WorldWideScience

Sample records for ground plane spacedly

  1. System safety activities supporting an aero-space plane ground support technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattern, Steven F.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is presented of the specific system safety activities required to support the ground support technology program associated with the design of an aerospace plane. Safe zones must be assessed to ensure that explosive safety requirements are attained to protect the vehicle, personnel, and support and operational facilities. Attention is given to the specific and unique design requirements connected with the utilization of cryogenic fuels as they apply to the design and development of an aerospace plane.

  2. National aero-space plane: Flight mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mciver, Duncan E.; Morrell, Frederick R.

    1990-01-01

    The current status and plans of the U.S. National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) program are reviewed. The goal of the program is to develop technology for single stage, hypersonic vehicles which use airbreathing propulsion to fly directly to orbit. The program features an X-30 flight research vehicle to explore altitude-speed regimes not amenable to ground testing. The decision to build the X-30 is now scheduled for 1993, with the first flight in the late 1990's. The flight mechanics, controls, flight management, and flight test considerations for the X-30 are discussed.

  3. Artificial impedance ground planes for low profile antenna applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Ian T.

    Recent interest in artificial impedance surfaces for low-profile antennas has led to extensive research with the goal of optimizing the ground plane's characteristics for a given antenna configuration and broadening the operational bandwidth, or alternatively creating a multi-band functionality. A method of determining the optimal reflection phase for a low-profile dipole antenna over an electromagnetic band gap (EBG) ground plane has been developed based on image theory and is presented with experimental and numerical validation. A new artificial impedance surface has also been developed, which is composed of an annular slot ring on a thin grounded dielectric. The main difference between the proposed ground plane and a conventional EBG is that the high impedance condition exists only in the vicinity of the slot and is therefore best suited for antennas with a current distribution that has a similar shape as the annular slot ring. It is shown that a loop antenna positioned closely over an annular slot loaded ground plane exhibits approximately the same gain as a loop antenna over a conventional EBG ground plane. The advantage of the new structure is its lack of periodicity, which significantly eases manufacturing. Additionally, it is shown that multiple concentric slot rings can be designed into the ground plane, which excites multiple resonances in low-profile wideband antennas. The result is a multi-band high impedance ground plane constructed using a simple arrangement of annular slots. Finally, a manufacturing technique is presented for the application of arbitrarily configured EBG antennas to handheld dual-sensor landmine detection systems. It is shown that creating an EBG antenna using very thin layers of metal will enable it to be used for ground penetrating radar (GPR) when it is co-located with a low frequency metal detector without compromising the operation of the metal detector. The potential benefit of such an antenna would be a lower profile sensor

  4. Comb-Line Filter with Coupling Capacitor in Ground Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Kitamura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A comb-line filter with a coupling capacitor in the ground plane is proposed. The filter consists of two quarter-wavelength microstrip resonators. A coupling capacitor is inserted into the ground plane in order to build strong coupling locally along the resonators. The filtering characteristics are investigated through numerical simulations as well as experiments. Filtering characteristics that have attenuation poles at both sides of the passband are obtained. The input susceptances of even and odd modes and coupling coefficients are discussed. The filters using stepped impedance resonators (SIRs are also discussed, and the effects of the coupling capacitor for an SIR structure are shown.

  5. Innovative focal plane design for large space telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Wilfried; Ferrari, Marc; Hugot, Emmanuel

    2016-07-01

    Future large drift-scan space telescopes, providing high angular resolution and sensitive observations, require long linear focal planes covering large fields of view. In order to reach higher on-earth spatial resolution while keeping a large field of view, the use of homothetic imaging systems is prohibitive for VIS/IR applications. Based on Integral Field Unit technology developed for ground based instrumentation, we present an innovative optical system reorganizing a 1D field of view on a 2D detector array. Such a solution presents a high gain in terms of volume and weight, allowing compact cryogenic systems for IR observations.

  6. Coupling Between Microstrip Lines With Finite Width Ground Plane Embedded in Thin Film Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchak, George E.; Dalton, Edan; Tentzeris, Manos M.; Papapolymerou, John

    2003-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) interconnects built upon multiple layers of polyimide are required for constructing 3D circuits on CMOS (low resistivity) Si wafers, GaAs, and ceramic substrates. Thin film microstrip lines (TFMS) with finite width ground planes embedded in the polyimide are often used. However, the closely spaced TFMS lines a r e susceptible to high levels of coupling, which degrades circuit performance. In this paper, Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) analysis and experimental measurements a r e used to show that the ground planes must be connected by via holes to reduce coupling in both the forward and backward directions. Furthermore, it is shown that coupled microstrip lines establish a slotline type mode between the two ground planes and a dielectric waveguide type mode, and that the via holes recommended here eliminate these two modes.

  7. Grounding word learning in space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa K Samuelson

    Full Text Available Humans and objects, and thus social interactions about objects, exist within space. Words direct listeners' attention to specific regions of space. Thus, a strong correspondence exists between where one looks, one's bodily orientation, and what one sees. This leads to further correspondence with what one remembers. Here, we present data suggesting that children use associations between space and objects and space and words to link words and objects--space binds labels to their referents. We tested this claim in four experiments, showing that the spatial consistency of where objects are presented affects children's word learning. Next, we demonstrate that a process model that grounds word learning in the known neural dynamics of spatial attention, spatial memory, and associative learning can capture the suite of results reported here. This model also predicts that space is special, a prediction supported in a fifth experiment that shows children do not use color as a cue to bind words and objects. In a final experiment, we ask whether spatial consistency affects word learning in naturalistic word learning contexts. Children of parents who spontaneously keep objects in a consistent spatial location during naming interactions learn words more effectively. Together, the model and data show that space is a powerful tool that can effectively ground word learning in social contexts.

  8. Does monocular visual space contain planes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, J.J.; Albertazzi, L.; Doorn, A.J. van; Ee, R. van; Grind, W.A. van de; Kappers, A.M.L.; Lappin, J.S.; Norman, J.F.; Oomes, A.H.J.; Pas, S.F. te; Phillips, F.; Pont, S.C.; Richards, W.A.; Todd, J.T.; Verstraten, F.A.J.; Vries, S.C. de

    2010-01-01

    The issue of the existence of planes—understood as the carriers of a nexus of straight lines—in the monocular visual space of a stationary human observer has never been addressed. The most recent empirical data apply to binocular visual space and date from the 1960s (Foley, 1964). This appears to be

  9. Earth-Facing Antenna Characterization in a Complex Ground Plane/Multipath Rich Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Bryan W.; Piasecki, Marie T.

    2015-01-01

    The Space Communications and Navigation (SCAN) Testbed was a Software Defined Radio (SDR)-based payload launched to the International Space Station (ISS) in July of 2012. The purpose of the SCAN Testbed payload was to investigate the applicability of SDRs to NASA space missions in an operational space environment, which means that a proper model for system performance in said operational space environment is a necessary condition. The SCAN Testbed has line-of-sight connections to various ground stations with its S-Band Earth-facing Near-Earth Network Low Gain Antenna (NEN-LGA). Any previous efforts to characterize the NEN-LGA proved difficult, therefore, the NASA Glenn Research Center built its own S-Band ground station, which became operational in 2015, and has been successfully used to characterize the NEN-LGAs in-situ pattern measurements. This methodology allows for a more realistic characterization of the antenna performance, where the pattern oscillation induced by the complex ISS ground plane, as well as shadowing effects due to ISS structural blockage are included into the final performance model. This paper describes the challenges of characterizing an antenna pattern in this environment. It will also discuss the data processing, present the final antenna pattern measurements and derived model, as well as discuss various lessons learned.

  10. Bandwidth Improvement of UWB Microstrip Antenna Using Finite Ground Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Mishra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Microstrip antennas play a vital role in communication system. It is required in high performance wireless applications. But due to its resonant nature microstrip antennas have some considerable drawbacks like narrowband performance. Extensive study has been carried out on microstrip patch antennas in the recent past, but it still have large scope for improvement in the near future. To overcome narrow bandwidth problem, number of methods and techniques have been suggested and investigated, keeping in mind that the basic advantages of microstrip antenna should not be altered such as low profile, light weight, low cost and simple printed circuit structure. The area of investigation includes modification in geometrical shape of the antenna, use of resonators, use of dipole, and many other parameters. This paper presents a comparison between conventional microstrip antenna and microstip antenna with finite ground plane at ultra wideband. HFSS simulation tool is used here for antenna simulation. For feeding purpose microstrip feed line is used (50Ω. Optimized result provides impedance bandwidth of 7.2GHz with VSWR<2, operating frequency range is from 6.5GHz to 13.7GHz. Proposed antenna is useful for many ultra wideband applications.

  11. Earth-Facing Antenna Characterization in Complex Ground Plane/Multipath Rich Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Bryan W.; Piasecki, Marie T.

    2015-01-01

    The Space Communications and Navigation (SCAN) Testbed was a Software Defined Radio (SDR)-based payload launched to the International Space Station (ISS) in July of 2012. The purpose of the SCAN Testbed payload was to investigate the applicability of SDRs to NASA space missions in an operational environment, which means that a proper model for system performance in said operational space environment is a necessary condition. The SCAN Testbed has line-of-sight connections to various ground stations with its S-Band Earth-facing Near-Earth-Network Low Gain Antenna (NEN-LGA). Any previous efforts to characterize the NEN-LGA proved difficult, therefore, the NASA Glenn Research Center built its own S-Band ground station, which became operational in 2015, and has been used successfully to characterize the NEN-LGA's in-situ pattern measurements. This methodology allows for a more realistic characterization of the antenna performance, where the pattern oscillation induced by the complex ISS ground plane, as well as shadowing effects due to ISS structural blockage are included into the final performance model. This paper describes the challenges of characterizing an antenna pattern in this environment. It will also discuss the data processing, present the final antenna pattern measurements and derived model, as well as discuss various lessons learned

  12. Coupling Between Microstrip Lines with Finite Width Ground Plane Embedded in Polyimide Layers for 3D-MMICs on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchak, George E.; Dalton, Edan; Tentzeris, Emmanouil M.; Papapolymerou, John; Williams, W. Dan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional circuits built upon multiple layers of polyimide are required for constructing Si/SiGe monolithic microwave/millimeter-wave integrated circuits on complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) (low resistivity) Si wafers. Thin film microstrip lines (TFMS) with finite width ground planes embedded in the polyimide are often used. However, the closely spaced TFMS lines are susceptible to high levels of coupling, which degrades circuit performance. In this paper, Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) analysis and experimental measurements are used to show that the ground planes must be connected by via holes to reduce coupling in both the forward and backward directions.

  13. Space-based monitoring of ground deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobakht Ersi, Fereydoun; Safari, Abdolreza; Gamse, Sonja

    2016-07-01

    Ground deformation monitoring is valuable to understanding of the behaviour of natural phenomena. Space-Based measurement systems such as Global Positioning System are useful tools for continuous monitoring of ground deformation. Ground deformation analysis based on space geodetic techniques have provided a new, more accurate, and reliable source of information for geodetic positioning which is used to detect deformations of the Ground surface. This type of studies using displacement fields derived from repeated measurments of space-based geodetic networks indicates how crucial role the space geodetic methods play in geodynamics. The main scope of this contribution is to monitor of ground deformation by obtained measurements from GPS sites. We present ground deformation analysis in three steps: a global congruency test on daily coordinates of permanent GPS stations to specify in which epochs deformations occur, the localization of the deformed GPS sites and the determination of deformations.

  14. Microstrip Resonator for High Field MRI with Capacitor-Segmented Strip and Ground Plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Boer, Vincent; Petersen, Esben Thade

    2017-01-01

    ) segmenting stripe and ground plane of the resonator with series capacitors. The design equations for capacitors providing symmetric current distribution are derived. The performance of two types of segmented resonators are investigated experimentally. To authors’ knowledge, a microstrip resonator, where both......, strip and ground plane are capacitor-segmented, is shown here for the first time....

  15. Two-Stage MAS Technique for Analysis of DRA Elements and Arrays on Finite Ground Planes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Niels Vesterdal; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2007-01-01

    A two-stage Method of Auxiliary Sources (MAS) technique is proposed for analysis of dielectric resonator antenna (DRA) elements and arrays on finite ground planes (FGPs). The problem is solved by first analysing the DRA on an infinite ground plane (IGP) and then using this solution to model the FGP...... problem....

  16. Modelling the Impact of Ground Planes on Antenna Radiation Using the Method of Auxiliary Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Niels Vesterdal; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2007-01-01

    The Method of Auxiliary Sources is employed to model the impact of finite ground planes on the radiation from antennas. In many cases the computational cost of available commercial tools restricts the simulations to include only a small ground plane or, by use of the image principle, the infinitely...

  17. Back Radiation Suppression through a Semitransparent Ground Plane for a mm-Wave Patch Antenna

    KAUST Repository

    Klionovski, Kirill

    2017-06-21

    Omnidirectional radiation pattern with minimum backward radiation is highly desirable for base station antennas to minimize the multipath effects. Semitransparent ground planes have been used to reduce the backward radiation, but mostly with complicated non-uniform impedance distribution. In this work, we propose, for the first time, a round semitransparent ground plane of radius 0.8 λ with uniform impedance distribution that can improve the front-to-back ratio of a wideband patch antenna by 11.6 dB as compared to a similar sized metallic ground plane. The value of uniform impedance is obtained through analytical optimization by using asymptotic expressions in the Kirchhoff approximation of the radiation pattern of a toroidal wave scattered by a round semitransparent ground plane. The semitransparent ground plane has been realized using a low-cost carbon paste on a Kapton film. Experimental results match closely with those of simulations and validate the overall concept.

  18. Space/ground systems as cooperating agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, T. J.

    1994-01-01

    Within NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) it is agreed that autonomy is an important goal for the design of future spacecraft and that this requires on-board artificial intelligence. NASA emphasizes deep space and planetary rover missions, while ESA considers on-board autonomy as an enabling technology for missions that must cope with imperfect communications. ESA's attention is on the space/ground system. A major issue is the optimal distribution of intelligent functions within the space/ground system. This paper describes the multi-agent architecture for space/ground systems (MAASGS) which would enable this issue to be investigated. A MAASGS agent may model a complete spacecraft, a spacecraft subsystem or payload, a ground segment, a spacecraft control system, a human operator, or an environment. The MAASGS architecture has evolved through a series of prototypes. The paper recommends that the MAASGS architecture should be implemented in the operational Dutch Utilization Center.

  19. Noncommutative Geometry: Fuzzy Spaces, the Groenewold-Moyal Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiyalam P. Balachandran

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In this talk, we review the basics concepts of fuzzy physics and quantum field theory on the Groenewold-Moyal Plane as examples of noncommutative spaces in physics. We introduce the basic ideas, and discuss some important results in these fields. At the end we outline some recent developments in the field.

  20. Is space the ultimate high ground?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Gregory J.; Stallings, Francis P.

    2011-06-01

    Military experts often refer to space as the ultimate high ground under the premise that placing systems in orbit provides advantages consistent with the military doctrine of high ground. Although space provides the ultimate "observation post", it has none of the other advantages traditionally associated with high ground. Army Field Manual (FM) 34-130 states the other advantages of holding key terrain: commanding avenues of approach, overcoming obstacles, and affording cover and concealment as additional benefits of high ground. Yet systems in orbit incur none of these additional advantages. Finally, international restrictions and reciprocity concerns limit the employment of weapons in space nullifying many of the unique capability advantages that would otherwise support the "high ground" aspect of space. As the ultimate observation post, satellites provide a large quantity of vital data to military decision makers. This massive amount of data needs to have as much context as possible to convert this data to useful knowledge. To use space assets optimally, the military needs to learn from the past and make space and cyber products distributed and tactical. It is absolutely essential to distribute the right information to the lowest level (tactical elements) of the organization or the "boots on the ground" in a timely manner.

  1. Quantum Teichm\\"uller space from quantum plane

    CERN Document Server

    Frenkel, Igor B

    2010-01-01

    We derive the quantum Teichm\\"uller space, previously constructed by Kashaev and by Fock and Chekhov, from tensor products of a single canonical representation of the modular double of the quantum plane. We show that the quantum dilogarithm function appears naturally in the decomposition of the tensor square, the quantum mutation operator arises from the tensor cube, the pentagon identity from the tensor fourth power of the canonical representation, and an operator of order three from isomorphisms between canonical representation and its left and right duals. We also show that the quantum universal Teichm\\"uller space is realized in the infinite tensor power of the canonical representation naturally indexed by rational numbers including the infinity. This suggests a relation to the same index set in the classification of projective modules over the quantum torus, the unitary counterpart of the quantum plane, and points to a new quantization of the universal Teichm\\"uller space.

  2. The Fermat-Torricelli problem in normed planes and spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Martini, Horst; Weiss, Gunter

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the Fermat-Torricelli problem in d-dimensional real normed spaces or Minkowski spaces, mainly for d=2. Our approach is to study the Fermat-Torricelli locus in a geometric way. We present many new results, as well as give an exposition of known results that are scattered in various sources, with proofs for some of them. Together, these results can be considered to be a minitheory of the Fermat-Torricelli problem in Minkowski spaces and especially in Minkowski planes. This demonstrates that substantial results about locational problems valid for all norms can be found using a geometric approach.

  3. Operational Capabilities and Legal Implications of a Military Space Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charania, A.

    2002-01-01

    The potential challenges for the United States military in this upcoming century may require new types of capabilities only achievable through the application of new technologies. One of these potential capabilities includes a Military Space Plane (MSP). An MSP is a concept to use reusable launch vehicle (RLV) technologies in a system to provide the military global access and reach in a timely fashion that could be operational within a decade. New awareness is evident from both recent federal commission reports and activities in Afghanistan of the military's possible use of such capabilities to provide asymmetric advantages. The MSP may eventually become part of a new spaceforce that coordinates the broad range of defensive and offensive space assets. In addition, a new emphasis is being placed upon NASA and the U.S. Air Force to coordinate activity on such a space plane/RLV development. The interaction of civilian and defense agencies for such a program has ramifications, not just in terms of the requirements on a final operational vehicle, but also on the legal charters of both entities. This examination presents operational scenarios for a military space plane in order to derive various legal implications.

  4. Space and Ground-Based Infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weems, Jon; Zell, Martin

    This chapter deals first with the main characteristics of the space environment, outside and inside a spacecraft. Then the space and space-related (ground-based) infrastructures are described. The most important infrastructure is the International Space Station, which holds many European facilities (for instance the European Columbus Laboratory). Some of them, such as the Columbus External Payload Facility, are located outside the ISS to benefit from external space conditions. There is only one other example of orbital platforms, the Russian Foton/Bion Recoverable Orbital Capsule. In contrast, non-orbital weightless research platforms, although limited in experimental time, are more numerous: sounding rockets, parabolic flight aircraft, drop towers and high-altitude balloons. In addition to these facilities, there are a number of ground-based facilities and space simulators, for both life sciences (for instance: bed rest, clinostats) and physical sciences (for instance: magnetic compensation of gravity). Hypergravity can also be provided by human and non-human centrifuges.

  5. A Method of Auxiliary Sources Approach for Modelling the Impact of Ground Planes on Antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Niels Vesterdal; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2006-01-01

    The Method of Auxiliary Sources (MAS) is employed to model the impact of finite ground planes on the radiation from antennas. Two different antenna test cases are shown and the calculated results agree well with reference measurements......The Method of Auxiliary Sources (MAS) is employed to model the impact of finite ground planes on the radiation from antennas. Two different antenna test cases are shown and the calculated results agree well with reference measurements...

  6. Ground penetrating radar antenna measurements based on plane-wave expansions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The plane-wave transmitting spectrum of the system consisting of the ground penetrating radar (GPR) antenna and the air-soil interface is measured using a loop buried in the soil. The plane-wave spectrum is used to determine various parameters characterizing the radiation of the GPR antenna...

  7. Infrasound from ground to space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Daniel Charles

    Acoustic detector networks are usually located on the Earth's surface. However, these networks suffer from shortcomings such as poor detection range and pervasive wind noise. An alternative is to deploy acoustic sensors on high altitude balloons. In theory, such platforms can resolve signals arriving from great distances, acquire others that never reach the surface at all, and avoid wind noise entirely. This dissertation focuses on scientific advances, instrumentation, and analytical techniques resulting from the development of such sensor arrays. Results from infrasound microphones deployed on balloon flights in the middle stratosphere are described, and acoustic sources such as the ocean microbarom and building ventilation systems are discussed. Electromagnetic noise originating from the balloon, flight system, and other payloads is shown to be a pervasive issue. An experiment investigating acoustic sensor calibration at low pressures is presented, and implications for high altitude recording are considered. Outstanding challenges and opportunities in sound measurement using sensors embedded in the free atmosphere are outlined. Acoustic signals from field scale explosions designed to emulate volcanic eruptions are described, and their generation mechanisms modeled. Wave forms recorded on sensors suspended from tethered helium balloons are compared with those detected on ground stations during the experiment. Finally, the Hilbert-Huang transform, a high time resolution spectral analysis method for nonstationary and nonlinear time series, is presented.

  8. Improving the detection of explosive hazards with LIDAR-based ground plane estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, A.; Keller, J. M.; Popescu, M.

    2016-05-01

    Three-dimensional point clouds generated by LIDAR offer the potential to build a more complete understanding of the environment in front of a moving vehicle. In particular, LIDAR data facilitates the development of a non-parametric ground plane model that can filter target predictions from other sensors into above-ground and below-ground sets. This allows for improved detection performance when, for example, a system designed to locate above-ground targets considers only the set of above-ground predictions. In this paper, we apply LIDAR-based ground plane filtering to a forward looking ground penetrating radar (FLGPR) sensor system and a side looking synthetic aperture acoustic (SAA) sensor system designed to detect explosive hazards along the side of a road. Additionally, we consider the value of the visual magnitude of the LIDAR return as a feature for identifying anomalies. The predictions from these sensors are evaluated independently with and without ground plane filtering and then fused to produce a combined prediction confidence. Sensor fusion is accomplished by interpolating the confidence scores of each sensor along the ground plane model to create a combined confidence vector at specified points in the environment. The methods are tested along an unpaved desert road at an arid U.S. Army test site.

  9. Fate of the Superconducting Ground State on the Moyal Plane

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Prasad; Vaidya, Sachindeo

    2009-01-01

    It is known that Berry curvature of the band structure of certain crystals can lead to effective noncommutativity between spatial coordinates. Using the techniques of twisted quantum field theory, we investigate the question of the formation of a paired state of twisted fermions in such a system. We find that to leading order in the noncommutativity parameter, the gap between the non-interacting ground state and the paired state is {\\it smaller} compared to its commutative counterpart. This suggests that BCS type superconductivity, if present in such systems, is more fragile and easier to disrupt.

  10. Aerodynamics of flapping insect wing in inclined stroke plane hovering with ground effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda v, Krishne; Vengadesan, S.

    2014-11-01

    This work presents the time-varying aerodynamic forces and the unsteady flow structures of flapping insect wing in inclined stroke plane hovering with ground effect. Two-dimensional dragonfly model wing is chosen and the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically by using immersed boundary method. The main objective of the present work is to analyze the ground effect on the unsteady forces and vortical structures for the inclined stroke plane motions. We also investigate the influences of kinematics parameters such as Reynolds number (Re), stroke amplitude, wing rotational timing, for various distances between the airfoil and the ground. The effects of aforementioned parameters together with ground effect, on the stroke averaged force coefficients and regimes of force behavior are similar in both normal (horizontal) and inclined stroke plane motions. However, the evolution of the vortex structures which produces the effects are entirely different.

  11. Multicultural Ground Teams in Space Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, M.

    2012-01-01

    In the early years of space flight only two countries had access to space. In the last twenty years, there have been major changes in how we conduct space business. With the fall of the iron curtain and the growing of the European Union, more and more players were able to join the space business and space science. By end of the last century, numerous countries, agencies and companies earned the right to be equal partners in space projects. This paper investigates the impact of multicultural teams in the space arena. Fortunately, in manned spaceflight, especially for long duration missions, there are several studies and simulations reporting on multicultural team impact. These data have not been as well explored on the team interactions within the ground crews. The focus of this paper are the teams working on the ISS project. Hypotheses will be drawn from the results of space crew research to determine parallels and differences for this vital segment of success in space missions. The key source of the data will be drawn from structured interviews with managers and other ground crews on the ISS project.

  12. Dielectric Resonator Antenna Mounted on Cylindrical Ground Plane for Handheld RFID Reader at 5.8 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hend Abd El-Azem Malhat

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dielectric resonator antenna (DRA mounted on cylindrical ground plane is investigated for handheld RFID reader applications at 5.8 GHz. The simplicity of the structure makes it practical in terms of cost, space, and ease of fabrication. The radiation characteristics of the antenna in free space and in the presence of a proposed compact reader device model and human hand are calculated. The antenna is circularly polarized and exhibits peak gain of 7.62 dB at 5.8 GHz with high front to back ratio of 15.5 dB. Using the same reader device model, a sequentially feeding 2×2 DRA array mounted on the same cylindrical ground plane is used for RFID reader antenna at 5.8 GHz. The array introduces high gain of 9.36 dB at 5.8 GHz with high front to back ratio of 10.48 dB. The 2×2 DRA array elements exhibit circular polarization over a frequency band of 1.1 GHz. The axial ratio is 1.1 dB at 5.8 GHz. The proposed reader model is simple and has a small size compared with that in the case of planar ground plane. The results are calculated using the finite element method (FEM and compared with that calculated using the finite integral technique (FIT.

  13. Concentrated Ground Plane Booster Antenna Technology for Multiband Operation in Handset Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Picher

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The current demand in the handset antenna field requires multiband antennas due to the existence of multiple communication standards and the emergence of new ones. At the same time, antennas with reduced dimensions are strongly required in order to be easily integrated. In this sense, the paper proposes a compact radiating system that uses two non-resonant elements to properly excite the ground plane to solve the abovementioned shortcomings by minimizing the required Printed Circuit Board (PCB area while ensuring a multiband performance. These non-resonant elements are called here ground plane boosters since they excite an efficient mode of the ground plane. The proposed radiating system comprises two ground plane boosters of small dimensions of 5 mm x 5 mm x 5 mm. One is in charge of the low frequency region (0.824-0.960 GHz and the other is in charge of the high frequency region (1.710-2.170 GHz. With the aim of achieving a compact configuration, the two boosters are placed close to each other in a corner of the ground plane of a handset device (concentrated architecture. Several experiments related to the coupling between boosters have been carried out in two different platforms (barphone and smartphone, and the best position and the required matching network are presented. The novel proposal achieves multiband performance at GSM850/900/1800/1900 and UMTS.

  14. Studies on an aerial propellant transfer space plane (APTSP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayan, N.; Biju Kumar, K.S.; Gupta, A.K.; Kashyap, A.K.; Venkatraman, K.; Mathews, J.; Makunda, H.S. [Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering

    2004-03-01

    This paper presents a study of a fully reusable earth-to-orbit launch vehicle concept with horizontal take-off and landing, employing a turbojet engine for low speed, and a rocket for high-speed acceleration and space operations. This concept uses existing technology to the maximum possible extent, thereby reducing development time, cost and effort. It uses the experience in aerial filling of military aircraft for propellant filling at an altitude of 13 km at a flight speed of M=0.85. Aerial filling of propellant reduces the take-off weight significantly thereby minimizing the structural weight of the vehicle. The vehicle takes off horizontally and uses turbojet engines till the end of the propellant filling operation. The rocket engines provide thrust for the next phase till the injection of a satellite at LEO. A sensitivity analysis of the mission with respect to rocket engine specific impulse and overall vehicle structural factor is also presented in this paper. A conceptual design of space plane with a payload capability of 10 ton to LEO is carried out. The study shows that the realization of an aerial propellant transfer space plane is possible with limited development of new technology thus reducing the demands on the finances required for achieving the objectives. (author)

  15. Plane Pendulum and Beyond by Phase Space Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Klee, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    By careful analysis, the simple harmonic approximation leads to a wildly inaccurate prediction for the period of a simple plane pendulum. We make a perturbation ansatz for the phase space trajectory of a one-dimensional, anharmonic oscillator and apply conservation of energy to set undetermined functions. Iteration of the algorithm yields, to arbitrary precision, a solution to the equations of motion and the period of oscillation. Comparison with Jacobian elliptic functions leads to multidimensional applications such as the construction of approximate Seiffert spirals. Throughout we develop a quantum/classical analogy for the purpose of comparing time-independent perturbation theories.

  16. Distributed intelligence for ground/space systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarup, Mads; Munch, Klaus Heje; Fuchs, Joachim; Hartmann, Ralf; Baud, Tim

    1994-01-01

    DI is short for Distributed Intelligence for Ground/Space Systems and the DI Study is one in a series of ESA projects concerned with the development of new concepts and architectures for future autonomous spacecraft systems. The kick-off of DI was in January 1994 and the planned duration is three years. The background of DI is the desire to design future ground/space systems with a higher degree of autonomy than seen in today's missions. The aim of introducing autonomy in spacecraft systems is to: (1) lift the role of the spacecraft operators from routine work and basic troubleshooting to supervision; (2) ease access to and increase availability of spacecraft resources; (3) carry out basic mission planning for users; (4) enable missions which have not yet been feasible due to eg. propagation delays, insufficient ground station coverage etc.; and (5) possibly reduce mission cost. The study serves to identify the feasibility of using state-of-the-art technologies in the area of planning, scheduling, fault detection using model-based diagnosis and knowledge processing to obtain a higher level of autonomy in ground/space systems.

  17. Construction and Testing of Broadband High Impedance Ground Planes (HIGPS) for Surface Mount Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    mushrooms (with side lengths of 7.6mm). Larger mushrooms (with side lengths of 16mm) were located to the edges of the substrate . The resulting...thickness and substrate permittivity are two of the main design parameters. But these parameters have production constraints, since they are ordered off...plane designs as a meta- substrate for a broadband bow-tie antenna were presented. Consequently, the high impedance ground plane provided a suitable

  18. Characteristic Impedance of a Microstrip-Like Interconnect Line in Presence of Ground Plane Aperture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Sharma

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose new empirical expressions for the characteristic impedance of a microstrip-like interconnect line in presence of ground plane aperture. The existing characteristic impedance expressions are modified so as to include the effect of the ground plane aperture. The variation in the characteristic impedance vis-à-vis the aperture size is established. The proposed expressions are general and valid for a range of dielectric materials concerning MICs, RFICs, and PCBs. The results are validated by measurements performed on a vector network analyzer.

  19. A Robust and Efficient Homography Based Approach for Ground Plane Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Sofat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a homography based ground planedetection method. The method is developed as a part of stereovision based obstacle detection technique for the visuallyimpaired people. The method assumes the presence of a texturedominant ground plane in the lower portion of the scene, whichis not severe restriction in a real world. SIFT algorithm is usedto extract features in the stereo images. The extracted SIFTfeatures are robustly matched by model fitting using RANSAC.A sample of putative matches lying in the lower portion of theimage is selected. A fitness function is developed to selectmatches from this sample, which are used to estimate groundplane homography hypothesis. The ground plane homographyhypothesis is used to classify the SIFT features as eitherbelonging to ground plane or not. Image segmentation usingmean shift and normalized cut is further used to filter theoutliers and augment the ground plane. Experimental testshave been conducted to test the performance of the proposedapproach. The tests indicate that the proposed approach hasgood classification rate and have operating distance rangefrom 3 feet to 12 feet.

  20. Geometry of state space in plane Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvitanović, P.; Gibson, J. F.

    A large conceptual gap separates the theory of low-dimensional chaotic dynamics from the infinite-dimensional nonlinear dynamics of turbulence. Recent advances in experimental imaging, computational methods, and dynamical systems theory suggest a way to bridge this gap in our understanding of turbulence. Recent discoveries show that recurrent coherent structures observed in wall-bounded shear flows (such as pipes and plane Couette flow) result from close passes to weakly unstable invariant solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. These 3D, fully nonlinear solutions (equilibria, traveling waves, and periodic orbits) structure the state space of turbulent flows and provide a skeleton for analyzing their dynamics. We calculate a hierarchy of invariant solutions for plane Couette, a canonical wall-bounded shear flow. These solutions reveal organization in the flow's turbulent dynamics and can be used to predict directly from the fundamental equations physical quantities such as bulk flow rate and mean wall drag. All results and the code that generates them are disseminated through through our group's open-source CFD software and solution database Channelflow.org and the collaborative e-book ChaosBook.org.

  1. Measurement of Plane-Wave Spectra of Ground Penetrating Radar Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The plane-wave transmitting spectrum of a ground penetrating radar (GPR) loop antenna close to the air-soil interface is measured by means of a probe buried in soil. Probe correction is implemented based upon knowledge about the complex permittivity of the soil and the current distribution...

  2. Measurement of Plane-Wave Spectra of Ground Penetrating Radar Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The plane-wave transmitting spectrum of a ground penetrating radar (GPR) loop antenna close to the air-soil interface is measured by means of a probe buried in soil. Probe correction is implemented based upon knowledge about the complex permittivity of the soil and the current distribution...

  3. Ground Processing Affordability for Space Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingalls, John; Scott, Russell

    2011-01-01

    Launch vehicles and most of their payloads spend the majority of their time on the ground. The cost of ground operations is very high. So, why so often is so little attention given to ground processing during development? The current global space industry and economic environment are driving more need for efficiencies to save time and money. Affordability and sustainability are more important now than ever. We can not continue to treat space vehicles as mere science projects. More RLV's (Reusable Launch Vehicles) are being developed for the gains of reusability which are not available for ELV's (Expendable Launch Vehicles). More human-rated vehicles are being developed, with the retirement of the Space Shuttles, and for a new global space race, yet these cost more than the many unmanned vehicles of today. We can learn many lessons on affordability from RLV's. DFO (Design for Operations) considers ground operations during design, development, and manufacturing-before the first flight. This is often minimized for space vehicles, but is very important. Vehicles are designed for launch and mission operations. You will not be able to do it again if it is too slow or costly to get there. Many times, technology changes faster than space products such that what is launched includes outdated features, thus reducing competitiveness. Ground operations must be considered for the full product Lifecycle, from concept to retirement. Once manufactured, launch vehicles along with their payloads and launch systems require a long path of processing before launch. Initial assembly and testing always discover problems to address. A solid integration program is essential to minimize these impacts, as was seen in the Constellation Ares I-X test rocket. For RLV's, landing/recovery and post-flight turnaround activities are performed. Multi-use vehicles require reconfiguration. MRO (Maintenance, Repair, and Overhaul) must be well-planned--- even for the unplanned problems. Defect limits and

  4. Imaging Young Planets From Ground and Space

    CERN Document Server

    Beichman, Charles A; Trauger, John T; Greene, Thomas P; Oppenheimer, Ben; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Doyon, Rene; Boccaletti, Antony; Barman, Travis S; Rieke, Marcia

    2010-01-01

    High contrast imaging can find and characterize gas giant planets around nearby young stars and the closest M stars, complementing radial velocity and astrometric searches by exploring orbital separations inaccessible to indirect methods. Ground-based coronagraphs are already probing within 25 AU of nearby young stars to find objects as small as ~ 3 Jupiter masses. This paper compares near-term and future ground-based capabilities with high contrast imaging modes of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Monte Carlo modeling reveals that JWST can detect planets with masses as small as 0.2 MJup across a broad range of orbital separations. We present new calculations for planet brightness as a function of mass and age for specific JWST filters and extending to 0.1 MJup.

  5. Circularly Polarized Low-Profile Antenna for Radiating Parallel to Ground Plane for RFID Reader Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kittima Lertsakwimarn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a low-profile printed antenna with double U-shaped arms radiating circular polarization for the UHF RFID readers. The proposed antenna consists of double U-shaped strip structures and a capacitive feeding line to generate circular polarization. A part of the U-shaped arms is bent by 90° to direct the main beam parallel to the ground plane. From the results, -10 dB |S11| and 3 dB axial ratio of the antenna cover a typical UHF RFID band from 920 MHz to 925 MHz. The bidirectional beam is obtained with the maximum gain of 1.8 dBic in the parallel direction to the ground plane at the 925 MHz. The overall size of the proposed antenna including ground plane is 107 mm × 57 mm × 12.8 mm (0.33λ0 × 0.17λ0 × 0.04λ0.

  6. General scaling limitations of ground-plane and isolated-object cloaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemi, Hila; Johnson, Steven G. [Department of Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Oskooi, A. [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University (Japan); Joannopoulos, J. D. [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    We prove that, for arbitrary three-dimensional transformation-based invisibility cloaking of an object above a ground plane or of isolated objects, there are practical constraints that increase with the object size. In particular, we show that the cloak thickness must scale proportionally to the thickness of the object being cloaked, assuming bounded refractive indices, and that absorption discrepancies and other imperfections must scale inversely with the object thickness. For isolated objects, we also show that bounded refractive indices imply a lower bound on the effective cross section.

  7. Hexagonal Shaped Ultra Wide Band Patch Antenna with Pyramid Shaped fractal in Ground Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astt.Prof. Abhishek Choubey,

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this research paper a hexagonal patch antenna with pyramid shaped fractal in ground plane, is presented which has been designed to radiate into human breast tissue. The antenna is shown by means of simulation and practical measurement to possess a wide input bandwidth, stable radiation patterns. Consideration is also given to its ability to radiate a pulse, and in this respect it is also found to be suitable for the proposed application. The proposed geometry is simulated with IE3D and in results return loss, gain, and VSWR are calculated. The simulated results are shown to illustrate the performances of the proposed antenna.

  8. A 260 megapixel visible/NIR mixed technology focal plane for space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besuner, Robert W.; Bebek, Christopher J.; Haller, Gunther M.; Harris, Stewart E.; Hart, Philip A.; Heetderks, Henry D.; Jelinsky, Patrick N.; Lampton, Michael L.; Levi, Michael E.; Maldonado, Sergio E.; Roe, Natalie A.; Roodman, Aaron J.; Sapozhnikov, Leonid

    2011-10-01

    Mission concepts for NASA's Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST)1,2, ESA's Euclid3,4 mission, as well as next-generation ground-based surveys require large mosaic focal planes sensitive in both visible and near infrared (NIR) wavelengths. We have developed space-qualified detectors, readout electronics and focal plane design techniques that can be used to intermingle CCDs and NIR detectors on a single, silicon carbide (SiC) cold plate. This enables optimized, wideband observing strategies. The CCDs, developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, are fully-depleted, pchannel devices that are backside illuminated and capable of operating at temperatures down to 120K. The NIR detectors are 1.7 μm and 2.0 μm wavelength cutoff H2RG® HgCdTe, manufactured by Teledyne Imaging Sensors under contract to LBNL. Both the CCDs and NIR detectors are packaged on 4-side abuttable SiC pedestals with a common mounting footprint supporting a 44 mm mosaic pitch. Both types of detectors have direct-attached readout electronics that convert the detector signal directly to serial, digital data streams and allow a flexible, low cost data acquisition strategy to enable large data rates. A mosaic of these detectors can be operated at a common temperature that achieves the required dark current and read noise performance necessary for dark energy observations. We report here the qualification testing and performance verification for a focal plane that accommodates a 4x8 array of CCDs and HgCdTe detectors.

  9. Sagittal Plane Knee Biomechanics and Vertical Ground Reaction Forces Are Modified Following ACL Injury Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padua, Darin A.; DiStefano, Lindsay J.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) occur because of excessive loading on the knee. ACL injury prevention programs can influence sagittal plane ACL loading factors and vertical ground reaction force (VGRF). Objective: To determine the influence of ACL injury prevention programs on sagittal plane knee biomechanics (anterior tibial shear force, knee flexion angle/moments) and VGRF. Data Sources: The PubMed database was searched for studies published between January 1988 and June 2008. Reference lists of selected articles were also reviewed. Study Selection: Studies were included that evaluated healthy participants for knee flexion angle, sagittal plane knee kinetics, or VGRF after performing a multisession training program. Two individuals reviewed all articles and determined which articles met the selection criteria. Approximately 4% of the articles fulfilled the selection criteria. Data Extraction: Data were extracted regarding each program’s duration, frequency, exercise type, population, supervision, and testing procedures. Means and variability measures were recorded to calculate effect sizes. One reviewer extracted all data and assessed study quality using PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database). A second reviewer (blinded) verified all information. Results: There is moderate evidence to indicate that knee flexion angle, external knee flexion moment, and VGRF can be successfully modified by an ACL injury prevention program. Programs utilizing multiple exercises (ie, integrated training) appear to produce the most improvement, in comparison to that of single-exercise programs. Knee flexion angle was improved following integrated training (combined balance and strength exercises or combined plyometric and strength exercises). Similarly, external knee flexion moment was improved following integrated training consisting of balance, plyometric, and strength exercises. VGRF was improved when incorporating supervision with instruction and

  10. Initial Coefficients Estimation of Ground Plane with Point Clouds%基于点云的地平面初系数估测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜万和; 杨晶东; 杨敬辉

    2015-01-01

    提出了一种基于点云的地平面初系数估测算法。采用八叉树存储包含RGB和空间位置信息点云数据,通过比较相邻两帧树的叶节点来获取运动目标的局部点云。并使用随机采样一致性算法估计,由运动目标局部点云重心所构成的点集上的平面模型参数。同时,采用ISOCLUS算法对场景在法向空间和距离空间上进行两次聚类来分割平面。最终,以运动平面法向信息作为参考因素,从待选平面中标识出地平面点云数据。实验结果显示,该方法可有效地估测出地平面初系数。%An approach is proposed for estimating initial coefficients of the ground plane with point clouds.The octree used first to store the point clouds that contain RGB and location information.The moving object's partial point clouds can be acquired by comparing leaf nodes of two neighboring frames.Then a set consists of centroids extracted from moving object's partial point clouds is utilized to fit a plane through RANSAC.Besides, clustering is performed on normal and distance space successively by ISOCLUS algorithm to segment planes.Finally, the ground plane is chosen from segmented planes according to normal of the plane of the moving object.This method achieves reliable results for estimating initial coefficients of the ground plane through experiment.

  11. General Cosmological Solutions of Einstein's Equations for Spherical, Plane and Hyperbolic Symmetric Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammed Ashraful Islam

    2000-01-01

    The analytic cosmological solutions of Einstein's field equations for a type of static metric representing plane, spherical and hyperbolic symmetric spaces are presented and their properties are discussed separately. A general type of solution is obtained which represents the plane, spherical and hyperbolic symmetric cosmological models. Its physical properties are also discussed in details.

  12. Technology challenges for the National Aero-Space Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piland, William M.

    1987-01-01

    The National Aerospace Plane (NASP) will require an exceptionally high degree of integration between propulsion and aerodynamic configuration, in order to achieve the requisite specific impulse and low structural weight. This is to be achieved through the use of forebody shock compression and afterbody exhaust expansion. Attention is presently given to the materials and structural concepts required for the realization of these NASP airframe functions, in view of the exceptionally high aerothermodynamic loads that will be experienced at hypersonic speeds. Active cooling will have to be used in certain critical airframe and propulsion components. CFD characterizations of these processes must be carefully developed and fully validated.

  13. High Resolution, Radiation Tolerant Focal Plane Array for Lunar And Deep Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aerius Photonics and its partners propose the development of a high resolution, radiation hardened 3-D FLASH Focal Plane Array (FPA), with performance expected to be...

  14. Movable Ground Based Recovery System for Reuseable Space Flight Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver, George L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A reusable space flight launch system is configured to eliminate complex descent and landing systems from the space flight hardware and move them to maneuverable ground based systems. Precision landing of the reusable space flight hardware is enabled using a simple, light weight aerodynamic device on board the flight hardware such as a parachute, and one or more translating ground based vehicles such as a hovercraft that include active speed, orientation and directional control. The ground based vehicle maneuvers itself into position beneath the descending flight hardware, matching its speed and direction and captures the flight hardware. The ground based vehicle will contain propulsion, command and GN&C functionality as well as space flight hardware landing cushioning and retaining hardware. The ground based vehicle propulsion system enables longitudinal and transverse maneuverability independent of its physical heading.

  15. Effects of Dielectric Substrates and Ground Planes on Resonance Frequency of Archimedean Spirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Jerris W; Ramaswamy, Vijaykumar; Arora, Rajendra K; Edison, Arthur S; Brey, William W

    2016-04-01

    Superconducting self-resonant spiral structures are of current interest for applications both in metamaterials and as probe coils for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for high-sensitivity chemical analysis. Accurate spiral models are available in the literature for behavior of a spiral below and up to self-resonance. However, knowledge of the higher modes is also important. We present the relationships between the spiral parameters and the multiple mode frequencies of single sided spirals on dielectric substrates as modeled by method of moments simulation. In the absence of a ground plane, we find that the mode frequency has a linear though not necessarily harmonic dependence on the mode number. The effect of a thick substrate can be approximated by an effective dielectric constant. But when the thickness is less than 20% of the spiral trace width (router - rinner) this approximation is no longer accurate. We have developed a simple empirical formula to predict the higher modes.

  16. Discontinuous Galerkin Time-Domain Analysis of Power-Ground Planes Taking Into Account Decoupling Capacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Ping

    2017-03-22

    In this paper, a discontinuous Galerkin time-domain (DGTD) method is developed to analyze the power-ground planes taking into account the decoupling capacitors. In the presence of decoupling capacitors, the whole physical system can be split into two subsystems: 1) the field subsystem that is governed by Maxwell\\'s equations that will be solved by the DGTD method, and 2) the circuit subsystem including the capacitor and its parasitic inductor and resistor, which is going to be characterized by the modified nodal analysis algorithm constructed circuit equations. With the aim to couple the two subsystems together, a lumped port is defined over a coaxial surface between the via barrel and the ground plane. To reach the coupling from the field to the circuit subsystem, a lumped voltage source calculated by the integration of electric field along the radial direction is introduced. On the other hand, to facilitate the coupling from the circuit to field subsystem, a lumped port current source calculated from the circuit equation is introduced, which serves as an impressed current source for the field subsystem. With these two auxiliary terms, a hybrid field-circuit matrix equation is established, which enables the field and circuit subsystems are solved in a synchronous scheme. Furthermore, the arbitrarily shaped antipads are considered by enforcing the proper wave port excitation using the magnetic surface current source derived from the antipads supported electric eigenmodes. In this way, the S-parameters corresponding to different modes can be conveniently extracted. To further improve the efficiency of the proposed algorithm in handling multiscale meshes, the local time-stepping marching scheme is applied. The proposed algorithm is verified by several representative examples.

  17. The locally connected compact metric spaces embeddable in the plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Carsten

    2004-01-01

    We prove that a 2-connected, locally connected, compact topological space M is homeomorphic to a subset of the 2-sphere if and only if M is metrizable and contains none of the Kuratowski graphs K-5 and K-3,K-3.......We prove that a 2-connected, locally connected, compact topological space M is homeomorphic to a subset of the 2-sphere if and only if M is metrizable and contains none of the Kuratowski graphs K-5 and K-3,K-3....

  18. HyPlane for Space Tourism and Business Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savino, R.

    In the present work a preliminary study on a small hypersonic airplane for a long duration space tourism mission is presented. It is also consistent with a point-to-point medium range (5000-6000 km) hypersonic trip, in the frame of the "urgent business travel" market segment. The main ideas is to transfer technological solutions developed for aeronautical and space atmospheric re-entry systems to the design of such a hypersonic airplane. A winged vehicle characterized by high aerodynamic efficiency and able to manoeuvre along the flight path, in all aerodynamic regimes encountered, is taken into consideration. Rocket-Based Combined Cycle and Turbine-Based Combined Cycle engines are investigated to ensure higher performances in terms of flight duration and range. Different flight-paths are also considered, including sub-orbital parabolic trajectories and steady state hypersonic cruise. The former, in particular, takes advantage of the high aerodynamic efficiency during the unpowered phase, in combination with a periodic engine actuation, to guarantee a long duration oscillating flight path. These trajectories offer Space tourists the opportunity of extended missions, characterized by repeated periods of low-gravity at altitudes high enough to ensure a wide view of the Earth from Space.

  19. Numerical simulations of aerodynamic contribution of flows about a space-plane-type configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Kisa; Takanashi, Susume; Fujii, Kozo; Obayashi, Shigeru

    1987-01-01

    The slightly supersonic viscous flow about the space-plane under development at the National Aerospace Laboratory (NAL) in Japan was simulated numerically using the LU-ADI algorithm. The wind-tunnel testing for the same plane also was conducted with the computations in parallel. The main purpose of the simulation is to capture the phenomena which have a great deal of influence to the aerodynamic force and efficiency but is difficult to capture by experiments. It includes more accurate representation of vortical flows with high angles of attack of an aircraft. The space-plane shape geometry simulated is the simplified model of the real space-plane, which is a combination of a flat and slender body and a double-delta type wing. The comparison between experimental results and numerical ones will be done in the near future. It could be said that numerical results show the qualitatively reliable phenomena.

  20. High Resolution Image Reconstruction Method for a Double-plane PET System with Changeable Spacing

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Xiao-Yue; Li, Lin; Yin, Peng-Fei; Shang, Lei-Min; Yun, Ming-Kai; Lu, Zhen-Rui; Huang, Xian-Chao; Wei, Long

    2015-01-01

    Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) imaging systems with the ability in detection of millimeter-sized tumors were developed in recent years. And some of them have been well used in clinical applications. In consideration of biopsy application, a double-plane detector configuration is practical for the convenience of breast immobilization. However, the serious blurring effect in the double-plane system with changeable spacing for different breast size should be studied. Methods: We study a high resolution reconstruction method applicable for a double-plane PET system with a changeable detector spacing. Geometric and blurring components should be calculated at real time for different detector distance. Accurate geometric sensitivity is obtained with a tube area model. Resolution recovery is achieved by estimating blurring effects derived from simulated single gamma response information. Results: The results show that the new geometric modeling gives a more finite and smooth sensitivity weight in double-plane sy...

  1. Transport in arrays of submicron Josephson junctions over a ground plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Teressa Rae [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    One-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) arrays of Al islands linked by submicron Al/AlxOy/Al tunnel junctions were fabricated on an insulating layer grown on a ground plane. The arrays were cooled to temperatures as low as 20 mK where the Josephson coupling energy EJ of each junction and the charging energy EC of each island were much greater than the thermal energy kBT. The capacitance Cg between each island and the ground plane was much greater than the junction capacitance C. Two classes of arrays were studied. In the first class, the normal state tunneling resistance of the junctions was much larger than the resistance quantum for single electrons, RN>> RQe≡ h/e2 ~ 25.8 kΩ, and the islands were driven normal by an applied magnetic field such that EJ = 0 and the array was in the Coulomb blockade regime. The arrays were made on degenerately-doped Si, thermally oxidized to a thickness of approximately 100 nm. The current-voltage (I - V) characteristics of a 1D and a 2D array were measured and found to display a threshold voltage VT below which little current flows. In the second class of arrays, the normal state tunneling resistance of the junctions was close to the resistance quantum for Cooper pairs, RN≈RQ≡h/4e2≈6.45kΩ, such that EJ/EC≈1. The arrays were made on GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As heterostructures with a two-dimensional electron gas approximately 100 nm below the surface. One array displayed superconducting behavior at low temperature. Two arrays displayed insulating behavior at low temperature, and the size of the Coulomb gap increased with increasing Rg.

  2. Spectropolarimeter of ground support of space experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidmachenko, A. P.; Ivanov, Yu. S.; Morozhenko, O. V.; Siniavsky, I. I.; Nevodovskyi, P. V.; Nevodovskyi, P. V.; Sosonkim, M. G.

    2017-08-01

    At various space experiments it is necessary to plan carrying out parallel terrestrial observations. For this purpose spectropolarimeter of support of Space experiments in spectral range of 350-900 nm was developed and manufactured at the Main Astronomical Observatory of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. As a dispersing system of SPS it was proposed to use a complex prism system, whose elements can be located in different parts of the optical system and work with different angular increase. In the spectral range of 370-870 nm, the variance was almost uniform. Spectropolarimeter SPS of SE support, has been used for observation of stars with exoplanets and of Solar System bodies.

  3. Near-Field Characterization of a Printed Circuit Board in the Presence of a Finite-sized Metallic Ground Plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franek, Ondrej; Sørensen, Morten; Ebert, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Model of a generic printed circuit board (PCB) in a presence of a finite-sized metallic ground plane is introduced as a commonly occurring scenario of electronic module whose electromagnetic fields are disturbed by a nearby object. Finite-difference time-domain simulations are performed...

  4. Algorithm study of transient response of vertical magnetic bipolar source in whole space plane layered medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Bo; YUE Jian-hua; YANG Hai-yan

    2009-01-01

    For some time, whole space feature as a theoretical problem has been a puzzle in mining transient electromagnetic method (TEM). We have introduced a detailed method of calculating the transient response of a vertical magnetic bipolar source in a whole space plane layered medium in order to obtain whole space features. After designing a whole space plane layered medium model, equations were established based on boundary conditions in terms of electromagnetic vector potential. Expressions of electromag-netic fields were obtained by solving these equations. The expressions were computed by the Hankel transform after dispersion. The results in a frequency domain were changed into a time domain by using a multinomial cosine transform method. The expressions were correctly validated by comparing them with the analytical solution in half space. The half space and whole space results show that the whole space features are clear, suggesting that the theory of half space is not suitable for the whole space. Our algorithm supplied the technical instrument for studying the distributed features of whole space transient electromagnetic fields.

  5. Advanced stellar compass deep space navigation, ground testing results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Jørgensen, Peter Siegbjørn

    2006-01-01

    Deep space exploration is in the agenda of the major space agencies worldwide and at least the European Space Agency (SMART & Aurora Programs) and the American NASA (New Millennium Program) have set up programs to allow the development and the demonstration of technologies that can reduce the risks...... and the costs of the deep space missions. Navigation is the Achilles' heel of deep space. Being performed on ground, it imposes considerable constraints on the system and the operations, it is very expensive to execute, especially when the mission lasts several years and, above all, it is not failure tolerant....... Nevertheless, up to now, ground navigation has been the only possible solution. The technological breakthrough of advanced star trackers, like the micro-advanced stellar compass (mu ASC) might change this situation. Indeed, exploiting the capabilities of this instrument, the authors have devised a method...

  6. Ground Plane and Near-Surface Thermal Analysis for NASA's Constellation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasbarre, Joseph F.; Amundsen, Ruth M.; Scola, Salvatore; Leahy, Frank F.; Sharp, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Most spacecraft thermal analysis tools assume that the spacecraft is in orbit around a planet and are designed to calculate solar and planetary fluxes, as well as radiation to space. On NASA Constellation projects, thermal analysts are also building models of vehicles in their pre-launch condition on the surface of a planet. This process entails making some modifications in the building and execution of a thermal model such that the radiation from the planet, both reflected albedo and infrared, is calculated correctly. Also important in the calculation of pre-launch vehicle temperatures are the natural environments at the vehicle site, including air and ground temperatures, sky radiative background temperature, solar flux, and optical properties of the ground around the vehicle. A group of Constellation projects have collaborated on developing a cohesive, integrated set of natural environments that accurately capture worst-case thermal scenarios for the pre-launch and launch phases of these vehicles. The paper will discuss the standardization of methods for local planet modeling across Constellation projects, as well as the collection and consolidation of natural environments for launch sites. Methods for Earth as well as lunar sites will be discussed.

  7. Interstellar scintillations of PSR B1919+21: space-ground interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Shishov, V I; Gwinn, C R; Andrianov, A S; Popov, M V; Rudnitskiy, A G; Soglasnov, V A

    2016-01-01

    We carried out observations of pulsar PSR B1919+21 at 324 MHz to study the distribution of interstellar plasma in the direction of this pulsar. We used the RadioAstron (RA) space radiotelescope together with two ground telescopes: Westerbork (WB) and Green Bank (GB). The maximum baseline projection for the space-ground interferometer was 60000 km. We show that interstellar scintillation of this pulsar consists of two components: diffractive scintillations from inhomogeneities in a layer of turbulent plasma at a distance $z_{1} = 440$ pc from the observer; and weak scintillations from a screen located near the observer at $z_{2} = 0.13$ pc. Furthermore, in the direction to the pulsar we detected a prism that deflects radiation, leading to a shift of observed source position. We show that the influence of the ionosphere can be ignored for the space-ground baseline. Analysis of the spatial coherence function for the space-ground baseline (RA-GB) yielded the scattering angle in the observer plane: $\\theta_{scat}$...

  8. CTA telescopes as deep-space lasercom ground receivers

    CERN Document Server

    Carrasco-Casado, Alberto; Vergaz, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    The amount of scientific data to be transmitted from deep-space probes is very limited due to RF-communications constraints. Free-space optical communication can alleviate this bottleneck, increasing data rate while reducing weight, mass and power of communication onboard equipment. Nevertheless, optimizing the power delivery from spacecraft to Earth is needed. In RF communications, the strategy has been to increase the aperture of ground terminals. Free-space optical communications can also follow it, as they share the limitation of low power received on Earth. As the cost of big telescopes increases exponentially with aperture, new ideas are required to maximize the aperture-to-cost ratio. This work explores the feasibility of using telescopes of the future Cherenkov Telescope Array as optical-communication ground stations. Ground-based gamma-ray astronomy has the same power limitation, hence Cherenkov telescopes are designed to maximize receiver's aperture with minimum cost and some relaxed requirements. B...

  9. Space- and ground-based particle physics meet at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    The fourth international conference on Particle and Fundamental Physics in Space (SpacePart12) will take place at CERN from 5 to 7 November. The conference will bring together scientists working on particle and fundamental physics in space and on ground, as well as space policy makers from around the world.   One hundred years after Victor Hess discovered cosmic rays using hot air balloons, the experimental study of particle and fundamental physics is still being pursued today with extremely sophisticated techniques: on the ground, with state-of-the-art accelerators like the LHC; and in space, with powerful observatories that probe, with amazing accuracy, the various forms of cosmic radiation, charged and neutral, which are messengers of the most extreme conditions of matter and energy. SpacePart12 will be the opportunity for participants to exchange views on the progress of space-related science and technology programmes in the field of particle and fundamental physics in space. SpacePar...

  10. Research on spatial-variant property of bistatic ISAR imaging plane of space target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Bao-Feng; Wang, Jun-Ling; Gao, Mei-Guo

    2015-04-01

    The imaging plane of inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) is the projection plane of the target. When taking an image using the range-Doppler theory, the imaging plane may have a spatial-variant property, which causes the change of scatter’s projection position and results in migration through resolution cells. In this study, we focus on the spatial-variant property of the imaging plane of a three-axis-stabilized space target. The innovative contributions are as follows. 1) The target motion model in orbit is provided based on a two-body model. 2) The instantaneous imaging plane is determined by the method of vector analysis. 3) Three Euler angles are introduced to describe the spatial-variant property of the imaging plane, and the image quality is analyzed. The simulation results confirm the analysis of the spatial-variant property. The research in this study is significant for the selection of the imaging segment, and provides the evidence for the following data processing and compensation algorithm. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61401024), the Shanghai Aerospace Science and Technology Innovation Foundation, China (Grant No. SAST201240), and the Basic Research Foundation of Beijing Institute of Technology (Grant No. 20140542001).

  11. Research on spatial-variant property of bistatic ISAR imaging plane of space target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭宝锋; 王俊岭; 高梅国; 尚朝轩; 傅雄军

    2015-01-01

    The imaging plane of inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) is the projection plane of the target. When taking an image using the range-Doppler theory, the imaging plane may have a spatial-variant property, which causes the change of scatter’s projection position and results in migration through resolution cells. In this study, we focus on the spatial-variant property of the imaging plane of a three-axis-stabilized space target. The innovative contributions are as follows. 1) The target motion model in orbit is provided based on a two-body model. 2) The instantaneous imaging plane is determined by the method of vector analysis. 3) Three Euler angles are introduced to describe the spatial-variant property of the imaging plane, and the image quality is analyzed. The simulation results confirm the analysis of the spatial-variant property. The research in this study is significant for the selection of the imaging segment, and provides the evidence for the following data processing and compensation algorithm.

  12. International Space Station EXPRESS Pallet. Ground Demonstration Baseline Design Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, James R.

    1995-01-01

    This publication is comprised of the viewgraphs from the presentations of the EXPRESS Pallet Baseline Design Review meeting held July 20, 1995. Individual presentations addressed general requirements and objectives; mechanical, electrical, and data systems; software; operations and KSC (Kennedy Space Center) integration; payload candidates; thermal considerations; ground vs. flight demo; and recommended actions.

  13. Achievement of the best design for unequally spaced grounding grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Sayed M. El-Refaie

    2015-03-01

    Also, unequal spacing can reduce the cost of the grids and enhance the level of safety for people and equipments. In this paper two different approaches were used to determine the best possible configuration of grounding grid. These approaches based on sequential multiplicative and sequential power techniques.

  14. Crawl space assisted heat pump. [using stored ground heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternes, M. P.

    1980-01-01

    A variety of experiments and simulations, currently being designed or underway, to determine the feasibility of conditioning the source air of an air to air heat pump using stored ground heat or cool to produce higher seasonal COP's and net energy savings are discussed. The ground would condition ambient air as it is drawn through the crawl space of a house. Tests designed to evaluate the feasibility of the concept, to determine the amount of heat or cool available from the ground, to study the effect of the system on the heating and cooling loads of the house, to study possible mechanisms which could enhance heat flow through the ground, and to determine if diurnal temperature swings are necessary to achieve successful system performance are described.

  15. On the local form of static plane symmetric space-times in the presence of matter

    CERN Document Server

    Gomes, Leandro G

    2015-01-01

    For any configuration of a static plane-symmetric distribution of matter along space-time, there are coordinates where the metric can be put explicitly as a functional of the energy density and pressures. It satisfies Einstein equations as far as we require the conservation of the energy-momentum tensor, which is the single ODE for self-gravitating hydrostatic equilibrium. As a direct application, a general solution is given when the pressures are linearly related to the energy density, recovering, as special cases, most of known solutions of static plane-symmetric Einstein equations.

  16. Minimum-fuel aerodynamic orbital plane change maneuvers. [for Space Shuttle Orbiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosten, B. K.; Pierson, B. L.

    1981-01-01

    Several minimum-fuel, aerodynamically controlled, orbital plane change problems are formulated and solved as optimal control problems. A gradient projection algorithm is used to iteratively modify both the control functions, angle of attack and bank angle, and two control parameters to obtain the optimal trajectory. The atmospheric flight profile is combined with two Keplerian (two-body vacuum flight) arcs so that a complete orbit-to-orbit analysis results. The vehicle used in this investigation is the Space Transportation System Shuttle Orbiter. The effects of heat load constraint level and plane change angle are analysed.

  17. Classification of conics and Cassini curves in Minkowski space-time plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad N. Shonoda

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we use the Apollonius definition of conics to generate algebraic curves in the Minkowski space-time plane M2, which turn out to be different from classical conic sections. We extend and classify this sort of “M-conics”. We discuss the cases of the singularity points of these M-conics, coming from the transition from timelike world to spacelike world through the lightlike one. Finally, we translate the classical concept of Cassini curves with two foci and that of (multifocal Cassini curves to Minkowski planes M2.

  18. Analysis of High Tc Superconducting Rectangular Microstrip Patches over Ground Planes with Rectangular Apertures in Substrates Containing Anisotropic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderraouf Messai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A rigorous full-wave analysis of high Tc superconducting rectangular microstrip patch over ground plane with rectangular aperture in the case where the patch is printed on a uniaxially anisotropic substrate material is presented. The dyadic Green’s functions of the considered structure are efficiently determined in the vector Fourier transform domain. The effect of the superconductivity of the patch is taken into account using the concept of the complex resistive boundary condition. The accuracy of the analysis is tested by comparing the computed results with measurements and previously published data for several anisotropic substrate materials. Numerical results showing variation of the resonant frequency and the quality factor of the superconducting antenna with regard to operating temperature are given. Finally, the effects of uniaxial anisotropy in the substrate on the resonant frequencies of different TM modes of the superconducting microstrip antenna with rectangular aperture in the ground plane are presented.

