 m × 200 m.The construction site of the terminal locates on the irregular topography,and its alluvium achieves about 300 m in thickness.The spatial correlation of seismic ground motion,as well as the amplification of soft alluvium and the effect of irregular topography,should be considered.This paper uses a simplified method to obtain the response spectrum of the engineering bedrock under the irregular topography.The spectrum is used to generate the sets of spatially correlative horizontal and vertical seismic motions.The surface ground motion was calculated under incidence of the spatially correlative seismic motion by 2D finite element method (FEM) model considering nonlinear properties of the soil by means of the equivalent linear method.In order to compare the effect of 2D irregular topography,the seismic response analysis of 1D model is carried out by using the equivalent linear method.For indicating the effect of the spatial correlation of input motions,the horizontal uniform inputs,as well as the horizontal and vertical uniform input are carried out for the seismic response analysis of the site.Finally,some characteristics of seismic ground motion calculated for previously mentioned cases are compared.

  20. Evaluation of the Most Current and Effective Methods in the Analysis of Chlorinated Dioxins in Ground Beef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebere C. Anyanwu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlorinated dioxins are the group of environmental pollutants consisting of 210 chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans. They are highly toxic and persistent. They are lipophilic and can easily biomagnify in the food chain, hence posing a serious threat to human health. The daily consumption of low-level contaminated food, mainly of animal origin, leads to the accumulation of dioxins in the human body. The exposures of the general human population to dioxins and the specific issues of a risk assessment of dioxin pose serious concerns in public environmental and nutritional health. This paper reviews the analysis of chlorinated dioxins in ground beef. The sources of contamination of chlorinated dioxins in ground beef are first reviewed to form a basis for a clear understanding of the health implications of chlorinated dioxins in the human food chain and why it is necessary to monitor the level of dioxins in animal food products, especially ground beef. The methods of collection, sampling, and processing of ground beef, and the methods of sample clean up prior to the analysis, are reviewed. Emphasis is laid on the new techniques that are available and that might be effective in the analysis of chlorinated dioxins in ground beef. Among these new methods and techniques are: the synergistic combination of ELISA/GC/MS, direct sample introduction to /GC/MS-MS, automated clean-up method, and the supercritical fluid extraction methods. The possible treatments of results from each method and technique are discussed and their respective efficiencies are compared. Finally, quality control and quality assurance parameters are evaluated for levels of accuracy, reproducibility, and precision.

  1. The analysis of the effect of vertical component of earthquake ground motions on the behavior of equipment base isolation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, M. K.; Jeon, Y. S.; Choi, I. K. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents the effect of vertical component of earthquake ground motions on the behavior of equipment base isolation system. For this purpose, the base isolation effects are considered when the 3 dimensional shaking tests are performed. The vertical seismic isolation effects are also considered. The Friction Pendulum System (FPS), natural rubber bearing (NRB) and high damping rubber bearing (HDRB) were selected for the isolation. The three kinds of seismic motions which frequency contents are much different are selected for the shaking table test.

  2. Economic impact and effectiveness of radiation protection measures in aviation during a ground level enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthiä Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the omnipresent irradiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR and their secondary products, passengers and aircraft crew may be exposed to radiation from solar cosmic rays during ground level enhancements (GLE. In general, lowering the flight altitude and changing the flight route to lower latitudes are procedures applicable to immediately reduce the radiation exposure at aviation altitudes. In practice, however, taking such action necessarily leads to modifications in the flight plan and the consequential, additional fuel consumption constrains the mitigating measures. In this work we investigate in a case study of the ground level event of December 13th 2006 how potential mitigation procedures affect the total radiation exposure during a transatlantic flight from Seattle to Cologne taking into account constraints concerning fuel consumption and range.

  3. Effects of a ground vortex on the aerodynamics of an airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krothapalli, A.; Leopold, D.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental investigation was carried out to study the aerodynamics of an airfoil with a rectangular jet exiting from its lower surface at fifty percent of the chord. The airfoil was tested with and without the influence of a ground plane. Surface static pressures were measured on the airfoil at jet to free stream velocity ratios ranging from 0 to 9. From these pressures, the variation of C sub L with velocity ratio was easily determined. The measurements indicated significant positive and negative pressure regions on the lower surface of the airfoil ahead of and after the nozzle exit respectively. The presence of a ground plane enhanced these pressure regions at low velocity ratios, but at a particular ratio for each plane location, a recirculation zone or vortex formed ahead of the jet resulting in decreased pressures and a drop in C sub L.

  4. Mitigation of ground motion effects via feedback systems in the Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Pfingstner, Jürgen; Schmickler, Hermann; Schulte, Daniel

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a future multi-TeV electron positron collider, which is currently being designed at CERN. To achieve its ambitious goals, CLIC has to produce particle beams of the highest quality, which makes the accelerator very sensitive to ground motion. Four mitigation methods have been foreseen by the CLIC design group to cope with the feasibility issue of ground motion. This thesis is concerned with the design of one of these mitigation methods, named linac feedback (L-FB), but also with the simultaneous simulation and validation of all mitigation methods. Additionally, a technique to improve the quality of the indispensable system knowledge has been developed. The L-FB suppresses beam oscillations along the accelerator. Its design is based on the decoupling of the overall accelerator system into independent channels. For each channel an individual compensator is found with the help of a semi- automatic control synthesis procedure. This technique allows the designer to incorporate ...

  5. Ground return effect on wave propagation parameters of overhead power cables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malo Machado, V.M.; Brandao Faria, J.A.; Borges da Silva, J.F. (Centro de Electrotecnia da Univ. Tecnia de Lisboa, Inst. Superior Tecnico, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, 1096 Lisboa Codex (PT))

    1990-04-01

    The propagation properties of overhead three-phase cables are usually analyzed assuming that the pipe conductor establishes a perfect shielding between the inner conductor set and any outer conductor, i.e., the power cable is assumed as an isolated system. The influence of a lossy ground plane in the neighborhood of the cable is examined in this paper. The propagation parameters for both approaches are compared---significative differences being found to exist, in the zero mode, at low working frequencies.

  6. Atmospheric Effects for Ground Target Signature Modeling. 3. Discussion and Application of the ASL Scattering Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-03-01

    Potential Use of Tactical Microwave Radio (TMR) for Transmission of Weather Radar Data," ECOM-5524, December 1973. 42. Lindberg, James D., and...frared Radiometer ," ECOM-5556, February 1975. 74. Miers, B. T., and H. S. Oey, "An Evaluation of the Hydrometeorological Ground Truth Facility at...Chemical Transport Pgrm Division of Biomedical and Environmental Rsch ATTN: US Atomic Energy Commission Washington, DC 20545 Commander Naval Air

  7. The Effect of Images on Surface Potential and Resistance Calculation of Grounding Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARTINS, A.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the grounding systems with a two layers soil, the calculation of the surface potential using the image method is sometimes impossible due to singularities, avoiding researchers to use the method for electrodes in the bottom layer. In the literature this problem solution is refereed as unreliable or solved with other more complex methods. This paper presents a new approach to calculate the surface potentials in a two. layer soil, for electrodes in the bottom layer, when images are at surface. The singularities in computing surface voltage, when the first image upwards lies at surface, are analysed and it's shown that a small change in top layer thickness allows an approximate solution. Surface potentials due to grid conductor are also considered and the values of resistance are compared with those from other methodologies. Singularities for a ground rod that crosses the two layers are also treated. The obtained values of resistance are not satisfactory, due to lower segments images that overlap the upper segments. This paper also proposes shifting the surface of the upper part of the ground rod, in the upper layer, or taking the modulus of the mutual resistance, to overcome this difficulty.

