WorldWideScience

Sample records for ground operations evaluation

  1. Evaluation of Anomaly Detection Capability for Ground-Based Pre-Launch Shuttle Operations. Chapter 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Rodney Alexander

    2010-01-01

    This chapter will provide a thorough end-to-end description of the process for evaluation of three different data-driven algorithms for anomaly detection to select the best candidate for deployment as part of a suite of IVHM (Integrated Vehicle Health Management) technologies. These algorithms were deemed to be sufficiently mature enough to be considered viable candidates for deployment in support of the maiden launch of Ares I-X, the successor to the Space Shuttle for NASA's Constellation program. Data-driven algorithms are just one of three different types being deployed. The other two types of algorithms being deployed include a "nile-based" expert system, and a "model-based" system. Within these two categories, the deployable candidates have already been selected based upon qualitative factors such as flight heritage. For the rule-based system, SHINE (Spacecraft High-speed Inference Engine) has been selected for deployment, which is a component of BEAM (Beacon-based Exception Analysis for Multimissions), a patented technology developed at NASA's JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) and serves to aid in the management and identification of operational modes. For the "model-based" system, a commercially available package developed by QSI (Qualtech Systems, Inc.), TEAMS (Testability Engineering and Maintenance System) has been selected for deployment to aid in diagnosis. In the context of this particular deployment, distinctions among the use of the terms "data-driven," "rule-based," and "model-based," can be found in. Although there are three different categories of algorithms that have been selected for deployment, our main focus in this chapter will be on the evaluation of three candidates for data-driven anomaly detection. These algorithms will be evaluated upon their capability for robustly detecting incipient faults or failures in the ground-based phase of pre-launch space shuttle operations, rather than based oil heritage as performed in previous studies. Robust

  2. Development and evaluation of the Stingray, an amphibious maritime interdiction operations unmanned ground vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoa G.; Castelli, Robin

    2014-06-01

    The U.S. Navy and Marine Corps conduct thousands of Maritime Interdiction Operations (MIOs) every year around the globe. Navy Visit, Board, Search, and Seizure (VBSS) teams regularly board suspect ships and perform search operations, often in hostile environments. There is a need for a small tactical robot that can be deployed ahead of the team to provide enhanced situational awareness in these boarding, breaching, and clearing operations. In 2011, the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific conducted user evaluations on a number of small throwable robots and sensors, verified the requirements, and developed the key performance parameters (KPPs) for an MIO robot. Macro USA Corporation was then tasked to design and develop two prototype systems, each consisting of one control/display unit and two small amphibious Stingray robots. Technical challenges included the combination paddle wheel/shock-absorbing wheel, the tradeoff between impact resistance, size, and buoyancy, and achieving adequate traction on wet surfaces. This paper describes the technical design of these robots and the results of subsequent user evaluations by VBSS teams.

  3. Distributed operating system for NASA ground stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, John F.

    1987-01-01

    NASA ground stations are characterized by ever changing support requirements, so application software is developed and modified on a continuing basis. A distributed operating system was designed to optimize the generation and maintenance of those applications. Unusual features include automatic program generation from detailed design graphs, on-line software modification in the testing phase, and the incorporation of a relational database within a real-time, distributed system.

  4. Distributed operating system for NASA ground stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, John F.

    1987-01-01

    NASA ground stations are characterized by ever changing support requirements, so application software is developed and modified on a continuing basis. A distributed operating system was designed to optimize the generation and maintenance of those applications. Unusual features include automatic program generation from detailed design graphs, on-line software modification in the testing phase, and the incorporation of a relational database within a real-time, distributed system.

  5. Kennedy Space Center Orion Processing Team Planning for Ground Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letchworth, Gary; Schlierf, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Topics in this presentation are: Constellation Ares I/Orion/Ground Ops Elements Orion Ground Operations Flow Orion Operations Planning Process and Toolset Overview, including: 1 Orion Concept of Operations by Phase 2 Ops Analysis Capabilities Overview 3 Operations Planning Evolution 4 Functional Flow Block Diagrams 5 Operations Timeline Development 6 Discrete Event Simulation (DES) Modeling 7 Ground Operations Planning Document Database (GOPDb) Using Operations Planning Tools for Operability Improvements includes: 1 Kaizen/Lean Events 2 Mockups 3 Human Factors Analysis

  6. Evaluating Autonomous Ground-Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-14

    range from robot soccer (football) to measuring the performance of a robot in computer simulations. However, many resultant designs are narrowly focused...from robot soccer (football) to measuring the performance of a robot in computer simulations. However, many resultant designs are narrowly focused or...Predicting Operator Capacity for Supervisory Control of Multiple UAVs, Innovations in Intelligent Machines, Springer , 2009 [5] Davidson, E.J., Evaluation

  7. Test and Evaluation of Autonomous Ground Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Sun; Guangming Xiong; Weilong Song; Jianwei Gong; Huiyan Chen

    2014-01-01

    A preestablished test and evaluation system will benefit the development of autonomous ground vehicles. This paper proposes a design method for a scientific and comprehensive test and evaluation system for autonomous ground vehicles competitions. It can better guide and regulate the development of China’s autonomous ground vehicles. The test and evaluation system includes the test contents, the test environment, the test methods, and the evaluation methods. Using a hierarchical design approac...

  8. Spheres: from Ground Development to ISS Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katterhagen, A.

    2016-01-01

    SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites) is an internal International Space Station (ISS) Facility that supports multiple investigations for the development of multi-spacecraft and robotic control algorithms. The SPHERES National Lab Facility aboard ISS is managed and operated by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) at Moffett Field California. The SPHERES Facility on ISS consists of three self-contained eight-inch diameter free-floating satellites which perform the various flight algorithms and serve as a platform to support the integration of experimental hardware. SPHERES has served to mature the adaptability of control algorithms of future formation flight missions in microgravity (6 DOF (Degrees of Freedom) / long duration microgravity), demonstrate key close-proximity formation flight and rendezvous and docking maneuvers, understand fault diagnosis and recovery, improve the field of human telerobotic operation and control, and lessons learned on ISS have significant impact on ground robotics, mapping, localization, and sensing in three-dimensions - among several other areas of study.

  9. Contamination Control and Evaluation for Manufacturing, Ground Tests, Flight Operation and Post-Retrieval Analyses of the TANPOPO Exposed Panels and Capture Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Hajime; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Kawaguchi, Yuko; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Uchihori, Yukio; Tabata, Makoto; Yamagishi, Akihiko; Sasaki, Satoshi; Imai, Eiichi

    The TANPOPO (“dandelion” in Japanese) is Japan’s first astrobiology space experiment to be exposed on and retrieved from the ISS-Kibo Exposed Facility from the 2014-5 timeframe. During its 1-3 years of continuous exposure operation in the low earth orbit (LEO) of the Earth, it aims to test key questions consisted of the “quasi-panspermia” hypothesis, a theory for exogenesis origin of life and their precursor transports among celestial bodies The TANPOPO experiment consists of following six sub-themes (ST): 1) the first intact capture of terrestrial microbial colonies in LEO, 2) survival test of terrestrial microbes long exposed in LEO, 3) alteration tests of artificially composed “astronomical organic analogs” long exposed in LEO, 4) intact capture of organic-bearing micrometeoroids with the lowest peak temperature ever in LEO, 5) space flight verification of the world’s lowest density aerogels for intact capture of microparticles, and 6) meteoroid and orbital debris flux assessment only capable to be measured in-situ in LEO. Each will utilize one or more Capture Panel(CP) and Exposure Panel (EP) samples from various pointing faces onboard the Kibo Exposed Facility, i.e., anti-Earth pointing face(Space), leading face (East) and anti-Pressurized Facility face (North), as the ISS is an Earth gravity gradient three-axis stabilized satellite. In order to both satisfy scientific values and planetary protection policy, contamination control and evaluation protocols are implemented for the whole process of manufacturing, ground tests, flight operation and post-retrieval initial analyses of both CPs and EPs. The CPs employ blocks of 0.01g/ccultra-low dense aerogels on its to intact capture impacting solid microparticles such as organic-bearing micrometeoroids, artificial orbital debris and possible terrestrial aerosols temporally reached to the LEO, for assessing the possibility of interplanetary transport of life and its precursors. By analyzing them

  10. Operational Area Environmental Evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey-White, Brenda Eileen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nagy, Michael David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wagner, Katrina Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Goodman, Thomas Richard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Herring, Allen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Catechis, Christopher S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kinghorn, Aubrianna Nicole [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johnson, Ellie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Barthel, Michael David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Casaus, Benito [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The Operational Area Environmental Evaluation update provides a description of activities that have the potential to adversely affect natural and cultural resources, including soil, air, water, biological, ecological, and historical resources. The environmental sensitivity of an area is evaluated and summarized, which may facilitate informed management decisions as to where development may be prohibited, restricted, or subject to additional requirements.

  11. Evaluation of multimodal ground cues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordahl, Rolf; Lecuyer, Anatole; Serafin, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    This chapter presents an array of results on the perception of ground surfaces via multiple sensory modalities,with special attention to non visual perceptual cues, notably those arising from audition and haptics, as well as interactions between them. It also reviews approaches to combining synth...... synthetic multimodal cues, from vision, haptics, and audition, in order to realize virtual experiences of walking on simulated ground surfaces or other features....

  12. Analysis and Prediction of Weather Impacted Ground Stop Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao Xun

    2014-01-01

    When the air traffic demand is expected to exceed the available airport's capacity for a short period of time, Ground Stop (GS) operations are implemented by Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Traffic Flow Management (TFM). The GS requires departing aircraft meeting specific criteria to remain on the ground to achieve reduced demands at the constrained destination airport until the end of the GS. This paper provides a high-level overview of the statistical distributions as well as causal factors for the GSs at the major airports in the United States. The GS's character, the weather impact on GSs, GS variations with delays, and the interaction between GSs and Ground Delay Programs (GDPs) at Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR) are investigated. The machine learning methods are used to generate classification models that map the historical airport weather forecast, schedule traffic, and other airport conditions to implemented GS/GDP operations and the models are evaluated using the cross-validations. This modeling approach produced promising results as it yielded an 85% overall classification accuracy to distinguish the implemented GS days from the normal days without GS and GDP operations and a 71% accuracy to differentiate the GS and GDP implemented days from the GDP only days.

  13. Ground truth and benchmarks for performance evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Ayako; Shneier, Michael; Hong, Tsai Hong; Chang, Tommy; Scrapper, Christopher; Cheok, Geraldine S.

    2003-09-01

    Progress in algorithm development and transfer of results to practical applications such as military robotics requires the setup of standard tasks, of standard qualitative and quantitative measurements for performance evaluation and validation. Although the evaluation and validation of algorithms have been discussed for over a decade, the research community still faces a lack of well-defined and standardized methodology. The range of fundamental problems include a lack of quantifiable measures of performance, a lack of data from state-of-the-art sensors in calibrated real-world environments, and a lack of facilities for conducting realistic experiments. In this research, we propose three methods for creating ground truth databases and benchmarks using multiple sensors. The databases and benchmarks will provide researchers with high quality data from suites of sensors operating in complex environments representing real problems of great relevance to the development of autonomous driving systems. At NIST, we have prototyped a High Mobility Multi-purpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) system with a suite of sensors including a Riegl ladar, GDRS ladar, stereo CCD, several color cameras, Global Position System (GPS), Inertial Navigation System (INS), pan/tilt encoders, and odometry . All sensors are calibrated with respect to each other in space and time. This allows a database of features and terrain elevation to be built. Ground truth for each sensor can then be extracted from the database. The main goal of this research is to provide ground truth databases for researchers and engineers to evaluate algorithms for effectiveness, efficiency, reliability, and robustness, thus advancing the development of algorithms.

  14. Launch and Landing Effects Ground Operations (LLEGO) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    LLEGO is a model for understanding recurring launch and landing operations costs at Kennedy Space Center for human space flight. Launch and landing operations are often referred to as ground processing, or ground operations. Currently, this function is specific to the ground operations for the Space Shuttle Space Transportation System within the Space Shuttle Program. The Constellation system to follow the Space Shuttle consists of the crewed Orion spacecraft atop an Ares I launch vehicle and the uncrewed Ares V cargo launch vehicle. The Constellation flight and ground systems build upon many elements of the existing Shuttle flight and ground hardware, as well as upon existing organizations and processes. In turn, the LLEGO model builds upon past ground operations research, modeling, data, and experience in estimating for future programs. Rather than to simply provide estimates, the LLEGO model s main purpose is to improve expenses by relating complex relationships among functions (ground operations contractor, subcontractors, civil service technical, center management, operations, etc.) to tangible drivers. Drivers include flight system complexity and reliability, as well as operations and supply chain management processes and technology. Together these factors define the operability and potential improvements for any future system, from the most direct to the least direct expenses.

  15. Apparatus and method for grounding compressed fuel fueling operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joseph Perry; Farese, David John; Xu, Jianguo

    2002-06-11

    A safety system for grounding an operator at a fueling station prior to removing a fuel fill nozzle from a fuel tank upon completion of a fuel filling operation is provided which includes a fuel tank port in communication with the fuel tank for receiving and retaining the nozzle during the fuel filling operation and a grounding device adjacent to the fuel tank port which includes a grounding switch having a contact member that receives physical contact by the operator and where physical contact of the contact member activates the grounding switch. A releasable interlock is included that provides a lock position wherein the nozzle is locked into the port upon insertion of the nozzle into the port and a release position wherein the nozzle is releasable from the port upon completion of the fuel filling operation and after physical contact of the contact member is accomplished.

  16. Test and Evaluation of Autonomous Ground Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A preestablished test and evaluation system will benefit the development of autonomous ground vehicles. This paper proposes a design method for a scientific and comprehensive test and evaluation system for autonomous ground vehicles competitions. It can better guide and regulate the development of China's autonomous ground vehicles. The test and evaluation system includes the test contents, the test environment, the test methods, and the evaluation methods. Using a hierarchical design approach, the test content is designed to be stage by stage, moving from simplicity to complexity and from individual modules to the entire vehicle. The hierarchical test environment is established according to the levels of test content. The test method based on multilevel platforms and sensors is put forward to ensure the accuracy of test results. A fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method combined with analytic hierarchy process (AHP is used for the comprehensive evaluation which can quantitatively evaluate the individual module and the overall technical performance of autonomous ground vehicles. The proposed test and evaluation system has been successfully applied to real autonomous ground vehicle competitions.

  17. Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration Units Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall goal of the project is to demonstrate cost efficient cryogenic operations on a relevant scale that can be projected onto future Spaceport architectures...

  18. Remote Operations and Ground Control Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Barry S.; Lankford, Kimberly; Pitts, R. Lee

    2004-01-01

    The Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center supports the International Space Station (ISS) through remote interfaces around the world. The POIC was originally designed as a gateway to space for remote facilities; ranging from an individual user to a full-scale multiuser environment. This achievement was accomplished while meeting program requirements and accommodating the injection of modern technology on an ongoing basis to ensure cost effective operations. This paper will discuss the open POIC architecture developed to support similar and dissimilar remote operations centers. It will include technologies, protocols, and compromises which on a day to day basis support ongoing operations. Additional areas covered include centralized management of shared resources and methods utilized to provide highly available and restricted resources to remote users. Finally, the effort of coordinating the actions of participants will be discussed.

  19. Ground operation of robotics on Space Station Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Z. Alex; Hunter, David G.; Cantin, Marc R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reflects work carried out on Ground Operated Telerobotics (GOT) in 1992 to refine further the ideas, procedures, and technologies needed to test the procedures in a high latency environment, and to integrate GOT into Space Station Freedom operations. Space Station Freedom (SSF) will be in operation for 30 years, and will depend on robots to carry out a significant part of the assembly, maintenance, and utilization workload. Current plans call for on-orbit robotics to be operated by on-board crew members. This approach implies that on-orbit robotics operations use up considerable crew time, and that these operations cannot be carried out when SSF is unmanned. GOT will allow robotic operations to be operated from the ground, with on-orbit crew interventions only when absolutely required. The paper reviews how GOT would be implemented, how GOT operations would be planned and supported, and reviews GOT issues, critical success factors, and benefits.

  20. A usage-centered evaluation methodology for unmanned ground vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diggelen, J. van; Looije, R.; Mioch, T.; Neerincx, M.A.; Smets, N.J.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a usage-centered evaluation method to assess the capabilities of a particular Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) for establishing the operational goals. The method includes a test battery consisting of basic tasks (e.g., slalom, funnel driving, object detection). Tests can be of diffe

  1. A usage-centered evaluation methodology for unmanned ground vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diggelen, J. van; Looije, R.; Mioch, T.; Neerincx, M.A.; Smets, N.J.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a usage-centered evaluation method to assess the capabilities of a particular Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) for establishing the operational goals. The method includes a test battery consisting of basic tasks (e.g., slalom, funnel driving, object detection). Tests can be of diffe

  2. Orion Pad Abort 1 Flight Test - Ground and Flight Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackenbergy, Davis L.; Hicks, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the ground and flight operations aspects to the Pad Abort 1 launch. The paper details the processes used to plan all operations. The paper then discussions the difficulties of integration and testing, while detailing some of the lessons learned throughout the entire launch campaign. Flight operational aspects of the launc are covered in order to provide the listener with the full suite of operational issues encountered in preparation for the first flight test of the Orion Launch Abort System.

  3. iPhone in NASA Ground Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Ashley; Byrd, Keena; Ignacio, Lalaine; Lagu, Amit; Palmer, Ralph Curtis, III; Savoy, April; Surabattula, Deepti; Vaitkunas, Samantha

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive review of the literature and historical background of NASA established a need for an easy-to-implement technological improvement to displaying procedures which is cost effective and risk reducing. Previous unsuccessful attempts have led this team to explore the practicality of using a mobile handheld device. The major products, inputs, resources, constraints, planning and effort required for consideration of this type of solution were outlined. After analyzing the physical, environmental, life-cycle, functional, and socio-technical requirements, a Functional Analysis was performed to describe the top-level, second-level, and third-level functions of the system requirements. In addition, the risk/value proposition of conversion to a new technology was considered and gave a blueprint for transitioning along with the tasks necessary to implement the device into the Vehicle Assembly Building's (VAB) current infrastructure. A Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) described the elemental work items of the implementation. Once the viability of this system was confirmed, a device was selected through use of technical design comparison methods including the Pugh Matrix and House of Quality. Comparison and evaluation of the Apple iPhone, Motorola Q, Blackberry, PC Notebook, and PDA revealed that the iPhone is the most suitable device for this task. This paper outlines the device design/ architecture, as well as some of the required infrastructure.

  4. Ground controlled robotic assembly operations for Space Station Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Joseph C.

    1991-01-01

    A number of dextrous robotic systems and associated positioning and transportation devices are available on Space Station Freedom (SSF) to perform assembly tasks that would otherwise need to be performed by extravehicular activity (EVA) crewmembers. The currently planned operating mode for these robotic systems during the assembly phase is teleoperation by intravehicular activity (IVA) crewmembers. While this operating mode is less hazardous and expensive than manned EVA operations, and has insignificant control loop time delays, the amount of IVA time available to support telerobotic operations is much less than the anticipated requirements. Some alternative is needed to allow the robotic systems to perform useful tasks without exhausting the available IVA resources; ground control is one such alternative. The issues associated with ground control of SSF robotic systems to alleviate onboard crew time availability constraints are investigated. Key technical issues include the effect of communication time delays, the need for safe, reliable execution of remote operations, and required modifications to the SSF ground and flight system architecture. Time delay compensation techniques such as predictive displays and world model-based force reflection are addressed and collision detection and avoidance strategies to ensure the safety of the on-orbit crew, Orbiter, and SSF are described. Although more time consuming and difficult than IVA controlled teleoperations or manned EVA, ground controlled telerobotic operations offer significant benefits during the SSF assembly phase, and should be considered in assembly planning activities.

  5. Web Application Software for Ground Operations Planning Database (GOPDb) Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanham, Clifton; Kallner, Shawn; Gernand, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    A Web application facilitates collaborative development of the ground operations planning document. This will reduce costs and development time for new programs by incorporating the data governance, access control, and revision tracking of the ground operations planning data. Ground Operations Planning requires the creation and maintenance of detailed timelines and documentation. The GOPDb Web application was created using state-of-the-art Web 2.0 technologies, and was deployed as SaaS (Software as a Service), with an emphasis on data governance and security needs. Application access is managed using two-factor authentication, with data write permissions tied to user roles and responsibilities. Multiple instances of the application can be deployed on a Web server to meet the robust needs for multiple, future programs with minimal additional cost. This innovation features high availability and scalability, with no additional software that needs to be bought or installed. For data governance and security (data quality, management, business process management, and risk management for data handling), the software uses NAMS. No local copy/cloning of data is permitted. Data change log/tracking is addressed, as well as collaboration, work flow, and process standardization. The software provides on-line documentation and detailed Web-based help. There are multiple ways that this software can be deployed on a Web server to meet ground operations planning needs for future programs. The software could be used to support commercial crew ground operations planning, as well as commercial payload/satellite ground operations planning. The application source code and database schema are owned by NASA.

  6. Distributed Common Ground System - Army (DCGS-A) Increment 1 Release 2 Follow-on Operational Test and Evaluation (FOT and E) Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    questionnaires from the users, including the System Usability Scale (SUS). ATEC, however, did not reduce the collected data sufficiently to address...equipment failure and failures in equipment external to DCGS-A. System Failure includes systems aborts and rapidly recoverable events that were system... aborts . TOC – Tactical Operations Center; TAC – Tactical Action Center Reliability Mean Time Between System Failures Table 4-2 shows the Mean

  7. The IXV Ground Segment design, implementation and operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martucci di Scarfizzi, Giovanni; Bellomo, Alessandro; Musso, Ivano; Bussi, Diego; Rabaioli, Massimo; Santoro, Gianfranco; Billig, Gerhard; Gallego Sanz, José María

    2016-07-01

    The Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle (IXV) is an ESA re-entry demonstrator that performed, on the 11th February of 2015, a successful re-entry demonstration mission. The project objectives were the design, development, manufacturing and on ground and in flight verification of an autonomous European lifting and aerodynamically controlled re-entry system. For the IXV mission a dedicated Ground Segment was provided. The main subsystems of the IXV Ground Segment were: IXV Mission Control Center (MCC), from where monitoring of the vehicle was performed, as well as support during pre-launch and recovery phases; IXV Ground Stations, used to cover IXV mission by receiving spacecraft telemetry and forwarding it toward the MCC; the IXV Communication Network, deployed to support the operations of the IXV mission by interconnecting all remote sites with MCC, supporting data, voice and video exchange. This paper describes the concept, architecture, development, implementation and operations of the ESA Intermediate Experimental Vehicle (IXV) Ground Segment and outlines the main operations and lessons learned during the preparation and successful execution of the IXV Mission.

  8. SILEX ground segment control facilities and flight operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demelenne, Benoit; Tolker-Nielsen, Toni; Guillen, Jean-Claude

    1999-04-01

    The European Space Agency is going to conduct an inter orbit link experiment which will connect a low Earth orbiting satellite and a Geostationary satellite via optical terminals. This experiment has been called SILEX (Semiconductor Inter satellite Link Experiment). Two payloads have been built. One called PASTEL (PASsager de TELecommunication) has been embarked on the French Earth observation satellite SPOT4 which has been launched successfully in March 1998. The future European experimental data relay satellite ARTEMIS (Advanced Relay and TEchnology MISsion), which will route the data to ground, will carry the OPALE terminal (Optical Payload Experiment). The European Space Agency is responsible for the operation of both terminals. Due to the complexity and experimental character of this new optical technology, the development, preparation and validation of the ground segment control facilities required a long series of technical and operational qualification tests. This paper is presenting the operations concept and the early results of the PASTEL in orbit operations.

  9. Ground-water contribution to dose from past Hanford Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freshley, M.D.; Thorne, P.D.

    1992-08-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides migrating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: (1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; (2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; (3) through wells next to the Columbia River downstream of Hanford that draw some or all of their water from the river (riparian wells); and (4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring by transport in the ground water. These four pathways make up the ground-water pathway,'' which is the subject of this study. Assessment of the ground-water pathway was performed by (1) reviewing the existing extensive literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and (2) performing calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations where no monitoring data were collected. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to these radionuclides were calculated.

  10. CATIA V5 Virtual Environment Support for Constellation Ground Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    This summer internship primarily involved using CATIA V5 modeling software to design and model parts to support ground operations for the Constellation program. I learned several new CATIA features, including the Imagine and Shape workbench and the Tubing Design workbench, and presented brief workbench lessons to my co-workers. Most modeling tasks involved visualizing design options for Launch Pad 39B operations, including Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) access and internal access to the Ares I rocket. Other ground support equipment, including a hydrazine servicing cart, a mobile fuel vapor scrubber, a hypergolic propellant tank cart, and a SCAPE (Self Contained Atmospheric Protective Ensemble) suit, was created to aid in the visualization of pad operations.

  11. Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration for Responsive Space Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert G.; Notardonato, William U.

    2013-01-01

    Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration Units (IGODU) project developed to mature, integrate and demonstrate advancements in cryogenics, system health management and command and control technologies. Two Distinct Testing Environments: a) GODU Integrated Refrigeration and Storage - GODU LH2; b) GODU Autonomous Control - GODU LO2. Scope: I. GODU LH2: a) Investigate alternative storage and distribution architecture for future cryogenic propellant operations. b) Demonstrate advanced cryogenic propellant handling operations (liquefaction, storage and distribution) of normal boiling point and sub-cooled cryogenic propellants. II. GODU L02: a) Develop and demonstrate advanced control and health management technologies and techniques to autonomously control cryogenic propellant servicing operations. b) Investigate modern COTS hardware and control systems in an effort to reduce the "standing army" of engineers associated with maintaining and operating ground systems through the use of health management and autonomous control technologies. Goals: a) Raise Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) and Integration Readiness Levels (IRL) of several key technology development areas. b) Reduce operations lifecycle costs of future test programs and launch complexes. c) Demonstrate technologies for future exploration beyond low earth orbit. d) Serve as test environments for extraterrestrial surface operations.

  12. The Interim : until you achieve an operationally responsive ground system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendlandt, Bob; Clarke, Kelly; Lei, Jordan; Miyamoto, Charles; Owen-Mankovich, Kyran

    2008-01-01

    Everyone wants to achieve a 'Responsive' Ground Data System (GDS), but that takes time. What do you do in the interim? Our group, called the Integration, Test and Deployment Team (ITD), is a group of responsive engineers whose primary focus is to assist JPL projects to successfully adapt, test, integrate and deploy their ground data system. The team configures and adapts the GDS for a project, so that analysts, engineers and scientist do not need to be experts in the GDS to operate it. The team has developed a human interface to accommodate all types of users. It provides Graphical User Interfaces (GUI's) for those that want GUI's, command line interfaces for those that want control, and selection button interfaces for other users. The cornerstone of a responsive Ground Data System is responsive people. Without individuals who can be aware of a project's changing needs and requirements, how can the GDS become responsive

  13. Ground Operations Aerospace Language (GOAL). Volume 3: Data bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The GOAL (Ground Operations Aerospace Language) test programming language was developed for use in ground checkout operations in a space vehicle launch environment. To insure compatibility with a maximum number of applications, a systematic and error-free method of referencing command/response (analog and digital) hardware measurements is a principle feature of the language. Central to the concept of requiring the test language to be independent of launch complex equipment and terminology is that of addressing measurements via symbolic names that have meaning directly in the hardware units being tested. To form the link from test program through test system interfaces to the units being tested the concept of a data bank has been introduced. The data bank is actually a large cross-reference table that provides pertinent hardware data such as interface unit addresses, data bus routings, or any other system values required to locate and access measurements.

  14. Ground Operations Aerospace Language (GOAL). Volume 2: Compiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The principal elements and functions of the Ground Operations Aerospace Language (GOAL) compiler are presented. The technique used to transcribe the syntax diagrams into machine processable format for use by the parsing routines is described. An explanation of the parsing technique used to process GOAL source statements is included. The compiler diagnostics and the output reports generated during a GOAL compilation are explained. A description of the GOAL program package is provided.

  15. Grounded Capacitor Oscillators Using A Single Operational Transconductance Amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Taher Abuelma'atti; Muhammad Haroon Khan

    1996-01-01

    New oscillator circuits using operational transconductance amplifiers (OTAs) are presented. Each circuit uses a single OTA and grounded capacitors. The feasibility of obtaining oscillators with independent control of frequency and oscillation is considered. Also, the feasibility of exploiting, to advantage, the frequency dependence of the OTA-transconductance is considered. This may result in OTA-based RC oscillators using only one externally-connected capacitor.

  16. Ground Operations Autonomous Control and Integrated Health Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, James

    2014-01-01

    The Ground Operations Autonomous Control and Integrated Health Management plays a key role for future ground operations at NASA. The software that is integrated into this system is called G2 2011 Gensym. The purpose of this report is to describe the Ground Operations Autonomous Control and Integrated Health Management with the use of the G2 Gensym software and the G2 NASA toolkit for Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) which is a Computer Software Configuration Item (CSCI). The decision rationale for the use of the G2 platform is to develop a modular capability for ISHM and AC. Toolkit modules include knowledge bases that are generic and can be applied in any application domain module. That way, there's a maximization of reusability, maintainability, and systematic evolution, portability, and scalability. Engine modules are generic, while application modules represent the domain model of a specific application. Furthermore, the NASA toolkit, developed since 2006 (a set of modules), makes it possible to create application domain models quickly, using pre-defined objects that include sensors and components libraries for typical fluid, electrical, and mechanical systems.

  17. Combined operation of two ground transmitters for enhanced ionospheric heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. C.; Groves, K. M.; Liao, C. P.; Rivas, D. R.; Kuo, S. P.

    1988-01-01

    The combined operation of a high or medium frequency ground transmitter and a VLF transmitter for enhanced ionospheric heating is examined. The high or medium frequency transmitter operating in a pulsed mode produce short-scale density striations that can render the nonlinear mode conversion of the subsequently launched VLF waves into lower hybrid waves. Also if the VLF waves are intense enough, they can excite meter-scale density striations and lower hybrid waves via parametric instabilities. The expected ionospheric effects of the system are discussed.

  18. Evaluation of Carburized and Ground Face Gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, David G.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Heath, Gregory F.; Sheth, Vijay

    1999-01-01

    Experimental durability tests were performed on carburized and ground AIS19310 steel face gears. The tests were in support of a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Technology Reinvestment Program (TRP) to enhance face-gear technology. The tests were conducted in the NASA Glenn spiral-bevel-gear/face-gear test facility. Tests were run at 2300 rpm face gear speed and at loads of 64, 76, 88, 100, and 112-percent of the design torque of 377 N-m (3340 in-lb). The carburized and ground face gears demonstrated the required durability when run for ten-million cycles at each of the applied loads. Proper installation was critical for the successful operation of the spur pinions and face gears. A large amount of backlash produced tooth contact patterns that approached the inner-diameter edge of the face-gear tooth. Low backlash produced tooth contact patterns that approached the outer-diameter edge of the face-gear tooth. Measured backlashes in the range of 0.178 to 0.254 mm (0.007 to 0.010 in) produced acceptable tooth contact patterns.

  19. Space station operations task force. Panel 2 report: Ground operations and support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    The Ground Operations Concept embodied in this report provides for safe multi-user utilization of the Space Station, eases user integration, and gives users autonomy and flexibility. It provides for meaningful multi-national participation while protecting U.S. interests. The concept also supports continued space operations technology development by maintaining NASA expertise and enabling technology evolution. Given attention here are pre/post flight operations, logistics, sustaining engineering/configuration management, transportation services/rescue, and information systems and communication.

  20. Engineering a Multimission Approach to Navigation Ground Data System Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimatos, Dimitrios V.; Attiyah, Ahlam A.

    2012-01-01

    The Mission Design and Navigation (MDNAV) Section at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) supports many deep space and earth orbiting missions from formulation to end of mission operations. The requirements of these missions are met with a multimission approach to MDNAV ground data system (GDS) infrastructure capable of being shared and allocated in a seamless and consistent manner across missions. The MDNAV computing infrastructure consists of compute clusters, network attached storage, mission support area facilities, and desktop hardware. The multimission architecture allows these assets, and even personnel, to be leveraged effectively across the project lifecycle and across multiple missions simultaneously. It provides a more robust and capable infrastructure to each mission than might be possible if each constructed its own. It also enables a consistent interface and environment within which teams can conduct all mission analysis and navigation functions including: trajectory design; ephemeris generation; orbit determination; maneuver design; and entry, descent, and landing analysis. The savings of these efficiencies more than offset the costs of increased complexity and other challenges that had to be addressed: configuration management, scheduling conflicts, and competition for resources. This paper examines the benefits of the multimission MDNAV ground data system infrastructure, focusing on the hardware and software architecture. The result is an efficient, robust, scalable MDNAV ground data system capable of supporting more than a dozen active missions at once.

  1. Evaluating transmission towers potentials during ground faults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    During ground faults on transmission lines, a number of towers near the fault are likely to acquire high potentials to ground. These tower voltages, if excessive, may present a hazard to humans and animals. This paper presents analytical methods in order to determine the transmission towers potentials during ground faults, for long and short lines. The author developed a global systematic approach to calculate these voltages, which are dependent of a number of factors. Some of the most important factors are: magnitudes of fault currents, fault location with respect to the line terminals, conductor arrangement on the tower and the location of the faulted phase, the ground resistance of the faulted tower, soil resistivity, number, material and size of ground wires. The effects of these factors on the faulted tower voltages have been also examined for different types of power lines.

  2. Stepped leaders observed in ground operations of ADELE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. M.; Kelley, N.; Lowell, A.; Martinez-McKinney, F.; Dwyer, J. R.; Splitt, M. E.; Lazarus, S. M.; Cramer, E. S.; Levine, S.; Cummer, S. A.; Lu, G.; Shao, X.; Ho, C.; Eastvedt, E. M.; Trueblood, J.; Edens, H. E.; Hunyady, S. J.; Winn, W. P.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2010-12-01

    While the Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE) was designed primarily to study high-energy radiation associated with thunderstorms at aircraft altitude, it can also be used as a mobile ground-based instrument when mounted in a van. ADELE contains scintillation detectors optimized for faint and bright events and a flat-plate antenna measuring dE/dt. In July and August 2010, ADELE was brought to Langmuir Laboratory in New Mexico as a stationary detector and to the Florida peninsula (based at the Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne) for rapid-response (storm-chasing) operations. In ten days of chasing, stepped-leader x-ray emission was observed from at least four close CG flashes, a much higher rate of success than can be achieved from a stationary detector or array. We will present these four events as well as the results of a study of candidate events of lesser statistical significance. We will also discuss the optimization of lightning-chasing strategies, science goals for future ground campaigns, and what additional instrumentation would be most scientifically beneficial. In the latter category, a proximity sensor (comparing flash and thunder arrival times) and a field mill are particularly important.

  3. 1997 annual ground control operating plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    This plan presents background information and a working guide to assist Mine Operations and Engineering in developing strategies for addressing ground control issues at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). With the anticipated receipt of waste in late 1997, this document provides additional detail to Panel 1 activities and options. The plan also serves as a foundation document for development and revision of the annual long-term ground control plan. Section 2.0 documents the current status of all underground excavations with respect to location, geology, geometry, age, ground support, operational use, projected life, and physical conditions. Section 3.0 presents the methods used to evaluate ground conditions, including visual observations of the roof, ribs, and floor, inspection of observation holes, and review of instrumentation data. Section 4.0 lists several ground support options and specific applications of each. Section 5.0 discusses remedial ground control measures that have been implemented to date. Section 6.0 presents projections and recommendations for ground control actions based on the information in Sections 2.0 through 5.0 of this plan and on a rating of the critical nature of each specific area. Section 7.0 presents a summary statement, and Section 8.0 includes references. Appendix A provides an overview and critique of ground control systems that have been, or may be, used at the site. Because of the dynamic nature of the underground openings and associated geotechnical activities, this plan will be revised as additional data are incorporated.

  4. Embracing Safe Ground Test Facility Operations and Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Steven C.; Green, Donald R.

    2010-01-01

    Conducting integrated operations and maintenance in wind tunnel ground test facilities requires a balance of meeting due dates, efficient operation, responsiveness to the test customer, data quality, effective maintenance (relating to readiness and reliability), and personnel and facility safety. Safety is non-negotiable, so the balance must be an "and" with other requirements and needs. Pressure to deliver services faster at increasing levels of quality in under-maintained facilities is typical. A challenge for management is to balance the "need for speed" with safety and quality. It s especially important to communicate this balance across the organization - workers, with a desire to perform, can be tempted to cut corners on defined processes to increase speed. Having a lean staff can extend the time required for pre-test preparations, so providing a safe work environment for facility personnel and providing good stewardship for expensive National capabilities can be put at risk by one well-intending person using at-risk behavior. This paper documents a specific, though typical, operational environment and cites management and worker safety initiatives and tools used to provide a safe work environment. Results are presented and clearly show that the work environment is a relatively safe one, though still not good enough to keep from preventing injury. So, the journey to a zero injury work environment - both in measured reality and in the minds of each employee - continues. The intent of this paper is to provide a benchmark for others with operational environments and stimulate additional sharing and discussion on having and keeping a safe work environment.

  5. Anomaly Detection for Next-Generation Space Launch Ground Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirkovska, Lilly; Iverson, David L.; Hall, David R.; Taylor, William M.; Patterson-Hine, Ann; Brown, Barbara; Ferrell, Bob A.; Waterman, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is developing new capabilities that will enable future human exploration missions while reducing mission risk and cost. The Fault Detection, Isolation, and Recovery (FDIR) project aims to demonstrate the utility of integrated vehicle health management (IVHM) tools in the domain of ground support equipment (GSE) to be used for the next generation launch vehicles. In addition to demonstrating the utility of IVHM tools for GSE, FDIR aims to mature promising tools for use on future missions and document the level of effort - and hence cost - required to implement an application with each selected tool. One of the FDIR capabilities is anomaly detection, i.e., detecting off-nominal behavior. The tool we selected for this task uses a data-driven approach. Unlike rule-based and model-based systems that require manual extraction of system knowledge, data-driven systems take a radically different approach to reasoning. At the basic level, they start with data that represent nominal functioning of the system and automatically learn expected system behavior. The behavior is encoded in a knowledge base that represents "in-family" system operations. During real-time system monitoring or during post-flight analysis, incoming data is compared to that nominal system operating behavior knowledge base; a distance representing deviation from nominal is computed, providing a measure of how far "out of family" current behavior is. We describe the selected tool for FDIR anomaly detection - Inductive Monitoring System (IMS), how it fits into the FDIR architecture, the operations concept for the GSE anomaly monitoring, and some preliminary results of applying IMS to a Space Shuttle GSE anomaly.

  6. Earthquake Ground Motion Measures for Seismic Response Evaluation of Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, In-Kil; Ahn, Seong-Moon; Choun, Young-Sun; Seo, Jeong-Moon

    2007-03-15

    This study used the assessment results of failure criteria - base shear, story drift, top acceleration and top displacement - for a PSC containment building subjected to 30 sets of near-fault ground motions to evaluate the earthquake ground motion intensity measures. Seven intensity measures, peak ground acceleration(PGA), peak ground velocity(PGV), spectral acceleration(Sa), velocity(Sv), spectrum intensity for acceleration(SIa), velocity(SIv) and displacement(SId), were used to represent alternative ground motion. The regression analyses of the failure criteria for a PSC containment building were carried out to evaluate a proper intensity measure by using two regression models and seven ground motion parameters. The regression analysis results demonstrate the correlation coefficients of the failure criteria in terms of the candidate IM. From the results, spectral acceleration(Sa) is estimated as the best parameter for a evaluation of the structural safety for a seismic PSA.

  7. Space Mission Operations Ground Systems Integration Customer Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Karl

    2014-01-01

    , and cultural differences, to ensure an efficient response to customer issues using a small Customer Service Team (CST) and adaptability, constant communication with customers, technical expertise and knowledge of services, and dedication to customer service. The HOSC Customer Support Team has implemented a variety of processes, and procedures that help to mitigate the potential problems that arise when integrating ground system services for a variety of complex missions and the lessons learned from this experience will lead the future of customer service in the space operations industry.

  8. SCAILET: An intelligent assistant for satellite ground terminal operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidi, A. K.; Crapo, J. A.; Schlegelmilch, R. F.; Reinhart, R. C.; Petrik, E. J.; Walters, J. L.; Jones, R. E.

    1993-05-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center has applied artificial intelligence to an advanced ground terminal. This software application is being deployed as an experimenter interface to the link evaluation terminal (LET) and was named Space Communication Artificial Intelligence for the Link Evaluation Terminal (SCAILET). The high-burst-rate (HBR) LET provides 30-GHz-transmitting and 20-GHz-receiving, 220-Mbps capability for wide band communications technology experiments with the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS). The HBR-LET terminal consists of seven major subsystems. A minicomputer controls and monitors these subsystems through an IEEE-488 or RS-232 protocol interface. Programming scripts (test procedures defined by design engineers) configure the HBR-LET and permit data acquisition. However, the scripts are difficult to use, require a steep learning curve, are cryptic, and are hard to maintain. This discourages experimenters from utilizing the full capabilities of the HBR-LET system. An intelligent assistant module was developed as part of the SCAILET software. The intelligent assistant addresses critical experimenter needs by solving and resolving problems that are encountered during the configuring of the HBR-LET system. The intelligent assistant is a graphical user interface with an expert system running in the background. In order to further assist and familiarize an experimenter, an on-line hypertext documentation module was developed and included in the SCAILET software.

  9. NASA Planning for Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle Ground Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letchworth, Gary; Schlierf, Roland

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Orion Ground Processing Team was originally formed by the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Constellation (Cx) Project Office's Orion Division to define, refine and mature pre-launch and post-landing ground operations for the Orion human spacecraft. The multidisciplined KSC Orion team consisted of KSC civil servant, SAIC, Productivity Apex, Inc. and Boeing-CAPPS engineers, project managers and safety engineers, as well as engineers from Constellation's Orion Project and Lockheed Martin Orion Prime contractor. The team evaluated the Orion design configurations as the spacecraft concept matured between Systems Design Review (SDR), Systems Requirement Review (SRR) and Preliminary Design Review (PDR). The team functionally decomposed prelaunch and post-landing steps at three levels' of detail, or tiers, beginning with functional flow block diagrams (FFBDs). The third tier FFBDs were used to build logic networks and nominal timelines. Orion ground support equipment (GSE) was identified and mapped to each step. This information was subsequently used in developing lower level operations steps in a Ground Operations Planning Document PDR product. Subject matter experts for each spacecraft and GSE subsystem were used to define 5th - 95th percentile processing times for each FFBD step, using the Delphi Method. Discrete event simulations used this information and the logic network to provide processing timeline confidence intervals for launch rate assessments. The team also used the capabilities of the KSC Visualization Lab, the FFBDs and knowledge of the spacecraft, GSE and facilities to build visualizations of Orion pre-launch and postlanding processing at KSC. Visualizations were a powerful tool for communicating planned operations within the KSC community (i.e., Ground Systems design team), and externally to the Orion Project, Lockheed Martin spacecraft designers and other Constellation Program stakeholders during the SRR to PDR timeframe. Other operations planning

  10. Information transfer during contingency operations: Emergency air-ground communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    Safety related problems are reported which occur as a consequence of information transfer deficiencies that arise when air/ground communications are (or should be) used as a resource in inflight emergency situations. The system factors, the human errors, and the associated causes of these problem are defined.

  11. Ground motion input in seismic evaluation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sewell, R.T.; Wu, S.C.

    1996-07-01

    This report documents research pertaining to conservatism and variability in seismic risk estimates. Specifically, it examines whether or not artificial motions produce unrealistic evaluation demands, i.e., demands significantly inconsistent with those expected from real earthquake motions. To study these issues, two types of artificial motions are considered: (a) motions with smooth response spectra, and (b) motions with realistic variations in spectral amplitude across vibration frequency. For both types of artificial motion, time histories are generated to match target spectral shapes. For comparison, empirical motions representative of those that might result from strong earthquakes in the Eastern U.S. are also considered. The study findings suggest that artificial motions resulting from typical simulation approaches (aimed at matching a given target spectrum) are generally adequate and appropriate in representing the peak-response demands that may be induced in linear structures and equipment responding to real earthquake motions. Also, given similar input Fourier energies at high-frequencies, levels of input Fourier energy at low frequencies observed for artificial motions are substantially similar to those levels noted in real earthquake motions. In addition, the study reveals specific problems resulting from the application of Western U.S. type motions for seismic evaluation of Eastern U.S. nuclear power plants.

  12. The Earth Observing System (EOS) Ground System: Leveraging an Existing Operational Ground System Infrastructure to Support New Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardison, David; Medina, Johnny; Dell, Greg

    2016-01-01

    The Earth Observer System (EOS) was officially established in 1990 and went operational in December 1999 with the launch of its flagship spacecraft Terra. Aqua followed in 2002 and Aura in 2004. All three spacecraft are still operational and producing valuable scientific data. While all are beyond their original design lifetime, they are expected to remain viable well into the 2020s. The EOS Ground System is a multi-mission system based at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center that supports science and spacecraft operations for these three missions. Over its operational lifetime to date, the EOS Ground System has evolved as needed to accommodate mission requirements. With an eye towards the future, several updates are currently being deployed. Subsystem interconnects are being upgraded to reduce data latency and improve system performance. End-of-life hardware and operating systems are being replaced to mitigate security concerns and eliminate vendor support gaps. Subsystem hardware is being consolidated through the migration to Virtual Machine based platforms. While mission operations autonomy was not a design goal of the original system concept, there is an active effort to apply state-of-the-art products from the Goddard Mission Services Evolution Center (GMSEC) to facilitate automation where possible within the existing heritage architecture. This presentation will provide background information on the EOS ground system architecture and evolution, discuss latest improvements, and conclude with the results of a recent effort that investigated how the current system could accommodate a proposed new earth science mission.

  13. Onboard Autonomy and Ground Operations Automation for the Intelligent Payload Experiment (IPEX) CubeSat Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Steve; Doubleday, Joshua; Ortega, Kevin; Tran, Daniel; Bellardo, John; Williams, Austin; Piug-Suari, Jordi; Crum, Gary; Flatley, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The Intelligent Payload Experiment (IPEX) is a cubesat manifested for launch in October 2013 that will flight validate autonomous operations for onboard instrument processing and product generation for the Intelligent Payload Module (IPM) of the Hyperspectral Infra-red Imager (HyspIRI) mission concept. We first describe the ground and flight operations concept for HyspIRI IPM operations. We then describe the ground and flight operations concept for the IPEX mission and how that will validate HyspIRI IPM operations. We then detail the current status of the mission and outline the schedule for future development.

  14. Integrated Procedures for Flight and Ground Operations Using International Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingalls, John

    2011-01-01

    Imagine astronauts using the same Interactive Electronic Technical Manuals (IETM's) as the ground personnel who assemble or maintain their flight hardware, and having all of that data interoperable with design, logistics, reliability analysis, and training. Modern international standards and their corresponding COTS tools already used in other industries provide a good foundation for streamlined technical publications in the space industry. These standards cover everything from data exchange to product breakdown structure to business rules flexibility. Full Product Lifecycle Support (PLCS) is supported. The concept is to organize, build once, reuse many ways, and integrate. This should apply to all future and some current launch vehicles, payloads, space stations/habitats, spacecraft, facilities, support equipment, and retrieval ships.

  15. Evaluation of ground stiffness parameters using continuous surface wave geophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Anne; Foged, Niels

    2000-01-01

    -small-strain stiffness of the ground Gmax. Continuous surface wave geophysics offers a quick, non-intrusive and economical way of making such measurements. This paper reviews the continuous surface wave techniques and evaluates, in engineering terms, the applicability of the method to the site investigation industry....

  16. Evaluation of ground stiffness parameters using continuous surface wave geophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Anne; Foged, Niels

    2000-01-01

    -small-strain stiffness of the ground Gmax. Continuous surface wave geophysics offers a quick, non-intrusive and economical way of making such measurements. This paper reviews the continuous surface wave techniques and evaluates, in engineering terms, the applicability of the method to the site investigation industry....

  17. Easy-to-Use UAV Ground Station Software for Low-Altitude Civil Operations Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to design and develop easy-to-use Ground Control Station (GCS) software for low-altitude civil Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) operations. The GCS software...

  18. Achieving Lights-Out Operation of SMAP Using Ground Data System Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The approach used in the SMAP ground data system to provide reliable, automated capabilities to conduct unattended operations has been presented. The impacts of automation on the ground data system architecture were discussed, including the three major automation patterns identified for SMAP and how these patterns address the operations use cases. The architecture and approaches used by SMAP will set the baseline for future JPL Earth Science missions.

  19. Operations Research Flight Ground Service Education/Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2011-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes a nutritional biochemistry assessment of astronauts in preflight, in-flight, and post-flight operations. In-flight collections of blood and urine samples from astronauts to test the effects of Vitamin K, Pro K, Vitamin D, Omega-3 Fatty Acids, Iron, and Sodium in spaceflight is shown. A demonstration of a 1-carbon metabolism pathway that determines the existence of enzymes and polymorphisms is also presented.

  20. Improving Air-Ground Operations on the Complex Battlefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    of civilians transit the terrain collecting firewood or herding sheep and can easily be confused for insurgents transiting or conducting operations...limitations that the commander and fire support personnel must understand in detail in order to properly integrate and synchronize them to effectively...Commanders and fire support personnel must be 11 prepared to actively synchronize multiple ISR and strike platforms, likely conducting multiple

  1. Characterization of ground state entanglement by single-qubit operations and excitation energies

    CERN Document Server

    Giampaolo, S M; Illuminati, F; Verrucchi, P; Giampaolo, Salvatore M.; Illuminati, Fabrizio; Siena, Silvio De; Verrucchi, Paola

    2006-01-01

    We consider single-qubit unitary operations and study the associated excitation energies above the ground state of interacting quantum spins. We prove that there exists a unique operation such that the vanishing of the corresponding excitation energy determines a necessary and sufficient condition for the separability of the ground state. We show that the energy difference associated to factorization exhibits a monotonic behavior with the one-tangle and the entropy of entanglement, including non analiticity at quantum critical points. The single-qubit excitation energy thus provides an independent, directly observable characterization of ground state entanglement, and a simple relation connecting two universal physical resources, energy and nonlocal quantum correlations.

  2. Boots on the Ground: Troop Density in Contingency Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Singapore quickly prospered, and in 186 that port as well as Malacca and Penang , two small port enclaves on the western Malay coast, formally became the...operations was clearly indicated in statistical analyses maintained by the British com- mand.90 The British command formed larger Gurkha headquarters...displays the density statistics for the Balkans’ deployments. 5 Ta bl e 6. T ro op D en si ty in th e B al ka ns O pe ra tio ns M ili ta ry Fo

  3. Rock characterization while drilling and application of roof bolter drilling data for evaluation of ground conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jamal Rostami; Sair Kahraman; Ali Naeimipour; Craig Collins

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in mine health and safety, roof collapse and instabilities are still the leading causes of injury and fatality in underground mining operations. Improving safety and optimum design of ground support requires good and reliable ground characterization. While many geophysical methods have been developed for ground characterizations, their accuracy is insufficient for customized ground support design of underground workings. The actual measurements on the samples of the roof and wall strata from the exploration boring are reliable but the related holes are far apart, thus unsuitable for design purposes. The best source of information could be the geological back mapping of the roof and walls, but this is disruptive to mining operations, and provided information is only from rock surface. Interpretation of the data obtained from roof bolt drilling can offer a good and reliable source of in-formation that can be used for ground characterization and ground support design and evaluations. This paper offers a brief review of the mine roof characterization methods, followed by introduction and discussion of the roof characterization methods by instrumented roof bolters. A brief overview of the results of the preliminary study and initial testing on an instrumented drill and summary of the sug-gested improvements are also discussed.

  4. Rock characterization while drilling and application of roof bolter drilling data for evaluation of ground conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Rostami

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in mine health and safety, roof collapse and instabilities are still the leading causes of injury and fatality in underground mining operations. Improving safety and optimum design of ground support requires good and reliable ground characterization. While many geophysical methods have been developed for ground characterizations, their accuracy is insufficient for customized ground support design of underground workings. The actual measurements on the samples of the roof and wall strata from the exploration boring are reliable but the related holes are far apart, thus unsuitable for design purposes. The best source of information could be the geological back mapping of the roof and walls, but this is disruptive to mining operations, and provided information is only from rock surface. Interpretation of the data obtained from roof bolt drilling can offer a good and reliable source of information that can be used for ground characterization and ground support design and evaluations. This paper offers a brief review of the mine roof characterization methods, followed by introduction and discussion of the roof characterization methods by instrumented roof bolters. A brief overview of the results of the preliminary study and initial testing on an instrumented drill and summary of the suggested improvements are also discussed.

  5. Stable approximate evaluation of unbounded operators

    CERN Document Server

    Groetsch, Charles W

    2007-01-01

    Spectral theory of bounded linear operators teams up with von Neumann’s theory of unbounded operators in this monograph to provide a general framework for the study of stable methods for the evaluation of unbounded operators. An introductory chapter provides numerous illustrations of unbounded linear operators that arise in various inverse problems of mathematical physics. Before the general theory of stabilization methods is developed, an extensive exposition of the necessary background material from the theory of operators on Hilbert space is provided. Several specific stabilization methods are studied in detail, with particular attention to the Tikhonov-Morozov method and its iterated version.

  6. Operational impacts to residual stands following ground-based skidding in Hyrcanian Forest, northern Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meghdad Jourgholami

    2012-01-01

    Hyrcanian (Caspian) Forest in northern Iran has a richness of biological diversity,with endemic and endangered species.The usage of ground-based skidding is well accepted practice for the extraction of timber from the forest,but this operation has tended to cause the greatest environmental problems.The aims of the study were to evaluate and comparison of operational impacts,residual stand damage,regeneration,and to quantify these effects such as:the extent of the damage,wounding patterns,size and distribution after logging operations that utilized two different methods:short-log and long-log.A Timberjack cable skidder was used and the study location was in the Kheyrud Forest.Post harvesting assessment of damage to the residual stand was compared along skid trail by 100% inventory method and also for the assessment of regeneration damage along winching strips.The results show that along winching strips the percentage of damage to the regeneration was 44% and 36%,while the tree damages along skid trails reached 2.3% and 4.1% in the short-log and long-log methods,respectively.The greatest average amount of damage to a bole occurred along the first 1 m up from the ground (97%) and also within 4 m of the skidder centerline (80%).These results show that the short-log method causes less damage to the residual stand than the long-log method.Tree location to skidder trail appears to have a significant effect on the number and height of scars on a tree.Well designed and constructed trails should he wide enough to allow wood extraction from the forest.Damage to the residual stand might be reduced by proper planning and training of logging crews.

  7. EVALUATION OF POST-OPERATIVE SENSITIVITY AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof

    composites in wear resistance and achievement of good proximal contour ... change in result was recorded for post-operative sensitivity at the end of the evaluation period. 100% was recorded ..... Overcoming challenges with resin in class II ...

  8. LWIR passive perception system for stealthy unmanned ground vehicle night operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daren; Rankin, Arturo; Huertas, Andres; Nash, Jeremy; Ahuja, Gaurav; Matthies, Larry

    2016-05-01

    Resupplying forward-deployed units in rugged terrain in the presence of hostile forces creates a high threat to manned air and ground vehicles. An autonomous unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) capable of navigating stealthily at night in off-road and on-road terrain could significantly increase the safety and success rate of such resupply missions for warfighters. Passive night-time perception of terrain and obstacle features is a vital requirement for such missions. As part of the ONR 30 Autonomy Team, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed a passive, low-cost night-time perception system under the ONR Expeditionary Maneuver Warfare and Combating Terrorism Applied Research program. Using a stereo pair of forward looking LWIR uncooled microbolometer cameras, the perception system generates disparity maps using a local window-based stereo correlator to achieve real-time performance while maintaining low power consumption. To overcome the lower signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution of LWIR thermal imaging technologies, a series of pre-filters were applied to the input images to increase the image contrast and stereo correlator enhancements were applied to increase the disparity density. To overcome false positives generated by mixed pixels, noisy disparities from repeated textures, and uncertainty in far range measurements, a series of consistency, multi-resolution, and temporal based post-filters were employed to improve the fidelity of the output range measurements. The stereo processing leverages multi-core processors and runs under the Robot Operating System (ROS). The night-time passive perception system was tested and evaluated on fully autonomous testbed ground vehicles at SPAWAR Systems Center Pacific (SSC Pacific) and Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California. This paper describes the challenges, techniques, and experimental results of developing a passive, low-cost perception system for night-time autonomous navigation.

  9. Evaluation of terrain geomorphometric characteristics for ground clearance charts production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko A. Borisov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Geomorphometric exploration applied in the military terrain analysis is based on the GIS methodology of spatial analyses and is related primarily to military terrain analyses. It includes relief assessment aiming at producing ground clearance charts for the analysis of terrain maneuverability and its deployment, cover and concealment possibilities. An evaluation analysis of geomorphological parameters was performed for the Avala test area using a few terrain parameters (visibility, terrain aspect and slope as well as some terrain qualitative categories (e.g. vegetation density. Terrain slope Slope and aspect are morphometric terrain parameters that can be derived directly from the DTM using some GIS operations. Slope is the first derivative of a surface and has both magnitude and direction. Slope is perhaps the most important aspect of the surface form, since surfaces are formed completely of slopes, and slope angles control the gravitational force available for geomorphic work. Mathematically, the tangent of the slope angle is the first derivative of altitude, and it is a tangent or percent slope as this surface parameter is generally referred to. Slope is defined at each point as the slope of a plane tangent to the surface at that point. In practice, however, slope is generally measured over a finite distance, especially when data are obtained from a contour map. Terrain aspect Aspect is also the first derivative of a surface and has both magnitude and direction. The term aspect is defined as the direction of the biggest slope vector on the tangent plane projected onto the horizontal plane. Aspect is the bearing (or azimuth of the slope direction, and its angle ranges from 0 to 360°. Analyses of terrain slope and ground clearance for military forces The analysis of land assessment of the Avala test area included the definition of relief categories in relation to cover and concealment purposes with the aim to include the geomorphological basis

  10. Expectation values of single-particle operators in the random phase approximation ground state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosov, D S

    2017-02-07

    We developed a method for computing matrix elements of single-particle operators in the correlated random phase approximation ground state. Working with the explicit random phase approximation ground state wavefunction, we derived a practically useful and simple expression for a molecular property in terms of random phase approximation amplitudes. The theory is illustrated by the calculation of molecular dipole moments for a set of representative molecules.

  11. Expectation values of single-particle operators in the random phase approximation ground state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosov, D. S.

    2017-02-01

    We developed a method for computing matrix elements of single-particle operators in the correlated random phase approximation ground state. Working with the explicit random phase approximation ground state wavefunction, we derived a practically useful and simple expression for a molecular property in terms of random phase approximation amplitudes. The theory is illustrated by the calculation of molecular dipole moments for a set of representative molecules.

  12. Operator Workload: Comprehensive Review and Evaluation of Operator Workload Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    respectively. 29 Table 2-1. Taxonomy of workload assssment tocheiiques. TECHNIQUE CATEGORY SUBCATEGORY r xpert Opinion Manual Control Models Math Models...evaluating the subsequent review and discussion. Sw MWy of Tecnoe and Mimsau Sensitivity of workload assessment techniques Is the degree to which the...to some aspect(s) of wokload-related operator performance. The most prominent of these models are based on manual control, information theory, and

  13. UNIX-based operating systems robustness evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Ming

    1996-01-01

    Robust operating systems are required for reliable computing. Techniques for robustness evaluation of operating systems not only enhance the understanding of the reliability of computer systems, but also provide valuable feed- back to system designers. This thesis presents results from robustness evaluation experiments on five UNIX-based operating systems, which include Digital Equipment's OSF/l, Hewlett Packard's HP-UX, Sun Microsystems' Solaris and SunOS, and Silicon Graphics' IRIX. Three sets of experiments were performed. The methodology for evaluation tested (1) the exception handling mechanism, (2) system resource management, and (3) system capacity under high workload stress. An exception generator was used to evaluate the exception handling mechanism of the operating systems. Results included exit status of the exception generator and the system state. Resource management techniques used by individual operating systems were tested using programs designed to usurp system resources such as physical memory and process slots. Finally, the workload stress testing evaluated the effect of the workload on system performance by running a synthetic workload and recording the response time of local and remote user requests. Moderate to severe performance degradations were observed on the systems under stress.

  14. Real-time threat evaluation in a ground based air defence environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JN Roux

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In a military environment a ground based air defence operator is required to evaluate the tactical situation in real-time and protect Defended Assets (DAs on the ground against aerial threats by assigning available Weapon Systems (WSs to engage enemy aircraft. Since this aerial environment requires rapid operational planning and decision making in stress situations, the associated responsibilities are typically divided between a number of operators and computerized systems that aid these operators during the decision making processes. One such a Decision Support System (DSS, a threat evaluation and weapon assignment system, assigns threat values to aircraft (with respect to DAs in real-time and uses these values to propose possible engagements of observed enemy aircraft by anti-aircraft WSs. In this paper a design of the threat evaluation part of such a DSS is put forward. The design follows the structured approach suggested in [Roux JN & van Vuuren JH, 2007, Threat evaluation and weapon assignment decision support: A review of the state of the art, ORiON, 23(2, pp. 151-187], phasing in a suite of increasingly complex qualitative and quantitative model components as more (reliable data become available.