  19. Advanced stellar compass deep space navigation, ground testing results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Jørgensen, Peter Siegbjørn

    2006-01-01

    Deep space exploration is in the agenda of the major space agencies worldwide and at least the European Space Agency (SMART & Aurora Programs) and the American NASA (New Millennium Program) have set up programs to allow the development and the demonstration of technologies that can reduce the ris...... to determine the orbit of a spacecraft autonomously, on-board and without any a priori knowledge of any kind. The solution is robust, elegant and fast. This paper presents the preliminary performances obtained during the ground tests. The results are very positive and encouraging....

  20. Radiation of a Plane Shear Wave from an Elastic Waveguide to a Composite Elastic Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigoryan E.Kh.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The radiation of a plane shear wave from an elastic strip (waveguide to an elastic space is investigated in this paper. The strip is embedded into a space and is partially bonded with it. A given plane shear wave propagates from the free part of the strip and radiates into the composite space. The problem’s solution is led to a system of two uncoupled functional Wiener-Hopf type equations which are solved via the method of factorization. Closed form expressions are obtained which determine the wavefield in all the parts of the strip and space. Asymptotic expressions are provided which represent the wavefield in the far field and in the neighborhood of the contact zones. From these formulas it follows that: a in the cases of several values of the ratio of the wave numbers of the strip and space the order of vanishing of the volume wave in the strip becomes less and equal to the one in the case of a homogeneous material, b the radiated volume wave in the strip has a velocity of propagation equal to the volume wave’s velocity in the space.

  1. Ground operation of robotics on Space Station Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Z. Alex; Hunter, David G.; Cantin, Marc R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reflects work carried out on Ground Operated Telerobotics (GOT) in 1992 to refine further the ideas, procedures, and technologies needed to test the procedures in a high latency environment, and to integrate GOT into Space Station Freedom operations. Space Station Freedom (SSF) will be in operation for 30 years, and will depend on robots to carry out a significant part of the assembly, maintenance, and utilization workload. Current plans call for on-orbit robotics to be operated by on-board crew members. This approach implies that on-orbit robotics operations use up considerable crew time, and that these operations cannot be carried out when SSF is unmanned. GOT will allow robotic operations to be operated from the ground, with on-orbit crew interventions only when absolutely required. The paper reviews how GOT would be implemented, how GOT operations would be planned and supported, and reviews GOT issues, critical success factors, and benefits.

  2. Space Shuttle Damper System for Ground Wind Load Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, G. D.; Holt, J. R.; Chang, C. S.

    1973-01-01

    An active damper system which was originally developed for a 5.5% Saturn IB/Skylab Ground Winds Model was modified and used for similar purposes in a Space Shuttle model. A second damper system which was originally used in a 3% Saturn V/Dry Workshop model was also modified and made compatible with the Space Shuttle model to serve as a back-up system. Included in this final report are descriptions of the modified damper systems and the associated control and instrumentation.

  3. Space Theory and Strategy: War From the High Ground Down

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Strategy is the “art of creating power.”30 Strategy constantly adjusts to current realities generating advantageous options.31 Thus, it makes sense to...SPACE THEORY AND STRATEGY: WAR FROM THE HIGH GROUND DOWN BY ANGELO FERNANDEZ A THESIS PRESENTED TO THE FACULTY OF THE SCHOOL...you find a way to make me laugh. Thank you for the memories and I can not wait to make more. vi ABSTRACT This thesis provides a

  4. Plane Strain Deformation of a Poroelastic Half-space in Welded Contact with Transversely Isotropic Elastic Half-Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEELAM KUMARI

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Biot linearized theory for fluid saturated porous materials is used to study the plane strain deformation of an isotropic, homogeneous, poroelastPic half space in welded contact with a homogeneous, transversely isotropic, elastic half space caused by an inclined line-load in elastic half space. The integral expressions for the displacements and stresses in the two half spaces in welded contact are obtained from the corresponding expressions for an unbounded transversely isotropic elastic and poroelastic medium by applying boundary conditions at the interface. The integrals for the inclined line-load are solved analytically for the limiting casei.e. undrained conditions in high frequency limit. The undrained displacements, stresses and pore pressure are shown graphically. Expression for the pore pressure is also calculated for undrained conditions in the high frequency limit.

  5. High resolution image reconstruction method for a double-plane PET system with changeable spacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiao-Yue; Zhou, Wei; Li, Lin; Wei, Long; Yin, Peng-Fei; Shang, Lei-Min; Yun, Ming-Kai; Lu, Zhen-Rui; Huang, Xian-Chao

    2016-05-01

    Breast-dedicated positron emission tomography (PET) imaging techniques have been developed in recent years. Their capacities to detect millimeter-sized breast tumors have been the subject of many studies. Some of them have been confirmed with good results in clinical applications. With regard to biopsy application, a double-plane detector arrangement is practicable, as it offers the convenience of breast immobilization. However, the serious blurring effect of the double-plane PET, with changeable spacing for different breast sizes, should be studied. We investigated a high resolution reconstruction method applicable for a double-plane PET. The distance between the detector planes is changeable. Geometric and blurring components were calculated in real-time for different detector distances, and accurate geometric sensitivity was obtained with a new tube area model. Resolution recovery was achieved by estimating blurring effects derived from simulated single gamma response information. The results showed that the new geometric modeling gave a more finite and smooth sensitivity weight in the double-plane PET. The blurring component yielded contrast recovery levels that could not be reached without blurring modeling, and improved visual recovery of the smallest spheres and better delineation of the structures in the reconstructed images were achieved with the blurring component. Statistical noise had lower variance at the voxel level with blurring modeling at matched resolution, compared to without blurring modeling. In distance-changeable double-plane PET, finite resolution modeling during reconstruction achieved resolution recovery, without noise amplification. Supported by Knowledge Innovation Project of The Chinese Academy of Sciences (KJCX2-EW-N06)

  6. NASA's mobile satellite communications program; ground and space segment technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, F.; Weber, W. J.; Knouse, G. H.

    1984-10-01

    This paper describes the Mobile Satellite Communications Program of the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The program's objectives are to facilitate the deployment of the first generation commercial mobile satellite by the private sector, and to technologically enable future generations by developing advanced and high risk ground and space segment technologies. These technologies are aimed at mitigating severe shortages of spectrum, orbital slot, and spacecraft EIRP which are expected to plague the high capacity mobile satellite systems of the future. After a brief introduction of the concept of mobile satellite systems and their expected evolution, this paper outlines the critical ground and space segment technologies. Next, the Mobile Satellite Experiment (MSAT-X) is described. MSAT-X is the framework through which NASA will develop advanced ground segment technologies. An approach is outlined for the development of conformal vehicle antennas, spectrum and power-efficient speech codecs, and modulation techniques for use in the non-linear faded channels and efficient multiple access schemes. Finally, the paper concludes with a description of the current and planned NASA activities aimed at developing complex large multibeam spacecraft antennas needed for future generation mobile satellite systems.

  7. NASA's mobile satellite communications program; ground and space segment technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, F.; Weber, W. J.; Knouse, G. H.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the Mobile Satellite Communications Program of the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The program's objectives are to facilitate the deployment of the first generation commercial mobile satellite by the private sector, and to technologically enable future generations by developing advanced and high risk ground and space segment technologies. These technologies are aimed at mitigating severe shortages of spectrum, orbital slot, and spacecraft EIRP which are expected to plague the high capacity mobile satellite systems of the future. After a brief introduction of the concept of mobile satellite systems and their expected evolution, this paper outlines the critical ground and space segment technologies. Next, the Mobile Satellite Experiment (MSAT-X) is described. MSAT-X is the framework through which NASA will develop advanced ground segment technologies. An approach is outlined for the development of conformal vehicle antennas, spectrum and power-efficient speech codecs, and modulation techniques for use in the non-linear faded channels and efficient multiple access schemes. Finally, the paper concludes with a description of the current and planned NASA activities aimed at developing complex large multibeam spacecraft antennas needed for future generation mobile satellite systems.

  8. CYCLE SPACES OF GRAPHS ON THE SPHERE AND THE PROJECTIVE PLANE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Han; Liu Yanpei; Ma Dengju; Lu Junjie

    2005-01-01

    Cycle base theory of a graph has been well studied in abstract mathematical field such matroid theory as Whitney and Tutte did and found many applications in pratical uses such as electric circuit theory and structure analysis, etc. In this paper graph embedding theory is used to investigate cycle base structures of a 2-(edge)-connected graph on the sphere and the projective plane and it is shown that short cycles do generate the cycle spaces in the case of "small face-embeddings". As applications the authors find the exact formulae for the minimum lengthes of cycle bases of some types of graphs and present several known results. Infinite examples shows that the conditions in their main results are best possible and there are many 3-connected planar graphs whose minimum cycle bases can not be determined by the planar formulae but may be located by re-embedding them into the projective plane.

  9. Analysis of complexity measures and information planes of selected molecules in position and momentum spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel, Rodolfo O; Angulo, Juan Carlos; Antolín, Juan; Dehesa, Jesús S; López-Rosa, Sheila; Flores-Gallegos, Nelson

    2010-07-14

    The Fisher-Shannon and LMC shape complexities and the Shannon-disequilibrium, Fisher-Shannon and Fisher-disequilibrium information planes, which consist of two localization-delocalization factors, are computed in both position and momentum spaces for the one-particle densities of 90 selected molecules of various chemical types, at the CISD/6-311++G(3df,2p) level of theory. We found that while the two measures of complexity show general trends only, the localization-delocalization planes clearly exhibit chemically significant patterns. Several molecular properties (energy, ionization potential, total dipole moment, hardness, electrophilicity) are analyzed and used to interpret and understand the chemical nature of the composite information-theoretic measures above mentioned. Our results show that these measures detect not only randomness or localization but also pattern and organization.

  10. Space imaging infrared optical guidance for autonomous ground vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Akira; Kobayashi, Nobuaki; Mutoh, Eiichiro; Kumagai, Hideo; Yamada, Hirofumi; Ishii, Hiromitsu

    2008-08-01

    We have developed the Space Imaging Infrared Optical Guidance for Autonomous Ground Vehicle based on the uncooled infrared camera and focusing technique to detect the objects to be evaded and to set the drive path. For this purpose we made servomotor drive system to control the focus function of the infrared camera lens. To determine the best focus position we use the auto focus image processing of Daubechies wavelet transform technique with 4 terms. From the determined best focus position we transformed it to the distance of the object. We made the aluminum frame ground vehicle to mount the auto focus infrared unit. Its size is 900mm long and 800mm wide. This vehicle mounted Ackerman front steering system and the rear motor drive system. To confirm the guidance ability of the Space Imaging Infrared Optical Guidance for Autonomous Ground Vehicle we had the experiments for the detection ability of the infrared auto focus unit to the actual car on the road and the roadside wall. As a result the auto focus image processing based on the Daubechies wavelet transform technique detects the best focus image clearly and give the depth of the object from the infrared camera unit.

  11. Ground controlled robotic assembly operations for Space Station Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Joseph C.

    1991-01-01

    A number of dextrous robotic systems and associated positioning and transportation devices are available on Space Station Freedom (SSF) to perform assembly tasks that would otherwise need to be performed by extravehicular activity (EVA) crewmembers. The currently planned operating mode for these robotic systems during the assembly phase is teleoperation by intravehicular activity (IVA) crewmembers. While this operating mode is less hazardous and expensive than manned EVA operations, and has insignificant control loop time delays, the amount of IVA time available to support telerobotic operations is much less than the anticipated requirements. Some alternative is needed to allow the robotic systems to perform useful tasks without exhausting the available IVA resources; ground control is one such alternative. The issues associated with ground control of SSF robotic systems to alleviate onboard crew time availability constraints are investigated. Key technical issues include the effect of communication time delays, the need for safe, reliable execution of remote operations, and required modifications to the SSF ground and flight system architecture. Time delay compensation techniques such as predictive displays and world model-based force reflection are addressed and collision detection and avoidance strategies to ensure the safety of the on-orbit crew, Orbiter, and SSF are described. Although more time consuming and difficult than IVA controlled teleoperations or manned EVA, ground controlled telerobotic operations offer significant benefits during the SSF assembly phase, and should be considered in assembly planning activities.

  12. Marshall Space Flight Center Ground Systems Development and Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Gina

    2016-01-01

    Ground Systems Development and Integration performs a variety of tasks in support of the Mission Operations Laboratory (MOL) and other Center and Agency projects. These tasks include various systems engineering processes such as performing system requirements development, system architecture design, integration, verification and validation, software development, and sustaining engineering of mission operations systems that has evolved the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) into a leader in remote operations for current and future NASA space projects. The group is also responsible for developing and managing telemetry and command configuration and calibration databases. Personnel are responsible for maintaining and enhancing their disciplinary skills in the areas of project management, software engineering, software development, software process improvement, telecommunications, networking, and systems management. Domain expertise in the ground systems area is also maintained and includes detailed proficiency in the areas of real-time telemetry systems, command systems, voice, video, data networks, and mission planning systems.

  13. Multivariable parametric cost model for space and ground telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Henrichs, Todd

    2016-09-01

    Parametric cost models can be used by designers and project managers to perform relative cost comparisons between major architectural cost drivers and allow high-level design trades; enable cost-benefit analysis for technology development investment; and, provide a basis for estimating total project cost between related concepts. This paper hypothesizes a single model, based on published models and engineering intuition, for both ground and space telescopes: OTA Cost (X) D (1.75 +/- 0.05) λ (-0.5 +/- 0.25) T-0.25 e (-0.04) Y Specific findings include: space telescopes cost 50X to 100X more ground telescopes; diameter is the most important CER; cost is reduced by approximately 50% every 20 years (presumably because of technology advance and process improvements); and, for space telescopes, cost associated with wavelength performance is balanced by cost associated with operating temperature. Finally, duplication only reduces cost for the manufacture of identical systems (i.e. multiple aperture sparse arrays or interferometers). And, while duplication does reduce the cost of manufacturing the mirrors of segmented primary mirror, this cost savings does not appear to manifest itself in the final primary mirror assembly (presumably because the structure for a segmented mirror is more complicated than for a monolithic mirror).

  14. Evolution of early-type galaxies in distant clusters : The fundamental plane from Hubble Space Telescope imaging and Keck spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelson, DD; vanDokkum, PG; Franx, M; Illingworth, GD; Fabricant, D

    1997-01-01

    We present new results on the fundamental plane of galaxies in two rich clusters, Cl 1358+62 at z = 0.33 and MS 2053-04 at z = 0.58, based on Keck and Hubble Space Telescope observations. Our new data triple the sample of galaxies with measured fundamental plane parameters at intermediate redshift.

  15. Numerical Computation of the Chemically Reacting Flow around the National Aero-Space Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannehill, J. C.

    1999-01-01

    This final report summarizes the research accomplished. The research performed during the grant period can be divided into the following major areas: (1) Computation of chemically reacting Supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) flowfields. (2) Application of a two-equation turbulence model to supersonic combustion flowfields. (3) Computation of the integrated aerodynamic and propulsive flowfields of a generic hypersonic space plane. (4) Computation of hypersonic flows with finite-catalytic walls. (5) Development of an upwind Parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) code for thermo-chemical nonequilibrium flows.

  16. Arithmetic of Plane Cremona Transformations and the Dimensions of Transfinite Heterotic String Space-Time

    CERN Document Server

    Saniga, M

    2001-01-01

    It is shown that the two sequences of characteristic dimensions of transfinite heterotic string space-time found by El Naschie can be remarkably well accounted for in terms of the arithmetic of self-conjugate homaloidal nets of plane algebraic curves of orders 3 to 20. A firm algebraic geometrical justification is thus given not only for all the relevant dimensions of the classical theory, but also for other two dimensions proposed by El Naschie, viz. the inverse of quantum gravity coupling constant (~42.36067977) and that of (one half of) fine structure constant (~68.54101967). A non-trivial coupling between the two El Naschie sequences is also revealed.

  17. Oscillating dark energy model in plane symmetric space-time with time periodic varying deceleration parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, M.; Jiang, L. P.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, an oscillating dark energy model is presented in an isotropic but inhomogeneous plane symmetric space-time by considering a time periodic varying deceleration parameter. We find three different types of new solutions which describe different scenarios of oscillating universe. The first two solutions show an oscillating universe with singularities. For the third one, the universe is singularity-free during the whole evolution. Moreover, the Hubble parameter oscillates and keeps positive which explores an interesting possibility to unify the early inflation and late time acceleration of the universe.

  18. Electromagnetic plane-wave pulse transmission into a Lorentz half-space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Natalie A

    2011-12-01

    The propagation of an electromagnetic plane-wave signal obliquely incident upon a Lorentz half-space is studied analytically. Time-domain asymptotic expressions that increase in accuracy with propagation distance are derived by application of uniform saddle point methods on the Fourier-Laplace integral representation of the transmitted field. The results are shown to be continuous in time and comparable with numerical calculations of the field. Arrival times and angles of refraction are given for prominent transient pulse features and the steady-state signal.

  19. Reflection of plane waves in an initially stressed perfectly conducting transversely isotropic solid half-space

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Baljeet Singh; Anand Kumar Yadav

    2013-08-01

    Reflection of plane waves is studied at a free surface of a perfectly conducting transversely isotropic elastic solid half-space with initial stress. The governing equations are solved to obtain the velocity equation which indicates the existence of two quasi planar waves in the medium. Reflection coefficients and energy ratios for reflected qP and qSV waves are derived and computed numerically for a particular material. Effects of the initial stress and magnetic field are shown graphically on these reflection coefficients and energy ratios.

  20. Ground-based gamma-ray telescopes as ground stations in deep-space lasercom

    CERN Document Server

    Carrasco-Casado, Alberto; Vergaz, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    As the amount of information to be transmitted from deep-space rapidly increases, the radiofrequency technology has become a bottleneck in space communications. RF is already limiting the scientific outcome of deep-space missions and could be a significant obstacle in the developing of manned missions. Lasercom holds the promise to solve this problem, as it will considerably increase the data rate while decreasing the energy, mass and volume of onboard communication systems. In RF deep-space communications, where the received power is the main limitation, the traditional approach to boost the data throughput has been increasing the receiver's aperture, e.g. the 70-m antennas in the NASA's Deep Space Network. Optical communications also can benefit from this strategy, thus 10-m class telescopes have typically been suggested to support future deep-space links. However, the cost of big telescopes increase exponentially with their aperture, and new ideas are needed to optimize this ratio. Here, the use of ground-...

  1. An ANN-Based Synthesis Model for Parallel Coupled Microstrip Lines with Floating Ground-Plane Conductor and Its Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Cao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To directly obtain physical dimensions of parallel coupled microstrip lines with a floating ground-plane conductor (PCMLFGPC, an accurate synthesis model based on an artificial neural network (ANN is proposed. The synthesis model is validated by using the conformal mapping technique (CMT analysis contours. Using the synthesis model and the CMT analysis, the PCMLFGPC having equal even- and odd-mode phase velocities can be obtained by adjusting the width of the floating ground-plane conductor. Applying the method, a 7 dB coupler with the measured isolation better than 27 dB across a wide bandwidth (more than 120%, a 90° Schiffman phase shifter with phase deviation ±2.5° and return loss more than 17.5 dB covering 63.4% bandwidth, and a bandpass filter with completely eliminated second-order spurious band are implemented. The performances of the current designs are superior to those of the previous components configured with the PCMLFGPC.

  2. Image-based pupil plane characterization via a space-domain basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Zac; Burbine, Andrew; Verduijn, Erik; Wood, Obert; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Benk, Markus P.; Wojdyla, Antoine; Smith, Bruce W.

    2017-04-01

    Aberration characterization plays a critical role in the development of any optical system. State-of-the-art lithography systems have the tightest aberration tolerances. We present an approach to image-based pupil plane amplitude and phase characterization using models built with a space-domain basis, in which aberration effects are separable. A polynomial model is constructed between the projections of the image intensity for chosen binary mask targets onto this basis and pupil amplitude or phase variation. This method separates model building and pupil characterization into two distinct steps, thus enabling rapid pupil characterization following data collection. The basis is related to both the transmission cross-coefficient function and the principal components of the image intensity. The pupil plane variation of a zone-plate lens from the Semiconductor High-NA Actinic Reticle Review Project (SHARP) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is examined using this method. Results are compared to pupil plane characterization using a previously proposed methodology where inverse solutions are obtained through an iterative process involving least-squares regression.

  3. Mutual coupling between parallel columns of periodic slots in a ground plane surrounded by dielectric slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, J. P.; Munk, Benedikt A.

    1992-01-01

    Arrays of slots with arbitrary orientation in a conducting plane which are infinitely periodic in one dimension and finitely periodic in another dimension are considered. The perfect conducting plane extends infinitely and is bounded on each side by dielectric slabs of finite thickness and infinite extent. Single columns of slots are represented by equivalent magnetic scattering currents, which are solved for via the moment method. The mutual coupling (admittance) between slot columns in the presence of the stratified media is found by the array scanning method (ASM), which expresses the admittance as the average of the scan admittance of an artificially constructed doubly infinite array of slots over all real scan angles. The technique avoids the use of Sommerfeld integrals, but still gives rise to singularities at scan angles corresponding to the resonant excitation of surface waves. An analytical approximation is made to remove these surface wave singularities, thus making numerical implementation of the method practical. The method is quite general and may be extended to thin slot elements of arbitrary shape and orientation.

  4. Space Fence Ground-Based Radar System Increment 1 (Space Fence Inc 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-438 Space Fence Ground-Based Radar System Increment 1 (Space Fence Inc 1) As of FY 2017...11 Track to Budget 17 Cost and Funding 18 Low Rate Initial Production 23 Foreign Military Sales 24 Nuclear Costs 24 Unit Cost...Document CLIN - Contract Line Item Number CPD - Capability Production Document CY - Calendar Year DAB - Defense Acquisition Board DAE - Defense Acquisition

  5. Ground effects of space weather investigated by the surface impedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirjola, R.; Boteler, D.; Trichtchenko, L.

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide a discussion of the surface impedance applicable in connection with studies of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) in technological systems. This viewpoint means that the surface impedance is regarded as a tool to determine the horizontal (geo)electric field at the Earth's surface, which is the key quantity for GIC. Thus the approach is different from the traditional magnetotelluric viewpoint. The definition of the surface impedance usually involves wavenumber-frequency-domain fields, so inverse Fourier transforming the expression of the electric field in terms of the surface impedance and the geomagnetic field results in convolution integrals in the time and space domains. The frequency-dependent surface impedance has a high-pass filter character whereas the corresponding transfer function between the electric field and the time derivative of the magnetic field is of a low-pass filter type. The relative change of the latter transfer function with frequency is usually smaller than that of the surface impedance, which indicates that the geoelectric field is closer to the time derivative than to the magnetic field itself. An investigation of the surface impedance defined by the space-domain electric and magnetic components indicates that the largest electric fields are not always achieved by the plane wave assumption, which is sometimes regarded as an extreme case for GIC. It is also concluded in this paper that it is often possible to apply the plane wave relation locally between the surface electric and magnetic fields. The absolute value of the surface impedance decreases with an increasing wavenumber although the maximum may also be at a non-zero value of the wavenumber. The imaginary part of the surface impedance usually much exceeds the real part.

  6. Plane strain deformation of a multi-layered poroelastic half-space by surface loads

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sarva Jit Singh; Sunita Rani

    2006-12-01

    The Biot linearized quasi-static theory of fluid-infiltrated porous materials is used to formulate the problem of the two-dimensional plane strain deformation of a multi-layered poroelastic half-space by surface loads. The Fourier–Laplace transforms of the stresses, displacements, pore pressure and fluid flux in each homogeneous layer of the multi-layered half-space are expressed in terms of six arbitrary constants. Generalized Thomson–Haskell matrix method is used to obtain the deformation field. Simplified explicit expressions for the elements of the 6 × 6 propagator matrix for the poroelastic medium are obtained. As an example of the possible applications of the analytical formulation developed, formal solution is given for normal strip loading, normal line loading and shear line loading.

  7. Measurement of the \\{220\\} lattice-plane spacing of a $^{28}$Si crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Massa, Enrico; Kuetgens, Ulrich; Ferroglio, Luca

    2010-01-01

    The spacing of the \\{220\\} lattice planes of a $^{28}$Si crystal was measured by combined x-ray and optical interferometry to a $3.5\\times 10^{-9}$ relative accuracy. The result is $d_{220}=(192014712.67 \\pm 0.67)$ am, at 20.0 $^\\circ$C and 0 Pa. This value is greater by $(1.9464 \\pm 0.0067)\\times 10^{-9} d_{220}$ than the spacing in natural Si, a difference which confirms quantum mechanics calculations. Subsequently, this crystal has been used to determine the Avogadro constant by counting the Si atoms, a key step towards a realization of the mass unit based on a conventional value of the Planck or the Avogadro constants.

  8. Families of bitangent planes of space curves and minimal non-fibration families

    KAUST Repository

    Lubbes, Niels

    2014-01-01

    A cone curve is a reduced sextic space curve which lies on a quadric cone and does not pass through the vertex. We classify families of bitangent planes of cone curves. The methods we apply can be used for any space curve with ADE singularities, though in this paper we concentrate on cone curves. An embedded complex projective surface which is adjoint to a degree one weak Del Pezzo surface contains families of minimal degree rational curves, which cannot be defined by the fibers of a map. Such families are called minimal non-fibration families. Families of bitangent planes of cone curves correspond to minimal non-fibration families. The main motivation of this paper is to classify minimal non-fibration families. We present algorithms which compute all bitangent families of a given cone curve and their geometric genus. We consider cone curves to be equivalent if they have the same singularity configuration. For each equivalence class of cone curves we determine the possible number of bitangent families and the number of rational bitangent families. Finally we compute an example of a minimal non-fibration family on an embedded weak degree one Del Pezzo surface.

  9. Space Mission Operations Ground Systems Integration Customer Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Karl

    2014-01-01

    , and cultural differences, to ensure an efficient response to customer issues using a small Customer Service Team (CST) and adaptability, constant communication with customers, technical expertise and knowledge of services, and dedication to customer service. The HOSC Customer Support Team has implemented a variety of processes, and procedures that help to mitigate the potential problems that arise when integrating ground system services for a variety of complex missions and the lessons learned from this experience will lead the future of customer service in the space operations industry.

  10. Simultaneous Topology, Shape, and Sizing Optimisation of Plane Trusses with Adaptive Ground Finite Elements Using MOEAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norapat Noilublao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel integrated design strategy to accomplish simultaneous topology shape and sizing optimisation of a two-dimensional (2D truss. An optimisation problem is posed to find a structural topology, shape, and element sizes of the truss such that two objective functions, mass and compliance, are minimised. Design constraints include stress, buckling, and compliance. The procedure for an adaptive ground elements approach is proposed and its encoding/decoding process is detailed. Two sets of design variables defining truss layout, shape, and element sizes at the same time are applied. A number of multiobjective evolutionary algorithms (MOEAs are implemented to solve the design problem. Comparative performance based on a hypervolume indicator shows that multiobjective population-based incremental learning (PBIL is the best performer. Optimising three design variable types simultaneously is more efficient and effective.

  11. EFFECTS OF FATIGUE ON FRONTAL PLANE KNEE MOTION, MUSCLE ACTIVITY, AND GROUND REACTION FORCES IN MEN AND WOMEN DURING LANDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Smith

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Women tear their Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL 2-8 times more frequently than men. Frontal plane knee motion can produce a pathological load in the ACL. During a state of fatigue the muscles surrounding the knee joint may lose the ability to protect the joint during sudden deceleration while landing. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of fatigue and gender on frontal plane knee motion, EMG amplitudes, and GRF magnitudes during drop- jump landing. Pretest-posttest comparison group design was used. Twenty-six volunteers (14 women; 12 Men; Mean ± standard deviation age = 24.5 ± 2.7 yrs; height = 1.73 ± 0.09 m; mass = 74.3 ± 11.8 kg participated in the study. Knee frontal plane ranges of motion and positions, ground reaction force peak magnitudes, and surface EMG RMS amplitudes from five lower extremity muscles (vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, medial hamstring, lateral hamstring, and lateral gastrocnemius were obtained during the landing phase of a drop-jump. MANOVA and ANOVA indicated that peak GRF significantly (p < 0.05; 2.50 ± 0.75 BW vs. 2.06 ± 0.93 BW decreased during fatigued landings. No other variables exhibited a fatigue main effect, although there was a significant (p < 0.05 fatigue by gender interaction for the frontal plane range of motion from initial contact to max knee flexion variable. Follow-up analyses failed to reveal significant gender differences at the different levels of fatigue for this variable. Additionally, no variables exhibited a significant gender main effect. Single subject analysis indicated that fatigue significantly altered frontal plane knee motion, peak GRF, and EMG in some subjects and the direction of differences varied by individual. Fatigue altered some aspects of landing performance in both men and women, but there were no gender differences. Additionally, both group and single subject analyses provided valuable but different information about factors representing

  12. Design Of Monopole Antenna With U Slot In Patch And Ground Plane Ideally Suited For Wireless Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diptanuprasad Chakraborty

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a Monopole Antenna, square in shape, has been designed by cutting slots in both ground plane and patch for better impedance matching. The patch is assigned PEC material, and the substrate of the proposed antenna is Rogers RO3003(tm having relative permittivity 3, and dielectric loss tangent of 0.0013. It is a Tri-band antenna having three resonant frequencies viz. 3.1GHz, 5.1GHz and 8.7GHz respectively, which exhibits same operating characteristics over a wider range of pass band. Comprehensive study of the frequency domain characteristics of the Antenna is being done, and is presented in this paper. The Antenna is simple and small in size, and is simulated using High Frequency Structure Simulator(HFSS software. It is found to be suitable especially for Wireless Applications.

  13. Spectroscopy of Solar Prominences Simultaneously from Space and Ground

    CERN Document Server

    Stellmacher, G; Dammasch, I E

    2013-01-01

    We present a comprehensive set of spectral data from two quiescent solar prominences observed in parallel from space and ground: with the VTT, simultaneous two-dimensional imaging of H-beta 4862 and Ca II 8542 yields a constant ratio, indicating small spatial pressure variations over the prominences. With the Gregory, simultaneous spectra of Ca II 8542 and He I 10830 were taken, their widths yielding 80006 *10^4 K; higher levels k > 8 appear more and more overpopulated. The larger widths of the Lyman lines require high non-thermal broadening close to that of 'hot' EUV lines. In contrast, the He II emission is more related to the 'cool' lines.

  14. Single-band and Dual-band Artificial Magnetic Conductor Ground Planes for Multi-band Dipole Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Two new designs of high impedance surface (HIS structure are presented, namely zigzag and slotted rectangular with I-shaped slot Artificial Magnetic Conductor (AMC. The zigzag AMC is designed based on the straight dipole AMC. The zigzag AMC is introduced to minimize the AMC size and to be suitable for UHF RFID applications. On the other hand, the slotted rectangular with I-shaped slot AMC is designed to operate at 0.92 GHz and 2.45 GHz. The slot is loaded in the main patch of the AMC to create the other resonant frequency. By using this technique the resonant frequency can be lowered, and hence reduce the size of the AMC. Both structures are designed using the same dielectric substrate that is Taconic TLC-32. The properties of the AMC are investigated such as the reflection phase, reflection magnitude and surface impedance. The designed AMCs then are used as a back plane for the printed multi-band dipole antenna. By introducing the AMC as a ground plane (GP for the printed dipole antenna, the gain of the dipole antenna is increased.

  15. An overview of aeroelasticity studies for the National Aero-Space Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Rodney H.; Noll, Thomas E.; Whitlow, Woodrow, Jr.; Huttsell, Lawrence J.

    1993-01-01

    The National Aero-Space Plane (NASP), or X-30, is a single-stage-to-orbit vehicle that is designed to takeoff and land on conventional runways. Research in aeroelasticity was conducted by the NASA and the Wright Laboratory to support the design of a flight vehicle by the national contractor team. This research includes the development of new computational codes for predicting unsteady aerodynamic pressures. In addition, studies were conducted to determine the aerodynamic heating effects on vehicle aeroelasticity and to determine the effects of fuselage flexibility on the stability of the control systems. It also includes the testing of scale models to better understand the aeroelastic behavior of the X-30 and to obtain data for code validation and correlation. This paper presents an overview of the aeroelastic research which has been conducted to support the airframe design.

  16. Transmission of longitudinal wave at a plane interface between micropolar elastic and chiral solid half-spaces: Incidence from micropolar half-space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Aarti; Tomar, S. K.

    2008-04-01

    Reflection and transmission phenomena of a plane longitudinal displacement wave impinging obliquely at a plane interface between a micropolar elastic solid half-space and a chiral elastic solid half-space are investigated. The incident wave is assumed to be striking at the plane interface after propagating through the micropolar elastic solid half-space. The reflection and transmission coefficients are obtained by utilizing two possible sets of boundary conditions, for a specific model and there values corresponding to two boundary conditions are also compared graphically. The effect of chirality parameter on various reflection and transmission coefficients have been noticed and shown graphically. Results of Lakhtakia et al. [Reflection of elastic plane waves at a planar achiral-chiral interface, Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 87 (1990) 2314-2318] and Miklowitz [The Theory of Elastic Waves and Waveguides, North-Holland, New York, 1978] have also been reduced as special cases from the present formulation.

  17. The "RED Versa NIR" Plane to Retrieve Broken-Cloud Optical Depth from Ground-Based Measurements"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshak, A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Evans, K.; Wiscombe, W.

    2003-01-01

    A new method for retrieving cloud optical depth from ground-based measurements of zenith radiance in the RED and near infrared (MR) spectral regions is introduced. Because zenith radiance does not have a one-to-one relationship with optical depth, it is absolutely impossible to use a monochromatic retrieval. On the other side, algebraic combinations of spectral radiances such as NDCI while largely removing nouniquiness and the radiative effects of cloud inhomogeneity, can result in poor retrievals due to its insensitivity to cloud fraction. Instead, both RED and NIR radiances as points on the 'RED vs. NIR' plane are proposed to be used for retrieval. The proposed retrieval method is applied to Cimel measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) site in Oklahoma. Cimel, a multi-channel sunphotometer, is a part of AERONET - a ground-based network for monitoring aerosol optical properties. The results of retrieval are compared with the ones from Microwave Radiometer (MWR) and Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSR) located next to Cimel at the ARM site. In addition, the performance of the retrieval method is assessed using a fractal model of cloud inhomogeneity and broken cloudiness. The preliminary results look very promising both theoretically and from measurements.

  18. Designing of a risk assessment architecture to analyze potential risks from space weather to space and ground based assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, Erum

    2016-07-01

    Today's world is more vulnerable to space weather due to ever increased advance and costly space technology deployed in space and on ground. The space weather has a natural potential of posing harmful effects on space and ground based assets and on astronaut's life. This global challenge of space weather essentially demands global and regional preparedness to develop its situational awareness, analyzing risks and devise possible mitigation procedures. Considering risk mitigation architecture as inevitable for all scientific missions, this paper focuses to develop a risk assessment architecture for the space environment and to map its utility in identifying and analyzing potential risks to space and ground based assets from space weather in the South Asia region. Different risk assessment tools will be studied and would conclude in the most effective tool or strategy that may help to develop our capability in identifying, protecting and mitigating from the devastating effects of the space weather.

  19. Face Sheet/Core Disbond Growth in Honeycomb Sandwich Panels Subjected to Ground-Air-Ground Pressurization and In-Plane Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi M.; Krueger, Ronald; Rinker, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Typical damage modes in light honeycomb sandwich structures include face sheet/core disbonding and core fracture, both of which can pose a threat to the structural integrity of a component. These damage modes are of particular interest to aviation certification authorities since several in-service occurrences, such as rudder structural failure and other control surface malfunctions, have been attributed to face sheet/core disbonding. Extensive studies have shown that face sheet/core disbonding and core fracture can lead to damage propagation caused by internal pressure changes in the core. The increasing use of composite sandwich construction in aircraft applications makes it vitally important to understand the effect of ground-air-ground (GAG) cycles and conditions such as maneuver and gust loads on face sheet/core disbonding. The objective of the present study was to use a fracture mechanics based approach developed earlier to evaluate the loading at the disbond front caused by ground-air-ground pressurization and in-plane loading. A honeycomb sandwich panel containing a circular disbond at one face sheet/core interface was modeled with three-dimensional (3D) solid finite elements. The disbond was modeled as a discrete discontinuity and the strain energy release rate along the disbond front was computed using the Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT). Special attention was paid to the pressure-deformation coupling which can decrease the pressure load within the disbonded sandwich section significantly when the structure is highly deformed. The commercial finite element analysis software, Abaqus/Standard, was used for the analyses. The recursive pressure-deformation coupling problem was solved by representing the entrapped air in the honeycomb cells as filled cavities in Abaqus/Standard. The results show that disbond size, face sheet thickness and core thickness are important parameters that determine crack tip loading at the disbond front. Further, the pressure

  20. Identification of active release planes using ground-based differential InSAR at the Randa rock slope instability, Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gischig

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Five ground-based differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (GB-DInSAR surveys were conducted between 2005 and 2007 at the rock slope instability at Randa, Switzerland. Resultant displacement maps revealed, for the first time, the presence of an active basal rupture zone and a lateral release surface daylighting on the exposed 1991 failure scarp. Structures correlated with the boundaries of interferometric displacement domains were confirmed using a helicopter-based LiDAR DTM and oblique aerial photography. Former investigations at the site failed to conclusively detect these active release surfaces essential for kinematic and hazard analysis of the instability, although their existence had been hypothesized. The determination of the basal and lateral release planes also allowed a more accurate estimate of the currently unstable volume of 5.7±1.5 million m3. The displacement patterns reveal that two different kinematic behaviors dominate the instability, i.e. toppling above 2200 m and translational failure below. In the toppling part of the instability the areas with the highest GB-DInSAR displacements correspond to areas of enhanced micro-seismic activity. The observation of only few strongly active discontinuities daylighting on the 1991 failure surface points to a rather uniform movement in the lower portion of the instability, while most of the slip occurs along the basal rupture plane. Comparison of GB-DInSAR displacements with mapped discontinuities revealed correlations between displacement patterns and active structures, although spatial offsets occur as a result of the effective resolution of GB-DInSAR. Similarly, comparisons with measurements from total station surveys generally showed good agreement. Discrepancies arose in several cases due to local movement of blocks, the size of which could not be resolved using GB-DInSAR.

  1. Polarization measurements through space-to-ground atmospheric propagation paths by using a highly polarized laser source in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoshima, Morio; Takenaka, Hideki; Shoji, Yozo; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Koyama, Yoshisada; Kunimori, Hiroo

    2009-12-07

    The polarization characteristics of an artificial laser source in space were measured through space-to-ground atmospheric transmission paths. An existing Japanese laser communication satellite and optical ground station were used to measure Stokes parameters and the degree of polarization of the laser beam transmitted from the satellite. As a result, the polarization was preserved within an rms error of 1.6 degrees, and the degree of polarization was 99.4+/-4.4% through the space-to-ground atmosphere. These results contribute to the link estimation for quantum key distribution via space and provide the potential for enhancements in quantum cryptography worldwide in the future.

  2. Gravitational Wave Detection by Interferometry (Ground and Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Pitkin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been made in recent years on the development of gravitational-wave detectors. Sources such as coalescing compact binary systems, neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries, stellar collapses and pulsars are all possible candidates for detection. The most promising design of gravitational-wave detector uses test masses a long distance apart and freely suspended as pendulums on Earth or in drag-free spacecraft. The main theme of this review is a discussion of the mechanical and optical principles used in the various long baseline systems in operation around the world - LIGO (USA, Virgo (Italy/France, TAMA300 and LCGT (Japan, and GEO600 (Germany/U.K. - and in LISA, a proposed space-borne interferometer. A review of recent science runs from the current generation of ground-based detectors will be discussed, in addition to highlighting the astrophysical results gained thus far. Looking to the future, the major upgrades to LIGO (Advanced LIGO, Virgo (Advanced Virgo, LCGT and GEO600 (GEO-HF will be completed over the coming years, which will create a network of detectors with the significantly improved sensitivity required to detect gravitational waves. Beyond this, the concept and design of possible future "third generation" gravitational-wave detectors, such as the Einstein Telescope (ET, will be discussed.

  3. Gravitational Wave Detection by Interferometry (Ground and Space).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkin, Matthew; Reid, Stuart; Rowan, Sheila; Hough, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in recent years on the development of gravitational-wave detectors. Sources such as coalescing compact binary systems, neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries, stellar collapses and pulsars are all possible candidates for detection. The most promising design of gravitational-wave detector uses test masses a long distance apart and freely suspended as pendulums on Earth or in drag-free spacecraft. The main theme of this review is a discussion of the mechanical and optical principles used in the various long baseline systems in operation around the world - LIGO (USA), Virgo (Italy/France), TAMA300 and LCGT (Japan), and GEO600 (Germany/U.K.) - and in LISA, a proposed space-borne interferometer. A review of recent science runs from the current generation of ground-based detectors will be discussed, in addition to highlighting the astrophysical results gained thus far. Looking to the future, the major upgrades to LIGO (Advanced LIGO), Virgo (Advanced Virgo), LCGT and GEO600 (GEO-HF) will be completed over the coming years, which will create a network of detectors with the significantly improved sensitivity required to detect gravitational waves. Beyond this, the concept and design of possible future "third generation" gravitational-wave detectors, such as the Einstein Telescope (ET), will be discussed.

  4. Ground-based Space Weather Monitoring with LOFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Michael; van Haarlem, Michiel; Lawrence, Gareth; Reid, Simon; Bos, Andre; Rawlings, Steve; Salvini, Stef; Mitchell, Cathryn; Soleimani, Manuch; Amado, Sergio; Teresa, Vital

    As one of the first of a new generation of radio instruments, the International LOFAR Telescope (ILT) will provide a number of unique and novel capabilities for the astronomical community. These include remote configuration and operation, dynamic real-time processing and system response, and the ability to provide multiple simultaneous streams of data to a community whose scientific interests run the gamut from lighting in the atmospheres of distant planets to the origins of the universe itself. The LOFAR (LOw Frequency ARray) system is optimized for a frequency range from 30-240 MHz and consists of multiple antenna fields spread across Europe. In the Netherlands, a total 36 LOFAR stations are nearing completion with an initial 8 international stations currently being deployed in Germany, France, Sweden, and the UK. Digital beam-forming techniques make the LOFAR system agile and allow for rapid repointing of the telescope as well as the potential for multiple simultaneous observations. With its dense core array and long interferometric baselines, LOFAR has the potential to achieve unparalleled sensitivity and spatial resolution in the low frequency radio regime. LOFAR will also be one of the first radio observatories to feature automated processing pipelines to deliver fully calibrated science products to its user community. As we discuss in this presentation, the same capabilities that make LOFAR a powerful tool for radio astronomy also provide an excellent platform upon which to build a ground-based monitoring system for space weather events. For example, the ability to monitor Solar activity in near real-time is one of the key scientific capabilities being developed for LOFAR. With only a fraction of its total observing capacity, LOFAR will be able to provide continuous monitoring of the Solar spectrum over the entire 10-240 MHz band down to microsecond timescales. Autonomous routines will scan these incoming spectral data for evidence of Solar flares and be

  5. Applications of atom interferometry - from ground to space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Christian; Rasel, Ernst Maria; Gaaloul, Naceur; Ertmer, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    Atom interferometry is utilized for the measurement of rotations [1], accelerations [2] and for tests of fundamental physics [3]. In these devices, three laser light pulses separated by a free evolution time coherently manipulate the matter waves which resembles the Mach-Zehnder geometry in optics. Atom gravimeters demonstrated an accuracy of few microgal [2,4], and atom gradiometers showed a noise floor of 30 E Hz^{-1/2} [5]. Further enhancements of atom interferometers are anticipated by the integration of novel source concepts providing ultracold atoms, extending the free fall time of the atoms, and enhanced techniques for coherent manipulation. Sources providing Bose-Einstein condensates recently demontrated a flux compatible with precision experiments [6]. All of these aspects are studied in the transportable quantum gravimeter QG-1 and the very long baseline atom interferometry teststand in Hannover [7] with the goal of surpassing the microgal regime. Going beyond ground based setups, the QUANTUS collaboration exploits the unique features of a microgravity environment in drop tower experiments [8] and in a sounding rocket mission. The payloads are compact and robust atom optics experiments based on atom chips [6], enabling technology for transportable sensors on ground as a byproduct. More prominently, they are pathfinders for proposed satellite missions as tests of the universality of free fall [9] and gradiometry based on atom interferometers [10]. This work is supported by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under grant numbers DLR 50WM1552-1557 (QUANTUS-IV-Fallturm) and by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft in the framework of the SFB 1128 geo-Q. [1] PRL 114 063002 2015 [2] Nature 400 849 1999 [3] PRL 112 203002 2014 [4] NJP 13 065026 2011 [5] PRA 65 033608 2002 [6] NJP 17 065001 2015 [7] NJP 17 035011 2015 [8] PRL 110 093602 2013 [9

  6. Kennedy Space Center Orion Processing Team Planning for Ground Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letchworth, Gary; Schlierf, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Topics in this presentation are: Constellation Ares I/Orion/Ground Ops Elements Orion Ground Operations Flow Orion Operations Planning Process and Toolset Overview, including: 1 Orion Concept of Operations by Phase 2 Ops Analysis Capabilities Overview 3 Operations Planning Evolution 4 Functional Flow Block Diagrams 5 Operations Timeline Development 6 Discrete Event Simulation (DES) Modeling 7 Ground Operations Planning Document Database (GOPDb) Using Operations Planning Tools for Operability Improvements includes: 1 Kaizen/Lean Events 2 Mockups 3 Human Factors Analysis

  7. Shapiro's plane waves in spaces of constant curvature and separation of variables in real and complex coordinates

    CERN Document Server

    Ovsiyuk, E M; Red'kov, V M

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the article to clarify the status of Shapiro plane wave solutions of the Schr\\"odinger's equation in the frames of the well-known general method of separation of variables. To solve this task, we use the well-known cylindrical coordinates in Riemann and Lobachevsky spaces, naturally related with Euler angle-parameters. Conclusion may be drawn: the general method of separation of variables embraces the all plane wave solutions; the plane waves in Lobachevsky and Riemann space consist of a small part of the whole set of basis wave functions of Schr\\"odinger equation. In space of constant positive curvature $S_{3}$, a complex analog of horospherical coordinates of Lobachevsky space $H_{3}$ is introduced. To parameterize real space $S_{3}$, two complex coordinates $(r,z)$ must obey additional restriction in the form of the equation $r^{2} = e^{z-z^{*}} - e^{2z} $. The metrical tensor of space $S_{3}$ is expressed in terms of $(r,z)$ with additional constraint, or through pairs of conjugate variables $(...

  8. Validating global hydrological models by ground and space gravimetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU JiangCun; SUN HePing; XU JianQiao

    2009-01-01

    The long-term continuous gravity observations obtained by the superconducting gravimeters (SG) at seven globally-distributed stations are comprehensively analyzed. After removing the signals related to the Earth's tides and variations in the Earth's rotation, the gravity residuals are used to describe the seasonal fluctuations in gravity field. Meanwhile, the gravity changes due to the air pressure loading are theoretically modeled from the measurements of the local air pressure, and those due to land water and nontidal ocean loading are also calculated according to the corresponding numerical models. The numerical results show that the gravity changes due to both the air pressure and land water loading are as large as 100×10-9 m s-2 in magnitude, and about 10×10-9 m s-2 for those due to the nontidal ocean loading in the coastal area. On the other hand, the monthly-averaged gravity variations over the area surrounding the stations are derived from the spherical harmonic coefficients of the GRACE-recovered gravity fields, by using Gaussian smoothing technique in which the radius is set to be 600 km. Compared the land water induced gravity variations, the SG observations after removal of tides, polar motion effects, air pressure and nontidal ocean loading effects and the GRACE-derived gravity variations with each other, it is inferred that both the ground- and space-based gravity observations can effectively detect the seasonal gravity variations with a magnitude of 100×10-9 m s-2 induced by the land water loading. This implies that high precision gravimetry is an effective technique to validate the reliabilities of the hydrological models.

  9. Anomaly Detection for Next-Generation Space Launch Ground Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirkovska, Lilly; Iverson, David L.; Hall, David R.; Taylor, William M.; Patterson-Hine, Ann; Brown, Barbara; Ferrell, Bob A.; Waterman, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is developing new capabilities that will enable future human exploration missions while reducing mission risk and cost. The Fault Detection, Isolation, and Recovery (FDIR) project aims to demonstrate the utility of integrated vehicle health management (IVHM) tools in the domain of ground support equipment (GSE) to be used for the next generation launch vehicles. In addition to demonstrating the utility of IVHM tools for GSE, FDIR aims to mature promising tools for use on future missions and document the level of effort - and hence cost - required to implement an application with each selected tool. One of the FDIR capabilities is anomaly detection, i.e., detecting off-nominal behavior. The tool we selected for this task uses a data-driven approach. Unlike rule-based and model-based systems that require manual extraction of system knowledge, data-driven systems take a radically different approach to reasoning. At the basic level, they start with data that represent nominal functioning of the system and automatically learn expected system behavior. The behavior is encoded in a knowledge base that represents "in-family" system operations. During real-time system monitoring or during post-flight analysis, incoming data is compared to that nominal system operating behavior knowledge base; a distance representing deviation from nominal is computed, providing a measure of how far "out of family" current behavior is. We describe the selected tool for FDIR anomaly detection - Inductive Monitoring System (IMS), how it fits into the FDIR architecture, the operations concept for the GSE anomaly monitoring, and some preliminary results of applying IMS to a Space Shuttle GSE anomaly.

  10. Understanding macrophage differentiation during space flight: The importance of ground-based experiments before space flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapes, Stephen K; Ortega, M Teresa

    2013-06-01

    In preparation for a space flight on STS-126, two in vitro culture systems were used to investigate macrophage colony stimulating factor-dependent macrophage differentiation from mouse primary bone marrow cells. The patented Techshot Cell Cult Bioreactor and the BioServe Fluid Processing Apparatus (FPA) were operated in different orientations to determine their impact on macrophage growth and differentiation. Bone marrow cell parameters were determined after cells were grown in FPAs incubated at 37°C in vertical or horizontal orientations, and macrophage cell recovery was significantly higher from FPAs that were incubated in the horizontal orientation compared to "vertical" FPAs. Similarly, when bone marrow cells were grown in the Techshot bioreactor, there were significant differences in the numbers of macrophages recovered after 7 days, depending on movement and orientation of the bioreactor. Macrophage recovery was highest when the patented bioreactor was rotated in the horizontal, x-axis plane (merry-go-round fashion) compared to static and vertically, y-axis plane rotated (Ferris wheel fashion) bioreactors. In addition, the expression of F4/80 and other differentiation markers varied depending on whether macrophages differentiated in FPAs or in bioreactors. After 7 days, significant differences in size, granularity and molecule expression were seen even when the same primary bone marrow cells were used to seed the cultures. These data show that culture outcomes are highly dependent on the culture device and device orientation. Moreover, the impact of the culture system needs to be understood in order to interpret space flight data.

  11. DETERMINING PLANE-SWEEP SAMPLING POINTS IN IMAGE SPACE USING THE CROSS-RATIO FOR IMAGE-BASED DEPTH ESTIMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ruf

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available With the emergence of small consumer Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs, the importance and interest of image-based depth estimation and model generation from aerial images has greatly increased in the photogrammetric society. In our work, we focus on algorithms that allow an online image-based dense depth estimation from video sequences, which enables the direct and live structural analysis of the depicted scene. Therefore, we use a multi-view plane-sweep algorithm with a semi-global matching (SGM optimization which is parallelized for general purpose computation on a GPU (GPGPU, reaching sufficient performance to keep up with the key-frames of input sequences. One important aspect to reach good performance is the way to sample the scene space, creating plane hypotheses. A small step size between consecutive planes, which is needed to reconstruct details in the near vicinity of the camera may lead to ambiguities in distant regions, due to the perspective projection of the camera. Furthermore, an equidistant sampling with a small step size produces a large number of plane hypotheses, leading to high computational effort. To overcome these problems, we present a novel methodology to directly determine the sampling points of plane-sweep algorithms in image space. The use of the perspective invariant cross-ratio allows us to derive the location of the sampling planes directly from the image data. With this, we efficiently sample the scene space, achieving higher sampling density in areas which are close to the camera and a lower density in distant regions. We evaluate our approach on a synthetic benchmark dataset for quantitative evaluation and on a real-image dataset consisting of aerial imagery. The experiments reveal that an inverse sampling achieves equal and better results than a linear sampling, with less sampling points and thus less runtime. Our algorithm allows an online computation of depth maps for subsequences of five frames, provided that

  12. Space vehicle field unit and ground station system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judd, Stephen; Dallmann, Nicholas; Delapp, Jerry; Proicou, Michael; Seitz, Daniel; Michel, John; Enemark, Donald

    2017-09-19

    A field unit and ground station may use commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components and share a common architecture, where differences in functionality are governed by software. The field units and ground stations may be easy to deploy, relatively inexpensive, and be relatively easy to operate. A novel file system may be used where datagrams of a file may be stored across multiple drives and/or devices. The datagrams may be received out of order and reassembled at the receiving device.

  13. Space vehicle field unit and ground station system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Stephen; Dallmann, Nicholas; Delapp, Jerry; Proicou, Michael; Seitz, Daniel; Michel, John; Enemark, Donald

    2016-10-25

    A field unit and ground station may use commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components and share a common architecture, where differences in functionality are governed by software. The field units and ground stations may be easy to deploy, relatively inexpensive, and be relatively easy to operate. A novel file system may be used where datagrams of a file may be stored across multiple drives and/or devices. The datagrams may be received out of order and reassembled at the receiving device.

  14. Grounded Blends and Mathematical Gesture Spaces: Developing Mathematical Understandings via Gestures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Caroline; Thomas, Michael O. J.; Dreyfus, Tommy

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines how a person's gesture space can become endowed with mathematical meaning associated with mathematical spaces and how the resulting mathematical gesture space can be used to communicate and interpret mathematical features of gestures. We use the theory of grounded blends to analyse a case study of two teachers who used gestures…

  15. SH-Wave at a Plane Interface between Homogeneous and Inhomogeneous Fibre-Reinforced Elastic Half-Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Zorammuana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of reflection and refraction of SH-waves at a plane interface between the homogeneous and inhomogeneous fibre-reinforced elastic half-spaces has been investigated. Amplitude and energy ratios corresponding to the reflected and refracted SH-waves are derived using appropriate boundary conditions. These ratios are computed numerically for a particular model and the results are depicted graphically.

  16. THREE-DIMENSIONAL INTERACTIONS OF A HALF-PLANE CRACK IN A TRANSVERSELY ISOTROPIC PIEZOELECTRIC SPACE WITH RESULTANT SOURCES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hou Pengfei; Pan Xiaoping; Ding Haojiang

    2005-01-01

    Exact solutions in elementary functions are derived for the stress and electric displacement intensity factors of a half-plane crack in a transversely isotropic piezoelectric space interacting with various resultant sources, including force dipole, electric dipole, moment, force dilatation and rotation. Such force and charge sources may model defects like vacancies, foreign particles and dislocations. The locations and orientations of the stress and charge sources with respect to the crack are arbitrary.

  17. Universal adaptive λ tracker for nonholonomic wheeled mobile robots moving on a plane in three-dimensional space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Alicja

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a universal adaptive (lambda) -tracking control algorithm for wheeled mobile robots moving on the plane in the 3D space. The introduce control algorithm maybe considered as a dynamic version of the PD controller requiring only a knowledge of the robot kinematics. This controller preserves the convergence of the position tracking error of mobile robots to the ball of radius (lambda) > 0, where (lambda) is arbitrary but prespecified. Theoretical considerations are illustrated with simulations.

  18. Advantages of ground-to-space laser power beaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rather, John D. G.

    1992-01-01

    NASA's current research activities to evaluate laser power beaming systems are reviewed. Applications of such systems are considered, including communications satellites, radar and direct broadcast satellites, space transfer vehicles lunar base operations and exploration, and optical technologies. The current laser power beaming program within the NASA Headquarters Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology is addressed.

  19. Configuration space Faddeev calculations. I. Triton ground state properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, G. L.; Friar, J. L.; Gibson, B. F.; Afnan, I. R.

    1980-08-01

    The formulation of Faddeev-type equations in configuration space is discussed. Numerical solutions are obtained using splines and the method of orthogonal collocation. Triton observables and wave-function probabilities are calculated for s-wave NN interaction models of Malfliet and Tjon and the tensor force model of Reid. Comparison with previously published triton results is made; our full five-channel results for the Reid soft-core potential are in excellent agreement with those obtained by Afnan and Birrell using separable expansion methods. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE 3H, Faddeev calculations configuration space.

  20. Transition between free-space Helmholtz equation solutions with plane sources and parabolic wave equation solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahillo-Isla, R; Gonźalez-Morales, M J; Dehesa-Martínez, C

    2011-06-01

    The slowly varying envelope approximation is applied to the radiation problems of the Helmholtz equation with a planar single-layer and dipolar sources. The analyses of such problems provide procedures to recover solutions of the Helmholtz equation based on the evaluation of solutions of the parabolic wave equation at a given plane. Furthermore, the conditions that must be fulfilled to apply each procedure are also discussed. The relations to previous work are given as well.

  1. Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration for Responsive Space Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert G.; Notardonato, William U.

    2013-01-01

    Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration Units (IGODU) project developed to mature, integrate and demonstrate advancements in cryogenics, system health management and command and control technologies. Two Distinct Testing Environments: a) GODU Integrated Refrigeration and Storage - GODU LH2; b) GODU Autonomous Control - GODU LO2. Scope: I. GODU LH2: a) Investigate alternative storage and distribution architecture for future cryogenic propellant operations. b) Demonstrate advanced cryogenic propellant handling operations (liquefaction, storage and distribution) of normal boiling point and sub-cooled cryogenic propellants. II. GODU L02: a) Develop and demonstrate advanced control and health management technologies and techniques to autonomously control cryogenic propellant servicing operations. b) Investigate modern COTS hardware and control systems in an effort to reduce the "standing army" of engineers associated with maintaining and operating ground systems through the use of health management and autonomous control technologies. Goals: a) Raise Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) and Integration Readiness Levels (IRL) of several key technology development areas. b) Reduce operations lifecycle costs of future test programs and launch complexes. c) Demonstrate technologies for future exploration beyond low earth orbit. d) Serve as test environments for extraterrestrial surface operations.

  2. Reflection of plane waves at the free surface of a fibre-reinforced elastic half-space

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Baljeet Singh; Sarva Jit Singh

    2004-06-01

    The propagation of plane waves in fibre-reinforced, anisotropic, elastic media is discussed. The expressions for the phase velocity of quasi-$P(qP)$ and quasi-$SV(qSV)$ waves propagating in a plane containing the reinforcement direction are obtained as functions of the angle between the propagation and reinforcement directions. Closed form expressions for the amplitude ratios for qP and qSV waves reflected at the free surface of a fibre-reinforced, anisotropic, homogeneous, elastic half-space are obtained. These expressions are used to study the variation of amplitude ratios with angle of incidence. It is found that reinforcement has a significant effect on the amplitude ratios and critical angle.

  3. Inertial Motion in the Events Plane of Minkowski Space with Non-zero Rest Mass (Axiomatic Description)

    CERN Document Server

    Vagner, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    Inertial motion is considered in the plane of events characterized by the homogeneous Lorentz group L. On the basis of this group, a set of inertial movements and its decomposition into sets which are disconnected from one another with respect to the L-subgroups are considered. The geometric and corresponding physical characteristics of these motions are discussed: relativistic velocity, mass, relativistic momentum and mass/velocity ratio. It is shown that only one world line of inertial motion corresponds to each point on the plane in a space-like area, and the mass growth, dependent on the velocity, takes place only in the particle system. The mathematical model describing the aforementioned physical characteristics is developed in a geometric context, based on group theory.

  4. Large File Transfers from Space Using Multiple Ground Terminals and Delay-Tolerant Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William D.; Paulsen, Phillip; Stewart, Dave; Eddy, Wesley; McKim, James; Taylor, John; Lynch, Scott; Heberle, Jay; Northam, James; Jackson, Chris; Wood, Lloyd

    2010-01-01

    We use Delay-Tolerant Networking (DTN) to break control loops between space-ground communication links and ground-ground communication links to increase overall file delivery efficiency, as well as to enable large files to be proactively fragmented and received across multiple ground stations. DTN proactive fragmentation and reactive fragmentation were demonstrated from the UK-DMC satellite using two independent ground stations. The files were reassembled at a bundle agent, located at Glenn Research Center in Cleveland Ohio. The first space-based demonstration of this occurred on September 30 and October 1, 2009. This paper details those experiments. Communication, delay-tolerant networking, DTN, satellite, Internet, protocols, bundle, IP, TCP.

  5. Diffraction of plane P waves by a canyon of arbitrary shape in poroelastic half-space (Ⅰ): Formulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianwen Liang; Zhongxian Liu

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an indirect boundary integration equation method for diffraction of plane P waves by a two-dimensional canyon of arbitrary shape in poroelastic half-space. The Green's functions of compressional and shear wave sources in poroelastic half-space are derived based on Biot's theory. The scattered waves are constructed using the fictitious wave sources close to the boundary of the canyon, and magnitude of the fictitious wave sources are determined by the boundary conditions. The precision of the method is verified by the satisfaction extent of boundary conditions, the comparison between the degenerated solutions of single-phased half-space and the well-known solutions, and the numerical stability of the method.

  6. Gravitational Wave Detection by Interferometry (Ground and Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hough Jim

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been made in recent years on the development of gravitational wave detectors. Sources such as coalescing compact binary systems, low-mass X-ray binaries, stellar collapses and pulsars are all possible candidates for detection. The most promising design of gravitational wave detector uses test masses a long distance apart and freely suspended as pendulums on Earth or in drag-free craft in space. The main theme of this review is a discussion of the mechanical and optical principles used in the various long baseline systems being built around the world -- LIGO (USA, VIRGO (Italy/France, TAMA 300 (Japan and GEO 600 (Germany/UK -- and in LISA, a proposed space-borne interferometer.

  7. Tracking Non-stellar Objects on Ground and in Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Troels; Jørgensen, John Leif

    1999-01-01

    are easily divided into two classes; Stationary (galaxies, nebulae etc.), and moving object (planets, asteroids, satellite etc.).For missions targeting moving objects, detection down to mv 11 is possible without any system impacts, simply by comparing lists of objects with regular intervals, leaving out all......Many space exploration missions require a fast, early and accurate detection of a specific target. E.g. missions to asteroids, x-ray source missions or interplanetary missions.A second generation star tracker may be used for accurate detection of non-stellar objects of interest for such missions......, simply by listing all objects detected in an image not being identified as a star. Of course a lot of deep space objects will be listed too, especially if the detection threshold is set to let faint object pass through. Assuming a detection threshold of, say mv 7 (the Hipparcos catalogue is complete...