  8. How assessment and reflection relate to more effective learning in adaptive management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Biggs

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Assessment (an immediate evaluation of significance or performance and reflection (a lengthy, deep consideration should be important components of adaptive management leading to learning. In this paper we use a prototype adaptive cycle and feedback framework, which are related to some aspects of learning theory, to examine the extent to which assessment and reflection were applied in a series of studies and initiatives in the Kruger National Park. In addition to evaluating assessment and reflection, we also considered how the various contributing components of each case were inter-related to provide a holistic view of each initiative.Two other studies in the Kruger National Park, which have examined learning specifically, are also discussed. One of them suggests that in a complex environment, learning necessarily has a dual nature, with each component of seven contrasting pairs of the aspects of learning in partial tension with the other. We use these dualities to further probe assessment, reflection, inter-relatedness and learning in the cases presented. Each contrasting aspect of a ‘learning duality’ turns out to emphasise either assessment or reflection, which reinforces the idea that both are needed to facilitate sufficient learning for successful adaptive management. We hope this analysis can act as a springboard for further study, practice and reflection on these important and often underrated components of adaptive management.Conservation implications: The better understanding of assessment and reflection as being largely separate but complementary actions will assist adaptive management practitioners to give explicit attention to both, and to relate them better to each other.

  9. Ground radiometric investigation of natural radiation levels and their radiological effects in Akpabuyo, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpan, Anthony E.; Paul, Nnana D.; Uwah, Edet J.

    2016-11-01

    Ground investigations of the activity concentrations from primordial radionuclides (238U, 232Th and 40K) were conducted in Akpabuyo, southeastern Nigeria. These investigations were aimed at assessing the magnitude and spatial distribution of activity concentrations from primordial radionuclides. Also, radiological hazard assessment and their associated risk to both human environmental healths and suitability of soils in the area for constructing dwellings places will be made. Instrument used for the investigations, which were conducted both randomly and along 6 profiles with inter-profile distance of 100 m, was a potable GRS-2 model of a Pico Envirotec spectrometer. Activity concentrations in the area, which vary with spatial distribution of soil texture, lithology, land use and topography, range between 2.22 and 116.09 Bq kg-1 (mean of 34.67 Bq kg-1) for 238U, 3.65-87.41 Bq kg-1 (mean of 38.59 Bq kg-1) for 232Th and 6.26-384.99 Bq kg-1 (mean of 114.66 Bq kg-1) for 40K. The mean activity concentrations of 238U and 232Th are marginally higher than world averages of 30 and 39 Bq kg-1 respectively. However, the activity concentration of 40K, which is the most abundant radionuclide (60.02%), is less than the world average of 400 Bq kg-1. Results obtained from skew and kurtosis analyses of the activity concentration data show that the distribution of 238U and 232Th radionuclides in the soils is nearly symmetrical. The radiological hazard indicators computed from the activity concentrations of the radionuclides are all below maximum permissible limits. For instance, values of radium equivalent, which vary from 41.72 to 171.02 Bq kg-1 (average of 98.68 Bq kg-1), are below the permissible limit of 370 Bq kg-1. External and internal hazard indices vary between 0.11 and 0.46 Bq kg-1 (mean of 0.27 Bq kg-1) and 0.14-0.72 Bq kg-1 (mean of 0.36 Bq kg-1) respectively. These results are below the 1 Bq kg-1 benchmark required for materials to be safe for use in constructing

  10. Effect Of Long-Period Earthquake Ground Motions On Nonlinear Vibration Of Shells With Variable Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdikarimov, R.; Bykovtsev, A.; Khodzhaev, D.; Research Team Of Geotechnical; Structural Engineers

    2010-12-01

    Long-period earthquake ground motions (LPEGM) with multiple oscillations have become a crucial consideration in seismic hazard assessment because of the rapid increase of tall buildings and special structures (SP).Usually, SP refers to innovative long-span structural systems. More specifically, they include many types of structures, such as: geodesic showground; folded plates; and thin shells. As continuation of previous research (Bykovtsev, Abdikarimov, Khodzhaev 2003, 2010) analysis of nonlinear vibrations (NV) and dynamic stability of SP simulated as shells with variable rigidity in geometrically nonlinear statement will be presented for two cases. The first case will represent NV example of a viscoelastic orthotropic cylindrical shell with radius R, length L and variable thickness h=h(x,y). The second case will be NV example of a viscoelastic shell with double curvature, variable thickness, and bearing the concentrated masses. In both cases we count, that the SP will be operates under seismic load generated by LPEGM with multiple oscillations. For different seismic loads simulations, Bykovtsev’s Model and methodology was used for generating LPEGM time history. The methodology for synthesizing LPEGM from fault with multiple segmentations was developed by Bykovtev (1978-2010) and based on 3D-analytical solutions by Bykovtsev-Kramarovskii (1987&1989) constructed for faults with multiple segmentations. This model is based on a kinematics description of displacement function on the fault and included in consideration of all possible combinations of 3 components of vector displacement (two slip vectors and one tension component). The opportunities to take into consideration fault segmentations with both shear and tension vector components of displacement on the fault plane provide more accurate LPEGM evaluations. Radiation patterns and directivity effects were included in the model and more physically realistic results for simulated LPEGM were considered. The

  11. Effect of Concave Sound Reflecting Surfaces on Speech Intelligibility and Articulation Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaiyat, Sami Abdulrahman

    Three different methods are used to assess speech intelligibility in spaces with and without concave sound reflecting surfaces: calculated articulation index (AI), measured rapid speech transmission index (RASTI), and modified rhyme tests (MRT) with occupants. Factors such as the room size, size of curvature, the speaker's position, and the background noise level are considered in the two on -site testing methods. The MRT results show unexpectedly significant deviation from results obtained through the other methods such that they are de-emphasized in all discussions. Results from rooms without curvatures show no significant differences between the AI and RASTI values; whereas, these differences are significant when rooms with curvatures are considered. A modification factor to be subtracted from calculated AI values to account for erosional effects of the curved surfaces is developed according to further analysis of the differences between the AI and RASTI values. The magnitude of the modification factors depends on all the above factors as well as the location of the listeners within the room. There are no clear indications of any dead spots, however, the sound foci from both the 2ft. and 8ft. curvatures have caused certain group locations to have smaller modification factors than that of all other locations. The magnitude of the developed modification factors ranges between 0.01, for the 16ft. curvature in the small rooms, to 0.17, for the 8ft. curvature in the large room with NC-45 and the speaker's position is on the center. This range is of almost the same magnitude as that of the erosional corrections to calculated AI due to elevated reverberation time. This range is also of almost same magnitude as that of improvement in calculated AI due to presence of visual cues.

  12. Reflective Writing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenkiel Jørgensen, Andriette

    2016-01-01

    Høeg etetera. The dialogues work as a tool of reflection in terms of providing opportunity to examine his own beliefs, to explore the possible reasons for engaging in a particular activity. On the basis of Sven-Ingvar Andersson’s book a teaching program at the Aarhus School of Architecture provides...... a contribution to the discussions about the role of reflection in design work and in learning situations at large. By engaging with the dialogic reflection, which is one of the four essential types of reflection, (the three others being descriptive writing, descriptive reflection and critical reflection...