  15. Spaceflight Systems Training: A Comparison and Contrasting of Techniques for Training Ground Operators and Onboard Crewmembers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmain, Clinton; Fleming, Mark

    2009-01-01

    When developing techniques and products for instruction on manned spaceflight systems, training organizations are often faced with two very different customers: ground operators and onboard crewmembers. Frequently, instructional development focuses on one of these customers with the assumption that the other s needs will be met by default. Experience teaches us that differing approaches are required when developing training tailored to the specific needs of each customer. As a rule, ground operators require focused instruction on specific areas of expertise. Their knowledge should be of the details of the hardware, software, and operational techniques associated with that system. They often benefit from historical knowledge of how their system has operated over its lifetime. Since several different ground operators may be interfacing with the same system, each individual operator must understand the agreed-to principles by which that system will be run. In contrast, onboard crewmembers require a more broad, hands-on awareness of their operational environment. Their training should be developed with an understanding of the physical environment in which they live and work and the day-to-day tasks they are most likely to perform. Rarely do they require a deep understanding of the details of a system; it is often sufficient to teach them just enough to maintain situational awareness and perform basic tasks associated with maintenance and operation of onboard systems. Crewmembers may also develop unique onboard operational techniques that differ from preceding crews. They should be taught what flexibility they have in systems operations and how their specific habits can be communicated to ground support personnel. This paper will explore the techniques that can be employed when developing training for these unique customers. We will explore the history of International Space Station training development and how past efforts can guide us in creating training for users of

  16. Evaluation of SMART load follow operation capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jae Seung; Zee, Sung Quun

    1998-07-01

    The daily load follow operation capability of SMART, which is 330 MWth integral reactor with boron free operation concept, was evaluated. In the boron free operation core the axial offset(AO) can not be limited or limited by wider range than the typical PWR that uses soluble boron. Current SMART conceptual core design does not have the limit for the axial offset and the operation is limited by three dimensional local power peak. In this report, the capability of load follow operation is evaluated for 14-2-6-2 daily load follow by 50% power reduction that is very typical in the large commercial power reactors. The cycle length of SMART is limited by three dimensional local power peak and the nominal axial power distribution is top skewed at the end of cycle. When the power returns to 100%, control rod should be withdrawn for the compensation of reactivity decrease due to the xenon buildup. The control rod withdrawal results in the increase of three dimensional local power peak. To solve this problem, an operation strategy for the control of local peak. To solve this problem, an operation strategy for the control of local peak was established and it was shown that the strategy is effective in controlling the local peak less than target value of the three dimensional local power peak. (author). 7 refs., 5 tabs., 13 figs.

  17. The Next Generation of Ground Operations Command and Control; Scripting in C no. and Visual Basic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, George; Pedoto, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    Scripting languages have become a common method for implementing command and control solutions in space ground operations. The Systems Test and Operations Language (STOL), the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Scripting Language Processor (SLP), and the Spacecraft Control Language (SCL) offer script-commands that wrap tedious operations tasks into single calls. Since script-commands are interpreted, they also offer a certain amount of hands-on control that is highly valued in space ground operations. Although compiled programs seem to be unsuited for interactive user control and are more complex to develop, Marshall Space flight Center (MSFC) has developed a product called the Enhanced and Redesign Scripting (ERS) that makes use of the graphical and logical richness of a programming language while offering the hands-on and ease of control of a scripting language. ERS is currently used by the International Space Station (ISS) Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) Cadre team members. ERS integrates spacecraft command mnemonics, telemetry measurements, and command and telemetry control procedures into a standard programming language, while making use of Microsoft's Visual Studio for developing Visual Basic (VB) or C# ground operations procedures. ERS also allows for script-style user control during procedure execution using a robust graphical user input and output feature. The availability of VB and C# programmers, and the richness of the languages and their development environment, has allowed ERS to lower our "script" development time and maintenance costs at the Marshall POIC.

  18. Evaluation of Macrobend Loss on Long Distance Optical Ground Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. M. Salleh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bend loss is a kind of loss that contributes to the power attenuation which is caused by the bending of optical fiber. For long distance optical fiber, bending might occur at joining point as there are many joining points along the link. Studies related to bend loss always relate the effect of bend radius on bend loss value. There is no study that relates the value of loss that can be affected by other factors like the natural environmental conditions. In this study, the evaluation of bend loss on existing long distance Optical Ground Wire (OPGW was studied since the cable was exposed to any climate condition.

  19. Ground-water contribution to dose from past Hanford Operations. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freshley, M.D.; Thorne, P.D.

    1992-08-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides migrating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: (1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; (2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; (3) through wells next to the Columbia River downstream of Hanford that draw some or all of their water from the river (riparian wells); and (4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring by transport in the ground water. These four pathways make up the ``ground-water pathway,`` which is the subject of this study. Assessment of the ground-water pathway was performed by (1) reviewing the existing extensive literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and (2) performing calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations where no monitoring data were collected. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to these radionuclides were calculated.

  20. Evaluation of thermal overload in boiler operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Camila Soares; Rodrigues, Valéria Antônia Justino; Campos, Julio César Costa; de Souza, Amaury Paulo; Minette, Luciano José; de Moraes, Angêlo Casali; Sensato, Guilherme Luciano

    2012-01-01

    The Brazilians educational institutions need a large energy demand for the operation of laundries, restaurants and accommodation of students. Much of that energy comes from steam generated in boilers with wood fuel. The laboral activity in boiler may present problems for the operator's health due to exposure to excessive heat, and its operation has a high degree of risk. This paper describes an analysis made the conditions of thermal environment in the operation of a B category boiler, located at a Higher Education Institution, located in the Zona da Mata Mineira The equipments used to collect data were Meter WBGT of the Heat Index; Meter of Wet Bulb Index and Globe Thermometer (WBGT); Politeste Instruments, an anemometer and an Infrared Thermometer. By the application of questionnaires, the second phase consisted of collecting data on environmental factors (temperature natural environment, globe temperature, relative humidity and air velocity). The study concluded that during the period evaluated, the activity had thermal overload.

  1. Shuttle Ground Operations Efficiencies/Technologies Study (SGOE/T). Volume 5: Technical Information Sheets (TIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, A. L.; Hart, M. T.; Lowry, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    The Technology Information Sheet was assembled in database format during Phase I. This document was designed to provide a repository for information pertaining to 144 Operations and Maintenance Instructions (OMI) controlled operations in the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF), Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), and PAD. It provides a way to accumulate information about required crew sizes, operations task time duration (serial and/or parallel), special Ground Support Equipment (GSE). required, and identification of a potential application of existing technology or the need for the development of a new technolgoy item.

  2. Operation UPSHOT-KNOTHOLE. Operational Summary, Nevada Proving Grounds, 1 March - 9 June 1953

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-01

    Forces Special Weapons Project Sandia Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico August 1953 NOTICE This is an extract of OPERATION UPSHOT-KNOTHOLE, Operational...Office was superseded by a group of information representatives from the AEC, the FODA ., and the DOD under the direction of Mfr. Morse S&l31 bury, =E...the Directorate of Weapons Ufacts Tests at Sand-ia Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico . 2.4 = = ’HfC A Reports Branch vas organized in the Office of the

  3. Near real-time operation of public image database for ground vehicle navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, E.; Kozaitis, S. P.

    2015-02-01

    An effective color night vision system for ground vehicle navigation should operate in near real-time to be practical. We described a system that uses a public database as a source of color information to colorize night vision imagery. Such an approach presents several problems due to differences between acquired and reference imagery. Our system performed registration, colorizing, and reference updating in near real-time in an effort to help drivers of ground vehicles during night to see a colored view of a scene.

  4. Expectation values of single-particle operators in the random phase approximation ground state

    CERN Document Server

    Kosov, Daniel S

    2016-01-01

    We developed a method for computing matrix elements of single-particle operators in the correlated random phase approximation ground state. Working with the explicit random phase approximation ground state wavefunction, we derived practically useful and simple expression for a molecular property in terms of random phase approximation amplitudes. The theory is illustrated by the calculation of molecular dipole moments. It is shown that Hartree-Fock based random phase approximation provides a systematic improvement of molecular dipole moment values in comparison to M{\\o}ller-Plesset second order perturbation theory and coupled cluster method for a considered set of molecules.

  5. Effectiveness evaluation of STOL transport operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, E. F.; Bruckner, J. M. H.; Drago, V. J.; Brown, R. A.; Rea, F. G.; Porter, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    A short-takeoff and landing (STOL) systems simulation model has been developed and implemented in a computer code (known as STOL OPS) which permits evaluation of the operation of a STOL aircraft and its avionics in a commercial airline operating environment. STOL OPS concentrated on the avionics functions of navigation, guidance, control, communication, hazard aviodance, and systems management. External world factors influencing the operation of the STOL aircraft include each airport and its geometry, air traffic at each airport, air traffic control equipment and procedures, weather (including winds and visibility), and the flight path between each airport served by the route. The development of the STOL OPS program provides NASA a set of computer programs which can be used for detailed analysis of a STOL aircraft and its avionics and permit establishment of system requirements as a function of airline mission performance goals.

  6. Analysis of Short Time Period of Operation of Horizontal Ground Heat Exchangers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salsuwanda Selamat

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ground source heat pump (GSHP systems have been proven to have higher efficiency compared to conventional air source heat pump systems for space heating and cooling applications. While vertical ground heat exchangers (GHE are favorable in GSHP installation, this type of configuration requires higher capital costs as opposed to horizontal configuration. Numerical simulation has been used to accurately predict the thermal performance of GHE. In this paper, numerical analysis of thermal performance for slinky horizontal GHE loops in different orientations and operation modes is discussed. It was found that the loop orientation is not so important due to the little effect it has on thermal performance. While the mean heat exchange rate of copper loop increases 48% compared to HDPE loop, the analysis supports the common claim that heat exchange rate is predominantly limited by the thermal conductivity of the ground. With the same amount of circulation work, the mean heat exchange rate increases by 83%–162% when operated in parallel loops operations. The performance in these operations can be further optimized to 10%–14% increase when spacing between adjacent loops was provided. The spacing helps to minimize interference of heat flow that would penalize the overall thermal performance.

  7. Ground operations and logistics in the context of the International Asteroid Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    The role of Ground Operations and Logistics, in the context of the International Asteroid Mission (IAM), is to define the mission of Ground Operations; to identify the components of a manned space infrastructure; to discuss the functions and responsibilities of these components; to provide cost estimates for delivery of the spacecraft to LEO from Earth; to identify significant ground operations and logistics issues. The purpose of this dissertation is to bring a degree of reality to the project. 'One cannot dissociate development and set up of a manned infrastructure from its operational phase since it is this last one which is the most costly due to transportation costs which plague space station use' (Eymar, 1990). While this reference is to space stations, the construction and assembly of the proposed crew vehicle and cargo vehicles will face similar cost difficulties, and logistics complexities. The uniqueness of long duration space flight is complicated further by the lack of experience with human habitated, and non-refurbishable life support systems. These problems are addressed.

  8. Tug fleet and ground operations schedules and controls. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    This study presents Tug Fleet and Ground Operations Schedules and Controls plan. This plan was developed and optimized out of a combination of individual Tug program phased subplans, special emphasis studies, contingency analyses and sensitivity analyses. The subplans cover the Tug program phases: (1) Tug operational, (2) Interim Upper Stage (IUS)/Tug fleet utilization, (3) and IUS/Tug payload integration, (4) Tug site activation, (5) IUS/Tug transition, (6) Tug acquisition. Resource requirements (facility, GSE, TSE, software, manpower, logistics) are provided in each subplan, as are appropriate Tug processing flows, active and total IUS and Tug fleet requirements, fleet management and Tug payload integration concepts, facility selection recommendations, site activation and IUS to Tug transition requirements. The impact of operational concepts on Tug acquisition is assessed and the impact of operating Tugs out of KSC and WTR is analyzed and presented showing WTR as a delta. Finally, cost estimates for fleet management and ground operations of the DDT&E and operational phases of the Tug program are given.

  9. UAV-guided navigation for ground robot tele-operation in a military reconnaissance environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jessie Y C

    2010-08-01

    A military reconnaissance environment was simulated to examine the performance of ground robotics operators who were instructed to utilise streaming video from an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to navigate his/her ground robot to the locations of the targets. The effects of participants' spatial ability on their performance and workload were also investigated. Results showed that participants' overall performance (speed and accuracy) was better when she/he had access to images from larger UAVs with fixed orientations, compared with other UAV conditions (baseline- no UAV, micro air vehicle and UAV with orbiting views). Participants experienced the highest workload when the UAV was orbiting. Those individuals with higher spatial ability performed significantly better and reported less workload than those with lower spatial ability. The results of the current study will further understanding of ground robot operators' target search performance based on streaming video from UAVs. The results will also facilitate the implementation of ground/air robots in military environments and will be useful to the future military system design and training community.

  10. An evaluation of dental operative simulation materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Li-Hong; Foster Page, Lyndie; Purton, David

    2012-01-01

    The study was to evaluate the performance of different materials used in dental operative simulation and compare them with those of natural teeth. Three typical phantom teeth materials were compared with extracted permanent teeth by a nanoindentation system and evaluated by students and registered dentists on the drilling sensation of the materials. Moreover, the tool life (machinability) of new cylindrical diamond burs on cutting the sample materials was tested and the burs were observed. Although student and dentist evaluations were scattered and inconclusive, it was found that elastic modulus (E) and hardness (H) were not the main factors in determining the drilling sensation of the materials. The sensation of drilling is a reflection of cutting force and power consumption.An ideal material for dental simulation should be able to generate similar drilling resistance to that of natural tooth, which is the machinability of the material.

  11. Systems Engineering Approach To Ground Combat Vehicle Survivability In Urban Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    of global urbanization, planning for urban operations is critical to the execution and success of any military campaign. The U.S. Army describes...for the enemy to prepare for the likely attack direction and to plan coordinated attacks against the incoming ground force. Enemy sensors can also...The Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) is developing an integrated counter IED suite known as the Counter IED & Mine Suite ( CIMS ). According to Eshel

  12. Operational Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Initiation Forecasting Utilizing S-Band Dual-Polarization Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    cells exhibit considerably more complexity in their charge distributions, the tripole model is adequate to explain lightning formation. Although...application of dual-polarization weather radar. Part II: Warm- and cold- season applications. J. Operational Meteor., 1 (20), 243-264. Kumjian, M. R...Res., 94, 13151–13167. 60 Wolf, P., 2006: Anticipating the initiation, cessation , and frequency of cloud-to-ground lightning, utilizing WSR

  13. Alabama Ground Operations during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Lawrence; Blakeslee, Richard; Koshak, William; Bain, Lamont; Rogers, Ryan; Kozlowski, Danielle; Sherrer, Adam; Saari, Matt; Bigelbach, Brandon; Scott, Mariana; Schultz, Elise; Schultz, Chris; Gatlin, Patrick; Wingo, Matt; Phillips, Dustin; Phillips, Chris; Peterson, Harold; Bailey, Jeff; Frederickson, Terryn; Hall, John; Bart, Nicole; Becker, Melissa; Pinkney, Kurtis; Rowe, Scott; Starzec, Mariusz

    2013-01-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field campaign investigates the impact of deep, midlatitude convective clouds, including their dynamical, physical and lighting processes, on upper tropospheric composition and chemistry. DC3 science operations took place from 14 May to 30 June 2012. The DC3 field campaign utilized instrumented aircraft and ground ]based observations. The NCAR Gulfstream ]V (GV) observed a variety of gas ]phase species, radiation and cloud particle characteristics in the high ]altitude outflow of storms while the NASA DC ]8 characterized the convective inflow. Groundbased radar networks were used to document the kinematic and microphysical characteristics of storms. In order to study the impact of lightning on convective outflow composition, VHF ]based lightning mapping arrays (LMAs) provided detailed three ]dimensional measurements of flashes. Mobile soundings were utilized to characterize the meteorological environment of the convection. Radar, sounding and lightning observations were also used in real ]time to provide forecasting and mission guidance to the aircraft operations. Combined aircraft and ground ]based observations were conducted at three locations, 1) northeastern Colorado, 2) Oklahoma/Texas and 3) northern Alabama, to study different modes of deep convection in a variety of meteorological and chemical environments. The objective of this paper is to summarize the Alabama ground operations and provide a preliminary assessment of the ground ]based observations collected over northern Alabama during DC3. The multi ] Doppler, dual ]polarization radar network consisted of the UAHuntsville Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR), the UAHuntsville Mobile Alabama X ]band (MAX) radar and the Hytop (KHTX) Weather Surveillance Radar 88 Doppler (WSR ]88D). Lightning frequency and structure were observed in near real ]time by the NASA MSFC Northern Alabama LMA (NALMA). Pre ]storm and inflow proximity

  14. Review of Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Tools for Verifying Command and Control Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Michael L.; Bonanne, Kevin H.; Favretto, Jeffrey A.; Jackson, Maddalena M.; Jones, Stephanie L.; Mackey, Ryan M.; Sarrel, Marc A.; Simpson, Kimberly A.

    2014-01-01

    The Exploration Systems Development (ESD) Standing Review Board (SRB) requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) conduct an independent review of the plan developed by Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) for identifying models and emulators to create a tool(s) to verify their command and control software. The NESC was requested to identify any issues or weaknesses in the GSDO plan. This document contains the outcome of the NESC review.

  15. The Next Generation of Ground Operations Command and Control; Scripting in C Sharp and Visual Basic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, George; Pedoto, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of scripting languages in Ground Operations Command and Control. It describes the use of scripting languages in a historical context, the advantages and disadvantages of scripts. It describes the Enhanced and Redesigned Scripting (ERS) language, that was designed to combine the features of a scripting language and the graphical and IDE richness of a programming language with the utility of scripting languages. ERS uses the Microsoft Visual Studio programming environment and offers custom controls that enable an ERS developer to extend the Visual Basic and C sharp language interface with the Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) telemetry and command system.

  16. Evaluation of Fibre Lifetime in Optical Ground Wire Transmission Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunvalds, R.; Ciekurs, A.; Porins, J.; Supe, A.

    2017-06-01

    In the research, measurements of polarisation mode dispersion of two OPGWs (optical ground wire transmission lines), in total four fibres, have been carried out, and the expected lifetime of the infrastructure has been assessed on the basis of these measurements. The cables under consideration were installed in 1995 and 2011, respectively. Measurements have shown that polarisation mode dispersion values for cable installed in 1995 are four times higher than that for cable installed in 2011, which could mainly be explained by technological differences in fibre production and lower fibre polarisation mode dispersion requirements in 1995 due to lack of high-speed (over 10 Gbit/s) optical transmission systems. The calculation methodology of non-refusal work and refusal probabilities, using the measured polarisation mode dispersion parameters, is proposed in the paper. Based on reliability calculations, the expected lifetime is then predicted, showing that all measured fibres most likely will be operational within minimum theoretical service life of 25 years accepted by the industry.

  17. Insights into the Thwaites Glacier grounding zone from Operation IceBridge aerogravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinto, K. J.; Bell, R. E.; Cochran, J. R.; Elieff, S.; Frearson, N.

    2010-12-01

    Operation IceBridge acquired 1500 km of geophysical data, at 10 km spacing, in front of the Thwaites Glacier grounding line during the 2009 season. The gravity anomalies recorded by the survey have been used to model the bathymetry of the sea floor in front of the glacier, an area inaccessible to previous surveys. The resulting map reveals previously unseen detail of the Thwaites grounding zone, as well as the spatial extent of features that were formerly only known as points affecting the ice surface. The modeled bathymetry in front of Thwaites Glacier is marked by an undulating ridge running sub-parallel to the grounding line, 40 km seaward. The highest peak on the ridge is in contact with the overlying ice shelf, hindering its flow. Ridge elevation decreases to the west, with a maximum ridge depth of 850 m and an average relief of 350 m. This is comparable in scale to the recently identified ridge crossing the channel of nearby Pine Island Glacier (Jenkins et al., 2010). The present-day grounding line of Thwaites appears to be marked by a more subdued ridge, in which we have identified a 20 km wide hollow, to a water depth of 1200 m. Our model shows that this hollow corresponds to a landward bight in the grounding line, in the region through which the fast ice flow of Thwaites Glacier is focused. This correlation was not visible on previous, coarser scale maps of the grounding line, and shows a clear relationship between the bathymetry and ice flow. Gravity inversions have been constrained by nearby marine surveys, satellite images of the ice rise at the peak of the ridge and radar and laser data from the IceBridge survey to constrain ice thickness. The absolute values of predicted bathymetry are dependent on the density of the rocks in the subsurface, for example the presence or absence of volcanic material or loose sediments. Some models of the geology of the survey area are also proposed. Uncertainty of underlying geology may account for ~100 m errors in the

  18. Application of a Modified Universal Design Survey for Evaluation of Ares 1 Ground Crew Worksites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    Operability is a driving requirement for NASA's Ares 1 launch vehicle. Launch site ground operations include several operator tasks to prepare the vehicle for launch or to perform maintenance. Ensuring that components requiring operator interaction at the launch site are designed for optimal human use is a high priority for operability. To support design evaluation, the Ares 1 Upper Stage (US) element Human Factors Engineering (HFE) group developed a survey based on the Universal Design approach. Universal Design is a process to create products that can be used effectively by as many people as possible. Universal Design per se is not a priority for Ares 1 because launch vehicle processing is a specialized skill and not akin to a consumer product that should be used by all people of all abilities. However, applying principles of Universal Design will increase the probability of an error free and efficient design which is a priority for Ares 1. The Design Quality Evaluation Survey centers on the following seven principles: (1) Equitable use, (2) Flexibility in use, (3) Simple and intuitive use, (4) Perceptible information, (5) Tolerance for error, (6) Low physical effort, (7) Size and space for approach and use. Each principle is associated with multiple evaluation criteria which were rated with the degree to which the statement is true. All statements are phrased in the utmost positive, or the design goal so that the degree to which judgments tend toward "completely agree" directly reflects the degree to which the design is good. The Design Quality Evaluation Survey was employed for several US analyses. The tool was found to be most useful for comparative judgments as opposed to an assessment of a single design option. It provided a useful piece of additional data when assessing possible operator interfaces or worksites for operability

  19. Flat foot functional evaluation using pattern recognition of ground reaction data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertani, A; Cappello, A; Benedetti, M G; Simoncini, L; Catani, F

    1999-08-01

    Main purpose of this study was to apply quantitative gait analysis and statistical pattern recognition as clinical decision-making aids in flat foot diagnosis and post-surgery monitoring. Statistical pattern recognition techniques were applied to discriminate between normal and flat foot populations through ground reaction force measurements; ground reaction forces time course was assumed as a sensible index of the foot function. Gait analysis is becoming recognized as an important clinical tool in orthopaedics, in pre-surgery planning, post-surgery monitoring and in a posteriori evaluation of different treatment techniques. Statistical pattern recognition techniques have been utilized with success in this field to identify the most significant variables of selected motor functions in different pathologies, and to design classification rules and quantitative evaluation scores. Ground reaction forces were recorded during free speed barefoot walks on 28 healthy subjects, and 28 symptomatic flexible flat foot children selected for surgical intervention. A new feature selection algorithm, based on heuristic optimization, was applied to select the most discriminant ground reaction forces time samples. A two-stage pattern recognition system, composed by three linear feature extractors, one for each ground reaction force component, and a linear classifier, was designed to classify the feet of each subject using the selected features. The output of the classifier was used to define a functional score. The classifier assigned the ground reaction force patterns performed by each subject into the right class with an estimated error of 15%, corresponding to an assignment error for each subject's foot of 9%. The most discriminant ground reaction forces time samples selected are in full agreement with the pathophysiology of the symptomatic flexible flat foot. The obtained score was utilized to monitor the 1 and 2 years post-operative functional recovery of two differently

  20. Operation modes research of liquefied natural gas storages as a part of the ground complexes equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Korolev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of the Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG in the space-rocket equipment is motivated by some advantages. That is why a lot of tests and works are actively carried out now on rocket engines using liquefied natural gas.To provide the engine tests and subsequent rocket complex operation a creation of LNG storages is demanded as a part of ground processing equipment and support for their safe operation conditions.One of LNG danger factor is its low boiling temperature, and also changing the condition, density and LNG boiling temperature at storage due to evaporation of light component, namely methane. At refill of the storages having fuel remains with a new LNG portion these factors can lead to formation of the stratified macro-layers and cause a mode of the intensive mixing that is called "rollover", with almost instant evaporation of LNG big mass and sharp pressure boost, capable to result in the storage distraction with catastrophic effects.The work objectives are formulated such as a technique development for forecasting of the LNG parameters in operating storages including the rollover mode, a comparison of calculated results of the LNG parameters with the experimental data, and a definition of possible recommendations for safe operation of LNG storages as a part of the ground complexes equipment.The paper reviews 12 publications concerning the issues and proceeding processes at operation of LNG storages, including the rollover mode.To verify the reliability of process simulation results in the LNG, represented in models by the binary methane-ethane mixture the calculated values have been compared with the experimental data for a LNG storage mode in the reservoir of a ground test complex.The reliability of developed models of the heat-mass-exchange processes in stratified on density and temperature in LNG storage with emergence of conditions for the rollover mode has been verified by comparing the settlement characteristics to the published

  1. Concept of Operations for a Prospective "Proving Ground" in the Lunar Vicinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Stanley G.; Hill, James J.

    2016-01-01

    NASA is studying a "Proving Ground" near the Moon to conduct human space exploration missions in preparation for future flights to Mars. This paper describes a concept of operations ("conops") for activities in the Proving Ground, focusing on the construction and use of a mobile Cislunar Transit Habitat capable of months-long excursions within and beyond the Earth-Moon system. Key elements in the conops include the Orion spacecraft (with mission kits for docking and other specialized operations) and the Space Launch System heavy-lift rocket. Potential additions include commercial launch vehicles and logistics carriers, solar electric propulsion stages to move elements between different orbits and eventually take them on excursions to deep space, a node module with multiple docking ports, habitation and life support blocks, and international robotic and piloted lunar landers. The landers might include reusable ascent modules which could remain docked to in-space elements between lunar sorties. The architecture will include infrastructure for launch preparation, communication, mission control, and range safety. The conops describes "case studies" of notional missions chosen to guide the design of the architecture and its elements. One such mission is the delivery of a 10-ton pressurized element, co-manifested with an Orion on a Block 1B Space Launch System rocket, to the Proving Ground. With a large solar electric propulsion stage, the architecture could enable a year-long mission to land humans on a near-Earth asteroid. In the last case, after returning to near-lunar space, two of the asteroid explorers could join two crewmembers freshly arrived from Earth for a Moon landing, helping to safely quantify the risk of landing deconditioned crews on Mars. The conops also discusses aborts and contingency operations. Early return to Earth may be difficult, especially during later Proving Ground missions. While adding risk, limited-abort conditions provide needed practice

  2. Evaluation of three manually operated weeding devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, V K; Datta, R K; Murthy, A S

    1991-04-01

    Performance of three manually operated weeders was evaluated from ergonomics and mechanical considerations. Three operators were selected for laboratory and field trials; they represented the 5th, 50th and 95th percentiles of the operator population. Laboratory tests were conducted in a psychometric chamber to study physiological response under varying load and environmental conditions. From the data, relationships between energy expenditure rate and oxygen consumption rate vs heart rate were established. Field tests were carried out with the three weeders in a farm with Arhar crop (Cajannus Cajan L.) during August-September, when the average ambient temperature and relative humidity were 36 degrees C and 82% respectively. The results of this investigation indicated that weeding with the indigenous tools of a 'khurpi' and a spade and with the improved tool (3-tine hoe) could be rated as 'moderately heavy' work. However, a 'khurpi' demanded less energy expenditure than a 3-tine hoe followed by a spade. The squatting posture with a 'khurpi' appeared to be more comfortable than the standing posture with about 145 degrees erect position for the 3-tine hoe, followed by the standing posture with about 108 degrees erect position with the spade. For consideration of higher output, the order was spade, 3-tine hoe and 'khurpi', For weeding efficiency the trend was, however, just the reverse.

  3. Evaluation of decommissioning alternatives for the Pilot Plant Complex, Aberdeen Proving Ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rueda, J.; Zimmerman, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    This report presents an evaluation of four decommissioning alternatives for the Pilot Plant Complex (PPC), an inactive chemical weapons research, development, and production facility consisting of nine buildings located in the Edgewood Area of the Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland. Decommissioning the PPC involves six steps: (1) assessing existing conditions; (2) dismantling the aboveground portions of the buildings (including the floor slabs, paved roads, and sidewalks within the PPC); (3) reducing the size of the demolition debris and sealing the debris in containers for later testing and evaluation; (4) testing and evaluating the debris; (5) conducting site operation and maintenance activities; and (6) recycling or disposing of the debris with or without prior treatment, as appropriate.

  4. Evaluation of Nevada Test Site Ground Motion and Rock Property Data to Bound Ground Motions at the Yucca Mountain Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchings, L H; Foxall, W; Rambo, J; Wagoner, J L

    2005-03-09

    Yucca Mountain licensing will require estimation of ground motions from probabilistic seismic hazard analyses (PSHA) with annual probabilities of exceedance on the order of 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -7} per year or smaller, which correspond to much longer earthquake return periods than most previous PSHA studies. These long return periods for the Yucca Mountain PSHA result in estimates of ground motion that are extremely high ({approx} 10 g) and that are believed to be physically unrealizable. However, there is at present no generally accepted method to bound ground motions either by showing that the physical properties of materials cannot maintain such extreme motions, or the energy release by the source for such large motions is physically impossible. The purpose of this feasibility study is to examine recorded ground motion and rock property data from nuclear explosions to determine its usefulness for studying the ground motion from extreme earthquakes. The premise is that nuclear explosions are an extreme energy density source, and that the recorded ground motion will provide useful information about the limits of ground motion from extreme earthquakes. The data were categorized by the source and rock properties, and evaluated as to what extent non-linearity in the material has affected the recordings. They also compiled existing results of non-linear dynamic modeling of the explosions carried out by LLNL and other institutions. They conducted an extensive literature review to outline current understanding of extreme ground motion. They also analyzed the data in terms of estimating maximum ground motions at Yucca Mountain.

  5. Evaluation of Nevada Test Site Ground Motion and Rock Property Data to Bound Ground Motions at the Yucca Mountain Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchings, L J; Foxall, W; Rambo, J; Wagoner, J L

    2005-02-14

    Yucca Mountain licensing will require estimation of ground motions from probabilistic seismic hazard analyses (PSHA) with annual probabilities of exceedance on the order of 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -7} per year or smaller, which correspond to much longer earthquake return periods than most previous PSHA studies. These long return periods for the Yucca Mountain PSHA result in estimates of ground motion that are extremely high ({approx} 10 g) and that are believed to be physically unrealizable. However, there is at present no generally accepted method to bound ground motions either by showing that the physical properties of materials cannot maintain such extreme motions, or the energy release by the source for such large motions is physically impossible. The purpose of this feasibility study is to examine recorded ground motion and rock property data from nuclear explosions to determine its usefulness for studying the ground motion from extreme earthquakes. The premise is that nuclear explosions are an extreme energy density source, and that the recorded ground motion will provide useful information about the limits of ground motion from extreme earthquakes. The data were categorized by the source and rock properties, and evaluated as to what extent non-linearity in the material has affected the recordings. They also compiled existing results of non-linear dynamic modeling of the explosions carried out by LLNL and other institutions. They conducted an extensive literature review to outline current understanding of extreme ground motion. They also analyzed the data in terms of estimating maximum ground motions at Yucca Mountain.

  6. Evaluating data worth for ground-water management under uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, B.J.

    1999-01-01

    A decision framework is presented for assessing the value of ground-water sampling within the context of ground-water management under uncertainty. The framework couples two optimization models-a chance-constrained ground-water management model and an integer-programing sampling network design model-to identify optimal pumping and sampling strategies. The methodology consists of four steps: (1) The optimal ground-water management strategy for the present level of model uncertainty is determined using the chance-constrained management model; (2) for a specified data collection budget, the monitoring network design model identifies, prior to data collection, the sampling strategy that will minimize model uncertainty; (3) the optimal ground-water management strategy is recalculated on the basis of the projected model uncertainty after sampling; and (4) the worth of the monitoring strategy is assessed by comparing the value of the sample information-i.e., the projected reduction in management costs-with the cost of data collection. Steps 2-4 are repeated for a series of data collection budgets, producing a suite of management/monitoring alternatives, from which the best alternative can be selected. A hypothetical example demonstrates the methodology's ability to identify the ground-water sampling strategy with greatest net economic benefit for ground-water management.A decision framework is presented for assessing the value of ground-water sampling within the context of ground-water management under uncertainty. The framework couples two optimization models - a chance-constrained ground-water management model and an integer-programming sampling network design model - to identify optimal pumping and sampling strategies. The methodology consists of four steps: (1) The optimal ground-water management strategy for the present level of model uncertainty is determined using the chance-constrained management model; (2) for a specified data collection budget, the monitoring

  7. Evaluation and Improvement of Spectral Features for the Detection of Buried Explosive Hazards Using Forward-Looking Ground-Penetrating Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    for the NIITEK ground penetrating radar using order weighted averaging operators for landmine detection”, Proc. SPIE 5415, 953-962 (2004). [9] Sun, Y...and Li, J., "Plastic landmine detection using time-frequency analysis for forward-looking ground - penetrating radar ”, Proc. SPIE 5089, 851-862...REPORT Evaluation and Improvement of Spectral Features for the Detection of Buried Explosive Hazards Using Forward-Looking Ground - Penetrating Radar 14

  8. A Near-Term Concept for Trajectory Based Operations with Air/Ground Data Link Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, David; Mueller, Eric; Thipphavong, David; Paielli, Russell; Cheng, Jinn-Hwei; Lee, Chuhan; Sahlman, Scott; Walton, Joe

    2010-01-01

    An operating concept and required system components for trajectory-based operations with air/ground data link for today's en route and transition airspace is proposed. Controllers are fully responsible for separation as they are today, and no new aircraft equipage is required. Trajectory automation computes integrated solutions to problems like metering, weather avoidance, traffic conflicts and the desire to find and fly more time/fuel efficient flight trajectories. A common ground-based system supports all levels of aircraft equipage and performance including those equipped and not equipped for data link. User interface functions for the radar controller's display make trajectory-based clearance advisories easy to visualize, modify if necessary, and implement. Laboratory simulations (without human operators) were conducted to test integrated operation of selected system components with uncertainty modeling. Results are based on 102 hours of Fort Worth Center traffic recordings involving over 37,000 individual flights. The presence of uncertainty had a marginal effect (5%) on minimum-delay conflict resolution performance, and windfavorable routes had no effect on detection and resolution metrics. Flight plan amendments and clearances were substantially reduced compared to today s operations. Top-of-descent prediction errors are the largest cause of failure indicating that better descent predictions are needed to reliably achieve fuel-efficient descent profiles in medium to heavy traffic. Improved conflict detections for climbing flights could enable substantially more continuous climbs to cruise altitude. Unlike today s Conflict Alert, tactical automation must alert when an altitude amendment is entered, but before the aircraft starts the maneuver. In every other failure case tactical automation prevented losses of separation. A real-time prototype trajectory trajectory-automation system is running now and could be made ready for operational testing at an en route

  9. Evaluation of chemical sensors for in situ ground-water monitoring at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, E.M.; Hostetler, D.D.

    1989-03-01

    This report documents a preliminary review and evaluation of instrument systems and sensors that may be used to detect ground-water contaminants in situ at the Hanford Site. Three topics are covered in this report: (1) identification of a group of priority contaminants at Hanford that could be monitored in situ, (2) a review of current instrument systems and sensors for environmental monitoring, and (3) an evaluation of instrument systems that could be used to monitor Hanford contaminants. Thirteen priority contaminants were identified in Hanford ground water, including carbon tetrachloride and six related chlorinated hydrocarbons, cyanide, methyl ethyl ketone, chromium (VI), fluoride, nitrate, and uranium. Based on transduction principles, chemical sensors were divided into four classes, ten specific types of instrument systems were considered: fluorescence spectroscopy, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), spark excitation-fiber optic spectrochemical emission sensor (FOSES), chemical optrodes, stripping voltammetry, catalytic surface-modified ion electrode immunoassay sensors, resistance/capacitance, quartz piezobalance and surface acoustic wave devices. Because the flow of heat is difficult to control, there are currently no environmental chemical sensors based on thermal transduction. The ability of these ten instrument systems to detect the thirteen priority contaminants at the Hanford Site at the required sensitivity was evaluated. In addition, all ten instrument systems were qualitatively evaluated for general selectivity, response time, reliability, and field operability. 45 refs., 23 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Evaluations of cirrus contamination and screening in ground aerosol observations using collocated lidar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jingfeng; Hsu, N. Christina; Tsay, Si-Chee; Holben, Brent N.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Smirnov, Alexander; Jeong, Myeong-Jae; Hansell, Richard A.; Berkoff, Timothy A.; Liu, Zhaoyan; Liu, Gin-Rong; Campbell, James R.; Liew, Soo Chin; Barnes, John E.

    2012-08-01

    Cirrus clouds, particularly subvisual high thin cirrus with low optical thickness, are difficult to screen in operational aerosol retrieval algorithms. Collocated aerosol and cirrus observations from ground measurements, such as the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and the Micro-Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET), provide us with an unprecedented opportunity to systematically examine the susceptibility of operational aerosol products to cirrus contamination. Quality assured aerosol optical thickness (AOT) measurements were also tested against the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) vertical feature mask (VFM) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) thin cirrus screening parameters for the purpose of evaluating cirrus contamination. Key results of this study include: (1) quantitative evaluations of data uncertainties in AERONET AOT retrievals are conducted; although AERONET cirrus screening schemes are successful in removing most cirrus contamination, strong residuals displaying strong spatial and seasonal variability still exist, particularly over thin cirrus prevalent regions during cirrus peak seasons; (2) challenges in matching up different data for analysis are highlighted and corresponding solutions proposed; and (3) estimates of the relative contributions from cirrus contamination to aerosol retrievals are discussed. The results are valuable for better understanding and further improving ground aerosol measurements that are critical for aerosol-related climate research.

  11. Network operability of ground-based microwave radiometers: Calibration and standardization efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospichal, Bernhard; Löhnert, Ulrich; Küchler, Nils; Czekala, Harald

    2017-04-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR) are already widely used by national weather services and research institutions all around the world. Most of the instruments operate continuously and are beginning to be implemented into data assimilation for atmospheric models. Especially their potential for continuously observing boundary-layer temperature profiles as well as integrated water vapor and cloud liquid water path makes them valuable for improving short-term weather forecasts. However until now, most MWR have been operated as stand-alone instruments. In order to benefit from a network of these instruments, standardization of calibration, operation and data format is necessary. In the frame of TOPROF (COST Action ES1303) several efforts have been undertaken, such as uncertainty and bias assessment, or calibration intercomparison campaigns. The goal was to establish protocols for providing quality controlled (QC) MWR data and their uncertainties. To this end, standardized calibration procedures for MWR have been developed and recommendations for radiometer users compiled. Based on the results of the TOPROF campaigns, a new, high-accuracy liquid-nitrogen calibration load has been introduced for MWR manufactured by Radiometer Physics GmbH (RPG). The new load improves the accuracy of the measurements considerably and will lead to even more reliable atmospheric observations. Next to the recommendations for set-up, calibration and operation of ground-based MWR within a future network, we will present homogenized methods to determine the accuracy of a running calibration as well as means for automatic data quality control. This sets the stage for the planned microwave calibration center at JOYCE (Jülich Observatory for Cloud Evolution), which will be shortly introduced.

  12. Ground test facilities for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion engines and fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, G. C.; Beck, D. F.; Harmon, C. D.; Shipers, L. R.

    Interagency panels evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion development options have consistently recognized the need for constructing a major new ground test facility to support fuel element and engine testing. This paper summarizes the requirements, configuration, and design issues of a proposed ground test complex for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion engines and fuel elements being developed for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program.

  13. Analysis of strong ground motions to evaluate regional attenuation relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Montaldo

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Italian attenuation relationships at regional scale have been refined using a data set of 322 horizontal components of strong ground motions recorded mainly during the 1997-1998 Umbria-Marche, Central Italy, earthquake sequence. The data set includes records generated by events with local magnitude (M L ranging between 4.5 and 5.9, recorded at rock or soil sites and epicentral distance smaller than 100 km. Through a multiple step regression analysis, we calculated empirical equations for the peak ground acceleration and velocity, the Arias Intensity and for the horizontal components of the 5% damped velocity pseudo response spectra, corresponding to 14 frequencies ranging from 0.25 to 25 Hz. We compared our results with well known predictive equations, widely used on the national territory for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis. The results obtained in this study show smaller values for all the analyzed ground motion indicators compared to other predictive equations.

  14. Ground tests of the Dynamic Albedo of Neutron instrument operation in the passive mode with a Martian soil model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvetsov, V. N.; Dubasov, P. V.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Krylov, A. R.; Krylov, V. A.; Litvak, M. L.; Malakhov, A. V.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Sanin, A. B.; Timoshenko, G. N.; Vostrukhin, A. A.; Zontikov, A. O.

    2017-07-01

    The results of the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instrument ground tests in the passive mode of operation are presented in comparison with the numerical calculations. These test series were conducted to support the current surface measurements of DAN onboard the MSL Curiosity rover. The instrument sensitivity to detect thin subsurface layers of water ice buried at different depths in the analog of Martian soil has been evaluated during these tests. The experiments have been done with a radioisotope Pu-Be neutron source (analog of the MMRTG neutron source onboard the Curiosity rover) and the Martian soil model assembled from silicon-rich window glass pane. Water ice layers were simulated with polyethylene sheets. All experiments have been performed at the test facility built at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna, Russia).

  15. Use of a ground-water flow model with particle tracking to evaluate ground-water vulnerability, Clark County, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, D.T.; Wilkinson, J.M.; Orzol, L.L.

    1996-01-01

    A ground-water flow model was used in conjunction with particle tracking to evaluate ground-water vulnerability in Clark County, Washington. Using the particle-tracking program, particles were placed in every cell of the flow model (about 60,000 particles) and tracked backwards in time and space upgradient along flow paths to their recharge points. A new computer program was developed that interfaces the results from a particle-tracking program with a geographic information system (GIS). The GIS was used to display and analyze the particle-tracking results. Ground-water vulnerability was evaluated by selecting parts of the ground-water flow system and combining the results with ancillary information stored in the GIS to determine recharge areas, characteristics of recharge areas, downgradient impact of land use at recharge areas, and age of ground water. Maps of the recharge areas for each hydrogeologic unit illustrate the presence of local, intermediate, or regional ground-water flow systems and emphasize the three-dimensional nature of the ground-water flow system in Clark County. Maps of the recharge points for each hydrogeologic unit were overlaid with maps depicting aquifer sensitivity as determined by DRASTIC (a measure of the pollution potential of ground water, based on the intrinsic characteristics of the near-surface unsaturated and saturated zones) and recharge from on-site waste-disposal systems. A large number of recharge areas were identified, particularly in southern Clark County, that have a high aquifer sensitivity, coincide with areas of recharge from on-site waste-disposal systems, or both. Using the GIS, the characteristics of the recharge areas were related to the downgradient parts of the ground-water system that will eventually receive flow that has recharged through these areas. The aquifer sensitivity, as indicated by DRASTIC, of the recharge areas for downgradient parts of the flow system was mapped for each hydrogeologic unit. A number of

  16. 40 CFR 141.626 - Operational evaluation levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... operational evaluation and submit a written report of the evaluation to the State no later than 90 days after... written report must be made available to the public upon request. (2) Your operational evaluation must... scope of evaluation in writing and you must keep that approval with the completed report....

  17. Temperature and energy deficit in the ground during operation and recovery phases of closed-loop ground source heat pump system: Effect of the groundwater flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Selcuk; Francois, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    The advection/dispersion mechanism of the groundwater flow in the ground has a significant effect on a borehole heat exchanger (BHE) to enhance its thermal performance. However, the amount of energy extracted from the ground never disappears and only shifts with the magnitude of the effective thermal velocity in the infinite domain. In this work, we focus on the temperature and the energy balance of the ground in an advection/dispersion dominated heat transfer system during the operation period of a BHE and the subsequent recovery phase when the system is idle. The problem is treated with single BHE and multi-BHEs systems, for different representative geology and different groundwater flow velocity. In order to assess the thermal energy deficit due to heat extraction from the ground, we used the finite line source analytical model, developed recently (Erol et al., 2015) that provides the temperature distributions around the boreholes for discontinuous heat extraction. The model is developed based on the Green's function, which is the solution of heat conduction/advection/dispersion equation in porous media, for discontinuous heat extraction by analytically convoluting rectangular function or pulses in time domain. The results demonstrate the significant positive impact of the groundwater flow for the recovery in terms of temperature deficit at the location of the borehole. However, the total thermal energy deficit is not affected by the groundwater movement. The energy balance of the ground is the same no matter the prevailing heat transfer system, which can be only conduction or advection/dispersion. In addition, the energy balance of the ground is not based on either the duration of the production period operation or of the recovery phase, but depends on the total amount of heat that is extracted and on the bulk volumetric heat capacity of the ground.

  18. Seismic Data for Evaluation of Ground Motion Hazards in Las Vegas in Support of Test Site Readiness Ground Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, A

    2008-01-16

    In this report we describe the data sets used to evaluate ground motion hazards in Las Vegas from nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. This analysis is presented in Rodgers et al. (2005, 2006) and includes 13 nuclear explosions recorded at the John Blume and Associates network, the Little Skull Mountain earthquake and a temporary deployment of broadband station in Las Vegas. The data are available in SAC format on CD-ROM as an appendix to this report.

  19. Mission Operations Centers (MOCs): Integrating key spacecraft ground data system components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbaugh, Randy; Szakal, Donna

    1994-11-01

    In an environment characterized by decreasing budgets, limited system development time, and user needs for increased capabilities, the Mission Operations Division (MOD) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center initiated a new, cost-effective concept in developing its spacecraft ground data systems: the Mission Operations Center (MOC). In the MOC approach, key components are integrated into a comprehensive and cohesive spacecraft planning, monitoring, command, and control system with a single, state-of-the-art graphical user interface. The MOD is currently implementing MOC's, which feature a common, reusable, and extendable system architecture, to support the X-Ray Timing Explorer (XTE), Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), and Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) missions. As a result of the MOC approach, mission operations are integrated, and users can, with a single system, perform real-time health and safety monitoring, real-time command and control, real-time attitude processing, real-time and predictive graphical spacecraft monitoring, trend analysis, mission planning and scheduling, command generation and management, network scheduling, guide star selection, and (using an expert system) spacecraft monitoring and fault isolation. The MOD is also implementing its test and training simulators under the new MOC management structure. This paper describes the MOC concept, the management approaches used in developing MOC systems, the technologies employed and the development process improvement initiatives applied in implementing MOC systems, and the expected benefits to both the user and the mission project in using the MOC approach.

  20. Operation of an array of field-change detectors to provide ground truth for FORTE data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massey, R.S.; Eack, K.B.; Eberle, M.H.; Shao, X.M.; Smith, D.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Space and Atmospheric Sciences Group; Wiens, K.C. [New Mexico Inst. of Tech., Socorro, NM (United States)

    1999-06-01

    The authors have deployed an array of fast electric-field-change sensors around the state of New Mexico to help identify the lightning processes responsible for the VHF RF signals detected by the FORTE satellite`s wide-band transient radio emission receivers. The array provides them with locations and electric-field waveforms for events within New Mexico and into surrounding states, and operates continuously. They are particularly interested in events for which there are coincident FORTE observations. For these events, they can correct both the array and FORTE waveforms for time of flight, and can plot the two waveforms on a common time axis. Most of the coincident events are from cloud-go-ground discharges, but the most powerful are from a little-studied class of events variously called narrow bipolar events and compact intra-cloud discharges. They have therefore focused their attention on these events whether or not FORTE was in position to observe them.

  1. Thermo-physical performance prediction of the KSC Ground Operation Demonstration Unit for liquid hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baik, J. H.; Notardonato, W. U.; Karng, S. W.; Oh, I.

    2015-12-01

    NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) researchers have been working on enhanced and modernized cryogenic liquid propellant handling techniques to reduce life cycle costs of propellant management system for the unique KSC application. The KSC Ground Operation Demonstration Unit (GODU) for liquid hydrogen (LH2) plans to demonstrate integrated refrigeration, zero-loss flexible term storage of LH2, and densified hydrogen handling techniques. The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) has partnered with the KSC researchers to develop thermal performance prediction model of the GODU for LH2. The model includes integrated refrigeration cooling performance, thermal losses in the tank and distribution lines, transient system characteristics during chilling and loading, and long term steady-state propellant storage. This paper will discuss recent experimental data of the GODU for LH2 system and modeling results.

  2. X-ray-absorption sum rules in jj-coupled operators and ground-state moments of actinide ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, G; Thole, BT

    1996-01-01

    Sum rules for magnetic x-ray dichroism, relating the signals of the spin-orbit split core level absorption edges to the ground-state spin and orbital operators, are expressed in jj-coupled operators. These sum rules can be used in the region of intermediate coupling by taking into account the cross

  3. Preliminary design of a space system operating a ground-penetrating radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Errico, Marco; Ponte, Salvatore; Grassi, Michele; Moccia, Antonio

    2005-12-01

    Ground-penetrating radars (GPR) are currently used only in ground campaigns or in few airborne installations. A feasibility analysis of a space mission operating a GPR for archaeological applications is presented in this work with emphasis on spacecraft critical aspects: antenna dimension and power required for achieving adequate depth and accuracy. Sensor parametric design is performed considering two operating altitudes (250 and 500 km) and user requirements, such as minimum skin depth, vertical and horizontal resolution. A 500-km altitude, 6 a.m.-6 p.m. sun-synchronous orbit is an adequate compromise between atmospheric drag and payload transmitted average power (12 kW) to achieve a 3-m penetration depth. The satellite bus preliminary design is then performed, with focus on critical subsystems and technologies. The payload average power requirement can be kept within feasible limits (1 kW) by using NiH2 batteries to supply the radar transmitter, and with a strong reduction of the mission duty cycle ( 40km×1100km are observed per orbit). As for the electric power subsystem, a dual-voltage strategy is adopted, with the battery charge regulator supplied at 126 V and the bus loads at 50 V. The overall average power (1.9 kW), accounting for both payload and bus needs, can be supplied by a 20m2 GaAs solar panel for a three-year lifetime. Finally, the satellite mass is kept within reasonable limits (1.6 tons) using inflatable-rigidisable structure for both the payload antenna and the solar panels.

  4. Evaluation of Real-Time Ground-Based GPS Meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, P.; Bock, Y.; Gutman, S.

    2003-04-01

    We demonstrate and evaluate a system to estimate zenith tropospheric delays in real time (5-10 minute latency) based on the technique of instantaneous GPS positioning as described by Bock et al. [2000] using data from the Orange County Real Time GPS Network. OCRTN is an upgrade of a sub-network of SCIGN sites in southern California to low latency (1-2 sec), high-rate (1 Hz) data streaming. Currently, ten sites are streaming data (Ashtech binary MBEN format) by means of dedicated, point-to-point radio modems to a network hub that translates the asynchronous serial data to TCP/IP and onto a PC workstation residing on a local area network. Software residing on the PC allows multiple clients to access the raw data simultaneously though TCP/IP. One of the clients is a Geodetics RTD server that receives and archives (1) the raw 1 Hz network data, (2) estimates of instantaneous positions and zenith tropospheric delays, and (3) RINEX data to decimated to 30 seconds. The network is composed of ten sites. The distribution of nine of the sites approximates a right triangle with two 60 km legs, and a tenth site on Catalina Island a distance of about 50 km (over water) from the hypotenuse of the triangle. Relative zenith delays are estimated every second with a latency less than a second. Median values are computed at a user-specified interval (e.g., 10 minutes) with outliers greater than 4 times the interquartile range rejected. We describe the results with those generated by our operational system using the GAMIT software, with a latency of 30-60 minutes. Earlier results (from a similar network) comparing 30-minute median RTD values to GAMIT 30-minute estimates indicate that the two solutions differ by about 1 cm. We also describe our approach to determining absolute zenith delays. If an Internet connection is available we will present a real-time demonstration. [Bock, Y., R. Nikolaidis, P. J. de Jonge, and M. Bevis, Instantaneous resolution of crustal motion at medium

  5. Energetic Efficiency Evaluation by Using GroundWater Heat Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokar Adriana

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Romania has significant energy potential from renewable sources, but the potential used is much lower due to technical and functional disadvantages, to economic efficiency, the cost elements and environmental limitations. However, efforts are being made to integrate renewable energy in the national energy system. To promote and encourage private investments for renewable energy utilization, programs have been created in order to access funds needed to implement these technologies. Assessment of such investments was carried out from technical and economical point of view, by analyzing a heat pump using as heat source the solar energy from the ground.

  6. Cosmological Physics Ground Rules and How to Evaluate Cosmologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilworth, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    This paper is a simple reminder for cosmology enthusiasts of the bright line separating the laws of physics from science fiction. It provides some tools: rules, guidelines and a definition of space useful for examining cosmology science claims and concepts. It explains the stringent thresholds for an idea before it can accurately be called a scientific theory or hypothesis; and who bears the burden of proof for a theory. These simple tools provide solid ground so you may more easily examine cosmology claims to help make up your own mind which side of the science/science fiction line a specific claim belongs on.

  7. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Ground Level Area Sources in Dairy and Cattle Feedyard Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvin B. Parnell

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A protocol that consisted of an isolation flux chamber and a portable gas chromatograph was used to directly quantify greenhouse gas (GHG emissions at a dairy and a feedyard operation in the Texas Panhandle. Field sampling campaigns were performed 5 consecutive days only during daylight hours from 9:00 am to 7:00 pm each day. The objective of this research was to quantify and compare GHG emission rates (ERs from ground level area sources (GLAS at dairy and cattle feedyard operations during the summer. A total of 74 air samples using flux chamber were collected from the barn (manure lane and bedding area, loafing pen, open lot, settling basin, lagoons, and compost pile within the dairy operation. For the cattle feedyard, a total of 87 air samples were collected from four corner pens of a large feedlot, runoff holding pond, and compost pile. Three primary GHGs (methane, carbon dioxide, and nitrous oxide were measured and quantified from both operations. The aggregate estimated ERs for CH4, CO2, and N2O were 836, 5573, 3.4 g hd−1 d−1 (collectively 27.5 kg carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e hd−1 d−1, respectively, at the dairy operation. The aggregate ERs for CH4, CO2, and N2O were 3.8, 1399, 0.68 g hd−1 d−1 (1.7 kg CO2e hd−1 d−1, respectively, from the feedyard. The estimated USEPA GHG ERs were about 13.2 and 1.16 kg CO2e hd−1 d−1, respectively, for dairy and feedyard operations. Aggregate CH4, CO2 and N2O ERs at the dairy facility were about 219, 4 and 5 times higher, respectively, than those at the feedyard. At the dairy, average CH4 ERs estimated from the settling basin, primary and secondary lagoons were significantly higher than those from the other GLAS, contributing about 98% of the aggregate CH4 emission. The runoff holding pond and pen surface of the feedyard contributed about 99% of the aggregate CH4 emission. Average CO2 and N2O ERs estimated from the pen surface area were significantly higher than those estimated from

  8. Ground-state energies and charge radii of $^{4}$He, $^{16}$O, $^{40}$Ca, and $^{56}$Ni in the unitary-model-operator approach

    CERN Document Server

    Miyagi, Takayuki; Okamoto, Ryoji; Otsuka, Takaharu

    2015-01-01

    We study the nuclear ground-state properties by using the unitary-model-operator approach (UMOA). Recently, the particle-basis formalism has been introduced in the UMOA and enables us to employ the charge-dependent nucleon-nucleon interaction. We evaluate the ground-state energies and charge radii of $^{4}$He, $^{16}$O, $^{40}$Ca, and $^{56}$Ni with the charge-dependent Bonn potential. The ground-state energy is dominated by the contributions from the one- and two-body cluster terms, while, for the radius, the one-particle-one-hole excitations are more important than the two-particle-two-hole excitations. The calculated results reproduce the trend of experimental data of the saturation property for finite nuclei.

  9. Dark fermentation of ground wheat starch for bio-hydrogen production by fed-batch operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kargi, Fikret; Pamukoglu, M. Yunus [Department of Environmental Engineering, Dokuz Eylul University, 35160 Buca, Izmir (Turkey)

    2009-04-15

    Ground wheat solution was used for bio-hydrogen production by dark fermentation using heat-treated anaerobic sludge in a completely mixed fermenter operating in fed-batch mode. The feed wheat powder (WP) solution was fed to the anaerobic fermenter with a constant flow rate of 8.33 mL h{sup -1} (200 mL d{sup -1}). Cumulative hydrogen production, starch utilization and hydrogen yields were determined at three different WP loading rates corresponding to the feed WP concentrations of 10, 20 and 30 g L{sup -1}. The residual starch (substrate) concentration in the fermenter decreased with operation time while starch consumption was increasing. The highest cumulative hydrogen production (3600 mL), hydrogen yield (465 mL H{sub 2} g{sup -1} starch or 3.1 mol H{sub 2} mol{sup -1} glucose) and hydrogen production rate (864 mL H{sub 2} d{sup -1}) were obtained after 4 days of fed-batch operation with the 20 g L{sup -1} feed WP concentration corresponding to a WP loading rate of 4 g WP d{sup -1}. Low feed WP concentrations (10 g L{sup -1}) resulted in low hydrogen yields and rates due to substrate limitations. High feed WP concentrations (30 g L{sup -1}) resulted in the formation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) in high concentrations causing inhibition on the rate and yield of hydrogen production. (author)

  10. Evaluating operating system vulnerability to memory errors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Kurt Brian; Bridges, Patrick G. (University of New Mexico); Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Mueller, Frank (North Carolina State University); Fiala, David (North Carolina State University); Brightwell, Ronald Brian

    2012-05-01

    Reliability is of great concern to the scalability of extreme-scale systems. Of particular concern are soft errors in main memory, which are a leading cause of failures on current systems and are predicted to be the leading cause on future systems. While great effort has gone into designing algorithms and applications that can continue to make progress in the presence of these errors without restarting, the most critical software running on a node, the operating system (OS), is currently left relatively unprotected. OS resiliency is of particular importance because, though this software typically represents a small footprint of a compute node's physical memory, recent studies show more memory errors in this region of memory than the remainder of the system. In this paper, we investigate the soft error vulnerability of two operating systems used in current and future high-performance computing systems: Kitten, the lightweight kernel developed at Sandia National Laboratories, and CLE, a high-performance Linux-based operating system developed by Cray. For each of these platforms, we outline major structures and subsystems that are vulnerable to soft errors and describe methods that could be used to reconstruct damaged state. Our results show the Kitten lightweight operating system may be an easier target to harden against memory errors due to its smaller memory footprint, largely deterministic state, and simpler system structure.

  11. Ground Operations of the ISS GNC Babb-Mueller Atmospheric Density Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogan, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    The ISS GNC system was updated recently with a new software release that provides onboard state determination capability. Prior to this release, only the Russian segment maintained and propagated the onboard state, which was periodically updated through Russian ground tracking. The new software gives the US segment the capability for maintaining the onboard state, and includes new GPS and state vector propagation capabilities. Part of this software package is an atmospheric density model based on the Babb-Mueller algorithm. Babb-Mueller efficiently mimics a full analytical density model, such as the Jacchia model. While lacchia is very robust and is used in the Mission Control Center, it is too computationally intensive for use onboard. Thus, Babb-Mueller was chosen as an alternative. The onboard model depends on a set of calibration coefficients that produce a curve fit to the lacchia model. The ISS GNC system only maintains one set of coefficients onboard, so a new set must be uplinked by controllers when the atmospheric conditions change. The onboard density model provides a real-time density value, which is used to calculate the drag experienced by the ISS. This drag value is then incorporated into the onboard propagation of the state vector. The propagation of the state vector, and therefore operation of the BabbMueller algorithm, will be most critical when GPS updates and secondary state vector sources fail. When GPS is active, the onboard state vector will be updated every ten seconds, so the propagation error is irrelevant. When GPS is inactive, the state vector must be updated at least every 24 hours, based on current protocol. Therefore, the Babb-Mueller coefficients must be accurate enough to fulfill the state vector accuracy requirements for at least one day. A ground operations concept was needed in order to manage both the on board Babb-Mueller density model and the onboard state quality. The Babb-Mueller coefficients can be determined operationally

  12. Developing a Logistics Data Process for Support Equipment for NASA Ground Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Suman

    2010-01-01

    the design of the equipment can make such operational effort unnecessary. Finally, this paper addresses processes of tying resources to a timeline of tasks performed in ground operations: this enables various overarching analyses, e.g., a summarization of all resources used for a given piece of equipment. Quality Control of data will also be discussed: importing and exporting data from product teams, including spreadsheets-todatabase or data exchange between databases.

  13. Developing a Logistics Data Process for Support Equipment for NASA Ground Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Suman

    2010-01-01

    the design of the equipment can make such operational effort unnecessary. Finally, this paper addresses processes of tying resources to a timeline of tasks performed in ground operations: this enables various overarching analyses, e.g., a summarization of all resources used for a given piece of equipment. Quality Control of data will also be discussed: importing and exporting data from product teams, including spreadsheets-todatabase or data exchange between databases.