  8. State-Vector Space and Canonical Coherent States in Noncommutative Plane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The structure of the state-vector space of identical bosons in noncommutative spaces is investigated. To maintain Bose-Einstein statistics the commutation relations of phase space variables should simultaneously include coordinate-coordinate non-commutativity and momentum-momentum non-commutativity, which leads to a kind of de-formed Heisenberg-Weyl algebra. Although there is no ordinary number representation in this state-vector space, several set of orthogonal and complete state-vectors can be derived which are common eigenvectors of corresponding pairs of commuting Hermitian operators. As a simple application of this state-vector space, an explicit form of two-dimensional canonical coherent state is constructed and its properties are discussed.

  9. Electromagnetic Pulse Excitation of Finite-Long Dissipative Conductors over a Conducting Ground Plane in the Frequency Domain.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    campione, salvatore; Warne, Larry K.; Schiek, Richard; Basilio, Lorena I.

    2017-09-01

    This report details the modeling results for the response of a finite-length dissipative conductor interacting with a conducting ground to a hypothetical nuclear device with the same output energy spectrum as the Fat Man device. We use a frequency-domain method based on transmission line theory and implemented it in a code we call ATLOG - Analytic Transmission Line Over Ground. Select results are compared to ones computed using the circuit simulator Xyce. Intentionally Left Blank

  10. Configuration space Faddeev calculations. I. Triton ground-state properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payne, G.L.; Friar, J.L.; Gibson, B.F.; Afnan, I.R.

    1980-08-01

    The formulation of Faddeev-type equations in configuration space is discussed. Numerical solutions are obtained using splines and the method of orthogonal collocation. Triton observables and wave-function probabilities are calculated for s-wave NN interaction models of Malfliet and Tjon and the tensor force model of Reid. Comparison with previously published triton results is made; our full five-channel results for the Reid soft-core potential are in excellent agreement with those obtained by Afnan and Birrell using separable expansion methods.

  11. Space Weather and the Ground-Level Solar Proton Events of the 23rd Solar Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, M. A.; Smart, D. F.

    2012-10-01

    Solar proton events can adversely affect space and ground-based systems. Ground-level events are a subset of solar proton events that have a harder spectrum than average solar proton events and are detectable on Earth's surface by cosmic radiation ionization chambers, muon detectors, and neutron monitors. This paper summarizes the space weather effects associated with ground-level solar proton events during the 23rd solar cycle. These effects include communication and navigation systems, spacecraft electronics and operations, space power systems, manned space missions, and commercial aircraft operations. The major effect of ground-level events that affect manned spacecraft operations is increased radiation exposure. The primary effect on commercial aircraft operations is the loss of high frequency communication and, at extreme polar latitudes, an increase in the radiation exposure above that experienced from the background galactic cosmic radiation. Calculations of the maximum potential aircraft polar route exposure for each ground-level event of the 23rd solar cycle are presented. The space weather effects in October and November 2003 are highlighted together with on-going efforts to utilize cosmic ray neutron monitors to predict high energy solar proton events, thus providing an alert so that system operators can possibly make adjustments to vulnerable spacecraft operations and polar aircraft routes.

  12. Which future for electromagnetic Astronomy: Ground Based vs Space Borne Large Astrophysical Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubertini, Pietro

    2015-08-01

    The combined use of large ground based facilities and large space observatories is playing a key role in the advance of astrophysics by providing access to the entire electromagnetic spectrum, allowing high sensitivity observations from the lower radio wavelength to the higher energy gamma rays.It is nowadays clear that a forward steps in the understanding of the Universe evolution and large scale structure formation is essential and only possible with the combined use of multiwavelength imaging and spectral high resolution instruments.The increasing size, complexity and cost of large ground and space observatories places a growing emphasis on international collaboration. If the present set of astronomical facilities is impressive and complete, with nicely complementary space and ground based telescopes, the scenario becomes worrisome and critical in the next two decades. In fact, only a few ‘Large’ main space missions are planned and there is a need to ensure proper ground facility coverage: the synergy Ground-Space is not escapable in the timeframe 2020-2030.The scope of this talk is to review the current astronomical instrumentation panorama also in view of the recent major national agencies and international bodies programmatic decisions.This Division B meeting give us a unique opportunity to review the current situation and discuss the future perspectives taking advantage of the large audience ensured by the IAU GA.

  13. Tracking Non-stellar Objects on Ground and in Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Troels; Jørgensen, John Leif

    1999-01-01

    Many space exploration missions require a fast, early and accurate detection of a specific target. E.g. missions to asteroids, x-ray source missions or interplanetary missions.A second generation star tracker may be used for accurate detection of non-stellar objects of interest for such missions...... approximately down to CCD magnitude mv 7.5), the objects thus listed will include galaxies, nebulae, planets, asteroids, comets and artefacts as satellites.The angular resolution in inertial reference coordinates is a few arcseconds, allowing quite accurate tracking of these objects. Furthermore, the objects...... are easily divided into two classes; Stationary (galaxies, nebulae etc.), and moving object (planets, asteroids, satellite etc.).For missions targeting moving objects, detection down to mv 11 is possible without any system impacts, simply by comparing lists of objects with regular intervals, leaving out all...

  14. An IBEM solution to the scattering of plane SH-waves by a lined tunnel in elastic wedge space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongxian Liu; Lei Liu

    2015-01-01

    The indirect boundary element method (IBEM) is developed to solve the scattering of plane SH-waves by a lined tunnel in elastic wedge space.According to the theory of single-layer potential,the scattered-wave field can be constructed by applying virtual uniform loads on the surface of lined tunnel and the nearby wedge surface.The densities of virtual loads can be solved by establishing equations through the continuity conditions on the interface and zero-traction conditions on free surfaces.The total wave field is obtained by the superposition of free field and scattered-wave field in elastic wedge space.Numerical results indicate that the IBEM can solve the diffraction of elastic wave in elastic wedge space accurately and efficiently.The wave motion feature strongly depends on the wedge angle,the angle of incidence,incident frequency,the location of lined tunnel,and material parameters.The waves interference and amplification effect around the tunnel in wedge space is more significant,causing the dynamic stress concentration factor on rigid tunnel and the displacement amplitude of flexible tunnel up to 50.0 and 17.0,respectively,more than double that of the case of half-space.Hence,considerable attention should be paid to seismic resistant or anti-explosion design of the tunnel built on a slope or hillside.

  15. An integrated aerodynamic/propulsion study for generic aero-space planes based on waverider concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, G.; Rasmussen, M. L.

    1991-01-01

    Research efforts related to the development of a unified aerospace plane analysis based on waverider technology are summarized. Viscous effects on the forebodies of cone-derived waverider configurations were studied. A simple means for determining the average skin friction coefficient of laminar boundary layers was established. This was incorporated into a computer program that provides lift and drag coefficients and lift/drag ratio for on-design waveriders when the temperature and Reynolds number based on length are specified. An effort was made to carry out parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) calculations for cone-derived waveriders. When the viscous terms were turned off (in the Euler mode) computations for elliptic cone-derived waveriders could be carried out for a wide range of on-design and off-design situations. Work related to waveriders derived from power law shocks is described in some detail.

  16. Modeling the Ages and Metallicities of Early-Type Galaxies in Fundamental Plane Space

    CERN Document Server

    Porter, L A; Primack, J R; Croton, D J; Covington, M D; Graves, G J; Faber, S M

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations have probed the formation histories of nearby elliptical galaxies by tracking correlations between the stellar population parameters, age and metallicity, and the structural parameters that enter the Fundamental Plane, radius and velocity dispersion sigma. These studies have found intriguing correlations between these four parameters. In this work, we make use of a semi-analytic model, based on halo merger trees extracted from the Bolshoi cosmological simulation, that predicts the structural properties of spheroid-dominated galaxies based on an analytic model that has been tested and calibrated against an extensive suite of hydrodynamic+N-body binary merger simulations. We predict the radius, sigma, luminosity, age, and metallicity of spheroid-dominated galaxies, enabling us to compare directly to observations. Our model predicts a strong correlation between age and sigma for early-type galaxies, and no significant correlation between age and radius, in agreement with observations. In addi...

  17. Electromagnetic Pulse Excitation of Finite-Long Dissipative Conductors over a Conducting Ground Plane in the Time Domain.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    campione, salvatore; Warne, Larry K.; Schiek, Richard; Basilio, Lorena I.

    2017-09-01

    This report details the modeling results for the response of a finite-length dissipative conductor interacting with a conducting ground to a hypothetical nuclear device with the same output energy spectrum as the Fat Man device. We use a time-domain method based on transmission line theory that allows accounting for time-varying air conductivities. We implemented such method in a code we call ATLOG - Analytic Transmission Line Over Ground. Results are compared the frequency-domain version of ATLOG previously developed and to the circuit simulator Xyce in some instances. Intentionally Left Blank

  18. Quantum Limits of Space-to-Ground Optical Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, H.; Dolinar, S.

    2012-01-01

    For a pure loss channel, the ultimate capacity can be achieved with classical coherent states (i.e., ideal laser light): (1) Capacity-achieving receiver (measurement) is yet to be determined. (2) Heterodyne detection approaches the ultimate capacity at high mean photon numbers. (3) Photon-counting approaches the ultimate capacity at low mean photon numbers. A number of current technology limits drive the achievable performance of free-space communication links. Approaching fundamental limits in the bandwidth-limited regime: (1) Heterodyne detection with high-order coherent-state modulation approaches ultimate limits. SOA improvements to laser phase noise, adaptive optics systems for atmospheric transmission would help. (2) High-order intensity modulation and photon-counting can approach heterodyne detection within approximately a factor of 2. This may have advantages over coherent detection in the presence of turbulence. Approaching fundamental limits in the photon-limited regime (1) Low-duty cycle binary coherent-state modulation (OOK, PPM) approaches ultimate limits. SOA improvements to laser extinction ratio, receiver dark noise, jitter, and blocking would help. (2) In some link geometries (near field links) number-state transmission could improve over coherent-state transmission

  19. Quantum Limits of Space-to-Ground Optical Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, H.; Dolinar, S.

    2012-01-01

    For a pure loss channel, the ultimate capacity can be achieved with classical coherent states (i.e., ideal laser light): (1) Capacity-achieving receiver (measurement) is yet to be determined. (2) Heterodyne detection approaches the ultimate capacity at high mean photon numbers. (3) Photon-counting approaches the ultimate capacity at low mean photon numbers. A number of current technology limits drive the achievable performance of free-space communication links. Approaching fundamental limits in the bandwidth-limited regime: (1) Heterodyne detection with high-order coherent-state modulation approaches ultimate limits. SOA improvements to laser phase noise, adaptive optics systems for atmospheric transmission would help. (2) High-order intensity modulation and photon-counting can approach heterodyne detection within approximately a factor of 2. This may have advantages over coherent detection in the presence of turbulence. Approaching fundamental limits in the photon-limited regime (1) Low-duty cycle binary coherent-state modulation (OOK, PPM) approaches ultimate limits. SOA improvements to laser extinction ratio, receiver dark noise, jitter, and blocking would help. (2) In some link geometries (near field links) number-state transmission could improve over coherent-state transmission

  20. Gender Differences among Sagittal Plane Knee Kinematic and Ground Reaction Force Characteristics during a Rapid Sprint and Cut Maneuver

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, C. Roger; Sizer, Phillip S.; Starch, David W.; Lockhart, Thurmon E.; Slauterbeck, James

    2004-01-01

    Women are more prone to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury during cutting sports than men. The purpose of this study was to examine knee kinematic and ground reaction forces (GRF) differences between genders during cutting. Male and female athletes performed cutting trials while force platform and video data were recorded (180 Hz).…

  1. Improving Problem-Solving Skills with the Help of Plane-Space Analogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budai, László

    2013-01-01

    We live our lives in three-dimensional space and encounter geometrical problems (equipment instructions, maps, etc.) every day. Yet there are not sufficient opportunities for high school students to learn geometry. New teaching methods can help remedy this. Specifically our experience indicates that there is great promise for use of geometry…

  2. Deformation space of a non-uniform 3-dimensional real hyperbolic lattice in quaternionic hyperbolic plane

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Inkang

    2012-01-01

    In this note, we study deformations of a non-uniform real hyperbolic lattice in quaternionic hyperbolic spaces. Specially we show that the representations of the fundamental group of the figure eight knot complement into PU(2,1) cannot be deformed in $PSp(2,1)$ out of PU(2,1) up to conjugacy.

  3. Update on Multi-Variable Parametric Cost Models for Ground and Space Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Henrichs, Todd; Luedtke, Alexander; West, Miranda

    2012-01-01

    Parametric cost models can be used by designers and project managers to perform relative cost comparisons between major architectural cost drivers and allow high-level design trades; enable cost-benefit analysis for technology development investment; and, provide a basis for estimating total project cost between related concepts. This paper reports on recent revisions and improvements to our ground telescope cost model and refinements of our understanding of space telescope cost models. One interesting observation is that while space telescopes are 50X to 100X more expensive than ground telescopes, their respective scaling relationships are similar. Another interesting speculation is that the role of technology development may be different between ground and space telescopes. For ground telescopes, the data indicates that technology development tends to reduce cost by approximately 50% every 20 years. But for space telescopes, there appears to be no such cost reduction because we do not tend to re-fly similar systems. Thus, instead of reducing cost, 20 years of technology development may be required to enable a doubling of space telescope capability. Other findings include: mass should not be used to estimate cost; spacecraft and science instrument costs account for approximately 50% of total mission cost; and, integration and testing accounts for only about 10% of total mission cost.

  4. NO2 DOAS measurements from ground and space: comparison of ground based measurements and OMI data in Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, C.; Stremme, W.; Grutter, M.

    2012-04-01

    The combination of satellite data and ground based measurements can provide valuable information about atmospheric chemistry and air quality. In this work we present a comparison between measured ground based NO2 differential columns at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) in Mexico City, using the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique and NO2 total columns measured by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard the Aura satellite using the same measurement technique. From these data, distribution maps of average NO2 above the Mexico basin were constructed and hot spots inside the city could be identified. In addition, a clear footprint was detected from the Tula industrial area, ~50 km northwest of Mexico City, where a refinery, a power plant and other industries are located. A less defined footprint was identified in the Cuernavaca basin, South of Mexico City, and the nearby cities of Toluca and Puebla do not present strong enhancements in the NO2 total columns. With this study we expect to cross-validate space and ground measurements and provide useful information for future studies.

  5. Commercial off the Shelf Ground Control Supports Calibration and Conflation from Ground to Space Based Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielová, M.; Hummel, P.

    2016-06-01

    The need for rapid deployment of aerial and satellite imagery in support of GIS and engineering integration projects require new sources of geodetic control to ensure the accuracy for geospatial projects. In the past, teams of surveyors would need to deploy to project areas to provide targeted or photo identifiable points that are used to provide data for orthorecificaion, QA/QC and calibration for multi-platform sensors. The challenge of integrating street view, UAS, airborne and Space based sensors to produce the common operational picture requires control to tie multiple sources together. Today commercial off the shelf delivery of existing photo identifiable control is increasing the speed of deployment of this data without having to revisit sites over and over again. The presentation will discuss the processes developed by CompassData to build a global library of 40,000 control points available today. International Organization for Standardization (ISO) based processes and initiatives ensure consistent quality of survey data, photo identifiable features selected and meta data to support photogrammetrist, engineers and GIS professionals to quickly deliver projects with better accuracy.

  6. A wideband fast multipole boundary element method for half-space/plane-symmetric acoustic wave problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Jun Zheng; Hai-Bo Chen; Lei-Lei Chen

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel wideband fast multipole boundary element approach to 3D half-space/planesymmetric acoustic wave problems.The half-space fundamental solution is employed in the boundary integral equations so that the tree structure required in the fast multipole algorithm is constructed for the boundary elements in the real domain only.Moreover,a set of symmetric relations between the multipole expansion coefficients of the real and image domains are derived,and the half-space fundamental solution is modified for the purpose of applying such relations to avoid calculating,translating and saving the multipole/local expansion coefficients of the image domain.The wideband adaptive multilevel fast multipole algorithm associated with the iterative solver GMRES is employed so that the present method is accurate and efficient for both lowand high-frequency acoustic wave problems.As for exterior acoustic problems,the Burton-Miller method is adopted to tackle the fictitious eigenfrequency problem involved in the conventional boundary integral equation method.Details on the implementation of the present method are described,and numerical examples are given to demonstrate its accuracy and efficiency.

  7. Space station operations task force. Panel 2 report: Ground operations and support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    The Ground Operations Concept embodied in this report provides for safe multi-user utilization of the Space Station, eases user integration, and gives users autonomy and flexibility. It provides for meaningful multi-national participation while protecting U.S. interests. The concept also supports continued space operations technology development by maintaining NASA expertise and enabling technology evolution. Given attention here are pre/post flight operations, logistics, sustaining engineering/configuration management, transportation services/rescue, and information systems and communication.

  8. A Ground-Based Validation System of Teleoperation for a Space Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Xueqian Wang; Houde Liu; Wenfu Xu; Bin Liang; Yingchun Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Teleoperation of space robots is very important for future on‐orbit service. In order to assure the task is accomplished successfully, ground experiments are required to verify the function and validity of the teleoperation system before a space robot is launched. In this paper, a ground‐based validation subsystem is developed as a part of a teleoperation system. The subsystem is mainly composed of four parts: the input verification module, the onboard verification module, the dynamic and ima...

  9. Reflection of Plane Waves in Generalized Thermoelastic Half Space under the Action of Uniform Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narottam Maity

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reflection of longitudinal displacement waves in a generalized thermoelastic half space under the action of uniform magnetic field has been investigated. The magnetic field is applied in such a direction that the problem can be considered as a two-dimensional one. The discussion is based on the three theories of generalized thermoelasticity: Lord-Shulman (L-S, Green-Lindsay (G-L, and Green-Naghdi (G-N with energy dissipation. We compute the possible wave velocities for different models. Amplitude ratios have been presented. The effects of magnetic field on various subjects of interest are discussed and shown graphically.

  10. Real-space and plane-wave hybrid method for electronic structure calculations for two-dimensional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, V. Nam; Le, H. Anh; Vu, V. Thieu

    2017-04-01

    We propose a computational approach to combining the plane-wave method and the real-space treatment to describe the periodic variation in the material plane and the decay of wave functions from the material surfaces. The proposed approach is natural for two-dimensional material systems and thus may circumvent some intrinsic limitations involving the artificial replication of material layers in traditional supercell methods. In particular, we show that the proposed method is easy to implement and, especially, computationally effective since low-cost computational algorithms, such as iterative and recursive techniques, can be used to treat matrices with block tridiagonal structure. Using this approach we show first-principles features that supplement the current knowledge of some fundamental issues in bilayer graphene systems, including the coupling between the two graphene layers, the preservation of the σ band of monolayer graphene in the electronic structure of the bilayer system, and the differences in low-energy band structure between the AA- and AB-stacked configurations.

  11. Growth and magnetic properties of epitaxial Fe4N films on insulators possessing lattice spacing close to Si(001) plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Keita; Higashikozono, Soma; Takata, Fumiya; Gushi, Toshiki; Toko, Kaoru; Suemasu, Takashi

    2016-12-01

    We grew ferromagnetic Fe4N films by molecular beam epitaxy on MgO(001), MgAl2O4(MAO)(001), SrTiO3(STO)(001), and CaF2(001) substrates, possessing the lattice spacing close to Si(001) plane. Highly oriented epitaxial growth was confirmed for the Fe4N films on the MgO, MAO, and STO by reflection high-energy electron diffraction and x-ray diffractions. The degree of orientation of the Fe4N film on the STO was the best among these samples. This was attributed to the smallest lattice mismatch of -2.8% between Fe4N(001) and STO(001). On the other hand, crystallinity of the Fe4N film on the CaF2(001) substrate was poor due to a very large lattice mismatch of -30% between Fe4N(001) and CaF2(001) arising from the unexpected epitaxial relationship as Fe4N(001)[100] || CaF2(001)[100]. The saturation magnetization of the Fe4N films was approximately 1200 emu/cm3 at room temperature for all the samples, and the magnetization easy axis was in-plane Fe4N[100]. We consider that STO is the suitable buffer layer for the growth of Fe4N on Si(001), hence to realize the Si-based spintronics devices using highly spin-polarized Fe4N.

  12. Ground states for a modified capillary surface equation in weighted Orlicz-Sobolev space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqing Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we prove a compact embedding theorem for the weighted Orlicz-Sobolev space of radially symmetric functions. Using the embedding theorem and critical points theory, we prove the existence of multiple radial solutions and radial ground states for the following modified capillary surface equation $$\\displaylines{ -\\operatorname{div}\\Big(\\frac{|\

  13. Space situational awareness satellites and ground based radiation counting and imaging detector technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, Frank, E-mail: frank.jansen@dlr.de [DLR Institute of Space Systems, Robert-Hooke-Str. 7, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Behrens, Joerg [DLR Institute of Space Systems, Robert-Hooke-Str. 7, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Pospisil, Stanislav [Czech Technical University, IEAP, 12800 Prague 2, Horska 3a/22 (Czech Republic); Kudela, Karel [Slovak Academy of Sciences, IEP, 04001 Kosice, Watsonova 47 (Slovakia)

    2011-05-15

    We review the current status from the scientific and technological point of view of solar energetic particles, solar and galactic cosmic ray measurements as well as high energy UV-, X- and gamma-ray imaging of the Sun. These particles and electromagnetic data are an important tool for space situational awareness (SSA) aspects like space weather storm predictions to avoid failures in space, air and ground based technological systems. Real time data acquisition, position and energy sensitive imaging are demanded by the international space weather forecast services. We present how newly developed, highly miniaturized radiation detectors can find application in space in view of future SSA related satellites as a novel space application due to their counting and imaging capabilities.

  14. NASA's CubeQuest Challenge - From Ground Tournaments to Lunar and Deep Space Derby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Elizabeth Lee; Cockrell, James J.

    2017-01-01

    The First Flight of NASA's Space Launch System will feature 13 CubeSats that will launch into cis-lunar space. Three of these CubeSats are winners of the CubeQuest Challenge, part of NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Centennial Challenge Program. In order to qualify for launch on EM-1, the winning teams needed to win a series of Ground Tournaments, periodically held since 2015. The final Ground Tournament, GT-4, was held in May 2017, and resulted in the Top 3 selection for the EM-1 launch opportunity. The Challenge now proceeds to the in-space Derbies, where teams must build and test their spacecraft before launch on EM-1. Once in space, they will compete for a variety of Communications and Propulsion-based challenges. This is the first Centennial Challenge to compete in space and is a springboard for future in-space Challenges. In addition, the technologies gained from this challenge will also propel development of deep space CubeSats.

  15. A 1D time-domain method for in-plane wave motions in a layered half-space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingbo Liu; Yan Wang

    2007-01-01

    A 1D finite element method in time domain is developed in this paper and applied to calculate in-plane wave motions of free field exited by SV or P wave oblique incidence in an elastic layered half-space. First, the layered half-space is discretized on the basis of the propagation cha-racteristic of elastic wave according to the Snell law. Then, the finite element method with lumped mass and the cen-tral difference method are incorporated to establish 2D wave motion equations, which can be transformed into 1D equa-tions by discretization principle and explicit finite element method. By solving the 1D equations, the displacements of nodes in any vertical line can be obtained, and the wave motions in layered half-space are finally determined based on the characteristic of traveling wave. Both the theoretical ana-lysis and the numerical results demonstrate that the proposed method has high accuracy and good stability.

  16. Two-body scattering states in Minkowski space and the Nakanishi integral representation onto the null plane

    CERN Document Server

    Frederico, Tobias; Viviani, Michele

    2011-01-01

    The Nakanishi perturbative integral representation of the four-dimensional T-matrix is investigated in order to get a workable treatment for scattering states, solutions of the inhomogeneous Bethe-Salpeter Equation, in Minkowski space. The projection onto the null-plane of the four-dimensional inhomogeneous Bethe-Salpeter Equation plays a key role for devising an equation for the Nakanishi weight function (a real function), as in the homogeneous case that corresponds to bound states and it has been already studied within different frameworks. In this paper, the whole formal development is illustrated in detail and applied to a system, composed by two massive scalars interacting through the exchange of a massive scalar. The explicit expression of the scattering integral equations are also obtained in ladder approximation, and, as simple applications of our formalism, some limiting cases, like the zero-energy limit and the Wick-Cutkosky model in the continuum, are presented.

  17. Making Ground, Losing Space: Land Reclamation and Urban Public Space in Island Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Grydehøj

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article foregrounds urban public space by considering land reclamation in island cities. Land reclamation is nearly ubiquitous in the urban development of coastal cities, and island cities in particular are subject to exceptionally dense urbanisation and thus exceptionally strong conflict over urban space. Drawing upon theories at the intersection of the land and the sea (liquid, archipelago, and aquapelago spatiality, we analyse socially problematic aspects of the creation of new urban space through land reclamation. Land reclamation occurs in island cities such as Bahrain, Copenhagen, Dubai, Hong Kong, Macau, New York City, and Xiamen in order to construct space for urban industrial, residential, and leisure functions while avoiding the social conflict that often accompanies urban renewal efforts. However, whether in the case of publically accessible leisure parks or secessionary island enclaves for the ultra-rich, land reclamation processes serve powerful societal forces and represent the capture of urban space for elite interests. This reduces the prospects for urban public space and limits the horizons for the development of more socially just future cities. The transformation of unclaimed fluid space into solid private space is a relative form of accumulation by dispossession, even if the public has never been aware of what it possessed.

  18. Effluent Containment System for space thermal nuclear propulsion ground test facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-08-01

    This report presents the research and development study work performed for the Space Reactor Power System Division of the U.S. Department of Energy on an innovative effluent containment system (ECS) that would be used during ground testing of a space nuclear thermal rocket engine. A significant portion of the ground test facilities for a space nuclear thermal propulsion engine are the effluent treatment and containment systems. The proposed ECS configuration developed recycles all engine coolant media and does not impact the environment by venting radioactive material. All coolant media, hydrogen and water, are collected, treated for removal of radioactive particulates, and recycled for use in subsequent tests until the end of the facility life. Radioactive materials removed by the treatment systems are recovered, stored for decay of short-lived isotopes, or packaged for disposal as waste. At the end of the useful life, the facility will be decontaminated and dismantled for disposal.

  19. Experimental investigation of space--energy distributions of slow neutrons in water near plane absorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussein, A.; El-Konsol, S.; Novikov, A.; Zakharkin, I.; Hamouda, I.

    1973-12-31

    A mechanical neutron time-of-flight spectrometer was used to measure neutron space-energy distributions near a cadmium plate, of 1 mm thickness, immersed in a water-filled tank. The ET-RR-1 reactor served as a neutron source. Measurements of thermal and resonance neutron distributions, using activation technique, were performed in the tank with and without the cadmium plate. Measurements were made of the neutron spectra emerging normally from the plate ( mu = +1). The spectra were measured at the distances 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.5, 3.0, and 5.0 cm from the plate surface. An exit tube was used to extract the neutron beam from the region of measurement. The required corrections were introduced to the measured spectra. The measurements are discussed and analyzed in the framework of the neutron temperature approximation. An appreciable softening effect is observed for the measured neutron spectra of mu = +1. The temperature for the spectrum at a distance of 0.25 cm from the plate was 41 deg lower than that of the asymptotic spectrum, and the softening effect relaxed and vanished at a distance of 5 cm. (18 figures) (auth)

  20. SCATTERING OF SH-WAVE BY CIRCULAR CAVITY IN RIGHT-ANGLE PLANE AND SEISMIC GROUND MOTION%SH波对直角平面区域内圆形衬砌的散射与地震动

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张根昌; 齐辉; 刘平安

    2013-01-01

    The scattering of SH-wave with arbitrary incident angle by a circular lining in a right-angle plane is studied together with its influence on the seismic ground motion. The problem in a right-angle plane is transformed into the scattering of SH-wave in half-space by using the complex function method, the multi-polar coordinate transformation and the image method. According to the boundary conditions , the solution of the problem can be reduced to a series of algebraic equations. The numerical examples show that the concentration of the dynamic stress and the ground motion are related with the different wave numbers, the angle, the geometrical location and the thickness of the circular cavity.%研究了以任意方向入射的平面SH波对直角平面区域内圆形衬砌的散射与地震动问题.利用复变函数法、多极坐标移动技术及镜像法,将直角平面区域内的波场延拓于半无限空间,根据边界条件将该问题的解答可归结为对一组无穷代数方程组的求解问题,通过算例考虑衬砌的动应力集中和地表位移.结果表明,衬砌的动应力集中和地表位移幅值取决于入射波频率、角度、衬砌的位置和厚度比.

  1. Level-Ground Walking for 3D Quasi-Passive Walker with Flat Feet - Lateral-plane Input using McKibben-Type Artificial Muscle -

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamoto Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, many bipedal robots have been proposed to realize the high energy efficiency walking. The passive dynamic walking does not require control input. Generally, a foot of passive dynamic walking robot is an arc foot. In this paper, it is intended to establish a control method and control mechanism to achieve energy efficient and stable gate. Therefore, we developed 3D quasi-passive walker with flat feet driven by an antagonistic pneumatic artificial muscle. An antagonistic mechanism is constituted by a pair of McKibben muscle. And an antagonistic pneumatic system is used as joint actuators of linkage mechanisms which control the torque, joint stiffness and position simultaneously. Finally, this report shows that the 3D quasi-passive walking in the level ground can realize by the swinging (simple input of the frontal direction, and the stride of the robot is proportional to lateral-plane input.

  2. Precision simulation of ground-based lensing data using observations from space

    CERN Document Server

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Leauthaud, Alexie; Massey, Richard J; Rhodes, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Current and upcoming wide-field, ground-based, broad-band imaging surveys promise to address a wide range of outstanding problems in galaxy formation and cosmology. Several such uses of ground-based data, especially weak gravitational lensing, require highly precise measurements of galaxy image statistics with careful correction for the effects of the point-spread function (PSF). In this paper, we introduce the SHERA (SHEar Reconvolution Analysis) software to simulate ground-based imaging data with realistic galaxy morphologies and observing conditions, starting from space-based data (from COSMOS, the Cosmological Evolution Survey) and accounting for the effects of the space-based PSF. This code simulates ground-based data, optionally with a weak lensing shear applied, in a model-independent way using a general Fourier space formalism. The utility of this pipeline is that it allows for a precise, realistic assessment of systematic errors due to the method of data processing, for example in extracting weak len...

  3. Spectrally selective surfaces for ground and space-based instrumentation: support for a resource base

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Susan H.; Sinclair, R. Lawrence; Pompea, Stephen M.; Breault, Robert P.

    1993-11-01

    The performance of space telescopes, space instruments, and space radiator systems depends critically upon the selection of appropriate spectrally selective surfaces. Many space programs have suffered severe performance limitations, schedule setbacks, and spent hundreds of thousands of dollars in damage control because of a lack of readily-accessible, accurate data on the properties of spectrally selective surfaces, particularly black surfaces. A Canadian effort is underway to develop a resource base (database and support service) to help alleviate this problem. The assistance of the community is required to make the resource base comprehensive and useful to the end users. The paper aims to describe the objectives of this project. In addition, a request for information and support is made for various aspects of the project. The resource base will be useful for both ground and space-based instrumentation.

  4. Total transmission of incident plane waves that satisfy the Brewster conditions at a free-space-chiral interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar, Ezekiel

    2010-09-01

    The common definition of the Brewster angles for dielectric and magnetic achiral materials are the angles at which the vertically and horizontally polarized reflection coefficients vanish. We examine broader definitions of the Brewster conditions for waves that are incident on a free-space-chiral interface. Besides the common definition, the Brewster angles have been defined as the angles at which the polarizations of the reflected waves are independent of the polarizations of the incident waves. We consider total transmission of incident plane waves that satisfy the Brewster conditions at a free-space-chiral medium planar interface. In this case we determine the polarization of the incident wave for which the reflected vertically and horizontally polarized waves vanish simultaneously. Thus with this definition of the Brewster conditions the polarization of the reflected wave is undefined. The conditions for the excitation of surface waves are considered. The characteristic polarizations that are the same for the reflected and incident waves are also examined subject to the Brewster conditions. Potential applications of this analysis are to experimentally determine the chiral or geotropic measure of the medium and to identify and characterize biological and chemical materials through their optical activity in real time. Several independent measurements can be taken with the same polarimetric instrument to avoid false identifications. Since measurements can be conducted in the reflection mode they can be nonintrusive.

  5. Real time monitoring for nowcasting and forecasting ionospheric space weatherin Europe with ground digisondes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Belehaki

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The Earth's ionosphere largely determines space weather effects on radio wave communications, navigation and surveillance systems. Lately there has been an increasing demand for ionospheric nowcast and accurate forecast services by various groups of users, including European industry. The paper reviews research activities in Europe based on the exploitation of real-time ground digisondes for the provision of nowcasting and forecasting ionospheric space weather information and useful products and services to support operational applications. During the last few years, important progress in databasing, modelling and forecasting ionospheric disturbances based on real-time data from ground digisondes was achieved in the frames of COST Action 271 «Effects of the Upper Atmosphere on Terrestrial and Earth-Space Communications». Further developments are expected to be deployed with the new COST Action 724 on «Developing the basis for monitoring, modelling and predicting space weather», as well as through the Space Weather Pilot Project of the European Space Agency and through projects funded by the European Commission programmes.

  6. Comparative analysis and approximations of space-charge formation in Langmuir probes with plane, cylindrical and spherical electrodes including temperature effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdeblanquez, Eder [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de IngenierIa, Universidad del Zulia, Apartado 4011- A 526, Maracaibo, Venezuela and Centro de Investigacion de Matematicas Aplicadas Facultad de IngenierIa, Universidad del Zulia, Apartado 10486, Maracaibo (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)], E-mail: eder@luz.edu.ve

    2008-10-15

    In this paper the space-charge effects in Langmuir probes are compared for different kinds of symmetries: plane, cylindrical and spherical. A detailed analysis is performed here including temperature effects, and therefore kinetic theory is used instead of fluid equations as used by other authors. The nonlinear equations obtained here have been solved first by numerical computation and later by approximations using Bessel functions. The accuracy of each approximation is also discussed. Space-charge effects are more important in plane geometries than in the case of cylindrical or spherical symmetries.

  7. Research Objectives for Human Missions in the Proving Ground of Cis-Lunar Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, James; Niles, Paul; Eppler, Dean; Kennedy, Kriss; Lewis, Ruthan; Sullivan, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Introduction: This talk will introduce the preliminary findings in support of NASA's Future Capabilities Team. In support of the ongoing studies conducted by NASA's Future Capabilities Team, we are tasked with collecting re-search objectives for the Proving Ground activities. The objectives could include but are certainly not limited to: demonstrating crew well being and performance over long duration missions, characterizing lunar volatiles, Earth monitoring, near Earth object search and identification, support of a far-side radio telescope, and measuring impact of deep space environment on biological systems. Beginning in as early as 2023, crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit will be enabled by the new capabilities of the SLS and Orion vehicles. This will initiate the "Proving Ground" phase of human exploration with Mars as an ultimate destination. The primary goal of the Proving Ground is to demonstrate the capability of suitably long dura-tion spaceflight without need of continuous support from Earth, i.e. become Earth Independent. A major component of the Proving Ground phase is to conduct research activities aimed at accomplishing major objectives selected from a wide variety of disciplines including but not limited to: Astronomy, Heliophysics, Fun-damental Physics, Planetary Science, Earth Science, Human Systems, Fundamental Space Biology, Microgravity, and In Situ Resource Utilization. Mapping and prioritizing the most important objectives from these disciplines will provide a strong foundation for establishing the architecture to be utilized in the Proving Ground. Possible Architectures: Activities and objectives will be accomplished during the Proving Ground phase using a deep space habitat. This habitat will potentially be accompanied by a power/propulsion bus capable of moving the habitat to accomplish different objectives within cis-lunar space. This architecture can also potentially support stag-ing of robotic and tele-robotic assets as well as

  8. Comparing Dawn, Hubble Space Telescope, and Ground-Based Interpretations of (4) Vesta

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, Vishnu; Corre, Lucille Le; Scully, Jennifer E C; Gaskell, Robert; Russell, Christopher T; Park, Ryan S; Nathues, Andreas; Raymond, Carol; Gaffey, Michael J; Sierks, Holger; Becker, Kris J; McFadden, Lucy A

    2013-01-01

    Observations of asteroid 4 Vesta by NASA's Dawn spacecraft are interesting because its surface has the largest range of albedo, color and composition of any other asteroid visited by spacecraft to date. These hemispherical and rotational variations in surface brightness and composition have been attributed to impact processes since Vesta's formation. Prior to Dawn's arrival at Vesta, its surface properties were the focus of intense telescopic investigations for nearly a hundred years. Ground-based photometric and spectroscopic observations first revealed these variations followed later by those using Hubble Space Telescope. Here we compare interpretations of Vesta's rotation period, pole, albedo, topographic, color, and compositional properties from ground-based telescopes and HST with those from Dawn. Rotational spectral variations observed from ground-based studies are also consistent with those observed by Dawn. While the interpretation of some of these features was tenuous from past data, the interpretati...

  9. Shuttle Ground Support Equipment (GSE) T-0 Umbilical to Space Shuttle Program (SSP) Flight Elements Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Timmy R.; Kichak, Robert A.; McManamen, John P.; Kramer-White, Julie; Raju, Ivatury S.; Beil, Robert J.; Weeks, John F.; Elliott, Kenny B.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was tasked with assessing the validity of an alternate opinion that surfaced during the investigation of recurrent failures at the Space Shuttle T-0 umbilical interface. The most visible problem occurred during the Space Transportation System (STS)-112 launch when pyrotechnics used to separate Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Hold-Down Post (HDP) frangible nuts failed to fire. Subsequent investigations recommended several improvements to the Ground Support Equipment (GSE) and processing changes were implemented, including replacement of ground-half cables and connectors between flights, along with wiring modifications to make critical circuits quad-redundant across the interface. The alternate opinions maintained that insufficient data existed to exonerate the design, that additional data needed to be gathered under launch conditions, and that the interface should be further modified to ensure additional margin existed to preclude failure. The results of the assessment are contained in this report.

  10. Nulling interferometry: performance comparison between space and ground-based sites for exozodiacal disc detection

    CERN Document Server

    Defrère, D; Foresto, V Coudé du; Danchi, W C; Hartog, R den

    2008-01-01

    Characterising the circumstellar dust around nearby main sequence stars is a necessary step in understanding the planetary formation process and is crucial for future life-finding space missions such as ESA's Darwin or NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF). Besides paving the technological way to Darwin/TPF, the space-based infrared interferometers Pegase and FKSI (Fourier-Kelvin Stellar Interferometer) will be valuable scientific precursors in that respect. In this paper, we investigate the performance of Pegase and FKSI for exozodiacal disc detection and compare the results with ground-based nulling interferometers. Besides their main scientific goal (characterising hot giant extrasolar planets), Pegase and FKSI are very efficient in assessing within a few minutes the level of circumstellar dust in the habitable zone around nearby main sequence stars. They are capable of detecting exozodiacal discs respectively 5 and 1 time as dense as the solar zodiacal cloud and they outperform any ground-based instrumen...

  11. Retrieving the aerosol lidar ratio profile by combining ground- and space-based elastic lidars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiyue, Mao; Wei, Gong; Yingying, Ma

    2012-02-15

    The aerosol lidar ratio is a key parameter for the retrieval of aerosol optical properties from elastic lidar, which changes largely for aerosols with different chemical and physical properties. We proposed a method for retrieving the aerosol lidar ratio profile by combining simultaneous ground- and space-based elastic lidars. The method was tested by a simulated case and a real case at 532 nm wavelength. The results demonstrated that our method is robust and can obtain accurate lidar ratio and extinction coefficient profiles. Our method can be useful for determining the local and global lidar ratio and validating space-based lidar datasets.

  12. Planet Sensitivity from Combined Ground- and Space-based Microlensing Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Wei; Beichman, Charles; Novati, Sebastiano Calchi; Carey, Sean; Gaudi, B Scott; Henderson, Calen B; Penny, Matthew; Shvartzvald, Yossi; Yee, Jennifer C; Udalski, A; Poleski, R; Skowron, J; Kozlowski, S; Mroz, P; Pietrukowicz, P; Pietrzynski, G; Szymanski, M K; Soszynski, I; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, L; Abe, F; Barry, R K; Bennett, D P; Bhattacharya, A; Fukunaga, D; Inayama, K; Koshimoto, N; Namba, S; Sumi, T; Suzuki, D; Tristram, P J; Wakiyama, Y; Yonehara, A; Maoz, D; Kaspi, S; Friedmann, M

    2015-01-01

    To move one step forward toward a Galactic distribution of planets, we present the first planet sensitivity analysis for microlensing events with simultaneous observations from space and the ground. We present this analysis for two such events, OGLE-2014-BLG-0939 and OGLE-2014-BLG-0124, which both show substantial planet sensitivity even though neither of them reached high magnification. This suggests that an ensemble of low to moderate magnification events can also yield significant planet sensitivity and therefore probability to detect planets. The implications of our results to the ongoing and future space-based microlensing experiments to measure the Galactic distribution of planets are discussed.

  13. Ground-based Observations of the Solar Sources of Space Weather (Invited Review)

    CERN Document Server

    Veronig, Astrid M

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring of the Sun and its activity is a task of growing importance in the frame of space weather research and awareness. Major space weather disturbances at Earth have their origin in energetic outbursts from the Sun: solar flares, coronal mass ejections and associated solar energetic particles. In this review we discuss the importance and complementarity of ground-based and space-based observations for space weather studies. The main focus is drawn on ground-based observations in the visible range of the spectrum, in particular in the diagnostically manifold H$\\alpha$ spectral line, which enables us to detect and study solar flares, filaments, filament eruptions, and Moreton waves. Existing H$\\alpha$ networks such as the GONG and the Global High-Resolution H$\\alpha$ Network are discussed. As an example of solar observations from space weather research to operations, we present the system of real-time detection of H$\\alpha$ flares and filaments established at Kanzelh\\"ohe Observatory (KSO; Austria) in the...

  14. Prototype of space-borne LTT module and its ground tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In order to develop the technique of Laser Time Transfer(LTT) ,Shanghai Astronomical Observatory has built a prototype of space-borne LTT module. The performance of the LTT module and the results of ground tests are discussed in the paper. The average precision of time difference between two rubidium clocks measured by laser pulses is 196 ps,and the uncertainty of measurement for the relative frequency differences is 1.2×10-13/2800 s.

  15. Direct imaging of extrasolar planets: overview of ground and space programs

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony, Boccaletti

    2009-01-01

    With the ever-growing number of exoplanets detected, the issue of characterization is becoming more and more relevant. Direct imaging is certainly the most efficient but the most challenging tool to probe the atmosphere of exoplanets and hence in turns determine the physical properties and refine models of exoplanets. A number of instruments optimized for exoplanets imaging are now operating or planned for the short and long term both on the ground and in space. This paper reviews these instr...

  16. An equivalent ground thermal test method for single-phase fluid loop space radiator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Xianwen; Wang Yuying; Zhang Jiaxun; Liu Dongxiao

    2015-01-01

    Thermal vacuum test is widely used for the ground validation of spacecraft thermal con-trol system. However, the conduction and convection can be simulated in normal ground pressure environment completely. By the employment of pumped fluid loops’ thermal control technology on spacecraft, conduction and convection become the main heat transfer behavior between radiator and inside cabin. As long as the heat transfer behavior between radiator and outer space can be equivalently simulated in normal pressure, the thermal vacuum test can be substituted by the nor-mal ground pressure thermal test. In this paper, an equivalent normal pressure thermal test method for the spacecraft single-phase fluid loop radiator is proposed. The heat radiation between radiator and outer space has been equivalently simulated by combination of a group of refrigerators and thermal electrical cooler (TEC) array. By adjusting the heat rejection of each device, the relationship between heat flux and surface temperature of the radiator can be maintained. To verify this method, a validating system has been built up and the experiments have been carried out. The results indi-cate that the proposed equivalent ground thermal test method can simulate the heat rejection per-formance of radiator correctly and the temperature error between in-orbit theory value and experiment result of the radiator is less than 0.5 ?C, except for the equipment startup period. This provides a potential method for the thermal test of space systems especially for extra-large space-craft which employs single-phase fluid loop radiator as thermal control approach.

  17. SPARCL: a high-altitude tethered balloon-based optical space-to-ground communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badesha, Surjit S.

    2002-12-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) has conducted a feasibility study to determine if a high altitude (20 km) tethered balloon-based space-to-ground optical communication system is a feasible concept. To support this effort, a detailed concept definition was developed and associated issues were identified and analyzed systematically. Of all the adverse atmospheric phenomena, cloud coverage was identified as the most prohibitive obstacle for a space-to-ground optical communication link. However, by placing a receiver on a balloon at a 20 km altitude, the proposed high altitude system avoids virtually all atmospheric effects. A practical notional scenario was developed (i.e. surveillance and/or reconnaissance of a regional conflict) involving end-to-end optical communication architecture to identify system elements, system level requirements, and to quantify realistic data rate requirements. Analysis of the proposed space-to-ground communication elements indicates that while significant development is required, the system is technically feasible and is a very cost effective 24/7solution.

  18. Comparison of optical observational capabilities for the coming decades: ground versus space

    CERN Document Server

    Mountain, Matt; Soummer, Remi; Koekemoer, Anton; Ferguson, Harry; Postman, Marc; Gavel, Donald T; Guyon, Olivier; Simons, Douglas; Traub, Wesley A

    2009-01-01

    Ground-based adaptive optics (AO) in the infrared has made exceptional advances in approaching space-like image quality at higher collecting area. Optical-wavelength applications are now also growing in scope. We therefore provide here a comparison of the pros and cons of observational capabilities from the ground and from space at optical wavelengths. With an eye towards the future, we focus on the comparison of a ~30m ground-based telescope with an 8-16m space-based telescope. We review the current state-of-the-art in AO, and summarize the expected future improvements in image quality, field of view, contrast, and low-wavelength cut-off. We discuss the exciting advances in extreme AO for exoplanet studies and explore what the theoretical limitations in achievable contrast might be. Our analysis shows that extreme AO techniques face both fundamental and technological hurdles to reach the contrast of 1E-10 necessary to study an Earth-twin at 10 pc. Based on our assessment of the current state-of-the-art, the ...

  19. Dynamic interaction of twin vertically overlapping lined tunnels in an elastic half space subjected to incident plane waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongxian; Wang, Yirui; Liang, Jianwen

    2016-06-01

    The scattering of plane harmonic P and SV waves by a pair of vertically overlapping lined tunnels buried in an elastic half space is solved using a semi-analytic indirect boundary integration equation method. Then the effect of the distance between the two tunnels, the stiffness and density of the lining material, and the incident frequency on the seismic response of the tunnels is investigated. Numerical results demonstrate that the dynamic interaction between the twin tunnels cannot be ignored and the lower tunnel has a significant shielding effect on the upper tunnel for high-frequency incident waves, resulting in great decrease of the dynamic hoop stress in the upper tunnel; for the low-frequency incident waves, in contrast, the lower tunnel can lead to amplification effect on the upper tunnel. It also reveals that the frequency-spectrum characteristics of dynamic stress of the lower tunnel are significantly different from those of the upper tunnel. In addition, for incident P waves in low-frequency region, the soft lining tunnels have significant amplification effect on the surface displacement amplitude, which is slightly larger than that of the corresponding single tunnel.

  20. Thermal Contributions to the Degradation of Ground Laboratory and Space Irradiated Teflon

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Martin, Morgana

    2003-01-01

    The aluminized Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene outer most layer of the multilayer insulation blankets on the Hubble Space Telescope has become embrittled resulting in severe on-orbit cracking. During the second servicing mission, a piece of aluminized fluorinated ethylene propylene was retrieved that had curled, exposing the back-surface aluminum to space. This extremely embrittled piece reached 200 C on-orbit, 150 C higher than the nominal temperature extreme. Therefore, experiments have been conducted to determine the effect of heating on the degradation of fluorinated ethylene propylene that has been irradiated in a ground laboratory facility or in space on Hubble Space Telescope. Samples of pristine, x-ray irradiated and Hubble Space Telescope retrieved fluorinated ethylene propylene were heat treated from 50 to 200 C at 25 C intervals in a high vacuum facility and tensile tested. Density measurements were also obtained. Results indicate that heating does not embrittle non-irradiated Teflon. However, there is a significant dependence of the embrittlement of irradiated Teflon on heating temperature, with near complete loss of elongation at 100 C and higher. Rate of degradation changes, which were consistent with the glass transition temperature for fluorinated ethylene propylene, were present in the data. The results support chain scission as the primary mechanism of degradation of fluorinated ethylene propylene on Hubble Space Telescope, and indicate the significance of the on-orbit temperature of fluorinated ethylene propylene with respect to its degradation in the space environment.

  1. Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) space to ground mission data architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jack L.; Ames, J.A.; Williams, J.; Patschke, R.; Mott, C.; Joseph, J.; Garon, H.; Mah, G.

    2012-01-01

    The Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) is a scientific endeavor to extend the longest continuous multi-spectral imaging record of Earth's land surface. The observatory consists of a spacecraft bus integrated with two imaging instruments; the Operational Land Imager (OLI), built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation in Boulder, Colorado, and the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS), an in-house instrument built at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Both instruments are integrated aboard a fine-pointing, fully redundant, spacecraft bus built by Orbital Sciences Corporation, Gilbert, Arizona. The mission is scheduled for launch in January 2013. This paper will describe the innovative end-to-end approach for efficiently managing high volumes of simultaneous realtime and playback of image and ancillary data from the instruments to the reception at the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Landsat Ground Network (LGN) and International Cooperator (IC) ground stations. The core enabling capability lies within the spacecraft Command and Data Handling (C&DH) system and Radio Frequency (RF) communications system implementation. Each of these systems uniquely contribute to the efficient processing of high speed image data (up to 265Mbps) from each instrument, and provide virtually error free data delivery to the ground. Onboard methods include a combination of lossless data compression, Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) data formatting, a file-based/managed Solid State Recorder (SSR), and Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) forward error correction. The 440 Mbps wideband X-Band downlink uses Class 1 CCSDS File Delivery Protocol (CFDP), and an earth coverage antenna to deliver an average of 400 scenes per day to a combination of LGN and IC ground stations. This paper will also describe the integrated capabilities and processes at the LGN ground stations for data reception using adaptive filtering, and the mission operations approach fro- the LDCM

  2. Influence of variations in the electron-electron interaction on the ground state metric space "band structure" of a two-electron magnetic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, P. M.; D'Amico, I.

    2016-02-01

    We consider a model system of two electrons confined in a two-dimensional harmonic oscillator potential, with the electrons interacting via an α / r2 potential, and subject to a magnetic field applied perpendicular to the plane of confinement. Our results show that variations in the strength of the electron-electron interaction generate a "band structure" in ground state metric spaces, which shares many characteristics with those generated as a result of varying the confinement potential. In particular, the metric spaces for wavefunctions, particle densities, and paramagnetic current densities all exhibit distinct "bands" and "gaps". The behavior of the polar angle of the bands also shares traits with that obtained by varying the confinement potential, but the behavior of the arc lengths of the bands on the metric space spheres can be seen to be different for the two cases and opposite for a large range of angular momentum values. The findings here and in Refs. [1,2] demonstrate that the "band structure" that arises in ground state metric spaces when a magnetic field is applied is a robust feature.

  3. Halo Observations from the Ground and from Space: Further Checks on the Sprite Polarity Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E.; Kuo, C.; Bor, J.; Satori, G.; Newsome, R. T.; Boldi, R. A.; Downes, E.; Saba, M. M.; Taylor, M. J.; Chen, A. B.; Lyons, W. A.

    2009-12-01

    In continuing efforts to verify the hypothesis that halos produced by negative polarity ground flashes provide a resolution to the ‘sprite polarity paradox’ and are caused by the fast initial charge transfer in the lightning return stroke, additional halo observations are considered from the ground and from space. The ground-based observations include standard frame-rate video cameras, a high-time resolution (40 microsec)) photometer (called PIPER), the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), and ELF charge moment observations from Nagycenk Observatory in Hungary. The space-based observations are measurements from the limb-viewing ISUAL satellite. The observations in support of the hypothesis are: (1) charge moments of the same magnitude required for sprites are evident for ‘negative’ halos, (2) negative halos outnumber positive halos in both ISUAL and PIPER observations, (3) short (working hypothesis are (1) ISUAL peak lightning brightnesses are no larger for negative than for positive halo-parent lightning flashes, (2) NLDN peak currents for brighter ‘positive’ halos are not notably larger than for dimmer ‘negative’ flashes, and (3) ELF measurements of charge moments for negative flashes tend to be greater than for positive flashes. An additional similarity between ground- and space-based observations is the tendency for halos to be produced by single-stroke negative flashes, a distinct departure from the statistics of stroke multiplicity for all negative flashes with large peak current. The reason for the polarity asymmetry in the parent lightning flash, at the origin of the sprite polarity asymmetry, remains an open question.

  4. An equivalent ground thermal test method for single-phase fluid loop space radiator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Xianwen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermal vacuum test is widely used for the ground validation of spacecraft thermal control system. However, the conduction and convection can be simulated in normal ground pressure environment completely. By the employment of pumped fluid loops’ thermal control technology on spacecraft, conduction and convection become the main heat transfer behavior between radiator and inside cabin. As long as the heat transfer behavior between radiator and outer space can be equivalently simulated in normal pressure, the thermal vacuum test can be substituted by the normal ground pressure thermal test. In this paper, an equivalent normal pressure thermal test method for the spacecraft single-phase fluid loop radiator is proposed. The heat radiation between radiator and outer space has been equivalently simulated by combination of a group of refrigerators and thermal electrical cooler (TEC array. By adjusting the heat rejection of each device, the relationship between heat flux and surface temperature of the radiator can be maintained. To verify this method, a validating system has been built up and the experiments have been carried out. The results indicate that the proposed equivalent ground thermal test method can simulate the heat rejection performance of radiator correctly and the temperature error between in-orbit theory value and experiment result of the radiator is less than 0.5 °C, except for the equipment startup period. This provides a potential method for the thermal test of space systems especially for extra-large spacecraft which employs single-phase fluid loop radiator as thermal control approach.

  5. NASA Space Technology Draft Roadmap Area 13: Ground and Launch Systems Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Greg

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the technology development roadmap for the area of ground and launch systems processing. The scope of this technology area includes: (1) Assembly, integration, and processing of the launch vehicle, spacecraft, and payload hardware (2) Supply chain management (3) Transportation of hardware to the launch site (4) Transportation to and operations at the launch pad (5) Launch processing infrastructure and its ability to support future operations (6) Range, personnel, and facility safety capabilities (7) Launch and landing weather (8) Environmental impact mitigations for ground and launch operations (9) Launch control center operations and infrastructure (10) Mission integration and planning (11) Mission training for both ground and flight crew personnel (12) Mission control center operations and infrastructure (13) Telemetry and command processing and archiving (14) Recovery operations for flight crews, flight hardware, and returned samples. This technology roadmap also identifies ground, launch and mission technologies that will: (1) Dramatically transform future space operations, with significant improvement in life-cycle costs (2) Improve the quality of life on earth, while exploring in co-existence with the environment (3) Increase reliability and mission availability using low/zero maintenance materials and systems, comprehensive capabilities to ascertain and forecast system health/configuration, data integration, and the use of advanced/expert software systems (4) Enhance methods to assess safety and mission risk posture, which would allow for timely and better decision making. Several key technologies are identified, with a couple of slides devoted to one of these technologies (i.e., corrosion detection and prevention). Development of these technologies can enhance life on earth and have a major impact on how we can access space, eventually making routine commercial space access and improve building and manufacturing, and weather

  6. NASA solar dynamic ground test demonstration (GTD) program and its application to space nuclear power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, William B.; Shaltens, Richard K.

    1993-01-01

    Closed Brayton cycle power conversion systems are readily adaptable to any heat source contemplated for space application. The inert gas working fluid can be used directly in gas-cooled reactors and coupled to a variety of heat sources (reactor, isotope or solar) by a heat exchanger. This point is demonstrated by the incorporation in the NASA 2 kWe Solar Dynamic (SD) Space Power Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) Program of the turboalternator-compressor and recuperator from the Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) program. This paper will review the goals and status of the SD GTD Program, initiated in April 1992. The performance of the BIPS isotope-heated system will be compared to the solar-heated GTD system incorporating the BIPS components and the applicability of the GTD test bed to dynamics space nuclear power R&D will be discussed.

  7. Space life sciences: ground-based iron-ion biology and physics, including shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This session of the 35th Scientific Assembly of COSPAR focuses on recent advances in ground-based studies of high-energy (mainly 1 GeV/nucleon) iron ions. The theme is interdisciplinary in nature and encompasses both physics and biology reports. Manned space missions, including those of the International Space Station and the planned Mars mission, will require the extended presence of crew members in space. As such, a better understanding in shielding design--in radiation detection as well as radio-protection based on simulating studies--is much needed. On the other hand, a better understanding of the basic mechanisms that modulate radiation sensitivity; in determining DNA double strand breaks, chromosomal aberrations, and the induction of apoptosis, will provide important information for an interventional approach.

  8. Numerical simulation of the effect of wind removing the corona space charge over grounded structures under thunderstorm conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Stephan; Lopez, Javier; Holbøll, Joachim;

    2015-01-01

    that the effectof the removal of the corona space charge by the wind leadsto a higher field strength at the grounded object and, therefore,it becomes easier for it to initiate an upward connecting leadercompared to a situation where the space charge is present. Inthis work, a simplified space charge drift model...

  9. A dataset of stereoscopic images and ground-truth disparity mimicking human fixations in peripersonal space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canessa, Andrea; Gibaldi, Agostino; Chessa, Manuela; Fato, Marco; Solari, Fabio; Sabatini, Silvio P.

    2017-03-01

    Binocular stereopsis is the ability of a visual system, belonging to a live being or a machine, to interpret the different visual information deriving from two eyes/cameras for depth perception. From this perspective, the ground-truth information about three-dimensional visual space, which is hardly available, is an ideal tool both for evaluating human performance and for benchmarking machine vision algorithms. In the present work, we implemented a rendering methodology in which the camera pose mimics realistic eye pose for a fixating observer, thus including convergent eye geometry and cyclotorsion. The virtual environment we developed relies on highly accurate 3D virtual models, and its full controllability allows us to obtain the stereoscopic pairs together with the ground-truth depth and camera pose information. We thus created a stereoscopic dataset: GENUA PESTO—GENoa hUman Active fixation database: PEripersonal space STereoscopic images and grOund truth disparity. The dataset aims to provide a unified framework useful for a number of problems relevant to human and computer vision, from scene exploration and eye movement studies to 3D scene reconstruction.

  10. A dataset of stereoscopic images and ground-truth disparity mimicking human fixations in peripersonal space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canessa, Andrea; Gibaldi, Agostino; Chessa, Manuela; Fato, Marco; Solari, Fabio; Sabatini, Silvio P

    2017-03-28

    Binocular stereopsis is the ability of a visual system, belonging to a live being or a machine, to interpret the different visual information deriving from two eyes/cameras for depth perception. From this perspective, the ground-truth information about three-dimensional visual space, which is hardly available, is an ideal tool both for evaluating human performance and for benchmarking machine vision algorithms. In the present work, we implemented a rendering methodology in which the camera pose mimics realistic eye pose for a fixating observer, thus including convergent eye geometry and cyclotorsion. The virtual environment we developed relies on highly accurate 3D virtual models, and its full controllability allows us to obtain the stereoscopic pairs together with the ground-truth depth and camera pose information. We thus created a stereoscopic dataset: GENUA PESTO-GENoa hUman Active fixation database: PEripersonal space STereoscopic images and grOund truth disparity. The dataset aims to provide a unified framework useful for a number of problems relevant to human and computer vision, from scene exploration and eye movement studies to 3D scene reconstruction.

  11. A Ground-Based Array to Observe Geospace Electrodynamics During Adverse Space Weather Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, J. J.; Eccles, J. V.; Rice, D.

    2004-05-01

    Geomagnetic Storms occur with surprising frequency and create adverse space weather conditions. During these periods, our knowledge and ability to specify or forecast in adequate detail for user needs is negligible. Neither experimental observations nor theoretical developments have made a significant new impact on the problem for over two decades. Although we can now map Total Electron Content (TEC) in the ionosphere over a continent with sufficient resolution to see coherent long-lived structures, these do not provide constraints on the geospace electrodynamics that is at the heart of our lack of understanding. We present arguments for the need of a continental deployment of ground-based sensors to stepwise advance our understanding of the geospace electrodynamics when it is most adverse from a space weather perspective and also most frustrating from an understanding of Magnetosphere-Ionosphere coupling. That a continental-scale deployment is more productive at addressing the problem than a realizable global distribution is shown. Each measurement is discussed from the point-of-view of either providing new knowledge or becoming a key for future real-time specification and forecasting for user applications. An example of a storm database from one mid-latitude station for the 31 March 2002 is used as a conceptual point in a ground-based array. The presentation focuses on scientific questions that have eluded a quantitative solution for over three decades and view a ground-based array as an "IGY" type of catalyst for answering these questions.

  12. Thermal Contributions to the Degradation of Ground-Laboratory- and Space-Irradiated Teflon Investigated

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Martin, Morgana

    2003-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is covered with two primary types of thermal control materials, radiators and multilayer insulation blankets, which passively control temperatures during orbit. Both of these thermal control materials utilize back-surface metalized Teflon FEP (DuPont, fluorinated ethylene propylene) as the exterior (spacefacing) layer because of its excellent optical properties (low solar absorptance and high thermal emittance). The aluminized-FEP (Al-FEP) outermost layer of the multilayer insulation blankets on the HST has become embrittled while in space, resulting in severe on-orbit cracking (see the photographs). During the second servicing mission, an extremely embrittled piece of Al-FEP was retrieved that had curled, exposing the backsurface aluminum to space (see the photograph on the right). Because the aluminum surface has a lower thermal emittance than the FEP, this curled piece reached 200 C during orbit, 150 C higher than the nominal temperature extreme. To better understand the effect of temperature on the rate of degradation, and on the mechanism of degradation, of this insulation material in the low-Earth-orbit environment, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center conducted experiments to determine the effect of heating on the degradation of FEP that has been irradiated in a ground laboratory facility or in space on the HST. For this study, Teflon FEP retrieved from the HST during the third servicing mission after 9.7 years of space exposure was provided to Glenn by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

  13. Ground-based Observations of the Solar Sources of Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronig, A. M.; Pötzi, W.