  13. Effects of ground freezing and snow avalanche deposits on debris flows in alpine environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bardou

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Debris flows consist of a mixture of water and sediments of various sizes. Apart from few exceptions, the water is usually contributed directly from precipitation. In a high mountain environment like the Alps, it appears necessary to consider infiltration of water into the ground during rainfall events, the runoff characteristics and the potential supply of sediment as a function of a multitude of climatic and hydrogeological factors. This paper outlines several new processes - either linked to ice formation in the ground before an event, or to the presence of snow avalanche deposits - that change the probability of observing an event. These processes were identified during field observations connected with extreme weather events that occurred recently in the Valais Alps (south-western Switzerland: they can be seen as factors either amplifying or reducing the potential of slope instability caused by the precipitation event. An intense freezing of the ground during the week preceding the exceptional rainfall event in mid-October 2000 amplified the probability of triggering debris flows between roughly 1800 and 2300m asl. Both growth of ice needles and superficial ground freezing destroyed soil aggregates (increasing the availability of sediments and/or, a deeper ground freezing resulted in decreased infiltration rate (increased runoff during the first hours of heavy rainfall. The presence of snow avalanche deposits in a gully could be simultaneously an amplifying factor (the snow deposits increase the base flow and create a sliding plane for the sediments, mainly at the time of summer storms or a reducing factor (reduction in the impact energy of the raindrops, mainly at the time of winter storms of the risk of triggering debris flows. If it is not currently possible to establish rainfall threshold values for debris flow triggering, the knowledge and the implementation of these processes in the analysis of the potential triggering (for example by

  14. Liberating Moral Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horell, Harold D.

    2013-01-01

    The author argues that if we are to foster life-giving and liberating moral reflection, we must first liberate moral reflection from distortions; specifically, from the distorting effects of moral insensitivity, destructive moral relativism, and confusions resulting from a failure to understand the dynamics of moral reflection. The author proposes…

  15. Liberating Moral Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horell, Harold D.

    2013-01-01

    The author argues that if we are to foster life-giving and liberating moral reflection, we must first liberate moral reflection from distortions; specifically, from the distorting effects of moral insensitivity, destructive moral relativism, and confusions resulting from a failure to understand the dynamics of moral reflection. The author proposes…

  16. Angular reflectance of suspended gold, aluminum and silver nanospheres on a gold film: Effects of concentration and size distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslan, Mustafa M., E-mail: mustafa.aslan@mam.gov.t [TUBITAK Marmara Research Center, Materials Institute (Turkey); Wriedt, Thomas [Institut fuer Werkstofftechnik (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    In this article, we describe a parametric study of the effects of the size distribution (SD) and the concentration of nanospheres in ethanol on the angular reflectance. Calculations are based on an effective medium approach in which the effective dielectric constant of the mixture is obtained using the Maxwell-Garnett formula. The detectable size limits of gold, aluminum, and silver nanospheres on a 50-nm-thick gold film are calculated to investigate the sensitivity of the reflectance to the SD and the concentration of the nanospheres. The following assumptions are made: (1) the total number of particles in the unit volume of suspension is constant, (2) the nanospheres in the suspension on a gold film have a SD with three different concentrations, and (3) there is no agglomeration and the particles have a log-normal SD, where the effective diameter, d{sub eff} and the effective variance, {nu}{sub eff} are given. The dependence of the reflectance on the d{sub eff}, {nu}{sub eff}, and the width of the SD are also investigated numerically. The angular variation of the reflectance as a function of the incident angle shows a strong dependence on the effective size of the metallic nanospheres. The results confirm that the size of the nanospheres (d{sub eff} <100 nm) can be detected by reflected light from the bottom surface of a gold film with a reasonable sensitivity if a proper angle of incidence is chosen based on the type of metallic particles on a gold thin film at {lambda} = 632 nm. We show that the optimum incident angle to characterize the size of nanospheres on a gold film is between 70{sup o} and 75{sup o} for a given concentration with a particular SD.

  17. Geohydrology of the Central Oahu, Hawaii, Ground-Water Flow System and Numerical Simulation of the Effects of Additional Pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Delwyn S.

    1998-01-01

    A two-dimensional, finite-difference, ground-water flow model was developed for the central Oahu flow system, which is the largest and most productive ground-water flow system on the island. The model is based on the computer code SHARP which simulates both freshwater and saltwater flow. The ground-water model was developed using average pumping and recharge conditions during the 1950's, which was considered to be a steady-state period. For 1950's conditions, model results indicate that 62 percent (90.1 million gallons per day) of the discharge from the Schofield ground-water area flows southward and the remaining 38 percent (55.2 million gallons per day) of the discharge from Schofield flows northward. Although the contribution of recharge from infiltration of rainfall and irrigation water directly on top of the southern and northern Schofield ground-water dams was included in the model, the distribution of natural discharge from the Schofield ground-water area was estimated exclusive of the recharge on top of the dams. The model was used to investigate the long-term effects of pumping under future land-use conditions. Future recharge was conservatively estimated by assuming no recharge associated with agricultural activities. Future pumpage used in the model was based on the 1995-allocated rates. Model results indicate that the long-term effect of pumping at the 1995-allocated rates will be a reduction of water levels from present (1995) conditions in all ground-water areas of the central Oahu flow system. In the Schofield ground-water area, model results indicate that water levels could decline about 30 feet from the 1995 water-level altitude of about 275 feet. In the remaining ground-water areas of the central Oahu flow system, water levels may decline from less than 1 foot to as much as 12 feet relative to 1995 water levels. Model results indicate that the bottoms of several existing deep wells in northern and southern Oahu extend below the model

  18. Feedback Providing Improvement Strategies and Reflection on Feedback Use: Effects on Students' Writing Motivation, Process, and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijnhouwer, Hendrien; Prins, Frans J.; Stokking, Karel M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of feedback providing improvement strategies and a reflection assignment on students' writing motivation, process, and performance. Students in the experimental feedback condition (n = 41) received feedback including improvement strategies, whereas students in the control feedback condition (n = 41) received…

  19. Structured Reflection Breaks Embedded in an Online Course--Effects on Learning Experience, Time on Task and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verpoorten, Dominique; Westera, Wim

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to gain an insight into the effects of practicing short, frequent, and structured reflection breaks interspersed with the learning material in a computer-based course. To that end, the study sets up a standardized control trial with two groups of secondary school pupils. The study shows that while performance is not…

  20. Group awareness of social and cognitive performance in a CSCL environment: Effects of a peer feedback and reflection tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phielix, Chris; Prins, Frans; Kirschner, Paul A.; Erkens, Gijsbert; Jaspers, Jos

    2010-01-01

    Phielix, C., Prins, F. J., Kirschner, P. A., Erkens, G., & Jaspers, J. (2011). Group awareness of social and cognitive performance in a CSCL environment: Effects of a peer feedback and reflection tool. Computers in Human Behavior, 27(3), 1087-1102. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2010.06.024

  1. Effects of Reflective Inquiry Instructional Technique on Students' Academic Achievement and Ability Level in Electronic Work Trade in Technical Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbuanya, T. C.; Owodunni, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of reflective inquiry instructional technique on achievement of students in Technical Colleges. The study adopted a pre-test, post-test, non-equivalent control group, quasi-experimental research design which involved groups of students in their intact class assigned to experimental group and control…

  2. Learning How To Throw Darts : The Effect Of Modeling Type And Reflection On Dart-Throwing Skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Loo, Janneke; Frissen, Eefje; Krahmer, Emiel

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigate the effect of modeling type and reflection on the acquisition of dart-throwing skills, self-efficacy beliefs and self-reaction scores by replicating a study by Kitsantas, Zimmerman, and Cleary (2000). Participants observing a coping model were expected to surpass partici

  3. The effect of surface microstructure on the optical reflectance of monocrystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quanji; Zhou, Weidong; Chen, Fangfang; Yang, Ruizhao

    2016-12-01

    Surface texturing is an important technique used to enhance the light absorption by forming certain microstructures on silicon surface. In this article, four different microstructures, based on repeat units of triangles, perpendicular grooves, hexagons and parallel grooves respectively, were fabricated directly on the surface of monocrystalline silicon wafers by using femtosecond laser texturing technique. Compare to the silicon wafers that were not treated by laser, a significant decrease of light reflectance can be observed for those laser etched silicon surfaces. And the treated silicon surface with triangles texture was found to have the lowest relative reflectance of ∼20% in the wavelength range from 400 to 1000 nm, if the textured surfaces were irradiated using the same laser fabrication condition. In addition, the relative reflectance of laser etched silicon surfaces with similar repeat unit but different structural period was investigated as well. The results show that the relative reflectance of the treated surface increases along with the increase of structural period size. These results obtained here can provide a useful guide for fabricating silicon-based optoelectronic devices with a more excellent anti-reflective performance.