  14. Operational optical turbulence forecast for the service mode of top-class ground based telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masciadri, Elena; Lascaux, Franck; Turchi, Alessio; Fini, Luca

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution we present the most relevant results obtained in the context of a feasibility study (MOSE) undertaken for ESO. The principal aim of the project was to quantify the performances of an atmospherical non-hydrostatical mesoscale model (Astro-Meso-NH code) in forecasting all the main atmospherical parameters relevant for the ground-based astronomical observations and the optical turbulence (CN2 and associated integrated astroclimatic parameters) above Cerro Paranal (site of the VLT) and Cerro Armazones (site of the E-ELT). A detailed analysis on the score of success of the predictive capacities of the system have been carried out for all the astroclimatic as well as for the atmospherical parameters. Considering the excellent results that we obtained, this study proved the opportunity to implement on these two sites an automatic system to be run nightly in an operational configuration to support the scheduling of scientific programs as well as of astronomical facilities (particularly those supported by AO systems) of the VLT and the E-ELT. At the end of 2016 a new project for the implementation of a demonstrator of an operational system to be run on the two ESO's sites will start. The fact that the system can be run simultaneously on the two sites is an ancillary appealing feature of the system. Our team is also responsible for the implementation of a similar automatic system at Mt.Graham, site of the LBT (ALTA Project). Our system/method will permit therefore to make a step ahead in the framework of the Service Mode for new generation telescopes. Among the most exciting achieved results we cite the fact that we proved to be able to forecast CN2 profiles with a vertical resolution as high as 150 m. Such a feature is particularly crucial for all WFAO systems that require such detailed information on the OT vertical stratification on the whole 20 km above the ground. This important achievement tells us that all the WFAO systems can rely on automatic

  15. The Operational Testing Effectiveness Evaluation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    compared, testing methods improved, and critics silenced . Given that checking IOT&E assessments against operational data seemed to be common sense, was...history of OT&E, discussing the poasibility that the record of frequent convulsive organizational change is related to the lack of adequate feedback on... silence the critics, and ultimately ensure that the weapons reaching the ramp really are effective and suitable. 30 ~• x , .-.-. I- BIBLIOGRAPH d Books

  16. New active-only grounded inductance simulator employing current-mode approach suitable for wide band operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamacli, Serhan; Ozcan, Sadri; Kuntman, Hakan

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, an active-only grounded lossless inductance simulator operating in current-mode is presented. The circuit uses only a current operational amplifier (COA) and an operational transconductance amplifier (OTA). The novelty of the proposed circuit is that it uses a COA instead of a voltage operational amplifier (VOA) to take the wider frequency operation advantage of the current-mode approach. The simulation results obtained through SPICE with 0.5 μm standard CMOS technology verify that the designed circuit can be operated up to 30 MHz, which is much higher than the operation frequency of previously reported inductance simulators utilising VOAs. The inductance value of the presented circuit can be adjusted electronically between 3.9 μH and 37 μH via the biasing current of the OTA. A parallel resonance circuit application is also given validating the operation of the proposed inductance simulator.

  17. Operational optical turbulence forecast for the Service Mode of top-class ground based telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Masciadri, E; Turchi, A; Fini, L

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution we present the most relevant results obtained in the context of a feasibility study (MOSE) undertaken for ESO. The principal aim of the project was to quantify the performances of a mesoscale model (Astro-Meso-NH code) in forecasting all the main atmospherical parameters relevant for the ground-based astronomical observations and the optical turbulence (CN2 and associated integrated astroclimatic parameters) above Cerro Paranal (site of the VLT) and Cerro Armazones (site of the E-ELT). A detailed analysis on the score of success of the predictive capacities of the system have been carried out for all the astroclimatic as well as for the atmospherical parameters. Considering the excellent results that we obtained, this study proved the opportunity to implement on these two sites an automatic system to be run nightly in an operational configuration to support the scheduling of scientific programs as well as of astronomical facilities (particularly those supported by AO systems) of the VLT a...

  18. Ground-penetrating radar evaluation of bridge decks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Glenn E.

    1995-05-01

    Radar has emerged as a valuable non-destructive test method for evaluating the condition of New Hampshire bridge decks. It allows the inspector to 'see' the top surface of the portland cement concrete deck which is typically covered with asphalt pavement. Radar is also very 'customer friendly' in that it allows inspectors to evaluate the bridge decks without closing travel lanes or otherwise impeding traffic flow in any way. This paper discusses the inspection needs of the New Hampshire Department of Transportation which necessitated the use of radar, as well as a history of its selection, development, and incorporation into New Hampshire's bridge management system.

  19. Experimental evaluation of ALS point cloud ground extraction over different land cover in the Malopolska Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniowska, Karolina; Mandlburger, Gottfried; Klimczyk, Agata

    2013-04-01

    The paper presents an evaluation of different terrain point extraction algorithms for Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) point clouds. The research area covers eight test sites in the Małopolska Province (Poland) with varying point density between 3-15points/m² and surface as well as land cover characteristics. In this paper the existing implementations of algorithms were considered. Approaches based on mathematical morphology, progressive densification, robust surface interpolation and segmentation were compared. From the group of morphological filters, the Progressive Morphological Filter (PMF) proposed by Zhang K. et al. (2003) in LIS software was evaluated. From the progressive densification filter methods developed by Axelsson P. (2000) the Martin Isenburg's implementation in LAStools software (LAStools, 2012) was chosen. The third group of methods are surface-based filters. In this study, we used the hierarchic robust interpolation approach by Kraus K., Pfeifer N. (1998) as implemented in SCOP++ (Trimble, 2012). The fourth group of methods works on segmentation. From this filtering concept the segmentation algorithm available in LIS was tested (Wichmann V., 2012). The main aim in executing the automatic classification for ground extraction was operating in default mode or with default parameters which were selected by the developers of the algorithms. It was assumed that the default settings were equivalent to the parameters on which the best results can be achieved. In case it was not possible to apply an algorithm in default mode, a combination of the available and most crucial parameters for ground extraction were selected. As a result of these analyses, several output LAS files with different ground classification were achieved. The results were described on the basis of qualitative and quantitative analyses, both being in a formal description. The classification differences were verified on point cloud data. Qualitative verification of ground extraction was

  20. Evaluation of low-cost commercial-off-the-shelf autopilot systems for SUAS operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Calvin Thomas

    With this increase in unmanned aircraft system (UAS) operations, there is a need for a structured process to evaluate different commercially available systems, particularly autopilots. The Remotely Operated Aircraft Management, Interpretation, and Navigation from Ground or ROAMING scale was developed to meet this need. This scale is a modification of the widely accepted Handling Qualities Rating scale developed by George Cooper and Robert Harper Jr. The Cooper-Harper scale allows pilots to rate a vehicle's performance in completing some task. Similarly, the ROAMING scale allows UAS operators to evaluate the management and observability of UAS in completing some task. The standardized evaluative process consists of cost, size, weight, and power (SWAP) analysis, ease of implementation through procedural description of setup, ROAMING scale rating, a slightly modified NASA TLX rating, and comparison of manual operation to autonomous operation of the task. This standard for evaluation of autopilots and their software will lead to better understanding of the workload placed on UAS operators and indicate where improvements to design and operational procedures can be made. An assortment of low-cost commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) autopilots were selected for use in the development of the evaluation and results of these tests demonstrate the commonalities and differences in these systems.

  1. Operator performance evaluation using multi criteria decision making methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Ruzanita Mat; Ismail, Wan Rosmanira; Razali, Siti Fatihah

    2014-06-01

    Operator performance evaluation is a very important operation in labor-intensive manufacturing industry because the company's productivity depends on the performance of its operators. The aims of operator performance evaluation are to give feedback to operators on their performance, to increase company's productivity and to identify strengths and weaknesses of each operator. In this paper, six multi criteria decision making methods; Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP), fuzzy AHP (FAHP), ELECTRE, PROMETHEE II, Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) and VlseKriterijumska Optimizacija I Kompromisno Resenje (VIKOR) are used to evaluate the operators' performance and to rank the operators. The performance evaluation is based on six main criteria; competency, experience and skill, teamwork and time punctuality, personal characteristics, capability and outcome. The study was conducted at one of the SME food manufacturing companies in Selangor. From the study, it is found that AHP and FAHP yielded the "outcome" criteria as the most important criteria. The results of operator performance evaluation showed that the same operator is ranked the first using all six methods.

  2. From the ground up: building a participatory evaluation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Victoria; Carrillo, Christina; Wallerstein, Nina

    2011-01-01

    We engaged in a community-based participatory research (CBPR) project with the New Mexico Department of Health (DOH) and its 32 county-based health councils. We report on the process of the collaborative development of an evaluation model that would identify and link council actions to intermediate system change. We used multiple data sources and interactive, iterative processes to systematically examine and document the health council system including document review, a statewide partnership survey, and multiple meetings with partners. We highlight lessons and challenges in our CBPR process, including the need for community partners to overcome the fear of evaluation, the use of multiple participatory mechanisms, the value of a linking agent, and understanding multiple data needs. The time and resources of this participatory evaluation process enabled successful navigation of two important issues: (1) increased attention to statewide accountability of collaborative public health initiatives, and (2) increased expectation by health councils or other community partnerships to have a recognized voice in defining measures for this accountability.

  3. Finding common ground: A participatory approach to evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Sutherland

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: This article describes the efforts of a group of donors and activists to collectively develop a national base line on organisations working for human rights in relation to sexual orientation and gender identity (SOGI in Kenya to develop an ongoing monitoring and evaluation process.Objectives: The purpose of the base line was to support both activist strategising and ongoing reflection, and more effective donor collaboration and grant making.Method: Drawing on interviews with key stakeholders, the authors examined the dominant approach to funding and evaluation on social change globally. They analysed the impact of this dominant approach on developing and sustaining a SOGI movement in Kenya. They developed an alternative theory of change and participatory methodology and worked with a range of donors and SOGI organisations to conceptualise and support the collaborative collection of information on four themes: legislation and policy, organisational mapping, political and cultural context, and lived experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people.Results: This was a useful process and tool for activists and donors to develop a shared understanding of the current context and capacities influencing efforts to promote SOGI rights. It served as a basis for improved strategising and participants expected it to prove useful for monitoring progress in the longer term.Conclusion: This theory of change and participatory approach to base line development could be helpful to donors, activists and monitoring and evaluation specialists concerned with supporting social change in the region and globally.

  4. Ground Vehicle Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    Ground Vehicle Robotics Jim Parker Associate Director, Ground Vehicle Robotics UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution Statement A. Approved for public...DATE 20 AUG 2013 2. REPORT TYPE Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED 09-05-2013 to 15-08-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ground Vehicle Robotics 5a...Willing to take Risk on technology -User Evaluated -Contested Environments -Operational Data Applied Robotics for Installation & Base Ops -Low Risk

  5. Evaluation of depleted uranium in the environment at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland and Yuma Proving Grounds, Arizona. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, P.L.; Clements, W.H.; Myers, O.B.; Bestgen, H.T.; Jenkins, D.G. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Fishery and Wildlife Biology

    1995-01-01

    This report represents an evaluation of depleted uranium (DU) introduced into the environment at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds (APG), Maryland and Yuma Proving Grounds (YPG) Arizona. This was a cooperative project between the Environmental Sciences and Statistical Analyses Groups at LANL and with the Department of Fishery and Wildlife Biology at Colorado State University. The project represents a unique approach to assessing the environmental impact of DU in two dissimilar ecosystems. Ecological exposure models were created for each ecosystem and sensitivity/uncertainty analyses were conducted to identify exposure pathways which were most influential in the fate and transport of DU in the environment. Research included field sampling, field exposure experiment, and laboratory experiments. The first section addresses DU at the APG site. Chapter topics include bioenergetics-based food web model; field exposure experiments; bioconcentration by phytoplankton and the toxicity of U to zooplankton; physical processes governing the desorption of uranium from sediment to water; transfer of uranium from sediment to benthic invertebrates; spead of adsorpion by benthic invertebrates; uptake of uranium by fish. The final section of the report addresses DU at the YPG site. Chapters include the following information: Du transport processes and pathway model; field studies of performance of exposure model; uptake and elimination rates for kangaroo rates; chemical toxicity in kangaroo rat kidneys.

  6. Evaluation of thinning operations in older pine stands. Research methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter F. Giefing

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of forest operations in different scientific institutions resulted in inventing of various methods. The objective of this paper is to present a universal concept of a research method for the evaluation of forest operations (including thinning operations with a multicriteria analysis of ecological, ergonomic and economic aspects (3E. Special attention was paid to the ecological evaluation, which has not been widely researched. Analysis of all three aspects of the 3E evaluation was based on a literature study. The results showed that it is essential to consider all three aspects in the evaluation of timber harvesting and that mechanised thinning operations (harvester – forwarder are preferable, considering all three aspects, compared to those carried out by chainsaw and skidder.  

  7. Transforming America’s Military: Integrating Unconventional Ground Forces into Combat Air Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    the Vietnam War, Operation Desert One (the failed Iranian hostage rescue attempt), and Operation Urgent Fury (the disjointed Grenada operation) was...airpower could have in the upcoming operation to liberate Kuwait. The former commander of JSOC , Army General (Ret.) Wayne Downing, believed that “no...Operations Air Component Commander JSOC —Joint Special Operations Command JSOTF—Joint Special Operations Task Force 22 JSTARS—Joint Surveillance Target

  8. Performance evaluation of a 1.6-µm methane DIAL system from ground, aircraft and UAV platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaat, Tamer F; Ismail, Syed; Nehrir, Amin R; Hair, John W; Crawford, James H; Leifer, Ira; Shuman, Timothy

    2013-12-16

    Methane is an efficient absorber of infrared radiation and a potent greenhouse gas with a warming potential 72 times greater than carbon dioxide on a per molecule basis. Development of methane active remote sensing capability using the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique enables scientific assessments of the gas emission and impacts on the climate. A performance evaluation of a pulsed DIAL system for monitoring atmospheric methane is presented. This system leverages a robust injection-seeded pulsed Nd:YAG pumped Optical Parametric Oscillator (OPO) laser technology operating in the 1.645 µm spectral band. The system also leverages an efficient low noise, commercially available, InGaAs avalanche photo-detector (APD). Lidar signals and error budget are analyzed for system operation on ground in the range-resolved DIAL mode and from airborne platforms in the integrated path DIAL (IPDA) mode. Results indicate system capability of measuring methane concentration profiles with <1.0% total error up to 4.5 km range with 5 minute averaging from ground. For airborne IPDA, the total error in the column dry mixing ratio is less than 0.3% with 0.1 sec average using ground returns. This system has a unique capability of combining signals from the atmospheric scattering from layers above the surface with ground return signals, which provides methane column measurement between the atmospheric scattering layer and the ground directly. In such case 0.5% and 1.2% total errors are achieved with 10 sec average from airborne platforms at 8 km and 15.24 km altitudes, respectively. Due to the pulsed nature of the transmitter, the system is relatively insensitive to aerosol and cloud interferences. Such DIAL system would be ideal for investigating high latitude methane releases over polar ice sheets, permafrost regions, wetlands, and over ocean during day and night. This system would have commercial potential for fossil fuel leaks detection and industrial monitoring applications.

  9. Ground State Energy of the One-Dimensional Discrete Random Schr\\"{o}dinger Operator with Bernoulli Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we show the that the ground state energy of the one-dimensional Discrete Random Schr\\"{o}dinger Operator with Bernoulli Potential is controlled asymptotically as the system size N goes to infinity by the random variable, $\\ell_N$ the length the longest consecutive sequence of sites on the lattice with potential equal to zero. Specifically, we will show that with probability one the limit as the system size goes to infinity the ratio of the ground state energy with the energy of a half-sine wave converges to one.

  10. Space operation system for Chang’E program and its capability evaluation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yu Zhi-jian; Lu Li-chang; Liu Yung-chun; Dong Guang-liang

    2005-12-01

    Space operation for China ’s first lunar exploration program,Chang ’E will be provided by the S-band aerospace Telemetry,Tracking and Command (TT&C)network designed for China ’s manned space program.This is undoubtedly a great challenge to the ground TT&C system.The largest antennas of China ’s S-band aerospace TT&C network has an aperture of only 12 m.A series of technical measures have been taken into the designing of the spacecraft-ground TT&C system to ensure that such antennas can communicate with Chang ’E-1 lunar probe 400,000 km away.These include installation of high-gain directional antennae and medium-gain omni-directional antennae for the probe,adding channel encoding to the downlink channel,using both high and low data rates for information transmission and upgrade and design of ground equipment terminals.Among them,the omni-directional antenna will operate in the earth-ground transfer orbit phase and the directional antenna will operate in the lunar orbit phase.These measures satisfy the spacecraft- ground link and program design requirements. To provide accurate navigation for the probe during its Earth –Moon flight and initial lunar orbiting flight,China ’s VLBI system designed for astronomical observations,will also be used besides the ranging and range rate measurement capabilities of the S-band TT&C network.The purpose is to provide 100 m accuracy in position determination during lunar orbit.This paper describes the system design,technical challenges,solutions and capability evaluation of space operation for Chang ’E-1.

  11. Airline Operational Control (AOC)/UAS Ground Control Station (GCS) Collaboration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to form a network and a set of tools that will create a shared situation awareness with Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Ground Control Stations (GCSs) and...

  12. Miscellaneous information regarding operation and inventory of 618-11 Burial Ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, C.R.

    1993-06-01

    This report is a compilation of inventories and radiation surveys taken for the 618-11 Burial Ground at Hanford. This report deals with waste management activities at the facility during the early to mid-1960s.

  13. Geophysical Monitoring of Ground Surface Deformation Associated with a Confined Aquifer Storage and Recovery Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneville, Alain; Heggy, Essam; Strickland, Christopher; Normand, Jonathan; Dermond, Jeffrey; Fang, Yilin; Sullivan, Charlotte

    2015-08-01

    One important issue in the storage of large volumes of fluids, mainly water and CO2, in the deep subsurface is to determine the resulting field-scale-induced displacements and consequences of overpressures on the mechanical integrity of the storage reservoir and surroundings. A quantifiable estimation of displacement can be made by combining the robust, cost-effective, and repeatable geophysical techniques of micro-gravimetry, differential global positioning system (DGPS), and differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry (DInSAR). These techniques were field tested and evaluated for the first time on an active large-volume aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) project in Pendleton, Oregon, USA, where three ASR wells are injecting up to 1.9 million m3 year-1 into basalt aquifers to a depth of about 150 m. Injection and recovery of water at the wells are accompanied by significant gravity anomalies and vertical deformation of the ground surface localized to the immediate surroundings of the injection wells as evidenced by DGPS and gravity measurements collected in 2011. At a larger scale, and between 2011 and 2013, DInSAR monitoring of the Pendleton area shows sub- centimetric deformation in the western part of the city and close to the injection locations associated with ASR cycle. Deformations are found to be temporally out phased with the injection and recovery events due to complex groundwater flow. A numerical simulation of the effect of the water injection gives results in good agreement with the observations and confirms the validity of the approach, which could be deployed in similar geological contexts to look at the mechanical effects of water and gas injections.

  14. Evaluation and Adaptation of Mine-Hunting Operations with AUVs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, R. van; Giodini, S.; Hunter, A.J.; Beckers, A.L.D.; Williams, D.F.

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness and efficiency of mine-hunting operations with autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) are greatly influenced by environmental conditions, such as seabed, turbidity, currents, and tides. Therefore accurate environmental information is needed for the planning and evaluation of

  15. Simple Evaluation of Chiral Jacobian with Overlap Dirac Operator

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, H

    1999-01-01

    The chiral Jacobian, which is defined with Neuberger's overlap Dirac operator of lattice fermion, is explicitly evaluated in the continuum limit without expanding it in the gauge coupling constant. Our calculational scheme is simple and straightforward. We determine a coefficient of the chiral anomaly for general value of the bare mass parameter and the Wilson parameter of the overlap Dirac operator.

  16. Development of an operations evaluation system for sinking EDM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauwers, B.; Oosterling, J.A.J.; Vanderauwera, W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the development and validation of an operations evaluation system for sinking EDM operations. Based on a given workpiece geometry (e.g. mould), regions to be EDM'ed are automatically indentified. For a given electrode configuration, consisting of one or more regions, EDM machini

  17. Development of an operations evaluation system for sinking EDM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauwers, B.; Oosterling, J.A.J.; Vanderauwera, W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the development and validation of an operations evaluation system for sinking EDM operations. Based on a given workpiece geometry (e.g. mould), regions to be EDM'ed are automatically indentified. For a given electrode configuration, consisting of one or more regions, EDM machini

  18. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of Six 300-FF-2 Operable Unit Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. D. Ludowise

    2006-12-12

    This report provides the final hazard categorization (FHC) for the remediation of six solid waste disposal sites (referred to as burial grounds) located in the 300-FF-2 Operable Unit (OU) on the Hanford Site. These six sites (618-1, 618-2, 618-3, 618-7, 618-8, and 618-13 Burial Grounds) were determined to have a total radionuclide inventory (WCH 2005a, WCH 2005d, WCH 2005e and WCH 2006b) that exceeds the DOE-STD-1027 Category 3 threshold quantity (DOE 1997) and are the subject of this analysis. This FHC document examines the hazards, identifies appropriate controls to manage the hazards, and documents the FHC and commitments for the 300-FF-2 Burial Grounds Remediation Project.

  19. Mine stability evaluation of panel 1 during waste emplacement operations at WIPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maleki, H. [Maleki Technologies Inc., Spokane, WA (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The specific objectives of the work were defined by the Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) as follows: (1) assess the stability of panel 1 during the proposed operation of waste emplacement; (2) estimate the amount of time before room closure would be expected to transfer rock loads to the waste packages. The work consisted of (1) an analysis of geotechnical data and a review of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) plans for waste emplacement in panel 1, (2) an evaluation of ground conditions based on data analysis and observations of changes in ground conditions since the first evaluation in 1993 (USBM 1993), and (3) preparation of a report and presentation of the results to EEG staff. Excluded from this study are radiological safety issues and policies. The study is based on data provided by DOE and Westinghouse Electric Corporation (operator of the site) and conversations with DOE and Westinghouse personnel. MTI cannot independently verify the accuracy of the data within the scope of this study and recommends independent evaluations of data gathering, quality assurance procedures, and structural designs. The operator has the ultimate responsibility for structural designs and has expressed a strong commitment to ensuring worker safety.

  20. The Use of Dexamethasone in Support of High-Altitude Ground Operations: Review of the Literature & Current Training of U.S. Special Operations Medical Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    8) 8 mg twice daily starting the day before the ascent to 4,559 m throughout the 2-day study Dexamethasone improved VO2 - max (pɘ.05) and...4,559 m Dexamethasone improved VO2 - max (p=0.025); no significant difference existed in arterial O2 saturation during maximal exercise...AFRL-SA-WP-SR-2013-0006 The Use of Dexamethasone in Support of High-Altitude Ground Operations: Review of the Literature & Current

  1. Evaluation of Grounding Impedance of a Complex Lightning Protective System Using Earth Ground Clamp Measurements and ATP Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Carlos T.; Rakov, V. A.; Mata, Angel G.

    2010-01-01

    A new Lightning Protection System (LPS) was designed and built at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B), at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, which consists of a catenary wire system (at a height of about 181 meters above ground level) supported by three insulators installed atop three towers in a triangular configuration. A total of nine downconductors (each about 250 meters long, on average) are connected to the catenary wire system. Each of the nine downconductors is connected to a 7.62-meter radius circular counterpoise conductor with six equally spaced 6-meter long vertical grounding rods. Grounding requirements at LC39B call for all underground and above ground metallic piping, enclosures, raceways, and cable trays, within 7.62 meters of the counterpoise, to be bounded to the counterpoise, which results in a complex interconnected grounding system, given the many metallic piping, raceways, and cable trays that run in multiple direction around LC39B. The complexity of this grounding system makes the fall of potential method, which uses multiple metallic rods or stakes, unsuitable for measuring the grounding impedances of the downconductors. To calculate the downconductors grounding impedance, an Earth Ground Clamp (a stakeless grounding resistance measuring device) and a LPS Alternative Transient Program (ATP) model are used. The Earth Ground Clamp is used to measure the loop impedance plus the grounding impedance of each downconductor and the ATP model is used to calculate the loop impedance of each downconductor circuit. The grounding impedance of the downconductors is then calculated by subtracting the ATP calculated loop impedances from the Earth Ground Clamp measurements.

  2. Vehicle-mounted ground penetrating radar (Mine Stalker III) field evaluation in Angola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudato, Stephen; Hart, Kerry; Nevard, Michael; Lauziere, Steven; Grant, Shaun

    2014-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Defense Humanitarian Demining Research and Development (HD R&D) Program, Non-Intrusive Inspection Technology (NIITEK), Inc. and The HALO Trust have over the last decade funded, developed and tested various prototype vehicle mounted ground penetrating radar (GPR) systems named the Mine Stalker. The HD R&D Program and NIITEK developed the Mine Stalker to detect low metal anti-tank (LM-AT) mines in roads. The country of Angola is severely affected by LM-AT mines in and off road, some of which are buried beyond the effective range of detection sensors current used in country. The threat from LM-AT mines such as the South African Number 8 (No. 8) and the Chinese Type 72 (72AT) still persist from Angola's 30 years of civil war. These LM-AT threats are undetectable at depths greater than 5 to 10 centimeters using metal detection technology. Clearing commerce routes are a critical requirement before Angola can rebuild its infrastructure and improve safety conditions for the local populace. The Halo Trust, a non-governmental demining organization (NGO) focused on demining and clearance of unexploded ordnance (UXO), has partnered with the HD R&D Program to conduct an operational field evaluation (OFE) of the Mine Stalker III (MS3) in Angola. Preliminary testing and training efforts yielded encouraging results. This paper presents a review of the data collected, testing results, system limitations and deficiencies while operating in a real world environment. Our goal is to demonstrate and validate this technology in live minefield environments, and to collect data to prompt future developments to the system.

  3. Evaluation of Horizontal Electric Field Under Different Lightning Current Models by Perfect Ground Assumption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Jianfeng; LI Yanming

    2012-01-01

    Lightning electromagnetics can affect the reliability of the power system or communication system.Therefore,evaluation of electromagnetic fields generated by lightning return stroke is indispensable.Arnold sommerfeld proposed a model to calculate the electromagnetic field,but it involved the time-consuming sommerfeld integral.However,perfect conductor ground assumption can account for fast calculation,thus this paper reviews the perfect ground equation for evaluation of lightning electromagnetic fields,presents three engineering lightning return stroke models,and calculates the horizontal electric field caused by three lightning return stroke models.According to the results,the amplitude of lightning return stroke has a strong impact on horizontal electric fields,and the steepness of lightning return stroke influences the horizontal electric fields.Moreover,the perfect ground method is faster than the sommerfeld integral method.

  4. Concentrated Ground Plane Booster Antenna Technology for Multiband Operation in Handset Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Picher

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The current demand in the handset antenna field requires multiband antennas due to the existence of multiple communication standards and the emergence of new ones. At the same time, antennas with reduced dimensions are strongly required in order to be easily integrated. In this sense, the paper proposes a compact radiating system that uses two non-resonant elements to properly excite the ground plane to solve the abovementioned shortcomings by minimizing the required Printed Circuit Board (PCB area while ensuring a multiband performance. These non-resonant elements are called here ground plane boosters since they excite an efficient mode of the ground plane. The proposed radiating system comprises two ground plane boosters of small dimensions of 5 mm x 5 mm x 5 mm. One is in charge of the low frequency region (0.824-0.960 GHz and the other is in charge of the high frequency region (1.710-2.170 GHz. With the aim of achieving a compact configuration, the two boosters are placed close to each other in a corner of the ground plane of a handset device (concentrated architecture. Several experiments related to the coupling between boosters have been carried out in two different platforms (barphone and smartphone, and the best position and the required matching network are presented. The novel proposal achieves multiband performance at GSM850/900/1800/1900 and UMTS.

  5. Low energy stage study. Volume 3: Conceptual design, interface analysis, flight and ground operations. [launching space shuttle payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Low energy conceptual stage designs and adaptations to existing/planned shuttle upper stages were developed and their performance established. Selected propulsion modes and subsystems were used as a basis to develop airborne support equipment (ASE) design concepts. Orbiter installation and integration (both physical and electrical interfaces) were defined. Low energy stages were adapted to the orbiter and ASE interfaces. Selected low energy stages were then used to define and describe typical ground and flight operations.

  6. Evaluation index system for positive operation of water conservancy projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-yuan ZHU

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The conditions for the positive operation of water conservancy projects are described in this paper. A scientific and effective evaluation index system was established based on frequency analysis, theoretical analysis, and expert consultation. This evaluation index system can be divided into six first-level indices: the degree to which facilities are intact and functionality standards are reached, the status of operation and management funds, the rationality and degree of advancement of the management team structure, the adaptability and rationality of the water conservancy project management system, the degree of automatization and informationization of the management techniques, and the conduciveness of the exterior environment. The weights for evaluation indices were obtained through the analytic hierarchy process method with consideration of the difference between public welfare and profit-oriented water conservancy projects. This study provides a scientific method for evaluating the positive operation of water conservancy projects.

  7. Holistic Evaluation of Lightweight Operating Systems using the PERCU Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, William T.C.; He, Yun (Helen); Carter, Jonathan; Glenski, Joseph; Rippe, Lynn; Cardo, Nicholas

    2008-05-01

    The scale of Leadership Class Systems presents unique challenges to the features and performance of operating system services. This paper reports results of comprehensive evaluations of two Light Weight Operating Systems (LWOS), Cray's Catamount Virtual Node (CVN) and Linux Environment (CLE) operating systems, on the exact same large-scale hardware. The evaluation was carried out over a 5-month period on NERSC's 19,480 core Cray XT-4, Franklin, using a comprehensive evaluation method that spans Performance, Effectiveness, Reliability, Consistency and Usability criteria for all major subsystems and features. The paper presents the results of the comparison between CVN and CLE, evaluates their relative strengths, and reports observations regarding the world's largest Cray XT-4 as well.

  8. Special Operations Forces and Elusive Enemy Ground Targets: Lessons from Vietnam and the Persian Gulf War

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Enemy Ground Targets team members to fire their weapons as they were lifted from the forest floor . 4 9 Moving through and searching the jungle...MACVSOG headquarters, and as bartenders and waitresses at MACVSOG compounds, where they 61Prados, Blood Road, p. 274. Yearly totals for SHINING BRASS

  9. Ground Maneuver and Air Interdiction: A Matter of Mutual Support at the Operational Level of War

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-08-01

    i title, "Air hiit , rdictiii anid thii Nced for Doictrinal hag, rteiRiuo20, I’all 1992. 3t1 8 Fuotrell, 546; 58 9. Otto P’. Weyliaid, holi Air...George H. Doran Co., 1927), 392. There is a striking resemblance here to the deceptive end run of US ground forces in Desert Storm and the ann~hilation

  10. Contamination of ground water, surface water, and soil, and evaluation of selected ground-water pumping alternatives in the Canal Creek area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorah, Michelle M.; Clark, Jeffrey S.

    1996-01-01

    Chemical manufacturing, munitions filling, and other military-support activities have resulted in the contamination of ground water, surface water, and soil in the Canal Creek area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Chlorinated volatile organic compounds, including 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane and trichloroethylene, are widespread ground-water contaminants in two aquifers that are composed of unconsolidated sand and gravel. Distribution and fate of chlorinated organic compounds in the ground water has been affected by the movement and dissolution of solvents in their dense immiscible phase and by microbial degradation under anaerobic conditions. Detection of volatile organic contaminants in adjacent surface water indicates that shallow contaminated ground water discharges to surface water. Semivolatile organic compounds, especially polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, are the most prevalent organic contaminants in soils. Various trace elements, such as arsenic, cadmium, lead, and zinc, were found in elevated concentrations in ground water, surface water, and soil. Simulations with a ground-water-flow model and particle tracker postprocessor show that, without remedial pumpage, the contaminants will eventually migrate to Canal Creek and Gunpowder River. Simulations indicate that remedial pumpage of 2.0 million gallons per day from existing wells is needed to capture all particles originating in the contaminant plumes. Simulated pumpage from offsite wells screened in a lower confined aquifer does not affect the flow of contaminated ground water in the Canal Creek area.

  11. Shear wave velocity-based evaluation and design of stone column improved ground for liquefaction mitigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Yanguo; Sun Zhengbo; Chen Jie; Chen Yunmin; Chen Renpeng

    2017-01-01

    The evaluation and design of stone column improvement ground for liquefaction mitigation is a challenging issue for the state of practice.In this paper,a shear wave velocity-based approach is proposed based on the well-defined correlations of liquefaction resistance (CRR)-shear wave velocity (Vs)-void ratio (e) of sandy soils,and the values of parameters in this approach are recommended for preliminary design purpose when site specific values are not available.The detailed procedures of pre-and post-improvement liquefaction evaluations and stone column design are given.According to this approach,the required level of ground improvement will be met once the target Vs of soil is raised high enough (i.e.,no less than the critical velocity) to resist the given earthquake loading according to the CRR-Vs relationship,and then this requirement is transferred to the control of target void ratio (i.e.,the critical e) according to the Vs-e relationship.As this approach relies on the densification of the surrounding soil instead of the whole improved ground and is conservative by nature,specific considerations of the densification mechanism and effect are given,and the effects of drainage and reinforcement of stone columns are also discussed.A case study of a thermal power plant in Indonesia is introduced,where the effectiveness of stone column improved ground was evaluated by the proposed Vs-based method and compared with the SPT-based evaluation.This improved ground performed well and experienced no liquefaction during subsequent strong earthquakes.

  12. Shear wave velocity-based evaluation and design of stone column improved ground for liquefaction mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanguo; Sun, Zhengbo; Chen, Jie; Chen, Yunmin; Chen, Renpeng

    2017-04-01

    The evaluation and design of stone column improvement ground for liquefaction mitigation is a challenging issue for the state of practice. In this paper, a shear wave velocity-based approach is proposed based on the well-defined correlations of liquefaction resistance (CRR)-shear wave velocity ( V s)-void ratio ( e) of sandy soils, and the values of parameters in this approach are recommended for preliminary design purpose when site specific values are not available. The detailed procedures of pre- and post-improvement liquefaction evaluations and stone column design are given. According to this approach, the required level of ground improvement will be met once the target V s of soil is raised high enough (i.e., no less than the critical velocity) to resist the given earthquake loading according to the CRR- V s relationship, and then this requirement is transferred to the control of target void ratio (i.e., the critical e) according to the V s- e relationship. As this approach relies on the densification of the surrounding soil instead of the whole improved ground and is conservative by nature, specific considerations of the densification mechanism and effect are given, and the effects of drainage and reinforcement of stone columns are also discussed. A case study of a thermal power plant in Indonesia is introduced, where the effectiveness of stone column improved ground was evaluated by the proposed V s-based method and compared with the SPT-based evaluation. This improved ground performed well and experienced no liquefaction during subsequent strong earthquakes.

  13. Evaluation of the Operational Stress Control and Readiness (OSCAR) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    that their unit cares about them, and that everyone gets treated fairly and equally. Whether it’s PTS [posttraumatic stress ] or financial issues. When...training on suicide prevention (U.S. Marine Corps, 2012). Recommendation 2.2. Integrate Combat and Operational Stress –Control Training into the...Christine Anne Vaughan, Carrie M. Farmer, Joshua Breslau, Crystal Burnette Evaluation of the Operational Stress Control and Readiness (OSCAR

  14. Simulation-based decision support for evaluating operational plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Schubert

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe simulation-based decision support techniques for evaluation of operational plans within effects-based planning. Using a decision support tool, developers of operational plans are able to evaluate thousands of alternative plans against possible courses of events and decide which of these plans are capable of achieving a desired end state. The objective of this study is to examine the potential of a decision support system that helps operational analysts understand the consequences of numerous alternative plans through simulation and evaluation. Operational plans are described in the effects-based approach to operations concept as a set of actions and effects. For each action, we examine several different alternative ways to perform the action. We use a representation where a plan consists of several actions that should be performed. Each action may be performed in one of several different alternative ways. Together these action alternatives make up all possible plan instances, which are represented as a tree of action alternatives that may be searched for the most effective sequence of alternative actions. As a test case, we use an expeditionary operation with a plan of 43 actions and several alternatives for these actions, as well as a scenario of 40 group actors. Decision support for planners is provided by several methods that analyze the impact of a plan on the 40 actors, e.g., by visualizing time series of plan performance. Detailed decision support for finding the most influential actions of a plan is presented by using sensitivity analysis and regression tree analysis. Finally, a decision maker may use the tool to determine the boundaries of an operation that it must not move beyond without risk of drastic failure. The significant contribution of this study is the presentation of an integrated approach for evaluation of operational plans.

  15. Subjective evaluation with FAA criteria: A multidimensional scaling approach. [ground track control management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreifeldt, J. G.; Parkin, L.; Wempe, T. E.; Huff, E. F.

    1975-01-01

    Perceived orderliness in the ground tracks of five A/C during their simulated flights was studied. Dynamically developing ground tracks for five A/C from 21 separate runs were reproduced from computer storage and displayed on CRTS to professional pilots and controllers for their evaluations and preferences under several criteria. The ground tracks were developed in 20 seconds as opposed to the 5 minutes of simulated flight using speedup techniques for display. Metric and nonmetric multidimensional scaling techniques are being used to analyze the subjective responses in an effort to: (1) determine the meaningfulness of basing decisions on such complex subjective criteria; (2) compare pilot/controller perceptual spaces; (3) determine the dimensionality of the subjects' perceptual spaces; and thereby (4) determine objective measures suitable for comparing alternative traffic management simulations.

  16. Evaluation Practice of Regional Operational Programmes in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Kupiec

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The study concentrated on the process of evaluation of public programs currently implemented with the support of European Union funds in Poland. The aim was to show how the evaluation practice was adopted in the regional administration within programming and implementation of Regional Operational Programs 2007–2013 (ROP. The author analysed what types of decisions are primarily supported by evaluation and what functions evaluation serves. Methodology: The quantitative analysis was based on data drawn from documentation of the full population of ROP evaluations completed in 2007 to 2012, which was acquired from 16 ROP evaluation units. Findings: The practice of evaluation was well adopted in regional administration and has grown rapidly in recent years. 236 studies, costing more than 16 million PLN, were completed by the end of 2012. However, most studies were of limited value as they concentrated on the implementation process, not on the effects and justification of intervention. Implications: This study focused on quantitative aspects of the knowledge production process (evaluation reports. It omitted the question of actual evaluation use, which together with evaluation process quality and development of evaluation culture should be a subject of further investigation. Originality: This study was the fi rst review of ROP evaluations in Poland. It went far beyond the scope of data collected previously by the Ministry of Regional Development and proposed novel categorizations of evaluation subjects that may be useful for other than ROP evaluations.

  17. A methodology for nuclear power plant operational events evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Jeferson, E-mail: jeferson@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CGRC/CNEN), Rio de janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao Geral de Reatores e do Ciclo de Combustivel; Costa, Sergio Dias, E-mail: sergiodiascosta@hotmail.com [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Operational events are normal occurrences in industrial plants and in nuclear power plants. The evaluation of operational events gains importance when it comes specifically to nuclear power plants due to the proportions that the impact and the consequences of these events may cause to the installation itself, their workers, the external area of the nuclear installation, the environment and to the public in general. These consequences, for the operation of these facilities can range from very little, until the consequences that lead to accidents and can cause significant impacts. Operational events may be associated or have influence in many fields of knowledge, such as operation, maintenance, engineering, Radiological Protection, physical protection, chemistry, Human or Organizational Factors and external events, among others. The accident at the Fukushima Daichi nuclear power plant, shows the importance of exhausting all the studies concerning operational events in order to improve the operational safety of nuclear plants, considering all the causes and possible consequences. In this context, the evaluation of operational events discipline emerges as an important and relevant tool to contribute to the maintenance and/or improvement of the operational safety of nuclear installations. Not without reason the nuclear industry actively participates in programs of exchange of operational experience, where relevant events are thoroughly evaluated and discussed in specific forums, such as power plant operators, regulators and/or joint technical meetings, always with the purpose to prevent, minimize or mitigate its consequences. Any evaluation of operational events passes necessarily by an in-depth study of the circumstances of the event, culminating with the identification of your cause and proposition of corrective actions to prevent recurrence of similar events. Additionally, the events should not be studied individually, but evaluated within a temporal context in order

  18. IBM PC/IX operating system evaluation plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Granier, Martin; Hall, Philip P.; Triantafyllopoulos, Spiros

    1984-01-01

    An evaluation plan for the IBM PC/IX Operating System designed for IBM PC/XT computers is discussed. The evaluation plan covers the areas of performance measurement and evaluation, software facilities available, man-machine interface considerations, networking, and the suitability of PC/IX as a development environment within the University of Southwestern Louisiana NASA PC Research and Development project. In order to compare and evaluate the PC/IX system, comparisons with other available UNIX-based systems are also included.

  19. Test Operations Procedure (TOP) 02-2-546 Teleoperated Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) Latency Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-11

    A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC), AD No.: 14. ABSTRACT...discrete system components or measurements of latency in autonomous systems. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Unmanned Ground Vehicles, Basic Video Latency, End -to... End System Latency, Command-to-Action Latency 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 23 19a

  20. Determining the Forces Generated by the Contact of an Electrically-Operated Vehicle with the Ground

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we analyse the motion of an electric vehicle,when there is only the pure rolling of the wheels on the ground.The equations of holonomic and non-holonomic constraints have been rendered explicitly obtaining 27 equations algebraic-differential system with the same number of unknowns.Besides,this system supplies a model to calculate the bonding reaction forces.

  1. Ground water quality evaluation near mining area and development of heavy metal pollution index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Bably; Kumari, Puja; Bano, Shamima; Kumari, Shweta

    2014-03-01

    Opencast as well as underground coal mining are likely to disturb the underground water table in terms of quantity as well as quality. Added to this is the problem of leachates from the large number of industrial waste and overburden dumps that are in abundance in mining areas, reaching the ground water and adversely affecting its quality. Enhancement of heavy metals contamination of the ground water is one eventuality. In the present work, concentrations of 7 heavy metals have been evaluated at 20 important ground water sampling stations at Dhanbad township situated very near to Jharia coalfields. The concentration of heavy metals in general was found to be below the permissible levels although concentration of iron and manganese was found above the permissible limits at a few stations. These data have been used for the calculation of heavy metal pollution index (HPI). The HPI of ground water in total was found to be 6.8860 which is far below the critical index limit of 100 pointing to the fact that the ground water is not polluted with respect to heavy metals in spite of the prolific growth of mining and allied industrial activities near the town.

  2. Stage Right operational safety analysis and evaluation of Pantex personnel operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rountree, S.L.K.; Whitehurst, H.O.; Tomlin, E.H.; Restrepo, L.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); White, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)]|[Intera, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This report documents a study (Stage Right Operational Safety Analysis) that was performed to evaluate the effects of new Stage Right operations on the safety of Pantex personnel who perform the operations and maintain the equipment. The primary concern of the evaluation was for personnel safety during Stage Right operations, but operations equipment damage and degradation also were taken into account. This analysis evaluates safety of the work process in the staging of dismantled nuclear weapon pits within the modified Richmond magazines only. This Stage Right Process and Operational Safety Analysis includes the following processes: moving the pelletized drums from the pallet trailer to the pallet turner, staging of pallets and removal of pallets from the magazine, recovery from an incident in a magazine, setting up, opening, and closing a Zone 4 magazine, inventory of pelletized drums in the magazines, transporting pelletized drums from Zone 12 to Zone 4, and maintenance on the shielded lift truck that involves removal of the cab shielding. The analysis includes the following undesirable consequences: injury to personnel, breach of an AL-R8 container, drop of a loaded pallet, damage to equipment, and equipment unreliability.

  3. Operational Evaluation of VEGGIE Food Production System in the Habitat Demonstration Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutte, Gary W.; Newsham, Gerard; Morrow, Robert M.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS) of the VEGGIE Food Production System in the Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM) was the first operational evaluation of salad crop production technology in a NASA analog test. A systematic evaluation of rooting media and nutrient delivery systems were evaluated for three lettuce cultivars that have shown promise as candidates for a surface based food production system. The VEGGIE nutrient delivery system worked well, was able to be maintained by multiple operators with a minimum of training, and supported excellent lettuce growth for the duration of the test. A Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) evaluation was performed using ProSan(tm) as sanitation agent prior to consumption was approved, and the crew was allowed to consume the lettuce grown using the VEGGIE light cap and gravity based nutrient delivery system at the completion of the 14-day DRAT field test. The DRAT field test validated the crew operations; Growth of all lettuce cultivars was excellent. The operational DRAT field testing in the HDU identified light quality issues related to morphology and pigment development that will need to be addressed through additional testing. Feedback from the crew, ground support personnel, and human factors leads was uniformly positive on the psychological value of having the crop production system in the excursion module. A number of areas have been identified for future work, to minimize the "footprint" of the Food Production system through creative use of unused wall and floor space in the unit.

  4. Operation Evaluation of the VEGGIE Food Production System in the Habitat Demonstration Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutte, Gary W.; Newsham, Gerard; Morrow, Robert M.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS) of the VEGGIE Food Production System in the Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM) was the first operational evaluation of salad crop production technology in a NASA analog test. A systematic evaluation of rooting media and nutrient delivery systems were evaluated for three lettuce cultivars that have shown promise as candidates for a surface based food production system. The VEGGIE nutrient delivery system worked well, was able to be maintained by multiple operators with a minimum of training, and supported excellent lettuce growth for the duration of the test. A Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) evaluation was performed using ProSantm as sanitation agent prior to consumption was approved, and the crew was allowed to consume the lettuce grown using the VEGGIE light cap and gravity based nutrient delivery system at the completion of the 14-day DRAT field test. The DRAT field test validated the crew operations; Growth of all lettuce cultivars was excellent. The operational DRAT field testing in the HDU identified light quality issues related to morphology and pigment development that will need to be addressed through additional testing. Feedback from the crew, ground support personnel, and human factors leads was uniformly positive on the psychological value of having the crop production system in the excursion module. A number of areas have been identified for future work, to minimize the "footprint" of the Food Production system through creative use of unused wall and floor space in the unit.

  5. Statistical evaluation of effects of riparian buffers on nitrate and ground water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruill, T.B.

    2000-01-01

    A study was conducted to statistically evaluate the effectiveness of riparian buffers for decreasing nitrate concentrations in ground water and for affecting other chemical constituents. Values for pH, specific conductance, alkalinity, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), silica, ammonium, phosphorus, iron, and manganese at 28 sites in the Contentnea Creek Basin were significantly higher (p 20 yr) discharging ground water draining areas with riparian buffers compared with areas without riparian buffers. No differences in chloride, nitrate nitrogen, calcium, sodium, and dssolved oxygen concentrations in old ground water between buffer and nonbuffer areas were detected. Comparison of samples of young (20 yr) discharging ground water draining areas with riparian buffers compared with areas without riparian buffers. No differences in chloride, nitrate nitrogen, calcium, sodium, and dissolved oxygen concentrations in old ground water between buffer and nonbuffer areas were detected. Comparison of samples of young (water samples from buffer and nonbuffer areas indicated significantly higher specific conductance, calcium, chloride, and nitrate nitrogen in nonbuffer areas. Riparian buffers along streams can affect the composition of the hyporheic zone by providing a source of organic carbon to the streambed, which creates reducing geochemical conditions that consequently can affect the chemical quality of old ground water discharging through it. Buffer zones between agricultural fields and streams facilitate dilution of conservative chemical constituents in young ground water that originate from fertilizer applications and also allow denitrification in ground water by providing an adequate source of organic carbon generated by vegetation in the buffer zone. Based on the median chloride and nitrate values for young ground water in the Contentnea Creek Basin, nitrate was 95% lower in buffer areas compared with nonbuffer areas, with a 30 to 35% reduction estimated to be due to

  6. Crew Transportation Operations Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango, Edward J.; Pearson, Don J. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Crew Transportation Operations Standards contains descriptions of ground and flight operations processes and specifications and the criteria which will be used to evaluate the acceptability of Commercial Providers' proposed processes and specifications.

  7. Program Evaluation of Math Factual Operations for Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Deficiencies in mathematics standardized test scores prompted school district policymakers to consider implementing a program designed to increase students' basic multiplication fact skills. This study was an evaluation of the Math Factual Operations for Understanding program. The program, marketed with a martial arts theme, was intended to…

  8. Evaluating the performance of survey-based operational management procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pomarede, M.; Hillary, R.; Ibaibarriaga, L.; Bogaards, J.A.; Apostolaki, P.

    2010-01-01

    The design and evaluation of survey-based management strategies is addressed in this article, using three case-study fisheries: North Sea herring, Bay of Biscay anchovy and North Sea cod, with a brief history and the main management issues with each fishery outlined. A range of operational managemen

  9. Defensive Information Operations in Support of the Marine Air Ground Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Report INFOSEC Information Security INFOSYS Information Systems IO Information Operations ISMO Information Systems Management Office...scanning software. “ Much of the success of the Information Systems Management Office ( ISMO ) team comes from educating the Marines on these dangers and

  10. Safety management of a complex R&D ground operating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, J.; Mauer, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Report discusses safety program implementation for large R&D operating system. Analytical techniques are defined and suggested as tools for identifying potential hazards and determining means to effectively control or eliminate hazards.

  11. Safety management of a complex R and D ground operating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, J. F.; Maurer, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A perspective on safety program management was developed for a complex R&D operating system, such as the NASA-Lewis Research Center. Using a systems approach, hazardous operations are subjected to third-party reviews by designated-area safety committees and are maintained under safety permit controls. To insure personnel alertness, emergency containment forces and employees are trained in dry-run emergency simulation exercises. The keys to real safety effectiveness are top management support and visibility of residual risks.

  12. Safety management of a complex R&D ground operating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, J. F.; Maurer, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A perspective on safety program management has been developed for a complex R&D operating system, such as the NASA-Lewis Research Center. Using a systems approach, hazardous operations are subjected to third-party reviews by designated area safety committees and are maintained under safety permit controls. To insure personnel alertness, emergency containment forces and employees are trained in dry-run emergency simulation exercises. The keys to real safety effectiveness are top management support and visibility of residual risks.

  13. Autonomous Inspection Robot for Power Transmission Lines Maintenance While Operating on the Overhead Ground Wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a mobile robot capable of clearing such obstacles as counterweights, anchor clamps, and torsion tower. The mobile robot walks on overhead ground wires in 500KV power tower. Its ultimate purpose is to automate to inspect the defect of power transmission line. The robot with 13 motors is composed of two arms, two wheels, two claws, two wrists, etc. Each arm has 4 degree of freedom. Claws are also mounted on the arms. An embedded computer based on PC/104 is chosen as the core of control system. Visible light and thermal infrared cameras are installed to obtain the video and temperature information, and the communication system is based on wireless LAN TCP/IP protocol. A prototype robot was developed with careful considerations of mobility. The new sensor configuration is used for the claw to grasp the overhead ground wires. The bridge is installed in the torsion tower for the robot easy to cross obstacles. The new posture plan is proposed for obstacles cleaning in the torsion tower. Results of experiments demonstrate that the robot can be applied to execute the navigation and inspection tasks.

  14. Autonomous Inspection Robot for Power Transmission Lines Maintenance While Operating on the Overhead Ground Wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Li

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a mobile robot capable of clearing such obstacles as counterweights, anchor clamps, and torsion tower. The mobile robot walks on overhead ground wires in 500KV power tower. Its ultimate purpose is to automate to inspect the defect of power transmission line. The robot with 13 motors is composed of two arms, two wheels, two claws, two wrists, etc. Each arm has 4 degree of freedom. Claws are also mounted on the arms. An embedded computer based on PC/104 is chosen as the core of control system. Visible light and thermal infrared cameras are installed to obtain the video and temperature information, and the communication system is based on wireless LAN TCP/IP protocol. A prototype robot was developed with careful considerations of mobility. The new sensor configuration is used for the claw to grasp the overhead ground wires. The bridge is installed in the torsion tower for the robot easy to cross obstacles. The new posture plan is proposed for obstacles cleaning in the torsion tower. Results of experiments demonstrate that the robot can be applied to execute the navigation and inspection tasks.

  15. GSA's Green Proving Ground: Identifying, Testing and Evaluating Innovative Technologies (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandt, A.; Lowell, M.

    2012-05-01

    GSA's Green Proving Ground (GPG) program utilizes GSA's real estate portfolio to test and evaluate innovative and underutilized sustainable building technologies and practices. Findings are used to support the development of GSA performance specifications and inform decision making within GSA, other federal agencies, and the real estate industry. The program aims to drive innovation in environmental performance in federal buildings and help lead market transformation through deployment of new technologies.

  16. Finite Element Optimization for Nondestructive Evaluation on a Graphics Processing Unit for Ground Vehicle Hull Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-22

    GPU ,GA, genetic algorithm, FE, optimization, CUDA , Damage, Evaluation 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF... GPU with CUDA architecture [4]). There is however a severe memory limit – 4 GB at present. This would limit large problems as well as optimization...August 2013 UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 FE Optimization for NDE on GPUs for Ground

  17. Nodal sets for ground-states of Schroedinger operators with zero magnetic field in non simply connected domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helffer, B. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Dept. de Mathematiques; Hoffmann-Ostenhof, M. [Institut fuer Mathematik, Universitaet Wien, Strudthofgasse 4, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Hoffmann-Ostenhof, T. [Institut fuer Theoretische Chemie, Universitaet Wien, Waehringerstrasse 17, A-1090 Wien (Austria)]|[International Erwin Schroedinger Inst. for Mathematical Physics, Vienna (Austria); Owen, M.P. [International Erwin Schroedinger Inst. for Mathematical Physics, Vienna (Austria)

    1999-05-01

    We investigate nodal sets of magnetic Schroedinger operators with zero magnetic field, acting on a non-simply connected domain in R{sup 2}. For the case of circulation 1/2 of the magnetic vector potential around each hole in the region, we obtain a characterisation of the nodal set, and use this to obtain bounds on the multiplicity of the ground state. For the case of one hole and a fixed electric potential, we show that the first eigenvalue takes its highest value for circulation 1/2. (orig.) With 8 figs., 20 refs.

  18. On-Board and Ground-Based Complexes for Operating the Science Payload of the CORONAS-F Space Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, A. I.; Lisin, D. V.; Kuznetsov, V. D.; Afanas'ev, A. N.; Osin, A. I.; Schwarz, J.

    To ensure reliable operation of the science payload of the CORONAS-F satellite and to exercise its flexible control in the course of realization of the research program, an on-board and a specialized ground-based control complexes (GCCs) were designed and manufactured at the Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN). A demand for such systems arose because the service facilities of the satellite basic platform were unable to satisfy the requirements of the unique scientific experiments, i.e., an efficient on-line control of the variety of scientific instruments, managing large amounts of scientific information, etc.

  19. Operational Mechanism and Evaluation System for Emergency Logistics Risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Cheng

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Lots of risks existed in the operating process of emergency logistics especially when natural disasters happened. Both operating mechanism and evaluation system research on Emergency Logistics Risks (ELR are the basis of effective recognizing, preventing and responding to risks, so it’s of great theoretical and practical significance to study the formation and influence mechanism and to establish an evaluating index system for ELR. Firstly, some foundation research about ELR was carried out, including definition, characteristics and classification of ELR. The formation and influence mechanism of ELR were discussed. The research of questionnaire survey offered an objective support for theoretical mechanism and index system establishment. Then, the evaluating index system for ELR was established. This system was a multi-level index system, and mainly evaluated by the decision-making risk, dispatching and commanding risk, organizing and coordinating risk, executing and controlling risk, resources supporting risk and their sub index. The establishment principles and significance of the index system were discussed. Then, the fuzzy comprehensive evaluation and Delphi method were used to confirm the index weight and value. Finally, a case analysis on ELR of Yushu earthquake was conducted to demonstrate the evaluating index system and to evaluate the actual risk level.

  20. Evaluation of the Heading Confinement Pressure Effect on Ground Settlement for EPBTBM Using Full 3D Numerical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Haghi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ground settlement is often the most serious concern when tunneling under an old city with numerous historic monuments. A successful engineering design under these conditions would require getting the most out of the ground strength parameters and avoiding any weakening maneuver throughout the operation. Knowing that surface settlement is highly affected by tunneling parameters in EPB shield tunneling lead us to estimate the optimum values for the machine heading pressure with the lower amount of the ground settlement in fragile structure of the old city for the Esfahan Subway Project. Tunnels were dug underneath some of the most prominent historical sites along the path of the project. To improve precision and efficiency in tunneling operation, at the first step, tunnel heading confinement pressure is calculated by using an advanced 3D mathematical approach based on the limit equilibrium theory. Then, a promoted 3D finite element model is developed, taking into account the tunneling procedures and the designed heading confinement pressure from the first step. Settlements were pre-calculated and the surface displacement was checked at all sensitive locations. At the third step, settlement is estimated by exerting executed face supporting pressure to the tunnel face and the concluded amounts for displacement are compared with the outputs of extensometers. This comparison leads us to check the reliability of calculated settlements and the accuracy of the designed tunnel heading confinement pressure. Furthermore, evaluating the relation between extensometer outputs and executed tunnel face pressure at the points of extensometers stations validates the assumption that the safe face supporting pressure causes least surface displacement. Although the minimum pressure occurred in short term fluctuations, this approach confirms the sensibility of settlement with the least executed face supporting pressure.. It is also found that higher executed face

  1. Preharvest Salmonella Detection for Evaluation of Fresh Ground Poultry Product Contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Nicholas P; Evans, Robert D; Regalado, Jason; Sullivan, Joseph F; Dutta, Vikrant; Elvinger, Francois; Pierson, F William

    2015-07-01

    Salmonella is an important economic and public health concern for the poultry industry. Fresh ground product has been linked with multiple salmonellosis outbreaks in humans. Exposure can be controlled by proper handling and preparation by consumers; however, the industry desires to minimize carriage levels in the final product. A substantial obstacle in reducing product contamination stems from limitations in diagnostic methodologies. Detection of Salmonella contamination currently requires extended incubation periods, and by the time test results are available, the fresh product has reached retail shelves. The goal of this study was to develop a preharvest diagnostic protocol for the evaluation of ground product contamination. The turkey processing plant where this research was conducted had previously established Salmonella screening (BAX system) of ground product, thus providing an opportunity for preharvest sample comparison. Drag swabs were collected from live-haul trailers entering the processing plant over a 12-month period. The swabs were added to modified buffered peptone water and incubated at 40°C. After incubation for 6 h or overnight, samples were tested for the presence of Salmonella with the DNAble assay and related to ground turkey samples from corresponding lots. The linear relationship for the percentage of Salmonella-positive live-haul trailers was significant for both the 6-h (slope = 1.02, R(2) = 0.96, and P salmonellosis outbreaks.

  2. Biocybernetic system evaluates indices of operator engagement in automated task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, A. T.; Bogart, E. H.; Bartolome, D. S.

    1995-01-01

    A biocybernetic system has been developed as a method to evaluate automated flight deck concepts for compatibility with human capabilities. A biocybernetic loop is formed by adjusting the mode of operation of a task set (e.g., manual/automated mix) based on electroencephalographic (EEG) signals reflecting an operator's engagement in the task set. A critical issue for the loop operation is the selection of features of the EEG to provide an index of engagement upon which to base decisions to adjust task mode. Subjects were run in the closed-loop feedback configuration under four candidate and three experimental control definitions of an engagement index. The temporal patterning of system mode switching was observed for both positive and negative feedback of the index. The indices were judged on the basis of their relative strength in exhibiting expected feedback control system phenomena (stable operation under negative feedback and unstable operation under positive feedback). Of the candidate indices evaluated in this study, an index constructed according to the formula, beta power/(alpha power + theta power), reflected task engagement best.

  3. Ground-simulation investigations of VTOL airworthiness criteria for terminal-area operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebacqz, J. V.; Decker, W. A.; Alderete, T. S.; Scott, B. C.; Harper, P. J. G.; Chung, W. W.

    1990-01-01

    Several ground-based simulation experiments undertaken to investigate concerns related to tilt-rotor aircraft airworthiness were conducted. The experiments were conducted on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center's Vertical Motion Simulator, which permits simulation of a wide variety of aircraft with a high degree of fidelity of motion cueing. Variations in conversion/deceleration profile, type of augmentation or automation, level of display assistance, and meteorological conditions were considered in the course of the experiments. Certification pilots from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) participated, in addition to NASA research pilots. The setup of these experiments on the simulator is summarized, and some of the results highlighted.