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring of the Sun and its activity is a task of growing importance in the frame of space weather research and awareness. Major space weather disturbances at Earth have their origin in energetic outbursts from the Sun: solar flares, coronal mass ejections and associated solar energetic particles. In this review we discuss the importance and complementarity of ground-based and space-based observations for space weather studies. The main focus is drawn on ground-based observations in the visible range of the spectrum, in particular in the diagnostically manifold Hα spectral line, which enables us to detect and study solar flares, filaments (prominences), filament (prominence) eruptions, and Moreton waves. Existing Hα networks such as the GONG and the Global High-Resolution Hα Network are discussed. As an example of solar observations from space weather research to operations, we present the system of real-time detection of Hα flares and filaments established at Kanzelhöhe Observatory (KSO; Austria) in the frame of the space weather segment of the ESA Space Situational Awareness programme (swe.ssa.esa.int). An evaluation of the system, which is continuously running since July 2013 is provided, covering an evaluation period of almost 2.5 years. During this period, KSO provided 3020 hours of real-time Hα observations at the ESA SWE portal. In total, 824 Hα flares were detected and classified by the real-time detection system, including 174 events of Hα importance class 1 and larger. For the total sample of events, 95 % of the automatically determined flare peak times lie within ±5 min of the values given in the official optical flares reports (by NOAA and KSO), and 76 % of the start times. The heliographic positions determined are better than ±5°. The probability of detection of flares of importance 1 or larger is 95 %, with a false alarm rate of 16 %. These numbers confirm the high potential of automatic flare detection and alerting from ground

  14. A Comparison of Two Theories of Perceived Distance on the Ground Plane: The Angular Expansion Hypothesis and the Intrinsic Bias Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Li

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Two theories of distance perception—ie, the angular expansion hypothesis (Durgin and Li, 2011 Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics 73 1856–1870 and the intrinsic bias hypothesis (Ooi et al, 2006 Perception 35 605–624—are compared. Both theories attribute exocentric distance foreshortening to an exaggeration in perceived slant, but their fundamental geometrical assumptions are very different. The intrinsic bias hypothesis assumes a constant bias in perceived geographical slant of the ground plane and predicts both perceived egocentric and exocentric distances are increasingly compressed. In contrast, the angular expansion hypothesis assumes exaggerations in perceived gaze angle and perceived optical slant. Because the bias functions of the two angular variables are different, it allows the angular expansion hypothesis to distinguish two types of distance foreshortening—the linear compression in perceived egocentric distance and the nonlinear compression in perceived exocentric distance. While the intrinsic bias is proposed only for explaining distance biases, the angular expansion hypothesis provides accounts for a broader range of spatial biases.

  15. Analysis of Space Shuttle Ground Support System Fault Detection, Isolation, and Recovery Processes and Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Anthony R.; Gerald-Yamasaki, Michael; Trent, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    As part of the FDIR (Fault Detection, Isolation, and Recovery) Project for the Constellation Program, a task was designed within the context of the Constellation Program FDIR project called the Legacy Benchmarking Task to document as accurately as possible the FDIR processes and resources that were used by the Space Shuttle ground support equipment (GSE) during the Shuttle flight program. These results served as a comparison with results obtained from the new FDIR capability. The task team assessed Shuttle and EELV (Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle) historical data for GSE-related launch delays to identify expected benefits and impact. This analysis included a study of complex fault isolation situations that required a lengthy troubleshooting process. Specifically, four elements of that system were considered: LH2 (liquid hydrogen), LO2 (liquid oxygen), hydraulic test, and ground special power.

  16. Development of Laser Beam Transmission Strategies for Future Ground-to-Space Optical Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Keith E.; Kovalik, Joseph M.; Biswas, Abhijit; Roberts, William T.

    2007-01-01

    Optical communications is a key technology to meet the bandwidth expansion required in the global information grid. High bandwidth bi-directional links between sub-orbital platforms and ground and space terminals can provide a seamless interconnectivity for rapid return of critical data to analysts. The JPL Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) is located in Wrightwood California at an altitude of 2.2.km. This 200 sq-m facility houses a state-of- the-art 1-m telescope and is used to develop operational strategies for ground-to-space laser beam propagation that include safe beam transmission through navigable air space, adaptive optics correction and multi-beam scintillation mitigation, and line of sight optical attenuation monitoring. JPL has received authorization from international satellite owners to transmit laser beams to more than twenty retro-reflecting satellites. This paper presents recent progress in the development of these operational strategies tested by narrow laser beam transmissions from the OCTL to retro-reflecting satellites. We present experimental results and compare our measurements with predicted performance for a variety of atmospheric conditions.

  17. Ground experimental investigations into an ejected spray cooling system for space closed-loop application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hongsheng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Spray cooling has proved its superior heat transfer performance in removing high heat flux for ground applications. However, the dissipation of vapor–liquid mixture from the heat surface and the closed-loop circulation of the coolant are two challenges in reduced or zero gravity space environments. In this paper, an ejected spray cooling system for space closed-loop application was proposed and the negative pressure in the ejected condenser chamber was applied to sucking the two-phase mixture from the spray chamber. Its ground experimental setup was built and experimental investigations on the smooth circle heat surface with a diameter of 5 mm were conducted with distilled water as the coolant spraying from a nozzle of 0.51 mm orifice diameter at the inlet temperatures of 69.2 °C and 78.2 °C under the conditions of heat flux ranging from 69.76 W/cm2 to 311.45 W/cm2, volume flow through the spray nozzle varying from 11.22 L/h to 15.76 L/h. Work performance of the spray nozzle and heat transfer performance of the spray cooling system were analyzed; results show that this ejected spray cooling system has a good heat transfer performance and provides valid foundation for space closed-loop application in the near future.

  18. Ground experimental investigations into an ejected spray cooling system for space closed-loop application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Hongsheng; Li Yunze; Wang Shengnan; Liu Yang; Zhong Mingliang

    2016-01-01

    Spray cooling has proved its superior heat transfer performance in removing high heat flux for ground applications. However, the dissipation of vapor–liquid mixture from the heat sur-face and the closed-loop circulation of the coolant are two challenges in reduced or zero gravity space environments. In this paper, an ejected spray cooling system for space closed-loop application was proposed and the negative pressure in the ejected condenser chamber was applied to sucking the two-phase mixture from the spray chamber. Its ground experimental setup was built and exper-imental investigations on the smooth circle heat surface with a diameter of 5 mm were conducted with distilled water as the coolant spraying from a nozzle of 0.51 mm orifice diameter at the inlet temperatures of 69.2 ?C and 78.2 ?C under the conditions of heat flux ranging from 69.76 W/cm2 to 311.45 W/cm2, volume flow through the spray nozzle varying from 11.22 L/h to 15.76 L/h. Work performance of the spray nozzle and heat transfer performance of the spray cooling system were analyzed;results show that this ejected spray cooling system has a good heat transfer performance and provides valid foundation for space closed-loop application in the near future.

  19. A Ground-Based Validation System of Teleoperation for a Space Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueqian Wang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Teleoperation of space robots is very important for future on‐orbit service. In order to assure the task is accomplished successfully, ground experiments are required to verify the function and validity of the teleoperation system before a space robot is launched. In this paper, a ground‐based validation subsystem is developed as a part of a teleoperation system. The subsystem is mainly composed of four parts: the input verification module, the onboard verification module, the dynamic and image workstation, and the communication simulator. The input verification module, consisting of hardware and software of the master, is used to verify the input ability. The onboard verification module, consisting of the same hardware and software as the onboard processor, is used to verify the processor’s computing ability and execution schedule. In addition, the dynamic and image workstation calculates the dynamic response of the space robot and target, and generates emulated camera images, including the hand‐eye cameras, global‐ vision camera and rendezvous camera. The communication simulator provides fidelity communication conditions, i.e., time delays and communication bandwidth. Lastly, we integrated a teleoperation system and conducted many experiments on the system. Experiment results show that the ground system is very useful for verified teleoperation technology.

  20. Towards a Multi-Variable Parametric Cost Model for Ground and Space Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Henrichs, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Parametric cost models can be used by designers and project managers to perform relative cost comparisons between major architectural cost drivers and allow high-level design trades; enable cost-benefit analysis for technology development investment; and, provide a basis for estimating total project cost between related concepts. This paper hypothesizes a single model, based on published models and engineering intuition, for both ground and space telescopes: OTA Cost approximately (X) D(exp (1.75 +/- 0.05)) lambda(exp(-0.5 +/- 0.25) T(exp -0.25) e (exp (-0.04)Y). Specific findings include: space telescopes cost 50X to 100X more ground telescopes; diameter is the most important CER; cost is reduced by approximately 50% every 20 years (presumably because of technology advance and process improvements); and, for space telescopes, cost associated with wavelength performance is balanced by cost associated with operating temperature. Finally, duplication only reduces cost for the manufacture of identical systems (i.e. multiple aperture sparse arrays or interferometers). And, while duplication does reduce the cost of manufacturing the mirrors of segmented primary mirror, this cost savings does not appear to manifest itself in the final primary mirror assembly (presumably because the structure for a segmented mirror is more complicated than for a monolithic mirror).

  1. Extreme climatic events constrain space use and survival of a ground-nesting bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Evan P; Elmore, R Dwayne; Fuhlendorf, Samuel D; Davis, Craig A; Dahlgren, David K; Orange, Jeremy P

    2017-05-01

    Two fundamental issues in ecology are understanding what influences the distribution and abundance of organisms through space and time. While it is well established that broad-scale patterns of abiotic and biotic conditions affect organisms' distributions and population fluctuations, discrete events may be important drivers of space use, survival, and persistence. These discrete extreme climatic events can constrain populations and space use at fine scales beyond that which is typically measured in ecological studies. Recently, a growing body of literature has identified thermal stress as a potential mechanism in determining space use and survival. We sought to determine how ambient temperature at fine temporal scales affected survival and space use for a ground-nesting quail species (Colinus virginianus; northern bobwhite). We modeled space use across an ambient temperature gradient (ranging from -20 to 38 °C) through a maxent algorithm. We also used Andersen-Gill proportional hazard models to assess the influence of ambient temperature-related variables on survival through time. Estimated available useable space ranged from 18.6% to 57.1% of the landscape depending on ambient temperature. The lowest and highest ambient temperature categories (35 °C, respectively) were associated with the least amount of estimated useable space (18.6% and 24.6%, respectively). Range overlap analysis indicated dissimilarity in areas where Colinus virginianus were restricted during times of thermal extremes (range overlap = 0.38). This suggests that habitat under a given condition is not necessarily a habitat under alternative conditions. Further, we found survival was most influenced by weekly minimum ambient temperatures. Our results demonstrate that ecological constraints can occur along a thermal gradient and that understanding the effects of these discrete events and how they change over time may be more important to conservation of organisms than are average and broad

  2. Understanding the Longitudinal Variability of Equatorial Electrodynamics using integrated Ground- and Space-based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizengaw, E.; Moldwin, M.; Zesta, E.

    2015-12-01

    The currently funded African Meridian B-Field Education and Research (AMBER) magnetometer array comprises more than thirteen magnetometers stationed globally in the vicinity of geomagnetic equator. One of the main objectives of AMBER network is to understand the longitudinal variability of equatorial electrodynamics as function of local time, magnetic activity, and season. While providing complete meridian observation in the region and filling the largest land-based gap in global magnetometer coverage, the AMBER array addresses two fundamental areas of space physics: first, the processes governing electrodynamics of the equatorial ionosphere as a function of latitude (or L-shell), local time, longitude, magnetic activity, and season, and second, ULF pulsation strength at low/mid-latitude regions and its connection with equatorial electrojet and density fluctuation. The global AMBER network can also be used to augment observations from space-based instruments, such us the triplet SWARM mission and the upcoming ICON missions. Thus, in coordination with space-based and other ground-based observations, the AMBER magnetometer network provides a great opportunity to understand the electrodynamics that governs equatorial ionosphere motions. In this paper we present the longitudinal variability of the equatorial electrodynamics using the combination of instruments onboard SWARM and C/NOFS satellites and ground-based AMBER network. Both ground- and pace-based observations show stronger dayside and evening sector equatorial electrodynamics in the American and Asian sectors compared to the African sector. On the other hand, the African sector is home to stronger and year-round ionospheric bubbles/irregularities compared to the American and Asian sectors. This raises the question if the evening sector equatorial electrodynamics (vertical drift), which is believed to be the main cause for the enhancement of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth rate, is stronger in the

  3. Coordinated Ground- and Space-based Multispectral Campaign to Study Equatorial Spread-F Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, S. C.; Geddes, G.; Aryal, S.; Stephan, A. W.; Budzien, S. A.; Duggirala, P. R.; Chakrabarti, S.; Valladares, C.

    2016-12-01

    We present a concept for a multispectral campaign using coordinated data from state-of-the-art instruments aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and multiple ground-based spectrometers and digisondes deployed at low-latitudes to study the formation and development of Equatorial Spread-F (ESF). This extended observational campaign utilizes ultraviolet, visible, and radio measurements to develop a predictive capability for ESF and to study the coupling of the ionosphere-thermosphere (I-T) system during geomagnetically quiet and disturbed times. The ground-based instruments will be deployed in carefully chosen locations in the American and Indian sectors while the space-based data will provide global coverage spanning all local times and longitudes within ±51° geographic latitudes. The campaign, over an extended period covering a range of geophysical conditions, will provide the extensive data base necessary to address the important science questions. The space-based instrument suite consists of the Limb-imaging Ionospheric and Thermospheric Extreme-ultraviolet Spectrograph (LITES) and the GPS Radio Occultation and Ultraviolet Photometry-Colocated (GROUP-C) instruments, scheduled to launch to the ISS in November 2016. LITES is a compact imaging spectrograph for remote sensing of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere from 60 to 140nm and GROUP-C has a nadir-viewing FUV photometer. The ground-based instruments to be deployed for this campaign are three high-resolution imaging spectrographs capable of continuous round-the-clock airglow observations: Multiwavelength Imaging Spectrograph using Echelle grating (MISE) in India and two High Throughput and Multi-slit Imaging Spectrographs (HiT&MIS) to be deployed in Colombia and Argentina, the Low-Latitude Ionosphere Sensor Network (LISN), and the Global Ionospheric Radio Observatory (GIRO) digisondes network. We present data from the ground-based instruments, initial results from the LITES and GROUP-C instruments on

  4. Ground-based testing of the dynamics of flexible space structures using band mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L. F.; Chew, Meng-Sang

    1991-01-01

    A suspension system based on a band mechanism is studied to provide the free-free conditions for ground based validation testing of flexible space structures. The band mechanism consists of a noncircular disk with a convex profile, preloaded by torsional springs at its center of rotation so that static equilibrium of the test structure is maintained at any vertical location; the gravitational force will be directly counteracted during dynamic testing of the space structure. This noncircular disk within the suspension system can be configured to remain unchanged for test articles with the different weights as long as the torsional spring is replaced to maintain the originally designed frequency ratio of W/k sub s. Simulations of test articles which are modeled as lumped parameter as well as continuous parameter systems, are also presented.

  5. Portable Microwave Frequency Dissemination in Free Space and Implications on Ground-Satellite Synchronization

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Bo; Bai, Yu; Yuan, Yibo; Gao, Chao; Wang, Lijun

    2015-01-01

    Frequency dissemination and synchronization in free space plays an important role in global navigation satellite system (GNSS), radio astronomy and synthetic aperture radar (SAR). In this paper, we demonstrate a portable radio frequency (RF) dissemination scheme via free space using microwave antennas. The setup has a good environment adaptability and high dissemination stability. The frequency signal is disseminated at different distances ranging from 10 to 640 m with a fixed 10 Hz locking bandwidth, and the scaling law of dissemination stability on distance and averaging time is discussed. The preliminary extrapolation shows that the dissemination stability may reach $1\\times10^{-12}/s$ in ground-to-satellite synchronization, which far exceeds all present methods, and is worthy for further study.

  6. Ground-remote control for space station telerobotics with time delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    The study proposes a ground-remote telerobot control architecture which could be used for control of Space Station Freedom manipulators. The architecture provides two local-site operator control stations representing potential earth-based and remote Space Station-based operator control stations. A unified control system at the remote site provides autonomous, shared, and teleoperation control for single-and dual-arm task execution. An operational laboratory system which demonstrates the feasibility of various technologies in the proposed architecture, including teleoperation, shared control, and supervised autonomy, is described. Enhancements to the system currently under development, including remote site implementation in Ada, integration and control of a redundant 7-DOF manipulator, and local site advanced operator aids, are also described.

  7. Validation of space/ground antenna control algorithms using a computer-aided design tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantenbein, Rex E.

    1995-01-01

    The validation of the algorithms for controlling the space-to-ground antenna subsystem for Space Station Alpha is an important step in assuring reliable communications. These algorithms have been developed and tested using a simulation environment based on a computer-aided design tool that can provide a time-based execution framework with variable environmental parameters. Our work this summer has involved the exploration of this environment and the documentation of the procedures used to validate these algorithms. We have installed a variety of tools in a laboratory of the Tracking and Communications division for reproducing the simulation experiments carried out on these algorithms to verify that they do meet their requirements for controlling the antenna systems. In this report, we describe the processes used in these simulations and our work in validating the tests used.

  8. Numerical analysis of thermal distortion of the mirror in space-to-ground laser communication links

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-feng; ZHANG Bai-lei; LIN Mi; QI Li-mei

    2005-01-01

    The thermal distortion of an optical reflector surface due to the changing sunlight in a space environment will cause shift and spreading of its reflected focus and thereby influence the performance of space-to-ground laser communication links. Based on the characteristics of a low orbit satellite, the normal shift of a plan mirror caused by thermal distortion is analyzed with the software of the ANSYS of finite element analysis. A general expression of the transmitted beam from a distorted reflector surface and a counting formula for the shifts of the focus center before and after thermal distortion are deduced. The result of simulation shows that the magnitude order of the normal shift of the antenna mirror surface can be as high as tens of μrad.The worse the mirror thermal distortion is, the larger the shift of the received focus center is. And the change of the shifts does not obey a linear rule.

  9. Mexico City remote sensing results from ground and space in the last 5 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grutter, M.; Stremme, W.; Plaza-Medina, E. F.; Bezanilla, A.; Rivera, C.; Arellano, J.; Blumenstock, T.; Gisi, M.; Hase, F.

    2013-05-01

    The use of remote sensing tools is becoming increasingly important to investigate the pollution of urban areas. Satellite sensors working both in the infrared and ultraviolet regions have proven extremely useful and when combined with ground-based instruments, can provide reliable data products with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution. In this work we present examples of how coincident measurements from two ground stations located in and out-side Mexico City, can complement the observations from space. Both stations are equipped with FTIR and MAX-DOAS instruments, and have an altitude difference of 1760 m. Small commercial Lidar systems are also available and used to characterize the evolution of the mixing layer height. The spatial distributions of carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide around the metropolitan area have been investigated using IASI and OMI satellite instruments, respectively. Preliminary ozone vertical columns measured from both altitudes are also investigated as well as specific events of methane observed above the ground-station located inside the city. A general overview of the potential to use remote sensing techniques to characterize the emissions, seasonality and pollution transport events in megacities are discussed.

  10. Steerable Space Fed Lens Array for Low-Cost Adaptive Ground Station Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Popovic, Zoya; Rondineau, Sebastien; Miranda, Felix A.

    2007-01-01

    The Space Fed Lens Array (SFLA) is an alternative to a phased array antenna that replaces large numbers of expensive solid-state phase shifters with a single spatial feed network. SFLA can be used for multi-beam application where multiple independent beams can be generated simultaneously with a single antenna aperture. Unlike phased array antennas where feed loss increases with array size, feed loss in a lens array with more than 50 elements is nearly independent of the number of elements, a desirable feature for large apertures. In addition, SFLA has lower cost as compared to a phased array at the expense of total volume and complete beam continuity. For ground station applications, both of these tradeoff parameters are not important and can thus be exploited in order to lower the cost of the ground station. In this paper, we report the development and demonstration of a 952-element beam-steerable SFLA intended for use as a low cost ground station for communicating and tracking of a low Earth orbiting satellite. The dynamic beam steering is achieved through switching to different feed-positions of the SFLA via a beam controller.

  11. Social spaces, casual interactions, meaningful exchanges: 'information ground' characteristics based on the college student experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.E. Fisher

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In the late 1990s Fisher (writing as Pettigrew proposed information grounds to describe social settings in which people share everyday information while attending to a focal activity. Method. This study was conducted at a major research university, home to 45,000 students. Data were collected by seventy-two Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS students as part of an information behaviour class. Trained in interviewing techniques, each MLIS student interviewed ten students in public places, including the campus and the university commercial district. The survey, comprising twenty-seven primarily open-ended questions, was conducted from October 14-21, 2004. Data were collected from 729 college students and entered, along with extensive field notes, into an in-house Web form. Analysis. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were supplemented by mini-reports prepared by the student researchers along with full-team debriefings. Results. Using a 'people, place, information-related trichotomy', characteristics are discussed in terms of how they can be manipulated to optimize information flow in social settings. Conclusion. . By understanding better the characteristics of information grounds and the interactions among these characteristics, we may be able to develop social spaces in support of information flow and human interaction. Our college student and other studies suggest that information grounds play an intrinsic role in facilitating communication among people and that by building an in-depth typology, beginning with basic categorical characteristics, we may develop new methods for facilitating information exchange.

  12. The Sirius System and Its Astrophysical Puzzles: Hubble Space Telescope and Ground-based Astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Howard E.; Schaefer, Gail H.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Holberg, Jay B.; Mason, Brian D.; Lindenblad, Irving W.; Seitz-McLeese, Miranda; Arnett, W. David; Demarque, Pierre; Spada, Federico; Young, Patrick A.; Barstow, Martin A.; Burleigh, Matthew R.; Gudehus, Donald

    2017-05-01

    Sirius, the seventh-nearest stellar system, is a visual binary containing the metallic-line A1 V star Sirius A, the brightest star in the sky, orbited in a 50.13 year period by Sirius B, the brightest and nearest white dwarf (WD). Using images obtained over nearly two decades with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), along with photographic observations covering almost 20 years and nearly 2300 historical measurements dating back to the 19th century, we determine precise orbital elements for the visual binary. Combined with the parallax and the motion of the A component, these elements yield dynamical masses of 2.063+/- 0.023 {M}⊙ and 1.018+/- 0.011 {M}⊙ for Sirius A and B, respectively. Our precise HST astrometry rules out third bodies orbiting either star in the system, down to masses of ˜15-25 {M}{Jup}. The location of Sirius B in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram is in excellent agreement with theoretical cooling tracks for WDs of its dynamical mass, and implies a cooling age of ˜126 Myr. The position of Sirius B on the mass-radius plane is also consistent with WD theory, assuming a carbon-oxygen core. Including the pre-WD evolutionary timescale of the assumed progenitor, the total age of Sirius B is about 228 ± 10 Myr. We calculated evolutionary tracks for stars with the dynamical mass of Sirius A, using two independent codes. We find it necessary to assume a slightly subsolar metallicity, of about 0.85 {Z}⊙ , to fit its location on the luminosity-radius plane. The age of Sirius A based on these models is about 237-247 Myr, with uncertainties of ±15 Myr, consistent with that of the WD companion. We discuss astrophysical puzzles presented by the Sirius system, including the probability that the two stars must have interacted in the past, even though there is no direct evidence for this and the orbital eccentricity remains high. Based in part on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, and from

  13. Gaussian beam scintillation on ground-to-space paths: the importance of beam wander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Gary J.; Benson, Robert S.

    2004-10-01

    Predictions of scintillation for ground to space collimated Gaussian beams generated from a numerical wave optics simulation are compared with recent weak scintillation theory developed from the Rytov perturbation approach (L.C. Andrews, R.L. Phillips, P.T. Yu, Ap Opt 34, p 7742-7751, 1995; J.D. Shelton, JOSA A 12, p 2172-2181, 1995). Significant discrepancies are revealed for intermediate-sized beams, defined as beams whose initial diameters place the near ground turbulence in the transmitter near field and the remote space target in the transmitter far field. By adding wander tracking to the wave optics simulation, and by developing a separate analytic model of the beam wander scintillation mechanism, we show that the scintillation for intermediate-sized beams is dominated by turbulence-induced beam wander at the target, and that the results from the wave optics simulation are accurate. We conclude that the analytic theory"s treatment of beam wander is incomplete, leading to the output of incorrect predictions for the second moment of irradiance. The error is most severe at the target point on the transmitter"s optical axis.

  14. Stereo visualization in the ground segment tasks of the science space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneva, Natalia; Nazarov, Vladimir; Mogilevsky, Mikhail; Nazirov, Ravil

    The ground segment is one of the key components of any science space mission. Its functionality substantially defines the scientific effectiveness of the experiment as a whole. And it should be noted that its outstanding feature (in contrast to the other information systems of the scientific space projects) is interaction between researcher and project information system in order to interpret data being obtained during experiments. Therefore the ability to visualize the data being processed is essential prerequisite for ground segment's software and the usage of modern technological solutions and approaches in this area will allow increasing science return in general and providing a framework for new experiments creation. Mostly for the visualization of data being processed 2D and 3D graphics are used that is caused by the traditional visualization tools capabilities. Besides that the stereo data visualization methods are used actively in solving some tasks. However their usage is usually limited to such tasks as visualization of virtual and augmented reality, remote sensing data processing and suchlike. Low prevalence of stereo visualization methods in solving science ground segment tasks is primarily explained by extremely high cost of the necessary hardware. But recently appeared low cost hardware solutions for stereo visualization based on the page-flip method of views separation. In this case it seems promising to use the stereo visualization as an instrument for investigation of a wide range of problems, mainly for stereo visualization of complex physical processes as well as mathematical abstractions and models. The article is concerned with an attempt to use this approach. It describes the details and problems of using stereo visualization (page-flip method based on NVIDIA 3D Vision Kit, graphic processor GeForce) for display of some datasets of magnetospheric satellite onboard measurements and also in development of the software for manual stereo matching.

  15. Low-Impact Air-to-Ground Free-Space Optical Communication System Design and First Results

    CERN Document Server

    Carrasco-Casado, Alberto; Vergaz, Ricardo; Geday, Morten A; Sanchez-Pena, Jose M; Oton, Jose M

    2015-01-01

    An air-to-ground free-space optical communication system has been designed and partially developed. The design covers both the communications between the airborne and the ground station, and the acquisition, tracking and pointing. A strong effort has been made in order to achieve the minimum payload power, size and weight, for which a MEMS modulating retroreflector has been chosen. In the ground station, a new technique for fine pointing, based on a liquid crystal device, is proposed and will be demonstrated, as well as other improvements with the aim of optimizing the ground station performance.

  16. Functional proteomic analysis revealed ground-base ion radiations cannot reflect biological effects of space radiations of rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Sun, Yeqing; Zhao, Qian; Han, Lu

    2016-07-01

    Highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as main factor causing biological effects. Radiobiological studies during space flights are unrepeatable due to the variable space radiation environment, ground-base ion radiations are usually performed to simulate of the space biological effect. Spaceflights present a low-dose rate (0.1˜~0.3mGy/day) radiation environment inside aerocrafts while ground-base ion radiations present a much higher dose rate (100˜~500mGy/min). Whether ground-base ion radiation can reflect effects of space radiation is worth of evaluation. In this research, we compared the functional proteomic profiles of rice plants between on-ground simulated HZE particle radiation and spaceflight treatments. Three independent ground-base seed ionizing radiation experiments with different cumulative doses (dose range: 2˜~20000mGy) and different liner energy transfer (LET) values (13.3˜~500keV/μμm) and two independent seed spaceflight experiments onboard Chinese 20th satellite and SZ-6 spacecraft were carried out. Alterations in the proteome were analyzed by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry identifications. 45 and 59 proteins showed significant (pmetabolic process, protein folding and phosphorylation. The results implied that ground-base radiations cannot truly reflect effects of spaceflight radiations, ground-base radiation was a kind of indirect effect to rice causing oxidation and metabolism stresses, but space radiation was a kind of direct effect leading to macromolecule (DNA and protein) damage and signal pathway disorders. This functional proteomic analysis work might provide a new evaluation method for further on-ground simulated HZE radiation experiments.

  17. Three-body problem in 3D space: ground state, (quasi)-exact-solvability

    CERN Document Server

    Turbiner, Alexander V; Escobar-Ruiz, Adrian M

    2016-01-01

    We study aspects of the quantum and classical dynamics of a $3$-body system in 3D space with interaction depending only on mutual distances. The study is restricted to solutions in the space of relative motion which are functions of mutual distances only. It is shown that the ground state (and some other states) in the quantum case and the planar trajectories in the classical case are of this type. The quantum (and classical) system for which these states are eigenstates is found and its Hamiltonian is constructed. It corresponds to a three-dimensional quantum particle moving in a curved space with special metric. The kinetic energy of the system has a hidden $sl(4,R)$ Lie (Poisson) algebra structure, alternatively, the hidden algebra $h^{(3)}$ typical for the $H_3$ Calogero model. We find an exactly solvable three-body generalized harmonic oscillator-type potential as well as a quasi-exactly-solvable three-body sextic polynomial type potential.

  18. Application analysis of ground source heat pumps in building space conditioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Hua; Wang, Yungang

    2013-07-01

    The adoption of geothermal energy in space conditioning of buildings through utilizing ground source heat pump (GSHP, also known as geothermal heat pump) has increased rapidly during the past several decades. However, the impacts of the GSHP utilization on the efficiency of heat pumps and soil temperature distribution remained unclear and needs further investigation. This paper presents a novel model to calculate the soil temperature distribution and the coefficient of performance (COP) of GSHP. Different scenarios were simulated to quantify the impact of different factors on the GSHP performance, including heat balance, daily running mode, and spacing between boreholes. Our results show that GSHP is suitable for buildings with balanced cooling and heating loads. It can keep soil temperature at a relatively constant level for more than 10 years. Long boreholes, additional space between boreholes, intermittent running mode will improve the performance of GSHP, but large initial investment is required. The improper design will make the COP of GSHP even lower than traditional heat pumps. Professional design and maintenance technologies are greatly needed in order to promote this promising technology in the developing world.

  19. Determining Component Probability using Problem Report Data for Ground Systems used in Manned Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Mark W.; Gillespie, Amanda M.

    2013-01-01

    During the shuttle era NASA utilized a failure reporting system called the Problem Reporting and Corrective Action (PRACA) it purpose was to identify and track system non-conformance. The PRACA system over the years evolved from a relatively nominal way to identify system problems to a very complex tracking and report generating data base. The PRACA system became the primary method to categorize any and all anomalies from corrosion to catastrophic failure. The systems documented in the PRACA system range from flight hardware to ground or facility support equipment. While the PRACA system is complex, it does possess all the failure modes, times of occurrence, length of system delay, parts repaired or replaced, and corrective action performed. The difficulty is mining the data then to utilize that data in order to estimate component, Line Replaceable Unit (LRU), and system reliability analysis metrics. In this paper, we identify a methodology to categorize qualitative data from the ground system PRACA data base for common ground or facility support equipment. Then utilizing a heuristic developed for review of the PRACA data determine what reports identify a credible failure. These data are the used to determine inter-arrival times to perform an estimation of a metric for repairable component-or LRU reliability. This analysis is used to determine failure modes of the equipment, determine the probability of the component failure mode, and support various quantitative differing techniques for performing repairable system analysis. The result is that an effective and concise estimate of components used in manned space flight operations. The advantage is the components or LRU's are evaluated in the same environment and condition that occurs during the launch process.

  20. The 2006 SPIE Symposium on Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation ? Observing the Universe from Ground and Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorwood, A.

    2006-06-01

    The most recent of these biennial SPIE (The International Society for Optical Engineering) Symposia was held from 24-31 May in the Orlando World Center Marriott Resort & Convention Center in Florida, USA. Over the last decade, these meetings have grown to become the main forum for presenting and discussing all aspects of ground-based, airborne and space telescopes and their instrumentation, including associated advances in technology, software, operations and even astronomical results. As a consequence the meetings are large and well attended by people at all levels in the process of initiating, approving, implementing and operating astronomical projects and facilities. This year there were ~ 1700 registered participants who presented ~ 1600 papers and posters in the following 12 parallel conferences which formed the heart of the meeting.

  1. Long-Term Trends in Space-Ground Atmospheric Propagation Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemba, Michael J.; Nessel, James A.; Morse, Jacquelynne R.

    2015-01-01

    Propagation measurement campaigns are critical to characterizing the atmospheric behavior of a location and efficiently designing space-ground links. However, as global climate change affects weather patterns, the long-term trends of propagation data may be impacted over periods of decades or longer. Particularly, at high microwave frequencies (10 GHz and above), rain plays a dominant role in the attenuation statistics, and it has been observed that rain events over the past 50 years have trended toward increased frequency, intensity, and rain height. In the interest of quantifying the impact of these phenomena on long-term trends in propagation data, this paper compares two 20 GHz measurement campaigns both conducted at NASAs White Sands facility in New Mexico. The first is from the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) propagation campaign from 1994 to 1998, while the second is amplitude data recorded during a site test interferometer (STI) phase characterization campaign from 2009 to 2014.

  2. Application of star identification using pattern matching to space ground systems at GSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, D.; Shoup, D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports the application of pattern recognition techniques for star identification based on those proposed by Van Bezooijen to space ground systems for near-real-time attitude determination. A prototype was developed using these algorithms, which was used to assess the suitability of these techniques for support of the X-Ray Timing Explorer (XTE), Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS), and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) missions. Experience with the prototype was used to refine specifications for the operational system. Different geometry tests appropriate to the mission requirements of XTE, SWAS, and SOHO were adopted. The applications of these techniques to upcoming mission support of XTE, SWAS, and SOHO are discussed.

  3. Space and ground segment performance of the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC mission: four years in orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-J. Fong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate mission consisting of six Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO satellites is the world's first demonstration constellation using radio occultation signals from Global Positioning System (GPS satellites. The radio occultation signals are retrieved in near real-time for global weather/climate monitoring, numerical weather prediction, and space weather research. The mission has processed on average 1400 to 1800 high-quality atmospheric sounding profiles per day. The atmospheric radio occultation soundings data are assimilated into operational numerical weather prediction models for global weather prediction, including typhoon/hurricane/cyclone forecasts. The radio occultation data has shown a positive impact on weather predictions at many national weather forecast centers. A proposed follow-on mission transitions the program from the current experimental research system to a significantly improved real-time operational system, which will reliably provide 8000 radio occultation soundings per day. The follow-on mission as planned will consist of 12 satellites with a data latency of 45 min, which will provide greatly enhanced opportunities for operational forecasts and scientific research. This paper will address the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC system and mission overview, the spacecraft and ground system performance after four years in orbit, the lessons learned from the encountered technical challenges and observations, and the expected design improvements for the new spacecraft and ground system.

  4. The Park 51/Ground Zero Controversy and Sacred Sites as Contested Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne Halgren Kilde

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The Park 51 controversy swept like wildfire through the media in late August of 2010, fueled by Islamophobes who oppose all advance of Islam in America. Yet the controversy also resonated with many who were clearly not caught up in the fear of Islam. This article attempts to understand the broader concern that the Park 51 project would somehow violate the Ground Zero site, and, thus, as a sign of "respect" should be moved to a different location, an argument that was invariably articulated in “spatial language” as groups debated the physical and spatial presence of the buildings in question, their relative proximity, and even the shadows they cast. This article focuses on three sets of spatial meanings that undergirded these arguments: the site as sacred ground created through trauma, rebuilding as retaliation for the attack, and the assertion of American civil religion. The article locates these meanings within a broader civic discussion of liberty and concludes that the spatialization of the controversy opened up discursive space for repressive, anti-democratic views to sway even those who believe in religious liberty, thus evidencing a deep ambivalence regarding the legitimate civic membership of Muslim Americans.

  5. A Systems Approach to Developing an Affordable Space Ground Transportation Architecture using a Commonality Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Jerry L.; McCleskey, Carey M.; Bollo, Timothy R.; Rhodes, Russel E.; Robinson, John W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a structured approach for achieving a compatible Ground System (GS) and Flight System (FS) architecture that is affordable, productive and sustainable. This paper is an extension of the paper titled "Approach to an Affordable and Productive Space Transportation System" by McCleskey et al. This paper integrates systems engineering concepts and operationally efficient propulsion system concepts into a structured framework for achieving GS and FS compatibility in the mid-term and long-term time frames. It also presents a functional and quantitative relationship for assessing system compatibility called the Architecture Complexity Index (ACI). This paper: (1) focuses on systems engineering fundamentals as it applies to improving GS and FS compatibility; (2) establishes mid-term and long-term spaceport goals; (3) presents an overview of transitioning a spaceport to an airport model; (4) establishes a framework for defining a ground system architecture; (5) presents the ACI concept; (6) demonstrates the approach by presenting a comparison of different GS architectures; and (7) presents a discussion on the benefits of using this approach with a focus on commonality.

  6. Historical Trends in Ground-Based Optical Space Surveillance System Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, M.; Shroyer, L.

    In the spirit of the 50th anniversary of the launch of the first man-made satellite, an historical overview of ground-based optical space surveillance systems is provided. Specific emphasis is given on gathering metrics to analyze design trends. The subject of space surveillance spans the history of spaceflight: from the early tracking cameras at missile ranges, the first observations of Sputnik, to the evolution towards highly capable commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) systems, and much in between. Whereas previous reviews in the literature have been limited in scope to specific time periods, operational programs, countries, etc., a broad overview of a wide range of sources is presented. This review is focused on systems whose primary design purpose can be classified as Space Object Identification (SOI) or Orbit Determination (OD). SOI systems are those that capture images or data to determine information about the satellite itself, such as attitude, features, and material composition. OD systems are those that produce estimates of the satellite position, usually in the form of orbital elements or a time history of tracking angles. Systems are also categorized based on the orbital regime in which their targets reside, which has been simplified in this study to either Low Earth Orbit (LEO) or Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). The systems are further classified depending on the industry segment (government/commercial or academic), and whether the program is foreign or domestic. In addition to gathering metrics on systems designed solely for man-made satellite observations, it is interesting to find examples of other systems being similarly used. Examples include large astronomical telescopes being used for GEO debris surveys and anomaly resolution for deep-space probes. Another interesting development is the increase in number and capability of COTS systems, some of which are specifically marketed to consumers as satellite trackers. After describing the results of the

  7. Two Planes of Satellites in the Centaurus A Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, R. Brent; Libeskind, Noam I.; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Karachentseva, Valentina E.; Rizzi, Luca; Shaya, Edward J.

    2015-04-01

    Tip of the red giant branch measurements based on Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based imaging have resulted in accurate distances to 29 galaxies in the nearby Centaurus A Group. All but 2 of the 29 galaxies lie in either of two thin planes roughly parallel with the supergalactic equator. The planes are only slightly tilted from the line of sight, leaving little ambiguity regarding the morphology of the structure. The planes have characteristic rms long axis dimensions of ∼300 kpc and short axis dimensions of ∼60 kpc, hence axial ratios ∼0.2, and are separated in the short axis direction by 303 kpc.

  8. Active suspension design for a Large Space Structure ground test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Thomas J. H.; Schlegel, Clemens

    1993-01-01

    The expected future high performance requirements for Large Space Structures (LSS) enforce technology innovations such as active vibration damping techniques e.g., by means of structure sensors and actuators. The implementation of new technologies like that requires an interactive and integrated structural and control design with an increased effort in hardware validation by ground testing. During the technology development phase generic system tests will be most important covering verification and validation aspects up to the preparation and definition of relevant space experiments. For many applications using advanced designs it is deemed necessary to improve existing testing technology by further reducing disturbances and gravity coupling effects while maintaining high performance reliability. A key issue in this context is the improvement of suspension techniques. The ideal ground test facility satisfying these requirements completely will never be found. The highest degree of reliability will always be obtained by passive suspension methods taking into account severe performance limitations such as non-zero rigid body modes, restriction of degrees of freedom of motion and frequency response limitations. Passive compensation mechanisms, e.g., zero-spring-rate mechanisms, either require large moving masses or they are limited with respect to low-frequency performance by friction, stiction or other non-linear effects. With active suspensions these limitations can be removed to a large extent thereby increasing the range of applications. Despite an additional complexity which is associated with a potential risk in reliability their development is considered promising due to the amazing improvement of real-time control technology which is still continuing.

  9. THEMIS ground-space observations during the development of auroral spirals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Keiling

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A simultaneous observation of an auroral spiral and its generator region in the near-Earth plasma sheet is rather unlikely. Here we present such observations using the THEMIS spacecraft as well as the THEMIS ground network of all-sky imagers and magnetometers. Two consecutive auroral spirals separated by approximately 14 min occurred during a substorm on 19 February 2008. The spirals formed during the expansion phase and a subsequent intensification, and were among the brightest features in the aurora with diameters of 200–300 km. The duration for the formation and decay of each spiral was less than 60 s. Both spirals occurred shortly after the formation of two oppositely rotating plasma flow vortices in space, which were also accompanied by dipolarizations and ion injections, at ~11 RE geocentric distance. Observations and model calculations also give evidence for a magnetic-field-aligned current generation of approximately 0.1 MA via the flow vortices, connecting the generator region of the spirals with the ionosphere, during the formation of both spirals. In the ionosphere, a pair of equivalent ionospheric current (EIC vortices with opposite rotations (corresponding to upward and downward currents was present during both auroral spirals with enhanced EICs and ionospheric flows at the locations of the auroral spirals and along the auroral arcs. The combined ground and space observations suggest that each auroral spiral was powered by two oppositely rotating plasma flow vortices that caused a current enhancement in the substorm current wedge.

  10. Sound propagation around arrays of rigid and porous cylinders in free space and near a ground boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Guoyi; Zheng, Zhongquan Charlie

    2016-05-01

    Sound propagation through sonic crystals has been widely studied both theoretically and experimentally, because of its potential applications in many areas such as environmental noise barriers and sound cloaking. In this paper, a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical simulation coupled with the immersed boundary method is used to investigate the transmission properties of sonic crystals modeled as arrays of cylinders. Arrays in free field as well as those arranged above a ground boundary are studied. In the latter case, the cylinder axes are parallel to the ground plane. By comparing with the semi-analytical solutions, the numerical scheme is validated for simple arrays of rigid cylinders. The effects of locations and materials of cylinders, along with the ground effect, are investigated. The results are presented with discussions on achieving optimized sonic crystals for sound blockage.

  11. Feasibility of utilizing Cherenkov Telescope Array gamma-ray telescopes as free-space optical communication ground stations

    CERN Document Server

    Carrasco-Casado, Alberto; Vergaz, Ricardo; Cabrero, Juan Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The signals that will be received on Earth from deep-space probes in future implementations of free-space optical communication will be extremely weak, and new ground stations will have to be developed in order to support these links. This paper addresses the feasibility of using the technology developed in the gamma-ray telescopes that will make up the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory in the implementation of a new kind of ground station. Among the main advantages that these telescopes provide are the much larger apertures needed to overcome the power limitation that ground-based gamma-ray astronomy and optical communication both have. Also, the large number of big telescopes that will be built for CTA will make it possible to reduce costs by economy-scale production, enabling optical communications in the large telescopes that will be needed for future deep-space links.

  12. INVESTIGATION OF THE DYNAMIC BEHAVIOR OF TWO COLLINEAR ANTI-PLANE SHEAR CRACKS IN A PIEZOELECTRIC LAYER BONDED TO TWO HALF SPACES BY A NEW METOHD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周振功; 王彪

    2003-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of two collinear anti-plane shear cracks in a piezoelectriclayer bonded to two half spaces subjected to the harmonic waves is investigated by a newmethod. The cracks are parallel to the interfaces in the mid-plane of the piezoelectric layer.By using the Fourier transform, the problem can be solved with two pairs of triple integralequations. These equations are solved by using Schmidt's method. This process is quitedifferent from that adopted previously. Numerical examples are provided to show the effectof the geometry of cracks, the frequency of the incident wave, the thickness of thepiezoelectric layer and the constants of the materials upon the dynamic stress intensity factorof cracks.

  13. Architectural design of a ground-based deep-space optical reception antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, E. L.

    1989-01-01

    An architectural design of a ground-based antenna (telescope) for receiving optical communications from deep space is presented. Physical and optical parameters, and their effect on the performance and cost considerations, are described. The channel capacity of the antenna is 100 kbits/s from Saturn and 5 Mbits/s from Mars. A novel sunshade is designed to permit optical communication even when the deep-space laser source is as close to the sun as 12 deg. Inserts in the tubes of the sunshade permit operations at solar elongations as small as 6 or 3 deg. The Nd:YAG source laser and the Fraunhofer filter (a narrow-band predetection optical filter) are tuned to match the Doppler shifts of the source and background. A typical Saturn-to-earth data link can reduce its source power requirement from 8.2 W to 2 W of laser output by employing a Fraunhofer filter instead of a conventional multilayer dielectric filter.

  14. An Artificial-Gravity Space-Settlement Ground-Analogue Design Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorais, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    The design concept of a modular and extensible hypergravity facility is presented. Several benefits of this facility are described including that the facility is suitable as a full-scale artificial-gravity space-settlement ground analogue for humans, animals, and plants for indefinite durations. The design is applicable as an analogue for on-orbit settlements as well as those on moons, asteroids, and Mars. The design creates an extremely long-arm centrifuge using a multi-car hypergravity vehicle travelling on one or more concentric circular tracks. This design supports the simultaneous generation of multiple-gravity levels to explore the feasibility and value of and requirements for such space-settlement designs. The design synergizes a variety of existing technologies including centrifuges, tilting trains, roller coasters, and optionally magnetic levitation. The design can be incrementally implemented such that the facility can be operational for a small fraction of the cost and time required for a full implementation. Brief concept of operation examples are also presented.

  15. [Characteristics of night sleep of monkeys on the ground and during space flight on "Kosmos-1667"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlyk, G G; Rotenberg, V S; Shirvinskaia, M A; Koro'lkov, V I; Magedov, V S

    1989-01-01

    The data on the sleep structure of two rhesus monkeys, Vernyi and Gordyi, during their 7-day space flight on Cosmos-1667 and a control study staged a month after recovery are discussed. Sleep structure was changed to the greatest extent the night before launch when additional stress factors were involved. During the first night in space Vernyi showed the so-called recoil effect. Later his sleep structure became stabilized: the specific weight of fast sleep diminished and the fast sleep/delta/sleep index in the first two cycles decreased. In the ground-based control study, sleep parameters pointed to a deteriorated health status of the animal: his fast sleep patterns changed and delta-sleep often reached its maximum after a fast sleep episode. In this animal adaptation was associated with fast sleep restructuring. In the second primate, Gordyi, the process of adaptation was extended and took three nights. This animal consistently showed low parameters of delta-sleep during both fright and postflight control study; it exhibited no recoil phenomenon after its reduction in the prelaunch night. The structure of sleep indicated that it played a lesser role in the overall process of adaptation.

  16. Ground test challenges in the development of the Space Shuttle orbiter auxiliary power unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, N. H.; Lance, R. J.; Weary, D. P.

    1984-01-01

    A conventional aircraft hydraulic system design approach was selected to provide fluid power for the Space Shuttle Orbiter. Developing the power unit, known as the Auxiliary Power Unit (APU), to drive the hydraulic pumps presented a major technological challenge. A small, high speed turbine drive unit powered by catalytically decomposed hydrazine and operating in the pulse mode was selected to meet the requirement. Because of limitations of vendor test facilities, significant portions of the development, flight qualification, and postflight anomaly testing of the Orbiter APU were accomplished at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) test facilities. This paper discusses the unique requirements of attitude, gravity forces, pressure profiles, and thermal environments which had to be satisfied by the APU, and presents the unique test facility and simulation techniques employed to meet the ground test requirements. In particular, the development of the zero-g lubrication system, the development of necessary APU thermal control techniques, the accomplishment of integrated systems tests, and the postflight investigation of the APU lube oil cooler behavior are discussed.

  17. Altitudinal variation of midlatitude localized TEC enhancement from ground- and space-based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta-Barua, S.; Mannucci, A. J.; Walter, T.; Enge, P.

    2008-10-01

    We present terrestrial and space-based dual-frequency observations of a region of enhanced total electron content (TEC) over the southeastern United States at local nighttime during the geomagnetic storm of 29-31 October 2003. The apparently localized, large-amplitude, and nearly Earth-fixed midlatitude ionosphere disturbance contained about 10 m higher delay at Global Positioning System (GPS) L1 frequency than the nighttime background ionosphere TEC. Using the dual-frequency altimeter on board the Jason satellite, we show evidence that nearly all of the electron content was below its orbital altitude of 1300 km at 0000 local time on 31 October 2003. Dual frequency GPS measurements from the receiver on board the SAC-C satellite indicate that some portion of the electron content existed above the 700 km orbit altitude of SAC-C. We develop a horizontally piecewise constant regional model of the enhancement. We compare the model prediction of TEC with the SAC-C satellite GPS data to constrain the altitude of this enhanced TEC region. Our model indicates that the peak density of the anomalous region is at slightly higher altitude and greater in amplitude than that of the background. The TEC enhancement provides a concrete case study of an extreme scenario that both space-based and ground-based GPS augmentation systems must take into account in order to offer high-accuracy, high-integrity corrections to GPS for safety-of-life applications.

  18. Architectural design of a ground-based deep-space optical reception antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, E. L.

    1989-01-01

    An architectural design of a ground-based antenna (telescope) for receiving optical communications from deep space is presented. Physical and optical parameters, and their effect on the performance and cost considerations, are described. The channel capacity of the antenna is 100 kbits/s from Saturn and 5 Mbits/s from Mars. A novel sunshade is designed to permit optical communication even when the deep-space laser source is as close to the sun as 12 deg. Inserts in the tubes of the sunshade permit operations at solar elongations as small as 6 or 3 deg. The Nd:YAG source laser and the Fraunhofer filter (a narrow-band predetection optical filter) are tuned to match the Doppler shifts of the source and background. A typical Saturn-to-earth data link can reduce its source power requirement from 8.2 W to 2 W of laser output by employing a Fraunhofer filter instead of a conventional multilayer dielectric filter.

  19. A mixed space-time and wavenumber-frequency domain procedure for modelling ground vibration from surface railway tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroma, S. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Hussein, M. F. M.; Ntotsios, E.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a methodology for studying ground vibration in which the railway track is modelled in the space-time domain using the finite element method (FEM) and, for faster computation, discretisation of the ground using either FEM or the boundary element method (BEM) is avoided by modelling it in the wavenumber-frequency domain. The railway track is coupled to the ground through a series of rectangular strips located at the surface of the ground; their vertical interaction is described by a frequency-dependent dynamic stiffness matrix whose elements are represented by discrete lumped parameter models. The effectiveness of this approach is assessed firstly through frequency domain analysis using as excitation a stationary harmonic load applied on the rail. The interaction forces at the ballast/ground interface are calculated using the FE track model in the space-time domain, transformed to the wavenumber domain, and used as input to the ground model for calculating vibration in the free field. Additionally, time domain simulations are also performed with the inclusion of nonlinear track parameters. Results are presented for the coupled track/ground model in terms of time histories and frequency spectra for the track vibration, interaction forces and free-field ground vibration. For the linear track model, the results from the mixed formulation are in excellent agreement with those from a semi-analytical model formulated in the wavenumber-frequency domain, particularly in the vicinity of the loading point. The accuracy of the mixed formulation away from the excitation point depends strongly on the inclusion of through-ground coupling in the lumped parameter model, which has been found to be necessary for both track dynamics and ground vibration predictions.

  20. Configurable adaptive optical system for imaging of ground-based targets from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, Brian K.; Friedman, Edward J.; Hooker, R. Brian; Cermak, Michael A.

    2003-03-01

    Space-based, high resolution, Earth remote sensing systems, that employ large, flexible, lightweight primary mirrors, will require active wavefront correction, in the form of active and adaptive optics, to correct for thermally and vibrationally induced deformations in the optics. These remote sensing systems typically have a large field-of-view. Unlike the adaptive optics on ground-based astronomical telescopes, which have a negligible field-of-view, the adaptive optics on these space-based remote sensing systems will be required to correct the wavefront over the entire field-of-view, which can be several degrees. The error functions for astronomical adaptive optics have been developed for the narrow field-of-view correction of atmospheric turbulence and do not address the needs of wide field space-based systems. To address these needs, a new wide field adaptive optics theory and a new error function are developed. Modeling and experimental results demonstrate the validity of the wide field adaptive optics theory and new error function. This new error function, which is a new extension of conventional adaptive optics, lead to the development of three new types of imaging systems: wide field-of-view, selectable field-of-view, and steerable field-of-view. These new systems can have nearly diffraction-limited performance across the entire field-of-view or a narrow movable region of high-resolution imaging. The factors limiting system performance will be shown. The range of applicability of the wide field adaptive optics theory is shown. The range of applicability is used to avoid limitations in system performance and to estimate the optical systems parameters, which will meet the system"s performance requirements.

  1. Wave scattering of complex local site in a layered half-space by using a multidomain IBEM: incident plane SH waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Zhenning; Yin, Xiao

    2016-06-01

    A multidomain indirect boundary element method (IBEM) is proposed to study the wave scattering of plane SH waves by complex local site in a layered half-space. The new method, using both the full-space and layered half-space Green's functions as its fundamental solutions can also be regarded as a coupled method of the full-space IBEM and half-space IBEM. First, the whole model is decomposed into independent closed regions and an opened layered half-space region with all of the irregular interfaces; then, fictitious uniformly distributed loads are applied separately on the boundaries of each region, and scattered fields of the closed regions and the opened layered half-space region are constructed by calculating the full-space and layered half-space Green's functions, respectively; finally, all of the regions are assembled to establish the linear algebraic system that arises from discretization. The densities of the distributed loads are determined directly by solving the algebraic system. The accuracy and capability of the new approach are verified extensively by comparing its results with those of published approaches for a class of hills, valleys and embedded inclusions. And the capability of the new method is further displayed when it is used to investigate a hill-triple layered valley-hill coupled topography in a multilayered half-space. All of the numerical calculations presented in this paper demonstrate that the new method is very suitable for solving multidomain coupled multilayered wave scattering problems with the merits of high accuracy and representing the scattered fields in different kinds of regions more reasonably and flexibly.

  2. Radiation transfer in an anisotropically scattering plane-parallel medium with space dependent albedo, omega(x)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengel, Y. A.; Ozisik, M. N.

    1984-08-01

    An analytical model is developed for radiation transfer in a plane-parallel slab geometry with anisotropic scattering, spatially varying albedo, reflecting and emitting boundaries, and energy sources within the medium. The albedo is defined in terms of Legendre polynomials and account is taken of the effects of spatial albedo variation on reflectivity and transmissivity of the medium after formulating generalized incident radiation equation. Forward and backward radiation fluxes are then obtained. It is noted that the Legendre polynomials permit inclusion of sufficient numbers of terms to achieve any desired level of accuracy for the albedo.

  3. The Mid-Infrared Instrument for the James Webb Space Telescope, VIII: The MIRI Focal Plane System

    CERN Document Server

    Ressler, M E; Franklin, B R; Mahoney, J C; Thelen, M P; Bouchet, P; Colbert, J W; Cracraft, Misty; Dicken, D; Gastaud, R; Goodson, G B; Eccleston, Paul; Moreau, V; Rieke, G H; Schneider, Analyn

    2015-01-01

    We describe the layout and unique features of the focal plane system for MIRI. We begin with the detector array and its readout integrated circuit (combining the amplifier unit cells and the multiplexer), the electronics, and the steps by which the data collection is controlled and the output signals are digitized and delivered to the JWST spacecraft electronics system. We then discuss the operation of this MIRI data system, including detector readout patterns, operation of subarrays, and data formats. Finally, we summarize the performance of the system, including remaining anomalies that need to be corrected in the data pipeline.

  4. Nutritional status assessment in semiclosed environments: ground-based and space flight studies in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. M.; Davis-Street, J. E.; Rice, B. L.; Nillen, J. L.; Gillman, P. L.; Block, G.

    2001-01-01

    Adequate nutrition is critical during long-term spaceflight, as is the ability to easily monitor dietary intake. A comprehensive nutritional status assessment profile was designed for use before, during and after flight. It included assessment of both dietary intake and biochemical markers of nutritional status. A spaceflight food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was developed to evaluate intake of key nutrients during spaceflight. The nutritional status assessment protocol was evaluated during two ground-based closed-chamber studies (60 and 91 d; n = 4/study), and was implemented for two astronauts during 4-mo stays on the Mir space station. Ground-based studies indicated that the FFQ, administered daily or weekly, adequately estimated intake of key nutrients. Chamber subjects maintained prechamber energy intake and body weight. Astronauts tended to eat 40--50% of WHO-predicted energy requirements, and lost >10% of preflight body mass. Serum ferritin levels were lower after the chamber stays, despite adequate iron intake. Red blood cell folate concentrations were increased after the chamber studies. Vitamin D stores were decreased by > 40% on chamber egress and after spaceflight. Mir crew members had decreased levels of most nutritional indices, but these are difficult to interpret given the insufficient energy intake and loss of body mass. Spaceflight food systems can provide adequate intake of macronutrients, although, as expected, micronutrient intake is a concern for any closed or semiclosed food system. These data demonstrate the utility and importance of nutritional status assessment during spaceflight and of the FFQ during extended-duration spaceflight.

  5. Preliminary design of a space system operating a ground-penetrating radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Errico, Marco; Ponte, Salvatore; Grassi, Michele; Moccia, Antonio

    2005-12-01

    Ground-penetrating radars (GPR) are currently used only in ground campaigns or in few airborne installations. A feasibility analysis of a space mission operating a GPR for archaeological applications is presented in this work with emphasis on spacecraft critical aspects: antenna dimension and power required for achieving adequate depth and accuracy. Sensor parametric design is performed considering two operating altitudes (250 and 500 km) and user requirements, such as minimum skin depth, vertical and horizontal resolution. A 500-km altitude, 6 a.m.-6 p.m. sun-synchronous orbit is an adequate compromise between atmospheric drag and payload transmitted average power (12 kW) to achieve a 3-m penetration depth. The satellite bus preliminary design is then performed, with focus on critical subsystems and technologies. The payload average power requirement can be kept within feasible limits (1 kW) by using NiH2 batteries to supply the radar transmitter, and with a strong reduction of the mission duty cycle ( 40km×1100km are observed per orbit). As for the electric power subsystem, a dual-voltage strategy is adopted, with the battery charge regulator supplied at 126 V and the bus loads at 50 V. The overall average power (1.9 kW), accounting for both payload and bus needs, can be supplied by a 20m2 GaAs solar panel for a three-year lifetime. Finally, the satellite mass is kept within reasonable limits (1.6 tons) using inflatable-rigidisable structure for both the payload antenna and the solar panels.

  6. Characterization of Ground Displacement Sources from Variational Bayesian Independent Component Analysis of Space Geodetic Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualandi, Adriano; Serpelloni, Enrico; Elina Belardinelli, Maria; Bonafede, Maurizio; Pezzo, Giuseppe; Tolomei, Cristiano

    2015-04-01

    A critical point in the analysis of ground displacement time series, as those measured by modern space geodetic techniques (primarly continuous GPS/GNSS and InSAR) is the development of data driven methods that allow to discern and characterize the different sources that generate the observed displacements. A widely used multivariate statistical technique is the Principal Component Analysis (PCA), which allows to reduce the dimensionality of the data space maintaining most of the variance of the dataset explained. It reproduces the original data using a limited number of Principal Components, but it also shows some deficiencies, since PCA does not perform well in finding the solution to the so-called Blind Source Separation (BSS) problem. The recovering and separation of the different sources that generate the observed ground deformation is a fundamental task in order to provide a physical meaning to the possible different sources. PCA fails in the BSS problem since it looks for a new Euclidean space where the projected data are uncorrelated. Usually, the uncorrelation condition is not strong enough and it has been proven that the BSS problem can be tackled imposing on the components to be independent. The Independent Component Analysis (ICA) is, in fact, another popular technique adopted to approach this problem, and it can be used in all those fields where PCA is also applied. An ICA approach enables us to explain the displacement time series imposing a fewer number of constraints on the model, and to reveal anomalies in the data such as transient deformation signals. However, the independence condition is not easy to impose, and it is often necessary to introduce some approximations. To work around this problem, we use a variational bayesian ICA (vbICA) method, which models the probability density function (pdf) of each source signal using a mix of Gaussian distributions. This technique allows for more flexibility in the description of the pdf of the sources

  7. The Mechanical Design of a Kinematic Mount for the Mid Infrared Instrument Focal Plane Module on the James Webb Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Michael P.; Moore, Donald M.

    2009-01-01

    The detector assembly for the Mid Infrared Instrument (MIRI) of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is mechanically supported in the Focal Plane Module (FPM) Assembly with an efficient hexapod design. The kinematic mount design allows for precision adjustment of the detector boresight to assembly alignment fiducials and maintains optical alignment requirements during flight conditions of launch and cryogenic operations below 7 Kelvin. This kinematic mounting technique is able to be implemented in a variety of optical-mechanical designs and is capable of micron level adjustment control and stability over wide dynamic and temperature ranges.

  8. Ground-based simulation of telepresence for materials science experiments. [remote viewing and control of processes aboard Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, James C.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.; Bonner, Mary JO; Hahn, Richard C.; Herbach, Bruce

    1989-01-01

    A series of ground-based telepresence experiments have been performed to determine the minimum video frame rate and resolution required for the successive performance of materials science experiments in space. The approach used is to simulate transmission between earth and space station with transmission between laboratories on earth. The experiments include isothermal dendrite growth, physical vapor transport, and glass melting. Modifications of existing apparatus, software developed, and the establishment of an inhouse network are reviewed.

  9. Ground-based simulation of telepresence for materials science experiments. [remote viewing and control of processes aboard Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, James C.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.; Bonner, Mary JO; Hahn, Richard C.; Herbach, Bruce

    1989-01-01

    A series of ground-based telepresence experiments have been performed to determine the minimum video frame rate and resolution required for the successive performance of materials science experiments in space. The approach used is to simulate transmission between earth and space station with transmission between laboratories on earth. The experiments include isothermal dendrite growth, physical vapor transport, and glass melting. Modifications of existing apparatus, software developed, and the establishment of an inhouse network are reviewed.