  4. Effect of EDTA and Phosphoric Acid Pretreatment on the Bonding Effectiveness of Self-Etch Adhesives to Ground Enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ihab M.; Elkassas, Dina W.; Yousry, Mai M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This in vitro study determined the effect of enamel pretreatment with phosphoric acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on the bond strength of strong, intermediary strong, and mild self-etching adhesive systems. Methods: Ninety sound human premolars were used. Resin composite cylinders were bonded to flat ground enamel surfaces using three self-etching adhesive systems: strong Adper Prompt L-Pop (pH=0.9–1.0), intermediary strong AdheSE (pH=1.6–1.7), and mild Frog (pH=2). Adhesive systems were applied either according to manufacturer instructions (control) or after pretreatment with either phosphoric acid or EDTA (n=10). After 24 hours, shear bond strength was tested using a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/minute. Ultra-morphological characterization of the surface topography and resin/enamel interfaces as well as representative fractured enamel specimens were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: Neither surface pretreatment statistically increased the mean shear bond strength values of either the strong or the intermediary strong self-etching adhesive systems. However, phosphoric acid pretreatment significantly increased the mean shear bond strength values of the mild self-etching adhesive system. SEM examination of enamel surface topography showed that phosphoric acid pretreatment deepened the same etching pattern of the strong and intermediary strong adhesive systems but converted the irregular etching pattern of the mild self-etching adhesive system to a regular etching pattern. SEM examination of the resin/enamel interface revealed that deepening of the etching pattern was consistent with increase in the length of resin tags. EDTA pretreatment had a negligible effect on ultra-morphological features. Conclusions: Use of phosphoric acid pretreatment can be beneficial with mild self-etching adhesive systems for bonding to enamel. PMID:20922162

  5. Effects of backpack weight on posture, gait patterns and ground reaction forces of male children with obesity during stair descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qipeng; Yu, Bing; Zhang, Cui; Sun, Wei; Mao, Dewei

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of backpack weight on posture, gait pattern, and ground reaction forces for children with obesity in an attempt to define a safe backpack weight limit for them. A total of 16 obese (11.19 ± 0.66 years of age) and 21 normal body weight (11.13 ± 0.69 years of age) schoolboys were recruited. Two force plates and two video cameras were used. Multivariate analysis of variance with repeated measures was employed. Obese children showed increased trunk and head forward inclination angle, gait cycle duration and stance phase, decreased swing phase, and increased ground reaction force in the medial-lateral and anterior-posterior directions when compared with male children with a normal body weight. The changes were observed even with an empty backpack in comparison with normal body weight children and a 15% increase in backpack weight led to further instability and damage on their already strained bodies.

  6. Effects of Technological Parameters and Fishing Ground on Quality Attributes of Thawed, Chilled Cod Fillets Stored in Modified Atmosphere Packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøknæs, Niels; Østerberg, Carsten; Sørensen, Rie

    2001-01-01

    Effects were studied of various technological parameters and fishing ground on quality attributes of thawed, chilled cod fillets stored in modified atmosphere packaging Frozen fillets of Baltic Sea and Barents Sea cod, representing two commercial fishing grounds, were used as raw material...... frozen storage is more appropriate for manufacturing of thawed chilled MAP cod fillets. During chill storage of thawed MAP Barents Sea fillets previously kept at -30degreesC for 15 weeks, significant growth of Photobacterium phosphoreum and production of trimethylamine were observed. Oil the contrary, P....... phosphoreum growth and trimethylamine production in thawed and chill-stored MAP Baltic Sea cod fillets were strongly inhibited after as little as 4 weeks of frozen storage at -30degreesC. Contents of trimethylamine oxide and NaCl were substantially higher in fillets of Barents Sea cod compared to fillets...

  7. Zebra mussel beds: an effective feeding ground for Ponto-Caspian gobies or suitable shelter for their prey?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Kobak

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aggregations of the Ponto-Caspian invasive zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha constitute a suitable habitat for macroinvertebrates, considerably increasing their abundance and providing effective antipredator protection. Thus, the overall effect of a mussel bed on particular predator species may vary from positive to negative, depending on both prey density increase and predator ability to prey in a structurally complex habitat. Alien Ponto-Caspian goby fish are likely to be facilitated when introduced into new areas by zebra mussels, provided that they are capable of utilizing mussel beds as habitat and feeding grounds. We ran laboratory experiments to find which prey (chironomid larvae densities (from ca. 500 to 2,000 individuals m−2 in a mussel bed make it a more beneficial feeding ground for the racer goby Babka gymnotrachelus (RG and western tubenose goby Proterorhinus semilunaris (WTG compared to sandy and stone substrata (containing the basic prey density of 500 ind. m−2. Moreover, we checked how food availability affects habitat selection by fish. Mussel beds became more suitable for fish than alternative mineral substrata when food abundance was at least two times higher (1,000 vs. 500 ind. m−2, regardless of fish size and species. WTG was associated with mussel beds regardless of its size and prey density, whereas RG switched to this habitat when it became a better feeding ground than alternative substrata. Larger RG exhibited a stronger affinity for mussels than small individuals. WTG fed more efficiently from a mussel bed at high food abundances than RG. A literature review has shown that increasing chironomid density, which in our study was sufficient to make a mussel habitat an attractive feeding ground for the gobies, is commonly observed in mussel beds in the field. Therefore, we conclude that zebra mussels may positively affect the alien goby species and are likely to facilitate their establishment in novel areas

  8. The normalization of surface anisotropy effects present in SEVIRI reflectances by using the MODIS BRDF method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proud, Simon Richard; Zhang, Qingling; Schaaf, Crystal;

    2014-01-01

    A modified version of the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) algorithm is presented for use in the angular normalization of surface reflectance data gathered by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI...... acquisition period than the comparable MODIS products while, at the same time, removing many of the angular perturbations present within the original MSG data. The NBAR data are validated against reflectance data from the MODIS instrument and in situ data gathered at a field location in Africa throughout 2008....... It is found that the MSG retrievals are stable and are of high-quality across much of the SEVIRI disk while maintaining a higher temporal resolution than the MODIS BRDF products. However, a number of circumstances are discovered whereby the BRDF model is unable to function correctly with the SEVIRI...

  9. Analyzing the Effectiveness and Practicality of Reflective Approach in Teaching and Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    广东科技学院 广东 东莞 523083

    2013-01-01

    This essay aims to analyze the ef ectiveness of reflective practice in the teaching and learning of English and to examine the practicality of this approach in the current classroom. Firstly, some problems of traditional teaching were examined, and limitations of reflective practice in teaching were presented when stating its conductive advantages. Then the paper stated the ef ectiveness of reflective practice in language classes, such as active reaction from students and the ability of problem solving, and discussed the practicality between reflective teaching and learning through adopting reflective practice. Reflective practice, an important approach in improving the ef iciency of English teaching as a foreign language and making students develop their understanding and critical thinking skil s, wil be wel-developed in the process of teaching and learning.%本文主要分析反实践教学法在目前教学当中的有效性和实践性。首先,通过对传统教学法弱点和反实践教学法限制性的分析比较,得出反实践教学法在教学和学习当中具有传导性优势。然后阐述了反实践教学法在语言学习上的有效性,例如:学生的积极反映和解决问题能力,最后讨论了在教学和学习中它的实践性。反实践教学法不仅在提高英语教学效率上起着重要的作用,而且在培养学生的思考能力和批判性思维上也会得到更好的发展。

  10. Effect of vacuum packaging and pomegranate peel extract on quality aspects of ground goat meat and nuggets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devatkal, Suresh K; Thorat, Pramod; Manjunatha, M

    2014-10-01

    The effect of vacuum packaging and pomegranate peel extract on ground goat meat and cooked nuggets during refrigerated storage (4 ± 1 °C) was evaluated. Three different treatments evaluated were: I). Aerobic packaging (AP); II) Vacuum packaging (VP) and III). Vacuum packaging along with 1 % pomegranate peel extract (VP + PPE). Results of quality evaluation showed that VP and VP + PPE maintained a more stable colour than AP. In all treatments, a significant (P log 7) in AP than VP meat and nuggets. Thus VP and PPE have a synergistic antioxidant effect and VP extended the refrigerated shelf life of goat meat and nuggets.