  4. Air Force Support of Army Ground Operations Lessons Learned during World War II, Korea, and Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-06

    Th ;e 8epre--cdin this paper .rv thoe. of ’:ceauhor IDep 2rtmt-nt of Diefense rayo t gr: s hsPcC % FOC, O P 0- C GOUND OP!-txA’TONS ’A NS tTAI.D 11...NOTE S T edder, Wi.th Preudice: The War Memoirs . - y Air Force. Lord Tedaer. rr- 40-43. 2.".~ : X :"~ , M~.c, ’ = A r Power in Three Wars WW 7:, Kora...that FEAF assume operational control over land based Marine air units and over carri.er bjdsed aviation operating over Korea effective as soon as X

  5. Monitoring the natural attenuation of petroleum in ground water at the former naval complex, Operable Unit A, Adak Island, Alaska, May and June 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinicola, R.S.; Simonds, F.W.; Defawe, Rose

    2005-01-01

    During May and June 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey installed monitoring wells and collected data to characterize the effectiveness of natural attenuation processes for remediating petroleum-contaminated ground water at Operable Unit A of the former Naval complex on Adak Island, Alaska. In addition, the evidence for petroleum biodegradation in ground water was evaluated at selected petroleum sites, plans for future natural attenuation monitoring were suggested for the selected petroleum sites, and the natural attenuation monitoring strategy for the Downtown area of Adak Island was reviewed and refinements were suggested. U.S. Geological Survey personnel measured water levels and collected ground-water samples from about 100 temporary boreholes and 50 monitoring wells. Most samples were analyzed on-site for concentrations of selected petroleum compounds and natural attenuation parameters such as dissolved oxygen, ferrous iron, and carbon dioxide. The U.S. Geological Survey evaluated the data on-site, selected new monitoring well locations, and installed, developed, and sampled 10 monitoring wells. The review and suggestions for the natural attenuation monitoring strategy focused on how to better achieve monitoring objectives specified in the Record of Decision for Adak Island petroleum sites. To achieve the monitoring objective of verifying that natural attenuation is occurring, the monitoring plans for each monitored natural attenuation site need to include sampling of at least one strategically placed well at the downgradient margin of the contaminant plume margin, preferably where contaminant concentrations are detectable but less than the cleanup level. Collection of natural attenuation parameter data and sampling background wells is no longer needed to achieve the monitoring objective of demonstrating the occurrence of natural attenuation. To achieve the objective of monitoring locations where chemical concentrations exceed specified cleanup levels, at least

  6. Information operator approach applied to the retrieval of the vertical distribution of atmospheric constituents from ground-based high-resolution FTIR measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Senten

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of high spectral resolution Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR solar absorption spectra is an important issue in remote sensing. If this is done carefully, one can obtain information, not only about the total column abundances, but also about the vertical distribution of various constituents in the atmosphere. This work introduces the application of the information operator approach for extracting vertical profile information from ground-based FTIR measurements. The algorithm is implemented and tested within the well-known retrieval code SFIT2, adapting the optimal estimation method such as to take into account only the significant contributions to the solution. In particular, we demonstrate the feasibility of the method in an application to ground-based FTIR spectra taken in the framework of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC at Ile de La Réunion (21° S, 55° E. A thorough comparison is made between the original optimal estimation method, Tikhonov regularization and this alternative retrieval algorithm, regarding information content, retrieval robustness and corresponding full error budget evaluation for the target species ozone (O3, nitrous oxide (N2O, methane (CH4, and carbon monoxide (CO. It is shown that the information operator approach performs well and in most cases yields both a better accuracy and stability than the optimal estimation method. Additionally, the information operator approach has the advantage of being less sensitive to the choice of a priori information than the optimal estimation method and Tikhonov regularization. On the other hand, in general the Tikhonov regularization results seem to be slightly better than the optimal estimation method and information operator approach results when it comes to error budgets and column stability.

  7. The ’In Lieu Of’ Myth. Airmen in Joint Ground Operations (Walker Paper, Number 13)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    deaths in the other 14 conflicts totaled 5,400, as follows: Burundi (100), Sudan (100), Uganda (200), Colombia (500), Peru (25), India (700...Contingencies. Santa Monica, CA: RAND, 1995. ———. Army Forces for Operations Other than War. Santa Mon- ica , CA: RAND, 1997. Stockholm International Peace

  8. Reference-free ground truth metric for metal artifact evaluation in CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratz, Baerbel; Ens, Svitlana; Mueller, Jan; Buzug, Thorsten M. [Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Luebeck, 23538 Luebeck (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: In computed tomography (CT), metal objects in the region of interest introduce data inconsistencies during acquisition. Reconstructing these data results in an image with star shaped artifacts induced by the metal inconsistencies. To enhance image quality, the influence of the metal objects can be reduced by different metal artifact reduction (MAR) strategies. For an adequate evaluation of new MAR approaches a ground truth reference data set is needed. In technical evaluations, where phantoms can be measured with and without metal inserts, ground truth data can easily be obtained by a second reference data acquisition. Obviously, this is not possible for clinical data. Here, an alternative evaluation method is presented without the need of an additionally acquired reference data set. Methods: The proposed metric is based on an inherent ground truth for metal artifacts as well as MAR methods comparison, where no reference information in terms of a second acquisition is needed. The method is based on the forward projection of a reconstructed image, which is compared to the actually measured projection data. Results: The new evaluation technique is performed on phantom and on clinical CT data with and without MAR. The metric results are then compared with methods using a reference data set as well as an expert-based classification. It is shown that the new approach is an adequate quantification technique for artifact strength in reconstructed metal or MAR CT images. Conclusions: The presented method works solely on the original projection data itself, which yields some advantages compared to distance measures in image domain using two data sets. Beside this, no parameters have to be manually chosen. The new metric is a useful evaluation alternative when no reference data are available.

  9. Ground-level climate at a peatland wind farm in Scotland is affected by wind turbine operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Alona; Burton, Ralph R.; Lee, Susan E.; Mobbs, Stephen; Ostle, Nicholas; Smith, Victoria; Waldron, Susan; Whitaker, Jeanette

    2016-04-01

    The global drive to produce low-carbon energy has resulted in an unprecedented deployment of onshore wind turbines, representing a significant land use change for wind energy generation with uncertain consequences for local climatic conditions and the regulation of ecosystem processes. Here, we present high-resolution data from a wind farm collected during operational and idle periods that shows the wind farm affected several measures of ground-level climate. Specifically, we discovered that operational wind turbines raised air temperature by 0.18 °C and absolute humidity (AH) by 0.03 g m-3 during the night, and increased the variability in air, surface and soil temperature throughout the diurnal cycle. Further, the microclimatic influence of turbines on air temperature and AH decreased logarithmically with distance from the nearest turbine. These effects on ground-level microclimate, including soil temperature, have uncertain implications for biogeochemical processes and ecosystem carbon cycling, including soil carbon stocks. Consequently, understanding needs to be improved to determine the overall carbon balance of wind energy.

  10. Evaluation of Early Ground Control Station Configurations for Interacting with a UAS Traffic Management (UTM) System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Arik-Quang V.; Martin, Lynne; Mohlenbrink, Christoph; Bienert, Nancy; Wolte, Cynthia; Gomez, Ashley; Claudatos, Lauren; Mercer, Joey

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on a human factors evaluation of ground control station design concepts for interacting with an unmanned traffic management system. The data collected for this paper comes from recent field tests for NASA's Unmanned Traffic Management (UTM) project, and covers the following topics; workload, situation awareness, as well as flight crew communication, coordination, and procedures. The goal of this evaluation was to determine if the various software implementations for interacting with the UTM system can be described and classified into design concepts to provide guidance for the development of future UTM interfaces. We begin with a brief description of NASA's UTM project, followed by a description of the test range configuration related to a second development phase. We identified (post hoc) two classes in which the ground control stations could be grouped. This grouping was based on level of display integration. The analysis was exploratory and informal. It was conducted to compare ground stations across those two classes and against the aforementioned topics. Herein, we discuss the results.

  11. Surgical team turnover and operative time: An evaluation of operating room efficiency during pulmonary resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzi, Alain Joe; Shah, Karan; Seely, Andrew; Villeneuve, James Patrick; Sundaresan, Sudhir R; Shamji, Farid M; Maziak, Donna E; Gilbert, Sebastien

    2016-05-01

    Health care resources are costly and should be used judiciously and efficiently. Predicting the duration of surgical procedures is key to optimizing operating room resources. Our objective was to identify factors influencing operative time, particularly surgical team turnover. We performed a single-institution, retrospective review of lobectomy operations. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate the impact of different factors on surgical time (skin-to-skin) and total procedure time. Staff turnover within the nursing component of the surgical team was defined as the number of instances any nurse had to leave the operating room over the total number of nurses involved in the operation. A total of 235 lobectomies were performed by 5 surgeons, most commonly for lung cancer (95%). On multivariate analysis, percent forced expiratory volume in 1 second, surgical approach, and lesion size had a significant effect on surgical time. Nursing turnover was associated with a significant increase in surgical time (53.7 minutes; 95% confidence interval, 6.4-101; P = .026) and total procedure time (83.2 minutes; 95% confidence interval, 30.1-136.2; P = .002). Active management of surgical team turnover may be an opportunity to improve operating room efficiency when the surgical team is engaged in a major pulmonary resection. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A synthetic operational account of call-by-need evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zerny, Ian; Danvy, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    We present the first operational account of call by need that connects syntactic theory and implementation practice. Syntactic theory: the storeless operational semantics using syntax rewriting to account for demand-driven computation and for caching intermediate results. Implementational practice...... is that the theory of call by need agrees with the theory of call by name, and that the practice of call by need optimizes the practice of call by name. Our operational account takes the form of three new calculi for lazy evaluation of lambda-terms and our synthesis takes the form of three lock-step equivalences......-terms. Our results reveal a genuine and principled unity of computational theory and computational practice, one that readily applies to variations on the general theme of call by need....

  13. UAVs for the Operational Commander: Don’t Ground MAV (Manned Aerial Vehicles)!

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-04

    start, taxi, launch, recover and park aircraft on the deck. 78 Studies highlight many gesture recognition difficulties associated with dynamic...American Helicopter Society, 2007). 78 --. CV NATOPS Manual. (Lakehurst, NJ: Naval Air Systems Command, 2007). 79 Venetsky, Larry. Gesture Recognition for...Venetsky, Larry, Mark Husni and Mark Yager. Gesture Recognition for UCAV-N Flight Deck Operations. Problem Definition Final Report. Lakehurst, NJ

  14. Seizing the Digital High Ground: Military Operations and Politics in the Social Media Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-13

    certainly be traced to the standard sources: weak governance, low economic opportunity, corruption , income inequality , human rights violations, and...Politics in the Social Media Era 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR Lt Col Andrew Ridland, British Army 5d...of social media, is changing how society operates. Confidentiality is being replaced by openness; information that was hitherto the preserve of a few

  15. Image Quality Assessment for Performance Evaluation of Focus Measure Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida Memon

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the performance evaluation of eight focus measure operators namely Image CURV (Curvature, GRAE (Gradient Energy, HISE (Histogram Entropy, LAPM (Modified Laplacian, LAPV (Variance of Laplacian, LAPD (Diagonal Laplacian, LAP3 (Laplacian in 3D Window and WAVS (Sum of Wavelet Coefficients. Statistical matrics such as MSE (Mean Squared Error, PNSR (Peak Signal to Noise Ratio, SC (Structural Content, NCC (Normalized Cross Correlation, MD (Maximum Difference and NAE (Normalized Absolute Error are used to evaluate stated focus measures in this research. . FR (Full Reference method of the image quality assessment is utilized in this paper. Results indicate that LAPD method is comparatively better than other seven focus operators at typical imaging conditions

  16. Operational Phase Life Cycle Assessment of Select NASA Ground Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydnor, George H.; Marshall, Timothy J.; McGinnis, Sean

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) is responsible for many large, high-energy ground test facilities that accomplish the nation s most advanced aerospace research. In order to accomplish these national objectives, significant energy and resources are consumed. A select group of facilities was analyzed using life-cycle assessment (LCA) to determine carbon footprint and environmental impacts. Most of these impacts stem from electricity and natural gas consumption, used directly at the facility and to generate support processes such as compressed air and steam. Other activities were analyzed but determined to be smaller in scale and frequency with relatively negligible environmental impacts. More specialized facilities use R-134a, R-14, jet fuels, or nitrogen gas, and these unique inputs can have a considerable effect on a facility s overall environmental impact. The results of this LCA will be useful to ATP and NASA as the nation looks to identify its top energy consumers and NASA looks to maximize research output and minimize environmental impact. Keywords: NASA, Aeronautics, Wind tunnel, Keyword 4, Keyword 5

  17. MODELLING AND EVALUATION OF OPERATIONAL COMPETITIVENESS OF MANUFACTURING ENTERPRISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG LIU

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aiming to connect previous research in global competitiveness analysis. Research is based on doing numerous case studies and creating analytical models to evaluate the overall competitiveness, which is a novel concept by integrating the evaluation of manufacturing strategy and transformational leadership including technology level together. The empirical studies are focused to case companies in China especially Chinese State-Owned Manufacturing Enterprise (CSOME. The main emphasises of this research are manufacturing strategy and transformational leadership for CSOME. We have brought the influence of “China effect” to study how it will impact the operational competitiveness of CSOME on top of their manufacturing strategy and transformational leadership.

  18. Evaluation of Digital Checklists for Command and Control Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    EVALUATION OF DIGITAL CHECKLISTS FOR COMMAND AND CONTROL OPERATIONS Christopher K. McClernon 1 , Victor S. Finomore 2 , Terence S. Andre 3...the potential effectiveness of a digital system that could take the place of the paper system that is currently being used. A between groups...assessments of each system were analyzed and compared. The data showed that a linear digital checklist takes a longer amount of time than both a paper

  19. Evaluation of Nontraditional Airfield Pavement Surfaces for Contingency Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    to predict the performance of nontraditional pavements , although it was designed for traditional PCC ( rigid ), HMA (flexible), and unsurfaced...including a combination of rigid and flexible pavement analyses and, if possible, these criteria should be followed as detailed in ETL 08-14 (AFCESA...ER D C/ G SL T R -1 4 -2 Evaluation of Nontraditional Airfield Pavement Surfaces for Contingency Operations G eo te ch n ic al a n d

  20. Statistical and Probabilistic Extensions to Ground Operations' Discrete Event Simulation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trocine, Linda; Cummings, Nicholas H.; Bazzana, Ashley M.; Rychlik, Nathan; LeCroy, Kenneth L.; Cates, Grant R.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's human exploration initiatives will invest in technologies, public/private partnerships, and infrastructure, paving the way for the expansion of human civilization into the solar system and beyond. As it is has been for the past half century, the Kennedy Space Center will be the embarkation point for humankind's journey into the cosmos. Functioning as a next generation space launch complex, Kennedy's launch pads, integration facilities, processing areas, launch and recovery ranges will bustle with the activities of the world's space transportation providers. In developing this complex, KSC teams work through the potential operational scenarios: conducting trade studies, planning and budgeting for expensive and limited resources, and simulating alternative operational schemes. Numerous tools, among them discrete event simulation (DES), were matured during the Constellation Program to conduct such analyses with the purpose of optimizing the launch complex for maximum efficiency, safety, and flexibility while minimizing life cycle costs. Discrete event simulation is a computer-based modeling technique for complex and dynamic systems where the state of the system changes at discrete points in time and whose inputs may include random variables. DES is used to assess timelines and throughput, and to support operability studies and contingency analyses. It is applicable to any space launch campaign and informs decision-makers of the effects of varying numbers of expensive resources and the impact of off nominal scenarios on measures of performance. In order to develop representative DES models, methods were adopted, exploited, or created to extend traditional uses of DES. The Delphi method was adopted and utilized for task duration estimation. DES software was exploited for probabilistic event variation. A roll-up process was used, which was developed to reuse models and model elements in other less - detailed models. The DES team continues to innovate and expand

  1. Fusion of Landsat TM and ground spectrometry data in monitoring of non-operating mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Denitsa; Nikolov, Hristo N.

    2009-09-01

    Surface mining activities in Europe are estimated to cover an area of 5-10 000 km2. In this paper we suggest that the availability of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) for Earth observation allows the collection of environmental and minerelated data for use in the planning and undertaking of mine restoration work on cost-effective basis. The advantage is that these data are acquired digitally and can be easily processed and utilized in various information formats. Important step in the data processing is the verification of airborne data. For this purpose ground spectrometry measurements of samples taken from test sites have been performed. In the last decade several mining areas and corresponding dumps are subject to reclamation process in Bulgaria. We focused our research on one of the most important in the copper production for 20 year period for our country - Asarel-Medet deposit. This mining complex consists of an open mine, the dumps and a processing plant. After ceasing the exploitation of Medet deposit in 1994 a rehabilitation program for soil cover and hydrographic network was established and launched. A continuous task is the monitoring of these activities from the beginning for at least 15 years period, which is to end this year. To process the data, which characterize the progress of the land cover restoration, several techniques, both standard, such as basic and advanced statistics, image enhancement and data fusion, and novel methods for supervised classification were used. The results obtained show that used data and the implemented approach are useful in environmental monitoring and are economically attractive for the company responsible for the ecological state of the region.

  2. [The use of operational criteria for evaluations of mental competency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocha, Hiroki

    2013-01-01

    Today, either the DSM-IV or the ICD-10 is generally used for forensic purposes, especially for evaluations of mental competency. The use of operational criteria, such as the DSM-IV, in forensic settings has some risks. Here, these risks, as well as the advantages of operational criteria and precautions for their use, are discussed. Compared with the DSM-IV, the ICD-10 is preferred because this tool is less likely to complicate evaluations of the mental status of a criminal at the time of the crime when sufficient information is not available to make a diagnosis. The evaluation consists of two steps. The first step, which is based on empirical science, is to provide a psychiatric diagnosis. The second step, which is based on normative science, is to allocate the diagnosis to one of four categories of a forensic frame of reference and to provide useful information for judicial members to make a judgment about the mental competency of the criminal. To standardize evaluations, the use of not only global standard criteria, but also a general rule for the judgment of mental competency within each allocated category is needed.

  3. Objective Performance Evaluation of Video Segmentation Algorithms with Ground-Truth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨高波; 张兆扬

    2004-01-01

    While the development of particular video segmentation algorithms has attracted considerable research interest, relatively little effort has been devoted to provide a methodology for evaluating their performance. In this paper, we propose a methodology to objectively evaluate video segmentation algorithm with ground-truth, which is based on computing the deviation of segmentation results from the reference segmentation. Four different metrics based on classification pixels, edges, relative foreground area and relative position respectively are combined to address the spatial accuracy. Temporal coherency is evaluated by utilizing the difference of spatial accuracy between successive frames. The experimental results show the feasibility of our approach. Moreover, it is computationally more efficient than previous methods. It can be applied to provide an offline ranking among different segmentation algorithms and to optimally set the parameters for a given algorithm.

  4. Evaluation of SAR Data as Source of Ground Control Information: First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilaki, D. I.; Ioannidis, C.; Stamos, A. A.

    2013-05-01

    The high resolution imaging modes of modern SAR sensors has made SAR data compatible with optical images. SAR data offers various capabilities which can enhance the geometric correction process of optical images (accurate, direct and ground-independent georeferencing capabilities and global DEM products). In this paper the first results of an on-going study on the evaluation of SAR data as source of ground control information for the georeferencing of optical images are presented. The georeferencing of optical images using SAR data is in fact a co-registration problem which involves multimodal, mutitemporal, and multiresolution data. And although 2D transformations have proved to be insufficient for the georeferencing process, as they can not account for the distortions due to terrain, quite a few approaches on the registration of optical to SAR data using 2D-2D transformations can still be found in the literature. In this paper the performance of 2D-2D transformations is compared to the 3D-2D projective transformation over a greater area of Earth's surface with arbitrary terrain type. Two alternative forms of ground control information are used: points and FFLFs. The accuracy of the computed results is obtained using independent CPs and it is compared to the geolocation accuracy specification of the optical image, as well as to the accuracy of exhaustive georeferencing done by third parties.

  5. Strong Ground Motion Evaluation for an Active Fault System by the Empirical Green Function Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, In Kil; Choun, Young Sun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Shiba, Yoshiaki; Ohtori, Yasuki [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Chiba (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    In an area with a high seismic activity, a design earthquake ground motion is generally determined empirically by investigating the historical records concerning damaging events. But it is difficult in Korea to obtain such seismic records that reflect the local characteristics because of the low seismic activity. A geological survey on the active faults near the sites of nuclear power plants has been carried out recently, and the segmentation, slip rate and the latest activity of the fault system are partly revealed. It will be significant for the advanced seismic design of nuclear facilities to utilize the information derived from these geological investigations and evaluate the strong ground motions. In this study, the empirical Green's function method (EFGM) was used to simulate strong ground motions from an active fault system in Korea. The source models are assumed by using the information obtained from the geological survey and the trench investigation on the fault system. Finally, the applicability of this approach to Korea was estimated.

  6. Preparing the ground for an operational handling of long-term emissions in LCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakas, Ioannis; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard;

    2015-01-01

    hindering the standardisation of a methodology to account for potential impacts from long-term metal emissions, and to describe the characteristics of a robust framework for an operational impact assessment methodology.In order to demonstrate the issues around potential impacts from long-term emissions...... in LCA and derive a scientific basis for developing an adequate LCA methodology to address these impacts, a two-part review on long-term metal emissions is performed that (a) identifies a suitable time-dependent life cycle inventory (LCI) while underlining the problems in existing emission prediction......-term emissions, it is necessary to (i) represent future potential impacts more accurately by estimating time-dependent characterisation factors (CFs) corresponding to changing environmental conditions, (ii) develop more robust estimations by addressing uncertainty and (iii) refer to actual potential impacts...

  7. Forecast indices from ground-based microwave radiometer for operational meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimini, D.; Nelson, M.; Güldner, J.; Ware, R.

    2014-07-01

    Today, commercial microwave radiometers profilers (MWRP) are robust and unattended instruments providing real time accurate atmospheric observations at ~ 1 min temporal resolution under nearly all-weather conditions. Common commercial units operate in the 20-60 GHz frequency range and are able to retrieve profiles of temperature, vapour density, and relative humidity. Temperature and humidity profiles retrieved from MWRP data are used here to feed tools developed for processing radiosonde observations to obtain values of forecast indices (FI) commonly used in operational meteorology. The FI considered here include K index, Total Totals, KO index, Showalter index, T1 Gust, Fog Threat, Lifted Index, S Index (STT), Jefferson Index, MDPI, Thompson Index, TQ Index, and CAPE. Values of FI computed from radiosonde and MWRP-retrieved temperature and humidity profiles are compared in order to quantitatively demonstrate the level of agreement and the value of continuous FI updates. This analysis is repeated for two sites at midlatitude, the first one located at low altitude in Central Europe (Lindenberg, Germany), while the second one located at high altitude in North America (Whistler, Canada). It is demonstrated that FI computed from MWRP well correlate with those computed from radiosondes, with the additional advantage of nearly continuous update. The accuracy of MWRP-derived FI is tested against radiosondes, taken as a reference, showing different performances depending upon index and environmental situation. Overall, FI computed from MWRP retrievals agree well with radiosonde values, with correlation coefficients usually above 0.8 (with few exceptions). We conclude that MWRP retrievals can be used to produce meaningful FI, with the advantage (with respect to radiosondes) of nearly continuous update.

  8. Forecast indices from a ground-based microwave radiometer for operational meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimini, D.; Nelson, M.; Güldner, J.; Ware, R.

    2015-01-01

    Today, commercial microwave radiometer profilers (MWRPs) are robust and unattended instruments providing real-time, accurate atmospheric observations at ~ 1 min temporal resolution under nearly all weather conditions. Common commercial units operate in the 20-60 GHz frequency range and are able to retrieve profiles of temperature, vapour density, and relative humidity. Temperature and humidity profiles retrieved from MWRP data are used here to feed tools developed for processing radiosonde observations to obtain values of forecast indices (FIs) commonly used in operational meteorology. The FIs considered here include K index, total totals, KO index, Showalter index, T1 gust, fog threat, lifted index, S index (STT), Jefferson index, microburst day potential index (MDPI), Thompson index, TQ index, and CAPE (convective available potential energy). Values of FIs computed from radiosonde and MWRP-retrieved temperature and humidity profiles are compared in order to quantitatively demonstrate the level of agreement and the value of continuous FI updates. This analysis is repeated for two sites at midlatitude, the first one located at low altitude in central Europe (Lindenberg, Germany) and the second one located at high altitude in North America (Whistler, Canada). It is demonstrated that FIs computed from MWRPs well correlate with those computed from radiosondes, with the additional advantage of nearly continuous updates. The accuracy of MWRP-derived FIs is tested against radiosondes, taken as a reference, showing different performances depending upon index and environmental situation. Overall, FIs computed from MWRP retrievals agree well with radiosonde values, with correlation coefficients usually above 0.8 (with few exceptions). We conclude that MWRP retrievals can be used to produce meaningful FIs, with the advantage (with respect to radiosondes) of nearly continuous updates.

  9. Forecast indices from ground-based microwave radiometer for operational meteorology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Cimini

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Today, commercial microwave radiometers profilers (MWRP are robust and unattended instruments providing real time accurate atmospheric observations at ~ 1 min temporal resolution under nearly all-weather conditions. Common commercial units operate in the 20–60 GHz frequency range and are able to retrieve profiles of temperature, vapour density, and relative humidity. Temperature and humidity profiles retrieved from MWRP data are used here to feed tools developed for processing radiosonde observations to obtain values of forecast indices (FI commonly used in operational meteorology. The FI considered here include K index, Total Totals, KO index, Showalter index, T1 Gust, Fog Threat, Lifted Index, S Index (STT, Jefferson Index, MDPI, Thompson Index, TQ Index, and CAPE. Values of FI computed from radiosonde and MWRP-retrieved temperature and humidity profiles are compared in order to quantitatively demonstrate the level of agreement and the value of continuous FI updates. This analysis is repeated for two sites at midlatitude, the first one located at low altitude in Central Europe (Lindenberg, Germany, while the second one located at high altitude in North America (Whistler, Canada. It is demonstrated that FI computed from MWRP well correlate with those computed from radiosondes, with the additional advantage of nearly continuous update. The accuracy of MWRP-derived FI is tested against radiosondes, taken as a reference, showing different performances depending upon index and environmental situation. Overall, FI computed from MWRP retrievals agree well with radiosonde values, with correlation coefficients usually above 0.8 (with few exceptions. We conclude that MWRP retrievals can be used to produce meaningful FI, with the advantage (with respect to radiosondes of nearly continuous update.

  10. A review of selected ground penetrating radar applications to mineral resource evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francke, Jan

    2012-06-01

    Since the commercialisation of ground penetrating radar (GPR) in the 1970s, the technology has been relegated to niche applications in the mining industry. Advances in radar technology, such as flexible collinear antennas and the integration of live differential GPS positioning, have spurred GPR's acceptance in recent years as a standard exploration method for a number of deposit types. Provided herein is an overview of commercialised GPR applications for surface mineral resource evaluations, covering examples of alluvial channels, nickel and bauxitic laterites, iron ore deposits, mineral sands, coal and kimberlites.

  11. Evaluation of a completely robotized neurosurgical operating microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantelhardt, Sven R; Finke, Markus; Schweikard, Achim; Giese, Alf

    2013-01-01

    Operating microscopes are essential for most neurosurgical procedures. Modern robot-assisted controls offer new possibilities, combining the advantages of conventional and automated systems. We evaluated the prototype of a completely robotized operating microscope with an integrated optical coherence tomography module. A standard operating microscope was fitted with motors and control instruments, with the manual control mode and balance preserved. In the robot mode, the microscope was steered by a remote control that could be fixed to a surgical instrument. External encoders and accelerometers tracked microscope movements. The microscope was additionally fitted with an optical coherence tomography-scanning module. The robotized microscope was tested on model systems. It could be freely positioned, without forcing the surgeon to take the hands from the instruments or avert the eyes from the oculars. Positioning error was about 1 mm, and vibration faded in 1 second. Tracking of microscope movements, combined with an autofocus function, allowed determination of the focus position within the 3-dimensional space. This constituted a second loop of navigation independent from conventional infrared reflector-based techniques. In the robot mode, automated optical coherence tomography scanning of large surface areas was feasible. The prototype of a robotized optical coherence tomography-integrated operating microscope combines the advantages of a conventional manually controlled operating microscope with a remote-controlled positioning aid and a self-navigating microscope system that performs automated positioning tasks such as surface scans. This demonstrates that, in the future, operating microscopes may be used to acquire intraoperative spatial data, volume changes, and structural data of brain or brain tumor tissue.

  12. Supercritical fluid extraction from spent coffee grounds and coffee husks: antioxidant activity and effect of operational variables on extract composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Kátia S; Gonçalvez, Ricardo T; Maraschin, Marcelo; Ribeiro-do-Valle, Rosa Maria; Martínez, Julian; Ferreira, Sandra R S

    2012-01-15

    The present study describes the chemical composition and the antioxidant activity of spent coffee grounds and coffee husks extracts, obtained by supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) with CO(2) and with CO(2) and co-solvent. In order to evaluate the high pressure method in terms of process yield, extract composition and antioxidant activity, low pressure methods, such as ultrasound (UE) and soxhlet (SOX) with different organic solvents, were also applied to obtain the extracts. The conditions for the SFE were: temperatures of 313.15K, 323.15K and 333.15K and pressures from 100 bar to 300 bar. The SFE kinetics and the mathematical modeling of the overall extraction curves (OEC) were also investigated. The extracts obtained by LPE (low pressure extraction) with ethanol showed the best results for the global extraction yield (X(0)) when compared to SFE results. The best extraction yield was 15±2% for spent coffee grounds with ethanol and 3.1±04% for coffee husks. The antioxidant potential was evaluated by DPPH method, ABTS method and Folin-Ciocalteau method. The best antioxidant activity was showed by coffee husk extracts obtained by LPE. The quantification and the identification of the extracts were accomplished using HPLC analysis. The main compounds identified were caffeine and chlorogenic acid for the supercritical extracts from coffee husks.

  13. LiveWall Operational Evaluation: Seattle Law Enforcement Pilot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Burtner, Edwin R.; Stein, Steven L.

    2013-10-01

    The LiveWall concept envisioned as an outgrowth of the Precision Information Environment (PIE) project allows communications between separate groups using interactive video, audio, and a shared desktop environment; this allows everyone to participate and collaborate in real time, regardless of location. The LiveWall concept provides a virtual window to other locations, where all parties can interact and collaboratively work with each other. This functionality is intended to improve multi-site coordination amongst emergency operations centers (EOC), field operations sites and across organizations and jurisdictions to accommodate communications during routine and emergency events. For the initial LiveWall operational evaluation PNNL partnered with the Seattle Police Department (SPD). This partnership allowed for the creation of an excellent LiveWall test bed specific to law enforcement. This partnership made it possible to test the LiveWall concept with scenarios involving the many facets of the law enforcement work done by SPD. PNNL and SPD agreed that integrating the systems into operations for a real event would be the best test of the technology and give SPD staff greater visibility into the functionality and benefits offered by the LiveWall concept.

  14. Fast Multi-Operator Image Resizing and Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Ming Dong; Guan-Bo Bao; Xiao-Peng Zhang; Jean-Claude Paul

    2012-01-01

    Current multi operator image resizing methods succeed in generating impressive results by using image similarity measure to guide the resizing process.An optimal operation path is found in the resizing space.However,their slow resizing speed caused by inefficient computation strategy of the bidirectional patch matching becomes a drawback in practical use.In this paper,we present a novel method to address this problem.By combining seam carving with scaling and cropping,our method can realize content-aware image resizing very fast.We define cost functions combing image energy and dominant color descriptor for all the operators to evaluate the damage to both local image content and global visual effect.Therefore our algorithm can automatically find an optimal sequence of operations to resize the image by using dynamic programming or greedy algorithm.We also extend our algorithm to indirect image resizing which can protect the aspect ratio of the dominant object in an image.

  15. Teachers guide for building and operating weather satellite ground stations for high school science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, R. J.; Gotwald, T.

    1981-01-01

    A number of colleges and universities are operating APT direct readout stations. However, high school science teachers have often failed to realize the potential of meteorological satellites and their products as unique instructional tools. The ability to receive daily pictures from these satellites offers exciting opportunities for secondary school teachers and students to assemble the electronic hardware and to view real time pictures of Earth from outer space. The station and pictures can be used in the classroom to develop an approach to science teaching that could span many scientific disciplines and offer many opportunities for student research and participation in scientific processes. This can be accomplished with relatively small expenditures of funds for equipment. In most schools some of the equipment may already be available. Others can be constructed by teachers and/or students. Yet another source might be the purchase of used equipment from industry or through the government surplus channels. The information necessary for individuals unfamiliar with these systems to construct a direct readout for receiving real time APT photographs on a daily basis in the classroom is presented.

  16. Use of an operational model evaluation system for model intercomparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, K. T., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) is a centralized emergency response system used to assess the impact from atmospheric releases of hazardous materials. As part of an on- going development program, new three-dimensional diagnostic windfield and Lagrangian particle dispersion models will soon replace ARAC`s current operational windfield and dispersion codes. A prototype model performance evaluation system has been implemented to facilitate the study of the capabilities and performance of early development versions of these new models relative to ARAC`s current operational codes. This system provides tools for both objective statistical analysis using common performance measures and for more subjective visualization of the temporal and spatial relationships of model results relative to field measurements. Supporting this system is a database of processed field experiment data (source terms and meteorological and tracer measurements) from over 100 individual tracer releases.

  17. City of Flagstaff Project: Ground Water Resource Evaluation, Remote Sensing Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Pat S.; Velasco, Miguel G.; Bowell, Jo-Ann; Sides, Stuart C.; Gonzalez, Rosendo R.; Soltesz, Deborah L.

    1996-01-01

    Many regions, cities, and towns in the Western United States need new or expanded water resources because of both population growth and increased development. Any tools or data that can help in the evaluation of an area's potential water resources must be considered for this increasingly critical need. Remotely sensed satellite images and subsequent digital image processing have been under-utilized in ground water resource evaluation and exploration. Satellite images can be helpful in detecting and mapping an area's regional structural patterns, including major fracture and fault systems, two important geologic settings for an area's surface to ground water relations. Within the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Flagstaff Field Center, expertise and capabilities in remote sensing and digital image processing have been developed over the past 25 years through various programs. For the City of Flagstaff project, this expertise and these capabilities were combined with traditional geologic field mapping to help evaluate ground water resources in the Flagstaff area. Various enhancement and manipulation procedures were applied to the digital satellite images; the results, in both digital and hardcopy format, were used for field mapping and analyzing the regional structure. Relative to surface sampling, remotely sensed satellite and airborne images have improved spatial coverage that can help study, map, and monitor the earth surface at local and/or regional scales. Advantages offered by remotely sensed satellite image data include: 1. a synoptic/regional view compared to both aerial photographs and ground sampling, 2. cost effectiveness, 3. high spatial resolution and coverage compared to ground sampling, and 4. relatively high temporal coverage on a long term basis. Remotely sensed images contain both spectral and spatial information. The spectral information provides various properties and characteristics about the surface cover at a given location or pixel

  18. Evaluation of Damping Using Frequency Domain Operational Modal Analysis Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajric, Anela; Georgakis, Christos T.; Brincker, Rune

    2015-01-01

    Operational Modal Analysis (OMA) techniques provide in most cases reasonably accurate estimates of structural frequencies and mode shapes. In contrast though, they are known to often produce uncertain structural damping estimates, which is mainly due to inherent random and/or bias errors...... domain techniques, the Frequency Domain Decomposition (FDD) and the Frequency Domain Polyreference (FDPR). The response of a two degree-of-freedom (2DOF) system is numerically established with specified modal parameters subjected to white noise loading. The system identification is evaluated with well...

  19. Soft Computing Approach to Evaluate and Predict Blast-Induced Ground Vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Manoj

    2010-05-01

    Drilling and blasting is still one of the major economical operations to excavate a rock mass. The consumption of explosive has been increased many folds in recent years. These explosives are mainly used for the exploitation of minerals in mining industry or the removal of undesirable rockmass for community development. The amount of chemical energy converted into mechanical energy to fragment and displace the rockmass is minimal. Only 20 to 30% of this explosive energy is utilized for the actual fragmentation and displacement of rockmass and rest of the energy is wasted in undesirable ill effects, like, ground vibration, air over pressure, fly rock, back break, noise, etc. Ground vibration induced due to blasting is very crucial and critical as compared to other ill effects due to involvement of public residing in the close vicinity of mining sites, regulating and ground vibration standards setting agencies together with mine owners and environmentalists and ecologists. Also, with the emphasis shifting towards eco-friendly, sustainable and geo-environmental activities, the field of ground vibration have now become an important and imperative parameter for safe and smooth running of any mining and civil project. The ground vibration is a wave motion, spreading outward from the blast like ripples spreading outwards due to impact of a stone dropped into a pond of water. As the vibration passes through the surface structures, it induces vibrations in those structures also. Sometimes, due to high ground vibration level, dwellings may get damaged and there is always confrontation between mine management and the people residing in the surroundings of the mine area. There is number of vibration predictors available suggested by different researchers. All the predictors estimate the PPV based on mainly two parameters (maximum charge used per delay and distance between blast face to monitoring point). However, few predictors considered attenuation/damping factor too. For

  20. Evaluation of brightness temperature from a forward model of ground-based microwave radiometer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Rambabu; J S Pillai; A Agarwal; G Pandithurai

    2014-06-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers are getting great attention in recent years due to their capability to profile the temperature and humidity at high temporal and vertical resolution in the lower troposphere. The process of retrieving these parameters from the measurements of radiometric brightness temperature () includes the inversion algorithm, which uses the background information from a forward model. In the present study, an algorithm development and evaluation of this forward model for a ground-based microwave radiometer, being developed by Society for Applied Microwave Electronics Engineering and Research (SAMEER) of India, is presented. Initially, the analysis of absorption coefficient and weighting function at different frequencies was made to select the channels. Further the range of variation of for these selected channels for the year 2011, over the two stations Mumbai and Delhi is discussed. Finally the comparison between forward-model simulated s and radiometer measured s at Mahabaleshwar (73.66°E and 17.93°N) is done to evaluate the model. There is good agreement between model simulations and radiometer observations, which suggests that these forward model simulations can be used as background for inversion models for retrieving the temperature and humidity profiles.

  1. Evaluation of Sentinel-1A Data For Above Ground Biomass Estimation in Different Forests in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadrevu, Krishna Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Use of remote sensing data for mapping and monitoring of forest biomass across large spatial scales can aid in addressing uncertainties in carbon cycle. Earlier, several researchers reported on the use of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data for characterizing forest structural parameters and the above ground biomass estimation. However, these studies cannot be generalized and the algorithms cannot be applied to all types of forests without additional information on the forest physiognomy, stand structure and biomass characteristics. The radar backscatter signal also saturates as forest parameters such as biomass and the tree height increase. It is also not clear how different polarizations (VV versus VH) impact the backscatter retrievals in different forested regions. Thus, it is important to evaluate the potential of SAR data in different landscapes for characterizing forest structural parameters. In this study, the SAR data from Sentinel-1A has been used to characterize forest structural parameters including the above ground biomass from tropical forests of India. Ground based data on tree density, basal area and above ground biomass data from thirty-eight different forested sites has been collected to relate to SAR data. After the pre-processing of Sentinel 1-A data for radiometric calibration, geo-correction, terrain correction and speckle filtering, the variability in the backscatter signal in relation tree density, basal area and above biomass density has been investigated. Results from the curve fitting approach suggested exponential model between the Sentinel-1A backscatter versus tree density and above ground biomass whereas the relationship was almost linear with the basal area in the VV polarization mode. Of the different parameters, tree density could explain most of the variations in backscatter. Both VV and VH backscatter signals could explain only thirty and thirty three percent of variation in above biomass in different forest sites of India

  2. A simple evaluation method of seismic resistance of residential house under two consecutive severe ground motions with intensity 7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotaro Kojima

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake in Japan, two severe ground shakings with the seismic intensity 7 (the highest level in Japan Metheorological Agency (JMA scale; approximately X-XII in Mercalli scale occurred consecutively on April 14 and April 16. In the seismic regulations of most countries, it is usually prescribed that such severe earthquake ground motion occurs once in the working period of buildings. In this paper, a simple evaluation method is presented on the seismic resistance of residential houses under two consecutive severe ground motions with intensity 7. Therefore the proposed method can be used for the design of buildings under two consecutive severe ground motions. The present paper adopts an impulse as a representative of near-fault ground motion and two separated impulses are used as the repetition of intensive ground shakings with the seismic intensity 7. Two scenarios to building collapse (collapse limit in terms of zero restoring force with P-delta effect and collapse limit in terms of maximum deformation under two repeated severe ground shakings are provided and energy consideration is devised for the response evaluation. The validity and accuracy of the proposed theories are discussed through numerical analysis using recorded ground motions.

  3. EVALUATION OF FORWARDER WOOD EXTRACTION COST OF OPERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Nunes dos Santos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the costs of the activity of timber extraction done by forwarders until approximately 30,000 work hours. We used 7 John Deere forwarders, model 1710D with 160 kW engine power. A database provided by a forestry company located in the state of Minas Gerais was used, containing all the information necessary for calculating the operating cost of the machines and for the subsequent sensitivity analysis. The operating cost was obtained by the sum of the fixed and variable costs. For the sensitivity analysis a variation ± 20% of the most representative elements of the total cost of the machine was performed. The result obtained for the average operating cost of the forwarder was US$ 147.80 h-1. Costs for repairs and maintenance, labor, fuel, and depreciation represented approximately 90% of the total cost of the machine. A 10% reduction in their values resulted in a savings of approximately 9% in all years evaluated.

  4. Ground-based & satellite DOAS measurements integration for air quality evaluation/forecast management in the frame of QUITSAT Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostadinov, Ivan; Petritoli, Andrea; Giovanelli, Giorgio; Masieri, Samuele; Premuda, Margarita; Bortoli, Daniele; Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Palazzi, Elisa

    The observations of the Earth's atmosphere from space provide excellent opportunities for the exploration of the sophisticated physical-chemical processes on both global and regional scales. The major interest during the last three decades was focused mainly on the stratosphere and the ozone depletion. More recently the continuous improvements of satellite sensors have revealed new opportunities for larger applications of space observations, attracting scientific interest to the lower troposphere and air quality issues. The air quality depends strongly on the anthropogenic activity and therefore regional environmental agencies along with policy makers are in need of appropriate means for its continuous monitoring and control to ensure the adoption of the most appropriate actions. The goal of the pilot project QUITSAT, funded by the Italian Space Agency, is to develop algorithms and procedures for the evaluation and prediction of the air quality in Lombardia and Emilia-Romagna regions (Italy) by means of integrating satellite observations with ground-based in-situ and remote sensing measurements. This work presents dedicated Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements performed during the summer of 2007 and the winter of 2008. One of the DOAS instruments operate at Mt.Cimone station (2165m a.s.l) and the other two instruments conducted measurements in/near Bologna (90 m. a.s.l). Different observational geometry was adopted (zenith-sky, multi-axis and long-path) aimed to provide tropospheric NO2 columns and O3, SO2 and HCHO concentrations at ground level as an input data for QUITSAT procedures. Details of the instruments, the radiative transfer model used and the algorithms for retrieving and calculation of the target gases concentrations are presented. The obtained experimental results are correlated with the corresponding ones retrieved from SCIAMACHY /ENVISAT observations during the overpasses above the ground-based instruments. The analysis

  5. Evaluation of atmospheric dust prediction models using ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terradellas, Enric; María Baldasano, José; Cuevas, Emilio; Basart, Sara; Huneeus, Nicolás; Camino, Carlos; Dundar, Cinhan; Benincasa, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    An important step in numerical prediction of mineral dust is the model evaluation aimed to assess its performance to forecast the atmospheric dust content and to lead to new directions in model development and improvement. The first problem to address the evaluation is the scarcity of ground-based routine observations intended for dust monitoring. An alternative option would be the use of satellite products. They have the advantage of a large spatial coverage and a regular availability. However, they do have numerous drawbacks that make the quantitative retrievals of aerosol-related variables difficult and imprecise. This work presents the use of different ground-based observing systems for the evaluation of dust models in the Regional Center for Northern Africa, Middle East and Europe of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and Assessment System (SDS-WAS). The dust optical depth at 550 nm forecast by different models is regularly compared with the AERONET measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) for 40 selected stations. Photometric measurements are a powerful tool for remote sensing of the atmosphere allowing retrieval of aerosol properties, such as AOD. This variable integrates the contribution of different aerosol types, but may be complemented with spectral information that enables hypotheses about the nature of the particles. Comparison is restricted to cases with low Ångström exponent values in order to ensure that coarse mineral dust is the dominant aerosol type. Additionally to column dust load, it is important to evaluate dust surface concentration and dust vertical profiles. Air quality monitoring stations are the main source of data for the evaluation of surface concentration. However they are concentrated in populated and industrialized areas around the Mediterranean. In the present contribution, results of different models are compared with observations of PM10 from the Turkish air quality network for

  6. Regional Characterization of Metropolitan Areas in Japan for Strong Ground Motion Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, N.; Sato, H.; Koketsu, K.; Umeda, Y.; Iwata, T.; Kasahara, K.; Okaya, D.

    2002-12-01

    Introduction After the 1995 Kobe earthquake, the Japanese government increased its focus and funding of earthquake hazards evaluation, studies of man-made structures integrity, and emergency response planning in the major urban centers. A new agency, the Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion, was formed to oversee appropriate research in the earth sciences and civil engineering. This agency distributes research funds of \\$130 million per year. Projects include these topics: 1) Densification of seismic and GPS networks, 2) Paleoseismological investigation of major active faults, 3) Research on the geometry and physical properties of basins under the cities, 4) Probablistic strong ground motion estimation, and 5) Regional characterization of faults and physical parameters. Regional Characterization Study A long-term goal is to produce map of reliable estimations of strong ground motion. This requires accurate determination of: Source, Propagation path, Near surface and Ground motion response.A new five year project starts this year to characterize the "source" and "propagation path" in the Kanto (Tokyo) region and Kinki (Osaka) region. The proximity of the Pacific and Philippine Sea subducting plates requires study of the relationship between earthquakes and regional tectonics. This projects focuses on identification and geometry of: 1) Source faults, 2) Subducting plates and mega-thrust faults, 3)Crustal structure, 4) Seismogenic zone, 5) Sedimentary basins, 6) 3D velocity properties Reconstruction of source fault and velocity models allow for more realistic 3D EQ wave simulations. All of these information will be synthesized and provided to communities involved in probablistic hazards analysis, risk assessment and societal response. In 2002, we have started to deploy seismic profiling lines in the Boso Peninsula (112 km) and the Sagami bay area( 75 km) to image the subducting Philippine Sea plate

  7. ANEMOS: A computer code to estimate air concentrations and ground deposition rates for atmospheric nuclides emitted from multiple operating sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, C.W.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Begovich, C.L.; Hermann, O.W.

    1986-11-01

    This code estimates concentrations in air and ground deposition rates for Atmospheric Nuclides Emitted from Multiple Operating Sources. ANEMOS is one component of an integrated Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System (CRRIS) developed for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use in performing radiological assessments and in developing radiation standards. The concentrations and deposition rates calculated by ANEMOS are used in subsequent portions of the CRRIS for estimating doses and risks to man. The calculations made in ANEMOS are based on the use of a straight-line Gaussian plume atmospheric dispersion model with both dry and wet deposition parameter options. The code will accommodate a ground-level or elevated point and area source or windblown source. Adjustments may be made during the calculations for surface roughness, building wake effects, terrain height, wind speed at the height of release, the variation in plume rise as a function of downwind distance, and the in-growth and decay of daughter products in the plume as it travels downwind. ANEMOS can also accommodate multiple particle sizes and clearance classes, and it may be used to calculate the dose from a finite plume of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides passing overhead. The output of this code is presented for 16 sectors of a circular grid. ANEMOS can calculate both the sector-average concentrations and deposition rates at a given set of downwind distances in each sector and the average of these quantities over an area within each sector bounded by two successive downwind distances. ANEMOS is designed to be used primarily for continuous, long-term radionuclide releases. This report describes the models used in the code, their computer implementation, the uncertainty associated with their use, and the use of ANEMOS in conjunction with other codes in the CRRIS. A listing of the code is included in Appendix C.

  8. Performance evaluation and phylogenetic characterization of anaerobic fluidized bed reactors using ground tire and pet as support materials for biohydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Aruana Rocha; Adorno, Maria Angela Tallarico; Sakamoto, Isabel Kimiko; Maintinguer, Sandra Imaculada; Varesche, Maria Bernadete Amâncio; Silva, Edson Luiz

    2011-02-01

    This study evaluated two different support materials (ground tire and polyethylene terephthalate [PET]) for biohydrogen production in an anaerobic fluidized bed reactor (AFBR) treating synthetic wastewater containing glucose (4000 mg L(-1)). The AFBR, which contained either ground tire (R1) or PET (R2) as support materials, were inoculated with thermally pretreated anaerobic sludge and operated at a temperature of 30°C. The AFBR were operated with a range of hydraulic retention times (HRT) between 1 and 8h. The reactor R1 operating with a HRT of 2h showed better performance than reactor R2, reaching a maximum hydrogen yield of 2.25 mol H(2)mol(-1) glucose with 1.3mg of biomass (as the total volatile solids) attached to each gram of ground tire. Subsequent 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of particle samples revealed that reactor R1 favored the presence of hydrogen-producing bacteria such as Clostridium, Bacillus, and Enterobacter.

  9. Flight Simulator Evaluation of Enhanced Propulsion Control Modes for Emergency Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Jonathan, S; Sowers, T.; Owen, A., Karl; Fulton, Christopher, E.; Chicatelli, Amy, K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes piloted evaluation of enhanced propulsion control modes for emergency operation of aircraft. Fast Response and Overthrust modes were implemented to assess their ability to help avoid or mitigate potentially catastrophic situations, both on the ground and in flight. Tests were conducted to determine the reduction in takeoff distance achievable using the Overthrust mode. Also, improvements in Dutch roll damping, enabled by using yaw rate feedback to the engines to replace the function of a stuck rudder, were investigated. Finally, pilot workload and ability to handle the impaired aircraft on approach and landing were studied. The results showed that improvement in all aspects is possible with these enhanced propulsion control modes, but the way in which they are initiated and incorporated is important for pilot comfort and perceived benefit.

  10. Ground and Flight Evaluation of a Small-Scale Inflatable-Winged Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, James E.; Pahle, Joseph W.; Thornton, Stephen V.; Vogus, Shannon; Frackowiak, Tony; Mello, Joe; Norton, Brook; Bauer, Jeff (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A small-scale, instrumented research aircraft was flown to investigate the night characteristics of innersole wings. Ground tests measured the static structural characteristics of the wing at different inflation pressures, and these results compared favorably with analytical predictions. A research-quality instrumentation system was assembled, largely from commercial off-the-shelf components, and installed in the aircraft. Initial flight operations were conducted with a conventional rigid wing having the same dimensions as the inflatable wing. Subsequent flights were conducted with the inflatable wing. Research maneuvers were executed to identify the trim, aerodynamic performance, and longitudinal stability and control characteristics of the vehicle in its different wing configurations. For the angle-of-attack range spanned in this flight program, measured flight data demonstrated that the rigid wing was an effective simulator of the lift-generating capability of the inflatable wing. In-flight inflation of the wing was demonstrated in three flight operations, and measured flight data illustrated the dynamic characteristics during wing inflation and transition to controlled lifting flight. Wing inflation was rapid and the vehicle dynamics during inflation and transition were benign. The resulting angles of attack and of sideslip ere small, and the dynamic response was limited to roll and heave motions.

  11. Field study evaluation of diffuse ceiling ventilation in classroom during real operating conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Martin Heine; Jensen, Jakob Søland; Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    2017-01-01

    Highlights •Field experimental measurements during real operating conditions. •Evaluation of pressure chamber effect. •Evaluation of displacement effect. •Evaluation of thermal comfort.......Highlights •Field experimental measurements during real operating conditions. •Evaluation of pressure chamber effect. •Evaluation of displacement effect. •Evaluation of thermal comfort....

  12. Smart merger of developmental and operational test and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizzelle, Charles Delano, Jr.

    The Department of Defense (DoD) has implemented Acquisition Reform to take advantage of commercial products, to compress the acquisition cycle, and to reduce the overall life-cycle cost of major weapon systems. This initiative, following requirements of the National Performance Review to perform faster, cheaper, and better, is expected to produce significant savings required to fund a new generation of weapons for the United States military. The DoD has a clear requirement to verify through a rigorous test and evaluation (T&E) that these advanced weapons are suitable and effective for use in combat. T&E is an inherently expensive and time-consuming activity performed to ensure that the system under test can meet contractual specifications and the operational user requirements. With a detailed and rich theoretical base, T&E has come to consider alternatives. Making a change from the safe and traditional paradigm of sequential developmental and operational T&E to a combined T&E strategy is one option. The central research question for this dissertation is "Does combining developmental and operational T&E permit faster acquisition cycle times without unnecessarily increasing risks of deploying ineffective systems?" In this interrupted time-series multiple case study, the impact of the independent variable of acquisition reform is assessed regarding the applicability and utility of a combined T&E strategy for the dependent variable of the Brilliant Eyes, Follow-on Early Warning System, and Space-based Infra-red System programs. In this analysis, the Brilliant Eyes and Follow-on Early Warning System preceded application of the independent variable while the Space-based Infra-red System followed Acquisition Reform. The conclusion of this dissertation is that the combined T&E strategy, where developmental and operational T&E events and resources are merged to the greatest extent possible consistent with mission requirements, provides significant advantages in cost and

  13. A cost effective and operational methodology for wall to wall Above Ground Biomass (AGB) and carbon stocks estimation and mapping: Nepal REDD+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilani, H., Sr.; Ganguly, S.; Zhang, G.; Koju, U. A.; Murthy, M. S. R.; Nemani, R. R.; Manandhar, U.; Thapa, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    Nepal is a landlocked country with 39% forest cover of the total land area (147,181 km2). Under the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF) and implemented by the World Bank (WB), Nepal chosen as one of four countries best suitable for results-based payment system for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD and REDD+) scheme. At the national level Landsat based, from 1990 to 2000 the forest area has declined by 2%, i.e. by 1467 km2, whereas from 2000 to 2010 it has declined only by 0.12% i.e. 176 km2. A cost effective monitoring and evaluation system for REDD+ requires a balanced approach of remote sensing and ground measurements. This paper provides, for Nepal a cost effective and operational 30 m Above Ground Biomass (AGB) estimation and mapping methodology using freely available satellite data integrated with field inventory. Leaf Area Index (LAI) generated based on propose methodology by Ganguly et al. (2012) using Landsat-8 the OLI cloud free images. To generate tree canopy height map, a density scatter graph between the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on the Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) estimated maximum height and Landsat LAI nearest to the center coordinates of the GLAS shots show a moderate but significant exponential correlation (31.211*LAI0.4593, R2= 0.33, RMSE=13.25 m). From the field well distributed circular (750m2 and 500m2), 1124 field plots (0.001% representation of forest cover) measured which were used for estimation AGB (ton/ha) using Sharma et al. (1990) proposed equations for all tree species of Nepal. A satisfactory linear relationship (AGB = 8.7018*Hmax-101.24, R2=0.67, RMSE=7.2 ton/ha) achieved between maximum canopy height (Hmax) and AGB (ton/ha). This cost effective and operational methodology is replicable, over 5-10 years with minimum ground samples through integration of satellite images. Developed AGB used to produce optimum fuel wood scenarios using population and road

  14. Evaluation of ground state entanglement in spin systems with the random phase approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Matera, J M; Canosa, N

    2010-01-01

    We discuss a general treatment based on the mean field plus random phase approximation (RPA) for the evaluation of subsystem entropies and negativities in ground states of spin systems. The approach leads to a tractable general method, becoming straightforward in translationally invariant arrays. The method is examined in arrays of arbitrary spin with $XYZ$ couplings of general range in a uniform transverse field, where the RPA around both the normal and parity breaking mean field state, together with parity restoration effects, are discussed in detail. In the case of a uniformly connected $XYZ$ array of arbitrary size, the method is shown to provide simple analytic expressions for the entanglement entropy of any global bipartition, as well as for the negativity between any two subsystems, which become exact for large spin. The limit case of a spin $s$ pair is also discussed.

  15. Evaluation of ground-state entanglement in spin systems with the random phase approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matera, J. M.; Rossignoli, R.; Canosa, N.

    2010-11-01

    We discuss a general treatment based on the mean field plus random-phase approximation (RPA) for the evaluation of subsystem entropies and negativities in ground states of spin systems. The approach leads to a tractable general method that becomes straightforward in translationally invariant arrays. The method is examined in arrays of arbitrary spin with XYZ couplings of general range in a uniform transverse field, where the RPA around both the normal and parity-breaking mean-field state, together with parity-restoration effects, is discussed in detail. In the case of a uniformly connected XYZ array of arbitrary size, the method is shown to provide simple analytic expressions for the entanglement entropy of any global bipartition, as well as for the negativity between any two subsystems, which become exact for large spin. The limit case of a spin s pair is also discussed.

  16. Bank branch operating efficiency: evaluation with data envelopment analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roozbeh Talebi Zarinkamar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Measuring the relative efficiency of similar units has been a popular research especially when the units were mostly non-financial. Even, similar financial units may not be necessarily evaluated based on traditional financial figures such as return of equities, return of assets, etc. In this paper, we present an empirical investigation to measure the relative efficiency of 30 branches of an Iranian bank named Bank Mellat. The study considers four inputs including operating expenses, interest paid, capital expenditures and fixed assets. In addition, we use customers’ bank deposit, commissions and loans paid as output parameters. Using three different data envelopment analyses, the study measures the relative efficiencies of all units. The preliminary results indicate that most banks were working under desirable level of efficiency.

  17. Personnel Access Control System Evaluation for National Ignition Facility Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altenbach, T; Brereton, S.; Hermes, G.; Singh, M.

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to analyze the baseline Access Control System for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and to assess its effectiveness at controlling access to hazardous locations during full NIF operations. It reviews the various hazards present during a NIF shot sequence, and evaluates the effectiveness of the applicable set of controls at preventing access while the hazards are present. It considers only those hazards that could potentially be lethal. In addition, various types of technologies that might be applicable at NIF are reviewed, as are systems currently in use at other facilities requiring access control for safety reasons. Recommendations on how this system might be modified to reduce risk are made.

  18. Evaluation of satellite soil moisture products over Norway using ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesfeller, A.; Lahoz, W. A.; Jeu, R. A. M. de; Dorigo, W.; Haugen, L. E.; Svendby, T. M.; Wagner, W.

    2016-03-01

    In this study we evaluate satellite soil moisture products from the advanced SCATterometer (ASCAT) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) over Norway using ground-based observations from the Norwegian water resources and energy directorate. The ASCAT data are produced using the change detection approach of Wagner et al. (1999), and the AMSR-E data are produced using the VUA-NASA algorithm (Owe et al., 2001, 2008). Although satellite and ground-based soil moisture data for Norway have been available for several years, hitherto, such an evaluation has not been performed. This is partly because satellite measurements of soil moisture over Norway are complicated owing to the presence of snow, ice, water bodies, orography, rocks, and a very high coastline-to-area ratio. This work extends the European areas over which satellite soil moisture is validated to the Nordic regions. Owing to the challenging conditions for soil moisture measurements over Norway, the work described in this paper provides a stringent test of the capabilities of satellite sensors to measure soil moisture remotely. We show that the satellite and in situ data agree well, with averaged correlation (R) values of 0.72 and 0.68 for ASCAT descending and ascending data vs in situ data, and 0.64 and 0.52 for AMSR-E descending and ascending data vs in situ data for the summer/autumn season (1 June-15 October), over a period of 3 years (2009-2011). This level of agreement indicates that, generally, the ASCAT and AMSR-E soil moisture products over Norway have high quality, and would be useful for various applications, including land surface monitoring, weather forecasting, hydrological modelling, and climate studies. The increasing emphasis on coupled approaches to study the earth system, including the interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere, will benefit from the availability of validated and improved soil moisture satellite datasets, including those

  19. Communicating Sustainability: An Operational Model for Evaluating Corporate Websites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Siano

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The interest in corporate sustainability has increased rapidly in recent years and has encouraged organizations to adopt appropriate digital communication strategies, in which the corporate website plays a key role. Despite this growing attention in both the academic and business communities, models for the analysis and evaluation of online sustainability communication have not been developed to date. This paper aims to develop an operational model to identify and assess the requirements of sustainability communication in corporate websites. It has been developed from a literature review on corporate sustainability and digital communication and the analysis of the websites of the organizations included in the “Global CSR RepTrak 2015” by the Reputation Institute. The model identifies the core dimensions of online sustainability communication (orientation, structure, ergonomics, content—OSEC, sub-dimensions, such as stakeholder engagement and governance tools, communication principles, and measurable items (e.g., presence of the materiality matrix, interactive graphs. A pilot study on the websites of the energy and utilities companies included in the Dow Jones Sustainability World Index 2015 confirms the applicability of the OSEC framework. Thus, the model can provide managers and digital communication consultants with an operational tool that is useful for developing an industry ranking and assessing the best practices. The model can also help practitioners to identify corrective actions in the critical areas of digital sustainability communication and avoid greenwashing.

  20. ENVIROGEN PROPANE BIOSTIMULATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE IN-SITU TREATMENT OF MTBE-CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The primary objective of the Biostimulation Technology Evaluation was to determine if biodegradation was occurring in a ground-water Test Plot to a sufficient degree to reduce intrinsic MTBE to the State of California's treatability criteria of 5 mg/L or below. The evaluation wa...

  1. EVALUATION OF AN OPERATING THEATER DESIGN BY A SOFTWARE PROGRAM (OTDA: OPERATING THEATER DESIGN ANALYZER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal Abdel Wahed

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The design and establishment of the operating theatre (OT is not a simple architecture engineering work.This project needs a specialized planning and execution effort from all engineering specialists driven andcoordinated by the needs, preferences and safety of the medical/surgical team. More than one reference inoperating theatre design is available, but each reference is dedicated for the design of a special part of theproject. This paper presents a complete comprehensive integrated paperless database application programcalled Operating Theatre Design Analyzer (OTDA. This application is used to ensure the OT designcompliance with seven international standards and three accreditation programs integrated with eachother. It helps the owners of healthcare facilities or those who are interested in this area to identify andsolve the problems in the OT design. The program was introduced to some hospitals in different Arabcountries for evaluation; the percentage of compliance with standard for each item in OTDA was recorded.The analysis of the results reflects a lack of infection control awareness and misunderstanding of the roleof the clinical engineer in OT design and healthcare facilities design as whole.

  2. GSA's Green Proving Ground: Identifying, Testing and Evaluating Innovative Technologies; Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandt, A.; Lowell, M.