  10. BMTC: --A Tool for Standardized Tissue Engineering on Ground and in Space ---

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Peter; Kemmerle, Kurt; Jones, David

    ESA is developing the BMTC (Biotechnology Mammalian Tissue Culture Facility) as ground demonstrator in order to: • establish a well characterised terrestrial platform for tissue engineer-ing under defined, reproducible conditions • prepare for future tissue engineering experiments in space using proven, well characterised, modular equipment. In the beginning the facility will be dedicated to support research of bone and cartilage growth under controlled mechanical and/or biochemical stimulation. Meanwhile, the industrial BMTC team has finalised the first model. The BMTC is highly automated system which provides standardized experiment hardware for tissue cultivation and stimulation under controlled conditions and the reproducible execution of the experiment according pre-programmed protocols. The BMTC consists of an incubator for the control of the experiment environment. Internally it offers all experiment relevant subsystems: • two Cultivation Units, each with eight Experiment Chamber Modules optical in-situ sensors for pO2 and pH • the Liquid Handling Device for medium exchange and sample taking • the handling devices for the internal transport of the experiment chamber modules to different experiment services • workstations for uni-axial loading of tissue samples; ZETOS (for bone tissue) / CHONDROS (for cartilage tissue) provision of reproducible displacement profiles measurement of the resulting forces computation of the visco-eleastic properties of the samples provision of flow induced shear stress fluorescence microscope • two different reactor types are included in the baseline flat reactor for 2D-and flat 3D-cultures with flow induced shear stress stimulation compatible with microscope cylindrical 3D-reactor for cultivation of vital bone and cartilage samples compatible with un-directional stimulation / analysis by ZETOS / CHONDROS. The modular, flexible design of the system allows the servicing and accommodation of a wide range of other

  11. Future space missions and ground observatory for measurements of coronal magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineschi, Silvano; Gibson, Sarah; Bemporad, Alessandro; Zhukov, Andrei; Damé, Luc; Susino, Roberto; Larruquert, Juan

    2016-07-01

    This presentation gives an overview of the near-future perspectives for probing coronal magnetism from space missions (i.e., SCORE and ASPIICS) and ground-based observatory (ESCAPE). Spectro-polarimetric imaging of coronal emission-lines in the visible-light wavelength-band provides an important diagnostics tool of the coronal magnetism. The interpretation in terms of Hanle and Zeeman effect of the line-polarization in forbidden emission-lines yields information on the direction and strength of the coronal magnetic field. As study case, this presentation will describe the Torino Coronal Magnetograph (CorMag) for the spectro-polarimetric observation of the FeXIV, 530.3 nm, forbidden emission-line. CorMag - consisting of a Liquid Crystal (LC) Lyot filter and a LC linear polarimeter. The CorMag filter is part of the ESCAPE experiment to be based at the French-Italian Concordia base in Antarctica. The linear polarization by resonance scattering of coronal permitted line-emission in the ultraviolet (UV)can be modified by magnetic fields through the Hanle effect. Space-based UV spectro-polarimeters would provide an additional tool for the disgnostics of coronal magnetism. As a case study of space-borne UV spectro-polarimeters, this presentation will describe the future upgrade of the Sounding-rocket Coronagraphic Experiment (SCORE) to include new generation, high-efficiency UV polarizer with the capability of imaging polarimetry of the HI Lyman-α, 121.6 nm. SCORE is a multi-wavelength imager for the emission-lines, HeII 30.4 nm and HI 121.6 nm, and visible-light broad-band emission of the polarized K-corona. SCORE has flown successfully in 2009. The second lauch is scheduled in 2016. Proba-3 is the other future solar mission that would provide the opportunity of diagnosing the coronal magnetic field. Proba-3 is the first precision formation-flying mission to launched in 2019). A pair of satellites will fly together maintaining a fixed configuration as a 'large rigid

  12. Ground-Laboratory to In-Space Atomic Oxygen Correlation for the Polymer Erosion and Contamination Experiment (PEACE) Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambler, Arielle H.; Inoshita, Karen E.; Roberts, Lily M.; Barbagallo, Claire E.; deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    The Materials International Space Station Experiment 2 (MISSE 2) Polymer Erosion and Contamination Experiment (PEACE) polymers were exposed to the environment of low Earth orbit (LEO) for 3.95 years from 2001 to 2005. There were 41 different PEACE polymers, which were flown on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS) in order to determine their atomic oxygen erosion yields. In LEO, atomic oxygen is an environmental durability threat, particularly for long duration mission exposures. Although spaceflight experiments, such as the MISSE 2 PEACE experiment, are ideal for determining LEO environmental durability of spacecraft materials, ground-laboratory testing is often relied upon for durability evaluation and prediction. Unfortunately, significant differences exist between LEO atomic oxygen exposure and atomic oxygen exposure in ground-laboratory facilities. These differences include variations in species, energies, thermal exposures and radiation exposures, all of which may result in different reactions and erosion rates. In an effort to improve the accuracy of ground-based durability testing, ground-laboratory to in-space atomic oxygen correlation experiments have been conducted. In these tests, the atomic oxygen erosion yields of the PEACE polymers were determined relative to Kapton H using a radio-frequency (RF) plasma asher (operated on air). The asher erosion yields were compared to the MISSE 2 PEACE erosion yields to determine the correlation between erosion rates in the two environments. This paper provides a summary of the MISSE 2 PEACE experiment; it reviews the specific polymers tested as well as the techniques used to determine erosion yield in the asher, and it provides a correlation between the space and ground laboratory erosion yield values. Using the PEACE polymers asher to in-space erosion yield ratios will allow more accurate in-space materials performance predictions to be made based on plasma asher durability evaluation.

  13. Status and Prospect of China's Space Transportation System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LongLehao

    2004-01-01

    The space transportation system refers to all transportation vehicles carrying various paylaads and flying between the ground and space orbits or among orbits. It includes launch vehicle, space shuttle, space plane,emergency rescue vehicle and all kinds of auxiliary systems. The space

  14. An Optimum Space-to-Ground Communication Concept for CubeSat Platform Utilizing NASA Space Network and Near Earth Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yen F.; Kegege, Obadiah; Schaire, Scott H.; Bussey, George; Altunc, Serhat; Zhang, Yuwen; Patel, Chitra

    2016-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) CubeSat missions are expected to grow rapidly in the next decade. Higher data rate CubeSats are transitioning away from Amateur Radio bands to higher frequency bands. A high-level communication architecture for future space-to-ground CubeSat communication was proposed within NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This architecture addresses CubeSat direct-to-ground communication, CubeSat to Tracking Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) communication, CubeSat constellation with Mothership direct-to-ground communication, and CubeSat Constellation with Mothership communication through K-Band Single Access (KSA).A Study has been performed to explore this communication architecture, through simulations, analyses, and identifying technologies, to develop the optimum communication concepts for CubeSat communications. This paper will present details of the simulation and analysis that include CubeSat swarm, daughter shipmother ship constellation, Near Earth Network (NEN) S and X-band direct to ground link, TDRS Multiple Access (MA) array vs Single Access mode, notional transceiverantenna configurations, ground asset configurations and Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) signal trades for daughter mother CubeSat constellation inter-satellite crosslink. Results of Space Science X-band 10 MHz maximum achievable data rate study will be summarized. Assessment of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of current CubeSat communication technologies capabilities will be presented. Compatibility test of the CubeSat transceiver through NEN and Space Network (SN) will be discussed. Based on the analyses, signal trade studies and technology assessments, the functional design and performance requirements as well as operation concepts for future CubeSat end-to-end communications will be derived.

  15. Set-theoretic deconvolution (STD) for multichromatic ground/air/space-based imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safronov, Aleksandr N.

    1997-09-01

    This paper proposes a class of nonlinear methods, called Set-Theoretic Deconvolution (STD), developed for joint restoration of M(M >1) monochrome distorted 2-dimensional images (snapshots) of an unknown extended object, being viewed through the optical channel with unknown PSF, whose true monochrome brightness profiles look distinct at M(M>!) slightly different wavelengths chosen. The presented method appeals to the generalized Projection Onto Convex Sets (POCS) formalism, so that the proper projective metric is introduced and then minimized. Thus, a number of operators is derived in closed form and cyclically applied to M-dimensional functional vector built up from estimates for combinations of monochrome images. During the projecting of vector onto convex sets one attempts to avoid non-physical inversion and to correctly form a feasible solution (fixed point) consistent with qualitative not quantitative information being assumed to be known in advance. Computer simulation demonstrates that the resulting improved monochrome images reveal fine details which could not easily be discerned in the original distorted images. This technique recovers fairly reliably the total multichromatic 2-D portrait of an arbitrary compact object whose monochrome brightness distributions have discontinuities and are highly nonconvex plus multiply connected ones. Originally developed for the deblurring of passively observed objects, the STD approach can be carried over to scenario with actively irradiated objects (f.e., near-Earth space targets). Under advanced conditions, such as spatio-spectrally diversified laser illumination or coherent Doppler imaging implementation, the synthesized loop deconvolver could be universal tool in object feature extraction by means of occasionally aberrated space-borne telescope or turbulence-affected ground/air-based large aperture optical systems.

  16. A Comparison of Space and Ground Based Facility Environmental Effects for FEP Teflon. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Kitral, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) Teflon is widely used as a thermal control material for spacecraft, however, it is susceptible to erosion, cracking, and subsequent mechanical failure in low Earth orbit. One of the difficulties in determining whether FEP Teflon will survive during a mission is the wide disparity of erosion rates observed for this material in space and in ground based facilities. Each environment contains different levels of atomic oxygen, ions, and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation in addition to parameters such as the energy of the arriving species and temperature. These variations make it difficult to determine what is causing the observed differences in erosion rates. This paper attempts to narrow down which factors affect the erosion rate of FEP Teflon through attempting to change only one environmental constituent at a time. This was attempted through the use of a single simulation facility (plasma asher) environment with a variety of Faraday cages and VUV transparent windows. Isolating one factor inside of a radio frequency (RF) plasma proved to be very difficult. Two observations could be made. First, it appears that the erosion yield of FEP Teflon with respect to that of polyimide Kapton is not greatly affected by the presence or lack of VUV radiation present in the RF plasma and the relative erosion yield for the FEP Teflon may decrease with increasing fluence. Second, shielding from charged particles appears to lower the relative erosion yield of the FEP to approximately that observed in space, however it is difficult to determine for sure whether ions, electrons, or some other components are causing the enhanced erosion.

  17. Space shuttle/food system study. Volume 2, Appendix G: Ground support system analysis. Appendix H: Galley functional details analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    The capabilities for preflight feeding of flight personnel and the supply and control of the space shuttle flight food system were investigated to determine ground support requirements; and the functional details of an onboard food system galley are shown in photographic mockups. The elements which were identified as necessary to the efficient accomplishment of ground support functions include the following: (1) administration; (2) dietetics; (3) analytical laboratories; (4) flight food warehouse; (5) stowage module assembly area; (6) launch site module storage area; (7) alert crew restaurant and disperse crew galleys; (8) ground food warehouse; (9) manufacturing facilities; (10) transport; and (11) computer support. Each element is discussed according to the design criteria of minimum cost, maximum flexibility, reliability, and efficiency consistent with space shuttle requirements. The galley mockup overview illustrates the initial operation configuration, food stowage locations, meal assembly and serving trays, meal preparation configuration, serving, trash management, and the logistics of handling and cleanup equipment.

  18. Key Ground-Based and Space-Based Assets to Disentangle Magnetic Field Sources in the Earth's Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulliat, A.; Matzka, J.; Masson, A.; Milan, S. E.

    2016-10-01

    The magnetic field measured on the ground or in space is the addition of several sources: from flows within the Earth's core to electric currents in distant regions of the magnetosphere. Properly separating and characterizing these sources requires appropriate observations, both ground-based and space-based. In the present paper, we review the existing observational infrastructure, from magnetic observatories and magnetometer arrays on the ground to satellites in low-Earth (Swarm) and highly elliptical (Cluster) orbits. We also review the capability of SuperDARN to provide polar ionospheric convection patterns supporting magnetic observations. The past two decades have been marked by exciting new developments in all observation types. We review these developments, focusing on how they complement each other and how they have led or could lead in the near future to improved separation and modeling of the geomagnetic sources.

  19. Stochastic model of the NASA/MSFC ground facility for large space structures with uncertain parameters: The maximum entropy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Wei-Shen

    1987-01-01

    A stochastic control model of the NASA/MSFC Ground Facility for Large Space Structures (LSS) control verification through Maximum Entropy (ME) principle adopted in Hyland's method was presented. Using ORACLS, a computer program was implemented for this purpose. Four models were then tested and the results presented.

  20. Comparison of space- and ground-grown Bi 2Se 0.21Te 2.79 thermoelectric crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanfei; Li, Xiaoya; Bai, Shengqiang; Chen, Lidong

    2010-03-01

    Two crystals of Bi 2Se 0.21Te 2.79 doped with 0.08 wt% TeI 4 were grown by zone melting on the Foton-M3 spacecraft of Russia and the ground in 2007, respectively. The chemical composition, structure and thermoelectric properties of the space and ground crystals grown were evaluated by EPMA, XRD and thermoelectric measurements including Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity. The compositions of the space crystal grown along growth direction were more homogeneous than that of the ground crystal grown. The crystallization of space crystal grown was obviously improved. The maximum ZT value of space crystal reached 1.14 at 300 K, which was higher about 29% than that of ground crystal at room temperature. These results imply that the composition homogeneity and crystallization of Bi 2Se 0.21Te 2.79 crystal can be improved under microgravity conditions, which is helpful for enhancing thermoelectric figure of merit of Bi 2Te 3-base materials.

  1. Cloud Structure of Galactic OB Cluster Forming Regions from Combining Ground and Space Based Bolometric Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Yuxin; Li, Di; Zhang, Zhiyu; Ginsburg, Adam; Pineda, Jaime E; Qian, Lei; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; McLeod, Anna Faye; Rosolowsky, Erik; Dale, James E; Immer, Katharina; Koch, Eric; Longmore, Steve; Walker, Daniel; Testi, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an iterative procedure to systematically combine the millimeter and submillimeter images of OB cluster-forming molecular clouds, which were taken by ground based (CSO, JCMT, APEX, IRAM-30m) and space telescopes (Herschel, Planck). For the seven luminous ($L$$>$10$^{6}$ $L_{\\odot}$) Galactic OB cluster-forming molecular clouds selected for our analyses, namely W49A, W43-Main, W43-South, W33, G10.6-0.4, G10.2-0.3, G10.3-0.1, we have performed single-component, modified black-body fits to each pixel of the combined (sub)millimeter images, and the Herschel PACS and SPIRE images at shorter wavelengths. The $\\sim$10$"$ resolution dust column density and temperature maps of these sources revealed dramatically different morphologies, indicating very different modes of OB cluster-formation, or parent molecular cloud structures in different evolutionary stages. The molecular clouds W49A, W33, and G10.6-0.4 show centrally concentrated massive molecular clumps that are connected with approximately radia...

  2. Gap interpolation by inpainting methods : Application to Ground and Space-based Asteroseismic data

    CERN Document Server

    Pires, Sandrine; Garcia, Rafael A; Ballot, Jérôme; Stello, Dennis; Sato, Kumiko

    2014-01-01

    In asteroseismology, the observed time series often suffers from incomplete time coverage due to gaps. The presence of periodic gaps may generate spurious peaks in the power spectrum that limit the analysis of the data. Various methods have been developed to deal with gaps in time series data. However, it is still important to improve these methods to be able to extract all the possible information contained in the data. In this paper, we propose a new approach to handle the problem, the so-called inpainting method. This technique, based on a sparsity prior, enables to judiciously fill-in the gaps in the data, preserving the asteroseismic signal, as far as possible. The impact of the observational window function is reduced and the interpretation of the power spectrum is simplified. This method is applied both on ground and space-based data. It appears that the inpainting technique improves the oscillation modes detection and estimation. Additionally, it can be used to study very long time series of many star...

  3. OGLE-2015-BLG-0196: Ground-based Gravitational Microlens Parallax Confirmed By Space-Based Observation

    CERN Document Server

    Han, C; Gould, A; Zhu, Wei; Szymański, M K; Soszyński, I; Skowron, J; Mróz, P; Poleski, R; Pietrukowicz, P; Kozłowski, S; Ulaczyk, K; Pawlak, M; Yee, J C; Beichman, C; Novati, S Calchi; Carey, S; Bryden, C; Fausnaugh, M; Gaudi, B S; Henderson, Calen B; Shvartzvald, Y; Wibking, B

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present the analysis of the binary gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0196. The event lasted for almost a year and the light curve exhibited significant deviations from the lensing model based on the rectilinear lens-source relative motion, enabling us to measure the microlens parallax. The ground-based microlens parallax is confirmed by the data obtained from space-based microlens observations using the {\\it Spitzer} telescope. By additionally measuring the angular Einstein radius from the analysis of the resolved caustic crossing, the physical parameters of the lens are determined up to the two-fold degeneracy: $u_00$ solutions caused by the well-known "ecliptic" degeneracy. It is found that the binary lens is composed of two M dwarf stars with similar masses $M_1=0.38\\pm 0.04\\ M_\\odot$ ($0.50\\pm 0.05\\ M_\\odot)$ and $M_2=0.38\\pm 0.04\\ M_\\odot$ ($0.55\\pm 0.06\\ M_\\odot$) and the distance to the lens is $D_{\\rm L}=2.77\\pm 0.23$ kpc ($3.30\\pm 0.29$ kpc). Here the physical parameter...

  4. Phase Space Diagnostics of Trapped Atoms By Magnetic Ground-State Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahn, S. B.; Kumarakrishnan, A.; Shim, U.; Sleator, T.

    1997-04-01

    The in-situ measurement of the phase space distribution of atoms in a trap is important in the study of both ordinary and Bose-condensed matter. The current techniques for measuring the density distribution involve imaging the light emitted by atoms in the trap, time-of-flight measurement of the atoms as they fall through a sheet of light(C.D. Wallace, et al, JOSA B,11),703 (1994), resonant absorption imaging of the cloud(J.R. Ensher, et al, PRL 77), 4984 (1996), or off-resonant dispersive imaging. The first two techniques are in general use for imaging magneto-optical traps (MOTs) and the second two for Bose condensates. Velocity information is obtained indirectly by recording the expansion of the trap at different times following shut-off. By exploiting the magnetic field dependence of ground-state magnetic sublevel coherences, we have employed two techniques, MGE and MGFID(B. Dubetsky and P.R. Berman, Appl. Phys. B, 59), 147 (1994), to obtain atomic spatial information. This variant of atomic beam magnetic imaging(J.E. Thomas and L.J. Wang, Physics Reports 262), 311-366 (1995) also yields correlated position-velocity information by appropriate orientation of the applied magnetic field, as the detuning of the atom depends on both its position and velocity. Initial studies have given the velocity distribution and size of the MOT, and future experiments to measure correlations are proposed.

  5. Survival of B. Horneckiae Spores Under Ground-simulated Space Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanche, Bradley

    2012-01-01

    To prevent forward contamination and maintain the scientific integrity of future life detection missions, it is important to characterize and attempt to eliminate terrestrial microorganisms associated with exploratory spacecraft and landing vehicles. Among the organisms isolated from spacecraft-associated habitats, spore-forming microbes are highly resistant to various physical and chemical conditions, which include ionizing and UV radiation, desiccation and oxidative stress, and the harsh environment of outer space or planetary surfaces. Recently a radiation resistant, spore forming bacterial isolate, Bacillus horneckiae, was isolated from a clean room of the Kennedy Space Center where the Phoenix spacecraft was assembled. The exceptionally high tolerance of extreme conditions demonstrated by sporeforming bacteria highlighted the need to assess the viability of these microbes in situ (in real) space. The proposed BOSS (Biofilm Organisms Surfing Space) project aims to understand the mechanisms by which biofilm forming organisms, such as B. horneckiae, will potentially be able to withstand harsh space conditions. As previously stated, the spore producing ability of these species gives them increased survivability to harsh conditions. Some of the spores will have the protective exosporium layer artificially removed before the test to determine if the existence of this layer significantly changes the survivability during the mission. In preparation for that experiment, we analyzed spores which were exposed during a ground simulation, the EXPOSE R2 Biofilm Organisms Surfing Space (BOSS). Previous to exposure, spores were deposited onto spacecraft grade aluminum coupons in a spore suspension calculated to contain between 10(exp 7) and 10(exp 8) spores. This precursor series will be used to establish a baseline survivability function for comparison with the future flight tests during EXPOSE-R. For each coupon, a 10% polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) film was applied and peeled

  6. Advancing Translational Space Research Through Biospecimen Sharing: Amplifying the Impact of Ground-Based Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronca, A.; Lewis, L.; Staten, B.; Moyer, E.; Vizir, V.; Gompf, H.; Hoban-Higgins, T.; Fuller, C. A.

    2017-01-01

    Biospecimen Sharing Programs (BSPs) have been organized by NASA Ames Research Center since the 1960s with the goal of maximizing utilization and scientific return from rare, complex and costly spaceflight experiments. BSPs involve acquiring otherwise unused biological specimens from primary space research experiments for distribution to secondary experiments. Here we describe a collaboration leveraging Ames expertise in biospecimen sharing to magnify the scientific impact of research informing astronaut health funded by the NASA Human Research Program (HRP) Human Health Countermeasures (HHC) Element. The concept expands biospecimen sharing to one-off ground-based studies utilizing analogue space platforms (e.g., Hind limb Unloading (HLU), Artificial Gravity) for rodent experiments, thereby significantly broadening the range of research opportunities with translational relevance for protecting human health in space and on Earth. In this presentation, we will report on biospecimens currently being acquired from HHC Award Head-Down Tilt as a Model for Intracranial and Intraocular Pressures, and Retinal Changes during Spaceflight, and their availability. The BSP add-on to the project described herein has already yielded for HHC-funded investigators more than 4,700 additional tissues that would otherwise have been discarded as waste, with additional tissues available for analysis. Young (3-mo old) male and female rats and Older (9-mo old) male rats are being exposed to HLU for either 7, 14, 28, or 90 days. Additional groups are exposed to 90 days of unloading followed by either 7, 14, 28 days or 90 days of recovery (normal loading). Comparisons are made with non-suspended controls. Unused tissues are: Skin, Lungs, Thymus, Adrenals, Kidneys, Spleen, Hindlimb Muscles (Soleus, Extensor Digitorum Longus, Tibialis Anterior, Plantaris Gastrocnemius), Fat Pads, Reproductive Organs, and Intestines. Tissues are harvested, weighed, preserved then archived (with metadata) using a

  7. An Efficient Optical Observation Ground Network is the Fundamental basis for any Space Based Debris Observation Segment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibin, L.; Chiarini, M.; Annoni, G.; Milani, A.; Bernardi, F.; Dimare, L.; Valsecchi, G.; Rossi, A.; Ragazzoni, R.; Salinari, P.

    2013-08-01

    A matter which is strongly debated in the SSA Community, concerns the observation of Space Debris from Space [1]. This topic has been preliminary studied by our Team for LEO, MEO and GEO orbital belts, allowing to remark a fundamental concept, residing in the fact that to be suitable to provide a functionality unavailable from ground in a cost to performance perspective, any Space Based System must operate in tight collaboration with an efficient Optical Ground Observation Network. In this work an analysis of the different functionalities which can be implemented with this approach for every orbital belt is illustrated, remarking the different achievable targets in terms of population size as a function of the observed orbits. Further, a preliminary definition of the most interesting missions scenarios, together with considerations and assessments on the observation strategy and P/L characteristics are presented.

  8. An Optimum Space-to-Ground Communication Concept for CubeSat Platform Utilizing NASA Space Network and Near Earth Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yen F.; Kegege, Obadiah; Schaire, Scott H.; Bussey, George; Altunc, Serhat; Zhang, Yuwen; Patel Chitra

    2016-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) CubeSat missions are expected to grow rapidly in the next decade. Higher data rate CubeSats are transitioning away from Amateur Radio bands to higher frequency bands. A high-level communication architecture for future space-to-ground CubeSat communication was proposed within NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This architecture addresses CubeSat direct-to-ground communication, CubeSat to Tracking Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) communication, CubeSat constellation with Mothership direct-to-ground communication, and CubeSat Constellation with Mothership communication through K-Band Single Access (KSA). A study has been performed to explore this communication architecture, through simulations, analyses, and identifying technologies, to develop the optimum communication concepts for CubeSat communications. This paper presents details of the simulation and analysis that include CubeSat swarm, daughter ship/mother ship constellation, Near Earth Network (NEN) S and X-band direct to ground link, TDRSS Multiple Access (MA) array vs Single Access mode, notional transceiver/antenna configurations, ground asset configurations and Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) signal trades for daughter ship/mother ship CubeSat constellation inter-satellite cross link. Results of space science X-band 10 MHz maximum achievable data rate study are summarized. CubeSat NEN Ka-Band end-to-end communication analysis is provided. Current CubeSat communication technologies capabilities are presented. Compatibility test of the CubeSat transceiver through NEN and SN is discussed. Based on the analyses, signal trade studies and technology assessments, the desired CubeSat transceiver features and operation concepts for future CubeSat end-to-end communications are derived.

  9. Comparison of ATLOG and Xyce for Bell Labs Electromagnetic Pulse Excitation of Finite-Long Dissipative Conductors over a Ground Plane.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    campione, salvatore; Warne, Larry K.; Schiek, Richard; Basilio, Lorena I.

    2017-09-01

    This report details the modeling results for the response of a finite-length dissipative conductor interacting with a conducting ground to the Bell Labs electromagnetic pulse excitation. We use both a frequency-domain and a time-domain method based on transmission line theory through a code we call ATLOG - Analytic Transmission Line Over Ground. Results are compared to the circuit simulator Xyce for selected cases. Intentionally Left Blank

  10. Insight into mechanisms of reduced orthostatic performance after exposure to microgravity: comparison of ground-based and space flight data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, V. A.

    1998-01-01

    Since the beginning of human spaceflight, the value of understanding mechanisms of physiological adaptation to microgravity became apparent to life scientists who were interested in maintining crew health and developing countermeasures agains adverse effects of the mission. However, several characteristics associated the the logistics of spaceflight presented significant limitations to the scientific study of human adaptation to microgravity. Because space missions are so infrequent and involve minimal numbers of crewmembers, meaninful statistical analysis of data are limited. Reproducibility of results from spaceflight experiments is difficult to assess since there are few repeated space missions involving the same crewmembers. Since the emphasis of space missions is placed on operations, experiments are compromised without adequate control over various factors (e.g., time, diet, physical activities, etc.) that can impact measured responses. With the mimimal opportunity to collect spaceflight data, there is a high risk of experiments that simultaneously interfere with other experiments by the increasing demand on the crewmembers to participate in mumerous experiments proposed by multiple investigators. The technology and ability to measure physiological functions necessary to test specific hypotheses can be severely limited by physical space and power constraints of the space enviroment. Finally, technical and logistical aspects of space missions such as launch delays, extended missions, and inflight operational emergencies can significantly compromise the timing and control of experiments. These limitations have stimulated scientists to develop ground-based analogs of microgravity in an effort to investigate the effects of spaceflight on physiological function in a controlled experimental setting. The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected comparison of data collected from ground-based experiments with those obtained from spaceflight in an effort to

  11. A determination of the space density and birth rate of hydrogen-line (DA) white dwarfs in the Galactic plane, based on the UVEX survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek, Kars; Groot, Paul J.; Nelemans, Gijs; Scaringi, Simone; Napiwotzki, Ralf; Drew, Janet E.; Steeghs, Danny; Casares, Jorge; Corral-Santana, Jesus M.; Gänsicke, Boris T.; González-Solares, Eduardo; Greimel, Robert; Heber, Ulrich; Irwin, Mike J.; Knigge, Christian; Wright, Nicholas J.; Zijlstra, Albert A.

    2013-10-01

    We present a determination of the average space density and birth rate of hydrogen-line (DA) white dwarfs within a radius of 1 kpc around the Sun, based on an observational sample of 360 candidate white dwarfs with g plane, in combination with a theoretical white dwarf population that has been constructed to simulate the observations, including the effects of reddening and observational selection effects. The main uncertainty in the derivation of the white dwarf space density and current birth rate lies in the absolute photometric calibration and the photometric scatter of the observational data, which influences the classification method on colours, the completeness and the pollution. Corrections for these effects are applied. We derive an average space density of DA white dwarfs with Teff > 10 000 K (MV < 12.2) of (3.8 ± 1.1) × 10-4 pc-3, and an average DA white dwarf birth rate over the last 7×107 yr of (5.4 ± 1.5) × 10-13 pc-3 yr-1. Additionally, we show that many estimates of the white dwarf space density from different studies are consistent with each other, and with our determination here.

  12. Comparison of Precipitation Observations from a Prototype Space-based Cloud Radar and Ground-based Radars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Liping; ZHANG Zhiqiang; YU Danru; YANG Hu; ZHAO Chonghui; ZHONG Lingzhi

    2012-01-01

    A prototype space-based cloud radar has been developed and was installed on an airplane to observe a precipitation system over Tianjin,China in July 2010.Ground-based S-band and Ka-band radars were used to examine the observational capability of the prototype. A cross-comparison algorithm between different wavelengths,spatial resolutions and platform radars is presented.The reflectivity biases,correlation coefficients and standard deviations between the radars are analyzed.The equivalent reflectivity bias between the S- and Ka-band radars were simulated with a given raindrop size distribution.The results indicated that reflectivity bias between the S- and Ka-band radars due to scattering properties was less than 5 dB,and for weak precipitation the bias was negligible. The prototype space-based cloud radar was able to measure a reasonable vertical profile of reflectivity,but the reflectivity below an altitude of 1.5 km above ground level was obscured by ground clutter.The measured reflectivity by the prototype space-based cloud radar was approximately 10.9 dB stronger than that by the S-band Doppler radar (SA radar),and 13.7 dB stronger than that by the ground-based cloud radar.The reflectivity measured by the SA radar was 0.4 dB stronger than that by the ground-based cloud radar.This study could provide a method for the quantitative examination of the observation ability for space-based radars.

  13. Effect of nozzle-to-plate spacing on the development of a plane jet impinging on a heated plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Ben Kalifa; Saïd, Nejla Mahjoub; Bournot, Hervé; Le Palec, Georges

    2016-09-01

    An experimental investigation was carried out to study the behavior of a turbulent air jet impinging on a heated plate. The study of the flow field was performed using a particle image velocimetry. A three-dimensional numerical model with Reynolds stress model has been conducted to examine the global flow. Numerical results agree well with experimental data. The main properties of the fluid occurring between the nozzle and the flat plate are presented. In addition, the effect of the distance between the nozzle exit and the plate (h/e = 14 and 28) were investigated and detailed analysis of the dynamic, turbulent distribution and temperature fields were performed. The wall shear stress and the pressure fields near the heated plate are then explored. Results showed that the mean velocity and the heat transfer characteristics of small nozzle-to-plate spacing are significantly different from those of large nozzle-to-plate spacing.

  14. Pinatubo Global- to Micro-Scale Evolution: A Unified Picture from Space, Air, and Ground Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Philip B.; Livingston, J. M.; Puesche, R. F.; Pollack, J. B.; Brooks, S.; Hamill, P.; Hughes, J.; Thomason, L.; Stowe, L.; Deshler, T.; Podolske, James R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We combine space, air, and ground measurements to develop a composite picture of the post-Pinatubo aerosol, and assess the consistency and uncertainties of various measurement and retrieval techniques. impactor and optical counter measurements, as well as retrievals from optical depth spectra, paint a generally consistent picture of the evolution of particle effective radii, R(sub eff). In the first month after the eruption, although particle numbers increased by orders of magnitude, R(sub eff) was similar to the preeruption value of 4.2 micrometers, because both small (r less than 0.25 micrometers) and large (r greater than 0.6 micrometers) particles increased in number, Over the next 3-6 months, R(sub eff) increased rapidly to about 0.5 micrometers. In general, R(sub eff) continued to increase for about a year after the eruption. The peak wavelength of optical depth spectra increased from initial values of less than 0.42 micrometers to values between 0.78 and 1 micrometer. This coupled evolution in particle size distribution and optical depth spectra helps explain the relationship between the global maps of 0.5 and 1.0-micrometer optical depth derived from the AVHRR and SAGE satellite measurements. It also sets a context for evaluating remaining uncertainties in each of these satellite data products. We also make consensus recommendations for particle composition, shape, and temperature- and wavelength-dependent refractive index, and show how the latter effect on backscatter spectra can influence particle sizes retrieved from multiwavelength lidar measurements.

  15. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of Saturn's F ring region during the 1995 ring--plane crossings

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhee, C. A.; Nicholson, P. D.; French, R. G.; Hall, K. J.

    1998-09-01

    HST observations of Saturn's ring--plane crossings in May, August and November 1995 revealed the presence of multiple objects orbiting in or near the F ring (Nicholson et\\ al.; Bosh and Rivkin 1996, Science 272, 509; 518). The combination of the May and August data sets, along with refined ring template subtraction, has allowed us to improve our understanding of the distribution of these suspected F ring clumps. In addition to new orbits for objects S/1995 S5, S6 and S7, we have obtained measurements and orbital parameters for S9, first reported in data taken at the CFHT (Roddier et\\ al. 1995, IAUC 6515), and measurements of a host of fainter objects in both HST data sets. An additional 3 F--ring objects in May and 5 in August were found to account for a total of ~ 90 of these fainter clump measurements. S/1995 S1 orbits very close to Atlas, well inside the F ring; S7 and S9 appear to be coorbital with Prometheus; while S3 and S6 fall ~ 500 km on either side of the F ring. These results lend support to Cuzzi and Burns' (1988, Icarus 74, 284) hypothesis of a belt of moonlet--sized (or smaller) objects occupying the entire radial region between Pandora and Prometheus. Object & Semimajor axis (km) & e & RMS residual (km) S/1995 S1 & 137,529+/-87 & 0 & 528.43 Atlas & 137,678 &0 & S/1995 S7 & 139,371+/-93 &0 & 250.64 Prometheus& 139,377.2+/-0.1 & 0.0024 & 214.91 S7+May 358 & 139,382.4+/-0.3 & 0.0024 & 389.67 S/1995 S9 & 139,445+/-139 & 0 & 362.95 S/1995 S6 & 139,594+/-75 & 0 & 350.67 S/1995 S5 & 139,824+/-88 & 0.0029 & 329.44 F ring & 140,209 & 0.0029 & S/1995 S3 & 140,742+/-135 & 0 & 570.33 Pandora & 141,714.8+/-0.2 & 0.0044 & 314.06

  16. Results from a multi aperture Fizeau interferometer ground testbed: demonstrator for a future space-based interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccichet, Nicola; Caillat, Amandine; Rakotonimbahy, Eddy; Dohlen, Kjetil; Savini, Giorgio; Marcos, Michel

    2016-08-01

    In the framework of the European FP7-FISICA (Far Infrared Space Interferometer Critical Assessment) program, we developed a miniaturized version of the hyper-telescope to demonstrate multi-aperture interferometry on ground. This setup would be ultimately integrated into a CubeSat platform, therefore providing the first real demonstrator of a multi aperture Fizeau interferometer in space. In this paper, we describe the optical design of the ground testbed and the data processing pipeline implemented to reconstruct the object image from interferometric data. As a scientific application, we measured the Sun diameter by fitting a limb-darkening model to our data. Finally, we present the design of a CubeSat platform carrying this miniature Fizeau interferometer, which could be used to monitor the Sun diameter over a long in-orbit period.

  17. Modular Extended-Stay HyperGravity Facility Design Concept: An Artificial-Gravity Space-Settlement Ground Analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorais, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    This document defines the design concept for a ground-based, extended-stay hypergravity facility as a precursor for space-based artificial-gravity facilities that extend the permanent presence of both human and non-human life beyond Earth in artificial-gravity settlements. Since the Earth's current human population is stressing the environment and the resources off-Earth are relatively unlimited, by as soon as 2040 more than one thousand people could be living in Earthorbiting artificial-gravity habitats. Eventually, the majority of humanity may live in artificialgravity habitats throughout this solar system as well as others, but little is known about the longterm (multi-generational) effects of artificial-gravity habitats on people, animals, and plants. In order to extend life permanently beyond Earth, it would be useful to create an orbiting space facility that generates 1g as well as other gravity levels to rigorously address the numerous challenges of such an endeavor. Before doing so, developing a ground-based artificial-gravity facility is a reasonable next step. Just as the International Space Station is a microgravity research facility, at a small fraction of the cost and risk a ground-based artificial-gravity facility can begin to address a wide-variety of the artificial-gravity life-science questions and engineering challenges requiring long-term research to enable people, animals, and plants to live off-Earth indefinitely.

  18. Quantifying Systemic Efficiency using Exergy and Energy Analysis for Ground Source Heat Pumps: Domestic Space Conditioning and Water Heating Applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    Although air temperatures over land surfaces show wide seasonal and daily variations, the ground, approximately 10 meters below the earth s surface, remains relatively stable in temperature thereby serving as an energy source or sink. Ground source heat pumps can heat, cool, and supply homes with hot water efficiently by utilizing the earth s renewable and essentially inexhaustible energy resources, saving fossil fuels, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and lowering the environmental footprint. In this paper, evidence is shown that ground source heat pumps can provide up to 79%-87% of domestic hot water energy needs, and up to 77% of space heating needs with the ground s thermal energy resources. The case refers to a 12-month study conducted at a 253 m2 research house located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 36.01 N 84.26 W in a mixed-humid climate with HDD of 2218 C-days and CDD of 723 C-days under simulated occupancy conditions. A single 94.5m vertical bore interfaced the heat pump with the ground. The research shows that this technology is capable of achieving US DOE targets of 25 % and 35% energy savings in HVAC, and in water heating, respectively by 2030. It is also a viable technology to meet greenhouse gas target emissions under the IECC 2012 Standard, as well as the European Union (EU) 2020 targets of using renewable energy resources. The paper quantifies systemic efficiencies using Exergy analysis of the major components, clearly pointing areas for further improvement.

  19. Results of soil, ground-water, surface-water, and streambed-sediment sampling at Air Force Plane 85, Columbus, Ohio, 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Aeronautical Systems Center, Environmental Management Directorate, Restoration Division, prepared the Surface- and Ground- Water Monitoring Work Plan for Air Force Plant 85 (AFP 85 or Plant), Columbus, Ohio, under the Air Force Installation Restoration Program to characterize any ground-water, surface-water, and soil contamination that may exist at AFP 85. The USGS began the study in November 1996. The Plant was divided into nine sampling areas, which included some previously investi gated study sites. The investigation activities included the collection and presentation of data taken during drilling and water-quality sampling. Data collection focused on the saturated and unsatur ated zones and surface water. Twenty-three soil borings were completed. Ten monitoring wells (six existing wells and four newly constructed monitoring wells) were selected for water-quality sam pling. Surface-water and streambed-sediment sampling locations were chosen to monitor flow onto and off of the Plant. Seven sites were sampled for both surface-water and streambed-sediment quality. This report presents data on the selected inorganic and organic constituents in soil, ground water, surface water, and streambed sediments at AFP 85. The methods of data collection and anal ysis also are included. Knowledge of the geologic and hydrologic setting could aid Aeronautical Systems Center, Environmental Management Directorate, Restoration Division, and its governing regulatory agencies in future remediation studies.

  20. How human resource organization can enhance space information acquisition and processing: the experience of the VENESAT-1 ground segment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Romina; Orihuela, Nuris; Blanco, Rafael; Varela, Francisco; Camacho, Enrique; Urbina, Marianela; Aponte, Luis Gabriel; Vallenilla, Leopoldo; Acuña, Liana; Becerra, Roberto; Tabare, Terepaima; Recaredo, Erica

    2009-12-01

    Built in cooperation with the P.R of China, in October 29th of 2008, the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela launched its first Telecommunication Satellite, the so called VENESAT-1 (Simón Bolívar Satellite), which operates in C (covering Center America, The Caribbean Region and most of South America), Ku (Bolivia, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Haiti, Paraguay, Uruguay, Venezuela) and Ka bands (Venezuela). The launch of VENESAT-1 represents the starting point for Venezuela as an active player in the field of space science and technology. In order to fulfill mission requirements and to guarantee the satellite's health, local professionals must provide continuous monitoring, orbit calculation, maneuvers preparation and execution, data preparation and processing, as well as data base management at the VENESAT-1 Ground Segment, which includes both a primary and backup site. In summary, data processing and real time data management are part of the daily activities performed by the personnel at the ground segment. Using published and unpublished information, this paper presents how human resource organization can enhance space information acquisition and processing, by analyzing the proposed organizational structure for the VENESAT-1 Ground Segment. We have found that the proposed units within the organizational structure reflect 3 key issues for mission management: Satellite Operations, Ground Operations, and Site Maintenance. The proposed organization is simple (3 hierarchical levels and 7 units), and communication channels seem efficient in terms of facilitating information acquisition, processing, storage, flow and exchange. Furthermore, the proposal includes a manual containing the full description of personnel responsibilities and profile, which efficiently allocates the management and operation of key software for satellite operation such as the Real-time Data Transaction Software (RDTS), Data Management Software (DMS), and Carrier Spectrum Monitoring Software (CSM

  1. Real-time monitoring of genetically modified Chlamydomonas reinhardtii during the Foton M3 space mission and ground irradiation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambreva, Maya; Rea, Giuseppina; Antonacci, Amina; Serafini, Agnese; Damasso, Mario; Margonelli, Andrea; Johanningmeier, Udo; Bertalan, Ivo; Pezzotti, Gianni; Giardi, Maria Teresa

    developed to measure the chlorophyll fluorescence and to provide a living conditions for 24 different algae strains. Twelve different C. reinhardtii strains were analytically selected and two replications for each strain were brought to space, among them, some mutants modified at the level of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of xanthophylls. We analysed the hourly changes and the daily light/dark trend in the maximum quantum yield of PSII photochemistry as well as some physiological parameters that characterize the post-flight effect on algae viability and photosynthetic performance. The ground control experiments were performed following the same protocol for the sample preparation and the temperature recorded during the pre-flight, flight and post-flight phases. The space flight results in comparison to the ground simulations are discussed.

  2. Analysis of meteorological variables in the Australasian region using ground- and space-based GPS techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuleshov, Yuriy; Choy, Suelynn; Fu, Erjiang Frank; Chane-Ming, Fabrice; Liou, Yuei-An; Pavelyev, Alexander G.

    2016-07-01

    Results of analysis of meteorological variables (temperature and moisture) in the Australasian region using the global positioning system (GPS) radio occultation (RO) and GPS ground-based observations verified with in situ radiosonde (RS) data are presented. The potential of using ground-based GPS observations for retrieving column integrated precipitable water vapour (PWV) over the Australian continent has been demonstrated using the Australian ground-based GPS reference stations network. Using data from the 15 ground-based GPS stations, the state of the atmosphere over Victoria during a significant weather event, the March 2010 Melbourne storm, has been investigated, and it has been shown that the GPS observations has potential for monitoring the movement of a weather front that has sharp moisture contrast. Temperature and moisture variability in the atmosphere over various climatic regions (the Indian and the Pacific Oceans, the Antarctic and Australia) has been examined using satellite-based GPS RO and in situ RS observations. Investigating recent atmospheric temperature trends over Antarctica, the time series of the collocated GPS RO and RS data were examined, and strong cooling in the lower stratosphere and warming through the troposphere over Antarctica has been identified, in agreement with outputs of climate models. With further expansion of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) system, it is expected that GNSS satellite- and ground-based measurements would be able to provide an order of magnitude larger amount of data which in turn could significantly advance weather forecasting services, climate monitoring and analysis in the Australasian region.

  3. Validation of CALIPSO space-borne-derived attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles using a ground-based lidar in Athens, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Mamouri

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We present initial aerosol validation results of the space-borne lidar CALIOP -onboard the CALIPSO satellite- Level 1 attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles, using coincident observations performed with a ground-based lidar in Athens, Greece (37.9° N, 23.6° E. A multi-wavelength ground-based backscatter/Raman lidar system is operating since 2000 at the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA in the framework of the European Aerosol Research LIdar NETwork (EARLINET, the first lidar network for tropospheric aerosol studies on a continental scale. Since July 2006, a total of 40 coincidental aerosol ground-based lidar measurements were performed over Athens during CALIPSO overpasses. The ground-based measurements were performed each time CALIPSO overpasses the station location within a maximum distance of 100 km. The duration of the ground–based lidar measurements was approximately two hours, centred on the satellite overpass time. From the analysis of the ground-based/satellite correlative lidar measurements, a mean bias of the order of 22% for daytime measurements and of 8% for nighttime measurements with respect to the CALIPSO profiles was found for altitudes between 3 and 10 km. The mean bias becomes much larger for altitudes lower that 3 km (of the order of 60% which is attributed to the increase of aerosol horizontal inhomogeneity within the Planetary Boundary Layer, resulting to the observation of possibly different air masses by the two instruments. In cases of aerosol layers underlying Cirrus clouds, comparison results for aerosol tropospheric profiles become worse. This is attributed to the significant multiple scattering effects in Cirrus clouds experienced by CALIPSO which result in an attenuation which is less than that measured by the ground-based lidar.

  4. Space-borne detection of volcanic carbon dioxide anomalies: The importance of ground-based validation networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandner, F. M.; Carn, S. A.; Corradini, S.; Merucci, L.; Salerno, G.; La Spina, A.

    2012-04-01

    We have investigated the feasibility of space-borne detection of volcanic carbon dioxide (CO2) anomalies, and their integration with ground-based observations. Three goals provide motivation to their integration: (a) development of new volcano monitoring techniques, with better spatial and temporal coverage, because pre-eruptive volcanic CO2 emissions are potentially the earliest available indicators of volcanic unrest; (b) improvement the currently very poor global CO2 source strength inventory for volcanoes, and (c) use of volcanic CO2 emissions for high altitude strong point source emission and dispersion studies. (1) Feasibility of space-borne detection of volcanic CO2 anomalies. Volcanoes are highly variable but continuous CO2 emitters, distributed globally, and emissions often occur at high altitudes. To detect strong point sources of CO2 from space, several hurdles have to be overcome: orographic clouds, unknown dispersion behavior, a high CO2 background in the troposphere, and sparse data coverage from existing satellite sensors. These obstacles can be overcome by a small field of view, enhanced spectral resolving power, and by employing repeat target mode observation strategies. The Japanese GOSAT instrument has been operational since January 2009, producing CO2 total column measurements with a repeat cycle of 3 days and a field of view of 10km. GOSAT thus has the potential to provide spatially integrated data for entire volcanic edifices, especially in target mode. Since summer 2010 we have conducted repeated target mode observations of over 20 persistently active global volcanoes including Etna (Italy), Erta Ale (Ethiopia), and Ambrym (Vanuatu), using L2 GOSAT FTS SWIR data. One of our best-studied test cases is Mt. Etna on Sicily (Italy), which reawakened in 2011 after a period of quiescence and produced a sequence of eruptive activities including lava fountaining events, coinciding with target-mode GOSAT observations conducted there since 2010. For the

  5. A transit timing analysis with combined ground- and space-based photometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raetz St.

    2015-01-01

    The CoRoT satellite looks back on six years of high precision photometry of a very high number of stars. Thousands of transiting events are detected from which 27 were confirmed to be transiting planets so far. In my research I search and analyze TTVs in the CoRoT sample and combine the unprecedented precision of the light curves with ground-based follow-up photometry. Because CoRoT can observe transiting planets only for a maximum duration of 150 days the ground-based follow-up can help to refine the ephemeris. Here we present first examples.

  6. Standards and Specifications for Ground Processing of Space Vehicles: From an Aviation-Based Shuttle Project to Global Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingalls, John; Cipolletti, John

    2011-01-01

    Proprietary or unique designs and operations are expected early in any industry's development, and often provide a competitive early market advantage. However, there comes a time when a product or industry requires standardization for the whole industry to advance...or survive. For the space industry, that time has come. Here, we will focus on standardization of ground processing for space vehicles and their ground systems. With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, and emergence of a new global space race, affordability and sustainability are more important now than ever. The growing commercialization of the space industry and current global economic environment are driving greater need for efficiencies to save time and money. More RLV's (Reusable Launch Vehicles) are being developed for the gains of reusability not achievable with traditional ELV's (Expendable Launch Vehicles). More crew/passenger vehicles are also being developed. All of this calls for more attention needed for ground processing-repeatedly before launch and after landing/recovery. RLV's should provide more efficiencies than ELV's, as long as MRO (Maintenance, Repair, and Overhaul) is well-planned-even for the unplanned problems. NASA's Space Shuttle is a primary example of an RLV which was supposed to thrive on reusability savings with efficient ground operations, but lessons learned show that costs were (and still are) much greater than expected. International standards and specifications can provide the commonality needed to simplify design and manufacturing as well as to improve safety, quality, maintenance, and operability. There are standards organizations engaged in the space industry, but ground processing is one of the areas least addressed. Challenges are encountered due to various factors often not considered during development. Multiple vehicle elements, sites, customers, and contractors pose various functional and integration difficulties. Resulting technical publication structures

  7. Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astronomy: Parameter Estimation and Tests of General Relativity with Space- and Ground-Based Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Salvatore

    2016-07-01

    With the discovery of the binary-black-hole (BBH) coalescence GW150914 the era of gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy has started. It has recently been shown that BBH with masses comparable to or higher than GW150914 would be visible in the Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA) band a few years before they finally merge in the band of ground-based detectors. This would allow for premerger electromagnetic alerts, dramatically increasing the chances of a joint detection, if BBHs are indeed luminous in the electromagnetic band. In this Letter we explore a quite different aspect of multiband GW astronomy, and verify if, and to what extent, measurement of masses and sky position with eLISA could improve parameter estimation and tests of general relativity with ground-based detectors. We generate a catalog of 200 BBHs and find that having prior information from eLISA can reduce the uncertainty in the measurement of source distance and primary black hole spin by up to factor of 2 in ground-based GW detectors. The component masses estimate from eLISA will not be refined by the ground based detectors, whereas joint analysis will yield precise characterization of the newly formed black hole and improve consistency tests of general relativity.

  8. Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astronomy: Parameter Estimation and Tests of General Relativity with Space- and Ground-Based Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Salvatore

    2016-07-29

    With the discovery of the binary-black-hole (BBH) coalescence GW150914 the era of gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy has started. It has recently been shown that BBH with masses comparable to or higher than GW150914 would be visible in the Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA) band a few years before they finally merge in the band of ground-based detectors. This would allow for premerger electromagnetic alerts, dramatically increasing the chances of a joint detection, if BBHs are indeed luminous in the electromagnetic band. In this Letter we explore a quite different aspect of multiband GW astronomy, and verify if, and to what extent, measurement of masses and sky position with eLISA could improve parameter estimation and tests of general relativity with ground-based detectors. We generate a catalog of 200 BBHs and find that having prior information from eLISA can reduce the uncertainty in the measurement of source distance and primary black hole spin by up to factor of 2 in ground-based GW detectors. The component masses estimate from eLISA will not be refined by the ground based detectors, whereas joint analysis will yield precise characterization of the newly formed black hole and improve consistency tests of general relativity.

  9. Technology Infusion of CodeSonar into the Space Network Ground Segment (RII07)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Markland

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Software Assurance Research Program (in part) performs studies as to the feasibility of technologies for improving the safety, quality, reliability, cost, and performance of NASA software. This study considers the application of commercial automated source code analysis tools to mission critical ground software that is in the operations and sustainment portion of the product lifecycle.

  10. Manufacturing in Space: (It's Getting off the Ground!) Resources in Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology Teacher, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Discusses current issues and work on the planned manufacturing Space Station. Such topics as human resources, energy sources, and types of products to be manufactured in space are covered. The possibility of mining other planets for raw materials is considered. Student activities and a quiz covering the article are included. (CH)

  11. Farm Fair Voices, Space, History, the Middle Ground and "The Future" of Rural Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, John

    2011-01-01

    This article is essentially written as two linked parts. The first part considers how space, spatiality and history can contribute to understanding and "doing something about" the sustainability of rural communities. This is done by extensive reference to Soja's (1989 & 1996) space and spatial theorising and selective perspectives of…

  12. Contribution of space platforms to a ground and airborne remote-sensing programme over active Italian volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassinis, R.; Lechi, G. M.; Tonelli, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    ERTS-1 imagery of the volcanic areas of southern Italy was used primarily for the evaluation of space platform capabilties in the domains of regional geology, soil and rock-type classification and, more generally, to study the environment of active volcanoes. The test sites were selected and equipped primarily to monitor thermal emission, but ground truth data was also collected in other domains (reflectance of rocks, soils and vegetation). The test areas were overflown with a two channel thermal scanner, while a thermo camera was used on the ground to monitor the hot spots. The primary goal of this survey was to plot the changes in thermal emission with time in the framework of a research program for the surveillance of active volcanoes. However, another task was an evaluation of emissivity changes by comparing the outputs of the two thermal channels. These results were compared with the reflectance changes observed on multispectral ERTS-1 imagery.

  13. Ground and excited states of doubly open-shell nuclei from ab initio valence-space Hamiltonians

    CERN Document Server

    Stroberg, S R; Holt, J D; Bogner, S K; Schwenk, A

    2015-01-01

    We present ab initio predictions for ground and excited states of doubly open-shell fluorine and neon isotopes based on chiral two- and three-nucleon interactions. We use the in-medium similarity renormalization group, in both flow-equation and Magnus formulations, to derive mass-dependent sd valence-space Hamiltonians. The experimental ground-state energies are reproduced through neutron number N=14, beyond which a new targeted normal-ordering procedure improves agreement with data and large-scale multi-reference calculations. For spectroscopy, we focus on neutron-rich 23-26F and 24-26Ne isotopes near N=14,16 magic numbers. In all cases we find an agreement with experiment competitive with established phenomenology. Moreover, yrast states are well described in 20Ne and 24Mg, providing an ab initio description of deformation in the medium-mass region.

  14. Space density distribution of galaxies in the absolute magnitude - rotation velocity plane: a volume-complete Tully-Fisher relation from CALIFA stellar kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekeraité, S.; Walcher, C. J.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Garcia Lorenzo, B.; Lyubenova, M.; Sánchez, S. F.; Spekkens, K.; van de Ven, G.; Wisotzki, L.; Ziegler, B.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Catalán-Torrecilla, C.; García-Benito, R.

    2016-10-01

    We measured the distribution in absolute magnitude - circular velocity space for a well-defined sample of 199 rotating galaxies of the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area Survey (CALIFA) using their stellar kinematics. Our aim in this analysis is to avoid subjective selection criteria and to take volume and large-scale structure factors into account. Using stellar velocity fields instead of gas emission line kinematics allows including rapidly rotating early-type galaxies. Our initial sample contains 277 galaxies with available stellar velocity fields and growth curve r-band photometry. After rejecting 51 velocity fields that could not be modelled because of the low number of bins, foreground contamination, or significant interaction, we performed Markov chain Monte Carlo modelling of the velocity fields, from which we obtained the rotation curve and kinematic parameters and their realistic uncertainties. We performed an extinction correction and calculated the circular velocity vcirc accounting for the pressure support of a given galaxy. The resulting galaxy distribution on the Mr-vcirc plane was then modelled as a mixture of two distinct populations, allowing robust and reproducible rejection of outliers, a significant fraction of which are slow rotators. The selection effects are understood well enough that we were able to correct for the incompleteness of the sample. The 199 galaxies were weighted by volume and large-scale structure factors, which enabled us to fit a volume-corrected Tully-Fisher relation (TFR). More importantly, we also provide the volume-corrected distribution of galaxies in the Mr-vcirc plane, which can be compared with cosmological simulations. The joint distribution of the luminosity and circular velocity space densities, representative over the range of -20 > Mr > -22 mag, can place more stringent constraints on the galaxy formation and evolution scenarios than linear TFR fit parameters or the luminosity function alone. Galaxies main

  15. Level crossing statistics for optical beam wander in a turbulent atmosphere with applications to ground-to-space laser communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yura, Harold T; Fields, Renny A

    2011-06-20

    Level crossing statistics is applied to the complex problem of atmospheric turbulence-induced beam wander for laser propagation from ground to space. A comprehensive estimate of the single-axis wander angle temporal autocorrelation function and the corresponding power spectrum is used to develop, for the first time to our knowledge, analytic expressions for the mean angular level crossing rate and the mean duration of such crossings. These results are based on an extension and generalization of a previous seminal analysis of the beam wander variance by Klyatskin and Kon. In the geometrical optics limit, we obtain an expression for the beam wander variance that is valid for both an arbitrarily shaped initial beam profile and transmitting aperture. It is shown that beam wander can disrupt bidirectional ground-to-space laser communication systems whose small apertures do not require adaptive optics to deliver uniform beams at their intended target receivers in space. The magnitude and rate of beam wander is estimated for turbulence profiles enveloping some practical laser communication deployment options and suggesting what level of beam wander effects must be mitigated to demonstrate effective bidirectional laser communication systems.

  16. Temporal dynamics of the gut microbiota in people sharing a confined environment, a 520-day ground-based space simulation, MARS500

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Silvia Turroni; Simone Rampelli; Elena Biagi; Clarissa Consolandi; Marco Severgnini; Clelia Peano; Sara Quercia; Matteo Soverini; Franck G Carbonero; Giovanna Bianconi; Petra Rettberg; Francesco Canganella; Patrizia Brigidi; Marco Candela

    2017-01-01

    .... Results The MARS500 project, the longest ground-based space simulation ever, provided us with a unique opportunity to trace the crew microbiota over 520 days of isolated confinement, such as that...

  17. Transportable optical ground station for high-speed free-space laser communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Amita; Brechtelsbauer, Martin

    2012-10-01

    Near real-time data downlinks from aircrafts, satellites and high altitude platforms via high-speed laser commu- nication links is an important research topic at the Institute of Communications and Navigation of the German Aerospace Center (DLR). Ground stations for such scenarios are usually fixed at a certain location. With a mo- tivation to provide a ground station that is quickly and easily deployed anywhere in the world, a transportable optical ground station (TOGS) has been developed. TOGS features a pneumatically deployable Cassegrain-type telescope with main mirror diameter of 60 cm, including optical tracking and receiving system. For calibration of position and attitude, multiple sensors like dual-antenna GPS and inclination sensors have been installed. In order to realize these systems, robust software that operates and controls them is essential. The software is platform independent and is aimed to be used on both mobile and ground terminals. It includes implementa- tion of accurate pointing, acquisition and tracking algorithms, hardware drivers, and user interfaces. Important modules of the software are GPS tracking, optical tracking, star- and satellite tracking, and calibration of the TOGS itself. Recently, a first successful data-downlink from an aircraft to TOGS using GPS tracking has been performed. To streamline the software development and testing process, some simulation environments like mount simulator, aircraft path simulator, tracking camera simulator and tracking error analysis tool have also been developed. This paper presents the overall hardware/software structure of the TOGS, and gives results of the tracking accuracy improvement techniques like GPS extrapolation and optical tracking.

  18. Monitoring ground subsidence due to underground mining using integrated space geodetic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linlin Ge; Michael Hsing-Chung Chang; Chris Rizos [University of NSW, NSW (Australia)

    2004-04-01

    Differential radar interferometry (DInSAR) can deliver {approximately} 1cm height change resolution. The combination of regular radar beam scanning and movement of the satellites carrying the radar sensor enables imaging of the mining region in seconds, from which subtle ground movements can be detected. Quantitative validation comparing the DInSAR-derived subsidence profile against ground truth shows a best RMS error of 1.4cm. A methodology has been developed to use GPS (the Global Positioning System) observations to measure atmospheric disturbances so that the DInSAR results can be corrected. A Geographic Information System (GIS) has been used to post-process InSAR results throughout this project. GIS can be used to present the final results in various formats, for example, profiles for validating with ground truth, subsidence contour maps, and three-dimensional views. Professional looking thematic maps can be generated based on these analyses, lining up with the practice within the mining industry to deliver drawings/maps in a GIS format. Multi-temporal DInSAR results can be analysed using GIS, and the final results compiled into an animation, showing the subsidence region moving as time passes. A virtual reality image has been generated in the GIS, combining DEM, aerial photography, and DInSAR subsidence results. The UNSW InSAR-GPS-GIS Integration Software has been developed to support the seamless flow of data among the three technologies, DInSAR, GPS, and GIS. Several radar satellite missions, some especially designed for InSAR, are scheduled for launch in the near future. Therefore radar data of global coverage with weekly or even daily revisit will be made available at multiple radar bands. With atmospheric disturbances properly accounted for, DInSAR will be a cost-effective, reliable, and operational tool that complements traditional ground survey methods.

  19. The Gaia Era: synergy between space missions and ground based surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Vallenari, A

    2008-01-01

    The Gaia mission is expected to provide highly accurate astrometric, photometric, and spectroscopic measurements for about $10^9$ objects. Automated classification of detected sources is a key part of the data processing. Here a few aspects of the Gaia classification process are presented. Information from other surveys at longer wavelengths, and from follow-up ground based observations will be complementary to Gaia data especially at faint magnitudes, and will offer a great opportunity to understand our Galaxy.

  20. Diffraction of plane P waves by a canyon of arbitrary shape in poroelastic half-space (Ⅱ): Numerical results and discussion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianwen Liang; Zhongxian Liu

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates in detail the nature of diffraction of plane P waves around a canyon in poroelastic half-space, and studies the effects of incident frequency, drainage condition, porosity, etc, on the diffraction of waves. It is shown that the surface displacement amplitudes of the drained case are close to those of the undrained case, however, the surface displacement amplitudes of the dry case are very different from those of the saturated (either drained or undrained) cases. There are large phase shift between the dry case and the saturated cases, as well as slightly longer resultant wavelengths for the undrained case than those for the drained case and longer resultant wavelengths for the drained case than those for the dry case. For small porosity the surface displacement amplitudes for the saturated cases are almost identical to those for the dry case; while for large porosity, the effect of drainage condition becomes significant, and the surface displacement amplitudes for the undrained case are larger than those for the drained case. As the incident frequency increases, the effect of porosity becomes significant, and more significant for the undrained case than that for the drained case. As the porosity increases, the pore pressures increase significantly but their oscillations become smoother. As the incident frequency increases, the pore pressures become more complicated.

  1. Primary Dendrite Array Morphology: Observations from Ground-based and Space Station Processed Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Surendra; Rajamure, Ravi; Grugel, Richard; Erdmann, Robert; Poirier, David

    2012-01-01

    Influence of natural convection on primary dendrite array morphology during directional solidification is being investigated under a collaborative European Space Agency-NASA joint research program, "Microstructure Formation in Castings of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions (MICAST)". Two Aluminum-7 wt pct Silicon alloy samples, MICAST6 and MICAST7, were directionally solidified in microgravity on the International Space Station. Terrestrially grown dendritic monocrystal cylindrical samples were remelted and directionally solidified at 18 K/cm (MICAST6) and 28 K/cm (MICAST7). Directional solidification involved a growth speed step increase (MICAST6-from 5 to 50 micron/s) and a speed decrease (MICAST7-from 20 to 10 micron/s). Distribution and morphology of primary dendrites is currently being characterized in these samples, and also in samples solidified on earth under nominally similar thermal gradients and growth speeds. Primary dendrite spacing and trunk diameter measurements from this investigation will be presented.

  2. Primary Dendrite Array: Observations from Ground-Based and Space Station Processed Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Surendra N.; Grugel, Richard N.; Erdman, Robert G.; Poirier, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Influence of natural convection on primary dendrite array morphology during directional solidification is being investigated under a collaborative European Space Agency-NASA joint research program, Microstructure Formation in Castings of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions (MICAST). Two Aluminum-7 wt pct Silicon alloy samples, MICAST6 and MICAST7, were directionally solidified in microgravity on the International Space Station. Terrestrially grown dendritic monocrystal cylindrical samples were remelted and directionally solidified at 18 K per centimeter (MICAST6) and 28 K per centimeter (MICAST7). Directional solidification involved a growth speed step increase (MICAST6-from 5 to 50 millimeters per second) and a speed decrease (MICAST7-from 20 to 10 millimeters per second). Distribution and morphology of primary dendrites is currently being characterized in these samples, and also in samples solidified on earth under nominally similar thermal gradients and growth speeds. Primary dendrite spacing and trunk diameter measurements from this investigation will be presented.

  3. Transit timing of TrES-2: a combined analysis of ground- and space-based photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Raetz, St; Ginski, Ch; Mugrauer, M; Berndt, A; Eisenbeiss, T; Adam, Ch; Raetz, M; Roell, T; Seeliger, M; Marka, C; Vanko, M; Bukowiecki, L; Errmann, R; Kitze, M; Ohlert, J; Pribulla, T; Schmidt, J G; Sebastian, D; Puchalski, D; Tetzlaff, N; Hohle, M M; Schmidt, T O B; Neuhäuser, R

    2014-01-01

    Homogeneous observations and careful analysis of transit light curves can lead to the identification of transit timing variations (TTVs). TrES-2 is one of few exoplanets, which offer the matchless possibility to combine long-term ground-based observations with continuous satellite data. Our research aimed at the search for TTVs that would be indicative of perturbations from additional bodies in the system. We also wanted to refine the system parameters and the orbital elements. We obtained 44 ground-based light curves of 31 individual transit events of TrES-2. Eight 0.2 - 2.2-m telescopes located at six observatories in Germany, Poland and Spain were used. In addition, we analysed 18 quarters (Q0-Q17) of observational data from NASA's space telescope Kepler including 435 individual transit events and 11 publicly available ground-based light curves. Assuming different limb darkening (LD) laws we performed an analysis for all light curves and redetermined the parameters of the system. We also carried out a join...