  11. Dilution Effects on Two-Dimensional Heisenberg Antiferromagnets with Non-Magnetic Spin-Gapped Ground State

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuda, Chitoshi; Todo, Synge; Matsumoto, Munehisa; Takayama, Hajime

    2002-01-01

    Dilution effects on spin-1/2 quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnets with a non-magnetic spin-gapped ground state are studied by means of the qunatum Monte Carlo simulation. In the site-diluted system, an antiferromagnetic long-range order (AF-LRO) is induced at an infinitesimal concentration of dilution due to an effective coupling $\\tilde{J}_{mn}$ between induced magnetic moments. In the bond-diluted case, on the other hand, the AF-LRO is not induced up to a certain concentration of dilution du...

  12. Differentiation among effects of nitrogen fertilization treatments on conifer seedlings by foliar reflectance: a comparison of methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, J A; Mitchell, A K; Goodmanson, G; Stockburger, K A

    2000-10-01

    Analysis of reflectance can be used to estimate foliar concentrations of photosynthetic pigments, thus providing information on the physiological status of green plants. We compared several methods of reflectance analysis for the capacity to differentiate among effects of fertilization treatments across different irradiances on seedlings of Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmanii Parry ex Engelm.). Seedlings were grown in two light treatments (0 and 60% shade) and three nitrogen (N) treatments (10, 25 and 100 mg N l-1) for one growing season, after which foliar reflectance of the needles was measured. Five indices were tested: R550 (% reflectance at 550 nm); red edge position; the ratio R698:R760; the structure independent pigment index (SIPI); and the photochemical reflectance index (PRI). Both the light and nutrient treatments significantly affected foliar chlorophyll a and b and carotenoid concentrations. Among the indices tested, R550, red edge position and R698:R760 ratio were related to chlorophyll concentration, and were significantly affected by both light and N treatments. Both SIPI and PRI were related to chlorophyll and carotenoid concentrations. Among these relationships, PRI was affected by both treatments, whereas SIPI was sensitive to N treatment but not to light treatment. All five indices were weakly but significantly correlated with growth as measured by dry weight.

  13. Impact of guided reflection with peers on the development of effective problem solving strategies and physics learning

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Students must learn effective problem solving strategies in order to develop expertise in physics. Effective problem solving strategies include a conceptual analysis of the problem followed by planning of the solution, and then implementation, evaluation and reflection upon the process. Research suggests that converting a problem from the initial verbal representation to other suitable representation, e.g., diagrammatic representation, during the initial conceptual analysis can facilitate further analysis of the problem.6 But without guidance, many introductory physics students solve problems using superficial clues and cues and do not perceive problem solving as an opportunity for learning. Here, we describe a study which suggests that engaging students in reflection with peers about effective problem solving strategies while effective approaches are modeled for them and prompt feedback is provided may enhance desirable skills.

  14. Impact of Guided Reflection with Peers on the Development of Effective Problem Solving Strategies and Physics Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Andrew J.; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-05-01

    Students must learn effective problem solving strategies in order to develop expertise in physics. Effective problem solving strategies include a conceptual analysis of the problem followed by planning of the solution, and then implementation, evaluation, and reflection upon the process. Research suggests that converting a problem from the initial verbal representation to other suitable representation, e.g., diagrammatic representation, during the initial conceptual analysis can facilitate further analysis of the problem. But without guidance, many introductory physics students solve problems using superficial clues and cues and do not perceive problem solving as an opportunity for learning. Here, we describe a study that suggests that engaging students in reflection with peers about effective problem solving strategies while effective approaches are modeled for them and prompt feedback is provided may enhance desirable skills.

  15. Effect of tillage and planting date on seasonal abundance and diversity of predacious ground beetles in cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, R B; Parajulee, M N

    2010-01-01

    A 2-year field study was conducted in the southern High Plains region of Texas to evaluate the effect of tillage system and cotton planting date window on seasonal abundance and activity patterns of predacious ground beetles. The experiment was deployed in a split-plot randomized block design with tillage as the main-plot factor and planting date as the subplot factor. There were two levels for each factor. The two tillage systems were conservation tillage (30% or more of the soil surface is covered with crop residue) and conventional tillage. The two cotton planting date window treatments were early May (normal planting) and early June (late planting). Five prevailing predacious ground beetles, Cicindela sexguttata F., Calosoma scrutator Drees, Pasimachus spp., Pterostichus spp., and Megacephala Carolina L. (Coleoptera: Carabidae), were monitored using pitfall traps at 2-week intervals from June 2002 to October 2003. The highest total number of ground beetles (6/trap) was observed on 9 July 2003. Cicindela sexguttata was the dominant ground dwelling predacious beetle among the five species. A significant difference between the two tillage systems was observed in the abundances of Pterostichus spp. and C. sexguttata. In 2002. significantly more Pterostichus spp. were recorded from conventional plots (0.27/trap) than were recorded from conservation tillage plots (0.05/trap). Significantly more C. sexguttata were recorded in 2003 from conservation plots (3.77/trap) than were recorded from conventional tillage plots (1.04/trap). There was a significant interaction between year and tillage treatments. However, there was no significant difference in the abundances of M. Carolina and Pasimachus spp. between the two tillage practices in either of the two years. M. Carolina numbers were significantly higher in late-planted cotton compared with those observed in normal-planted cotton. However, planting date window had no significant influence on the activity patterns of the

  16. The Impact of Sunlight Conditions on the Consistency of Vegetation Indices in Croplands—Effective Usage of Vegetation Indices from Continuous Ground-Based Spectral Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsunori Ishihara

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A ground-based network of spectral observations is useful for ecosystem monitoring and validation of satellite data. However, these observations contain inherent uncertainties due to the change of sunlight conditions. This study investigated the impact of changing solar zenith angles and diffuse/direct light conditions on the consistency of vegetation indices (normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI and green-red vegetation index (GRVI derived from ground-based spectral measurements in three different types of cropland (paddy field, upland field, cultivated grassland in Japan. In general, the vegetation indices decreased with decreasing solar zenith angle. This response was affected significantly by the growth stage and diffuse/direct light conditions. The decreasing response of the NDVI to the decreasing solar zenith angle was high during the middle growth stage (0.4 < NDVI < 0.8. On the other hand, a similar response of the GRVI was evident except in the early growth stage (GRVI < 0. The response of vegetation indices to the solar zenith angle was evident under clear sky conditions but almost negligible under cloudy sky conditions. At large solar zenith angles, neither the NDVI nor the GRVI were affected by diffuse/direct light conditions in any growth stage. These experimental results were supported well by the results of simulations based on a physically-based canopy reflectance model (PROSAIL. Systematic selection of the data from continuous diurnal spectral measurements in consideration of the solar light conditions would be effective for accurate and consistent assessment of the canopy structure and functioning.