    2012-05-01

    This paper will provide an overview of the GPG program and its objectives as well as a summary and status update of the 16 technologies selected for enhanced testing and evaluation in 2011. The federal government's General Services Administration's (GSA) Public Buildings Service (PBS) acquires space on behalf of the federal government through new construction and leasing, and acts as a caretaker for federal properties across the country. PBS owns or leases 9,624 assets and maintains an inventory of more than 370.2 million square feet of workspace, and as such has enormous potential for implementing energy efficient and renewable energy technologies to reduce energy and water use and associated emissions. The Green Proving Ground (GPG) program utilizes GSA's real estate portfolio to test and evaluate innovative and underutilized sustainable building technologies and practices. Findings are used to support the development of GSA performance specifications and inform decision making within GSA, other federal agencies, and the real estate industry. The program aims to drive innovation in environmental performance in federal buildings and help lead market transformation through deployment of new technologies. In 2011, the GPG program selected 16 technologies or practices for rigorous testing and evaluation. Evaluations are currently being performed in collaboration with the Department of Energy's National Laboratories, and a steady stream of results will be forthcoming throughout 2012. This paper will provide an overview of the GPG program and its objectives as well as a summary and status update of the 16 technologies selected for enhanced testing and evaluation in 2011. Lastly, it provides a general overview of the 2012 program.

  3. Ground-based multispectral measurements for airborne data verification in non-operating open pit mine "Kremikovtsi"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Denitsa; Nikolov, Hristo; Petkov, Doyno

    2013-10-01

    The impact of mining industry and metal production on the environment is presented all over the world. In our research we set focus on the impact of already non-operating ferrous "Kremikovtsi"open pit mine and related waste dumps and tailings which we consider to be the major factor responsible for pollution of one densely populated region in Bulgaria. The approach adopted is based on correct estimation of the distribution of the iron oxides inside open pit mines and the neighboring regions those considered in this case to be the key issue for the ecological state assessment of soils, vegetation and water. For this study the foremost source of data are those of airborne origin and those combined with ground-based in-situ and laboratory acquired data were used for verification of the environmental variables and thus in process of assessment of the present environmental status influenced by previous mining activities. The percentage of iron content was selected as main indicator for presence of metal pollution since it could be reliably identified by multispectral data used in this study and also because the iron compounds are widely spread in the most of the minerals, rocks and soils. In our research the number of samples from every source (air, field, lab) was taken in the way to be statistically sound and confident. In order to establish relationship between the degree of pollution of the soil and mulspectral data 40 soil samples were collected during a field campaign in the study area together with GPS measurements for two types of laboratory measurements: the first one, chemical and mineralogical analysis and the second one, non-destructive spectroscopy. In this work for environmental variables verification over large areas mulspectral satellite data from Landsat instruments TM/ETM+ and from ALI/OLI (Operational Land Imager) were used. Ground-based (laboratory and in-situ) spectrometric measurements were performed using the designed and constructed in Remote

  4. Critical Evaluation of the ISCCP Simulator Using Ground-Based Remote Sensing Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mace, G G; Houser, S; Benson, S; Klein, S A; Min, Q

    2009-11-02

    Given the known shortcomings in representing clouds in Global Climate Models (GCM) comparisons with observations are critical. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) diagnostic products provide global descriptions of cloud top pressure and column optical depth that extends over multiple decades. The necessary limitations of the ISCCP retrieval algorithm require that before comparisons can be made between model output and ISCCP results the model output must be modified to simulate what ISCCP would diagnose under the simulated circumstances. We evaluate one component of the so-called ISCCP simulator in this study by comparing ISCCP and a similar algorithm with various long-term statistics derived from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility ground-based remote sensors. We find that were a model to simulate the cloud radiative profile with the same accuracy as can be derived from the ARM data, then the likelihood of that occurrence being placed in the same cloud top pressure and optical depth bin as ISCCP of the 9 bins that have become standard ranges from 30% to 70% depending on optical depth. While the ISCCP simulator improved the agreement of cloud-top pressure between ground-based remote sensors and satellite observations, we find minor discrepancies due to the parameterization of cloud top pressure in the ISCCP simulator. The primary source of error seems to be related to discrepancies in visible optical depth that are not accounted for in the ISCCP simulator. We show that the optical depth discrepancies are largest when the assumptions necessary for plane parallel radiative transfer optical depths retrievals are violated.

  5. Evaluating Cloud Computing in the Proposed NASA DESDynI Ground Data System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, John J.; Cinquini, Luca; Mattmann, Chris A.; Zimdars, Paul A.; Cuddy, David T.; Leung, Kon S.; Kwoun, Oh-Ig; Crichton, Dan; Freeborn, Dana

    2011-01-01

    The proposed NASA Deformation, Ecosystem Structure and Dynamics of Ice (DESDynI) mission would be a first-of-breed endeavor that would fundamentally change the paradigm by which Earth Science data systems at NASA are built. DESDynI is evaluating a distributed architecture where expert science nodes around the country all engage in some form of mission processing and data archiving. This is compared to the traditional NASA Earth Science missions where the science processing is typically centralized. What's more, DESDynI is poised to profoundly increase the amount of data collection and processing well into the 5 terabyte/day and tens of thousands of job range, both of which comprise a tremendous challenge to DESDynI's proposed distributed data system architecture. In this paper, we report on a set of architectural trade studies and benchmarks meant to inform the DESDynI mission and the broader community of the impacts of these unprecedented requirements. In particular, we evaluate the benefits of cloud computing and its integration with our existing NASA ground data system software called Apache Object Oriented Data Technology (OODT). The preliminary conclusions of our study suggest that the use of the cloud and OODT together synergistically form an effective, efficient and extensible combination that could meet the challenges of NASA science missions requiring DESDynI-like data collection and processing volumes at reduced costs.

  6. Evaluation of federal and state subsidies for ground-source heat pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumsack, S.; Kleit, A. [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, 213 Hosler Building University Park, PA (United States); Smith, S.W. [Westcott Consulting, 110 Hosler Building, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Energy efficiency can be a powerful way to lower energy bills, as well as the external (social) costs associated with energy consumption. Previous experience and research, however, has demonstrated that consumers are often unwilling to make investments in energy efficiency, even when such investments have relatively short payback periods. Because energy efficiency can contribute to correcting negative externalities associated with energy use, subsidies and other programs have been proposed as a way to increase efficiency investments. Thus, under the right circumstances, such subsidies can improve economic efficiency. In this paper, we analyze the economics of energy-efficient space conditioning using data from an actual household in rural Pennsylvania to evaluate ground-source heat pumps (GHP). GHP technology has been advocated as a potentially appealing energy efficiency measure for rural communities. We find that with current subsidies GHP is economically viable for a wide range of electricity prices. We also find, however, that current subsidies are actually greater than those that can be economically justified. Using the efficient level of subsidies reduces, but does not eliminate, the economic case for GHP technology. We also evaluate the economics of efficiency subsidies using an ambitious program in Pennsylvania as a case study. The program, known as the Alternative Energy Investment Act (AEIA), provides subsidies for GHP among other technologies. We find that the substantial federal subsidies for GHP undercut the economic efficiency arguments for the AEIA with respect to GHP.

  7. Quality evaluation of functional chicken nuggets incorporated with ground carrot and mashed sweet potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosale, S S; Biswas, A K; Sahoo, J; Chatli, M K; Sharma, D K; Sikka, S S

    2011-06-01

    This study was envisaged to evaluate the effect of ground raw carrot (0%, 5%, 10% and 15%) and mashed sweet potato (0%, 5%, 10% and 15%) as functional ingredients on the quality of chicken meat nuggets. The products were evaluated for physicochemical quality, proximate composition, nutritive value, sensory quality as well as color and texture profile analyses. Additions of either raw carrot or mashed sweet potato represent an improvement in the nutritional value and have some beneficial effects due to the presence of dietary fibers and β-carotene. They were also found to be effective in sustaining the desired cooking yield and emulsion stability. Treated samples showed lower (p > 0.05) protein, fat and ash contents but higher (p < 0.05) moisture content than control. There were differences among the nugget samples with respect to sensory qualities, and control samples as well as samples with 10% added carrot/sweet potato had higher overall acceptability scores. Hunter color values (L*, a* and b* values) were higher (p < 0.05) for both the formulated products, while their textural parameters were nearly unchanged. In conclusion, carrot and sweet potato at 10% added level have greater potential as good source of dietary fibers and β-carotene and may find their way in meat industry.

  8. Ground heat flux: An analytical review of 6 models evaluated at 88 sites and globally

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, A. J.; Fisher, J. B.; Goulden, M. L.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    Uncertainty in ground heat flux (G) means that evaluation of the other terms in the surface energy balance (e.g., latent and sensible heat fluxes (LE and H)) remains problematic. Algorithms that calculate LE and H require available energy, the difference between net radiation, RNET, and G. There are a wide range of approaches to model G for large-scale applications, with a subsequent wide range of estimates and accuracies. We provide the largest review of these methods to date (N = 6), evaluating modeled G against measured G from 88 FLUXNET sites. The instantaneous midday variability in G is best captured by models forced with net radiation, while models forced by temperature show the least error at both instantaneous and daily time scales. We produce global decadal data sets of G to illustrate regional and seasonal sensitivities, as well as uncertainty. Global model mean midmorning instantaneous G is highest during September, October, and November at 63.42 (±16.84) Wm-2, while over December, January, and February G is lowest at 53.86 (±18.09) Wm-2 but shows greater intermodel uncertainty. Results from this work have the potential to improve evapotranspiration estimates and guide appropriate G model selection and development for various land uses.

  9. Evaluating Cloud Computing in the Proposed NASA DESDynI Ground Data System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, John J.; Cinquini, Luca; Mattmann, Chris A.; Zimdars, Paul A.; Cuddy, David T.; Leung, Kon S.; Kwoun, Oh-Ig; Crichton, Dan; Freeborn, Dana

    2011-01-01

    The proposed NASA Deformation, Ecosystem Structure and Dynamics of Ice (DESDynI) mission would be a first-of-breed endeavor that would fundamentally change the paradigm by which Earth Science data systems at NASA are built. DESDynI is evaluating a distributed architecture where expert science nodes around the country all engage in some form of mission processing and data archiving. This is compared to the traditional NASA Earth Science missions where the science processing is typically centralized. What's more, DESDynI is poised to profoundly increase the amount of data collection and processing well into the 5 terabyte/day and tens of thousands of job range, both of which comprise a tremendous challenge to DESDynI's proposed distributed data system architecture. In this paper, we report on a set of architectural trade studies and benchmarks meant to inform the DESDynI mission and the broader community of the impacts of these unprecedented requirements. In particular, we evaluate the benefits of cloud computing and its integration with our existing NASA ground data system software called Apache Object Oriented Data Technology (OODT). The preliminary conclusions of our study suggest that the use of the cloud and OODT together synergistically form an effective, efficient and extensible combination that could meet the challenges of NASA science missions requiring DESDynI-like data collection and processing volumes at reduced costs.

  10. Analysis and evaluation of operational data. Annual report, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) has published reports of its activities since 1984. The first report covered January through June of 1984, and the second report covered July through December of 1984. After those first two semiannual reports, AEOD published annual reports of its activities from 1985 through 1993. Beginning with report for 1986, AEOD Annual Reports have been published as NUREG-1272. Beginning with the report for 1987, NUREG-1272 has been published in two parts, No. 1 covering power reactors and No. 2 covering nonreactors (changed to `nuclear materials` with the 1993 report). AEOD changed its annual report from a calendar year (CY) to a fiscal year report, and added part No. 3 covering technical training, beginning with the combined Annual Report for CY 1994 and fiscal year 1995, NUREG-1272, Vol. 9, Nos. 1-3. This report, NUREG-1272, Vol. 10, No. 2, covers nuclear materials and presents a review of the events and concerns associated with the use of licensed material in applications other than power reactores. NUREG-1272, Vol. 10, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the fiscal year 1996 operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective. NUREG-1272, Vol. 10, No. 3, covers technical training and presents the activities of the Technical Training Center in support of the NRC`s mission. Throughout these reports, whenever information is presented for a calendar year, it is so designated. Fiscal year information is designated by the four digits of the fiscal year.

  11. Performance evaluation of optical channel transmission between UAVs and Ground Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatziefremidis Antonis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Free space optical (FSO communications links is a promising solution for the provision of high data rate point to point communications. In particular deploying FSO technology for mobile links between Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs and fixed Ground Stations (GS introduces several interesting challenges. In this paper, we investigate the ability of a mobile FSO system to operate in different atmospheric conditions. Specifically, we characterize the quality of the optical channel with a proper model in terms of Bit Error Rate (BER and average Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR and we report a detailed optical amplification model able to support a constant Quality of Service for different distances from 1 km up to 35 km at 10 Gbps with 1550 nm wavelength. An extensive comparative analysis among different FSO configurations links considering the altitude of the UAV, the wavelength and the atmospheric conditions is provided. The results show that there is degradation at the BER over a slanted path compared to a horizontal path at the same conditions.

  12. SLOPE STABILITY EVALUATION AND EQUIPMENT SETBACK DISTANCES FOR BURIAL GROUND EXCAVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCSHANE DS

    2010-03-25

    After 1970 Transuranic (TRU) and suspect TRU waste was buried in the ground with the intention that at some later date the waste would be retrieved and processed into a configuration for long term storage. To retrieve this waste the soil must be removed (excavated). Sloping the bank of the excavation is the method used to keep the excavation from collapsing and to provide protection for workers retrieving the waste. The purpose of this paper is to document the minimum distance (setback) that equipment must stay from the edge of the excavation to maintain a stable slope. This evaluation examines the equipment setback distance by dividing the equipment into two categories, (1) equipment used for excavation and (2) equipment used for retrieval. The section on excavation equipment will also discuss techniques used for excavation including the process of benching. Calculations 122633-C-004, 'Slope Stability Analysis' (Attachment A), and 300013-C-001, 'Crane Stability Analysis' (Attachment B), have been prepared to support this evaluation. As shown in the calculations the soil has the following properties: Unit weight 110 pounds per cubic foot; and Friction Angle (natural angle of repose) 38{sup o} or 1.28 horizontal to 1 vertical. Setback distances are measured from the top edge of the slope to the wheels/tracks of the vehicles and heavy equipment being utilized. The computer program utilized in the calculation uses the center of the wheel or track load for the analysis and this difference is accounted for in this evaluation.

  13. Effects of silvicultural operations in a Mississippi River bottomland hardwood forest on ground beetles in the genus Brachinus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynne C. Thompson; Brian Roy Lockhart

    2006-01-01

    Little information is available on how insects are affected by anthropogenic influences in the bottomland forests of the West Gulf Coastal Plain. This study investigates one genus of ground beetles that lives in managed forested landscapes to discover which species are positively and negatively influenced by human disturbances. Ground beetles (Carabidae) were collected...

  14. Building a common ground on the clinical case: design, implementation and evaluation of an information model for a Handover EHR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemming, Daniel; Paul, Mareike; Hübner, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Handovers need a common ground on the clinical cases between the members of the successive shifts to establish continuity of care. Conventional electronic patient record systems (EHR) proved to be only insufficiently suitable for supporting the grounding process. Against this background we proposed a basic concept for a handover EHR that extends general EHRs in particular openEHR based systems. The resulting handover information model was implemented in a database and evaluated based on 120 clinical cases. The information items of these cases could be mapped successfully to the model, however, the new class "anticipatory guidance" needed to be introduced. The evaluation also demonstrated the importance of highly aggregated information on the clinical case, opinions and meta-information such as the relevance of an item during handovers. Based on these findings, in particular the handover database, handover EHR applications are currently developed to support the grounding process.

  15. Control performance evaluation of railway vehicle MR suspension using fuzzy sky-ground hook control algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, S. H.; Choi, S. B.; Lee, G. S.; Yoo, W. H.

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents control performance evaluation of railway vehicle featured by semi-active suspension system using magnetorheological (MR) fluid damper. In order to achieve this goal, a nine degree of freedom of railway vehicle model, which includes car body and bogie, is established. The wheel-set data is loaded from measured value of railway vehicle. The MR damper system is incorporated with the governing equation of motion of the railway vehicle model which includes secondary suspension. To illustrate the effectiveness of the controlled MR dampers on suspension system of railway vehicle, the control law using the sky-ground hook controller is adopted. This controller takes into account for both vibration control of car body and increasing stability of bogie by adopting a weighting parameter between two performance requirements. The parameters appropriately determined by employing a fuzzy algorithm associated with two fuzzy variables: the lateral speed of the car body and the lateral performance of the bogie. Computer simulation results of control performances such as vibration control and stability analysis are presented in time and frequency domains.

  16. 40 CFR 265 interim status indicator-evaluation ground-water monitoring plan for the 216-B-63 trench

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjornstad, B.N.; Dudziak, S.

    1989-03-01

    This document outlines a ground-water monitoring plan for the 216-B-63 trench located in the northeast corner of the 200-East Area on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. It has been determined that hazardous materials (corrosives) were disposed of to the trench during past operations. Installation of an interim-status ground-water monitoring system is required to determine whether hazardous chemicals are leaching to the ground water from beneath the trench. This document summarizes the existing data that are available from near the 216-B-63 trench and presents a plan to determine the extent of ground-water contamination, if any, derived from the trench. The plan calls for the installation of four new monitoring wells located near the west end of the trench. These wells will be used to monitor ground-water levels and water quality immediately adjacent to the trench. Two existing RCRA monitoring wells, which are located near the trench and hydraulically upgradient of it, will be used as background wells. 46 refs., 15 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. Qualitative and quantitative physical land evaluation : an operational approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanen, van H.A.J.

    1991-01-01

    Physical land evaluation methods are crucial for evaluating potentials and constraints of land for intended land use. Physical resources, such as soil, climate, hydrology, and topography are evaluated. Different technical procedures are used for physical land evaluation ranging from simple

  18. Clinical Study of Intra-operative Computed Tomography Guided Localization with A Hook-wire System for Small Ground Glass Opacities in Minimally Invasive Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyang CHU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Localization of pulmonary ground glass small nodule is the technical difficulty of minimally invasive operation resection. The aim of this study is to evaluate the value of intraoperative computed tomography (CT-guided localization using a hook-wire system for small ground glass opacity (GGO in minimally invasive resection, as well as to discuss the necessity and feasibility of surgical resection of small GGOs (<10 mm through a minimally invasive approach. Methods The records of 32 patients with 41 small GGOs who underwent intraoperative CT-guided double-thorn hook wire localization prior to video-assisted thoracoscopic wedge resection from October 2009 to October 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS within 10 min after wire localization. The efficacy of intraoperative localization was evaluated in terms of procedure time, VATS success rate, and associated complications of localization. Results A total of 32 patients (15 males and 17 females underwent 41 VATS resections, with 2 simultaneous nodule resections performed in 3 patients, 3 lesion resections in 1 patient, and 5 lesions in a patient. Nodule diameters ranged from 2 mm-10 mm (mean: 5 mm. The distance of lung lesions from the nearest pleural surfaces ranged within 5 mm-24 mm (mean: 12.5 mm. All resections of lesions guided by the inserted hook wires were successfully performed by VATS (100% success rate. The mean procedure time for the CT-guided hook wire localization was 8.4 min (range: 4 min-18 min. The mean procedure time for VATS was 32 min (range: 14 min-98 min. The median hospital time was 8 d (range: 5 d-14 d. Results of pathological examination revealed 28 primary lung cancers, 9 atypical adenomatous hyperplasia, and 4 nonspecific chronic inflammations. No major complication related to the intraoperative hook wire localization and VATS was noted. Conclusion Intraoperative CT-guided hook wire

  19. Selected Foreign Counterparts of U.S. Army Ground Combat Systems and Implications for Combat Operations and Modernization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-18

    not have a new ground combat vehicle under development and “at current funding levels, the Bradley and Abrams will remain in the inventory for 50...time since World War I, that the Army does not have a new ground combat vehicle under development and “at current funding levels, the Bradley and...Jane’s Land Warfare Platforms Armoured Fighting Vehicles, 2016-2017; IHS Jane’s Armour and Artillery, 2011-2012; and unclassified information provided to

  20. Evaluation of Operation Flexibility and Operation Selection in Multi-agent Based Production Scheduling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on the concept of operation flexibility, we study the relationship amongmultiple operation sequences and provide a flexibility measure for operation sequences. Acriterion is proposed to prioritize each operation (rather than sequence). Under the multi-agentarchitecture the criterion can be used to guide the decision-making procedure during production scheduling so that there is an adequate flexibility at each decision point. Experimentalresults demonstrate the efficiency of the criterion when it is used as a scheduling heuristic.It can increase flexibility of manufacturing systems, and consequently improve the performance of the systems.

  1. Evaluating the operations capability of Freedom's Data Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowizral, Henry A.

    1990-01-01

    Three areas of Data Management System (DMS) performance are examined: raw processor speed, the subjective speed of the Lynx OS X-Window system, and the operational capacity of the Runtime Object Database (RODB). It is concluded that the proposed processor will operate at its specified rate of speed and that the X-Window system operates within users' subjective needs. It is also concluded that the RODB cannot provide the required level of service, even with a two-order of magnitude (100 fold) improvement in speed.

  2. Evaluation of the Impacts of Irrigation Ground-Water Withdrawl on a Prairie Wetland

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To assess the effects of ground-water removal for irrigation on a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service easement wetland in Kidder County, North Dakota, researchers...

  3. Comparative evaluation of ground-coupled heat pumps that use solar energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, J.W.; Catan, M.A.

    1985-03-01

    A study of combined building space conditioning systems using both solar energy and heat pumps was conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Several of these systems used the ground as a source or storage element for thermal energy, in order to reduce or eliminate the need for backup energy. This paper summarizes the results obtained for these systems in the United States, and describes the relationship of ground-coupling to the overall US solar-assisted heat-pump program.

  4. Hydrogeologic evaluation and numerical simulation of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Agnese, F.A.; Faunt, C.C.; Turner, A.K.; Hill, M.C.

    1997-12-31

    Yucca Mountain is being studied as a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. In cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Geological Survey is evaluating the geologic and hydrologic characteristics of the ground-water system. The study area covers approximately 100,000 square kilometers between lat 35{degrees}N., long 115{degrees}W and lat 38{degrees}N., long 118{degrees}W and encompasses the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system. Hydrology in the region is a result of both the and climatic conditions and the complex described as dominated by interbasinal flow and may be conceptualized as having two main components: a series of relatively shallow and localized flow paths that are superimposed on deeper regional flow paths. A significant component of the regional ground-water flow is through a thick Paleozoic carbonate rock sequence. Throughout the regional flow system, ground-water flow is probably controlled by extensive and prevalent structural features that result from regional faulting and fracturing. Hydrogeologic investigations over a large and hydrogeologically complex area impose severe demands on data management. This study utilized geographic information systems and geoscientific information systems to develop, store, manipulate, and analyze regional hydrogeologic data sets describing various components of the ground-water flow system.

  5. A Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Investigation of the Efficacy of Modafinil for Maintaining Alertness and Performance in Sustained Military Ground Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    SUSTAINED MILITARY GROUND OPERATIONS Jeffrey Whitmore Patrick Hickey Brandon Doan Richard Harrison James Kisner Thomas Beltran John McQuade Joseph...NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62202F 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Whitmore;Jeffrey, Hickey, Patrick; Doan, 7757 Brandon; Harrison, Richard, Kisner ...Heintz, Hickey, Hurtle, Kisner , and Smith, 2004). The dosing scheme used in the current study was similar to schemes recommended by Buguet, Moroz

  6. Beach Point Test Site, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood Area, Maryland. Focused Feasibility Study, Final Quality Assurance Project Plan, Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs). Appendix A

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Powell, Robert M., Clark, Don A., and Paul , Cynthia J.; 1991, Facilitated Transport of Inorganic Contaminants in Ground Water: Part II Colloidal...Transport In "EPA Environmental Research Brief EPA/600/M-91/040", July 1991 Puls, Robert W., Powell, Robert M., Bledsoe, Bert, Clark, Don A., and Paul ...1 of 2 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE 022 SEDIMENT AND BENTIIIC MACROINVERTEBRATESAMPLING WITH ECKMAN GRAB 1.0 Scope and Application This standard

  7. Canal Creek Study Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood Area, Maryland. Groundwater Monitoring Plan, Final Quality Assurance Project Plan, Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs). Appendix A

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    023", December 1990 Puls, Robert W., Powell, Robert M., Clark, Don A., and Paul , Cynthia J.; 1991, Facilitated Transport of Inorganic Contaminants in...Bledsoe, Bert, Clark, Don A., and Paul , Cynthia J.; 1992, Metals in Ground Water: Sampling Artifacts and Reproducibility In "Hazardous Waste & Hazardous...Revision: 3 Page: 1 of 2 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE 022 SEDIMENT AND BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATESAMPLING WITH ECKMAN GRAB * 1.0 Scope and Application

  8. Evaluation of Silicon-on-Insulator HTOP-01 Operational Amplifier for Wide Temperature Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik

    2008-01-01

    Electronics capable of operation under extreme temperatures are required in many of NASA space exploration missions. Aerospace and military applications, as well as some terrestrial industries constitute environments where electronic systems are anticipated to be exposed to extreme temperatures and wide-range thermal swings. Electronics that are able to withstand and operate efficiently in such harsh environments would simplify, if not eliminate, traditional thermal control elements and their associated structures for proper ambient operation. As a result, overall system mass would be reduced, design would be simplified, and reliability would be improved. Electronic parts that are built utilizing silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology are known to offer better radiation-tolerance compared to their conventional silicon counterparts, provide faster switching, and consume less power. They also exhibit reduced leakage current and, thus, they are often tailored for high temperature operation. These attributes make SOI-based devices suitable for use in harsh environments where extreme temperatures and wide thermal swings are anticipated. A new operational amplifier, based on silicon-on-insulator technology and geared for high temperature well-logging applications, was recently introduced by Honeywell Corporation. This HTOP-01 dual precision operational amplifier is a low power device, operates on a single supply, and has an internal oscillator and an external clocking option [1]. It is rated for operation from -55 C to +225 C with a maximum output current capability of 50 mA. The amplifier chip is designed as a 14-pin, hermetically-sealed device in a ceramic package. Table I shows some of the device manufacturer s specifications.

  9. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF DIFFERENT GROUND FILTERING ALGORITHMS FOR UAV-BASED POINT CLOUDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Serifoglu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Digital Elevation Model (DEM generation is one of the leading application areas in geomatics. Since a DEM represents the bare earth surface, the very first step of generating a DEM is to separate the ground and non-ground points, which is called ground filtering. Once the point cloud is filtered, the ground points are interpolated to generate the DEM. LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging point clouds have been used in many applications thanks to their success in representing the objects they belong to. Hence, in the literature, various ground filtering algorithms have been reported to filter the LiDAR data. Since the LiDAR data acquisition is still a costly process, using point clouds generated from the UAV images to produce DEMs is a reasonable alternative. In this study, point clouds with three different densities were generated from the aerial photos taken from a UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle to examine the effect of point density on filtering performance. The point clouds were then filtered by means of five different ground filtering algorithms as Progressive Morphological 1D (PM1D, Progressive Morphological 2D (PM2D, Maximum Local Slope (MLS, Elevation Threshold with Expand Window (ETEW and Adaptive TIN (ATIN. The filtering performance of each algorithm was investigated qualitatively and quantitatively. The results indicated that the ATIN and PM2D algorithms showed the best overall ground filtering performances. The MLS and ETEW algorithms were found as the least successful ones. It was concluded that the point clouds generated from the UAVs can be a good alternative for LiDAR data.

  10. Evaluation Model of Design for Operation and Architecture of Hierarchical Virtual Simulation for Flight Vehicle Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hu; TIAN Yongliang; ZHANG Chaoying; YIN Jiao; SUN Yijie

    2012-01-01

    In order to take requirements for commercial operations or military missions into better consideration in new flight vehicle design,a tri-hierarchical task classification model of "design for operation" is proposed,which takes basic man-object interaction task,complex collaborative operation and large-scale joint operation into account.The corresponding general architecture of evaluation criteria is also depicted.Then a virtual simulation-based approach to implement the evaluations at three hierarchy levels is mainly analyzed with a detailed example,which validates the feasibility and effectiveness of evaluation architecture.Finally,extending the virtual simulation architecture from design to operation training is discussed.

  11. Empirical Network Performance Evaluation of Security Protocols on Operating Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaneel Narayan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Securing data transmission is currently a widely researched topic. There are numerous facades in data security. Virtual Private Network (VPN is one such strand that provides security for data that is in motion. Performance of a network that has VPN implementation is at the forefront of network design and choice of the operating systems and cryptographic algorithms is critical to enhancing network performance. In this research undertaking, three VPN techniques, namely DES, 3DES and AES, which are commonly used to implement IPSec VPNs, are performance analyzed on test-bed setup. These are implemented on a network with Linux Fedora and a router and Windows desktop operating systems on another node. The VPN algorithms tested show that there may be performance differences when implemented with different operating system combinations.

  12. Evaluation of risk management status for Croatian logistic operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana BOŽIĆ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding organisational risks makes possible to control them and to change them into organisational strengths. Being known as “measure of uncertainty” in the business process, the risk is the uncertainty of achieving the organizational objectives. It may involve positive or negative consequences. There is a level of uncertainty in every supply chain while operating transportation and warehousing, positioning on the market, developing customer support, reducing cycle times or cutting costs. Therefore, the risk assessment should be one of the main tasks for any supply chain management team. It is required to develop formal risk assessment procedures, to identify the potential impacts to the supply chain operations and to develop a set of contingency plans to mitigate risks. This paper deals with supply chain risk assessment methodology, outlining the present risk management status of Croatian logistic operators.

  13. Evaluation of the ground surface Enthalpy balance from bedrock shallow borehole temperatures (Livingston Island, Maritime Antarctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ramos

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The annual evolution of the ground temperatures from Incinerador borehole in Livingston Island (South Shetlands, Antarctic is studied. The borehole is 2.4 m deep and is located in a quartzite outcrop in the proximity of the Spanish Antarctic Station Juan Carlos I. In order to model the movement of the 0°C isotherm (velocity and maximum depth hourly temperature profiles from: (i the cooling periods of the frost seasons of 2000 to 2005, and (ii the warming periods of the thaw seasons of 2002–2003, 2003–2004 and 2004–2005, were studied. In this modelling approach, heat gains and losses across ground surface are considered to be the causes for the 0°C isotherm movement. A methodological approach to calculate the Enthalpy change based on the thermodynamic analysis of the ground during the cooling and warming periods is proposed. The Enthalpy change is equivalent to the heat exchange through the ground surface during each season, thus enabling to describe the interaction ground-atmosphere and providing valuable data for studies on permafrost and periglacial processes. The bedrock density is considered to be constant in the borehole and initial isothermal conditions at 0°C are assumed to run the model. The final stages correspond to the temperatures at the end of the cooling and warming periods (annual minima and maxima.

  14. Evaluation of the ground surface Enthalpy balance from bedrock shallow borehole temperatures (Livingston Island, Maritime Antarctic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, M.; Vieira, G.

    2008-03-01

    The annual evolution of the ground temperatures from Incinerador borehole in Livingston Island (South Shetlands, Antarctic) is studied. The borehole is 2.4 m deep and is located in a quartzite outcrop in the proximity of the Spanish Antarctic Station Juan Carlos I. In order to model the movement of the 0°C isotherm (velocity and maximum depth) hourly temperature profiles from: (i) the cooling periods of the frost seasons of 2000 to 2005, and (ii) the warming periods of the thaw seasons of 2002-2003, 2003-2004 and 2004-2005, were studied. In this modelling approach, heat gains and losses across ground surface are considered to be the causes for the 0°C isotherm movement. A methodological approach to calculate the Enthalpy change based on the thermodynamic analysis of the ground during the cooling and warming periods is proposed. The Enthalpy change is equivalent to the heat exchange through the ground surface during each season, thus enabling to describe the interaction ground-atmosphere and providing valuable data for studies on permafrost and periglacial processes. The bedrock density is considered to be constant in the borehole and initial isothermal conditions at 0°C are assumed to run the model. The final stages correspond to the temperatures at the end of the cooling and warming periods (annual minima and maxima).

  15. Evaluation of nickel-yttria stabilized zirconia anode degradation during discharge operation and redox cycles operation by electrochemical calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimura, Takaaki; Jiao, Zhenjun; Shikazono, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    Degradation of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) anode during discharge operation and redox cycles operation were evaluated by three-dimensional electrochemical calculations using a Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). Three dimensional microstructures were obtained by Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB-SEM) reconstruction. In the electrochemical calculations, changes in exchange current density and ionic conductivity of Yttria stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) during the operations were assumed and their values were calculated by fitting the calculated overpotential values to the experimental ones. Changes in triple phase boundary density calculated from the reconstructed microstructures were inconsistent with the gradual degradation observed during repeated redox-discharge cycles. Changes of the fitted exchange current density and YSZ ionic conductivity values in both discharge operation and redox cycle operation showed same tendency as the experimental results. Change in exchange current density or YSZ ionic conductivity should be considered as an essential factor which governs the cell performance change regardless of the redox treatment.

  16. Economic evaluation of intermediate operations in oak stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry H. Webster; John C., Jr. Meadows

    1971-01-01

    Economic evaluation of forest-management opportunities is a vital ingredient of effective forestry programs. Choices among management opportunities are necessary because opportunities inevitably exceed funds available, and they are important because opportunities commonly range from highly productive to decidedly unproductive. Economic evaluation in oak stands shows a...

  17. USE OF REMPI-TOFMS FOR REAL-TIME MEASUREMENT OF TRACE AROMATICS DURING OPERATION OF AIRCRAFT GROUND EQUIPMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emissions of aromatic air toxics from aircraft ground equipment were measured with a resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization—time of flight mass spectrometry (REMPI-TOFMS) system consisting of a pulsed solid state laser for photoionization and a TOFMS for mass discrimination. T...

  18. Evaluation of computer flow modelling in operating theatres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemaire, A.D.; Ham, P.J.; Luscuere, P.G.

    1996-01-01

    Nowadays most Operating Theatres (OT's) in the Netherlands have a certain standard configuration to guarantee good control of airflows and by doing so keep the risk of infections from airborne contaminants low. It is, however, the question if this risk is low enougii. A correct answer can only be fo

  19. Evaluation of human operator visual performance capability for teleoperator missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, C. T.; Malone, T. B.; Shields, N. L., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Investigation of the human operator visual performance demands of teleoperator system applications to earth-orbital missions involving visual system requirements for satellite retrieval and satellite servicing functions. The first phase of an experimental program implementing this investigation is described in terms of the overall test apparatus and procedures used, the specific tests performed, and the test results obtained.

  20. Open Access Evaluation of Post-Operative Visual Outcomes of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gastroprotective Effects of Ethyl acetate Extract of A. difformis ... The proportion of post operative eyes with good outcome (6/6-6/18) was 22.0% within 48 ... This article is available in Embase, Index Corpenicus, Scopus, PubsHub, Chemical ...

  1. Strength and durability tests of pipeline supports for the areas of above-ground routing under the influence of operational loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surikov Vitaliy Ivanovich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The present article deals with integrated research works and tests of pipeline supports for the areas of above-ground routing of the pipeline system “Zapolyarye - Pur-pe” which is laid in the eternally frozen grounds. In order to ensure the above-ground routing method for the oil pipeline “Zapolyarye - Pur-pe” and in view of the lack of construction experience in case of above-ground routing of oil pipelines, the leading research institute of JSC “Transneft” - LLC “NII TNN” over the period of August, 2011 - September, 2012 performed a research and development work on the subject “Development and production of pipeline supports and pile foundation test specimens for the areas of above-ground routing of the pipeline system “Zapolyarye - Pur-pe”. In the course of the works, the test specimens of fixed support, linear-sliding and free-sliding pipeline supports DN1000 and DN800 were produced and examined. For ensuring the stable structural reliability of the supports constructions and operational integrity of the pipelines the complex research works and tests were performed: 1. Cyclic tests of structural elements of the fixed support on the test bed of JSC “Diascan” by means of internal pressure and bending moment with the application of specially prepared equipment for defining the pipeline supports strength and durability. 2. Tests of the fixed support under the influence of limit operating loads and by means of internal pressure for confirming the support’s integrity. On the test bed there were simulated all the maximum loads on the support (vertical, longitudinal, side loadings, bending moment including subsidence of the neighboring sliding support and, simultaneously, internal pressure of the carried medium. 3. Cyclic tests of endurance and stability of the displacements of sliding supports under the influence of limit operating loads for confirming their operation capacity. Relocation of the pipeline on the sliding

  2. Evaluation of the ground surface Enthalpy balance from bedrock temperatures (Livingston Island, Maritime Antarctic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, M.; Vieira, G.

    2009-05-01

    The annual evolution of the ground temperatures from Incinerador borehole in Livingston Island (South Shetlands, Antarctic) is studied. The borehole is 2.4 m deep and is located in a massive quartzite outcrop with negligible water content, in the proximity of the Spanish Antarctic Station Juan Carlos I. In order to model the movement of the 0°C isotherm (velocity and maximum depth) hourly temperature profiles from: (i) the cooling periods of the frost season of 2000 to 2005, and (ii) the warming periods of the thaw season of 2002-2003, 2003-2004 and 2004-2005, were studied. In this modelling approach, heat gains and losses across the ground surface are assumed to be the causes for the 0°C isotherm movement. A methodological approach to calculate the ground Enthalpy change based on the thermodynamic analysis of the ground during the cooling and warming periods is proposed. The Enthalpy change into the rock is equivalent to the heat exchange through the ground surface during each season, thus enabling to describe the interaction ground-atmosphere and providing valuable data for studies on permafrost and periglacial processes. The bedrock density and thermal conductivity are considered to be constant and initial isothermal conditions at 0°C are assumed (based in collected data and local meteorological conditions in this area) to run the model in the beginning of each season. The final stages correspond to the temperatures at the end of the cooling and warming periods (annual minima and maxima). The application of this method avoids error propagation induced by the heat exchange calculations from multiple sensors using the Fourier method.

  3. Evaluation of the ground surface Enthalpy balance from bedrock temperatures (Livingston Island, Maritime Antarctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ramos

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The annual evolution of the ground temperatures from Incinerador borehole in Livingston Island (South Shetlands, Antarctic is studied. The borehole is 2.4 m deep and is located in a massive quartzite outcrop with negligible water content, in the proximity of the Spanish Antarctic Station Juan Carlos I. In order to model the movement of the 0°C isotherm (velocity and maximum depth hourly temperature profiles from: (i the cooling periods of the frost season of 2000 to 2005, and (ii the warming periods of the thaw season of 2002–2003, 2003–2004 and 2004–2005, were studied. In this modelling approach, heat gains and losses across the ground surface are assumed to be the causes for the 0°C isotherm movement. A methodological approach to calculate the ground Enthalpy change based on the thermodynamic analysis of the ground during the cooling and warming periods is proposed. The Enthalpy change into the rock is equivalent to the heat exchange through the ground surface during each season, thus enabling to describe the interaction ground-atmosphere and providing valuable data for studies on permafrost and periglacial processes. The bedrock density and thermal conductivity are considered to be constant and initial isothermal conditions at 0°C are assumed (based in collected data and local meteorological conditions in this area to run the model in the beginning of each season. The final stages correspond to the temperatures at the end of the cooling and warming periods (annual minima and maxima. The application of this method avoids error propagation induced by the heat exchange calculations from multiple sensors using the Fourier method.

  4. Evaluation of Six High-Resolution Satellite and Ground-Based Precipitation Products over Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mou Leong Tan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Satellite precipitation products (SPPs potentially constitute an alternative to sparse rain gauge networks for assessing the spatial distribution of precipitation. However, applications of these products are still limited due to the lack of robust quality assessment. This study compares daily, monthly, seasonal, and annual rainfall amount at 342 rain gauges over Malaysia to estimations using five SPPs (3B42RT, 3B42V7, GPCP-1DD, PERSIANN-CDR, and CMORPH and a ground-based precipitation product (APHRODITE. The performance of the precipitation products was evaluated from 2003 to 2007 using continuous (RMSE, R2, ME, MAE, and RB and categorical (ACC, POD, FAR, CSI, and HSS statistical approaches. Overall, 3B42V7 and APHRODITE performed the best, while the worst performance was shown by GPCP-1DD. 3B42RT, 3B42V7, and PERSIANN-CDR slightly overestimated observed precipitation by 2%, 4.7%, and 2.1%, respectively. By contrast, APHRODITE and CMORPH significantly underestimated precipitations by 19.7% and 13.2%, respectively, whereas GPCP-1DD only slightly underestimated by 2.8%. All six precipitation products performed better in the northeast monsoon than in the southwest monsoon. The better performances occurred in eastern and southern Peninsular Malaysia and in the north of East Malaysia, which receives higher rainfall during the northeast monsoon, whereas poor performances occurred in the western and dryer Peninsular Malaysia. All precipitation products underestimated the no/tiny (<1 mm/day and extreme (≥20 mm/day rainfall events, while they overestimated low (1–20 mm/day rainfall events. 3B42RT and 3B42V7 showed the best ability to detect precipitation amounts with the highest HSS value (0.36. Precipitations during flood events such as those which occurred in late 2006 and early 2007 were estimated the best by 3B42RT and 3B42V7, as shown by an R2 value ranging from 0.49 to 0.88 and 0.52 to 0.86, respectively. These results on SPPs’ uncertainties

  5. Measurements for monitoring ground motion resulting from mining operations in the Rhenish brown coal district; Messungen zur Ueberwachung von bergbaubedingten Bodenbewegungen im rheinischen Braunkohlenbergbau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duddek, H.; Schaefer, W. [Rheinbraun AG, Koeln (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    Coal mining in the Rhenish brown coal district resulted in loose rock slopes with a total height of more than 350 m. Mining operations caused ground motion in open-cast mines, in the slopes and in the region ahead of the face. Internal dumping caused motions of the floors, the overburden tip and te slopes of the open-cast mines. The deformations were measured by different methods, and the evaluations are presented here. As examples, permanent monitoring of a slope using the GEOROBOT measuring system and continuous subsidence measurements in an overburdan dump by means of hydrostatic measuring systems are presented. GEOROBOT ensures quasi-continuous measurements of slope motion with an error of 5-7 mm. Hydrostatic measuring systems on the basis of pressure sensors were developed for measurements of single overburden dump strata and the overburden dump basis during dumping. (orig.) [Deutsch] In den rheinischen Braunkohlentagebauen entstehen Lockergesteinsboeschungen mit Gesamthoehen von mehr als 350 m. Die Gewinnungstaetigkeiten verursachen Entlastungsbewegungen im Tagebau, in den Boeschungen und im Tagebauvorfeld. Die Innenverkippung fuehrt erneut zu Bodenbewegungen im Liegenden, im Kippenkoerper und im Bereich der Tagebauraender. Die auftretenden Deformationen werden mit verschiedenen Messverfahren erfasst, ausgewertet und dargestellt. Beispielhaft werden die permanente Ueberwachung einer Boeschung mittels des automatischen Messsystems GEOROBOT und kontinuierliche Setzungsmessungen in einer Tagebaukippe mit hydrostatischen Messsystemen vorgestellt. Mit GEOROBOT werden quasi kontinuierlich Boeschungsbewegungsmessungen mit einer Genauigkeit von {+-}5 bis 7 mm durchgefuehrt. Auf der Basis von Drucksensoren wurden hydrostatische Messsysteme konzipiert, mit denen Setzungen einzelner Kippscheiben und der Kippenbasis waehrend des Kippenaufbaues ermittelt werden. (orig.)

  6. A Preliminary Evaluation of the DOE-2.1E Ground Vertical Well Model Using Maxey School Measured Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, M.A.; McLain, H.A.

    1999-06-19

    A new ground source heat pump routine has been incorporated in the DOE-2 building simulation program, but field validation of this routine is limited. Measured data are available for the operation of a ground source heat pump system for Maxey School, located in Lincoln, NE. Temperatures of the propylene glycol solution flowing in and out of the heat pump system vertical well field as predicted by the DOE-2 routine were compared with the measured data. The results showed a need for improvement in the routine, and a number of improvements were made. These changes helped, but some of the input parameters still had to be adjusted to obtain a reasonably good fit to the measured data. Future areas of investigation were suggested and a course of action was recommended.

  7. Evaluation of robustness indicators using railway operation simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Wittrup; Landex, Alex; Nielsen, Otto Anker

    2014-01-01

    The classical way of evaluating the robustness of railway timetables is the use of microscopic simulation. This is precise and offers a high level of detail, but it also requires a high amount of work. The alternative is to use robustness indicators that directly or indirectly indicate the robust......The classical way of evaluating the robustness of railway timetables is the use of microscopic simulation. This is precise and offers a high level of detail, but it also requires a high amount of work. The alternative is to use robustness indicators that directly or indirectly indicate...... the robustness of a railway system. However, the semantics of these are mainly unknown and indicators are therefore best for comparison of alternatives. The paper therefore reviews and evaluates different robustness indicators against a microscopic simulation. This evaluation show that the indicators compare...

  8. An Intelligent Hierarchical Decision Architecture for Operational Test and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-05-01

    complementary operations were originally introduced by Lofti Zadeh . As other researchers have applied fuzzy theory, slight modifications have been made...FUZZY LOGIC In Lofti Zadeh’s 1973 "Outline of a New Approach to the Analysis of Complex Systems and Decision Processes," he stated [10] ... it is this...classes of objects encountered in the physical world do not fit into clean, crisp classes or have precisely defined criteria for membership. Dr. Zadeh

  9. Director, Operational Test and Evaluation FY 2005 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    will also have the capability to select and attack targets autonomously. Activity • Contractor testing during FY05 included captive flight tests...assessment. B-2 System • B-2 FOT&E of the Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile (JASSM) occurred in March and April 2005. Captive carry and live weapon...vulnerability models such as the Operational Requirement-based Casualty Assessment ( ORCA ). Sensor-Fuzed Weapon Cold-Target Effectiveness. JLF/A/AA funded

  10. Evaluation of risk management status for Croatian logistic operators

    OpenAIRE

    Božić, Diana; Rogić, Kristijan; Stanković, Ratko

    2010-01-01

    Understanding organisational risks makes possible to control them and to change them into organisational strengths. Being known as “measure of uncertainty” in the business process, the risk is the uncertainty of achieving the organizational objectives. It may involve positive or negative consequences. There is a level of uncertainty in every supply chain while operating transportation and warehousing, positioning on the market, developing customer support, reducing cycle times or cutting cost...

  11. Director, Operational Test and Evaluation Report FY󈨚

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-07

    directed or kinectic energy weapons). Such a range would include orbital experimentation platforms, tracking and sensor platforms, data relay...configurations, VI and V2 . The VI configuration consists of the master logic block, visual display unit, keyboard and printer. The V2 configuration...testing. Test hardware consisted of six V2 configured systems and four operational "float" systems. All hardware was randomly selected from systems

  12. An Evaluation of Potential Operating Systems for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    conditions. Electromagnetic characteristics, density, salinity, temperature and motion of the water create a number of operational challenges ranging from...at the New Mexico Institute of Technology [32] and is now owned by Wind River systems. It runs a thin Linux microkernel that separates and...at hard real-time systems. It has been developed since 1986 and is aimed to be a modular OS with a small microkernel of core functionality, with extra

  13. Evaluations of Generic ABWR ATWS Emergency Operation Procedures Using MAAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ying-Ting; Ferng, Yuh-Ming; Peir, Jinn-Jer; Shih, Chunkuan [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2008-07-01

    Lungmen NPP, the fourth one in Taiwan is under construction and the EOP (Emergency Operation Procedures) for Lungmen NPP, originally provided by GE (General Electric) is currently under review and verification. In this paper, a specific sequence of transients including LOTDRFP (Loss of Turbine Driven Feedwater Pump), ATWS (Anticipated Transients Without Scram) and LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident) were considered in order to ensure that the operator could bring the NPP to a safe condition by following the directions of EOP in this particular transient scenario. MAAP (Modular Accident Analysis Program), version 4.05 that is fast-running while producing credible results was used for transient simulations. The results of simulation indicated that the NPP indeed could be brought to a safe condition by following the EOP. It is also found that the transient sequence would evolve into an entirely different way due to the operator's action, and the time delay between each step would greatly affect the transient sequence too. (authors)

  14. Analysis and field evaluation of an advanced ground-coupled heat pump system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, V.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Catan, M.A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Hughes, H.M. (Climate Master, Inc. (USA)); Hughes, P.J. (Fleming (W.S.) and Associates, Inc., Syracuse, NY (USA)); O' Neil, R.A. (Niagara Mohawk Power Corp., Syracuse, NY (USA))

    1986-01-01

    This paper addresses the performance of a ground-coupled heat pump (GCHP) system with a water-source heat pump (WSHP) package designed expressly for such systems for a northern climate. The research objective was to minimize the life-cycle cost (LCC) of a GCHP system by optimizing the design of both the heat pump package and the ground heat exchanger in concert. The LCC of a GCHP system with a horizontal ground heat exchanger was minimized over a seven-year economic life for an 1800 ft{sup 2} (167 m{sup 2}) house in Pittsburgh, PA, USA. Simple payback for the optimized system, relative to conventional air-source heat pumps (ASHPs), was less than three years. The resulting WSHP design is calculated to cost approximately 20% more than its conventional counterpart, but offers a 20% higher heating coefficient of performance (COP) and a 23% higher cooling COP. The major conclusion of this study is that by improving the WSHP package efficiency, the ground heat exchanger size can be reduced by at least 30% without sacrificing performance; this can yield significant improvement in the cost competitiveness of GCHP systems. 10 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. Evaluation of instrumented shoes for ambulatory assessment of ground reaction forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liedtke, Christian; Fokkenrood, Steven A.W.; Menger, Jasper T.; Kooij, van der Herman; Veltink, Peter H.

    2007-01-01

    Currently, force plates or pressure sensitive insoles are the standard tools to measure ground reaction forces and centre of pressure data during human gait. Force plates, however, impose constraints on foot placement, and the available pressure sensitive insoles measure only one component of force.

  16. Development of a Remotely Operated, Field-Deployable Tritium Analysis System for Surface and Ground Water Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofstetter, K.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Cable, P.R.; Noakes, J.E. [University of Georgia, , GA (United States); Spaulding, J.D. [University of Georgia, , GA (United States); Neary, M. P. [University of Georgia, , GA (United States); Wasyl, M.S. [Packard Instrument Company, , ()

    1996-06-20

    The environmental contamination resulting from decades of testing and manufacturing of nuclear materials for a national defense purposes is a problem now being faced by the United States. The Center for Applied Isotope Studies at the University of Georgia, in cooperation with the Westinghouse Savannah River Company and Packard Instrument Company, have developed a prototype unit for remote, near real time, in situ analysis of tritium in surface and ground water samples.

  17. Finite Ground Coplanar (FGC) Waveguide: Characteristics and Advantages Evaluated for Radiofrequency and Wireless Communication Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchak, George E.

    1999-01-01

    Researchers in NASA Lewis Research Center s Electron Device Technology Branch are developing transmission lines for radiofrequency and wireless circuits that are more efficient, smaller, and make lower cost circuits possible. Traditionally, radiofrequency and wireless circuits have employed a microstrip or coplanar waveguide to interconnect the various electrical elements that comprise a circuit. Although a coplanar waveguide (CPW) is widely viewed as better than a microstrip for most applications, it too has problems. To solve these problems, NASA Lewis and the University of Michigan developed a new version of a coplanar waveguide with electrically narrow ground planes. Through extensive numerical modeling and experimental measurements, we have characterized the propagation constant of the FGC waveguide, the lumped and distributed circuit elements integrated in the FGC waveguide, and the coupling between parallel transmission lines. Although the attenuation per unit length is higher for the FGC waveguide because of higher conductor loss, the attenuation is comparable when the ground plane width is twice the center conductor width as shown in the following graph. An upper limit to the line width is derived from observations that when the total line width is greater than ld/2, spurious resonances due to the parallel plate waveguide mode are established. Thus, the ground plane width must be less than ld/4 where ld is the wavelength in the dielectric. Since the center conductor width S is typically less than l/10 to maintain good transverse electromagnetic mode characteristics, it follows that a ground plane width of B = 2S would also be electrically narrow. Thus, we can now treat the ground strips of the FGC waveguide the same way that the center conductor is treated.

  18. Procedure of evaluating parameters of inland earthquakes caused by long strike-slip faults for ground motion prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Dianshu; Dan, Kazuo; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki; Morikawa, Nobuyuki

    2016-04-01

    We proposed a procedure of evaluating fault parameters of asperity models for predicting strong ground motions from inland earthquakes caused by long strike-slip faults. In order to obtain averaged dynamic stress drops, we adopted the formula obtained by dynamic fault rupturing simulations for surface faults of the length from 15 to 100 km, because the formula of the averaged static stress drops for circular cracks, commonly adopted in existing procedures, cannot be applied to surface faults or long faults. The averaged dynamic stress drops were estimated to be 3.4 MPa over the entire fault and 12.2 MPa on the asperities, from the data of 10 earthquakes in Japan and 13 earthquakes in other countries. The procedure has a significant feature that the average slip on the seismic faults longer than about 80 km is constant, about 300 cm. In order to validate our proposed procedure, we made a model for a 141 km long strike-slip fault by our proposed procedure for strike-slip faults, predicted ground motions, and showed that the resultant motions agreed well with the records of the 1999 Kocaeli, Turkey, earthquake (Mw 7.6) and with the peak ground accelerations and peak ground velocities by the GMPE of Si and Midorikawa (1999).

  19. Wuhan Ground Source Heat Pump Engineering Economic Evaluation Based on the Life Cycle%基于全寿命周期的地源热泵工程经济性评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付红阳; 陈伟; 张国辉

    2012-01-01

    通过分析我国地源热泵工程的发展现状及国家和武汉地区政策标准,实地调研武汉地区8个地源热泵工程项目相关经济数据,构建武汉地区地源热泵工程经济性评价体系,通过费用构成分析、能耗分析、运行费用分析和环境评价分析对地源热泵工程进行全寿命周期经济性评价,从而为武汉地区乃至全国推广地源热泵工程提供相关依据和建议。%By analyzing development situation of ground source heat pump engineering and policy standards of China and Wuhan province,the paper investigates related economic data of Wuhan eight ground source heat pump engineering,establishes the economic evaluation system of Wuhan ground source heat pump engineering,and do economic evaluates to ground source heat pump engineering of Wuhan from the analysis of expense components,the energy consumption,the operation cost and the environment evaluation,in order to provide relevant basis and suggestions to promote the promote ground source heat pump engineering of Wuhan to the whole nation.

  20. Composite system reliability evaluation by stochastic calculation of system operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haubrick, H.-J.; Hinz, H.-J.; Landeck, E. [Dept. of Power Systems and Power Economics (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    This report describes a new developed probabilistic approach for steady-state composite system reliability evaluation and its exemplary application to a bulk power test system. The new computer program called PHOENIX takes into consideration transmission limitations, outages of lines and power stations and, as a central element, a highly sophisticated model to the dispatcher performing remedial actions after disturbances. The kernel of the new method is a procedure for optimal power flow calculation that has been specially adapted for the use in reliability evaluations under the above mentioned conditions. (author) 11 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Joint Intelligence Operations Center (JIOC) Baseline Business Process Model & Capabilities Evaluation Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Targeting Review Board OPLAN Operations Plan OPORD Operations Order OPSIT Operational Situation OSINT Open Source Intelligence OV...Analysis Evaluate FLTREPs MISREPs Unit Assign Assets Feedback Asset Shortfalls Multi-Int Collection Political & Embasy Law Enforcement HUMINT OSINT ...Embassy Information OSINT Manage Theater HUMINT Law Enforcement Collection Sort Requests Platform Information Agency Information M-I Collect

  2. Evaluation of ATV Track Systems for Winter Mountain Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    range on-trail operations. Résumé …..... Le présent document traite de l’évaluation de véhicules tout terrain ( VTT ) munis de systèmes de chenilles...les petits VTT à chenilles seront utiles dans les situations nécessitant une bonne maniabilité et une grande mobilité sur des pentes abruptes et...better choice. iv DRDC Suffield TM 2011-073 Sommaire ..... Évaluation de systèmes de chenilles de VTT pour des opérations hivernales en

  3. Tier One Performance Screen Initial Operational Test and Evaluation: 2011 Interim Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Battery (ASVAB) Content, Structure, and Scor ing The ASVAB is a multiple aptitude battery of nine tests administered by the MEPCOM. Most military...Technical Report 1306 Tier One Performance Screen Initial Operational Test and Evaluation: 2011 Interim Report Deirdre J...to) August 2009 to May 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Tier One Performance Screen Initial Operational Test and Evaluation: 2011 Interim

  4. Evaluation and Design of Supply Chain Operations using DEA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Chen (Chien-Ming)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractPerformance evaluation has been one of the most critical components in management. As production systems nowadays consist of a growing number of integrated and interacting processes, the interrelationship and dynamic among processes have create a major challenge in measuring system and p

  5. Special Operations Forces (SOF) technical analysis and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1987-08-31

    In response to Task Order 001, Los Alamos National Laboratory Contract 9-L5H-1508P-1, Betac Corporation is pleased to provide ten quick-response, short-term analytical papers in support of Low Intensity Conflict (LIC) and Special Operations (SO). The papers are study methodologies which provide background, baseline, concepts, approaches, and recommendations in the mission areas identified in the Statement of Work. Although the Statement of Work specifies only nine papers, a tenth paper has been included addressing Command Relationships, since this subject affects all other topics and is of critical importance to USCINCSOC in establishing the United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM). Each paper addresses the feasibility of further effort in each area of interest. The ten papers address: (1) mission support systems; (2) research, development, and acquisition; (3) headquarters equipment; (4) C3I architecture; (5) intelligence dissemination; (6) intelligence collection management; (7) intelligence support to SOF targeting; (8) joint mission area analysis (JMAA); (9) joint SOF master plan; and (10) command relationships.

  6. Stable evaluation of differential operators and linear and nonlinear multi-scale filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otmar Scherzer

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion processes create multi--scale analyses, which enable the generation of simplified pictures, where for increasing scale the image gets sketchier. In many practical applications the ``scaled image'' can be characterized via a variational formulation as the solution of a minimization problem involving unbounded operators. These unbounded operators can be evaluated by regularization techniques. We show that the theory of stable evaluation of unbounded operators can be applied to efficiently solve these minimization problems.

  7. Evaluation of VIIRS and MODIS Thermal Emissive Band Calibration Stability Using Ground Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriharsha Madhavan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The S-NPP Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS instrument, a polar orbiting Earth remote sensing instrument built using a strong MODIS background, employs a similarly designed on-board calibrating source—a V-grooved blackbody for the Thermal Emissive Bands (TEB. The central wavelengths of most VIIRS TEBs are very close to those of MODIS with the exception of the 10.7 µm channel. To ensure the long term continuity of climate data records derived using VIIRS and MODIS TEB, it is necessary to assess any systematic differences between the two instruments, including scenes with temperatures significantly lower than blackbody operating temperatures at approximately 290 K. Previous work performed by the MODIS Characterization Support Team (MCST at NASA/GSFC used the frequent observations of the Dome Concordia site located in Antarctica to evaluate the calibration stability and consistency of Terra and Aqua MODIS over the mission lifetime. The near-surface temperature measurements from an automatic weather station (AWS provide a direct reference useful for tracking the stability and determining the relative bias between the two MODIS instruments. In this study, the same technique is applied to the VIIRS TEB and the results are compared with those from the matched MODIS TEB. The results of this study show a small negative bias when comparing the matching VIIRS and Aqua MODIS TEB, implying a higher brightness temperature for S-VIIRS at the cold end. Statistically no significant drift is observed for VIIRS TEB performance over the first 3.5 years of the mission.

  8. Evaluation of VIIRS and MODIS Thermal Emissive Band Calibration Stability Using Ground Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Sriharsha; Brinkmann, Jake; Wenny, Brian N.; Wu, Aisheng; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2017-01-01

    The S-NPP Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument, a polar orbiting Earth remote sensing instrument built using a strong MODIS background, employs a similarly designed on-board calibrating source - a V-grooved blackbody for the thermal emissive bands (TEB). The central wavelengths of most VIIRS TEBs are very close to those of MODIS with the exception of the 10.7 micron channel. To ensure the long term continuity of climate data records derived using VIIRS and MODIS TEB, it is necessary to assess any systematic differences between the two instruments, including scenes with temperatures significantly lower than blackbody operating temperatures at approximately 290 K. Previous work performed by the MODIS Characterization Support Team (MCST) at NASAGSFC used the frequent observations of the Dome Concordia site located in Antarctica to evaluate the calibration stability and consistency of Terra and Aqua MODIS over the mission lifetime. The near-surface temperature measurements from an automatic weather station (AWS) provide a direct reference useful for tracking the stability and determining the relative bias between the two MODIS instruments. In this study, the same technique is applied to the VIIRS TEB and the results are compared with those from the matched MODIS TEB. The results of this study show a small negative bias when comparing the matching VIIRS and Aqua MODIS TEB, implying a higher scene temperature retrieval for S-VIIRS at the cold end. Statistically no significant drift is observed for VIIRS TEB performance over the first 3.5 years of the mission.

  9. Evaluating performance of container terminal operation using simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawawi, Mohd Kamal Mohd; Jamil, Fadhilah Che; Hamzah, Firdaus Mohamad

    2015-05-01

    A container terminal is a facility where containers are transshipped from one mode of transport to another. Congestion problem leads to the decreasing of the customer's level of satisfaction. This study presents the application of simulation technique with the main objective of this study is to develop the current model and evaluate the performance of the container terminal. The suitable performance measure used in this study to evaluate the container terminal model are the average waiting time in queue, average of process time at berth, number of vessels enter the berth and resource utilization. Simulation technique was found to be a suitable technique to conduct in this study. The results from the simulation model had proved to solve the problem occurred in the container terminal.