  4. Space sequestration below ground in old-growth spruce-beech forests—signs for facilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolte, Andreas; Kampf, Friederike; Hilbrig, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    Scientists are currently debating the effects of mixing tree species for the complementary resource acquisition in forest ecosystems. In four unmanaged old-growth spruce-beech forests in strict nature reserves in southern Sweden and northern Germany we assessed forest structure and fine rooting profiles and traits (≤2 mm) by fine root sampling and the analysis of fine root morphology and biomass. These studies were conducted in selected tree groups with four different interspecific competition perspectives: (1) spruce as a central tree, (2) spruce as competitor, (3) beech as a central tree, and (4) beech as competitor. Mean values of life fine root attributes like biomass (FRB), length (FRL), and root area index (RAI) were significantly lower for spruce than for beech in mixed stands. Vertical profiles of fine root attributes adjusted to one unit of basal area (BA) exhibited partial root system stratification when central beech is growing with spruce competitors. In this constellation, beech was able to raise its specific root length (SRL) and therefore soil exploration efficiency in the subsoil, while increasing root biomass partitioning into deeper soil layers. According to relative values of fine root attributes (rFRA), asymmetric below-ground competition was observed favoring beech over spruce, in particular when central beech trees are admixed with spruce competitors. We conclude that beech fine rooting is facilitated in the presence of spruce by lowering competitive pressure compared to intraspecific competition whereas the competitive pressure for spruce is increased by beech admixture. Our findings underline the need of spatially differentiated approaches to assess interspecific competition below ground. Single-tree approaches and simulations of below-ground competition are required to focus rather on microsites populated by tree specimens as the basic spatial study area. PMID:24009616

  5. Modeling of Rocket Fuel Heating and Cooling Processes in the Interior Receptacle Space of Ground-Based Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. I. Denisova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The propellant to fill the fuel tanks of the spacecraft, upper stages, and space rockets on technical and ground-based launch sites before fueling should be prepared to ensure many of its parameters, including temperature, in appropriate condition. Preparation of fuel temperature is arranged through heating and cooling the rocket propellants (RP in the tanks of fueling equipment. Processes of RP temperature preparation are the most energy-intensive and timeconsuming ones, which require that a choice of sustainable technologies and modes of cooling (heating RP provided by the ground-based equipment has been made through modeling of the RP [1] temperature preparation processes at the stage of design and operation of the groundbased fueling equipment.The RP temperature preparation in the tanks of the ground-based systems can be provided through the heat-exchangers built-in the internal space and being external with respect to the tank in which antifreeze, air or liquid nitrogen may be used as the heat transfer media. The papers [1-12], which note a promising use of the liquid nitrogen to cool PR, present schematic diagrams and modeling systems for the RP temperature preparation in the fueling equipment of the ground-based systems.We consider the RP temperature preparation using heat exchangers to be placed directly in RP tanks. Feeding the liquid nitrogen into heat exchanger with the antifreeze provides the cooling mode of PR while a heated air fed there does that of heating. The paper gives the systems of equations and results of modeling the processes of RP temperature preparation, and its estimated efficiency.The systems of equations of cooling and heating RP are derived on the assumption that the heat exchange between the fuel and the antifreeze, as well as between the storage tank and the environment is quasi-stationary.The paper presents calculation results of the fuel temperature in the tank, and coolant temperature in the heat exchanger, as

  6. Influence of proprioceptive information on space orientation on the ground and in orbital weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Baumgarten, R.; Kass, J.; Vogel, H.; Wetzig, J.

    Conscious space orientation depends on afferent information from different sense organs including the labyrinth, the eyes, tactile cues from the skin, joint receptors, muscle spindles, tendon organs and possibly viscera. An important role is played by impulses from the cervical position receptors in interaction with concomitant information from the otolith system. In order to isolate the effect of cervical position receptors from that of the otolith system, space experiments in orbital weightlessness and in parabolic aircraft flight were performed. It was found that stimulation of the neck receptors in weightlessness markedly influences the perception of the subjective vertical and horizontal and in addition has a weak effect on ocular torsion.

  7. Observations of Blazar S5 0716+714 With Ground Based Telescopes and the Spitzer Infrared Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Jeffery; Lacy, M.; Morton, A.; Travagli, T.; Mulaveesala, M.; Santiago, J.; Rapp, S.; Stefaniak, L.

    2006-12-01

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) to be launched in 2007 has a proposed observing list that includes AGNs and Polars bright enough to be observed optically by amateurs and students. This observing list is maintained by the Global Telescope Network (GTN). One of our targets, S5 0716+714, was observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope MIPS and IRAC instruments and also using ground based telescopes. Observations were made in seven infrared bands with Spitzer. Additional observations made from the ground by students, amateur astronomers, and college observatories in R,V, and I were nearly simultaneous with the Spitzer observations. This data were used to construct light curves over the course of the observation and the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) of the target using all the sources. These data were compared to models of the dust emission from the torus, synchrotron emission from the radio core, and thermal emission from the accretion disk to determine the relative importance of the different emission mechanisms in this object as a function of wavelength. Results were compared to observations of 4C 29.45 made last year. This research was supported by the Spitzer Science Center, the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, and the California Department of Education's Specialized Secondary Program.

  8. Multiple asteroid systems : Dimensions and thermal properties from Spitzer Space Telescope and ground-based observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchis, F.; Enriquez, J. E.; Emery, J. P.; Mueller, M.; Baek, M.; Pollock, J.; Assafin, M.; Vieira Martins, R.; Berthier, J.; Vachier, F.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Lim, L. F.; Reichart, D. E.; Ivarsen, K. M.; Haislip, J. B.; LaCluyze, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    We collected mid-IR spectra from 5.2 to 38 μm using the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph of 28 asteroids representative of all established types of binary groups. Photometric lightcurves were also obtained for 14 of them during the Spitzer observations to provide the context of the

  9. Development of a Ground-Based Analog to the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device Aboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, Nathaniel J.; Scott-Pandorf, M. M.; Caldwell, E.; DeWitt, J.K.; Fincke, R.; Peters, B.T.

    2010-01-01

    NASA and Wyle engineers constructed a Horizontal Exercise Fixture (HEF) that was patented in 2006. Recently modifications were made to HEF with the goal of creating a device that mimics squat exercise on the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) and can be used by bed rest subjects who must remain supine during exercise. This project posed several engineering challenges, such as how best to reproduce the hip motions (we used a sled that allowed hip motion in the sagittal plane), how to counterweight the pelvis against gravity (we used a pulley and free-weight mechanism), and how to apply large loads (body weight plus squat load) to the shoulders while simultaneously supporting the back against gravity (we tested a standard and a safety bar that allowed movement in the subject s z-axis, both of which used a retractable plate for back support). METHODS An evaluation of the HEF was conducted with human subjects (3F, 3M), who performed sets of squat exercises of increasing load from 10-repetition maximum (RM) up to 1-RM. Three pelvic counterweight loads were tested along with each of the two back-support squat bars. Data collection included 3-dimensional ground reaction forces (GRF), muscle activation (EMG), body motion (video-based motion capture), and subjective comments. These data were compared with previous ground-based ARED study data. RESULTS All subjects in the evaluation were able to perform low- to high-loading squats on the HEF. Four of the 6 subjects preferred a pelvic counterweight equivalent to 60 percent of their body weight. Four subjects preferred the standard squat bar, whereas 2 female subjects preferred the safety bar. EMG data showed muscle activation in the legs and low back typical of squat motion. GRF trajectories and eccentric-concentric loading ratios were similar to ARED. CONCLUSION: Squat exercise performed on HEF approximated squat exercise on ARED.

  10. Comparison of ground-based and space flight energy expenditure and water turnover in middle-aged healthy male US astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, H. W.; Gretebeck, R. J.; Schoeller, D. A.; Davis-Street, J.; Socki, R. A.; Gibson, E. K.

    1997-01-01

    Energy requirements during space flight are poorly defined because they depend on metabolic-balance studies, food disappearance, and dietary records. Water turnover has been estimated by balance methods only. The purpose of this study was to determine energy requirements and water turnover for short-term space flights (8-14 d). Subjects were 13 male astronauts aged 36-51 y with normal body mass indexes (BMIs). Total energy expenditure (TEE) was determined during both a ground-based period and space flight and compared with the World Health Organization (WHO) calculations of energy requirements and dietary intake. TEE was not different for the ground-based and the space-flight periods (12.40 +/- 2.83 and 11.70 +/- 1.89 MJ/d, respectively), and the WHO calculation using the moderate activity correction was a good predictor of TEE during space flight. During the ground-based period, energy intake and TEE did not differ, but during space flight energy intake was significantly lower than TEE; body weight was also less at landing than before flight. Water turnover was lower during space flight than during the ground-based period (2.7 +/- 0.6 compared with 3.8 +/- 0.5 L/d), probably because of lower fluid intakes and perspiration loss during flight. This study confirmed that the WHO calculation can be used for male crew members' energy requirements during short space flights.

  11. Cryogenic Testing of the Thermal Vacuum Chamber and Ground Support Equipment for the James Webb Space Telescope in Chamber A at Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPirro, M.; Homan, J.; Havey, K.; Ousley, W.

    2017-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is the largest cryogenic instrument telescope to be developed for space flight. The telescope will be passively cooled to 50 K and the instrument package will be at 40 K with the mid-infrared instrument at 6 K. The final cryogenic test of the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) as an assembly (OTE + ISIM OTIS) will be performed in the largest 15 K chamber in the world, Chamber A at Johnson Space Center. The planned duration of this test will be 100 days in the middle of 2017. Needless to say, this ultimate test of OTIS, the cryogenic portion of JWST will be crucial in verifying the end-to-end performance of JWST. A repeat of this test would not only be expensive, but would delay the launch schedule (currently October 2018). Therefore a series of checkouts and verifications of the chamber and ground support equipment were planned and carried out between 2012 and 2016. This paper will provide a top-level summary of those tests, trades in coming up with the test plan, as well as some details of individual issues that were encountered and resolved in the course of testing.

  12. Precipitation of radiation belt electrons by EMIC waves, observed from ground and space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordanova, Vania K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miyoski, Y [NAGOYA UNIV; Sakaguchi, K [NAGOYA UNIV; Shiokawa, K [NAGOYA UNIV; Evans, D S [NOAA, BOULDER; Albert, Jay [AFRL; Connors, M [UNIV OF ATHABASCA

    2008-01-01

    We show evidence that left-hand polarised electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) plasma waves can cause the loss of relativistic electrons into the atmosphere. Our unique set of ground and satellite observations shows coincident precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keY and of relativistic electrons into an isolated proton aurora. The coincident precipitation was produced by wave-particle interactions with EMIC waves near the plasmapause. The estimation of pitch angle diffusion coefficients supports that the observed EMIC waves caused coincident precipitation ofboth ions and relativistic electrons. This study clarifies that ions with energies of tens of ke V affect the evolution of relativistic electrons in the radiation belts via cyclotron resonance with EMIC waves, an effect that was first theoretically predicted in the early 1970's.

  13. Fractional Vegetation Cover of East African Wetlands Observed on Ground and from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M.; Amler, E.; Guerschmann, J. P.; Scarth, P.; Behn, K.; Thonfeld, F.

    2016-08-01

    Wetlands are important ecosystems providing numerous ecosystem services. They are of particular importance to communities in East Africa where agriculture is the most important economic sector and where food availability to households critical. During an intensive field campaign in the dry season of 2013 were Fractional Vegetation Cover (FVC) measurements, botanical vegetation cover and vegetation structure estimates acquired in three wetland test sites within the East African region. FVC cover data were collated in three strata: ground layer, midstorey and overstorey (woody vegetation greater than 2 m). Fractional cover estimates for the green and no-green vegetative fraction were calculated for Landsat MODIS imagery. These FVC data products were evaluated a) with FVC field data and b) relative to each other for their usability in the East African region. First results show some promise for further studies.

  14. Bubble motion in a rotating liquid body. [ground based tests for space shuttle experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, P.; Subramanian, R. S.; Cole, R.

    1982-01-01

    The behavior of a single gas bubble inside a rotating liquid-filled sphere has been investigated analytically and experimentally as part of ground-based investigations aimed at aiding in the design and interpretation of Shuttle experiments. In the analysis, a quasi-static description of the motion of a bubble was developed in the limit of small values of the Taylor number. A series of rotation experiments using air bubbles and silicone oils were designed to match the conditions specified in the analysis, i.e., the bubble size, sphere rotation rate, and liquid kinematic viscosity were chosen such that the Taylor number was much less than unity. The analytical description predicts the bubble velocity and its asymptotic location. It is shown that the asymptotic position is removed from the axis of rotation.

  15. A New Approach to Space Situational Awareness using Small Ground-Based Telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anheier, Norman C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chen, Cliff S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This report discusses a new SSA approach evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) that may lead to highly scalable, small telescope observing stations designed to help manage the growing space surveillance burden. Using the methods and observing tools described in this report, the team was able to acquire and track very faint satellites (near Pluto’s apparent brightness). Photometric data was collected and used to correlate object orbital position as a function of atomic clock-derived time. Object apparent brightness was estimated by image analysis and nearby star calibration. The measurement performance was only limited by weather conditions, object brightness, and the sky glow at the observation site. In the future, these new SSA technologies and techniques may be utilized to protect satellite assets, detect and monitor orbiting debris fields, and support Outer Space Treaty monitoring and transparency.

  16. Ground and Space-Based Measurement of Rocket Engine Burns in the Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Ballenthin, J. O.; Baumgardner, J. L.; Bhatt, A.; Boyd, I. D.; Burt, J. M.; Caton, R. G.; Coster, A.; Erickson, P. J.; Huba, J. D.; Earle, G. D.; Kaplan, C. R.; Foster, J. C.; Groves, K. M.; Haaser, R. A.; Heelis, R. A.; Hunton, D. E.; Hysell, D. L.; Klenzing, J. H.; Larsen, M. F.; Lind, F. D.; Pedersen, T. R.; Pfaff, R. F.; Stoneback, R. A.; Roddy, P. A.; Rodriguez, S. P.; San Antonio, G. S.; Schuck, P. W.; Siefring, C. L.; Selcher, C. A.; Smith, S. M.; Talaat, E. R.; Thomason, J. F.; Tsunoda, R. T.; Varney, R. H.

    2013-01-01

    On-orbit firings of both liquid and solid rocket motors provide localized disturbances to the plasma in the upper atmosphere. Large amounts of energy are deposited to ionosphere in the form of expanding exhaust vapors which change the composition and flow velocity. Charge exchange between the neutral exhaust molecules and the background ions (mainly O+) yields energetic ion beams. The rapidly moving pickup ions excite plasma instabilities and yield optical emissions after dissociative recombination with ambient electrons. Line-of-sight techniques for remote measurements rocket burn effects include direct observation of plume optical emissions with ground and satellite cameras, and plume scatter with UHF and higher frequency radars. Long range detection with HF radars is possible if the burns occur in the dense part of the ionosphere. The exhaust vapors initiate plasma turbulence in the ionosphere that can scatter HF radar waves launched from ground transmitters. Solid rocket motors provide particulates that become charged in the ionosphere and may excite dusty plasma instabilities. Hypersonic exhaust flow impacting the ionospheric plasma launches a low-frequency, electromagnetic pulse that is detectable using satellites with electric field booms. If the exhaust cloud itself passes over a satellite, in situ detectors measure increased ion-acoustic wave turbulence, enhanced neutral and plasma densities, elevated ion temperatures, and magnetic field perturbations. All of these techniques can be used for long range observations of plumes in the ionosphere. To demonstrate such long range measurements, several experiments were conducted by the Naval Research Laboratory including the Charged Aerosol Release Experiment, the Shuttle Ionospheric Modification with Pulsed Localized Exhaust experiments, and the Shuttle Exhaust Ionospheric Turbulence Experiments.

  17. Space-based LH 2 propellant storage system: subscale ground testing results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liggett, M. W.

    An orbital cryogenic liquid storage facility will be one of the essential elements of the US Space Program to realize the benefits of space-based cryogenic propulsion vehicles such as NASA's space transfer vehicle (STV) for transporting personnel and scientific packages from a space station in low earth orbit (LEO) to geosynchronous orbit (GEO), the moon and beyond. Long-term thermal control of LH 2 and LO 2 storage cryotanks is a key technical objective for many NASA and SDI programmes. Improved retention using refrigeration, boil-off vapour-cooled shields (VCSs), multilayer superinsulation (MLI) and para-ortho (P-O) hydrogen conversion are the required state-of-the-art techniques. The cryotank system level development testing (CSLDT) programme has supported the development of these technologies. Under the programme, trade studies and analyses were followed by the design and construction of a subscale LH 2 storage facility test article for steady-state and transient thermal tests. A two-stage gaseous helium (GHe) refrigerator was integrated with the test article and used to reduce boil-off and/or decrease the time required between passive test configuration steady-state conditions. The LH 2 tank, mounted in a vacuum chamber, was thermally shielded from the chamber wall by MLI blankets and two VCSs. The VCSs were cooled with either LH 2 boil-off gas (through an optional P-O converter) or refrigerated GHe. The CSLDT test article design, assembly and results from 400 hours of thermal tests are presented along with important conclusions. A comparison of predicted and measured steady-state boil-off rates is provided for 10 test configurations, and the system time constant is addressed. Also presented are some of the unique issues and challenges encountered during these tests that are related to instrumentation and control.

  18. Ground Optical Signal Processing Architecture for Contributing Space-Based SSA Sensor Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE SEP 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND...Propagation (Both sensor and target) Sensor/Target State Vectors & Target Radiometric Properties Millennium Space Systems Tasker/Scheduler...capability of converting visual magnitudes to radiometric quantities. However, since the model covers the full range of light (from UV through VLWIR) a

  19. Instrumentation for Ground-Based Testing in Simulated Space and Planetary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiman, Jacob; Horodetsky, Sergey; Issoupov, Vitali

    This paper is an overview of instrumentation developed and created by ITL Inc. for simulated testing and performance evaluation of spacecraft materials, structures, mechanisms, assemblies and components in different space and planetary environments. The LEO Space Environment Simulator allows simulation of the synergistic effect of ultra-high vacuum conditions, 5 eV neutral atomic oxygen beams, Vacuum-Ultraviolet (VUV) and Near-Ultraviolet (NUV) radiation, and temperature conditions. The simulated space environmental conditions can be controlled in-situ using a quadruple mass-spectrometer, Time-of-Flight technique, as well as Quartz Crystal Microbalance sensors. The new NUV System is capable of delivering an NUV power intensity of up to 10 Equivalent Suns. The design of the system uses horizontal orientation of the 5 kW Mercury lamp, focusing of NUV radiation is achieved due to a parabolic reflector. To address the Lunar/Martian surface environments, the Planetary Environmental Simulator/Test Facility has been developed and built to allow for physical evaluation of the effects of the Lunar/Martian dust environments in conjunction with other factors (ultra-high vacuum or planetary atmospheric conditions, VUV/NUV radiation, thermal cycling, and darkness). The ASTM E 595/ASTM E 1559 Outgassing Test Facility provides the means for the outgassing test of materials with the objective to select materials with low outgassing properties for spacecraft use and allows to determine the following outgassing parameters: Total Mass Loss, Collected Volatile Condensable Materials, and Water Vapor Regained.

  20. Ground Enterprise Management System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Emergent Space Technologies Inc. proposes to develop the Ground Enterprise Management System (GEMS) for spacecraft ground systems. GEMS will provide situational...

  1. Space weather monitoring by ground-based means carried out in Polar Geophysical Center at Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzhura, Alexander

    A real-time information on geophysical processes in polar regions is very important for goals of Space Weather monitoring by the ground-based means. The modern communication systems and computer technology makes it possible to collect and process the data from remote sites without significant delays. A new acquisition equipment based on microprocessor modules and reliable in hush climatic conditions was deployed at the Roshydromet networks of geophysical observations in Arctic and is deployed at observatories in Antarctic. A contemporary system for on-line collecting and transmitting the geophysical data from the Arctic and Antarctic stations to AARI has been realized and the Polar Geophysical Center (PGC) arranged at AARI ensures the near-real time processing and analyzing the geophysical information from 11 stations in Arctic and 5 stations in Antarctic. The space weather monitoring by the ground based means is one of the main tasks standing before the Polar Geophysical Center. As studies by Troshichev and Janzhura, [2012] showed, the PC index characterizing the polar cap magnetic activity appeared to be an adequate indicator of the solar wind energy that entered into the magnetosphere and the energy that is accumulating in the magnetosphere. A great advantage of the PC index application over other methods based on satellite data is a permanent on-line availability of information about magnetic activity in both northern and southern polar caps. A special procedure agreed between Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI) and Space Institute of the Danish Technical University (DTUSpace) ensures calculation of the unified PC index in quasi-real time by magnetic data from the Thule and Vostok stations (see public site: http://pc-index.org). The method for estimation of AL and Dst indices (as indicators of state of the disturbed magnetosphere) based on data on foregoing PC indices has been elaborated and testified in the Polar Geophysical Center. It is

  2. Large Format Uncooled Focal Plane Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Black Forest Engineering has identified innovative modifications in uncooled focal plane array (UFPA) architecture and processing that allows development of large...

  3. New-Measurement Techniques to Diagnose Charged Dust and Plasma Layers in the Near-Earth Space Environment Using Ground-Based Ionospheric Heating Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoudian, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Recently, experimental observations have shown that radar echoes from the irregularitysource region associated with mesospheric dusty space plasmas may be modulated by radio wave heating with ground-based ionospheric heating facilities. These experiments show great promise as a diagnostic for the associated dusty plasma in the Near-Earth Space Environment which is believed to have links to global change. This provides an alternative to more complicated and costly space-based observational app...

  4. Adaptation of Motility Analysis Apparatus for Space Science and Microgravity Ground-Based Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jacqueline U.

    1996-01-01

    Previous space flight studies have described unfavorable effects of microgravity on testicular morphology and spermatogenesis (Cosmos 1887 Biosputnik flight, 9/29/87 - 10/12/87). The flight animals demonstrated small reductions in testicular and epididymal size, the phenomenon explained as resulting water loss. Yet, light microscopic histological preparations revealed few spermatozoa in the rete testis of the flight males compared to control animals. The cause for this finding was subjectively assessed to be due to "the anatomical dislocation of the organs... and a disturbance in testicular blood supply". Unfortunately, the reported effects of microgravity on the reproductive processes (particularly within males) are few and divergent. If habitation in space is a futuristic goal, more objective testing (of male and female gametes) in a microgravity environment will provide insight to the developmental potential of these reproductive cells. As part of the Marshall Space Flight Centers' Summer Faculty Fellowship Program within the Biophysics Branch, a key component of the research investigation was to develop a test to evaluate individual cell motility and orientation in varying gravitational environments, using computerized assessment of sperm cell concentration, morphology and motility to provide objective, quantitative experimental control. In previous work performed jointly by the author and a NASA colleague, it has been shown that macroscopic motile aggregates of spermatozoa were not altered by the absence of microgravity. Variations in the number of normal versus abnormal sperm due to microgravity influences have yet to be established. It is therefore of interest to monitor the cytoskeletal matrix (microtubulin) of these organisms as a possible indicator of cell viability and/or function.

  5. A preferred ground state for the scalar field in de Sitter space

    OpenAIRE

    Aslanbeigi, Siavash; Buck, Michel

    2013-01-01

    We investigate a recent proposal for a distinguished vacuum state of a free scalar quantum field in an arbitrarily curved spacetime, known as the Sorkin-Johnston (SJ) vacuum, by applying it to de Sitter space. We derive the associated two-point functions on both the global and Poincar\\'e (cosmological) patches in general d+1 dimensions. In all cases where it is defined, the SJ vacuum belongs to the family of de Sitter invariant alpha-vacua. We obtain different states depending on the spacetim...

  6. Coordinated ground and space measurements of an auroral surge over South Pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, T.J.; Detrick, D.L.; Mizera, P.F.; Gorney, D.J.; Berkey, F.T.; Eather, R.H.; Lanzerotti, L.J.

    1987-10-01

    Coincident ground-based and satellite observations are presented of a premidnight auroral surge over Amundsen-Scott South Pole station. The set of near-simultaneous measurements provides an excellent opportunity to gain a more quantitative understanding of the nature of premidnight substorm activity at high geomagnetic latitudes. The surge produced a rapid onset of cosmic radio noise absorption at the station. On the polar-orbiting DMSP F6 spacecraft, intense X ray emissions with E>2 keV energy were imaged 1/sup 0/ to 2/sup 0/ magnetically equatorward of South Pole approximately 1 min prior to the peak of the absorption event. The spectrum of precipitating electrons determined from the X ray measurements could be characterized by an e-folding energy of approx.11 keV and is found to be adequate to account for the cosmic noise absorption and maximum auroral luminosity recorded at South Pole. Photometer, all-sky camera, riometer, and magnetometer data are used to estimate the velocity of motion and spatial extent of the auroral precipitation and the ionospheric currents associated with the surge. The electron precipitation region is deduced to have a latitudinal scale size of <100 km and to move poleward with a speed of approx.1--2 km/s coincident with the movement of a westward electrojet.

  7. Coordinated ground and space measurements of auroral surge over South Pole. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, T.J.; Detrick, D.L.; Mizera, P.F.; Gorney, D.J.; Berkey, F.T.

    1988-02-01

    Coincident ground-based and satellite observations are presented of a premidnight auroral surge over Amundsen-Scott South Pole station. The set of near-simultaneous measurements provides an excellent opportunity to gain a more-quantitative understanding of the nature of premidnight substorm activity at high geomagnetic latitudes. The surge produced a rapid onset of cosmic radio noise absorption at the station. On the polar-orbiting DMSP-F6 spacecraft, intense x-ray emissions with E > 2-keV energy were imaged 1 to 2 deg magnetically equatorward of the South Pole approximately 1 min prior to the peak of the absorption event. The precipitating electron spectrum determined from the x-ray measurements could be characterized by an e-folding energy of approx. 11 keV and is found to be adequate to account for the cosmic noise absorption and maximum auroral luminosity recorded at South Pole. Photometer, all-sky camera, riometer, and magnetometer data are used to estimate the velocity of motion and spatial extent of the auroral precipitation and the ionospheric currents associated with the surge.

  8. Earthquake forewarning — A multidisciplinary challenge from the ground up to space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Friedemann

    2013-08-01

    Most destructive earthquakes nucleate at between 5-7 km and about 35-40 km depth. Before earthquakes, rocks are subjected to increasing stress. Not every stress increase leads to rupture. To understand pre-earthquake phenomena we note that igneous and high-grade metamorphic rocks contain defects which, upon stressing, release defect electrons in the oxygen anion sublattice, known as positive holes. These charge carriers are highly mobile, able to flow out of stressed rocks into surrounding unstressed rocks. They form electric currents, which emit electromagnetic radiation, sometimes in pulses, sometimes sustained. The arrival of positive holes at the ground-air interface can lead to air ionization, often exclusively positive. Ionized air rising upward can lead to cloud condensation. The upward flow of positive ions can lead to instabilities in the mesosphere, to mesospheric lightning, to changes in the Total Electron Content (TEC) at the lower edge of the ionosphere, and electric field turbulences. Advances in deciphering the earthquake process can only be achieved in a broadly multidisciplinary spirit.

  9. Designing optimized ultra-lightweighted mirror structures made of Cesic for space and ground based applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofbauer, Peter; Krödel, Matthias R.

    2010-07-01

    Today's space applications increasingly utilize lightweighted construction concepts, motivated by the demands of manufacturing and functionality, and by economics. Particularly for space optics, mirror stability and stiffness need to be maximized, while mass needs to be minimized. Therefore, mirror materials must possess, besides high material strength and manufacturing versatility, high thermal conductivity combined with low heat capacity and long-term stability against varying thermal loads. Additionally, optical surfaces need to be compatible with reflective coating materials. In order to achieve these requirements, the interplay between material properties and mirror design on one hand, and budgetary constraints on the other must be considered. In this paper, we address these issues by presenting an FEM design study of open and closed-back mirror structures with extremely thin reinforcing ribs, with the goal of obtaining optimal physical and optical characteristics. Furthermore, we show that ECM's carbon-fiber reinforced SiC composite, Cesic®, and its newly developed, HB-Cesic® , with their low CTE, low density, and high stiffness, are not only excellent mirror materials, but allow the rapid manufacturing of complex monolithic optical structures at reasonable cost.

  10. A preferred ground state for the scalar field in de Sitter space

    CERN Document Server

    Aslanbeigi, Siavash

    2013-01-01

    We investigate a recent proposal for a distinguished vacuum state of a free scalar quantum field in an arbitrarily curved spacetime, known as the Sorkin-Johnston (SJ) vacuum, by applying it to de Sitter space. We derive the associated two-point functions on both the global and Poincar\\'e (cosmological) patches in general d+1 dimensions. In all cases where it is defined, the SJ vacuum belongs to the family of de Sitter invariant alpha-vacua. We obtain different states depending on the spacetime dimension, mass of the scalar field, and whether the state is evaluated on the global or Poincar\\'e patch. We find that the SJ vacuum agrees with the Euclidean/Bunch-Davies state for heavy ("principal series") fields on the global patch in even spacetime dimensions. We also compute the SJ vacuum on a causal set corresponding to a causal diamond in 1+1 dimensional de Sitter space. Our simulations show that the mean of the SJ two-point function on the causal set agrees well with its expected continuum counterpart.

  11. A preferred ground state for the scalar field in de Sitter space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanbeigi, S.; Buck, M.

    2013-08-01

    We investigate a recent proposal for a distinguished vacuum state of a free scalar quantum field in an arbitrarily curved spacetime, known as the Sorkin-Johnston (SJ) vacuum, by applying it to de Sitter space. We derive the associated two-point functions on both the global and Poincaré (cosmological) patches in general d + 1 dimensions. In all cases where it is defined, the SJ vacuum belongs to the family of de Sitter invariant α-vacua. We obtain different states depending on the spacetime dimension, mass of the scalar field, and whether the state is evaluated on the global or Poincaré patch. We find that the SJ vacuum agrees with the Euclidean/Bunch-Davies state for heavy ("principal series") fields on the global patch in even spacetime dimensions. We also compute the SJ vacuum on a causal set corresponding to a causal diamond in 1 + 1 dimensional de Sitter space. Our simulations show that the mean of the SJ two-point function on the causal set agrees well with its expected continuum counterpart.

  12. Extremely Severe Space Weather and Geomagnetically Induced Currents in Regions with Locally Heterogeneous Ground Resistivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Shigeru; Kataoka, Ryuho; Pulkkinen, Antti; Watari, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    Large geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) triggered by extreme space weather events are now regarded as one of the serious natural threats to the modern electrified society. The risk is described in detail in High-Impact, Low-Frequency Event Risk, A Jointly-Commissioned Summary Report of the North American Electric Reliability Corporation and the US Department of Energy's November 2009 Workshop, June 2010. For example, the March 13-14,1989 storm caused a large-scale blackout affecting about 6 million people in Quebec, Canada, and resulting in substantial economic losses in Canada and the USA (Bolduc 2002). Therefore, European and North American nations have invested in GIC research such as the Solar Shield project in the USA (Pulkkinen et al. 2009, 2015a). In 2015, the Japanese government (Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, METI) acknowledged the importance of GIC research in Japan. After reviewing the serious damages caused by the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, METI recognized the potential risk to the electric power grid posed by extreme space weather. During extreme events, GICs can be concerning even in mid- and low-latitude countries and have become a global issue.

  13. Analysis of Correlation between Ionospheric Spatial Gradients and Space Weather Intensity under Nominal Conditions for Ground-Based Augmentation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.

    2013-12-01

    Ground-Based Augmentation Systems (GBAS) support aircraft precision approach and landing by providing differential GPS corrections to aviation users. For GBAS applications, most of ionospheric errors are removed by applying the differential corrections. However, ionospheric correction errors may exist due to ionosphere spatial decorrelation between GBAS ground facility and users. Thus, the standard deviation of ionosphere spatial decorrelation (σvig) is estimated and included in the computation of error bounds on user position solution. The σvig of 4mm/km, derived for the Conterminous United States (CONUS), bounds one-sigma ionospheric spatial gradients under nominal conditions (including active, but not stormy condition) with an adequate safety margin [1]. The conservatism residing in the current σvig by fixing it to a constant value for all non-stormy conditions could be mitigated by subdividing ionospheric conditions into several classes and using different σvig for each class. This new concept, real-time σvig adaptation, will be possible if the level of ionospheric activity can be well classified based on space weather intensity. This paper studies correlation between the statistics of nominal ionospheric spatial gradients and space weather indices. The analysis was carried out using two sets of data collected from Continuous Operating Reference Station (CORS) Network; 9 consecutive (nominal and ionospherically active) days in 2004 and 19 consecutive (relatively 'quiet') days in 2010. Precise ionospheric delay estimates are obtained using the simplified truth processing method and vertical ionospheric gradients are computed using the well-known 'station pair method' [2]. The remaining biases which include carrier-phase leveling errors and Inter-frequency Bias (IFB) calibration errors are reduced by applying linear slip detection thresholds. The σvig was inflated to overbound the distribution of vertical ionospheric gradients with the required confidence

  14. The Distribution of Cloud to Ground Lightning Strike Intensities and Associated Magnetic Inductance Fields Near the Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Lee; Decker, Ryan

    2005-01-01

    Lightning strike location and peak current are monitored operationally in the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) area by the Cloud to Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS). The present study compiles ten years worth of CGLSS data into a database of near strikes. Using shuffle launch platform LP39A as a convenient central point, all strikes recorded within a 20-mile radius for the period of record O R ) from January 1, 1993 to December 31,2002 were included in the subset database. Histograms and cumulative probability curves are produced for both strike intensity (peak current, in kA) and the corresponding magnetic inductance fields (in A/m). Results for the full POR have application to launch operations lightning monitoring and post-strike test procedures.

  15. Statistical distribution of the optical intensity obtained using a Gaussian Schell model for space-to-ground link laser communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengnan; Tan, Liying; Ma, Jing; Yu, Siyuan; Yang, Qingbo; Wu, Jiajie

    2016-05-01

    Based on the characteristics of the laser device and the inevitable error of the processing technique, a laser beam emitted from a communication terminal can be represented by the Gaussian Schell model (GSM). In space-to-ground link laser communications, the optical intensity is affected by the source coherence parameter and the zenith angle. With full consideration of these two parameters, the statistical distribution model of the optical intensity with a GSM laser in both downlink and uplink is derived. The simulation results indicate that increasing the source coherence parameter has an effect on the statistical distribution of the optical intensity; this effect is highly similar to the effect of a larger zenith angle. The optical intensity invariably degrades with increasing source coherence parameter or zenith angle. The results of this work can promote the improvement of the redundancy design of a laser communication receiver system.

  16. The Tourism Encounter in Community-Based Tourism in Northern Thailand: Empty Meeting Ground or Space for Change?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Dolezal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article offers a contribution to the anthropology of tourism by investigating the tourism encounter in community-based tourism (CBT in Northern Thailand. It does so by discussing MacCannell’s (1992 idea of the Empty Meeting Grounds and Said’s Orientalism (1978, two works that contributed to research on power inequalities between tourists and residents in the developing world. By establishing a relationship between the two and embedding these in the wider literature on the tourism encounter, this article suggests moving away from binaries towards understanding the space of the tourism encounter and its potential for change. Building on empirical research conducted in Ban Mae Kampong, a CBT village in Northern Thailand, findings suggest that CBT shows signs of resident-host interactions that are based on understanding and learning rather than exploitation. While also in CBT friendships and meaning take time to emerge and the ‘Other’ is used as attraction, villagers’ agency and control over tourism are acknowledged. This paper therefore calls for a revisiting of the theoretical grounding that influences our understanding of the tourism encounter and argues for an investigation of community power relations in connection to the tourism encounter and its potential for residents’ empowerment in CBT.

  17. A mobile robot system for ground servicing operations on the space shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, K.; Bennett, R.; Blackwell, M.; Graham, T.; Gatrall, S.; O'Toole, R.; Schempf, H.

    1992-01-01

    A mobile system for space shuttle servicing, the Tessellator, has been configured, designed and is currently being built and integrated. Robot tasks include chemical injection and inspection of the shuttle's thermal protection system. This paper outlines tasks, rationale, and facility requirements for the development of this system. A detailed look at the mobile system and manipulator follow with a look at mechanics, electronics, and software. Salient features of the mobile robot include omnidirectionality, high reach, high stiffness and accuracy with safety and self-reliance integral to all aspects of the design. The robot system is shown to meet task, facility, and NASA requirements in its design resulting in unprecedented specifications for a mobile-manipulation system.

  18. Maintaining an expert system for the Hubble Space Telescope ground support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenmayer, Kelly; Vick, Shon; Rosenthal, Don

    1987-01-01

    The transformation portion of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Proposal Entry Processor System converts astronomer-oriented description of a scientific observing program into a detailed description of the parameters needed for planning and scheduling. The transformation system is one of a very few rulebased expert systems that has ever entered an operational phase. The day to day operations of the system and its rulebase are no longer the responsibility of the original developer. As a result, software engineering properties of the rulebased approach become more important. Maintenance issues associated with the coupling of rules within a rulebased system are discussed and a method is offered for partitioning a rulebase so that the amount of knowledge needed to modify the rulebase is minimized. This method is also used to develop a measure of the coupling strength of the rulebase.

  19. Ultrastable assembly and integration technology for ground- and space-based optical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressel, Simon; Gohlke, Martin; Rauen, Dominik; Schuldt, Thilo; Kronast, Wolfgang; Mescheder, Ulrich; Johann, Ulrich; Weise, Dennis; Braxmaier, Claus

    2010-08-01

    Optical metrology systems crucially rely on the dimensional stability of the optical path between their individual optical components. We present in this paper a novel adhesive bonding technology for setup of quasi-monolithic systems and compare selected characteristics to the well-established state-of-the-art technique of hydroxide-catalysis bonding. It is demonstrated that within the measurement resolution of our ultraprecise custom heterodyne interferometer, both techniques achieve an equivalent passive path length and tilt stability for time scales between 0.1 mHz and 1 Hz. Furthermore, the robustness of the adhesive bonds against mechanical and thermal inputs has been tested, making this new bonding technique in particular a potential option for interferometric applications in future space missions. The integration process itself is eased by long time scales for alignment, as well as short curing times.

  20. Characterizing peat palm forest degradation in the Peruvian Amazon from space and on the ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergoualc'h, Kristell; Gutierrez-Velez, Victor Hugo; van Lent, Jeffrey; Verchot, Louis Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Peru has the second largest area of peatlands in the Tropics however little is known on how the biogeochemical cycle of its peat forests can be affected through anthropogenic intervention. The most representative land cover on peat is a Mauritia flexuosa-dominated palm swamp forest which has been under human pressure over decades due the high demand for the M. flexuosa fruit often collected by cutting down the entire palm. Degradation of these carbon-dense forests can severely affect emissions of greenhouse gases and contribute to climate change. The objectives of this research were to assess the impacts on soil trace gas fluxes and biomass carbon stocks of peat palm swamp forest degradation and to explore the potential of remote sensing methods combined with field measurements to map the distribution of peat palm swamp forest according degradation levels. Results suggest a shift in forest composition from palm- to woody-tree dominated forest following degradation. We also found that human intervention in peat palm swamp forest can translate into substantial reductions in tree carbon stocks with a decrease in initial biomass (above and below-ground) stocks (118.3 ± 1.1 Mg C ha-1) by 26 and 44% following medium and high degradation. Preliminary results suggest high and low soil CH4 and CO2 emission rates on average, as compared to Southeast Asian peat swamp forests whereas N2O emissions are of the same magnitude. Degradation seems to disrupt soil respiration mainly through micro-climatic changes induced by reduced canopy cover. The analysis indicates a good potential to discriminate areas of peat palm swamp forest with different levels of degradation from other land covers, suggesting the feasibility of monitoring peat palm swamp forest degradation using remote sensing analyses.

  1. The comparison between a ground based and a space based probabilistic landslide susceptibility assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, P.; Mondini, A.; Guzzetti, F.; Rossi, M.; Ardizzone, F.; Cardinali, M.

    2009-04-01

    , thematic maps obtained processing satellite data can be an effective alternative to maps prepared using more traditional, ground based methods.

  2. New Applications for Detecting Natural Hazards Using Ground and Space-Based GNSS-Derived Ionospheric Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komjathy, A.; Butala, M.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.; Wilson, B. D.; Iijima, B.; Akopian, V.; Mannucci, A.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and University of Southern California (USC) have jointly developed the Global Assimilative Ionospheric Model (GAIM) to monitor space weather, study storm effects, and provide ionospheric calibration for various customers including NASA flight projects. JPL/USC GAIM is a physics-based 3D data assimilation model using 4DVAR and Kalman filter approaches to solve for ion and electron density states and other key ionospheric drivers. The JPL/USC GAIM technologies, now operating in real-time and post-processing modes, can routinely accept as input ground GPS TEC data from 1200+ sites including streaming and hourly GPS stations, occultation links from CHAMP, SAC-C, COSMIC and C/NOFS satellites, UV limb and nadir scans. In the presentation, first we will discuss recent advances in our assimilating ground-based GPS, C/NOFS and COSMIC occultation measurements using our GAIM system characterizing the ionosphere in 3D. We will elaborate on our improved space-based bias estimation techniques to generate high precision calibrated TEC measurements to be assimilated into GAIM. We will discuss the benefits of adding GLONASS measurements to our GIM and GAIM processing technologies. New and upcoming applications and first results will be shown for estimating very high precision TEC perturbations using real-time and post-processed GNSS observations from GEONET and IGS networks. We will demonstrate initial steps on how to integrate this GNSS ionosphere-based technology into a global tsunami warning system. Additional potential applications might include the remote sensing of ionospheric TEC perturbations generated by other natural hazards such as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions and human-made events such as nuclear tests.

  3. An economic analysis of space solar power and its cost competitiveness as a supplemental source of energy for space and ground markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzwell, N. I.

    2002-01-01

    Economic Growth has been historically associated with nations that first made use of each new energy source. There is no doubt that Solar Power Satellites is high as a potential energy system for the future. A conceptual cost model of the economics value of space solar power (SSP) as a source of complementary power for in-space and ground applications will be discussed. Several financial analysis will be offered based on present and new technological innovations that may compete with or be complementary to present energy market suppliers depending on various institutional arrangements for government and the private sector in a Global Economy. Any of the systems based on fossil fuels such as coal, oil, natural gas, and synthetic fuels share the problem of being finite resources and are subject to ever-increasing cost as they grow ever more scarce with drastic increase in world population. Increasing world population and requirements from emerging underdeveloped countries will also increase overall demand. This paper would compare the future value of SSP with that of other terrestrial renewable energy in distinct geographic markets within the US, in developing countries, Europe, Asia, and Eastern Europe.

  4. Generalized plane gravitational waves of non-symmetric unified field theories in plane symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjiv R. Bhoyar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigated the plane wave solutions of both the weak and strong non-symmetric unified field equations of Einstein and Bonner in a generalized plane symmetric space-time in the sense of Taub [Ann. Math. 53, 472 (1951] for plane gravitational waves. We show that the plane wave solutions of Einstein and Bonner field equations exist in plane symmetry.

  5. How Cities Breathe: Ground-Referenced, Airborne Hyperspectral Imaging Precursor Measurements To Space-Based Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifer, Ira; Tratt, David; Quattrochi, Dale; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Buchwitz, Michael; Burrows, John

    2013-01-01

    the complex and often aerosol laden, humid, urban microclimates, atmospheric transport and profile monitoring, spatial resolution, temporal cycles (diurnal and seasonal which involve interactions with the surrounding environment diurnal and seasonal cycles) and representative measurement approaches given traffic realities. Promising approaches incorporate contemporaneous airborne remote sensing and in situ measurements, nocturnal surface surveys, with ground station measurement

  6. The Effect of Heating on the Degradation of Ground Laboratory and Space Irradiated Teflon(r) FEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Martin, Morgana

    2002-01-01

    The outer most layer of the multilayer insulation (MLI) blankets on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is back surface aluminized Teflon(R) FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene). As seen by data collected after each of the three servicing missions and as observed during the second servicing mission (SM2), the FEP has become embrittled in the space environment, leading to degradation of the mechanical properties and severe on-orbit cracking of the FEP. During SM2, a sample of aluminized-FEP was retrieved from HST that had cracked and curled, exposing its aluminum backside to space. Because of the difference in optical properties between FEP and aluminum, this insulation piece reached 200 C on-orbit, which is significantly higher than the nominal MLI temperature extreme of 50 C. This piece was more brittle than other retrieved material from the first and third servicing missions (SM1 and SM3A, respectively). Due to this observation and the fact that Teflon thermal shields on the solar array bi-stems were heated on-orbit to 130 C, experiments have been conducted to determine the effect of heating on the degradation of FEP that has been irradiated in a ground laboratory facility or in space on HST. Teflon FEP samples were X-ray irradiated in a high vacuum facility in order to simulate the damage caused by radiation in the space environment. Samples of pristine FEP, X-ray irradiated FEP and FEP retrieved from the HST during SM3A were heat treated from 50 to 200 C at 25 intervals in a high vacuum facility and then tensile tested. In addition, samples were tested in a density gradient column to determine the effect of the radiation and heating on the density of FEP. Results indicate that although heating does not degrade the tensile properties of non-irradiated Teflon, there is a significant dependence of the percent elongation at failure of irradiated Teflon as a function of heating temperature. Irradiated Teflon was found to undergo increasing degradation in the elongation

  7. Hiding levitating objects above a ground plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Luo, Yu; Mortensen, Asger

    2010-01-01

    An approach to hiding objects levitating above a conducting sheet is suggested in this paper. The proposed device makes use of isotropic negative-refractive-index materials without extreme material parameters, and creates an illusion of a remote conducting sheet. Numerical simulations are perform...

  8. Top-down estimation of carbon monoxide emissions from the Mexico Megacity based on FTIR measurements from ground and space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Stremme

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Continuous carbon monoxide (CO total column densities above the UNAM campus in Mexico City have been derived from solar absorption infrared spectroscopic measurements since October 2007. Its diurnal evolution is used in the present study in conjunction with other ground-based and satellite data to develop a top-down emission estimate of the annual CO emission of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA. The growth-rate of the total column around noon under low ventilation conditions is calculated and allows us to derive the average surface emission-flux at UNAM, while similar measurements taken at the edge of the MCMA in Tecámac provides information on background CO levels in the Mexico basin. Based on 3 yr of measurements, CO column measurements from the IASI satellite instrument are used to reconstruct the spatial distribution of this anthropogenic pollutant over the MCMA. The agreement between the measured columns of the satellite and ground-based measurements is excellent, particularly when a comparison strategy based on time-displaced air masses is used. The annual emission of the Mexico Megacity is estimated to be (2.15 ± 0.5 Tg yr−1 for the year 2008, while the official inventory for that year reported 1.6 Tg yr−1. The difference is slightly higher than the conservative uncertainty estimated in this work suggesting that the emission might be underestimated by the conventional bottom-up method. A larger discrepancy is found in the spatial distribution of the emissions, when comparing the emission flux over UNAM (derived from the ground-based measurement with that of the inventory integrated over a representative area. The methodology presented here represents a new and useful strategy to evaluate the contribution of megacities to the global anthropogenic gas emissions. Additionally, three different strategies to compare ground and space-based measurements above an inhomogeneous and strongly contaminated area like

  9. Optical gravitational wave detectors on the ground and in space: theory and technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean-Yves Vinet

    2010-01-01

    Major predictions of General Relativity, unforeseen at the beginning of the preceding century, are now under investigation. The existence of black holes of any mass from tens to billions of solar masses is now established, and the physics around these objects begins to be studied through direct observations in a wide electromagnetic spectrum from visible light to X-rays. General relativity, however, provides an extra medium which carries more information on the regions of intense gravitational field, namely gravitational waves (GWs). Due to their extremely weak coupling to matter, GWs are precisely generated in those regions of spacetime undergoing strong curvature, which is very exciting for modern astrophysics. On the other hand, this weak coupling makes it difficult for GWs to cause appreciable effects in human made instruments. This is why technology of GW detectors took such a long time to reach a sensitivity level consistent with GW amplitudes predicted by theoretical models of sources. In the present status, apart from resonant solid detectors, two large interferometric antennas (LIGO in the USA and the French-Italian Virgo) are beginning to produce data, and a joint ESA-NASA space mission, resulting from a wide effort of European and American groups, is reaching a crucial approval phase. The aim of the present review is to give the theoretical bases of GW detectors using light.

  10. Adaptive optics correction into single mode fiber for a low Earth orbiting space to ground optical communication link using the OPALS downlink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Malcolm W; Morris, Jeffery F; Kovalik, Joseph M; Andrews, Kenneth S; Abrahamson, Matthew J; Biswas, Abhijit

    2015-12-28

    An adaptive optics (AO) testbed was integrated to the Optical PAyload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) ground station telescope at the Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) as part of the free space laser communications experiment with the flight system on board the International Space Station (ISS). Atmospheric turbulence induced aberrations on the optical downlink were adaptively corrected during an overflight of the ISS so that the transmitted laser signal could be efficiently coupled into a single mode fiber continuously. A stable output Strehl ratio of around 0.6 was demonstrated along with the recovery of a 50 Mbps encoded high definition (HD) video transmission from the ISS at the output of the single mode fiber. This proof of concept demonstration validates multi-Gbps optical downlinks from fast slewing low-Earth orbiting (LEO) spacecraft to ground assets in a manner that potentially allows seamless space to ground connectivity for future high data-rates network.

  11. RadioAstron Studies of the Nearby, Turbulent Interstellar Plasma With the Longest Space-Ground Interferometer Baseline

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnova, T V; Popov, M V; Gwinn, C R; Anderson, J M; Andrianov, A S; Bartel, N; Deller, A; Johnson, M D; Joshi, B C; Kardashev, N S; Karuppusamy, R; Kovalev, Y Y; Kramer, M; Soglasnov, V A; Zensus, J A; Zhuravlev, V I

    2014-01-01

    RadioAstron space-ground VLBI observations of the pulsar B0950+08, conducted with the 10-m space radio telescope in conjunction with the Arecibo 300-m telescope and Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope at a frequency of 324 MHz, were analyzed in order to investigate plasma inhomogeneities in the direction of this nearby pulsar. The observations were conducted at a spacecraft distance of 330,000 km, resulting in a projected baseline of 220,000 km, providing the greatest angular resolution ever achieved at meter wavelengths. Our analysis is based on fundamental behavior of structure and coherence functions. We find that the pulsar shows scintillation on two frequency scales, both much less than the observing frequency; but modulation is less than 100%. We infer that the scattering is weak, but a refracting wedge disperses the scintillation pattern. The refraction angle of this "cosmic prism" is measured as theta_0=1.1 - 4.4 mas, with the refraction direction being approximately perpendicular to the observer vel...

  12. Space-borne and ground-based observation of Aerosols in China and an overview of the EAST-AIRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.; Holben, B.; Xia, X.; Xin, J.; Dickerson, R.

    2006-05-01

    China is a region of heavy aerosol loading of distinct and complex properties. To date, few in-situ measurements were made of the physical properties and chemical composition of the aerosols near the source regions. A lack of aerosol properties, together with relative bright surfaces, makes the retrieval of aerosols from space challenging and uncertain. In order to gain a basic knowledge of the characteristics of aerosols and to improve satellite retrievals, a team of scientists from U.S. and China conduct joint field measurements in the form of routine observations at fixed sites, and intensive observation campaigns. Major findings will be presented concerning both the aerosol properties and their spatial and temporal variations using ground-based and space-borne remote sensing techniques, as well as in-situ observation techniques. The results reveal that the mean aerosol loading is on average larger by several factors than the global mean values. All existing satellite aerosol retrieved products contain exceptionally large errors. Yet, the aerosol absorption is so strong that lead to extremely large forcing at the surface but very small at the TOA. A large fraction of major aerosol episodes are caused by anthropogenic emissions that are built up by stable atmospheric conditions.

  13. Experiments Using a Ground-Based Electrostatic Levitator and Numerical Modeling of Melt Convection for the Iron-Cobalt System in Support of Space Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghyun; SanSoucie, Michael P.

    2017-08-01

    Materials research is being conducted using an electromagnetic levitator installed in the International Space Station. Various metallic alloys were tested to elucidate unknown links among the structures, processes, and properties. To accomplish the mission of these space experiments, several ground-based activities have been carried out. This article presents some of our ground-based supporting experiments and numerical modeling efforts. Mass evaporation of Fe50Co50, one of flight compositions, was predicted numerically and validated by the tests using an electrostatic levitator (ESL). The density of various compositions within the Fe-Co system was measured with ESL. These results are being served as reference data for the space experiments. The convection inside a electromagnetically-levitated droplet was also modeled to predict the flow status, shear rate, and convection velocity under various process parameters, which is essential information for designing and analyzing the space experiments of some flight compositions influenced by convection.

  14. Space and ground segment performance and lessons learned of the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC mission: four years in orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-J. Fong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate Mission consisting of six Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO satellites is the world's first demonstration constellation using radio occultation signals from Global Positioning System (GPS satellites. The atmospheric profiles derived by processing radio occultation signals are retrieved in near real-time for global weather/climate monitoring, numerical weather prediction, and space weather research. The mission has processed, on average, 1400 to 1800 high-quality atmospheric sounding profiles per day. The atmospheric radio occultation data are assimilated into operational numerical weather prediction models for global weather prediction, including typhoon/hurricane/cyclone forecasts. The radio occultation data has shown a positive impact on weather predictions at many national weather forecast centers. A follow-on mission was proposed that transitions the current experimental research mission into a significantly improved real-time operational mission, which will reliably provide 8000 radio occultation soundings per day. The follow-on mission, as planned, will consist of 12 LEO satellites (compared to 6 satellites for the current mission with data latency requirement of 45 min (compared to 3 h for the current mission, which will provide greatly enhanced opportunities for operational forecasts and scientific research. This paper will address the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC system and mission overview, the spacecraft and ground system performance after four years in orbit, the lessons learned from the encountered technical challenges and observations, and the expected design improvements for the spacecraft and ground system for FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2.

  15. RadioAstron Studies of the Nearby, Turbulent Interstellar Plasma with the Longest Space-Ground Interferometer Baseline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, T. V.; Shishov, V. I.; Popov, M. V.; Gwinn, C. R.; Anderson, J. M.; Andrianov, A. S.; Bartel, N.; Deller, A.; Johnson, M. D.; Joshi, B. C.; Kardashev, N. S.; Karuppusamy, R.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Kramer, M.; Soglasnov, V. A.; Zensus, J. A.; Zhuravlev, V. I.

    2014-05-01

    RadioAstron space-ground very long baseline interferometry observations of the pulsar B0950+08, conducted with the 10 m Space Radio Telescope in conjunction with the Arecibo 300 m telescope and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope at a frequency of 324 MHz were analyzed in order to investigate plasma inhomogeneities in the direction of this nearby pulsar. The observations were conducted at a spacecraft distance of 330,000 km, resulting in a projected baseline of 220,000 km, providing the greatest angular resolution ever achieved at meter wavelengths. Our analysis is based on fundamental behavior of structure and coherence functions. We find that the pulsar shows scintillation on two frequency scales, both much less than the observing frequency, but modulation is less than 100%. We infer that the scattering is weak, but a refracting wedge disperses the scintillation pattern. The refraction angle of this "cosmic prism" is measured as θ0 = 1.1-4.4 mas, with the refraction direction being approximately perpendicular to the observer velocity. We show that the observed parameters of scintillation effects indicate that two plasma layers lie along the line of sight to the pulsar, at distances of 4.4-16.4 pc and 26-170 pc, and traveling in different directions relative to the line of sight. Spectra of turbulence for the two layers are found to follow a power law with the indices γ1 = γ2 = 3.00 ± 0.08, significantly different from the index expected for a Kolmogorov spectrum of turbulence, γ = 11/3.

  16. Advantages of using subsurface flow constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment in space applications: Ground-based mars base prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M.; Alling, A.; Dempster, W. F.; van Thillo, M.; Allen, John

    Research and design of subsurface flow wetland wastewater treatment systems for a ground-based experimental prototype Mars Base facility has been carried out, using a subsurface flow approach. These systems have distinct advantages in planetary exploration scenarios: they are odorless, relatively low-labor and low-energy, assist in purification of water and recycling of atmospheric CO2, and will support some food crops. An area of 6-8 m2 may be sufficient for integration of wetland wastewater treatment with a prototype Mars Base supporting 4-5 people. Discharge water from the wetland system will be used as irrigation water for the agricultural crop area, thus ensuring complete recycling and utilization of nutrients. Since the primary requirements for wetland treatment systems are warm temperatures and lighting, such bioregenerative systems may be integrated into early Mars base habitats, since waste heat from the lights may be used for temperature maintenance in the human living environment. "Wastewater gardens ™" can be modified for space habitats to lower space and mass requirements. Many of its construction requirements can eventually be met with use of in-situ materials, such as gravel from the Mars surface. Because the technology requires little machinery and no chemicals, and relies more on natural ecological mechanisms (microbial and plant metabolism), maintenance requirements are minimized, and systems can be expected to have long operating lifetimes. Research needs include suitability of Martian soil and gravel for wetland systems, system sealing and liner options in a Mars Base, and wetland water quality efficiency under varying temperature and light regimes.

  17. Hubble Space Telescope and Ground-Based Observations of the Type Iax Supernovae SN 2005hk and SN 2008A

    CERN Document Server

    McCully, Curtis; Foley, Ryan J; Chornock, Ryan; Holtzman, Jon A; Balam, David D; Branch, David; Filippenko, Alexei V; Frieman, Joshua; Fynbo, Johan; Galbany, Lluis; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Garnavich, Peter M; Graham, Melissa L; Hsiao, Eric Y; Leloudas, Giorgos; Leonard, Douglas C; Li, Weidong; Riess, Adam G; Sako, Masao; Schneider, Donald P; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Sollerman, Jesper; Steele, Thea N; Thomas, Rollin C; Wheeler, J Craig; Zheng, Chen

    2013-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based optical and near-infrared observations of SN 2005hk and SN 2008A, typical members of the Type Iax class of supernovae (SNe). These objects are peculiar cousins of normal Type Ia SNe, with SN 2002cx as the prototype. Here we focus on late-time observations, where these objects deviate most dramatically from normal SNe Ia. Instead of the dominant nebular emission lines that are observed in normal SNe Ia at late phases (and indeed, in SNe of all other types), spectra of SNe 2005hk and 2008A show lines of Fe II, Ca II, and Fe I more than a year past maximum light, along with narrow [Fe II] and [Ca II] emission. We use spectral features to constrain the temperature and density of the ejecta, and find high densities at late times, with n_e >~ 10^9 cm^-3. Such high densities should yield enhanced cooling of the ejecta, making these objects good candidates to observe the expected "infrared catastrophe," a generic feature of SN Ia models. However, our HST photom...

  18. Fiber-coupling efficiency simulation of Gaussian Schell Model laser in space-to-ground optical communication link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Liying; Li, Mengnan; Wu, Jiajie; Ma, Jing; Yang, Qingbo

    2015-08-01

    In practice, due to reasons related to the laser device and the inevitable error of the processing technique, a laser source emitted from a communication terminal is partially coherent, which is represented by the Gaussian Schell Model (GSM). In a space-to-ground optical communication link, the cross-spectral density function, based on the Gaussian Model in previous research, is replaced by GSM; thus, the fiber-coupling efficiency equation of the GSM laser source is deduced. The GSM equation presents the effects of the source coherent parameter ζ and the zenith angle θ on the fiber-coupling efficiency, which were not included previously. The effects on the fiber-coupling efficiency are numerically simulated and analyzed. The results manifest that the fiber-coupling efficiency invariably degrades with increasing ζ or θ. The hope of this work is to improve the redundancy design of fiber-coupling receiver systems by analyzing the fiber-coupling efficiency with the source coherent parameter.

  19. Hubble space telescope and ground-based observations of the type Iax supernovae SN 2005hk and SN 2008A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCully, Curtis; Jha, Saurabh W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Foley, Ryan J. [Astronomy Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Chornock, Ryan [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Holtzman, Jon A. [Department of Astronomy, MSC 4500, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Balam, David D. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Branch, David [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Filippenko, Alexei V.; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Li, Weidong [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Frieman, Joshua [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Fynbo, Johan; Leloudas, Giorgos [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Galbany, Lluis [Institut de Física d' Altes Energies, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Garnavich, Peter M. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Graham, Melissa L. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Hsiao, Eric Y. [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Colina El Pino, Casilla 601 (Chile); Leonard, Douglas C., E-mail: cmccully@physics.rutgers.edu [Department of Astronomy, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States); and others

    2014-05-10

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based optical and near-infrared observations of SN 2005hk and SN 2008A, typical members of the Type Iax class of supernovae (SNe). Here we focus on late-time observations, where these objects deviate most dramatically from all other SN types. Instead of the dominant nebular emission lines that are observed in other SNe at late phases, spectra of SNe 2005hk and 2008A show lines of Fe II, Ca II, and Fe I more than a year past maximum light, along with narrow [Fe II] and [Ca II] emission. We use spectral features to constrain the temperature and density of the ejecta, and find high densities at late times, with n{sub e} ≳ 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}. Such high densities should yield enhanced cooling of the ejecta, making these objects good candidates to observe the expected 'infrared catastrophe', a generic feature of SN Ia models. However, our HST photometry of SN 2008A does not match the predictions of an infrared catastrophe. Moreover, our HST observations rule out a 'complete deflagration' that fully disrupts the white dwarf for these peculiar SNe, showing no evidence for unburned material at late times. Deflagration explosion models that leave behind a bound remnant can match some of the observed properties of SNe Iax, but no published model is consistent with all of our observations of SNe 2005hk and 2008A.

  20. Hubble Space Telescope and Ground-Based Observations of the Type Iax Supernovae SN 2005hk and SN 2008A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCully, Curtis; Jha, Saurabh W.; Foley, Ryan J.; Chornock, Ryan; Holtzman, Jon A.; Balam, David D.; Branch, David; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Frieman, Joshua; Fynbo, Johan; Galbany, Lluis; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Garnavich, Peter M.; Graham, Melissa L.; Hsiao, Eric Y.; Leloudas, Giorgos; Leonard, Douglas C.; Li, Weidong; Riess, Adam G.; Sako, Masao; Schneider, Donald P.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Sollerman, Jesper; Steele, Thea N.; Thomas, Rollin C.; Wheeler, J. Craig; Zheng, Chen

    2014-04-24

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based optical and near-infrared observations of SN 2005hk and SN 2008A, typical members of the Type Iax class of supernovae (SNe). Here we focus on late-time observations, where these objects deviate most dramatically from all other SN types. Instead of the dominant nebular emission lines that are observed in other SNe at late phases, spectra of SNe 2005hk and 2008A show lines of Fe II, Ca II, and Fe I more than a year past maximum light, along with narrow [Fe II] and [Ca II] emission. We use spectral features to constrain the temperature and density of the ejecta, and find high densities at late times, with ne109 cm–3. Such high densities should yield enhanced cooling of the ejecta, making these objects good candidates to observe the expected "infrared catastrophe," a generic feature of SN Ia models. However, our HST photometry of SN 2008A does not match the predictions of an infrared catastrophe. Moreover, our HST observations rule out a "complete deflagration" that fully disrupts the white dwarf for these peculiar SNe, showing no evidence for unburned material at late times. Deflagration explosion models that leave behind a bound remnant can match some of the observed properties of SNe Iax, but no published model is consistent with all of our observations of SNe 2005hk and 2008A.

  1. Multi-wavelength Observations of Photospheric Vortex Flows in the Photosphere Using Ground-based and Space-borne Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, J.; Vargas Domínguez, S.; Balmaceda, L. A.; Cabello, I.; Domingo, V.