  17. Blasting and Blast Effects in Cold Regions. Part 3. Explosions in Ground Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    entries in Table 8 stuggest 20’ to 26’ for for most materials tends to be around 200 when the equivalent sideslope, while the last four entries 3t0 Fable...34 to 47 . rocal of volume per unit weight is a specific energy Iwo entries in -able 8 (small-scale tests in sand- if multiplied by the energy per unit...the best I I approximation at small scaled radii from ground Explcsion Sensor zero for a deep blast, with square root scaling giv- I Rock Rock2 Rock

  18. Reflected Glory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    The nebula Messier 78 takes centre stage in this image taken with the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile, while the stars powering the bright display take a backseat. The brilliant starlight ricochets off dust particles in the nebula, illuminating it with scattered blue light. Igor Chekalin was the overall winner of ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 astrophotography competition with his image of this stunning object. Messier 78 is a fine example of a reflection nebula. The ultraviolet radiation from the stars that illuminate it is not intense enough to ionise the gas to make it glow - its dust particles simply reflect the starlight that falls on them. Despite this, Messier 78 can easily be observed with a small telescope, being one of the brightest reflection nebulae in the sky. It lies about 1350 light-years away in the constellation of Orion (The Hunter) and can be found northeast of the easternmost star of Orion's belt. This new image of Messier 78 from the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory is based on data selected by Igor Chekalin in his winning entry to the Hidden Treasures competition [1]. The pale blue tint seen in the nebula in this picture is an accurate representation of its dominant colour. Blue hues are commonly seen in reflection nebulae because of the way the starlight is scattered by the tiny dust particles that they contain: the shorter wavelength of blue light is scattered more efficiently than the longer wavelength red light. This image contains many other striking features apart from the glowing nebula. A thick band of obscuring dust stretches across the image from the upper left to the lower right, blocking the light from background stars. In the bottom right corner, many curious pink structures are also visible, which are created by jets of material being ejected from stars that have recently formed and are still buried deep in dust clouds. Two bright stars, HD 38563A and

  19. The Normalization of Surface Anisotropy Effects Present in SEVIRI Reflectances by Using the MODIS BRDF Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proud, Simon Richard; Zhang, Qingling; Schaaf, Crystal; Fensholt, Rasmus; Rasmussen, Mads Olander; Shisanya, Chris; Mutero, Wycliffe; Mbow, Cheikh; Anyamba, Assaf; Pak, Ed; Sandholt, Inge

    2014-01-01

    A modified version of the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) algorithm is presented for use in the angular normalization of surface reflectance data gathered by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) aboard the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites. We present early and provisional daily nadir BRDFadjusted reflectance (NBAR) data in the visible and near-infrared MSG channels. These utilize the high temporal resolution of MSG to produce BRDF retrievals with a greatly reduced acquisition period than the comparable MODIS products while, at the same time, removing many of the angular perturbations present within the original MSG data. The NBAR data are validated against reflectance data from the MODIS instrument and in situ data gathered at a field location in Africa throughout 2008. It is found that the MSG retrievals are stable and are of high-quality across much of the SEVIRI disk while maintaining a higher temporal resolution than the MODIS BRDF products. However, a number of circumstances are discovered whereby the BRDF model is unable to function correctly with the SEVIRI observations-primarily because of an insufficient spread of angular data due to the fixed sensor location or localized cloud contamination.

  20. Unpredictability, Transformation, and the Pedagogical Encounter: Reflections on "What Is Effective" in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Aislinn

    2013-01-01

    In this article, Aislinn O'Donnell offers a set of reflections on the relation between therapy and education. In the first section, she examines criticisms of therapeutic education, mobilizing the example of prison education to highlight the difficulties that arise from imposing prescriptive modes of subjectification and socialization in…

  1. The effect of zirconia and titanium implant abutments on light reflection of the supporting soft tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brakel, Ralph; Noordmans, Herke Jan; Frenken, Joost; de Roode, Rowland; de Wit, Gerard C.; Cune, Marco S.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the difference in light reflection of oral mucosa covering titanium (Ti) or zirconia (ZrO2) abutments as it relates to the thickness of the covering mucosa. Material and methods: Fifteen anterior implants (Astra Osseo speed (R)) in 11 patients were fitted with a Ti or a ZrO2

  2. The effects of creative, expressive, and reflective writing on career learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mijke Post; Reinekke Lengelle; Rob Poell; dr. Frans Meijers

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates whether creative, expressive, and reflective writing contributes to the formation of a work-life narrative that offers both meaning and direction among students in higher education. The content of writing done by students who participated in a two-day writing course at the st

  3. Grazing incidence reflectivity and total electron yield effects in soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alders, D; Hibma, T; Sawatzky, G.A; Cheung, K.C.; van Dorssen, G.E.; Roper, M.D.; Padmore, H.A.; van der Laan, G.; Vogel, J; Sacchi, M.

    1997-01-01

    We report on a study of grazing incidence absorption and reflection spectra of NiO in the region of the Ni 2p edge. The aim is to evaluate the distortion of the near edge spectrum by the critical angle behavior of individual components within the spectrum. This can be used to improve the separation

  4. Effects of surface reflectance on local second order shape estimation in dynamic scenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dövencioglu, D.N.; Wijntjes, M.W.A.; Ben-Sharar, O.; Doerschner, K.

    2015-01-01

    In dynamic scenes, relative motion between the object, the observer, and/or the environment projects as dynamic visual information onto the retina (optic flow) that facilitates 3D shape perception. When the object is diffusely reflective, e.g. a matte painted surface, this optic flow is directly lin

  5. Situated Learning, Reflective Practice and Conceptual Expansion: Effective Peer Observation for Tutor Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Amani; Mladenovic, Rosina

    2015-01-01

    Despite tutors' importance, they often encounter inadequate professional development and support. This study describes the impact of peer observation of teaching activities on tutors' professional development using multiple data-sets over a three-year period. The data was analysed according to three themes: situated learning, reflective practice…

  6. Effects of Reflection Type in the Here and Now Mobile Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Florence; Ertzberger, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Here and now mobile learning has the capability to engage learners anytime and anywhere and situate them in their learning context. Mobile devices provide opportunity for learners to participate in reflective activities with experts, peers or self while being situated in the learning context such as being in a museum or gallery and using mobile…

  7. Effects of Reflection Type in the Here and Now Mobile Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Florence; Ertzberger, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Here and now mobile learning has the capability to engage learners anytime and anywhere and situate them in their learning context. Mobile devices provide opportunity for learners to participate in reflective activities with experts, peers or self while being situated in the learning context such as being in a museum or gallery and using mobile…

  8. Effects of composition and exposure on the solar reflectance of Portland cement concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem

    2001-12-21

    Increasing the solar reflectance (albedo) of a paved surface keeps it cooler in the sun, reducing convection of heat from pavement to air and thereby decreasing the ambient air temperature. Simulations of the influence of pavement albedo on air temperature in Los Angeles predict that increasing the albedo of 1,250 km2 of pavement by 0.25 would save cooling energy worth $15M yr-1, and reduce smog-related medical and lost-work expenses by $76M yr-1. Most sidewalks and a small fraction of roads and parking areas are paved with portland cement concrete, which can be made quite reflective through suitable choice of cement and aggregate. Variations with composition and environmental exposure of the albedos of portland cement concrete pavements were investigated through laboratory fabrication and exposure of 32 mixes of concrete. Twenty-four mixes yielded substandard, ''rough'' concretes due to high, unmet aggregate water demand. The albedos of the remaining eight ''smooth'' concrete mixes ranged from 0.41 to 0.77 (mean 0.59). Simulated weathering, soiling, and abrasion each reduced average concrete albedo (mean decreases 0.06, 0.05, and 0.19, respectively), though some samples became slightly more reflective through weathering or soiling. Simulated rain (wetting) strongly depressed the albedos of concretes (mean decrease 0.23) until their surfaces were dried. Concrete albedo grew as the cement hydration reaction progressed (mean increase 0.08), but stabilized within six weeks of casting. White-cement concretes were on average significantly more reflective than gray-cement concretes. The albedo of the most-reflective white-cement concrete was 0.18 to 0.39 higher than that of the most-reflective gray-cement concrete, depending on state of exposure. Concrete albedo generally correlated with cement albedo and sand albedo, and, after abrasion, with rock albedo. Cement albedo had a disproportionately strong influence on the reflectance

  9. Effects of exchange-correlation potentials in density functional descriptions of ground-state and photoionization of fullerenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jinwoo; Chang, Eonho; Anstine, Dylan M.; Chakraborty, Himadri

    2016-05-01

    We study the ground state properties of C60 and C240 molecules in a spherical frame of local density approximation (LDA). Within this mean-field theory, two different approximations to the exchange-correlation (xc) functional are used: (i) The Gunnerson-Lundqvist parametrization augmented by a treatment to correct for the electron self-interaction and (ii) the van Leeuwen and Baerends (LB94) model potential that inclusively restores electron's asymptotic properties. Results show differences in the ground-state potential, level energies and electron densities between the two xc choices. We then use the ground structure to find the excited and ionized states of the systems and calculate dipole single-photoionization cross sections in a time-dependent LDA method that incorporates linear-response dynamical correlations. Comparative effects of the choices of xc on collective plasmon and single-excitation Auger resonances as well as on geometry driven cavity oscillations are found significant. The work is supported by the NSF, USA.