  10. Evaluation of Logistics Operation Command and Control Capability: Optimization Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    Turkish Infantry Brigade, Vehicle Routing Problem 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18. SECURITY...Formulation of the Vehicle Routing Problem ........16 5. Modifications to the model for the Turkish Army scenario ..........17 6. Description of the...evaluated the existing and proposed concepts on how to use the Combat Service Support Element resources of a FSSG by solving a vehicle routing problem with

  11. Director, Operational Test and Evaluation FY 2014 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    training continues at Eglin AFB, Florida , and expanded in September 2014 when additional F-35B training began at MCAS Beaufort, South Carolina...sensor from a shore base at the contractor’s facility in West Palm Beach, Florida . A third phase of testing described by the RMS Test and Evaluation...Martin – West Palm Beach, Florida • AN/AQS-20A: Raytheon Corporation – Portsmouth, Rhode Island the LCS MCM mission package and therefore would not

  12. Evaluation of the Most Current and Effective Methods in the Analysis of Chlorinated Dioxins in Ground Beef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebere C. Anyanwu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlorinated dioxins are the group of environmental pollutants consisting of 210 chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans. They are highly toxic and persistent. They are lipophilic and can easily biomagnify in the food chain, hence posing a serious threat to human health. The daily consumption of low-level contaminated food, mainly of animal origin, leads to the accumulation of dioxins in the human body. The exposures of the general human population to dioxins and the specific issues of a risk assessment of dioxin pose serious concerns in public environmental and nutritional health. This paper reviews the analysis of chlorinated dioxins in ground beef. The sources of contamination of chlorinated dioxins in ground beef are first reviewed to form a basis for a clear understanding of the health implications of chlorinated dioxins in the human food chain and why it is necessary to monitor the level of dioxins in animal food products, especially ground beef. The methods of collection, sampling, and processing of ground beef, and the methods of sample clean up prior to the analysis, are reviewed. Emphasis is laid on the new techniques that are available and that might be effective in the analysis of chlorinated dioxins in ground beef. Among these new methods and techniques are: the synergistic combination of ELISA/GC/MS, direct sample introduction to /GC/MS-MS, automated clean-up method, and the supercritical fluid extraction methods. The possible treatments of results from each method and technique are discussed and their respective efficiencies are compared. Finally, quality control and quality assurance parameters are evaluated for levels of accuracy, reproducibility, and precision.

  13. Evaluation of Ground Arthropod Structure in Restoration Area of Talangagung Landfill as Edutourism Attraction, Kepanjen, Malang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinda Azalia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this research is to know the composition, community structure and survivality of ground arthropod in restoration area of Talangagung edutourism landfill (TPA Wisata Edukasi Talangagung. Arthopod survey was conducted with four methods, yellow pan trap, pit fall trap, berlesetullgren, and sweep net. The research was done in four different locations with twice repetition. Survey location was devided in three zone, which is zone one with 10 years restoration, zone two with five years restoration, and zone three which not yet restored, and reference site. Abiotic factor which observed in this research such as light intensity, humidity, and air temperature. Analysis of arthropod diversity and community structure in each site was calculated from importance value index (IVI and diversity index (Shannon Wienner Index. The results show that diversity of ground arthropod in zone one, two, three, and reference site was on medium level which each score 1.9, 1.87, 1.71, and 2.08. Community structure with dominant pattern showed with IVI from Acrididae in zone one and zone three with IVI 67.2 % and 53.5 %. Myrmicidae in reference site dominance with IVI 51.4 % and Formicidae in zone one with IVI 48.6 %. Ground arthropod in zone one and reference site had similarity in community structure which showed in same cluster in biplot analysis and zone two and three was in another different cluster. Keywords : Arthropod, diversity, restoration, community structure

  14. Solid waste burial grounds interim safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, G.H.

    1994-10-01

    This Interim Safety Analysis document supports the authorization basis for the interim operation and restrictions on interim operations for the near-surface land disposal of solid waste in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. The Solid Waste Burial Grounds Interim Safety Basis supports the upgrade progress for the safety analysis report and the technical safety requirements for the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. Accident safety analysis scenarios have been analyzed based on the significant events identified in the preliminary hazards analysis. The interim safety analysis provides an evaluation of the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds to determine if the radiological and hazardous material exposures will be acceptable from an overall health and safety standpoint to the worker, the onsite personnel, the public, and the environment.

  15. Large Scale Evaluation of AMSR-E Soil Moisture Products Based on Ground Soil Moisture Network Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruhier, C.; de Rosnay, P.; Richaume, P.; Kerr, Y.; Rudiger, C.; Boulet, G.; Walker, J. P.; Mougin, E.; Ceschia, E.; Calvet, J.

    2007-05-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS) soil moisture products, based on a comparison with three ground soil moisture networks. The selected ground sites are representative of various climatic, hydrologic and environmental conditions in temperate and semi-arid areas. They are located in the south-west of France, south-east of Australia and the Gourma region of the Sahel. These sites were respectively implemented in the framework of the projects SMOSREX (Surface Monitoring Of Soil Reservoir Experiment), SASMAS/GoREx (Scaling and Assimilation of Soil Moisture and Streamflow in the Goulburn River Experimental catchment) and AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis). In all cases, the arrangement of the soil moisture measuring sites was specifically designed to address the validation of remotely sensed soil moisture in the context of the preparation of the SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) project. For the purpose of this study, 25km AMSR-E products were used, including brightness temperatures at 6.9 and 10.7 GHz, and derived soil moisture. The study is focused on the year 2005. It is based on ground soil moisture network measurements from 4 stations for SMOSREX extended to the SUDOUEST project of CESBIO, 12 stations for GoRex, and 4 stations for AMMA. Temporal and spatial features of soil moisture variability and stability is a critical issue to be addressed for remotely sensed soil moisture validation. While ground measurements provide information on soil moisture dynamics at local scale and high temporal resolution (hourly), satellite measurements are sparser in time (up to several days), but cover a larger region (25km x 25km for AMSR-E). First, a statistical analysis, including mean relative difference and Spearman rank, is conducted for the three soil moisture networks. This method is mainly based on the approach proposed by Cosh et al. (2004) for the purpose of the use of ground networks for

  16. Evaluation of litter type and dietary coarse ground corn inclusion on broiler live performance, gastrointestinal tract development, and litter characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y; Stark, C R; Ferket, P R; Williams, C M; Nusairat, B; Brake, J

    2015-03-01

    Two 49 d floor pen studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of litter type and dietary coarse ground corn (CC) inclusion on broiler live performance, gastrointestinal tract (GIT) development, and litter characteristics. Experiment 1 was a 2×2 factorial arrangement of 2 genders (male or female) and 2 CC levels (0 or 50%). From 15 to 35 d, the addition of CC decreased feed intake (Plitter types (ground old litter or new wood shavings litter). The inclusion of CC decreased feed intake throughout the experiment without affecting final BW when only males were used and improved FCR after 25 d (Plitter improved FCR from 1 to 14 d (Plitter moisture (Plitter had only a marginal benefit on broiler live performance.

  17. Technology development for evaluation of operational quantities in radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jang Lyul; Chang, S. Y.; Lee, L. T.; Kim, B. H.; Chung, K. K.; Lee, J. I.; Lim, G. S.; Kim, J. S.; Nam, Y. M.; Chang, J. K.; Kim, D. Y.; Yang, J. S

    2000-03-01

    A study on the fabrication of a new personal thermo-luminescence dosimeter, which can evaluate the personal dose equivalent H{sub p}(d), has been performed. Optimum conditions for fabrication of a LiF:Mg,Cu,Na,Si TL phosphor powder has been determined and a disc type TL pellet has been fabricated from this TL powder. Another type of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy,Mo TL material has been also fabricated. These two TL materials have shown greater TL sensitivity than the foreign-made commercial TL materials. Mono-energetic fluorescence X-ray from 8.6 keV to 75 keV for use in performance testing of the developed TLDs energy response have been constructed and evaluated for the performance of the purity, air kerma, beam uniformity and distribution, and scattered fraction of X-rays. Reference neutron field of a D{sub 2}O moderated {sup 252}Cf source was characterized and the irradiation system using {sup 226}Ra and {sup 137}Cs sources was installed to construct the environmental gamma reference radiation and the low-level gamma radiation. A capability of calibration and measurement of KAERI In Vivo counting system for transuranic elements in the lung has been evaluated through the participation in the overseas intercomparison study on the In Vivo radioactivity measurement. An improvement and advancement of KAERI lung counting technology have been made by the analysis off uncertainties from the assumption of uniform radioactivity distribution in the lung, experimental determination and comparing of detection efficiency with different lung sets, and mathematical efficiency calibration of In Vivo counting system. (author)

  18. CFD evaluation of SFP cooling capacity during normal operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Dong Hyeog; Kim, Jin Hyuck; Seul, Kwang Won [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    In Fukushima nuclear accident, due to earthquake, the cooling system of the spent fuel pool failed and the safety issue of the spent fuel pool (SFP) generated. Because of the unavailability of offsite storage for spent nuclear fuel in Korea, the spent fuel should be placed in storage at specially designed facilities, kept and monitored in the plant. In recent years, spent fuel storage racks are being replaced with high density racks due to the lack of storage capacity. For the above reasons, the necessity is felt to analyze the safety of the spent fuel pool. Hence, to evaluate the safety of spent fuel pools, in case of loss of offsite power like the Fukushima nuclear accident, the safety analysis was conducted for Gori Unit 1 and Ulchin unit3 in order to estimate the time it takes for nuclear fuels to be uncovered, when water in the pool evaporated by decay heat of spent fuels. In addition, there are some researches evaluating heat removal, thermal hydraulic behaviors and accident circumstances in the spent fuel pool with system thermal hydraulic codes, such as RELAP, TRACE and ASTEC. Some researchers are attempting to carry out 3D CFD analysis. In this study, thermal hydraulic characteristics of the spent fuel pool of Ulchin unit 3 are investigated by using ANSYS CFX 13 which is a commercial CFD code. Three dimensional fluid flow and heat removal capacity of the spent fuel pool are evaluated by 3 D CFD simulation, while carrying out comparative analysis with the multi D analysis of MARS KS.

  19. Actively Secure Two-Party Evaluation of Any Quantum Operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupuis, Frédéric; Nielsen, Jesper Buus; Salvail, Louis

    2012-01-01

    We provide the first two-party protocol allowing Alice and Bob to evaluate privately even against active adversaries any completely positive, trace-preserving map , given as a quantum circuit, upon their joint quantum input state . Our protocol leaks no more to any active adversary than an ideal ...... functionality for provided Alice and Bob have the cryptographic resources for active secure two-party classical computation. Our protocol is constructed from the protocol for the same task secure against specious adversaries presented in [4]....

  20. Evaluation of Meteorology Data for MOPITT Operational Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziskin, D.; Deeter, M. N.; Worden, H. M.; Mao, D.; Dean, V.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere[1] (MOPITT) is an instrument flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite[2]. It measures CO using correlated spectroscopy[3]. As part of its processing it uses surface temperature, an atmospheric temperature profile and a water vapor profile from analysis. Since there are many analysis products on the market (e.g. GMAO, NCEP, ECMWF etc.) that meet MOPITT's operational requirements, the question arises as to which product is most apt? There is a collection of "validation data" that MOPITT compares its CO retrievals against[4]. The validation dataset has been acquired by in situ air samples taken by aircraft at a series of altitudes. We can run our processing system in "validation mode" which processes the satellite data for only the days that validation data exists and for a spatial subset that corresponds to the region where the validation data has been collected. We will run the MOPITT retrievals in validation mode separately using each variety of analysis data. We will create a cost function that will provide a scalar estimate of the retrieved CO profile error relative to the validation dataset which is assumed to be "the truth". The retrieval errors of each of the input datasets will be compared to each other to provide insight into the best choice for use in operational MOPITT processing. [1] Drummond, J.R., "Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT)," in The Use of EOS for Studies of Atmospheric Physics, J. C. Gille, G. Visconti, eds. (North Holland, Amsterdam), pp. 77-101, 1992. [2] 1999 EOS Reference Handbook: A Guide to NASA's Earth Science Enterprise and the Earth Observing System; Eds. Michael D. King and Reynold Greenstone; NASA, Greenbelt, MD, 1999. [3] Drummond, J.R., G. P. Brasseur, G. R. Davis, J. C. Gille, J. C. McConnell, G. D. Pesket, H. G. Reichle, N. Roulet, MOPITT Mission Description Document (Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 1A7), 1993. [4] Deeter, M. N

  1. Imaging-guided thoracoscopic resection of a ground-glass opacity lesion in a hybrid operating room equipped with a robotic C-arm CT system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chen-Ping; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Fang, Hsin-Yueh; Chao, Yin-Kai

    2017-05-01

    The intraoperative identification of small pulmonary nodules through video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery remains challenging. Although preoperative CT-guided nodule localization is commonly used to detect tumors during video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), this approach carries inherent risks. We report the case of a patient with stage I lung cancer presenting as an area of ground-glass opacity (GGO) in the right upper pulmonary lobe. He successfully underwent a single-stage, CT-guided localization and removal of the pulmonary nodule within a hybrid operating room (OR) equipped with a robotic C-arm.

  2. Modeling to Evaluate Coordination and Flexibility in Aluminum Recycling Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brommer, Tracey; Olivetti, Elsa; Fjeldbo, Snorre; Kirchain, Randolph

    Reprocessing of aluminum production byproducts or dross for use in secondary production presents a particular challenge to the aluminum industry. While use of these non-traditional secondary materials is of interest due to their reduced energy and economic burden over virgin counterparts, these materials necessitate the use of particular furnaces, specialized handling and processing conditions. Therefore, to make use of them firms may pursue use of an intermediate recycling facility that can reprocess the secondary materials into a liquid product. After reprocessing downstream aluminum remelters could incorporate the liquid products into their aluminum alloy production schedules. Energy and environmental benefits result from delivering the products as liquid but coordination challenges result because of the energy cost to maintain the liquid. Further coordination challenges result from the need to establish long term recycling production plans in the presence of long term downstream aluminum remelter production uncertainty and inherent variation in the daily order schedule of the downstream aluminum remelters. In this context a fundamental question arises, considering the metallurgical complexities of dross reprocessing, what is the value of operating a coordinated set of by-product reprocessing plants and remelting cast houses?

  3. Ergonomic evaluation of winegrape trellis systems pruning operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, A E; Fathallah, F A; Miles, J A; Meyers, J M; Faucett, J; Janowitz, I; Garcia, E G

    2006-02-01

    The winegrape industry suffers from high incidence rates of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Pruning of dormant vines is a significant task, requiring long periods of highly repetitive and physically demanding work. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively evaluate five commonly used winegrape trellis systems with regard to the risk of developing musculoskeletal injuries to the wrist and lower back while pruning. Eleven subjects participated in this study. Subjects performed a simulated pruning task as wrist and trunk postures were gathered using electrogoniometers. The results showed significant postural differences among the trellis systems. Compared to the other systems, the VSP was determined to be the optimal system in terms of decreasing relative MSD risk. These results will assist vineyards in the selection process of suitable trellis systems that will include the worker health aspect in conjunction with other trellis-related parameters such as grape quality and productivity.

  4. Service Quality Evaluation and Ranking of Container Terminal Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Sayareh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the service industry, the regular assessment of service quality is considered as a means of promoting the quality of services. Container market is no exception, and the quality of providing service in a container terminal is of prime importance in attracting new customers and maintaining the existing ones. The main aim of present research is to evaluate the quality of service being offered at Shahid Rajaee Container Terminal (SRCT in Bandar Abbas port. The evaluation process uses SERVQUAL model which is an appropriate tool for measuring the service quality, identifying and analyzing available gaps between service expectations and perceptions. Target population in this research includes customers of SRCT. The standard and customized questionnaires were distributed among 165 samples, out of which 127 (77% were returned. For the purpose of data analyses, initially the reliability of SERVQUAL model was checked, and then paired sample t-test was performed to reveal any possible gap between expectations and perceptions of respondents. Finally, TOPSIS was used to rank the 9 main container service companies in the SRCT. The results indicated that there are significant gaps between customers’ expectations and perceptions in SRCT, in all five dimensions of services quality. Additionally, from weighing point of view, ‘Tangibles’ was the most important dimension, followed by ‘Reliability’, ‘Assurance’, ‘Responsiveness’ and ‘Empathy’. In addition, ‘Tangibles’ dimension had maximum gap and ‘Empathy’ dimension had minimum gap between customers’ expectations and perceptions. Finally, after ranking companies, BandarAbbas Aria Container Terminal (BACT Company was ranked first among nine companies in satisfying customers’ expectations.

  5. EVALUATING AND IMPROVING REAL-TIME STRATEGIES FOR ENGINEERING GROUND MOTION PREDICTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iervolino, I.; Giorgio, M.; Manfredi, G.

    2009-12-01

    Because, from the engineering perspective, the effectiveness of earthquake early warning systems (EEWS) depends only on the possibility of immediately detecting the earthquake and estimating the expected loss, or a proxy for it, for an engineered system of interest in order to undertake actions to manage/mitigate the risk before the strike, it is worthwhile to assess the efficiency of strategies to predict in real-time the earthquake’s destructive potential. The simplest engineering ground motion parameter is the peak ground acceleration (PGA) which may be predicted through probabilistic seismic hazard analysis in the framework of EEW conditional on some measures the seismologists use to estimate the magnitude from the early recorded signal. The effects of different sources of uncertainty on the prediction of PGA are assessed with reference to the ISNet (Irpinia Seismic Network) EEWS, although results can be considered general. The analyses show how the uncertainty of the ground motion prediction equation (GMPE) dominates those of magnitude and distance, almost independently of the information available for the event. Because the uncertainty related to GMPE is usually very large, it seems that the estimation of PGA should be where to put effort rather than improving the estimation of magnitude and/or earthquake location. An attempt to reduce the uncertainty in the estimation of PGA is made by adding more information (i.e., a second parameter measured in the early part of the signal from real-time seismology) and using the intra-event spatial correlation of peak accelerations at different sites. Based on these analyses distance-related bounds to uncertainty and information-dependent lead-time maps are defined and illustratively computed for the Campania (southern Italy) region.

  6. Derivation and evaluation of land surface temperature from the geostationary operational environmental satellite series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Li

    according to the characteristics of the imager onboard the GOES series. For the GOES 8-11 and GOES R series with split window (SW) channels, a new temperature and emissivity separation (TES) approach was proposed for deriving LST and LSE simultaneously by using multiple-temporal satellite observations. Two split-window regression formulas were selected for this approach, and two satellite observations over the same geo-location within a certain time interval were utilized. This method is particularly applicable to geostationary satellite missions from which qualified multiple-temporal observations are available. For the GOES M(12)-Q series without SW channels, the dual-window LST algorithm was adopted to derive LST. Instead of using the conventional training method to generate coefficients for the LST regression algorithms, a machine training technique was introduced to automatically select the criteria and the boundary of the sub-ranges for generating algorithm coefficients under different conditions. A software package was developed to produce a brand new GOES LST product from both operational GOES measurements and historical archive. The system layers of the software and related system input and output were illustrated in this work. Comprehensive evaluation of GOES LST products was conducted by validating products against multiple ground-based LST observations, LST products from fine-resolution satellites (e.g. MODIS) and GSIP LST products. The key issues relevant to the cloud diffraction effect were studied as well. GOES measurements as well as ancillary data, including satellite and solar geometry, water vapor, cloud mask, land emissivity etc., were collected to generate GOES LST products. In addition, multiple in situ temperature measurements were collected to test the performance of the proposed GOES LST retrieval algorithms. The ground-based dataset included direct surface temperature measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM), and

  7. Evaluation of spectrum measurement devices for operational use

    CERN Document Server

    Devine, R T; Gray, D W; Seagraves, D T; Olsher, R H; Johnson, J P

    2002-01-01

    Several neutron spectrometers manufactured by Bubble Technology Industries (BTI) were tested and evaluated in a variety of neutron fields. Findings and conclusions are presented for the following BTI instruments: a modification of the Rotational Spectrometer (ROSPEC) that includes a thermal and epithermal capability, the Simple Scintillation Spectrometer that is used in conjunction with the ROSPEC to extend its high-energy range, and the MICROSPEC N-Probe which is capable of providing a crude spectrum over the energy range from thermal to 18 MeV. The main objective of these measurements was to determine the accuracy of both the energy spectrum and dose equivalent information generated by these devices. In addition, the dose response of the Wide-Energy Neutron Detection Instrument (WENDI-II) was measured in all neutron fields relative to a bare sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf calibration. The performance of the WENDI-II rem meter was compared to the dose information generated by the neutron spectrometers. The instruments...

  8. CLINICAL EVALUATION OF FAILED ENDONASAL DCR OPERATIONS AND THEIR MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Naveed

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Endoscopic Intra nasal approach to by-pass the obstruction of lacrimal apparatus is a simple and commonly practiced surgery among the ENT Surgeons. Various modifications in the form of usage of micro drill, application of Mitomycin C and preserving the nasal flap to line the opening in the sac to name a few are being used. Recurrence of epiphora and closure of the neo opening is described and observed are labeled as failed endonasal DCR. This study makes an attempt to review retrospectively and prospectively to evaluate the degree of recurrence and causes of failure. OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY: This study also attempts to determine the causes of failure of endonasal DCR and its subsequent management. Thus this study precludes the role of revision DCR. Materials and Methods: 50 patients who underwent endonasal DCR surgery at GGH Kurnool and reported with symptoms of returning of epiphora, purulent discharge from the eye were included. A detailed history taking and endoscopic examination done to find the cause of failure. An attempt is made to classify the causes and find suitable remedy.RESULTS:36% of the patients showed tendency to form synaechiae, 18.6% of patients presented with thick lacrimal crest, 9% of them showed formation of a thin veil like membrane over the neo-ostium. All the patients were subjected to revision surgery and subjective improvement in 92% of the patients reported at the time of reporting of the study.

  9. Serial evaluation of hepatic function profile after Fontan operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaulitz, R; Haber, P; Sturm, E; Schäfer, J; Hofbeck, M

    2014-02-01

    Moderate persistent elevation of the γ-glutamyltransferase (γGT) level is a frequent finding during long-term follow-up of patients with total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) for palliation of functionally univentricular hearts. Serial intraindividual data revealed a significant increase in the γGT level within a minimum 4-year interval in more than 80 % of cases. The level of γGT elevation showed a significant correlation to hemodynamic parameters such as systemic ventricular end diastolic pressure and mean pulmonary artery pressure, but did not strongly correlate with duration of follow-up or other liver function parameters, which were less frequent and less impressively deranged. None of the patients had signs of synthetic dysfunction. With increasing postoperative follow-up, abnormalities of sonographic hepatic texture including increased echogenicity, inhomogeneity, or liver surface nodularity were found. All 17 patients with liver surface nodularity had a follow-up period of over 10 years. Structural abnormalities did not correlate with biochemical or hemodynamic parameters. Doppler evaluation revealed inspiratory dependence of hepatic vein flow in more than 90 % as a relevant finding after TCPC; a decrease in portal vein flow velocity was observed in many patients. Since long-term survivors after Fontan procedure are at an increased risk of cardiac hepatopathy and cirrhosis, detailed routine investigation and monitoring of hepatic morphology are needed.

  10. Evaluating Topographic Effects on Ground Deformation: Insights from Finite Element Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronchin, Erika; Geyer, Adelina; Martí, Joan

    2015-07-01

    Ground deformation has been demonstrated to be one of the most common signals of volcanic unrest. Although volcanoes are commonly associated with significant topographic relief, most analytical models assume the Earth's surface as flat. However, it has been confirmed that this approximation can lead to important misinterpretations of the recorded surface deformation data. Here we perform a systematic and quantitative analysis of how topography may influence ground deformation signals generated by a spherical pressure source embedded in an elastic homogeneous media and how these variations correlate with the different topographic parameters characterizing the terrain form (e.g., slope, aspect, curvature). For this, we bring together the results presented in previous published papers and complement them with new axisymmetric and 3D finite element (FE) model results. First, we study, in a parametric way, the influence of a volcanic edifice centered above the pressure source axis. Second, we carry out new 3D FE models simulating the real topography of three different volcanic areas representative of topographic scenarios common in volcanic regions: Rabaul caldera (Papua New Guinea) and the volcanic islands of Tenerife and El Hierro (Canary Islands). The calculated differences are then correlated with a series of topographic parameters. The final aim is to investigate the artifacts that might arise from the use of half-space models at volcanic areas due to diverse topographic features (e.g., collapse caldera structures, prominent central edifices, large landslide scars).

  11. Sensory evaluation of dry-fermented sausage containing ground deodorized yellow mustard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuliu; Aliani, Michel; Holley, Richard A

    2013-10-01

    Ground deodorized yellow mustard is used as a binder and meat protein substitute in cooked processed meat products. Recent studies have shown that it has the potential to be used in uncooked processed meat products because of its natural antimicrobial properties. In the present study, ground deodorized yellow mustard was added to uncooked dry-fermented sausage during manufacture at 1% to 4% (w/w) and analyzed for its effects on starter cultures, physico-chemical properties, and consumer acceptability. Mustard had a nondose-dependent inhibitory effect on the Staphylococcus starter culture, had no effect on water activity or instrumental texture, and tended to accelerate sausage pH reduction. At 3% and 4% mustard, consumer scores on all sensory attributes as well as overall acceptability were significantly lower. The appearance and color of 3% and 4% mustard-treated sausages were liked slightly, whereas flavor, texture, and overall acceptability scores were reduced. The control without mustard and 1% mustard-treated sausages had similar sensory properties and were the most acceptable, while 2% mustard-treated sausages were given "like moderately" and "like slightly" descriptors. Sensory results mean that at concentrations necessary for mandated regulatory control of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in dry sausages, mustard may have a negative effect on consumer acceptance.

  12. How Precise Are Preinterventional Measurements Using Centerline Analysis Applications? Objective Ground Truth Evaluation Reveals Software-Specific Centerline Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoegen, Philipp; Wörz, Stefan; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Geisbüsch, Philipp; Liao, Wei; Rohr, Karl; Schmitt, Matthias; Rengier, Fabian; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate different centerline analysis applications using objective ground truth from realistic aortic aneurysm phantoms with precisely defined geometry and centerlines to overcome the lack of unknown true dimensions in previously published in vivo validation studies. Three aortic phantoms were created using computer-aided design (CAD) software and a 3-dimensional (3D) printer. Computed tomography angiograms (CTAs) of phantoms and 3 patients were analyzed with 3 clinically approved and 1 research software application. The 3D centerline coordinates, intraluminal diameters, and lengths were validated against CAD ground truth using a dedicated evaluation software platform. The 3D centerline position mean error ranged from 0.7±0.8 to 2.9±2.5 mm between tested applications. All applications calculated centerlines significantly different from ground truth. Diameter mean errors varied from 0.5±1.2 to 1.1±1.0 mm among 3 applications, but exceeded 8.0±11.0 mm with one application due to an unsteady distortion of luminal dimensions along the centerline. All tested commercially available software tools systematically underestimated centerline total lengths by -4.6±0.9 mm to -10.4±4.3 mm (maximum error -14.6 mm). Applications with the highest 3D centerline accuracy yielded the most precise diameter and length measurements. One clinically approved application did not provide reproducible centerline-based analysis results, while another approved application showed length errors that might influence stent-graft choice and procedure success. The variety and specific characteristics of endovascular aneurysm repair planning software tools require scientific evaluation and user awareness.

  13. Decision-oriented Usability Evaluation of an Operation Interface: Model and Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-jun; SUN Lin-yan; LI Min

    2012-01-01

    To support multi-factor decision problems about usability evaluation, especially when studies fall short of comparable objects, a fuzzy synthetic evaluation model is explored in this paper. Grey relational analysis (GRA) is brought in the model to calculate weight vectors of the usability factors. And membership functions of a remark vector are constructed in the context of use of the operation interface. The present method is applied in usability evaluation of operation interface and is proved to be effective. The comprehensive usability gradation of the operation interface to good is 0. 616 4 that meets the requirements in practice.

  14. Long-term ground-water monitoring program and performance-evaluation plan for the extraction system at the former Nike Missile Battery Site, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senus, Michael P.; Tenbus, Frederick J.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents lithologic and ground-water-quality data collected during April and May 2000 in the remote areas of the tidal wetland of West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Contamination of the Canal Creek aquifer with volatile organic compounds has been documented in previous investigations of the area. This study was conducted to investigate areas that were previously inaccessible because of deep mud and shallow water, and to support ongoing investigations of the fate and transport of volatile organic compounds in the Canal Creek aquifer. A unique vibracore drill rig mounted on a hovercraft was used for drilling and ground-water sampling. Continuous cores of the wetland sediment and of the Canal Creek aquifer were collected at five sites. Attempts to sample ground water were made by use of a continuous profiler at 12 sites, without well installation, at a total of 81 depths within the aquifer. Of those 81 attempts, only 34 sampling depths produced enough water to collect samples. Ground-water samples from two sites had the highest concentrations of volatile organic compounds?with total volatile organic compound concentrations in the upper part of the aquifer ranging from about 15,000 to 50,000 micrograms per liter. Ground-water samples from five sites had much lower total volatile organic compound concentrations (95 to 2,100 micrograms per liter), whereas two sites were essentially not contaminated, with total volatile organic compound concentrations less than or equal to 5 micrograms per liter.

  15. Evaluation of tropospheric and stratospheric ozone trends over Western Europe from ground-based FTIR network observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Vigouroux

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the European project UFTIR (Time series of Upper Free Troposphere observations from an European ground-based FTIR network, six ground-based stations in Western Europe, from 79° N to 28° N, all equipped with Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR instruments and part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, have joined their efforts to evaluate the trends of several direct and indirect greenhouse gases over the period 1995–2004. The retrievals of CO, CH4, C2H6, N2O, CHClF2, and O3 have been optimized. Using the optimal estimation method, some vertical information can be obtained in addition to total column amounts. A bootstrap resampling method has been implemented to determine annual partial and total column trends for the target gases. The present work focuses on the ozone results. The retrieved time series of partial and total ozone columns are validated with ground-based correlative data (Brewer, Dobson, UV-Vis, ozonesondes, and Lidar. The observed total column ozone trends are in agreement with previous studies: 1 no total column ozone trend is seen at the lowest latitude station Izaña (28° N; 2 slightly positive total column trends are seen at the two mid-latitude stations Zugspitze and Jungfraujoch (47° N, only one of them being significant; 3 the highest latitude stations Harestua (60° N, Kiruna (68° N and Ny-Ålesund (79° N show significant positive total column trends. Following the vertical information contained in the ozone FTIR retrievals, we provide partial columns trends for the layers: ground-10 km, 10–18 km, 18–27 km, and 27–42 km, which helps to distinguish the contributions from dynamical and chemical changes on the total column ozone trends. We obtain no statistically significant trends in the ground-10 km layer for five out of the six ground-based stations. We find significant positive trends for the lowermost

  16. Simulating the thermal operating conditions in the thermal wells of ground-source heat-pump heat supply systems. Part I: Porous moisture freezing processes in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyev, G. P.; Peskov, N. V.; Lichman, V. A.; Gornov, V. F.; Kolesova, M. V.

    2015-08-01

    The mathematical models laid down in the new blocks of the INSOLAR.GSHP.12 software system simulating unsteady operating conditions of ground-source heat-pump (GSHP) heat supply systems are presented. The new model blocks take into account the effect the freezing of porous moisture in soil has on the GSHP system performance efficiency. Illustration is given to the need of taking into account the porous moisture freezing/thawing processes in soil, and the results from investigations devoted to the opening possibilities of constructing adaptive GSHP systems with controlled intensity of heat transfer in the soil-thermal well system are presented. The development of software simulating the porous moisture phase state variation processes in soil was preceded by development of mathematical equations representing the thermal conditions of soil body involving porous moisture freezing/thawing processes. A description of these equations is also given in the article. In constructing the mathematical model, the notion "effective thermal conductivity" of soil was introduced for taking into account the latent heat of phase transition that releases during the freezing of moisture. The above-mentioned effective thermal conductivity of soil involves two components: the soil thermal conductivity coefficient itself and an additional term modifying the thermal conductivity value for taking into account the influence of phase transition. For quantitatively evaluating the soil effective thermal conductivity component that takes into account the influence of phase transition, the soil freezing zone radius around the thermal well was determined. The obtained analytic solutions have been implemented in the form of computer program blocks, after which a "numerical experiment" was carried out for estimating the effect the porous moisture freezing/thawing processes have on the soil thermal conditions. It was demonstrated during that experiment that the soil thermal conductivities determined

  17. Preliminary evaluation of a virtual reality dental simulation system on drilling operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dangxiao; Zhao, Siming; Li, Teng; Zhang, Yuru; Wang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the fidelity of the iDental system and investigate its utility and performance on simulated drilling operations, user studies consisting of objective and subjective evaluations were performed. A voxel-based drilling simulation sub-system in the iDental system was employed for evaluation. Twenty participants were enrolled to take part in the experiments and were divided into two groups: novice and resident. A combined evaluation method including objective and subjective methods was employed. The objective evaluation included two dental drilling tasks: caries removal operation and pulp chamber opening operation. In the subjective method, participants were required to complete a questionnaire to evaluate the fidelity of the system after the operation task. Based on the structured global assessment scales in the questionnaire, the average subjective evaluation scores of the proposed metrics were greater than 4.5, demonstrating that the system operated above medium fidelity. Dentists expressed great interest and positive attitudes toward the potential of the iDental system. The objective evaluation data including time spent and the volume of removed healthy and carious tissue were obtained. Although no significant differences could be found between the two groups, the volume of removed caries and the depth of pulp chamber insertion manifested small standard deviations. Evaluation results illustrated that dentists were willing to use the virtual reality training system. Several future research topics were identified, including increasing the task difficulty, improving the system fidelity and introducing appropriate finger rest points.

  18. Evaluation of Standard Gear Metrics in Helicopter Flight Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, M.; Pryor, A. H.; Huff, E. M.

    2002-01-01

    Each false alarm made by a machine monitoring system carries a high price tag. The machine must be taken out of service, thoroughly inspected with possible disassembly, and then made ready for service. Loss of use of the machine and the efforts to inspect it are costly. In addition, if a monitoring system is prone to false alarms, the system will soon be turned off or ignored. For aircraft applications, one growing concern is that the dynamic flight environment differs from the laboratory environment where fault detection methods are developed and tested. Vibration measurements made in flight are less stationary than those made in a laboratory, or test facility, and thus a given fault detection method may produce more false alarms in flight than might be anticipated. In 1977. Stewart introduced several metrics, including FM0 and FM4, for evaluating the health of a gear. These metrics are single valued functions of the vibration signal that indicate if the signal deviates from an ideal model of the signal. FM0 is a measure of the ratio of the peak-to-peak level to the harmonic energy in the signal. FM4 is the kurtosis of the signal with the gear mesh harmonics and first order side bands removed. The underlying theory is that a vibration signal from a gear in good condition is expected to be dominated by a periodic signal at the gear mesh frequency. If one or a small number of gear teeth contain damage or faults, the signal will change, possibly showing increased amplitude, local phase changes or both near the damaged region of the gear. FM0 increases if a signal contains a local increase in amplitude. FM4 increases if a signal contains a local increase in amplitude or local phase change in a periodic signal. Over the years, other single value metrics were also introduced to detect the onset and growth of damage in gears. These various metrics have detected faults in several gear tests in experimental test rigs. Conditions in these tests have been steady state in the

  19. Non-destructive evaluation of moisture content in wood using ground-penetrating radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reci, Hamza; Chinh Maï, Tien; Sbartaï, Zoubir Mehdi; Pajewski, Lara; Kiri, Emanuela

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents the results of a series of laboratory measurements, carried out to study how the ground-penetrating radar (GPR) signal is affected by moisture variation in wood material. The effects of the wood fibre direction, with respect to the polarisation of the electromagnetic field, are investigated. The relative permittivity of wood and the amplitude of the electric field received by the radar are measured for different humidity levels using the direct-wave method in wide angle radar reflection configuration, in which one GPR antenna is moved while the other is kept in a fixed position. The received signal is recorded for different separations between the transmitting and receiving antennas. Dielectric constants estimated from direct waves are compared to those estimated from reflected waves: direct and reflected waves show different behaviour when the moisture content varies, due to their different propagation paths.

  20. Occupational Health Screenings of the Virtual Warrior: Distributed Common Ground System Intelligence Operators Compared with Non-Combatant Support Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    exercise/training each week (e.g., 20-30 minutes of walking, moderate cycling, moderate speed sport or aerobic activity)? Response options were none...work hours) and problematic health behaviors (e.g., poor sleep hygiene , excessive caffeine use). The findings of this study provide insight into the...intelligence operators have more restriction (such as reduced access to base facilities and physical training time built into work routines) for

  1. Ground-Based Midcourse Defense (GMD) Sea-Based X-Band Radar (SBX) Placement and Operation, Adak, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-03

    can swim freely in the ocean and includes fish, squids, and marine mammals. Most species of nektonic animals live near the sea surface, where food is...living in rural areas of Alaska are partially or wholly dependent on the harvesting of natural resources for food and other living necessities. To...emissions time of up to 5 hours per day. The main beam would be GMO SBX Placement and Operation at Adak, Alaska EA 4-11 constantly moving and would

  2. Special requisites for ground switch operation of parallel circuits of strongly connected transmission lines; Requisitos especiais de manobra para chaves de terra de circuitos paralelos de linhas de transmissao fortemente acoplados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amon Filho, J.; Kastrup Filho, O.; Franca, W.J. [FURNAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1993-12-31

    This work aims to present results of a qualitative and quantitative analysis of the problem concerning the ground switch turn off operation of transmission lines parallel circuits involving computer simulations and field tests, being such tests compared to standards and constant criteria of the technical specifications of such ground switches. The so far achieved conclusions indicate that the arc resistors installed in the ground switches have been satisfactory solving the problem of the interruption of induced currents by those ground switches. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. An evaluation of IASI-NH3 with ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammers, Enrico; Palm, Mathias; Van Damme, Martin; Vigouroux, Corinne; Smale, Dan; Conway, Stephanie; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Jones, Nicholas; Nussbaumer, Eric; Warneke, Thorsten; Petri, Christof; Clarisse, Lieven; Clerbaux, Cathy; Hermans, Christian; Lutsch, Erik; Strong, Kim; Hannigan, James W.; Nakajima, Hideaki; Morino, Isamu; Herrera, Beatriz; Stremme, Wolfgang; Grutter, Michel; Schaap, Martijn; Wichink Kruit, Roy J.; Notholt, Justus; Coheur, Pierre-F.; Erisman, Jan Willem

    2016-08-01

    Global distributions of atmospheric ammonia (NH3) measured with satellite instruments such as the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) contain valuable information on NH3 concentrations and variability in regions not yet covered by ground-based instruments. Due to their large spatial coverage and (bi-)daily overpasses, the satellite observations have the potential to increase our knowledge of the distribution of NH3 emissions and associated seasonal cycles. However the observations remain poorly validated, with only a handful of available studies often using only surface measurements without any vertical information. In this study, we present the first validation of the IASI-NH3 product using ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) observations. Using a recently developed consistent retrieval strategy, NH3 concentration profiles have been retrieved using observations from nine Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) stations around the world between 2008 and 2015. We demonstrate the importance of strict spatio-temporal collocation criteria for the comparison. Large differences in the regression results are observed for changing intervals of spatial criteria, mostly due to terrain characteristics and the short lifetime of NH3 in the atmosphere. The seasonal variations of both datasets are consistent for most sites. Correlations are found to be high at sites in areas with considerable NH3 levels, whereas correlations are lower at sites with low atmospheric NH3 levels close to the detection limit of the IASI instrument. A combination of the observations from all sites (Nobs = 547) give a mean relative difference of -32.4 ± (56.3) %, a correlation r of 0.8 with a slope of 0.73. These results give an improved estimate of the IASI-NH3 product performance compared to the previous upper-bound estimates (-50 to +100 %).

  4. Areal-Averaged Spectral Surface Albedo from Ground-Based Transmission Data Alone: Toward an Operational Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgueni Kassianov

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We present here a simple retrieval of the areal-averaged spectral surface albedo using only ground-based measurements of atmospheric transmission under fully overcast conditions. Our retrieval is based on a one-line equation. The feasibility of our retrieval for routine determinations of albedo is demonstrated for different landscapes with various degrees of heterogeneity using three sets of measurements: (1 spectral atmospheric transmission from the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR at five wavelengths (415, 500, 615, 673, and 870 nm; (2 tower-based measurements of local surface albedo at the same wavelengths; and (3 areal-averaged surface albedo at four wavelengths (470, 560, 670 and 860 nm from collocated and coincident Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS observations. These integrated datasets cover both temporally long (2008–2013 and short (April–May 2010 periods at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Southern Great Plains site and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA Table Mountain site, respectively. The calculated root mean square error (RMSE, defined here as the root mean squared difference between the MODIS-derived surface albedo and the retrieved areal-averaged albedo, is quite small (RMSE ≤ 0.015 and comparable with that obtained previously by other investigators for the shortwave broadband albedo. Good agreement between tower-based measurements of daily-averaged surface albedo for completely overcast and non-overcast conditions is also demonstrated.

  5. EVALUATION AND PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF INNOVATIVE LOW-VOC CONTACT ADHESIVES IN WOOD LAMINATING OPERATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of an evaluation and assessment of the perfor-mance, economics, and emission reduction potential upon application of low-volatile organic compound (VOC) waterborne contact adhesive formulations specifically ina manual laminating operation for assembling s...

  6. Lightning return stroke current radiation in presence of a conducting ground: 1. Theory and numerical evaluation of the electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfino, Federico; Procopio, Renato; Rossi, Mansueto

    2008-03-01

    The general theory describing the electromagnetic field radiated by a lightning stroke over a conducting ground is presented in this paper. The derivation of the Green functions necessary to solve the problem is discussed in detail, and the determination of the expressions for the electromagnetic field components is carried out in a form that minimizes the final computational costs. A method for the numerical evaluation of the electromagnetic field is then proposed, and it is shown that it can be used starting from any "engineering model" representation for the lightning current distribution along the channel. Such method is based on a new efficient evaluation of the so-called Sommerfeld's integrals appearing in the electromagnetic field expressions, without resorting to any kind of approximated formulas for them. The numerical treatment of the Sommerfeld's integrals is characterized by a proper subdivision of the integration domain, the use of the Romberg technique and the determination of a suitable upper bound for the error due to the integral truncation. In the second part of this work it will be shown how the results provided by the developed theory can be used in order to assess the validity of the most common simplified approach for the calculation of the lightning radiation over a lossy ground plane.

  7. Evaluation of intra-annual variation in U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment ground water quality data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Michael R; Voss, Frank D; Arufe, Jorge A

    2008-01-01

    Assessment of ground-water quality trends under the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) included the analysis of samples collected on a quarterly basis for 1 yr between 2001 and 2005. The purpose of this quarterly sampling was to test the hypothesis that variations in the concentration of water-quality parameters of selected individual wells could demonstrate that the intra-annual variation was greater or less than the decadal changes observed for a trend network. Evaluation of more than 100 wells over this period indicates that 1 yr of quarterly sampling is not adequate to address the issue of intra-annual variation because variations seem to be random and highly variable between different wells in the same networks and among networks located in different geographical areas of the USA. In addition, the data from only 1 yr makes it impossible to assess whether variations are due to univariate changes caused by land use changes, hydrologic variations due to variable recharge, or variations caused by ground-water pumping. These data indicate that funds allocated to this activity can be directed to the collection of more effective trend data, including age dating of all wells in the NAWQA network using multiple techniques. Continued evaluation of data and updating of monitoring plans of the NAWQA program is important for maintaining relevance to national goals and scientific objectives.

  8. Areal-averaged and Spectrally-resolved Surface Albedo from Ground-based Transmission Data Alone: Toward an Operational Retrieval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Riihimaki, Laura D.; Michalsky, Joseph; Hodges, G. B.

    2014-08-22

    We present here a simple retrieval of the areal-averaged and spectrally resolved surface albedo using only ground-based measurements of atmospheric transmission under fully overcast conditions. Our retrieval is based on a one-line equation and widely accepted assumptions regarding the weak spectral dependence of cloud optical properties in the visible and near-infrared spectral range. The feasibility of our approach for the routine determinations of albedo is demonstrated for different landscapes with various degrees of heterogeneity using three sets of measurements:(1) spectrally resolved atmospheric transmission from Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) at wavelength 415, 500, 615, 673, and 870 nm, (2) tower-based measurements of local surface albedo at the same wavelengths, and (3) areal-averaged surface albedo at four wavelengths (470, 560, 670 and 860 nm) from collocated and coincident Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations. These integrated datasets cover both long (2008-2013) and short (April-May, 2010) periods at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site and the NOAA Table Mountain site, respectively. The calculated root mean square error (RMSE), which is defined here as the root mean squared difference between the MODIS-derived surface albedo and the retrieved area-averaged albedo, is quite small (RMSE≤0.01) and comparable with that obtained previously by other investigators for the shortwave broadband albedo. Good agreement between the tower-based daily averages of surface albedo for the completely overcast and non-overcast conditions is also demonstrated. This agreement suggests that our retrieval originally developed for the overcast conditions likely will work for non-overcast conditions as well.

  9. Evaluation of tropospheric and stratospheric ozone trends over Western Europe from ground-based FTIR network observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Vigouroux

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Within the European project UFTIR (Time series of Upper Free Troposphere observations from an European ground-based FTIR network, six ground-based stations in Western Europe, from 79° N to 28° N, all equipped with Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR instruments and part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, have joined their efforts to evaluate the trend of several direct and indirect greenhouse gases over the period 1995–2004. The retrievals of CO, CH4, C2H6, N2O, CHClF2, and O3 have been optimized. Using the optimal estimation method, some vertical information can be obtained in addition to total column amounts. A bootstrap resampling method has been implemented to determine annual partial and total column trends for the target gases. The present work focuses on the ozone results. The retrieved time series of partial and total ozone columns are validated with ground-based correlative data (Brewer, Dobson, UV-Vis, ozonesondes, and Lidar. The observed total column ozone trends are in agreement with previous studies: 1 no total column ozone trend is seen at the lowest latitude station Izaña (28° N; 2 slightly positive total column trends are seen at the two mid-latitude stations Zugspitze and Jungfraujoch (47° N, only one of them being significant; 3 the highest latitude stations Harestua (60° N, Kiruna (68° N and Ny-Ålesund (79° N show significant positive total column trends. Following the vertical information contained in the ozone FTIR retrievals, we provide partial columns trends for the layers: ground-10 km, 10–18 km, 18–27 km, and 27–42 km, which helps to distinguish the contributions from dynamical and chemical changes on the total column ozone trends. We obtain no statistically significant trends in the ground–10 km layer for five out of the six ground-based stations. We find significant positive trends for the lowermost

  10. Evaluation of Satellite and Ground Based Precipitation Products for Flood Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintalapudi, S.; Sharif, H.; Yeggina, S.

    2012-04-01

    The development in satellite-derived rainfall estimates encouraged the hydrological modeling in sparse gauged basins or ungauged basins. Especially, physically-based distributed hydrological models can benefit from the good spatial and temporal coverage of satellite precipitation products. In this study, three satellite derived precipitation datasets (TRMM, CMORPH, and PERSIANN), NEXRAD, and rain gauge precipitation datasets were used to drive the hydrological model. The physically-based, distributed hydrological model Gridded Surface Subsurface Hydrological Analysis (GSSHA) was used in this study. Focus will be on the results from the Guadalupe River Basin above Canyon Lake and below Comfort, Texas. The Guadalupe River Basin above Canyon Lake and below Comfort Texas drains an area of 1232 km2. Different storm events will be used in these simulations. August 2007 event was used as calibration and June 2007 event was used as validation. Results are discussed interms of accuracy of satellite precipitation estimates with the ground based precipitation estimates, predicting peak discharges, runoff volumes, time lag, and spatial distribution. The initial results showed that, model was able to predict the peak discharges and runoff volumes when using NEXRAD MPE data, and TRMM 3B42 precipitation product. The results also showed that there was time lag in hydrographs driven by both PERSIANN and CMORPH data sets.

  11. An Evaluation of Activated Bismuth Isotopes in Environmental Samples From the Former Western Pacific Proving Grounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robison, W.L.; Brunk, J.A.; Jokela, T.A.

    2000-03-21

    {sup 207}Bi (t{sub 1/2}=32.2 y) was generated by activation of weapons material during a few ''clean'' nuclear tests at the U.S. Western Pacific Proving Grounds of Enewetak and Bikini Atolls. The radionuclides first appeared in the Enewetak environment during 1958 and in the environment of Bikini during 1956. Crater sediments from Bikini with high levels of {sup 207}Bi were analyzed by gamma spectrometry in an attempt to determine the relative concentrations of {sup 208}Bi (t{sup 1/2} = 3.68 x 10{sup 5} y). The bismuth isotopes were probably generated during the ''clean'', 9.3 Mt Poplar test held on 7/12/58. The atom ratio of {sup 208}Bi to {sup 207}Bi (R value) ranges from {approx}12 to over 200 in sections of core sediments from the largest nuclear crater at Bikini atoll. The presence of bismuth in the device is suggested to account for R values in excess of 10.

  12. Application of ground-penetrating radar technique to evaluate the waterfront location in hardened concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Abad, Isabel; Klysz, Gilles; Martínez-Sala, Rosa; Balayssac, Jean Paul; Mené-Aparicio, Jesús

    2016-12-01

    The long-term performance of concrete structures is directly tied to two factors: concrete durability and strength. When assessing the durability of concrete structures, the study of the water penetration is paramount, because almost all reactions like corrosion, alkali-silica, sulfate, etc., which produce their deterioration, require the presence of water. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) has shown to be very sensitive to water variations. On this basis, the objective of this experimental study is, firstly, to analyze the correlation between the water penetration depth in concrete samples and the GPR wave parameters. To do this, the samples were immersed into water for different time intervals and the wave parameters were obtained from signals registered when the antenna was placed on the immersed surface of the samples. Secondly, a procedure has been developed to be able to determine, from those signals, the reliability in the detection and location of waterfront depths. The results have revealed that GPR may have an enormous potential in this field, because excellent agreements were found between the correlated variables. In addition, when comparing the waterfront depths calculated from GPR measurements and those visually registered after breaking the samples, we observed that they totally agreed when the waterfront was more than 4 cm depth.

  13. Performance evaluation of a ground-source heat pump system utilizing a flowing well and estimation of suitable areas for its installation in Aizu Basin, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Gaurav; Uchida, Youhei; Kuronuma, Satoru; Yamaya, Mutsumi; Katsuragi, Masahiko; Kaneko, Shohei; Shibasaki, Naoaki; Yoshioka, Mayumi

    2017-08-01

    Development of a ground-source heat pump (GSHP) system with higher efficiency, and evaluation of its operating performance, is essential to expand the growth of GSHP systems in Japan. A closed-loop GSHP system was constructed utilizing a flowing (artesian) well as a ground heat exchanger (GHE). The system was demonstrated for space-heating and space-cooling of a room (area 126.7 m2) in an office building. The average coefficient of performance was found to be 4.5 for space-heating and 8.1 for space-cooling. The maximum heat exchange rate was 70.8 W/m for space-heating and 57.6 W/m for space-cooling. From these results, it was determined that a GSHP system with a flowing well as a GHE can result in higher performance. With this kind of highly efficient system, energy saving and cost reduction can be expected. In order to assess appropriate locations for the installation of similar kinds of GSHP systems in Aizu Basin, a suitability map showing the distribution of groundwater up-flowing areas was prepared based on the results of a regional-scale three-dimensional analytical model. Groundwater up-flowing areas are considered to be suitable because the flowing well can be constructed at these areas. Performance evaluation of the GSHP system utilizing the flowing well, in conjunction with the prepared suitability map for its installation, can assist in the promotion of GSHP systems in Japan.

  14. Performance evaluation of a ground-source heat pump system utilizing a flowing well and estimation of suitable areas for its installation in Aizu Basin, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Gaurav; Uchida, Youhei; Kuronuma, Satoru; Yamaya, Mutsumi; Katsuragi, Masahiko; Kaneko, Shohei; Shibasaki, Naoaki; Yoshioka, Mayumi

    2017-02-01

    Development of a ground-source heat pump (GSHP) system with higher efficiency, and evaluation of its operating performance, is essential to expand the growth of GSHP systems in Japan. A closed-loop GSHP system was constructed utilizing a flowing (artesian) well as a ground heat exchanger (GHE). The system was demonstrated for space-heating and space-cooling of a room (area 126.7 m2) in an office building. The average coefficient of performance was found to be 4.5 for space-heating and 8.1 for space-cooling. The maximum heat exchange rate was 70.8 W/m for space-heating and 57.6 W/m for space-cooling. From these results, it was determined that a GSHP system with a flowing well as a GHE can result in higher performance. With this kind of highly efficient system, energy saving and cost reduction can be expected. In order to assess appropriate locations for the installation of similar kinds of GSHP systems in Aizu Basin, a suitability map showing the distribution of groundwater up-flowing areas was prepared based on the results of a regional-scale three-dimensional analytical model. Groundwater up-flowing areas are considered to be suitable because the flowing well can be constructed at these areas. Performance evaluation of the GSHP system utilizing the flowing well, in conjunction with the prepared suitability map for its installation, can assist in the promotion of GSHP systems in Japan.

  15. Dynamic quantitative echocardiographic evaluation of mitral regurgitation in the operating department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisbert, Alejandro; Soulière, Vicky; Denault, André Y; Bouchard, Denis; Couture, Pierre; Pellerin, Michel; Carrier, Michel; Levesque, Sylvie; Ducharme, Anique; Basmadjian, Arsène J

    2006-02-01

    Hemodynamic modifications induced by general anesthesia could lead to underestimation of mitral regurgitation (MR) severity in the operating department and potentially serious consequences. The intraoperative severity of MR was prospectively compared with the preoperative baseline evaluation using dynamic quantitative transesophageal echocardiography in 25 patients who were stable with MR 2/4 or greater undergoing coronary bypass, mitral valve operation, or both. Significant changes in the severity of MR using transesophageal echocardiographic criteria occurred after the induction of general anesthesia and with phenylephrine. Quantitative transesophageal echocardiographic evaluation of MR using effective orifice area and vena contracta, and the use of phenylephrine challenge, were useful to avoid underestimating MR severity in the operating department.

  16. Evaluation of OMI operational standard NO2 column retrievals using in situ and surface-based NO2 observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Lamsal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We assess the standard operational nitrogen dioxide (NO2 data product (OMNO2, version 2.1 retrieved from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI onboard NASA's Aura satellite using a combination of aircraft and surface in situ measurements as well as ground-based column measurements at several locations and a bottom-up NOx emission inventory over the continental US. Despite considerable sampling differences, NO2 vertical column densities from OMI are modestly correlated (r = 0.3–0.8 with in situ measurements of tropospheric NO2 from aircraft, ground-based observations of NO2 columns from MAX-DOAS and Pandora instruments, in situ surface NO2 measurements from photolytic converter instruments, and a bottom-up NOx emission inventory. Overall, OMI retrievals tend to be lower in urban regions and higher in remote areas, but generally agree with other measurements to within ± 20%. No consistent seasonal bias is evident. Contrasting results between different data sets reveal complexities behind NO2 validation. Monthly mean vertical NO2 profile shapes from the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI chemistry-transport model (CTM used in the OMI retrievals are highly consistent with in situ aircraft measurements, but these measured profiles exhibit considerable day-to-day variation, affecting the retrieved daily NO2 columns by up to 40%. This assessment of OMI tropospheric NO2 columns, together with the comparison of OMI-retrieved and model-simulated NO2 columns, could offer diagnostic evaluation of the model.

  17. Objective evaluation of reconstruction methods for quantitative SPECT imaging in the absence of ground truth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Song, Na; Caffo, Brian; Frey, Eric C.

    2015-03-01

    Quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is emerging as an important tool in clinical studies and biomedical research. There is thus a need for optimization and evaluation of systems and algorithms that are being developed for quantitative SPECT imaging. An appropriate objective method to evaluate these systems is by comparing their performance in the end task that is required in quantitative SPECT imaging, such as estimating the mean activity concentration in a volume of interest (VOI) in a patient image. This objective evaluation can be performed if the true value of the estimated parameter is known, i.e. we have a gold standard. However, very rarely is this gold standard known in human studies. Thus, no-gold-standard techniques to optimize and evaluate systems and algorithms in the absence of gold standard are required. In this work, we developed a no-gold-standard technique to objectively evaluate reconstruction methods used in quantitative SPECT when the parameter to be estimated is the mean activity concentration in a VOI. We studied the performance of the technique with realistic simulated image data generated from an object database consisting of five phantom anatomies with all possible combinations of five sets of organ uptakes, where each anatomy consisted of eight different organ VOIs. Results indicate that the method pro- vided accurate ranking of the reconstruction methods. We also demonstrated the application of consistency checks to test the no-gold-standard output.

  18. Design and Testing of the Strain Transducer for Measuring Deformations of Pipelines Operating in the Mining-deformable Ground Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawedzki Waclaw

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Design and laboratory test results of the strain transducer intended for monitoring and assessing stress states of pipelines sited in mining areas are presented in this paper. This transducer allows measuring strains of pipelines subjected to external forces - being the mining operations effect. Pipeline strains can have a direct influence on a tightness loss and penetration of the transported fluid into the environment. The original strain gauge transducer was proposed for performing measurements of strains. It allows measuring circumferential strains and determining the value and direction of the main longitudinal strain. This strain is determined on the basis of measuring component longitudinal strains originating from axial forces and the resultant bending moment. The main purpose of investigations was the experimental verification of the possibility of applying the strain transducer for measuring strains of polyethylene pipelines. The obtained results of the transducer subjected to influences of tensile and compression forces are presented and tests of relaxation properties of polyethylene are performed.

  19. Evaluation of operation strategies of hybrid systems; Avaliacao de estrategias de operacao de sistemas hibridos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauschild, Luciano; Zilles, Roberto [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Eletrotecnica e Energia. Lab. de Sistemas Fotovoltaicos]. E-mail: lucianoh@iee.usp.br

    2006-07-01

    This article evaluates the operation strategies of photovoltaic-eolic-diesel hybrid systems used for the rural area applied to two cases studies placed at the Cardoso Island, SP. The operation strategies evaluation is performed by simulation using data collected at the Cardoso Island such as electric power consumption profile and the solar and wind potential. With those data, simulation have been done considering different operation strategies and different levels of renewable energies penetration in the total energy produced by the system, in order to obtain system operation results such as Diesel oil consumption and depth of average discharge of the battery banks. From the simulation results an economic analysis have been done by using elements data from the cost of life average cycle (LAC) for determining which strategy is the most adequate for operation the electric power supply hybrid system.

  20. Integral evaluation of operating quality and the deciding of management strategy in productive coal mines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jing-li(赵景礼)

    2004-01-01

    According to overall mean square root of weighted deviation, presented an evaluation model of "geology-technique-social conditions" with a significant index system for the estimation of operating quality in productive coal mines. In the given example, the evaluation result is used to decide management strategy of coal mine, which plays a guiding role in the production.

  1. Evaluating some factors that affect feasility of using ground penetrating radar for landmine detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metwaly, Mohamed; Ismail, Ahmed; Matsushima, Jun

    2007-09-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is one of the promising technologies that can be used to detect landmines. Many factors may affect the ability of GPR to detect landmines. Among those factors are: 1) the type of landmine material (metallic or plastic), 2) conditions of the host soil (soil texture and soil moisture), and 3) the radar frequency utilized. The impact of these factors on the ability of GPR to detect landmines is investigated by studying their effect on the dielectric permittivity contrast between the landmine and the host soil, as well as on the attenuation of the radar waves. The impact of each factor was theoretically reviewed and modeled using the Matlab and Mathcad software packages. Results of the computer modeling were correlated with GPR data acquired for metallic and plastic landmine types. It was found that the ability of GPR to detect landmines depends to a great extent on the landmine type, water content of the host soil, utilized radar frequency, and soil texture. The landmines are much easier to detect than plastic landmines for any soil conditions and any radar frequency. Increasing the soil’s moisture content, regardless of soil texture, eases the detection of the plastic landmine and worsens the detection of the metallic mines. Increasing the percentage of clay in the soil causes the same effect as the moisture content. However, higher radar frequency delivers better results for landmine detection as long as the percentage of clay and the moisture content in the soil remains low. The results of this study are expected to help in selecting optimum radar antennae and data acquisition parameters depending on the landmine type and environmental conditions.

  2. Evaluation of arsenic and other physico-chemical parameters of surface and ground water of Jamshoro, Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baig, Jameel Ahmed, E-mail: jab_mughal@yahoo.com [National Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Kazi, Tasneem Gul, E-mail: tgkazi@yahoo.com [National Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Arain, Muhammad Balal, E-mail: bilal_KU2004@yahoo.com [National Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Afridi, Hassan Imran, E-mail: hassanimranafridi@yahoo.com [National Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Kandhro, Ghulam Abbas, E-mail: gakandhro@yahoo.com [National Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Sarfraz, Raja Adil, E-mail: rajaadilsarfraz@yahoo.com [National Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Jamal, Muhammad Khan, E-mail: mkhanjamali@yahoo.com [Government Degree College Usta Muhammad, Balochistan 08300 (Pakistan); Shah, Abdul Qadir, E-mail: aqshah07@yahoo.com [National Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan)

    2009-07-30

    Arsenic contamination in water has caused severe health problems around the world. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the geological and anthropogenic aspects of As pollution in surface and groundwater resources of Jamshoro Sindh, Pakistan. Hydride generator atomic absorption spectrophotometry (HG-AAS) is employed for the determination of arsenic in water samples, with detection limit of 0.02 {mu}g l{sup -1}. Arsenic concentrations in surface and underground water range from 3.0 to 50.0, and 13 to 106 {mu}g l{sup -1}, respectively. In most of the water samples As levels exceeded the WHO provisional guideline values 10 {mu}g l{sup -1}. The high level of As in under study area may be due to widespread water logging from Indus river irrigation system which causes high saturation of salts in this semi-arid region and lead to enrichment of As in shallow groundwater. Among the physico-chemical parameters, electrical conductivity, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} were found to be higher in surface and ground water, while elevated levels of Ca{sup 2+} and Cl{sup -} were detected only in ground water than WHO permissible limit. The high level of iron was observed in ground water, which is a possible source of As enrichment in the study area. The multivariate technique (cluster analysis) was used for the elucidation of high, medium and low As contaminated areas. It may be concluded that As originate from coal combustion at brick factories and power generation plants, and it was mobilized promotionally by the alkaline nature of the understudy groundwater samples.