    2016-04-01

    In this work we follow a series of papers on high-resolution observations of small-scale structures in the solar atmosphere (Balmaceda et al. 2009, 2010; Vargas Domínguez et al. 2011; Palacios et al. 2012; Domingo et al. 2012; Vargas Domínguez et al. 2015, Cabello et al., in prep), combining several multi-wavelength data series. These were acquired by both ground-based (SST) and space-borne (Hinode) instruments during the joint campaign of the Hinode Operation Program 14, in September 2007. Diffraction-limited SST data were taken in the G-band and G-cont, and were restored by the MFBD technique. Hinode instruments, on the other hand, provided multispectral data from SOT-FG in the CN band, and Mg I and Ca II lines, as well as from SOT-SP in the Fe I line. In this series of works we have thoroughly studied vortex flows and their statistical occurrences, horizontal velocity fields by means of Local Correlation Tracking (LCT), divergence and vorticity. Taking advantage of the high-cadence and high spatial resolution data, we have also studied bright point statistics and magnetic field intensification, highlighting the importance of the smallest-scale magnetic element observations.

  2. Decoupling of ground level pressures observed in Italian volcanoes: are they driven by space weather geo-effectiveness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Madonia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Investigations on correlation drops between near-ground atmospheric pressures measured at sea level and at higher altitudes on Italian volcanoes have been carried out. We looked for perturbations of the atmospheric pressure field driven by volcanic activity, but not excluding possible external triggers for the observed anomalies. Decorrelations between atmospheric pressures measured at Stromboli Island in stations located at different altitudes (years 2002-10 have been analysed and compared with data from other volcanic (Vesuvius and non volcanic (Mt. Soro orographic structures. We investigated as their possible triggers volcanic, meteorological and space weather parameters, with particular attention to Total Solar Irradiance (TSI, Kp index and Forbush decreases. Pressure decorrelations seems to be driven by astronomic cycles, with maxima in summer and minima in winter. A further contribution was found, seemingly assignable to TSI anomalies, with correlation minima occurring 12 hours after these but only during phases of high Sun activity. Moreover, during the same phases a main periodicity of about 27 days in pressure decorrelations was revealed by FFT analysis. This period is the same of the Sun Carrington rotation, expressing the periodic reappearance of sunspot groups on Sun’s surface. The strong similarity between recurrences of sunspot number and atmospheric pressure anomalies further supports the role of the former as a possible trigger for the latter.

  3. Internet-to-orbit gateway and virtual ground station: A tool for space research and scientific outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffer, Ghulam; Nader, Ronnie; Koudelka, Otto

    2011-09-01

    Students in higher education, and scientific and technological researchers want to communicate with the International Space Station (ISS), download live satellite images, and receive telemetry, housekeeping and science/engineering data from nano-satellites and larger spacecrafts. To meet this need the Ecuadorian Civilian Space Agency (EXA) has recently provided the civilian world with an internet-to-orbit gateway (Hermes-A/Minotaur) Space Flight Control Center (SFCC) available for public use. The gateway has a maximum range of tracking and detection of 22,000 km and sensitivity such that it can receive and discriminate the signals from a satellite transmitter with power˜0.1 W. The capability is enough to receive the faintest low-earth-orbit (LEO) satellites. This gateway virtually connects participating internet clients around the world to a remote satellite ground station (GS), providing a broad community for multinational cooperation. The goal of the GS is to lower financial and engineering barriers that hinder access to science and engineering data from orbit. The basic design of the virtual GS on a user side is based on free software suites. Using these and other software tools the GS is able to provide access to orbit for a multitude of users without each having to go through the costly setups. We present the design and implementation of the virtual GS in a higher education and scientific outreach settings. We also discuss the basic architecture of the single existing system and the benefits of a proposed distributed system. Details of the software tools and their applicability to synchronous round-the-world tracking, monitoring and processing performed by students and teams at Graz University of Technology, Austria, EXA-Ecuador, University of Michigan, USA and JAXA who have participated in various mission operations and have investigated real-time satellite data download and image acquisition and processing. Students and other remote users at these

  4. Using the FLUKA Monte Carlo Code to Simulate the Interactions of Ionizing Radiation with Matter to Assist and Aid Our Understanding of Ground Based Accelerator Testing, Space Hardware Design, and Secondary Space Radiation Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddell, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    Designing hardware to operate in the space radiation environment is a very difficult and costly activity. Ground based particle accelerators can be used to test for exposure to the radiation environment, one species at a time, however, the actual space environment cannot be duplicated because of the range of energies and isotropic nature of space radiation. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code is an integrated physics package based at CERN that has been under development for the last 40+ years and includes the most up-to-date fundamental physics theory and particle physics data. This work presents an overview of FLUKA and how it has been used in conjunction with ground based radiation testing for NASA and improve our understanding of secondary particle environments resulting from the interaction of space radiation with matter.

  5. A Miniature Robotic Plane Meteorological Sounding System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马舒庆; 陈洪滨; 汪改; 潘毅; 李强

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a miniature robotic plane meteorological sounding system RPMSS), which consists of three major subsystems: a miniature robotic plane, an air-borne meteorological sounding and flight control system, and a ground-based system. Take-off and landing of the miniature aircraft are guided by radio control, and the flight of the robotic plane along a pre-designed trajectory is automatically piloted by an onboard navigation system. The observed meteorological data as well as all flight information are sent back in real time to the ground, then displayed and recorded by the ground-based computer. The ground-based subsystem can also transmit instructions to the air-borne control subsystem. Good system performance has been demonstrated by more than 300 hours of flight for atmospheric sounding.

  6. Quantifying the spatio-temporal pattern of the ground impact of space weather events using dynamical networks formed from the SuperMAG database of ground based magnetometer stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dods, Joe; Chapman, Sandra; Gjerloev, Jesper

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative understanding of the full spatial-temporal pattern of space weather is important in order to estimate the ground impact. Geomagnetic indices such as AE track the peak of a geomagnetic storm or substorm, but cannot capture the full spatial-temporal pattern. Observations by the ~100 ground based magnetometers in the northern hemisphere have the potential to capture the detailed evolution of a given space weather event. We present the first analysis of the full available set of ground based magnetometer observations of substorms using dynamical networks. SuperMAG offers a database containing ground station magnetometer data at a cadence of 1min from 100s stations situated across the globe. We use this data to form dynamic networks which capture spatial dynamics on timescales from the fast reconfiguration seen in the aurora, to that of the substorm cycle. Windowed linear cross-correlation between pairs of magnetometer time series along with a threshold is used to determine which stations are correlated and hence connected in the network. Variations in ground conductivity and differences in the response functions of magnetometers at individual stations are overcome by normalizing to long term averages of the cross-correlation. These results are tested against surrogate data in which phases have been randomised. The network is then a collection of connected points (ground stations); the structure of the network and its variation as a function of time quantify the detailed dynamical processes of the substorm. The network properties can be captured quantitatively in time dependent dimensionless network parameters and we will discuss their behaviour for examples of 'typical' substorms and storms. The network parameters provide a detailed benchmark to compare data with models of substorm dynamics, and can provide new insights on the similarities and differences between substorms and how they correlate with external driving and the internal state of the

  7. Space-Based Internet of Things Applications Based on Integrated Ground-Air-Space Information Network%天地一体化信息网络天基物联网应用体系研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾业; 周永将

    2016-01-01

    天地一体化信息网络是国家重点工程之一,是未来我国信息时代的战略性公共信息基础设施。随着跨境电子商务、智能家居、智能航空管理等物联网应用的蓬勃发展,对发展天基物联网提出了急需。因此将天地一体化网络工程建设与天基物联网应用服务紧密结合非常重要。本文将主要对基于天地一体化信息网络工程的物联网应用体系进行研究,包括参考模型、网络架构、协议体系和软件系统等几个方面,为天地一体化信息网络工程的建设奠定基础。%As one of the key project in our country,the integrated ground-air-space information network will be the strategic infrastructure and technology in the coming information times. As the development of cross-border electronic commerce, smart home and intelligence air manages, the necessary on the development of space-based internet of things is presented, so it is significant to combine the building of integrated ground-air-space information network project with space-based internet of things applications. This paper focus on the research of space-based internet of things applications based on integrated ground-air-space information network, includes reference model, network architecture, software system and protocols architecture, and lay the foundation to build the integrated ground-air-space information network project.

  8. Validation of Atmosphere/Ionosphere Signals Associated with Major Earthquakes by Multi-Instrument Space-Borne and Ground Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounov, Dimitar; Pulinets, Sergey; Hattori, Katsumi; Parrot, Michel; Liu, J. Y.; Yang, T. F.; Arellano-Baeza, Alonso; Kafatos, M.; Taylor, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    ) eahquakes. Results have revealed the presence of related variations of these parameters implying their connection with the earthquake process. The second phase (B) of this validation included 102 major earthquakes (M>5.9) in Taiwan and Japan. We have found anomalous behavior before all of these events with no false negatives. False alarm ratio for false positives is less then 10% and has been calculated for the same month of the earthquake occurrence for the entire period of analysis (2003-2009). The commonalities for detecting atmospheric/ionospheric anomalies are: i.) Regularly appearance over regions of maximum stress (i.e., along plate boundaries); ii.) Anomaly existence over land and sea; and iii) association with M>5.9 earthquakes not deeper than 100km. Due to their long duration over the same region these anomalies are not consistent with a meteorological origin. Our initial results from the ISTF validation of multi-instrument space-borne and ground observations show a systematic appearance of atmospheric anomalies near the epicentral area, one to seven (average) days prior to the largest earthquakes, and suggest that it could be explained by a coupling process between the observed physical parameters and the pre-earthquake preparation processes.

  9. Comparison of Ground- and Space-based Radar Observations with Disdrometer Measurements During the PECAN Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, A. D.; Rasmussen, K. L.; Bodine, D. J.; Dougherty, E.

    2015-12-01

    Plains Elevated Convection At Night (PECAN) was a large field campaign that studied nocturnal mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), convective initiation, bores, and low-level jets across the central plains in the United States. MCSs are responsible for over half of the warm-season precipitation across the central U.S. plains. The rainfall from deep convection of these systems over land have been observed to be underestimated by satellite radar rainfall-retrieval algorithms by as much as 40 percent. These algorithms have a strong dependence on the generally unmeasured rain drop-size distribution (DSD). During the campaign, our group measured rainfall DSDs, precipitation fall velocities, and total precipitation in the convective and stratiform regions of MCSs using Ott Parsivel optical laser disdrometers. The disdrometers were co-located with mobile pod units that measured temperature, wind, and relative humidity for quality control purposes. Data from the operational NEXRAD radar in LaCrosse, Wisconsin and space-based radar measurements from a Global Precipitation Measurement satellite overpass on July 13, 2015 were used for the analysis. The focus of this study is to compare DSD measurements from the disdrometers to radars in an effort to reduce errors in existing rainfall-retrieval algorithms. The error analysis consists of substituting measured DSDs into existing quantitative precipitation estimation techniques (e.g. Z-R relationships and dual-polarization rain estimates) and comparing these estimates to ground measurements of total precipitation. The results from this study will improve climatological estimates of total precipitation in continental convection that are used in hydrological studies, climate models, and other applications.

  10. Introduction of a terrestrial free-space optical communications network facility: IN-orbit and Networked Optical ground stations experimental Verification Advanced testbed (INNOVA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoshima, Morio; Munemasa, Yasushi; Takenaka, Hideki; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Koyama, Yoshisada; Kunimori, Hiroo; Kubooka, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Kenji; Yamamoto, Shinichi; Taira, Shinichi; Tsuji, Hiroyuki; Nakazawa, Isao; Akioka, Maki

    2014-03-01

    A terrestrial free-space optical communications network facility, named IN-orbit and Networked Optical ground stations experimental Verification Advanced testbed (INNOVA) is introduced. Many demonstrations have been conducted to verify the usability of sophisticated optical communications equipment in orbit. However, the influence of terrestrial weather conditions remains as an issue to be solved. One potential solution is site diversity, where several ground stations are used. In such systems, implementing direct high-speed optical communications links for transmission of data from satellites to terrestrial sites requires that links can be established even in the presence of clouds and rain. NICT is developing a terrestrial free-space optical communications network called INNOVA for future airborne and satellitebased optical communications projects. Several ground stations and environmental monitoring stations around Japan are being used to explore the site diversity concept. This paper describes the terrestrial free-space optical communications network facility, the monitoring stations around Japan for free-space laser communications, and potential research at NICT.

  11. Ground effects on magnetooptic Bragg cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Feng; WU BaoJian; QIU Kun

    2008-01-01

    Propagation equation of magnetostatic waves in an arbitrarily magnetized yttrium-iron-garnet/gadolinium-gallium-garnet waveguide coated with perfect metal planes is obtained using the method of the surface magnetic permeability. And ground effects on magnetooptic Bragg cells are investigated with the magnetooptic coupled-mode theory. Theoretical analysis indicates that, diffraction efficiency of guided optical waves can be improved by adjusting the spacing of the metal plane from the ferrite film, and ground effects on the diffraction efficiency will be enhanced using an appropriately tilted bias magnetic field. In the metal clad waveguide system, the magnetostatic wave frequency at which the diffraction efficiency peak is obtained corresponds to the "zero-dispersion" point. Performance of RF spectrum analyzers in this system can also be improved by comparing with the case of the sandwich waveguide. Therefore, magnetooptic Bragg cells with the metal clad waveguide are potential applications to the microwave communication and optical signal processing.

  12. Free space millimeter wave-coupled electro-optic high speed nonlinear polymer phase modulator with in-plane slotted patch antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, D H; Pagán, V R; Murphy, T E; Luo, J; Jen, A K-Y; Herman, W N

    2015-04-06

    We report in-plane slotted patch antenna-coupled electro-optic phase modulators with a carrier-to-sideband ratio (CSR) of 22 dB under an RF power density of 120 W/m(2) and a figure of merit of 2.0 W(-1/2) at the millimeter wave frequencies of 36-37 GHz based on guest-host type of second-order nonlinear polymer SEO125. CSR was improved more than 20 dB by using a SiO(2) protection layer. We demonstrate detection of 3 GHz modulation of the RF carrier. We also derive closed-form expressions for the modulated phase of optical wave and carrier-to-sideband ratio. Design, simulation, fabrication, and experimental results are discussed.

  13. The Nonrelativistic Ground State Energy Spectra of Potential Counting Coulomb and Quad-ratic Terms in Non-commutative Two Dimensional Real Spaces and Phases

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelmadjid Maireche

    2016-01-01

    A novel theoretical study for the exact solvability of nonrelativistic quantum spectrum systems for potential containing coulomb and quadratic terms is discussed used both Boopp’s shift method and standard perturbation theory in both noncommutativity two dimensional real space and phase (NC-2D: RSP), it has been observed that the exact corrections for the ground states spectrum of studied potential was depended on two infinitesimals parameters and which plays an opposite rolls, and we ha...

  14. Cloud Structure of Galactic OB Cluster-forming Regions from Combining Ground- and Space-based Bolometric Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuxin; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Li, Di; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Ginsburg, Adam; Pineda, Jaime E.; Qian, Lei; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; McLeod, Anna Faye; Rosolowsky, Erik; Dale, James E.; Immer, Katharina; Koch, Eric; Longmore, Steve; Walker, Daniel; Testi, Leonardo

    2016-09-01

    We have developed an iterative procedure to systematically combine the millimeter and submillimeter images of OB cluster-forming molecular clouds, which were taken by ground-based (CSO, JCMT, APEX, and IRAM-30 m) and space telescopes (Herschel and Planck). For the seven luminous (L\\gt {10}6 L ⊙) Galactic OB cluster-forming molecular clouds selected for our analyses, namely W49A, W43-Main, W43-South, W33, G10.6-0.4, G10.2-0.3, and G10.3-0.1, we have performed single-component, modified blackbody fits to each pixel of the combined (sub)millimeter images, and the Herschel PACS and SPIRE images at shorter wavelengths. The ˜10″ resolution dust column density and temperature maps of these sources revealed dramatically different morphologies, indicating very different modes of OB cluster-formation, or parent molecular cloud structures in different evolutionary stages. The molecular clouds W49A, W33, and G10.6-0.4 show centrally concentrated massive molecular clumps that are connected with approximately radially orientated molecular gas filaments. The W43-Main and W43-South molecular cloud complexes, which are located at the intersection of the Galactic near 3 kpc (or Scutum) arm and the Galactic bar, show a widely scattered distribution of dense molecular clumps/cores over the observed ˜10 pc spatial scale. The relatively evolved sources G10.2-0.3 and G10.3-0.1 appear to be affected by stellar feedback, and show a complicated cloud morphology embedded with abundant dense molecular clumps/cores. We find that with the high angular resolution we achieved, our visual classification of cloud morphology can be linked to the systematically derived statistical quantities (i.e., the enclosed mass profile, the column density probability distribution function (N-PDF), the two-point correlation function of column density, and the probability distribution function of clump/core separations). In particular, the massive molecular gas clumps located at the center of G10.6-0.4 and

  15. ARC Code TI: X-Plane Communications Toolbox (XPC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The X-Plane Communications Toolbox (XPC) is an open source research tool used to interact with the commercial flight simulator software X-Plane. XPC allows users to...

  16. Large Format Uncooled Focal Plane Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Uncooled focal plane arrays have improved dramatically and array sizes of 320x240 elements in a 50-?m pitch are commercially available at affordable cost. Black...

  17. Titanium Heat Pipe Thermal Plane Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermacore Inc. proposes an innovative titanium heat pipe thermal plane for passive thermal control of individual cells within a fuel cell stack. The proposed...

  18. Titanium Heat Pipe Thermal Plane Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the Phase II program is to complete the development of the titanium heat pipe thermal plane and establish all necessary steps for production of this...

  19. Thinking out of the box (and back in the plane). Concepts of space and spatial representation in two classic adventure games.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veugen, J.I.L.

    2008-01-01

    In this article we examine location, space and spatial representation in two classic adventure games belonging to the same game series: Gabriel Knight Sins of the Fathers, a one screen at a time point-and-click adventure and Gabriel Knight Blood of the Sacred Blood of the Damned, a 3D game. Our aim

  20. Asteroseismology with the WIRE satellite. I. Combining Ground- and Space-based Photometry of the Delta Scuti Star Epsilon Cephei

    CERN Document Server

    Bruntt, H; Bedding, T R; Buzasi, D L; Moya, A; Amado, P J; Martin-Ruiz, S; Garrido, R; De Coca, P L; Rolland, A; Costa, V; Olivares, I; Garcia-Pelayo, J M

    2006-01-01

    We have analysed ground-based multi-colour Stromgren photometry and single-filter photometry from the star tracker on the WIRE satellite of the delta scuti star Epsilon Cephei. The ground-based data set consists of 16 nights of data collected over 164 days, while the satellite data are nearly continuous coverage of the star during 14 days. The spectral window and noise level of the satellite data are superior to the ground-based data and this data set is used to locate the frequencies. However, we can use the ground-based data to improve the accuracy of the frequencies due to the much longer time baseline. We detect 26 oscillation frequencies in the WIRE data set, but only some of these can be seen clearly in the ground-based data. We have used the multi-colour ground-based photometry to determine amplitude and phase differences in the Stromgren b-y colour and the y filter in an attempt to identify the radial degree of the oscillation frequencies. We conclude that the accuracies of the amplitudes and phases a...

  1. 曲断片(牙合)平面对下颌第三磨牙间隙测量的影响%Comparison among occlusal planes for lower third molar space measurement on panoramic radiograph

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李若萱; 吕亚林; 王晓庚; 项天庆; 王新华

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of occlusal plane (OP) on the lower third molar space measurement on panoramic radiographs. Methods Subjects in the study consisted of 65 adult (28 males, 37 females) and were divided into two groups:third molar fully erupted group and third molar impacted group. 44 erupted mandible quadrants and 69impacted mandible quadrants on panoramic radiographs were used to compare the difference OP as the reference planes on the third molar space measurement on panoramic radiographs by block designs.Results Significant difference was noted among different occlusal planes (p<0. 05) on the third molar space measurement both in fully erupted group and in impacted group. Conclusions Lower third molar space measurement was sensitive to various inclination of OP on panoramic radiographs.%目的 在曲断片上分析(牙合)平面作为参考平面对测量下颌第三磨牙间隙的影响.方法 选择65例错(牙合)患者正畸前的曲断片(男28人,女37人),年龄19.5岁~26.8岁.下第三磨牙完全萌出组44侧,阻生组69侧.用配对t检验分析(牙合)平面定点误差对下颌第三磨牙间隙测量的影响.用随机区组分析比较各(牙合)平面测量第三磨牙间隙的差异.结果 (牙合)平面的定点误差较小(P≥0.05);下第三磨牙萌出组和阻生组以不同(牙合)平面测量第三磨牙间隙都有显著差异(P<0.05).结论 尽管(牙合)平面的定点误差小,但不同(牙合)平面对下颌第三磨牙间隙测量值有明显影响.

  2. Fixed Sagittal Plane Imbalance

    OpenAIRE

    Savage, Jason W.; Patel, Alpesh A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective To discuss the evaluation and management of fixed sagittal plane imbalance. Methods A comprehensive literature review was performed on the preoperative evaluation of patients with sagittal plane malalignment, as well as the surgical strategies to address sagittal plane deformity. Results Sagittal plane imbalance is often caused by de novo scoliosis or iatrogenic flat back deformity. Understanding the etiology and magnitude of sagittal malalignment is ...

  3. A determination of the space density and birth rate of hydrogen-line (DA) white dwarfs in the Galactic Plane, based on the UVEX survey

    CERN Document Server

    Verbeek, Kars; Nelemans, Gijs; Scaringi, Simone; Napiwotzki, Ralf; Drew, Janet E; Steeghs, Danny; Casares, Jorge; Corral-Santana, Jesus M; Gänsicke, Boris T; González-Solares, Eduardo; Greimel, Robert; Heber, Ulrich; Irwin, Mike J; Knigge, Christian; Wright, Nicholas J; Zijlstra, Albert A

    2013-01-01

    We present a determination of the average space density and birth rate of hydrogen-line (DA) white dwarfs within a radius of 1 kpc around the Sun, based on an observational sample of 360 candidate white dwarfs with g 10,000K (M_V<12.2) of (3.8 +/- 1.1) x 1e-4 pc^-3, and an average DA white dwarf birth rate over the last 7e7 years of (5.4 + 1.5) x 1e-13 pc^-3 yr^-1. Additionally, we show that many estimates of the white dwarf space density from different studies are consistent with each other, and with our determination here.

  4. 临近空间红外探测像面照度建模与仿真%Modeling and simulation of imaging plane irradiance for near space infrared detecting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄晨; 梁小虎; 王建军; 高昕

    2014-01-01

    低空突防目标飞行高度低、时间短,对其进行有效的探测一直是研究的重点和难题。以2.7μm、4.3μm作为探测系统的中心波长,建立了临近空间红外探测像面照度模型。模拟SBIRS天基红外系统和临近空间探测系统,仿真典型目标弹道,考虑大气影响,得到主动段、被动段红外辐射分别在SBIRS预警卫星和临近空间平台的像面照度及目标背景调制对比度。仿真结果表明:对于低空突防目标,临近空间平台较SBIRS拥有更高的信号对比度及更长的探测时间。在被动段,以4.3μm为探测中心波长探测效果好于2.7μm。%It has been the focus of the study for effective detection of low altitude penetration target which has low altitude, short flight time. To 2.7μm, 4.3μm wavelength as the center of the detection system, a near space infrared detection image plane irradiance model was established. SBIRS space-based infrared system and the near space detection system were simulated. Simulating typical target trajectory, considering the atmospheric effects, infrared radiation image plane irradiance and modulation contrast of object and background of boost phase and post-boost phase at SBIRS and near space platform were obtained. Simulation results show that near space platform has a higher signal contrast and a longer detection time than SBIRS. For TBM′s post-boost phase, the detection effect of 4.3μm is better than that of 2.7μm as detection center wavelength.

  5. Metrics and causality on Moyal planes

    CERN Document Server

    Franco, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Metrics structures stemming from the Connes distance promote Moyal planes to the status of quantum metric spaces. We discuss this aspect in the light of recent developments, emphasizing the role of Moyal planes as representative examples of a recently introduced notion of quantum (noncommutative) locally compact space. We move then to the framework of Lorentzian noncommutative geometry and we examine the possibility of defining a notion of causality on Moyal plane, which is somewhat controversial in the area of mathematical physics. We show the actual existence of causal relations between the elements of a particular class of pure (coherent) states on Moyal plane with related causal structure similar to the one of the usual Minkowski space, up to the notion of locality.

  6. OGLE-2015-BLG-0479LA,B: Binary Gravitational Microlens Characterized by Simultaneous Ground-based and Space-based Observation

    CERN Document Server

    Han, C; Gould, A; Zhu, Wei; Street, R A; Yee, J C; Beichman, C; Bryden, C; Novati, S Calchi; Carey, S; Fausnaugh, M; Gaudi, B S; Henderson, Calen B; Shvartzvald, Y; Wibking, B; Szymański, M K; Soszyński, I; Skowron, J; Mróz, P; Poleski, R; Pietrukowicz, P; Kozłowski, S; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Pawlak, M; Tsapras, Y; Hundertmark, M; Bachelet, E; Dominik, M; Bramich, D M; Cassan, A; Jaimes, R Figuera; Horne, K; Ranc, C; Schmidt, R; Snodgrass, C; Wambsganss, J; Steele, I A; Menzies, J; Mao, S; Bozza, V; Jørgensen, U G; Alsubai, K A; Ciceri, S; D'Ago, G; Haugbølle, T; Hessman, F V; Hinse, T C; Juncher, D; Korhonen, H; Mancini, L; Popovas, A; Rabus, M; Rahvar, S; Scarpetta, G; Skottfelt, J; Southworth, J; Starkey, D; Surdej, J; Wertz, O; Zarucki, M; Pogge, R W; DePoy, D L

    2016-01-01

    We present a combined analysis of the observations of the gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0479 taken both from the ground and by the {\\it Spitzer Space Telescope}. The light curves seen from the ground and from space exhibit a time offset of $\\sim 13$ days between the caustic spikes, indicating that the relative lens-source positions seen from the two places are displaced by parallax effects. From modeling the light curves, we measure the space-based microlens parallax. Combined with the angular Einstein radius measured by analyzing the caustic crossings, we determine the mass and distance of the lens. We find that the lens is a binary composed of two G-type stars with masses $\\sim 1.0\\ M_\\odot$ and $\\sim 0.9\\ M_\\odot$ located at a distance $\\sim 3$ kpc. In addition, we are able to constrain the complete orbital parameters of the lens thanks to the precise measurement of the microlens parallax derived from the joint analysis. In contrast to the binary event OGLE-2014-BLG-1050, which was also ob...

  7. Observation of an Aligned Gas - Solid "Eutectic" during Controlled Directional Solidification Aboard the International Space Station - Comparison with Ground-based Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, R. N.; Anilkumar, A.

    2005-01-01

    Direct observation of the controlled melting and solidification of succinonitrile was conducted in the glovebox facility of the International Space Station (ISS). The experimental samples were prepared on ground by filling glass tubes, 1 cm ID and approximately 30 cm in length, with pure succinonitrile (SCN) in an atmosphere of nitrogen at 450 millibar pressure for eventual processing in the Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI) apparatus in the glovebox facility (GBX) on board the ISS. Real time visualization during controlled directional melt back of the sample showed nitrogen bubbles emerging from the interface and moving through the liquid up the imposed temperature gradient. Over a period of time these bubbles disappear by dissolving into the melt. Translation is stopped after melting back of about 9 cm of the sample, with an equilibrium solid-liquid interface established. During controlled re-solidification, aligned tubes of gas were seen growing perpendicular to the planar solid/liquid interface, inferring that the nitrogen previously dissolved into the liquid SCN was now coming out at the solid/liquid interface and forming the little studied liquid = solid + gas eutectic-type reaction. The observed structure is evaluated in terms of spacing dimensions, interface undercooling, and mechanisms for spacing adjustments. Finally, the significance of processing in a microgravity environment is ascertained in view of ground-based results.

  8. Networked simulation for team training of Space Station astronauts, ground controllers, and scientists - A training and development environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajare, Ankur R.; Wick, Daniel T.; Bovenzi, James J.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe plans for the Space Station Training Facility (SSTF) which has been designed to meet the envisioned training needs for Space Station Freedom. To meet these needs, the SSTF will integrate networked simulators with real-world systems in five training modes: Stand-Alone, Combined, Joint-Combined, Integrated, and Joint-Integrated. This paper describes the five training modes within the context of three training scenaries. In addition, this paper describes an authoring system which will support the rapid integration of new real-world system changes in the Space Station Freedom Program.

  9. Observing Exoplanets with High Dispersion Coronagraphy. I. The Scientific Potential of Current and Next-generation Large Ground and Space Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ji; Mawet, Dimitri; Ruane, Garreth; Hu, Renyu; Benneke, Björn

    2017-04-01

    Direct imaging of exoplanets presents a formidable technical challenge owing to the small angular separation and high contrast between exoplanets and their host stars. High Dispersion Coronagraphy (HDC) is a pathway to achieve unprecedented sensitivity to Earth-like planets in the habitable zone. Here, we present a framework to simulate HDC observations and data analyses. The goal of these simulations is to perform a detailed analysis of the trade-off between raw star light suppression and spectral resolution for various instrument configurations, target types, and science cases. We predict the performance of an HDC instrument at Keck observatory for characterizing directly imaged gas-giant planets in near-infrared bands. We also simulate HDC observations of an Earth-like planet using next-generation ground-based (TMT) and spaced-base telescopes (HabEx and LUVOIR). We conclude that ground-based ELTs are more suitable for HDC observations of an Earth-like planet than future space-based missions owing to the considerable difference in collecting area. For ground-based telescopes, HDC observations can detect an Earth-like planet in the habitable zone around an M-dwarf star at 10-4 star light suppression level. Compared to the 10-7 planet/star contrast, HDC relaxes the star light suppression requirement by a factor of 103. For space-based telescopes, detector noise will be a major limitation at spectral resolutions higher than 104. Considering detector noise and speckle chromatic noise, R = 400 (1600) is the optimal spectral resolutions for HabEx (LUVOIR). The corresponding star light suppression requirement to detect a planet with planet/star contrast = 6.1× {10}-11 is relaxed by a factor of 10 (100) for HabEx (LUVOIR).

  10. Optimizing the configuration of precipitation stations in a space-ground integrated sensor network based on spatial-temporal coverage maximization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Guan, Qingfeng; Chen, Nengcheng; Tong, Daoqin; Hu, Chuli; Peng, Yuling; Dong, Xianyong; Yang, Chao

    2017-05-01

    The two major rainfall observation techniques, ground-based measurements and remote sensing, have distinct coverage characteristics. Large-scale spatial coverage and long-term temporal coverage cannot be achieved simultaneously by using only ground-based precipitation stations or space-borne sensors. Given the temporal discontinuity of satellite coverage and limited ground-based observation resources, we propose a method for siting precipitation stations in conjunction with satellite-based rainfall sensors to maximize the total spatial-temporal coverage of weighted demand in a continuous observation period. Considering the special principles of deploying precipitation stations and the requirement for continuous coverage in space and time, a time-continuous maximal covering location problem (TMCLP) model is introduced. The maximal spatial coverage range of a precipitation station is determined based on the minimum density required and the site-specific terrain conditions. The coverage of a satellite sensor is calculated for each time period when it passes overhead. The polygon intersection point set (PIPS) is refined to identify finite candidate sites. By narrowing the continuous search space to a finite dominating set and discretizing the continuous observation period to sequential sub-periods, the siting problem is solved using the TMCLP model and refined PIPS. According to specific monitoring purposes, different weighting schemes can be used to evaluate the coverage priority of each demand object. The Jinsha River Basin is selected as the study region to test the proposed method. Satellite-borne precipitation radar is used to evaluate the satellite coverage. The results show that the proposed method is effective for precipitation station configuration optimization, and the model solution achieves higher coverage than the real-world deployment. The applicability of the proposed method, site selection criteria, deployment strategies in different observation modes

  11. A review of ground-based heavy-ion radiobiology relevant to space radiation risk assessment: Part II. Cardiovascular and immunological effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakely, Eleanor A.; Chang, Polly Y.

    2007-02-26

    The future of manned space flight depends on an analysis of the numerous potential risks of travel into deep space. Currently no radiation dose limits have been established for these exploratory missions. To set these standards more information is needed about potential acute and late effects on human physiology from appropriate radiation exposure scenarios, including pertinent radiation types and dose rates. Cancer risks have long been considered the most serious late effect from chronic daily relatively low-dose exposures to the complex space radiation environment. However, other late effects from space radiation exposure scenarios are under study in ground-based accelerator facilities and have revealed some unique particle radiation effects not observed with conventional radiations. A comprehensive review of pertinent literature that considers tissue effects of radiation leading to functional detriments in specific organ systems has recently been published (NCRP National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, Information Needed to Make Radiation Protection Recommendations for Space Missions Beyond Low-Earth Orbit, Report 153, Bethesda, MD, 2006). This paper highlights the review of two non-cancer concerns from this report: cardiovascular and immunological effects.

  12. Study of the Forbush Decreases, Geomagnetic Storms, and Ground-Level Enhancements in Selected Intervals and Their Space Weather Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badruddin; Kumar, Anand

    2015-04-01

    We analysed geomagnetic storms, ground-level enhancements (GLEs), and Forbush decreases in cosmic-ray intensity that occurred in selected intervals. We used data of ground-based neutron monitors for the cosmic-ray intensity. We used the geomagnetic index Dst as a measure of the geomagnetic storm intensity. Solar observations and interplanetary plasma/field parameters were used to identify the solar cause(s), interplanetary structure(s), and physical mechanism(s) responsible for the geomagnetic storms, the Forbush decreases, and the GLEs of different amplitudes and time profiles; all of them occurring within four selected periods of one month each. The observed differences in cosmic-ray and geomagnetic-activity responses to the same solar sources were used to distinguish the structures and mechanisms responsible for transient cosmic-ray modulation and geomagnetic storms.

  13. Seismo-traveling ionospheric disturbances of earthquake and tsunami waves observed by space- and ground-based GPS receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J. Y. G.; Chen, C. Y.; Lin, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C) is a constellation of six microsatellites launched on April 15, 2006 and has been orbiting with 72° inclination at 700 to 800 km above the earth since December 2007. The main payload of the F3/C is the GPS Occultation eXperiment (GOX) which carries out probing the radio occultation (RO) total electron content between GPS satellite and F3/C. Therefore, F3/C provides us an excellent opportunity to vertically scan ionospheric electron density from 100 up to 800 km altitude. On the other hand, worldwide ground-based GPS receivers can be employed to observe traveling ionospheric disturbances of the TEC. Here, we present the ionosphere response to seismic and tsunami waves by means of F3/C RO TEC and worldwide ground-based GPS TEC as well as existing data of infrasondes, magnetometers, and Doppler sounding systems during the 11 March 2011 M9.0 Tohoku earthquake.

  14. Low energy stage study. Volume 3: Conceptual design, interface analysis, flight and ground operations. [launching space shuttle payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Low energy conceptual stage designs and adaptations to existing/planned shuttle upper stages were developed and their performance established. Selected propulsion modes and subsystems were used as a basis to develop airborne support equipment (ASE) design concepts. Orbiter installation and integration (both physical and electrical interfaces) were defined. Low energy stages were adapted to the orbiter and ASE interfaces. Selected low energy stages were then used to define and describe typical ground and flight operations.

  15. Interplanetary Charged Dust Magnetic Clouds Striking the Magnetosphere: Coordinated Space-based and Ground-based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. T.; Chi, Peter; Lai, Hairong

    In general, asteroids, meteoroids and dust do not interact with the plasma structures in the solar system, but after a collision between fast moving bodies the debris cloud contains nanoscale dust particles that are charged and behave like heavy ions. Dusty magnetic clouds are then accelerated to the solar wind speed. While they pose no threat to spacecraft because of the particle size, the coherency imposed by the magnetization of the cloud allows the cloud to interact with the Earth’s magnetosphere as well as the plasma in the immediate vicinity of the cloud. We call these clouds Interplanetary Field Enhancements (IFEs). These IFEs are a unique class of interplanetary field structures that feature cusp-shaped increases and decreases in the interplanetary magnetic field and a thin current sheet. The occurrence of IFEs is attributed to the interaction between the solar wind and dust particles produced in inter-bolide collisions. Previous spacecraft observations have confirmed that IFEs move with the solar wind. When IFEs strike the magnetosphere, they may distort the magnetosphere in several possible ways, such as producing a small indentation, a large scale compression, or a glancing blow. In any event if the IFE is slowed by the magnetosphere, the compression of the Earth’s field should be seen in the ground-based magnetic records that are continuously recorded. Thus it is important to understand the magnetospheric response to IFE arrival. In this study, we investigate the IFE structure observed by spacecraft upstream of the magnetosphere and the induced magnetic field perturbations observed by networks of ground magnetometers, including the THEMIS, CARISMA, McMAC arrays in North America and the IMAGE array in Europe. We find that, in a well-observed IFE event on December 24, 2006, all ground magnetometer stations observed an impulse at approximately 1217 UT when the IFE was expected to arrive at the Earth’s magnetopause. These ground stations spread across

  16. Translation planes foundations and construction principles

    CERN Document Server

    Knarr, Norbert

    1995-01-01

    The book discusses various construction principles for translation planes and spreads from a general and unifying point of view and relates them to the theory of kinematic spaces. The book is intended for people working in the field of incidence geometry and can be read by everyone who knows the basic facts about projective and affine planes. The methods developed work especially well for topological spreads of real and complex vector spaces. In particular, a complete classification of all semifield spreads of finite dimensional complex vector spaces is obtained.

  17. On-Board and Ground-Based Complexes for Operating the Science Payload of the CORONAS-F Space Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, A. I.; Lisin, D. V.; Kuznetsov, V. D.; Afanas'ev, A. N.; Osin, A. I.; Schwarz, J.

    To ensure reliable operation of the science payload of the CORONAS-F satellite and to exercise its flexible control in the course of realization of the research program, an on-board and a specialized ground-based control complexes (GCCs) were designed and manufactured at the Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN). A demand for such systems arose because the service facilities of the satellite basic platform were unable to satisfy the requirements of the unique scientific experiments, i.e., an efficient on-line control of the variety of scientific instruments, managing large amounts of scientific information, etc.

  18. Characterization of Atmospheric Aerosol Behavior and Climatic Effects by Analysis of SAGE 2 and Other Space, Air, and Ground Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, John M.

    1999-01-01

    This report documents the research performed under NASA Ames Cooperative Agreement NCC 2-991, which covered the period 1 April 1997 through 31 March 1999. Previously, an interim technical report (Technical Report No. 1, 20 March 1998) summarized the work completed during the period 1 April 1997 through 31 March 1998. The objective of the proposed research was to advance our understanding of atmospheric aerosol behavior, aerosol-induced climatic effects, and the remote measurement and retrieval capabilities of spaceborne sensors such as SAGE II by combining and comparing data from these instruments and from airborne and ground-based instruments.

  19. Unitals in Projective Planes

    CERN Document Server

    Barwick, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Unitals are key structures in projective planes, and have connections with other structures in algebra. This book presents a monograph on unitals embedded in finite projective planes. It offers a survey of the research literature on embedded unitals. It is suitable for graduate students and researchers who want to learn about this topic

  20. Houston, We Have A Problem: A History of Air-to-Ground Voice Transmissions from the U.S. Manned Space Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Glen E.

    2002-01-01

    America's manned civil space program unfolded before the public through a vast array of sights and sounds. Beginning with Alan Shepard's first flight into space and continuing through the early Space Shuttle Program, nearly every word spoken between Earth and astronaut was recorded, transcribed and published for the world to see. Engineers installed onboard tape recorders which, as part of their data-saving function, recorded astronaut intercom communications. Some of these recordings were made during critical phases of each flight when the preservation of all data was essential. These tapes along with hundreds of others that gathered on the ground from each mission became the focused attention of legions of typists whose single job was converting voice to paper. Armed with reel-to-reel tape players, electric typewriters and reams of paper, these folks hammered out thousands of pages of transcripts. The results are a permanent written record that reveal a different side to America's manned space program; one in which its astronauts are both professional and profane, calm and excited, confident and unsure, healthy and sick - in a word, "human."

  1. Music-space associations are grounded, embodied and situated: examination of cello experts and non-musicians in a standard tone discrimination task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachmair, Martin; Cress, Ulrike; Fissler, Tim; Kurek, Simone; Leininger, Jan; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph

    2017-07-25

    In recent research, a systematic association of musical pitch with space has been described in the so-called Spatial-Pitch-Association-of-Response Codes-effect (SPARC). Typically, high pitch is associated with upper/right and low pitch with lower/left space. However, a theoretical classification of these associations regarding their experiential sources is difficult. Therefore, we applied a theoretical framework of numerical cognition classifying similar Space-Associated Response Codes (SARC) effects according to their groundedness, embodiedness and situatedness. We tested these attributes with a group of non-musicians and with a group of highly skilled cello players playing high tones with lower hand positions (i.e., reverse SPARC alignment) in a standard SPARC context of a piano and a reversed SPARC context of a cello. The results showed that SPARC is grounded, in general. However, for cello player SPARC is also situated and embodied. We conclude that groundedness, embodiedness and situatedness provide general characteristics of mapping cognitive representations to space.

  2. 3D表面重构中的共平面约束及其解的空间分析%Analysis on the Co-plane Constraint and Space of Solution in 3D Surface Reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于永彦; 王志坚

    2015-01-01

    基于单图像的3D重构因其先天性约束不足和潜在的巨大价值成为计算机视觉领域的研究热点,被广泛应用于航空航天、机械制造、医疗、考古、地质、犯罪现场复原、建筑设计、城市规划等领域。针对图像中几何元素的共平面性可提供景深信息的特点,提出一种基于交叉曲线共平面性约束的3D重构方案,即对于不平行于投影方向的某一个平面,根据其所含曲线与另一平面中某曲线的交叉构型构造一个线性系统,当一组这样的交叉曲线位于拟求解表面时,可获得精确解。对于含噪系统,要求测得的交点远离平坦面,增加新的约束条件,定义表面的平坦度度量模型,使用SVD法获得极小化线性系统的代数误差的逼近解。由于利用正投影和透视投影的等价性,可将透视投影转化为正投影,从而将这两种投影下的3D重构规划一个框架中。实验表明,这种方法大大提高了3D重构的健壮性,对噪声的敏感性小,可适用于完全未标定结构光等真实场景。%3D Reconstruction based on a single image is the research hotspot of computer vision because of its natural under-constrained and huge potential worthiness, which have been applied to aviation, mechanism, archaeology, geology, recovering the crime scene, architecture and city planning, etc. By the fact that co-plane of geometric item in an image may be provide the information about depth of field, this article suggested a complete new idea for 3D reconstruction based on co-plane constraint about intersection curves. For the planes which do not contain the projection direction, one formulated a linear system by the configuration of across curves between planes.When such a set on curves lied in a solution surface, one can get a accurate solution space. For any noisy systems, a key is that data points would escape from flat and nearly-flat planes, hence to add a new

  3. Depolarization ratio of polar stratospheric clouds in coastal Antarctica: comparison analysis between ground-based Micro Pulse Lidar and space-borne CALIOP observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Córdoba-Jabonero

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs play an important role in polar ozone depletion, since they are involved in diverse ozone destruction processes (chlorine activation, denitrification. The degree of that ozone reduction is depending on the type of PSCs, and hence on their occurrence. Therefore PSC characterization, mainly focused on PSC-type discrimination, is widely demanded. The backscattering (R and volume linear depolarization (δV ratios are the parameters usually used in lidar measurements for PSC detection and identification. In this work, an improved version of the standard NASA/Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL-4, which includes a built-in depolarization detection module, has been used for PSC observations above the coastal Antarctic Belgrano II station (Argentina, 77.9° S 34.6° W, 256 m a.s.l. since 2009. Examination of the MPL-4 δV feature as a suitable index for PSC-type discrimination is based on the analysis of the two-channel data, i.e., the parallel (p- and perpendicular (s- polarized MPL signals. This study focuses on the comparison of coincident δV-profiles as obtained from ground-based MPL-4 measurements during three Antarctic winters with those reported from the space-borne lidar CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization aboard the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation satellite in the same period (83 simultaneous cases are analysed for 2009–2011 austral winter times. Three different approaches are considered for the comparison analysis between both lidar profile data sets in order to test the degree of agreement: the correlation coefficient (CC, as a measure of the relationship between both PSC vertical structures; the mean differences together with their root mean square (RMS values found between data sets; and the percentage differences (BIAS, parameter also used in profiling comparisons between CALIOP and other ground-based lidar systems. All of them are examined as a function

  4. Cross-Cultural Issues of Intra- and Inter-Organisational Cooperation in Space Operations: A Survey Study with Ground Personnel of the European Space Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjeldheim Sandal, Gro; Mjeldheim Sandal, Gro; Manzey, Dietrich

    Today's space operations often involve close co-working of people with different ethnical, professional and organizational backgrounds. The aim of the study was to examine the implications of cultural diversity for efficient collaboration within the European Space Agency (ESA), and between ESA employees and representatives from other agencies. Methods: A web-based survey was answered by 905 employees at the European Astronaut Centre and at the European Space Technology Centre. An adapted version of the Flight Management Attitude Questionnaire by Helmreich and Merrit was used. Personnel were also asked about interpersonal and operational issues that interfered with efficient co-working within ESA and in relation to other space agencies. Results: Collaboration within ESA: A descriptive analysis was conducted of the rank orders of challenges perceived by members of different nationalities (the Netherlands (N=68), German (N=138), Italian (N=135), French (N=124), British (N=84) and Scandinavian (27).Rank orders show a surprisingly uniformity across nationalities. Most respondents perceived differences in the preferred leadership style as the main challenge for co-working in multi-national groups followed by differences in dealing with conflicts and misunderstandings. In contrast communication problems due different languages and differences in non-verbal behaviour, as well as differences in gender stereotypes were among the lowest rated issues. However, Scandinavian respondents showed a different pattern from other nationalities. Collaboration between agencies: The most significant issues reported to interfere with the efficiency of inter-agency collaboration varied. Most difficulties were reported in relation to clarity of communication, insufficient sharing of task related information, understanding the process of decision making in partner organization, and authoritarian leadership style in the partner organization Conclusion: Cultural differences in leadership and

  5. Wigner’s phase-space function and atomic structure: II. Ground states for closed-shell atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, Michael; Dahl, Jens Peder

    1987-01-01

    display and analyze the function for the closed-shell atoms helium, beryllium, neon, argon, and zinc in the Hartree-Fock approximation. The quantum-mechanical exact results are compared with those obtained with the approximate Thomas-Fermi description of electron densities in phase space....

  6. The Anti-Emetic Properties of 1-Sulpiride in a Ground-Based Model of Space Motion Sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joseph D.; Brizzee, Kenneth R.

    1987-01-01

    L-sulpiride, at a dose of 4 mg/kg, essentially abolished motion- induced emesis in a group of 6 squirrel monkeys undergoing horizontal rotation at 25 rpm, a terrestrial model of space motion sickness (SMS). Extrapyramidal side effects were not observed. In the absence of the drug, the usual emetic response returned. In comparison while typical neuroleptics were also strongly anti-emetic, they produced a considerable degree of rigidity and akinesia.

  7. A rotating differential accelerometer for testing the equivalence principle in space: results from laboratory tests of a ground prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobili, A. M.; Bramanti, D.; Comandi, G. L.; Toncelli, R.; Polacco, E.

    2003-07-01

    We have proposed to test the equivalence principle (EP) in low Earth orbit with a rapidly rotating differential accelerometer (made of weakly coupled concentric test cylinders) whose rotation provides high frequency signal modulation and avoids severe limitations otherwise due to operation at room temperature [PhRvD 63 (2001) 101101]. Although the accelerometer has been conceived for best performance in absence of weight, we have designed, built and tested a variant of it at 1-g. Here we report the results of measurements performed so far. Losses measured with the full system in operation yield a quality factor only four times smaller than the value required for the proposed high accuracy EP test in space. Unstable whirl motions, which are known to arise in the system and might be a matter of concern, are found to grow as slowly as predicted and can be stabilized. The capacitance differential read-out (the mechanical parts, electronics and software for data analysis) is in all similar to what is needed in the space experiment. In the instrument described here the coupling of the test masses is 24 000 times stiffer than in the one proposed for flight, which makes it 24 000 times less sensitive to differential displacements. With this stiffness it should detect test masses separations of 1.5·10 -2 μm, while so far we have achieved only 1.5 μm, because of large perturbations—due to the motor, the ball bearings, the non-perfect verticality of the system—all of which, however, are absent in space. The effects of these perturbations should be reduced by 100 times in order to perform a better demonstration. Further instrument improvements are underway to fill this gap and also to reduce its stiffness, thus increasing its significance as a prototype of the space experiment.

  8. Gravity-mode period spacings as seismic diagnostic for a sample of gamma Doradus stars from Kepler space photometry and high-resolution ground-based spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Van Reeth, T; Aerts, C; Papics, P I; Triana, S A; Zwintz, K; Degroote, P; Debosscher, J; Bloemen, S; Schmid, V S; De Smedt, K; Fremat, Y; Fuentes, A S; Homan, W; Hrudkova, M; Karjalainen, R; Lombaert, R; Nemeth, P; Oestensen, R; Van De Steene, G; Vos, J; Raskin, G; Van Winckel, H

    2015-01-01

    Gamma Doradus stars (hereafter gamma Dor stars) are gravity-mode pulsators of spectral type A or F. Such modes probe the deep stellar interior, offering a detailed fingerprint of their structure. Four-year high-precision space-based Kepler photometry of gamma Dor stars has become available, allowing us to study these stars with unprecedented detail. We selected, analysed, and characterized a sample of 67 gamma Dor stars for which we have Kepler observations available. For all the targets in the sample we assembled high-resolution spectroscopy to confirm their F-type nature. We found fourteen binaries, among which four single-lined binaries, five double-lined binaries, two triple systems and three binaries with no detected radial velocity variations. We estimated the orbital parameters whenever possible. For the single stars and the single-lined binaries, fundamental parameter values were determined from spectroscopy. We searched for period spacing patterns in the photometric data and identified this diagnosti...

  9. Mechanics of Ship Grounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    In these notes first a simplified mathematical model is presented for analysis of ship hull loading due to grounding on relatively hard and plane sand, clay or rock sea bottoms. In a second section a more rational calculation model is described for the sea bed soil reaction forces on the sea bottom...

  10. Blackfolds, plane waves and minimal surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Armas, Jay; Blau, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Minimal surfaces in Euclidean space provide examples of possible non-compact horizon geometries and topologies in asymptotically flat space-time. On the other hand, the existence of limiting surfaces in the space-time provides a simple mechanism for making these configurations compact. Limiting surfaces appear naturally in a given space-time by making minimal surfaces rotate but they are also inherent to plane wave or de Sitter space-times in which case minimal surfaces can be static and comp...

  11. A high-performance ground-based prototype of horn-type sequential vegetable production facility for life support system in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuming; Liu, Hui; Shao, Lingzhi; Wang, Minjuan; Berkovich, Yu A.; Erokhin, A. N.; Liu, Hong

    2013-07-01

    Vegetable cultivation plays a crucial role in dietary supplements and psychosocial benefits of the crew during manned space flight. Here we developed a ground-based prototype of horn-type sequential vegetable production facility, named Horn-type Producer (HTP), which was capable of simulating the microgravity effect and the continuous cultivation of leaf-vegetables on root modules. The growth chamber of the facility had a volume of 0.12 m3, characterized by a three-stage space expansion with plant growth. The planting surface of 0.154 m2 was comprised of six ring-shaped root modules with a fibrous ion-exchange resin substrate. Root modules were fastened to a central porous tube supplying water, and moved forward with plant growth. The total illuminated crop area of 0.567 m2 was provided by a combination of red and white light emitting diodes on the internal surfaces. In tests with a 24-h photoperiod, the productivity of the HTP at 0.3 kW for lettuce achieved 254.3 g eatable biomass per week. Long-term operation of the HTP did not alter vegetable nutrition composition to any great extent. Furthermore, the efficiency of the HTP, based on the Q-criterion, was 7 × 10-4 g2 m-3 J-1. These results show that the HTP exhibited high productivity, stable quality, and good efficiency in the process of planting lettuce, indicative of an interesting design for space vegetable production.

  12. Temporal dynamics of the gut microbiota in people sharing a confined environment, a 520-day ground-based space simulation, MARS500.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turroni, Silvia; Rampelli, Simone; Biagi, Elena; Consolandi, Clarissa; Severgnini, Marco; Peano, Clelia; Quercia, Sara; Soverini, Matteo; Carbonero, Franck G; Bianconi, Giovanna; Rettberg, Petra; Canganella, Francesco; Brigidi, Patrizia; Candela, Marco

    2017-03-24

    The intestinal microbial communities and their temporal dynamics are gaining increasing interest due to the significant implications for human health. Recent studies have shown the dynamic behavior of the gut microbiota in free-living, healthy persons. To date, it is not known whether these dynamics are applicable during prolonged life sharing in a confined and controlled environment. The MARS500 project, the longest ground-based space simulation ever, provided us with a unique opportunity to trace the crew microbiota over 520 days of isolated confinement, such as that faced by astronauts in real long-term interplanetary space flights, and after returning to regular life, for a total of 2 years. According to our data, even under the strictly controlled conditions of an enclosed environment, the human gut microbiota is inherently dynamic, capable of shifting between different steady states, typically with rearrangements of autochthonous members. Notwithstanding a strong individuality in the overall gut microbiota trajectory, some key microbial components showed conserved temporal dynamics, with potential implications for the maintenance of a health-promoting, mutualistic microbiota configuration. Sharing life in a confined habitat does not affect the resilience of the individual gut microbial ecosystem, even in the long term. However, the temporal dynamics of certain microbiota components should be monitored when programming future mission simulations and real space flights, to prevent breakdowns in the metabolic and immunological homeostasis of the crewmembers.

  13. Photometry of the Variable Bright Red Supergiant Betelgeuse from the Ground and from Space with the BRITE Nano-satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Robert; Guinan, Edward F.

    2016-01-01

    Robert B. Minor, Edward Guinan, Richard Wasatonic Betelgeuse (Alpha Orionis) is a large, luminous semi-regular red supergiant of spectral class M1.5-2Iab. It is the 8th brightest star in the night sky. Betelgeuse is 30,000 times more luminous than the Sun and 700 times larger. It has an estimated age of ~8 +/- 2 Myr. Betelgeuse explode in a Type II supernova (anytime within the next million years). When it explodes, it will shine with about the intensity of a full moon and may be visible during the day. However, it is too far away to cause any major damage to Earth. Photometry of this pre-supernova star has been ongoing at Villanova for nearly 45 years. These observations are being used to define the complex brightness variations of this star. Semi-regular periodic light variations have been found with periods of 385 days up to many years. These light variations are used to study its unstable atmosphere and resulting complex pulsations. Over the last 15 years, it has been observed by Wasatonic who has accumulated a large photometric database. The ground-based observations are limited to precisions of 1.5%, and due to poor weather, limit observations to about 1-2 times per week. However, with the recent successful launch of the BRITE Nano-satellites (http://www.brite-constellation.at) during 2013-14, it is possible to secure high precision photometry of bright stars, including Betelgeuse, continuously for up to 3 months. Villanova has participated in the BRITE guest investigators program and has been awarded observing time and data rights many bright stars, including Betelgeuse. BRITE blue and red observations of Betelgeuse were carried out during the Nov-Feb 2013-14 season and the 2014-15. These datasets were given to Villanova and have been combined with coexistent photometry from Wasatonic. Although BRITE's red data is saturated, the blue data is useable. The BRITE datasets were combined with our ground-based V, red, and near-IR photometry. Problems were

  14. Quadrifilar Helix Antenna for Enhanced Air-to-Ground Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    5d. PROJECT NUMBER TPA # CE-SE-2014-09 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) US Army...effect of the metallic ground plane provided by the aircraft fuselage is explored through simulation, and the ideal standoff distance from this ground...Fig. 5 Effect of ground plane and absorber on QHA reflection coefficient .....4 Fig. 6 Effect of ground plane and absorber on QHA radiation pattern

  15. A Method of Function Space for Vertical Impedance Function of a Circular Rigid Foundation on a Transversely Isotropic Ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Eskandari-Ghadi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with investigation of vertical impedance function of a surface rigid circular foundation resting on a semi-infinite transversely isotropic alluvium. To this end, the equations of motion in cylindrical coordinate system, which because of axissymmetry are two coupled equations, are converted into one partial differential equation using a method of potential function. The governing partial differential equation for the potential function is solved via implementing Hankel integral transforms in radial direction. The vertical and radial components of displacement vector are determined with the use of transformed displacement-potential function relationships. The mixed boundary conditions at the surface are satisfied by specifying the traction between the rigid foundation and the underneath alluvium in a special function space introduced in this paper, where the vertical displacements are forced to satisfy the rigid boundary condition. Through exercising these restraints, the normal traction and then the vertical impedance function are obtained. The results are then compared with the existing results in the literature for the simpler case of isotropic half-space, which shows an excellent agreement. Eventually, the impedance functions are presented in terms of dimensionless frequency for different materials. The method presented here may be used to obtain the impedance function in any other direction as well as in buried footing in layered media.

  16. Fixed sagittal plane imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Jason W; Patel, Alpesh A

    2014-12-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective To discuss the evaluation and management of fixed sagittal plane imbalance. Methods A comprehensive literature review was performed on the preoperative evaluation of patients with sagittal plane malalignment, as well as the surgical strategies to address sagittal plane deformity. Results Sagittal plane imbalance is often caused by de novo scoliosis or iatrogenic flat back deformity. Understanding the etiology and magnitude of sagittal malalignment is crucial in realignment planning. Objective parameters have been developed to guide surgeons in determining how much correction is needed to achieve favorable outcomes. Currently, the goals of surgery are to restore a sagittal vertical axis Sagittal plane malalignment is an increasingly recognized cause of pain and disability. Treatment of sagittal plane imbalance varies according to the etiology, location, and severity of the deformity. Fixed sagittal malalignment often requires complex reconstructive procedures that include osteotomy correction. Reestablishing harmonious spinopelvic alignment is associated with significant improvement in health-related quality-of-life outcome measures and patient satisfaction.

  17. Blackfolds, plane waves and minimal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Jay; Blau, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    Minimal surfaces in Euclidean space provide examples of possible non-compact horizon geometries and topologies in asymptotically flat space-time. On the other hand, the existence of limiting surfaces in the space-time provides a simple mechanism for making these configurations compact. Limiting surfaces appear naturally in a given space-time by making minimal surfaces rotate but they are also inherent to plane wave or de Sitter space-times in which case minimal surfaces can be static and compact. We use the blackfold approach in order to scan for possible black hole horizon geometries and topologies in asymptotically flat, plane wave and de Sitter space-times. In the process we uncover several new configurations, such as black helicoids and catenoids, some of which have an asymptotically flat counterpart. In particular, we find that the ultraspinning regime of singly-spinning Myers-Perry black holes, described in terms of the simplest minimal surface (the plane), can be obtained as a limit of a black helicoid, suggesting that these two families of black holes are connected. We also show that minimal surfaces embedded in spheres rather than Euclidean space can be used to construct static compact horizons in asymptotically de Sitter space-times.

  18. Multi-year comparisons of ground-based and space-borne Fourier transform spectrometers in the high Arctic between 2006 and 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Debora; Walker, Kaley A.; Conway, Stephanie; Kolonjari, Felicia; Strong, Kimberly; Batchelor, Rebecca; Boone, Chris D.; Dan, Lin; Drummond, James R.; Fogal, Pierre F.; Fu, Dejian; Lindenmaier, Rodica; Manney, Gloria L.; Weaver, Dan

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents 8 years (2006-2013) of measurements obtained from Fourier transform spectrometers (FTSs) in the high Arctic at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL; 80.05° N, 86.42° W). These measurements were taken as part of the Canadian Arctic ACE (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment) validation campaigns that have been carried out since 2004 during the polar sunrise period (from mid-February to mid-April). Each spring, two ground-based FTSs were used to measure total and partial columns of HF, O3, and trace gases that impact O3 depletion, namely, HCl and HNO3. Additionally, some tropospheric greenhouse gases and pollutant species were measured, namely CH4, N2O, CO, and C2H6. During the same time period, the satellite-based ACE-FTS made measurements near Eureka and provided profiles of the same trace gases. Comparisons have been carried out between the measurements from the Portable Atmospheric Research Interferometric Spectrometer for the InfraRed (PARIS-IR) and the co-located high-resolution Bruker 125HR FTS, as well as with the latest version of the ACE-FTS retrievals (v3.5). The total column comparison between the two co-located ground-based FTSs, PARIS-IR and Bruker 125HR, found very good agreement for most of these species (except HF), with differences well below the estimated uncertainties ( ≤ 6  %) and with high correlations (R ≥ 0. 8). Partial columns have been used for the ground-based to space-borne comparison, with coincident measurements selected based on time, distance, and scaled potential vorticity (sPV). The comparisons of the ground-based measurements with ACE-FTS show good agreement in the partial columns for most species within 6  % (except for C2H6 and PARIS-IR HF), which is consistent with the total retrieval uncertainty of the ground-based instruments. The correlation coefficients (R) of the partial column comparisons for all eight species range from approximately 0.75 to 0.95. The comparisons show no

  19. Thermal Design of Focal Plane Assembly on Space-borne Camera Based on Thermo-Electric Cooling Technology%基于热电制冷技术的某星载相机焦面组件热设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    连新昊; 颜吟雪

    2011-01-01

    热电制冷(Thermo-Electric Cooling,TEC)技术是利用帕尔帖效应的一种制冷方法,它不需要任何工质,无活动部件,结构简单,非常适宜于微型制冷领域或有特殊要求的场合.文章将TEC技术应用于某星载相机焦面组件的热设计,解决了探测器恒温控制问题.仿真分析结果表明,基于TEC技术的热设计方案在满足探测器恒温控制的同时,控温功耗比传统方案降低了90%.%Thermo-Electric Cooling (TEC) technology, based on Peltier effect, is one of the refrigeration methods. In view of the advantages of TEC, such as simple structure, no refrigerant, no moving parts, it is particularly suitable for micro-refrigeration or other special occasions. TEC technology, which is applied in thermal design of focal plane assembly on space-borne camera, solved the problem that how to keep sensor's temperature constant The simulation results showed that thermal design based on TEC technology could keep sensor's temperature constant, and meanwhile, its power used for controlling temperature reduced by 90% compared with traditional thermal design.

  20. 'Grounded' Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Garbi

    2012-01-01

    play within one particular neighbourhood: Nørrebro in the Danish capital, Copenhagen. The article introduces the concept of grounded politics to analyse how groups of Muslim immigrants in Nørrebro use the space, relationships and history of the neighbourhood for identity political statements....... The article further describes how national political debates over the Muslim presence in Denmark affect identity political manifestations within Nørrebro. By using Duncan Bell’s concept of mythscape (Bell, 2003), the article shows how some political actors idealize Nørrebro’s past to contest the present...