  10. Ministering effectively in the context of Pentecostalism in Africa: A reformed missional reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Derrick Mashau

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Pentecostalism is a global phenomenon with a large following in North America, Latin America, Asia, Africa and other parts of the world. The rise, growth and influence of Pentecostalism in Africa are enormous and have, without fear of contradiction, become one of the dominant expressions of Christianity on the continent. A contextual analysis of Christianity in Africa showed that the African soil is more fertile for this movement. Its manifestation ranges from classical Pentecostalism (first wave, to the charismatic movement (second wave and the charismatic renewal movements (third wave. Its growth in Africa came with a fair number of missiological challenges to evangelical reformed churches, and therefore this article sought to sketch this movement by providing a historical perspective on Pentecostalism, a contextual analysis of Pentecostalism in Africa, issues and challenges in Pentecostalism, and concludes by looking closely at a reformed missional reflection, thereby providing some nuances as to how best one can minister effectively in the context of Pentecostalism. This article called for evangelical reformed churches to exercise the spirit of discernment whilst dealing with the influence of Pentecostalism, but at the same time to learn from this movement the zeal for mission and the role of the Holy Spirit in mission.Reformatoriese missionale nadenke oor effektiewe bediening in the konteks van Afrika Pentekostalisme. Pentekostalisme is 'n globale fenomeen met ‘n groot aanhang in Noord-Amerika, Latyns Amerika, Asië, Afrika en ander wêrelddele. Die opkoms, groei en invloed van Pentekostalisme in Afrika was geweldig en het een van die dominante gedaantes van Christenskap op die kontinent geword. ‘n Kontekstuele analise van Christenskap in Afrika wys dat Afrika meer vatbaar was vir hierdie tendens. Die manifestasie daarvan reik van klassieke Pentekostalisme (eerste golf, tot die charismatiese beweging (tweede golf en die charismatiese

  11. Acrotelm pedogenesis of a Sphagnum bog is reflected in effective unsaturated hydraulic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Tobias K. D.; Iden, Sascha C.; Durner, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    In ombrotrophic peatlands, the moisture content of the vadose zone (acrotelm) controls oxygen diffusion rates, redox state, and the turnover of organic matter. Whether peatlands act as sinks or sources of atmospheric carbon thus relies on variably saturated flow processes. Modeling of these processes is crucial in assessing effects of changed environmental conditions on the future development of these ecosystems. The Richards equation (RE) is the standard model for water flow in soils, but it is not clear whether it can be applied to simulate water flow in live Sphagnum moss. To check the suitability of the RE to describe the water dynamics in drying moss and peat we conducted transient laboratory evaporation experiments on undisturbed samples from the entire acrotelm. The experimental data consisted of measured pressure heads in two depths and water fluxes, and were evaluated by inverse modelling using the RE as process model. The results showed that the measurements could be matched very well only if the soil hydraulic properties (SHPs) were represented by a suitable model. A successful parameterisation of the SHPs of the moss was based on pore-size distributions (PSD) which combine three distinct pore systems of the Sphagnum moss, reflecting an inter-, intra-, and inner-plant pore space. We had to extend the traditional van Genuchten-Mualem model to account for non-capillary water storage and flow to obtain consistent descriptions of the observations. For the deeper samples, the pedogenesis of the acrotelm, a process of compaction and biochemical degradation of the solid matrix, had considerably impact on the shape of the SHPs. The collapse of the inter-plant pores and their filling with smaller particles led gradually to bi-modal PSDs with increasing depth. This coincides with a homogenisation and a considerably reduction in horizontal variability of SHPs at greater depths. We conclude that the RE with adequate representation of SHPs is a valid process

  12. Lewis icing research tunnel test of the aerodynamic effects of aircraft ground deicing/anti-icing fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runyan, L. James; Zierten, Thomas A.; Hill, Eugene G.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of the effect of aircraft ground deicing/anti-icing fluids on the aerodynamic characteristics of a Boeing 737-200ADV airplane was conducted. The test was carried out in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel. Fluids tested include a Newtonian deicing fluid, three non-Newtonian anti-icing fluids commercially available during or before 1988, and eight new experimental non-Newtonian fluids developed by four fluid manufacturers. The results show that fluids remain on the wind after liftoff and cause a measurable lift loss and drag increase. These effects are dependent on the high-lift configuration and on the temperature. For a configuration with a high-lift leading-edge device, the fluid effect is largest at the maximum lift condition. The fluid aerodynamic effects are related to the magnitude of the fluid surface roughness, particularly in the first 30 percent chord. The experimental fluids show a significant reduction in aerodynamic effects.

  13. Illumination compensation in ground based hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Alexander; Underwood, James

    2017-07-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has emerged as an important tool for analysing vegetation data in agricultural applications. Recently, low altitude and ground based hyperspectral imaging solutions have come to the fore, providing very high resolution data for mapping and studying large areas of crops in detail. However, these platforms introduce a unique set of challenges that need to be overcome to ensure consistent, accurate and timely acquisition of data. One particular problem is dealing with changes in environmental illumination while operating with natural light under cloud cover, which can have considerable effects on spectral shape. In the past this has been commonly achieved by imaging known reference targets at the time of data acquisition, direct measurement of irradiance, or atmospheric modelling. While capturing a reference panel continuously or very frequently allows accurate compensation for illumination changes, this is often not practical with ground based platforms, and impossible in aerial applications. This paper examines the use of an autonomous unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) to gather high resolution hyperspectral imaging data of crops under natural illumination. A process of illumination compensation is performed to extract the inherent reflectance properties of the crops, despite variable illumination. This work adapts a previously developed subspace model approach to reflectance and illumination recovery. Though tested on a ground vehicle in this paper, it is applicable to low altitude unmanned aerial hyperspectral imagery also. The method uses occasional observations of reference panel training data from within the same or other datasets, which enables a practical field protocol that minimises in-field manual labour. This paper tests the new approach, comparing it against traditional methods. Several illumination compensation protocols for high volume ground based data collection are presented based on the results. The findings in this paper are

  14. Microstructural changes in ground 3Y-TZP and their effect on mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Tabares, J.A., E-mail: j.a.munoz.tabares@gmail.com [Departament de Ciencia dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallurgica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Avda. Diagonal 647 (ETSEIB), 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Jimenez-Pique, E. [Departament de Ciencia dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallurgica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Avda. Diagonal 647 (ETSEIB), 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centre de Recerca en Nanoenginyeria (CRnE), C. Pascual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Reyes-Gasga, J. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito de la Investigacion Cientifica s/n, Cd Universitaria, 04510 Mexico DF (Mexico); Anglada, M. [Departament de Ciencia dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallurgica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Avda. Diagonal 647 (ETSEIB), 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centre de Recerca en Nanoenginyeria (CRnE), C. Pascual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    In the present work we studied the changes in the microstructure and mechanical properties that are produced by grinding of tetragonal polycrystalline zirconia doped with 3 mol.% yttria (3Y-TZP). It is shown that the X-ray diffraction spectrum of ground 3Y-TZP presents asymmetric broadening of the (1 1 1) tetragonal peak, reversal of the intensity of the (0 0 2) and (2 0 0) tetragonal peaks, and tetragonal to monoclinic (t-m) phase transformation. The in-depth monoclinic phase distribution obtained by micro-Raman spectroscopy has been related with the compression residual stresses profile generated during grinding. These compressive residual stresses are also responsible for the observed increase in mechanical properties (strength and apparent fracture toughness). The subsurface microstructure of ground specimens has been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and three different regions were found from the interior to the surface: (1) a t-m phase transformation zone in the deeper region, (2) a plastically deformed zone, with dynamically recovered dislocation cells, and (3) a surface recrystallized zone with grains of {approx}20 nm in diameter, resulting from in situ recrystallization. In addition, microcracking is concentrated on the sides of the grinding grooves, corresponding to the zone of maximum tensile stress during contact with an abrasive particle.