  3. Ground truth evaluation of computer vision based 3D reconstruction of synthesized and real plant images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael; Andersen, Hans Jørgen; Slaughter, David

    2007-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in using 3D computer vision in precision agriculture. This calls for better quantitative evaluation and understanding of computer vision methods. This paper proposes a test framework using ray traced crop scenes that allows in-depth analysis of algorithm performance...

  4. A portfolio approach to evaluating natural hazard mitigation policies: An Application to lateral-spread ground failure in Coastal California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernknopf, R.L.; Dinitz, L.B.; Rabinovici, S.J.M.; Evans, A.M.

    2001-01-01

    In the past, efforts to prevent catastrophic losses from natural hazards have largely been undertaken by individual property owners based on site-specific evaluations of risks to particular buildings. Public efforts to assess community vulnerability and encourage mitigation have focused on either aggregating site-specific estimates or adopting standards based upon broad assumptions about regional risks. This paper develops an alternative, intermediate-scale approach to regional risk assessment and the evaluation of community mitigation policies. Properties are grouped into types with similar land uses and levels of hazard, and hypothetical community mitigation strategies for protecting these properties are modeled like investment portfolios. The portfolios consist of investments in mitigation against the risk to a community posed by a specific natural hazard, and are defined by a community's mitigation budget and the proportion of the budget invested in locations of each type. The usefulness of this approach is demonstrated through an integrated assessment of earthquake-induced lateral-spread ground failure risk in the Watsonville, California area. Data from the magnitude 6.9 Loma Prieta earthquake of 1989 are used to model lateral-spread ground failure susceptibility. Earth science and economic data are combined and analyzed in a Geographic Information System (GIS). The portfolio model is then used to evaluate the benefits of mitigating the risk in different locations. Two mitigation policies, one that prioritizes mitigation by land use type and the other by hazard zone, are compared with a status quo policy of doing no further mitigation beyond that which already exists. The portfolio representing the hazard zone rule yields a higher expected return than the land use portfolio does: However, the hazard zone portfolio experiences a higher standard deviation. Therefore, neither portfolio is clearly preferred. The two mitigation policies both reduce expected losses

  5. An empirically grounded agent based model for modeling directs, conflict detection and resolution operations in Air Traffic Management

    CERN Document Server

    Bongiorno, C; Mantegna, Rosario N

    2016-01-01

    We present an agent based model of the Air Traffic Management socio-technical complex system that aims at modeling the interactions between aircrafts and air traffic controllers at a tactical level. The core of the model is given by the conflict detection and resolution module and by the directs module. Directs are flight shortcuts that are given by air controllers to speed up the passage of an aircraft within a certain airspace and therefore to facilitate airline operations. Conflicts resolution between flight trajectories can arise during the en-route phase of each flight due to both not detailed flight trajectory planning or unforeseen events that perturb the planned flight plan. Our model performs a local conflict detection and resolution procedure. Once a flight trajectory has been made conflict-free, the model searches for possible improvements of the system efficiency by issuing directs. We give an example of model calibration based on real data. We then provide an illustration of the capability of our...

  6. Evaluation of water injection effect on compressor and engine performance and operability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roumeliotis, I.; Mathioudakis, K. [Laboratory of Thermal Turbomachines, National Technical University of Athens, Iroon Polytechniou 9, Athens 15773 (Greece)

    2010-04-15

    Gas turbine performance enhancement technologies such as inlet fogging, combustor water/steam injection and overspray are being employed by users in recent years without fully evaluating their effect on gas turbine performance and operability. The water injection techniques can significantly affect the engine operating point thus a careful analysis should precede the application of performance enhancement devices, especially when the devices are retrofitted to old engines or engines operating at extreme conditions. The present paper examines the most widespread techniques that implement water injection by using in-house models that can reproduce the effects of water injection on the gas turbine and compressor off-design operation. The results are analyzed with respect to both performance augmentation and engine operability in order to give further insight on gas turbine operation with water injection. The behaviour of the gas turbine is interpreted while the risks on engine integrity due to water injection are identified. (author)

  7. Characterization and error analysis of an operational retrieval algorithm for estimating column ozone and aerosol properties from ground-based ultra-violet irradiance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Thomas E.; L'Ecuyer, Tristan; Slusser, James; Stephens, Graeme; Krotkov, Nick; Davis, John; Goering, Christian

    2005-08-01

    Extensive sensitivity and error characteristics of a recently developed optimal estimation retrieval algorithm which simultaneously determines aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol single scatter albedo (SSA) and total ozone column (TOC) from ultra-violet irradiances are described. The algorithm inverts measured diffuse and direct irradiances at 7 channels in the UV spectral range obtained from the United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) UV-B Monitoring and Research Program's (UVMRP) network of 33 ground-based UV-MFRSR instruments to produce aerosol optical properties and TOC at all seven wavelengths. Sensitivity studies of the Tropospheric Ultra-violet/Visible (TUV) radiative transfer model performed for various operating modes (Delta-Eddington versus n-stream Discrete Ordinate) over domains of AOD, SSA, TOC, asymmetry parameter and surface albedo show that the solutions are well constrained. Realistic input error budgets and diagnostic and error outputs from the retrieval are analyzed to demonstrate the atmospheric conditions under which the retrieval provides useful and significant results. After optimizing the algorithm for the USDA site in Panther Junction, Texas the retrieval algorithm was run on a cloud screened set of irradiance measurements for the month of May 2003. Comparisons to independently derived AOD's are favorable with root mean square (RMS) differences of about 3% to 7% at 300nm and less than 1% at 368nm, on May 12 and 22, 2003. This retrieval method will be used to build an aerosol climatology and provide ground-truthing of satellite measurements by running it operationally on the USDA UV network database.

  8. Evaluating multimodel variability of humidity over Europe using long term GPS network and ground base datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastin, Sophie; Bock, Olivier; Parracho, Ana

    2016-04-01

    Thanks to efforts made to reanalyse observed data to produce long-term homogenized datasets of new parameters or multi-parameters in recent years, we can better characterize, evaluate and analyse the water cycle in models at different scales. In this paper, a few MED-CORDEX simulations covering the ERA-interim period are evaluated against reprocessed IWV from GPS datasets over the European domain, from 1995 to 2008. The humidity is an important component of the water cycle, and models often have difficulties representing it. The high quality, consistent, long-term IWV dataset recently produced from GPS at more than 100 stations over Europe, with about half of the stations having nearly 15 years of data over the period from 1995 to 2010 is therefore used to evaluate the simulated IWV at seasonal, interannual and possibly diurnal time scales. Regional features are then identified, corresponding to different climate regimes. Other datasets, such as reanalysis of multi-parameters observed at one site (SIRTA, Palaiseau, France) over more than 10 years, or more regional networks are used to explain the dispersion of IWV among the different models and their biases against observations. The relationship between IWV and surface temperature is also evaluated locally to assess how much the sources of humidity from advection or surface fluxes are enough to reach the total capacity of the atmosphere in humidity when temperature increases. Over arid areas, this relation can depart from the Clausius-Clapeyron relation when temperature becomes too high. The ability of models to reproduce this relation during present climate is of high importance to estimate future climate.

  9. Water-quality and hydrogeologic data used to evaluate the effects of farming systems on ground-water quality at the Management Systems Evaluation Area near Princeton,Minnesota, 1991-95

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landon, M.K.; Delin, G.N.; Nelson, K.J.; Regan, C.P.; Lamb, J.A.; Larson, S.J.; Capel, P.D.; Anderson, J.L.; Dowdy, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    The Minnesota Management Systems Evaluation Area (MSEA) project was part of a multi-scale, inter-agency initiative to evaluate the effects of agricultural management systems on water quality in the midwest corn belt. The research area was located in the Anoka Sand Plain about 5 kilometers southwest of Princeton, Minnesota. The ground-water-quality monitoring network within and immediately surrounding the research area consisted of 73 observation wells and 25 multiport wells. The primary objectives of the ground-water monitoring program at the Minnesota MSEA were to: (1) determine the effects of three farming systems on ground-water quality, and (2) understand the processes and factors affecting the loading, transport, and fate of agricultural chemicals in ground water at the site. This report presents well construction, geologic, water-level, chemical application, water-quality, and quality-assurance data used to evaluate the effects of farming systems on ground-water quality during 1991-95.

  10. SIZE AND FISHING GROUND OFWAHOO (Acanthocybium solandri Cuvier, 1832 FROM CATCH DATA OF TUNA LONGLINE OPERATED IN INDIAN OCEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustinus Anung Widodo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Wahoo (Acanthocybium solandri Cuvier, 1832 is a member of the Scombrid family, is a pelagic (open ocean species found worldwide in tropical and warm-temperate seas. It is fished throughout its range by artisanal, recreational, and commercial. Wahoo is one of the by-product species of the tuna long line fleets operate in Indian Ocean. This paper describes status of wahoo resource caught by tuna long line in Indian Ocean based at Benoa-Bali. Data obtained from onboard observer program on the tuna long liner based at Benoa-Bali during 2005-2010. Total of 85 trips of onboard observation were carried out with the total long line sets (one set per day were 2873 times. The data covered the horizontal and vertical position of tuna long line hooks caught the wahoo, hook rate and fish size distribution. Data of horizontal fishing positions (coordinates gained from the global positioning system availabled in the tuna long liners. The depth of the long line gear in the waters and teperature of waters were measured by mini-loggers TDR type SP2T-1200, brand: NKE Micrel. Hook rate of wahoo is calculated using the Klawe (1986 method. Result of research showed that the wahoos caught by tuna long lines based at Benoa spread horizontally between 1o31’-33o 40’S and 77o18’-117o53’E and spread vertically between the depth of 75.2- 285.7 m. From 85 tuna long line fishing trips, only about 50% of 85 tuna long line fishing trips caught wahoo with hook rate ranged 0.947-1.399 per 1000 hooks/setting. Size distribution of wahoo ranged 70-180cm with modus ranged 101-110cm.

  11. Airport Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Tommy

    travels safely and efficiently through the airport. When an aircraft lands, a significant number of tasks must be performed by different groups of ground crew, such as fueling, baggage handling and cleaning. These tasks must be complete before the aircraft is able to depart, as well as check......-in and security services. These tasks are collectively known as ground handling, and are the major source of activity with airports. The business environments of modern airports are becoming increasingly competitive, as both airports themselves and their ground handling operations are changing to private...... ownership. As airports are in competition to attract airline routes, efficient and reliable ground handling operations are imperative for the viability and continued growth of both airports and airlines. The increasing liberalization of the ground handling market prompts ground handling operators...

  12. Use of environmental tracers to evaluate ground-water age and water-quality trends in a buried-valley aquifer, Dayton area, southwestern, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Gary L.; Shapiro, Stephanie Dunkle; Schlosser, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFC method) and tritium and helium isotopes (3H-3He method) were used as environmental tracers to estimate ground-water age in conjunction with efforts to develop a regional ground-water flow model of the buried-valley aquifer in the Dayton area, southwestern Ohio. This report describes results of CFC and water-quality sampling, summarizes relevant aspects of previously published work, and describes the use of 3H-3He ages to characterize temporal trends in ground-water quality of the buried-valley aquifer near Dayton, Ohio. Results of CFC sampling indicate that approximately 25 percent of the 137 sampled wells were contaminated with excess CFC's that rendered the ground water unsuitable for age dating. Evaluation of CFC ages obtained for the remaining samples indicated that the CFC compounds used for dating were being affected by microbial degradation. The degradation occurred under anoxic conditions that are found in most parts of the buried-valley aquifer. As a result, ground-water ages derived by the CFC method were too old and were inconsistent with measured tritium concentrations and independently derived 3H-3He ages. Limited data indicate that dissolved methane may play an important role in the degradation of the CFC's. In contrast, the 3H-3He technique was found to yield ground-water ages that were chemically and hydrologically reasonable. Ground-water ages derived by the 3H-3He technique were compared to values for selected water- quality characteristics to evaluate temporal trends in ground-water quality in the buried- valley aquifer. Distinct temporal trends were not identified for pH, alkalinity, or calcium and magnesium because of rapid equilibration of ground-water with calcite and dolomite in aquifer sediments. Temporal trends in which the amount of scatter and the number of outlier concentrations increased as ground-water age decreased were noted for sodium, potassium, boron, bromide, chloride, ammonia, nitrate, phosphate

  13. Evaluation of Aircraft Battery Charge, Discharge, and Analyzation Requirements for Ground Support Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-27

    M81757/8-2, 20Ah Battery . ............ o.......... o..........o.................... 40 8B Charge Temperature Chart for Type M81757/8-2, 20-Ah Battery . 41... battery M83769/ 6-1. M83769/7-1 12V , 54 Ah 6140-00-328-3854 C-117D, C-118B, VC-1118B, C- 131F, T-33B Varley 24V, 18 Ah 6140-00-467-6112 AV-8A, AV-8C...RD-A144 243 EVALUATION OF AIRCRAFT BATTERY CHARGE DISCHARGE AND i/i ANKLYZAT ION REQUIREME. U) NAVAL WEAPONS SUPPORT CENTER CRANE IN WEAPONS QUALITY

  14. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 3, Appendix A, Draft standard operating procedures and elements: Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP): Phase 1, Task 4, Field Investigation, Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    This report presents information concerning field procedures employed during the monitoring, well construction, well purging, sampling, and well logging at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Activities were conducted in an effort to evaluate ground water contamination.

  15. Evaluation of soil liquefaction potential for level ground during earthquakes. A summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seed, H.B.; Arango, I.; Chan, C.K.

    1975-10-01

    The results of a three-year research program conducted to investigate the settlement and liquefaction of sands under multi-directional shaking are evaluated. The investigation indicated that the behavior of a saturated sand under cyclic loading conditions is a function of its geologic and seismic history and grain structure as well as its placement density. It is concluded that the resistance to liquefaction of a sand deposit can best be estimated by laboratory testing on undisturbed samples. It is shown that cyclic triaxial tests used in conjunction with appropriate correction factors to account for multi-directional shaking, simple shear loading conditions, and overconsolidation effects can provide valid data on cyclic loading characteristics. The concepts of ''limited strain potential'' and acceptable value of the factor of safety against initial liquefaction are introduced. Finally, the two basic methods for evaluating liquefaction potential and the effects of liquefaction are reviewed and updated with the information obtained through this research effort.

  16. Final report on evaluation of cyclocraft support of oil and gas operations in wetland areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggington, W.J.; Stevens, P.M.; John, C.J.; Harder, B.J.; Lindstedt, D.M.

    1994-10-01

    The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft, capable of VTOL, lifting heavy and bulky loads, highly controllable, having high safety characteristics and low operating costs. Mission Research Corporation (MRC), under Department of Energy sponsorship, is evaluating the potential use of cyclocraft in the transport of drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment, in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner, to support oil and gas drilling, production, and transportation operations in wetland areas. Based upon the results of an earlier parametric study, a cyclocraft design, having a payload capacity of 45 tons and designated H.1 Cyclocraft, was selected for further study, including the preparation of a preliminary design and a development plan, and the determination of operating costs. This report contains all of the results derived from the program to evaluate the use of cyclocraft in the support of oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas.

  17. Evaluation of sampling errors of precipitation from spaceborne and ground sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Charles E.; Valdes, Juan B.; Shen, Samuel S. P.; North, Gerald R.

    1993-01-01

    The spatial and temporal characteristics of rainfall over Oklahoma and Kansas are analyzed using the raingage data collected during the Preliminary Regional Experiment for STORM-Central (PRE-STORM). The spectra obtained are compared with those obtained from the oceanic precipitation in the GARP and with that obtained from analyzing raingage records in east Texas. In addition, the spectra are used to evaluate the sampling errors that are due to the spatial gaps in measurements. It was found that the temporal spectra from PRE-STORM had a spectral shape similar to that obtained in GARP, except that the tail of the PRE-STORM spectra has a lower slope than in GARP spectra, suggesting that the largest difference between tropical oceanic rainfall and convective land precipitation is at the highest frequencies.

  18. Evaluation of Biodiesel Fuels to Reduce Fossil Fuel Use in Corps of Engineers Floating Plant Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    ER D C/ CH L TR -1 6- 11 Dredging Operations and Environmental Research Program Evaluation of Biodiesel Fuels to Reduce Fossil Fuel Use...Fuels to Reduce Fossil Fuel Use in Corps of Engineers Floating Plant Operations Michael Tubman and Timothy Welp Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory...sensitive emissions, increase use of renewable energy, and reduce the use of fossil fuels was conducted with funding from the U.S. Army Corps of

  19. Model selection on solid ground: Rigorous comparison of nine ways to evaluate Bayesian model evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöniger, Anneli; Wöhling, Thomas; Samaniego, Luis; Nowak, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    Bayesian model selection or averaging objectively ranks a number of plausible, competing conceptual models based on Bayes' theorem. It implicitly performs an optimal trade-off between performance in fitting available data and minimum model complexity. The procedure requires determining Bayesian model evidence (BME), which is the likelihood of the observed data integrated over each model's parameter space. The computation of this integral is highly challenging because it is as high-dimensional as the number of model parameters. Three classes of techniques to compute BME are available, each with its own challenges and limitations: (1) Exact and fast analytical solutions are limited by strong assumptions. (2) Numerical evaluation quickly becomes unfeasible for expensive models. (3) Approximations known as information criteria (ICs) such as the AIC, BIC, or KIC (Akaike, Bayesian, or Kashyap information criterion, respectively) yield contradicting results with regard to model ranking. Our study features a theory-based intercomparison of these techniques. We further assess their accuracy in a simplistic synthetic example where for some scenarios an exact analytical solution exists. In more challenging scenarios, we use a brute-force Monte Carlo integration method as reference. We continue this analysis with a real-world application of hydrological model selection. This is a first-time benchmarking of the various methods for BME evaluation against true solutions. Results show that BME values from ICs are often heavily biased and that the choice of approximation method substantially influences the accuracy of model ranking. For reliable model selection, bias-free numerical methods should be preferred over ICs whenever computationally feasible.

  20. Model selection on solid ground: Rigorous comparison of nine ways to evaluate Bayesian model evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöniger, Anneli; Wöhling, Thomas; Samaniego, Luis; Nowak, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    Bayesian model selection or averaging objectively ranks a number of plausible, competing conceptual models based on Bayes' theorem. It implicitly performs an optimal trade-off between performance in fitting available data and minimum model complexity. The procedure requires determining Bayesian model evidence (BME), which is the likelihood of the observed data integrated over each model's parameter space. The computation of this integral is highly challenging because it is as high-dimensional as the number of model parameters. Three classes of techniques to compute BME are available, each with its own challenges and limitations: (1) Exact and fast analytical solutions are limited by strong assumptions. (2) Numerical evaluation quickly becomes unfeasible for expensive models. (3) Approximations known as information criteria (ICs) such as the AIC, BIC, or KIC (Akaike, Bayesian, or Kashyap information criterion, respectively) yield contradicting results with regard to model ranking. Our study features a theory-based intercomparison of these techniques. We further assess their accuracy in a simplistic synthetic example where for some scenarios an exact analytical solution exists. In more challenging scenarios, we use a brute-force Monte Carlo integration method as reference. We continue this analysis with a real-world application of hydrological model selection. This is a first-time benchmarking of the various methods for BME evaluation against true solutions. Results show that BME values from ICs are often heavily biased and that the choice of approximation method substantially influences the accuracy of model ranking. For reliable model selection, bias-free numerical methods should be preferred over ICs whenever computationally feasible.

  1. Evaluation of chronic arsenic poisoning due to consumption of contaminated ground water in West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asutosh Ghosh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic arsenic poisoning is an important public health problem and most notable in West Bengal and Bangladesh. In this study different systemic manifestations in chronic arsenic poisoning were evaluated. Methods: A nonrandomized, controlled, cross-sectional, observational study was carried out in Arsenic Clinic, Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Kolkata, West Bengal, over a period of 1 year 4 months. Seventy-three cases diagnosed clinically, consuming water containing arsenic ≥50 μg/L and having hair and nail arsenic level >0.6 μg/L, were included. Special investigations included routine parameters and organ-specific tests. Arsenic levels in the drinking water, hair, and nail were measured in all. Twenty-five nonsmoker healthy controls were evaluated. Results: Murshidabad and districts adjacent to Kolkata, West Bengal, were mostly affected. Middle-aged males were the common sufferers. Skin involvement was the commonest manifestation (100%, followed by hepatomegaly [23 (31.5%] with or without transaminitis [7 (9.58%]/portal hypertension [9 (12.33%]. Restrictive abnormality in spirometry [11 (15.06%], bronchiectasis [4 (5.47%], interstitial fibrosis [2 (2.73%], bronchogenic carcinoma [2 (2.73%], oromucosal plaque [7 (9.58%], nail hypertrophy [10 (13.69%], alopecia [8 (10.95%], neuropathy [5 (6.84%], and Electrocardiography abnormalities [5 (6.84%] were also observed. Conclusions: Mucocutaneous and nail lesions, hepatomegaly, and restrictive change in spirometry were the common and significant findings. Other manifestations were characteristic but insignificant.

  2. Nuclear power plant human computer interface design incorporating console simulation, operations personnel, and formal evaluation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, C.; Edwards, R.M.; Goldberg, J.H.

    1993-12-31

    New CRT-based information displays which enhance the human machine interface are playing a very important role and are being increasingly used in control rooms since they present a higher degree of flexibility compared to conventional hardwired instrumentation. To prototype a new console configuration and information display system at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), an iterative process of console simulation and evaluation involving operations personnel is being pursued. Entire panels including selector switches and information displays are simulated and driven by plant dynamical simulations with realistic responses that reproduce the actual cognitive and physical environment. Careful analysis and formal evaluation of operator interaction while using the simulated console will be conducted to determine underlying principles for effective control console design for this particular group of operation personnel. Additional iterations of design, simulation, and evaluation will then be conducted as necessary.

  3. Orbital transfer vehicle concept definition and system analysis study, 1985. Volume 2: OTV concept definition and evaluation. Book 4: Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jack C.; Keeley, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    The benefits of the reusable Space Shuttle and the advent of the new Space Station hold promise for increasingly effective utilization of space by the scientific and commercial as well as military communities. A high energy reusable oribital transfer vehicle (OTV) represents an additional capability which also exhibits potential for enhancing space access by allowing more ambitious missions and at the same time reducing launch costs when compared to existing upper stages. This section, Vol. 2: Book 4, covers launch operations and flight operations. The launch operations section covers analyses of ground based and space based vehicles, launch site facilities, logistics requirements, propellant loading, space based maintenance and aft cargo carrier access options. The flight operations sections contain summary descriptions of ground based and space based OTV missions, operations and support requirements, and a discussion of fleet implications.

  4. Feasibility Study of a Rotorcraft Health and Usage Monitoring System (HUMS): Results of Operator's Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Raylund; Summers, Harold; Cronkhite, James

    1996-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the feasibility of a state-of-the-art health and usage monitoring system (HUMS) to provide monitoring of critical mechanical systems on the helicopter, including motors, drive train, engines, and life-limited components. The implementation of HUMS and cost integration with current maintenance procedures was assessed from the operator's viewpoint in order to achieve expected benefits from these systems, such as enhanced safety, reduced maintenance cost, and increased availability. An operational HUMS that was installed and operated under an independent flight trial program was used as a basis for this study. The HUMS equipment and software were commercially available. Based on the results of the feasibility study, the HUMS used in the flight trial program generally demonstrated a high level of reliability in monitoring the rotor system, engines, drive train, and life-limited components. The system acted as a sentinel to warn of impending failures. A worn tail rotor pitch bearing was detected by HUMS, which had the capability for self testing to diagnose system and sensor faults. Examples of potential payback to the operator with HUMS were identified, including reduced insurance cost through enhanced safety, lower operating costs derived from maintenance credits, increased aircraft availability, and improved operating efficiency. The interfacing of HUMS with current operational procedures was assessed to require only minimal revisions to the operator's maintenance manuals. Finally the success in realizing the potential benefits from HUMS technology was found to depend on the operator, helicopter manufacturer, regulator (FAA), and HUMS supplier working together.

  5. Study on the Optimizing Operation of Exhaust Air Heat Recovery and Solar Energy Combined Thermal Compensation System for Ground-Coupled Heat Pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study proposed an exhaust air heat recovery and solar energy combined thermal compensation system (ESTC for ground-coupled heat pumps. Based on the prediction of the next day’s exhaust air temperature and solar irradiance, an optimized thermal compensation (OTC method was developed in this study as well, in which the exhaust air heat recovery compensator and solar energy compensator in the ESTC system run at high efficiency throughout various times of day. Moreover, a modified solar term similar days group (STSDG method was proposed to improve the accuracy of solar irradiance prediction in hazy weather. This modified STSDG method was based on air quality forecast and AQI (air quality index correction factors. Through analyzing the operating parameters and the simulation results of a case study, the ESTC system proved to have good performance and high efficiency in eliminating the heat imbalance by using the OTC method. The thermal compensation quantity per unit energy consumption (TEC of ESTC under the proposed method was 1.25 times as high as that under the traditional operation method. The modified STSDG method also exhibited high accuracy. For the accumulated solar irradiance of the four highest daily radiation hours, the monthly mean absolute percentage error (MAPE between the predicted values and the measured values was 6.35%.

  6. [Operational availability of ground-based emergency medical services in Rheinland-Palatinate: state-wide web-based system for collation, display and analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiz, T; van Lengen, R H; Wickenkamp, A; Kranz, T; Madler, C

    2011-05-01

    A growing number of reports have been published in Germany related to problems with the operational readiness of mobile emergency physician services, although no systematic analyses have yet been presented. However, such investigations form the prerequisite for the deployment of countermeasures. Rhineland-Palatinate (4,060,000 inhabitants, 7,753 mi(2)) is a typical territorial state in the southwest of Germany with extensive wooded areas covering 42% of the state and only few metropolitan areas. These basic conditions represent a challenge to the provision of state-wide emergency medical services (EMS). On behalf of the Ministry of the Interior a web-based platform for the collation, display and analysis of the operational readiness of all 68 ground-based physician-staffed emergency units within the state was developed. Of these units 61 are affiliated to hospitals and 7 units to medical practices and 89,000 emergency missions are carried out annually. Within the study period (April 2009-March 2010) 56 of the 68 units (82.4%) reported 1 or more periods of unavailability of operational readiness. In total 2,613 periods of temporary unavailability were documented with a mean duration of 8.9 h. The mean unavailability of operational readiness was 3.9% for the whole state, 6.2% for the northern and 1.6% for the southern EMS districts. In 7 of the units (10.3%) the degree of unavailability exceeded 5% and in 8 units (11.7%) it exceeded 10%. Two thirds of all suspended services were the result of shortages of emergency physicians, with considerably higher deficits at bases affiliated with hospitals of lower levels of care or in rural regions. This tool enables the large-scale collation and analysis of the operational readiness of physician-based ambulance services. Currently the state does not suffer from a general lack of emergency physicians. However, rural areas as well as bases affiliated with small hospitals show a considerable deficit in operational readiness

  7. Research on Control Method Based on Real-Time Operational Reliability Evaluation for Space Manipulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifan Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A control method based on real-time operational reliability evaluation for space manipulator is presented for improving the success rate of a manipulator during the execution of a task. In this paper, a method for quantitative analysis of operational reliability is given when manipulator is executing a specified task; then a control model which could control the quantitative operational reliability is built. First, the control process is described by using a state space equation. Second, process parameters are estimated in real time using Bayesian method. Third, the expression of the system's real-time operational reliability is deduced based on the state space equation and process parameters which are estimated using Bayesian method. Finally, a control variable regulation strategy which considers the cost of control is given based on the Theory of Statistical Process Control. It is shown via simulations that this method effectively improves the operational reliability of space manipulator control system.

  8. Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan Colon Container Terminal (CCT) Panama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newhouse, Robert N.

    2010-01-01

    Report on the Operational Testing and Evaluation to validate and baseline an operable system that meets the Second Line of Defense (SLD) mission requirements. An SLD system is defined as the detection technology and associated equipment, the system operators from the host country, the standard operating procedures (SOPs), and other elements such as training and maintenance which support long-term system sustainment. To this end, the activities conducted during the OT&E phase must demonstrate that the Megaports System can be operated effectively in real-time by Panama Direccion General de Aduanas (DGA Panama Customs) personnel to the standards of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA).

  9. Development and application of procedures to evaluate air quality and visibility impacts of low-altitude flying operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebsch, E.J.

    1990-08-01

    This report describes the development and application of procedures to evaluate the effects of low-altitude aircraft flights on air quality and visibility. The work summarized in this report was undertaken as part of the larger task of assessing the various potential environmental impacts associated with low-altitude military airspaces. Accomplishing the air quality/visibility analysis for the GEIS included (1) development and application of an integrated air quality model and aircraft emissions database specifically for Military Training Route (MTR) or similar flight operations, (2) selection and application of an existing air quality model to analyze the more widespread and less concentrated aircraft emissions from military Operations Areas (MOAs) and Restricted Areas (RAs), and (3) development and application of procedures to assess impacts of aircraft emissions on visibility. Existing air quality models were considered to be inadequate for predicting ground-level concentrations of pollutants emitted by aircraft along MTRs; therefore, the Single-Aircraft Instantaneous Line Source (SAILS) and Multiple-Aircraft Instantaneous Line Source (MAILS) models were developed to estimate potential impacts along MTRs. Furthermore, a protocol was developed and then applied in the field to determine the degree of visibility impairment caused by aircraft engine exhaust plumes. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Hydrogeologic setting, ground-water flow, and ground-water quality at the Lake Wheeler Road research station, 2001-03 : North Carolina Piedmont and Mountains Resource Evaluation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Melinda J.; Bolich, Richard E.; Huffman, Brad A.

    2005-01-01

    variations in vertical gradients are apparent. Water-quality sampling and monitoring efforts were conducted to characterize the interaction of components of the ground-water system. Elevated nitrate concentrations as high as 22 milligrams per liter were detected in shallow ground water from the regolith at the study site. These elevated nitrate concentrations likely are related to land use, which includes agricultural practices that involve animal feeding operations and crop fertilization. Continuous ground-water-quality data indicate seasonal fluctuations in field water-quality properties, differences with respect to depth, and fluctuations during recharge events. Water-quality properties recorded in the regolith well following rainfall indicate the upwelling of deeper ground water in the discharge area, likely from ground water in the transition-zone fractures. Additionally, interaction with a surface-water boundary appears likely in the ground-water discharge area, as water levels in all three ground-water zones, including the deep bedrock, mimic the surface-water rise during rainfall.

  11. Differentiated digital library evaluation in a hierarchical model stemming from its operational scope and complexity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU; Jianhua; WANG; Zhaohui

    2009-01-01

    Digital libraries are complex systems and this brings difficulties for their evaluation.This paper proposes a hierarchical model to solve this problem,and puts the entangled matters into a clear-layered structure.Firstly,digital libraries(DLs thereafter)are classified into 5 groups in ascending gradations,i.e.mini DLs,small DLs,medium DLs,large DLs,and huge DLs by their scope of operation.Then,according to the characteristics of DLs at different operational scope and level of sophistication,they are further grouped into unitary DLs,union DLs and hybrid DLs accordingly.Based on this simulated structure,a hierarchical model for digital library evaluation is introduced,which evaluates DLs differentiatingly within a hierarchical scheme by using varying criteria based on their specific level of operational complexity such as at the micro-level,medium-level,and/or at the macro-level.Based on our careful examination and analysis of the current literature about DL evaluation system,an experiment is conducted by using the DL evaluation model along with its criteria for unitary DLs at micro-level.The main contents resulting from this evaluation experimentation and also those evaluation indicators and relevant issues of major concerns for DLs at medium-level and macro-level are also to be presented at some length.

  12. Ground-state properties of rare-earth metals: an evaluation of density-functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderlind, Per; Turchi, P E A; Landa, A; Lordi, V

    2014-10-15

    The rare-earth metals have important technological applications due to their magnetic properties, but are scarce and expensive. Development of high-performance magnetic materials with less rare-earth content is desired, but theoretical modeling is hampered by complexities of the rare earths electronic structure. The existence of correlated (atomic-like) 4f electrons in the vicinity of the valence band makes any first-principles theory challenging. Here, we apply and evaluate the efficacy of density-functional theory for the series of lanthanides (rare earths), investigating the influence of the electron exchange and correlation functional, spin-orbit interaction, and orbital polarization. As a reference, the results are compared with those of the so-called 'standard model' of the lanthanides in which electrons are constrained to occupy 4f core states with no hybridization with the valence electrons. Some comparisons are also made with models designed for strong electron correlations. Our results suggest that spin-orbit coupling and orbital polarization are important, particularly for the magnitude of the magnetic moments, and that calculated equilibrium volumes, bulk moduli, and magnetic moments show correct trends overall. However, the precision of the calculated properties is not at the level of that found for simpler metals in the Periodic Table of Elements, and the electronic structures do not accurately reproduce x-ray photoemission spectra.

  13. Mobile Ground-Based Radar Sensor for Localization and Mapping: An Evaluation of two Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Vivet

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with robotic applications using a ground‐based radar sensor for simultaneous localization and mapping problems. In mobile robotics, radar technology is interesting because of its long range and the robustness of radar waves to atmospheric conditions, making these sensors well‐suited for extended outdoor robotic applications. Two localization and mapping approaches using data obtained from a 360° field of view microwave radar sensor are presented and compared. The first method is a trajectory‐ oriented simultaneous localization and mapping technique, which makes no landmark assumptions and avoids the data association problem. The estimation of the ego‐motion makes use of the Fourier‐Mellin transform for registering radar images in a sequence, from which the rotation and translation of the sensor motion can be estimated. The second approach uses the consequence of using a rotating range sensor in high speed robotics. In such a situation, movement combinations create distortions in the collected data. Velocimetry is achieved here by explicitly analysing these measurement distortions. As a result, the trajectory of the vehicle and then the radar map of outdoor environments can be obtained. The evaluation of experimental results obtained by the two methods is presented on real‐world data from a vehicle moving at 30 km/h over a 2.5 km course.

  14. Tide forecasting method based on dynamic weight distribution for operational evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-wei QIU; Zeng-chuan DONG; Fen XU; Li SUN; Sheng CHEN

    2009-01-01

    Through analysis of operational evaluation factors for tide forecasting, the relationship between the evaluation factors and the weights of forecasters was examined. A tide forecasting method based on dynamic weight distribution for operational evaluation was developed, and multiple-forecaster synchronous forecasting was realized while avoiding the instability cased by only one forecaster. Weights were distributed to the forecasters according to each one's forecast precision. An evaluation criterion for the professional level of the forecasters was also built. The eligibility rates of forecast results demonstrate the skill of the forecasters and the stability of their forecasts. With the developed tide forecasting method, the precision and reasonableness of tide forecasting are improved. The application of the present method to tide forecasting at the Huangpu Park tidal station demonstrates the validity of the method.

  15. Evaluation of 3D Ground Penetrating Radar Efficiency for Abandoned Tailings Pond Internal Structure Analysis and Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortada, Unai; Martínez, Julián; Hidalgo, Mª Carmen; Rey, Javier

    2017-04-01

    Evaluation of 3D Ground Penetrating Radar Efficiency for Abandoned Tailings Pond Internal Structure Analysis and Risk Assessment Abandoned tailings ponds constitute a severe environmental problem in old Pb mining districts due to their high contents in metallic and semi-metallic elements. In most of the cases, there is a lack of information about the construction procedures and the previous environmental situation, which hinders the environmental risk evaluation. In these cases, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) could be an interesting technique to analyze the internal structure of the tailings ponds and detect vulnerable zones for leaching processes. Consequently, the GPR could help in the abandoned tailings ponds environmental risk assessment. In this study, a GPR 3D campaign was carried out with a 250 MHz frequency antenna in order to evaluate the efficiency of this technique in both the analysis of internal structures and the environmental risk assessment. Subsequently, 2D and 3D models were undertaken to represent graphically the obtained results. The studied tailings pond is located in the Guadiel river bank, a water course draining the mining district of Linares, Spain. The dam is 150 m length and 80 m width. The GPR 3D was done in a selected area near the central part of the pond. The analyzed grid was 25x50 m and the spacing of the slides was 1 m. The study revealed that the contact between the tailings and the substratum is located at 2.5 m. No intermediate layer was found, which means that the tailings pond was heightened on the fluvial terrace without any insulation system. Inside the first meter of the pond, a cross stratification was identified. The orientation of those laminations changed with the depth, which means that the stockpiling was performed from the different sides of the tailings pond. Furthermore, the direction of these stratifications is slightly concentric to the middle of the dam which could be associated with a central drainage system

  16. Evaluation of VIIRS, GOCI, and MODIS Collection 6 AOD retrievals against ground sunphotometer observations over East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Q.; Zhang, H.; Choi, M.; Li, S.; Kondragunta, S.; Kim, J.; Holben, B.; Levy, R. C.; Liu, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Persistent high aerosol loadings together with extremely high population densities have raised serious air quality and public health concerns in many urban centers in East Asia. However, ground-based air quality monitoring is relatively limited in this area. Recently, satellite-retrieved Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) at high resolution has become a powerful tool to characterize aerosol patterns in space and time. Using ground AOD observations from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON)-Asia Campaign, as well as from handheld sunphotometers, we evaluated emerging aerosol products from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP), the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) aboard the Communication, Ocean, and Meteorology Satellite (COMS), and Terra and Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) (Collection 6) in East Asia in 2012 and 2013. In the case study in Beijing, when compared with AOD observations from handheld sunphotometers, 51 % of VIIRS Environmental Data Record (EDR) AOD, 37 % of GOCI AOD, 33 % of VIIRS Intermediate Product (IP) AOD, 26 % of Terra MODIS C6 3 km AOD, and 16 % of Aqua MODIS C6 3 km AOD fell within the reference expected error (EE) envelope (±0.05 ± 0.15 AOD). Comparing against AERONET AOD over the Japan-South Korea region, 64 % of EDR, 37 % of IP, 61 % of GOCI, 39 % of Terra MODIS, and 56 % of Aqua MODIS C6 3 km AOD fell within the EE. In general, satellite aerosol products performed better in tracking the day-to-day variability than tracking the spatial variability at high resolutions. The VIIRS EDR and GOCI products provided the most accurate AOD retrievals, while VIIRS IP and MODIS C6 3 km products had positive biases.

  17. Seismic Response and Performance Evaluation of Self-Centering LRB Isolators Installed on the CBF Building under NF Ground Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junwon Seo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly treats the seismic behavior of lead-rubber bearing (LRB isolation systems with superealstic shape memory alloy (SMA bending bars functioning as damper and self-centering devices. The conventional LRB isolators that are usually installed at the column bases supply extra flexibility to the centrically braced frame (CBF building with a view to elongate its vibration period, and thus make a contribution to mitigating seismic acceleration transferred from ground to structure. However, these base isolation systems are somehow susceptible to shear failure due to the lack of lateral resistance. In the construction site, they have been used to be integrated with displacement control dampers additionally withstanding lateral seismic forces. For this motivation, LRB isolation systems equipped with superelastic SMA bending bars, which possess not only excellent energy dissipation but also outstanding recentering capability, are proposed in this study. These reinforced and recentering LRB base isolators are modeled as nonlinear component springs, and then assigned into the bases of 2D frame models used for numerical simulation. Their seismic performance and capacity in the base-isolated frame building can be evaluated through nonlinear dynamic analyses conducted with historic ground motion data. After comparative study with analyses results, it is clearly shown that 2D frame models with proposed LRB isolators generally have smaller maximum displacements than those with conventional LRB isolators. Furthermore, the LRB isolation systems with superelastic SMA bending bars effectively reduce residual displacement as compared to those with steel bending bars because they provide more flexibility and recentering force to the entire building structure.

  18. High-Resolution Precipitation Mapping in a Mountainous Watershed: Ground Truth for Evaluating Uncertainty in a National Precipitation Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, C.; Slater, M. E.; Roberti, J. A.; Laseter, S. H.; Swift, L. W.

    2016-12-01

    A 69-station, densely-spaced rain gauge network was maintained over the period 1951-1958 in the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory, located in the southern Appalachians in western North Carolina, USA. This unique dataset was used to develop the first digital seasonal and annual precipitation maps for the Coweeta basin, using elevation regression functions and residual interpolation. It was found that a 10-m elevation grid filtered to an approximately 7-km effective wavelength explained the most variance in precipitation (R2 = 0.82-0.95). A "dump zone" of locally high precipitation a short distance downwind from the mountain crest marking the southern border of the basin was the main feature that was not explained well by the precipitation-elevation relationship. These data and maps provided a rare "ground-truth" for estimating uncertainty in the national-scale Parameter-elevation Relationships on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) precipitation grids for this location and time period. Differences between PRISM and ground-truth were compared to uncertainty estimates produced by the PRISM model and cross-validation errors. Potential sources of uncertainty in the national PRISM grids were evaluated, including the effects of coarse grid resolution, limited station data, and imprecise station locations. The PRISM national grids matched closely (within five percent) with the Coweeta dataset. The PRISM regression prediction interval, which includes the influence of stations in an area of tens of km around a given location, overestimated the local error at Coweeta (12-20 percent). Offsetting biases and generally low error rates made it difficult to isolate major sources of uncertainty in the PRISM grids. However, station density and selection, and mis-location of stations were identified as likely sources of error. The methods used in this study can be repeated in other areas where high-density data exist to gain a more comprehensive picture of the uncertainties in national

  19. On the construction of a ground truth framework for evaluating voxel-based diffusion tensor MRI analysis methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hecke, Wim; Sijbers, Jan; De Backer, Steve; Poot, Dirk; Parizel, Paul M; Leemans, Alexander

    2009-07-01

    Although many studies are starting to use voxel-based analysis (VBA) methods to compare diffusion tensor images between healthy and diseased subjects, it has been demonstrated that VBA results depend heavily on parameter settings and implementation strategies, such as the applied coregistration technique, smoothing kernel width, statistical analysis, etc. In order to investigate the effect of different parameter settings and implementations on the accuracy and precision of the VBA results quantitatively, ground truth knowledge regarding the underlying microstructural alterations is required. To address the lack of such a gold standard, simulated diffusion tensor data sets are developed, which can model an array of anomalies in the diffusion properties of a predefined location. These data sets can be employed to evaluate the numerous parameters that characterize the pipeline of a VBA algorithm and to compare the accuracy, precision, and reproducibility of different post-processing approaches quantitatively. We are convinced that the use of these simulated data sets can improve the understanding of how different diffusion tensor image post-processing techniques affect the outcome of VBA. In turn, this may possibly lead to a more standardized and reliable evaluation of diffusion tensor data sets of large study groups with a wide range of white matter altering pathologies. The simulated DTI data sets will be made available online (http://www.dti.ua.ac.be).

  20. Evaluation of MODIS LST Products Using Longwave Radiation Ground Measurements in the Northern Arid Region of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenping Yu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study presents preliminary results of the validation of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS daily LST products (MOD/MYD11A1, Version 5 using longwave radiation ground measurements obtained at 12 stations in the North Arid and Semi-Arid Area Cooperative Experimental Observation Integrated Research program. In this evaluation process, the broadband emissivity at each station was obtained from the ASTER Spectral Library or estimated from the MODIS narrowband emissivity Collection 5. A comparison of the validation results based on those two methods shows that no significant differences occur in the short-term validation, and a sensitivity analysis of the broadband emissivity demonstrates that it has a limited effect on the evaluation results. In general, the results at the 12 stations indicate that the LST products have a lower accuracy in China’s arid and semi-arid areas than in other areas, with a mean absolute error of 2–3 K. Compared with the temporal mismatch, the spatial mismatch has a stronger effect on the validation results in this study, and the stations with homogeneous land cover have more comparable MODIS LST accuracies. Comparisons between the stations indicate that the spatial mismatch can increase the influence of the temporal mismatch.

  1. A Prospective Cohort Evaluation of a Robotic, Auto-Navigating Operating Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, Michael A; Oppenlander, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    The unique challenges inherent to microneurosurgery demand that we stay on the forefront of new surgical technologies. Many believe the next major technological advance in neurosurgery will be the widespread application of image-guided robotics in the operating room. We evaluated a novel technology for image-guided robotic auto-navigation of the operating microscope in a prospectively enrolled cohort of patients. Twenty patients were prospectively enrolled for analysis. Data were collected on the extent of resection, operative time, estimated blood loss, time taken to set up the new software, and complications encountered. Software accuracy, reliability, and usefulness in the case were subjectively evaluated. The most commonly  treated pathologies were cavernous malformation (n = 5), arteriovenous malformation (n = 4), and meningioma (n = 4). The time to set up the new software interface before the start of the operation was robotic interface to be accurate, reliable, and useful. The new technology was significantly more useful in deeper lesions. The addition of image-guided robotic auto-positioning features to the operating microscope has a great potential to advance the field of neurosurgery. This study is the first prospective evaluation of such a technology in a patient cohort. The results suggest that the newest robotic auto-positioning technology has the potential to improve the neurosurgeon's efficiency and efficacy, thereby positively impacting patient safety and surgical outcomes, especially in cases involving deep-seated lesions. PMID:27493844

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF A GAME FOR THE EVALUATION OF OPERATIVE STRUCTURE IN TEENAGERS WITH DOWN SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Cezar Amate

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When an individual presents some type of mental deficiency, there is a tendency to expose him to innumerous evaluations, repeating them several times in a short period so as to verify his development. In some cases, the evaluation is tiring and could lead to the desistance of the person evaluated and to the   exhaustion of the appraiser. In this article a computational game was developed in Flash for teenagers with the Down Syndrome that demonstrate light or moderate mental deficiency to evaluate cognitive seriation functions and classes inclusion based on the Jean Piaget theory. The game is set up in a kitchen where the individual  to be evaluated  helps the principal character in achieving tasks. After the termination of the activities a report is made with the  analysis  of the operative structures  demonstrated. To evaluate the efficiency of the game, the subjects went through the evaluation of the operative tests and then played the game. Two pilot tests were made and applied to 13 teenagers with the Down Syndrome. The analysis showed that the method minimizes subjectivity and manipulation of the material needing less time making the report as the  game is produced immediately. There was a bigger interest because the game contextualizes the tests even when the individual had verbal difficulty  the evaluation access was possible through the game which didn´t occur when applied in the real tests

  3. Tier One Performance Screen Initial Operational Test and Evaluation: 2012 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Adaptive Personality Assessment System (TAPAS), for an initial operational test and evaluation ( IOT &E), beginning administration to applicants in 2009...selection and classification purposes. The Information / Communications Technology Literacy Test (ICTL) has also been incorporated into the IOT &E. The...classification SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF 19. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Unclassified Unlimited 20. NUMBER OF PAGES 110 21. RESPONSIBLE

  4. Evaluation and use of remotely piloted aircraft systems for operations and research - RxCADRE 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas J. Zajkowski; Matthew B. Dickinson; J. Kevin Hiers; William Holley; Brett W. Williams; Alexander Paxton; Otto Martinez; Gregory W. Walker

    2016-01-01

    Small remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS), also known as unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), are expected to provide important contributions to wildland fire operations and research, but their evaluation and use have been limited. Our objectives were to leverage US Air Force-controlled airspace to (1) deploy RPAS in support of the 2012 Prescribed Fire...

  5. SURDEV: surface irrigation software; design, operation, and evaluation of basin, border, and furrow irrigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurriëns, M.; Zerihun, D.; Boonstra, J.; Feyen, J.

    2001-01-01

    SURDEV is a computer package for the design, operation, and evaluation of surface irrigation. SURDEV combines three sub-programs: BASDEV (for basin irrigation), FURDEV (for furrow irrigation), and BORDEV for (border irrigation). This combination enables the user to simulate many of the problems invo

  6. SURDEV: surface irrigation software; design, operation, and evaluation of basin, border, and furrow irrigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurriëns, M.; Zerihun, D.; Boonstra, J.; Feyen, J.

    2001-01-01

    SURDEV is a computer package for the design, operation, and evaluation of surface irrigation. SURDEV combines three sub-programs: BASDEV (for basin irrigation), FURDEV (for furrow irrigation), and BORDEV for (border irrigation). This combination enables the user to simulate many of the problems

  7. Second Line of Defense, Megaports Initiative, Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan, Port of Lazaro Cardenas, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Jamie D.

    2012-05-30

    The purpose of the Operational Testing and Evaluation (OT&E) phases of the project is to prepare for turnover of the Megaports System supplied by U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA)—located at the Export Lanes of the Port of Lazaro Cardenas, Mexico—to the Government of Mexico (GOM).

  8. Office of Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data 1989 annual report, Power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1990-07-01

    The annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during 1989. The report is published in two separate parts. This document, NUREG-1272, Vol. 4, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective, including comments about the trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year and summarizes information from such sources as licensee event reports, diagnostic evaluations, and reports to the NRC's Operations Center. This report also compiles the status of staff actions resulting from previous Incident Investigation Team (IIT) reports. 16 figs., 9 tabs.

  9. Evaluation of Elevated Tritium Levels in Groundwater Downgradient from the 618-11 Burial Ground Phase I Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dresel, P.E.; Smith, R.M.; Williams, B.A.; Thompson, C.J.; Evans, J.C.; Hulstrom, L.C.

    2000-05-01

    This report describes the results of the preliminary investigation of elevated tritium in groundwater discovered near the 618-11 burial ground, located in the eastern part of the Hanford Site. Tritium in one well downgradient of the burial ground was detected at levels up to 8,140,000 pCi/L. The 618-11 burial ground received a variety of radioactive waste from the 300 Area between 1962 and 1967. The burial ground covers 3.5 hectare (8.6 acre) and contains trenches, large diameter caissons, and vertical pipe storage units. The burial ground was stabilized with a native sediment covering. The Energy Northwest reactor complex was constructed immediately east of the burial ground.

  10. Locality and Efficient Evaluation of Lattice Composite Fields: Overlap-Based Gauge Operators

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandru, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel general approach to locality of lattice composite fields, which in case of QCD involves locality in both quark and gauge degrees of freedom. The method is applied to gauge operators based on the overlap Dirac matrix elements, showing for the first time their local nature on realistic path-integral backgrounds. The framework entails a method for efficient evaluation of such non-ultralocal operators, whose computational cost is volume-indepenent at fixed accuracy, and only grows logarithmically as this accuracy approaches zero. This makes computation of useful operators, such as overlap-based topological density, practical. The key notion underlying these features is that of exponential insensitivity to distant fields, made rigorous by introducing the procedure of statistical regularization. The scales associated with insensitivity property are useful characteristics of non-local continuum operators.

  11. Evaluation of pre-operative staging of renal cell cancer with cine MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uematsu, Hidemasa; Inoue, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Koji; Kitagawa, Akane; Yamamori, Sanae; Ishitoya, Satoshi; Ogura, Keiji [Rakuwakai Otowa Hospital, Kyoto (Japan); Yamada, Hiroki; Ishii, Yasushi

    1994-12-01

    To assess the utility of single section cine MR images in evaluation of extrarenal invasion of renal cell cancer. Six patients who subsequently underwent definitive surgery were examined. Sequential twenty FLASH images were acquired in coronal and parasagittal single section during one respiratory cycle. These images were evaluated in cine-loop mode to assess tumoral movement with adjacent structures. Cine MR images showed that the tumor in one patient were fixed to the spleen and the tumors in five patients showed free movement. At pathologic examination, cine MR findings were proved correct in all patients. Cine MR images may be useful for pre-operative evaluation of extrarenal invasion. (author).

  12. Dynamic modeling and evaluation of solid oxide fuel cell - combined heat and power system operating strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanaeda, Kimihiro; Mueller, Fabian; Brouwer, Jacob; Samuelsen, Scott

    Operating strategies of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) combined heat and power (CHP) systems are developed and evaluated from a utility, and end-user perspective using a fully integrated SOFC-CHP system dynamic model that resolves the physical states, thermal integration and overall efficiency of the system. The model can be modified for any SOFC-CHP system, but the present analysis is applied to a hotel in southern California based on measured electric and heating loads. Analysis indicates that combined heat and power systems can be operated to benefit both the end-users and the utility, providing more efficient electric generation as well as grid ancillary services, namely dispatchable urban power. Design and operating strategies considered in the paper include optimal sizing of the fuel cell, thermal energy storage to dispatch heat, and operating the fuel cell to provide flexible grid power. Analysis results indicate that with a 13.1% average increase in price-of-electricity (POE), the system can provide the grid with a 50% operating range of dispatchable urban power at an overall thermal efficiency of 80%. This grid-support operating mode increases the operational flexibility of the SOFC-CHP system, which may make the technology an important utility asset for accommodating the increased penetration of intermittent renewable power.

  13. Evaluation of OMI operational standard NO2 column retrievals using in situ and surface-based NO2 observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Lamsal

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We assess the standard operational nitrogen dioxide (NO2 data product (OMNO2, version 2.1 retrieved from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI onboard NASA's Aura satellite using a combination of aircraft and surface in~situ measurements as well as ground-based column measurements at several locations and a bottom-up NOx emission inventory over the continental US. Despite considerable sampling differences, NO2 vertical column densities from OMI are modestly correlated (r = 0.3–0.8 with in situ measurements of tropospheric NO2 from aircraft, ground-based observations of NO2 columns from MAX-DOAS and Pandora instruments, in situ surface NO2 measurements from photolytic converter instruments, and a bottom-up NOx emission inventory. Overall, OMI retrievals tend to be lower in urban regions and higher in remote areas, but generally agree with other measurements to within ± 20%. No consistent seasonal bias is evident. Contrasting results between different data sets reveal complexities behind NO2 validation. Since validation data sets are scarce and are limited in space and time, validation of the global product is still limited in scope by spatial and temporal coverage and retrieval conditions. Monthly mean vertical NO2 profile shapes from the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI chemistry-transport model (CTM used in the OMI retrievals are highly consistent with in situ aircraft measurements, but these measured profiles exhibit considerable day-to-day variation, affecting the retrieved daily NO2 columns by up to 40%. This assessment of OMI tropospheric NO2 columns, together with the comparison of OMI-retrieved and model-simulated NO2 columns, could offer diagnostic evaluation of the model.

  14. Evaluation of microwaves soil moisture products based on two years of ground measurements over a Sahelian region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruhier, C.; de Rosnay, P.; Kerr, Y.; Kergoat, L.

    2008-12-01

    Microwaves remote sensing is a promising approach to measure soil moisture values and variations. Soil moisture is a very important variable which strongly interacts with soil-vegetation-atmosphere fluxes. This is particularly true in Sahelian region with monsoon climatic system. From active or passive microwaves measurements of backscatter coefficients or brightness temperatures, soil moisture products are derived. Soil moisture products evaluation is essential to improve algorithm and inform users on the products quality (eg quality of soil moisture products variability or absolutes). This study aims to evaluate and to intercompare five soil moisture products from active and passive microwaves sensors. The study is performed for 2005-2006, for a 1 x 3 degrees longitude-latitude window located in Sahel (14-17N and 0-1W). In addition an accurate validation is conducted for specific locations based on ground measurements available in this region. It uses the Gourma (Mali) soil moisture measurements network installed in the framework of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) program. The soil moisture network has been organized in order to validate remotely sensed soil moisture for the future Soil Moisture an Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. Three stations located on sandy dune systems have been selected according to their location along the North-South climatic gradient. They provide continuous soil moisture measurements at 15-minute time step and at 5-cm depth for 2005-2006. Five soil moisture products provided by three different sensors are considered. 1) From the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer on Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), two soil moisture products are used: the National Snow and Ice Data Center product and the Amsterdam University product. 2) From the Wind Scatterometer, on European Remote Sensing (ERS) satellite, two soil moisture products are evaluated: the Vienna University of Technology and the Zribi et al 2007 products. 3) The

  15. Evaluation method for the proficiency level of an operating myoelectric hand using EMG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Kahori; Kato, Ryu; Yokoi, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the proficiency level of an operating myoelectric hand, we proposed an evaluation index consisting of the accuracy and the reproducibility of electromyography (EMG) signal patterns. Our proposed method is not an absolute evaluation because we use bio-signals, so it is necessary to verify the correlation between the proposed index and performance evaluation to confirm the usefulness of the index. Therefore, we conducted classification tests on eight forearm motions and verified the correlation between the proposed method and the classification rate. There was a strong correlation between the accuracy and the classification rate. In addition, if the accuracy was high, high reproducibility led to an increase in the classification rate. We conclude that the proposed method can evaluate the proficiency level of a myoelectric hand.

  16. A Prospective Cohort Evaluation of a Robotic, Auto-Navigating Operating Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, Michael A; Oppenlander, Mark E; Spetzler, Robert

    2016-06-30

    The unique challenges inherent to microneurosurgery demand that we stay on the forefront of new surgical technologies. Many believe the next major technological advance in neurosurgery will be the widespread application of image-guided robotics in the operating room. We evaluated a novel technology for image-guided robotic auto-navigation of the operating microscope in a prospectively enrolled cohort of patients. Twenty patients were prospectively enrolled for analysis. Data were collected on the extent of resection, operative time, estimated blood loss, time taken to set up the new software, and complications encountered. Software accuracy, reliability, and usefulness in the case were subjectively evaluated. The most commonly  treated pathologies were cavernous malformation (n = 5), arteriovenous malformation (n = 4), and meningioma (n = 4). The time to set up the new software interface before the start of the operation was microscope has a great potential to advance the field of neurosurgery. This study is the first prospective evaluation of such a technology in a patient cohort. The results suggest that the newest robotic auto-positioning technology has the potential to improve the neurosurgeon's efficiency and efficacy, thereby positively impacting patient safety and surgical outcomes, especially in cases involving deep-seated lesions.

  17. Risk evaluation of ground water table decline as a type of desertification. A case study are: Southern Iran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asrari, E.; Masoudi, M.

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a model to assess risk of ground water table decline. Taking into consideration eleven indicators of lowering of ground water table the model identifies areas with Potential Risk (risky zones) and areas of Actual risk as well as projects the probability of the worse degradation in future. (Author) 7 refs.

  18. Development and Evaluation of Bus Operation Control System Based on Cooperative Speed Guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Teng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Buses often have strong bunching or large interval tendency when traveling further along the route. To restrain this further deterioration of operation service, this paper developed a bus operation control system to dynamically adjust bus speed, bus dwell time, and traffic signal timings along the running path. In addition, a simulation platform was developed to evaluate the proposed control system with the actual data collected from bus route number 210 in Shanghai. The simulation results show that the proposed control system can mitigate the amplification trend of the headway deviation along the route to produce headways within a given tolerance.

  19. Evaluation of dual multi-mission space exploration vehicle operations during simulated planetary surface exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abercromby, Andrew F. J.; Gernhardt, Michael L.; Jadwick, Jennifer

    2013-10-01

    IntroductionA pair of small pressurized rovers (multi-mission space exploration vehicles, or MMSEVs) is at the center of the Global Point-of-Departure architecture for future human lunar exploration. Simultaneous operation of multiple crewed surface assets should maximize productive crew time, minimize overhead, and preserve contingency return paths. MethodsA 14-day mission simulation was conducted in the Arizona desert as part of NASA's 2010 Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS) field test. The simulation involved two MMSEV earth-gravity prototypes performing geological exploration under varied operational modes affecting both the extent to which the MMSEVs must maintain real-time communications with the mission control center (Continuous [CC] versus Twice-a-Day [2/D]) and their proximity to each other (Lead-and-Follow [L&F] versus Divide-and-Conquer [D&C]). As part of a minimalist lunar architecture, no communication relay satellites were assumed. Two-person crews (an astronaut and a field geologist) operated each MMSEV, day and night, throughout the entire 14-day mission, only leaving via the suit ports to perform simulated extravehicular activities. Metrics and qualitative observations enabled evaluation of the extent to which the operating modes affected productivity and scientific data quality (SDQ). Results and discussionSDQ was greater during CC mode than during 2/D mode; metrics showed a marginal increase while qualitative assessments suggested a practically significant difference. For the communications architecture evaluated, significantly more crew time (14% per day) was required to maintain communications during D&C than during L&F (5%) or 2/D (2%), increasing the time required to complete all traverse objectives. Situational awareness of the other vehicle's location, activities, and contingency return constraints were qualitatively enhanced during L&F and 2/D modes due to line-of-sight and direct MMSEV-to-MMSEV communication. Future testing

  20. Evaluating Fault Management Operations Concepts for Next-Generation Spacecraft: What Eye Movements Tell Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Miwa; Ravinder, Ujwala; McCann, Robert S.; Beutter, Brent; Spirkovska, Lily

    2009-01-01

    Performance enhancements associated with selected forms of automation were quantified in a recent human-in-the-loop evaluation of two candidate operational concepts for fault management on next-generation spacecraft. The baseline concept, called Elsie, featured a full-suite of "soft" fault management interfaces. However, operators were forced to diagnose malfunctions with minimal assistance from the standalone caution and warning system. The other concept, called Besi, incorporated a more capable C&W system with an automated fault diagnosis capability. Results from analyses of participants' eye movements indicate that the greatest empirical benefit of the automation stemmed from eliminating the need for text processing on cluttered, text-rich displays.