  1. Stochastic modeling and control system designs of the NASA/MSFC Ground Facility for large space structures: The maximum entropy/optimal projection approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Wei-Shen

    1986-01-01

    In the Control Systems Division of the Systems Dynamics Laboratory of the NASA/MSFC, a Ground Facility (GF), in which the dynamics and control system concepts being considered for Large Space Structures (LSS) applications can be verified, was designed and built. One of the important aspects of the GF is to design an analytical model which will be as close to experimental data as possible so that a feasible control law can be generated. Using Hyland's Maximum Entropy/Optimal Projection Approach, a procedure was developed in which the maximum entropy principle is used for stochastic modeling and the optimal projection technique is used for a reduced-order dynamic compensator design for a high-order plant.

  2. Evaluation of the Performance Characteristics of CGLSS II and U.S. NLDN Using Ground-Truth Dalta from Launch Complex 398, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, C. T.; Mata, A. G.; Rakov, V. A.; Nag, A.; Saul, J.

    2012-01-01

    A new comprehensive lightning instrumentation system has been designed for Launch Complex 39B (LC39B) at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. This new instrumentation system includes seven synchronized high-speed video cameras, current sensors installed on the nine downconductors of the new lightning protection system (LPS) for LC39B; four dH/dt, 3-axis measurement stations; and five dE/dt stations composed of two antennas each. The LPS received 8 direct lightning strikes (a total of 19 strokes) from March 31 through December 31 2011. The measured peak currents and locations are compared to those reported by the Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS II) and the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). Results of comparison are presented and analyzed in this paper.

  3. Campaign 9 of the $K2$ Mission: Observational Parameters, Scientific Drivers, and Community Involvement for a Simultaneous Space- and Ground-based Microlensing Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, Calen B; Street, Rachel A; Bennett, David P; Hogg, David W; Poleski, R; Barclay, T; Barentsen, G; Howell, S B; Udalski, A; Szymański, M K; Skowron, J; Mróz, P; Kozłowski, S; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Pietrukowicz, P; Soszyński, I; Ulaczyk, K; Pawlak, M; Sumi, T; Abe, F; Asakura, Y; Barry, R K; Bhattacharya, A; Bond, I A; Donachie, M; Freeman, M; Fukui, A; Hirao, Y; Itow, Y; Koshimoto, N; Li, M C A; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Nagakane, M; Ohnishi, K; Oyokawa, H; Rattenbury, N; Saito, To; Sharan, A; Sullivan, D J; Tristram, P J; Yonehara, A; Bachelet, E; Bramich, D A; Cassan, A; Dominik, M; Jaimes, R Figuera; Horne, K; Hundertmark, M; Mao, S; Ranc, C; Schmidt, R; Snodgrass, C; Steele, I A; Tsapras, Y; Wambsganss, J; Akeson, R; Batista, V; Beaulieu, J -P; Beichman, C A; Bozza, V; Bryden, G; Ciardi, D; Cole, A; Coutures, C; Dong, S; Foreman-Mackey, D; Fouqué, P; Gaudi, B S; Kerins, E; Korhonen, H; Jørgensen, U; Lang, D; Lineweaver, C; Marquette, J -B; Mogavero, Federico; Morales, J C; Nataf, D; Pogge, R W; Santerne, A; Shvartzvald, Y; Suzuki, D; Tamura, M; Tisserand, P; Wang, D; Zhu, W

    2016-01-01

    $K2$'s Campaign 9 ($K2$C9) will conduct a $\\sim$3.4 deg$^{2}$ survey toward the Galactic bulge from 7/April through 1/July of 2016 that will leverage the spatial separation between $K2$ and the Earth to facilitate measurement of the microlens parallax $\\pi_{\\rm E}$ for $\\gtrsim$120 microlensing events, including several planetary in nature as well as many short-timescale microlensing events, which are potentially indicative of free-floating planets (FFPs). These satellite parallax measurements will in turn allow for the direct measurement of the masses of and distances to the lensing systems. In this white paper we provide an overview of the $K2$C9 space- and ground-based microlensing survey. Specifically, we detail the demographic questions that can be addressed by this program, including the frequency of FFPs and the Galactic distribution of exoplanets, the observational parameters of $K2$C9, and the array of ground-based resources dedicated to concurrent observations. Finally, we outline the avenues throug...

  4. Space-Borne and Ground-Based InSAR Data Integration: The Åknes Test Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Bardi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This work concerns a proposal of the integration of InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar data acquired by ground-based (GB and satellite platforms. The selected test site is the Åknes rockslide, which affects the western Norwegian coast. The availability of GB-InSAR and satellite InSAR data and the accessibility of a wide literature make the landslide suitable for testing the proposed procedure. The first step consists of the organization of a geodatabase, performed in the GIS environment, containing all of the available data. The second step concerns the analysis of satellite and GB-InSAR data, separately. Two datasets, acquired by RADARSAT-2 (related to a period between October 2008 and August 2013 and by a combination of TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X (acquired between July 2010 and October 2012, both of them in ascending orbit, processed applying SBAS (Small BAseline Subset method, are available. GB-InSAR data related to five different campaigns of measurements, referred to the summer seasons of 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2012, are available, as well. The third step relies on data integration, performed firstly from a qualitative point of view and later from a semi-quantitative point of view. The results of the proposed procedure have been validated by comparing them to GPS (Global Positioning System data. The proposed procedure allowed us to better define landslide sectors in terms of different ranges of displacements. From a qualitative point of view, stable and unstable areas have been distinguished. In the sector concerning movement, two different sectors have been defined thanks to the results of the semi-quantitative integration step: the first sector, concerning displacement values higher than 10 mm, and the 2nd sector, where the displacements did not exceed a 10-mm value of displacement in the analyzed period.

  5. Lessons Learned from Biosphere 2: When Viewed as a Ground Simulation/Analogue for Long Duration Human Space Exploration and Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCallum, T.; Poynter, J.; Bearden, D.

    A human mission to Mars, or a base on the Moon or Mars, is a longer and more complex mission than any space endeavor undertaken to date. Ground simulations provide a relevant, analogous environment for testing technologies and learning how to manage complex, long duration missions, while addressing inherent mission risks. Multiphase human missions and settlements that may preclude a rapid return to Earth, require high fidelity, end-to-end, at least full mission duration tests in order to evaluate a system's ability to sustain the crew for the entire mission and return the crew safely to Earth. Moreover, abort scenarios are essentially precluded in many mission scenarios, though certain risks may only become evident late in the mission. Aging and compounding effects cannot be simulated through accelerated tests for all aspects of the mission. Until such high fidelity long duration simulations are available, and in order to help prepare those simulations and mission designs, it is important to extract as many lessons as possible from analogous environments. Possibly the best analogue for a long duration space mission is the two year mission of Biosphere 2. Biosphere 2 is a three-acre materially closed ecological system that supported eight crewmembers with food, air and water in a sunlight driven bioregenerative system for two years. It was designed for research applicable to environmental management on Earth and the development of human life support for space. A brief overview of the two-year Biosphere 2 mission is presented, followed by select data and lessons learned that are applicable to the design and operation of a long duration human space mission, settlement or test bed. These lessons include technical, programmatic, and psychological issues

  6. Seasonal & Daily Amazon Column CO2 & CO Observations from Ground & Space Used to Evaluate Tropical Ecosystem Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, M. K.; Parker, H. A.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wunch, D.; Jacobson, A. R.; Kawa, S. R.; Keppel-Aleks, G.; Basu, S.; O'Dell, C.; Frankenberg, C.; Michalak, A. M.; Baker, D. F.; Christofferson, B.; Restrepo-Coupe, N.; Saleska, S. R.; De Araujo, A. C.; Miller, J. B.

    2016-12-01

    The Amazon basin stores 150-200 PgC, exchanges 18 PgC with the atmosphere every year and has taken up 0.42-0.65 PgC/y over the past two decades. Despite its global significance, the response of the tropical carbon cycle to climate variability and change is ill constrained as evidenced by the large negative and positive feedbacks in future climate simulations. The complex interplay of radiation, water and ecosystem phenology remains unresolved in current tropical ecosystem models. We use high frequency regional scale TCCON observations of column CO2, CO and CH4 near Manaus, Brazil that began in October 2014 to understand the aforementioned interplay of processes in regulating biosphere-atmosphere exchange. We observe a robust daily column CO2 uptake of about 2 ppm (4 ppm to 0.5 ppm) over 8 hours and evaluate how it changes as we transition to the dry season. Back-trajectory calculations show that the daily CO2 uptake footprint is terrestrial and influenced by the heterogeneity of the Amazon rain forests. The column CO falls from above 120 ppb to below 80 ppb as we transition from the biomass burning to wet seasons. The daily mean column CO2 rises by 3 ppm from October through June. Removal of biomass burning, secular CO2 increase and variations from transport (by Carbon tracker simulations) implies an increase of 2.3 ppm results from tropical biospheric processes (respiration and photosynthesis). This is consistent with ground-based remote sensing and eddy flux observations that indicate that leaf development and demography drives the tropical carbon cycle in regions that are not water limited and is not considered in current models. We compare our observations with output from 7 CO2 inversion transport models with assimilated meteorology and find that while 5 models reproduce the CO2 seasonal cycle all of them under predict the daily drawdown of CO2 by a factor of 3. This indicates that the CO2 flux partitioning between photosynthesis and respiration is incorrect

  7. Ground state structure of some double- hypernuclei by a three-body model using a simple coordinate space approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Mahapatra; J Nag

    2003-06-01

    New experimental data on the binding energy of $^{6}_{}$He, reported very recently, come up with the values = 7.25 ± 0.14 MeV and = 1.01 ± 0.2 MeV which are substantially lower than the old data = 10.9 ± 0.8 MeV and = 4.7 ± 1.0 MeV in use in literature since 1966. In view of the new data we decided to undertake a re-study of the $^{6}_{}$He hypernucleus using the same three-body model (--) with a simple coordinate space variational approach which was employed earlier with the old data on $^{6}_{}$He. After fitting different - potentials to the new data of $^{6}_{}$He we have applied our method to study some double- hypernuclei in light, medium and heavy mass regions and have determined the structural quantities like , the r.m.s. values of core- $(\\langle r_{\\text{core}-}\\rangle)$ and - $(\\langle r_{-}\\rangle)$ distances theoretically. The core- interaction considered is of Woods–Saxon type. The strength and the range of the core- potential have been adjusted to reproduce the -binding energy (). These are in good agreement with the relativistic mean field (RMF) results. Our study shows that the - bonding energy decreases with increasing mass number from $^{10}_{}$Be to $^{210}_{}$Pb of a double- hypernucleus.

  8. Study of growth and development features of ten ground cover plants in Kish Island green space in warm season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shooshtarian

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Having special ecological condition, Kish Island has a restricted range of native species of ornamental plants. Expansion of urban green space in this Island is great of importance due to its outstanding touristy position in the South of Iran. The purpose of this study was to investigate the growth and development of groundcover plants planted in four different regions of Kish Island and to recommend the most suitable and adaptable species for each region. Ten groundcover species included Festuca ovina L., Glaucium flavum Crantz., Frankenia thymifolia Desf., Sedum spurium Bieb., Sedum acre L., .Potentilla verna L., Carpobrotus acinaciformis (L. L. Bolus., Achillea millefolium L., Alternanthera dentata Moench. and Lampranthus spectabilis Haw. Evaluation of growth and development had been made by measurement of morphological characteristics such as height, covering area, leaf number and area, dry and fresh total weights and visual scoring. Physiological traits included proline and chlorophyll contents evaluated. This study was designed in factorial layout based on completely randomized blocks design with six replicates. Results showed that in terms of indices such as covering area, visual quality, height, total weight, and chlorophyll content, Pavioon and Sadaf plants had the most and the worst performances, respectively in comparison to other regions’ plants. Based on evaluated characteristics, C. acinaciformis, L. spectabilis and F. thymifolia had the most expansion and growth in all quadruplet regions and are recommend for planting in Kish Island and similar climates.

  9. Multi-band gravitational wave astronomy: science with joint space- and ground-based observations of black hole binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesana, Alberto

    2017-05-01

    Soon after the observation of the first black hole binary (BHB) by advanced LIGO (aLIGO), GW150914, it was realised that such a massive system would have been observable in the milli-Hz (mHz) band few years prior to coalescence. Operating in the frequency range 0.1-100 mHz, the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) can potentially detect up to thousands inspiralling BHBs, based on the coalescence rates inferred from the aLIGO first observing run (O1). The vast majority of them (those emitting at f 10 mHz however, several of them will sweep through the LISA band, eventually producing loud coalescences in the audio-band probed by aLIGO. This contribution reviews the scientific potential of these new class of LISA sources which, in the past few months, has been investigated in several contexts, including multi-messenger and multi-band gravitational wave astronomy, BHB astrophysics, tests of alternative theories of gravity and cosmography.

  10. Performance limits of high-rate space-to-ground optical communications through the turbulent atmospheric channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, John E.

    1995-04-01

    Atmospheric turbulence corrupts both the amplitude and phase of an optical field propagating from space to an earth-based receiver. While aperture averaging can mitigate amplitude scintillation effects, the performance of single spatial-mode receiver systems such as coherent detection or preamplified direction detection can be significantly degraded by the corrupted phase when the ratio of aperture diameter D to atmospheric coherence length r0 exceeds unity. Although adaptive optics may be employed to correct the wavefront, in practice the correction is imperfect and the residual phase errors induce a communications performance loss. That loss is quantified here by Monte Carlo simulation techniques. Single-mode-receiver fade statistics for imperfect phase correction are calculated in terms of the atmospheric Greenwood frequency fg, the adaptive optic servo loop cutoff frequency fc, and the ratio D/r0. From these statistics, link bit-error rate (BER) performance is calculated. The results reveal that conventional performance measures such as Strehl ratio or mean signal-to- noise ratio loss can significantly underestimate receiver BER losses. Only when the ratio fg/fc is 0.1 or less will communications losses be small (about 0.5 dB) over a wide range of D/r0.

  11. International Space Station Sustaining Engineering: A Ground-Based Test Bed for Evaluating Integrated Environmental Control and Life Support System and Internal Thermal Control System Flight Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Charles D.; Perry, Jay L.; Callahan, David M.

    2000-01-01

    As the International Space Station's (ISS) various habitable modules are placed in service on orbit, the need to provide for sustaining engineering becomes increasingly important to ensure the proper function of critical onboard systems. Chief among these are the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) and the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS). Without either, life onboard the ISS would prove difficult or nearly impossible. For this reason, a ground-based ECLSS/ITCS hardware performance simulation capability has been developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. The ECLSS/ITCS Sustaining Engineering Test Bed will be used to assist the ISS Program in resolving hardware anomalies and performing periodic performance assessments. The ISS flight configuration being simulated by the test bed is described as well as ongoing activities related to its preparation for supporting ISS Mission 5A. Growth options for the test facility are presented whereby the current facility may be upgraded to enhance its capability for supporting future station operation well beyond Mission 5A. Test bed capabilities for demonstrating technology improvements of ECLSS hardware are also described.

  12. 以胰腺为轴心的相关筋膜及安全外科平面解剖研究%Relative Anatomic Research Around Pancreatic Interfascial Space and Safe Surgical Plane-Regard Pancreas as Axis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王广伟; 顾元龙; 翟年宽; 刘敏丰

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究胰十二指肠区域血管的应用解剖、相关系膜及系膜间隙的解剖学特点,观察胰十二指肠区域解剖标志及安全外科平面,为临床上开展胰头及十二指肠、胆总管末端手术提供解剖学基础.方法 对7具甲醛固定的成人尸体的十二指肠、胰腺周围供血血管及胆总管下段作了解剖学观察,对横结肠系膜构成的网膜囊及胰腺周围胚胎时期形成的潜在的筋膜间隙和解剖层次标志进行观察描述.结果 准确定位胃左动脉和肝总动脉,由胰腺前筋膜形成的肝胰襞及胃胰襞是一个很好的标志.当进行胰腺游离及后方淋巴结清扫时,在胰腺后筋膜及肾前筋膜间有一无血管平面可以应用.肾前筋膜是避免损伤腹膜后血管、肾上腺的安全界面,为避免腹膜后血管及肾上腺的损伤,肾前筋膜应作为安全分离平面的后界.胰十二指肠前后动脉弓及分支主要供应十二指肠降部和水平部的血运,行保留十二指肠的胰头切除术时应注意保护胰十二指肠前后动脉弓.结论 充分理解胚胎发育过程胰腺周围筋膜及筋膜间隙的形成,对于手术中正确理解、辨识解剖平面非常重要,沿着筋膜间隙的操作可避免出血及副损伤,也是肿瘤外科根治性切除的基本要求.%Objective To study the vascular applied anatomy, the anatomic features of fascial, and interfas-cial space around the pancreas and duodenum, observe marker and safe surgical plane of pancreaticoduodenal region, and provide clinical anatomy basis for surgery of duodenum, pancreatic head, and distal common bile duct. Methods Anatomical observations were performed in 7 formalin fixed cadavers on duodenum, distal common bile duct, and pancreatic peripheral blood supply. Transverse mesocolon, pancreatic capsule and potential interfascial space, surgical plane and anatomic marker for reorganization around pancreas were observed. Results Gastropancreatic fold and

  13. SNAP focal plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampton, Michael L.; Kim, A.; Akerlof, C.W.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Berkovitz, J.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers Jr., W.C.; Commins, E.D.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.E.; DiGennaro,R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.S.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.E.; Harvey, P.R.; Heetderks, H.D.; Holland, S.E.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Levi, M.E.; Levin, D.S.; Linder,E.V.; Loken, S.C.; Malina, R.; Massey, R.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.P.; Miquel, R.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto, E.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch,A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, R.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-29

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square-degree field sensitive in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. We describe the requirements for the instrument suite and the evolution of the focal plane design to the present concept in which all the instrumentation--visible and near-infrared imagers, spectrograph, and star guiders--share one common focal plane.

  14. Spectral distance on the Moyal plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinetti, Pierre [Universitaet Goettingen (Germany). Courant Centre

    2010-07-01

    We compute the spectral distance, defined in Connes' noncommutative geometry, in the Moyal plane. We find that the distance between the eigenstates m,m+1 of the quantum harmonic oscillator is proportional to m{sup -1/2}. We also show how to truncate the Moyal spectral triple in order to obtain quantum metric spaces in the sense of Rieffel.

  15. Evaluating a 3-D transport model of atmospheric CO2 using ground-based, aircraft, and space-borne data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-D. Paris

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the GEOS-Chem atmospheric transport model (v8-02-01 of CO2 over 2003–2006, driven by GEOS-4 and GEOS-5 meteorology from the NASA Goddard Global Modelling and Assimilation Office, using surface, aircraft and space-borne concentration measurements of CO2. We use an established ensemble Kalman filter to estimate a posteriori biospheric+biomass burning (BS+BB and oceanic (OC CO2 fluxes from 22 geographical regions, following the TransCom 3 protocol, using boundary layer CO2 data from a subset of GLOBALVIEW surface sites. Global annual net BS+BB+OC CO2 fluxes over 2004–2006 for GEOS-4 (GEOS-5 meteorology are −4.4±0.9 (−4.2±0.9, −3.9±0.9 (−4.5±0.9, and −5.2±0.9 (−4.9±0.9 Pg C yr−1 , respectively. The regional a posteriori fluxes are broadly consistent in the sign and magnitude of the TransCom-3 study for 1992–1996, but we find larger net sinks over northern and southern continents. We find large departures from our a priori over Europe during summer 2003, over temperate Eurasia during 2004, and over North America during 2005, reflecting an incomplete description of terrestrial carbon dynamics. We find GEOS-4 (GEOS-5 a posteriori CO2 concentrations reproduce the observed surface trend of 1.91–2.43 ppm yr−1, depending on latitude, within 0.15 ppm yr−1 (0.2 ppm yr−1 and the seasonal cycle within 0.2 ppm (0.2 ppm at all latitudes. We find the a posteriori model reproduces the aircraft vertical profile measurements of CO2 over North America and Siberia generally within 1.5 ppm in the free and upper troposphere but can be biased by up to 4–5 ppm in the boundary layer at the start and end of the growing season. The model has a small negative bias in the free troposphere CO2 trend (1.95–2.19 ppm yr−1 compared to AIRS data which has a trend of 2.21–2.63 ppm yr−1 during 2004–2006, consistent with surface data. Model CO2 concentrations in the upper troposphere, evaluated using CONTRAIL (Comprehensive

  16. Evaluating a 3-D transport model of atmospheric CO2 using ground-based, aircraft, and space-borne data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-D. Paris

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the GEOS-Chem atmospheric transport model (v8-02-01 of CO2 over 2003–2006, driven by GEOS-4 and GEOS-5 meteorology from the NASA Goddard Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, using surface, aircraft and space-borne concentration measurements of CO2. We use an established ensemble Kalman Filter to estimate a posteriori biospheric+biomass burning (BS + BB and oceanic (OC CO2 fluxes from 22 geographical regions, following the TransCom-3 protocol, using boundary layer CO2 data from a subset of GLOBALVIEW surface sites. Global annual net BS + BB + OC CO2 fluxes over 2004–2006 for GEOS-4 (GEOS-5 meteorology are −4.4 ± 0.9 (−4.2 ± 0.9, −3.9 ± 0.9 (−4.5 ± 0.9, and −5.2 ± 0.9 (−4.9 ± 0.9 PgC yr−1, respectively. After taking into account anthropogenic fossil fuel and bio-fuel emissions, the global annual net CO2 emissions for 2004–2006 are estimated to be 4.0 ± 0.9 (4.2 ± 0.9, 4.8 ± 0.9 (4.2 ± 0.9, and 3.8 ± 0.9 (4.1 ± 0.9 PgC yr−1, respectively. The estimated 3-yr total net emission for GEOS-4 (GEOS-5 meteorology is equal to 12.5 (12.4 PgC, agreeing with other recent top-down estimates (12–13 PgC. The regional a posteriori fluxes are broadly consistent in the sign and magnitude of the TransCom-3 study for 1992–1996, but we find larger net sinks over northern and southern continents. We find large departures from our a priori over Europe during summer 2003, over temperate Eurasia during 2004, and over North America during 2005, reflecting an incomplete description of terrestrial carbon dynamics. We find GEOS-4 (GEOS-5 a posteriori CO2 concentrations reproduce the observed surface trend of 1.91–2.43 ppm yr−1 (parts per million per year, depending on latitude, within 0.15 ppm yr−1 (0.2 ppm yr−1 and the seasonal cycle within 0.2 ppm (0.2 ppm at all latitudes. We find the a posteriori model reproduces the aircraft vertical profile measurements of CO2 over North America and Siberia generally within 1

  17. Blackfolds, Plane Waves and Minimal Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Armas, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Minimal surfaces in Euclidean space provide examples of possible non-compact horizon geometries and topologies in asymptotically flat space-time. On the other hand, the existence of limiting surfaces in the space-time provides a simple mechanism for making these configurations compact. Limiting surfaces appear naturally in a given space-time by making minimal surfaces rotate but they are also inherent to plane wave or de Sitter space-times in which case minimal surfaces can be static and compact. We use the blackfold approach in order to scan for possible black hole horizon geometries and topologies in asymptotically flat, plane wave and de Sitter space-times. In the process we uncover several new configurations, such as black helicoids and catenoids, some of which have an asymptotically flat counterpart. In particular, we find that the ultraspinning regime of singly-spinning Myers-Perry black holes, described in terms of the simplest minimal surface (the plane), can be obtained as a limit of a black helicoid...

  18. Beamlet focal plane diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caird, J.A.; Nielsen, N.D.; Patton, H.G.; Seppala, L.G.; Thompson, C.E.; Wegner, P.J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes the major optical and mechanical design features of the Beamlet Focal Plane Diagnostic system as well as measurements of the system performance, and typical data obtained to date. We also discuss the NIF requirements on the focal spot that we are interested in measuring, and some of our plans for future work using this system.

  19. Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maziar Nekovee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive radio is being intensively researched as the enabling technology for license-exempt access to the so-called TV White Spaces (TVWS, large portions of spectrum in the UHF/VHF bands which become available on a geographical basis after digital switchover. Both in the US, and more recently, in the UK the regulators have given conditional endorsement to this new mode of access. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in technology, regulation, and standardisation of cognitive access to TVWS. It examines the spectrum opportunity and commercial use cases associated with this form of secondary access.

  20. 饱和半空间中隧道衬砌对平面SV波的散射IBIEM求解%IBIEM solution to scattering of plane SV waves by tunnel lining in saturated poroelastic half-space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘中宪; 琚鑫; 梁建文

    2015-01-01

    基于Biot两相介质理论,采用一种高精度的间接边界积分方程法(IBIEM),研究了平面SV波在饱和半空间中隧道衬砌周围散射的基本规律,并给出了不同参数下地表位移幅值、衬砌动应力集中因子及表面孔隙水压分布图和相应的频谱结果.数值分析表明:饱和半空间隧道衬砌对SV波的散射特征取决于围岩介质孔隙率、入射波的频率和角度、隧道埋深等因素;隧道外壁透水状态对地表位移和隧道应力影响不大;不同角度SV波入射下,隧道应力集中部位有很大差别,且随半空间介质孔隙率增大,应力集中越发显著;衬砌外壁孔隙水压峰值可达到入射波应力幅值的4倍,且 30°斜入射下幅值明显大于 0°垂直入射情况;衬砌上方附近不同点位位移频谱特征差异显著,斜入射情况位移放大效应明显;随埋深增大,地表位移幅值和衬砌表面动应力谱振荡更为剧烈,但幅值会有所降低.另外,按波速比等效的单相介质模型可以近似计算SV波入射下隧道-饱和围岩的位移场和应力场.%Based on the Biot's theory of two-phase medium, a high-precision indirect boundary integral equation method (IBIEM) is proposed to solve the scattering of SV waves by a two-dimensional tunnel lining in saturated poroelastic half-space. The ground displacement amplitudes, dynamic stress concentration of the tunnel and pore pressure on the outer surface of the tunnel are investigated under different circumstances, and the frequency spectrum analysis is also made. Numerical analysis shows that the propagation and scattering characteristics of seismic waves depend on the porosity of the surrounding medium, frequency and angle of the incident waves, tunnel depth, etc. The drainage state of tunnel outer surface has little impact on the ground displacement amplitudes and dynamic stress concentration of the tunnel. The features of the dynamic stress concentration in the tunnel strongly

  1. Objective Lightning Forecasting at Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station using Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Winifred; Wheeler, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) forecasters at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in Florida include a probability of thunderstorm occurrence in their daily morning briefings. This information is used by personnel involved in determining the possibility of violating Launch Commit Criteria, evaluating Flight Rules for the Space Shuttle, and daily planning for ground operation activities on Kennedy Space Center (KSC)/CCAFS. Much of the current lightning probability forecast is based on a subjective analysis of model and observational data. The forecasters requested that a lightning probability forecast tool based on statistical analysis of historical warm-season (May - September) data be developed in order to increase the objectivity of the daily thunderstorm probability forecast. The tool is a set of statistical lightning forecast equations that provide a lightning occurrence probability for the day by 1100 UTC (0700 EDT) during the warm season. This study used 15 years (1989-2003) of warm season data to develop the objective forecast equations. The local CCAFS 1000 UTC sounding was used to calculate stability parameters for equation predictors. The Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS) data were used to determine lightning occurrence for each day. The CGLSS data have been found to be more reliable indicators of lightning in the area than surface observations through local informal analyses. This work was based on the results from two earlier research projects. Everitt (1999) used surface observations and rawinsonde data to develop logistic regression equations that forecast the daily thunderstorm probability at CCAFS. The Everitt (1999) equations showed an improvement in skill over the Neumann-Pfeffer thunderstorm index (Neumann 1971), which uses multiple linear regression, and also persistence and climatology forecasts. Lericos et al. (2002) developed lightning distributions over the Florida peninsula based on specific flow regimes. The

  2. On plane submerged laminar jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, Wilfried; Sanchez, Antonio L.

    2016-11-01

    We address the laminar flow generated when a developed stream of liquid of kinematic viscosity ν flowing along channel of width 2 h discharges into an open space bounded by two symmetric plane walls departing from the channel rim with an angle α 1 . Attention is focused on values of the jet volume flux 2 Q such that the associated Reynolds number Re = Qh / ν is of order unity. The formulation requires specification of the boundary conditions far from the channel exit. If the flow is driven by the volume flux, then the far-field solution corresponds to Jeffery-Hamel self-similar flow. However, as noted by Fraenkel (1962), such solutions exist only for α potential flow driven by the jet entrainment, and a Falkner-Skan near-wall boundary layer. Numerical integrations of the Navier-Stokes equations are used to ascertain the existence of these different solutions.

  3. Coupled Ground- and Space-Based Assessment of Regional Inundation Dynamics to Assess Impact of Local and Upstream Changes on Evaporation in Tropical Wetlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Schwerdtfeger

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Modifications of human land use and climate change are known to be a threat for the health and proper functioning of tropical wetlands. They interfere with the seasonal flood pulse, which is seen as the most important driver for biodiversity and directly controls evaporation. In order to investigate the impact of local and upstream changes on wetlands, a regional assessment of evaporation is crucial but challenging in such often remote and poorly gauged ecosystems. Evaporation is the major water balance component of these wetlands and links the flood pulse with the ecosystem. It can therefore be seen as a proxy for their functioning. In the last decades, information from space became an important data source to assess remote wetland areas. Here, we developed a new approach to quantify regional evaporation driven by inundation dynamics as its dominant control. We used three water and vegetation indices (mNDWI (modified Normalized Difference Water Index, NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, and EVI (Enhanced Vegetation Index from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer surface reflectance products to assess regional inundation dynamics between the dry and wet seasons. Two years of continual in situ water level measurements at different locations in our study area, the Pantanal wetland of South America, provided the reference to evaluate our method. With process-based modeling that used the inundation dynamics to determine the water available for evaporation, we were able to estimate actual evaporation (AET on a regional scale. Relating AET to changes in discharge due to upstream flow modifications and on local precipitation over the last 13 years, we found that the Pantanal is more vulnerable to alternated inundation dynamics than to changes in local precipitation. We concluded that coupling ground- and space-based information in this remote wetland area is a valuable first step to investigate the status of the Pantanal

  4. Effect of ground stress on hydraulic fracturing of methane well

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Chun-zhi; MAO Xian-biao; MIAO Xie-xing; WANG Peng

    2008-01-01

    Most of the coal reservoirs in China are of low-permeability, so hydraulic fracturing is widely used to improve the permeability in the extraction of gas by ground drilling. The ground stress around the well was analyzed by using theory of elasticity. The pressure when the well fractured is formulated and the effect of ground stress on pressure is discussed. The effect of ground-stress-differences on hydraulic fracturing was analyzed by using the numerical software RFPA2D-Flow in reference to the tectonic stress in Jincheng coal area. The results show that: 1) the position where initial fracture appears is random and fracture branches emerge when the fractures expand if ground stresses in any two directions within a horizontal plane are equal; 2) otherwise, the fractures expand in general along the direction of maximum ground stress and the critical pressure decreases with increasing ground-stress-differences and 3) the preferred well-disposition pattern is diamond shaped. The preferred well spacing is 250 m×300 m. This study can provide a reference for the design of wells.

  5. Boundaries in digital planes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efim Khalimsky

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of topological connectedness properties in processing digital pictures is well known. A natural way to begin a theory for this is to give a definition of connectedness for subsets of a digital plane which allows one to prove a Jordan curve theorem. The generally accepted approach to this has been a non-topological Jordan curve theorem which requires two different definitions, 4-connectedness, and 8-connectedness, one for the curve and the other for its complement.

  6. BKP plane partitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, Omar; Wheeler, Michael [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2007-01-15

    Using BKP neutral fermions, we derive a product expression for the generating function of volume-weighted plane partitions that satisfy two conditions. If we call a set of adjacent equal height-h columns, h > 0, an h-path, then 1. Every h-path can assume one of two possible colours. 2. There is a unique way to move along an h-path from any column to another.

  7. Ibis ground calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, A.J.; Barlow, E.J.; Tikkanen, T. [Southampton Univ., School of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Bazzano, A.; Del Santo, M.; Ubertini, P. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica - IASF/CNR, Roma (Italy); Blondel, C.; Laurent, P.; Lebrun, F. [CEA Saclay - Sap, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Di Cocco, G.; Malaguti, E. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica-Bologna - IASF/CNR (Italy); Gabriele, M.; La Rosa, G.; Segreto, A. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica- IASF/CNR, Palermo (Italy); Quadrini, E. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica-Cosmica, EASF/CNR, Milano (Italy); Volkmer, R. [Institut fur Astronomie und Astrophysik, Tubingen (Germany)

    2003-11-01

    We present an overview of results obtained from IBIS ground calibrations. The spectral and spatial characteristics of the detector planes and surrounding passive materials have been determined through a series of calibration campaigns. Measurements of pixel gain, energy resolution, detection uniformity, efficiency and imaging capability are presented. The key results obtained from the ground calibration have been: - optimization of the instrument tunable parameters, - determination of energy linearity for all detection modes, - determination of energy resolution as a function of energy through the range 20 keV - 3 MeV, - demonstration of imaging capability in each mode, - measurement of intrinsic detector non-uniformity and understanding of the effects of passive materials surrounding the detector plane, and - discovery (and closure) of various leakage paths through the passive shielding system.

  8. Stochastic model of the NASA/MSFC ground facility for large space structures with uncertain parameters: The maximum entropy approach, part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Wei Shen

    1989-01-01

    A validated technology data base is being developed in the areas of control/structures interaction, deployment dynamics, and system performance for Large Space Structures (LSS). A Ground Facility (GF), in which the dynamics and control systems being considered for LSS applications can be verified, was designed and built. One of the important aspects of the GF is to verify the analytical model for the control system design. The procedure is to describe the control system mathematically as well as possible, then to perform tests on the control system, and finally to factor those results into the mathematical model. The reduction of the order of a higher order control plant was addressed. The computer program was improved for the maximum entropy principle adopted in Hyland's MEOP method. The program was tested against the testing problem. It resulted in a very close match. Two methods of model reduction were examined: Wilson's model reduction method and Hyland's optimal projection (OP) method. Design of a computer program for Hyland's OP method was attempted. Due to the difficulty encountered at the stage where a special matrix factorization technique is needed in order to obtain the required projection matrix, the program was successful up to the finding of the Linear Quadratic Gaussian solution but not beyond. Numerical results along with computer programs which employed ORACLS are presented.

  9. Campaign 9 of the K2 Mission: Observational Parameters, Scientific Drivers, and Community Involvement for a Simultaneous Space- and Ground-based Microlensing Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Calen B.; Poleski, Radosław; Penny, Matthew; Street, Rachel A.; Bennett, David P.; Hogg, David W.; Gaudi, B. Scott; K2 Campaign 9 Microlensing Science Team; Zhu, W.; Barclay, T.; Barentsen, G.; Howell, S. B.; Mullally, F.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pawlak, M.; OGLE Project, The; Sumi, T.; Abe, F.; Asakura, Y.; Barry, R. K.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bond, I. A.; Donachie, M.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Li, M. C. A.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Oyokawa, H.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Sharan, A.; Sullivan, D. J.; Tristram, P. J.; Yonehara, A.; MOA Collaboration; Bachelet, E.; Bramich, D. M.; Cassan, A.; Dominik, M.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Mao, S.; Ranc, C.; Schmidt, R.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Wambsganss, J.; RoboNet Project, The; Bozza, V.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Calchi Novati, S.; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Evans, D. F.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Husser, T.-O.; Mancini, L.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Unda-Sanzana, E.; The MiNDSTEp Team; Bryson, S. T.; Caldwell, D. A.; Haas, M. R.; Larson, K.; McCalmont, K.; Packard, M.; Peterson, C.; Putnam, D.; Reedy, L.; Ross, S.; Van Cleve, J. E.; K2C9 Engineering Team; Akeson, R.; Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Beichman, C. A.; Bryden, G.; Ciardi, D.; Cole, A.; Coutures, C.; Foreman-Mackey, D.; Fouqué, P.; Friedmann, M.; Gelino, C.; Kaspi, S.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Lang, D.; Lee, C.-H.; Lineweaver, C. H.; Maoz, D.; Marquette, J.-B.; Mogavero, F.; Morales, J. C.; Nataf, D.; Pogge, R. W.; Santerne, A.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Suzuki, D.; Tamura, M.; Tisserand, P.; Wang, D.

    2016-12-01

    K2's Campaign 9 (K2C9) will conduct a ˜3.7 deg2 survey toward the Galactic bulge from 2016 April 22 through July 2 that will leverage the spatial separation between K2 and the Earth to facilitate measurement of the microlens parallax {π }{{E}} for ≳ 170 microlensing events. These will include several that are planetary in nature as well as many short-timescale microlensing events, which are potentially indicative of free-floating planets (FFPs). These satellite parallax measurements will in turn allow for the direct measurement of the masses of and distances to the lensing systems. In this article we provide an overview of the K2C9 space- and ground-based microlensing survey. Specifically, we detail the demographic questions that can be addressed by this program, including the frequency of FFPs and the Galactic distribution of exoplanets, the observational parameters of K2C9, and the array of resources dedicated to concurrent observations. Finally, we outline the avenues through which the larger community can become involved, and generally encourage participation in K2C9, which constitutes an important pathfinding mission and community exercise in anticipation of WFIRST.

  10. The Expanding Nebular Remnant of the Recurrent Nova RS Ophiuchi (2006): II. Modeling of Combined Hubble Space Telescope Imaging and Ground-based Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ribeiro, V A R M; Darnley, M J; Harman, D J; Newsam, A M; O'Brien, T J; Bohigas, J; Echevarría, J M; Bond, H E; Chavushyan, V H; Costero, R; Coziol, R; Evans, A; Eyres, S P S; León-Tavares, J; Richer, M G; Tovmassian, G; Starrfield, S; Zharikov, S V

    2009-01-01

    We report Hubble Space Telescope imaging, obtained 155 and 449 days after the 2006 outburst of the recurrent nova RS Ophiuchi, together with ground-based spectroscopic observations, obtained from the Observatorio Astron\\'omico Nacional en San Pedro M\\'artir, Baja California, M\\'exico and at the Observatorio Astrof\\'isico Guillermo Haro, at Cananea, Sonora, M\\'exico. The observations at the first epoch were used as inputs to model the geometry and kinematic structure of the evolving RS Oph nebular remnant. We find that the modeled remnant comprises two distinct co-aligned bipolar components; a low-velocity, high-density innermost (hour glass) region and a more extended, high-velocity (dumbbell) structure. This overall structure is in agreement with that deduced from radio observations and optical interferometry at earlier epochs. We find that the asymmetry observed in the west lobe is an instrumental effect caused by the profile of the HST filter and hence demonstrate that this lobe is approaching the observer...

  11. 天地一体化网关设计与实现%Design and Implementation of Gateway in Integrated Space-air-ground Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐琪; 周华春; 李光磊; 高德云; 李泰新; 李海峰

    2016-01-01

    The proposed identifier‐based universal networks aims to decouple the binding of identifier and loca‐tor ,resource and locator ,control and forwarding ,and takes advantages of DTN architecture to design an inte‐grated space‐air‐ground network .In this paper ,a gateway was designed and implemented to interconnect ter‐restrial network and space network ,which translated protocol and identifier for packets .Based on the experi‐mental platform of the identifier‐based universal networks ,the earth‐to‐moon communication experiment sce‐nario was designed . Multiple earth‐to‐moon data transmission experiments were carried out with different asymmetric uplink and downlink ratio and bit error rate to test the basic function of the designed extended mod‐ule WebCache .The result indicated that the gateway can overcome the constraint of space link and the Web‐Cache module can help improve the utilization ratio of space link .%采用身份与位置分离、资源与控制分离、控制与转发分离的思想和空间DTN体系结构,提出一体化标识网络构建天地一体化网络,并设计实现天地一体化网关,通过标识和协议转换实现地面网络和空间网络的互联互通。基于一体化标识网络实验平台设计地月通信实验场景,在不同的非对称上下行速率比、误码率情况下进行多次地月数据传输实验,测试所设计的扩展模块WebCache的基本功能。实验结果表明网关能够在一定程度上适应空间链路特性,而WebCache模块能够帮助提高空间链路的利用率。

  12. Mechanics of Ship Grounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    In these notes first a simplified mathematical model is presented for analysis of ship hull loading due to grounding on relatively hard and plane sand, clay or rock sea bottoms. In a second section a more rational calculation model is described for the sea bed soil reaction forces on the sea bottom....... Finally, overall hull failure is considered first applying a quasistatic analysis model and thereafter a full dynamic model....

  13. Elastic Sturmian spirals in the Lorentz-Minkowski plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uçum Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider some elastic spacelike and timelike curves in the Lorentz-Minkowski plane and obtain the respective vectorial equations of their position vectors in explicit analytical form. We study in more details the generalized Sturmian spirals in the Lorentz-Minkowski plane which simultaneously are elastics in this space.

  14. Plane and geodetic surveying

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Aylmer

    2004-01-01

    Plane and Geodetic Surveying blends theory and practice, conventional techniques and GPS, to provide the ideal book for students of surveying.Detailed guidance is given on how and when the principle surveying instruments (theodolites, Total Stations, levels and GPS) should be used. Concepts and formulae needed to convert instrument readings into useful results are explained. Rigorous explanations of the theoretical aspects of surveying are given, while at the same time a wealth of useful advice about conducting a survey in practice is provided. An accompanying least squares adjustment program

  15. Fourier plane image amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackel, L.A.; Hermann, M.R.; Dane, C.B.; Tiszauer, D.H.

    1995-12-12

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 {micro}m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only about 1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power. 1 fig.

  16. The Aerodynamic Plane Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahm, A F

    1924-01-01

    This report gives the description and the use of a specially designed aerodynamic plane table. For the accurate and expeditious geometrical measurement of models in an aerodynamic laboratory, and for miscellaneous truing operations, there is frequent need for a specially equipped plan table. For example, one may have to measure truly to 0.001 inch the offsets of an airfoil at many parts of its surface. Or the offsets of a strut, airship hull, or other carefully formed figure may require exact calipering. Again, a complete airplane model may have to be adjusted for correct incidence at all parts of its surfaces or verified in those parts for conformance to specifications. Such work, if but occasional, may be done on a planing or milling machine; but if frequent, justifies the provision of a special table. For this reason it was found desirable in 1918 to make the table described in this report and to equip it with such gauges and measures as the work should require.

  17. The MOND Fundamental Plane

    CERN Document Server

    Cardone, V F; Diaferio, A; Tortora, C; Molinaro, R

    2010-01-01

    Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) has been shown to be able to fit spiral galaxy rotation curves as well as giving a theoretical foundation for empirically determined scaling relations, such as the Tully - Fisher law, without the need for a dark matter halo. As a complementary analysis, one should investigate whether MOND can also reproduce the dynamics of early - type galaxies (ETGs) without dark matter. As a first step, we here show that MOND can indeed fit the observed central velocity dispersion $\\sigma_0$ of a large sample of ETGs assuming a simple MOND interpolating functions and constant anisotropy. We also show that, under some assumptions on the luminosity dependence of the Sersic n parameter and the stellar M/L ratio, MOND predicts a fundamental plane for ETGs : a log - linear relation among the effective radius $R_{eff}$, $\\sigma_0$ and the mean effective intensity $\\langle I_e \\rangle$. However, we predict a tilt between the observed and the MOND fundamental planes.

  18. Fourier plane image amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Hermann, Mark R.; Dane, C. Brent; Tiszauer, Detlev H.

    1995-01-01

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 .mu.m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only .about.1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power.

  19. CO2 laser as a possible candidate for optical transmitter in free-space satellite-ground-satellite laser communication: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M. A.; Naik, Govind; Shenoy, N. V.; Rao, Mandavilli M.

    1999-04-01

    Terrestrial fiber optic communication systems handle most of the inter-continental communication systems today. However recent studies indicate that these links, in spite of their huge bandwidth will be saturated in the near future. Hence attempts are being made is augment and may be even replace these by inter satellite links (ISLs). Though high power laser diodes have been found to be suitable for ISLs, they are unfortunately inadequate for satellite-ground links (SGL and GSL) as they are not powerful enough. So we have to look for more powerful lasers for SGLs & GSLs. One possible candidate is the CO2 laser. It is a gas laser. It provides a number of advantages over other sources. They include high life time, high efficiency and stability. Besides it can generate a high power continuous wave and requires only radiative cooling. CO2 can provide a high bit rate and long range transmission with low bit error rate. Also CO2 laser is in near infra-red and hence the turbulence effects due to clouds is minimum. All these make CO2 laser a very economical choice. The use of optical communication in GSLs provides many advantages over radio links. Laser being a high energy source provides the advantage of greater bandwidth, smaller beam divergence angles, smaller antennae, greater security and a new spectrum. Lesser power consumption and smaller size make it more suitable for use in a satellite. The present paper deals with a case study of a CO2 laser based free space optical communication link by making the link budget analysis.

  20. Free string evolution across plane wave singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg

    2009-01-01

    In these proceedings, we summarize our studies of free string propagation in (near-)singular scale-invariant plane wave geometries. We analyze the singular limit of the evolution for the center-of-mass motion and all excited string modes. The requirement that the entire excitation energy of the string should be finite excludes consistent propagation across the singularity, in case no dimensionful scales are introduced at the singular locus (in an otherwise scale-invariant space-time).

  1. Plane strain problem in microstretch elastic solid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajneesh Kumar; Ranjit Singh; T K Chadha

    2003-12-01

    The eigenvalue approach is developed for the two-dimensional plane strain problem in a microstretch elastic medium. Applying Laplace and Fourier transforms, an infinite space subjected to a concentrated force is studied. The integral transforms are inverted using a numerical technique to get displacement, force stress, couple stress and first moment, which are also shown graphically. The results of micropolar elasticity are deduced as a special case from the present formulation.

  2. Analysis of Broadband High-Impedance Ground Plane Antenna Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-01

    materials. 4.2 Fabrication The fabrication process involves several “best approach” determinations. Choos - ing a substrate material requires more than just...undated. 6. Knott, Eugene F. and others. Radar Cross Section (Second Edition). Norwood MA: Artech House, 1993. 7. Kolundzija, Branko and others. WIPL-D

  3. Plane symmetric cosmological models

    CERN Document Server

    Yadav, Anil Kumar; Ray, Saibal; Mallick, A

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we perform the Lie symmetry analysis on the Einstein-Maxwell field equations in plane symmetric spacetime. Here Lie point symmetries and optimal system of one dimensional subalgebras are determined. The similarity reductions and exact solutions are obtained in connection to the evolution of universe. The present study deals with the electromagnetic energy of inhomogeneous universe where $F_{12}$ is the non-vanishing component of electromagnetic field tensor. To get a deterministic solution, it is assumed that the free gravitational field is Petrov type-II non-degenerate. The electromagnetic field tensor $F_{12}$ is found to be positive and increasing function of time. As a special case, to validate the solution set, we discuss some physical and geometric properties of a specific sub-model.

  4. Duality and noncommutative planes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jøndrup, Søren

    2015-01-01

    We study extensions of simple modules over an associative ring A   and we prove that for twosided ideals mm and nn with artinian factors the condition ExtA1(A/m,A/n)≠0 holds for the left A  -modules A/mA/m and A/nA/n if and only if it holds for the right modules A/nA/n and A/mA/m. The methods pro...... proving this are applied to show that noncommutative models of the plane, i.e. algebras of the form k〈x,y〉/(f)k〈x,y〉/(f), where f∈([x,y])f∈([x,y]) are noetherian only in case (f)=([x,y])...

  5. Ground energy coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, P. D.

    The feasibility of ground coupling for various heat pump systems was investigated. Analytical heat flow models were developed to approximate design ground coupling devices for use in solar heat pump space conditioning systems. A digital computer program called GROCS (GRound Coupled Systems) was written to model 3-dimensional underground heat flow in order to simulate the behavior of ground coupling experiments and to provide performance predictions which have been compared to experimental results. GROCS also has been integrated with TRNSYS. Soil thermal property and ground coupling device experiments are described. Buried tanks, serpentine earth coils in various configurations, lengths and depths, and sealed vertical wells are being investigated. An earth coil used to heat a house without use of resistance heating is described.

  6. Space shuttle engineering and operations support: Study of the effects of multiple ground updates on the accuracy of the onboard state vector with IMU only navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, R.

    1977-01-01

    There are six cases considered: (1) no updates made during the flight, (2) one ground update in the vertical components only at the first practice separation minus 15 minutes, (3) one ground update in all components at the first practice separation minus 5 minutes, (4) updates 2 and 3 applied successively, (5) Case 4 plus an update in all components at the second separation attempt minus 3 minutes, and (6) one ground update at first separation attempt minus 5 minutes and a second update at second separation minus two minutes. The mission control simulation program, GROPER, was run using as radar input a tape containing radar derived state vectors for the trajectory.

  7. A Climatology of Tropospheric CO over the Central and Southeastern United States and the Southwestern Pacific Ocean Derived from Space, Air, and Ground-based Infrared Interferometer Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillian, W. Wallace; Strow, L. Larrabee; Revercomb, H.; Knuteson, R.; Thompson, A.

    2003-01-01

    This final report summarizes all research activities and publications undertaken as part of NASA Atmospheric Chemistry and Modeling Analysis Program (ACMAP) Grant NAG-1-2022, 'A Climatology of Tropospheric CO over the Central and Southeastern United States and the Southwestern Pacific Ocean Derived from Space, Air, and Ground-based Infrared Interferometer Spectra'. Major project accomplishments include: (1) analysis of more than 300,000 AERI spectra from the ARM SGP site yielding a 5-year (1998-2002) timeseries of CO retrievals from the Lamont, OK AERI; (2) development of a prototype CO profile retrieval algorithm for AERI spectra; (3) validation and publication of the first CO retrievals from the Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (SHIS); and (4) development of a prototype AERI tropospheric O3 retrieval algorithm. Compilation and publication of the 5-year Lamont, OK timeseries is underway including a new collaboration with scientists at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Public access to this data will be provided upon article submission. A comprehensive CO analysis of the archive of HIS spectra of remains as the only originally proposed activity with little progress. The greatest challenge faced in this project was motivating the University of Wisconsin Co-Investigators to deliver their archived HIS and AERIOO data along with the requisite temperature and water vapor profiles in a timely manner. Part of the supplied HIS dataset from ASHOE may be analyzed as part of a Master s Thesis under a separate project. Our success with the SAFARI 2000 SHIS CO analysis demonstrates the utility of such aircraft remote sensing data given the proper support from the instrument investigators. In addition to the PI and Co-I s, personnel involved in this CO climatology project include one Post Doctoral Fellow, one Research Scientist, two graduate students, and two undergraduate students. A total of fifteen presentations regarding research related to this

  8. Distribution of inhomogeneities in the interstellar plasma in the directions of three distant pulsars from observations with the RadioAstron ground-space interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, M. V.; Andrianov, A. S.; Bartel, N.; Gwinn, C.; Joshi, B. C.; Jauncey, D.; Kardashev, N. S.; Rudnitskii, A. G.; Smirnova, T. V.; Soglasnov, V. A.; Fadeev, E. N.; Shishov, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    The RadioAstron ground-space interferometer has been used to measure the angular sizes of the scattering disks of the three distant pulsars B1641-45, B1749-28, and B1933+16. The observations were carried out with the participation of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope; two 32-m telescopes at Torun, Poland and Svetloe, Russia (the latter being one antenna of the KVAZAR network); the Saint Croix VLBA antenna; the Arecibo radio telescope; the Parkes, Narrabri (ATCA), Mopra, Hobart, and Ceduna Australian radio telescopes; and the Hartebeesthoek radio telescope in South Africa. The full widths at half maximum of the scattering disks were 27 mas at 1668 MHz for B1641-45, 0.5 mas at 1668 MHz for B1749-28, and 12.3 at 316 MHz and 0.84 mas at 1668 MHz for B1933+16. The characteristic time scales for scatter-broadening of the pulses on inhomogeneities in the interstellar plasma τsc were also measured for these pulsars using various methods. Joint knowledge of the size of the scattering disk and the scatter-broadening time scale enables estimation of the distance to the effective scattering screen d. For B1641-45, d = 3.0 kpc for a distance to the pulsar D = 4.9 kpc, and for B1749-28, d = 0.95 kpc for D = 1.3 kpc. Observations of B1933+16 were carried out simultaneously at 316 and 1668 MHz. The positions of the screen derived using the measurements at the two frequencies agree: d 1 = 2.6 and d 2 = 2.7 kpc, for a distance to the pulsar of 3.7 kpc. Two screens were detected for this pulsar from an analysis of parabolic arcs in the secondary dynamic spectrum at 1668 MHz, at 1.3 and 3.1 kpc. The scattering screens for two of the pulsars are identified with real physical objects located along the lines of sight toward the pulsars: G339.1-04 (B1641-45) and G0.55-0.85 (B1749-28).

  9. Grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Tina

    2015-04-29

    Grounded theory is a popular research approach in health care and the social sciences. This article provides a description of grounded theory methodology and its key components, using examples from published studies to demonstrate practical application. It aims to demystify grounded theory for novice nurse researchers, by explaining what it is, when to use it, why they would want to use it and how to use it. It should enable nurse researchers to decide if grounded theory is an appropriate approach for their research, and to determine the quality of any grounded theory research they read.

  10. Focal Plane Instrumentation of VERITAS

    CERN Document Server

    Nagai, T; Sleege, G; Petry, D

    2007-01-01

    VERITAS is a new atmospheric Cherenkov imaging telescope array to detect very high energy gamma rays above 100 GeV. The array is located in southern Arizona, USA, at an altitude of 1268m above sea level. The array consists of four 12-m telescopes of Davies-Cotton design and structurally resembling the Whipple 10-m telescope. The four focal plane instruments are equipped with high-resolution (499 pixels) fast photo-multiplier-tube (PMT) cameras covering a 3.5 degree field of view with 0.15 degree pixel separation. Light concentrators reduce the dead-space between PMTs to 25% and shield the PMTs from ambient light. The PMTs are connected to high-speed preamplifiers allowing operation at modest anode current and giving good single photoelectron peaks in situ. Electronics in the focus box provides real-time monitoring of the anode currents for each pixel and ambient environmental conditions. A charge injection subsystem installed in the focus box allows daytime testing of the trigger and data acquisition system b...

  11. Ground-based experiments complement microgravity flight opportunities in the investigation of the effects of space flight on the immune response: is protein kinase C gravity sensitive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapes, S. K.; Woods, K. M.; Armstrong, J. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    This manuscript briefly reviews ground-based and flight experiments, discusses how those experiments complement each other, and details how those experiments lead us to speculate about the gravity-sensitive nature of protein kinase C.

  12. (abstract) 9 (micro)m Cutoff 640x480 Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP) Focal Plane Array Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Sundaram, M.; Liu, J. K.; Bandara, S. V.; Shott, C. A.; Hoelter, T.

    1997-01-01

    Long wavelength infrared (LWIR) detectors, 8 (micro)m to 12 (micro)m, are of great interest for a variety of ground-based and space-borne applications. These applications have placed stringent requirements on the performance of the infrared detectors and arrays including high detectivity, low dark current, uniformity, radiation hardness, and low power dissipation. I will discuss the development and progress of GaAs based long-wavelength quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs) to meet those stringent requirements and the demonstration of a 9 (micro)m cutoff 640x480 QUIP focal plane array camera. The noise equivalent temperature difference of the focal plane array is 25 mK at 300 K background and the operating temperature is 70 K.

  13. Remote Sensing from Ground to Space Platforms Associated with Terrain Attributes as a Hybrid Strategy on the Development of a Pedological Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. M. Demattê

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a consensus about the necessity to achieve a quick soil spatial information with few human resources. Remote/proximal sensing and pedotransference are methods that can be integrated into this approach. On the other hand, there is still a lack of strategies indicating on how to put this in practice, especially in the tropics. Thus, the objective of this work was to suggest a strategy for the spatial prediction of soil classes by using soil spectroscopy from ground laboratory spectra to space images platform, as associated with terrain attributes and spectral libraries. The study area is located in São Paulo State, Brazil, which was covered by a regular grid (one per ha, with 473 boreholes collected at top and undersurface. All soil samples were analyzed in laboratory (granulometry and chemical, and scanned with a VIS-NIR-SWIR (400–2500 nm spectroradiometer. We developed two traditional pedological maps with different detail levels for comparison: TFS-1 regarding orders and subgroups; and TFS-2 with additional information such as color, iron and fertility. Afterwards, we performed a digital soil map, generated by models, which used the following information: (i predicted soil attributes from undersurface layer (diagnostic horizon, obtained by using a local spectral library; (ii spectral reflectance of a bare soil surface obtained by Landsat image; and (iii derivative of terrain attributes. Thus, the digital map was generated by a combination of three variables: remote sensing (Landsat data, proximal sensing (laboratory spectroscopy and relief. Landsat image with bare soil was used as a first observation of surface. This strategy assisted on the location of topossequences to achieve soil variation in the area. Afterwards, spectral undersurface information from these locations was used to modelize soil attributes quantification (156 samples. The model was used to quantify samples in the entire area by spectra (other 317 samples. Since

  14. Vergence and accommodation to multiple-image-plane stereoscopic displays: 'Real world' responses with practical image-plane separations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, K. J.; Dickson, R. A.; Watt, S. J.

    2011-03-01

    Conventional stereoscopic displays present images on a single focal plane. The resulting mismatch between the stimuli to the eyes' focusing response (accommodation) and to convergence causes fatigue and poor stereo performance. One promising solution is to distribute image intensity across a number of relatively widely spaced image planes - a technique referred to as depth filtering. Previously, we found this elicits accurate, continuous monocular accommodation responses with image-plane separations as large as 1.1 Diopters, suggesting that a relatively small (i.e. practical) number of image planes is sufficient to eliminate vergence-accommodation conflicts over a large range of simulated distances. However, accommodation responses have been found to overshoot systematically when the same stimuli are viewed binocularly. Here, we examined the minimum image-plane spacing required for accurate accommodation to binocular depth-filtered images. We compared accommodation and vergence responses to step changes in depth for depth-filtered stimuli, using image-plane separations of 0.6-1.2 D, and equivalent real stimuli. Accommodation responses to real and depth-filtered stimuli were equivalent for image-plane separations of ~0.6-0.9 D, but inaccurate thereafter. We conclude that depth filtering can be used to precisely match accommodation and vergence demand in a practical stereoscopic display, using a relatively small number of image planes.

  15. Plane waves in a thermally conducting viscous liquid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Baljeet Singh

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate plane waves in a thermally conducting viscous liquid half-space with thermal relaxation times. There exist three basic waves, namely; thermal wave, longitudinal wave and transverse wave in a thermally conducting viscous liquid half-space. Reflection of plane waves from the free surface of a thermally conducting viscous liquid half-space is studied. The results are obtained in terms of amplitude ratios and are compared with those without viscosity and thermal disturbances.

  16. Plane Mercury librations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkin, Yu. V.; Ferrandiz, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    theory of Mercury librations in longitude by using three characteristics of Mercury rotation determined in the paper [3]. Two from these parameters are values of angle of librations in longitude and angular velocity in moment of passage of perihelion of Mercury orbit on 17 April 2002: (^g)0 = 0007 ± 0001, (^?•? )0 = (2.10± 0.06)•? ars/d. Third parameter determined in [3] is a dynamical coefficient: K = (B -A)•(4Cm ) = (5.08± 0.30) × 10-5. B > A are principal moment of inertia, corresponding to equatorial axes of inertia; Cm is a polar moment of inertia of the mantle of Mercury. 1 Analytical theory of plane Mercury librations. This theory describes forced and free librations of Mercury in longitude in the frame of plane problem about resonant librations of Mercury considered or as non-spherical rigid body, or as system of rigid non-spherical mantle and liquid ellipsoidal core. Saving the main terms for the perturbations of angle of librations ^g and angular velocity ^? in both mentioned cases we will have formulae [6]: ^g = K(E sin M + E sin2M + E sin 3M + E sin4M + E sin5M ) 1 2 3 4 5+K0 sin(E šKM- - φ) (A)

  17. Auditory spatial resolution in horizontal, vertical, and diagonal planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantham, D Wesley; Hornsby, Benjamin W Y; Erpenbeck, Eric A

    2003-08-01

    Minimum audible angle (MAA) and minimum audible movement angle (MAMA) thresholds were measured for stimuli in horizontal, vertical, and diagonal (60 degrees) planes. A pseudovirtual technique was employed in which signals were recorded through KEMAR's ears and played back to subjects through insert earphones. Thresholds were obtained for wideband, high-pass, and low-pass noises. Only 6 of 20 subjects obtained wideband vertical-plane MAAs less than 10 degrees, and only these 6 subjects were retained for the complete study. For all three filter conditions thresholds were lowest in the horizontal plane, slightly (but significantly) higher in the diagonal plane, and highest for the vertical plane. These results were similar in magnitude and pattern to those reported by Perrott and Saberi [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 87, 1728-1731 (1990)] and Saberi and Perrott [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 88, 2639-2644 (1990)], except that these investigators generally found that thresholds for diagonal planes were as good as those for the horizontal plane. The present results are consistent with the hypothesis that diagonal-plane performance is based on independent contributions from a horizontal-plane system (sensitive to interaural differences) and a vertical-plane system (sensitive to pinna-based spectral changes). Measurements of the stimuli recorded through KEMAR indicated that sources presented from diagonal planes can produce larger interaural level differences (ILDs) in certain frequency regions than would be expected based on the horizontal projection of the trajectory. Such frequency-specific ILD cues may underlie the very good performance reported in previous studies for diagonal spatial resolution. Subjects in the present study could apparently not take advantage of these cues in the diagonal-plane condition, possibly because they did not externalize the images to their appropriate positions in space or possibly because of the absence of a patterned visual field.

  18. Gravitational Couplings for Gop-Planes and y-Op-Planes

    CERN Document Server

    Ospina-Giraldo, J F

    2000-01-01

    The Wess-Zumino actions for generalized orientifold planes (GOp-planes) and y-deformed orientifold planes (yOp-planes) are presented and two series power expantions are realized from whiches processes that involves GOp-planes,yOp-planes, RR-forms, gravitons and gaugeons, are obtained. Finally non-standard GOp-planes and y-Op-planes are showed.

  19. Crisis bifurcations in plane Poiseuille flow

    CERN Document Server

    Zammert, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of transitional plane Poiseuille flow in a mirror-symmetric subspace reveal several interior and exterior crisis bifurcations. They appear in the upper branch that emerges in a saddle-node bifurcation near $Re_{SN}=641$ and then undergoes several bifurcations into a chaotic attractor. Near $Re_{XC}=785.95$ the attractor collides with the lower-branch state and turns into a chaotic saddle in a exterior crisis, with a characteristic $(Re-Re_{XC})^{-\\delta}$ variation in lifetimes. For intermediate Reynolds numbers, the attractor undergoes several interior crises, in which new states appear and intermittent behavior can be observed. They contribute to increasing the complexity of the dynamics and to a more dense coverage of state space. The exterior crisis marks the onset of transient turbulence in this subspace of plane Poiseuille flow.

  20. Grounded cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsalou, Lawrence W

    2008-01-01

    Grounded cognition rejects traditional views that cognition is computation on amodal symbols in a modular system, independent of the brain's modal systems for perception, action, and introspection. Instead, grounded cognition proposes that modal simulations, bodily states, and situated action underlie cognition. Accumulating behavioral and neural evidence supporting this view is reviewed from research on perception, memory, knowledge, language, thought, social cognition, and development. Theories of grounded cognition are also reviewed, as are origins of the area and common misperceptions of it. Theoretical, empirical, and methodological issues are raised whose future treatment is likely to affect the growth and impact of grounded cognition.