  15. The Effects of Disturbance History on Ground-Layer Plant Community Composition in British Columbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ton

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant communities are sensitive to perturbations and may display alternative recovery pathways depending on disturbance history. In sub-boreal lodgepole pine forests of central interior British Columbia, Canada, fire and logging are two widespread landscape disturbances that overlap in many regions. We asked whether cumulative, short-interval disturbance from logging and fire resulted in different ground-layer plant communities than resulted from fire alone. Using field-collected data, we compared the taxonomic composition and functional traits of 3-year old plant communities that were either harvested 6-to-13 years prior, or not harvested prior to being burned in a large stand-replacing fire. The taxonomic composition diverged between the two treatments, driven primarily by differences in a few key indicator species such as Petasites frigidus and Vaccinium membranaceum. Analysis of individual species’ morphological traits indicated that only a few species vary in size in relation to disturbance history. Our data suggest that a history of forest harvest leaves a subtle footprint on post-fire ground-layer plant communities at early stages of succession.

  16. Evaluating Topographic Effects on Ground Deformation: Insights from Finite Element Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronchin, Erika; Geyer, Adelina; Martí, Joan

    2015-07-01

    Ground deformation has been demonstrated to be one of the most common signals of volcanic unrest. Although volcanoes are commonly associated with significant topographic relief, most analytical models assume the Earth's surface as flat. However, it has been confirmed that this approximation can lead to important misinterpretations of the recorded surface deformation data. Here we perform a systematic and quantitative analysis of how topography may influence ground deformation signals generated by a spherical pressure source embedded in an elastic homogeneous media and how these variations correlate with the different topographic parameters characterizing the terrain form (e.g., slope, aspect, curvature). For this, we bring together the results presented in previous published papers and complement them with new axisymmetric and 3D finite element (FE) model results. First, we study, in a parametric way, the influence of a volcanic edifice centered above the pressure source axis. Second, we carry out new 3D FE models simulating the real topography of three different volcanic areas representative of topographic scenarios common in volcanic regions: Rabaul caldera (Papua New Guinea) and the volcanic islands of Tenerife and El Hierro (Canary Islands). The calculated differences are then correlated with a series of topographic parameters. The final aim is to investigate the artifacts that might arise from the use of half-space models at volcanic areas due to diverse topographic features (e.g., collapse caldera structures, prominent central edifices, large landslide scars).

  17. [Effect of preservatives on survival of Campylobacter jejuni in ground pork meat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uradziński, J; Szteyn, J

    1993-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni strains: Pen 2, 3, 6, 10 and 20 isolated from the food-borne infections in humans were tested. Fresh ground pork samples supplemented with chemical preservatives: sodium chloride--24,000 mg/kg, sodium nitrite--125 mg/kg, potassium nitrate--500 mg/kg, sodium ascorbate--300 mg/kg and polyphosphate (Hamine S)--3000 mg/kg were contaminated by C. jejuni strains. Survival of C. jejuni in ground pork was determined immediate after the contamination and over a 2-d period at 4 degrees C on Brucella agar (Difco) containing 10% horse blood, which were incubated 48 hrs at 42 degrees C under microaerobic conditions (5% O2, 5% CO2 and 90% N2). Campylobacter jejuni was isolated from all tested samples at the initial inoculum 2.5 x 10(5) to 1.7 x 10(8) cfu/1 g of meat. It was proved that chemical preservatives, added to meat samples in concentration usually used in meat processing, were affected in differential way on the survival of different strains of C. jejuni. Campylobacter jejuni Pen 2 was resistant to all preservatives used in this studies. Campylobacter jejuni Pen 3 and Pen 10 were sensitive to sodium nitrite, and Pen 10 was sensitive also to sodium chloride, potassium nitrate and composition of all tested chemicals. Also, Campylobacter jejuni Pen 20 was sensitive to sodium chloride, but potassium nitrate, sodium ascorbate and Hamine S stimulated growth of this strain.

  18. Effect of Borehole Material on Analytical Solutions of the Heat Transfer Model of Ground Heat Exchangers Considering Groundwater Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangwoo Park

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater flow is one of the most important factors for the design of a ground heat exchanger (GHEX since the thermal environment of the ground around the buried GHEX is significantly affected by heat convection due to the groundwater flow. Several preceding studies have been conducted to develop analytical solutions to the heat transfer model of GHEX with consideration of groundwater flow. One of these solutions is the combined heat transfer model of conduction and convection. However, the developed combined analytical models are inapplicable to all of the configurations of ordinary GHEXs because these solutions assume that the inner part of the borehole is thermally inert or consists of the same material as that of the surrounding ground. In this paper, the applicability of the combined solid cylindrical heat source model, which is the most suitable to energy piles until now, was evaluated by performing a series of numerical analyses. In the numerical analysis, the inner part of the borehole was modeled as two different materials (i.e., permeable ground formation and impermeable fill such as concrete to evaluate applicability of the analytical solution along with different diameter-length (D/L ratios of borehole. In a small value of the D/L ratio, the analytical solution to the combined heat transfer model is in good agreement with the result of numerical analysis. On the other hand, when increasing the D/L ratio, the analytical solution significantly overestimates the effect of groundwater flow on the heat transfer of GHEXs because the analytical solution disregards the existence of the impermeable region in the borehole. Consequently, such tendency is more critical in the GHEX with a large D/L ratio such as large-diameter energy piles.

  19. Ground Wars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Kleis

    Political campaigns today are won or lost in the so-called ground war--the strategic deployment of teams of staffers, volunteers, and paid part-timers who work the phones and canvass block by block, house by house, voter by voter. Ground Wars provides an in-depth ethnographic portrait of two...... infrastructures that utilize large databases with detailed individual-level information for targeting voters, and armies of dedicated volunteers and paid part-timers. Nielsen challenges the notion that political communication in America must be tightly scripted, controlled, and conducted by a select coterie...... of professionals. Yet he also quashes the romantic idea that canvassing is a purer form of grassroots politics. In today's political ground wars, Nielsen demonstrates, even the most ordinary-seeming volunteer knocking at your door is backed up by high-tech targeting technologies and party expertise. Ground Wars...

  20. The effects of air gap reflections during air-coupled leaky Lamb wave inspection of thin plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zichuan; Jiang, Wentao; Cai, Maolin; Wright, William M D

    2016-02-01

    Air-coupled ultrasonic inspection using leaky Lamb waves offers attractive possibilities for non-contact testing of plate materials and structures. A common method uses an air-coupled pitch-catch configuration, which comprises a transmitter and a receiver positioned at oblique angles to a thin plate. It is well known that the angle of incidence of the ultrasonic bulk wave in the air can be used to preferentially generate specific Lamb wave modes in the plate in a non-contact manner, depending on the plate dimensions and material properties. Multiple reflections of the ultrasonic waves in the air gap between the transmitter and the plate can produce additional delayed waves entering the plate at angles of incidence that are different to those of the original bulk wave source. Similarly, multiple reflections of the leaky Lamb waves in the air gap between the plate and an inclined receiver may then have different angles of incidence and propagation delays when arriving at the receiver and hence the signal analysis may become complex, potentially leading to confusion in the identification of the wave modes. To obtain a better understanding of the generation, propagation and detection of leaky Lamb waves and the effects of reflected waves within the air gaps, a multiphysics model using finite element methods was established. This model facilitated the visualisation of the propagation of the reflected waves between the transducers and the plate, the subsequent generation of additional Lamb wave signals within the plate itself, their leakage into the adjacent air, and the reflections of the leaky waves in the air gap between the plate and receiver. Multiple simulations were performed to evaluate the propagation and reflection of signals produced at different transducer incidence angles. Experimental measurements in air were in good agreement with simulation, which verified that the multiphysics model can provide a convenient and accurate way to interpret the signals in