  1. Evaluation of baseline ground-water conditions in the Mosteiros, Ribeira Paul, and Ribeira Faja Basins, Republic of Cape Verde, West Africa, 2005-06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilweil, Victor M.; Earle, John D.; Cederberg, Jay R.; Messer, Mickey M.; Jorgensen, Brent E.; Verstraeten, Ingrid M.; Moura, Miguel A.; Querido, Arrigo; Spencer,; Osorio, Tatiana

    2006-01-01

    This report documents current (2005-06) baseline ground-water conditions in three basins within the West African Republic of Cape Verde (Mosteiros on Fogo, Ribeira Paul on Santo Ant?o, and Ribeira Faj? on S?o Nicolau) based on existing data and additional data collected during this study. Ground-water conditions (indicators) include ground-water levels, ground-water recharge altitude, ground-water discharge amounts, ground-water age (residence time), and ground-water quality. These indicators are needed to evaluate (1) long-term changes in ground-water resources or water quality caused by planned ground-water development associated with agricultural projects in these basins, and (2) the feasibility of artificial recharge as a mitigation strategy to offset the potentially declining water levels associated with increased ground-water development. Ground-water levels in all three basins vary from less than a few meters to more than 170 meters below land surface. Continuous recorder and electric tape measurements at three monitoring wells (one per basin) showed variations between August 2005 and June 2006 of as much as 1.8 meters. Few historical water-level data were available for the Mosteiros or Ribeira Paul Basins. Historical records from Ribeira Faj? indicate very large ground-water declines during the 1980s and early 1990s, associated with dewatering of the Galleria Faj? tunnel. More-recent data indicate that ground-water levels in Ribeira Faj? have reached a new equilibrium, remaining fairly constant since the late 1990s. Because of the scarcity of observation wells within each basin, water-level data were combined with other techniques to evaluate ground-water conditions. These techniques include the quantification of ground-water discharge (well withdrawals, spring discharge, seepage to springs, and gallery drainage), field water-quality measurements, and the use of environmental tracers to evaluate sources of aquifer recharge, flow paths, and ground

  2. M109 Family of Vehicles, Paladin Integrated Management (PIM): Operational Assessment of the Initial Operational Test and Evaluation (IOT and E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Operational Test and Evaluation (IOT&E) at Fort Hood, Texas , with a six-howitzer firing battery and support personnel during the period of September 25...points. Further logistical analysis will occur as part of a second IOT&E. Resupply operations for repair parts and petroleum products reflected a

  3. Effects of a remedial system and its operation on volatile organic compound-contaminated ground water, Operable Unit 1, Savage Municipal Well Superfund Site, Milford, New Hampshire, 1998-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harte, Philip T.

    2006-01-01

    The Savage Municipal Well Superfund site in the Town of Milford, N.H., is underlain by a 0.5-square mile plume of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), mostly tetrachloroethylene (PCE). The plume occurs mostly within a highly transmissive sand and gravel layer, but also extends into underlying till and bedrock. The plume has been divided into two areas called Operable Unit 1 (OU1), which contains the primary source area, and Operable Unit 2 (OU2), which is defined as the extended plume area. PCE concentrations in excess of 100,000 parts per billion (ppb) had been detected in the OU1 area in 1995, indicating a likely Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) source. In the fall of 1998, the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) installed a remedial system in OU1 to contain and capture the dissolved VOC plume. The OU1 remedial system includes a low-permeability barrier wall that encircles the highest detected concentrations of PCE, and a series of injection and extraction wells to contain and remove contaminants. The barrier wall likely penetrates the full thickness of the sand and gravel; in most places, it also penetrates the full thickness of the underlying basal till and sits atop bedrock. Remedial injection and extraction wells have been operating since the spring of 1999 and include a series of interior (inside the barrier wall) injection and extractions wells and exterior (outside the barrier wall) injection and extraction wells. A recharge gallery outside the barrier wall receives the bulk of the treated water and reinjects it into the shallow aquifer. From 1998 to 2004, PCE concentrations decreased by an average of 80 percent at most wells outside the barrier wall. This decrease indicates (1) the barrier wall and interior extraction effectively contained high PCE concentrations inside the wall, (2) other sources of PCE did not appear to be outside of the wall, and (3) ambient ground

  4. An evaluation of the ecological consequences of partial-power operation of the K Reactor, SRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladden, J.B.; Mackey, H.E.; Paller, M.H.; Specht, W.L.; Wike, L.D.; Wilde, E.W.

    1991-06-01

    The K Reactor at the Savannah River Site (SRS) shut-down in spring 1988 for maintenance and safety upgrades. Since that time the receiving stream for thermal effluent, Indian Grave Branch and Pen Branch, have undergone a pattern of post-thermal recovery that is typical of other SRS streams following removal of thermal stress. Divesity of fish and aquatic macroinvertebrate communities has increased and available habitats have been colonized by numerous species of herbaceous and woody plants. K Reactor is scheduled to resume operation in 1991 and operate through 1992 without a cooling tower to cool the discharge. It is likely that the reactor will operate at approximately one-third to one-half of full power (800--1200 MW thermal) during this period and effluent temperatures will be substantially lower than earlier operation at full power. Monthly average discharge temperatures at half-power operation will range from approximately 42{degrees}C in winter to 49{degrees}C in summer. The volume of water discharged will not be affected by altered power levels and will average approximately 10--11 m{sup 3}/s. The ecological consequences of this mode of operation on the Indian Grave/Pen Branch stream system have been evaluated.

  5. Calibration and evaluation of CCD spectroradiometers for ground-based and airborne measurements of spectral actinic flux densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Birger; Lohse, Insa

    2017-09-01

    The properties and performance of charge-coupled device (CCD) array spectroradiometers for the measurement of atmospheric spectral actinic flux densities (280-650 nm) and photolysis frequencies were investigated. These instruments are widely used in atmospheric research and are suitable for aircraft applications because of high time resolutions and high sensitivities in the UV range. The laboratory characterization included instrument-specific properties like the wavelength accuracy, dark signal, dark noise and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Spectral sensitivities were derived from measurements with spectral irradiance standards. The calibration procedure is described in detail, and a straightforward method to minimize the influence of stray light on spectral sensitivities is introduced. From instrument dark noise, minimum detection limits ≈ 1 × 1010 cm-2 s-1 nm-1 were derived for spectral actinic flux densities at wavelengths around 300 nm (1 s integration time). As a prerequisite for the determination of stray light under field conditions, atmospheric cutoff wavelengths were defined using radiative transfer calculations as a function of the solar zenith angle (SZA) and total ozone column (TOC). The recommended analysis of field data relies on these cutoff wavelengths and is also described in detail taking data from a research flight on HALO (High Altitude and Long Range Research Aircraft) as an example. An evaluation of field data was performed by ground-based comparisons with a double-monochromator-based, highly sensitive reference spectroradiometer. Spectral actinic flux densities were compared as well as photolysis frequencies j(NO2) and j(O1D), representing UV-A and UV-B ranges, respectively. The spectra expectedly revealed increased daytime levels of stray-light-induced signals and noise below atmospheric cutoff wavelengths. The influence of instrument noise and stray-light-induced noise was found to be insignificant for j(NO2) and rather limited for j(O1D

  6. Aircraft Ground Operation, Servicing, Fluid Lines and Fittings, Mechanics Privileges and Limitations, and Maintenance Publications, Forms and Records (Course Outline), Aviation Mechanics 1 (Power and Frame): 9073.02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outline consists of five instructional blocks of several units each: (1) Aircraft Ground Operation and Servicing; (2) Fluid Lines and Fittings; (3) Mechanics Requirements, Privileges and Limitations; (4) Maintenance Publications; and, (5) Maintenance forms and Records. It is a basic course of knowledge and skills necessary to any…

  7. Hydrogeologic Evaluation of a Ground-Source Cooling System at the BSF/CSF on the Battelle Campus: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Mackley, Rob D.; Waichler, Scott R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Moon, Thomas W.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; DeSmet, Darrell J.; Lindsey, K. A.; Porcello, J. J.

    2010-05-12

    This report documents both the field characterization activities and the numerical modeling effort at the BSF/CSF site to determine the viability of an open-loop ground source heat pump (GSHP). The primary purpose of the integrated field and modeling study was to determine far-field impacts related to a non-consumptive use water right for the well field containing four extraction and four injection wells. In the field, boreholes were logged and used to develop the geologic conceptual model. Hydraulic testing was performed to identify hydraulic properties and determine sustainable pumping rates. Estimates of the Ringold hydraulic conductivity (60-150 m/d) at the BSF/CSF site were consistent with the local and regional hydrogeology as well as estimates previously published by other investigators. Sustainable pumping rates at the extraction wells were variable (100 – 700 gpm), and confirmed field observations of aquifer heterogeneity. Field data were used to develop a numerical model of the site. Simulations assessed the potential of the well field to impact nearby contaminant plumes, neighboring water rights, and the thermal regime of nearby surface water bodies. Using steady-state flow scenarios in conjunction with particle tracking, a radius of influence of 400–600 m was identified around the well field. This distance was considerably shorter than the distance to the closest contaminant plume (~1.2 km northwest to the DOE Horn Rapids Landfill) and the nearest water right holder (~1.2 km southeast to the City of Richland Well Field). Results demonstrated that current trajectories for nearby contaminant plumes will not be impacted by the operation of the GSHP well field. The objective of the energy transport analysis was to identify potential thermal impacts to the Columbia River under likely operational scenarios for the BSF/CSF well field. Estimated pumping rates and injection temperatures were used to simulate heat transport for a range of hydraulic

  8. Operator health risk evaluation of off-highway dump truck under shovel loading condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    申焱华; 许敏; 金纯; 高玉; 魏福林

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the operator health risk exposed to whole-body vibration (WBV) while the electric-shovel loads the ore on the truck body, the semi-truck mathematical model and 3-D virtual prototype were built to simulate the high shockwave of truck cab under the shovel loading. Discrete element method was utilized to accurately estimate the impacting force on the truck body. Based on the ISO 2631-5 criteria, theSed is about 0.56 MPa in both models, which means that the dump operators have a high probability of adverse health effects over long-term exposure to these vibrations. The 4-DOF operator model was built to investigate the biodynamic response of seated-human body exposed to WBV in terms of the transmission of vibrations through the body. The results show that the response peak is in the frequency range of 4−6 Hz corresponding to the primary body resonant frequency.

  9. Evaluation of geohydrologic framework, recharge estimates and ground-water flow of the Joshua Tree area, San Bernardino County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Tracy; Izbicki, John A.; Hevesi, Joseph A.; Stamos, Christina L.; Martin, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Ground water historically has been the sole source of water supply for the community of Joshua Tree in the Joshua Tree ground-water subbasin of the Morongo ground-water basin in the southern Mojave Desert. The Joshua Basin Water District (JBWD) supplies water to the community from the underlying Joshua Tree ground-water subbasin. The JBWD is concerned with the long-term sustainability of the underlying aquifer. To help meet future demands, the JBWD plans to construct production wells in the adjacent Copper Mountain ground-water subbasin. As growth continues in the desert, there may be a need to import water to supplement the available ground-water resources. In order to manage the ground-water resources and to identify future mitigating measures, a thorough understanding of the ground-water system is needed. The purpose of this study was threefold: (1) improve the understanding of the geohydrologic framework of the Joshua Tree and Copper Mountain ground-water subbasins, (2) determine the distribution and quantity of recharge using field and numerical techniques, and (3) develop a ground-water flow model that can be used to help manage the water resources of the region. The geohydrologic framework was refined by collecting and interpreting water-level and water-quality data, geologic and electric logs, and gravity data. The water-bearing deposits in the Joshua Tree and Copper Mountain ground-water subbasins are Quarternary alluvial deposits and Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic deposits. The Quarternary alluvial deposits were divided into two aquifers (referred to as the 'upper' and the 'middle' alluvial aquifers), which are about 600 feet (ft) thick, and the Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic deposits were assigned to a single aquifer (referred to as the 'lower' aquifer), which is as thick as 1,500 ft. The ground-water quality of the Joshua Tree and Copper Mountain ground-water subbasins was defined by collecting 53 ground-water samples from 15 wells (10 in the

  10. Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Phase 1, Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.; Dingee, D.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.

    1987-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume I, reviews diesel-generator experience to identify the systems and components most subject to aging degradation and isolates the major causes of failure that may affect future operational readiness. Evaluations show that as plants age, the percent of aging-related failures increases and failure modes change. A compilation is presented of recommended corrective actions for the failures identified. This study also includes a review of current, relevant industry programs, research, and standards. Volume II reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986 to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators.

  11. Research on the performance evaluation of agricultural products supply chain integrated operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiake; Wang, Xifu; Liu, Yang

    2017-04-01

    The agricultural product supply chain integrated operation can ensure the quality and efficiency of agricultural products, and achieve the optimal goal of low cost and high service. This paper establishes a performance evaluation index system of agricultural products supply chain integration operation based on the development status of agricultural products and SCOR, BSC and KPI model. And then, we constructing rough set theory and BP neural network comprehensive evaluation model with the aid of Rosetta and MATLAB tools and the case study is about the development of agricultural products integrated supply chain in Jing-Jin-Ji region. And finally, we obtain the corresponding performance results, and give some improvement measures and management recommendations to the managers.

  12. An evaluation of methylphenidate as a potential establishing operation for some common classroom reinforcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northup, J; Fusilier, I; Swanson, V; Roane, H; Borrero, J

    1997-01-01

    We conducted reinforcer assessments for 3 boys with a diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder who alternately received either placebo or previously prescribed methylphenidate. Our purpose was to evaluate whether methylphenidate altered the relative reinforcing effectiveness of various stimuli that are often used in classroom-based behavioral treatment programs (e.g., activities, tangible items). Results showed clear differences for some stimuli between reinforcer assessments conducted when participants had received methylphenidate compared to placebo. Results suggest that methylphenidate might act as an establishing operation for some common classroom reinforcers. Implications for the development and evaluation of behavioral treatments are discussed.

  13. Measurements methodology for evaluation of Digital TV operation in VHF high-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudwell Chaves de Almeida, M.; Vladimir Gonzalez Castellanos, P.; Alfredo Cal Braz, J.; Pereira David, R.; Saboia Lima de Souza, R.; Pereira da Soledade, A.; Rodrigues Nascimento Junior, J.; Ferreira Lima, F.

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the experimental setup of field measurements carried out for evaluating the operation of the ISDB-TB (Integrated Services Digital Broadcasting, Terrestrial, Brazilian version) standard digital TV in the VHF-highband. Measurements were performed in urban and suburban areas in a medium-sized Brazilian city. Besides the direct measurements of received power and environmental noise, a measurement procedure involving the injection of Gaussian additive noise was employed to achieve the signal to noise ratio threshold at each measurement site. The analysis includes results of static reception measurements for evaluating the received field strength and the signal to noise ratio thresholds for correct signal decoding.

  14. New geometric design consistency model based on operating speed profiles for road safety evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Torregrosa, Francisco J; Pérez-Zuriaga, Ana M; Campoy-Ungría, J Manuel; García-García, Alfredo

    2013-12-01

    To assist in the on-going effort to reduce road fatalities as much as possible, this paper presents a new methodology to evaluate road safety in both the design and redesign stages of two-lane rural highways. This methodology is based on the analysis of road geometric design consistency, a value which will be a surrogate measure of the safety level of the two-lane rural road segment. The consistency model presented in this paper is based on the consideration of continuous operating speed profiles. The models used for their construction were obtained by using an innovative GPS-data collection method that is based on continuous operating speed profiles recorded from individual drivers. This new methodology allowed the researchers to observe the actual behavior of drivers and to develop more accurate operating speed models than was previously possible with spot-speed data collection, thereby enabling a more accurate approximation to the real phenomenon and thus a better consistency measurement. Operating speed profiles were built for 33 Spanish two-lane rural road segments, and several consistency measurements based on the global and local operating speed were checked. The final consistency model takes into account not only the global dispersion of the operating speed, but also some indexes that consider both local speed decelerations and speeds over posted speeds as well. For the development of the consistency model, the crash frequency for each study site was considered, which allowed estimating the number of crashes on a road segment by means of the calculation of its geometric design consistency. Consequently, the presented consistency evaluation method is a promising innovative tool that can be used as a surrogate measure to estimate the safety of a road segment.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A METHODOLOGY FOR EVALUATING QUALITY COST IN A SEMIMECANIZED LOGGING OPERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laércio Antônio Gonçalves Jacovine

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The etudy made a description and use of a methodology for evaluating quality cost in a semimechanized    logging   operation   was   developed. For  description  this  goal the logging sub-operations were detailed. The effects of the non conformity of one sub-operation on the succeeding ones were listed and analysed. Those consequences on which a money value could be atributed were specified. The methodology was applied to a case study. Quality cost were divided in three categories: evaluation cost, prevention cost, and faillure cost. It was concluded that the firm is not investing enough in evaluation and prevention causing a faillure cost of R$1.541,11/ha, which is considered too high. The percent composition of this cost was: log spliting 40,96%; error in wood volume determination in the stocking yeard 37,12%; wood waste in the stand 9,52%; non separation of thin logs 8,46%; logs left in the fire control line 1,49%; miscalculation of splited wood volume 1,53%; wood volume remaining in the coppices 0,51%; presence of branches in the fire control line 0,41%. The logs spliting operation must be worked out in order to diminish its cost. Firm profit may be increased throught investiment and research in reducing evaluation and prevention costs. Every waste cost must be avoided because is not only the firm itself, but the whole society who ends up paying the bill.

  16. An evaluation of 2D SLAM techniques available in Robot Operating System

    OpenAIRE

    Machado Santos, Joao; Portugal, David; Rocha, Rui P.

    2013-01-01

    n this work, a study of several laser-based 2D Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) techniques available in Robot Operating System (ROS) is conducted. All the approaches have been evaluated and compared in 2D simulations and real world experiments. In order to draw conclusions on the performance of the tested techniques, the experimental results were collected under the same conditions and a generalized performance metric based on the k-nearest neighbours concept was applied. Moreover...

  17. Tier One Performance Screen Initial Operational Test and Evaluation: 2012 Interim Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    the WPA is part of the TOPS IOT &E, WPA scores will not be considered for enlistment eligibility. The WPA is scheduled for administration at MEPS...Tailored Adaptive Personality Assessment System (TAPAS), for an initial operational test and evaluation ( IOT &E), beginning administration to applicants in...for both selection and classification purposes. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Personnel , Manpower, Selection and classification SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  18. An evaluation of the Navy Resale System's operating and financial statements

    OpenAIRE

    Barnett, Michael Stephen

    1984-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution unlimited This thesis contains an evaluation of the Navy Resale System financial and operating statements used to manage the sales activities from the headquarters, region, main, and branch levels. Navy Resale System (NRS) statements are compared to the National Retail Merchants Association's (NRMA) statements presented in the Retail Accounting Manual and to statements provided by major retailers. From the results of the evalua...

  19. Solar production of industrial process hot water: Operation and evaluation of the Campbell Soup hot water solar facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kull, J. I.; Neimeyer, W. N.; Youngblood, S. B.

    1980-12-01

    The operation and evaluation of a solar hot water facility is summarized. The period of evaluation was for 12 months from October 1979 through September 1980. The objective of the work was to obtain additional, long term data on the operation and performance of the facility. Minor modifications to the facility were completed. The system was operated for 15 months, and 12 months of detailed data were evaluated. The facility was available for operation and of the time during the last 8 months of evaluation. A detailed description of the solar facility and of the operating experience is given, and a summary of system performance for the 12 month operation/evaluation period is presented. Recommendations for large scale solar facilities based on this project's experience are given, and an environmental impact assessment is provided.

  20. Design, construction, operation and evaluation of a prototype anthracite culm combustion boiler unit. Facility test plan: startup and shakedown, parametric studies and long term operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-06-01

    This proposed performance study is to be performed in the anthracite culm prototype boiler located at Paxinos, Pennsylvania. The boiler is designed to produce 23,400 lb/hr of steam of 200 psig. Effects of operating variables on combustion efficiency, sulfur retention, erosion and corrosion will be analyzed during the runs. The boiler will be operated to determine its technical, economic and environmental performance and to project the viability of it for commercial operation. After the initial testing, the boiler performance will be evaluated over the long term operation.

  1. Evaluation of the potential for operating carbon neutral WWTPs in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiaodi; Liu, Ranbin; Huang, Xin

    2015-12-15

    Carbon neutrality is starting to become a hot topic for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) all over the world, and carbon neutral operations have emerged in some WWTPs. Although China is still struggling to control its water pollution, carbon neutrality will definitely become a top priority for WWTPs in the near future. In this review, the potential for operating carbon neutral WWTPs in China is technically evaluated. Based on the A(2)/O process of a typical municipal WWTP, an evaluation model is first configured, which couples the COD/nutrient removals (mass balance) with the energy consumption/recovery (energy balance). This model is then applied to evaluate the potential of the organic (COD) energy with regards to carbon neutrality. The model's calculations reveal that anaerobic digestion of excess sludge can only provide some 50% of the total amount of energy consumption. Water source heat pumps (WSHP) can effectively convert the thermal energy contained in wastewater to heat WWTPs and neighbourhood buildings, which can supply a net electrical equivalency of 0.26 kWh when 1 m(3) of the effluent is cooled down by 1 °C. Photovoltaic (PV) technology can generate a limited amount of electricity, barely 10% of the total energy consumption. Moreover, the complexity of installing solar panels on top of tanks makes PV technology almost not worth the effort. Overall, therefore, organic and thermal energy sources can effectively supply enough electrical equivalency for China to approach to its target with regards to carbon neutral operations.

  2. Evaluating transit operator efficiency: An enhanced DEA model with constrained fuzzy-AHP cones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses efforts to comb the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP with Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA to deliver a robust enhanced DEA model for transit operator efficiency assessment. The proposed model is designed to better capture inherent preferences information over input and output indicators by adding constraint cones to the conventional DEA model. A revised fuzzy-AHP model is employed to generate cones, where the proposed model features the integration of the fuzzy logic with a hierarchical AHP structure to: 1 normalize the scales of different evaluation indicators, 2 construct the matrix of pair-wise comparisons with fuzzy set, and 3 optimize the weight of each criterion with a non-linear programming model. With introduction of cone-based constraints, the new system offers accounting advantages in the interaction among indicators when evaluating the performance of transit operators. To illustrate the applicability of the proposed approach, a real case in Nanjing City, the capital of China's Jiangsu Province, has been selected to assess the efficiencies of seven bus companies based on 2009 and 2010 datasets. A comparison between conventional DEA and enhanced DEA was also conducted to clarify the new system's superiority. Results reveal that the proposed model is more applicable in evaluating transit operator's efficiency thus encouraging a boarder range of applications.

  3. Bomb-produced radiocarbon in the western tropical Pacific Ocean: Guam coral reveals operation-specific signals from the Pacific Proving Grounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Allen H.; Asami, Ryuji; Iryu, Yasufumi; Kobayashi, Donald R.; Camacho, Frank

    2016-08-01

    High-resolution radiocarbon (14C) analyses on a coral core extracted from Guam, a western tropical Pacific island, revealed a series of early bomb-produced 14C spikes. The typical marine bomb 14C signal—phase lagged and attenuated relative to atmospheric records—is present in the coral and is consistent with other regional coral records. However, 14C levels well above what can be attributed to air-sea diffusion alone punctuate this pattern. This anomaly was observed in other Indo-Pacific coral records, but the Guam record is unmatched in magnitude and temporal resolution. The Guam coral Δ14C record provided three spikes in 1954-1955, 1956-1957, and 1958-1959 that are superimposed on a normal 14C record. Relative to mean prebomb levels, the first peak rises an incredible ˜700‰ and remained elevated for ˜1.2 years. A follow up assay with finer resolution increased the peak by ˜300‰. Subsequent spikes were less intense with a rise of ˜35 and ˜70‰. Each can be linked to thermonuclear testing in the Pacific Proving Grounds at Bikini and Enewetak atolls in Operations Castle (1954), Redwing (1956), and Hardtack I (1958). These 14C signals can be explained by vaporization of coral reef material in the nuclear fireball, coupled with neutron activation of atmospheric nitrogen (14C production), and subsequent absorption of 14CO2 to form particulate carbonates of close-in fallout. The lag time in reaching Guam and other coral records abroad was tied to ocean surface currents and modeling provided validation of 14C arrival observations.

  4. Software Supportability Risk Assessment in OT&E (Operational Test and Evaluation): An Evaluation of Risk Methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-31

    DISTRIBUTION: UNIMITED) ELC 0 AUUST 31, M94 Wd/A 8 4 496-TR wwvw WW CORPORATION 1801 RANDOLPH ROAD. S.E * ALSUQUERQUE. NEW MEXICO 87106 *(505) 848-5=0...Road, S.E., Albuquerque, New Mexico , 87106, to the Air Force Operational Test and Evaluation Center, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico , 87117. This...metrics described in section 3.4 should be reported in a storyboard fashion. This technique would act as a summary of the ri.sk assessment process

  5. Dynamic Exergy Method for Evaluating the Control and Operation of Oxy-Combustion Boiler Island Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Bo; Zhao, Haibo; Zheng, Chuguang; Liang, Zhiwu

    2017-01-03

    Exergy-based methods are widely applied to assess the performance of energy conversion systems; however, these methods mainly focus on a certain steady-state and have limited applications for evaluating the control impacts on system operation. To dynamically obtain the thermodynamic behavior and reveal the influences of control structures, layers and loops, on system energy performance, a dynamic exergy method is developed, improved, and applied to a complex oxy-combustion boiler island system for the first time. The three most common operating scenarios are studied, and the results show that the flow rate change process leads to less energy consumption than oxygen purity and air in-leakage change processes. The variation of oxygen purity produces the largest impact on system operation, and the operating parameter sensitivity is not affected by the presence of process control. The control system saves energy during flow rate and oxygen purity change processes, while it consumes energy during the air in-leakage change process. More attention should be paid to the oxygen purity change because it requires the largest control cost. In the control system, the supervisory control layer requires the greatest energy consumption and the largest control cost to maintain operating targets, while the steam control loops cause the main energy consumption.

  6. Development and evaluation of temporary placement and conveyance operation simulation system using augmented reality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Weida; Aoyama, Shuhei; Ishii, Hirotake; Shimoda, Hiroshi [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Sang, Tran T.; Inge, Solhang Lars [AR Lab, Halden (Norway); Lygren, Toppe Aleksander; Terje, Johnsen [Institute for Energy Technolog, Halden (Norway); Izumi, Masanori [Fugen Decommissioning Engineering Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Fukui (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    When decommissioning a nuclear power plant, it is difficult to make an appropriate plan to ensure sufficient space for temporary placement and conveyance operations of dismantling targets. This paper describes a system to support temporary placement and conveyance operations using augmented reality (AR). The system employs a laser range scanner to measure the three-dimensional (3D) information of the environment and a dismantling target to produce 3D surface polygon models. Then, the operator simulates temporary placement and conveyance operations using the system by manipulating the obtained 3D model of the dismantling target in the work field. Referring to the obtained 3D model of the environment, a possible collision between the dismantling target and the environment is detectable. Using AR, the collision position is presented intuitively. After field workers evaluated this system, the authors concluded that the system is feasible and acceptable to verify whether spaces for passage and temporary storage are sufficient for temporary placement and conveyance operations. For practical use in the future, some new functions must be added to improve the system. For example, it must be possible for multiple workers to use the system simultaneously by sharing the view of dismantling work.

  7. Measurement of spatial dose distribution for evaluation operator dose during nero-interventional procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Su Chul [Division of Medical Radiation Equipment, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Dong Hee [Dept. of Radiology Science, Far East University, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The spatial dose distribution was measured with ionization chamber as preliminary study to evaluate operator dose and to study dose reduction during neuro-interventional procedures. The zone of operators was divided into four area (45, 135, 225, and 315 degree).We supposed that operator exist on the four area and indicated location of critical organs(eyes, breast, gonad). The spatial doses were measured depending on distance( 80, 100, 120, and 140 cm) and location of critical organs. The spatial doses of area of 225 degree were 114.5 mR/h (eyes location), 143.1 mR/h (breast location) and 147 mR/h (gonad location) in 80 cm. When changed location of x-ray generator, spatial dose increased in 18.1±10.5%, averagely. We certified spatial dose in the operator locations, Using the results of this study, It is feasible to protect operator from radiation in neuro-interventional procedures.

  8. A Study on Evaluation of Training Program for MCR Operators of SMART Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Jun; Lee, Joon Ku; Jeong, Kwang Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    It is important to develop a training program by simulators in main control room of nuclear power plants because there is no an operation expert and no operating experience in the pre-construction phase of nuclear power plants. It is also necessary to develop a training program and its evaluation method taking human error into account. The purpose of this study is developing evaluation model of simulators. In a training program, once training requirements are selected, evaluation of training is as important as its implementation. Training effectiveness is available value in a simulator-based environment. The main control room of SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor) is consist of workstation, visual display units such as LDP and FPD based on digital systems. Cognitive behaviors of a high level are required to operators in these man-machine interface system (MMIS). Therefore, it is essential to identify training requirements and to develop its evaluation model. Virtual Environments such as a simulator have utilized by a lot of industries and companies for training and accident prevention. Simulators have three primary benefits. The first is that training by simulators is less expensive than those in real environment. The second is that simulators enable safety enhancement using systematic training program. The third is that simulators provide a preliminary to prevent human error. It is significant to apply TER, TCR, TCE in evaluation of training effect. It is expected that these could be applied to revise training criteria and enable to consider efficiency in terms of cost and benefit.

  9. Application of Boston matrix combined with SWOT analysis on operational development and evaluations of hospital development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Z-Q; Shi, A-M

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the application of Boston matrix combined with SWOT analysis on operational development and evaluations of hospital departments. We selected 73 clinical and medical technology departments of our hospital from 2011 to 2013, and evaluated our hospital by Boston matrix combined with SWOT analysis according to the volume of services, medical quality, work efficiency, patients' evaluations, development capacity, operational capability, economic benefits, comprehensive evaluation of hospital achievement, innovation ability of hospital, influence of hospital, human resources of hospital, health insurance costs, etc. It was found that among clinical departments, there were 11 in Stars (22.4%), 17 in cash cow (34.7%), 15 in question marks (31.2%), 6 Dogs (12.2%), 16 in the youth stage of life cycle assessment (27.6%), 14 in the prime stage (24.1%), 12 in the stationary stage (20.7%), 9 in the aristocracy stage (15.5%) and 7 in the recession stage (12.1%). Among medical technology departments, there were 5 in Stars (20.8%), 1 in Cash cow (4.2%), 10 in question marks (41.6%), 8 Dogs (29.1%), 9 in the youth stage of life cycle assessment (37.5%), 4 in the prime stage (16.7%), 4 in the stable stage (16.7%), 1 in the aristocracy stage (4.2%) and 6 in the recession stage (25%). In conclusion, Boston matrix combined with SWOT analysis is suitable for operational development and comprehensive evaluations of hospital development, and it plays an important role in providing hospitals with development strategies.

  10. Use of a size-resolved 1-D resuspension scheme to evaluate resuspended radioactive material associated with mineral dust particles from the ground surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Masahide; Mikami, Masao; Tanaka, Taichu Y; Igarashi, Yasuhito; Kita, Kazuyuki; Yamada, Yutaka; Yoshida, Naohiro; Toyoda, Sakae; Satou, Yukihiko; Kinase, Takeshi; Ninomiya, Kazuhiko; Shinohara, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    A size-resolved, one-dimensional resuspension scheme for soil particles from the ground surface is proposed to evaluate the concentration of radioactivity in the atmosphere due to the secondary emission of radioactive material. The particle size distributions of radioactive particles at a sampling point were measured and compared with the results evaluated by the scheme using four different soil textures: sand, loamy sand, sandy loam, and silty loam. For sandy loam and silty loam, the results were in good agreement with the size-resolved atmospheric radioactivity concentrations observed at a school ground in Tsushima District, Namie Town, Fukushima, which was heavily contaminated after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in March 2011. Though various assumptions were incorporated into both the scheme and evaluation conditions, this study shows that the proposed scheme can be applied to evaluate secondary emissions caused by aeolian resuspension of radioactive materials associated with mineral dust particles from the ground surface. The results underscore the importance of taking soil texture into account when evaluating the concentrations of resuspended, size-resolved atmospheric radioactivity.

  11. Analysis of Operating Characteristics of Hybrid Ground Source Heat Pump Assisted with Chiller%冷机辅助复合式地源热泵运行特性探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周世玉; 崔文智

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid ground source heat pump system assisted with chiller is proposed in this paper, and also two kinds of operation scheme. System operation of 30 years is simulated using TRNSYS software. Compared with conventional ground source heat pump system, operating characteristics and the feasibility of the hybrid ground source heat pump system are analyzed from the ground temperature increase, system performance, energy consumption and also the technical and economic aspects.%提出了冷水机组和热泵机组分设的复合式地源热泵系统,并提出了两种运行方案。采用 TRNSYS软件模拟其30年的系统运行,并分别从地温增幅、系统性能、能耗及技术经济角度和常规地源热泵系统进行比较,分析了该复合式地源热泵系统的运行特性及其可行性。

  12. Evaluation of a size-resolved aerosol model based on satellite and ground observations and its implication on aerosol forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoyan; Yu, Fangqun

    2016-04-01

    The latest AeroCom phase II experiments have showed a large diversity in the simulations of aerosol concentrations, size distribution, vertical profile, and optical properties among 16 detailed global aerosol microphysics models, which contribute to the large uncertainty in the predicted aerosol radiative forcing and possibly induce the distinct climate change in the future. In the last few years, we have developed and improved a global size-resolved aerosol model (Yu and Luo, 2009; Ma et al., 2012; Yu et al., 2012), GEOS-Chem-APM, which is a prognostic multi-type, multi-component, size-resolved aerosol microphysics model, including state-of-the-art nucleation schemes and condensation of low volatile secondary organic compounds from successive oxidation aging. The model is one of 16 global models for AeroCom phase II and participated in a couple of model inter-comparison experiments. In this study, we employed multi-year aerosol optical depth (AOD) data from 2004 to 2012 taken from ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) satellite retrievals to evaluate the performance of the GEOS-Chem-APM in predicting aerosol optical depth, including spatial distribution, reginal variation and seasonal variabilities. Compared to the observations, the modelled AOD is overall good over land, but quite low over ocean possibly due to low sea salt emission in the model and/or higher AOD in satellite retrievals, specifically MODIS and MISR. We chose 72 AERONET sites having at least 36 months data available and representative of high spatial domain to compare with the model and satellite data. Comparisons in various representative regions show that the model overall agrees well in the major anthropogenic emission regions, such as Europe, East Asia and North America. Relative to the observations, the modelled AOD is

  13. Improving sustainability during hospital design and operation a multidisciplinary evaluation tool

    CERN Document Server

    Bottero, Marta; Buffoli, Maddalena; Lettieri, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    This book describes the Sustainable High Quality Healthcare (SustHealth) project, which had the goal of developing an original multidisciplinary evaluation tool that can be applied to assess and improve hospitals’ overall sustainability. The comprehensive nature of the appraisal offered by this tool exceeds the scope of most current rating systems, which typically permit a thorough evaluation of relevant environmental factors when designing a new building but fail to consider social and economic impacts of the design phase or the performance of the hospital’s operational structure in these fields. The multidisciplinary evaluation system was developed, from its very inception through to its testing, by following a scientific experimental method in which a global perspective was constantly maintained, as opposed to a focus only on specific technical issues. Application of the SustHealth rating tool to a currently functioning hospital, or one under design, will identify weaknesses and guide users to potentia...

  14. Test and evaluation procedures for Sandia's Teraflops Operating System (TOS) on Janus.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnette, Daniel Wayne

    2005-10-01

    This report describes the test and evaluation methods by which the Teraflops Operating System, or TOS, that resides on Sandia's massively-parallel computer Janus is verified for production release. Also discussed are methods used to build TOS before testing and evaluating, miscellaneous utility scripts, a sample test plan, and a proposed post-test method for quickly examining the large number of test results. The purpose of the report is threefold: (1) to provide a guide to T&E procedures, (2) to aid and guide others who will run T&E procedures on the new ASCI Red Storm machine, and (3) to document some of the history of evaluation and testing of TOS. This report is not intended to serve as an exhaustive manual for testers to conduct T&E procedures.

  15. Space shuttle engineering and operations support: Study of the effects of multiple ground updates on the accuracy of the onboard state vector with IMU only navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, R.

    1977-01-01

    There are six cases considered: (1) no updates made during the flight, (2) one ground update in the vertical components only at the first practice separation minus 15 minutes, (3) one ground update in all components at the first practice separation minus 5 minutes, (4) updates 2 and 3 applied successively, (5) Case 4 plus an update in all components at the second separation attempt minus 3 minutes, and (6) one ground update at first separation attempt minus 5 minutes and a second update at second separation minus two minutes. The mission control simulation program, GROPER, was run using as radar input a tape containing radar derived state vectors for the trajectory.

  16. Evaluating North Carolina Food Pantry Food Safety-Related Operating Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaifetz, Ashley; Chapman, Benjamin

    2015-11-01

    Almost one in seven American households were food insecure in 2012, experiencing difficulty in providing enough food for all family members due to a lack of resources. Food pantries assist a food-insecure population through emergency food provision, but there is a paucity of information on the food safety-related operating procedures used in the pantries. Food pantries operate in a variable regulatory landscape; in some jurisdictions, they are treated equivalent to restaurants, while in others, they operate outside of inspection regimes. By using a mixed methods approach to catalog the standard operating procedures related to food in 105 food pantries from 12 North Carolina counties, we evaluated their potential impact on food safety. Data collected through interviews with pantry managers were supplemented with observed food safety practices scored against a modified version of the North Carolina Food Establishment Inspection Report. Pantries partnered with organized food bank networks were compared with those that operated independently. In this exploratory research, additional comparisons were examined for pantries in metropolitan areas versus nonmetropolitan areas and pantries with managers who had received food safety training versus managers who had not. The results provide a snapshot of how North Carolina food pantries operate and document risk mitigation strategies for foodborne illness for the vulnerable populations they serve. Data analysis reveals gaps in food safety knowledge and practice, indicating that pantries would benefit from more effective food safety training, especially focusing on formalizing risk management strategies. In addition, new tools, procedures, or policy interventions might improve information actualization by food pantry personnel.

  17. Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data. 1992 annual report: Nonreactors: Volume 7, No. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    The annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during 1992. The report is published in two separate parts. NUREG-1272, Vol. 7, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective, including comments about the trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year and summarizes information from such sources as licensee event reports, diagnostic evaluations, and reports to the NRC`s Operations Center. NUREG-1272, Vol. 7, No. 2, covers nonreactors and presents a review of the events and concerns during 1992 associated with the use of licensed material in nonreactor applications, such as personnel overexposures and medical misadministrations. Both reports also contain a discussion of the Incident Investigation Team program and summarize both the Incident Investigation Team and Augmented Inspection Team reports. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD reports issued for 1981--1992.

  18. Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data 1990 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-07-01

    The annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during 1990. The report is published in two separate parts. This document NUREG-1272, Vol. 5, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective, including comments about the trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year and summarizes information from such sources as licensee event reports, diagnostic evaluations, and reports to the NRC's Operations Center. NUREG-1272, Vol.5, No. 2, covers nonreactors and presents a review of the events and concerns during 1990 associated with the use of licensed material in nonreactor applications, such as personnel overexposures and medical misadministrations. The reports contain a discussion of the Incident Investigation Team program and summarize the Incident Investigation Team and Augmented Inspection Team reports for that group of licensees. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD reports issued for 1980 through 1990. 9 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. Design, Construction and Evaluation of an Interchangeable Digital System to Measure Slip and Ground Speed of Existing 2WD Tractors in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Khosravi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The majority of existing tractors in Iran are not equipped with any tools to measure and display slip and ground speed. This is mainly due to the lack of national standards for measuring tools and instruments of tractors. In current research, an interchangeable system for two wheel drive tractors has been designed. Furthermore, it has been assessed after construction. To measure actual and theoretical ground speed, four rotary encoders for sensing the rotation of front and rear wheels have been utilized. Slip and ground speed were measured by means of software which has been developed in an ATmega16PU microprocessor. The measured slip and speed are digitally displayed on tractor dashboard. To evaluate the performance of the system, the measured values of ground speed and slip were compared with their calculated values obtained from conventional method. The Micro-controller has been programmed in such a way that the effect of front wheel sliding on slip is eliminated. In all evaluation conditions (in field and on asphalt, the maximum difference between system measurements for slip and speed and calculated slip and speed via conventional method was 2.4% and 0.2 km h-1, respectively. With slight alteration this system can be fitted on any kind of exiting two wheel drive tractors in the country.

  20. TARDEC Ground Vehicle Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-30

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED 10 Optionally Manned Vehicles OMV can be driven by a soldier; OMV can drive a soldier; OMV can be remotely operated; OMV can be...all missions for OMV (i.e. shared driving) (i.e. remotely operated) 2 m od al iti es Mission Payloads UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED 11 Ground

  1. Landmine-detection rats: an evaluation of reinforcement procedures under simulated operational conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Amanda; Lalonde, Kate; Edwards, Timothy; Cox, Christophe; Weetjens, Bart; Poling, Alan

    2014-05-01

    Because the location of landmines is initially unknown, it is impossible to arrange differential reinforcement for accurate detection of landmines by pouched rats working on actual minefields. Therefore, provision must be made for maintenance of accurate responses by an alternative reinforcement strategy. The present experiment evaluated a procedure in which a plastic bag containing 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), the active ingredient in most landmines, was placed in contact with the ground in a disturbed area, then removed, to establish opportunities for reinforcement. Each of five rats continued to accurately detect landmines when extinction was arranged for landmine-detection responses and detections of TNT-contaminated locations were reinforced under a fixed-ratio 1 schedule. The results of this translational research study suggest that the TNT-contamination procedure is a viable option for arranging reinforcement opportunities for rats engaged in actual landmine-detection activities and the viability of this procedure is currently being evaluated on minefields in Angola and Mozambique.

  2. Evaluation of the Operator Protection Factors Offered by Positive Pressure Air Suits against Airborne Microbiological Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackie A. Steward

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Laboratories throughout the world that perform work with Risk Group 4 Pathogens generally adopt one of two approaches within BSL-4 environments: either the use of positive pressure air-fed suits or using Class III microbiological safety cabinets and isolators for animal work. Within the UK at present, all laboratories working with Risk Group 4 agents adopt the use of Class III microbiological safety cabinet lines and isolators. Operator protection factors for the use of microbiological safety cabinets and isolators are available however; there is limited published data on the operator protection factors afforded by the use of positive pressure suits. This study evaluated the operator protection factors provided by positive pressure air suits against a realistic airborne microbiological challenge. The suits were tested, both intact and with their integrity compromised, on an animated mannequin within a stainless steel exposure chamber. The suits gave operator protection in all tests with an intact suit and with a cut in the leg. When compromised by a cut in the glove, a very small ingress of the challenge was seen as far as the wrist. This is likely to be due to the low airflow in the gloves of the suit. In all cases no microbiological penetration of the respiratory tract was observed. These data provide evidence on which to base safety protocols for use of positive pressure suits within high containment laboratories.

  3. Evaluation of the operator protection factors offered by positive pressure air suits against airborne microbiological challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, Jackie A; Lever, Mark S

    2012-08-01

    Laboratories throughout the world that perform work with Risk Group 4 Pathogens generally adopt one of two approaches within BSL-4 environments: either the use of positive pressure air-fed suits or using Class III microbiological safety cabinets and isolators for animal work. Within the UK at present, all laboratories working with Risk Group 4 agents adopt the use of Class III microbiological safety cabinet lines and isolators. Operator protection factors for the use of microbiological safety cabinets and isolators are available however; there is limited published data on the operator protection factors afforded by the use of positive pressure suits. This study evaluated the operator protection factors provided by positive pressure air suits against a realistic airborne microbiological challenge. The suits were tested, both intact and with their integrity compromised, on an animated mannequin within a stainless steel exposure chamber. The suits gave operator protection in all tests with an intact suit and with a cut in the leg. When compromised by a cut in the glove, a very small ingress of the challenge was seen as far as the wrist. This is likely to be due to the low airflow in the gloves of the suit. In all cases no microbiological penetration of the respiratory tract was observed. These data provide evidence on which to base safety protocols for use of positive pressure suits within high containment laboratories.

  4. Development of multidimensional sequence operation theory with applications to risk evaluation in power system generation scheduling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Sequence operation theory (SOT) is a powerful tool for solving complex probabil-istic problems in power system. However, the basic single dimension SOT cannot satisfy the requirement of multi-state and multi-attribute analysis, which is often the case in actual power system practice. To address this problem, multidimensional sequence operation theory (MSOT) is developed. On the basis of previous research, this paper first categorizes the situations by the number of state variables and the number of attribute values, and defines the multidimensional sequence for single state variable and multiple attribute values, as well as the multidimensional se-quence for multiple state variables and multiple attribute values. Corresponding to those definitions, four types of operations between two discrete multidimensional sequences are derived respectively. Therefore, the sequence is extended from sin-gle dimensional to multidimensional, establishing an integrated theory of multidi-mensional sequence operation. In particular, the basic single dimension SOT can be viewed as a special case of MSOT with only one state variable and one attribute value. Finally, the paper demonstrates the effectiveness of MSOT through an ex-ample of risk evaluation in power system generation scheduling.

  5. Experimental Laboratory Research and Evaluation of Periodic Operation Small Size Bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitalij Kolodynskij

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The investigation device – small size periodic operation bioreactors, which are developed for the production of biogas from different organic, vegetable waste. The device operates by maintaining optimum operating temperature and oxygen concentration required for anaerobic treatment process inside the bioreactor. Under favorable conditions, organic substance is being degradated because of anaerobic processess, colonies of microorganisms grow, and methane bacteria produce CH4 – useful flammable gases, which can be used as natural gas analogue. The gas is stored in special tanks of gas – gas holders. A study was implemented by analizing five different loads, according to the mixing ratio of vegetables (potatoes and chicken manure waste. The quality and quantity of biogas was analized as well. It was found that the highest concentration of methane (67.8% was achieved by using a load consisting only of chicken manure, but after evaluation of biogas yield, it was found that the best result (according to the quantity of biogas, a high concentration of CH4 and time of load degradation is achieved using chicken manure and potato waste mix (relatively 70 and 30%. Mesophilic process temperature during the experiment was 33–35 °C, and oxygen concentration – 0.0–0.1%. After research implementation there will be an opportunity to create small size periodic operation bioreactors, which can be used in small farms or private houses, where the small amount of organic waste and manure are formed.

  6. Initial evaluation of a canine stifle arthrotomy post-operative pain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomas, A; Bledsoe, D; Wall, S; Davidson, G; Lascelles, B D X

    2015-06-01

    Most models of acute post-operative orthopedic pain involve the injection of a clinically irrelevant pro-inflammatory agent. The ideal model should, however, be clinically relevant and allow full functional recovery of enrolled animals after research is completed. This study explored the validity of a model employing arthrotomy and objectively measured limb use. Six purpose-bred Beagles underwent arthrotomies on each stifle with a washout period in between. Using a randomized crossover design, each dog received placebo and an extended-release buprenorphine (ER-Bup) preparation. Static and dynamic ground reaction forces (GRFs) were measured prior to and for 72 h following surgery using a pressure sensitive walkway (PSW). GRFs for each hind limb were compared using difference (delta), and symmetry indices (SI). The effects of surgery and of treatment were analyzed using repeated measures ANCOVA. The results indicated significantly decreased limb use compared to baseline for placebo, and significantly increased limb use in the ER-Bup group over placebo at all times for % bodyweight distribution (%BWdistrib), peak vertical force (PVF) and vertical impulse (VI). There was a significant treatment by time interaction for velocity (P = 0.03) and %BWdistrib (P = 0.01, 0.003). Overall, the data show that reduced limb use was present for at least 72 h following arthrotomy. In addition, the use of the ER-Bup analgesic decreased lameness, confirming the validity of this approach as a model of post-operative pain. Subjective assessments did not detect the pain-inducing effects of arthrotomy or pain-alleviating effects of treatment, and subjective measures of procedural pain in research dogs need to be developed.

  7. Upcrowding energy co-operatives - Evaluating the potential of crowdfunding for business model innovation of energy co-operatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilger, Mathias Georg; Jovanović, Tanja; Voigt, Kai-Ingo

    2017-08-01

    Practice and theory have proven the relevance of energy co-operatives for civic participation in the energy turnaround. However, due to a still low awareness and changing regulation, there seems an unexploited potential of utilizing the legal form 'co-operative' in this context. The aim of this study is therefore to investigate the crowdfunding implementation in the business model of energy co-operatives in order to cope with the mentioned challenges. Based on a theoretical framework, we derive a Business Model Innovation (BMI) through crowdfunding including synergies and differences. A qualitative study design, particularly a multiple-case study of energy co-operatives, was chosen to prove the BMI and to reveal barriers. The results show that although most co-operatives are not familiar with crowdfunding, there is strong potential in opening up predominantly local structures to a broader group of members. Building on this, equity-based crowdfunding is revealed to be suitable for energy co-operatives as BMI and to accompany other challenges in the same way. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Research on the Construction of Monitoring and Evaluation System for the Operation of Marine Economy in Liaoning Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qianjin; TAN; Weimin; GOU; Peili; SUN

    2015-01-01

    According to the needs of Liaoning province marine economic operation monitoring and evaluation system for capacity building in this paper,it proposes the concept of marine economy operation monitoring and evaluation system,and introduces the system construction content and its architecture,and discusses the key issues on the monitoring index system,evaluation index system,mechanism construction and system implementation. It will help to improve the Liaoning marine economic statistical informatization level and promote the innovation of marine economy in Liaoning,and expect to provide reference for the system construction of other coastal provinces’ provincial marine economy operation monitoring and evaluation system.

  9. Army Gas-Cooled Reactor Systems Program. Operation of ML-1 reactor skid in GCRE: safety evaluation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1964-10-01

    The operation of the ML-1 reactor skid in the modified GCRE facility, utilizing the GCRE reactor coolant circulating and heat removal systems, is described. An evaluation of the safety considerations associated with this mode of operation indicates that the consequences of the maximum credible accident are less severe than those previously approved for operation of the ML-1 reactor at the ML-1 test site or for operation of the GCRE-I reactor in the GCRE facility.

  10. Report to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission on Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1987-05-01

    This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during calendar year 1986. Comments and observations are provided on operating experience at nuclear power plants and other NRC licensees, including results from selected AEOD studies; summaries of abnormal occurrences involving US nuclear plants; reviews of licensee event reports and their quality, reactor scram experience from 1984 to 1986, engineered safety features actuations, and the trends and patterns analysis program; and assessments of nonreactor and medical misadministration events. In addition, the report provides the year-end status of all recommendations included in AEOD studies, and listings of all AEOD reports issued from 1980 through 1986.

  11. Performance evaluation of a shell and tube heat exchanger operated with oxide based nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrul, I. M.; Mahbubul, I. M.; Saidur, R.; Khaleduzzaman, S. S.; Sabri, M. F. M.

    2016-08-01

    This study is about the performance evaluation of a shell and tube heat exchanger operated with nanofluid. Thermal conductivity, viscosity, and density of the nanofluids were increased, but the specific heat of the nanofluids was decreased with increasing the concentrations of the particles. The convective heat transfer coefficient was found to be 2-15 % higher than that of water at 50 kg/min of both side fluid. Nevertheless, energy effectiveness has improved about 23-52 % for the above-mentioned nanofluids. As, energy effectiveness (ɛ) is strongly depends on the density and specific heat of the operating fluids therefore, maximum ɛ has obtained for ZnO-W nanofluid and lowest found for SiO2-W nanofluid.

  12. Evaluation Of Communal Wastewater Treatment Plant Operating Anaerobic Baffled Reactor And Biofilter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evy Hendriarianti

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Construction of communal Waste Water Treatment Plant, WWTP in city of Malang since 1998 but until recently had never done an evaluation the performance. Communal WWTP performance evaluation is needed to see how far the efficiency of processing result. Until now, Environmental Agency Malang City only measure effluent from WWTP Communal  to know the suitability  with domestic wastewater quality standards. Effluent quality data in 2014 showed value above the quality standard of domestic wastewater from East Java Governor Regulation No. 72 in 2013 for parameters BOD and COD. WWTP Communal USRI research objects are on a six (6 locations by involving the user community during the planning, construction, operation and maintenance. Technology choice of ABR followed by a biofilter reactor with the stone media proved capable of processing organic matter of BOD and COD with the removal levels respectively by 78% -99% and 71% -99%. As for the parameters of TSS, NO3 and PO4 have the ranges of removal respectively by 56% -100%, (43% - 72%, (2% - 13%. Ratio BOD and COD in influent are low and ranged from 0.22 to 0.41. From the evaluation shows that high organic matter concentrations in influent along with the HRT and operation time high will result in a higher removal level

  13. Influential factors and effect evaluation of the intra-operative puncture biopsy for pancreatic masses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUANG Yan; YANG Yin-mo; WANG Wei-min; GAO Hong-qiao; WAN Yuan-lian

    2012-01-01

    Background It is a challenge for the surgeons to accurately diagnose the pancreatic masses preoperatively,which decides the choice of surgical managements and subsequently results in different survivor outcomes,operative complications,and mortality rates.The purposes of this study were to evaluate the diagnostic role that intra-operative puncture biopsy may play in pancreatic masses and to explore the relevant factors influencing the diagnosis.Methods A retrospective study was performed on 94 in-patients admitted to Peking University First Hospital for pancreatic masses during the period from June 1994 to December 2007.They all underwent intra-operative puncture biopsy during exploratory laparotomy.The sensitivity and specificity of intra-operative puncture biopsy were calculated and the relevant factors to the diagnosis of biopsy were selected for the statistical analysis.Results The overall sensitivity,specificity,positive predictive value,and negative predictive value of intra-operative puncture biopsy were 76.0%,94.7%,98.3% and 50.0%,respectively.The analysis of bivariate correlations showed that the size of the pancreatic masses (P=-0.000),the number of puncture biopsies (P=0.000),and the presence of pancreatic fibrosis (P=-0.012) had statistic significance for the diagnosis.But the multivariate analysis identified the size of the pancreatic masses (P=0.004) and the number of puncture biopsies (P=0.000) as independent predictive factors for intra-operative puncture biopsy.In addition,as the number of puncture biopsies increased,the sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis was improved (P=0.000).The sensitivity and specificity of intra-operative puncture biopsy were found to be lower for the pancreatic masses less than 25 mm compared with the masses larger than 25 mm (P=0.000).It was noted,however,that even if the masses were less than 25 mm,the sensitivity and specificity could be improved significantly as the number of puncture biopsies reached 3 to 6

  14. Evaluation of Landing Characteristics Achieved by Simulations and Flight Tests on a Small-scaled Model Related to Magnetically Levitated Advanced Take-off and Landing Operations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohacs, D.; Voskuijl, M.; Siepenkotter, N.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to simulate and measure on a small-scaled model the landing characteristics related to take-off and landing (TOL) operations supported by a magnetic levitation (MAGLEV) system as ground-based power supply. The technical feasibility and the potential benefits of using ground

  15. Evaluation of Landing Characteristics Achieved by Simulations and Flight Tests on a Small-scaled Model Related to Magnetically Levitated Advanced Take-off and Landing Operations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohacs, D.; Voskuijl, M.; Siepenkotter, N.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to simulate and measure on a small-scaled model the landing characteristics related to take-off and landing (TOL) operations supported by a magnetic levitation (MAGLEV) system as ground-based power supply. The technical feasibility and the potential benefits of using ground

  16. Grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Tina

    2015-04-29

    Grounded theory is a popular research approach in health care and the social sciences. This article provides a description of grounded theory methodology and its key components, using examples from published studies to demonstrate practical application. It aims to demystify grounded theory for novice nurse researchers, by explaining what it is, when to use it, why they would want to use it and how to use it. It should enable nurse researchers to decide if grounded theory is an appropriate approach for their research, and to determine the quality of any grounded theory research they read.

  17. Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) Multi-Service Operational Test and Evaluation-2 Report (with Classified Annex)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    degrees North and 65 degrees South latitudes and provide dual coverage to more than 65 percent of the service area. The Ground Transport Segment is...existing DISN infrastructure. The SCS consists of a primary MUOS Telemetry , Tracking, and Commanding facility at Naval Satellite Operations Center...functions for maintaining the iv satellites on-orbit and receives telemetry from the satellites to monitor the health of the satellites. The control

  18. Evaluating fuzzy operators of an object-based image analysis for detecting landslides and their changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizizadeh, Bakhtiar; Blaschke, Thomas; Tiede, Dirk; Moghaddam, Mohammad Hossein Rezaei

    2017-09-01

    This article presents a method of object-based image analysis (OBIA) for landslide delineation and landslide-related change detection from multi-temporal satellite images. It uses both spatial and spectral information on landslides, through spectral analysis, shape analysis, textural measurements using a gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), and fuzzy logic membership functionality. Following an initial segmentation step, particular combinations of various information layers were investigated to generate objects. This was achieved by applying multi-resolution segmentation to IRS-1D, SPOT-5, and ALOS satellite imagery in sequential steps of feature selection and object classification, and using slope and flow direction derivatives from a digital elevation model together with topographically-oriented gray level co-occurrence matrices. Fuzzy membership values were calculated for 11 different membership functions using 20 landslide objects from a landslide training data. Six fuzzy operators were used for the final classification and the accuracies of the resulting landslide maps were compared. A Fuzzy Synthetic Evaluation (FSE) approach was adapted for validation of the results and for an accuracy assessment using the landslide inventory database. The FSE approach revealed that the AND operator performed best with an accuracy of 93.87% for 2005 and 94.74% for 2011, closely followed by the MEAN Arithmetic operator, while the OR and AND (*) operators yielded relatively low accuracies. An object-based change detection was then applied to monitor landslide-related changes that occurred in northern Iran between 2005 and 2011. Knowledge rules to detect possible landslide-related changes were developed by evaluating all possible landslide-related objects for both time steps.

  19. Evaluation of SCaMPR Satellite QPEs for Operational Hydrologic Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    LEE, H.; Zhang, Y.; Seo, D.; Kitzmiller, D. H.; Kuligowski, R. J.; Corby, R.

    2011-12-01

    National Weather Service (NWS) River Forecast Centers (RFCs) use rain gauge or radar-gauge multi-sensor quantitative precipitation estimates (QPEs) as the primary rainfall input to their operational hydrologic models. In areas with poor radar and rain gauge coverage, satellite-based QPEs are a potential alternative. In this work, we evaluated the utility of satellite-based QPEs produced via the Self-Calibrating Multivariate Precipitation Retrieval (SCaMPR) algorithm for operational hydrologic modeling for a set of basins in Texas and Louisiana for the period of 2000-7. First, we assessed the relative accuracy of two sets of SCaMPR QPEs versus gauge-only QPE, with operational multi-sensor QPEs as the reference. One set used only operational polar orbiting satellite microwave input as the predictors, the other included Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) rain rates in the calibration process. We then performed hydrologic simulations using these QPEs and evaluated the simulations. Results indicated that a) SCaMPR QPEs showed better/worse skill than the gauge-only QPEs in resolving heavy precipitation at 1-h/24-h time intervals in terms of Critical Success Index (CSI); b) SCaMPR QPEs underperformed gauge-only QPEs in simulating flood events; and c) ingesting TRMM rainfall rates helped enhance the hydrologic utility of SCaMPR QPE, by mitigating the positive bias of SCaMPR QPEs, elevating the detection rates of heavy rainfall, and improving the simulation of flood discharge. Our findings suggest that the superior performance of gauge-only QPEs versus SCaMPR in hydrologic simulations is tied to its better accuracy at 24-h scale. The implication of the scale dependence in the relative performance of SCaMPR QPEs to their potential hydrologic utility is discussed.

  20. Evaluation of geologic structure guiding ground water flow south and west of Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKee, E.H.

    1998-02-01

    Ground water flow through the region south and west of Frenchman Flat, in the Ash Meadows subbasin of the Death Valley ground water flow system, is controlled mostly by the distribution of permeable and impermeable rocks. Geologic structures such as faults are instrumental in arranging the distribution of the aquifer and aquitard rock units. Most permeability is in fractures caused by faulting in carbonate rocks. Large faults are more likely to reach the potentiometric surface about 325 meters below the ground surface and are more likely to effect the flow path than small faults. Thus field work concentrated on identifying large faults, especially where they cut carbonate rocks. Small faults, however, may develop as much permeability as large faults. Faults that are penetrative and are part of an anastomosing fault zone are particularly important. The overall pattern of faults and joints at the ground surface in the Spotted and Specter Ranges is an indication of the fracture system at the depth of the water table. Most of the faults in these ranges are west-southwest-striking, high-angle faults, 100 to 3500 meters long, with 10 to 300 /meters of displacement. Many of them, such as those in the Spotted Range and Rock Valley are left-lateral strike-slip faults that are conjugate to the NW-striking right-lateral faults of the Las Vegas Valley shear zone. These faults control the ground water flow path, which runs west-southwest beneath the Spotted Range, Mercury Valley and the Specter Range. The Specter Range thrust is a significant geologic structure with respect to ground water flow. This regional thrust fault emplaces siliceous clastic strata into the north central and western parts of the Specter Range.